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Sample records for genes radical-induced cell

  1. VEGF secretion during hypoxia depends on free radicals-induced Fyn kinase activity in mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Roman, Jonathan; Ibarra-Sanchez, Alfredo; Lamas, Monica; Gonzalez Espinosa, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) secrete functional VEGF but do not degranulate after Cobalt chloride-induced hypoxia. → CoCl 2 -induced VEGF secretion in mast cells occurs by a Ca 2+ -insensitive but brefeldin A and Tetanus toxin-sensitive mechanism. → Trolox and N-acetylcysteine inhibit hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion but only Trolox inhibits FcεRI-dependent anaphylactic degranulation in mast cells. → Src family kinase Fyn activation after free radical production is necessary for hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion in mast cells. -- Abstract: Mast cells (MC) have an important role in pathologic conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), where hypoxia conduce to deleterious inflammatory response. MC contribute to hypoxia-induced angiogenesis producing factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), but the mechanisms behind the control of hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion in this cell type is poorly understood. We used the hypoxia-mimicking agent cobalt chloride (CoCl 2 ) to analyze VEGF secretion in murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). We found that CoCl 2 promotes a sustained production of functional VEGF, able to induce proliferation of endothelial cells in vitro. CoCl 2 -induced VEGF secretion was independent of calcium rise but dependent on tetanus toxin-sensitive vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs). VEGF exocytosis required free radicals formation and the activation of Src family kinases. Interestingly, an important deficiency on CoCl 2 -induced VEGF secretion was observed in Fyn kinase-deficient BMMCs. Moreover, Fyn kinase was activated by CoCl 2 in WT cells and this activation was prevented by treatment with antioxidants such as Trolox and N-acetylcysteine. Our results show that BMMCs are able to release VEGF under hypoxic conditions through a tetanus toxin-sensitive mechanism, promoted by free radicals-dependent Fyn kinase activation.

  2. VEGF secretion during hypoxia depends on free radicals-induced Fyn kinase activity in mast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Roman, Jonathan; Ibarra-Sanchez, Alfredo; Lamas, Monica [Departamento de Farmacobiologia, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN (Cinvestav, IPN) (Mexico); Gonzalez Espinosa, Claudia, E-mail: cgonzal@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Farmacobiologia, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN (Cinvestav, IPN) (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) secrete functional VEGF but do not degranulate after Cobalt chloride-induced hypoxia. {yields} CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion in mast cells occurs by a Ca{sup 2+}-insensitive but brefeldin A and Tetanus toxin-sensitive mechanism. {yields} Trolox and N-acetylcysteine inhibit hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion but only Trolox inhibits Fc{epsilon}RI-dependent anaphylactic degranulation in mast cells. {yields} Src family kinase Fyn activation after free radical production is necessary for hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion in mast cells. -- Abstract: Mast cells (MC) have an important role in pathologic conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), where hypoxia conduce to deleterious inflammatory response. MC contribute to hypoxia-induced angiogenesis producing factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), but the mechanisms behind the control of hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion in this cell type is poorly understood. We used the hypoxia-mimicking agent cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}) to analyze VEGF secretion in murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). We found that CoCl{sub 2} promotes a sustained production of functional VEGF, able to induce proliferation of endothelial cells in vitro. CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion was independent of calcium rise but dependent on tetanus toxin-sensitive vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs). VEGF exocytosis required free radicals formation and the activation of Src family kinases. Interestingly, an important deficiency on CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion was observed in Fyn kinase-deficient BMMCs. Moreover, Fyn kinase was activated by CoCl{sub 2} in WT cells and this activation was prevented by treatment with antioxidants such as Trolox and N-acetylcysteine. Our results show that BMMCs are able to release VEGF under hypoxic conditions through a tetanus toxin-sensitive mechanism, promoted by free radicals

  3. Structures and short linear motif of disordered transcription factor regions provide clues to the interactome of the cellular hub radical-induced cell death1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Shea, Charlotte; Staby, Lasse; Bendsen, Sidsel Krogh

    2017-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDRs) lack a well-defined three-dimensional structure, but often facilitate key protein functions. Some interactions between IDRs and folded protein domains rely on short linear motifs (SLiMs). These motifs are challenging to identify, but once found can...... point to larger networks of interactions, such as with proteins that serve as hubs for essential cellular functions. The stress-associated plant protein Radical-Induced Cell Death1 (RCD1) is one such hub, interacting with many transcription factors via their flexible IDRs. To identify the SLiM bound......046 formed different structures or were fuzzy in the complexes. These findings allow us to present a model of the stress-associated RCD1-transcription factor interactome and to contribute to the emerging understanding of the interactions between folded hubs and their intrinsically disordered partners....

  4. Senescence-associated barley NAC (NAM, ATAF1,2, CUC) transcription factor interacts with radical-induced cell death 1 through a disordered regulatory domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaersgaard, Trine; Jensen, Michael K; Christiansen, Michael W

    2011-01-01

    as a transcriptional activator suggesting that an involvement of HvNAC013 and HvNAC005 in senescence will be different. HvNAC013 interacted with barley radical-induced cell death 1 (RCD1) via the very C-terminal part of its TRD, outside of the region containing the LP motif. No significant secondary structure...... (NAM, ATAF1,2, CUC) TF family are up-regulated during senescence in barley (Hordeum vulgare). Both HvNAC005 and HvNAC013 bound the conserved NAC DNA target sequence. Computational and biophysical analyses showed that both proteins are intrinsically disordered in their large C-terminal domains, which...... was induced in the HvNAC013 TRD upon interaction with RCD1. RCD1 also interacted with regions dominated by intrinsic disorder in TFs of the MYB and basic helix-loop-helix families. We propose that RCD1 is a regulatory protein capable of interacting with many different TFs by exploiting their intrinsic...

  5. Potential for free radical-induced lipid peroxidation as a cause of endothelial cell injury in Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, D J; Santucci, L A

    1988-01-01

    Cells infected by Rickettsia rickettsii, the causative agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, display unusual intracellular morphological changes characterized by dilatation of the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum and outer nuclear envelope. These changes are consistent with those that might be expected to occur following peroxidation of membrane lipids initiated by oxygen radical species, such as the hydroxyl radical or a variety of organic radicals. Using a fluorescent probe, we have found significantly increased levels of peroxides in human endothelial cells infected by R. rickettsii. Studies with desferrioxamine, an iron chelator effective in preventing formation of the hydroxyl radical from hydrogen peroxide and the superoxide free radical, reduced peroxide levels in infected cells to those found in uninfected cells. This observation suggests that the increased peroxides in infected cells may be lipid peroxides, degradation products of free radical attack on polyenoic fatty acids. The potential for lipid peroxidation as an important mechanism in endothelial cell injury caused by R. rickettsii is discussed. Images PMID:3141280

  6. Cytoprotective Mechanisms Mediated by Polyphenols from Chilean Native Berries against Free Radical-Induced Damage on AGS Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Ávila

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of cytoprotective mechanisms induced by polyphenols such as activation of intracellular antioxidant responses (ICM and direct free radical scavenging was investigated in native Chilean species of strawberries, raspberries, and currants. Human gastric epithelial cells were co- and preincubated with polyphenolic-enriched extracts (PEEs from Chilean raspberries (Rubus geoides, strawberries (Fragaria chiloensis ssp. chiloensis f. chiloensis, and currants (Ribes magellanicum and challenged with peroxyl and hydroxyl radicals. Cellular protection was determined in terms of cell viability, glyoxalase I and glutathione s-transferases activities, and carboxymethyl lysine (CML and malondialdehyde levels. Our results indicate that cytoprotection induced by ICM was the prevalent mechanism for Rubus geoides and F. chiloensis. This agreed with increased levels of glyoxalase I and glutathione S-transferase activities in cells preincubated with PEEs. ORAC index indicated that F. chiloensis was the most efficient peroxyl radical scavenger. Moreover, ICM mediated by F. chiloensis was effective in protecting cells from CML accumulation in contrast to the protective effects induced by free radical scavenging. Our results indicate that although both polyphenol-mediated mechanisms can exert protective effects, ICM was the most prevalent in AGS cells. These results suggest a potential use of these native berries as functional food.

  7. Cytoprotective Mechanisms Mediated by Polyphenols from Chilean Native Berries against Free Radical-Induced Damage on AGS Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila, Felipe; Theoduloz, Cristina; López-Alarcón, Camilo; Dorta, Eva; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of cytoprotective mechanisms induced by polyphenols such as activation of intracellular antioxidant responses (ICM) and direct free radical scavenging was investigated in native Chilean species of strawberries, raspberries, and currants. Human gastric epithelial cells were co- and preincubated with polyphenolic-enriched extracts (PEEs) from Chilean raspberries ( Rubus geoides ), strawberries ( Fragaria chiloensis ssp. chiloensis f . chiloensis ), and currants ( Ribes magellanicum ) and challenged with peroxyl and hydroxyl radicals. Cellular protection was determined in terms of cell viability, glyoxalase I and glutathione s-transferases activities, and carboxymethyl lysine (CML) and malondialdehyde levels. Our results indicate that cytoprotection induced by ICM was the prevalent mechanism for Rubus geoides and F. chiloensis . This agreed with increased levels of glyoxalase I and glutathione S-transferase activities in cells preincubated with PEEs. ORAC index indicated that F. chiloensis was the most efficient peroxyl radical scavenger. Moreover, ICM mediated by F. chiloensis was effective in protecting cells from CML accumulation in contrast to the protective effects induced by free radical scavenging. Our results indicate that although both polyphenol-mediated mechanisms can exert protective effects, ICM was the most prevalent in AGS cells. These results suggest a potential use of these native berries as functional food.

  8. Antcin C from Antrodia cinnamomea Protects Liver Cells Against Free Radical-Induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis In Vitro and In Vivo through Nrf2-Dependent Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gokila Vani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the cytoprotective effects of antcin C, a steroid-like compound isolated from Antrodia cinnamaomea against AAPH-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in human hepatic HepG2 cells. Pretreatment with antcin C significantly protects hepatic cells from AAPH-induced cell death through the inhibition of ROS generation. Furthermore, AAPH-induced lipid peroxidation, ALT/AST secretion and GSH depletion was significantly inhibited by antcin C. The antioxidant potential of antcin C was correlated with induction of antioxidant genes including, HO-1, NQO-1, γ-GCLC, and SOD via transcriptional activation of Nrf2. The Nrf2 activation by antcin C is mediated by JNK1/2 and PI3K activation, whereas pharmacologic inhibition of JNK1/2 and PI3K abolished antcin C-induced Nrf2 activity. In addition, AAPH-induced apoptosis was significantly inhibited by antcin C through the down-regulation of pro-apoptotic factors including, Bax, cytochrome c, capase 9, -4, -12, -3, and PARP. In vivo studies also show that antcin C significantly protected mice liver from AAPH-induced hepatic injury as evidenced by reduction in hepatic enzymes in circulation. Further, immunocytochemistry analyses showed that antcin C significantly increased HO-1 and Nrf2 expression in mice liver tissues. These results strongly suggest that antcin C could protect liver cells from oxidative stress and cell death via Nrf2/ARE activation.

  9. Removal of oxygen free-radical-induced 5′,8-purine cyclodeoxynucleosides from DNA by the nucleotide excision-repair pathway in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuraoka, Isao; Bender, Christina; Romieu, Anthony; Cadet, Jean; Wood, Richard D.; Lindahl, Tomas

    2000-01-01

    Exposure of cellular DNA to reactive oxygen species generates several classes of base lesions, many of which are removed by the base excision-repair pathway. However, the lesions include purine cyclodeoxynucleoside formation by intramolecular crosslinking between the C-8 position of adenine or guanine and the 5′ position of 2-deoxyribose. This distorting form of DNA damage, in which the purine is attached by two covalent bonds to the sugar-phosphate backbone, occurs as distinct diastereoisomers. It was observed here that both diastereoisomers block primer extension by mammalian and microbial replicative DNA polymerases, using DNA with a site-specific purine cyclodeoxynucleoside residue as template, and consequently appear to be cytotoxic lesions. Plasmid DNA containing either the 5′R or 5′S form of 5′,8-cyclo-2-deoxyadenosine was a substrate for the human nucleotide excision-repair enzyme complex. The R diastereoisomer was more efficiently repaired than the S isomer. No correction of the lesion by direct damage reversal or base excision repair was detected. Dual incision around the lesion depended on the core nucleotide excision-repair protein XPA. In contrast to several other types of oxidative DNA damage, purine cyclodeoxynucleosides are chemically stable and would be expected to accumulate at a slow rate over many years in the DNA of nonregenerating cells from xeroderma pigmentosum patients. High levels of this form of DNA damage might explain the progressive neurodegeneration seen in XPA individuals. PMID:10759556

  10. Chemical determination of free radical-induced damage to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizdaroglu, M

    1991-01-01

    Free radical-induced damage to DNA in vivo can result in deleterious biological consequences such as the initiation and promotion of cancer. Chemical characterization and quantitation of such DNA damage is essential for an understanding of its biological consequences and cellular repair. Methodologies incorporating the technique of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) have been developed in recent years for measurement of free radical-induced DNA damage. The use of GC/MS with selected-ion monitoring (SIM) facilitates unequivocal identification and quantitation of a large number of products of all four DNA bases produced in DNA by reactions with hydroxyl radical, hydrated electron, and H atom. Hydroxyl radical-induced DNA-protein cross-links in mammalian chromatin, and products of the sugar moiety in DNA are also unequivocally identified and quantitated. The sensitivity and selectivity of the GC/MS-SIM technique enables the measurement of DNA base products even in isolated mammalian chromatin without the necessity of first isolating DNA, and despite the presence of histones. Recent results reviewed in this article demonstrate the usefulness of the GC/MS technique for chemical determination of free radical-induced DNA damage in DNA as well as in mammalian chromatin under a vast variety of conditions of free radical production.

  11. Radical-induced oxidation of RAFT agents : a kinetic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Changxi; He, Junpo; Zhou, Yanwu; Gu, Yuankai; Yang, Yuliang

    2011-01-01

    Radical-induced oxidn. of reversible addn.-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) agents is studied with respect to the effect of mol. structure on oxidn. rate. The radicals are generated by homolysis of either azobisisobutyronitrile or alkoxyamine and transformed in situ immediately into peroxy

  12. Mechanisms of free radical-induced damage to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizdaroglu, Miral; Jaruga, Pawel

    2012-04-01

    Endogenous and exogenous sources cause free radical-induced DNA damage in living organisms by a variety of mechanisms. The highly reactive hydroxyl radical reacts with the heterocyclic DNA bases and the sugar moiety near or at diffusion-controlled rates. Hydrated electron and H atom also add to the heterocyclic bases. These reactions lead to adduct radicals, further reactions of which yield numerous products. These include DNA base and sugar products, single- and double-strand breaks, 8,5'-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleosides, tandem lesions, clustered sites and DNA-protein cross-links. Reaction conditions and the presence or absence of oxygen profoundly affect the types and yields of the products. There is mounting evidence for an important role of free radical-induced DNA damage in the etiology of numerous diseases including cancer. Further understanding of mechanisms of free radical-induced DNA damage, and cellular repair and biological consequences of DNA damage products will be of outmost importance for disease prevention and treatment.

  13. Influence of Cocoa Flavanols and Procyanidins on Free Radical-induced Human Erythrocyte Hemolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Yan Zhu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Cocoa can be a rich source of antioxidants including the flavan-3-ols, epicatechin and catechin, and their oligomers (procyanidins. While these flavonoids have been reported to reduce the rate of free radical-induced erythrocyte hemolysis in experimental animal models, little is known about their effect on human erythrocyte hemolysis. The major objective of this work was to study the effect of a flavonoid-rich cocoa beverage on the resistance of human erythrocytes to oxidative stress. A second objective was to assess the effects of select purified cocoa flavonoids, epicatechin, catechin, the procyanidin Dimer B2 and one of its major metabolites, 3ʹ-O-methyl epicatechin, on free radical-induced erythrocyte hemolysis in vitro. Peripheral blood was obtained from 8 healthy subjects before and 1, 2, 4 and 8 h after consuming a flavonoid-rich cocoa beverage that provided 0.25 g/kg body weight (BW, 0.375 or 0.50 g/kg BW of cocoa. Plasma flavanol and dimer concentrations were determined for each subject. Erythrocyte hemolysis was evaluated using a controlled peroxidation reaction. Epicatechin, catechin, 3ʹ-O-methyl epicatechin and (--epicatechin-(4β > 8epicatechin (Dimer B2 were detected in the plasma within 1 h after the consumption of the beverage. The susceptibility of erythrocytes to hemolysis was reduced significantly following the consumption of the beverages. The duration of the lag time, which reflects the capacity of cells to buffer free radicals, was increased. Consistent with the above, the purified flavonoids, epicatechin, catechin, Dimer B2 and the metabolite 3ʹ-O-methyl epicatechin, exhibited dose-dependent protection against AAPH-induced erythrocyte hemolysis at concentrations ranging from 2.5 to 20 μM. Erythrocytes from subjects consuming flavonoid-rich cocoa show reduced susceptibility to free radical-induced hemolysis (p < 0.05.

  14. An ESR study of radicals induced in irradiated fresh mango

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Masahiro; Hussain, Mohammed S.; Morishita, Norio; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Ukai, Mitsuko; Shimoyama, Yuhei

    2009-01-01

    An electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopic study was performed on the radicals induced irradiated fresh mangoes. Fresh Philippine mangoes were irradiated by the γ-rays, lyophilized and powdered. The ESR spectrum of the dry specimen showed a strong main peak at g=2.004 and a pair of peaks at both magnetic fields of the main peak. The main peak detected from flesh and skin specimens faded away in a few days after the irradiation. On the other hand, the side peaks showed a well-defined dose response even 9 days after the irradiation. The side-peak is a useful mean to define the irradiation on fresh mangoes. (author)

  15. Hydroxyl-radical induced dechlorination of pentachlorophenol in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yongke; Wu Jilan; Fang Xingwang; Sonntag, C. von

    1998-01-01

    The hydroxyl-radical induced dechlorination of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in water has been investigated pulse radiolytically. Hydroxyl radicals react with PCP by both electron transfer and addition. The former process results in pentachlorophenoxyl radicals (PCP-O), the latter process followed by rapid HCl elimination gives birth to deprotonated hydroxytetrachlorophenoxyl radicals ( - O-TCP-O). These phenoxyl radicals exhibit maximum absorption around 452 nm, which hinders the proper estimation of the ratio of the two processes. However, these two processes cause different changes in conductivity. In basic solution, the electron transfer causes a conductivity increase due to the formation of OH - whereas an addition followed by HCl elimination results in a conductivity decrease. The concurrence of these two processes reduces the relative variation in conductivity, from which about 53% electron transfer is deduced

  16. Analysis of radicals induced in irradiated cereal flour using ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Shoei; Kishita, Keigo; Ukai, Mitsuko; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, we revealed radicals induced in cereal flour irradiated with gamma-ray or electron beam. Sample was wheat and rice. We detected a broad singlet signal at g = 2.0. It consists of a singlet signal and a triplet signal. It suggested that the singlet signal is originated from organic free radicals and the triplet signal is from 14 N. There were no differences of ESR spectra between irradiated wheat flour and rice flour. The signal intensity of radiation induced radical was tend to increase following with the increase of radiation dose level. After radiation treatment, relaxation time of radiation induced radical was changed during storage. T 1 was decreased and T 2 was increased. In this study, the relaxation time is calculated using the parameters obtained from the ESR signal. It is necessary to analyze the relaxation time directly with pulsed ESR spectroscopy in future. (author)

  17. Synthesis and characterization of partially fluorinated poly(acryl) ionomers for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells and ESR-spectroscopic investigation of the radically induced degradation of model compounds; Synthese und Charakterisierung teilfluorierter Poly(acryl)-Ionomere als Polymerelektrolytmembranen fuer Brennstoffzellen und ESR-spektroskopische Untersuchung der radikalinduzierten Degradation von Modellverbindungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenberger, Frank

    2008-07-09

    this work deals with the EPR-spectroscopic investigation of radically induced degradation reactions of model compounds which represent structural units of poly(aryl) ionomers prepared in the first part of this work. These model compounds are exposed to hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals in a flow cell, which are generated directly by photolysis of hydrogen peroxide in the cavity of an ESR spectrometer. By using this experimental setup different parameters (such as concentration of hydroxyl radicals, monomer concentration, flow rate, and pH value) are varied systematically and their influences in terms of the observed product formation of the aromatic model compounds with the hydroxyl radicals are estimated. Conclusions in terms of possible radical reactions of the poly(aryl) ionomer can be drawn from these investigations and information of avoidable structural features (e.g. type of the end groups of the ionomers) and avoidable conditions (e.g. inhomogeneities of pH values in the membrane) are obtained. (orig.)

  18. American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gene & Cell Therapy Defined Gene therapy and cell therapy are overlapping fields of biomedical research that aim to repair the direct cause of genetic diseases. Read More Gene & Cell Therapy FAQ's Read the most common questions raised by ...

  19. Gene Delivery for Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pang, Shen

    2001-01-01

    .... Enhanced by the bystander effect, the specific expression of the DTA gene causes significant cell death in prostate cancer cell cultures, with very low background cell eradication in control cell lines...

  20. Effects of the peculiar compositions in tea plant on free radicals induced by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yuehua; Lin Shuqi; Sun Tao; Cheng Qikun

    1994-01-01

    Effects of the peculiar compositions in tea plant on free radicals induced by radiation was investigated. Results showed that the contents of free radicals in aborescence large-leaf varieties were more than that in shrubby middle-small leaf varieties under the same irradiation dose. Dose-effect curve for free radical contents in tea varieties could be described with an exponential equation. The contents of free radical and the radiosensitivities were related to the contents of catechin, tea polyphenols, flavone glycoside and caffeine. The main factor that affected free radical content in tea plant was catechin. Results also showed that there was a quantitative effect between (-)-EGCG and free radical: (-)-EGCG could induce the increase of free radical contents in tea at low concentration but scavenge free radicals at high concentration

  1. Determining Physical Mechanisms of Gene Expression Regulation from Single Cell Gene Expression Data

    OpenAIRE

    Ezer, Daphne; Moignard, Victoria; G?ttgens, Berthold; Adryan, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Many genes are expressed in bursts, which can contribute to cell-to-cell heterogeneity. It is now possible to measure this heterogeneity with high throughput single cell gene expression assays (single cell qPCR and RNA-seq). These experimental approaches generate gene expression distributions which can be used to estimate the kinetic parameters of gene expression bursting, namely the rate that genes turn on, the rate that genes turn off, and the rate of transcription. We construct a complete ...

  2. Hydroxyl radical induced cross-linking of cytosine and tyrosine in nucleohistone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajewski, E.; Dizdaroglu, M.

    1990-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical induced formation of a DNA-protein cross-link involving cytosine and tyrosine in nucleohistone in buffered aqueous solution is reported. The technique of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used for this investigation. A γ-irradiated aqueous mixture of cytosine and tyrosine was first investigated in order to obtain gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric properties of possible cytosine-tyrosine cross-links. One cross-link was observed, and its structure was identified as the product from the formation of a covalent bond between carbon 6 of cytosine and carbon 3 of tyrosine. With the use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring, this cytosine-tyrosine cross-link was identified in acidic hydrolysates of calf thymus nucleohistone γ-irradiated in N 2 O-saturated aqueous solution. The yield of this DNA-protein cross-link in nucleohistone was found to be a linear function of the radiation dose in the range of 100-500 Gy (J·kg -1 ). This yield amounted to 0.05 nmol·J -1 . Mechanisms underlying the formation of the cytosine-tyrosine cross-link in nucleohistone were proposed to involve radical-radical and/or radical addition reactions of hydroxyl adduct radicals of cytosine and tyrosine moieties, forming a covalent bond between carbon 6 of cytosine and carbon 3 of tyrosine. When oxygen was present in irradiated solutions, no cytosine-tyrosine cross-links were observed

  3. Differential expression of cell adhesion genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stein, Wilfred D; Litman, Thomas; Fojo, Tito

    2005-01-01

    that compare cells grown in suspension to similar cells grown attached to one another as aggregates have suggested that it is adhesion to the extracellular matrix of the basal membrane that confers resistance to apoptosis and, hence, resistance to cytotoxins. The genes whose expression correlates with poor...... in cell adhesion and the cytoskeleton. If the proteins involved in tethering cells to the extracellular matrix are important in conferring drug resistance, it may be possible to improve chemotherapy by designing drugs that target these proteins....

  4. Cell cycle and apoptosis genes in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, Lianne Simone Mirjam

    2006-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was aimed at identifying the role of cell cycle and apoptosis genes in atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is the primary cause of cardiovascular disease, a disorder occurring in the large and medium-sized arteries of the body. Although in the beginning 90s promising

  5. Genes involved in cell division in mycoplasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Alarcón

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cell division has been studied mainly in model systems such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, where it is described as a complex process with the participation of a group of proteins which assemble into a multiprotein complex called the septal ring. Mycoplasmas are cell wall-less bacteria presenting a reduced genome. Thus, it was important to compare their genomes to analyze putative genes involved in cell division processes. The division and cell wall (dcw cluster, which in E. coli and B. subtilis is composed of 16 and 17 genes, respectively, is represented by only three to four genes in mycoplasmas. Even the most conserved protein, FtsZ, is not present in all mycoplasma genomes analyzed so far. A model for the FtsZ protein from Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma synoviae has been constructed. The conserved residues, essential for GTP/GDP binding, are present in FtsZ from both species. A strong conservation of hydrophobic amino acid patterns is observed, and is probably necessary for the structural stability of the protein when active. M. synoviae FtsZ presents an extended amino acid sequence at the C-terminal portion of the protein, which may participate in interactions with other still unknown proteins crucial for the cell division process.

  6. Cell cycle gene expression under clinorotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemenko, Olga

    2016-07-01

    Cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) are main regulators of the cell cycle of eukaryotes. It's assumes a significant change of their level in cells under microgravity conditions and by other physical factors actions. The clinorotation use enables to determine the influence of gravity on simulated events in the cell during the cell cycle - exit from the state of quiet stage and promotion presynthetic phase (G1) and DNA synthesis phase (S) of the cell cycle. For the clinorotation effect study on cell proliferation activity is the necessary studies of molecular mechanisms of cell cycle regulation and development of plants under altered gravity condition. The activity of cyclin D, which is responsible for the events of the cell cycle in presynthetic phase can be controlled by the action of endogenous as well as exogenous factors, but clinorotation is one of the factors that influence on genes expression that regulate the cell cycle.These data can be used as a model for further research of cyclin - CDK complex for study of molecular mechanisms regulation of growth and proliferation. In this investigation we tried to summarize and analyze known literature and own data we obtained relatively the main regulators of the cell cycle in altered gravity condition.

  7. Cholinergic regulation of VIP gene expression in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bo; Georg, Birgitte; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing......Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing...

  8. Optimizing autologous cell grafts to improve stem cell gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psatha, Nikoletta; Karponi, Garyfalia; Yannaki, Evangelia

    2016-07-01

    Over the past decade, stem cell gene therapy has achieved unprecedented curative outcomes for several genetic disorders. Despite the unequivocal success, clinical gene therapy still faces challenges. Genetically engineered hematopoietic stem cells are particularly vulnerable to attenuation of their repopulating capacity once exposed to culture conditions, ultimately leading to low engraftment levels posttransplant. This becomes of particular importance when transduction rates are low or/and competitive transplant conditions are generated by reduced-intensity conditioning in the absence of a selective advantage of the transduced over the unmodified cells. These limitations could partially be overcome by introducing megadoses of genetically modified CD34(+) cells into conditioned patients or by transplanting hematopoietic stem cells hematopoietic stem cells with high engrafting and repopulating potential. On the basis of the lessons gained from cord blood transplantation, we summarize the most promising approaches to date of increasing either the numbers of hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation or/and their engraftability, as a platform toward the optimization of engineered stem cell grafts. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Metallothionein gene expression in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeksha Pal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Metallothioneins (MTs are a group of low-molecular weight, cysteine-rich proteins. In general, MT is known to modulate three fundamental processes: (1 the release of gaseous mediators such as hydroxyl radical or nitric oxide, (2 apoptosis and (3 the binding and exchange of heavy metals such as zinc, cadmium or copper. Previous studies have shown a positive correlation between the expression of MT with invasion, metastasis and poor prognosis in various cancers. Most of the previous studies primarily used immunohistochemistry to analyze localization of MT in renal cell carcinoma (RCC. No information is available on the gene expression of MT2A isoform in different types and grades of RCC. Materials and Methods: In the present study, total RNA was isolated from 38 histopathologically confirmed cases of RCC of different types and grades. Corresponding adjacent normal renal parenchyma was taken as control. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT PCR analysis was done for the MT2A gene expression using b-actin as an internal control. All statistical calculations were performed using SPSS software. Results: The MT2A gene expression was found to be significantly increased (P < 0.01 in clear cell RCC in comparison with the adjacent normal renal parenchyma. The expression of MT2A was two to three-fold higher in sarcomatoid RCC, whereas there was no change in papillary and collecting duct RCC. MT2A gene expression was significantly higher in lower grade (grades I and II, P < 0.05, while no change was observed in high-grade tumor (grade III and IV in comparison to adjacent normal renal tissue. Conclusion: The first report of the expression of MT2A in different types and grades of RCC and also these data further support the role of MT2A in tumorigenesis.

  10. Identification of new genes in a cell envelope-cell division gene cluster of Escherichia coli: cell envelope gene murG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmond, G P; Lutkenhaus, J F; Donachie, W D

    1980-01-01

    We report the identification, cloning, and mapping of a new cell envelope gene, murG. This lies in a group of five genes of similar phenotype (in the order murE murF murG murC ddl) all concerned with peptidoglycan biosynthesis. This group is in a larger cluster of at least 10 genes, all of which are involved in some way with cell envelope growth. Images PMID:6998962

  11. Early gene regulation of osteogenesis in embryonic stem cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kirkham, Glen R.; Lovrics, Anna; Byrne, Helen M.; Jensen, Oliver E.; King, John R.; Shakesheff, Kevin M.; Buttery, Lee D. K.

    2012-01-01

    The early gene regulatory networks (GRNs) that mediate stem cell differentiation are complex, and the underlying regulatory associations can be difficult to map accurately. In this study, the expression profiles of the genes Dlx5, Msx2 and Runx2

  12. Stem cell and gene therapies for diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calne, Roy Y; Gan, Shu Uin; Lee, Kok Onn

    2010-03-01

    In this Perspectives article, we comment on the progress in experimental stem cell and gene therapies that might one day become a clinical reality for the treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus. Research on the ability of human embryonic stem cells to differentiate into islet cells has defined the developmental stages and transcription factors involved in this process. However, the clinical applications of human embryonic stem cells are limited by ethical concerns, as well as the potential for teratoma formation. As a consequence, alternative forms of stem cell therapies, such as induced pluripotent stem cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, have become an area of intense study. Finally, gene therapy shows some promise for the generation of insulin-producing cells. Here, we discuss two of the most frequently used approaches: in vitro gene delivery into cells which are then transplanted into the recipient and direct delivery of genes in vivo.

  13. DNA-mediated gene transfer into ataxia-telangiectasia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crescenzi, M.; Pulciani, S.; Carbonari, M.; Tedesco, L.; Russo, G.; Gaetano, C.; Fiorilli, M.

    1986-01-01

    The complete description of the genetic lesion(s) underlying the AT mutation might, therefore, highlight not only a DNA-repair pathwa, but also an important aspect of the physiology of lymphocytes. DNA-mediated gene transfer into eukaryotic cells has proved a powerful tool for the molecular cloning of certain mammalian genes. The possibility to clone a given gene using this technology depends, basically, on the availability of a selectable marker associated with the expression of the transfected gene in the recipient cell. Recently, a human DNA repair gene has been cloned in CHO mutant cells by taking advantage of the increased resistance to ultraviolet radiation of the transformants. As a preliminary step toward the molecular cloning of the AT gene(s), the authors have attempted to confer radioresistance to AT cells by transfection with normal human DNA

  14. OH-radical induced degradation of hydroxybenzoic- and hydroxycinnamic acids and formation of aromatic products-A gamma radiolysis study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krimmel, Birgit; Swoboda, Friederike [University of Vienna, Department of Nutritional Sciences, Section Radiation Biology (Austria); Solar, Sonja, E-mail: sonja.solar@univie.ac.a [University of Vienna, Department of Nutritional Sciences, Section Radiation Biology (Austria); Reznicek, Gottfried [Department of Pharmacognosy, Althanstrasse 14, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2010-12-15

    The OH-radical induced degradation of hydroxybenzoic acids (HBA), hydroxycinnamic acids (HCiA) and methoxylated derivatives, as well as of chlorogenic acid and rosmarinic acid was studied by gamma radiolysis in aerated aqueous solutions. Primary aromatic products resulting from an OH-radical attachment to the ring (hydroxylation), to the position occupied by the methoxyl group (replacement -OCH{sub 3} by -OH) as well as to the propenoic acid side chain of the cinnamic acids (benzaldehyde formations) were analysed by HPLC-UV and LC-ESI-MS. A comparison of the extent of these processes is given for 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, isovanillic acid, syringic acid, cinnamic acid, 4-hydroxycinnamic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, isoferulic acid, chlorogenic acid, and rosmarinic acid. For all cinnamic acids and derivatives benzaldehydes were significant oxidation products. With the release of caffeic acid from chlorogenic acid the cleavage of a phenolic glycoside could be demonstrated. Reaction mechanisms are discussed.

  15. Advances of reporter gene imaging monitoring stem cell therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei Zhijun; Zhang Yongxue

    2010-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation in the treatment of various tissue damage or degenerative diseases are research hotspots both at home and abroad. However, ignorance of the homing, differentiation and functional expression of the stem cell in vivo influence the further development of stem cell therapy. As an important component of molecular imaging technology, reporter gene imaging dynamically monitors the change of stem cell in vivo via monitoring the expression of transfected reporter gene. This paper briefly describes the latest research progress and the future development trend of the monitoring of reporter gene imaging in stem cell therapy in vivo. (authors)

  16. Microarray gene expression profiling and analysis in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhukhan Provash

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the most common cancer in adult kidney. The accuracy of current diagnosis and prognosis of the disease and the effectiveness of the treatment for the disease are limited by the poor understanding of the disease at the molecular level. To better understand the genetics and biology of RCC, we profiled the expression of 7,129 genes in both clear cell RCC tissue and cell lines using oligonucleotide arrays. Methods Total RNAs isolated from renal cell tumors, adjacent normal tissue and metastatic RCC cell lines were hybridized to affymatrix HuFL oligonucleotide arrays. Genes were categorized into different functional groups based on the description of the Gene Ontology Consortium and analyzed based on the gene expression levels. Gene expression profiles of the tissue and cell line samples were visualized and classified by singular value decomposition. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed to confirm the expression alterations of selected genes in RCC. Results Selected genes were annotated based on biological processes and clustered into functional groups. The expression levels of genes in each group were also analyzed. Seventy-four commonly differentially expressed genes with more than five-fold changes in RCC tissues were identified. The expression alterations of selected genes from these seventy-four genes were further verified using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Detailed comparison of gene expression patterns in RCC tissue and RCC cell lines shows significant differences between the two types of samples, but many important expression patterns were preserved. Conclusions This is one of the initial studies that examine the functional ontology of a large number of genes in RCC. Extensive annotation, clustering and analysis of a large number of genes based on the gene functional ontology revealed many interesting gene expression patterns in RCC. Most

  17. Analysis of mammary specific gene locus regulation in differentiated cells derived by somatic cell fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, Claire; Kolb, Andreas F.

    2009-01-01

    The transcriptional regulation of a gene is best analysed in the context of its normal chromatin surroundings. However, most somatic cells, in contrast to embryonic stem cells, are refractory to accurate modification by homologous recombination. We show here that it is possible to introduce precise genomic modifications in ES cells and to analyse the phenotypic consequences in differentiated cells by using a combination of gene targeting, site-specific recombination and somatic cell fusion. To provide a proof of principle, we have analysed the regulation of the casein gene locus in mammary gland cells derived from modified murine ES cells by somatic cell fusion. A β-galactosidase reporter gene was inserted in place of the β-casein gene and the modified ES cells, which do not express the reporter gene, were fused with the mouse mammary gland cell line HC11. The resulting cell clones expressed the β-galactosidase gene to a similar extent and with similar hormone responsiveness as the endogenous gene. However, a reporter gene under the control of a minimal β-casein promoter (encompassing the two consensus STAT5 binding sites which mediate the hormone response of the casein genes) was unable to replicate expression levels or hormone responsiveness of the endogenous gene when inserted into the same site of the casein locus. As expected, these results implicate sequences other than the STAT5 sites in the regulation of the β-casein gene

  18. Integrative characterization of germ cell-specific genes from mouse spermatocyte UniGene library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy Edward M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The primary regulator of spermatogenesis, a highly ordered and tightly regulated developmental process, is an intrinsic genetic program involving male germ cell-specific genes. Results We analyzed the mouse spermatocyte UniGene library containing 2155 gene-oriented transcript clusters. We predict that 11% of these genes are testis-specific and systematically identified 24 authentic genes specifically and abundantly expressed in the testis via in silico and in vitro approaches. Northern blot analysis disclosed various transcript characteristics, such as expression level, size and the presence of isoform. Expression analysis revealed developmentally regulated and stage-specific expression patterns in all of the genes. We further analyzed the genes at the protein and cellular levels. Transfection assays performed using GC-2 cells provided information on the cellular characteristics of the gene products. In addition, antibodies were generated against proteins encoded by some of the genes to facilitate their identification and characterization in spermatogenic cells and sperm. Our data suggest that a number of the gene products are implicated in transcriptional regulation, nuclear integrity, sperm structure and motility, and fertilization. In particular, we found for the first time that Mm.333010, predicted to contain a trypsin-like serine protease domain, is a sperm acrosomal protein. Conclusion We identify 24 authentic genes with spermatogenic cell-specific expression, and provide comprehensive information about the genes. Our findings establish a new basis for future investigation into molecular mechanisms underlying male reproduction.

  19. Stem cell collection and gene transfer in Fanconi anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patrick F; Radtke, Susan; von Kalle, Christof; Balcik, Brenden; Bohn, Kimberley; Mueller, Robin; Schuesler, Todd; Haren, Moira; Reeves, Lilith; Cancelas, Jose A; Leemhuis, Thomas; Harris, Richard; Auerbach, Arleen D; Smith, Franklin O; Davies, Stella M; Williams, David A

    2007-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare genetic syndrome characterized by progressive bone marrow failure (BMF), congenital anomalies, and a predisposition to malignancy. Successful gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) could reverse BMF in this disease. We developed clinical trials to determine whether a sufficient number of CD34(+) stem cells could be collected for gene modification and to evaluate the safety and efficacy of HSC-corrective gene transfer in FA genotype A (FANCA) patients. Here, we report that FA patients have significant depletion of their BM CD34(+) cell compartment even before severe pancytopenia is present. However, oncoretroviral-mediated ex vivo gene transfer was efficient in clinical scale in FA-A cells, leading to reversal of the cellular phenotype in a significant percentage of CD34(+) cells. Re-infusion of gene-corrected products in two patients was safe and well tolerated and accompanied by transient improvements in hemoglobin and platelet counts. Gene correction was transient, likely owing to the low dose of gene-corrected cells infused. Our early experience shows that stem cell collection is well tolerated in FA patients and suggests that collection be considered as early as possible in patients who are potential candidates for future gene transfer trials.

  20. Genes and Gene Networks Involved in Sodium Fluoride-Elicited Cell Death Accompanying Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Oral Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Tabuchi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Here, to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying cell death induced by sodium fluoride (NaF, we analyzed gene expression patterns in rat oral epithelial ROE2 cells exposed to NaF using global-scale microarrays and bioinformatics tools. A relatively high concentration of NaF (2 mM induced cell death concomitant with decreases in mitochondrial membrane potential, chromatin condensation and caspase-3 activation. Using 980 probe sets, we identified 432 up-regulated and 548 down-regulated genes, that were differentially expressed by >2.5-fold in the cells treated with 2 mM of NaF and categorized them into 4 groups by K-means clustering. Ingenuity® pathway analysis revealed several gene networks from gene clusters. The gene networks Up-I and Up-II included many up-regulated genes that were mainly associated with the biological function of induction or prevention of cell death, respectively, such as Atf3, Ddit3 and Fos (for Up-I and Atf4 and Hspa5 (for Up-II. Interestingly, knockdown of Ddit3 and Hspa5 significantly increased and decreased the number of viable cells, respectively. Moreover, several endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress-related genes including, Ddit3, Atf4 and Hapa5, were observed in these gene networks. These findings will provide further insight into the molecular mechanisms of NaF-induced cell death accompanying ER stress in oral epithelial cells.

  1. Sexual selection, genetic conflict, selfish genes, and the atypical patterns of gene expression in spermatogenic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleene, Kenneth C

    2005-01-01

    This review proposes that the peculiar patterns of gene expression in spermatogenic cells are the consequence of powerful evolutionary forces known as sexual selection. Sexual selection is generally characterized by intense competition of males for females, an enormous variety of the strategies to maximize male reproductive success, exaggerated male traits at all levels of biological organization, co-evolution of sexual traits in males and females, and conflict between the sexual advantage of the male trait and the reproductive fitness of females and the individual fitness of both sexes. In addition, spermatogenesis is afflicted by selfish genes that promote their transmission to progeny while causing deleterious effects. Sexual selection, selfish genes, and genetic conflict provide compelling explanations for many atypical features of gene expression in spermatogenic cells including the gross overexpression of certain mRNAs, transcripts encoding truncated proteins that cannot carry out basic functions of the proteins encoded by the same genes in somatic cells, the large number of gene families containing paralogous genes encoding spermatogenic cell-specific isoforms, the large number of testis-cancer-associated genes that are expressed only in spermatogenic cells and malignant cells, and the overbearing role of Sertoli cells in regulating the number and quality of spermatozoa.

  2. Geometry of the Gene Expression Space of Individual Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Korem

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a revolution in the ability to analyze gene expression of single cells in a tissue. To understand this data we must comprehend how cells are distributed in a high-dimensional gene expression space. One open question is whether cell types form discrete clusters or whether gene expression forms a continuum of states. If such a continuum exists, what is its geometry? Recent theory on evolutionary trade-offs suggests that cells that need to perform multiple tasks are arranged in a polygon or polyhedron (line, triangle, tetrahedron and so on, generally called polytopes in gene expression space, whose vertices are the expression profiles optimal for each task. Here, we analyze single-cell data from human and mouse tissues profiled using a variety of single-cell technologies. We fit the data to shapes with different numbers of vertices, compute their statistical significance, and infer their tasks. We find cases in which single cells fill out a continuum of expression states within a polyhedron. This occurs in intestinal progenitor cells, which fill out a tetrahedron in gene expression space. The four vertices of this tetrahedron are each enriched with genes for a specific task related to stemness and early differentiation. A polyhedral continuum of states is also found in spleen dendritic cells, known to perform multiple immune tasks: cells fill out a tetrahedron whose vertices correspond to key tasks related to maturation, pathogen sensing and communication with lymphocytes. A mixture of continuum-like distributions and discrete clusters is found in other cell types, including bone marrow and differentiated intestinal crypt cells. This approach can be used to understand the geometry and biological tasks of a wide range of single-cell datasets. The present results suggest that the concept of cell type may be expanded. In addition to discreet clusters in gene-expression space, we suggest a new possibility: a continuum of states within a

  3. Genes affecting β-cell function in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fløyel, Tina; Kaur, Simranjeet; Pociot, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a multifactorial disease resulting from an immune-mediated destruction of the insulin-producing pancreatic β cells. Several environmental and genetic risk factors predispose to the disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified around 50 genetic regions...... that affect the risk of developing T1D, but the disease-causing variants and genes are still largely unknown. In this review, we discuss the current status of T1D susceptibility loci and candidate genes with focus on the β cell. At least 40 % of the genes in the T1D susceptibility loci are expressed in human...... islets and β cells, where they according to recent studies modulate the β-cell response to the immune system. As most of the risk variants map to noncoding regions of the genome, i.e., promoters, enhancers, intergenic regions, and noncoding genes, their possible involvement in T1D pathogenesis as gene...

  4. Type 1 Diabetes Candidate Genes Linked to Pancreatic Islet Cell Inflammation and Beta-Cell Apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Størling, Joachim; Pociot, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    (GWAS) have identified more than 50 genetic regions that affect the risk of developing T1D. Most of these susceptibility loci, however, harbor several genes, and the causal variant(s) and gene(s) for most of the loci remain to be established. A significant part of the genes located in the T1D...... susceptibility loci are expressed in human islets and β cells and mounting evidence suggests that some of these genes modulate the β-cell response to the immune system and viral infection and regulate apoptotic β-cell death. Here, we discuss the current status of T1D susceptibility loci and candidate genes...

  5. Effect of shear stress and free radicals induced by ultrasound on erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, T.; Fukushima, Y.; Kon, H.; Riesz, P.

    1989-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to elucidate the mechanism of hemolysis induced by ultrasound. Ar or N2O gas was used to distinguish between cavitation with or without free radical formation (hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen atoms). Free radical formation was examined by the method of spin trapping combined with ESR. After sonication of erythrocyte suspensions, several structural and functional parameters of the erythrocyte membrane--hemolysis, membrane fluidity, membrane permeability, and membrane deformability--were examined. Although free radical formation was observed in the erythrocyte suspensions sonicated in the presence of Ar, no free radical formation was observed in the presence of N2O. However, the hemolysis behavior induced by ultrasound was similar in the presence of Ar or N2O. The membrane fluidity, permeability, and deformability of the remaining unlysed erythrocytes after sonication in the presence of Ar or N2O were unchanged and identical to those of the control cells. On the other hand, after gamma irradiation (700 Gy), the hemolysis behavior was quite different from that after sonication, and the membrane properties were significantly changed. These results suggest that hemolysis induced by sonication was due to mechanical shearing stress arising from cavitation, and that the membrane integrity of the remaining erythrocytes after sonication was the same as that of control cells without sonication. The triatomic gas, N2O, may be useful for ultrasonically disrupting cells without accompanying free radical formation

  6. Identifying Candidate Reprogramming Genes in Mouse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fang; Li, Jingyu; Zhang, Heng; Yang, Xu; An, Tiezhu

    2017-08-01

    Factor-based induced reprogramming approaches have tremendous potential for human regenerative medicine, but the efficiencies of these approaches are still low. In this study, we analyzed the global transcriptional profiles of mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (miPSCs) and mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) from seven different labs and present here the first successful clustering according to cell type, not by lab of origin. We identified 2131 different expression genes (DEs) as candidate pluripotency-associated genes by comparing mESCs/miPSCs with somatic cells and 720 DEs between miPSCs and mESCs. Interestingly, there was a significant overlap between the two DE sets. Therefore, we defined the overlap DEs as "consensus DEs" including 313 miPSC-specific genes expressed at a higher level in miPSCs versus mESCs and 184 mESC-specific genes in total and reasoned that these may contribute to the differences in pluripotency between mESCs and miPSCs. A classification of "consensus DEs" according to their different expression levels between somatic cells and mESCs/miPSCs shows that 86% of the miPSC-specific genes are more highly expressed in somatic cells, while 73% of mESC-specific genes are highly expressed in mESCs/miPSCs, indicating that the miPSCs have not efficiently silenced the expression pattern of the somatic cells from which they are derived and failed to completely induce the genes with high expression levels in mESCs. We further revealed a strong correlation between oocyte-enriched factors and insufficiently induced mESC-specific genes and identified 11 hub genes via network analysis. In light of these findings, we postulated that these key hub genes might not only drive somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) reprogramming but also augment the efficiency and quality of miPSC reprogramming.

  7. Patterns of expression of cell wall related genes in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima D.U.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Our search for genes related to cell wall metabolism in the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database (http://sucest.lbi.dcc.unicamp.br resulted in 3,283 reads (1% of the total reads which were grouped into 459 clusters (potential genes with an average of 7.1 reads per cluster. To more clearly display our correlation coefficients, we constructed surface maps which we used to investigate the relationship between cell wall genes and the sugarcane tissues libraries from which they came. The only significant correlations that we found between cell wall genes and/or their expression within particular libraries were neutral or synergetic. Genes related to cellulose biosynthesis were from the CesA family, and were found to be the most abundant cell wall related genes in the SUCEST database. We found that the highest number of CesA reads came from the root and stem libraries. The genes with the greatest number of reads were those involved in cell wall hydrolases (e.g. beta-1,3-glucanases, xyloglucan endo-beta-transglycosylase, beta-glucosidase and endo-beta-mannanase. Correlation analyses by surface mapping revealed that the expression of genes related to biosynthesis seems to be associated with the hydrolysis of hemicelluloses, pectin hydrolases being mainly associated with xyloglucan hydrolases. The patterns of cell wall related gene expression in sugarcane based on the number of reads per cluster reflected quite well the expected physiological characteristics of the tissues. This is the first work to provide a general view on plant cell wall metabolism through the expression of related genes in almost all the tissues of a plant at the same time. For example, developing flowers behaved similarly to both meristematic tissues and leaf-root transition zone tissues. Besides providing a basis for future research on the mechanisms of plant development which involve the cell wall, our findings will provide valuable tools for plant engineering in the

  8. Thiyl radical-induced cis-trans-isomerization of arachidonic acid inhibits prostaglandin metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kratzsch, S.; Droessler, K.; Sprinz, H.; Brede, O.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Thiyl radicals radiolytically generated from thiophenol in methanolic solution are known to isomerise double bonds of poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). γ-irradiating of such a system containing all-cis 5,8,11,14 eicosatetraenoic acid (arachidonic acid, AA) with low doses (0.1-0.8 kGy) results in a mixture of 8 to 32% mono-trans-isomers. Here we report about the influence of mono-trans-AA on the primary steps of AA-metabolism and prostaglandin synthesis, catalysed by cyclooxygenase (COX). In the cell-free model system the reaction of COX-1 with AA was analysed by controlling the oxygen level during the enzymatic reaction. As an example, a mixture of a low quantity of mono-trans-isomerized AA (10%) and 90% all-cis-isomer exhibits a marked reduced oxygen consumption by 45%. As further proofs - the yield of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by the COX-coupled peroxidase reaction was detected, - and the COX-1 activity in presence of different amounts of trans-AA was characterized using a photometric assay based on the oxidation of TMPD. All these methods indicated semiquantitatively a reduced activity of COX-1, depending on the trans-isomer yield. Therefore, an inhibition of COX-1 activity by only one trans-double-bond in AA could be concluded. Furthermore, in vitro cell-line experiments were performed analysing the influence of mono-trans-isomerized AA on the activity of the cell-own COX-2. Hence, VD 3 -differentiated and LPS-stimulated monocyte-like cells were incubated with mono-trans-AA and ROS-production was detected by the chemiluminescence measurements mentioned above. Compared to the reaction with all-cis-AA we found a considerable lowered formation of ROS. Likewise, we obtained a reduced PGE 2 -expression between 15 and 40% for cells treated with 8 to 29% trans-AA. The model as well as in vivo experiments demonstrate an inhibition effect of mono-trans-AA and give rise for postulating an enzyme blocking mechanism

  9. The cell cycle-regulated genes of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Anna; Rosebrock, Adam; Ferrezuelo, Francisco; Pyne, Saumyadipta; Chen, Haiying; Skiena, Steve; Futcher, Bruce; Leatherwood, Janet

    2005-07-01

    Many genes are regulated as an innate part of the eukaryotic cell cycle, and a complex transcriptional network helps enable the cyclic behavior of dividing cells. This transcriptional network has been studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast) and elsewhere. To provide more perspective on these regulatory mechanisms, we have used microarrays to measure gene expression through the cell cycle of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast). The 750 genes with the most significant oscillations were identified and analyzed. There were two broad waves of cell cycle transcription, one in early/mid G2 phase, and the other near the G2/M transition. The early/mid G2 wave included many genes involved in ribosome biogenesis, possibly explaining the cell cycle oscillation in protein synthesis in S. pombe. The G2/M wave included at least three distinctly regulated clusters of genes: one large cluster including mitosis, mitotic exit, and cell separation functions, one small cluster dedicated to DNA replication, and another small cluster dedicated to cytokinesis and division. S. pombe cell cycle genes have relatively long, complex promoters containing groups of multiple DNA sequence motifs, often of two, three, or more different kinds. Many of the genes, transcription factors, and regulatory mechanisms are conserved between S. pombe and S. cerevisiae. Finally, we found preliminary evidence for a nearly genome-wide oscillation in gene expression: 2,000 or more genes undergo slight oscillations in expression as a function of the cell cycle, although whether this is adaptive, or incidental to other events in the cell, such as chromatin condensation, we do not know.

  10. The Cell Cycle–Regulated Genes of Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Anna; Rosebrock, Adam; Ferrezuelo, Francisco; Pyne, Saumyadipta; Chen, Haiying; Skiena, Steve

    2005-01-01

    Many genes are regulated as an innate part of the eukaryotic cell cycle, and a complex transcriptional network helps enable the cyclic behavior of dividing cells. This transcriptional network has been studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast) and elsewhere. To provide more perspective on these regulatory mechanisms, we have used microarrays to measure gene expression through the cell cycle of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast). The 750 genes with the most significant oscillations were identified and analyzed. There were two broad waves of cell cycle transcription, one in early/mid G2 phase, and the other near the G2/M transition. The early/mid G2 wave included many genes involved in ribosome biogenesis, possibly explaining the cell cycle oscillation in protein synthesis in S. pombe. The G2/M wave included at least three distinctly regulated clusters of genes: one large cluster including mitosis, mitotic exit, and cell separation functions, one small cluster dedicated to DNA replication, and another small cluster dedicated to cytokinesis and division. S. pombe cell cycle genes have relatively long, complex promoters containing groups of multiple DNA sequence motifs, often of two, three, or more different kinds. Many of the genes, transcription factors, and regulatory mechanisms are conserved between S. pombe and S. cerevisiae. Finally, we found preliminary evidence for a nearly genome-wide oscillation in gene expression: 2,000 or more genes undergo slight oscillations in expression as a function of the cell cycle, although whether this is adaptive, or incidental to other events in the cell, such as chromatin condensation, we do not know. PMID:15966770

  11. The cell cycle-regulated genes of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Oliva

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Many genes are regulated as an innate part of the eukaryotic cell cycle, and a complex transcriptional network helps enable the cyclic behavior of dividing cells. This transcriptional network has been studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast and elsewhere. To provide more perspective on these regulatory mechanisms, we have used microarrays to measure gene expression through the cell cycle of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast. The 750 genes with the most significant oscillations were identified and analyzed. There were two broad waves of cell cycle transcription, one in early/mid G2 phase, and the other near the G2/M transition. The early/mid G2 wave included many genes involved in ribosome biogenesis, possibly explaining the cell cycle oscillation in protein synthesis in S. pombe. The G2/M wave included at least three distinctly regulated clusters of genes: one large cluster including mitosis, mitotic exit, and cell separation functions, one small cluster dedicated to DNA replication, and another small cluster dedicated to cytokinesis and division. S. pombe cell cycle genes have relatively long, complex promoters containing groups of multiple DNA sequence motifs, often of two, three, or more different kinds. Many of the genes, transcription factors, and regulatory mechanisms are conserved between S. pombe and S. cerevisiae. Finally, we found preliminary evidence for a nearly genome-wide oscillation in gene expression: 2,000 or more genes undergo slight oscillations in expression as a function of the cell cycle, although whether this is adaptive, or incidental to other events in the cell, such as chromatin condensation, we do not know.

  12. Rethinking cell-cycle-dependent gene expression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Stephen

    2017-11-01

    Three studies of gene expression during the division cycle of Schizosaccharomyces pombe led to the proposal that a large number of genes are expressed at particular times during the S. pombe cell cycle. Yet only a small fraction of genes proposed to be expressed in a cell-cycle-dependent manner are reproducible in all three published studies. In addition to reproducibility problems, questions about expression amplitudes, cell-cycle timing of expression, synchronization artifacts, and the problem with methods for synchronizing cells must be considered. These problems and complications prompt the idea that caution should be used before accepting the conclusion that there are a large number of genes expressed in a cell-cycle-dependent manner in S. pombe.

  13. Genome Binding and Gene Regulation by Stem Cell Transcription Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Brandsma (Johan)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractNearly all cells of an individual organism contain the same genome. However, each cell type transcribes a different set of genes due to the presence of different sets of cell type-specific transcription factors. Such transcription factors bind to regulatory regions such as promoters

  14. Bone marrow transplantations to study gene function in hematopoietic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winther, Menno P. J.; Heeringa, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Immune cells are derived from hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow. Experimental replacement of bone marrow offers the unique possibility to replace immune cells, to study gene function in mouse models of disease. Over the past decades, this technique has been used extensively to study, for

  15. Identification of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Engraftment Genes in Gene Therapy Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, John M; Trobridge, Grant D

    2013-09-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) therapy using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors is a promising approach to provide life-long correction for genetic defects. HSC gene therapy clinical studies have resulted in functional cures for several diseases, but in some studies clonal expansion or leukemia has occurred. This is due to the dyregulation of endogenous host gene expression from vector provirus insertional mutagenesis. Insertional mutagenesis screens using replicating retroviruses have been used extensively to identify genes that influence oncogenesis. However, retroviral mutagenesis screens can also be used to determine the role of genes in biological processes such as stem cell engraftment. The aim of this review is to describe the potential for vector insertion site data from gene therapy studies to provide novel insights into mechanisms of HSC engraftment. In HSC gene therapy studies dysregulation of host genes by replication-incompetent vector proviruses may lead to enrichment of repopulating clones with vector integrants near genes that influence engraftment. Thus, data from HSC gene therapy studies can be used to identify novel candidate engraftment genes. As HSC gene therapy use continues to expand, the vector insertion site data collected will be of great interest to help identify novel engraftment genes and may ultimately lead to new therapies to improve engraftment.

  16. Mast cells dysregulate apoptotic and cell cycle genes in mucosal squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Paul

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mucosal squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck is a disease of high mortality and morbidity. Interactions between the squamous cell carcinoma and the host's local immunity, and how the latter contributes to the biological behavior of the tumor are unclear. In vivo studies have demonstrated sequential mast cell infiltration and degranulation during squamous cell carcinogenesis. The degree of mast cell activation correlates closely with distinct phases of hyperkeratosis, dysplasia, carcinoma in-situ and invasive carcinoma. However, the role of mast cells in carcinogenesis is unclear. Aim This study explores the effects of mast cells on the proliferation and gene expression profile of mucosal squamous cell carcinoma using human mast cell line (HMC-1 and human glossal squamous cell carcinoma cell line (SCC25. Methods HMC-1 and SCC25 were co-cultured in a two-compartment chamber, separated by a polycarbonate membrane. HMC-1 was stimulated to degranulate with calcium ionophore A23187. The experiments were done in quadruplicate. Negative controls were established where SCC25 were cultured alone without HMC-1. At 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours, proliferation and viability of SCC25 were assessed with MTT colorimetric assay. cDNA microarray was employed to study differential gene expression between co-cultured and control SCC25. Results HMC-1/SCC25 co-culture resulted in suppression of growth rate for SCC-25 (34% compared with 110% for the control by 72 hours, p Conclusion We show that mast cells have a direct inhibitory effect on the proliferation of mucosal squamous cell carcinoma in vitro by dysregulating key genes in apoptosis and cell cycle control.

  17. CO2·- radical induced cleavage of disulfide bonds in proteins. A gamma-ray and pulse radiolysis mechanistic investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favaudon, V.; Tourbez, H.; Lhoste, J-M.; Houee-Levin, C.

    1990-01-01

    Disulfide bond reduction by the CO 2 ·- radical was investigated in aponeocarzinostatin, aporiboflavin-binding protein, and bovine immunoglobulin. Protein-bound cysteine free thiols were formed under γ-ray irradiation in the course of a pH-dependent and protein concentration dependent chain reaction. The chain efficiency increased upon acidification of the medium, with an apparent pK a around 5, and decreased abruptly below pH 3.6. It decreased also at neutral pH as cysteine accumulated. From pulse radiolysis analysis, CO 2 ·- proved able to induce rapid one-electron oxidation of thiols and of tyrosine phenolic groups in addition to one-electron donation to exposed disulfide bonds. The bulk rate constant of CO 2 ·- uptake by the native proteins was 5- to 10-fold faster at pH 3 than at pH 8, and the protonated form of the disulfide radical anion, appeared to be the major protein radical species formed under acidic conditions. Formation of the disulfide radical cation, phenoxyl radical Tyr-O · disproportionation, and phenoxyl radical induced oxidation of preformed thiol groups should also be taken into consideration to explain the fate of the oxygen-centered phenoxyl radical

  18. Characterization of transformation related genes in oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, D D; Park, N H; Denny, C T; Nelson, S F; Pe, M

    1998-04-16

    A cDNA representational difference analysis (cDNA-RDA) and an arrayed filter technique were used to characterize transformation-related genes in oral cancer. From an initial comparison of normal oral epithelial cells and a human papilloma virus (HPV)-immortalized oral epithelial cell line, we obtained 384 differentially expressed gene fragments and arrayed them on a filter. Two hundred and twelve redundant clones were identified by three rounds of back hybridization. Sequence analysis of the remaining clones revealed 99 unique clones corresponding to 69 genes. The expression of these transformation related gene fragments in three nontumorigenic HPV-immortalized oral epithelial cell lines and three oral cancer cell lines were simultaneously monitored using a cDNA array hybridization. Although there was a considerable cell line-to-cell line variability in the expression of these clones, a reliable prediction of their expression could be made from the cDNA array hybridization. Our study demonstrates the utility of combining cDNA-RDA and arrayed filters in high-throughput gene expression difference analysis. The differentially expressed genes identified in this study should be informative in studying oral epithelial cell carcinogenesis.

  19. Sex-Dependent Gene Expression in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ronen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Males and females have a variety of sexually dimorphic traits, most of which result from hormonal differences. However, differences between male and female embryos initiate very early in development, before hormonal influence begins, suggesting the presence of genetically driven sexual dimorphisms. By comparing the gene expression profiles of male and X-inactivated female human pluripotent stem cells, we detected Y-chromosome-driven effects. We discovered that the sex-determining gene SRY is expressed in human male pluripotent stem cells and is induced by reprogramming. In addition, we detected more than 200 differentially expressed autosomal genes in male and female embryonic stem cells. Some of these genes are involved in steroid metabolism pathways and lead to sex-dependent differentiation in response to the estrogen precursor estrone. Thus, we propose that the presence of the Y chromosome and specifically SRY may drive sex-specific differences in the growth and differentiation of pluripotent stem cells.

  20. Transcriptional changes of mitochondrial genes in irradiated cells ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to the increased oxidative stress in the mitochondria, DNA ... Keywords. mitochondrial gene expression; TK6 cells; radiation-induced effects. ..... This work was supported by an endowment fund, College of Nursing and Health Sciences,.

  1. The mechanism of gene targeting in human somatic cells.

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    Yinan Kan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene targeting in human somatic cells is of importance because it can be used to either delineate the loss-of-function phenotype of a gene or correct a mutated gene back to wild-type. Both of these outcomes require a form of DNA double-strand break (DSB repair known as homologous recombination (HR. The mechanism of HR leading to gene targeting, however, is not well understood in human cells. Here, we demonstrate that a two-end, ends-out HR intermediate is valid for human gene targeting. Furthermore, the resolution step of this intermediate occurs via the classic DSB repair model of HR while synthesis-dependent strand annealing and Holliday Junction dissolution are, at best, minor pathways. Moreover, and in contrast to other systems, the positions of Holliday Junction resolution are evenly distributed along the homology arms of the targeting vector. Most unexpectedly, we demonstrate that when a meganuclease is used to introduce a chromosomal DSB to augment gene targeting, the mechanism of gene targeting is inverted to an ends-in process. Finally, we demonstrate that the anti-recombination activity of mismatch repair is a significant impediment to gene targeting. These observations significantly advance our understanding of HR and gene targeting in human cells.

  2. Freedom of expression: cell-type-specific gene profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Leo; Cheetham, Seth W; Brand, Andrea H

    2014-01-01

    Cell fate and behavior are results of differential gene regulation, making techniques to profile gene expression in specific cell types highly desirable. Many methods now enable investigation at the DNA, RNA and protein level. This review introduces the most recent and popular techniques, and discusses key issues influencing the choice between these such as ease, cost and applicability of information gained. Interdisciplinary collaborations will no doubt contribute further advances, including not just in single cell type but single-cell expression profiling. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Advances of reporter gene monitoring stem cell therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xiang; Yin Hongyan; Zhang Yifan

    2010-01-01

    Stem cell therapy research has made great progress, demonstrating a broad application prospects. However, stem cell therapy as a new disease treatment, there are still many problems to be solved. Reporter gene imaging is a rapid development in recent years, a non-invasive, sensitive method of monitoring of stem cells, in particular radionuclide reporter gene imaging has high sensitivity and specificity of the advantages of strong and can carry out imaging of deep tissue and repeat imaging, is a tracer in vivo conditions, the most promising stem cell transplantation technique, showing good prospects for development. (authors)

  4. Cloned Hemoglobin Genes Enhance Growth Of Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, Chaitan; Bailey, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments show that portable deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences incorporated into host cells make them produce hemoglobins - oxygen-binding proteins essential to function of red blood cells. Method useful in several biotechnological applications. One, enhancement of growth of cells at higher densities. Another, production of hemoglobin to enhance supplies of oxygen in cells, for use in chemical reactions requiring oxygen, as additive to serum to increase transport of oxygen, and for binding and separating oxygen from mixtures of gases.

  5. T-cell activation and early gene response in dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally-Anne Mortlock

    Full Text Available T-cells play a crucial role in canine immunoregulation and defence against invading pathogens. Proliferation is fundamental to T-cell differentiation, homeostasis and immune response. Initiation of proliferation following receptor mediated stimuli requires a temporally programmed gene response that can be identified as immediate-early, mid- and late phases. The immediate-early response genes in T-cell activation engage the cell cycle machinery and promote subsequent gene activation events. Genes involved in this immediate-early response in dogs are yet to be identified. The present study was undertaken to characterise the early T-cell gene response in dogs to improve understanding of the genetic mechanisms regulating immune function. Gene expression profiles were characterised using canine gene expression microarrays and quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR, and paired samples from eleven dogs. Significant functional annotation clusters were identified following stimulation with phytohemagluttinin (PHA (5μg/ml, including the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway and phosphorylation pathways. Using strict statistical criteria, 13 individual genes were found to be differentially expressed, nine of which have ontologies that relate to proliferation and cell cycle control. These included, prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2/COX2, early growth response 1 (EGR1, growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene (GADD45B, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein 1 (PMAIP1, V-FOS FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS, early growth response 2 (EGR2, hemogen (HEMGN, polo-like kinase 2 (PLK2 and polo-like kinase 3 (PLK3. Differential gene expression was re-examined using qRT-PCR, which confirmed that EGR1, EGR2, PMAIP1, PTGS2, FOS and GADD45B were significantly upregulated in stimulated cells and ALAS2 downregulated. PTGS2 and EGR1 showed the highest levels of response in these dogs. Both of these genes are involved in

  6. Regulation of Cell and Gene Therapy Medicinal Products in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Chu; Wang, Po-Yu; Tsai, Shih-Chih; Lin, Chien-Liang; Tai, Hsuen-Yung; Lo, Chi-Fang; Wu, Shiow-Ing; Chiang, Yu-Mei; Liu, Li-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the rapid and mature development of emerging biotechnology in the fields of cell culture, cell preservation, and recombinant DNA technology, more and more cell or gene medicinal therapy products have been approved for marketing, to treat serious diseases which have been challenging to treat with current medical practice or medicine. This chapter will briefly introduce the Taiwan Food and Drug Administration (TFDA) and elaborate regulation of cell and gene therapy medicinal products in Taiwan, including regulatory history evolution, current regulatory framework, application and review procedures, and relevant jurisdictional issues. Under the promise of quality, safety, and efficacy of medicinal products, it is expected the regulation and environment will be more flexible, streamlining the process of the marketing approval of new emerging cell or gene therapy medicinal products and providing diverse treatment options for physicians and patients.

  7. Gene expression of manganese superoxide dismutase in human glioma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novi S. Hardiany

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim This study analyze the MnSOD gene expression as endogenous antioxidant in human glioma cells compared with leucocyte cells as control.Methods MnSOD gene expression of 20 glioma patients was analyzed by measuring the relative expression of mRNA and enzyme activity of MnSOD in brain and leucocyte cells. The relative expression of mRNA MnSOD was determined by using quantitative Real Time RT-PCR and the enzyme activity of MnSOD using biochemical kit assay (xantine oxidase inhibition. Statistic analysis for mRNA and enzyme activity of MnSOD was performed using Kruskal Wallis test.Results mRNA of MnSOD in glioma cells of 70% sample was 0.015–0.627 lower, 10% was 1.002-1.059 and 20% was 1.409-6.915 higher than in leucocyte cells. Also the specific activity of MnSOD enzyme in glioma cells of 80% sample showed 0,064-0,506 lower and 20% sample was 1.249-2.718 higher than in leucocyte cells.Conclusion MnSOD gene expression in human glioma cells are significantly lower than its expression in leucocytes cells. (Med J Indones 2010; 19:21-5Keywords : MnSOD, glioma, gene expression

  8. Impact of methoxyacetic acid on mouse Leydig cell gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waxman David J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methoxyacetic acid (MAA is the active metabolite of the widely used industrial chemical ethylene glycol monomethyl ether, which is associated with various developmental and reproductive toxicities, including neural toxicity, blood and immune disorders, limb degeneration and testicular toxicity. Testicular toxicity is caused by degeneration of germ cells in association with changes in gene expression in both germ cells and Sertoli cells of the testis. This study investigates the impact of MAA on gene expression in testicular Leydig cells, which play a critical role in germ cell survival and male reproductive function. Methods Cultured mouse TM3 Leydig cells were treated with MAA for 3, 8, and 24 h and changes in gene expression were monitored by genome-wide transcriptional profiling. Results A total of 3,912 MAA-responsive genes were identified. Ingenuity Pathway analysis identified reproductive system disease, inflammatory disease and connective tissue disorder as the top biological functions affected by MAA. The MAA-responsive genes were classified into 1,366 early responders, 1,387 mid-responders, and 1,138 late responders, based on the time required for MAA to elicit a response. Analysis of enriched functional clusters for each subgroup identified 106 MAA early response genes involved in transcription regulation, including 32 genes associated with developmental processes. 60 DNA-binding proteins responded to MAA rapidly but transiently, and may contribute to the downstream effects of MAA seen for many mid and late response genes. Genes within the phosphatidylinositol/phospholipase C/calcium signaling pathway, whose activity is required for potentiation of nuclear receptor signaling by MAA, were also enriched in the set of early MAA response genes. In contrast, many of the genes responding to MAA at later time points encode membrane proteins that contribute to cell adhesion and membrane signaling. Conclusions These findings

  9. Screening for the Most Suitable Reference Genes for Gene Expression Studies in Equine Milk Somatic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Cieslak

    Full Text Available Apart from the well-known role of somatic cell count as a parameter reflecting the inflammatory status of the mammary gland, the composition of cells isolated from milk is considered as a valuable material for gene expression studies in mammals. Due to its unique composition, in recent years an increasing interest in mare's milk consumption has been observed. Thus, investigating the genetic background of horse's milk variability presents and interesting study model. Relying on 39 milk samples collected from mares representing three breeds (Polish Primitive Horse, Polish Cold-blooded Horse, Polish Warmblood Horse we aimed to investigate the utility of equine milk somatic cells as a source of mRNA and to screen the best reference genes for RT-qPCR using geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The results showed that despite relatively low somatic cell counts in mare's milk, the amount and the quality of the extracted RNA are sufficient for gene expression studies. The analysis of the utility of 7 potential reference genes for RT-qPCR experiments for the normalization of equine milk somatic cells revealed some differences between the outcomes of the applied algorithms, although in both cases the KRT8 and TOP2B genes were pointed as the most stable. Analysis by geNorm showed that the combination of 4 reference genes (ACTB, GAPDH, TOP2B and KRT8 is required for apropriate RT-qPCR experiments normalization, whereas NormFinder algorithm pointed the combination of KRT8 and RPS9 genes as the most suitable. The trial study of the relative transcript abundance of the beta-casein gene with the use of various types and numbers of internal control genes confirmed once again that the selection of proper reference gene combinations is crucial for the final results of each real-time PCR experiment.

  10. Nuclear orphan receptor TLX affects gene expression, proliferation and cell apoptosis in beta cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Xiaoli; Xiong, Xiaokan; Dai, Zhe; Deng, Haohua; Sun, Li; Hu, Xuemei; Zhou, Feng; Xu, Yancheng, E-mail: oxyccc@163.com

    2015-12-04

    Nuclear orphan receptor TLX is an essential regulator of the growth of neural stem cells. However, its exact function in pancreatic islet cells is still unknown. In the present study, gene expression profiling analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in beta cell line MIN6 causes suppression of 176 genes and upregulation of 49 genes, including a cadre of cell cycle, cell proliferation and cell death control genes, such as Btg2, Ddit3 and Gadd45a. We next examined the effects of TLX overexpression on proliferation, apoptosis and insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. Proliferation analysis using EdU assay showed that overexpression of TLX increased percentage of EdU-positive cells. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in MIN6 cells resulted in higher percentage of cells exiting G1 into S-phase, and a 58.8% decrease of cell apoptosis induced by 0.5 mM palmitate. Moreover, TLX overexpression did not cause impairment of insulin secretion. Together, we conclude that TLX is among factors capable of controlling beta cell proliferation and survival, which may serve as a target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes. - Highlights: • TLX overexpression in MIN6 cell causes significant expression changes of 225 genes. • TLX overexpression promotes MIN6 cell proliferation and decreases cell apoptosis. • TLX overexpression does not cause impairment of insulin secretion.

  11. Nuclear orphan receptor TLX affects gene expression, proliferation and cell apoptosis in beta cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Xiaoli; Xiong, Xiaokan; Dai, Zhe; Deng, Haohua; Sun, Li; Hu, Xuemei; Zhou, Feng; Xu, Yancheng

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear orphan receptor TLX is an essential regulator of the growth of neural stem cells. However, its exact function in pancreatic islet cells is still unknown. In the present study, gene expression profiling analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in beta cell line MIN6 causes suppression of 176 genes and upregulation of 49 genes, including a cadre of cell cycle, cell proliferation and cell death control genes, such as Btg2, Ddit3 and Gadd45a. We next examined the effects of TLX overexpression on proliferation, apoptosis and insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. Proliferation analysis using EdU assay showed that overexpression of TLX increased percentage of EdU-positive cells. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in MIN6 cells resulted in higher percentage of cells exiting G1 into S-phase, and a 58.8% decrease of cell apoptosis induced by 0.5 mM palmitate. Moreover, TLX overexpression did not cause impairment of insulin secretion. Together, we conclude that TLX is among factors capable of controlling beta cell proliferation and survival, which may serve as a target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes. - Highlights: • TLX overexpression in MIN6 cell causes significant expression changes of 225 genes. • TLX overexpression promotes MIN6 cell proliferation and decreases cell apoptosis. • TLX overexpression does not cause impairment of insulin secretion.

  12. Blood cell gene expression profiling in rheumatoid arthritis. Discriminative genes and effect of rheumatoid factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Rieneck, Klaus; Workman, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    To study the pathogenic importance of the rheumatoid factor (RF) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to identify genes differentially expressed in patients and healthy individuals, total RNA was isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from eight RF-positive and six RF-negative RA...... patients, and seven healthy controls. Gene expression of about 10,000 genes were examined using oligonucleotide-based DNA chip microarrays. The analyses showed no significant differences in PBMC expression patterns from RF-positive and RF-negative patients. However, comparisons of gene expression patterns...

  13. Key factors which concur to the correct therapeutic evaluation of herbal products in free radical-induced diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare eMancuso

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available For many years now the world's scientific literature has been perfused with articles on the therapeutic potential of natural products, the vast majority of which have herbal origins, as in the case of free radical-induced diseases. What is often overlooked is the effort of researchers who take into consideration the preclinical and clinical evaluation of these herbal products, in order to demonstrate the therapeutic efficacy and safety. The first critical issue to be addressed in the early stages of the preclinical studies is related to pharmacokinetics, which is sometimes not very favorable, of some of these products, which limits the bioavailability after oral intake. In this regard, it is worthy underlining how it is often unethical to propose the therapeutic efficacy of a compound on the basis of preclinical results obtained with far higher concentrations to those which, hopefully, could be achieved in organs and tissues of subjects taking these products by mouth. The most widely used approach to overcome the problem related to the low bioavailability involves the complexation of the active ingredients of herbal products with non-toxic carriers that facilitate the absorption and distribution. Even the induction or inhibition of drug metabolizing enzymes by herbal products, and the consequent variations of plasma concentrations of co-administered drugs, are phenomena to be carefully evaluated as they can give rise to side-effects. This risk is even greater when considering that people lack the perception of the risk arising from an over use of herbal products that, by their very nature, are considered risk-free.

  14. Isolating human DNA repair genes using rodent-cell mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Brookman, K.W.; Salazar, E.P.; Stewart, S.A.; Mitchell, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    The DNA repair systems of rodent and human cells appear to be at least as complex genetically as those in lower eukaryotes and bacteria. The use of mutant lines of rodent cells as a means of identifying human repair genes by functional complementation offers a new approach toward studying the role of repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In each of six cases examined using hybrid cells, specific human chromosomes have been identified that correct CHO cell mutations affecting repair of damage from uv or ionizing radiations. This finding suggests that both the repair genes and proteins may be virtually interchangeable between rodent and human cells. Using cosmid vectors, human repair genes that map to chromosome 19 have cloned as functional sequences: ERCC2 and XRCC1. ERCC1 was found to have homology with the yeast excision repair gene RAD10. Transformants of repair-deficient cell lines carrying the corresponding human gene show efficient correction of repair capacity by all criteria examined. 39 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  15. Interdependence of cell growth and gene expression: origins and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Matthew; Gunderson, Carl W; Mateescu, Eduard M; Zhang, Zhongge; Hwa, Terence

    2010-11-19

    In bacteria, the rate of cell proliferation and the level of gene expression are intimately intertwined. Elucidating these relations is important both for understanding the physiological functions of endogenous genetic circuits and for designing robust synthetic systems. We describe a phenomenological study that reveals intrinsic constraints governing the allocation of resources toward protein synthesis and other aspects of cell growth. A theory incorporating these constraints can accurately predict how cell proliferation and gene expression affect one another, quantitatively accounting for the effect of translation-inhibiting antibiotics on gene expression and the effect of gratuitous protein expression on cell growth. The use of such empirical relations, analogous to phenomenological laws, may facilitate our understanding and manipulation of complex biological systems before underlying regulatory circuits are elucidated.

  16. Targeted delivery of genes to endothelial cells and cell- and gene-based therapy in pulmonary vascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen, Colin M; Mei, Shirley H J; Kugathasan, Lakshmi; Stewart, Duncan J

    2013-10-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease that, despite significant advances in medical therapies over the last several decades, continues to have an extremely poor prognosis. Gene therapy is a method to deliver therapeutic genes to replace defective or mutant genes or supplement existing cellular processes to modify disease. Over the last few decades, several viral and nonviral methods of gene therapy have been developed for preclinical PAH studies with varying degrees of efficacy. However, these gene delivery methods face challenges of immunogenicity, low transduction rates, and nonspecific targeting which have limited their translation to clinical studies. More recently, the emergence of regenerative approaches using stem and progenitor cells such as endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have offered a new approach to gene therapy. Cell-based gene therapy is an approach that augments the therapeutic potential of EPCs and MSCs and may deliver on the promise of reversal of established PAH. These new regenerative approaches have shown tremendous potential in preclinical studies; however, large, rigorously designed clinical studies will be necessary to evaluate clinical efficacy and safety. © 2013 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 3:1749-1779, 2013.

  17. Gene function in early mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Pearl A

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the genes that drive embryonic stem cell differentiation. However, such knowledge is necessary if we are to exploit the therapeutic potential of stem cells. To uncover the genetic determinants of mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC differentiation, we have generated and analyzed 11-point time-series of DNA microarray data for three biologically equivalent but genetically distinct mESC lines (R1, J1, and V6.5 undergoing undirected differentiation into embryoid bodies (EBs over a period of two weeks. Results We identified the initial 12 hour period as reflecting the early stages of mESC differentiation and studied probe sets showing consistent changes of gene expression in that period. Gene function analysis indicated significant up-regulation of genes related to regulation of transcription and mRNA splicing, and down-regulation of genes related to intracellular signaling. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the genes showing the largest expression changes were more likely to have originated in metazoans. The probe sets with the most consistent gene changes in the three cell lines represented 24 down-regulated and 12 up-regulated genes, all with closely related human homologues. Whereas some of these genes are known to be involved in embryonic developmental processes (e.g. Klf4, Otx2, Smn1, Socs3, Tagln, Tdgf1, our analysis points to others (such as transcription factor Phf21a, extracellular matrix related Lama1 and Cyr61, or endoplasmic reticulum related Sc4mol and Scd2 that have not been previously related to mESC function. The majority of identified functions were related to transcriptional regulation, intracellular signaling, and cytoskeleton. Genes involved in other cellular functions important in ESC differentiation such as chromatin remodeling and transmembrane receptors were not observed in this set. Conclusion Our analysis profiles for the first time gene expression at a very early stage of m

  18. Distinctive transforming genes in x-ray-transformed mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borek, C.; Ong, A.; Mason, H.

    1987-01-01

    DNAs from hamster embryo cells and mouse C3H/10T1/2 cells transformed in vitro by x-irradiation into malignant cells transmit the radiation transformation phenotype by producing transformed colonies (transfectants) in two mouse recipient lines, the NIH 3T3 and C3H/101/2 cells, and in a rat cell line, the Rat-2 cells. DNAs from unirradiated cells or irradiated and visibly untransformed cells do not produce transformed colonies. The transfectant grow in agar and form tumors in nude mice. Treatment of the DNAs with restriction endonucleases prior to transfection indicates that the same transforming gene (oncogene) is present in each of the transformed mouse cells and is the same in each of the transformed hamster cells. Southern blot analysis of 3T3 or Rat-2 transfectants carrying oncogenes from radiation-transformed C3H/10T1/2 or hamster cells indicates that the oncogenes responsible for the transformation of 3T3 cells are not the Ki-ras, Ha-ras, N-ras genes, nor are they neu, trk, raf, abl, or fms. The work demonstrates that DNAs from mammalian cells transformed into malignancy by direct exposure in vitro to radiation contain genetic sequences with detectable transforming activity in three recipient cell lines. The results provide evidence that DNA is the target of radiation carcinogenesis induced at a cellular level in vitro. The experiments indicate that malignant radiogenic transformation in vitro of hamster embryo and mouse C3H/10T1/2 cells involves the activation of unique non-ras transforming genes, which heretofore have not been described

  19. Ebola virus infection induces irregular dendritic cell gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Vanessa R; Kalina, Warren V; Williams, Priscilla

    2015-02-01

    Filoviruses subvert the human immune system in part by infecting and replicating in dendritic cells (DCs). Using gene arrays, a phenotypic profile of filovirus infection in human monocyte-derived DCs was assessed. Monocytes from human donors were cultured in GM-CSF and IL-4 and were infected with Ebola virus Kikwit variant for up to 48 h. Extracted DC RNA was analyzed on SuperArray's Dendritic and Antigen Presenting Cell Oligo GEArray and compared to uninfected controls. Infected DCs exhibited increased expression of cytokine, chemokine, antiviral, and anti-apoptotic genes not seen in uninfected controls. Significant increases of intracellular antiviral and MHC I and II genes were also noted in EBOV-infected DCs. However, infected DCs failed to show any significant difference in co-stimulatory T-cell gene expression from uninfected DCs. Moreover, several chemokine genes were activated, but there was sparse expression of chemokine receptors that enabled activated DCs to home to lymph nodes. Overall, statistically significant expression of several intracellular antiviral genes was noted, which may limit viral load but fails to stop replication. EBOV gene expression profiling is of vital importance in understanding pathogenesis and devising novel therapeutic treatments such as small-molecule inhibitors.

  20. Radiation Gene-expression Signatures in Primary Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minafra, Luigi; Bravatà, Valentina; Cammarata, Francesco P; Russo, Giorgio; Gilardi, Maria C; Forte, Giusi I

    2018-05-01

    In breast cancer (BC) care, radiation therapy (RT) is an efficient treatment to control localized tumor. Radiobiological research is needed to understand molecular differences that affect radiosensitivity of different tumor subtypes and the response variability. The aim of this study was to analyze gene expression profiling (GEP) in primary BC cells following irradiation with doses of 9 Gy and 23 Gy delivered by intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) in order to define gene signatures of response to high doses of ionizing radiation. We performed GEP by cDNA microarrays and evaluated cell survival after IOERT treatment in primary BC cell cultures. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was performed to validate candidate genes. We showed, for the first time, a 4-gene and a 6-gene signature, as new molecular biomarkers, in two primary BC cell cultures after exposure at 9 Gy and 23 Gy respectively, for which we observed a significantly high survival rate. Gene signatures activated by different doses of ionizing radiation may predict response to RT and contribute to defining a personalized biological-driven treatment plan. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  1. HIV Cell-to-Cell Spread Results in Earlier Onset of Viral Gene Expression by Multiple Infections per Cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikaël Boullé

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell-to-cell spread of HIV, a directed mode of viral transmission, has been observed to be more rapid than cell-free infection. However, a mechanism for earlier onset of viral gene expression in cell-to-cell spread was previously uncharacterized. Here we used time-lapse microscopy combined with automated image analysis to quantify the timing of the onset of HIV gene expression in a fluorescent reporter cell line, as well as single cell staining for infection over time in primary cells. We compared cell-to-cell spread of HIV to cell-free infection, and limited both types of transmission to a two-hour window to minimize differences due to virus transit time to the cell. The mean time to detectable onset of viral gene expression in cell-to-cell spread was accelerated by 19% in the reporter cell line and by 35% in peripheral blood mononuclear cells relative to cell-free HIV infection. Neither factors secreted by infected cells, nor contact with infected cells in the absence of transmission, detectably changed onset. We recapitulated the earlier onset by infecting with multiple cell-free viruses per cell. Surprisingly, the acceleration in onset of viral gene expression was not explained by cooperativity between infecting virions. Instead, more rapid onset was consistent with a model where the fastest expressing virus out of the infecting virus pool sets the time for infection independently of the other co-infecting viruses.

  2. Identification of astrocytoma associated genes including cell surface markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boon, Kathy; Edwards, Jennifer B; Eberhart, Charles G; Riggins, Gregory J

    2004-01-01

    Despite intense effort the treatment options for the invasive astrocytic tumors are still limited to surgery and radiation therapy, with chemotherapy showing little or no increase in survival. The generation of Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE) profiles is expected to aid in the identification of astrocytoma-associated genes and highly expressed cell surface genes as molecular therapeutic targets. SAGE tag counts can be easily added to public expression databases and quickly disseminated to research efforts worldwide. We generated and analyzed the SAGE transcription profiles of 25 primary grade II, III and IV astrocytomas [1]. These profiles were produced as part of the Cancer Genome Anatomy Project's SAGE Genie [2], and were used in an in silico search for candidate therapeutic targets by comparing astrocytoma to normal brain transcription. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry were used for the validation of selected candidate target genes in 2 independent sets of primary tumors. A restricted set of tumor-associated genes was identified for each grade that included genes not previously associated with astrocytomas (e.g. VCAM1, SMOC1, and thymidylate synthetase), with a high percentage of cell surface genes. Two genes with available antibodies, Aquaporin 1 and Topoisomerase 2A, showed protein expression consistent with transcript level predictions. This survey of transcription in malignant and normal brain tissues reveals a small subset of human genes that are activated in malignant astrocytomas. In addition to providing insights into pathway biology, we have revealed and quantified expression for a significant portion of cell surface and extra-cellular astrocytoma genes

  3. In search of suitable reference genes for gene expression studies of human renal cell carcinoma by real-time PCR

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    Kristiansen Glen

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Housekeeping genes are commonly used as endogenous reference genes for the relative quantification of target genes in gene expression studies. No conclusive systematic study comparing the suitability of different candidate reference genes in clear cell renal cell carcinoma has been published to date. To remedy this situation, 10 housekeeping genes for normalizing purposes of RT-PCR measurements already recommended in various studies were examined with regard to their usefulness as reference genes. Results The expression of the potential reference genes was examined in matched malignant and non-malignant tissue specimens from 25 patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Quality assessment of isolated RNA performed with a 2100 Agilent Bioanalyzer showed a mean RNA integrity number of 8.7 for all samples. The between-run variations related to the crossing points of PCR reactions of a control material ranged from 0.17% to 0.38%. The expression of all genes did not depend on age, sex, and tumour stage. Except the genes TATA box binding protein (TBP and peptidylprolyl isomerase A (PPIA, all genes showed significant differences in expression between malignant and non-malignant pairs. The expression stability of the candidate reference genes was additionally controlled using the software programs geNorm and NormFinder. TBP and PPIA were validated as suitable reference genes by normalizing the target gene ADAM9 using these two most stably expressed genes in comparison with up- and down-regulated housekeeping genes of the panel. Conclusion Our study demonstrated the suitability of the two housekeeping genes PPIA and TBP as endogenous reference genes when comparing malignant tissue samples with adjacent normal tissue samples from clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Both genes are recommended as reference genes for relative gene quantification in gene profiling studies either as single gene or preferably in combination.

  4. UV-induced changes in cell cycle and gene expression within rabbit lens epithelial cells

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    Sidjanin, D. [Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Grdina, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Woloschak, G.E. [Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1994-11-01

    Damage to lens epithelial cells is a probable initiation process in cataract formation induced by ultraviolet radiation. These experiments investigated the ability of 254 nm radiation on cell cycle progression and gene expression in rabbit lens epithelial cell line N/N1003A. No changes in expression of c-fos, c-jun, alpha- tubulin, or vimentin was observed following UV exposure. Using flow cytometry, an accumulation of cells in G1/S phase of the cell cycle 1 hr following exposure. The observed changes in gene expression, especially the decreased histone transcripts reported here may play a role in UV induced inhibition of cell cycle progression.

  5. EXSPRESSION OF MDR-GENES AND MONORESISTANCE GENES IN NON-SMALL-CELL LUNG CANCER

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    E. L. Yumov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the expression of multidrug resistance genes (MDR and monoresistance genes in normal bronchial tissue and tumor tissue of the non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT (vinorelbine-carboplatine. The study included 30 patients with NSCLC (Т2–4N0–3M0. Normal bronchial tissue, normal lung tissue and tumor tissue collected during surgery following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT served as a material of the study. The expression levels of MDR genes (ABCB1, ABCB2, ABCC1, ABCC2, ABCС5, ABCG1, ABCG2, GSTP and MVP, and monoresistance genes (BRCA1, ERCC1, RRM1, TOP1, TOP2A, TUBB3 and TYMS were estimated by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-qPCR. The expression levels of some MDR genes and monoresistance genes (АВСВ1, АВСВ2, ABCG1, ERCC1, GSTP1 and MVP were significantly higher in the bronchi than in tumor tissue. The expression of ABCG1, ABCG2 and ERCC1 genes was higher in patients with T1-2 cancer than in patients with T3-4 cancer. Patients with adenocarcinoma had higher expression of BRCA1, MVP and ABCB1 genes than patients with squamous cell lung cancer. A tendency towards reduction in the expression level of MDR-genes and monoresistance genes was observed in patients with partial tumor regression compared to that observed in patients with stable disease. These findings were consistent with the previous data on reduction in the MDR-gene expression after chemotherapy with a good response in breast cancer patients.

  6. The effect of the colostral cells on gene expression of cytokines in cord blood cells.

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    Hrdý, Jiří; Novotná, Olga; Kocourková, Ingrid; Prokešová, Ludmila

    2017-11-01

    Beneficial effect of maternal milk is acknowledged, but there is still question whether maternal milk from allergic mother is as good as from healthy one. In our study, we have assayed the effect of cells from colostrum of healthy and allergic mothers on gene expression of cytokines in cord blood cells of newborns of healthy and allergic mothers. Cytokines typical for Th1 (IL-2, IFN-gamma), Th2 (IL-4, IL-13), Tregs (IL-10, TGF-beta), and IL-8 were followed. We were not able to detect significant influence of colostral cells on gene expression of cytokines in cord blood after 2-day coculture using Transwell system. There was no difference in gene expression of cytokines in nonstimulated cord blood cells of newborns of healthy and allergic mothers, but generally increased gene expression of cytokines except IL-10 and TGF-beta after polyclonal stimulation was detected in cord blood cells of children of allergic mothers. There was no difference in IL-10 expression in stimulated cord blood cells of children of healthy and allergic mothers. Gene expression of TGF-beta was even decreased in stimulated cord blood cells of children of allergic mothers in comparison to healthy ones. We have not observed difference in the capacity of colostral cells of healthy and allergic mothers to influence gene expression of cytokines in cord blood cells, but we have described difference in the reactivity of cord blood cells between children of allergic and healthy mothers.

  7. Mural granulosa cell gene expression associated with oocyte developmental competence

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    Jiang Jin-Yi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ovarian follicle development is a complex process. Paracrine interactions between somatic and germ cells are critical for normal follicular development and oocyte maturation. Studies have suggested that the health and function of the granulosa and cumulus cells may be reflective of the health status of the enclosed oocyte. The objective of the present study is to assess, using an in vivo immature rat model, gene expression profile in granulosa cells, which may be linked to the developmental competence of the oocyte. We hypothesized that expression of specific genes in granulosa cells may be correlated with the developmental competence of the oocyte. Methods Immature rats were injected with eCG and 24 h thereafter with anti-eCG antibody to induce follicular atresia or with pre-immune serum to stimulate follicle development. A high percentage (30-50%, normal developmental competence, NDC of oocytes from eCG/pre-immune serum group developed to term after embryo transfer compared to those from eCG/anti-eCG (0%, poor developmental competence, PDC. Gene expression profiles of mural granulosa cells from the above oocyte-collected follicles were assessed by Affymetrix rat whole genome array. Results The result showed that twelve genes were up-regulated, while one gene was down-regulated more than 1.5 folds in the NDC group compared with those in the PDC group. Gene ontology classification showed that the up-regulated genes included lysyl oxidase (Lox and nerve growth factor receptor associated protein 1 (Ngfrap1, which are important in the regulation of protein-lysine 6-oxidase activity, and in apoptosis induction, respectively. The down-regulated genes included glycoprotein-4-beta galactosyltransferase 2 (Ggbt2, which is involved in the regulation of extracellular matrix organization and biogenesis. Conclusions The data in the present study demonstrate a close association between specific gene expression in mural granulosa cells and

  8. Gene expression patterns in pancreatic tumors, cells and tissues.

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    Anson W Lowe

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancers of the pancreas originate from both the endocrine and exocrine elements of the organ, and represent a major cause of cancer-related death. This study provides a comprehensive assessment of gene expression for pancreatic tumors, the normal pancreas, and nonneoplastic pancreatic disease.DNA microarrays were used to assess the gene expression for surgically derived pancreatic adenocarcinomas, islet cell tumors, and mesenchymal tumors. The addition of normal pancreata, isolated islets, isolated pancreatic ducts, and pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines enhanced subsequent analysis by increasing the diversity in gene expression profiles obtained. Exocrine, endocrine, and mesenchymal tumors displayed unique gene expression profiles. Similarities in gene expression support the pancreatic duct as the origin of adenocarcinomas. In addition, genes highly expressed in other cancers and associated with specific signal transduction pathways were also found in pancreatic tumors.The scope of the present work was enhanced by the inclusion of publicly available datasets that encompass a wide spectrum of human tissues and enabled the identification of candidate genes that may serve diagnostic and therapeutic goals.

  9. Identification and Characterization of Renal Cell Carcinoma Gene Markers

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    Louis S. Liou

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Microarray gene expression profiling has been used to distinguish histological subtypes of renal cell carcinoma (RCC, and consequently to identify specific tumor markers. The analytical procedures currently in use find sets of genes whose average differential expression across the two categories differ significantly. In general each of the markers thus identifi ed does not distinguish tumor from normal with 100% accuracy, although the group as a whole might be able to do so. For the purpose of developing a widely used economically viable diagnostic signature, however, large groups of genes are not likely to be useful. Here we use two different methods, one a support vector machine variant, and the other an exhaustive search, to reanalyze data previously generated in our Lab (Lenburg et al. 2003. We identify 158 genes, each having an expression level that is higher (lower in every tumor sample than in any normal sample, and each having a minimum differential expression across the two categorie at a signifi cance of 0.01. The set is highly enriched in cancer related genes (p = 1.6 × 10 – 12, containing 43 genes previously associated with either RCC or other types of cancer. Many of the biomarkers appear to be associated with the central alterations known to be required for cancer transformation. These include the oncogenes JAZF1, AXL, ABL2; tumor suppressors RASD1, PTPRO, TFAP2A, CDKN1C; and genes involved in proteolysis or cell-adhesion such as WASF2, and PAPPA.

  10. Epithelial Cell Gene Expression Induced by Intracellular Staphylococcus aureus

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    Xianglu Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available HEp-2 cell monolayers were cocultured with intracellular Staphylococcus aureus, and changes in gene expression were profiled using DNA microarrays. Intracellular S. aureus affected genes involved in cellular stress responses, signal transduction, inflammation, apoptosis, fibrosis, and cholesterol biosynthesis. Transcription of stress response and signal transduction-related genes including atf3, sgk, map2k1, map2k3, arhb, and arhe was increased. In addition, elevated transcription of proinflammatory genes was observed for tnfa, il1b, il6, il8, cxcl1, ccl20, cox2, and pai1. Genes involved in proapoptosis and fibrosis were also affected at transcriptional level by intracellular S. aureus. Notably, intracellular S. aureus induced strong transcriptional down-regulation of several cholesterol biosynthesis genes. These results suggest that epithelial cells respond to intracellular S. aureus by inducing genes affecting immunity and in repairing damage caused by the organism, and are consistent with the possibility that the organism exploits an intracellular environment to subvert host immunity and promote colonization.

  11. Estrogen-Responsive Genes Overlap with Triiodothyronine-Responsive Genes in a Breast Carcinoma Cell Line

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    Nancy Bueno Figueiredo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been well established that estrogen plays an important role in the progression and treatment of breast cancer. However, the role of triiodothyronine (T3 remains controversial. We have previously shown its capacity to stimulate the development of positive estrogen receptor breast carcinoma, induce the expression of genes (PR, TGF-alpha normally stimulated by estradiol (E2, and suppress genes (TGF-beta normally inhibited by E2. Since T3 regulates growth hormones, metabolism, and differentiation, it is important to verify its action on other genes normally induced by E2. Therefore, we used DNA microarrays to compare gene expression patterns in MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells treated with E2 and T3. Several genes were modulated by both E2 and T3 in MCF-7 cells (Student’s t-test, P 2.0, pFDR < 0.05. We confirmed our microarray results by real-time PCR. Our findings reveal that certain genes in MCF-7 cells can be regulated by both E2 and T3.

  12. Au nanoinjectors for electrotriggered gene delivery into the cell nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mijeong; Kim, Bongsoo

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular delivery of exogenous materials is an essential technique required for many fundamental biological researches and medical treatments. As our understanding of cell structure and function has been improved and diverse therapeutic agents with a subcellular site of action have been continuously developed, there is a demand to enhance the performance of delivering devices. Ideal intracellular delivery devices should convey various kinds of exogenous materials without deteriorating cell viability regardless of cell type and, furthermore, precisely control the location and the timing of delivery as well as the amount of delivered materials for advanced researches.In this chapter the development of a new intracellular delivery device, a nanoinjector made of a Au (gold) nanowire (a Au nanoinjector) is described in which delivery is triggered by external application of an electric pulse. As a model study, a gene was delivered directly into the nucleus of a neuroblastoma cell, and successful delivery without cell damage was confirmed by the expression of the delivered gene. The insertion of a Au nanoinjector directly into a cell can be generally applied to any kind of cell, and a high degree of surface modification of Au allows attachment of diverse materials such as proteins, small molecules, or nanoparticles as well as genes on Au nanoinjectors. This expands their applicability, and it is expected that they will provide important information on the effects of delivered exogenous materials and consequently contribute to the development of related therapeutic or clinical technologies.

  13. Gene Transfer in Eukaryotic Cells Using Activated Dendrimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennig, Jörg

    Gene transfer into eukaryotic cells plays an important role in cell biology. Over the last 30 years a number of transfection methods have been developed to mediate gene transfer into eukaryotic cells. Classical methods include co-precipitation of DNA with calcium phosphate, charge-dependent precipitation of DNA with DEAE-dextran, electroporation of nucleic acids, and formation of transfection complexes between DNA and cationic liposomes. Gene transfer technologies based on activated PAMAM-dendrimers provide another class of transfection reagents. PAMAM-dendrimers are highly branched, spherical molecules. Activation of newly synthesized dendrimers involves hydrolytic removal of some of the branches, and results in a molecule with a higher degree of flexibility. Activated dendrimers assemble DNA into compact structures via charge interactions. Activated dendrimer - DNA complexes bind to the cell membrane of eukaryotic cells, and are transported into the cell by non-specific endocytosis. A structural model of the activated dendrimer - DNA complex and a potential mechanism for its uptake into cells will be discussed.

  14. Adenovirus gene transfer to amelogenesis imperfecta ameloblast-like cells.

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    Anton V Borovjagin

    Full Text Available To explore gene therapy strategies for amelogenesis imperfecta (AI, a human ameloblast-like cell population was established from third molars of an AI-affected patient. These cells were characterized by expression of cytokeratin 14, major enamel proteins and alkaline phosphatase staining. Suboptimal transduction of the ameloblast-like cells by an adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 vector was consistent with lower levels of the coxsackie-and-adenovirus receptor (CAR on those cells relative to CAR-positive A549 cells. To overcome CAR -deficiency, we evaluated capsid-modified Ad5 vectors with various genetic capsid modifications including "pK7" and/or "RGD" motif-containing short peptides incorporated in the capsid protein fiber as well as fiber chimera with the Ad serotype 3 (Ad3 fiber "knob" domain. All fiber modifications provided an augmented transduction of AI-ameloblasts, revealed following vector dose normalization in A549 cells with a superior effect (up to 404-fold of pK7/RGD double modification. This robust infectivity enhancement occurred through vector binding to both α(vβ3/α(vβ5 integrins and heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs highly expressed by AI-ameloblasts as revealed by gene transfer blocking experiments. This work thus not only pioneers establishment of human AI ameloblast-like cell population as a model for in vitro studies but also reveals an optimal infectivity-enhancement strategy for a potential Ad5 vector-mediated gene therapy for AI.

  15. Progesterone Upregulates Gene Expression in Normal Human Thyroid Follicular Cells

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    Ana Paula Santin Bertoni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer and thyroid nodules are more prevalent in women than men, so female sex hormones may have an etiological role in these conditions. There are no data about direct effects of progesterone on thyroid cells, so the aim of the present study was to evaluate progesterone effects in the sodium-iodide symporter NIS, thyroglobulin TG, thyroperoxidase TPO, and KI-67 genes expression, in normal thyroid follicular cells, derived from human tissue. NIS, TG, TPO, and KI-67 mRNA expression increased significantly after TSH 20 μUI/mL, respectively: 2.08 times, P<0.0001; 2.39 times, P=0.01; 1.58 times, P=0.0003; and 1.87 times, P<0.0001. In thyroid cells treated with 20 μUI/mL TSH plus 10 nM progesterone, RNA expression of NIS, TG, and KI-67 genes increased, respectively: 1.78 times, P<0.0001; 1.75 times, P=0.037; and 1.95 times, P<0.0001, and TPO mRNA expression also increased, though not significantly (1.77 times, P=0.069. These effects were abolished by mifepristone, an antagonist of progesterone receptor, suggesting that genes involved in thyroid cell function and proliferation are upregulated by progesterone. This work provides evidence that progesterone has a direct effect on thyroid cells, upregulating genes involved in thyroid function and growth.

  16. Prediction of epigenetically regulated genes in breast cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loss, Leandro A; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Durinck, Steffen; Nautiyal, Shivani; Flaucher, Diane; Carlton, Victoria EH; Moorhead, Martin; Lu, Yontao; Gray, Joe W; Faham, Malek; Spellman, Paul; Parvin, Bahram

    2010-05-04

    Methylation of CpG islands within the DNA promoter regions is one mechanism that leads to aberrant gene expression in cancer. In particular, the abnormal methylation of CpG islands may silence associated genes. Therefore, using high-throughput microarrays to measure CpG island methylation will lead to better understanding of tumor pathobiology and progression, while revealing potentially new biomarkers. We have examined a recently developed high-throughput technology for measuring genome-wide methylation patterns called mTACL. Here, we propose a computational pipeline for integrating gene expression and CpG island methylation profles to identify epigenetically regulated genes for a panel of 45 breast cancer cell lines, which is widely used in the Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP). The pipeline (i) reduces the dimensionality of the methylation data, (ii) associates the reduced methylation data with gene expression data, and (iii) ranks methylation-expression associations according to their epigenetic regulation. Dimensionality reduction is performed in two steps: (i) methylation sites are grouped across the genome to identify regions of interest, and (ii) methylation profles are clustered within each region. Associations between the clustered methylation and the gene expression data sets generate candidate matches within a fxed neighborhood around each gene. Finally, the methylation-expression associations are ranked through a logistic regression, and their significance is quantified through permutation analysis. Our two-step dimensionality reduction compressed 90% of the original data, reducing 137,688 methylation sites to 14,505 clusters. Methylation-expression associations produced 18,312 correspondences, which were used to further analyze epigenetic regulation. Logistic regression was used to identify 58 genes from these correspondences that showed a statistically signifcant negative correlation between methylation profles and gene expression in the

  17. Nuclear orphan receptor TLX affects gene expression, proliferation and cell apoptosis in beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoli; Xiong, Xiaokan; Dai, Zhe; Deng, Haohua; Sun, Li; Hu, Xuemei; Zhou, Feng; Xu, Yancheng

    Nuclear orphan receptor TLX is an essential regulator of the growth of neural stem cells. However, its exact function in pancreatic islet cells is still unknown. In the present study, gene expression profiling analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in beta cell line MIN6 causes suppression of 176 genes and upregulation of 49 genes, including a cadre of cell cycle, cell proliferation and cell death control genes, such as Btg2, Ddit3 and Gadd45a. We next examined the effects of TLX overexpression on proliferation, apoptosis and insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. Proliferation analysis using EdU assay showed that overexpression of TLX increased percentage of EdU-positive cells. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in MIN6 cells resulted in higher percentage of cells exiting G1 into S-phase, and a 58.8% decrease of cell apoptosis induced by 0.5 mM palmitate. Moreover, TLX overexpression did not cause impairment of insulin secretion. Together, we conclude that TLX is among factors capable of controlling beta cell proliferation and survival, which may serve as a target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of genes associated with cisplatin resistance in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Ping; Zhang Zhiyuan; Zhou Xiaojian; Qiu Weiliu; Chen Fangan; Chen Wantao

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Cisplatin is widely used for chemotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. However, details of the molecular mechanism responsible for cisplatin resistance are still unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the expression of genes related to cisplatin resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. Methods A cisplatin-resistant cell line, Tca/cisplatin, was established from a cisplatin-sensitive cell line, Tca8113, which was derived from moderately-differe...

  19. Spatial reconstruction of single-cell gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satija, Rahul; Farrell, Jeffrey A; Gennert, David; Schier, Alexander F; Regev, Aviv

    2015-05-01

    Spatial localization is a key determinant of cellular fate and behavior, but methods for spatially resolved, transcriptome-wide gene expression profiling across complex tissues are lacking. RNA staining methods assay only a small number of transcripts, whereas single-cell RNA-seq, which measures global gene expression, separates cells from their native spatial context. Here we present Seurat, a computational strategy to infer cellular localization by integrating single-cell RNA-seq data with in situ RNA patterns. We applied Seurat to spatially map 851 single cells from dissociated zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos and generated a transcriptome-wide map of spatial patterning. We confirmed Seurat's accuracy using several experimental approaches, then used the strategy to identify a set of archetypal expression patterns and spatial markers. Seurat correctly localizes rare subpopulations, accurately mapping both spatially restricted and scattered groups. Seurat will be applicable to mapping cellular localization within complex patterned tissues in diverse systems.

  20. Gene expression analysis of cell death induction by Taurolidine in different malignant cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromik, Ansgar M; Weyhe, Dirk; Mittelkötter, Ulrich; Uhl, Waldemar; Hahn, Stephan A; Daigeler, Adrien; Flier, Annegret; Bulut, Daniel; May, Christina; Harati, Kamran; Roschinsky, Jan; Sülberg, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    The anti-infective agent Taurolidine (TRD) has been shown to have cell death inducing properties, but the mechanism of its action is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to identify potential common target genes modulated at the transcriptional level following TRD treatment in tumour cell lines originating from different cancer types. Five different malignant cell lines (HT29, Chang Liver, HT1080, AsPC-1 and BxPC-3) were incubated with TRD (100 μM, 250 μM and 1000 μM). Proliferation after 8 h and cell viability after 24 h were analyzed by BrdU assay and FACS analysis, respectively. Gene expression analyses were carried out using the Agilent -microarray platform to indentify genes which displayed conjoint regulation following the addition of TRD in all cell lines. Candidate genes were subjected to Ingenuity Pathways Analysis and selected genes were validated by qRT-PCR and Western Blot. TRD 250 μM caused a significant inhibition of proliferation as well as apoptotic cell death in all cell lines. Among cell death associated genes with the strongest regulation in gene expression, we identified pro-apoptotic transcription factors (EGR1, ATF3) as well as genes involved in the ER stress response (PPP1R15A), in ubiquitination (TRAF6) and mitochondrial apoptotic pathways (PMAIP1). This is the first conjoint analysis of potential target genes of TRD which was performed simultaneously in different malignant cell lines. The results indicate that TRD might be involved in different signal transduction pathways leading to apoptosis

  1. Exosomes from asbestos-exposed cells modulate gene expression in mesothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Phillip; Lam, Ying-Wai; Dragon, Julie; MacPherson, Maximilian; Shukla, Arti

    2018-03-19

    Asbestos exposure is a determinate cause of many diseases, such as mesothelioma, fibrosis, and lung cancer, and poses a major human health hazard. At this time, there are no identified biomarkers to demarcate asbestos exposure before the presentation of disease and symptoms, and there is only limited understanding of the underlying biology that governs asbestos-induced disease. In our study, we used exosomes, 30-140 nm extracellular vesicles, to gain insight into these knowledge gaps. As inhaled asbestos is first encountered by lung epithelial cells and macrophages, we hypothesize that asbestos-exposed cells secrete exosomes with signature proteomic cargo that can alter the gene expression of mesothelial cells, contributing to disease outcomes like mesothelioma. In the present study using lung epithelial cells (BEAS2B) and macrophages (THP-1), we first show that asbestos exposure causes changes in abundance of some proteins in the exosomes secreted from these cells. Furthermore, exposure of human mesothelial cells (HPM3) to these exosomes resulted in gene expression changes related to epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and other cancer-related genes. This is the first report to indicate that asbestos-exposed cells secrete exosomes with differentially abundant proteins and that those exosomes have a gene-altering effect on mesothelial cells.-Munson, P., Lam, Y.-W., Dragon, J. MacPherson, M., Shukla, A. Exosomes from asbestos-exposed cells modulate gene expression in mesothelial cells.

  2. Gene Therapy With Regulatory T Cells: A Beneficial Alliance

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    Moanaro Biswas

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy aims to replace a defective or a deficient protein at therapeutic or curative levels. Improved vector designs have enhanced safety, efficacy, and delivery, with potential for lasting treatment. However, innate and adaptive immune responses to the viral vector and transgene product remain obstacles to the establishment of therapeutic efficacy. It is widely accepted that endogenous regulatory T cells (Tregs are critical for tolerance induction to the transgene product and in some cases the viral vector. There are two basic strategies to harness the suppressive ability of Tregs: in vivo induction of adaptive Tregs specific to the introduced gene product and concurrent administration of autologous, ex vivo expanded Tregs. The latter may be polyclonal or engineered to direct specificity to the therapeutic antigen. Recent clinical trials have advanced adoptive immunotherapy with Tregs for the treatment of autoimmune disease and in patients receiving cell transplants. Here, we highlight the potential benefit of combining gene therapy with Treg adoptive transfer to achieve a sustained transgene expression. Furthermore, techniques to engineer antigen-specific Treg cell populations, either through reprogramming conventional CD4+ T cells or transferring T cell receptors with known specificity into polyclonal Tregs, are promising in preclinical studies. Thus, based upon these observations and the successful use of chimeric (IgG-based antigen receptors (CARs in antigen-specific effector T cells, different types of CAR-Tregs could be added to the repertoire of inhibitory modalities to suppress immune responses to therapeutic cargos of gene therapy vectors. The diverse approaches to harness the ability of Tregs to suppress unwanted immune responses to gene therapy and their perspectives are reviewed in this article.

  3. A Review of Gene Delivery and Stem Cell Based Therapies for Regenerating Inner Ear Hair Cells

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    Michael S. Detamore

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Sensory neural hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction have become the most common forms of sensory defects, affecting millions of people worldwide. Developing effective therapies to restore hearing loss is challenging, owing to the limited regenerative capacity of the inner ear hair cells. With recent advances in understanding the developmental biology of mammalian and non-mammalian hair cells a variety of strategies have emerged to restore lost hair cells are being developed. Two predominant strategies have developed to restore hair cells: transfer of genes responsible for hair cell genesis and replacement of missing cells via transfer of stem cells. In this review article, we evaluate the use of several genes involved in hair cell regeneration, the advantages and disadvantages of the different viral vectors employed in inner ear gene delivery and the insights gained from the use of embryonic, adult and induced pluripotent stem cells in generating inner ear hair cells. Understanding the role of genes, vectors and stem cells in therapeutic strategies led us to explore potential solutions to overcome the limitations associated with their use in hair cell regeneration.

  4. A review of gene delivery and stem cell based therapies for regenerating inner ear hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarajan, Keerthana; Staecker, Hinrich; Detamore, Michael S

    2011-09-13

    Sensory neural hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction have become the most common forms of sensory defects, affecting millions of people worldwide. Developing effective therapies to restore hearing loss is challenging, owing to the limited regenerative capacity of the inner ear hair cells. With recent advances in understanding the developmental biology of mammalian and non-mammalian hair cells a variety of strategies have emerged to restore lost hair cells are being developed. Two predominant strategies have developed to restore hair cells: transfer of genes responsible for hair cell genesis and replacement of missing cells via transfer of stem cells. In this review article, we evaluate the use of several genes involved in hair cell regeneration, the advantages and disadvantages of the different viral vectors employed in inner ear gene delivery and the insights gained from the use of embryonic, adult and induced pluripotent stem cells in generating inner ear hair cells. Understanding the role of genes, vectors and stem cells in therapeutic strategies led us to explore potential solutions to overcome the limitations associated with their use in hair cell regeneration.

  5. Susceptible genes and molecular pathways related to heavy ion irradiation in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fushimi, Kazuaki; Uzawa, Katsuhiro; Ishigami, Takashi; Yamamoto, Nobuharu; Kawata, Tetsuya; Shibahara, Takahiko; Ito, Hisao; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tanzawa, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Heavy ion beams are high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation characterized by a higher relative biologic effectiveness than low LET radiation. The aim of the current study was to determine the difference of gene expression between heavy ion beams and X-rays in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC)-derived cells. Materials and methods: The OSCC cells were irradiated with accelerated carbon or neon ion irradiation or X-rays using three different doses. We sought to identify genes the expression of which is affected by carbon and neon ion irradiation using Affymetrix GeneChip analysis. The identified genes were analyzed using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Tool to investigate the functional network and gene ontology. Changes in mRNA expression in the genes were assessed by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Results: The microarray analysis identified 84 genes that were modulated by carbon and neon ion irradiation at all doses in OSCC cells. Among the genes, three genes (TGFBR2, SMURF2, and BMP7) and two genes (CCND1 and E2F3), respectively, were found to be involved in the transforming growth factor β-signaling pathway and cell cycle:G1/S checkpoint regulation pathway. The qRT-PCR data from the five genes after heavy ion irradiation were consistent with the microarray data (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Our findings should serve as a basis for global characterization of radiation-regulated genes and pathways in heavy ion-irradiated OSCC

  6. Promoter DNA hypermethylation and gene repression in undifferentiated Arabidopsis cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Berdasco

    Full Text Available Maintaining and acquiring the pluripotent cell state in plants is critical to tissue regeneration and vegetative multiplication. Histone-based epigenetic mechanisms are important for regulating this undifferentiated state. Here we report the use of genetic and pharmacological experimental approaches to show that Arabidopsis cell suspensions and calluses specifically repress some genes as a result of promoter DNA hypermethylation. We found that promoters of the MAPK12, GSTU10 and BXL1 genes become hypermethylated in callus cells and that hypermethylation also affects the TTG1, GSTF5, SUVH8, fimbrin and CCD7 genes in cell suspensions. Promoter hypermethylation in undifferentiated cells was associated with histone hypoacetylation and primarily occurred at CpG sites. Accordingly, we found that the process specifically depends on MET1 and DRM2 methyltransferases, as demonstrated with DNA methyltransferase mutants. Our results suggest that promoter DNA methylation may be another important epigenetic mechanism for the establishment and/or maintenance of the undifferentiated state in plant cells.

  7. Regulation of gene expression in mammalian cells following ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boothman, D.A.; Lee, S.W

    1991-01-01

    Mammalian cells use a variety of mechanisms to control the expression of new gene transcrips elicited in response to ionizing radiation. Damage-induced proteins have been found which contain DNA binding sites located within the promoter regions of SV40 and human thymidine kinase genes. DNA binding proteins as well as proteins which bind to specific DNA lesions (e.g., XIP bp 175 binds specifically to X-ray-damaged DNA) may play a role in the initial recognition of DNA damage and may initiate DNA repair processes, along with new transcription. Mammalian gene expression after DNA damage is also regulated via the stabilization of preexisting mRNA transcripts. Stabilized mRNA transcripts are translated into protein products not previously present in the cell due to undefined posttranscriptional modifications. Thus far, the only example of mRNA stabilization following X-irradiation is the immediate induction of tissue-type plasminogen activator. Mammalian cells synthesize new mRNA transcripts indirect response to DNA damage. Using cDNA cloning, Northern RNA blotting and nuclear run-on techniques, the levels of a variety of known and previously unknown genes dramatically increase following X-irradiation. These genes/proteins now include; a) DNA binding transcripts factors, such as the UV-responsive element binding factors, ionizing radiation-induced DNA-binding proteins, and XIP bP 175; b) proto-oncogenes, such as c-fos, c-jun, and c-myc; c) several growth-related genes, (e.g., the gadd genes, protein kinase C, IL-1, and thymidine kinase); and d) a variety of other genes, including proteases, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and DT diaphorase. Mammalian cells respond to X-irradiation by eliciting a very complex series of events resulting in the appearance of new genes and proteins. These gene products may affect DNA repair, adaptive responses, apoptosis, SOS-type mutagenic response, and/or carcinogenesis. (J.P.N.)

  8. Double suicide genes selectively kill human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Lunxu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To construct a recombinant adenovirus containing CDglyTK double suicide genes and evaluate the killing effect of the double suicide genes driven by kinase domain insert containing receptor (KDR promoter on human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Methods Human KDR promoter, Escherichia coli (E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD gene and the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (TK gene were cloned using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Plasmid pKDR-CDglyTK was constructed with the KDR promoter and CDglyTK genes. A recombinant adenoviral plasmid AdKDR-CDglyTK was then constructed and transfected into 293 packaging cells to grow and harvest adenoviruses. KDR-expressing human umbilical vein endothelial cells (ECV304 and KDR-negative liver cancer cell line (HepG2 were infected with the recombinant adenoviruses at different multiplicity of infection (MOI. The infection rate was measured by green fluorescent protein (GFP expression. The infected cells were cultured in culture media containing different concentrations of prodrugs ganciclovir (GCV and/or 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC. The killing effects were measured using two different methods, i.e. annexin V-FITC staining and terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL staining. Results Recombinant adenoviruses AdKDR-CDglyTK were successfully constructed and they infected ECV304 and HepG2 cells efficiently. The infection rate was dependent on MOI of recombinant adenoviruses. ECV304 cells infected with AdKDR-CDglyTK were highly sensitive to GCV and 5-FC. The cell survival rate was dependent on both the concentration of the prodrugs and the MOI of recombinant adenoviruses. In contrast, there were no killing effects in the HepG2 cells. The combination of two prodrugs was much more effective in killing ECV304 cells than GCV or 5-FC alone. The growth of transgenic ECV304 cells was suppressed in the presence of prodrugs. Conclusion AdKDR-CDglyTK/double prodrog system may be a useful

  9. [Gene therapy and cell transplantation for Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Shin-ichi

    2005-11-01

    Increasing enthusiasm in the field of stem cell research is raising the hope of novel cell replacement therapies for Parkinson's disease (PD), but it also raises both scientific and ethical concerns. In most cases, dopaminergic cells are transplanted ectopically into the striatum instead of the substantia nigra. If the main mechanism underlying any observed functional recovery with these cell replacement therapies is restoration of dopaminergic neurotransmission, then viral vector-mediated gene delivery of dopamine-synthesizing enzymes is a more straight forward approach. The development of a recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector is making gene therapy for PD a feasible therapeutic option in the clinical arena. Efficient and long-term expression of genes for dopamine-synthesizing enzymes in the striatum restored local dopamine production and allowed behavioral recovery in animal models of PD. A clinical trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of AAV vector-mediated gene transfer of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, an enzyme that converts L-dopa to dopamine, is underway. With this strategy patients would still need to take L-dopa to control their PD symptoms, however, dopamine production could be regulated by altering the dose of L-dopa. Another AAV vector-based clinical trial is also ongoing in which the subthalamic nucleus is transduced to produce inhibitory transmitters.

  10. Specifically targeted gene therapy for small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C.L.; Zandi, R.; Gjetting, T.

    2009-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with poor prognosis. Hence, there is great demand for new therapies that can replace or supplement the current available treatment regimes. Gene therapy constitutes a promising strategy and relies on the principle of introducing exogenous...

  11. Gene expression profiles in adenosine-treated human mast cells ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gene expression profiles in adenosine-treated human mast cells. ... SW Kang, JE Jeong, CH Kim, SH Choi, SH Chae, SA Jun, HJ Cha, JH Kim, YM Lee, YS ... beta 4, ring finger protein, high-mobility group, calmodulin 2, RAN binding protein, ...

  12. Cloning and expression of cell wall acid invertase gene fragment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-01-25

    Jan 25, 2010 ... intron. It had a high homology to previously cloned cell wall acid invertase genes in other plants by sequence .... Japan) in a final volume of 50 µl. The programs for ... The first strand of cDNA was synthesized by using SYBR ...

  13. Analysis of the clonal repertoire of gene-corrected cells in gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paruzynski, Anna; Glimm, Hanno; Schmidt, Manfred; Kalle, Christof von

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy-based clinical phase I/II studies using integrating retroviral vectors could successfully treat different monogenetic inherited diseases. However, with increased efficiency of this therapy, severe side effects occurred in various gene therapy trials. In all cases, integration of the vector close to or within a proto-oncogene contributed substantially to the development of the malignancies. Thus, the in-depth analysis of integration site patterns is of high importance to uncover potential clonal outgrowth and to assess the safety of gene transfer vectors and gene therapy protocols. The standard and nonrestrictive linear amplification-mediated PCR (nrLAM-PCR) in combination with high-throughput sequencing exhibits technologies that allow to comprehensively analyze the clonal repertoire of gene-corrected cells and to assess the safety of the used vector system at an early stage on the molecular level. It enables clarifying the biological consequences of the vector system on the fate of the transduced cell. Furthermore, the downstream performance of real-time PCR allows a quantitative estimation of the clonality of individual cells and their clonal progeny. Here, we present a guideline that should allow researchers to perform comprehensive integration site analysis in preclinical and clinical studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessment of citalopram and escitalopram on neuroblastoma cell lines: Cell toxicity and gene modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, Laurent; Delétage, Nathalie; Chalus, Maryse; Aissouni, Youssef; Sylvain-Vidal, Valérie; Gobron, Stéphane; Coll, Guillaume

    2017-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are common antidepressants which cytotoxicity has been assessed in cancers notably colorectal carcinomas and glioma cell lines. We assessed and compared the cytotoxicity of 2 SSRI, citalopram and escitalopram, on neuroblastoma cell lines. The study was performed on 2 non-MYCN amplified cell lines (rat B104 and human SH-SY5Y) and 2 human MYCN amplified cell lines (IMR32 and Kelly). Citalopram and escitalopram showed concentration-dependent cytotoxicity on all cell lines. Citalopram was more cytotoxic than escitalopram. IMR32 was the most sensitive cell line. The absence of toxicity on human primary Schwann cells demonstrated the safety of both molecules for myelin. The mechanisms of cytotoxicity were explored using gene-expression profiles and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Citalopram modulated 1 502 genes and escitalopram 1 164 genes with a fold change ≥ 2. 1 021 genes were modulated by both citalopram and escitalopram; 481 genes were regulated only by citalopram while 143 genes were regulated only by escitalopram. Citalopram modulated 69 pathways (KEGG) and escitalopram 42. Ten pathways were differently modulated by citalopram and escitalopram. Citalopram drastically decreased the expression of MYBL2, BIRC5 and BARD1 poor prognosis factors of neuroblastoma with fold-changes of -107 (pescitalopram. PMID:28467792

  15. Assessment of citalopram and escitalopram on neuroblastoma cell lines. Cell toxicity and gene modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, Laurent; Delétage, Nathalie; Chalus, Maryse; Aissouni, Youssef; Sylvain-Vidal, Valérie; Gobron, Stéphane; Coll, Guillaume

    2017-06-27

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are common antidepressants which cytotoxicity has been assessed in cancers notably colorectal carcinomas and glioma cell lines. We assessed and compared the cytotoxicity of 2 SSRI, citalopram and escitalopram, on neuroblastoma cell lines. The study was performed on 2 non-MYCN amplified cell lines (rat B104 and human SH-SY5Y) and 2 human MYCN amplified cell lines (IMR32 and Kelly). Citalopram and escitalopram showed concentration-dependent cytotoxicity on all cell lines. Citalopram was more cytotoxic than escitalopram. IMR32 was the most sensitive cell line. The absence of toxicity on human primary Schwann cells demonstrated the safety of both molecules for myelin. The mechanisms of cytotoxicity were explored using gene-expression profiles and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Citalopram modulated 1 502 genes and escitalopram 1 164 genes with a fold change ≥ 2. 1 021 genes were modulated by both citalopram and escitalopram; 481 genes were regulated only by citalopram while 143 genes were regulated only by escitalopram. Citalopram modulated 69 pathways (KEGG) and escitalopram 42. Ten pathways were differently modulated by citalopram and escitalopram. Citalopram drastically decreased the expression of MYBL2, BIRC5 and BARD1 poor prognosis factors of neuroblastoma with fold-changes of -107 (pescitalopram.

  16. Mel-18, a mammalian Polycomb gene, regulates angiogenic gene expression of endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ji-Hye; Choi, Hyun-Jung; Maeng, Yong-Sun; Choi, Jung-Yeon; Kim, Minhyung; Kwon, Ja-Young; Park, Yong-Won; Kim, Young-Myeong; Hwang, Daehee; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2010-10-01

    Mel-18 is a mammalian homolog of Polycomb group (PcG) genes. Microarray analysis revealed that Mel-18 expression was induced during endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) differentiation and correlates with the expression of EC-specific protein markers. Overexpression of Mel-18 promoted EPC differentiation and angiogenic activity of ECs. Accordingly, silencing Mel-18 inhibited EC migration and tube formation in vitro. Gene expression profiling showed that Mel-18 regulates angiogenic genes including kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), claudin 5, and angiopoietin-like 2. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that Mel-18 plays a significant role in the angiogenic function of ECs by regulating endothelial gene expression. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Profiling helper T cell subset gene expression in deer mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hjelle Brian

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus are the most common mammals in North America and are reservoirs for several zoonotic agents, including Sin Nombre virus (SNV, the principal etiologic agent of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS in North America. Unlike human HCPS patients, SNV-infected deer mice show no overt pathological symptoms, despite the presence of virus in the lungs. A neutralizing IgG antibody response occurs, but the virus establishes a persistent infection. Limitations of detailed analysis of deer mouse immune responses to SNV are the lack of reagents and methods for evaluating such responses. Results We developed real-time PCR-based detection assays for several immune-related transcription factor and cytokine genes from deer mice that permit the profiling of CD4+ helper T cells, including markers of Th1 cells (T-bet, STAT4, IFNγ, TNF, LT, Th2 cells (GATA-3, STAT6, IL-4, IL-5 and regulatory T cells (Fox-p3, IL-10, TGFβ1. These assays compare the expression of in vitro antigen-stimulated and unstimulated T cells from individual deer mice. Conclusion We developed molecular methods for profiling immune gene expression in deer mice, including a multiplexed real-time PCR assay for assessing expression of several cytokine and transcription factor genes. These assays should be useful for characterizing the immune responses of experimentally- and naturally-infected deer mice.

  18. Gene expression profiling of circulating tumor cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from breast cancer patients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hensler, M.; Vancurova, I.; Becht, E.; Palata, O.; Strnad, P.; Tesarova, P.; Cabinakova, M.; Švec, David; Kubista, Mikael; Bartunkova, J.; Spisek, R.; Sojka, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 4 (2016), e1102827 ISSN 2162-402X Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Breast cancer * gene expression profiling * circulating tumor cells Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 7.719, year: 2016

  19. The effect of adenovirus-mediated gene expression of FHIT in small cell lung cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandi, Roza; Xu, Kai; Poulsen, Hans S

    2011-01-01

    The candidate tumor suppressor fragile histidine traid (FHIT) is frequently inactivated in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Mutations in the p53 gene also occur in the majority of SCLC leading to the accumulation of the mutant protein. Here we evaluated the effect of FHIT gene therapy alone...

  20. Identifying genes that mediate anthracyline toxicity in immune cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber eFrick

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of the immune system in response to chemotherapeutic agents remains elusive. The interpatient variability observed in immune and chemotherapeutic cytotoxic responses is likely, at least in part, due to complex genetic differences. Through the use of a panel of genetically diverse mouse inbred strains, we developed a drug screening platform aimed at identifying genes underlying these chemotherapeutic cytotoxic effects on immune cells. Using genome-wide association studies (GWAS, we identified four genome-wide significant quantitative trait loci (QTL that contributed to the sensitivity of doxorubicin and idarubicin in immune cells. Of particular interest, a locus on chromosome 16 was significantly associated with cell viability following idarubicin administration (p = 5.01x10-8. Within this QTL lies App, which encodes amyloid beta precursor protein. Comparison of dose-response curves verified that T-cells in App knockout mice were more sensitive to idarubicin than those of C57BL/6J control mice (p < 0.05.In conclusion, the cellular screening approach coupled with GWAS led to the identification and subsequent validation of a gene involved in T-cell viability after idarubicin treatment. Previous studies have suggested a role for App in in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity to anticancer agents; the overexpression of App enhances resistance, while the knockdown of this gene is deleterious to cell viability. Thus, further investigations should include performing mechanistic studies, validating additional genes from the GWAS, including Ppfia1 and Ppfibp1, and ultimately translating the findings to in vivo and human studies.

  1. Automatic Control of Gene Expression in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fracassi, Chiara; Postiglione, Lorena; Fiore, Gianfranco; di Bernardo, Diego

    2016-04-15

    Automatic control of gene expression in living cells is paramount importance to characterize both endogenous gene regulatory networks and synthetic circuits. In addition, such a technology can be used to maintain the expression of synthetic circuit components in an optimal range in order to ensure reliable performance. Here we present a microfluidics-based method to automatically control gene expression from the tetracycline-inducible promoter in mammalian cells in real time. Our approach is based on the negative-feedback control engineering paradigm. We validated our method in a monoclonal population of cells constitutively expressing a fluorescent reporter protein (d2EYFP) downstream of a minimal CMV promoter with seven tet-responsive operator motifs (CMV-TET). These cells also constitutively express the tetracycline transactivator protein (tTA). In cells grown in standard growth medium, tTA is able to bind the CMV-TET promoter, causing d2EYFP to be maximally expressed. Upon addition of tetracycline to the culture medium, tTA detaches from the CMV-TET promoter, thus preventing d2EYFP expression. We tested two different model-independent control algorithms (relay and proportional-integral (PI)) to force a monoclonal population of cells to express an intermediate level of d2EYFP equal to 50% of its maximum expression level for up to 3500 min. The control input is either tetracycline-rich or standard growth medium. We demonstrated that both the relay and PI controllers can regulate gene expression at the desired level, despite oscillations (dampened in the case of the PI controller) around the chosen set point.

  2. Gene expression of circulating tumour cells in breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bölke E

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diagnostic tools to predict the prognosis in patients suffering from breast cancer (BC need further improvements. New technological achievements like the gene profiling of circulating tumour cells (CTC could help identify new prognostic markers in the clinical setting. Furthermore, gene expression patterns of CTC might provide important informations on the mechanisms of tumour cell metastasation. Materials and methods We performed realtime-PCR and multiplex-PCR analyses following immunomagnetic separation of CTC. Peripheral blood (PB samples of 63 patients with breast cancer of various stages were analyzed and compared to a control group of 14 healthy individuals. After reverse-transcription, we performed multiplex PCR using primers for the genes ga733.3, muc-1 and c-erbB2. Mammaglobin1, spdef and c-erbB2 were analyzed applying realtime-PCR. Results ga733.2 overexpression was found in 12.7% of breast cancer cases, muc-1 in 15.9%, mgb1 in 9.1% and spdef in 12.1%. In this study, c-erbB2 did not show any significant correlation to BC, possibly due to a highly ambient expression. Besides single gene analyses, gene profiles were additionally evaluated. Highly significant correlations to BC were found in single gene analyses of ga733.2 and muc-1 and in gene profile analyses of ga733.3*muc-1 and GA7 ga733.3*muc-1*mgb1*spdef. Conclusion Our study reveals that the single genes ga733.3, muc-1 and the gene profiles ga733.3*muc-1 and ga733.3*3muc-1*mgb1*spdef can serve as markers for the detection of CTC in BC. The multigene analyses found highly positive levels in BC patients. Our study indicates that not single gene analyses but subtle patterns of multiple genes lead to rising accuracy and low loss of specificity in detection of breast cancer cases.

  3. Early gene regulation of osteogenesis in embryonic stem cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kirkham, Glen R.

    2012-01-01

    The early gene regulatory networks (GRNs) that mediate stem cell differentiation are complex, and the underlying regulatory associations can be difficult to map accurately. In this study, the expression profiles of the genes Dlx5, Msx2 and Runx2 in mouse embryonic stem cells were monitored over a 48 hour period after exposure to the growth factors BMP2 and TGFβ1. Candidate GRNs of early osteogenesis were constructed based on published experimental findings and simulation results of Boolean and ordinary differential equation models were compared with our experimental data in order to test the validity of these models. Three gene regulatory networks were found to be consistent with the data, one of these networks exhibited sustained oscillation, a behaviour which is consistent with the general view of embryonic stem cell plasticity. The work cycle presented in this paper illustrates how mathematical modelling can be used to elucidate from gene expression profiles GRNs that are consistent with experimental data. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  4. Identification of genes associated with cisplatin resistance in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Zhou, Xiaojian; Qiu, Weiliu; Chen, Fangan; Chen, Wantao

    2006-01-01

    Cisplatin is widely used for chemotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. However, details of the molecular mechanism responsible for cisplatin resistance are still unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the expression of genes related to cisplatin resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. A cisplatin-resistant cell line, Tca/cisplatin, was established from a cisplatin-sensitive cell line, Tca8113, which was derived from moderately-differentiated tongue squamous cell carcinoma. Global gene expression in this resistant cell line and its sensitive parent cell line was analyzed using Affymetrix HG-U95Av2 microarrays. Candidate genes involved in DNA repair, the MAP pathway and cell cycle regulation were chosen to validate the microarray analysis results. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis following cisplatin exposure were also investigated. Cisplatin resistance in Tca/cisplatin cells was stable for two years in cisplatin-free culture medium. The IC50 for cisplatin in Tca/cisplatin was 6.5-fold higher than that in Tca8113. Microarray analysis identified 38 genes that were up-regulated and 25 that were down-regulated in this cell line. Some were novel candidates, while others are involved in well-characterized mechanisms that could be relevant to cisplatin resistance, such as RECQL for DNA repair and MAP2K6 in the MAP pathway; all the genes were further validated by Real-time PCR. The cell cycle-regulated genes CCND1 and CCND3 were involved in cisplatin resistance; 24-hour exposure to 10 μM cisplatin induced a marked S phase block in Tca/cisplatin cells but not in Tca8113 cells. The Tca8113 cell line and its stable drug-resistant variant Tca/cisplatin provided a useful model for identifying candidate genes responsible for the mechanism of cisplatin resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Our data provide a useful basis for screening candidate targets for early diagnosis and further intervention in cisplatin resistance

  5. Identification of genes associated with cisplatin resistance in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Ping

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cisplatin is widely used for chemotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. However, details of the molecular mechanism responsible for cisplatin resistance are still unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the expression of genes related to cisplatin resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. Methods A cisplatin-resistant cell line, Tca/cisplatin, was established from a cisplatin-sensitive cell line, Tca8113, which was derived from moderately-differentiated tongue squamous cell carcinoma. Global gene expression in this resistant cell line and its sensitive parent cell line was analyzed using Affymetrix HG-U95Av2 microarrays. Candidate genes involved in DNA repair, the MAP pathway and cell cycle regulation were chosen to validate the microarray analysis results. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis following cisplatin exposure were also investigated. Results Cisplatin resistance in Tca/cisplatin cells was stable for two years in cisplatin-free culture medium. The IC50 for cisplatin in Tca/cisplatin was 6.5-fold higher than that in Tca8113. Microarray analysis identified 38 genes that were up-regulated and 25 that were down-regulated in this cell line. Some were novel candidates, while others are involved in well-characterized mechanisms that could be relevant to cisplatin resistance, such as RECQL for DNA repair and MAP2K6 in the MAP pathway; all the genes were further validated by Real-time PCR. The cell cycle-regulated genes CCND1 and CCND3 were involved in cisplatin resistance; 24-hour exposure to 10 μM cisplatin induced a marked S phase block in Tca/cisplatin cells but not in Tca8113 cells. Conclusion The Tca8113 cell line and its stable drug-resistant variant Tca/cisplatin provided a useful model for identifying candidate genes responsible for the mechanism of cisplatin resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Our data provide a useful basis for screening candidate targets for early diagnosis

  6. Gene Editing and CRISPR Therapeutics: Strategies Taught by Cell and Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Juan C

    2017-01-01

    A few years ago, we assisted in the demonstration for the first time of the revolutionary idea of a type of adaptive-immune system in the bacteria kingdom. This system, named CRISPR, and variants engineered in the lab, have been demonstrated as functional with extremely high frequency and fidelity in almost all eukaryotic cells studied to date. The capabilities of this RNA-guided nuclease have added to the interest that was announced with the advent of previous technologies for genome editing tools, such as ZFN and TALEN. The capabilities exhibited by these gene editors, opens up a novel scenario that indicates the promise of a next-generation medicine based on precision and personalized objectives, mostly due to the change in the paradigm regarding gene-surgery. This has certainly attracted, like never before, the attention of the biotech business and investor community. This chapter offers a brief overview of some of the factors that have contributed to a rapid entry into the biotech and pharmaceutical company's pipeline, focusing on how cell and gene therapies (CGT), collectively known as advanced therapies, have become the driving forces toward the therapeutic uses of gene editing technology. The sum of all those efforts for more than 30years has contributed to the new paradigm of considering genes as medicines. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Targeted gene therapy and cell reprogramming in Fanconi anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rio, Paula; Baños, Rocio; Lombardo, Angelo; Quintana-Bustamante, Oscar; Alvarez, Lara; Garate, Zita; Genovese, Pietro; Almarza, Elena; Valeri, Antonio; Díez, Begoña; Navarro, Susana; Torres, Yaima; Trujillo, Juan P; Murillas, Rodolfo; Segovia, Jose C; Samper, Enrique; Surralles, Jordi; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Naldini, Luigi; Bueren, Juan A

    2014-01-01

    Gene targeting is progressively becoming a realistic therapeutic alternative in clinics. It is unknown, however, whether this technology will be suitable for the treatment of DNA repair deficiency syndromes such as Fanconi anemia (FA), with defects in homology-directed DNA repair. In this study, we used zinc finger nucleases and integrase-defective lentiviral vectors to demonstrate for the first time that FANCA can be efficiently and specifically targeted into the AAVS1 safe harbor locus in fibroblasts from FA-A patients. Strikingly, up to 40% of FA fibroblasts showed gene targeting 42 days after gene editing. Given the low number of hematopoietic precursors in the bone marrow of FA patients, gene-edited FA fibroblasts were then reprogrammed and re-differentiated toward the hematopoietic lineage. Analyses of gene-edited FA-iPSCs confirmed the specific integration of FANCA in the AAVS1 locus in all tested clones. Moreover, the hematopoietic differentiation of these iPSCs efficiently generated disease-free hematopoietic progenitors. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of correcting the phenotype of a DNA repair deficiency syndrome using gene-targeting and cell reprogramming strategies. PMID:24859981

  8. Targeted gene therapy and cell reprogramming in Fanconi anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rio, Paula; Baños, Rocio; Lombardo, Angelo; Quintana-Bustamante, Oscar; Alvarez, Lara; Garate, Zita; Genovese, Pietro; Almarza, Elena; Valeri, Antonio; Díez, Begoña; Navarro, Susana; Torres, Yaima; Trujillo, Juan P; Murillas, Rodolfo; Segovia, Jose C; Samper, Enrique; Surralles, Jordi; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Naldini, Luigi; Bueren, Juan A

    2014-06-01

    Gene targeting is progressively becoming a realistic therapeutic alternative in clinics. It is unknown, however, whether this technology will be suitable for the treatment of DNA repair deficiency syndromes such as Fanconi anemia (FA), with defects in homology-directed DNA repair. In this study, we used zinc finger nucleases and integrase-defective lentiviral vectors to demonstrate for the first time that FANCA can be efficiently and specifically targeted into the AAVS1 safe harbor locus in fibroblasts from FA-A patients. Strikingly, up to 40% of FA fibroblasts showed gene targeting 42 days after gene editing. Given the low number of hematopoietic precursors in the bone marrow of FA patients, gene-edited FA fibroblasts were then reprogrammed and re-differentiated toward the hematopoietic lineage. Analyses of gene-edited FA-iPSCs confirmed the specific integration of FANCA in the AAVS1 locus in all tested clones. Moreover, the hematopoietic differentiation of these iPSCs efficiently generated disease-free hematopoietic progenitors. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of correcting the phenotype of a DNA repair deficiency syndrome using gene-targeting and cell reprogramming strategies. © 2014 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  9. Gene-specific cell labeling using MiMIC transposons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnerer, Joshua P; Venken, Koen J T; Dierick, Herman A

    2015-04-30

    Binary expression systems such as GAL4/UAS, LexA/LexAop and QF/QUAS have greatly enhanced the power of Drosophila as a model organism by allowing spatio-temporal manipulation of gene function as well as cell and neural circuit function. Tissue-specific expression of these heterologous transcription factors relies on random transposon integration near enhancers or promoters that drive the binary transcription factor embedded in the transposon. Alternatively, gene-specific promoter elements are directly fused to the binary factor within the transposon followed by random or site-specific integration. However, such insertions do not consistently recapitulate endogenous expression. We used Minos-Mediated Integration Cassette (MiMIC) transposons to convert host loci into reliable gene-specific binary effectors. MiMIC transposons allow recombinase-mediated cassette exchange to modify the transposon content. We developed novel exchange cassettes to convert coding intronic MiMIC insertions into gene-specific binary factor protein-traps. In addition, we expanded the set of binary factor exchange cassettes available for non-coding intronic MiMIC insertions. We show that binary factor conversions of different insertions in the same locus have indistinguishable expression patterns, suggesting that they reliably reflect endogenous gene expression. We show the efficacy and broad applicability of these new tools by dissecting the cellular expression patterns of the Drosophila serotonin receptor gene family. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Gene therapy: a lipofection approach for gene transfer into primary endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, A T L; Lakey, J R T; Murray, A G; Moore, R B

    2002-01-01

    Despite the great potential of gene therapy to become a new treatment modality in future medicine, there are still many limitations to overcome before this gene approach can pass to the stage of human trial. The foremost obstacle is the development of a safe, efficient, and efficacious vector system for in vivo gene application. This study evaluated the efficacy of lipofection as a gene delivery vehicle into primary endothelial cells. Transfection efficiency of several lipid-based reagents (Effectene, Fugene 6, DOTAP) was examined at experimental temperatures of 37 degrees C, 24 degrees C, and 6 degrees C. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were transfected with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) using precise amounts of DNA (Effectene, 0.2 microg; Fugene 6, 0.5 microg; DOTAP, 2.5 microg) and lipids (Effectene, 10 microl; Fugene 6, 6 microl; DOTAP, 15 microl) optimized in our laboratory. Duration of incubation in the DNA/lipid transfection mixture varied for each lipid transfectant as follows: 5 h for both Fugene 6 and DOTAP and 3 h for Effectene. Efficiency of transfection was quantified by microscopic evaluation of EFGP expression in a minimum of 100 cells per group. Transfection efficiencies achieved with these lipofection agents were 34 +/- 1.3% (mean +/- SEM), 33 +/- 1.4%, and 18 +/- 1.5% for Effectene, Fugene 6, and DOTAP, respectively, at 37 degrees C. Transfection results were lower at 24 degrees C with mean efficiencies of 26 +/- 2.4% for Effectene, 14 +/- 2.9% for Fugene 6, and 15 +/- 3.2% for DOTAP. Furthermore, mean efficiencies at 6 degrees C were 6 +/- 0.5%, 8 +/- 1.5%, and 6 +/- 0.0% for Effectene, Fugene 6, and DOTAP, respectively. Efficiency of transfection appeared to be temperature dependent (ANOVA; p lipofection a potential gene delivery strategy for in vivo gene therapy.

  11. Gene transfer into subcultured endometrial cells using lipofection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascombe, I; Mougin, P; Vuillermoz, C; Adessi, G L; Jouvenot, M

    1996-01-01

    Lipofection using the Lipofectin reagent was optimized to transiently transfect subcultured guinea pig endometrial stromal cells with a beta-galactosidase gene driven by a simian virus 40 promoter. Efficient transfection was obtained in the following conditions: a value of six for the ratio of lipofectin to DNA, a low cellular density (10(5) cells per 35-mm well) at the time of subculture (48 h before lipofection) and a lipofection duration of 12 hours. Lipofection was compared to calcium phosphate precipitation previously optimized in the same culture model. At a low cellular density, the lipofection method was found to be more efficient than the calcium phosphate precipitation. This result gives a great relevance to lipofection since the cultured cells available in an experiment are often limited. Then, using cells at low density and a plasmid containing the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene linked to an estrogen response element, it was shown that the lipofection procedure is a suitable tool for the evaluation of gene regulation by estrogen.

  12. Repression of the albumin gene in Novikoff hepatoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capetanaki, Y.G.; Flytzanis, C.N.; Alonso, A.

    1982-01-01

    Novikoff hepatoma cells have lost their capacity to synthesize albumin. As a first approach to study the mechanisms underlying this event, in vitro translation in a reticulocyte system was performed using total polyadenylated mRNA from rat liver and Novikoff hepatoma cells. Immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translation products with albumin-specific antibody revealed a total lack of albumin synthesis in Novikoff hepatoma, suggesting the absence of functional albumin mRNA in these cells. Titration experiments using as probe albumin cDNA cloned in pBR322 plasmid demonstrated the absence of albumin-specific sequences in both polysomal and nuclear polyadenylated and total RNA from Novikoff cells. This albumin recombinant plasmid was obtained by screening a rat liver cDNA library with albumin [/sup 32/P]cDNA reverse transcribed from immuno-precipitated mRNA. The presence of an albumin-specific gene insert was documented with translation assays as well as by restriction mapping. Repression of the albumin gene at the transcriptional level was further demonstrated by RNA blotting experiments using the cloned albumin cDNA probe. Genomic DNA blots using the cloned albumin cDNA as probe did not reveal any large-scale deletions, insertions, or rearrangements in the albumin gene, suggesting that the processes involved in the suppression of albumin mRNA synthesis do not involve extensive genomic rearrangements

  13. Global gene expression response to telomerase in bovine adrenocortical cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrault, Steven D.; Hornsby, Peter J.; Betts, Dean H.

    2005-01-01

    The infinite proliferative capability of most immortalized cells is dependent upon the presence of the enzyme telomerase and its ability to maintain telomere length and structure. However, telomerase may be involved in a greater system than telomere length regulation, as recent evidence has shown it capable of increasing wound healing in vivo, and improving cellular proliferation rate and survival from apoptosis in vitro. Here, we describe the global gene expression response to ectopic telomerase expression in an in vitro bovine adrenocortical cell model. Telomerase-immortalized cells showed an increased ability for proliferation and survival in minimal essential medium above cells transgenic for GFP. cDNA microarray analyses revealed an altered cell state indicative of increased adrenocortical cell proliferation regulated by the IGF2 pathway and alterations in members of the TGF-B family. As well, we identified alterations in genes associated with development and wound healing that support a model that high telomerase expression induces a highly adaptable, progenitor-like state

  14. Expression of caspase-3 gene in apoptotic HL-60 cell and different human tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaoming; Song Tianbao

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To research the expression of caspase-3 gene in the apoptotic and the control HL-60 cells and in the different human tumor cell lines. Methods: Caspase-3 mRNA in the control and γ-radiation-induced apoptotic HL-60 cells, and in the 6 types of human tumor cell lines, was analysed by Northern blot. Results: The caspase-3 gene transcript was more highly expressed in leukemia cells HL-60, CEM, K562 and neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y than in cervical adenocarcinoma HeLa and breast carcinoma MCF7, and more highly in the radiation-induced apoptotic HL-60 than in the control HL-60 cells. Conclusion: The high level of expression of caspase-3 may aid the efforts to understand the tumor cell sensitivity to radiation, apoptosis and its inherent ability to survive

  15. Clusters of conserved beta cell marker genes for assessment of beta cell phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Geert A; Jiang, Lei; Hellemans, Karine H

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a gene expression blueprint of pancreatic beta cells conserved from rodents to humans and to evaluate its applicability to assess shifts in the beta cell differentiated state. Genome-wide mRNA expression profiles of isolated beta cells were compared to those...... of a large panel of other tissue and cell types, and transcripts with beta cell-abundant and -selective expression were identified. Iteration of this analysis in mouse, rat and human tissues generated a panel of conserved beta cell biomarkers. This panel was then used to compare isolated versus laser capture...

  16. Embryo quality predictive models based on cumulus cells gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devjak R

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of in vitro fertilization (IVF in clinical practice of infertility treatment, the indicators for high quality embryos were investigated. Cumulus cells (CC have a specific gene expression profile according to the developmental potential of the oocyte they are surrounding, and therefore, specific gene expression could be used as a biomarker. The aim of our study was to combine more than one biomarker to observe improvement in prediction value of embryo development. In this study, 58 CC samples from 17 IVF patients were analyzed. This study was approved by the Republic of Slovenia National Medical Ethics Committee. Gene expression analysis [quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR] for five genes, analyzed according to embryo quality level, was performed. Two prediction models were tested for embryo quality prediction: a binary logistic and a decision tree model. As the main outcome, gene expression levels for five genes were taken and the area under the curve (AUC for two prediction models were calculated. Among tested genes, AMHR2 and LIF showed significant expression difference between high quality and low quality embryos. These two genes were used for the construction of two prediction models: the binary logistic model yielded an AUC of 0.72 ± 0.08 and the decision tree model yielded an AUC of 0.73 ± 0.03. Two different prediction models yielded similar predictive power to differentiate high and low quality embryos. In terms of eventual clinical decision making, the decision tree model resulted in easy-to-interpret rules that are highly applicable in clinical practice.

  17. Discrimination of meniscal cell phenotypes using gene expression profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Son

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The lack of quantitative and objective metrics to assess cartilage and meniscus cell phenotypes contributes to the challenges in fibrocartilage tissue engineering. Although functional assessment of the final resulting tissue is essential, initial characterization of cell sources and quantitative description of their progression towards the natural, desired cell phenotype would provide an effective tool in optimizing cell-based tissue engineering strategies. The purpose of this study was to identify quantifiable characteristics of meniscal cells and thereby find phenotypical markers that could effectively categorize cells based on their tissue of origin (cartilage, inner, middle, and outer meniscus. The combination of gene expression ratios collagen VI/collagen II, ADAMTS-5/collagen II, and collagen I/collagen II was the most effective indicator of variation among different tissue regions. We additionally demonstrate a possible application of these quantifiable metrics in evaluating the use of serially passaged chondrocytes as a possible cell source in fibrocartilage engineering. Comparing the ratios of the passaged chondrocytes and the native meniscal cells may provide direction to optimize towards the desired cell phenotype. We have thus shown that measurable markers defining the characteristics of the native meniscus can establish a standard by which different tissue engineering strategies can be objectively assessed. Such metrics could additionally be useful in exploring the different stages of meniscal degradation in osteoarthritis and provide some insight in the disease progression.

  18. The FRIABLE1 gene product affects cell adhesion in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Neumetzler

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion in plants is mediated predominantly by pectins, a group of complex cell wall associated polysaccharides. An Arabidopsis mutant, friable1 (frb1, was identified through a screen of T-DNA insertion lines that exhibited defective cell adhesion. Interestingly, the frb1 plants displayed both cell and organ dissociations and also ectopic defects in organ separation. The FRB1 gene encodes a Golgi-localized, plant specific protein with only weak sequence similarities to known proteins (DUF246. Unlike other cell adhesion deficient mutants, frb1 mutants do not have reduced levels of adhesion related cell wall polymers, such as pectins. Instead, FRB1 affects the abundance of galactose- and arabinose-containing oligosaccharides in the Golgi. Furthermore, frb1 mutants displayed alteration in pectin methylesterification, cell wall associated extensins and xyloglucan microstructure. We propose that abnormal FRB1 action has pleiotropic consequences on wall architecture, affecting both the extensin and pectin matrices, with consequent changes to the biomechanical properties of the wall and middle lamella, thereby influencing cell-cell adhesion.

  19. Altered epigenetic regulation of homeobox genes in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcinkiewicz, Katarzyna M.; Gudas, Lorraine J., E-mail: ljgudas@med.cornell.edu

    2014-01-01

    To gain insight into oral squamous cell carcinogenesis, we performed deep sequencing (RNAseq) of non-tumorigenic human OKF6-TERT1R and tumorigenic SCC-9 cells. Numerous homeobox genes are differentially expressed between OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells. Data from Oncomine, a cancer microarray database, also show that homeobox (HOX) genes are dysregulated in oral SCC patients. The activity of Polycomb repressive complexes (PRC), which causes epigenetic modifications, and retinoic acid (RA) signaling can control HOX gene transcription. HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcripts are higher in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells; using ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) we detected PRC2 protein SUZ12 and the epigenetic H3K27me3 mark on histone H3 at these genes in OKF6-TERT1R, but not in SCC-9 cells. In contrast, IRX1, IRX4, SIX2 and TSHZ3 transcripts are lower in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells. We detected SUZ12 and the H3K27me3 mark at these genes in SCC-9, but not in OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 depletion increased HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcript levels and decreased the proliferation of OKF6-TERT1R cells. Transcriptional responses to RA are attenuated in SCC-9 versus OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 and H3K27me3 levels were not altered by RA at these HOX genes in SCC-9 and OKF6-TERT1R cells. We conclude that altered activity of PRC2 is associated with dysregulation of homeobox gene expression in human SCC cells, and that this dysregulation potentially plays a role in the neoplastic transformation of oral keratinocytes. - Highlights: • RNAseq elucidates differences between non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic oral keratinocytes. • Changes in HOX mRNA in SCC-9 vs. OKF6-TERT1R cells are a result of altered epigenetic regulation. • RNAseq shows that retinoic acid (RA) influences gene expression in both OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells.

  20. Altered epigenetic regulation of homeobox genes in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcinkiewicz, Katarzyna M.; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2014-01-01

    To gain insight into oral squamous cell carcinogenesis, we performed deep sequencing (RNAseq) of non-tumorigenic human OKF6-TERT1R and tumorigenic SCC-9 cells. Numerous homeobox genes are differentially expressed between OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells. Data from Oncomine, a cancer microarray database, also show that homeobox (HOX) genes are dysregulated in oral SCC patients. The activity of Polycomb repressive complexes (PRC), which causes epigenetic modifications, and retinoic acid (RA) signaling can control HOX gene transcription. HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcripts are higher in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells; using ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) we detected PRC2 protein SUZ12 and the epigenetic H3K27me3 mark on histone H3 at these genes in OKF6-TERT1R, but not in SCC-9 cells. In contrast, IRX1, IRX4, SIX2 and TSHZ3 transcripts are lower in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells. We detected SUZ12 and the H3K27me3 mark at these genes in SCC-9, but not in OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 depletion increased HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcript levels and decreased the proliferation of OKF6-TERT1R cells. Transcriptional responses to RA are attenuated in SCC-9 versus OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 and H3K27me3 levels were not altered by RA at these HOX genes in SCC-9 and OKF6-TERT1R cells. We conclude that altered activity of PRC2 is associated with dysregulation of homeobox gene expression in human SCC cells, and that this dysregulation potentially plays a role in the neoplastic transformation of oral keratinocytes. - Highlights: • RNAseq elucidates differences between non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic oral keratinocytes. • Changes in HOX mRNA in SCC-9 vs. OKF6-TERT1R cells are a result of altered epigenetic regulation. • RNAseq shows that retinoic acid (RA) influences gene expression in both OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells

  1. Lentiviral hematopoietic cell gene therapy for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartier, Nathalie; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; Bougnères, Pierre; Schmidt, Manfred; Kalle, Christof Von; Fischer, Alain; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Aubourg, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a severe genetic demyelinating disease caused by a deficiency in ALD protein, an adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter encoded by the ABCD1 gene. When performed at an early stage of the disease, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) can arrest the progression of cerebral demyelinating lesions. To overcome the limitations of allogeneic HCT, hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy strategy aiming to perform autologous transplantation of lentivirally corrected cells was developed. We demonstrated the preclinical feasibility of HSC gene therapy for ALD based on the correction of CD34+ cells from X-ALD patients using an HIV1-derived lentiviral vector. These results prompted us to initiate an HSC gene therapy trial in two X-ALD patients who had developed progressive cerebral demyelination, were candidates for allogeneic HCT, but had no HLA-matched donors or cord blood. Autologous CD34+ cells were purified from the peripheral blood after G-CSF stimulation, genetically corrected ex vivo with a lentiviral vector encoding wild-type ABCD1 cDNA, and then reinfused into the patients after they had received full myeloablative conditioning. Over 3 years of follow-up, the hematopoiesis remained polyclonal in the two patients treated with 7-14% of granulocytes, monocytes, and T and B lymphocytes expressing the lentivirally encoded ALD protein. There was no evidence of clonal dominance or skewing based on the retrieval of lentiviral insertion repertoire in different hematopoietic lineages by deep sequencing. Cerebral demyelination was arrested 14 and 16months, respectively, in the two treated patients, without further progression up to the last follow-up, a clinical outcome that is comparable to that observed after allogeneic HCT. Longer follow-up of these two treated patients and HSC gene therapy performed in additional ALD patients are however needed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of lentiviral HSC

  2. Radiation-induced gene amplification in rodent and human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luecke-Huhle, C.; Gloss, B.; Herrlich, P.

    1990-01-01

    Ionizing and UV radiations induce amplification of SV40 DNA sequences integrated in the genome of Chinese hamster cells and increase amplification of the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene during methotrexate selection in human skin fibroblasts of a patient with ataxia telangiectasia. Various types of external (60-Co-γ-rays, 241-Am-α-particles, UV) or internal radiation (caused by the decay of 125 I incorporated into DNA in form of I-UdR) were applied. By cell fusion experiments it could be shown that SV40 gene amplification is mediated by one or several diffusible trans-acting factors induced or activated in a dose dependent manner by all types of radiation. One of these factors binds to a 10 bp sequence within the minimal origin of replication of SV40. In vivo competition with an excess of a synthetic oligonucleotide comprising this sequence blocks radiation-induced amplification. (author) 25 refs.; 8 figs

  3. Enrichment of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells facilitates transduction for stem cell gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kismet; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Romero, Zulema; Campo-Fernandez, Beatriz; Kaufman, Michael L; Cooper, Aaron R; Masiuk, Katelyn; Hollis, Roger P; Kohn, Donald B

    2015-05-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy for sickle cell disease has the potential to treat this illness without the major immunological complications associated with allogeneic transplantation. However, transduction efficiency by β-globin lentiviral vectors using CD34-enriched cell populations is suboptimal and large vector production batches may be needed for clinical trials. Transducing a cell population more enriched for HSC could greatly reduce vector needs and, potentially, increase transduction efficiency. CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells, comprising ∼1%-3% of all CD34(+) cells, were isolated from healthy cord blood CD34(+) cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and transduced with a lentiviral vector expressing an antisickling form of beta-globin (CCL-β(AS3) -FB). Isolated CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells were able to generate progeny over an extended period of long-term culture (LTC) compared to the CD34(+) cells and required up to 40-fold less vector for transduction compared to bulk CD34(+) preparations containing an equivalent number of CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells. Transduction of isolated CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells was comparable to CD34(+) cells measured by quantitative PCR at day 14 with reduced vector needs, and average vector copy/cell remained higher over time for LTC initiated from CD34(+) /38(-) cells. Following in vitro erythroid differentiation, HBBAS3 mRNA expression was similar in cultures derived from CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells or unfractionated CD34(+) cells. In vivo studies showed equivalent engraftment of transduced CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells when transplanted in competition with 100-fold more CD34(+) /CD38(+) cells. This work provides initial evidence for the beneficial effects from isolating human CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells to use significantly less vector and potentially improve transduction for HSC gene therapy. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  4. Spatial reconstruction of single-cell gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satija, Rahul; Farrell, Jeffrey A.; Gennert, David; Schier, Alexander F.; Regev, Aviv

    2015-01-01

    Spatial localization is a key determinant of cellular fate and behavior, but spatial RNA assays traditionally rely on staining for a limited number of RNA species. In contrast, single-cell RNA-seq allows for deep profiling of cellular gene expression, but established methods separate cells from their native spatial context. Here we present Seurat, a computational strategy to infer cellular localization by integrating single-cell RNA-seq data with in situ RNA patterns. We applied Seurat to spatially map 851 single cells from dissociated zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos, inferring a transcriptome-wide map of spatial patterning. We confirmed Seurat’s accuracy using several experimental approaches, and used it to identify a set of archetypal expression patterns and spatial markers. Additionally, Seurat correctly localizes rare subpopulations, accurately mapping both spatially restricted and scattered groups. Seurat will be applicable to mapping cellular localization within complex patterned tissues in diverse systems. PMID:25867923

  5. EVALUATION OF CYTOKINE GENE POLYMORPHISM IN B CELL LYMPHOID MALIGNANCIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Nazarova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies with some solid tumors has shown that polymorphisms of certain cytokine genes may be used as predictors of clinical outcome in the patients. It seemed important to evaluate potential correlations between production of certain pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and co-receptor molecules, and promoter polymorphism of the cytokine genes involved into regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, lipid metabolism and blood clotting in the patients with hematological malignancies. The article contains our results concerning associations between of IL-1β, -2, -4, -10, -17, TNFα, and allelic polymorphisms of their genes in 62 patients with B cell lymphoid malignancies in an ethnically homogenous group (self-identified as Russians. We have shown that the GА and AA genotypes of the G-308A polymorphism in TNFα gene are significantly associated with increased production of this cytokine, being more common in aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas, more rare in multiple myeloma and in indolent non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

  6. Gene expression pattern of functional neuronal cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bron Dominique

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuronal tissue has limited potential to self-renew or repair after neurological diseases. Cellular therapies using stem cells are promising approaches for the treatment of neurological diseases. However, the clinical use of embryonic stem cells or foetal tissues is limited by ethical considerations and other scientific problems. Thus, bone marrow mesenchymal stomal cells (BM-MSC could represent an alternative source of stem cells for cell replacement therapies. Indeed, many studies have demonstrated that MSC can give rise to neuronal cells as well as many tissue-specific cell phenotypes. Methods BM-MSC were differentiated in neuron-like cells under specific induction (NPBM + cAMP + IBMX + NGF + Insulin. By day ten, differentiated cells presented an expression profile of real neurons. Functionality of these differentiated cells was evaluated by calcium influx through glutamate receptor AMPA3. Results Using microarray analysis, we compared gene expression profile of these different samples, before and after neurogenic differentiation. Among the 1943 genes differentially expressed, genes down-regulated are involved in osteogenesis, chondrogenesis, adipogenesis, myogenesis and extracellular matrix component (tuftelin, AGC1, FADS3, tropomyosin, fibronectin, ECM2, HAPLN1, vimentin. Interestingly, genes implicated in neurogenesis are increased. Most of them are involved in the synaptic transmission and long term potentialisation as cortactin, CASK, SYNCRIP, SYNTL4 and STX1. Other genes are involved in neurite outgrowth, early neuronal cell development, neuropeptide signaling/synthesis and neuronal receptor (FK506, ARHGAP6, CDKRAP2, PMCH, GFPT2, GRIA3, MCT6, BDNF, PENK, amphiregulin, neurofilament 3, Epha4, synaptotagmin. Using real time RT-PCR, we confirmed the expression of selected neuronal genes: NEGR1, GRIA3 (AMPA3, NEF3, PENK and Epha4. Functionality of these neuron-like cells was demonstrated by Ca2+ influx through glutamate

  7. Regulatory Oversight of Cell and Gene Therapy Products in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Anthony; Agbanyo, Francisca; Wang, Jian; Rosu-Myles, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Health Canada regulates gene therapy products and many cell therapy products as biological drugs under the Canadian Food and Drugs Act and its attendant regulations. Cellular products that meet certain criteria, including minimal manipulation and homologous use, may be subjected to a standards-based approach under the Safety of Human Cells, Tissues and Organs for Transplantation Regulations. The manufacture and clinical testing of cell and gene therapy products (CGTPs) presents many challenges beyond those for protein biologics. Cells cannot be subjected to pathogen removal or inactivation procedures and must frequently be administered shortly after final formulation. Viral vector design and manufacturing control are critically important to overall product quality and linked to safety and efficacy in patients through concerns such as replication competence, vector integration, and vector shedding. In addition, for many CGTPs, the value of nonclinical studies is largely limited to providing proof of concept, and the first meaningful data relating to appropriate dosing, safety parameters, and validity of surrogate or true determinants of efficacy must come from carefully designed clinical trials in patients. Addressing these numerous challenges requires application of various risk mitigation strategies and meeting regulatory expectations specifically adapted to the product types. Regulatory cooperation and harmonisation at an international level are essential for progress in the development and commercialisation of these products. However, particularly in the area of cell therapy, new regulatory paradigms may be needed to harness the benefits of clinical progress in situations where the resources and motivation to pursue a typical drug product approval pathway may be lacking.

  8. Global Regulatory Differences for Gene- and Cell-Based Therapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coppens, Delphi G M; De Bruin, Marie L; Leufkens, Hubert G M

    2017-01-01

    Gene- and cell-based therapies (GCTs) offer potential new treatment options for unmet medical needs. However, the use of conventional regulatory requirements for medicinal products to approve GCTs may impede patient access and therapeutic innovation. Furthermore, requirements differ between...... jurisdictions, complicating the global regulatory landscape. We provide a comparative overview of regulatory requirements for GCT approval in five jurisdictions and hypothesize on the consequences of the observed global differences on patient access and therapeutic innovation....

  9. HIV-derived vectors for gene therapy targeting dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Maura; Cavarelli, Mariangela; Gregori, Silvia; Scarlatti, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-derived lentiviral vectors (LV) have the potential to mediate stable therapeutic gene transfer. However, similarly to other viral vectors, their benefit is compromised by the induction of an immune response toward transgene-expressing cells that closely mimics antiviral immunity. LV share with the parental HIV the ability to activate dendritic cells (DC), while lack the peculiar ability of subverting DC functions, which is responsible for HIV immune escape. Understanding the interaction between LV and DC, with plasmacytoid and myeloid DC playing fundamental and distinct roles, has paved the way to novel approaches aimed at regulating transgene-specific immune responses. Thanks to the ability to target either DC subsets LV might be a powerful tool to induce immunity (i.e., gene therapy of cancer), cell death (i.e., in HIV/AIDS infection), or tolerance (i.e., gene therapy strategies for monogenic diseases). In this chapter, similarities and differences between the LV-mediated and HIV-mediated induction of immune responses, with specific focus on their interactions with DC, are discussed.

  10. Sustainability of keratinocyte gene transfer and cell survival in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choate, K A; Khavari, P A

    1997-05-20

    The epidermis is an attractive site for therapeutic gene delivery because it is accessible and capable of delivering polypeptides to the systemic circulation. A number of difficulties, however, have emerged in attempts at cutaneous gene delivery, and central among these is an inability to sustain therapeutic gene production. We have examined two major potential contributing factors, viral vector stamina and involvement of long-lived epidermal progenitor cells. Human keratinocytes were either untreated or transduced with a retroviral vector for beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal) at > 99% efficiency and then grafted onto immunodeficient mice to regenerate human epidermis. Human epidermis was monitored in vivo after grafting for clinical and histologic appearance as well as for gene expression. Although integrated vector sequences persisted unchanged in engineered epidermis at 10 weeks post-grafting, retroviral long terminal repeat (LTR)-driven beta-Gal expression ceased in vivo after approximately 4 weeks. Endogenous cellular promoters, however, maintained consistently normal gene expression levels without evidence of time-dependent decline, as determined by immunostaining with species-specific antibodies for human involucrin, filaggrin, keratinocyte transglutaminase, keratin 10, type VII collagen, and Laminin 5 proteins out to week 14 post-grafting. Transduced human keratinocytes generated multilayer epidermis sustained through multiple epidermal turnover cycles; this epidermis demonstrated retention of a spatially appropriate pattern of basal and suprabasal epidermal marker gene expression. These results confirm previous findings suggesting that viral promoter-driven gene expression is not durable and demonstrate that keratinocytes passaged in vitro can regenerate and sustain normal epidermis for prolonged periods.

  11. Identification of valid endogenous control genes for determining gene expression in C6 glioma cell line treated with conditioned medium from adipose-derived stem cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iser, I C; de Campos, R P; Bertoni, A P S; Wink, M R

    2015-10-01

    There is growing evidence that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be important players in the tumor microenvironment. They can affect the glioma progression through the modulation of different genes. This modulation can be evaluated through a very useful model, treating the tumor cells with MSC-conditioned medium. However, for an accurate and reliable gene expression analysis, normalization of gene expression data against reference genes is a prerequisite. We performed a systematic review in an attempt to find a reference gene to use when analyzing gene expression in C6 glioma cells lines. Considering that we were not able to find a reference gene originated by an appropriate validation, in this study we evaluated candidate genes to be used as reference gene in C6 cells under different treatments with adipose-derived stem cells conditioned medium (CM-ADSCs). β-actin (ACTB); glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH); hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase I (HPRT-1); TATA box binding protein (TBP) and beta-2-microglobulin (B2M) were evaluated by real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR). The mean Cq, the maximum fold change (MFC) and NormFinder software were used for reference gene evaluation and selection. The GAPDH and ACTB genes have been the most widely used reference genes to normalize among the different investigated genes in our review, however, controversially these genes underwent a substantial variability among the genes evaluated in the present work. Individually, TBP gene was more stable when compared with other genes analyzed and the combination of TBP and HPRT-1 was even more stable. These results evidence the importance of appropriate validation of reference genes before performing qPCR experiments. Besides, our data will contribute with researchers that work analyzing the role of ADSCs in glioma microenvironment through gene expression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of γ-radiation on cell growth, cell cycle and promoter methylation of 22 cell cycle genes in the 1321NI astrocytoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamian, Yaman; Abou Alchamat, Ghalia; Murad, Hossam; Madania, Ammar

    2017-09-01

    DNA damage caused by radiation initiates biological responses affecting cell fate. DNA methylation regulates gene expression and modulates DNA damage pathways. Alterations in the methylation profiles of cell cycle regulating genes may control cell response to radiation. In this study we investigated the effect of ionizing radiation on the methylation levels of 22 cell cycle regulating genes in correlation with gene expression in 1321NI astrocytoma cell line. 1321NI cells were irradiated with 2, 5 or 10Gy doses then analyzed after 24, 48 and 72h for cell viability using MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliu bromide) assay. Flow cytometry were used to study the effect of 10Gy irradiation on cell cycle. EpiTect Methyl II PCR Array was used to identify differentially methylated genes in irradiated cells. Changes in gene expression was determined by qPCR. Azacytidine treatment was used to determine whether DNA methylation affectes gene expression. Our results showed that irradiation decreased cell viability and caused cell cycle arrest at G2/M. Out of 22 genes tested, only CCNF and RAD9A showed some increase in DNA methylation (3.59% and 3.62%, respectively) after 10Gy irradiation, and this increase coincided with downregulation of both genes (by 4 and 2 fold, respectively). with azacytidine confirmed that expression of CCNF and RAD9A genes was regulated by methylation. 1321NI cell line is highly radioresistant and that irradiation of these cells with a 10Gy dose increases DNA methylation of CCNF and RAD9A genes. This dose down-regulates these genes, favoring G2/M arrest. Copyright © 2017 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Pancreatic cancer circulating tumour cells express a cell motility gene signature that predicts survival after surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeant, Gregory; Eijsden, Rudy van; Roskams, Tania; Van Duppen, Victor; Topal, Baki

    2012-01-01

    Most cancer deaths are caused by metastases, resulting from circulating tumor cells (CTC) that detach from the primary cancer and survive in distant organs. The aim of the present study was to develop a CTC gene signature and to assess its prognostic relevance after surgery for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Negative depletion fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) was developed and validated with spiking experiments using cancer cell lines in whole human blood samples. This FACS-based method was used to enrich for CTC from the blood of 10 patients who underwent surgery for PDAC. Total RNA was isolated from 4 subgroup samples, i.e. CTC, haematological cells (G), original tumour (T), and non-tumoural pancreatic control tissue (P). After RNA quality control, samples of 6 patients were eligible for further analysis. Whole genome microarray analysis was performed after double linear amplification of RNA. ‘Ingenuity Pathway Analysis’ software and AmiGO were used for functional data analyses. A CTC gene signature was developed and validated with the nCounter system on expression data of 78 primary PDAC using Cox regression analysis for disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Using stringent statistical analysis, we retained 8,152 genes to compare expression profiles of CTC vs. other subgroups, and found 1,059 genes to be differentially expressed. The pathway with the highest expression ratio in CTC was p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) signaling, known to be involved in cancer cell migration. In the p38 MAPK pathway, TGF-β1, cPLA2, and MAX were significantly upregulated. In addition, 9 other genes associated with both p38 MAPK signaling and cell motility were overexpressed in CTC. High co-expression of TGF-β1 and our cell motility panel (≥ 4 out of 9 genes for DFS and ≥ 6 out of 9 genes for OS) in primary PDAC was identified as an independent predictor of DFS (p=0.041, HR (95% CI) = 1.885 (1.025 – 3.559)) and OS (p=0.047, HR

  14. Zfp206 regulates ES cell gene expression and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Walker, Emily; Tamplin, Owen J; Rossant, Janet; Stanford, William L; Hughes, Timothy R

    2006-01-01

    Understanding transcriptional regulation in early developmental stages is fundamental to understanding mammalian development and embryonic stem (ES) cell properties. Expression surveys suggest that the putative SCAN-Zinc finger transcription factor Zfp206 is expressed specifically in ES cells [Zhang,W., Morris,Q.D., Chang,R., Shai,O., Bakowski,M.A., Mitsakakis,N., Mohammad,N., Robinson,M.D., Zirngibl,R., Somogyi,E. et al., (2004) J. Biol., 3, 21; Brandenberger,R., Wei,H., Zhang,S., Lei,S., Murage,J., Fisk,G.J., Li,Y., Xu,C., Fang,R., Guegler,K. et al., (2004) Nat. Biotechnol., 22, 707-716]. Here, we confirm this observation, and we show that ZFP206 expression decreases rapidly upon differentiation of cultured mouse ES cells, and during development of mouse embryos. We find that there are at least six isoforms of the ZFP206 transcript, the longest being predominant. Overexpression and depletion experiments show that Zfp206 promotes formation of undifferentiated ES cell clones, and positively regulates abundance of a very small set of transcripts whose expression is also specific to ES cells and the two- to four-cell stages of preimplantation embryos. This set includes members of the Zscan4, Thoc4, Tcstv1 and eIF-1A gene families, none of which have been functionally characterized in vivo but whose members include apparent transcription factors, RNA-binding proteins and translation factors. Together, these data indicate that Zfp206 is a regulator of ES cell differentiation that controls a set of genes expressed very early in development, most of which themselves appear to be regulators.

  15. Changes in gene expression following growth stimulation of cultured cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathans, D.; Lau, L.F.; Lee, S.J.; Linzer, D.I.H.

    1986-01-01

    To identify genes that may be part of a genetic program for the growth of mammalian cells. The authors are characterizing cDNA clones derived from mRNAs that appear at various times after stimulation of resting BALB/c 3T3 cells with serum or growth factors. cDNA libraries were prepared from polyA/sup +/ RNA from cells stimulated with serum for various periods of time, and the libraries were differentially screened with /sup 32/P-cDNA probes made from stimulated or resting cell mRNA. One cDNA library was prepared from cells that were stimulated with serum for 3 hrs in the presence of cycloheximide. The authors purpose in inhibiting protein synthesis was to limit new mRNAs to those that do not require de novo protein synthesis for their accumulation and to amplify mRNAs that are superinduced by serum in the absence of protein synthesis. Of approximately 50,000 recombinant phage plaques screened, 357 clones hybridized to probes derived from stimulated-cell RNA but not to probes from resting-cell RNA. Cross hybridization analysis showed that 4 RNA sequence families accounted for over 95% of the clones; other sequences were found only once

  16. Gene therapy for sickle cell disease: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Selami; Uchida, Naoya; Tisdale, John F

    2018-05-30

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is one of the most common life-threatening monogenic diseases affecting millions of people worldwide. Allogenic hematopietic stem cell transplantation is the only known cure for the disease with high success rates, but the limited availability of matched sibling donors and the high risk of transplantation-related side effects force the scientific community to envision additional therapies. Ex vivo gene therapy through globin gene addition has been investigated extensively and is currently being tested in clinical trials that have begun reporting encouraging data. Recent improvements in our understanding of the molecular pathways controlling mammalian erythropoiesis and globin switching offer new and exciting therapeutic options. Rapid and substantial advances in genome engineering tools, particularly CRISPR/Cas9, have raised the possibility of genetic correction in induced pluripotent stem cells as well as patient-derived hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. However, these techniques are still in their infancy, and safety/efficacy issues remain that must be addressed before translating these promising techniques into clinical practice. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Cell of origin associated classification of B-cell malignancies by gene signatures of the normal B-cell hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Hans Erik; Bergkvist, Kim Steve; Schmitz, Alexander; Kjeldsen, Malene Krag; Hansen, Steen Møller; Gaihede, Michael; Nørgaard, Martin Agge; Bæch, John; Grønholdt, Marie-Louise; Jensen, Frank Svendsen; Johansen, Preben; Bødker, Julie Støve; Bøgsted, Martin; Dybkær, Karen

    2014-06-01

    Recent findings have suggested biological classification of B-cell malignancies as exemplified by the "activated B-cell-like" (ABC), the "germinal-center B-cell-like" (GCB) and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and "recurrent translocation and cyclin D" (TC) classification of multiple myeloma. Biological classification of B-cell derived cancers may be refined by a direct and systematic strategy where identification and characterization of normal B-cell differentiation subsets are used to define the cancer cell of origin phenotype. Here we propose a strategy combining multiparametric flow cytometry, global gene expression profiling and biostatistical modeling to generate B-cell subset specific gene signatures from sorted normal human immature, naive, germinal centrocytes and centroblasts, post-germinal memory B-cells, plasmablasts and plasma cells from available lymphoid tissues including lymph nodes, tonsils, thymus, peripheral blood and bone marrow. This strategy will provide an accurate image of the stage of differentiation, which prospectively can be used to classify any B-cell malignancy and eventually purify tumor cells. This report briefly describes the current models of the normal B-cell subset differentiation in multiple tissues and the pathogenesis of malignancies originating from the normal germinal B-cell hierarchy.

  18. Genomic instability of osteosarcoma cell lines in culture: impact on the prediction of metastasis relevant genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muff, Roman; Rath, Prisni; Ram Kumar, Ram Mohan; Husmann, Knut; Born, Walter; Baudis, Michael; Fuchs, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a rare but highly malignant cancer of the bone. As a consequence, the number of established cell lines used for experimental in vitro and in vivo osteosarcoma research is limited and the value of these cell lines relies on their stability during culture. Here we investigated the stability in gene expression by microarray analysis and array genomic hybridization of three low metastatic cell lines and derivatives thereof with increased metastatic potential using cells of different passages. The osteosarcoma cell lines showed altered gene expression during in vitro culture, and it was more pronounced in two metastatic cell lines compared to the respective parental cells. Chromosomal instability contributed in part to the altered gene expression in SAOS and LM5 cells with low and high metastatic potential. To identify metastasis-relevant genes in a background of passage-dependent altered gene expression, genes involved in "Pathways in cancer" that were consistently regulated under all passage comparisons were evaluated. Genes belonging to "Hedgehog signaling pathway" and "Wnt signaling pathway" were significantly up-regulated, and IHH, WNT10B and TCF7 were found up-regulated in all three metastatic compared to the parental cell lines. Considerable instability during culture in terms of gene expression and chromosomal aberrations was observed in osteosarcoma cell lines. The use of cells from different passages and a search for genes consistently regulated in early and late passages allows the analysis of metastasis-relevant genes despite the observed instability in gene expression in osteosarcoma cell lines during culture.

  19. Amniotic Fluid Cells Show Higher Pluripotency-Related Gene Expression Than Allantoic Fluid Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehl, Debora; Generali, Melanie; Görtz, Sabrina; Geering, Diego; Slamecka, Jaroslav; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Bleul, Ulrich; Weber, Benedikt

    2017-10-01

    Amniotic fluid represents an abundant source of multipotent stem cells, referred as broadly multipotent given their differentiation potential and expression of pluripotency-related genes. However, the origin of this broadly multipotent cellular fraction is not fully understood. Several sources have been proposed so far, including embryonic and extraembryonic tissues. In this regard, the ovine developmental model uniquely allows for direct comparison of fetal fluid-derived cells from two separate fetal fluid cavities, the allantois and the amnion, over the entire duration of gestation. As allantoic fluid mainly collects fetal urine, cells originating from the efferent urinary tract can directly be compared with cells deriving from the extraembryonic amniotic tissues and the fetus. This study shows isolation of cells from the amniotic [ovine amniotic fluid cells (oAFCs)] and allantoic fluid [ovine allantoic fluid cells (oALCs)] in a strictly paired fashion with oAFCs and oALCs derived from the same fetus. Both cell types showed cellular phenotypes comparable to standard mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), with trilineage differentiation potential, and expression of common ovine MSC markers. However, the expression of MSC markers per single cell was higher in oAFCs as measured by flow cytometry. oAFCs exhibited higher proliferative capacities and showed significantly higher expression of pluripotency-related genes OCT4, STAT3, NANOG, and REX1 by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction compared with paired oALCs. No significant decrease of pluripotency-related gene expression was noted over gestation, implying that cells with high differentiation potential may be isolated at the end of pregnancy. In conclusion, this study suggests that cells with highest stem cell characteristics may originate from the fetus itself or the amniotic fetal adnexa rather than from the efferent urinary tract or the allantoic fetal adnexa.

  20. Clusters of conserved beta cell marker genes for assessment of beta cell phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Geert A; Jiang, Lei; Hellemans, Karine H

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a gene expression blueprint of pancreatic beta cells conserved from rodents to humans and to evaluate its applicability to assess shifts in the beta cell differentiated state. Genome-wide mRNA expression profiles of isolated beta cells were compared to those...... of a large panel of other tissue and cell types, and transcripts with beta cell-abundant and -selective expression were identified. Iteration of this analysis in mouse, rat and human tissues generated a panel of conserved beta cell biomarkers. This panel was then used to compare isolated versus laser capture...... microdissected beta cells, monitor adaptations of the beta cell phenotype to fasting, and retrieve possible conserved transcriptional regulators....

  1. Decreased expression of cell adhesion genes in cancer stem-like cells isolated from primary oral squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Amrendra; Sriram, Harshini; Chandarana, Pinal; Tanavde, Vivek; Kumar, Rekha V; Gopinath, Ashok; Govindarajan, Raman; Ramaswamy, S; Sadasivam, Subhashini

    2018-05-01

    The goal of this study was to isolate cancer stem-like cells marked by high expression of CD44, a putative cancer stem cell marker, from primary oral squamous cell carcinomas and identify distinctive gene expression patterns in these cells. From 1 October 2013 to 4 September 2015, 76 stage III-IV primary oral squamous cell carcinoma of the gingivobuccal sulcus were resected. In all, 13 tumours were analysed by immunohistochemistry to visualise CD44-expressing cells. Expression of CD44 within The Cancer Genome Atlas-Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma RNA-sequencing data was also assessed. Seventy resected tumours were dissociated into single cells and stained with antibodies to CD44 as well as CD45 and CD31 (together referred as Lineage/Lin). From 45 of these, CD44 + Lin - and CD44 - Lin - subpopulations were successfully isolated using fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and good-quality RNA was obtained from 14 such sorted pairs. Libraries from five pairs were sequenced and the results analysed using bioinformatics tools. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed to experimentally validate the differential expression of selected candidate genes identified from the transcriptome sequencing in the same 5 and an additional 9 tumours. CD44 was expressed on the surface of poorly differentiated tumour cells, and within the The Cancer Genome Atlas-Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma samples, its messenger RNA levels were higher in tumours compared to normal. Transcriptomics revealed that 102 genes were upregulated and 85 genes were downregulated in CD44 + Lin - compared to CD44 - Lin - cells in at least 3 of the 5 tumours sequenced. The upregulated genes included those involved in immune regulation, while the downregulated genes were enriched for genes involved in cell adhesion. Decreased expression of PCDH18, MGP, SPARCL1 and KRTDAP was confirmed by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Lower expression of

  2. Cell culture density affects the stemness gene expression of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Seong; Lee, Myoung Woo; Lee, Tae-Hee; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe; Yoo, Keon Hee

    2017-03-01

    The results of clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are controversial due to the heterogeneity of human MSCs and differences in culture conditions. In this regard, it is important to identify gene expression patterns according to culture conditions, and to determine how the cells are expanded and when they should be clinically used. In the current study, stemness gene expression was investigated in adipose tissue-derived MSCs (AT-MSCs) harvested following culture at different densities. AT-MSCs were plated at a density of 200 or 5,000 cells/cm 2 . After 7 days of culture, stemness gene expression was examined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis. The proliferation rate of AT-MSCs harvested at a low density (~50% confluent) was higher than that of AT-MSCs harvested at a high density (~90% confluent). Although there were differences in the expression levels of stemness gene, such as octamer-binding transcription factor 4, nanog homeobox ( Nanog ), SRY-box 2, Kruppel like factor 4, v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog ( c-Myc ), and lin-28 homolog A, in the AT-MSCs obtained from different donors, RT-qPCR analysis demonstrated differential gene expression patterns according to the cell culture density. Expression levels of stemness genes, particularly Nanog and c-Myc , were upregulated in AT-MSCs harvested at a low density (~50% confluent) in comparison to AT-MSCs from the same donor harvested at a high density (~90% confluent). These results imply that culture conditions, such as the cell density at harvesting, modulate the stemness gene expression and proliferation of MSCs.

  3. Personalized Medicine: Cell and Gene Therapy Based on Patient-Specific iPSC-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yao; Chan, Lawrence; Nguyen, Huy V; Tsang, Stephen H

    2016-01-01

    Interest in generating human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells for stem cell modeling of diseases has overtaken that of patient-specific human embryonic stem cells due to the ethical, technical, and political concerns associated with the latter. In ophthalmology, researchers are currently using iPS cells to explore various applications, including: (1) modeling of retinal diseases using patient-specific iPS cells; (2) autologous transplantation of differentiated retinal cells that undergo gene correction at the iPS cell stage via gene editing tools (e.g., CRISPR/Cas9, TALENs and ZFNs); and (3) autologous transplantation of patient-specific iPS-derived retinal cells treated with gene therapy. In this review, we will discuss the uses of patient-specific iPS cells for differentiating into retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, uncovering disease pathophysiology, and developing new treatments such as gene therapy and cell replacement therapy via autologous transplantation.

  4. Benzyl isothiocyanate alters the gene expression with cell cycle regulation and cell death in human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Nou-Ying; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Yu, Chien-Chih; Liao, Ching-Lung; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Hsia, Te-Chun; Wu, King-Chuen; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Lu, Kung-Wen; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly malignant devastating brain tumor in adults. Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) is one of the isothiocyanates that have been shown to induce human cancer cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Herein, the effect of BITC on cell viability and apoptotic cell death and the genetic levels of human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells in vitro were investigated. We found that BITC induced cell morphological changes, decreased cell viability and the induction of cell apoptosis in GBM 8401 cells was time-dependent. cDNA microarray was used to examine the effects of BITC on GBM 8401 cells and we found that numerous genes associated with cell death and cell cycle regulation in GBM 8401 cells were altered after BITC treatment. The results show that expression of 317 genes was upregulated, and two genes were associated with DNA damage, the DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3 (DDIT3) was increased 3.66-fold and the growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible α (GADD45A) was increased 2.34-fold. We also found that expression of 182 genes was downregulated and two genes were associated with receptor for cell responses to stimuli, the EGF containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (EFEMP1) was inhibited 2.01-fold and the TNF receptor-associated protein 1 (TRAP1) was inhibited 2.08-fold. BITC inhibited seven mitochondria ribosomal genes, the mitochondrial ribosomal protein; tumor protein D52 (MRPS28) was inhibited 2.06-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein S2 (MRPS2) decreased 2.07-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein L23 (MRPL23) decreased 2.08-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein S2 (MRPS2) decreased 2.07-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein S12 (MRPS12) decreased 2.08-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein L12 (MRPL12) decreased 2.25-fold and the mitochondria ribosomal protein S34 (MRPS34) was decreased 2.30-fold in GBM 8401 cells. These changes of gene expression can provide the effects of BITC on the genetic level and are

  5. Differential expression of the klf6 tumor suppressor gene upon cell damaging treatments in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrau, Ricardo C.; D'Astolfo, Diego S.; Andreoli, Veronica; Bocco, Jose L.; Koritschoner, Nicolas P.

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian Krueppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) is involved in critical roles such as growth-related signal transduction, cell proliferation and differentiation, development, apoptosis and angiogenesis. Also, KLF6 appears to be an emerging key factor during cancer development and progression. Its expression is thoroughly regulated by several cell-damaging stimuli. DNA damaging agents at lethal concentrations induce a p53-independent down-regulation of the klf6 gene. To investigate the impact of external stimuli on human klf6 gene expression, its mRNA level was analyzed using a cancer cell line profiling array system, consisting in an assortment of immobilized cDNAs from multiple cell lines treated with several cell-damaging agents at growth inhibitory concentrations (IC 50 ). Cell-damaging agents affected the klf6 expression in 62% of the cDNA samples, though the expression pattern was not dependent on the cell origin type. Interestingly, significant differences (p 50 concentrations of physical and chemical stimuli in a p53-dependent manner. Most of these agents are frequently used in cancer therapy. Induction of klf6 expression in the absence of functional p53 directly correlates with cell death triggered by these compounds, whereas it is down-regulated in p53+/+ cells. Hence, klf6 expression level could represent a valuable marker for the efficiency of cell death upon cancer treatment.

  6. A systematic study on drug-response associated genes using baseline gene expressions of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Yang, Jiasheng; Zhang, Yi; Fang, Yun; Wang, Fayou; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Xiaoqi; Yang, Jialiang

    2016-03-01

    We have studied drug-response associated (DRA) gene expressions by applying a systems biology framework to the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia data. More than 4,000 genes are inferred to be DRA for at least one drug, while the number of DRA genes for each drug varies dramatically from almost 0 to 1,226. Functional enrichment analysis shows that the DRA genes are significantly enriched in genes associated with cell cycle and plasma membrane. Moreover, there might be two patterns of DRA genes between genders. There are significantly shared DRA genes between male and female for most drugs, while very little DRA genes tend to be shared between the two genders for a few drugs targeting sex-specific cancers (e.g., PD-0332991 for breast cancer and ovarian cancer). Our analyses also show substantial difference for DRA genes between young and old samples, suggesting the necessity of considering the age effects for personalized medicine in cancers. Lastly, differential module and key driver analyses confirm cell cycle related modules as top differential ones for drug sensitivity. The analyses also reveal the role of TSPO, TP53, and many other immune or cell cycle related genes as important key drivers for DRA network modules. These key drivers provide new drug targets to improve the sensitivity of cancer therapy.

  7. Gene expression in epithelial cells in response to pneumovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenberg Helene F

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and pneumonia virus of mice (PVM are viruses of the family Paramyxoviridae, subfamily pneumovirus, which cause clinically important respiratory infections in humans and rodents, respectively. The respiratory epithelial target cells respond to viral infection with specific alterations in gene expression, including production of chemoattractant cytokines, adhesion molecules, elements that are related to the apoptosis response, and others that remain incompletely understood. Here we review our current understanding of these mucosal responses and discuss several genomic approaches, including differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR and gene array strategies, that will permit us to unravel the nature of these responses in a more complete and systematic manner.

  8. Cell cycle and anti-estrogen effects synergize to regulate cell proliferation and ER target gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Dalvai

    Full Text Available Antiestrogens are designed to antagonize hormone induced proliferation and ERalpha target gene expression in mammary tumor cells. Commonly used drugs such as OH-Tamoxifen and ICI 182780 (Fulvestrant block cell cycle progression in G0/G1. Inversely, the effect of cell cycle stage on ER regulated gene expression has not been tested directly. We show that in ERalpha-positive breast cancer cells (MCF-7 the estrogen receptor gene and downstream target genes are cell cycle regulated with expression levels varying as much as three-fold between phases of the cell cycle. Steroid free culture conditions commonly used to assess the effect of hormones or antiestrogens on gene expression also block MCF-7 cells in G1-phase when several ERalpha target genes are overexpressed. Thus, cell cycle effects have to be taken into account when analyzing the impact of hormonal treatments on gene transcription. We found that antiestrogens repress transcription of several ERalpha target genes specifically in S phase. This observation corroborates the more rapid and strong impact of antiestrogen treatments on cell proliferation in thymidine, hydroxyurea or aphidicolin arrested cells and correlates with an increase of apoptosis compared to similar treatments in lovastatin or nocodazol treated cells. Hence, cell cycle effects synergize with the action of antiestrogens. An interesting therapeutic perspective could be to enhance the action of anti-estrogens by associating hormone-therapy with specific cell cycle drugs.

  9. Effects of chronic morphine and morphine withdrawal on gene expression in rat peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Desjardins , Stephane; Belkai , Emilie; Crete , Dominique; Cordonnier , Laurie; Scherrmann , Jean-Michel; Noble , Florence; Marie-Claire , Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    International audience; Chronic morphine treatment alters gene expression in brain structures. There are increasing evidences showing a correlation, in gene expression modulation, between blood cells and brain in psychological troubles. To test whether gene expression regulation in blood cells could be found in drug addiction, we investigated gene expression profiles in peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMC) cells of saline and morphine-treated rats. In rats chronically treated with morphine, th...

  10. Improving the efficiency of CHO cell line generation using glutamine synthetase gene knockout cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lianchun; Kadura, Ibrahim; Krebs, Lara E; Hatfield, Christopher C; Shaw, Margaret M; Frye, Christopher C

    2012-04-01

    Although Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, with their unique characteristics, have become a major workhorse for the manufacture of therapeutic recombinant proteins, one of the major challenges in CHO cell line generation (CLG) is how to efficiently identify those rare, high-producing clones among a large population of low- and non-productive clones. It is not unusual that several hundred individual clones need to be screened for the identification of a commercial clonal cell line with acceptable productivity and growth profile making the cell line appropriate for commercial application. This inefficiency makes the process of CLG both time consuming and laborious. Currently, there are two main CHO expression systems, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR)-based methotrexate (MTX) selection and glutamine synthetase (GS)-based methionine sulfoximine (MSX) selection, that have been in wide industrial use. Since selection of recombinant cell lines in the GS-CHO system is based on the balance between the expression of the GS gene introduced by the expression plasmid and the addition of the GS inhibitor, L-MSX, the expression of GS from the endogenous GS gene in parental CHOK1SV cells will likely interfere with the selection process. To study endogenous GS expression's potential impact on selection efficiency, GS-knockout CHOK1SV cell lines were generated using the zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) technology designed to specifically target the endogenous CHO GS gene. The high efficiency (∼2%) of bi-allelic modification on the CHO GS gene supports the unique advantages of the ZFN technology, especially in CHO cells. GS enzyme function disruption was confirmed by the observation of glutamine-dependent growth of all GS-knockout cell lines. Full evaluation of the GS-knockout cell lines in a standard industrial cell culture process was performed. Bulk culture productivity improved two- to three-fold through the use of GS-knockout cells as parent cells. The selection stringency was

  11. Conditional IL-2 gene deletion: consequences for T cell proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendall A Smith

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available To explore the role of interleukin-2 (IL-2 in T cell proliferation, and to circumvent the IL-2 deficiency autoimmune syndrome of conventional il2 gene deletion, mice were created to allow conditional il2 gene deletion when treated with the estrogen analogue, tamoxifen (TAM as adults. Splenocytes from four different mouse strains, C57Bl/6 wild type (WT, conventional IL-2 (-/-, TAM-treated Cre recombinase negative (Cre-/IL2fl/fl, and Cre+/IL-2fl/fl (Cre+, were activated with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28, and monitored for CD4+ and CD8+ T cell lymphocyte blastogenesis, aerobic glycolysis, BrdU incorporation into newly synthesized DNA, and CFSE dye dilution to monitor cell division. IL-2 production was monitored by quantitative ELISA and multiple additional cytokines were monitored by protein-bead arrays. Splenocytes from conventional IL-2 (-/- and TAM-treated Cre+ mice resulted in undetectable IL-2 production, so that both strains were IL-2 deficient. As monitored by flow cytometry, activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from WT, Cre+ and Cre- mice all underwent blastogenesis, whereas far fewer cells from conventional IL-2 (-/- mice did so. By comparison, only cells from IL-2 sufficient WT and Cre- switched to aerobic glycolysis as evidenced by a drop in media pH. Blastogenesis was mirrored by BrdU incorporation and CFSE dye dilution by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from WT, Cre+ and Cre- mice, which were all equivalent, while proliferation of cells from conventional IL-2 (-/- mice was compromised. Splenocytes from IL-2 deficient conventional IL-2 (-/- mice produced low or undetectable other γc-chain cytokines (IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-13, IL-15, and IL-21, whereas production of these γc-chain cytokines from IL-2-deficient conditional IL-2 (-/- Cre+ mice were comparable with WT and Cre- mice. These results indicate that CD4+ and CD8+ T cell blastogenesis cannot be attributable to IL-2 alone, but a switch to aerobic glycolysis is attributable to IL-2, and proliferation

  12. Cell-type-specific gene delivery into neuronal cells in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parveen, Zahida; Mukhtar, Muhammad; Rafi, Mohammed; Wenger, David A.; Siddiqui, Khwaja M.; Siler, Catherine A.; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Pomerantz, Roger J.; Schnell, Matthias J.; Dornburg, Ralph

    2003-01-01

    The avian retroviruses reticuloendotheliosis virus strain A (REV-A) and spleen necrosis virus (SNV) are not naturally infectious in human cells. However, REV-A-derived viral vectors efficiently infect human cells when they are pseudotyped with envelope proteins displaying targeting ligands specific for human cell-surface receptors. Here we report that vectors containing the gag region of REV-A and pol of SNV can be pseudotyped with the envelope protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and the glycoproteins of different rabies virus (RV) strains. Vectors pseudotyped with the envelope protein of the highly neurotropic RV strain CVS-N2c facilitated cell type-specific gene delivery into mouse and human neurons, but did not infect other human cell types. Moreover, when such vector particles were injected into the brain of newborn mice, only neuronal cells were infected in vivo. Cell-type-specific gene delivery into neurons may present quite specific gene therapy approaches for many degenerative diseases of the brain

  13. Liver cell-derived microparticles activate hedgehog signaling and alter gene expression in hepatic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witek, Rafal P; Yang, Liu; Liu, Renshui; Jung, Youngmi; Omenetti, Alessia; Syn, Wing-Kin; Choi, Steve S; Cheong, Yeiwon; Fearing, Caitlin M; Agboola, Kolade M; Chen, Wei; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2009-01-01

    Angiogenesis contributes to vascular remodeling during cirrhosis. In cirrhotic livers, cholangiocytes, and myofibroblastic hepatic stellate cells (MF-HSC) produce Hedgehog (Hh) ligands. During embryogenesis Hh ligands are released from ligand-producing cells in microparticles and activate Hh signaling in endothelial cells. We studied whether adult liver cell-derived microparticles contain Hh ligands that alter hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells (SEC). MF-HSC and cholangiocytes were exposed to platelet-derived growth factor to induce Hh ligands; microparticles were isolated from medium, analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and immunoblots, and applied to Hh-reporter-containing cells. Microparticles were obtained from serum and bile of rats after bile duct ligation (BDL) or sham surgery and applied to normal primary liver SEC with or without cyclopamine, an Hh signaling inhibitor. Effects on SEC gene expression were evaluated by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting. Hh target gene expression and SEC activation markers were compared in primary SEC and in liver sections from healthy and BDL rats. Platelet-derived growth factor-treated MF-HSC and cholangiocytes released exosome-enriched microparticles containing biologically-active Hh ligands. BDL increased release of Hh-containing exosome-enriched microparticles into plasma and bile. Transmission electron microscopy and immunoblots revealed similarities among microparticles from all sources; all microparticles induced similar Hh-dependent changes in SEC gene expression. SEC from healthy livers did not express Hh target genes or activation markers, but both were up-regulated in SEC after BDL. Hh-containing exosome-enriched microparticles released from liver cells alter hepatic SEC gene expression, suggesting a novel mechanism for cirrhotic vasculopathy.

  14. Identification of Cell Cycle-Regulated Genes by Convolutional Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chenglin; Cui, Peng; Huang, Tao

    2017-01-01

    The cell cycle-regulated genes express periodically with the cell cycle stages, and the identification and study of these genes can provide a deep understanding of the cell cycle process. Large false positives and low overlaps are big problems in cell cycle-regulated gene detection. Here, a computational framework called DLGene was proposed for cell cycle-regulated gene detection. It is based on the convolutional neural network, a deep learning algorithm representing raw form of data pattern without assumption of their distribution. First, the expression data was transformed to categorical state data to denote the changing state of gene expression, and four different expression patterns were revealed for the reported cell cycle-regulated genes. Then, DLGene was applied to discriminate the non-cell cycle gene and the four subtypes of cell cycle genes. Its performances were compared with six traditional machine learning methods. At last, the biological functions of representative cell cycle genes for each subtype are analyzed. Our method showed better and more balanced performance of sensitivity and specificity comparing to other machine learning algorithms. The cell cycle genes had very different expression pattern with non-cell cycle genes and among the cell-cycle genes, there were four subtypes. Our method not only detects the cell cycle genes, but also describes its expression pattern, such as when its highest expression level is reached and how it changes with time. For each type, we analyzed the biological functions of the representative genes and such results provided novel insight to the cell cycle mechanisms. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Ex-Vivo Gene Therapy Using Lentiviral Mediated Gene Transfer Into Umbilical Cord Blood Derived Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanieh Jalali

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Introduction of therapeutic genes into the injured site of nervous system can be achieved using transplantation of cellular vehicles containing desired gene. To transfer exogenous genes into the cellular vehicles, lentiviral vectors are one of interested vectors because of advantages such high transduction efficiency of dividing and non-dividing cells. Unrestricted somatic stem cells are subclasses of umbilical cord blood derived stem cells which are appreciate candidates to use as cellular vehicles for ex vivo gene therapy of nervous system. Objectives In current study we investigated the effect of lentiviral vector transduction on the neuronal related features of unrestricted somatic stem cells to indicate the probable and unwanted changes related to transduction procedure. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, lentiviral vector containing green fluorescent protein (GFP were transduced into unrestricted somatic stem cells and its effect was investigated with using MTT assay, qPCR and immunohistochemistry techniques. For statistical comparison of real time PCR results, REST software (2009, Qiagen was used. Results Obtained results showed lentiviral vector transduction did not have cytotoxic effects on unrestricted somatic stem cells and did not change neuronal differentiation capacity of them as well the expression of some neuronal related genes and preserved them in multilineage situation. Conclusions In conclusion, we suggested that lentiviral vectors could be proper vectors to transfer therapeutic gene into unrestricted somatic stem cells to provide a cellular vehicle for ex vivo gene therapy of nervous system disorders.

  16. Differential expression of the klf6 tumor suppressor gene upon cell damaging treatments in cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehrau, Ricardo C.; D' Astolfo, Diego S.; Andreoli, Veronica [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquimica Clinica e Inmunologia (CIBICI-CONICET), Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Bocco, Jose L., E-mail: jbocco@fcq.unc.edu.ar [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquimica Clinica e Inmunologia (CIBICI-CONICET), Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Koritschoner, Nicolas P. [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquimica Clinica e Inmunologia (CIBICI-CONICET), Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2011-02-10

    The mammalian Krueppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) is involved in critical roles such as growth-related signal transduction, cell proliferation and differentiation, development, apoptosis and angiogenesis. Also, KLF6 appears to be an emerging key factor during cancer development and progression. Its expression is thoroughly regulated by several cell-damaging stimuli. DNA damaging agents at lethal concentrations induce a p53-independent down-regulation of the klf6 gene. To investigate the impact of external stimuli on human klf6 gene expression, its mRNA level was analyzed using a cancer cell line profiling array system, consisting in an assortment of immobilized cDNAs from multiple cell lines treated with several cell-damaging agents at growth inhibitory concentrations (IC{sub 50}). Cell-damaging agents affected the klf6 expression in 62% of the cDNA samples, though the expression pattern was not dependent on the cell origin type. Interestingly, significant differences (p < 0.0001) in KLF6 mRNA levels were observed depending on the cellular p53 status upon cell damage. KLF6 expression was significantly increased in 63% of p53-deficient cells (122/195). Conversely, KLF6 mRNA level decreased nearly 4 fold in more than 70% of p53+/+ cells. In addition, klf6 gene promoter activity was down-regulated by DNA damaging agents in cells expressing the functional p53 protein whereas it was moderately increased in the absence of functional p53. Consistent results were obtained for the endogenous KLF6 protein level. Results indicate that human klf6 gene expression is responsive to external cell damage mediated by IC{sub 50} concentrations of physical and chemical stimuli in a p53-dependent manner. Most of these agents are frequently used in cancer therapy. Induction of klf6 expression in the absence of functional p53 directly correlates with cell death triggered by these compounds, whereas it is down-regulated in p53+/+ cells. Hence, klf6 expression level could represent a valuable

  17. Low-Dose Radiation Induces Genes Promoting Cell Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shu-Zheng; Chen, Dong; Mu, Ying

    1999-01-01

    Apoptosis is an important process controlling homeostasis of the body. It is influenced by stimuli constantly arising from the external and internal environment of the organism. It is well known that radiation could induce apoptosis of cells in vitro and in vivo. However, the dose-effect relationship of apoptosis extending to the low-dose range has scarcely been studied. Here, the molecular basis of the phenomenon is explored by examining the changes in expression of some of the proapoptotic and antiapoptotic genes

  18. Multi-gene epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes in T-cell lymphoma cells; delayed expression of the p16 protein upon reversal of the silencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagasawa, T; Zhang, Q; Raghunath, P N

    2006-01-01

    To understand better T-cell lymphomagenesis, we examined promoter CpG methylation and mRNA expression of closely related genes encoding p16, p15, and p14 tumor suppressor genes in cultured malignant T-cells that were derived from cutaneous, adult type, and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-express...

  19. Expression of minichromosome maintenance genes in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong HB

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Hongbin Zhong,1,* Bin Chen,1,* Henrique Neves,2 Jinchun Xing,1 Youxin Ye,1 Ying Lin,1 Guohong Zhuang,3 Shu-Dong Zhang,4 Jiyi Huang,1,5 Hang Fai Kwok2 1Xiang’an Branch, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian, People’s Republic of China; 2Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau, Taipa, Macau SAR; 3Medical College of Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian, People’s Republic of China; 4Northern Ireland Centre for Stratified Medicine, Biomedical Sciences Research Institute, Ulster University, Londonderry, UK; 5The First Clinical School of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, Fujian, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Minichromosome maintenance (MCM proteins play an essential role in DNA replication. They have been shown to be overexpressed in various types of cancer. However, the role of this family in renal cell carcinoma (RCC is widely unknown. In this study, we have identified a number of RCC datasets in the Gene Expression Omnibus database and also investigated the correlation between the expression levels of MCM genes and clinicopathological parameters. We found that the expression levels of MCM genes are positively correlated with one another. Expression levels of MCM2, MCM5, MCM6, and MCM7, but not of MCM3 and MCM4, were higher in RCC compared to paired adjacent normal tissue. Only the expression level of MCM4, but not of other MCMs, was positively correlated with tumor grade. In addition, a high-level expression of MCM2 in either primary tumor or metastases of RCC predicted a shorter disease-free survival time, while a high-level expression of MCM4 or MCM6 in primary tumor was also associated with poorer disease-free survival. Interestingly, we also demonstrated that patients with their primary RCC overexpressing 2 or more MCM genes had a shorter disease-free survival time, while those with RCC metastases overexpressing 3 or more MCM genes had a shorter

  20. Gene expression analysis uncovers novel Hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) effects in human bronchial epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaobo; Qiu, Weiliang; Sathirapongsasuti, J. Fah.; Cho, Michael H.; Mancini, John D.; Lao, Taotao; Thibault, Derek M.; Litonjua, Gus; Bakke, Per S.; Gulsvik, Amund; Lomas, David A.; Beaty, Terri H.; Hersh, Craig P.; Anderson, Christopher; Geigenmuller, Ute; Raby, Benjamin A.; Rennard, Stephen I.; Perrella, Mark A.; Choi, Augustine M.K.; Quackenbush, John; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog Interacting Protein (HHIP) was implicated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, it remains unclear how HHIP contributes to COPD pathogenesis. To identify genes regulated by HHIP, we performed gene expression microarray analysis in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (Beas-2B) stably infected with HHIP shRNAs. HHIP silencing led to differential expression of 296 genes; enrichment for variants nominally associated with COPD was found. Eighteen of the differentially expressed genes were validated by real-time PCR in Beas-2B cells. Seven of 11 validated genes tested in human COPD and control lung tissues demonstrated significant gene expression differences. Functional annotation indicated enrichment for extracellular matrix and cell growth genes. Network modeling demonstrated that the extracellular matrix and cell proliferation genes influenced by HHIP tended to be interconnected. Thus, we identified potential HHIP targets in human bronchial epithelial cells that may contribute to COPD pathogenesis. PMID:23459001

  1. Polycomb-group genes sustaining the stem cell activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takihara, Yoshihiro

    2006-01-01

    Polycomb-group genes (PcG) have a role in constituting the cellular memory mechanisms through which the once expressed phenotypes during development are transmitted thereafter and this review describes, together with authors' findings of sustaining hematopoietic stem cell activity by the PcG products, what molecular bases, involving the control of histone code, are concerned in the memory. Recent investigations have gradually elucidated the outline of epigenetic control mechanisms of the memory: messages are set up as a histone code in the chromatin and the PcG complex recruited by recognition of the code regulates the chromatin structure leading to DNA transcription and maintenance of the phenotype. Proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells ex vivo will be possible if exact and detailed mechanisms for PcG are made clear in future. Such ex vivo techniques are especially awaited for marrow remodeling treatment of hematopoietic failure induced by radiation exposure. (T.I.)

  2. Musashi1 modulates cell proliferation genes in the medulloblastoma cell line Daoy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung Jaclyn Y

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Musashi1 (Msi1 is an RNA binding protein with a central role during nervous system development and stem cell maintenance. High levels of Msi1 have been reported in several malignancies including brain tumors thereby associating Msi1 and cancer. Methods We used the human medulloblastoma cell line Daoy as model system in this study to knock down the expression of Msi1 and determine the effects upon soft agar growth and neurophere formation. Quantitative RT-PCR was conducted to evaluate the expression of cell proliferation, differentiation and survival genes in Msi1 depleted Daoy cells. Results We observed that MSI1 expression was elevated in Daoy cells cultured as neurospheres compared to those grown as monolayer. These data indicated that Msi1 might be involved in regulating proliferation in cancer cells. Here we show that shRNA mediated Msi1 depletion in Daoy cells notably impaired their ability to form colonies in soft agar and to grow as neurospheres in culture. Moreover, differential expression of a group of Notch, Hedgehog and Wnt pathway related genes including MYCN, FOS, NOTCH2, SMO, CDKN1A, CCND2, CCND1, and DKK1, was also found in the Msi1 knockdown, demonstrating that Msi1 modulated the expression of a subset of cell proliferation, differentiation and survival genes in Daoy. Conclusion Our data suggested that Msi1 may promote cancer cell proliferation and survival as its loss seems to have a detrimental effect in the maintenance of medulloblastoma cancer cells. In this regard, Msi1 might be a positive regulator of tumor progression and a potential target for therapy.

  3. Stem Cell Gene Therapy for Fanconi Anemia: Report from the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolar, Jakub; Adair, Jennifer E; Antoniou, Michael; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; Becker, Pamela S; Blazar, Bruce R; Bueren, Juan; Carroll, Thomas; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Clapp, D Wade; Dalgleish, Robert; Galy, Anne; Gaspar, H Bobby; Hanenberg, Helmut; Von Kalle, Christof; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Lindeman, Dirk; Naldini, Luigi; Navarro, Susana; Renella, Raffaele; Rio, Paula; Sevilla, Julián; Schmidt, Manfred; Verhoeyen, Els; Wagner, John E; Williams, David A; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2011-01-01

    Survival rates after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Fanconi anemia (FA) have increased dramatically since 2000. However, the use of autologous stem cell gene therapy, whereby the patient's own blood stem cells are modified to express the wild-type gene product, could potentially avoid the early and late complications of allogeneic HCT. Over the last decades, gene therapy has experienced a high degree of optimism interrupted by periods of diminished expectation. Optimism stems from recent examples of successful gene correction in several congenital immunodeficiencies, whereas diminished expectations come from the realization that gene therapy will not be free of side effects. The goal of the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting was to determine the optimal strategy for moving stem cell gene therapy into clinical trials for individuals with FA. To this end, key investigators examined vector design, transduction method, criteria for large-scale clinical-grade vector manufacture, hematopoietic cell preparation, and eligibility criteria for FA patients most likely to benefit. The report summarizes the roadmap for the development of gene therapy for FA. PMID:21540837

  4. Alteration of the gene expression profile of T-cell receptor αβ-modified T-cells with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Xianfeng; Yin, Qingsong; Tan, Huo; Wang, Chunyan; Chen, Shaohua; Yang, Lijian; Li, Bo; Wu, Xiuli; Li, Yangqiu

    2013-05-01

    Antigen-specific, T-cell receptor (TCR)-modified cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) that target tumors are an attractive strategy for specific adoptive immunotherapy. Little is known about whether there are any alterations in the gene expression profile after TCR gene transduction in T cells. We constructed TCR gene-redirected CTLs with specificity for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL)-associated antigens to elucidate the gene expression profiles of TCR gene-redirected T-cells, and we further analyzed the gene expression profile pattern of these redirected T-cells by Affymetrix microarrays. The resulting data were analyzed using Bioconductor software, a two-fold cut-off expression change was applied together with anti-correlation of the profile ratios to render the microarray analysis set. The fold change of all genes was calculated by comparing the three TCR gene-modified T-cells and a negative control counterpart. The gene pathways were analyzed using Bioconductor and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. Identical genes whose fold change was greater than or equal to 2.0 in all three TCR gene-redirected T-cell groups in comparison with the negative control were identified as the differentially expressed genes. The differentially expressed genes were comprised of 33 up-regulated genes and 1 down-regulated gene including JUNB, FOS, TNF, INF-γ, DUSP2, IL-1B, CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL9, CCL2, CCL4, and CCL8. These genes are mainly involved in the TCR signaling, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction pathways. In conclusion, we characterized the gene expression profile of DLBCL-specific TCR gene-redirected T-cells. The changes corresponded to an up-regulation in the differentiation and proliferation of the T-cells. These data may help to explain some of the characteristics of the redirected T-cells.

  5. 75 FR 54351 - Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ...] Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug... Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) is announcing a public workshop entitled ``Cell and Gene Therapy... Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), gene and cellular therapy clinical researchers, and other stakeholders...

  6. Epigenetic mechanisms of peptidergic regulation of gene expression during aging of human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashapkin, V V; Linkova, N S; Khavinson, V Kh; Vanyushin, B F

    2015-03-01

    Expression levels of genes encoding specific transcription factors and other functionally important proteins vary upon aging of pancreatic and bronchial epithelium cell cultures. The peptides KEDW and AEDL tissue-specifically affect gene expression in pancreatic and bronchial cell cultures, respectively. It is established in this work that the DNA methylation patterns of the PDX1, PAX6, NGN3, NKX2-1, and SCGB1A1 gene promoter regions change upon aging in pancreatic and bronchial cell cultures in correlation with variations in their expression levels. Thus, stable changes in gene expression upon aging of cell cultures could be caused by changes in their promoter methylation patterns. The methylation patterns of the PAX4 gene in pancreatic cells as well as those of the FOXA1, SCGB3A2, and SFTPA1 genes in bronchial cells do not change upon aging and are unaffected by peptides, whereas their expression levels change in both cases. The promoter region of the FOXA2 gene in pancreatic cells contains a small number of methylated CpG sites, their methylation levels being affected by cell culture aging and KEDW, though without any correlation with gene expression levels. The promoter region of the FOXA2 gene is completely unmethylated in bronchial cells irrespective of cell culture age and AEDL action. Changes in promoter methylation might be the cause of age- and peptide-induced variations in expression levels of the PDX1, PAX6, and NGN3 genes in pancreatic cells and NKX2-1 and SCGB1A1 genes in bronchial cells. Expression levels of the PAX4 and FOXA2 genes in pancreatic cells and FOXA1, FOXA2, SCGB3A2, and SFTPA1 genes in bronchial cells seem to be controlled by some other mechanisms.

  7. Aging: a portrait from gene expression profile in blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabria, Elisa; Mazza, Emilia Maria Cristina; Dyar, Kenneth Allen; Pogliaghi, Silvia; Bruseghini, Paolo; Morandi, Carlo; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Gelati, Matteo; Guidi, Gian Cesare; Bicciato, Silvio; Schiaffino, Stefano; Schena, Federico; Capelli, Carlo

    2016-08-01

    The availability of reliable biomarkers of aging is important not only to monitor the effect of interventions and predict the timing of pathologies associated with aging but also to understand the mechanisms and devise appropriate countermeasures. Blood cells provide an easily available tissue and gene expression profiles from whole blood samples appear to mirror disease states and some aspects of the aging process itself. We report here a microarray analysis of whole blood samples from two cohorts of healthy adult and elderly subjects, aged 43±3 and 68±4 years, respectively, to monitor gene expression changes in the initial phase of the senescence process. A number of significant changes were found in the elderly compared to the adult group, including decreased levels of transcripts coding for components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, which correlate with a parallel decline in the maximum rate of oxygen consumption (VO2max), as monitored in the same subjects. In addition, blood cells show age-related changes in the expression of several markers of immunosenescence, inflammation and oxidative stress. These findings support the notion that the immune system has a major role in tissue homeostasis and repair, which appears to be impaired since early stages of the aging process.

  8. Chinese medicine protein and peptide in gene and cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yinglu; Yin, Zifei; Zhang, Daniel; Srivastava, Arun; Ling, Chen

    2018-06-11

    The success of gene and cell therapy in clinic during the past two decades as well as our expanding ability to manipulate these biomaterials are leading to new therapeutic options for a wide range of inherited and acquired diseases. Combining conventional therapies with this emerging field is a promising strategy to treat those previously-thought untreatable diseases. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has evolved for thousands of years in China and still plays an important role in human health. As part of the active ingredients of TCM, proteins and peptides have attracted long-term enthusiasm of researchers. More recently, they have been utilized in gene and cell therapy, resulting in promising novel strategies to treat both cancer and non-cancer diseases. This manuscript presents a critical review on this field, accompanied with perspectives on the challenges and new directions for future research in this emerging frontier. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Alterations in radioresistance of eucaryotic cells after the transfer of genomic wildtype DNA and metallothionein genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohrer, H.

    1987-01-01

    The presented paper describes experiments concerning the alteration of radiosensitivity of eucaryotic cells after gene transfer. Ionizing radiation (γ- or X-ray) induces DNA single- or double strand breaks, which are religated by an unknown repair system. Repair deficient cells are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation. In the experiments described, cells from a patient with the heritable disease Ataxia telangiectasia were used as well as two X-ray sensitive CHO mutant cell lines. After gene transfer of an intact human DNA repair gene or a metallothionein gene the cells should regain radioresistance. (orig.) [de

  10. Gene expression profiling of resting and activated vascular smooth muscle cells by serial analysis of gene expression and clustering analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beauchamp, Nicholas J.; van Achterberg, Tanja A. E.; Engelse, Marten A.; Pannekoek, Hans; de Vries, Carlie J. M.

    2003-01-01

    Migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are key events in atherosclerosis. However, little is known about alterations in gene expression upon transition of the quiescent, contractile SMC to the proliferative SMC. We performed serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) of

  11. Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir, Sanjiv [Portola Valley, CA; Pritha, Ray [Mountain View, CA

    2011-06-07

    Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imagable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

  12. Suppression of the cell proliferation in stomach cancer cells by the ZNRD1 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Liu; Zhang Yumei; Liu Na; Liu Changjiang; Zhi Min; Pan Yanglin; Lan Mei; Sun Li; Fan Daiming

    2004-01-01

    Zinc ribbon domain-containing 1 (ZNRD1), a transcription-associated gene, was recently found to be downregulated in human gastric cancer tissues as compared to the matched adjacent nonneoplastic tissues. In this study, we constructed the siRNA eukaryotic expression vectors of ZNRD1 and transfected them into normal gastric epithelial cells (GES-1). We also introduced the ZNRD1 gene into gastric cancer cells that do (SGC7901) and do not (AGS) express ZNRD1 endogenously. GES-1 cells stably transfected with the ZNRD1-RNAi were found to exhibit significantly quicker proliferation than empty vector transfectants. AGS cells stably transfected with the ZNRD1 cDNA exhibited significantly decreased growth rate as compared to control vector transfectants, whereas SGC7901 cells did not. Furthermore, ZNRD1 suppresses growth of AGS cells in soft agar and tumor formation in athymic nude mice. This study clearly demonstrates that ZNRD1 may play an important role in the control of human gastric cancer development by regulating cell proliferation. These results provide new insights into the function of ZNRD1 and further validate ZNRD1 as a potential therapeutic target in gastric cancer

  13. Studies of globin gene expression in differentiating erythroid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    The author has addressed questions concerning globin gene expression and the loss of protein synthesis in the terminal stages of erythroid development. (1) The hypothesis that the rate of cell division affects the relative synthesis of γ and β globin in erythroid cells was investigated. The effect of hydroxyurea, aminopterin, or low culture temperature on the in vitro growth of erythroid progenitor cells and on the relative synthesis of γ and β globin was measured. No consistent change in γ globin synthesis was detected. (2) The hypothesis that the ratio of γ and β globin synthesis decreases during erythroid maturation because of differential mRNA stability was investigated. The half-lives of γ and β globin mRNAs and γ and β globin protein synthesis were measured in cultured reticulocytes. γ and β globin mRNAs were assayed by solution hybridization and by in vitro translation. Globin synthesis was determined by 3 H-leucine incorporation into the γ and β globin chains. γ and β globin mRNAs decay with similar half-lives in cultured reticulocytes. Therefore, the change in the ratio of γ and β globin synthesis during erythroid maturation cannot be explained by differences in mRNA stability and is likely to result from asynchronous transcription of the genes. These data suggest that protein synthesis in maturing reticulocytes is not limited by the quantity of mRNA but by the availability of translation factors. (3) The hypothesis was tested that the initiation factor GEF becomes limiting for protein synthesis during reticulocyte maturation

  14. Discovery of a novel gene involved in autolysis of Clostridium cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liejian; Bao, Guanhui; Zhu, Yan; Dong, Hongjun; Zhang, Yanping; Li, Yin

    2013-06-01

    Cell autolysis plays important physiological roles in the life cycle of clostridial cells. Understanding the genetic basis of the autolysis phenomenon of pathogenic Clostridium or solvent producing Clostridium cells might provide new insights into this important species. Genes that might be involved in autolysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum, a model clostridial species, were investigated in this study. Twelve putative autolysin genes were predicted in C. acetobutylicum DSM 1731 genome through bioinformatics analysis. Of these 12 genes, gene SMB_G3117 was selected for testing the in tracellular autolysin activity, growth profile, viable cell numbers, and cellular morphology. We found that overexpression of SMB_G3117 gene led to earlier ceased growth, significantly increased number of dead cells, and clear electrolucent cavities, while disruption of SMB_G3117 gene exhibited remarkably reduced intracellular autolysin activity. These results indicate that SMB_G3117 is a novel gene involved in cellular autolysis of C. acetobutylicum.

  15. Genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells: recent advances in the gene therapy of inherited diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueren, Juan A; Guenechea, Guillermo; Casado, José A; Lamana, María Luisa; Segovia, José C

    2003-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells constitute a rare population of precursor cells with remarkable properties for being used as targets in gene therapy protocols. The last years have been particularly productive both in the fields of gene therapy and stem cell biology. Results from ongoing clinical trials have shown the first unquestionable clinical benefits of immunodeficient patients transplanted with genetically modified autologous stem cells. On the other hand, severe side effects in a few patients treated with gene therapy have also been reported, indicating the usefulness of further improving the vectors currently used in gene therapy clinical trials. In the field of stem cell biology, evidence showing the plastic potential of adult hematopoietic stem cells and data indicating the multipotency of adult mesenchymal precursor cells have been presented. Also, the generation of embryonic stem cells by means of nuclear transfer techniques has appeared as a new methodology with direct implications in gene therapy.

  16. Comparative analysis of gene expression in normal and cancer human prostate cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Rosenberg

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is one of the main causes of mortality in men with malignant tumors. The urgent problem was a search for biomarkers of prostate cancer, which would allow distinguishing between aggressive metastatic and latent tumors. The aim of this work was to search for differentially expressed genes in normal epithelial cells PNT2 and prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, DU145 and PC3, produced from tumors with different aggressiveness and metas­tatic ability. Such genes might be used to create a panel of prognostic markers for aggressiveness and metastasis. Relative gene expression of 65 cancer-related genes was determined by the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR. Expression of 29 genes was changed in LNCaP cells, 20 genes in DU145 and 16 genes in PC3 cell lines, compared with normal line PNT2. The obtained data make it possible to conclude that the epithelial-mesenchymal cell transition took place, which involved the loss of epithelial markers, reduced cell adhesion and increased migration. We have also found few differentially expressed genes among 3 prostate cancer cell lines. We have found that genes, involved in cell adhesion (CDH1, invasiveness and metastasis (IL8, CXCL2 and cell cycle control (P16, CCNE1 underwent most changes. These genes might be used for diagnosis and prognosis of invasive metastatic prostate tumors.

  17. Silencing of Taxol-Sensitizer Genes in Cancer Cells: Lack of Sensitization Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Shang-Lang; Chao, Chuck C.-K.

    2015-01-01

    A previous genome-wide screening analysis identified a panel of genes that sensitize the human non-small-cell lung carcinoma cell line NCI-H1155 to taxol. However, whether the identified genes sensitize other cancer cells to taxol has not been examined. Here, we silenced the taxol-sensitizer genes identified (acrbp, atp6v0d2, fgd4, hs6st2, psma6, and tubgcp2) in nine other cancer cell types (including lung, cervical, ovarian, and hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines) that showed reduced cell viability in the presence of a sub-lethal concentration of taxol. Surprisingly, none of the genes studied increased sensitivity to taxol in the tested panel of cell lines. As observed in H1155 cells, SKOV3 cells displayed induction of five of the six genes studied in response to a cell killing dose of taxol. The other cell types were much less responsive to taxol. Notably, four of the five inducible taxol-sensitizer genes tested (acrbp, atp6v0d2, psma6, and tubgcp2) were upregulated in a taxol-resistant ovarian cancer cell line. These results indicate that the previously identified taxol-sensitizer loci are not conserved genetic targets involved in inhibiting cell proliferation in response to taxol. Our findings also suggest that regulation of taxol-sensitizer genes by taxol may be critical for acquired cell resistance to the drug

  18. Silencing of Taxol-Sensitizer Genes in Cancer Cells: Lack of Sensitization Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shang-Lang [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Chao, Chuck C.-K., E-mail: cckchao@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research and Development, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-16

    A previous genome-wide screening analysis identified a panel of genes that sensitize the human non-small-cell lung carcinoma cell line NCI-H1155 to taxol. However, whether the identified genes sensitize other cancer cells to taxol has not been examined. Here, we silenced the taxol-sensitizer genes identified (acrbp, atp6v0d2, fgd4, hs6st2, psma6, and tubgcp2) in nine other cancer cell types (including lung, cervical, ovarian, and hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines) that showed reduced cell viability in the presence of a sub-lethal concentration of taxol. Surprisingly, none of the genes studied increased sensitivity to taxol in the tested panel of cell lines. As observed in H1155 cells, SKOV3 cells displayed induction of five of the six genes studied in response to a cell killing dose of taxol. The other cell types were much less responsive to taxol. Notably, four of the five inducible taxol-sensitizer genes tested (acrbp, atp6v0d2, psma6, and tubgcp2) were upregulated in a taxol-resistant ovarian cancer cell line. These results indicate that the previously identified taxol-sensitizer loci are not conserved genetic targets involved in inhibiting cell proliferation in response to taxol. Our findings also suggest that regulation of taxol-sensitizer genes by taxol may be critical for acquired cell resistance to the drug.

  19. PDGF-receptor beta-targeted adenovirus redirects gene transfer from hepatocytes to activated stellate cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoemaker, Marieke H.; Rots, Marianne G.; Beljaars, Leonie; Ypma, Arjen Y.; Jansen, Peter L. M.; Poelstra, Klaas; Moshage, Albert; Haisma, Hidde J.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic liver damage may lead to liver fibrosis. In this process, hepatic activated stellate cells are the key players. Thus, activated stellate cells are attractive targets for antifibrotic gene therapy. Recombinant, adenovirus is a promising vehicle for delivering therapeutic genes to liver cells.

  20. Distinct gene expression signatures in human embryonic stem cells differentiated towards definitive endoderm at single-cell level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrman, Karin; Strömbeck, Anna; Semb, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    for the three activin A based protocols applied. Our data provide novel insights in DE gene expression at the cellular level of in vitro differentiated human embryonic stem cells, and illustrate the power of using single-cell gene expression profiling to study differentiation heterogeneity and to characterize...... of anterior definitive endoderm (DE). Here, we differentiated human embryonic stem cells towards DE using three different activin A based treatments. Differentiation efficiencies were evaluated by gene expression profiling over time at cell population level. A panel of key markers was used to study DE...... formation. Final DE differentiation was also analyzed with immunocytochemistry and single-cell gene expression profiling. We found that cells treated with activin A in combination with sodium butyrate and B27 serum-free supplement medium generated the most mature DE cells. Cell population studies were...

  1. Microarray analysis of gene expression alteration in human middle ear epithelial cells induced by micro particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jae-Jun; Kwon, Jee Young; Park, Moo Kyun; Seo, Young Rok

    2013-10-01

    The primary aim of this study is to reveal the effect of particulate matter (PM) on the human middle ear epithelial cell (HMEEC). The HMEEC was treated with PM (300 μg/ml) for 24 h. Total RNA was extracted and used for microarray analysis. Molecular pathways among differentially expressed genes were further analyzed by using Pathway Studio 9.0 software. For selected genes, the changes in gene expression were confirmed by real-time PCR. A total of 611 genes were regulated by PM. Among them, 366 genes were up-regulated, whereas 245 genes were down-regulated. Up-regulated genes were mainly involved in cellular processes, including reactive oxygen species generation, cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell differentiation, inflammatory response and immune response. Down-regulated genes affected several cellular processes, including cell differentiation, cell cycle, proliferation, apoptosis and cell migration. A total of 21 genes were discovered as crucial components in potential signaling networks containing 2-fold up regulated genes. Four genes, VEGFA, IL1B, CSF2 and HMOX1 were revealed as key mediator genes among the up-regulated genes. A total of 25 genes were revealed as key modulators in the signaling pathway associated with 2-fold down regulated genes. Four genes, including IGF1R, TIMP1, IL6 and FN1, were identified as the main modulator genes. We identified the differentially expressed genes in PM-treated HMEEC, whose expression profile may provide a useful clue for the understanding of environmental pathophysiology of otitis media. Our work indicates that air pollution, like PM, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of otitis media. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Toxic effect of trichloroethylene on liver cells with CYP3A4 gene defect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, R Y; Liu, S

    2016-06-20

    To investigate the toxic effect of trichloroethylene on liver cells with CYP3A4 gene defect. The normal human liver cells (L02 cells) and liver cells with CYP3A4 gene defect were exposed to trichloroethylene at different doses (0.0, 0.4, 0.8, 1.6, 3.2, and 6.4 mmol/L). CCK8 assay and RT-qPCR were used to measure cell viability and changes in the expression of apoptosis genes and oncogenes. After being exposed to trichloroethylene at doses of 1.6, 3.2, and 6.4 mmol/L, the liver cells with CYP3A4 gene defect showed significantly higher cell viability than L02 cells (0.91±0.06/0.89±0.05/0.85±0.07 vs 0.80±0.04/0.73±0.06/0.67±0.07, Ptrichloroethylene groups showed significant increases in the expression of the apoptosis genes caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9 (PTrichloroethylene exposure has a less effect on the expression of apoptosis genes and oncogenes in liver cells with CYP3A4 gene defect than in normal human liver cells, suggesting that CYP3A4 gene defect reduces the inductive effect of trichloroethylene on apoptosis genes and oncogenes.

  3. Meta-analysis of differentiating mouse embryonic stem cell gene expression kinetics reveals early change of a small gene set.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive H Glover

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell differentiation involves critical changes in gene expression. Identification of these should provide endpoints useful for optimizing stem cell propagation as well as potential clues about mechanisms governing stem cell maintenance. Here we describe the results of a new meta-analysis methodology applied to multiple gene expression datasets from three mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC lines obtained at specific time points during the course of their differentiation into various lineages. We developed methods to identify genes with expression changes that correlated with the altered frequency of functionally defined, undifferentiated ESC in culture. In each dataset, we computed a novel statistical confidence measure for every gene which captured the certainty that a particular gene exhibited an expression pattern of interest within that dataset. This permitted a joint analysis of the datasets, despite the different experimental designs. Using a ranking scheme that favored genes exhibiting patterns of interest, we focused on the top 88 genes whose expression was consistently changed when ESC were induced to differentiate. Seven of these (103728_at, 8430410A17Rik, Klf2, Nr0b1, Sox2, Tcl1, and Zfp42 showed a rapid decrease in expression concurrent with a decrease in frequency of undifferentiated cells and remained predictive when evaluated in additional maintenance and differentiating protocols. Through a novel meta-analysis, this study identifies a small set of genes whose expression is useful for identifying changes in stem cell frequencies in cultures of mouse ESC. The methods and findings have broader applicability to understanding the regulation of self-renewal of other stem cell types.

  4. Clinical Relevance of Gene Copy Number Variation in Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouhaud, François-Xavier; Blanchard, France; Sesboue, Richard; Flaman, Jean-Michel; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Pfister, Christian; Di Fiore, Frédéric

    2018-02-23

    Gene copy number variations (CNVs) have been reported to be frequent in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), with potential prognostic value for some. However, their clinical utility, especially to guide treatment of metastatic disease remains to be established. Our objectives were to assess CNVs on a panel of selected genes and determine their clinical relevance in patients who underwent treatment of metastatic RCC. The genetic assessment was performed on frozen tissue samples of clear cell metastatic RCC using quantitative multiplex polymerase chain reaction of short fluorescent fragment method to detect CNVs on a panel of 14 genes of interest. The comparison of the electropherogram obtained from both tumor and normal renal adjacent tissue allowed for CNV identification. The clinical, biologic, and survival characteristics were assessed for their associations with the most frequent CNVs. Fifty patients with clear cell metastatic RCC were included. The CNV rate was 21.4%. The loss of CDKN2A and PLG was associated with a higher tumor stage (P relevance, especially those located on CDKN2A, PLG, and ALDOB, in a homogeneous cohort of patients with clear cell metastatic RCC. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Fanconi anemia genes are highly expressed in primitive CD34+ hematopoietic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brodeur Isabelle

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fanconi anemia (FA is a complex recessive genetic disease characterized by progressive bone marrow failure (BM and a predisposition to cancer. We have previously shown using the Fancc mouse model that the progressive BM failure results from a hematopoietic stem cell defect suggesting that function of the FA genes may reside in primitive hematopoietic stem cells. Methods Since genes involved in stem cell differentiation and/or maintenance are usually regulated at the transcription level, we used a semiquantitative RT-PCR method to evaluate FA gene transcript levels in purified hematopoietic stem cells. Results We show that most FA genes are highly expressed in primitive CD34-positive and negative cells compared to lower levels in more differentiated cells. However, in CD34- stem cells the Fancc gene was found to be expressed at low levels while Fancg was undetectable in this population. Furthermore, Fancg expression is significantly decreased in Fancc -/- stem cells as compared to wild-type cells while the cancer susceptibility genes Brca1 and Fancd1/Brac2 are upregulated in Fancc-/- hematopoietic cells. Conclusions These results suggest that FA genes are regulated at the mRNA level, that increased Fancc expression in LTS-CD34+ cells correlates with a role at the CD34+ differentiation stage and that lack of Fancc affects the expression of other FA gene, more specifically Fancg and Fancd1/Brca2, through an unknown mechanism.

  6. 3-Deazaneplanocin A suppresses aggressive phenotype-related gene expression in an oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatta, Mitsutoki; Naganuma, Kaori; Kato, Kenichi; Yamazaki, Jun

    2015-01-01

    In tumor tissues, alterations of gene expression caused by aberrant epigenetic modifications confer phenotypic diversity on malignant cells. Although 3-deazaneplanocin A (DZNep) has been shown to reactivate tumor suppressor genes in several cancer cells, it remains unclear whether DZNep attenuates the malignant phenotypes of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of DZNep on the expression of genes related to aggressive phenotypes, such as epithelial–mesenchymal transition, in OSCC cells. We found that DZNep reduced the cellular levels of polycomb group proteins (EZH2, SUZ12, BMI1, and RING1A) and the associated trimethylation of Lys27 on histone H3 and monoubiquitination of Lys119 on histone H2A in the poorly differentiated OSCC cell line SAS. Immunocytochemical staining demonstrated that DZNep induced the reorganization of filamentous actin and the membrane localization of E-cadherin associated with cell–cell adhesions. We also found an inhibitory effect of DZNep on cell proliferation using a WST assay. Finally, quantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that genes involved in the aggressive phenotypes (TWIST2, EGFR, ACTA2, TGFB1, WNT5B, and APLIN) were down-regulated, whereas epithelial phenotype genes (CDH1, CLDN4, IVL, and TGM1) were up-regulated in SAS cells treated with DZNep. Collectively, our findings suggest that DZNep reverses the aggressive characteristics of OSCC cells through the dynamic regulation of epithelial plasticity via the reprogramming of gene expression patterns. - Highlights: • DZNep reduced PcG proteins and associated histone modifications in OSCC cells. • DZNep enhanced cell–cell adhesion indicative of epithelial phenotype in OSCC cells. • DZNep suppressed the aggressive phenotype-related gene expression in OSCC cells. • DZNep activated the gene expression of epithelial markers in OSCC cells.

  7. 3-Deazaneplanocin A suppresses aggressive phenotype-related gene expression in an oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatta, Mitsutoki, E-mail: hatta@college.fdcnet.ac.jp [Department of Physiological Science and Molecular Biology, Fukuoka Dental College, Fukuoka (Japan); Naganuma, Kaori [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Fukuoka Dental College, Fukuoka (Japan); Kato, Kenichi; Yamazaki, Jun [Department of Physiological Science and Molecular Biology, Fukuoka Dental College, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2015-12-04

    In tumor tissues, alterations of gene expression caused by aberrant epigenetic modifications confer phenotypic diversity on malignant cells. Although 3-deazaneplanocin A (DZNep) has been shown to reactivate tumor suppressor genes in several cancer cells, it remains unclear whether DZNep attenuates the malignant phenotypes of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of DZNep on the expression of genes related to aggressive phenotypes, such as epithelial–mesenchymal transition, in OSCC cells. We found that DZNep reduced the cellular levels of polycomb group proteins (EZH2, SUZ12, BMI1, and RING1A) and the associated trimethylation of Lys27 on histone H3 and monoubiquitination of Lys119 on histone H2A in the poorly differentiated OSCC cell line SAS. Immunocytochemical staining demonstrated that DZNep induced the reorganization of filamentous actin and the membrane localization of E-cadherin associated with cell–cell adhesions. We also found an inhibitory effect of DZNep on cell proliferation using a WST assay. Finally, quantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that genes involved in the aggressive phenotypes (TWIST2, EGFR, ACTA2, TGFB1, WNT5B, and APLIN) were down-regulated, whereas epithelial phenotype genes (CDH1, CLDN4, IVL, and TGM1) were up-regulated in SAS cells treated with DZNep. Collectively, our findings suggest that DZNep reverses the aggressive characteristics of OSCC cells through the dynamic regulation of epithelial plasticity via the reprogramming of gene expression patterns. - Highlights: • DZNep reduced PcG proteins and associated histone modifications in OSCC cells. • DZNep enhanced cell–cell adhesion indicative of epithelial phenotype in OSCC cells. • DZNep suppressed the aggressive phenotype-related gene expression in OSCC cells. • DZNep activated the gene expression of epithelial markers in OSCC cells.

  8. Microarray Analysis on Gene Regulation by Estrogen, Progesterone and Tamoxifen in Human Endometrial Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-E Ren

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial stromal cells represent a major cellular component of human uterine endometrium that is subject to tight hormonal regulation. Through cell-cell contacts and/or paracrine mechanisms, stromal cells play a significant role in the malignant transformation of epithelial cells. We isolated stromal cells from normal human endometrium and investigated the morphological and transcriptional changes induced by estrogen, progesterone and tamoxifen. We demonstrated that stromal cells express appreciable levels of estrogen and progesterone receptors and undergo different morphological changes upon hormonal stimulation. Microarray analysis indicated that both estrogen and progesterone induced dramatic alterations in a variety of genes associated with cell structure, transcription, cell cycle, and signaling. However, divergent patterns of changes, and in some genes opposite effects, were observed for the two hormones. A large number of genes are identified as novel targets for hormonal regulation. These hormone-responsive genes may be involved in normal uterine function and the development of endometrial malignancies.

  9. Potential in a single cancer cell to produce heterogeneous morphology, radiosensitivity and gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Sadayuki; Ishikawa, Ken-ichi; Kawai, Seiko; Koyama-Saegusa, Kumiko; Ishikawa, Atsuko; Imai, Takashi; Shimada, Yutaka; Inazawa, Johji

    2005-01-01

    Morphologically heterogeneous colonies were formed from a cultured cell line (KYSE70) established from one human esophageal carcinoma tissue. Two subclones were separated from a single clone (clone 13) of KYSE70 cells. One subclone (clone 13-3G) formed mainly mounding colonies and the other (clone 13-6G) formed flat, diffusive colonies. X-irradiation stimulated the cells to dedifferentiate from the mounding state to the flat, diffusive state. Clone 13-6G cells were more radiosensitive than the other 3 cell lines. Clustering analysis for gene expression level by oligonucleotide microarray demonstrated that in the radiosensitive clone 13-6G cells, expression of genes involved in cell adhesion was upregulated, but genes involved in the response to DNA damage stimulus were downregulated. The data demonstrated that a single cancer cell had the potential to produce progeny heterogeneous in terms of morphology, radiation sensitivity and gene expression, and irradiation enhanced the dedifferentiation of cancer cells. (author)

  10. Long-term in vitro, cell-type-specific genome-wide reprogramming of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakelien, Anne-Mari; Gaustad, Kristine G.; Taranger, Christel K.; Skalhegg, Bjorn S.; Kuentziger, Thomas; Collas, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate a cell extract-based, genome-wide and heritable reprogramming of gene expression in vitro. Kidney epithelial 293T cells have previously been shown to take on T cell properties following a brief treatment with an extract of Jurkat T cells. We show here that 293T cells exposed for 1 h to a Jurkat cell extract undergo genome-wide, target cell-type-specific and long-lasting transcriptional changes. Microarray analyses indicate that on any given week after extract treatment, ∼2500 genes are upregulated >3-fold, of which ∼900 are also expressed in Jurkat cells. Concomitantly, ∼1500 genes are downregulated or repressed, of which ∼500 are also downregulated in Jurkat cells. Gene expression changes persist for over 30 passages (∼80 population doublings) in culture. Target cell-type specificity of these changes is shown by the lack of activation or repression of Jurkat-specific genes by extracts of 293T cells or carcinoma cells. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirms the long-term transcriptional activation of genes involved in key T cell functions. Additionally, growth of cells in suspended aggregates, expression of CD3 and CD28 T cell surface markers, and interleukin-2 secretion by 293T cells treated with extract of adult peripheral blood T cells illustrate a functional nuclear reprogramming. Therefore, target cell-type-specific and heritable changes in gene expression, and alterations in cell function, can be promoted by extracts derived from transformed cells as well as from adult primary cells

  11. Mesenchymal stromal cells retrovirally transduced with prodrug-converting genes are suitable vehicles for cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ďuriniková, E; Kučerová, L; Matúšková, M

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) possess a set of several fairly unique properties which make them ideally suitable both for cellular therapies and regenerative medicine. These include: relative ease of isolation, the ability to differentiate along mesenchymal and non-mesenchymal lineages in vitro and the ability to be extensively expanded in culture without a loss of differentiative capacity. MSC are not only hypoimmunogenic, but they mediate immunosuppression upon transplantation, and possess pronounced anti-inflammatory properties. They are able to home to damaged tissues, tumors, and metastases following systemic administration. The ability of homing holds big promise for tumor-targeted delivery of therapeutic agents. Viruses are naturally evolved vehicles efficiently transferring their genes into host cells. This ability made them suitable for engineering vector systems for the delivery of genes of interest. MSC can be retrovirally transduced with genes encoding prodrug-converting genes (suicide genes), which are not toxic per se, but catalyze the formation of highly toxic metabolites following the application of a nontoxic prodrug. The homing ability of MSC holds advantages compared to virus vehicles which display many shortcomings in effective delivery of the therapeutic agents. Gene therapies mediated by viruses are limited by their restricted ability to track cancer cells infiltrating into the surrounding tissue, and by their low migratory capacity towards tumor. Thus combination of cellular therapy and gene delivery is an attractive option - it protects the vector from immune surveillance, and supports targeted delivery of a therapeutic gene/protein to the tumor site.

  12. A gene expression analysis of cell wall biosynthetic genes in Malus × domestica infected by ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma mali’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero, Gea; Giorno, Filomena; Ciccotti, Anna Maria; Schmidt, Silvia; Baric, Sanja

    2016-01-01

    Apple proliferation (AP) represents a serious threat to several fruit-growing areas and is responsible for great economic losses. Several studies have highlighted the key role played by the cell wall in response to pathogen attack. The existence of a cell wall integrity signaling pathway which senses perturbations in the cell wall architecture upon abiotic/biotic stresses and activates specific defence responses has been widely demonstrated in plants. More recently a role played by cell wall-related genes has also been reported in plants infected by phytoplasmas. With the aim of shedding light on the cell wall response to AP disease in the economically relevant fruit-tree Malus × domestica Borkh., we investigated the expression of the cellulose (CesA) and callose synthase (CalS) genes in different organs (i.e., leaves, roots and branch phloem) of healthy and infected symptomatic outdoor-grown trees, sampled over the course of two time points (i.e., spring and autumn 2011), as well as in in vitro micropropagated control and infected plantlets. A strong up-regulation in the expression of cell wall biosynthetic genes was recorded in roots from infected trees. Secondary cell wall CesAs showed up-regulation in the phloem tissue from branches of infected plants, while either a down-regulation of some genes or no major changes were observed in the leaves. Micropropagated plantlets also showed an increase in cell wall-related genes and constitute a useful system for a general assessment of gene expression analysis upon phytoplasma infection. Finally, we also report the presence of several ‘knot’-like structures along the roots of infected apple trees and discuss the occurrence of this interesting phenotype in relation to the gene expression results and the modalities of phytoplasma diffusion. PMID:23086810

  13. Transfer of Chinese hamster DNA repair gene(s) into repair-deficient human cells (Xeroderma pigmentosum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karentz, D.; Cleaver, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Transfer of repair genes by DNA transfection into repair-deficient Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells has thus far been unsuccessful, presenting an obstacle to cloning XP genes. The authors chose an indirect route to transfer repair genes in chromosome fragments. DNA repair-competent (UV resistant) hybrid cell lines were established by PEG-mediated fusions of DNA repair-deficient (UV sensitive) human fibroblasts (XP12RO) with wild type Chinese hamster (CHO) cells (AA8). CHO cells were exposed to 5 Krad X-rays prior to fusions, predisposing hybrid cells to lose CHO chromosome fragments preferentially. Repair-competent hybrids were selected by periodic exposures to UV light. Secondary and tertiary hybrid cell lines were developed by fusion of X-irradiated hybrids to XP12RO. The hybrid cell lines exhibit resistance to UV that is comparable to that of CHO cells and they are proficient at repair replication after UV exposure. Whole cell DNA-DNA hybridizations indicate that the hybrids have greater homology to CHO DNA than is evident between XP12RO and CHO. These observations indicate that CHO DNA sequences which can function in repair of UV-damaged DNA in human cells have been transferred into the genome of the repair-deficient XP12RO cells

  14. Time- and dose-dependent effects of curcumin on gene expression in human colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Erk Marjan J

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Curcumin is a spice and a coloring food compound with a promising role in colon cancer prevention. Curcumin protects against development of colon tumors in rats treated with a colon carcinogen, in colon cancer cells curcumin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, it is an anti-oxidant and it can act as an anti-inflammatory agent. The aim of this study was to elucidate mechanisms and effect of curcumin in colon cancer cells using gene expression profiling. Methods Gene expression changes in response to curcumin exposure were studied in two human colon cancer cell lines, using cDNA microarrays with four thousand human genes. HT29 cells were exposed to two different concentrations of curcumin and gene expression changes were followed in time (3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours. Gene expression changes after short-term exposure (3 or 6 hours to curcumin were also studied in a second cell type, Caco-2 cells. Results Gene expression changes (>1.5-fold were found at all time points. HT29 cells were more sensitive to curcumin than Caco-2 cells. Early response genes were involved in cell cycle, signal transduction, DNA repair, gene transcription, cell adhesion and xenobiotic metabolism. In HT29 cells curcumin modulated a number of cell cycle genes of which several have a role in transition through the G2/M phase. This corresponded to a cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase as was observed by flow cytometry. Functional groups with a similar expression profile included genes involved in phase-II metabolism that were induced by curcumin after 12 and 24 hours. Expression of some cytochrome P450 genes was downregulated by curcumin in HT29 and Caco-2 cells. In addition, curcumin affected expression of metallothionein genes, tubulin genes, p53 and other genes involved in colon carcinogenesis. Conclusions This study has extended knowledge on pathways or processes already reported to be affected by curcumin (cell cycle arrest, phase

  15. Thioridazine affects transcription of genes involved in cell wall biosynthesis in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Mette; Højland, Dorte Heidi; Kolmos, Hans Jørn

    2011-01-01

    have previously shown that the expression of some resistance genes is abolished after treatment with thioridazine and oxacillin. To further understand the mechanism underlying the reversal of resistance, we tested the expression of genes involved in antibiotic resistance and cell wall biosynthesis...... in response to thioridazine in combination with oxacillin. We observed that the oxacillin-induced expression of genes belonging to the VraSR regulon is reduced by the addition of thioridazine. The exclusion of such key factors involved in cell wall biosynthesis will most likely lead to a weakened cell wall...... reversal of resistance by thioridazine relies on decreased expression of specific genes involved in cell wall biosynthesis....

  16. Reference genes for gene expression analysis by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction of renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerregaard, Henriette; Pedersen, Shona; Kristensen, Søren Risom; Marcussen, Niels

    2011-12-01

    Differentiation between malignant renal cell carcinoma and benign oncocytoma is of great importance to choose the optimal treatment. Accurate preoperative diagnosis of renal tumor is therefore crucial; however, existing imaging techniques and histologic examinations are incapable of providing an optimal differentiation profile. Analysis of gene expression of molecular markers is a new possibility but relies on appropriate standardization to compare different samples. The aim of this study was to identify stably expressed reference genes suitable for the normalization of results extracted from gene expression analysis of renal tumors. Expression levels of 8 potential reference genes (ATP5J, HMBS, HPRT1, PPIA, TBP, 18S, GAPDH, and POLR2A) were examined by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in tumor and normal tissue from removed kidneys from 13 patients with renal cell carcinoma and 5 patients with oncocytoma. The expression levels of genes were compared by gene stability value M, average gene stability M, pairwise variation V, and coefficient of variation CV. More candidates were not suitable for the purpose, but a combination of HMBS, PPIA, ATP5J, and TBP was found to be the best combination with an average gene stability value M of 0.9 and a CV of 0.4 in the 18 tumors and normal tissues. A combination of 4 genes, HMBS, PPIA, ATP5J, and TBP, is a possible reference in renal tumor gene expression analysis by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. A combination of four genes, HMBS, PPIA, ATP5J and TBP, being stably expressed in tissues from RCC is possible reference genes for gene expression analysis.

  17. Identification and Regulation of c-Myb Target Genes in MCF-7 Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintana, Anita M; Liu, Fan; O'Rourke, John P; Ness, Scott A

    2011-01-01

    The c-Myb transcription factor regulates differentiation and proliferation in hematopoietic cells, stem cells and epithelial cells. Although oncogenic versions of c-Myb were first associated with leukemias, over expression or rearrangement of the c-myb gene is common in several types of solid tumors, including breast cancers. Expression of the c-myb gene in human breast cancer cells is dependent on estrogen stimulation, but little is known about the activities of the c-Myb protein or what genes it regulates in estrogen-stimulated cells. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with whole genome promoter tiling microarrays to identify endogenous c-Myb target genes in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and characterized the activity of c-Myb at a panel of target genes during different stages of estrogen deprivation and stimulation. By using different antibodies and different growth conditions, the c-Myb protein was found associated with over 10,000 promoters in MCF-7 cells, including many genes that encode cell cycle regulators or transcription factors and more than 60 genes that encode microRNAs. Several previously identified c-Myb target genes were identified, including CCNB1, MYC and CXCR4 and novel targets such as JUN, KLF4, NANOG and SND1. By studying a panel of these targets to validate the results, we found that estradiol stimulation triggered the association of c-Myb with promoters and that association correlated with increased target gene expression. We studied one target gene, CXCR4, in detail, showing that c-Myb associated with the CXCR4 gene promoter and activated a CXCR4 reporter gene in transfection assays. Our results show that c-Myb associates with a surprisingly large number of promoters in human cells. The results also suggest that estradiol stimulation leads to large-scale, genome-wide changes in c-Myb activity and subsequent changes in gene expression in human breast cancer cells

  18. Frequent mutations of genes encoding ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis pathway components in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Guangwu; Gui, Yaoting; Gao, Shengjie

    2012-01-01

    We sequenced whole exomes of ten clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) and performed a screen of similar to 1,100 genes in 88 additional ccRCCs, from which we discovered 12 previously unidentified genes mutated at elevated frequencies in ccRCC. Notably, we detected frequent mutations in the u...

  19. Integrative analysis of genome-wide gene copy number changes and gene expression in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Jabs

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC represents a genomically unstable cancer type with extensive copy number aberrations. The relationship of gene copy number alterations and subsequent mRNA levels has only fragmentarily been described. The aim of this study was to conduct a genome-wide analysis of gene copy number gains and corresponding gene expression levels in a clinically well annotated NSCLC patient cohort (n = 190 and their association with survival. While more than half of all analyzed gene copy number-gene expression pairs showed statistically significant correlations (10,296 of 18,756 genes, high correlations, with a correlation coefficient >0.7, were obtained only in a subset of 301 genes (1.6%, including KRAS, EGFR and MDM2. Higher correlation coefficients were associated with higher copy number and expression levels. Strong correlations were frequently based on few tumors with high copy number gains and correspondingly increased mRNA expression. Among the highly correlating genes, GO groups associated with posttranslational protein modifications were particularly frequent, including ubiquitination and neddylation. In a meta-analysis including 1,779 patients we found that survival associated genes were overrepresented among highly correlating genes (61 of the 301 highly correlating genes, FDR adjusted p<0.05. Among them are the chaperone CCT2, the core complex protein NUP107 and the ubiquitination and neddylation associated protein CAND1. In conclusion, in a comprehensive analysis we described a distinct set of highly correlating genes. These genes were found to be overrepresented among survival-associated genes based on gene expression in a large collection of publicly available datasets.

  20. Quantitative rather than qualitative differences in gene expression predominate in intestinal cell maturation along distinct cell lineages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velcich, Anna; Corner, Georgia; Paul, Doru; Zhuang Min; Mariadason, John M.; Laboisse, Christian; Augenlicht, Leonard

    2005-01-01

    Several cell types are present in the intestinal epithelium that likely arise from a common precursor, the stem cell, and each mature cell type expresses a unique set of genes that characterizes its functional phenotype. Although the process of differentiation is intimately linked to the cessation of proliferation, the mechanisms that dictate intestinal cell fate determination are not well characterized. To investigate the reprogramming of gene expression during the cell lineage allocation/differentiation process, we took advantage of a unique system of two clonal derivatives of HT29 cells, Cl16E and Cl19A cells, which spontaneously differentiate as mucus producing goblet and chloride-secreting cells, respectively, as a function of time. By profiling gene expression, we found that these two cell lines show remarkably similar kinetics of change in gene expression and common clusters of coordinately regulated genes. This demonstrates that lineage-specific differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells is characterized overall by the sequential recruitment of functionally similar gene sets independent of the final phenotype of the mature cells

  1. Reduced rates of gene loss, gene silencing, and gene mutation in Dnmt1-deficient embryonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, M.F.; van Amerongen, R.; Nijjar, T.; Cuppen, E.; Jones, P.A.; Laird, P.W.

    2001-01-01

    Tumor suppressor gene inactivation is a crucial event in oncogenesis. Gene inactivation mechanisms include events resulting in loss of heterozygosity (LOH), gene mutation, and transcriptional silencing. The contribution of each of these different pathways varies among tumor suppressor genes and by

  2. An Anion Conductance, the Essential Component of the Hydroxyl-Radical-Induced Ion Current in Plant Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Pottosin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress signaling is essential for plant adaptation to hostile environments. Previous studies revealed the essentiality of hydroxyl radicals (HO•-induced activation of massive K+ efflux and a smaller Ca2+ influx as an important component of plant adaptation to a broad range of abiotic stresses. Such activation would modify membrane potential making it more negative. Contrary to these expectations, here, we provide experimental evidence that HO• induces a strong depolarization, from −130 to −70 mV, which could only be explained by a substantial HO•-induced efflux of intracellular anions. Application of Gd3+ and NPPB, non-specific blockers of cation and anion conductance, respectively, reduced HO•-induced ion fluxes instantaneously, implying a direct block of the dual conductance. The selectivity of an early instantaneous HO•-induced whole cell current fluctuated from more anionic to more cationic and vice versa, developing a higher cation selectivity at later times. The parallel electroneutral efflux of K+ and anions should underlie a substantial leak of the cellular electrolyte, which may affect the cell’s turgor and metabolic status. The physiological implications of these findings are discussed in the context of cell fate determination, and ROS and cytosolic K+ signaling.

  3. Genomic instability of osteosarcoma cell lines in culture: impact on the prediction of metastasis relevant genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Muff

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma is a rare but highly malignant cancer of the bone. As a consequence, the number of established cell lines used for experimental in vitro and in vivo osteosarcoma research is limited and the value of these cell lines relies on their stability during culture. Here we investigated the stability in gene expression by microarray analysis and array genomic hybridization of three low metastatic cell lines and derivatives thereof with increased metastatic potential using cells of different passages.The osteosarcoma cell lines showed altered gene expression during in vitro culture, and it was more pronounced in two metastatic cell lines compared to the respective parental cells. Chromosomal instability contributed in part to the altered gene expression in SAOS and LM5 cells with low and high metastatic potential. To identify metastasis-relevant genes in a background of passage-dependent altered gene expression, genes involved in "Pathways in cancer" that were consistently regulated under all passage comparisons were evaluated. Genes belonging to "Hedgehog signaling pathway" and "Wnt signaling pathway" were significantly up-regulated, and IHH, WNT10B and TCF7 were found up-regulated in all three metastatic compared to the parental cell lines.Considerable instability during culture in terms of gene expression and chromosomal aberrations was observed in osteosarcoma cell lines. The use of cells from different passages and a search for genes consistently regulated in early and late passages allows the analysis of metastasis-relevant genes despite the observed instability in gene expression in osteosarcoma cell lines during culture.

  4. Association Mapping of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes and Cell Wall Quality in Switchgrass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartley, Laura [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Plant Biology; Wu, Y. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Zhu, L. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Brummer, E. C. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States); Saha, M. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States)

    2016-05-31

    Inefficient conversion of biomass to biofuels is one of the main barriers for biofuel production from such materials. Approximately half of polysaccharides in biomass remain unused by typical biochemical conversion methods. Conversion efficiency is influenced by the composition and structure of cell walls of biomass. Grasses such as wheat, maize, and rice, as well as dedicated perennial bioenergy crops, like switchgrass, make up ~55% of biomass that can be produced in the United States. Grass cell walls have a different composition and patterning compared with dicotyledonous plants, including the well-studied model plant, Arabidopsis. This project identified genetic determinants of cell wall composition in grasses using both naturally occurring genetic variation of switchgrass and gene network reconstruction and functional assays in rice. In addition, the project linked functional data in rice and other species to switchgrass improvement efforts through curation of the most abundant class of regulators in the switchgrass genome. Characterizing natural diversity of switchgrass for variation in cell wall composition and properties, also known as quality, provides an unbiased avenue for identifying biologically viable diversity in switchgrass cell walls. To characterizing natural diversity, this project generated cell wall composition and enzymatic deconstruction data for ~450 genotypes of the Switchgrass Southern Association Collection (SSAC), a diverse collection composed of 36 switchgrass accessions from the southern U.S. distribution of switchgrass. Comparing these data with other measures of cell wall quality for the same samples demonstrated the complementary nature of the diverse characterization platforms now being used for biomass characterization. Association of the composition data with ~3.2K single nucleotide variant markers identified six significant single nucleotide variant markers co-associated with digestibility and another compositional trait. These

  5. Interleukin-33 induces mucin gene expression and goblet cell hyperplasia in human nasal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishinaga, Hajime; Kitano, Masako; Toda, Masaaki; D'Alessandro-Gabazza, Corina N; Gabazza, Esteban C; Shah, Said Ahmad; Takeuchi, Kazuhiko

    2017-02-01

    We investigated whether IL-33 is involved in mucus overproduction and goblet cell hyperplasia in eosinophilic chronic rhinosinusitis (ECRS). IL-33 mRNA was significantly higher in the eosinophilic CRS group than in the non-eosinophilic CRS group from human nasal polyps. IL-33 induced MUC5AC mRNA and MUC5AC protein, and also goblet cell hyperplasia at air liquid interface culture in human nasal epithelial cells. In addition to that, IL-33 induced MUC5B and FOXA3, and reduces FOXJmRNA. In conclusion, our present study demonstrated that the direct evidence of IL-33 which lead to increase mucin gene and protein expression, as well as goblet cell hyperplasia. This study provides novel insights into the role of IL-33 on mucus overproduction in eosinophilic inflammation of human airways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis of gene expression in fetal and adult cells infected with rubella virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamo, Maria Pilar; Zapata, Marta; Frey, Teryl K.

    2008-01-01

    Congenital infection with rubella virus (RUB) leads to persistent infection and congenital defects and we showed previously that primary human fetal fibroblasts did not undergo apoptosis when infected with RUB, which could promote fetal virus persistence [Adamo, P., Asis, L., Silveyra, P., Cuffini, C., Pedranti, M., Zapata, M., 2004. Rubella virus does not induce apoptosis in primary human embryo fibroblasts cultures: a possible way of viral persistence in congenital infection. Viral Immunol. 17, 87-100]. To extend this observation, gene chip analysis was performed on a line of primary human fetal fibroblasts (10 weeks gestation) and a line of human adult lung fibroblasts (which underwent apoptosis in response to RUB infection) to compare gene expression in infected and uninfected cells. A total of 632 and 516 genes were upregulated or downregulated in the infected fetal and adult cells respectively in comparison to uninfected cells, however only 52 genes were regulated in both cell types. Although the regulated genes were different, across functional gene categories the patterns of gene regulation were similar. In general, regulation of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes following infection appeared to favor apoptosis in the adult cells and lack of apoptosis in the fetal cells, however there was a greater relative expression of anti-apoptotic genes and reduced expression of pro-apoptotic genes in uninfected fetal cells versus uninfected adult cells and thus the lack of apoptosis in fetal cells following RUB infection was also due to the prevailing background of gene expression that is antagonistic to apoptosis. In support of this hypothesis, it was found that of a battery of five chemicals known to induce apoptosis, two induced apoptosis in the adult cells, but not in fetal cells, and two induced apoptosis more rapidly in the adult cells than in fetal cells (the fifth did not induce apoptosis in either). A robust interferon-stimulated gene response was induced

  7. Precise gene modification mediated by TALEN and single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Wang

    Full Text Available The development of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs facilitates in vitro studies of human disease mechanisms, speeds up the process of drug screening, and raises the feasibility of using cell replacement therapy in clinics. However, the study of genotype-phenotype relationships in ESCs or iPSCs is hampered by the low efficiency of site-specific gene editing. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs spurred interest due to the ease of assembly, high efficiency and faithful gene targeting. In this study, we optimized the TALEN design to maximize its genomic cutting efficiency. We showed that using optimized TALENs in conjunction with single-strand oligodeoxynucleotide (ssODN allowed efficient gene editing in human cells. Gene mutations and gene deletions for up to 7.8 kb can be accomplished at high efficiencies. We established human tumor cell lines and H9 ESC lines with homozygous deletion of the microRNA-21 (miR-21 gene and miR-9-2 gene. These cell lines provide a robust platform to dissect the roles these genes play during cell differentiation and tumorigenesis. We also observed that the endogenous homologous chromosome can serve as a donor template for gene editing. Overall, our studies demonstrate the versatility of using ssODN and TALEN to establish genetically modified cells for research and therapeutic application.

  8. Gene Delivery into Plant Cells for Recombinant Protein Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant proteins are primarily produced from cultures of mammalian, insect, and bacteria cells. In recent years, the development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed plants to become a viable platform for recombinant protein production, with advantages in versatility, speed, cost, scalability, and safety over the current production paradigms. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the methodology of agroinfiltration, a solution to overcome the challenge of transgene delivery into plant cells for large-scale manufacturing of recombinant proteins. General gene delivery methodologies in plants are first summarized, followed by extensive discussion on the application and scalability of each agroinfiltration method. New development of a spray-based agroinfiltration and its application on field-grown plants is highlighted. The discussion of agroinfiltration vectors focuses on their applications for producing complex and heteromultimeric proteins and is updated with the development of bridge vectors. Progress on agroinfiltration in Nicotiana and non-Nicotiana plant hosts is subsequently showcased in context of their applications for producing high-value human biologics and low-cost and high-volume industrial enzymes. These new advancements in agroinfiltration greatly enhance the robustness and scalability of transgene delivery in plants, facilitating the adoption of plant transient expression systems for manufacturing recombinant proteins with a broad range of applications.

  9. Stem Cells and Gene Therapy for Cartilage Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umile Giuseppe Longo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage defects represent a common problem in orthopaedic practice. Predisposing factors include traumas, inflammatory conditions, and biomechanics alterations. Conservative management of cartilage defects often fails, and patients with this lesions may need surgical intervention. Several treatment strategies have been proposed, although only surgery has been proved to be predictably effective. Usually, in focal cartilage defects without a stable fibrocartilaginous repair tissue formed, surgeons try to promote a natural fibrocartilaginous response by using marrow stimulating techniques, such as microfracture, abrasion arthroplasty, and Pridie drilling, with the aim of reducing swelling and pain and improving joint function of the patients. These procedures have demonstrated to be clinically useful and are usually considered as first-line treatment for focal cartilage defects. However, fibrocartilage presents inferior mechanical and biochemical properties compared to normal hyaline articular cartilage, characterized by poor organization, significant amounts of collagen type I, and an increased susceptibility to injury, which ultimately leads to premature osteoarthritis (OA. Therefore, the aim of future therapeutic strategies for articular cartilage regeneration is to obtain a hyaline-like cartilage repair tissue by transplantation of tissues or cells. Further studies are required to clarify the role of gene therapy and mesenchimal stem cells for management of cartilage lesions.

  10. Regulated gene expression in cultured type II cells of adult human lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Philip L; Lee, Jae W; Fang, Xiaohui; Chapin, Cheryl; Allen, Lennell; Segal, Mark R; Fischer, Horst; Illek, Beate; Gonzales, Linda W; Kolla, Venkatadri; Matthay, Michael A

    2010-07-01

    Alveolar type II cells have multiple functions, including surfactant production and fluid clearance, which are critical for lung function. Differentiation of type II cells occurs in cultured fetal lung epithelial cells treated with dexamethasone plus cAMP and isobutylmethylxanthine (DCI) and involves increased expression of 388 genes. In this study, type II cells of human adult lung were isolated at approximately 95% purity, and gene expression was determined (Affymetrix) before and after culturing 5 days on collagen-coated dishes with or without DCI for the final 3 days. In freshly isolated cells, highly expressed genes included SFTPA/B/C, SCGB1A, IL8, CXCL2, and SFN in addition to ubiquitously expressed genes. Transcript abundance was correlated between fetal and adult cells (r = 0.88), with a subset of 187 genes primarily related to inflammation and immunity that were expressed >10-fold higher in adult cells. During control culture, expression increased for 8.1% of expressed genes and decreased for approximately 4% including 118 immune response and 10 surfactant-related genes. DCI treatment promoted lamellar body production and increased expression of approximately 3% of probed genes by > or =1.5-fold; 40% of these were also induced in fetal cells. Highly induced genes (> or =10-fold) included PGC, ZBTB16, DUOX1, PLUNC, CIT, and CRTAC1. Twenty-five induced genes, including six genes related to surfactant (SFTPA/B/C, PGC, CEBPD, and ADFP), also had decreased expression during control culture and thus are candidates for hormonal regulation in vivo. Our results further define the adult human type II cell molecular phenotype and demonstrate that a subset of genes remains hormone responsive in cultured adult cells.

  11. Identifying Genes Controlling Ferulate Cross-Linking Formation in Grass Cell Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de O. Buanafina, Marcia Maria [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2013-10-16

    This proposal focuses on cell wall feruloylation and our long term goal is to identify and isolate novel genes controlling feruloylation and to characterize the phenotype of mutants in this pathway, with a spotlight on cell wall properties.

  12. In Vitro Antioxidant-Activity Evaluation of Gallic-Acid-Grafted Chitosan Conjugate Synthesized by Free-Radical-Induced Grafting Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qiaobin; Wang, Taoran; Zhou, Mingyong; Xue, Jingyi; Luo, Yangchao

    2016-07-27

    The major objective of this work was to develop a green and facile process to prepare gallic acid-chitosan conjugate and comprehensively evaluate the physicochemical properties and biological activities of an as-prepared water-soluble chitosan derivative. A free-radical-induced grafting approach using an ascorbic acid-hydrogen peroxide redox pair was adopted. The obtained conjugate was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-vis, X-ray diffraction, and pKa analysis. The antioxidant activities were evaluated by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6)-sulphonic acid (ABTS), reducing power, and oxygen-radical antioxidant-capacity assays. The results showed that the mass ratio of gallic acid to chitosan played a vital role in determining the grafting degree and ζ potential of the conjugates, with the ratio of 0.5:1 being the optimal ratio that resulted in the highest grafting degree. The antioxidant assays demonstrated that conjugation significantly improved the antioxidant activities, being dramatically higher than that of free chitosan. It was notable that the DPPH- and ABTS-scavenging activities of conjugate at 0.4 mg/mL reached the same level as the free gallic acid at the equivalent concentration. Our study demonstrated a green and facile synthesis approach to preparing a novel water-soluble chitosan derivative that may have promising potentials in the food industry.

  13. Identification of novel senescence-associated genes in ionizing radiation-induced senescent carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Seon; Kim, Bong Cho; Han, Na Kyung; Hong, Mi Na; Park, Su Min; Yoo, Hee Jung; Chu, In Sun; Lee, Sun Hee

    2009-01-01

    Cellular senescence is considered as a defense mechanism to prevent tumorigenesis. Ionizing radiation (IR) induces stress-induced premature senescence as well as apoptosis in various cancer cells. Senescent cells undergo functional and morphological changes including large and flattened cell shape, senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-βGal) activity, and altered gene expressions. Even with the recent findings of several gene expression profiles and supporting functional data, it is obscure that mechanism of IR-induced premature senescence in cancer cells. We performed microarray analysis to identify the common regulated genes in ionizing radiation-induced prematurely senescent human carcinoma cell lines

  14. Regulated gene expression in cultured type II cells of adult human lung

    OpenAIRE

    Ballard, Philip L.; Lee, Jae W.; Fang, Xiaohui; Chapin, Cheryl; Allen, Lennell; Segal, Mark R.; Fischer, Horst; Illek, Beate; Gonzales, Linda W.; Kolla, Venkatadri; Matthay, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Alveolar type II cells have multiple functions, including surfactant production and fluid clearance, which are critical for lung function. Differentiation of type II cells occurs in cultured fetal lung epithelial cells treated with dexamethasone plus cAMP and isobutylmethylxanthine (DCI) and involves increased expression of 388 genes. In this study, type II cells of human adult lung were isolated at ∼95% purity, and gene expression was determined (Affymetrix) before and after culturing 5 days...

  15. Spontaneously immortalised bovine mammary epithelial cells exhibit a distinct gene expression pattern from the breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Qianqian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spontaneous immortalisation of cultured mammary epithelial cells (MECs is an extremely rare event, and the molecular mechanism behind spontaneous immortalisation of MECs is unclear. Here, we report the establishment of a spontaneously immortalised bovine mammary epithelial cell line (BME65Cs and the changes in gene expression associated with BME65Cs cells. Results BME65Cs cells maintain the general characteristics of normal mammary epithelial cells in morphology, karyotype and immunohistochemistry, and are accompanied by the activation of endogenous bTERT (bovine Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase and stabilisation of the telomere. Currently, BME65Cs cells have been passed for more than 220 generations, and these cells exhibit non-malignant transformation. The expression of multiple genes was investigated in BME65Cs cells, senescent BMECs (bovine MECs cells, early passage BMECs cells and MCF-7 cells (a human breast cancer cell line. In comparison with early passage BMECs cells, the expression of senescence-relevant apoptosis-related gene were significantly changed in BME65Cs cells. P16INK4a was downregulated, p53 was low expressed and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio was reversed. Moreover, a slight upregulation of the oncogene c-Myc, along with an undetectable level of breast tumor-related gene Bag-1 and TRPS-1, was observed in BME65Cs cells while these genes are all highly expressed in MCF-7. In addition, DNMT1 is upregulated in BME65Cs. These results suggest that the inhibition of both senescence and mitochondrial apoptosis signalling pathways contribute to the immortality of BME65Cs cells. The expression of p53 and p16INK4a in BME65Cs was altered in the pattern of down-regulation but not "loss", suggesting that this spontaneous immortalization is possibly initiated by other mechanism rather than gene mutation of p53 or p16INK4a. Conclusions Spontaneously immortalised BME65Cs cells maintain many characteristics of normal BMEC cells and

  16. Genome-wide methylation analysis identifies genes silenced in non-seminoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Dzul Azri Mohamed; Jeyapalan, Jennie N; Alhazmi, Safiah; Carr, Matthew; Squibb, Benjamin; Wallace, Claire; Tan, Christopher; Cusack, Martin; Hughes, Jaime; Reader, Tom; Shipley, Janet; Sheer, Denise; Scotting, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Silencing of genes by DNA methylation is a common phenomenon in many types of cancer. However, the genome-wide effect of DNA methylation on gene expression has been analysed in relatively few cancers. Germ cell tumours (GCTs) are a complex group of malignancies. They are unique in developing from a pluripotent progenitor cell. Previous analyses have suggested that non-seminomas exhibit much higher levels of DNA methylation than seminomas. The genomic targets that are methylated, the extent to which this results in gene silencing and the identity of the silenced genes most likely to play a role in the tumours' biology have not yet been established. In this study, genome-wide methylation and expression analysis of GCT cell lines was combined with gene expression data from primary tumours to address this question. Genome methylation was analysed using the Illumina infinium HumanMethylome450 bead chip system and gene expression was analysed using Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Regulation by methylation was confirmed by demethylation using 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine and reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Large differences in the level of methylation of the CpG islands of individual genes between tumour cell lines correlated well with differential gene expression. Treatment of non-seminoma cells with 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine verified that methylation of all genes tested played a role in their silencing in yolk sac tumour cells and many of these genes were also differentially expressed in primary tumours. Genes silenced by methylation in the various GCT cell lines were identified. Several pluripotency-associated genes were identified as a major functional group of silenced genes.

  17. Gene selection for the reconstruction of stem cell differentiation trees: a linear programming approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadie, Mohamed A; Japkowicz, Nathalie; Perkins, Theodore J

    2015-08-15

    Stem cell differentiation is largely guided by master transcriptional regulators, but it also depends on the expression of other types of genes, such as cell cycle genes, signaling genes, metabolic genes, trafficking genes, etc. Traditional approaches to understanding gene expression patterns across multiple conditions, such as principal components analysis or K-means clustering, can group cell types based on gene expression, but they do so without knowledge of the differentiation hierarchy. Hierarchical clustering can organize cell types into a tree, but in general this tree is different from the differentiation hierarchy itself. Given the differentiation hierarchy and gene expression data at each node, we construct a weighted Euclidean distance metric such that the minimum spanning tree with respect to that metric is precisely the given differentiation hierarchy. We provide a set of linear constraints that are provably sufficient for the desired construction and a linear programming approach to identify sparse sets of weights, effectively identifying genes that are most relevant for discriminating different parts of the tree. We apply our method to microarray gene expression data describing 38 cell types in the hematopoiesis hierarchy, constructing a weighted Euclidean metric that uses just 175 genes. However, we find that there are many alternative sets of weights that satisfy the linear constraints. Thus, in the style of random-forest training, we also construct metrics based on random subsets of the genes and compare them to the metric of 175 genes. We then report on the selected genes and their biological functions. Our approach offers a new way to identify genes that may have important roles in stem cell differentiation. tperkins@ohri.ca Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Identifying arsenic trioxide (ATO) functions in leukemia cells by using time series gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong; Lin, Shan; Cui, Jingru

    2014-02-10

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is presently the most active single agent in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). In order to explore the molecular mechanism of ATO in leukemia cells with time series, we adopted bioinformatics strategy to analyze expression changing patterns and changes in transcription regulation modules of time series genes filtered from Gene Expression Omnibus database (GSE24946). We totally screened out 1847 time series genes for subsequent analysis. The KEGG (Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes) pathways enrichment analysis of these genes showed that oxidative phosphorylation and ribosome were the top 2 significantly enriched pathways. STEM software was employed to compare changing patterns of gene expression with assigned 50 expression patterns. We screened out 7 significantly enriched patterns and 4 tendency charts of time series genes. The result of Gene Ontology showed that functions of times series genes mainly distributed in profiles 41, 40, 39 and 38. Seven genes with positive regulation of cell adhesion function were enriched in profile 40, and presented the same first increased model then decreased model as profile 40. The transcription module analysis showed that they mainly involved in oxidative phosphorylation pathway and ribosome pathway. Overall, our data summarized the gene expression changes in ATO treated K562-r cell lines with time and suggested that time series genes mainly regulated cell adhesive. Furthermore, our result may provide theoretical basis of molecular biology in treating acute promyelocytic leukemia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cell Wall Composition and Candidate Biosynthesis Gene Expression During Rice Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Fan; Manisseri, Chithra; Fagerström, Alexandra; Peck, Matthew L.; Vega-Sánchez, Miguel E.; Williams, Brian; Chiniquy, Dawn M.; Saha, Prasenjit; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Conlin, Brian; Zhu, Lan; Hahn, Michael G.; Willats, William G. T.; Scheller, Henrik V.; Ronald, Pamela C.; Bartley, Laura E.

    2016-08-01

    Cell walls of grasses, including cereal crops and biofuel grasses, comprise the majority of plant biomass and intimately influence plant growth, development and physiology. However, the functions of many cell wall synthesis genes, and the relationships among and the functions of cell wall components remain obscure. To better understand the patterns of cell wall accumulation and identify genes that act in grass cell wall biosynthesis, we characterized 30 samples from aerial organs of rice (Oryza sativa cv. Kitaake) at 10 developmental time points, 3-100 d post-germination. Within these samples, we measured 15 cell wall chemical components, enzymatic digestibility and 18 cell wall polysaccharide epitopes/ligands. We also used quantitative reverse transcription-PCR to measure expression of 50 glycosyltransferases, 15 acyltransferases and eight phenylpropanoid genes, many of which had previously been identified as being highly expressed in rice. Most cell wall components vary significantly during development, and correlations among them support current understanding of cell walls. We identified 92 significant correlations between cell wall components and gene expression and establish nine strong hypotheses for genes that synthesize xylans, mixed linkage glucan and pectin components. This work provides an extensive analysis of cell wall composition throughout rice development, identifies genes likely to synthesize grass cell walls, and provides a framework for development of genetically improved grasses for use in lignocellulosic biofuel production and agriculture.

  20. Roles of bHLH genes in neural stem cell differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki; Hatakeyama, Jun; Ohsawa, Ryosuke

    2005-01-01

    Neural stem cells change their characteristics over time during development: they initially proliferate only and then give rise to neurons first and glial cells later. In the absence of the repressor-type basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) genes Hes1, Hes3 and Hes5, neural stem cells do not proliferate sufficiently but prematurely differentiate into neurons and become depleted without making the later born cell types such as astrocytes and ependymal cells. Thus, Hes genes are essential for maintenance of neural stem cells to make cells not only in correct numbers but also in full diversity. Hes genes antagonize the activator-type bHLH genes, which include Mash1, Math and Neurogenin. The activator-type bHLH genes promote the neuronal fate determination and induce expression of Notch ligands such as Delta. These ligands activate Notch signaling and upregulate Hes1 and Hes5 expression in neighboring cells, thereby maintaining these cells undifferentiated. Thus, the activator-type and repressor-type bHLH genes regulate each other, allowing only subsets of cells to undergo differentiation while keeping others to stay neural stem cells. This regulation is essential for generation of complex brain structures of appropriate size, shape and cell arrangement

  1. Efficient gene transfer into lymphoma cells using adenoviral vectors combined with lipofection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttgereit, P; Weineck, S; Röpke, G; Märten, A; Brand, K; Heinicke, T; Caselmann, W H; Huhn, D; Schmidt-Wolf, I G

    2000-08-01

    Tumor cells, such as lymphoma cells, are possible targets for gene therapy. In general, gene therapeutic approaches require efficient gene transfer to host cells and sufficient transgene expression. However, lymphoma cells previously have been demonstrated to be resistant to most of the currently available gene transfer methods. The aim of this study was to analyze various methods for transfection of lymphoma cells and to improve the efficiency of gene delivery. In accordance with previously published reports, lymphoma cells were demonstrated to be resistant to lipofection and electroporation. In contrast, we present an improved adenoviral protocol leading to highly efficient gene transfer to lymphoma cell lines derived from B cells as well as primary lymphoma cells being achieved with an adenoviral vector system encoding the beta-galactosidase protein. At a multiplicity of infection of 200, up to 100% of Daudi cells and Raji cells and 70% of OCI-Ly8-LAM53 cells could be transfected. Even at high adenoviral concentrations, no marked toxicity was observed, and the growth characteristics of the lymphoma cell lines were not impaired. The transfection rates in primary cells derived from six patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were 30-65%, respectively. Transfection efficiency could be further increased by addition of cationic liposomes to adenoviral gene transfer. Furthermore, we examined the expression of the Coxsackie-adenoviral receptor (CAR) and the integrin receptors on the lymphoma cell surface. Flow cytometric analysis showed that 88% of Daudi cells, 69% of Raji cells, and 6% of OCI-Ly8-LAM53 cells expressed CAR on the cell surface. According to our data, adenoviral infection of lymphoma cells seems to be mediated by CAR. In contrast, integrin receptors are unlikely to play a major role, because lymphoma cells were negative for alphavbeta3-integrins and negative for alphavbeta5-integrins. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that B-lymphoma cell lines and

  2. UV-induced changes in cell cycle and gene expression within rabbit lens epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidjanin, D.; Grdina, D.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    Damage to lens epithelial cells is a probable initiation process in cataract formation mediated by UV radiation. In these experiments, we investigated the effects of exposure to 254 nm radiation on cell cycle progression in the rabbit lens epithelial cell line N/N1003A. The RNA was harvested at various times following exposure to UV (254 nm) radiation and analyzed by dot-blot and northern blot hybridizations. These results revealed that during the first 6 h following exposure of the cells to UV, there was, associated with decreasing dose, a decrease in accumulation of transcripts specific for histones H3 and H4 and an increase in the mRNA encoding protein kinase C and β- and γ-actin. Using flow cytometry, we detected an accumulation of cells in G1/S phase of the cell cycle 1 h following exposure to 254 nm radiation. The observed changes in gene expression, especially the decreased accumulation of histone transcripts reported here, may play a role in UV-induced inhibition of cell cycle progression. (Author)

  3. Differences in gene expression of cells growing in conventional 2D versus 3D cell culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zschenker, Oliver; Cordes, Nils; Streichert, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Telomeres are DNA protein complexes on the ends of chromosomes that distinguish the ends of chromosomes from double strand breaks and prevent degradation or fusion by nonhomologous end-joining. The loss of telomeres is associated with a loss of heterochromatic features leading to a less compact chromatin structure which allows e.g. DNA repair proteins to get better access to the site of the DNA damage and facilitate chromosome fusions. Telomerase is an enzyme that can counteract the loss of telomeres by adding telomeric repeats on the ends of chromosomes. Since telomerase is active in most tumor cells, telomerase is suggested to be the reason for the unlimited number of cell divisions of cancer cells. TRF2 is one of the most important proteins of the Shelterin complex protecting the telomeres from shortening by inhibiting ATM which is up-stream of the DNA repair mechanisms. Thus, we are concentrating on TRF2 and telomerase to investigate the differences in DNA repair in telomeric (heterochromatic) versus euchromatic regions. Human cancer cells with differences in status of p53 and telomerase like A549, UT-SCC15 and FaDu cells are used. Without any treatment, FaDu cells express high levels of telomerase and TRF2 in conventional 2D cell culture which is in contrast to e.g. A549. We found that telomerase is even higher expressed in 3D than in 2D cell culture. To connect telomere associated processes to both repair of radiogenic DNA damage/lesions and to cell-extracellular matrix interactions, we performed whole genome microarray analysis. By comparing the differential expression of genes associated with these three cell functions, we intend to yield new molecular insight into radiotherapy relevant tumor characteristics, particularly radioresistance and DNA damage response network processing. (author)

  4. Identification of mechanosensitive genes during skeletal development: alteration of genes associated with cytoskeletal rearrangement and cell signalling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, Rebecca A; Nowlan, Niamh C; Kenny, Elaine M; Cormican, Paul; Morris, Derek W; Prendergast, Patrick J; Kelly, Daniel; Murphy, Paula

    2014-01-20

    Mechanical stimulation is necessary for regulating correct formation of the skeleton. Here we test the hypothesis that mechanical stimulation of the embryonic skeletal system impacts expression levels of genes implicated in developmentally important signalling pathways in a genome wide approach. We use a mutant mouse model with altered mechanical stimulation due to the absence of limb skeletal muscle (Splotch-delayed) where muscle-less embryos show specific defects in skeletal elements including delayed ossification, changes in the size and shape of cartilage rudiments and joint fusion. We used Microarray and RNA sequencing analysis tools to identify differentially expressed genes between muscle-less and control embryonic (TS23) humerus tissue. We found that 680 independent genes were down-regulated and 452 genes up-regulated in humeri from muscle-less Spd embryos compared to littermate controls (at least 2-fold; corrected p-value ≤0.05). We analysed the resulting differentially expressed gene sets using Gene Ontology annotations to identify significant enrichment of genes associated with particular biological processes, showing that removal of mechanical stimuli from muscle contractions affected genes associated with development and differentiation, cytoskeletal architecture and cell signalling. Among cell signalling pathways, the most strongly disturbed was Wnt signalling, with 34 genes including 19 pathway target genes affected. Spatial gene expression analysis showed that both a Wnt ligand encoding gene (Wnt4) and a pathway antagonist (Sfrp2) are up-regulated specifically in the developing joint line, while the expression of a Wnt target gene, Cd44, is no longer detectable in muscle-less embryos. The identification of 84 genes associated with the cytoskeleton that are down-regulated in the absence of muscle indicates a number of candidate genes that are both mechanoresponsive and potentially involved in mechanotransduction, converting a mechanical stimulus

  5. Validation of endogenous normalizing genes for expression analyses in adult human testis and germ cell neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svingen, T; Jørgensen, Anne; Rajpert-De Meyts, E

    2014-01-01

    to define suitable normalizing genes for specific cells and tissues. Here, we report on the performance of a panel of nine commonly employed normalizing genes in adult human testis and testicular pathologies. Our analyses revealed significant variability in transcript abundance for commonly used normalizers......, highlighting the importance of selecting appropriate normalizing genes as comparative measurements can yield variable results when different normalizing genes are employed. Based on our results, we recommend using RPS20, RPS29 or SRSF4 when analysing relative gene expression levels in human testis...... and associated testicular pathologies. OCT4 and SALL4 can be used with caution as second-tier normalizers when determining changes in gene expression in germ cells and germ cell tumour components, but the relative transcript abundance appears variable between different germ cell tumour types. We further...

  6. Identification of differences in gene expression in primary cell cultures of human endometrial epithelial cells and trophoblast cells following their interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgh, Mette; Islin, Henrik; Møller, Charlotte

    2006-01-01

    The interaction between the cell types was simulated in vitro by growing primary cell cultures of human endometrial epithelial cells and trophoblast cells together (co-culture) and separately (control cultures). Gene expression in the cell cultures was compared using the Differential Display method and confirmed...

  7. Signed weighted gene co-expression network analysis of transcriptional regulation in murine embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou Qing; Plath Kathrin; Fan Guoping; Mason Mike J; Horvath Steve

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Recent work has revealed that a core group of transcription factors (TFs) regulates the key characteristics of embryonic stem (ES) cells: pluripotency and self-renewal. Current efforts focus on identifying genes that play important roles in maintaining pluripotency and self-renewal in ES cells and aim to understand the interactions among these genes. To that end, we...

  8. Potential gene regulatory role for cyclin D3 in muscle cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-06-27

    Jun 27, 2015 ... D3-expressing cells on induction of differentiation. 2. Materials and .... 2 –ΔΔCt method was used for quantification and each gene ..... of pluripotency genes known to be silenced by deposition of ..... embryonic stem cells.

  9. Imaging gene expression in human mesenchymal stem cells: from small to large animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willmann, Jürgen K; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Rodriguez-Porcel, Martin

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of reporter gene imaging in implanted human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in porcine myocardium by using clinical positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) scanning.......To evaluate the feasibility of reporter gene imaging in implanted human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in porcine myocardium by using clinical positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) scanning....

  10. Monitoring single-cell gene regulation under dynamically controllable conditions with integrated microfluidics and software

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaiser, Matthias; Jug, Florian; Julou, Thomas; Deshpande, S.R.; Pfohl, Thomas; Silander, Olin K.; Myers, Gene; Van Nimwegen, Erik

    2018-01-01

    Much is still not understood about how gene regulatory interactions control cell fate decisions in single cells, in part due to the difficulty of directly observing gene regulatory processes in vivo. We introduce here a novel integrated setup consisting of a microfluidic chip and accompanying

  11. 40 CFR 798.5300 - Detection of gene mutations in somatic cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... cells in culture. 798.5300 Section 798.5300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY....5300 Detection of gene mutations in somatic cells in culture. (a) Purpose. Mammalian cell culture... selected by resistance to ouabain. (2) Description. Cells in suspension or monolayer culture are exposed to...

  12. Effect of Smac gene on apoptosis of HeLa cells induced by γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Baofeng; Tian Mei; Ruan Jianlei; Su Xu

    2007-01-01

    To explore the effect of Smac gene on apoptosis of HeLa cells induced by γ-ray and its possible mechanisms, the full length cDNA of Smac gene was transferred into HeLa cells. 24 h after transferring, the results of Western Blot indicated the expression of Smac was increased but the expression of Survivin decreased. After HeLa cells was irradiated by γ-rays, Smac gene transferred HeLa/Smac cells showed more cell apoptosis rates and the higher activity of Caspase-3 than vector transferred control HeLa/pcDNA3.1 cells. However, the damage and repair of DNA and the cell cycle don't change significantly, comparing HeLa/Smac cells with HeLa/pcDNA3.1 cells. (authors)

  13. Bacterial toxin-antitoxin gene system as containment control in yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, P.; Jensen, G. B.; Gerdes, K.

    2000-01-01

    The potential of a bacterial toxin-antitoxin gene system for use in containment control in eukaryotes was explored. The Escherichia coli relE and relB genes were expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Expression of the relE gene was highly toxic to yeast cells. However, expression...... fermentation processes in which the escape of genetically modified cells would be considered highly risky....

  14. Signaling pathways in PACAP regulation of VIP gene expression in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falktoft, B.; Georg, B.; Fahrenkrug, J.

    2009-01-01

    Ganglia expressing the neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) innervate vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) containing neurons suggesting a role of PACAP in regulating VIP expression. Human NB-1 neuroblastoma cells were applied to study PACAP regulated VIP gene...... in PACAP regulation of the FOS and VIP gene expressions suggest for the first time a role of FOS in PACAP-induced VIP gene expression in human NB-1 neuroblastoma cells. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2009/10...

  15. Efficient gene transfer into nondividing cells by adeno-associated virus-based vectors.

    OpenAIRE

    Podsakoff, G; Wong, K K; Chatterjee, S

    1994-01-01

    Gene transfer vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) are emerging as highly promising for use in human gene therapy by virtue of their characteristics of wide host range, high transduction efficiencies, and lack of cytopathogenicity. To better define the biology of AAV-mediated gene transfer, we tested the ability of an AAV vector to efficiently introduce transgenes into nonproliferating cell populations. Cells were induced into a nonproliferative state by treatment with the DNA synthe...

  16. Guided genetic screen to identify genes essential in the regeneration of hair cells and other tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Wuhong; Xu, Lisha; Huang, Sunny C; Pettie, Kade; Idol, Jennifer; Rissone, Alberto; Jimenez, Erin; Sinclair, Jason W; Slevin, Claire; Varshney, Gaurav K; Jones, MaryPat; Carrington, Blake; Bishop, Kevin; Huang, Haigen; Sood, Raman; Lin, Shuo; Burgess, Shawn M

    2018-01-01

    Regenerative medicine holds great promise for both degenerative diseases and traumatic tissue injury which represent significant challenges to the health care system. Hearing loss, which affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide, is caused primarily by a permanent loss of the mechanosensory receptors of the inner ear known as hair cells. This failure to regenerate hair cells after loss is limited to mammals, while all other non-mammalian vertebrates tested were able to completely regenerate these mechanosensory receptors after injury. To understand the mechanism of hair cell regeneration and its association with regeneration of other tissues, we performed a guided mutagenesis screen using zebrafish lateral line hair cells as a screening platform to identify genes that are essential for hair cell regeneration, and further investigated how genes essential for hair cell regeneration were involved in the regeneration of other tissues. We created genetic mutations either by retroviral insertion or CRISPR/Cas9 approaches, and developed a high-throughput screening pipeline for analyzing hair cell development and regeneration. We screened 254 gene mutations and identified 7 genes specifically affecting hair cell regeneration. These hair cell regeneration genes fell into distinct and somewhat surprising functional categories. By examining the regeneration of caudal fin and liver, we found these hair cell regeneration genes often also affected other types of tissue regeneration. Therefore, our results demonstrate guided screening is an effective approach to discover regeneration candidates, and hair cell regeneration is associated with other tissue regeneration.

  17. Alterations in gene expression profiles between radioresistant and radiosensitive cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Fuxiang; Zhou Yunfeng; Xie Conghua; Dai Jing; Cao Zhen; Yu Haijun; Liao Zhengkai; Luo Zhiguo

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the-difference of gene expressions by the contrastive model including the cells with same pathological origin and genetic background, but definitely different radioresponse, and to find the main molecular targets related to radiosensitivity. Methods: Human larynx squamous carcinoma cell, Hep -2 was irradiated with dose of 637 cGy repeatedly to establish a radioresistant daughter cell line. The radiobiology characteristics were obtained using clone forming assay. The difference of gene expression between parent and daughter cells was detected by cDNA microarray using two different arrays including 14000 genes respectively. Results: A radioresistant cell strain Hep-2R was isolated from its parental strain Hep-2 cell. The SF 2 , D 0 , α, β for Hep-2R cell line were 0.6798, 3.24, 0.2951 and 0.0363, respectively, while 0.4148, 2.06, 0.1074 and 0.0405 for Hep-2, respectively (for SF 2 , χ 2 =63.957, P<0.001). Compared with Hep-2 cells, the expressions of 41 genes were significantly altered in the radioresistant Hep-2R cells, including 22 genes up-regulated and 19 genes down-regulated, which were involved in DNA repair, regulation of the cell cycle, cell proliferation, cytoskeleton, protein synthesis, cellular metabolism and especially apoptosis which is responsible for the different radiosensitivity between these two larynx cancer cells. The telomere protection protein gene, POT1, was the mostly up-regulated by 3.348 times. Conclusions: There is difference of gene expression between the radioresistant contrastive models. POT1 gene may be the target of radiosensitization. (authors)

  18. The Comparative Utility of Viromer RED and Lipofectamine for Transient Gene Introduction into Glial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudheendra Rao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of genes into glial cells for mechanistic studies of cell function and as a therapeutic for gene delivery is an expanding field. Though viral vector based systems do exhibit good delivery efficiency and long-term production of the transgene, the need for transient gene expression, broad and rapid gene setup methodologies, and safety concerns regarding in vivo application still incentivize research into the use of nonviral gene delivery methods. In the current study, aviral gene delivery vectors based upon cationic lipid (Lipofectamine 3000 lipoplex or polyethylenimine (Viromer RED polyplex technologies were examined in cell lines and primary glial cells for their transfection efficiencies, gene expression levels, and toxicity. The transfection efficiencies of polyplex and lipoplex agents were found to be comparable in a limited, yet similar, transfection setting, with or without serum across a number of cell types. However, differential effects on cell-specific transgene expression and reduced viability with cargo loaded polyplex were observed. Overall, our data suggests that polyplex technology could perform comparably to the market dominant lipoplex technology in transfecting various cells lines including glial cells but also stress a need for further refinement of polyplex reagents to minimize their effects on cell viability.

  19. DNMT1 is associated with cell cycle and DNA replication gene sets in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Suet Kee; Ab Hamid, Suzina Sheikh; Musa, Mustaffa; Wong, Kah Keng

    2018-01-01

    Dysregulation of DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) is associated with the pathogenesis of various types of cancer. It has been previously shown that DNMT1 is frequently expressed in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), however its functions remain to be elucidated in the disease. In this study, we gene expression profiled (GEP) shRNA targeting DNMT1(shDNMT1)-treated germinal center B-cell-like DLBCL (GCB-DLBCL)-derived cell line (i.e. HT) compared with non-silencing shRNA (control shRNA)-treated HT cells. Independent gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) performed using GEPs of shRNA-treated HT cells and primary GCB-DLBCL cases derived from two publicly-available datasets (i.e. GSE10846 and GSE31312) produced three separate lists of enriched gene sets for each gene sets collection from Molecular Signatures Database (MSigDB). Subsequent Venn analysis identified 268, 145 and six consensus gene sets from analyzing gene sets in C2 collection (curated gene sets), C5 sub-collection [gene sets from gene ontology (GO) biological process ontology] and Hallmark collection, respectively to be enriched in positive correlation with DNMT1 expression profiles in shRNA-treated HT cells, GSE10846 and GSE31312 datasets [false discovery rate (FDR) 0.8) with DNMT1 expression and significantly downregulated (log fold-change <-1.35; p<0.05) following DNMT1 silencing in HT cells. These results suggest the involvement of DNMT1 in the activation of cell cycle and DNA replication in DLBCL cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Application of HSVtk suicide gene to X-SCID gene therapy: Ganciclovir treatment offsets gene corrected X-SCID B cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Toru; Kumaki, Satoru; Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Onodera, Masafumi; Sato, Miki; Du, Wei; Sasahara, Yoji; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Sugamura, Kazuo; Tsuchiya, Shigeru

    2006-01-01

    Recently, a serious adverse effect of uncontrolled clonal T cell proliferation due to insertional mutagenesis of retroviral vector was reported in X-SCID gene therapy clinical trial. To offset the side effect, we have incorporated a suicide gene into therapeutic retroviral vector for selective elimination of transduced cells. In this study, B-cell lines from two X-SCID patients were transduced with bicistronic retroviral vector carrying human γc chain cDNA and Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene. After confirmation of functional reconstitution of the γc chain, the cells were treated with ganciclovir (GCV). The γc chain positive cells were eliminated under low concentration without cytotoxicity on untransduced cells and have not reappeared at least for 5 months. Furthermore, the γc chain transduced cells were still sensitive to GCV after five months. These results demonstrated the efficacy of the suicide gene therapy although further in vivo studies are required to assess feasibility of this approach in clinical trial

  1. Psoriatic T cells reduce epidermal turnover time and affect cell proliferation contributed from differential gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junqin; Li, Xinhua; Hou, Ruixia; Liu, Ruifeng; Zhao, Xincheng; Dong, Feng; Wang, Chunfang; Yin, Guohua; Zhang, Kaiming

    2015-09-01

    Psoriasis is mediated primarily by T cells, which reduce epidermal turnover time and affect keratinocyte proliferation. We aimed to identify differentially expressed genes (DEG) in T cells from normal, five pairs of monozygotic twins concordant or discordant for psoriasis, to determine whether these DEG may account for the influence to epidermal turnover time and keratinocyte proliferation. The impact of T cells on keratinocyte proliferation and epidermal turnover time were investigated separately by immunohistochemistry and cultured with (3) H-TdR. mRNA expression patterns were investigated by RNA sequencing and verified by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. After co-culture with psoriatic T cells, the expression of Ki-67, c-Myc and p53 increased, while expression of Bcl-2 and epidermal turnover time decreased. There were 14 DEG which were found to participate in the regulation of cell proliferation or differentiation. Psoriatic T cells exhibited the ability to decrease epidermal turnover time and affect keratinocyte proliferation because of the differential expression of PPIL1, HSPH1, SENP3, NUP54, FABP5, PLEKHG3, SLC9A9 and CHCHD4. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  2. Gene number determination and genetic polymorphism of the gamma delta T cell co-receptor WC1 genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chuang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background WC1 co-receptors belong to the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR superfamily and are encoded by a multi-gene family. Expression of particular WC1 genes defines functional subpopulations of WC1+ γδ T cells. We have previously identified partial or complete genomic sequences for thirteen different WC1 genes through annotation of the bovine genome Btau_3.1 build. We also identified two WC1 cDNA sequences from other cattle that did not correspond to sequences in the Btau_3.1 build. Their absence in the Btau_3.1 build may have reflected gaps in the genome assembly or polymorphisms among animals. Since the response of γδ T cells to bacterial challenge is determined by WC1 gene expression, it was critical to understand whether individual cattle or breeds differ in the number of WC1 genes or display polymorphisms. Results Real-time quantitative PCR using DNA from the animal whose genome was sequenced (“Dominette” and sixteen other animals representing ten breeds of cattle, showed that the number of genes coding for WC1 co-receptors is thirteen. The complete coding sequences of those thirteen WC1 genes is presented, including the correction of an error in the WC1-2 gene due to mis-assembly in the Btau_3.1 build. All other cDNA sequences were found to agree with the previous annotation of complete or partial WC1 genes. PCR amplification and sequencing of the most variable N-terminal SRCR domain (domain 1 which has the SRCR “a” pattern of each of the thirteen WC1 genes showed that the sequences are highly conserved among individuals and breeds. Of 160 sequences of domain 1 from three breeds of cattle, no additional sequences beyond the thirteen described WC1 genes were found. Analysis of the complete WC1 cDNA sequences indicated that the thirteen WC1 genes code for three distinct WC1 molecular forms. Conclusion The bovine WC1 multi-gene family is composed of thirteen genes coding for three structural forms whose

  3. Pipette tip with integrated electrodes for gene electrotransfer of cells in suspension: a feasibility study in CHO cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebersek, Matej; Kanduser, Masa; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2011-01-01

    Gene electrotransfer is a non-viral gene delivery method that requires successful electroporation for DNA delivery into the cells. Changing the direction of the electric field during the pulse application improves the efficacy of gene delivery. In our study, we tested a pipette tip with integrated electrodes that enables changing the direction of the electric field for electroporation of cell suspension for gene electrotransfer. A new pipette tip consists of four cylindrical rod electrodes that allow the application of electric pulses in different electric field directions. The experiments were performed on cell suspension of CHO cells in phosphate buffer. Plasmid DNA encoding for green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used and the efficiency of gene electrotransfer was determined by counting cells expressing GFP 24 h after the experiment. Experimental results showed that the percentage of cells expressing GFP increased when the electric field orientation was changed during the application. The GFP expression was almost two times higher when the pulses were applied in orthogonal directions in comparison with single direction, while cell viability was not significantly affected. We can conclude that results obtained with the described pipette tip are comparable to previously published results on gene electrotransfer using similar electrode geometry and electric pulse parameters. The tested pipette tip, however, allows work with small volumes/samples and requires less cell manipulation

  4. Selenium is critical for cancer-signaling gene expression but not cell proliferation in human colon Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Botnen, James H

    2007-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is a potential anticarcinogenic nutrient, and the essential role of Se in cell growth is well recognized but certain cancer cells appear to have acquired a survival advantage under conditions of Se-deficiency. To understand the molecular basis of Se-anticancer effects at nutritional doses (nmol/L) for cultured cells, we generated Se-deficient colon Caco-2 cells by gradually reducing serum in media because serum contains a trace amount of Se. The glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity of Se-deficient Caco-2 cells was 10.8 mU/mg protein compared to 133.6 approximately 146.3 mU/mg protein in Caco-2 cells supplemented with 500 nmol/L selenite, SeMSC or SeMet (three tested Se-chemical forms) after 7-d culture in serum free media. Interestingly, there were no detectable differences in cell growth, cell cycle progression between Se-deficient cells and cells supplemented with 500 nmol/L Se. To examine differential cancer signaling-gene expression between Se-deficient and Se-supplemented cells, we employed a cancer signal pathway-specific array assay coupled with the real time PCR analysis. Our data demonstrate that although Caco-2 cells are resistant to Se deprivation, Se may exert its anticancer property through increasing the expression of humoral defense gene (A2M) and tumor suppressor-related genes (IGFBP3, HHIP) while decreasing pro-inflammatory gene (CXC L9, HSPB2) expression.

  5. The fate of mesenchymal stem cells transplanted into immunocompetent neonatal mice: implications for skeletal gene therapy via stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyibizi, Christopher; Wang, Sujing; Mi, Zhibao; Robbins, Paul D

    2004-06-01

    To explore the feasibility of skeletal gene and cell therapies, we transduced murine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with a retrovirus carrying the enhanced green fluorescent protein and zeocin-resistance genes prior to transplantation into 2-day-old immunocompetent neonatal mice. Whole-body imaging of the recipient mice at 7 days post-systemic cell injection demonstrated a wide distribution of the cells in vivo. Twenty-five days posttransplantation, most of the infused cells were present in the lung as assessed by examination of the cells cultured from the lungs of the recipient mice. The cells persisted in lung and maintained a high level of gene expression and could be recovered from the recipient mice at 150 days after cell transplantation. A significant number of GFP-positive cells were also present in the bones of the recipient mice at 35 days post-cell transplantation. Recycling of the cells recovered from femurs of the recipient mice at 25 days posttransplantation by repeated injections into different neonatal mice resulted in the isolation of a clone of cells that was detected in bone and cartilage, but not in lung and liver after systemic injection. These data demonstrate that MSCs persist in immunocompetent neonatal mice, maintain a high level of gene expression, and may participate in skeletal growth and development of the recipient animals.

  6. Genes of cell-cell interactions, chemotherapy detoxification and apoptosis are induced during chemotherapy of acute myeloid leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Øyan, Anne Margrete; Ånensen, Nina; Bø, Trond Hellem; Stordrange, Laila; Jonassen, Inge; Bruserud, Øystein; Kalland, Karl-Henning; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore

    2009-01-01

    The molecular changes in vivo in acute myeloid leukemia cells early after start of conventional genotoxic chemotherapy are incompletely understood, and it is not known if early molecular modulations reflect clinical response. The gene expression was examined by whole genome 44 k oligo microarrays and 12 k cDNA microarrays in peripheral blood leukocytes collected from seven leukemia patients before treatment, 2–4 h and 18–24 h after start of chemotherapy and validated by real-time quantitative PCR. Statistically significantly upregulated genes were classified using gene ontology (GO) terms. Parallel samples were examined by flow cytometry for apoptosis by annexin V-binding and the expression of selected proteins were confirmed by immunoblotting. Significant differential modulation of 151 genes were found at 4 h after start of induction therapy with cytarabine and anthracycline, including significant overexpression of 31 genes associated with p53 regulation. Within 4 h of chemotherapy the BCL2/BAX and BCL2/PUMA ratio were attenuated in proapoptotic direction. FLT3 mutations indicated that non-responders (5/7 patients, 8 versus 49 months survival) are characterized by a unique gene response profile before and at 4 h. At 18–24 h after chemotherapy, the gene expression of p53 target genes was attenuated, while genes involved in chemoresistance, cytarabine detoxification, chemokine networks and T cell receptor were prominent. No signs of apoptosis were observed in the collected cells, suggesting the treated patients as a physiological source of pre-apoptotic cells. Pre-apoptotic gene expression can be monitored within hours after start of chemotherapy in patients with acute myeloid leukemia, and may be useful in future determination of therapy responders. The low number of patients and the heterogeneity of acute myeloid leukemia limited the identification of gene expression predictive of therapy response. Therapy-induced gene expression reflects the complex

  7. Amyloid precursor protein regulates migration and metalloproteinase gene expression in prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko [Division of Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction, Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Saitama 350-1241 (Japan); Inoue, Satoshi, E-mail: INOUE-GER@h.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Division of Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction, Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Saitama 350-1241 (Japan); Department of Geriatric Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Department of Anti-Aging Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • APP knockdown reduced proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells. • APP knockdown reduced expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes. • APP overexpression promoted LNCaP cell migration. • APP overexpression increased expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes. - Abstract: Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a type I transmembrane protein, and one of its processed forms, β-amyloid, is considered to play a central role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. We previously showed that APP is a primary androgen-responsive gene in prostate cancer and that its increased expression is correlated with poor prognosis for patients with prostate cancer. APP has also been implicated in several human malignancies. Nevertheless, the mechanism underlying the pro-proliferative effects of APP on cancers is still not well-understood. In the present study, we explored a pathophysiological role for APP in prostate cancer cells using siRNA targeting APP (siAPP). The proliferation and migration of LNCaP and DU145 prostate cancer cells were significantly suppressed by siAPP. Differentially expressed genes in siAPP-treated cells compared to control siRNA-treated cells were identified by microarray analysis. Notably, several metalloproteinase genes, such as ADAM10 and ADAM17, and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related genes, such as VIM, and SNAI2, were downregulated in siAPP-treated cells as compared to control cells. The expression of these genes was upregulated in LNCaP cells stably expressing APP when compared with control cells. APP-overexpressing LNCaP cells exhibited enhanced migration in comparison to control cells. These results suggest that APP may contribute to the proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells by modulating the expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes.

  8. Identification of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes Controlling Biomass Characteristics and Yield in Rice (Oryza Sativa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Zhaohua PEng [Mississippi State University; Ronald, Palmela [UC-Davis; Wang, Guo-Liang [The Ohio State University

    2013-04-26

    This project aims to identify the regulatory genes of rice cell wall synthesis pathways using a cell wall removal and regeneration system. We completed the gene expression profiling studies following the time course from cell wall removal to cell wall regeneration in rice suspension cells. We also completed, total proteome, nuclear subproteome and histone modification studies following the course from cell wall removal and cell wall regeneration process. A large number of differentially expressed regulatory genes and proteins were identified. Meanwhile, we generated RNAi and over-expression transgenic rice for 45 genes with at least 10 independent transgenic lines for each gene. In addition, we ordered T-DNA and transposon insertion mutants for 60 genes from Korea, Japan, and France and characterized the mutants. Overall, we have mutants and transgenic lines for over 90 genes, exceeded our proposed goal of generating mutants for 50 genes. Interesting Discoveries a) Cell wall re-synthesis in protoplasts may involve a novel cell wall synthesis mechanism. The synthesis of the primary cell wall is initiated in late cytokinesis with further modification during cell expansion. Phragmoplast plays an essential role in cell wall synthesis. It services as a scaffold for building the cell plate and formation of a new cell wall. Only one phragmoplast and one new cell wall is produced for each dividing cell. When the cell wall was removed enzymatically, we found that cell wall re-synthesis started from multiple locations simultaneously, suggesting that a novel mechanism is involved in cell wall re-synthesis. This observation raised many interesting questions, such as how the starting sites of cell wall synthesis are determined, whether phragmoplast and cell plate like structures are involved in cell wall re-synthesis, and more importantly whether the same set of enzymes and apparatus are used in cell wall re-synthesis as during cytokinesis. Given that many known cell wall

  9. Evaluation of tools for highly variable gene discovery from single-cell RNA-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Shun H; Sham, Pak Chung; Wang, Junwen

    2018-02-21

    Traditional RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) allows the detection of gene expression variations between two or more cell populations through differentially expressed gene (DEG) analysis. However, genes that contribute to cell-to-cell differences are not discoverable with RNA-seq because RNA-seq samples are obtained from a mixture of cells. Single-cell RNA-seq (scRNA-seq) allows the detection of gene expression in each cell. With scRNA-seq, highly variable gene (HVG) discovery allows the detection of genes that contribute strongly to cell-to-cell variation within a homogeneous cell population, such as a population of embryonic stem cells. This analysis is implemented in many software packages. In this study, we compare seven HVG methods from six software packages, including BASiCS, Brennecke, scLVM, scran, scVEGs and Seurat. Our results demonstrate that reproducibility in HVG analysis requires a larger sample size than DEG analysis. Discrepancies between methods and potential issues in these tools are discussed and recommendations are made.

  10. Identification of stable reference genes in differentiating human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, Gustav; Ghosheh, Nidal; Zeng, Xianmin; Bogestål, Yalda; Sartipy, Peter; Synnergren, Jane

    2015-06-01

    Reference genes, often referred to as housekeeping genes (HKGs), are frequently used to normalize gene expression data based on the assumption that they are expressed at a constant level in the cells. However, several studies have shown that there may be a large variability in the gene expression levels of HKGs in various cell types. In a previous study, employing human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) subjected to spontaneous differentiation, we observed that the expression of commonly used HKG varied to a degree that rendered them inappropriate to use as reference genes under those experimental settings. Here we present a substantially extended study of the HKG signature in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC), including nine global gene expression datasets from both hESC and human induced pluripotent stem cells, obtained during directed differentiation toward endoderm-, mesoderm-, and ectoderm derivatives. Sets of stably expressed genes were compiled, and a handful of genes (e.g., EID2, ZNF324B, CAPN10, and RABEP2) were identified as generally applicable reference genes in hPSCs across all cell lines and experimental conditions. The stability in gene expression profiles was confirmed by reverse transcription quantitative PCR analysis. Taken together, the current results suggest that differentiating hPSCs have a distinct HKG signature, which in some aspects is different from somatic cell types, and underscore the necessity to validate the stability of reference genes under the actual experimental setup used. In addition, the novel putative HKGs identified in this study can preferentially be used for normalization of gene expression data obtained from differentiating hPSCs. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Planar cell polarity gene expression correlates with tumor cell viability and prognostic outcome in neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyberg, Cecilia; Papachristou, Panagiotis; Haug, Bjørn Helge; Lagercrantz, Hugo; Kogner, Per; Ringstedt, Thomas; Wickström, Malin; Johnsen, John Inge

    2016-01-01

    The non-canonical Wnt/Planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathway is a major player in cell migration during embryonal development and has recently been implicated in tumorigenesis. Transfections with cDNA plasmids or siRNA were used to increase and suppress Prickle1 and Vangl2 expression in neuroblastoma cells and in non-tumorigenic cells. Cell viability was measured by trypan blue exclusion and protein expression was determined with western blotting. Transcriptional activity was studied with luciferase reporter assay and mRNA expression with real-time RT-PCR. Immunofluorescence stainings were used to study the effects of Vangl2 overexpression in non-tumorigenic embryonic cells. Statistical significance was tested with t-test or one-way ANOVA. Here we show that high expression of the PCP core genes Prickle1 and Vangl2 is associated with low-risk neuroblastoma, suppression of neuroblastoma cell growth and decreased Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Inhibition of Rho-associated kinases (ROCKs) that are important in mediating non-canonical Wnt signaling resulted in increased expression of Prickle1 and inhibition of β-catenin activity in neuroblastoma cells. In contrast, overexpression of Vangl2 in MYC immortalized neural stem cells induced accumulation of active β-catenin and decreased the neural differentiation marker Tuj1. Similarly, genetically modified mice with forced overexpression of Vangl2 in nestin-positive cells showed decreased Tuj1 differentiation marker during embryonal development. Our experimental data demonstrate that high expression of Prickle1 and Vangl2 reduce the growth of neuroblastoma cells and indicate different roles of PCP proteins in tumorigenic cells compared to normal cells. These results suggest that the activity of the non-canonical Wnt/PCP signaling pathway is important for neuroblastoma development and that manipulation of the Wnt/PCP pathway provides a possible therapy for neuroblastoma. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s

  12. Undifferentiated embryonic cell transcription factor 1 regulates ESC chromatin organization and gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kooistra, Susanne M; van den Boom, Vincent; Thummer, Rajkumar P

    2010-01-01

    Previous reports showed that embryonic stem (ES) cells contain hyperdynamic and globally transcribed chromatin-properties that are important for ES cell pluripotency and differentiation. Here, we demonstrate a role for undifferentiated embryonic cell transcription factor 1 (UTF1) in regulating ES...... cell chromatin structure. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip analysis, we identified >1,700 UTF1 target genes that significantly overlap with previously identified Nanog, Oct4, Klf-4, c-Myc, and Rex1 targets. Gene expression profiling showed that UTF1 knock down results in increased expression...... of a large set of genes, including a significant number of UTF1 targets. UTF1 knock down (KD) ES cells are, irrespective of the increased expression of several self-renewal genes, Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) dependent. However, UTF1 KD ES cells are perturbed in their differentiation in response...

  13. Expression of apoptotic genes in immature and in vitro matured equine oocytes and cumulus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, P M M; Campos, V F; Kaefer, C; Begnini, K R; McBride, A J A; Dellagostin, O A; Seixas, F K; Deschamps, J C; Collares, T

    2013-08-01

    The gene expression of Bax, Bcl-2, survivin and p53, following in vitro maturation of equine oocytes, was compared in morphologically distinct oocytes and cumulus cells. Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) were harvested and divided into two groups: G1 - morphologically healthy cells; and G2 - less viable cells or cells with some degree of atresia. Total RNA was isolated from both immature and in vitro matured COC and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was used to quantify gene expression. Our results showed there was significantly higher expression of survivin (P < 0.05) and lower expression of p53 (P < 0.01) in oocytes compared with cumulus cells in G1. No significant difference in gene expression was observed following in vitro maturation or in COC derived from G1 and G2. However, expression of the Bax gene was significantly higher in cumulus cells from G1 (P < 0.02).

  14. Impact of persistent cytomegalovirus infection on human neuroblastoma cell gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoever, Gerold; Vogel, Jens-Uwe; Lukashenko, Polina; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Komor, Martina; Doerr, Hans Wilhelm; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2005-01-01

    In a model of human neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines persistently infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) we previously showed that persistent HCMV infection is associated with an increased malignant phenotype, enhanced drug resistance, and invasive properties. To gain insights into the mechanisms of increased malignancy we analyzed the global changes in cellular gene expression induced by persistent HCMV infection of human neuroblastoma cells by use of high-density oligonucleotide microarrays (HG-U133A, Affymetrix) and RT-PCR. Comparing the gene expression of different NB cell lines with persistently infected cell sub-lines revealed 11 host cell genes regulated in a similar manner throughout all infected samples. Nine of these 11 genes may contribute to the previously observed changes in malignant phenotype of persistently HCMV infected NB cells by influencing invasive growth, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and proliferation. Thus, this work provides the basis for further functional studies

  15. Gene amplification in Chinese hamster embryo cells by the decay of incorporated iodine-125

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luecke-Huhle, Christine; Ehrfeld, Angelika; Rau, Waltraud

    1988-01-01

    Simian Virus 40-transformed Chinese hamster embryo cells (Co631) contain 5 viral copies integrated per cell genome. These SV40 sequences were used as an endogenous indicator gene to study response of mammalian cells to radiation at gene level. Cells were internally irradiated by Auger electrons emitted by Iodine-125 which was incorporated in cell DNA in form of 5-[ 125 I] iododeoxyuridine ( 125 IdU). An increase in gene copy number was measured using dispersed cell blotting and Southern analysis in combination with highly sensitive DNA hybridization. A 13-fold amplification of the SV40 sequences and a 2-fold amplification of two cellular oncogenes of the ras family were found. Other cellular genes, like the α-actin gene, are not amplified and no variation in gene copy number was observed after incubation of cells with cold IdU. Thus, specific gene amplification seems to be the consequence of radiation-induced DNA damage and the resulting cell cycle arrest. (author)

  16. Improving the Safety of Cell Therapy Products by Suicide Gene Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eDi Stasi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive T-cell therapy can involve donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the administration of tumor infiltrating lymphocyte (TILs expanded ex-vivo, or more recently the use of T cell receptor (TCR or chimeric antigen receptor (CAR redirected T cells. However cellular therapies can pose significant risks, including graft-versus-host-disease and other on and off-target effects, and therefore strategies need to be implemented to permanently reverse any sign of toxicity. A suicide gene is a genetically encoded molecule that allows selective destruction of adoptively transferred cells. Suicide gene addition to cellular therapeutic products can lead to selective ablation of gene-modified cells, preventing collateral damage to contiguous cells and/or tissues. The ‘ideal’ suicide gene would ensure the safety of gene modified cellular applications by granting irreversible elimination of ‘all’ and ‘only’ the cells responsible for the unwanted toxicity. This review presents the suicide gene safety systems reported to date, with a focus on the state-of-the-art and potential applications regarding two of the most extensively validated suicide genes, including the clinical setting: herpes-simplex-thymidine-kinase (HSV-TK and inducible-caspase-9 (iCasp9.

  17. In tobacco BY-2 cells xyloglucan oligosaccharides alter the expression of genes involved in cell wall metabolism, signalling, stress responses, cell division and transcriptional control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pérez, Lien; Perrotta, Lara; Acosta, Alexis; Orellana, Esteban; Spadafora, Natasha; Bruno, Leonardo; Bitonti, Beatrice M; Albani, Diego; Cabrera, Juan Carlos; Francis, Dennis; Rogers, Hilary J

    2014-10-01

    Xyloglucan oligosaccharides (XGOs) are breakdown products of XGs, the most abundant hemicelluloses of the primary cell walls of non-Poalean species. Treatment of cell cultures or whole plants with XGOs results in accelerated cell elongation and cell division, changes in primary root growth, and a stimulation of defence responses. They may therefore act as signalling molecules regulating plant growth and development. Previous work suggests an interaction with auxins and effects on cell wall loosening, however their mode of action is not fully understood. The effect of an XGO extract from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) on global gene expression was therefore investigated in tobacco BY-2 cells using microarrays. Over 500 genes were differentially regulated with similar numbers and functional classes of genes up- and down-regulated, indicating a complex interaction with the cellular machinery. Up-regulation of a putative XG endotransglycosylase/hydrolase-related (XTH) gene supports the mechanism of XGO action through cell wall loosening. Differential expression of defence-related genes supports a role for XGOs as elicitors. Changes in the expression of genes related to mitotic control and differentiation also support previous work showing that XGOs are mitotic inducers. XGOs also affected expression of several receptor-like kinase genes and transcription factors. Hence, XGOs have significant effects on expression of genes related to cell wall metabolism, signalling, stress responses, cell division and transcriptional control.

  18. Expression profiling of genes regulated by TGF-beta: Differential regulation in normal and tumour cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Takashi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TGF-beta is one of the key cytokines implicated in various disease processes including cancer. TGF-beta inhibits growth and promotes apoptosis in normal epithelial cells and in contrast, acts as a pro-tumour cytokine by promoting tumour angiogenesis, immune-escape and metastasis. It is not clear if various actions of TGF-beta on normal and tumour cells are due to differential gene regulations. Hence we studied the regulation of gene expression by TGF-beta in normal and cancer cells. Results Using human 19 K cDNA microarrays, we show that 1757 genes are exclusively regulated by TGF-beta in A549 cells in contrast to 733 genes exclusively regulated in HPL1D cells. In addition, 267 genes are commonly regulated in both the cell-lines. Semi-quantitative and real-time qRT-PCR analysis of some genes agrees with the microarray data. In order to identify the signalling pathways that influence TGF-beta mediated gene regulation, we used specific inhibitors of p38 MAP kinase, ERK kinase, JNK kinase and integrin signalling pathways. The data suggest that regulation of majority of the selected genes is dependent on at least one of these pathways and this dependence is cell-type specific. Interestingly, an integrin pathway inhibitor, RGD peptide, significantly affected TGF-beta regulation of Thrombospondin 1 in A549 cells. Conclusion These data suggest major differences with respect to TGF-beta mediated gene regulation in normal and transformed cells and significant role of non-canonical TGF-beta pathways in the regulation of many genes by TGF-beta.

  19. Changes of tumorigenicity and gene expressions of melanoma cells mutated in outer space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Qing; Xu Mei; Xiao Cheng; Xu Bo; Li Hongyan; Geng Chuanying; Pan Lin; Fang Qing; Guo Yupeng; Tang Jingtian

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To screen the cell lines with decreased tumorigenicity, and identify those genes related to the development and metastasis of melanoma. Methods: The murine melanoma B16 cells were carried into the outer space by No. 20 retrievable satellite, and the survival cells were cloned after returned to earth. Five monoclonal cell lines(No.1, No.5, No.6, No.7, No.8) were utilized for further study. The cells were injected into C57BL/6J mice subcutaneously and abdominally respectively, then tumor-free time and survival time were recorded, tumor lumps were examined by routine pathological method. Gene chips were used to detect the gene expressions in 2 cell lines(No.1, No.8)with decreased tumorigenicity. Results: Compared with the control group, the tumor-free time was longer for No.1 cell lines (P<0.05). The survival time was significantly increased (P<0.01) and the weights of tumors were significantly decreased (P<0.01) for both No.1 and No.8 cell lines. The lymphocytes were infiltrated into tumors and adjacent tissues in those mice injected with No.1 and No.8 cell lines. Changes in 145 gene expressions were identified in No.1 cell lines, and 124 genes in No.8 cell lines (P<0.05), 9 genes of them were common to both cell lines. Furthermore, prostaglandin D2 synthase gene was markedly upregulated. Conclusion: The study implied that the decrease of tumorigenicity was related to the changes of carcinoma-associated gene expressions. (authors)

  20. Ins1 Cre knock-in mice for beta cell-specific gene recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Thorens Bernard; Tarussio David; Maestro Miguel Angel; Maestro Miguel Angel; Rovira Meritxell; Rovira Meritxell; Heikkilä Eija; Ferrer Jorge; Ferrer Jorge; Ferrer Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Pancreatic beta cells play a central role in the control of glucose homeostasis by secreting insulin to stimulate glucose uptake by peripheral tissues. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that control beta cell function and plasticity has critical implications for the pathophysiology and therapy of major forms of diabetes. Selective gene inactivation in pancreatic beta cells, using the Cre-lox system, is a powerful approach to assess the role of particular genes in beta cel...

  1. [Cloning and characterization of genes differentially expressed in human dental pulp cells and gingival fibroblasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong-dong; Wu, Ji-nan; Zhou, Lin; Ling, Jun-qi; Guo, Xi-min; Xiao, Ming-zhen; Zhu, Feng; Pu, Qin; Chai, Yu-bo; Zhao, Zhong-liang

    2007-02-01

    To study the biological properties of human dental pulp cells (HDPC) by cloning and analysis of genes differentially expressed in HDPC in comparison with human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). HDPC and HGF were cultured and identified by immunocytochemistry. HPDC and HGF subtractive cDNA library was established by PCR-based modified subtractive hybridization, genes differentially expressed by HPDC were cloned, sequenced and compared to find homogeneous sequence in GenBank by BLAST. Cloning and sequencing analysis indicate 12 genes differentially expressed were obtained, in which two were unknown genes. Among the 10 known genes, 4 were related to signal transduction, 2 were related to trans-membrane transportation (both cell membrane and nuclear membrane), and 2 were related to RNA splicing mechanisms. The biological properties of HPDC are determined by the differential expression of some genes and the growth and differentiation of HPDC are associated to the dynamic protein synthesis and secretion activities of the cell.

  2. Gene expression profiles in BCL11B-siRNA treated malignant T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grabarczyk Piotr

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Downregulation of the B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL/lymphoma11B (BCL11B gene by small interfering RNA (siRNA leads to growth inhibition and apoptosis of the human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL cell line Molt-4. To further characterize the molecular mechanism, a global gene expression profile of BCL11B-siRNA -treated Molt-4 cells was established. The expression profiles of several genes were further validated in the BCL11B-siRNA -treated Molt-4 cells and primary T-ALL cells. Results 142 genes were found to be upregulated and 109 genes downregulated in the BCL11B-siRNA -treated Molt-4 cells by microarray analysis. Among apoptosis-related genes, three pro-apoptotic genes, TNFSF10, BIK, BNIP3, were upregulated and one anti-apoptotic gene, BCL2L1 was downregulated. Moreover, the expression of SPP1 and CREBBP genes involved in the transforming growth factor (TGF-β pathway was down 16-fold. Expression levels of TNFSF10, BCL2L1, SPP1, and CREBBP were also examined by real-time PCR. A similar expression pattern of TNFSF10, BCL2L1, and SPP1 was identified. However, CREBBP was not downregulated in the BLC11B-siRNA -treated Molt-4 cells. Conclusion BCL11B-siRNA treatment altered expression profiles of TNFSF10, BCL2L1, and SPP1 in both Molt-4 T cell line and primary T-ALL cells.

  3. Identification of NDRG1-regulated genes associated with invasive potential in cervical and ovarian cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Gang; Chen, Jiawei; Deng, Yanqiu; Gao, Feng; Zhu, Jiwei; Feng, Zhenzhong; Lv, Xiuhong; Zhao, Zheng

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → NDRG1 was knockdown in cervical and ovarian cancer cell lines by shRNA technology. → NDRG1 knockdown resulted in increased cell invasion activities. → Ninety-six common deregulated genes in both cell lines were identified by cDNA microarray. → Eleven common NDRG1-regulated genes might enhance cell invasive activity. → Regulation of invasion by NDRG1 is an indirect and complicated process. -- Abstract: N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is an important gene regulating tumor invasion. In this study, shRNA technology was used to suppress NDRG1 expression in CaSki (a cervical cancer cell line) and HO-8910PM (an ovarian cancer cell line). In vitro assays showed that NDRG1 knockdown enhanced tumor cell adhesion, migration and invasion activities without affecting cell proliferation. cDNA microarray analysis revealed 96 deregulated genes with more than 2-fold changes in both cell lines after NDRG1 knockdown. Ten common upregulated genes (LPXN, DDR2, COL6A1, IL6, IL8, FYN, PTP4A3, PAPPA, ETV5 and CYGB) and one common downregulated gene (CLCA2) were considered to enhance tumor cell invasive activity. BisoGenet network analysis indicated that NDRG1 regulated these invasion effector genes/proteins in an indirect manner. Moreover, NDRG1 knockdown also reduced pro-invasion genes expression such as MMP7, TMPRSS4 and CTSK. These results suggest that regulation of invasion and metastasis by NDRG1 is a highly complicated process.

  4. RNA-Seq reveals spliceosome and proteasome genes as most consistent transcripts in human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Macrae

    Full Text Available Accurate quantification of gene expression by qRT-PCR relies on normalization against a consistently expressed control gene. However, control genes in common use often vary greatly between samples, especially in cancer. The advent of Next Generation Sequencing technology offers the possibility to better select control genes with the least cell to cell variability in steady state transcript levels. Here we analyze the transcriptomes of 55 leukemia samples to identify the most consistent genes. This list is enriched for components of the proteasome (ex. PSMA1 and spliceosome (ex. SF3B2, and also includes the translation initiation factor EIF4H, and many heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein genes (ex. HNRNPL. We have validated the consistency of our new control genes in 1933 cancer and normal tissues using publically available RNA-seq data, and their usefulness in qRT-PCR analysis is clearly demonstrated.

  5. Expression of core clock genes in colorectal tumour cells compared with normal mucosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonnes, S; Donatsky, A M; Gögenur, I

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Experimental studies have shown that some circadian core clock genes may act as tumour suppressors and have an important role in the response to oncological treatment. This study investigated the evidence regarding modified expression of core clock genes in colorectal cancer and its...... expression of colorectal cancer cells compared with healthy mucosa cells from specimens analysed by real-time or quantitative real-time polymer chain reaction. The expression of the core clock genes Period, Cryptochrome, Bmal1 and Clock in colorectal tumours were compared with healthy mucosa and correlated...... with clinicopathological features and survival. RESULTS: Seventy-four articles were identified and 11 studies were included. Overall, gene expression of Period was significantly decreased in colorectal cancer cells compared with healthy mucosa cells. This tendency was also seen in the gene expression of Clock. Other core...

  6. Interferon-β gene transfer induces a strong cytotoxic bystander effect on melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Úrsula A; Gil-Cardeza, María L; Villaverde, Marcela S; Finocchiaro, Liliana M E; Glikin, Gerardo C

    2015-05-01

    A local gene therapy scheme for the delivery of type I interferons could be an alternative for the treatment of melanoma. We evaluated the cytotoxic effects of interferon-β (IFNβ) gene lipofection on tumor cell lines derived from three human cutaneous and four canine mucosal melanomas. The cytotoxicity of human IFNβ gene lipofection resulted higher or equivalent to that of the corresponding addition of the recombinant protein (rhIFNβ) to human cells. IFNβ gene lipofection was not cytotoxic for only one canine melanoma cell line. When cultured as monolayers, three human and three canine IFNβ-lipofected melanoma cell lines displayed a remarkable bystander effect. As spheroids, the same six cell lines were sensitive to IFNβ gene transfer, two displaying a significant multicell resistance phenotype. The effects of conditioned IFNβ-lipofected canine melanoma cell culture media suggested the release of at least one soluble thermolabile cytotoxic factor that could not be detected in human melanoma cells. By using a secretion signal-free truncated human IFNβ, we showed that its intracellular expression was enough to induce cytotoxicity in two human melanoma cell lines. The lower cytoplasmatic levels of reactive oxygen species detected after intracellular IFNβ expression could be related to the resistance displayed by one human melanoma cell line. As IFNβ gene transfer was effective against most of the assayed melanomas in a way not limited by relatively low lipofection efficiencies, the clinical potential of this approach is strongly supported. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Cell cycle gene expression networks discovered using systems biology: Significance in carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, RE; Ghule, PN; Stein, JL; Stein, GS

    2015-01-01

    The early stages of carcinogenesis are linked to defects in the cell cycle. A series of cell cycle checkpoints are involved in this process. The G1/S checkpoint that serves to integrate the control of cell proliferation and differentiation is linked to carcinogenesis and the mitotic spindle checkpoint with the development of chromosomal instability. This paper presents the outcome of systems biology studies designed to evaluate if networks of covariate cell cycle gene transcripts exist in proliferative mammalian tissues including mice, rats and humans. The GeneNetwork website that contains numerous gene expression datasets from different species, sexes and tissues represents the foundational resource for these studies (www.genenetwork.org). In addition, WebGestalt, a gene ontology tool, facilitated the identification of expression networks of genes that co-vary with key cell cycle targets, especially Cdc20 and Plk1 (www.bioinfo.vanderbilt.edu/webgestalt). Cell cycle expression networks of such covariate mRNAs exist in multiple proliferative tissues including liver, lung, pituitary, adipose and lymphoid tissues among others but not in brain or retina that have low proliferative potential. Sixty-three covariate cell cycle gene transcripts (mRNAs) compose the average cell cycle network with p = e−13 to e−36. Cell cycle expression networks show species, sex and tissue variability and they are enriched in mRNA transcripts associated with mitosis many of which are associated with chromosomal instability. PMID:25808367

  8. Validation of endogenous normalizing genes for expression analyses in adult human testis and germ cell neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svingen, T; Jørgensen, A; Rajpert-De Meyts, E

    2014-08-01

    The measurement of gene expression levels in cells and tissues typically depends on a suitable point of reference for inferring biological relevance. For quantitative (or real-time) RT-PCR assays, the method of choice is often to normalize gene expression data to an endogenous gene that is stably expressed across the samples analysed: a so-called normalizing or housekeeping gene. Although this is a valid strategy, the identification of stable normalizing genes has proved challenging and a gene showing stable expression across all cells or tissues is unlikely to exist. Therefore, it is necessary to define suitable normalizing genes for specific cells and tissues. Here, we report on the performance of a panel of nine commonly employed normalizing genes in adult human testis and testicular pathologies. Our analyses revealed significant variability in transcript abundance for commonly used normalizers, highlighting the importance of selecting appropriate normalizing genes as comparative measurements can yield variable results when different normalizing genes are employed. Based on our results, we recommend using RPS20, RPS29 or SRSF4 when analysing relative gene expression levels in human testis and associated testicular pathologies. OCT4 and SALL4 can be used with caution as second-tier normalizers when determining changes in gene expression in germ cells and germ cell tumour components, but the relative transcript abundance appears variable between different germ cell tumour types. We further recommend that such studies should be accompanied by additional assessment of histology and cellularity of each sample. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Expression of Mesenchymal Stem Cells-Related Genes and Plasticity of Aspirated Follicular Cells Obtained from Infertile Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edo Dzafic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available After removal of oocytes for in vitro fertilization, follicular aspirates which are rich in somatic follicular cells are discarded in daily medical practice. However, there is some evidence that less differentiated cells with stem cell characteristics are present among aspirated follicular cells (AFCs. The aim of this study was to culture AFCs in vitro and to analyze their gene expression profile. Using the RT2 Profiler PCR array, we investigated the expression profile of 84 genes related to stemness, mesenchymal stem cells (MCSs, and cell differentiation in AFCs enriched by hypoosmotic protocol from follicular aspirates of infertile women involved in assisted reproduction programme in comparison with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs and fibroblasts. Altogether the expression of 57 genes was detected in AFCs: 16 genes (OCT4, CD49f, CD106, CD146, CD45, CD54, IL10, IL1B, TNF, VEGF, VWF, HDAC1, MITF, RUNX2, PPARG, and PCAF were upregulated and 20 genes (FGF2, CASP3, CD105, CD13, CD340, CD73, CD90, KDR, PDGFRB, BDNF, COL1A1, IL6, MMP2, NES, NUDT6, BMP6, SMURF2, BMP4, GDF5, and JAG1 were downregulated in AFCs when compared with BM-MSCs. The genes which were upregulated in AFCs were mostly related to MSCs and connected with ovarian function, and differed from those in fibroblasts. The cultured AFCs with predominating granulosa cells were successfully in vitro differentiated into adipogenic-, osteogenic-, and pancreatic-like cells. The upregulation of some MSC-specific genes and in vitro differentiation into other types of cells indicated a subpopulation of AFCs with specific stemness, which was not similar to those of BM-MSCs or fibroblasts.

  10. What Population Reveals about Individual Cell Identity: Single-Cell Parameter Estimation of Models of Gene Expression in Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artémis Llamosi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Significant cell-to-cell heterogeneity is ubiquitously observed in isogenic cell populations. Consequently, parameters of models of intracellular processes, usually fitted to population-averaged data, should rather be fitted to individual cells to obtain a population of models of similar but non-identical individuals. Here, we propose a quantitative modeling framework that attributes specific parameter values to single cells for a standard model of gene expression. We combine high quality single-cell measurements of the response of yeast cells to repeated hyperosmotic shocks and state-of-the-art statistical inference approaches for mixed-effects models to infer multidimensional parameter distributions describing the population, and then derive specific parameters for individual cells. The analysis of single-cell parameters shows that single-cell identity (e.g. gene expression dynamics, cell size, growth rate, mother-daughter relationships is, at least partially, captured by the parameter values of gene expression models (e.g. rates of transcription, translation and degradation. Our approach shows how to use the rich information contained into longitudinal single-cell data to infer parameters that can faithfully represent single-cell identity.

  11. Catalog of gene expression in adult neural stem cells and their in vivo microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Cecilia; Wirta, Valtteri; Meletis, Konstantinos; Wikstroem, Lilian; Carlsson, Leif; Frisen, Jonas; Lundeberg, Joakim

    2006-01-01

    Stem cells generally reside in a stem cell microenvironment, where cues for self-renewal and differentiation are present. However, the genetic program underlying stem cell proliferation and multipotency is poorly understood. Transcriptome analysis of stem cells and their in vivo microenvironment is one way of uncovering the unique stemness properties and provides a framework for the elucidation of stem cell function. Here, we characterize the gene expression profile of the in vivo neural stem cell microenvironment in the lateral ventricle wall of adult mouse brain and of in vitro proliferating neural stem cells. We have also analyzed an Lhx2-expressing hematopoietic-stem-cell-like cell line in order to define the transcriptome of a well-characterized and pure cell population with stem cell characteristics. We report the generation, assembly and annotation of 50,792 high-quality 5'-end expressed sequence tag sequences. We further describe a shared expression of 1065 transcripts by all three stem cell libraries and a large overlap with previously published gene expression signatures for neural stem/progenitor cells and other multipotent stem cells. The sequences and cDNA clones obtained within this framework provide a comprehensive resource for the analysis of genes in adult stem cells that can accelerate future stem cell research

  12. Different Effects of BORIS/CTCFL on Stemness Gene Expression, Sphere Formation and Cell Survival in Epithelial Cancer Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Alberti

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells are cancer cells characterized by stem cell properties and represent a small population of tumor cells that drives tumor development, progression, metastasis and drug resistance. To date, the molecular mechanisms that generate and regulate cancer stem cells are not well defined. BORIS (Brother of Regulator of Imprinted Sites or CTCFL (CTCF-like is a DNA-binding protein that is expressed in normal tissues only in germ cells and is re-activated in tumors. Recent evidences have highlighted the correlation of BORIS/CTCFL expression with poor overall survival of different cancer patients. We have previously shown an association of BORIS-expressing cells with stemness gene expression in embryonic cancer cells. Here, we studied the role of BORIS in epithelial tumor cells. Using BORIS-molecular beacon that was already validated, we were able to show the presence of BORIS mRNA in cancer stem cell-enriched populations (side population and spheres of cervical, colon and breast tumor cells. BORIS silencing studies showed a decrease of sphere formation capacity in breast and colon tumor cells. Importantly, BORIS-silencing led to down-regulation of hTERT, stem cell (NANOG, OCT4, SOX2 and BMI1 and cancer stem cell markers (ABCG2, CD44 and ALDH1 genes. Conversely, BORIS-induction led to up-regulation of the same genes. These phenotypes were observed in cervical, colon and invasive breast tumor cells. However, a completely different behavior was observed in the non-invasive breast tumor cells (MCF7. Indeed, these cells acquired an epithelial mesenchymal transition phenotype after BORIS silencing. Our results demonstrate that BORIS is associated with cancer stem cell-enriched populations of several epithelial tumor cells and the different phenotypes depend on the origin of tumor cells.

  13. CD133+ cells contribute to radioresistance via altered regulation of DNA repair genes in human lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, Amar; Webb, Bryan; Gerson, Stanton L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Radioresistance in human tumors has been linked in part to a subset of cells termed cancer stem cells (CSCs). The prominin 1 (CD133) cell surface protein is proposed to be a marker enriching for CSCs. We explore the importance of DNA repair in contributing to radioresistance in CD133+ lung cancer cells. Materials and methods: A549 and H1299 lung cancer cell lines were used. Sorted CD133+ cells were exposed to either single 4 Gy or 8 Gy doses and clonogenic survival measured. ϒ-H2AX immunofluorescence and quantitative real time PCR was performed on sorted CD133+ cells both in the absence of IR and after two single 4 Gy doses. Lentiviral shRNA was used to silence repair genes. Results: A549 but not H1299 cells expand their CD133+ population after single 4 Gy exposure, and isolated A549 CD133+ cells demonstrate IR resistance. This resistance corresponded with enhanced repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and upregulated expression of DSB repair genes in A549 cells. Prior IR exposure of two single 4 Gy doses resulted in acquired DNA repair upregulation and improved repair proficiency in both A549 and H1299. Finally Exo1 and Rad51 silencing in A549 cells abrogated the CD133+ IR expansion phenotype and induced IR sensitivity in sorted CD133+ cells. Conclusions: CD133 identifies a population of cells within specific tumor types containing altered expression of DNA repair genes that are inducible upon exposure to chemotherapy. This altered gene expression contributes to enhanced DSB resolution and the radioresistance phenotype of these cells. We also identify DNA repair genes which may serve as promising therapeutic targets to confer radiosensitivity to CSCs

  14. Identification of reference genes in human myelomonocytic cells for gene expression studies in altered gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Cora S; Hauschild, Swantje; Tauber, Svantje; Paulsen, Katrin; Raig, Christiane; Raem, Arnold; Biskup, Josefine; Gutewort, Annett; Hürlimann, Eva; Unverdorben, Felix; Buttron, Isabell; Lauber, Beatrice; Philpot, Claudia; Lier, Hartwin; Engelmann, Frank; Layer, Liliana E; Ullrich, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression studies are indispensable for investigation and elucidation of molecular mechanisms. For the process of normalization, reference genes ("housekeeping genes") are essential to verify gene expression analysis. Thus, it is assumed that these reference genes demonstrate similar expression levels over all experimental conditions. However, common recommendations about reference genes were established during 1 g conditions and therefore their applicability in studies with altered gravity has not been demonstrated yet. The microarray technology is frequently used to generate expression profiles under defined conditions and to determine the relative difference in expression levels between two or more different states. In our study, we searched for potential reference genes with stable expression during different gravitational conditions (microgravity, normogravity, and hypergravity) which are additionally not altered in different hardware systems. We were able to identify eight genes (ALB, B4GALT6, GAPDH, HMBS, YWHAZ, ABCA5, ABCA9, and ABCC1) which demonstrated no altered gene expression levels in all tested conditions and therefore represent good candidates for the standardization of gene expression studies in altered gravity.

  15. [Analysis of tissue-specific differentially methylated genes with differential gene expression in non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, L G; Zou, Z Q; Zhao, H Y; Zhang, C L; Shen, J G; Qi, L; Qi, M; Xue, Z Q

    2014-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) are two subtypes of non-small cell lung carcinomas which are regarded as the leading cause of cancer-related malignancy worldwide. The aim of this study is to detect the differentially methylated loci (DMLs) and differentially methylated genes (DMGs) of these two tumor sets, and then to illustrate the different expression level of specific methylated genes. Using TCGA database and Illumina HumanMethylation 27 arrays, we first screened the DMGs and DMLs in tumor samples. Then, we explored the BiologicalProcess terms of hypermethylated and hypomethylated genes using Functional Gene Ontology (GO) catalogues. Hypermethylation intensively occurred in CpG-island, whereas hypomethylation was located in non-CpG-island. Most SCC and ADC hypermethylated genes involved GO function of DNA dependenit regulation of transcription, and hypomethylated genes mainly 'enriched in the term of immune responses. Additionally, the expression level of specific differentially methylated genesis distinctbetween ADC and SCC. It is concluded that ADC and SCC have different methylated status that might play an important role in carcinogenesis.

  16. Comparison of Gene Expression in Human Embryonic Stem Cells, hESC-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Romain Barbet; Isabelle Peiffer; Antoinette Hatzfeld; Pierre Charbord; Jacques A. Hatzfeld

    2011-01-01

    We present a strategy to identify developmental/differentiation and plasma membrane marker genes of the most primitive human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs). Using sensitive and quantitative TaqMan Low Density Arrays (TLDA) methodology, we compared the expression of 381 genes in human Embryonic Stem Cells (hESCs), hESC-derived MSCs ...

  17. Analysis of gene expression during odontogenic differentiation of cultured human dental pulp cells

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    Min-Seock Seo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives We analyzed gene-expression profiles after 14 day odontogenic induction of human dental pulp cells (DPCs using a DNA microarray and sought candidate genes possibly associated with mineralization. Materials and Methods Induced human dental pulp cells were obtained by culturing DPCs in odontogenic induction medium (OM for 14 day. Cells exposed to normal culture medium were used as controls. Total RNA was extracted from cells and analyzed by microarray analysis and the key results were confirmed selectively by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. We also performed a gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA of the microarray data. Results Six hundred and five genes among the 47,320 probes on the BeadChip differed by a factor of more than two-fold in the induced cells. Of these, 217 genes were upregulated, and 388 were down-regulated. GSEA revealed that in the induced cells, genes implicated in Apoptosis and Signaling by wingless MMTV integration (Wnt were significantly upregulated. Conclusions Genes implicated in Apoptosis and Signaling by Wnt are highly connected to the differentiation of dental pulp cells into odontoblast.

  18. High-throughput gene expression profiling of memory differentiation in primary human T cells

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    Russell Kate

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The differentiation of naive T and B cells into memory lymphocytes is essential for immunity to pathogens. Therapeutic manipulation of this cellular differentiation program could improve vaccine efficacy and the in vitro expansion of memory cells. However, chemical screens to identify compounds that induce memory differentiation have been limited by 1 the lack of reporter-gene or functional assays that can distinguish naive and memory-phenotype T cells at high throughput and 2 a suitable cell-line representative of naive T cells. Results Here, we describe a method for gene-expression based screening that allows primary naive and memory-phenotype lymphocytes to be discriminated based on complex genes signatures corresponding to these differentiation states. We used ligation-mediated amplification and a fluorescent, bead-based detection system to quantify simultaneously 55 transcripts representing naive and memory-phenotype signatures in purified populations of human T cells. The use of a multi-gene panel allowed better resolution than any constituent single gene. The method was precise, correlated well with Affymetrix microarray data, and could be easily scaled up for high-throughput. Conclusion This method provides a generic solution for high-throughput differentiation screens in primary human T cells where no single-gene or functional assay is available. This screening platform will allow the identification of small molecules, genes or soluble factors that direct memory differentiation in naive human lymphocytes.

  19. RNA interference: learning gene knock-down from cell physiology

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    Provenzano Maurizio

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Summary Over the past decade RNA interference (RNAi has emerged as a natural mechanism for silencing gene expression. This ancient cellular antiviral response can be exploited to allow specific inhibition of the function of any chosen target gene. RNAi is proving to be an invaluable research tool, allowing much more rapid characterization of the function of known genes. More importantly, RNAi technology considerably bolsters functional genomics to aid in the identification of novel genes involved in disease processes. This review briefly describes the molecular principles underlying the biology of RNAi phenomenon and discuss the main technical issues regarding optimization of RNAi experimental design.

  20. RNA interference: learning gene knock-down from cell physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone; Provenzano, Maurizio

    2004-01-01

    Over the past decade RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a natural mechanism for silencing gene expression. This ancient cellular antiviral response can be exploited to allow specific inhibition of the function of any chosen target gene. RNAi is proving to be an invaluable research tool, allowing much more rapid characterization of the function of known genes. More importantly, RNAi technology considerably bolsters functional genomics to aid in the identification of novel genes involved in disease processes. This review briefly describes the molecular principles underlying the biology of RNAi phenomenon and discuss the main technical issues regarding optimization of RNAi experimental design. PMID:15555080

  1. Gene expression changes in the injured spinal cord following transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells or olfactory ensheathing cells.

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    Abel Torres-Espín

    Full Text Available Transplantation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC or olfactory ensheathing cells (OEC have demonstrated beneficial effects after spinal cord injury (SCI, providing tissue protection and improving the functional recovery. However, the changes induced by these cells after their transplantation into the injured spinal cord remain largely unknown. We analyzed the changes in the spinal cord transcriptome after a contusion injury and MSC or OEC transplantation. The cells were injected immediately or 7 days after the injury. The mRNA of the spinal cord injured segment was extracted and analyzed by microarray at 2 and 7 days after cell grafting. The gene profiles were analyzed by clustering and functional enrichment analysis based on the Gene Ontology database. We found that both MSC and OEC transplanted acutely after injury induce an early up-regulation of genes related to tissue protection and regeneration. In contrast, cells transplanted at 7 days after injury down-regulate genes related to tissue regeneration. The most important change after MSC or OEC transplant was a marked increase in expression of genes associated with foreign body response and adaptive immune response. These data suggest a regulatory effect of MSC and OEC transplantation after SCI regarding tissue repair processes, but a fast rejection response to the grafted cells. Our results provide an initial step to determine the mechanisms of action and to optimize cell therapy for SCI.

  2. Candidate gene analysis using imputed genotypes: cell cycle single-nucleotide polymorphisms and ovarian cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L; Vierkant, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    Polymorphisms in genes critical to cell cycle control are outstanding candidates for association with ovarian cancer risk; numerous genes have been interrogated by multiple research groups using differing tagging single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sets. To maximize information gleaned from......, and rs3212891; CDK2 rs2069391, rs2069414, and rs17528736; and CCNE1 rs3218036. These results exemplify the utility of imputation in candidate gene studies and lend evidence to a role of cell cycle genes in ovarian cancer etiology, suggest a reduced set of SNPs to target in additional cases and controls....

  3. Mapping of HNF4alpha target genes in intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Mette; Bressendorff, Simon; Moller, Jette

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The role of HNF4alpha has been extensively studied in hepatocytes and pancreatic beta-cells, and HNF4alpha is also regarded as key regulator of intestinal epithelial cell differentiation as well. The aim of the present work is to identify novel HNF4alpha target genes....... The HNF4alpha ChIP-chip data was matched with gene expression and histone H3 acetylation status of the promoters in order to identify HNF4alpha binding to actively transcribed genes with an open chromatin structure. RESULTS: 1,541 genes were identified as potential HNF4alpha targets, many of which have...

  4. Systematic gene tagging using CRISPR/Cas9 in human stem cells to illuminate cell organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Brock; Haupt, Amanda; Tucker, Andrew; Grancharova, Tanya; Arakaki, Joy; Fuqua, Margaret A; Nelson, Angelique; Hookway, Caroline; Ludmann, Susan A; Mueller, Irina A; Yang, Ruian; Horwitz, Rick; Rafelski, Susanne M; Gunawardane, Ruwanthi N

    2017-10-15

    We present a CRISPR/Cas9 genome-editing strategy to systematically tag endogenous proteins with fluorescent tags in human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC). To date, we have generated multiple hiPSC lines with monoallelic green fluorescent protein tags labeling 10 proteins representing major cellular structures. The tagged proteins include alpha tubulin, beta actin, desmoplakin, fibrillarin, nuclear lamin B1, nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIB, paxillin, Sec61 beta, tight junction protein ZO1, and Tom20. Our genome-editing methodology using Cas9/crRNA ribonuclear protein and donor plasmid coelectroporation, followed by fluorescence-based enrichment of edited cells, typically resulted in <0.1-4% homology-directed repair (HDR). Twenty-five percent of clones generated from each edited population were precisely edited. Furthermore, 92% (36/39) of expanded clonal lines displayed robust morphology, genomic stability, expression and localization of the tagged protein to the appropriate subcellular structure, pluripotency-marker expression, and multilineage differentiation. It is our conclusion that, if cell lines are confirmed to harbor an appropriate gene edit, pluripotency, differentiation potential, and genomic stability are typically maintained during the clonal line-generation process. The data described here reveal general trends that emerged from this systematic gene-tagging approach. Final clonal lines corresponding to each of the 10 cellular structures are now available to the research community. © 2017 Roberts, Haupt, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  5. Gene transfer to primary corneal epithelial cells with an integrating lentiviral vector

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    Lauro Augusto de Oliveira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the transfer of heterologous genes carrying a Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP reporter cassette to primary corneal epithelial cells ex vivo. METHODS: Freshly enucleated rabbit corneoscleral tissue was used to obtain corneal epithelial cell suspension via enzymatic digestion. Cells were plated at a density of 5×10³ cells/cm² and allowed to grow for 5 days (to 70-80% confluency prior to transduction. Gene transfer was monitored using fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS. We evaluated the transduction efficiency (TE over time and the dose-response effect of different lentiviral particles. One set of cells were dual sorted by fluorescence activated cell sorter for green fluorescent protein expression as well as Hoechst dye exclusion to evaluate the transduction of potentially corneal epithelial stem cells (side-population phenotypic cells. RESULTS: Green fluorescent protein expressing lentiviral vectors were able to effectively transduce rabbit primary epithelial cells cultured ex vivo. Live cell imaging post-transduction demonstrated GFP-positive cells with normal epithelial cell morphology and growth. The transduction efficiency over time was higher at the 5th post-transduction day (14.1% and tended to stabilize after the 8th day. The number of transduced cells was dose-dependent, and at the highest lentivirus concentrations approached 7%. When double sorted by fluorescence activated cell sorter to isolate both green fluorescent protein positive and side population cells, transduced side population cells were identified. CONCLUSIONS: Lentiviral vectors can effectively transfer heterologous genes to primary corneal epithelial cells expanded ex vivo. Genes were stably expressed over time, transferred in a dose-dependence fashion, and could be transferred to mature corneal cells as well as presumable putative stem cells.

  6. Cell wall composition and candidate biosynthesis gene expression during rice development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Fan; Manisseri, Chithra; Fagerström, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Cell walls of grasses, including cereal crops and biofuel grasses, comprise the majority of plant biomass and intimately influence plant growth, development and physiology. However, the functions of many cell wall synthesis genes, and the relationships among and the functions of cell wall...... components remain obscure. To better understand the patterns of cell wall accumulation and identify genes that act in grass cell wall biosynthesis, we characterized 30 samples from aerial organs of rice (Oryza sativa cv. Kitaake) at 10 developmental time points, 3-100 d post-germination. Within these samples......, we measured 15 cell wall chemical components, enzymatic digestibility and 18 cell wall polysaccharide epitopes/ligands. We also used quantitative reverse transcription-PCR to measure expression of 50 glycosyltransferases, 15 acyltransferases and eight phenylpropanoid genes, many of which had...

  7. In vitro study for laser gene transfer in BHK-21 fibroblast cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Aziz, M.; Salem, D. S.; Salama, M. S.; Badr, Y.

    2009-02-01

    Modifications to our previously introduced system for laser microbeam cell surgery were carried out in the present work to match animal cells. These modifications included: 1- Using other laser system that used before, Excimer laser with 193 and 308 nm wavelengths. The used laser here, is He-Cd with low power and 441.5 nm wavelength in the visible region. 2- Instead of using pulsed laser, we used here CW He-Cd chopped by electrical chopper, which is synchronized with the mechanical motion of the mobile stage with step 40 microns, according to cell dimensions to avoid puncturing the same cell twice. The advantages of the modified here laser setup for gene transfer is: it is less damaging to the sensitive animal cell which has thin cell membrane. The present work aimed to: 1- Design a modified laser microbeam cell surgery, applicable to animal cells, such as fibroblast cells 2- To examine the efficiency of such system. 3- To assure gene transfer and its expression in the used cells. 4- To evaluate the ultra damages produced from using the laser beam as a modality for gene transfer. On the other wards, to introduce: safe, efficient and less damaging modality for gene transfer in animal cells. To achieve these goals, we applied the introduced here home-made laser setup with its synchronized parameters to introduce pBK-CMV phagemid, containing LacZ and neomycin resistance (neor )genes into BHK-21 fibroblast cell line. The results of the present work showed that: 1- Our modified laser microbeam cell surgery setup proved to be useful and efficient tool for gene transfer into fibroblast cells. 2- The presence and expression of LacZ gene was achieved using histochemical LacZ assay. 3- Selection of G418 antibiotic sensitivity assay confirmed the presence and expression towards stability of neor gene with time. 4- Presence of LacZ and neor genes in the genomic DNA of transfected fibroblast cells was indicated using PCR analysis. 5- Transmission electron microscopy indicated

  8. Patient Perspectives on Gene Transfer Therapy for Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Heather; Mitchell, Monica J; Goldstein-Leever, Alana; Shook, Lisa; Malik, Punam; Crosby, Lori E

    2017-08-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a chronic genetic disease with high morbidity and early mortality; it affects nearly 100,000 individuals in the USA. Bone marrow transplantation, the only curative treatment, is available to less than 20% of patients because of a number of access barriers. Gene transfer therapy (GTT) has been shown to be curative in animal models and is approved for use in humans for early-phase studies at a few centers. GTT would offer a more accessible treatment option available to all patients. It is important to understand patient perspectives on GTT to help ensure human clinical trial success. Two focus groups were conducted with younger (18-30 years) and older (31 years and older) adults with SCD to obtain data on patient knowledge and beliefs about GTT. Data from these two focus groups was used to develop a GTT educational brochure. A third focus group was conducted to obtain participant feedback on acceptability and feasibility of education and the brochure. Most adults, especially young adults, had little knowledge about GTT and expressed fear and uncertainty about the side effects of chemotherapy (e.g., hair loss, infertility), use of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-derived viral vector, and potential for cancer risk. Participants wanted full transparency in educational materials, but advised researchers not to share the vector's relation to HIV because of cultural stigma and no HIV virus is used for the GTT vector. Older adults had more desire to participate in human clinical GTT trials than younger participants. When recruiting for trials, researchers should develop GTT educational materials that address participant lack of trust in the healthcare system, cultural beliefs, fears related to side effects, and include visual illustrations. Use of such materials will provide adults with SCD the information they need to fully evaluate GTT.

  9. Genetic control of eosinophilia in mice: gene(s) expressed in bone marrow-derived cells control high responsiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vadas, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    A heterogeneity in the capacity of strains of mice to mount eosinophilia is described. BALB/c and C3H are eosinophil high responder strains (EO-HR) and CBA and A/J are eosinophil low responder strains (EO-LR), judged by the response of blood eosinophils to Ascaris suum, and the response of blood, bone marrow, and spleen eosinophils to keyhole limpet hemocyanin given 2 days after 150 mg/kg cyclophosphamide. Some of the gene(s) for high responsiveness appear to be dominant because (EO-HR x EO-LR)F 1 mice were intermediate to high responders. This gene is expressed in bone marrow-derived cells because radiation chimeras of the type EO-HR→F 1 were high responders and EO-LR→F 1 were low responders. This description of a genetic control of eosinophilia in mice may be useful in understanding the role of this cell in parasite immunity and allergy

  10. ING Genes Work as Tumor Suppressor Genes in the Carcinogenesis of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohan Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is the sixth most common cancer in the world. The evolution and progression of HNSCC are considered to result from multiple stepwise alterations of cellular and molecular pathways in squamous epithelium. Recently, inhibitor of growth gene (ING family consisting of five genes, ING1 to ING5, was identified as a new tumor suppressor gene family that was implicated in the downregulation of cell cycle and chromatin remodeling. In contrast, it has been shown that ING1 and ING2 play an oncogenic role in some cancers, this situation being similar to TGF-β. In HNSCC, the ING family has been reported to be downregulated, and ING translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm may be a critical event for carcinogenesis. In this paper, we describe our recent results and briefly summarize current knowledge regarding the biologic functions of ING in HNSCC.

  11. Smuggling gold nanoparticles across cell types - A new role for exosomes in gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roma-Rodrigues, Catarina; Pereira, Francisca; Alves de Matos, António P; Fernandes, Marta; Baptista, Pedro V; Fernandes, Alexandra R

    2017-05-01

    Once released to the extracellular space, exosomes enable the transfer of proteins, lipids and RNA between different cells, being able to modulate the recipient cells' phenotypes. Members of the Rab small GTP-binding protein family, such as RAB27A, are responsible for the coordination of several steps in vesicle trafficking, including budding, mobility, docking and fusion. The use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for gene silencing is considered a cutting-edge technology. Here, AuNPs were functionalized with thiolated oligonucleotides anti-RAB27A (AuNP@PEG@anti-RAB27A) for selective silencing of the gene with a consequent decrease of exosomes´ release by MCF-7 and MDA-MB-453 cells. Furthermore, communication between tumor and normal cells was observed both in terms of alterations in c-Myc gene expression and transportation of the AuNPs, mediating gene silencing in secondary cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of target genes of synovial sarcoma-associated fusion oncoprotein using human pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Kazuo [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Ikeya, Makoto [Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Fukuta, Makoto [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Woltjen, Knut [Department of Reprogramming Sciences, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Tamaki, Sakura; Takahara, Naoko; Kato, Tomohisa; Sato, Shingo [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Otsuka, Takanobu [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Toguchida, Junya, E-mail: togjun@frontier.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► We tried to identify targets of synovial sarcoma (SS)-associated SYT–SSX fusion gene. ► We established pluripotent stem cell (PSC) lines with inducible SYT–SSX gene. ► SYT–SSX responsive genes were identified by the induction of SYT–SSX in PSC. ► SS-related genes were selected from database by in silico analyses. ► 51 genes were finally identified among SS-related genes as targets of SYT–SSX in PSC. -- Abstract: Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a malignant soft tissue tumor harboring chromosomal translocation t(X; 18)(p11.2; q11.2), which produces SS-specific fusion gene, SYT–SSX. Although precise function of SYT–SSX remains to be investigated, accumulating evidences suggest its role in gene regulation via epigenetic mechanisms, and the product of SYT–SSX target genes may serve as biomarkers of SS. Lack of knowledge about the cell-of-origin of SS, however, has placed obstacle in the way of target identification. Here we report a novel approach to identify SYT–SSX2 target genes using human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) containing a doxycycline-inducible SYT–SSX2 gene. SYT–SSX2 was efficiently induced both at mRNA and protein levels within three hours after doxycycline administration, while no morphological change of hPSCs was observed until 24 h. Serial microarray analyses identified genes of which the expression level changed more than twofold within 24 h. Surprisingly, the majority (297/312, 95.2%) were up-regulated genes and a result inconsistent with the current concept of SYT–SSX as a transcriptional repressor. Comparing these genes with SS-related genes which were selected by a series of in silico analyses, 49 and 2 genes were finally identified as candidates of up- and down-regulated target of SYT–SSX, respectively. Association of these genes with SYT–SSX in SS cells was confirmed by knockdown experiments. Expression profiles of SS-related genes in hPSCs and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were strikingly

  13. Dose-related estrogen effects on gene expression in fetal mouse prostate mesenchymal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A Taylor

    Full Text Available Developmental exposure of mouse fetuses to estrogens results in dose-dependent permanent effects on prostate morphology and function. Fetal prostatic mesenchyme cells express estrogen receptor alpha (ERα and androgen receptors and convert stimuli from circulating estrogens and androgens into paracrine signaling to regulate epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation. To obtain mechanistic insight into the role of different doses of estradiol (E2 in regulating mesenchymal cells, we examined E2-induced transcriptomal changes in primary cultures of fetal mouse prostate mesenchymal cells. Urogenital sinus mesenchyme cells were obtained from male mouse fetuses at gestation day 17 and exposed to 10 pM, 100 pM or 100 nM E2 in the presence of a physiological concentration of dihydrotestosterone (0.69 nM for four days. Gene ontology studies suggested that low doses of E2 (10 pM and 100 pM induce genes involved in morphological tissue development and sterol biosynthesis but suppress genes involved in growth factor signaling. Genes involved in cell adhesion were enriched among both up-regulated and down-regulated genes. Genes showing inverted-U-shape dose responses (enhanced by E2 at 10 pM E2 but suppressed at 100 pM were enriched in the glycolytic pathway. At the highest dose (100 nM, E2 induced genes enriched for cell adhesion, steroid hormone signaling and metabolism, cytokines and their receptors, cell-to-cell communication, Wnt signaling, and TGF- β signaling. These results suggest that prostate mesenchymal cells may regulate epithelial cells through direct cell contacts when estrogen level is low whereas secreted growth factors and cytokines might play significant roles when estrogen level is high.

  14. HAP1 gene expression is associated with radiosensitivity in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jing; Zhang, Jun-ying; Yin, Li; Wu, Jian-zhong; Guo, Wen-jie; Wu, Jian-feng; Chen, Meng; Xia, You-you; Tang, Jin-hai; Ma, Yong-chao; He, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Overexpression of HAP1 gene promotes apoptosis in MCF-7 cells after irradiation. • HAP1 reduces tumor volume in nude mice xenograft models after irradiation. • HAP1 increases radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells in vitro and vivo. - Abstract: Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between huntingtin-associated protein1 (HAP1) gene and radiation therapy of breast cancer cells. Methods: HAP1 gene was transfected into breast cancer MCF-7 cells, which was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis (qRT-PCR) and Western blot in vitro. The changes of cell radiosensitivity were assessed by colony formation assay. Apoptosis were examined by flow cytometry. The expressions of two radiation-induced genes were evaluated by Western blot. Tumor growth was investigated in nude mice xenograft models in vivo. Results: Our data showed that HAP1 gene expression was significantly increased in HAP1-transfected MCF-7 cells in comparison with the parental cells or negative control cells. The survival rate in MCF-7/HAP1 cells was significantly decreased after irradiation (0, 2, 4, 6, 8 Gy), compared to cells in MCF-7 and MCF-7/Pb groups in vitro. HAP1 gene increased apoptosis in MCF-7 cells after irradiation. Additionally, the tumor volume and weight in MCF-7/HAP1 + RT group were observably lower than in MCF-7/HAP1 group and MCF-7/Pb + RT group. Conclusion: The present study indicated that HAP1 gene expression was related to the radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells and may play an important role in the regulation of cellular radiosensitivity

  15. Molecular pathways of early CD105-positive erythroid cells as compared with CD34-positive common precursor cells by flow cytometric cell-sorting and gene expression profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machherndl-Spandl, S; Suessner, S; Danzer, M; Proell, J; Gabriel, C; Lauf, J; Sylie, R; Klein, H-U; Béné, M C; Weltermann, A; Bettelheim, P

    2013-01-01

    Special attention has recently been drawn to the molecular network of different genes that are responsible for the development of erythroid cells. The aim of the present study was to establish in detail the immunophenotype of early erythroid cells and to compare the gene expression profile of freshly isolated early erythroid precursors with that of the CD34-positive (CD34 + ) compartment. Multiparameter flow cytometric analyses of human bone marrow mononuclear cell fractions (n=20) defined three distinct early erythroid stages. The gene expression profile of sorted early erythroid cells was analyzed by Affymetrix array technology. For 4524 genes, a differential regulation was found in CD105-positive erythroid cells as compared with the CD34 + progenitor compartment (2362 upregulated genes). A highly significant difference was observed in the expression level of genes involved in transcription, heme synthesis, iron and mitochondrial metabolism and transforming growth factor-β signaling. A comparison with recently published data showed over 1000 genes that as yet have not been reported to be upregulated in the early erythroid lineage. The gene expression level within distinct pathways could be illustrated directly by applying the Ingenuity software program. The results of gene expression analyses can be seen at the Gene Expression Omnibus repository

  16. CD133-targeted Gene Transfer Into Long-term Repopulating Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brendel, Christian; Goebel, Benjamin; Daniela, Abriss; Brugman, Martijn; Kneissl, Sabrina; Schwaeble, Joachim; Kaufmann, Kerstin B.; Mueller-Kuller, Uta; Kunkel, Hana; Chen-Wichmann, Linping; Abel, Tobias; Serve, Hubert; Bystrykh, Leonid; Buchholz, Christian J.; Grez, Manuel

    Gene therapy for hematological disorders relies on the genetic modification of CD34(+) cells, a heterogeneous cell population containing about 0.01% long-term repopulating cells. Here, we show that the lentiviral vector CD133-LV, which uses a surface marker on human primitive hematopoietic stem

  17. Gene Expression Music Algorithm-Based Characterization of the Ewing Sarcoma Stem Cell Signature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Sebastian Staege

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene Expression Music Algorithm (GEMusicA is a method for the transformation of DNA microarray data into melodies that can be used for the characterization of differentially expressed genes. Using this method we compared gene expression profiles from endothelial cells (EC, hematopoietic stem cells, neuronal stem cells, embryonic stem cells (ESC, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC and defined a set of genes that can discriminate between the different stem cell types. We analyzed the behavior of public microarray data sets from Ewing sarcoma (“Ewing family tumors,” EFT cell lines and biopsies in GEMusicA after prefiltering DNA microarray data for the probe sets from the stem cell signature. Our results demonstrate that individual Ewing sarcoma cell lines have a high similarity to ESC or EC. Ewing sarcoma cell lines with inhibited Ewing sarcoma breakpoint region 1-Friend leukemia virus integration 1 (EWSR1-FLI1 oncogene retained the similarity to ESC and EC. However, correlation coefficients between GEMusicA-processed expression data between EFT and ESC decreased whereas correlation coefficients between EFT and EC as well as between EFT and MSC increased after knockdown of EWSR1-FLI1. Our data support the concept of EFT being derived from cells with features of embryonic and endothelial cells.

  18. Transcriptional profiling of the human fibrillin/LTBP gene family, key regulators of mesenchymal cell functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Margaret R.; Andersson, Robin; Severin, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    in the structure of the extracellular matrix and controlling the bioavailability of TGFβ family members. Genes encoding these proteins show differential expression in mesenchymal cell types which synthesize the extracellular matrix. We have investigated the promoter regions of the seven gene family members using...... of the family members were expressed in a range of mesenchymal and other cell types, often associated with use of alternative promoters or transcription start sites within a promoter in different cell types. FBN3 was the lowest expressed gene, and was found only in embryonic and fetal tissues. The different...

  19. MiR genes in brast cells: studies in development and neoplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchi, I.

    2009-01-01

    Micro RNAs, roughly 23 nucleotides long are a large family of non-coding small RNAs that function to suppress gene expression through post-transcriptional regulation via either translational repression or mRNA turnover. Although new classes of small RNA molecules continue to be identified as more sequencing data are generated, currently it is estimated that at least one third of human genes are predicted targets for micro RNAs. However, the role that micro RNAs have in stem cell and cancer stem cell function and the precise mechanism by which they suppress gene expression in these cell types remain to be unequivocally identified

  20. MiR genes in brast cells: studies in development and neoplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucchi, I [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy)

    2009-07-01

    Micro RNAs, roughly 23 nucleotides long are a large family of non-coding small RNAs that function to suppress gene expression through post-transcriptional regulation via either translational repression or mRNA turnover. Although new classes of small RNA molecules continue to be identified as more sequencing data are generated, currently it is estimated that at least one third of human genes are predicted targets for micro RNAs. However, the role that micro RNAs have in stem cell and cancer stem cell function and the precise mechanism by which they suppress gene expression in these cell types remain to be unequivocally identified.

  1. Altered global gene expression profiles in human gastrointestinal epithelial Caco2 cells exposed to nanosilver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saura C. Sahu

    Full Text Available Extensive consumer exposure to food- and cosmetics-related consumer products containing nanosilver is of public safety concern. Therefore, there is a need for suitable in vitro models and sensitive predictive rapid screening methods to assess their toxicity. Toxicogenomic profile showing subtle changes in gene expressions following nanosilver exposure is a sensitive toxicological endpoint for this purpose. We evaluated the Caco2 cells and global gene expression profiles as tools for predictive rapid toxicity screening of nanosilver. We evaluated and compared the gene expression profiles of Caco-2 cells exposed to 20 nm and 50 nm nanosilver at a concentration 2.5 μg/ml. The global gene expression analysis of Caco2 cells exposed to 20 nm nanosilver showed that a total of 93 genes were altered at 4 h exposure, out of which 90 genes were up-regulated and 3 genes were down-regulated. The 24 h exposure of 20 nm silver altered 15 genes in Caco2 cells, out of which 14 were up-regulated and one was down-regulated. The most pronounced changes in gene expression were detected at 4 h. The greater size (50 nm nanosilver at 4 h exposure altered more genes by more different pathways than the smaller (20 nm one. Metallothioneins and heat shock proteins were highly up-regulated as a result of exposure to both the nanosilvers. The cellular pathways affected by the nanosilver exposure is likely to lead to increased toxicity. The results of our study presented here suggest that the toxicogenomic characterization of Caco2 cells is a valuable in vitro tool for assessing toxicity of nanomaterials such as nanosilver. Keywords: Nanosilver, Silver nanoparticles, Nanoparticles, Toxicogenomics, DNA microarray, Global gene expression profiles, Caco2 cells

  2. Genes adopt non-optimal codon usage to generate cell cycle-dependent oscillations in protein levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frenkel-Morgenstern, Milana; Danon, Tamar; Christian, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The cell cycle is a temporal program that regulates DNA synthesis and cell division. When we compared the codon usage of cell cycle-regulated genes with that of other genes, we discovered that there is a significant preference for non-optimal codons. Moreover, genes encoding proteins that cycle a...

  3. Gene targeting associated with the radiation sensitivity in squamous cell carcinoma by using microarray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimura, Yoshinori; Kumagai, Ken; Kouzu, Yoshinao; Higo, Morihiro; Kato, Yoshikuni; Seki, Naohiko; Yamada, Shigeru

    2005-01-01

    In order to identify a set of genes related to radiation sensitivity of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and establish a predictive method, we compared expression profiles of radio-sensitive/radio-resistant SCC cell lines, using the in-house cDNA microarray consisting of 2,201 human genes derived from full-length enriched SCC cDNA libraries and the Human oligo chip 30 K (Hitachi Software Engineering). Surviving fractions (SF) after irradiation of heavy iron were calculated by colony formation assay. Three pairs (TE2-TE13, YES5-YES6, and HSC3-HSC2), sensitive (SF1 0.6), were selected for the microarray analysis. The results of cDNA microarray analysis showed that 20 genes in resistant cell lines and 5 genes in sensitive cell lines were up regulated more than 1.5-fold compared with sensitive and resistant cell lines respectively. Fourteen out of 25 genes were confirmed the gene expression profiles by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Twenty-seven genes identified by Human oligo chip 30 K are candidate for the markers to distinguish radio-sensitive from radio-resistant. These results suggest that the isolated 27 genes are the candidates that might be used as specific molecular markers to predict radiation sensitivity. (author)

  4. Estimating immunoregulatory gene networks in human herpesvirus type 6-infected T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaku, Tomoiku; Ohyashiki, Junko H.; Zhang, Yu; Ohyashiki, Kazuma

    2005-01-01

    The immune response to viral infection involves complex network of dynamic gene and protein interactions. We present here the dynamic gene network of the host immune response during human herpesvirus type 6 (HHV-6) infection in an adult T-cell leukemia cell line. Using a pathway-focused oligonucleotide DNA microarray, we found a possible association between chemokine genes regulating Th1/Th2 balance and genes regulating T-cell proliferation during HHV-6B infection. Gene network analysis using an integrated comprehensive workbench, VoyaGene, revealed that a gene encoding a TEC-family kinase, ITK, might be a putative modulator in the host immune response against HHV-6B infection. We conclude that Th2-dominated inflammatory reaction in host cells may play an important role in HHV-6B-infected T cells, thereby suggesting the possibility that ITK might be a therapeutic target in diseases related to dysregulation of Th1/Th2 balance. This study describes a novel approach to find genes related with the complex host-virus interaction using microarray data employing the Bayesian statistical framework

  5. Expression of Nanog gene promotes NIH3T3 cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jingyu; Wang Xia; Chen Bing; Suo Guangli; Zhao Yanhong; Duan Ziyuan; Dai Jianwu

    2005-01-01

    Cells are the functional elements in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. A large number of cells are usually needed for these purposes. However, there are numbers of limitations for in vitro cell proliferation. Nanog is an important self-renewal determinant in embryonic stem cells. However, it remains unknown whether Nanog will influence the cell cycle and cell proliferation of mature cells. In this study, we expressed Nanog in NIH3T3 cells and showed that expression of Nanog in NIH3T3 promoted cells to enter into S phase and enhanced cell proliferation. This suggests that Nanog gene might function in a similar fashion in mature cells as in ES cells. In addition, it may provide an approach for in vitro cell expansion

  6. Stratification of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) genomes by gene-directed copy number alteration (CNA) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiesen, H-J; Steinbeck, F; Maruschke, M; Koczan, D; Ziems, B; Hakenberg, O W

    2017-01-01

    Tumorigenic processes are understood to be driven by epi-/genetic and genomic alterations from single point mutations to chromosomal alterations such as insertions and deletions of nucleotides up to gains and losses of large chromosomal fragments including products of chromosomal rearrangements e.g. fusion genes and proteins. Overall comparisons of copy number alterations (CNAs) presented in 48 clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) genomes resulted in ratios of gene losses versus gene gains between 26 ccRCC Fuhrman malignancy grades G1 (ratio 1.25) and 20 G3 (ratio 0.58). Gene losses and gains of 15762 CNA genes were mapped to 795 chromosomal cytoband loci including 280 KEGG pathways. CNAs were classified according to their contribution to Fuhrman tumour gradings G1 and G3. Gene gains and losses turned out to be highly structured processes in ccRCC genomes enabling the subclassification and stratification of ccRCC tumours in a genome-wide manner. CNAs of ccRCC seem to start with common tumour related gene losses flanked by CNAs specifying Fuhrman grade G1 losses and CNA gains favouring grade G3 tumours. The appearance of recurrent CNA signatures implies the presence of causal mechanisms most likely implicated in the pathogenesis and disease-outcome of ccRCC tumours distinguishing lower from higher malignant tumours. The diagnostic quality of initial 201 genes (108 genes supporting G1 and 93 genes G3 phenotypes) has been successfully validated on published Swiss data (GSE19949) leading to a restricted CNA gene set of 171 CNA genes of which 85 genes favour Fuhrman grade G1 and 86 genes Fuhrman grade G3. Regarding these gene sets overall survival decreased with the number of G3 related gene losses plus G3 related gene gains. CNA gene sets presented define an entry to a gene-directed and pathway-related functional understanding of ongoing copy number alterations within and between individual ccRCC tumours leading to CNA genes of prognostic and predictive value.

  7. Dynamic gene expression response to altered gravity in human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Cora S; Hauschild, Swantje; Huge, Andreas; Tauber, Svantje; Lauber, Beatrice A; Polzer, Jennifer; Paulsen, Katrin; Lier, Hartwin; Engelmann, Frank; Schmitz, Burkhard; Schütte, Andreas; Layer, Liliana E; Ullrich, Oliver

    2017-07-12

    We investigated the dynamics of immediate and initial gene expression response to different gravitational environments in human Jurkat T lymphocytic cells and compared expression profiles to identify potential gravity-regulated genes and adaptation processes. We used the Affymetrix GeneChip® Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 containing 44,699 protein coding genes and 22,829 non-protein coding genes and performed the experiments during a parabolic flight and a suborbital ballistic rocket mission to cross-validate gravity-regulated gene expression through independent research platforms and different sets of control experiments to exclude other factors than alteration of gravity. We found that gene expression in human T cells rapidly responded to altered gravity in the time frame of 20 s and 5 min. The initial response to microgravity involved mostly regulatory RNAs. We identified three gravity-regulated genes which could be cross-validated in both completely independent experiment missions: ATP6V1A/D, a vacuolar H + -ATPase (V-ATPase) responsible for acidification during bone resorption, IGHD3-3/IGHD3-10, diversity genes of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus participating in V(D)J recombination, and LINC00837, a long intergenic non-protein coding RNA. Due to the extensive and rapid alteration of gene expression associated with regulatory RNAs, we conclude that human cells are equipped with a robust and efficient adaptation potential when challenged with altered gravitational environments.

  8. Expression of human gamma-globin genes in human erythroleukemia (K562) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan-Peluso, M; Acuto, S; Swanson, M; Dobkin, C; Bank, A

    1987-12-15

    K562 cells express embryonic (epsilon) and fetal (gamma) globins and hemoglobins but not adult (beta) globin. To define the cis acting regulatory elements involved in the discrimination between gamma and beta genes, we have constructed chimeric genes composed of portions of gamma and beta and evaluated their expression in stable K562 transfectants. A gamma beta fusion gene containing gamma 5' sequences to the EcoRI site in exon 3 and beta sequences 3' is expressed at 10-40% that of the endogenous gamma level. In 50% of the lines, this fusion gene appropriately increases its expression in response to hemin, an inducer of endogenous globin gene expression in K562 cells. In contrast, a beta gamma fusion gene, containing beta sequences 5' to the EcoRI site in exon 3 and gamma sequences 3', is neither expressed nor correctly initiated. A beta gene containing gamma-intervening sequence (IVS) 2 accumulates an mRNA transcript when analyzed with a 3' beta probe. However, no correctly initiated beta mRNA is observed. A gamma gene with beta-IVS 2 is only inducible in one of six expressing clones. All the results are consistent with the presence of stage-specific trans acting factors in K562 cells that stimulate expression of gamma genes and suggest a significant role for gamma-IVS 2 in gamma gene expression.

  9. Identification and Regulation of c-Myb Target Genes in MCF-7 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Rourke John P

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The c-Myb transcription factor regulates differentiation and proliferation in hematopoietic cells, stem cells and epithelial cells. Although oncogenic versions of c-Myb were first associated with leukemias, over expression or rearrangement of the c-myb gene is common in several types of solid tumors, including breast cancers. Expression of the c-myb gene in human breast cancer cells is dependent on estrogen stimulation, but little is known about the activities of the c-Myb protein or what genes it regulates in estrogen-stimulated cells. Methods We used chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with whole genome promoter tiling microarrays to identify endogenous c-Myb target genes in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and characterized the activity of c-Myb at a panel of target genes during different stages of estrogen deprivation and stimulation. Results By using different antibodies and different growth conditions, the c-Myb protein was found associated with over 10,000 promoters in MCF-7 cells, including many genes that encode cell cycle regulators or transcription factors and more than 60 genes that encode microRNAs. Several previously identified c-Myb target genes were identified, including CCNB1, MYC and CXCR4 and novel targets such as JUN, KLF4, NANOG and SND1. By studying a panel of these targets to validate the results, we found that estradiol stimulation triggered the association of c-Myb with promoters and that association correlated with increased target gene expression. We studied one target gene, CXCR4, in detail, showing that c-Myb associated with the CXCR4 gene promoter and activated a CXCR4 reporter gene in transfection assays. Conclusions Our results show that c-Myb associates with a surprisingly large number of promoters in human cells. The results also suggest that estradiol stimulation leads to large-scale, genome-wide changes in c-Myb activity and subsequent changes in gene expression in human breast cancer

  10. Cytotoxicity and gene expression profiling of polyhexamethylene guanidine hydrochloride in human alveolar A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ha-Na; Zerin, Tamanna; Podder, Biswajit; Song, Ho-Yeon; Kim, Yong-Sik

    2014-06-01

    In Korea, lung disease of children and pregnant women associated with humidifier disinfectant use has become a major concern. A common sterilizer is polyhexamethylene guanidine (PHMG), a member of the guanidine family of antiseptics. This study was done to elucidate the putative cytotoxic effect of PHMG and the PHMG-mediated altered gene expression in human alveolar epithelial A549 cells in vitro. Cell viability analyses revealed the potent cytotoxicity of PHMG, with cell death evident at as low as 5 μg/mL. Death was dose- and time-dependent, and was associated with formation of intracellular reactive oxygen species, and apoptosis significantly, at even 2 μg/mL concentration. The gene expression profile in A549 cells following 24 h exposure to 5 μg/mL of PHMG was investigated using DNA microarray analysis. Changes in gene expression relevant to the progression of cell death included induction of genes related to apoptosis, autophagy, fibrosis, and cell cycle. However, the expressions of genes encoding antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes were down-regulated or not affected. The altered expression of selected genes was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses. The collective data suggest that PHMG confers cellular toxicity through the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and alteration of gene expression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Knockout of exogenous EGFP gene in porcine somatic cells using zinc-finger nucleases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Masahito; Umeyama, Kazuhiro; Matsunari, Hitomi; Takayanagi, Shuko; Haruyama, Erika; Nakano, Kazuaki; Fujiwara, Tsukasa; Ikezawa, Yuka; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → EGFP gene integrated in porcine somatic cells could be knocked out using the ZFN-KO system. → ZFNs induced targeted mutations in porcine primary cultured cells. → Complete absence of EGFP fluorescence was confirmed in ZFN-treated cells. -- Abstract: Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are expected as a powerful tool for generating gene knockouts in laboratory and domestic animals. Currently, it is unclear whether this technology can be utilized for knocking-out genes in pigs. Here, we investigated whether knockout (KO) events in which ZFNs recognize and cleave a target sequence occur in porcine primary cultured somatic cells that harbor the exogenous enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene. ZFN-encoding mRNA designed to target the EGFP gene was introduced by electroporation into the cell. Using the Surveyor nuclease assay and flow cytometric analysis, we confirmed ZFN-induced cleavage of the target sequence and the disappearance of EGFP fluorescence expression in ZFN-treated cells. In addition, sequence analysis revealed that ZFN-induced mutations such as base substitution, deletion, or insertion were generated in the ZFN cleavage site of EGFP-expression negative cells that were cloned from ZFN-treated cells, thereby showing it was possible to disrupt (i.e., knock out) the function of the EGFP gene in porcine somatic cells. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence that the ZFN-KO system can be applied to pigs. These findings may open a new avenue to the creation of gene KO pigs using ZFN-treated cells and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

  12. Key gene regulating cell wall biosynthesis and recalcitrance in Populus, gene Y

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jay; Engle, Nancy; Gunter, Lee E.; Jawdy, Sara; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Tuskan, Gerald A.

    2015-12-08

    This disclosure provides methods and transgenic plants for improved production of renewable biofuels and other plant-derived biomaterials by altering the expression and/or activity of Gene Y, an O-acetyltransferase. This disclosure also provides expression vectors containing a nucleic acid (Gene Y) which encodes the polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 1 and is operably linked to a heterologous promoter.

  13. Streptomyces sporulation - Genes and regulators involved in bacterial cell differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Streptomycetes are Gram-positive bacteria with a complex developmental life cycle. They form spores on specialized cells called aerial hyphae, and this sporulation involves alterations in growth, morphogenesis and cell cycle processes like cell division and chromosome segregation. Understanding the developmental mechanisms that streptomycetes have evolved for regulating for example cell division is of general interest in bacterial cell biology. It can also be valuable in the design of new dru...

  14. Integration of ATAC-seq and RNA-seq identifies human alpha cell and beta cell signature genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Amanda M; Wang, Zhiping; Schug, Jonathan; Naji, Ali; Kaestner, Klaus H

    2016-03-01

    Although glucagon-secreting α-cells and insulin-secreting β-cells have opposing functions in regulating plasma glucose levels, the two cell types share a common developmental origin and exhibit overlapping transcriptomes and epigenomes. Notably, destruction of β-cells can stimulate repopulation via transdifferentiation of α-cells, at least in mice, suggesting plasticity between these cell fates. Furthermore, dysfunction of both α- and β-cells contributes to the pathophysiology of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and β-cell de-differentiation has been proposed to contribute to type 2 diabetes. Our objective was to delineate the molecular properties that maintain islet cell type specification yet allow for cellular plasticity. We hypothesized that correlating cell type-specific transcriptomes with an atlas of open chromatin will identify novel genes and transcriptional regulatory elements such as enhancers involved in α- and β-cell specification and plasticity. We sorted human α- and β-cells and performed the "Assay for Transposase-Accessible Chromatin with high throughput sequencing" (ATAC-seq) and mRNA-seq, followed by integrative analysis to identify cell type-selective gene regulatory regions. We identified numerous transcripts with either α-cell- or β-cell-selective expression and discovered the cell type-selective open chromatin regions that correlate with these gene activation patterns. We confirmed cell type-selective expression on the protein level for two of the top hits from our screen. The "group specific protein" (GC; or vitamin D binding protein) was restricted to α-cells, while CHODL (chondrolectin) immunoreactivity was only present in β-cells. Furthermore, α-cell- and β-cell-selective ATAC-seq peaks were identified to overlap with known binding sites for islet transcription factors, as well as with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously identified as risk loci for type 2 diabetes. We have determined the genetic landscape of

  15. Cell-Specific PEAR1 Methylation Studies Reveal a Locus that Coordinates Expression of Multiple Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedetta Izzi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal interactions connect distant enhancers and promoters on the same chromosome, activating or repressing gene expression. PEAR1 encodes the Platelet-Endothelial Aggregation Receptor 1, a contact receptor involved in platelet function and megakaryocyte and endothelial cell proliferation. PEAR1 expression during megakaryocyte differentiation is controlled by DNA methylation at its first CpG island. We identified a PEAR1 cell-specific methylation sensitive region in endothelial cells and megakaryocytes that showed strong chromosomal interactions with ISGL20L2, RRNAD1, MRLP24, HDGF and PRCC, using available promoter capture Hi-C datasets. These genes are involved in ribosome processing, protein synthesis, cell cycle and cell proliferation. We next studied the methylation and expression profile of these five genes in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs and megakaryocyte precursors. While cell-specific PEAR1 methylation corresponded to variability in expression for four out of five genes, no methylation change was observed in their promoter regions across cell types. Our data suggest that PEAR1 cell-type specific methylation changes may control long distance interactions with other genes. Further studies are needed to show whether such interaction data might be relevant for the genome-wide association data that showed a role for non-coding PEAR1 variants in the same region and platelet function, platelet count and cardiovascular risk.

  16. Global Screening of Antiviral Genes that Suppress Baculovirus Transgene Expression in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chia-Hung; Naik, Nenavath Gopal; Liao, Lin-Li; Wei, Sung-Chan; Chao, Yu-Chan

    2017-09-15

    Although baculovirus has been used as a safe and convenient gene delivery vector in mammalian cells, baculovirus-mediated transgene expression is less effective in various mammalian cell lines. Identification of the negative regulators in host cells is necessary to improve baculovirus-based expression systems. Here, we performed high-throughput shRNA library screening, targeting 176 antiviral innate immune genes, and identified 43 host restriction factor genes in a human A549 lung carcinoma cell line. Among them, suppression of receptor interaction protein kinase 1 (RIP1, also known as RIPK1) significantly increased baculoviral transgene expression without resulting in significant cell death. Silencing of RIP1 did not affect viral entry or cell viability, but it did inhibit nuclear translocation of the IRF3 and NF-κB transcription factors. Also, activation of downstream signaling mediators (such as TBK1 and IRF7) was affected, and subsequent interferon and cytokine gene expression levels were abolished. Further, Necrostatin-1 (Nec-1)-an inhibitor of RIP1 kinase activity-dramatically increased baculoviral transgene expression in RIP1-silenced cells. Using baculovirus as a model system, this study presents an initial investigation of large numbers of human cell antiviral innate immune response factors against a "nonadaptive virus." In addition, our study has made baculovirus a more efficient gene transfer vector for some of the most frequently used mammalian cell systems.

  17. Integrated analysis of gene expression, CpG island methylation, and gene copy number in breast cancer cells by deep sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifu Sun

    Full Text Available We used deep sequencing technology to profile the transcriptome, gene copy number, and CpG island methylation status simultaneously in eight commonly used breast cell lines to develop a model for how these genomic features are integrated in estrogen receptor positive (ER+ and negative breast cancer. Total mRNA sequence, gene copy number, and genomic CpG island methylation were carried out using the Illumina Genome Analyzer. Sequences were mapped to the human genome to obtain digitized gene expression data, DNA copy number in reference to the non-tumor cell line (MCF10A, and methylation status of 21,570 CpG islands to identify differentially expressed genes that were correlated with methylation or copy number changes. These were evaluated in a dataset from 129 primary breast tumors. Gene expression in cell lines was dominated by ER-associated genes. ER+ and ER- cell lines formed two distinct, stable clusters, and 1,873 genes were differentially expressed in the two groups. Part of chromosome 8 was deleted in all ER- cells and part of chromosome 17 amplified in all ER+ cells. These loci encoded 30 genes that were overexpressed in ER+ cells; 9 of these genes were overexpressed in ER+ tumors. We identified 149 differentially expressed genes that exhibited differential methylation of one or more CpG islands within 5 kb of the 5' end of the gene and for which mRNA abundance was inversely correlated with CpG island methylation status. In primary tumors we identified 84 genes that appear to be robust components of the methylation signature that we identified in ER+ cell lines. Our analyses reveal a global pattern of differential CpG island methylation that contributes to the transcriptome landscape of ER+ and ER- breast cancer cells and tumors. The role of gene amplification/deletion appears to more modest, although several potentially significant genes appear to be regulated by copy number aberrations.

  18. Exogenous Gene Integration for Microalgal Cell Transformation Using a Nanowire-Incorporated Microdevice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sunwoong; Park, Seunghye; Kim, Jung; Choi, Jong Seob; Kim, Kyung Hoon; Kwon, Donguk; Jin, EonSeon; Park, Inkyu; Kim, Do Hyun; Seo, Tae Seok

    2015-12-16

    Superior green algal cells showing high lipid production and rapid growth rate are considered as an alternative for the next generation green energy resources. To achieve the biomass based energy generation, transformed microalgae with superlative properties should be developed through genetic engineering. Contrary to the normal cells, microalgae have rigid cell walls, so that target gene delivery into cells is challengeable. In this study, we report a ZnO nanowire-incorporated microdevice for a high throughput microalgal transformation. The proposed microdevice was equipped with not only a ZnO nanowire in the microchannel for gene delivery into cells but also a pneumatic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microvalve to modulate the cellular attachment and detachment from the nanowire. As a model, hygromycin B resistance gene cassette (Hyg3) was functionalized on the hydrothermally grown ZnO nanowires through a disulfide bond and released into green algal cells, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, by reductive cleavage. During Hyg3 gene delivery, a monolithic PDMS membrane was bent down, so that algal cells were pushed down toward ZnO nanowires. The supply of vacuum in the pneumatic line made the PDMS membrane bend up, enabling the gene delivered algal cells to be recovered from the outlet of the microchannel. We successfully confirmed Hyg3 gene integrated in microalgae by amplifying the inserted gene through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. The efficiency of the gene delivery to algal cells using the ZnO nanowire-incorporated microdevice was 6.52 × 10(4)- and 9.66 × 10(4)-fold higher than that of a traditional glass bead beating and electroporation.

  19. Low cytotoxicity effect of dendrosome as an efficient carrier for rotavirus VP2 gene transferring into a human lung cell line : dendrosome, as a novel intranasally gene porter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourasgari, Farzaneh; Ahmadian, Shahin; Salmanian, Ali Hatef; Sarbolouki, Mohammad Nabi; Massumi, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    The efficiency of dendrosome (a gene porter) was assessed in transferring recombinant human rotavirus VP2 cDNA into A549, a human lung cell line. After gene transferring, transmission electron microscopy showed core-like particles (CLPs) formation in the transfected cells both with dendrosome and lipofectamine porters. In addition, western blotting analysis showed that the expression of VP2 gene was almost equal in the dendrosome and lipofectamine-transfected cells. Also, the cytotoxicity studies revealed that dendrosome had a lower cytotoxicity than lipofectamine. Therefore, our study may introduce dendrosome as a possible carrier for gene transferring into the human lung cell line, especially, for intranasally administration of DNA vaccines.

  20. Genome-wide analysis of cell wall-related genes in Tuber melanosporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Raffaella; Sillo, Fabiano; Kohler, Annegret; Schneider, Georg; Faccio, Antonella; Tisserant, Emilie; Martin, Francis; Bonfante, Paola

    2012-06-01

    A genome-wide inventory of proteins involved in cell wall synthesis and remodeling has been obtained by taking advantage of the recently released genome sequence of the ectomycorrhizal Tuber melanosporum black truffle. Genes that encode cell wall biosynthetic enzymes, enzymes involved in cell wall polysaccharide synthesis or modification, GPI-anchored proteins and other cell wall proteins were identified in the black truffle genome. As a second step, array data were validated and the symbiotic stage was chosen as the main focus. Quantitative RT-PCR experiments were performed on 29 selected genes to verify their expression during ectomycorrhizal formation. The results confirmed the array data, and this suggests that cell wall-related genes are required for morphogenetic transition from mycelium growth to the ectomycorrhizal branched hyphae. Labeling experiments were also performed on T. melanosporum mycelium and ectomycorrhizae to localize cell wall components.

  1. Functional role of DNA mismatch repair gene PMS2 in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Shinichiro; Chang, Inik; Mitsui, Yozo; Chiyomaru, Takeshi; Yamamura, Soichiro; Majid, Shahana; Saini, Sharanjot; Deng, Guoren; Gill, Ankurpreet; Wong, Darryn K; Shiina, Hiroaki; Nonomura, Norio; Lau, Yun-Fai C; Dahiya, Rajvir; Tanaka, Yuichiro

    2015-06-30

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) enzymes act as proofreading complexes that maintains genomic integrity and MMR-deficient cells show an increased mutation rate. MMR has also been shown to influence cell signaling and the regulation of tumor development. MMR consists of various genes and includes post-meiotic segregation (PMS) 2 which is a vital component of mutL-alpha. In prostate, the functional role of this gene has never been reported and in this study, our aim was to investigate the effect of PMS2 on growth properties of prostate cancer (PCa) cells. Previous studies have shown PMS2 to be deficient in DU145 cells and this lack of expression was confirmed by Western blotting whereas normal prostatic PWR-1E and RWPE-1 cells expressed this gene. PMS2 effects on various growth properties of DU145 were then determined by creating stable gene transfectants. Interestingly, PMS2 caused decreased cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and in vivo growth; and increased apoptosis as compared to vector control. We further analyzed genes affected by PMS2 expression and observe the apoptosis-related TMS1 gene to be significantly upregulated whereas anti-apoptotic BCL2A1 was downregulated. These results demonstrate a functional role for PMS2 to protect against PCa progression by enhancing apoptosis of PCa cells.

  2. Design of magnetic gene complexes as effective and serum resistant gene delivery systems for mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian-Yuan; Wu, Jia-He; Xu, Qian-Hao; Wang, Xia-Rong; Lu, Jingxiong; Hu, Ying; Jo, Jun-Ichiro; Yamamoto, Masaya; Ling, Daishun; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2017-03-30

    Gene engineered mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been proposed as promising tools for their various applications in biomedicine. Nevertheless, the lack of an effective and safe way to genetically modify these stem cells is still a major obstacle in the current studies. Herein, we designed novel magnetic complexes by assembling cationized pullulan derivatives with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for delivering target genes to MSCs. Results showed that this complexes achieved effective gene expression with the assistance of external magnetic field, and resisted the adverse effect induced by serum proteins on the gene delivery. Moreover, neither significant cytotoxicity nor the interference on the osteogenic differentiation to MSCs were observed after magnetofection. Further studies revealed that this effective and serum resistant gene transfection was partly due to the accelerated and enhanced intracellular uptake process driven by external magnetic field. To conclude, the current study presented a novel option for genetic modification of MSCs in an effective, relatively safe and serum compatible way. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Engineering of red cells of Arabidopsis thaliana and comparative genome-wide gene expression analysis of red cells versus wild-type cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ming-Zhu; Xie, De-Yu

    2011-04-01

    We report metabolic engineering of Arabidopsis red cells and genome-wide gene expression analysis associated with anthocyanin biosynthesis and other metabolic pathways between red cells and wild-type (WT) cells. Red cells of A. thaliana were engineered for the first time from the leaves of production of anthocyanin pigment 1-Dominant (pap1-D). These red cells produced seven anthocyanin molecules including a new one that was characterized by LC-MS analysis. Wild-type cells established as a control did not produce anthocyanins. A genome-wide microarray analysis revealed that nearly 66 and 65% of genes in the genome were expressed in the red cells and wild-type cells, respectively. In comparison with the WT cells, 3.2% of expressed genes in the red cells were differentially expressed. The expression levels of 14 genes involved in the biosynthetic pathway of anthocyanin were significantly higher in the red cells than in the WT cells. Microarray and RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that the TTG1-GL3/TT8-PAP1 complex regulated the biosynthesis of anthocyanins. Furthermore, most of the genes with significant differential expression levels in the red cells versus the WT cells were characterized with diverse biochemical functions, many of which were mapped to different metabolic pathways (e.g., ribosomal protein biosynthesis, photosynthesis, glycolysis, glyoxylate metabolism, and plant secondary metabolisms) or organelles (e.g., chloroplast). We suggest that the difference in gene expression profiles between the two cell lines likely results from cell types, the overexpression of PAP1, and the high metabolic flux toward anthocyanins.

  4. Rat primary embryo fibroblast cells suppress transformation by the E6 and E7 genes of human papillomavirus type 16 in somatic hybrid cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Miyasaka, M; Takami, Y; Inoue, H; Hakura, A

    1991-01-01

    The E6 and E7 genes of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) transform established lines of rat cells but not rat cells in primary culture irrespective of the expression of the two genes. The reason for this difference between the susceptibilities of cell lines and primary cells was examined by using hybrid cells obtained by somatic cell fusion of rat cell lines transformed by the E6 and E7 genes of HPV-16 and freshly isolated rat embryo fibroblast cells. In these hybrid cells, transformed ph...

  5. Effect of chemical mutagens and carcinogens on gene expression profiles in human TK6 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lode Godderis

    Full Text Available Characterization of toxicogenomic signatures of carcinogen exposure holds significant promise for mechanistic and predictive toxicology. In vitro transcriptomic studies allow the comparison of the response to chemicals with diverse mode of actions under controlled experimental conditions. We conducted an in vitro study in TK6 cells to characterize gene expression signatures of exposure to 15 genotoxic carcinogens frequently used in European industries. We also examined the dose-responsive changes in gene expression, and perturbation of biochemical pathways in response to these carcinogens. TK6 cells were exposed at 3 dose levels for 24 h with and without S9 human metabolic mix. Since S9 had an impact on gene expression (885 genes, we analyzed the gene expression data from cells cultures incubated with S9 and without S9 independently. The ribosome pathway was affected by all chemical-dose combinations. However in general, no similar gene expression was observed among carcinogens. Further, pathways, i.e. cell cycle, DNA repair mechanisms, RNA degradation, that were common within sets of chemical-dose combination were suggested by clustergram. Linear trends in dose-response of gene expression were observed for Trichloroethylene, Benz[a]anthracene, Epichlorohydrin, Benzene, and Hydroquinone. The significantly altered genes were involved in the regulation of (anti- apoptosis, maintenance of cell survival, tumor necrosis factor-related pathways and immune response, in agreement with several other studies. Similarly in S9+ cultures, Benz[a]pyrene, Styrene and Trichloroethylene each modified over 1000 genes at high concentrations. Our findings expand our understanding of the transcriptomic response to genotoxic carcinogens, revealing the alteration of diverse sets of genes and pathways involved in cellular homeostasis and cell cycle control.

  6. Transient Gene and miRNA Expression Profile Changes of Confluent Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Lu, Tao; Wong, Michael; Feiveson, Alan; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity or an altered gravity environment from the static 1 gravitational constant has been shown to influence global gene expression patterns and protein levels in cultured cells. However, most of the reported studies conducted in space or using simulated microgravity on the ground have focused on the growth or differentiation of the cells. Whether non-dividing cultured cells will sense the presence of microgravity in space has not been specifically addressed. In an experiment conducted on the International Space Station, confluent human fibroblast cells were fixed after being cultured in space for 3 and 14 days for investigations of gene and miRNA (microRNA) expression profile changes in these cells. A fibroblast is a type of cell that synthesizes the extracellular matrix and collagen, the structural framework for tissues, and plays a critical role in wound healing and other functions. Results of the experiment showed that on Day 3, both the flown and ground cells were still proliferating slowly even though they were confluent, as measured by the expression of the protein Ki-67 positive cells, and the cells in space grew slightly faster. Gene and miRNA expression data indicated activation of NF(sub kappa)B (nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells) and other growth related pathways involving HGF and VEGF in the flown cells. On Day 14 when the cells were mostly non-dividing, the gene and miRNA expression profiles between the flight and ground samples were indistinguishable. Comparison of gene and miRNA expressions in the Day 3 samples in respect to Day 14 revealed that most of the changes observed on Day 3 were related to cell growth for both the flown and ground cells. Analysis of cytoskeleton changes by immunohistochemistry staining of the cells with antibodies for alpha-tubulin showed no difference between the flight and ground samples. Results of our study suggest that in true non-dividing human fibroblast cells, microgravity in

  7. Gene transfer preferentially selects MHC class I positive tumour cells and enhances tumour immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Ulrich T; Schildhauer, Ines; Barroso, Margarita Céspedes; Kofler, David M; Gerner, Franz M; Mysliwietz, Josef; Buening, Hildegard; Hallek, Michael; King, Susan B S

    2006-05-01

    The modulated expression of MHC class I on tumour tissue is well documented. Although the effect of MHC class I expression on the tumorigenicity and immunogenicity of MHC class I negative tumour cell lines has been rigorously studied, less is known about the validity of gene transfer and selection in cell lines with a mixed MHC class I phenotype. To address this issue we identified a C26 cell subline that consists of distinct populations of MHC class I (H-2D/K) positive and negative cells. Transient transfection experiments using liposome-based transfer showed a lower transgene expression in MHC class I negative cells. In addition, MHC class I negative cells were more sensitive to antibiotic selection. This led to the generation of fully MHC class I positive cell lines. In contrast to C26 cells, all transfectants were rejected in vivo and induced protection against the parental tumour cells in rechallenge experiments. Tumour cell specificity of the immune response was demonstrated in in vitro cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity assays. Transfectants expressing CD40 ligand and hygromycin phosphotransferase were not more immunogenic than cells expressing hygromycin resistance alone. We suggest that the MHC class I positive phenotype of the C26 transfectants had a bearing on their immunogenicity, because selected MHC class I positive cells were more immunogenic than parental C26 cells and could induce specific anti-tumour immune responses. These data demonstrate that the generation of tumour cell transfectants can lead to the selection of subpopulations that show an altered phenotype compared to the parental cell line and display altered immunogenicity independent of selection marker genes or other immune modulatory genes. Our results show the importance of monitoring gene transfer in the whole tumour cell population, especially for the evaluation of in vivo therapies targeted to heterogeneous tumour cell populations.

  8. Lineage relationship of prostate cancer cell types based on gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ware Carol B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate tumor heterogeneity is a major factor in disease management. Heterogeneity could be due to multiple cancer cell types with distinct gene expression. Of clinical importance is the so-called cancer stem cell type. Cell type-specific transcriptomes are used to examine lineage relationship among cancer cell types and their expression similarity to normal cell types including stem/progenitor cells. Methods Transcriptomes were determined by Affymetrix DNA array analysis for the following cell types. Putative prostate progenitor cell populations were characterized and isolated by expression of the membrane transporter ABCG2. Stem cells were represented by embryonic stem and embryonal carcinoma cells. The cancer cell types were Gleason pattern 3 (glandular histomorphology and pattern 4 (aglandular sorted from primary tumors, cultured prostate cancer cell lines originally established from metastatic lesions, xenografts LuCaP 35 (adenocarcinoma phenotype and LuCaP 49 (neuroendocrine/small cell carcinoma grown in mice. No detectable gene expression differences were detected among serial passages of the LuCaP xenografts. Results Based on transcriptomes, the different cancer cell types could be clustered into a luminal-like grouping and a non-luminal-like (also not basal-like grouping. The non-luminal-like types showed expression more similar to that of stem/progenitor cells than the luminal-like types. However, none showed expression of stem cell genes known to maintain stemness. Conclusions Non-luminal-like types are all representatives of aggressive disease, and this could be attributed to the similarity in overall gene expression to stem and progenitor cell types.

  9. Gene expression patterns induced at different stages of rhinovirus infection in human alveolar epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Etemadi

    Full Text Available Human rhinovirus (HRV is the common virus that causes acute respiratory infection (ARI and is frequently associated with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs. We aimed to investigate whether HRV infection induces a specific gene expression pattern in airway epithelial cells. Alveolar epithelial cell monolayers were infected with HRV species B (HRV-B. RNA was extracted from both supernatants and infected monolayer cells at 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours post infection (hpi and transcriptional profile was analyzed using Affymetrix GeneChip and the results were subsequently validated using quantitative Real-time PCR method. HRV-B infects alveolar epithelial cells which supports implication of the virus with LRTIs. In total 991 genes were found differentially expressed during the course of infection. Of these, 459 genes were up-regulated whereas 532 genes were down-regulated. Differential gene expression at 6 hpi (187 genes up-regulated vs. 156 down-regulated were significantly represented by gene ontologies related to the chemokines and inflammatory molecules indicating characteristic of viral infection. The 75 up-regulated genes surpassed the down-regulated genes (35 at 12 hpi and their enriched ontologies fell into discrete functional entities such as regulation of apoptosis, anti-apoptosis, and wound healing. At later time points of 24 and 48 hpi, predominated down-regulated genes were enriched for extracellular matrix proteins and airway remodeling events. Our data provides a comprehensive image of host response to HRV infection. The study suggests the underlying molecular regulatory networks genes which might be involved in pathogenicity of the HRV-B and potential targets for further validations and development of effective treatment.

  10. Roles of Breast Cancer Susceptibility Genes BRCA’s in Mammary Epithelial Cell Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    FANCA . Hum. Mol. Genet. 11, 2591-2597 (2002). 13. Tessari, M.A. et al. Transcriptional activation of the cyclin A gene by the architectural...caretakercancer susceptibility gene FANCA (24), as well several IFN- or caspase- associated proteins, were down-regulated. Concomitantly, in these cells...a mammary differentiation factor STAT5B and a caretaker cancer susceptibility gene FANCA were down-regulated. Nev- ertheless, it has yet to be

  11. Diagnostic value of immunoglobulin κ light chain gene rearrangement analysis in B-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokovic, Ira; Jezersek Novakovic, Barbara; Novakovic, Srdjan

    2015-03-01

    Analysis of the immunoglobulin κ light chain (IGK) gene is an alternative method for B-cell clonality assessment in the diagnosis of mature B-cell proliferations in which the detection of clonal immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) gene rearrangements fails. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the added value of standardized BIOMED-2 assay for the detection of clonal IGK gene rearrangements in the diagnostic setting of suspected B-cell lymphomas. With this purpose, 92 specimens from 80 patients with the final diagnosis of mature B-cell lymphoma (37 specimens), mature T-cell lymphoma (26 specimens) and reactive lymphoid proliferation (29 specimens) were analyzed for B-cell clonality. B-cell clonality analysis was performed using the BIOMED-2 IGH and IGK gene clonality assays. The determined sensitivity of the IGK assay was 67.6%, while the determined sensitivity of the IGH assay was 75.7%. The sensitivity of combined IGH+IGK assay was 81.1%. The determined specificity of the IGK assay was 96.2% in the group of T-cell lymphomas and 96.6% in the group of reactive lesions. The determined specificity of the IGH assay was 84.6% in the group of lymphomas and 86.2% in the group of reactive lesions. The comparison of GeneScan (GS) and heteroduplex pretreatment-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (HD-PAGE) methods for the analysis of IGK gene rearrangements showed a higher efficacy of GS analysis in a series of 27 B-cell lymphomas analyzed by both methods. In the present study, we demonstrated that by applying the combined IGH+IGK clonality assay the overall detection rate of B-cell clonality was increased by 5.4%. Thus, we confirmed the added value of the standardized BIOMED-2 IGK assay for assessment of B-cell clonality in suspected B-cell lymphomas with inconclusive clinical and cyto/histological diagnosis.

  12. Analysis of bone marrow stromal cell transferred bacterial {beta}-galactosidase gene by PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumakawa, Toshiro [Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Hospital, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Blood Transfusion and Hematology; Hibino, Hitoshi; Tani, Kenzaburo; Asano, Shigetaka; Futatugawa, Shouji; Sera, Kouichiro

    1997-12-31

    PIXE, Particle Induced X-ray Emission, is a powerful, multi-elemental analysis method which has many distinguishing features and has been used in varies research fields. Recently the method of applying baby cyclotrons for nuclear medicine to PIXE has been developed. This enables us to study biomedical phenomena from the physical point of view. Mouse bone marrow stromal cells were transferred bacterial {beta}-galactosidase gene (LacZ gene) by murine retroviral vectors. Analysis of the bone marrow stromal cells with the LacZ gene by PIXE revealed remarkable changes of intracellular trace elements compared with the normal control cells. These results indicate that gene transfer by retroviral vectors may bring about a dynamic change of intracellular circumstances of the target cell. (author)

  13. Angiogenesis gene expression in murine endothelial cells during post-pneumonectomy lung growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konerding Moritz A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although blood vessel growth occurs readily in the systemic bronchial circulation, angiogenesis in the pulmonary circulation is rare. Compensatory lung growth after pneumonectomy is an experimental model with presumed alveolar capillary angiogenesis. To investigate the genes participating in murine neoalveolarization, we studied the expression of angiogenesis genes in lung endothelial cells. After left pneumonectomy, the remaining right lung was examined on days 3, 6, 14 and 21days after surgery and compared to both no surgery and sham thoracotomy controls. The lungs were enzymatically digested and CD31+ endothelial cells were isolated using flow cytometry cell sorting. The transcriptional profile of the CD31+ endothelial cells was assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR arrays. Focusing on 84 angiogenesis-associated genes, we identified 22 genes with greater than 4-fold regulation and significantly enhanced transcription (p

  14. Development of a Combination Cell and Gene Therapy Approach for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lewis, Michael T

    2005-01-01

    The unique biology of the breast presents the opportunity to these cell and gene therapy techniques in a way that circumvents many of these technical limitations for the treatment of early stage breast cancer...

  15. Transient gene expression profile changes of confluent human fibroblast cells in spaceflight

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microgravity or an altered gravity environment from the static 1g has been shown to influence global gene expression patterns and protein levels in cultured cells or...

  16. Cloning and Characterization of Genes that Inhibit TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis of Breast Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shu, Hong-Bing

    2003-01-01

    ...). However, some cancer cells are resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis (3, 4, 6-13). The purpose of this proposed study is to clone and characterize such inhibitory genes of TRAIL-induced apoptosis...

  17. IBTK Differently Modulates Gene Expression and RNA Splicing in HeLa and K562 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Fiume

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The IBTK gene encodes the major protein isoform IBTKα that was recently characterized as substrate receptor of Cul3-dependent E3 ligase, regulating ubiquitination coupled to proteasomal degradation of Pdcd4, an inhibitor of translation. Due to the presence of Ankyrin-BTB-RCC1 domains that mediate several protein-protein interactions, IBTKα could exert expanded regulatory roles, including interaction with transcription regulators. To verify the effects of IBTKα on gene expression, we analyzed HeLa and K562 cell transcriptomes by RNA-Sequencing before and after IBTK knock-down by shRNA transduction. In HeLa cells, 1285 (2.03% of 63,128 mapped transcripts were differentially expressed in IBTK-shRNA-transduced cells, as compared to cells treated with control-shRNA, with 587 upregulated (45.7% and 698 downregulated (54.3% RNAs. In K562 cells, 1959 (3.1% of 63128 mapped RNAs were differentially expressed in IBTK-shRNA-transduced cells, including 1053 upregulated (53.7% and 906 downregulated (46.3%. Only 137 transcripts (0.22% were commonly deregulated by IBTK silencing in both HeLa and K562 cells, indicating that most IBTKα effects on gene expression are cell type-specific. Based on gene ontology classification, the genes responsive to IBTK are involved in different biological processes, including in particular chromatin and nucleosomal organization, gene expression regulation, and cellular traffic and migration. In addition, IBTK RNA interference affected RNA maturation in both cell lines, as shown by the evidence of alternative 3′- and 5′-splicing, mutually exclusive exons, retained introns, and skipped exons. Altogether, these results indicate that IBTK differently modulates gene expression and RNA splicing in HeLa and K562 cells, demonstrating a novel biological role of this protein.

  18. IBTK Differently Modulates Gene Expression and RNA Splicing in HeLa and K562 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiume, Giuseppe; Scialdone, Annarita; Rizzo, Francesca; De Filippo, Maria Rosaria; Laudanna, Carmelo; Albano, Francesco; Golino, Gaetanina; Vecchio, Eleonora; Pontoriero, Marilena; Mimmi, Selena; Ceglia, Simona; Pisano, Antonio; Iaccino, Enrico; Palmieri, Camillo; Paduano, Sergio; Viglietto, Giuseppe; Weisz, Alessandro; Scala, Giuseppe; Quinto, Ileana

    2016-11-07

    The IBTK gene encodes the major protein isoform IBTKα that was recently characterized as substrate receptor of Cul3-dependent E3 ligase, regulating ubiquitination coupled to proteasomal degradation of Pdcd4, an inhibitor of translation. Due to the presence of Ankyrin-BTB-RCC1 domains that mediate several protein-protein interactions, IBTKα could exert expanded regulatory roles, including interaction with transcription regulators. To verify the effects of IBTKα on gene expression, we analyzed HeLa and K562 cell transcriptomes by RNA-Sequencing before and after IBTK knock-down by shRNA transduction. In HeLa cells, 1285 (2.03%) of 63,128 mapped transcripts were differentially expressed in IBTK -shRNA-transduced cells, as compared to cells treated with control-shRNA, with 587 upregulated (45.7%) and 698 downregulated (54.3%) RNAs. In K562 cells, 1959 (3.1%) of 63128 mapped RNAs were differentially expressed in IBTK -shRNA-transduced cells, including 1053 upregulated (53.7%) and 906 downregulated (46.3%). Only 137 transcripts (0.22%) were commonly deregulated by IBTK silencing in both HeLa and K562 cells, indicating that most IBTKα effects on gene expression are cell type-specific. Based on gene ontology classification, the genes responsive to IBTK are involved in different biological processes, including in particular chromatin and nucleosomal organization, gene expression regulation, and cellular traffic and migration. In addition, IBTK RNA interference affected RNA maturation in both cell lines, as shown by the evidence of alternative 3'- and 5'-splicing, mutually exclusive exons, retained introns, and skipped exons. Altogether, these results indicate that IBTK differently modulates gene expression and RNA splicing in HeLa and K562 cells, demonstrating a novel biological role of this protein.

  19. Reverse-engineering of gene networks for regulating early blood development from single-cell measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jiangyong; Hu, Xiaohua; Zou, Xiufen; Tian, Tianhai

    2017-12-28

    Recent advances in omics technologies have raised great opportunities to study large-scale regulatory networks inside the cell. In addition, single-cell experiments have measured the gene and protein activities in a large number of cells under the same experimental conditions. However, a significant challenge in computational biology and bioinformatics is how to derive quantitative information from the single-cell observations and how to develop sophisticated mathematical models to describe the dynamic properties of regulatory networks using the derived quantitative information. This work designs an integrated approach to reverse-engineer gene networks for regulating early blood development based on singel-cell experimental observations. The wanderlust algorithm is initially used to develop the pseudo-trajectory for the activities of a number of genes. Since the gene expression data in the developed pseudo-trajectory show large fluctuations, we then use Gaussian process regression methods to smooth the gene express data in order to obtain pseudo-trajectories with much less fluctuations. The proposed integrated framework consists of both bioinformatics algorithms to reconstruct the regulatory network and mathematical models using differential equations to describe the dynamics of gene expression. The developed approach is applied to study the network regulating early blood cell development. A graphic model is constructed for a regulatory network with forty genes and a dynamic model using differential equations is developed for a network of nine genes. Numerical results suggests that the proposed model is able to match experimental data very well. We also examine the networks with more regulatory relations and numerical results show that more regulations may exist. We test the possibility of auto-regulation but numerical simulations do not support the positive auto-regulation. In addition, robustness is used as an importantly additional criterion to select candidate

  20. Alteration in gene expression profile and oncogenicity of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma by RIZ1 upregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shang-Wen; Li, Dong; Xu, Cong; Sun, Pei; Wang, Yuan-Guo; Zhang, Peng

    2013-10-07

    To investigate the effect of retinoblastoma protein-interacting zinc finger gene 1 (RIZ1) upregulation in gene expression profile and oncogenicity of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cell line TE13. TE13 cells were transfected with pcDNA3.1(+)/RIZ1 and pcDNA3.1(+). Changes in gene expression profile were screened and the microarray results were confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Nude mice were inoculated with TE13 cells to establish ESCC xenografts. After two weeks, the inoculated mice were randomly divided into three groups. Tumors were injected with normal saline, transfection reagent pcDNA3.1(+) and transfection reagent pcDNA3.1(+)/RIZ1, respectively. Tumor development was quantified, and changes in gene expression of RIZ1 transfected tumors were detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting. DNA microarray data showed that RIZ1 transfection induced widespread changes in gene expression profile of cell line TE13, with 960 genes upregulated and 1163 downregulated. Treatment of tumor xenografts with RIZ1 recombinant plasmid significantly inhibited tumor growth, decreased tumor size, and increased expression of RIZ1 mRNA compared to control groups. The changes in gene expression profile were also observed in vivo after RIZ1 transfection. Most of the differentially expressed genes were associated with cell development, supervision of viral replication, lymphocyte costimulatory and immune system development in esophageal cells. RIZ1 gene may be involved in multiple cancer pathways, such as cytokine receptor interaction and transforming growth factor beta signaling. The development and progression of esophageal cancer are related to the inactivation of RIZ1. Virus infection may also be an important factor.

  1. Improving Gene Therapy Efficiency through the Enrichment of Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiuk, Katelyn E; Brown, Devin; Laborada, Jennifer; Hollis, Roger P; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Kohn, Donald B

    2017-09-06

    Lentiviral vector (LV)-based hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy is becoming a promising clinical strategy for the treatment of genetic blood diseases. However, the current approach of modifying 1 × 10 8 to 1 × 10 9 CD34 + cells per patient requires large amounts of LV, which is expensive and technically challenging to produce at clinical scale. Modification of bulk CD34 + cells uses LV inefficiently, because the majority of CD34 + cells are short-term progenitors with a limited post-transplant lifespan. Here, we utilized a clinically relevant, immunomagnetic bead (IB)-based method to purify CD34 + CD38 - cells from human bone marrow (BM) and mobilized peripheral blood (mPB). IB purification of CD34 + CD38 - cells enriched severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) repopulating cell (SRC) frequency an additional 12-fold beyond standard CD34 + purification and did not affect gene marking of long-term HSCs. Transplant of purified CD34 + CD38 - cells led to delayed myeloid reconstitution, which could be rescued by the addition of non-transduced CD38 + cells. Importantly, LV modification and transplantation of IB-purified CD34 + CD38 - cells/non-modified CD38 + cells into immune-deficient mice achieved long-term gene-marked engraftment comparable with modification of bulk CD34 + cells, while utilizing ∼7-fold less LV. Thus, we demonstrate a translatable method to improve the clinical and commercial viability of gene therapy for genetic blood cell diseases. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Glycoengineering of Human Cell Lines Using Zinc Finger Nuclease Gene Targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steentoft, Catharina; Bennett, Eric Paul; Clausen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Lectin affinity chromatography is a powerful technique for isolation of glycoproteins carrying a specific glycan structure of interest. However, the enormous diversity of glycans present on the cell surface, as well as on individual proteins, makes it difficult to isolate an entire glycoproteome...... with one or even a series of lectins. Here we present a technique to generate cell lines with homogenous truncated O-glycans using zinc finger nuclease gene targeting. Because of their simplified O-glycoproteome, the cells have been named SimpleCells. Glycoproteins from SimpleCells can be isolated...... in a single purification step by lectin chromatography performed on a long lectin column. This protocol describes Zinc finger nuclease gene targeting of human cells to simplify the glycoproteome, as well as lectin chromatography and isolation of glycopeptides from total cell lysates of SimpleCells....

  3. Using Merkel cell polyomavirus specific TCR gene therapy for treatment of Merkel cellcarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngaa, Rikke Birgitte; Pedersen, Natasja Wulff; Linnemann, C.

    2016-01-01

    T cell receptor gene-therapy has entered the clinic and shown potential for successful cancer treatment. However, the clinical evaluation has also highlighted the need for selection of truly cancerspecific targets. Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a highly aggressive skin cancer associated with Mer......T cell receptor gene-therapy has entered the clinic and shown potential for successful cancer treatment. However, the clinical evaluation has also highlighted the need for selection of truly cancerspecific targets. Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a highly aggressive skin cancer associated...... with Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV). Due to the clear viral correlation CD8+ T cells specific for viral epitopes could potentially form cancer-specific targets in MCC patients. We have identified MCPyV specific T cells using a high-throughput platform for T-cell enrichment and combinatorial encoding...

  4. Shared control of gene expression in bacteria by transcription factors and global physiology of the cell.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berthoumieux, S.; Jong, H. de; Baptist, G.; Pinel, C.; Ranquet, C.; Ropers, D.; Geiselmann, J.

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is controlled by the joint effect of (i) the global physiological state of the cell, in particular the activity of the gene expression machinery, and (ii) DNA-binding transcription factors and other specific regulators. We present a model-based approach to distinguish between these

  5. TALE activators regulate gene expression in a position- and strand-dependent manner in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhde-Stone, Claudia; Cheung, Edna; Lu, Biao

    2014-01-24

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are a class of transcription factors that are readily programmable to regulate gene expression. Despite their growing popularity, little is known about binding site parameters that influence TALE-mediated gene activation in mammalian cells. We demonstrate that TALE activators modulate gene expression in mammalian cells in a position- and strand-dependent manner. To study the effects of binding site location, we engineered TALEs customized to recognize specific DNA sequences located in either the promoter or the transcribed region of reporter genes. We found that TALE activators robustly activated reporter genes when their binding sites were located within the promoter region. In contrast, TALE activators inhibited the expression of reporter genes when their binding sites were located on the sense strand of the transcribed region. Notably, this repression was independent of the effector domain utilized, suggesting a simple blockage mechanism. We conclude that TALE activators in mammalian cells regulate genes in a position- and strand-dependent manner that is substantially different from gene activation by native TALEs in plants. These findings have implications for optimizing the design of custom TALEs for genetic manipulation in mammalian cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. An evolutionary-game model of tumour-cell interactions: possible relevance to gene therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Lars Arve; Bentzen, Søren; Alsner, Jan

    2001-01-01

    interpretations of gene therapy. Two prototypical strategies for gene therapy are suggested, both of them leading to extinction of the malignant phenotype: one approach would be to reduce the relative proportion of the cooperating malignant cell type below a certain critical value. Another approach would...

  7. Analysis of cell-type-specific gene expression during mouse spermatogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almstrup, Kristian; Nielsen, John E; Hansen, Martin Asser

    2004-01-01

    In rodents, changes in gene expression during spermatogenesis can be monitored by sampling testis from each day during postnatal development. However, changes in gene expression at the tissue level can reflect changes in the concentration of an mRNA in a specific cell type, changes in volume of s...

  8. Activation of the ribosomal RNA genes late in the third cell cycle of porcine embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viuff, Dorthe; Greve, Torben; Holm, Peter

    2002-01-01

    ; there was no silver staining at the sites of the rRNA genes and nucleolus precursor bodies. From 30 hpc onwards, most 4-cell embryos had medium size to large clusters of FITC-labeled areas colocalized with silver staining of rRNA gene clusters and fibrillogranular nucleoli. These observations indicate that r...

  9. Balancing Cell Migration with Matrix Degradation Enhances Gene Delivery to Cells Cultured Three-Dimensionally Within Hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Jaclyn A.; Huang, Alyssa; Shikanova, Ariella; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2010-01-01

    In regenerative medicine, hydrogels are employed to fill defects and support the infiltration of cells that can ultimately regenerate tissue. Gene delivery within hydrogels targeting infiltrating cells has the potential to promote tissue formation, but the delivery efficiency of nonviral vectors within hydrogels is low hindering their applicability in tissue regeneration. To improve their functionality, we have conducted a mechanistic study to investigate the contribution of cell migration and matrix degradation on gene delivery. In this report, lipoplexes were entrapped within hydrogels based on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) crosslinked with peptides containing matrix metalloproteinase degradable sequences. The mesh size of these hydrogels is substantially less than the size of the entrapped lipoplexes, which can function to retain vectors. Cell migration and transfection were simultaneously measured within hydrogels with varying density of cell adhesion sites (Arg-Gly-Asp peptides) and solids content. Increasing RGD density increased expression levels up to 100-fold, while greater solids content sustained expression levels for 16 days. Increasing RGD density and decreasing solids content increased cell migration, which indicates expression levels increase with increased cell migration. Initially exposing cells to vector resulted in transient expression that declined after 2 days, verifying the requirement of migration to sustain expression. Transfected cells were predominantly located within the population of migrating cells for hydrogels that supported cell migration. Although the small mesh size retained at least 70% of the lipoplexes in the absence of cells after 32 days, the presence of cells decreased retention to 10% after 16 days. These results indicate that vectors retained within hydrogels contact migrating cells, and that persistent cell migration can maintain elevated expression levels. Thus matrix degradation and cell migration are fundamental design

  10. Experiment study of tyrosinase gene's expression in HEK293 cell by MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Jianpeng; Liang Biling; Zhong Jinglian; Xie Bangkun; Zhang Weidong; Zhang Lin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To transfect the tyrosinase gene into HEK293 cell as a reporter gene, and to evaluate the tyrosinase gene's expression by using MRI based on the gene's property of synthesizing large amount of melanin, and to search a way for evaluating the results of gene expression by MR in vitro. Methods: The plasmid of pcDNA3tyr which carried the full-length cDNA of tyrosinase gene was transfected into HEK293 cell by lipofectin, and MR signals of expressed melanin was observed by scanning the transfected cells with MR sequences of T 1 WI, T 1 WI/SPIR, and T 2 WI. Fontana stain and electric microscopy were used to search for melanin granules in transfected cells, and RT-PCR method was used to search for cDNA of tyrosinase gene. Results: (1) Plasmids of pcDNA3tyr could be transfected into HEK293 cells and could synthesize a large amount of melanin in them. The synthetic melanin in 10 6 cells, which had been transfected with 5 μg, 10 μg, and 20 μg plasmids of pcDNA3tyr separately, were all sufficient to be detected by MR and appeared as high signal on MR T 1 WI, T 1 WI/SPIR, and T 2 WI sequences. The more the amounts of transfected plasmids, the higher the signal intensities of MR imaging. On the other hand, 6.25 x 10 4 cells with 20 μg-plasmid of pcDNA3tyr transfection could also be detected by MR; (2) The melanin granules could be found in HEK293 cells in Fontana stain; (3) The melanin granules and their front bodies could be found in intracytoplasm of HEK293 cell by electric microscopy. (4) The cDNA fragment of tyrosinase gene could be detected in transfected HEK293 cells by RT-PCR. Conclusion: The fact that MR could detect the synthetic melanin in HEK293 cells controlled by expression of exogenous gene demonstrated that medical imaging combined with molecular biology technology could evaluate the result of gene expression in vitro, and it also indicated that medical imaging could play an important role in the evaluation of gene therapy following the development

  11. Altered Gene Transcription in Human Cells Treated with Ludox® Silica Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Fede

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Silica (SiO2 nanoparticles (NPs have found extensive applications in industrial manufacturing, biomedical and biotechnological fields. Therefore, the increasing exposure to such ultrafine particles requires studies to characterize their potential cytotoxic effects in order to provide exhaustive information to assess the impact of nanomaterials on human health. The understanding of the biological processes involved in the development and maintenance of a variety of pathologies is improved by genome-wide approaches, and in this context, gene set analysis has emerged as a fundamental tool for the interpretation of the results. In this work we show how the use of a combination of gene-by-gene and gene set analyses can enhance the interpretation of results of in vitro treatment of A549 cells with Ludox® colloidal amorphous silica nanoparticles. By gene-by-gene and gene set analyses, we evidenced a specific cell response in relation to NPs size and elapsed time after treatment, with the smaller NPs (SM30 having higher impact on inflammatory and apoptosis processes than the bigger ones. Apoptotic process appeared to be activated by the up-regulation of the initiator genes TNFa and IL1b and by ATM. Moreover, our analyses evidenced that cell treatment with LudoxÒ silica nanoparticles activated the matrix metalloproteinase genes MMP1, MMP10 and MMP9. The information derived from this study can be informative about the cytotoxicity of Ludox® and other similar colloidal amorphous silica NPs prepared by solution processes.

  12. Dysregulation of gene expression in the artificial human trisomy cells of chromosome 8 associated with transformed cell phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisakatsu Nawata

    Full Text Available A change in chromosome number, known as aneuploidy, is a common characteristic of cancer. Aneuploidy disrupts gene expression in human cancer cells and immortalized human epithelial cells, but not in normal human cells. However, the relationship between aneuploidy and cancer remains unclear. To study the effects of aneuploidy in normal human cells, we generated artificial cells of human primary fibroblast having three chromosome 8 (trisomy 8 cells by using microcell-mediated chromosome transfer technique. In addition to decreased proliferation, the trisomy 8 cells lost contact inhibition and reproliferated after exhibiting senescence-like characteristics that are typical of transformed cells. Furthermore, the trisomy 8 cells exhibited chromosome instability, and the overall gene expression profile based on microarray analyses was significantly different from that of diploid human primary fibroblasts. Our data suggest that aneuploidy, even a single chromosome gain, can be introduced into normal human cells and causes, in some cases, a partial cancer phenotype due to a disruption in overall gene expression.

  13. Responses of genes involved in cell cycle control to diverse DNA damaging chemicals in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gooderham Nigel J

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many anticancer agents and carcinogens are DNA damaging chemicals and exposure to such chemicals results in the deregulation of cell cycle progression. The molecular mechanisms of DNA damage-induced cell cycle alteration are not well understood. We have studied the effects of etoposide (an anticancer agent, cryptolepine (CLP, a cytotoxic alkaloid, benzo [a]pyrene (BaP, a carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo [4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP, a cooked-meat derived carcinogen on the expression of cell cycle regulatory genes to understand the molecular mechanisms of the cell cycle disturbance. Results A549 cells were treated with DMSO or chemicals for up to 72 h and periodically sampled for cell cycle analysis, mRNA and protein expression. DMSO treated cells showed a dominant G1 peak in cell cycle at all times examined. Etoposide and CLP both induced G2/M phase arrest yet the former altered the expression of genes functioning at multiple phases, whilst the latter was more effective in inhibiting the expression of genes in G2-M transition. Both etoposide and CLP induced an accumulation of p53 protein and upregulation of p53 transcriptional target genes. Neither BaP nor PhIP had substantial phase-specific cell cycle effect, however, they induced distinctive changes in gene expression. BaP upregulated the expression of CYP1B1 at 6–24 h and downregulated many cell cycle regulatory genes at 48–72 h. By contrast, PhIP increased the expression of many cell cycle regulatory genes. Changes in the expression of key mRNAs were confirmed at protein level. Conclusion Our experiments show that DNA damaging agents with different mechanisms of action induced distinctive changes in the expression pattern of a panel of cell cycle regulatory genes. We suggest that examining the genomic response to chemical exposure provides an exceptional opportunity to understand the molecular mechanism involved in cellular

  14. T cell cytokine gene polymorphisms in canine diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Andrea D; Catchpole, Brian; Kennedy, Lorna J; Barnes, Annette; Lee, Andy C; Jones, Chris A; Fretwell, Neale; Ollier, William E R

    2009-03-15

    Insulin-deficiency diabetes in dogs shares some similarities with human latent autoimmune diabetes of adults (LADA). Canine diabetes is likely to have a complex pathogenesis with multiple genes contributing to overall susceptibility and/or disease progression. An association has previously been shown between canine diabetes and MHC class II genes, although other genes are also likely to contribute to the genetic risk. Potential diabetes susceptibility genes include immuno-regulatory TH1/TH2 cytokines such as IFNgamma, IL-12, IL-4 and IL-10. We screened these candidate genes for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a range of different dog breeds using dHPLC analysis and DNA sequencing. Thirty-eight of the SNPs were genotyped in crossbreed dogs and seven other breed groups (Labrador Retriever, West Highland White Terrier, Collie, Schnauzer, Cairn Terrier, Samoyed and Cavalier King Charles Spaniel), which demonstrated substantial intra-breed differences in allele frequencies. When SNPs were examined for an association with diabetes by case:control analysis significant associations were observed for IL-4 in three breeds, the Collie, Cairn Terrier and Schnauzer and for IL-10 in the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. These results suggest that canine cytokine genes regulating the TH1/TH2 immune balance might play a contributory role in determining susceptibility to diabetes in some breeds.

  15. DNA context represents transcription regulation of the gene in mouse embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Misook; Hong, Soondo

    2016-04-01

    Understanding gene regulatory information in DNA remains a significant challenge in biomedical research. This study presents a computational approach to infer gene regulatory programs from primary DNA sequences. Using DNA around transcription start sites as attributes, our model predicts gene regulation in the gene. We find that H3K27ac around TSS is an informative descriptor of the transcription program in mouse embryonic stem cells. We build a computational model inferring the cell-type-specific H3K27ac signatures in the DNA around TSS. A comparison of embryonic stem cell and liver cell-specific H3K27ac signatures in DNA shows that the H3K27ac signatures in DNA around TSS efficiently distinguish the cell-type specific H3K27ac peaks and the gene regulation. The arrangement of the H3K27ac signatures inferred from the DNA represents the transcription regulation of the gene in mESC. We show that the DNA around transcription start sites is associated with the gene regulatory program by specific interaction with H3K27ac.

  16. Gene expression heterogeneities in embryonic stem cell populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Arias, Alfonso; Brickman, Joshua M

    2011-01-01

    Stem and progenitor cells are populations of cells that retain the capacity to populate specific lineages and to transit this capacity through cell division. However, attempts to define markers for stem cells have met with limited success. Here we consider whether this limited success reflects...... an intrinsic requirement for heterogeneity with stem cell populations. We focus on Embryonic Stem (ES) cells, in vitro derived cell lines from the early embryo that are considered both pluripotent (able to generate all the lineages of the future embryo) and indefinitely self renewing. We examine the relevance...... of recently reported heterogeneities in ES cells and whether these heterogeneities themselves are inherent requirements of functional potency and self renewal....

  17. [Gene Expression Profile of Apoptosis in Leukemia Cells Induced by Hsp90 Selective inhibitor 17-AAG].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Na-Na; Li, Zhi-Heng; Tao, Yan-Fang; Xu, Li-Xiao; Pan, Jian; Hu, Shao-Yan

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the apoptotic effects of Hsp90 selective inhibitor 17-AAG on human leukemia HL-60 and NB4 cells and analyse its possible mechanism. CCK-8 assay was used to quantify the growth inhibition of cells after exposure to 17-AAG for 24 hours. Flow cytometrve with annexin V/propidium iodide staining was used to detect apoptosis of leukemia cells. Then Western blot was used to detect the activation of apoptosis related protein caspase-3 and PARP level. Gene expression profile of NB4 cells treated with 17-AAG was analyzed with real-time PCR arrays. The inhibition of leukemia cell proliferation displayed a dose-dependent manner. Annexin V assay, cell cycle analysis and activation of PARP demonstrate that 17-AAG induced apoptosis leukemia cells. Real-time PCR array analysis showed that expression of 56 genes significantly up-regulated and expression of 23 genes were significantly down-regulated after 17-AAG treatment. The 17-AAG can inhibit the proliferation and induce the apoptosis of leukemia cells. After leukemia cells are treated with 17-AAG, the significant changes of apoptosis-related genes occured, and the cell apoptosis occurs via activating apoptosis related signaling pathway.

  18. Effect of suicidal gene combined with irradiation on esophageal carcinoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Jianji; Wang Jiezhong; Zheng Tianrong; Zheng Qiuhong

    2005-01-01

    Objective: As generally known that non-cytotoxic pro-drag can be transformed into cytotoxic drug by suicide gene, this work is to investigate the effect of Coli cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine suicide gene (CD/5-FC) used alone or combined with irradiation in esophageal carcinoma cell line(EC). Methods: CD gene was amplified from Coli DNA genome library with PCR technique, with the eukaryotic vector pcDNA3.1-CD then constructed. ECl09 cells were transfected with pcDNA3.1-CD by liposome method. The cytotoxic effect, bystander effect and radiosensitization effect of CD/5-FC in ECl09 was analyzed. Results: The transfection of CD gene into ECl09 and its transcription was confirmed by RT-PCR method. In vitro, 5-FC showed significantly cytotoxic effect on the EPC cell transfected with CD gene. After adding 5-FC , the survival rate of cultured cell containing 5 % transfect CD gene cell was 41.8 % ± 14.2% while that in the control group was 94.6 ± 4.3 %, (t=3.14, P < 0.05). The survival rate of cultured cell containing 10% transfected CD gene cell was 37.8 ± 4.4% compared to 95.6% ± 5.4% in the control group, (t=9.75, P<0.01). CD/5-FC showed significant radiosen-sitization effect, the survival fraction of CD transfected cell was much lower in 5-FC combined with irradiation, when compared with 5-FC alone and radiotherapy alone group together, (F=11.50, P < 0.01 ). When it was compared with 5-FC alone group and irradiation alone group separately, the difference was also significant( F=4.11, P < 0.05 and F10.53, P < 0.01, respectively). Conclusions: Suicide gene CD/5-FC shows conspicuous by-stander effect and radiosensitization effect. (authors)

  19. Global Gene Expression Analysis of Yeast Cells during Sake Brewing▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Zheng, Xiaohong; Araki, Yoshio; Sahara, Hiroshi; Takagi, Hiroshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2006-01-01

    During the brewing of Japanese sake, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells produce a high concentration of ethanol compared with other ethanol fermentation methods. We analyzed the gene expression profiles of yeast cells during sake brewing using DNA microarray analysis. This analysis revealed some characteristics of yeast gene expression during sake brewing and provided a scaffold for a molecular level understanding of the sake brewing process. PMID:16997994

  20. Adenoviral Gene Delivery to Primary Human Cutaneous Cells and Burn Wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch, Tobias; von Peter, Sebastian; Dubin, Grzegorz; Mittler, Dominik; Jacobsen, Frank; Lehnhardt, Markus; Eriksson, Elof; Steinau, Hans-Ulrich; Steinstraesser, Lars

    2006-01-01

    The adenoviral transfer of therapeutic genes into epidermal and dermal cells is an interesting approach to treat skin diseases and to promote wound healing. The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro and in vivo transfection efficacy in skin and burn wounds after adenoviral gene delivery. Primary keratinocytes (HKC), fibroblasts (HFB), and HaCaT cells were transfected using different concentrations of an adenoviral construct (eGFP). Transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity was determine...

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells display different gene expression profiles compared to hyaline and elastic chondrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhai, Li-Jie; Zhao, Ke-Qing; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Feng, Ya; Xing, Shuang-Chun

    2011-01-01

    Cartilage has a poor intrinsic repair capacity, requiring surgical intervention to effect biological repair. Tissue engineering technologies or regenerative medicine strategies are currently being employed to address cartilage repair. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are considered to be an excellent cell source for this application. However, the different gene expression profiles between the MSCs and differentiated cartilage remain unclear. In this report, we first examined the gene expression ...

  2. Analysis of Single-cell Gene Transcription by RNA Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronander, Elena; Bengtsson, Dominique C; Joergensen, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes (IE) to human endothelial receptors during malaria infections is mediated by expression of PfEMP1 protein variants encoded by the var genes. The haploid P. falciparum genome harbors approximately 60 different var genes of which only one has...... been believed to be transcribed per cell at a time during the blood stage of the infection. How such mutually exclusive regulation of var gene transcription is achieved is unclear, as is the identification of individual var genes or sub-groups of var genes associated with different receptors...... fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of var gene transcription by the parasite in individual nuclei of P. falciparum IE(1). Here, we present a detailed protocol for carrying out the RNA-FISH methodology for analysis of var gene transcription in single-nuclei of P. falciparum infected human...

  3. Genome-wide Gene Expression Profiling of SCID Mice with T-cell-mediated Colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brudzewsky, D.; Pedersen, A. E.; Claesson, M. H.

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disorder with an unknown aetiology. The aim of this study is to employ a murine model of IBD to identify pathways and genes, which may play a key role in the pathogenesis of IBD and could be important for discovery of new disease markers in human...... and colitis mice, and among these genes there is an overrepresentation of genes involved in inflammatory processes. Some of the most significant genes showing higher expression encode S100A proteins and chemokines involved in trafficking of leucocytes in inflammatory areas. Classification by gene clustering...... based on the genes with the significantly altered gene expression corresponds to two different levels of inflammation as established by the histological scoring of the inflamed rectum. These data demonstrate that this SCID T-cell transfer model is a useful animal model for human IBD and can be used...

  4. Effect of PTTG on endogenous gene expression in HEK 293 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panguluri Siva K

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG, also known as securin, is highly expressed in various tumors including pituitary, thyroid, colon, ovary, testis, lung, and breast. An overexpression of PTTG enhances cell proliferation, induces cellular transformation in vitro, and promotes tumor development in nude mice. PTTG also inhibits separation of sister chromatids leading to aneuploidy and genetic instability. A great amount of work has been undertaken to understand the biology of PTTG and its expression in various tumors. However, mechanisms by which PTTG mediates its tumorigenic function are not fully understood. To utilize this gene for cancer therapy, identification of the downstream signaling genes regulated by PTTG in mediation of its tumorigenic function is necessary. For this purpose, we expressed PTTG in human embryonic kidney (HEK293 cells that do not express PTTG and analyzed the downstream genes using microarray analysis. Results A total of 22,277 genes printed on an Affymetrix HG-U133A 2.0 GeneChip™ array were screened with labeled cRNA prepared from HEK293 cells infected with adenovirus vector expressing PTTG cDNA (AdPTTG cDNA and compared with labeled cRNA prepared from HEK293 cells infected with control adenovirus (control Ad or adenovirus vector expressing GFP (AdGFP. Out of 22,277 genes, 71 genes were down-regulated and 35 genes were up-regulated with an FDR corrected p-value of ≤ 0.05 and a fold change of ≥2. Most of the altered genes identified are involved in the cell cycle and cell apoptosis; a few are involved in mRNA processing and nitrogen metabolism. Most of the up-regulated genes belong to the histone protein family. Conclusion PTTG is a well-studied oncogene for its role in tumorigenesis. In addition to its importance in regulation of the cell cycle, this gene has also been recently shown to play a role in the induction of cell apoptosis. The microarray analysis in the present study

  5. Beta-cell lines derived from transgenic mice expressing a hybrid insulin gene-oncogene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efrat, S; Linde, S; Kofod, Hans

    1988-01-01

    Three pancreatic beta-cell lines have been established from insulinomas derived from transgenic mice carrying a hybrid insulin-promoted simian virus 40 tumor antigen gene. The beta tumor cell (beta TC) lines maintain the features of differentiated beta cells for about 50 passages in culture. The ...... both to immortalize a rare cell type and to provide a selection for the maintenance of its differentiated phenotype....

  6. Prospects and limitations of T cell receptor gene therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorritsma, Annelies; Schotte, Remko; Coccoris, Miriam; de Witte, Moniek A.; Schumacher, Ton N. M.

    2011-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells is an attractive means to provide cancer patients with immune cells of a desired specificity and the efficacy of such adoptive transfers has been demonstrated in several clinical trials. Because the T cell receptor is the single specificity-determining

  7. Transgene expression, but not gene delivery, is improved by adhesion-assisted lipofection of hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, H; Yunxu, C; Marit, G; Pla, M; Reiffers, J; Thèze, J; Froussard, P

    1999-05-01

    In contrast to adherent cells, cells growing in suspension and particularly hematopoietic cells, are notoriously difficult to transfect in vitro using nonviral approaches. In the present study, the effect of cell adhesion on gene transfer efficacy was investigated by allowing hematopoietic cells to bind to an adherent cell monolayer (ACM) before being subjected to cationic liposome-mediated DNA transfer. Human CD34 and T CD4 cell lines were cultivated on an ACM constituted of murine fibroblast NIH3T3 cells and transfected with a plasmid carrying the beta-galactosidase gene. X-gal staining showed that up to 27% of the cells expressed the transgene. In contrast, less than 0.1% of these cells were positively transfected in suspension. This adhesion-assisted lipofection (AAL) procedure was also successfully tested on blood lymphocytes, since it resulted in up to 30% of transfected human primary T lymphocytes. Flow cytometry analysis performed on T lymphocyte subsets revealed that 8 and 9%, respectively, of CD4 and CD8 cells could be transfected with a plasmid carrying the green fluorescent protein gene. Other adherent cells, such as MS5 murine stromal cells or HeLa epithelial cells, were also a compatible matrix for AAL. Moreover, the pCMV beta plasmid was present in similar amounts in the nuclei of TF1 cells transfected in suspension or with the AAL procedure. These data raise the possibility that cell matrix/hematopoietic cell interactions might govern expression of the transgene in hematopoietic cells growing usually in suspension, but not endocytosis of liposome/DNA particles and plasmid migration ot the cell nucleus.

  8. Gene editing in hematopoietic stem cells: a potential therapeutic approach for Fanconi anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diez Cabezas, B.

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy nowadays constitutes a safe and efficient treatment for a number of monogenic diseases affecting the hematopoietic system. Risks of insertional mutagenesis derived from the use of integrative vectors cannot, however, be completely excluded. Therefore, gene targeting has been proposed as a safer alternative, since the insertion of the herapeutic gene is driven to a specific locus in the genome. Gene targeting approaches are based on the use of specific nucleases which generate double strand breaks (DSBs) in a specific site of the genome,markedly enhancing the efficacy of homologous recombination (HR) with donor constructs harboring the gene of interest flanked by the corresponding homology arms. In this study we have optimized the conditions to target human lymphoblastic cell lines (LCLs) and also hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from healthy donors, with the final aim of correcting by gene editing the hematopoietic progenitor cells from Fanconi anemia subtype A (FA-A) patients. In particular, we have established a robust method to target both LCLs and HSCs in a safe harbor site in the genome, the AAVS1 locus. Our approach is based on the transduction of these cells with integrase-defective lentiviral vectors carrying a donor with the gene of interest, followed by the nucleofection of these cells with zinc finger nucleases used as mRNA. Using a control donor vector carrying the GFP reporter gene we have obtained, on average, 9.43% gene targeting efficiency in cord blood CD34+ cells from healthy donors. Moreover, we confirmed that gene targeting was also efficient in HSCs with long term and multipotent repopulation capacity, as demonstrated by transplants into immunodeficient mice. To improve the gene targeting efficiency, we investigated the feasibility of using gold nanoparticles, which were shown to improve the transduction efficiency of integrase-defective and competent lentiviral vectors in HSCs. This increment, however, did not lead to a higher gene

  9. Gene editing in hematopoietic stem cells: a potential therapeutic approach for Fanconi anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diez Cabezas, B.

    2015-07-01

    Gene therapy nowadays constitutes a safe and efficient treatment for a number of monogenic diseases affecting the hematopoietic system. Risks of insertional mutagenesis derived from the use of integrative vectors cannot, however, be completely excluded. Therefore, gene targeting has been proposed as a safer alternative, since the insertion of the herapeutic gene is driven to a specific locus in the genome. Gene targeting approaches are based on the use of specific nucleases which generate double strand breaks (DSBs) in a specific site of the genome,markedly enhancing the efficacy of homologous recombination (HR) with donor constructs harboring the gene of interest flanked by the corresponding homology arms. In this study we have optimized the conditions to target human lymphoblastic cell lines (LCLs) and also hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from healthy donors, with the final aim of correcting by gene editing the hematopoietic progenitor cells from Fanconi anemia subtype A (FA-A) patients. In particular, we have established a robust method to target both LCLs and HSCs in a safe harbor site in the genome, the AAVS1 locus. Our approach is based on the transduction of these cells with integrase-defective lentiviral vectors carrying a donor with the gene of interest, followed by the nucleofection of these cells with zinc finger nucleases used as mRNA. Using a control donor vector carrying the GFP reporter gene we have obtained, on average, 9.43% gene targeting efficiency in cord blood CD34+ cells from healthy donors. Moreover, we confirmed that gene targeting was also efficient in HSCs with long term and multipotent repopulation capacity, as demonstrated by transplants into immunodeficient mice. To improve the gene targeting efficiency, we investigated the feasibility of using gold nanoparticles, which were shown to improve the transduction efficiency of integrase-defective and competent lentiviral vectors in HSCs. This increment, however, did not lead to a higher gene

  10. Casticin induced apoptotic cell death and altered associated gene expression in human colon cancer colo 205 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Hung-Sheng; Liu, Jia-You; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chiang, Han-Sun; Lin, Chia-Hain; Chen, Ann; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2017-08-01

    Casticin, a polymethoxyflavone, derived from natural plant Fructus Viticis exhibits biological activities including anti-cancer characteristics. The anti-cancer and alter gene expression of casticin on human colon cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms were investigated. Flow cytometric assay was used to measure viable cell, cell cycle and sub-G1 phase, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca 2+ productions, level of mitochondria membrane potential (ΔΨ m ) and caspase activity. Western blotting assay was used to detect expression of protein level associated with cell death. Casticin induced cell morphological changes, decreased cell viability and induced G2/M phase arrest in colo 205 cells. Casticin increased ROS production but decreased the levels of ΔΨ m , and Ca 2+ , increased caspase-3, -8, and -9 activities. The cDNA microarray indicated that some of the cell cycle associated genes were down-regulated such as cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A) (p21, Cip1) and p21 protein (Cdc42/Rac)-activated kinase 3 (PAK3). TNF receptor-associated protein 1 (TRAP1), CREB1 (cAMP responsive element binding protein 1) and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (CDKN1B) (p27, Kip1) genes were increased but matrix metallopeptidase 2 (MMP-2), toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), PRKAR2B (protein kinase, cAMP-dependent, regulatory, type II, bet), and CaMK4 (calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV) genes were inhibited. Results suggest that casticin induced cell apoptosis via the activation of the caspase- and/or mitochondria-dependent signaling cascade, the accumulation of ROS and altered associated gene expressions in colo 205 human colon cancer cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. A CRISPR-Based Screen Identifies Genes Essential for West-Nile-Virus-Induced Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongming; Dang, Ying; Wu, Yonggan; Jia, Gengxiang; Anaya, Edgar; Zhang, Junli; Abraham, Sojan; Choi, Jang-Gi; Shi, Guojun; Qi, Ling; Manjunath, N; Wu, Haoquan

    2015-07-28

    West Nile virus (WNV) causes an acute neurological infection attended by massive neuronal cell death. However, the mechanism(s) behind the virus-induced cell death is poorly understood. Using a library containing 77,406 sgRNAs targeting 20,121 genes, we performed a genome-wide screen followed by a second screen with a sub-library. Among the genes identified, seven genes, EMC2, EMC3, SEL1L, DERL2, UBE2G2, UBE2J1, and HRD1, stood out as having the strongest phenotype, whose knockout conferred strong protection against WNV-induced cell death with two different WNV strains and in three cell lines. Interestingly, knockout of these genes did not block WNV replication. Thus, these appear to be essential genes that link WNV replication to downstream cell death pathway(s). In addition, the fact that all of these genes belong to the ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway suggests that this might be the primary driver of WNV-induced cell death. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cell based-gene delivery approaches for the treatment of spinal cord injury and neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Masoumeh Fakhr

    2010-03-01

    Cell based-gene delivery has provided an important therapeutic strategy for different disorders in the recent years. This strategy is based on the transplantation of genetically modified cells to express specific genes and to target the delivery of therapeutic factors, especially for the treatment of cancers and neurological, immunological, cardiovascular and heamatopoietic disorders. Although, preliminary reports are encouraging, and experimental studies indicate functionally and structurally improvements in the animal models of different disorders, universal application of this strategy for human diseases requires more evidence. There are a number of parameters that need to be evaluated, including the optimal cell source, the most effective gene/genes to be delivered, the optimal vector and method of gene delivery into the cells and the most efficient route for the delivery of genetically modified cells into the patient. Also, some obstacles have to be overcome, including the safety and usefulness of the approaches and the stability of the improvements. Here, recent studies concerning with the cell-based gene delivery for spinal cord injury and some neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease are briefly reviewed, and their exciting consequences are discussed.

  13. Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Anaplasma marginale Elicit Different Gene Expression Responses in Cultured Tick Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorica Zivkovic

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Anaplasma (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae includes obligate tick-transmitted intracellular organisms, Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Anaplasma marginale that multiply in both vertebrate and tick host cells. Recently, we showed that A. marginale affects the expression of tick genes that are involved in tick survival and pathogen infection and multiplication. However, the gene expression profile in A. phagocytophilum-infected tick cells is currently poorly characterized. The objectives of this study were to characterize tick gene expression profile in Ixodes scapularis ticks and cultured ISE6 cells in response to infection with A. phagocypthilum and to compare tick gene expression responses in A. phagocytophilum- and A. marginale-infected tick cells by microarray and real-time RT-PCR analyses. The results of these studies demonstrated modulation of tick gene expression by A. phagocytophilum and provided evidence of different gene expression responses in tick cells infected with A. phagocytophilum and A. marginale. These differences in Anaplasma-tick interactions may reflect differences in pathogen life cycle in the tick cells.

  14. Selection of reference genes for expression studies with fish myogenic cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston Ian A

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relatively few studies have used cell culture systems to investigate gene expression and the regulation of myogenesis in fish. To produce robust data from quantitative real-time PCR mRNA levels need to be normalised using internal reference genes which have stable expression across all experimental samples. We have investigated the expression of eight candidate genes to identify suitable reference genes for use in primary myogenic cell cultures from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.. The software analysis packages geNorm, Normfinder and Best keeper were used to rank genes according to their stability across 42 samples during the course of myogenic differentiation. Results Initial results showed several of the candidate genes exhibited stable expression throughout myogenic culture while Sdha was identified as the least stable gene. Further analysis with geNorm, Normfinder and Bestkeeper identified Ef1α, Hprt1, Ppia and RNApolII as stably expressed. Comparison of data normalised with the geometric average obtained from combinations of any three of these genes showed no significant differences, indicating that any combination of these genes is valid. Conclusion The geometric average of any three of Hprt1, Ef1α, Ppia and RNApolII is suitable for normalisation of gene expression data in primary myogenic cultures from Atlantic salmon.

  15. Selection of reference genes for expression studies with fish myogenic cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Neil I; Johnston, Ian A

    2009-08-10

    Relatively few studies have used cell culture systems to investigate gene expression and the regulation of myogenesis in fish. To produce robust data from quantitative real-time PCR mRNA levels need to be normalised using internal reference genes which have stable expression across all experimental samples. We have investigated the expression of eight candidate genes to identify suitable reference genes for use in primary myogenic cell cultures from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.). The software analysis packages geNorm, Normfinder and Best keeper were used to rank genes according to their stability across 42 samples during the course of myogenic differentiation. Initial results showed several of the candidate genes exhibited stable expression throughout myogenic culture while Sdha was identified as the least stable gene. Further analysis with geNorm, Normfinder and Bestkeeper identified Ef1alpha, Hprt1, Ppia and RNApolII as stably expressed. Comparison of data normalised with the geometric average obtained from combinations of any three of these genes showed no significant differences, indicating that any combination of these genes is valid. The geometric average of any three of Hprt1, Ef1alpha, Ppia and RNApolII is suitable for normalisation of gene expression data in primary myogenic cultures from Atlantic salmon.

  16. Integration of ATAC-seq and RNA-seq identifies human alpha cell and beta cell signature genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda M. Ackermann

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: We have determined the genetic landscape of human α- and β-cells based on chromatin accessibility and transcript levels, which allowed for detection of novel α- and β-cell signature genes not previously known to be expressed in islets. Using fine-mapping of open chromatin, we have identified thousands of potential cis-regulatory elements that operate in an endocrine cell type-specific fashion.

  17. Coxiella burnetii Nine Mile II proteins modulate gene expression of monocytic host cells during infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw Edward I

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes acute and chronic disease in humans. Bacterial replication occurs within enlarged parasitophorous vacuoles (PV of eukaryotic cells, the biogenesis and maintenance of which is dependent on C. burnetii protein synthesis. These observations suggest that C. burnetii actively subverts host cell processes, however little is known about the cellular biology mechanisms manipulated by the pathogen during infection. Here, we examined host cell gene expression changes specifically induced by C. burnetii proteins during infection. Results We have identified 36 host cell genes that are specifically regulated when de novo C. burnetii protein synthesis occurs during infection using comparative microarray analysis. Two parallel sets of infected and uninfected THP-1 cells were grown for 48 h followed by the addition of chloramphenicol (CAM to 10 μg/ml in one set. Total RNA was harvested at 72 hpi from all conditions, and microarrays performed using Phalanx Human OneArray™ slides. A total of 784 (mock treated and 901 (CAM treated THP-1 genes were up or down regulated ≥2 fold in the C. burnetii infected vs. uninfected cell sets, respectively. Comparisons between the complementary data sets (using >0 fold, eliminated the common gene expression changes. A stringent comparison (≥2 fold between the separate microarrays revealed 36 host cell genes modulated by C. burnetii protein synthesis. Ontological analysis of these genes identified the innate immune response, cell death and proliferation, vesicle trafficking and development, lipid homeostasis, and cytoskeletal organization as predominant cellular functions modulated by C. burnetii protein synthesis. Conclusions Collectively, these data indicate that C. burnetii proteins actively regulate the expression of specific host cell genes and pathways. This is in addition to host cell genes that respond to the presence of the

  18. Global Transcriptome Analysis of Primary Cerebrocortical Cells: Identification of Genes Regulated by Triiodothyronine in Specific Cell Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Ibañez, Pilar; García-García, Francisco; Dopazo, Joaquín; Bernal, Juan; Morte, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid hormones, thyroxine, and triiodothyronine (T3) are crucial for cerebral cortex development acting through regulation of gene expression. To define the transcriptional program under T3 regulation, we have performed RNA-Seq of T3-treated and untreated primary mouse cerebrocortical cells. The expression of 1145 genes or 7.7% of expressed genes was changed upon T3 addition, of which 371 responded to T3 in the presence of cycloheximide indicating direct transcriptional regulation. The results were compared with available transcriptomic datasets of defined cellular types. In this way, we could identify targets of T3 within genes enriched in astrocytes and neurons, in specific layers including the subplate, and in specific neurons such as prepronociceptin, cholecystokinin, or cortistatin neurons. The subplate and the prepronociceptin neurons appear as potentially major targets of T3 action. T3 upregulates mostly genes related to cell membrane events, such as G-protein signaling, neurotransmission, and ion transport and downregulates genes involved in nuclear events associated with the M phase of cell cycle, such as chromosome organization and segregation. Remarkably, the transcriptomic changes induced by T3 sustain the transition from fetal to adult patterns of gene expression. The results allow defining in molecular terms the elusive role of thyroid hormones on neocortical development. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Suppression of prolactin gene expression in GH cells correlates with site-specific DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z X; Kumar, V; Rivera, R T; Pasion, S G; Chisholm, J; Biswas, D K

    1989-10-01

    Prolactin- (PRL) producing and nonproducing subclones of the GH line of (rat) pituitary tumor cells have been compared to elucidate the regulatory mechanisms of PRL gene expression. Particular emphasis was placed on delineating the molecular basis of the suppressed state of the PRL gene in the prolactin-nonproducing (PRL-) GH subclone (GH(1)2C1). We examined six methylatable cytosine residues (5, -CCGG- and 1, -GCGC-) within the 30-kb region of the PRL gene in these subclones. This analysis revealed that -CCGG-sequences of the transcribed region, and specifically, one in the fourth exon of the PRL gene, were heavily methylated in the PRL-, GH(1)2C1 cells. Furthermore, the inhibition of PRL gene expression in GH(1)2C1 was reversed by short-term treatment of the cells with a sublethal concentration of azacytidine (AzaC), an inhibitor of DNA methylation. The reversion of PRL gene expression by AzaC was correlated with the concurrent demethylation of the same -CCGG- sequences in the transcribed region of PRL gene. An inverse correlation between PRL gene expression and the level of methylation of the internal -C- residues in the specific -CCGG-sequence of the transcribed region of the PRL gene was demonstrated. The DNase I sensitivity of these regions of the PRL gene in PRL+, PRL-, and AzaC-treated cells was also consistent with an inverse relationship between methylation state, a higher order of structural modification, and gene expression.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Identification of potential target genes of ROR-alpha in THP1 and HUVEC cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulec, Cagri, E-mail: cagri.gulec@gmail.com; Coban, Neslihan, E-mail: neslic@istanbul.edu.tr; Ozsait-Selcuk, Bilge, E-mail: ozsaitb@istanbul.edu.tr; Sirma-Ekmekci, Sema, E-mail: semasirma@gmail.com; Yildirim, Ozlem, E-mail: ozlm-yildirim@hotmail.com; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan, E-mail: nihanerginel@yahoo.com

    2017-04-01

    ROR-alpha is a nuclear receptor, activity of which can be modulated by natural or synthetic ligands. Due to its possible involvement in, and potential therapeutic target for atherosclerosis, we aimed to identify ROR-alpha target genes in monocytic and endothelial cell lines. We performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by tiling array (ChIP-on-chip) for ROR-alpha in monocytic cell line THP1 and endothelial cell line HUVEC. Following bioinformatic analysis of the array data, we tested four candidate genes in terms of dependence of their expression level on ligand-mediated ROR-alpha activity, and two of them in terms of promoter occupancy by ROR-alpha. Bioinformatic analyses of ChIP-on-chip data suggested that ROR-alpha binds to genomic regions near the transcription start site (TSS) of more than 3000 genes in THP1 and HUVEC. Potential ROR-alpha target genes in both cell types seem to be involved mainly in membrane receptor activity, signal transduction and ion transport. While SPP1 and IKBKA were shown to be direct target genes of ROR-alpha in THP1 monocytes, inflammation related gene HMOX1 and heat shock protein gene HSPA8 were shown to be potential target genes of ROR-alpha. Our results suggest that ROR-alpha may regulate signaling receptor activity, and transmembrane transport activity through its potential target genes. ROR-alpha seems also to play role in cellular sensitivity to environmental substances like arsenite and chloroprene. Although, the expression analyses have shown that synthetic ROR-alpha ligands can modulate some of potential ROR-alpha target genes, functional significance of ligand-dependent modulation of gene expression needs to be confirmed with further analyses.

  1. Natural killer cell receptor genes in the family Equidae: not only Ly49.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Futas

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells have important functions in immunity. NK recognition in mammals can be mediated through killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR and/or killer cell lectin-like Ly49 receptors. Genes encoding highly variable NK cell receptors (NKR represent rapidly evolving genomic regions. No single conservative model of NKR genes was observed in mammals. Single-copy low polymorphic NKR genes present in one mammalian species may expand into highly polymorphic multigene families in other species. In contrast to other non-rodent mammals, multiple Ly49-like genes appear to exist in the horse, while no functional KIR genes were observed in this species. In this study, Ly49 and KIR were sought and their evolution was characterized in the entire family Equidae. Genomic sequences retrieved showed the presence of at least five highly conserved polymorphic Ly49 genes in horses, asses and zebras. These findings confirmed that the expansion of Ly49 occurred in the entire family. Several KIR-like sequences were also identified in the genome of Equids. Besides a previously identified non-functional KIR-Immunoglobulin-like transcript fusion gene (KIR-ILTA and two putative pseudogenes, a KIR3DL-like sequence was analyzed. In contrast to previous observations made in the horse, the KIR3DL sequence, genomic organization and mRNA expression suggest that all Equids might produce a functional KIR receptor protein molecule with a single non-mutated immune tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM domain. No evidence for positive selection in the KIR3DL gene was found. Phylogenetic analysis including rhinoceros and tapir genomic DNA and deduced amino acid KIR-related sequences showed differences between families and even between species within the order Perissodactyla. The results suggest that the order Perissodactyla and its family Equidae with expanded Ly49 genes and with a potentially functional KIR gene may represent an interesting model for

  2. Natural Killer Cell Receptor Genes in the Family Equidae: Not only Ly49

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futas, Jan; Horin, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have important functions in immunity. NK recognition in mammals can be mediated through killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and/or killer cell lectin-like Ly49 receptors. Genes encoding highly variable NK cell receptors (NKR) represent rapidly evolving genomic regions. No single conservative model of NKR genes was observed in mammals. Single-copy low polymorphic NKR genes present in one mammalian species may expand into highly polymorphic multigene families in other species. In contrast to other non-rodent mammals, multiple Ly49-like genes appear to exist in the horse, while no functional KIR genes were observed in this species. In this study, Ly49 and KIR were sought and their evolution was characterized in the entire family Equidae. Genomic sequences retrieved showed the presence of at least five highly conserved polymorphic Ly49 genes in horses, asses and zebras. These findings confirmed that the expansion of Ly49 occurred in the entire family. Several KIR-like sequences were also identified in the genome of Equids. Besides a previously identified non-functional KIR-Immunoglobulin-like transcript fusion gene (KIR-ILTA) and two putative pseudogenes, a KIR3DL-like sequence was analyzed. In contrast to previous observations made in the horse, the KIR3DL sequence, genomic organization and mRNA expression suggest that all Equids might produce a functional KIR receptor protein molecule with a single non-mutated immune tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM) domain. No evidence for positive selection in the KIR3DL gene was found. Phylogenetic analysis including rhinoceros and tapir genomic DNA and deduced amino acid KIR-related sequences showed differences between families and even between species within the order Perissodactyla. The results suggest that the order Perissodactyla and its family Equidae with expanded Ly49 genes and with a potentially functional KIR gene may represent an interesting model for evolutionary biology of

  3. Redistribution of cell cycle by arsenic trioxide is associated with demethylation and expression changes of cell cycle related genes in acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line (NB4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Saeed; Khaleghian, Ali; Ahmadian, Shahin; Alizadeh, Shaban; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Ghaffari, Seyed H

    2018-01-01

    PML-RARα perturbs the normal epigenetic setting, which is essential to oncogenic transformation in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Transcription induction and recruitment of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) by PML-RARα and subsequent hypermethylation are components of this perturbation. Arsenic trioxide (ATO), an important drug in APL therapy, concurrent with degradation of PML-RARα induces cell cycle change and apoptosis. How ATO causes cell cycle alteration has remained largely unexplained. Here, we investigated DNA methylation patterns of cell cycle regulatory genes promoters, the effects of ATO on the methylated genes and cell cycle distribution in an APL cell line, NB4. Analysis of promoter methylation status of 22 cell cycle related genes in NB4 revealed that CCND1, CCNE1, CCNF, CDKN1A, GADD45α, and RBL1 genes were methylated 60.7, 84.6, 58.6, 8.7, 33.4, and 73.7%, respectively, that after treatment with 2 μM ATO for 48 h, turn into 0.6, 13.8, 0.1, 6.6, 10.7, and 54.5% methylated. ATO significantly reduced the expression of DNMT1, 3A, and 3B. ATO induced the expression of CCND1, CCNE1, and GADD45α genes, suppressed the expression of CCNF and CDKN1A genes, which were consistent with decreased number of cells in G1 and S phases and increased number of cells in G2/M phase. In conclusion, demethylation and alteration in the expression level of the cell cycle related genes may be possible mechanisms in ATO-induced cell cycle arrest in APL cells. It may suggest that ATO by demethylation of CCND1 and CCNE1 and their transcriptional activation accelerates G1 and S transition into the G2/M cell cycle arrest.

  4. DNA microarrays of baculovirus genomes: differential expression of viral genes in two susceptible insect cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, J; Isobe, R; Takebuchi, T; Bando, H

    2003-03-01

    We describe, for the first time, the generation of a viral DNA chip for simultaneous expression measurements of nearly all known open reading frames (ORFs) in the best-studied members of the family Baculoviridae, Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) and Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV). In this study, a viral DNA chip (Ac-BmNPV chip) was fabricated and used to characterize the viral gene expression profile for AcMNPV in different cell types. The viral chip is composed of microarrays of viral DNA prepared by robotic deposition of PCR-amplified viral DNA fragments on glass for ORFs in the NPV genome. Viral gene expression was monitored by hybridization to the DNA fragment microarrays with fluorescently labeled cDNAs prepared from infected Spodoptera frugiperda, Sf9 cells and Trichoplusia ni, TnHigh-Five cells, the latter a major producer of baculovirus and recombinant proteins. A comparison of expression profiles of known ORFs in AcMNPV elucidated six genes (ORF150, p10, pk2, and three late gene expression factor genes lef-3, p35 and lef- 6) the expression of each of which was regulated differently in the two cell lines. Most of these genes are known to be closely involved in the viral life cycle such as in DNA replication, late gene expression and the release of polyhedra from infected cells. These results imply that the differential expression of these viral genes accounts for the differences in viral replication between these two cell lines. Thus, these fabricated microarrays of NPV DNA which allow a rapid analysis of gene expression at the viral genome level should greatly speed the functional analysis of large genomes of NPV.

  5. Gene expression analysis of mouse embryonic stem cells following levitation in an ultrasound standing wave trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazou, Despina; Kearney, Roisin; Mansergh, Fiona; Bourdon, Celine; Farrar, Jane; Wride, Michael

    2011-02-01

    In the present paper, gene expression analysis of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells levitated in a novel ultrasound standing wave trap (USWT) (Bazou et al. 2005a) at variable acoustic pressures (0.08-0.85 MPa) and times (5-60 min) was performed. Our results showed that levitation of ES cells at the highest employed acoustic pressure for 60 min does not modify gene expression and cells maintain their pluripotency. Embryoid bodies (EBs) also expressed the early and late neural differentiation markers, which were also unaffected by the acoustic field. Our results suggest that the ultrasound trap microenvironment is minimally invasive as the biologic consequences of ES cell replication and EB differentiation proceed without significantly affecting gene expression. The technique holds great promise in safe cell manipulation techniques for a variety of applications including tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2011 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. TIMP-1 gene deficiency increases tumour cell sensitivity to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Marie Louise; Würts, S.Ø.; Rømer, Maria Unni Koefoed

    2006-01-01

    deficiency increases the response to chemotherapy considerably, confirming that TIMP-1 protects the cells from apoptosis. This is to our knowledge the first study investigating TIMP-1 and chemotherapy-induced apoptosis employing a powerful model system comprising TIMP-1 gene-deficient cells...... this hypothesis, we have established TIMP-1 gene-deficient and TIMP-1 wild-type fibrosarcoma cells from mouse lung tissue. We have characterised these cells with regard to TIMP-1 genotype, TIMP-1 expression, malignant transformation and sensitivity to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. We show that TIMP-1 gene...... and their genetically identical wild-type controls. For future studies, this cell system can be used to uncover the mechanisms and signalling pathways involved in the TIMP-1-mediated inhibition of apoptosis as well as to investigate the possibility of using TIMP-1 inhibitors to optimise the effect of conventional...

  7. Efficient production of a gene mutant cell line through integrating TALENs and high-throughput cell cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Changhong; Fan, Yu; Li, Juan; Wang, Gancheng; Zhang, Hanshuo; Xi, Jianzhong Jeff

    2015-02-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are becoming powerful DNA-targeting tools in a variety of mammalian cells and model organisms. However, generating a stable cell line with specific gene mutations in a simple and rapid manner remains a challenging task. Here, we report a new method to efficiently produce monoclonal cells using integrated TALE nuclease technology and a series of high-throughput cell cloning approaches. Following this method, we obtained three mTOR mutant 293T cell lines within 2 months, which included one homozygous mutant line. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  8. Study of the G2/M cell cycle checkpoint in irradiated mammary epithelial cells overexpressing Cul-4A gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Anu; Yang, L.-X.; Chen, L.-C.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Members of the cullin gene family are known to be involved in cell cycle control. One of the cullin genes, Cul-4A, is amplified and overexpressed in breast cancer cells. This study investigates the effect of Cul-4A overexpression upon G2/M cell cycle checkpoint after DNA damage induced by either ionizing or nonionizing radiation. Methods and Materials: The normal mammary epithelial cell line MCF10A was stably transfected with full-length Cul-4A cDNA. Independent clones of MCF10A cells that overexpress Cul-4A proteins were selected and treated with either 8 Gy of ionizing radiation or 7 J/M 2 of UV radiation. The profile of cell cycle progression and the accumulation of several cell cycle proteins were analyzed. Results: We found that overexpression of Cul-4A in MCF10A cells abrogated the G2/M cell cycle checkpoint in response to DNA damage induced by ionizing irradiation, but not to DNA damage induced by nonionizing radiation. Analysis of cell cycle proteins showed that after ionizing irradiation, p53 accumulated in the mock-transfected MCF10A cells, but not in the Cul-4A transfectants. Conclusion: Our results suggest a role for Cul-4A in tumorigenesis and/or tumor progression, possibly through disruption of cell cycle control

  9. Resolving tumor heterogeneity: genes involved in chordoma cell development identified by low-template analysis of morphologically distinct cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin El-Heliebi

    Full Text Available The classical sacrococcygeal chordoma tumor presents with a typical morphology of lobulated myxoid tumor tissue with cords, strands and nests of tumor cells. The population of cells consists of small non-vacuolated cells, intermediate cells with a wide range of vacuolization and large heavily vacuolated (physaliferous cells. To date analysis was only performed on bulk tumor mass because of its rare incidence, lack of suited model systems and technical limitations thereby neglecting its heterogeneous composition. We intended to clarify whether the observed cell types are derived from genetically distinct clones or represent different phenotypes. Furthermore, we aimed at elucidating the differences between small non-vacuolated and large physaliferous cells on the genomic and transcriptomic level. Phenotype-specific analyses of small non-vacuolated and large physaliferous cells in two independent chordoma cell lines yielded four candidate genes involved in chordoma cell development. UCHL3, coding for an ubiquitin hydrolase, was found to be over-expressed in the large physaliferous cell phenotype of MUG-Chor1 (18.7-fold and U-CH1 (3.7-fold cells. The mannosyltransferase ALG11 (695-fold and the phosphatase subunit PPP2CB (18.6-fold were found to be up-regulated in large physaliferous MUG-Chor1 cells showing a similar trend in U-CH1 cells. TMEM144, an orphan 10-transmembrane family receptor, yielded contradictory data as cDNA microarray analysis showed up- but RT-qPCR data down-regulation in large physaliferous MUG-Chor1 cells. Isolation of few but morphologically identical cells allowed us to overcome the limitations of bulk analysis in chordoma research. We identified the different chordoma cell phenotypes to be part of a developmental process and discovered new genes linked to chordoma cell development representing potential targets for further research in chordoma tumor biology.

  10. Contribution of the Pmra Promoter to Expression of Genes in the Escherichia coli mra Cluster of Cell Envelope Biosynthesis and Cell Division Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Ayala, Juan; Bouhss, Ahmed; van Heijenoort, Jean; Parquet, Claudine; Hara, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    Recently, a promoter for the essential gene ftsI, which encodes penicillin-binding protein 3 of Escherichia coli, was precisely localized 1.9 kb upstream from this gene, at the beginning of the mra cluster of cell division and cell envelope biosynthesis genes (H. Hara, S. Yasuda, K. Horiuchi, and J. T. Park, J. Bacteriol. 179:5802–5811, 1997). Disruption of this promoter (Pmra) on the chromosome and its replacement by the lac promoter (Pmra::Plac) led to isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG)-dependent cells that lysed in the absence of inducer, a defect which was complemented only when the whole region from Pmra to ftsW, the fifth gene downstream from ftsI, was provided in trans on a plasmid. In the present work, the levels of various proteins involved in peptidoglycan synthesis and cell division were precisely determined in cells in which Pmra::Plac promoter expression was repressed or fully induced. It was confirmed that the Pmra promoter is required for expression of the first nine genes of the mra cluster: mraZ (orfC), mraW (orfB), ftsL (mraR), ftsI, murE, murF, mraY, murD, and ftsW. Interestingly, three- to sixfold-decreased levels of MurG and MurC enzymes were observed in uninduced Pmra::Plac cells. This was correlated with an accumulation of the nucleotide precursors UDP–N-acetylglucosamine and UDP–N-acetylmuramic acid, substrates of these enzymes, and with a depletion of the pool of UDP–N-acetylmuramyl pentapeptide, resulting in decreased cell wall peptidoglycan synthesis. Moreover, the expression of ftsZ, the penultimate gene from this cluster, was significantly reduced when Pmra expression was repressed. It was concluded that the transcription of the genes located downstream from ftsW in the mra cluster, from murG to ftsZ, is also mainly (but not exclusively) dependent on the Pmra promoter. PMID:9721276

  11. Silencing of human T-cell leukemia virus type I gene transcription by epigenetic mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mueller Nancy

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I causes adult T-cell leukemia (ATL after a long latent period. Among accessory genes encoded by HTLV-I, the tax gene is thought to play a central role in oncogenesis. However, Tax expression is disrupted by several mechanims including genetic changes of the tax gene, deletion/hypermethylation of 5'-LTR. To clarify the role of epigenetic changes, we analyzed DNA methylation and histone modification in the whole HTLV-I provirus genome. Results The gag, pol and env genes of HTLV-I provirus were more methylated than pX region, whereas methylation of 5'-LTR was variable and 3'-LTR was not methylated at all. In ATL cell lines, complete DNA methylation of 5'-LTR was associated with transcriptional silencing of viral genes. HTLV-I provirus was more methylated in primary ATL cells than in carrier state, indicating the association with disease progression. In seroconvertors, DNA methylation was already observed in internal sequences of provirus just after seroconversion. Taken together, it is speculated that DNA methylation first occurs in the gag, pol and env regions and then extends in the 5' and 3' directions in vivo, and when 5'-LTR becomes methylated, viral transcription is silenced. Analysis of histone modification in the HTLV-I provirus showed that the methylated provirus was associated with hypoacetylation. However, the tax gene transcript could not be detected in fresh ATL cells regardless of hyperacetylated histone H3 in 5'-LTR. The transcription rapidly recovered after in vitro culture in such ATL cells. Conclusion These results showed that epigenetic changes of provirus facilitated ATL cells to evade host immune system by suppressing viral gene transcription. In addition, this study shows the presence of another reversible mechanism that suppresses the tax gene transcription without DNA methylation and hypoacetylated histone.

  12. Introduction of optical reporter gene into cancer and immune cells using lentiviral vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Jung Joon; Le, Uyenchi N.; Moon, Sung Min; Heo, Young Jun; Song, Ho Chun; Bom, Hee Seung; Kim, Yeon Soo

    2004-01-01

    For some applications such as gene therapy or reporter gene imaging, a gene has to be introduced into the organism of interest. Adenoviral vectors are capable of transducing both replicating and non-dividing cells. The adenoviral vectors do not integrate their DNA into host DNA, but do lead to an immune response. Lentiviruses belong to the retrovirus family and are capable of infecting both dividing and non-dividing cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is an example of a lentavirus. A disabled HIV virus has been developed and could be used for in vivo gene delivery. A portion of the viral genome which encodes for accessory proteins canbe deleted without affecting production of the vector and efficiency of infection. Lentiviral delivery into various rodent tissues shows sustained expression of the transgene of up to six months. Furthermore, there seems to be little or no immune response with these vectors. These lentiviral vectors hold significant promise for in vivo gene delivery. We constructed lentiviral vector encoding firefly luciferase (Fluc) and eGFP. Fluc-eGFP fusion gene was inserted into multiple cloning sites of pLentiM1.3 vector. Reporter gene (Fluc-eGFP) was designed to be driven by murine CMV promoter with enhanced efficacy of transgene expression as compared to human CMV promoter. We transfected pLenti1.3-Fluc into human cervix cancer cell line (HeLa) and murine T lymphocytes. We also constructed adenovirus encoding Fluc and transfected to HeLa and T cells. This LentiM1.3-Fluc was transfected into HeLa cells and murine T lymphocytes in vitro, showing consistent expression of eGFP under the fluorescence microscopy from the 2nd day of transfection. Firefly luciferase reporter gene was not expressed in immune cells when it is mediated by adenovirus. Lentivirus was validated as a useful vector for both immune and cancer cells

  13. Functional dissection of HOXD cluster genes in regulation of neuroblastoma cell proliferation and differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhong Zha

    Full Text Available Retinoic acid (RA can induce growth arrest and neuronal differentiation of neuroblastoma cells and has been used in clinic for treatment of neuroblastoma. It has been reported that RA induces the expression of several HOXD genes in human neuroblastoma cell lines, but their roles in RA action are largely unknown. The HOXD cluster contains nine genes (HOXD1, HOXD3, HOXD4, and HOXD8-13 that are positioned sequentially from 3' to 5', with HOXD1 at the 3' end and HOXD13 the 5' end. Here we show that all HOXD genes are induced by RA in the human neuroblastoma BE(2-C cells, with the genes located at the 3' end being activated generally earlier than those positioned more 5' within the cluster. Individual induction of HOXD8, HOXD9, HOXD10 or HOXD12 is sufficient to induce both growth arrest and neuronal differentiation, which is associated with downregulation of cell cycle-promoting genes and upregulation of neuronal differentiation genes. However, induction of other HOXD genes either has no effect (HOXD1 or has partial effects (HOXD3, HOXD4, HOXD11 and HOXD13 on BE(2-C cell proliferation or differentiation. We further show that knockdown of HOXD8 expression, but not that of HOXD9 expression, significantly inhibits the differentiation-inducing activity of RA. HOXD8 directly activates the transcription of HOXC9, a key effector of RA action in neuroblastoma cells. These findings highlight the distinct functions of HOXD genes in RA induction of neuroblastoma cell differentiation.

  14. Efficient gene transfer into nondividing cells by adeno-associated virus-based vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podsakoff, G; Wong, K K; Chatterjee, S

    1994-09-01

    Gene transfer vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) are emerging as highly promising for use in human gene therapy by virtue of their characteristics of wide host range, high transduction efficiencies, and lack of cytopathogenicity. To better define the biology of AAV-mediated gene transfer, we tested the ability of an AAV vector to efficiently introduce transgenes into nonproliferating cell populations. Cells were induced into a nonproliferative state by treatment with the DNA synthesis inhibitors fluorodeoxyuridine and aphidicolin or by contact inhibition induced by confluence and serum starvation. Cells in logarithmic growth or DNA synthesis arrest were transduced with vCWR:beta gal, an AAV-based vector encoding beta-galactosidase under Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat promoter control. Under each condition tested, vCWR:beta Gal expression in nondividing cells was at least equivalent to that in actively proliferating cells, suggesting that mechanisms for virus attachment, nuclear transport, virion uncoating, and perhaps some limited second-strand synthesis of AAV vectors were present in nondividing cells. Southern hybridization analysis of vector sequences from cells transduced while in DNA synthetic arrest and expanded after release of the block confirmed ultimate integration of the vector genome into cellular chromosomal DNA. These findings may provide the basis for the use of AAV-based vectors for gene transfer into quiescent cell populations such as totipotent hematopoietic stem cells.

  15. Self-focusing therapeutic gene delivery with intelligent gene vector swarms: intra-swarm signalling through receptor transgene expression in targeted cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolmachov, Oleg E

    2015-01-01

    Gene delivery in vivo that is tightly focused on the intended target cells is essential to maximize the benefits of gene therapy and to reduce unwanted side-effects. Cell surface markers are immediately available for probing by therapeutic gene vectors and are often used to direct gene transfer with these vectors to specific target cell populations. However, it is not unusual for the choice of available extra-cellular markers to be too scarce to provide a reliable definition of the desired therapeutically relevant set of target cells. Therefore, interrogation of intra-cellular determinants of cell-specificity, such as tissue-specific transcription factors, can be vital in order to provide detailed cell-guiding information to gene vector particles. An important improvement in cell-specific gene delivery can be achieved through auto-buildup in vector homing efficiency using intelligent 'self-focusing' of swarms of vector particles on target cells. Vector self-focusing was previously suggested to rely on the release of diffusible chemo-attractants after a successful target-specific hit by 'scout' vector particles. I hypothesize that intelligent self-focusing behaviour of swarms of cell-targeted therapeutic gene vectors can be accomplished without the employment of difficult-to-use diffusible chemo-attractants, instead relying on the intra-swarm signalling through cells expressing a non-diffusible extra-cellular receptor for the gene vectors. In the proposed model, cell-guiding information is gathered by the 'scout' gene vector particles, which: (1) attach to a variety of cells via a weakly binding (low affinity) receptor; (2) successfully facilitate gene transfer into these cells; (3) query intra-cellular determinants of cell-specificity with their transgene expression control elements and (4) direct the cell-specific biosynthesis of a vector-encoded strongly binding (high affinity) cell-surface receptor. Free members of the vector swarm loaded with therapeutic cargo

  16. Cloning the Gravity and Shear Stress Related Genes from MG-63 Cells by Subtracting Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu; Dai, Zhong-quan; Wang, Bing; Cao, Xin-sheng; Li, Ying-hui; Sun, Xi-qing

    2008-06-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to clone the gravity and shear stress related genes from osteoblast-like human osteosarcoma MG-63 cells by subtractive hybridization. Method MG-63 cells were divided into two groups (1G group and simulated microgravity group). After cultured for 60 h in two different gravitational environments, two groups of MG-63 cells were treated with 1.5Pa fluid shear stress (FSS) for 60 min, respectively. The total RNA in cells was isolated. The gravity and shear stress related genes were cloned by subtractive hybridization. Result 200 clones were gained. 30 positive clones were selected using PCR method based on the primers of vector and sequenced. The obtained sequences were analyzed by blast. changes of 17 sequences were confirmed by RT-PCR and these genes are related to cell proliferation, cell differentiation, protein synthesis, signal transduction and apoptosis. 5 unknown genes related to gravity and shear stress were found. Conclusion In this part of our study, our result indicates that simulated microgravity may change the activities of MG-63 cells by inducing the functional alterations of specific genes.

  17. Mutation of the planar cell polarity gene VANGL1 in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Malene Rask; Farooq, Muhammad; Koefoed, Karen

    2017-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Mutation analysis of a candidate disease gene in a cohort of patients with moderate to severe Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). OBJECTIVE: To investigate if damaging mutations in the planar cell polarity gene VANGL1 could be identified in AIS patients. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA......: AIS is a spinal deformity which occurs in 1-3% of the population. The cause of AIS is often unknown, but genetic factors are important in the etiology. Rare variants in genes encoding regulators of WNT/planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling were recently identified in AIS patients. METHODS: We analyzed...

  18. Transcriptional profiling of MEF2-regulated genes in human neural progenitor cells derived from embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shing Fai Chan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2 family of transcription factors is highly expressed in the brain and constitutes a key determinant of neuronal survival, differentiation, and synaptic plasticity. However, genome-wide transcriptional profiling of MEF2-regulated genes has not yet been fully elucidated, particularly at the neural stem cell stage. Here we report the results of microarray analysis comparing mRNAs isolated from human neural progenitor/stem cells (hNPCs derived from embryonic stem cells expressing a control vector versus progenitors expressing a constitutively-active form of MEF2 (MEF2CA, which increases MEF2 activity. Microarray experiments were performed using the Illumina Human HT-12 V4.0 expression beadchip (GEO#: GSE57184. By comparing vector-control cells to MEF2CA cells, microarray analysis identified 1880 unique genes that were differentially expressed. Among these genes, 1121 genes were up-regulated and 759 genes were down-regulated. Our results provide a valuable resource for identifying transcriptional targets of MEF2 in hNPCs.

  19. Horizontal gene transfers with or without cell fusions in all categories of the living matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkovics, Joseph G

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the history of widespread exchanges of genetic segments initiated over 3 billion years ago, to be part of their life style, by sphero-protoplastic cells, the ancestors of archaea, prokaryota, and eukaryota. These primordial cells shared a hostile anaerobic and overheated environment and competed for survival. "Coexist with, or subdue and conquer, expropriate its most useful possessions, or symbiose with it, your competitor" remain cellular life's basic rules. This author emphasizes the role of viruses, both in mediating cell fusions, such as the formation of the first eukaryotic cell(s) from a united crenarchaeon and prokaryota, and the transfer of host cell genes integrated into viral (phages) genomes. After rising above the Darwinian threshold, rigid rules of speciation and vertical inheritance in the three domains of life were established, but horizontal gene transfers with or without cell fusions were never abolished. The author proves with extensive, yet highly selective documentation, that not only unicellular microorganisms, but the most complex multicellular entities of the highest ranks resort to, and practice, cell fusions, and donate and accept horizontally (laterally) transferred genes. Cell fusions and horizontally exchanged genetic materials remain the fundamental attributes and inherent characteristics of the living matter, whether occurring accidentally or sought after intentionally. These events occur to cells stagnating for some 3 milliard years at a lower yet amazingly sophisticated level of evolution, and to cells achieving the highest degree of differentiation, and thus functioning in dependence on the support of a most advanced multicellular host, like those of the human brain. No living cell is completely exempt from gene drains or gene insertions.

  20. [The Influence of New Medium with RGD on Cell Growth,Cell Fusion and Expression of Exogenous Gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-Pei; Wei, Da-Peng; Zhu, Tong-Bo

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the influence of a new culture medium added with RGD on cell growth,cell fusion and expression of exogenous gene. A new medium was prepared by adding different concentrations of RGD to ordinary culture medium. The optimum concentration of RGD was determined by observation of the growth of human pancreatic epithelial cell line HPDE6-C7. After determining the optimum concentration of RGD,different concentrations of cells HPDE6-C7 (5×10 4 ,10 5 ,5×10 5 mL -1 ) were inoculated in the two mediums. The morphology,adherence,growth and density of the cells were observed by inverted microscope; The ratio of clone formation and the positive rate of cloning were compared between the two cultures after fusion; The fluorescence intensity after the transfection of plasmid with green fluorescent protein ( GFP ) and the protein expression after transfection of plasmid with KRAS were observed to campare the expression of exogenous genes between the new medium with ordinary medium. Firstly,the optimal concentration of RGD was 10 ng/mL. Compared with the normal medium,the cultured cells with RGD had better morphology,adhesion and faster proliferation. In addition,both of the number and positive rate of clones formed in the new medium were significantly higher than that in the ordinary medium ( P exogenous gene GFP in the new medium was significantly higher than that in normal medium ( P exogenous gene KRAS of the new medium was also significantly higher than that in normal medium. The new culture medium has highlighted advantages in cell growth,cell fusion and expression of exogenous genes. RGD peptide has widely prospect and potential value in the cell culture. Copyright© by Editorial Board of Journal of Sichuan University (Medical Science Edition).

  1. Global identification of genes regulated by estrogen signaling and demethylation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putnik, Milica, E-mail: milica.putnik@ki.se [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Novum, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge S-14183 (Sweden); Zhao, Chunyan, E-mail: chunyan.zhao@ki.se [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Novum, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge S-14183 (Sweden); Gustafsson, Jan-Ake, E-mail: jan-ake.gustafsson@ki.se [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Novum, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge S-14183 (Sweden); Department of Biology and Biochemistry, Science and Engineering Research Center Bldg, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5056 (United States); Dahlman-Wright, Karin, E-mail: karin.dahlman-wright@ki.se [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Novum, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge S-14183 (Sweden)

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estrogen signaling and demethylation can both control gene expression in breast cancers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cross-talk between these mechanisms is investigated in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 137 genes are influenced by both 17{beta}-estradiol and demethylating agent 5-aza-2 Prime -deoxycytidine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A set of genes is identified as targets of both estrogen signaling and demethylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is no direct molecular interplay of mediators of estrogen and epigenetic signaling. -- Abstract: Estrogen signaling and epigenetic modifications, in particular DNA methylation, are involved in regulation of gene expression in breast cancers. Here we investigated a potential regulatory cross-talk between these two pathways by identifying their common target genes and exploring underlying molecular mechanisms in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Gene expression profiling revealed that the expression of approximately 140 genes was influenced by both 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) and a demethylating agent 5-aza-2 Prime -deoxycytidine (DAC). Gene ontology (GO) analysis suggests that these genes are involved in intracellular signaling cascades, regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Based on previously reported association with breast cancer, estrogen signaling and/or DNA methylation, CpG island prediction and GO analysis, we selected six genes (BTG3, FHL2, PMAIP1, BTG2, CDKN1A and TGFB2) for further analysis. Tamoxifen reverses the effect of E2 on the expression of all selected genes, suggesting that they are direct targets of estrogen receptor. Furthermore, DAC treatment reactivates the expression of all selected genes in a dose-dependent manner. Promoter CpG island methylation status analysis revealed that only the promoters of BTG3 and FHL2 genes are methylated, with DAC inducing demethylation, suggesting DNA methylation directs repression of

  2. Global identification of genes regulated by estrogen signaling and demethylation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putnik, Milica; Zhao, Chunyan; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Dahlman-Wright, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Estrogen signaling and demethylation can both control gene expression in breast cancers. ► Cross-talk between these mechanisms is investigated in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. ► 137 genes are influenced by both 17β-estradiol and demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. ► A set of genes is identified as targets of both estrogen signaling and demethylation. ► There is no direct molecular interplay of mediators of estrogen and epigenetic signaling. -- Abstract: Estrogen signaling and epigenetic modifications, in particular DNA methylation, are involved in regulation of gene expression in breast cancers. Here we investigated a potential regulatory cross-talk between these two pathways by identifying their common target genes and exploring underlying molecular mechanisms in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Gene expression profiling revealed that the expression of approximately 140 genes was influenced by both 17β-estradiol (E2) and a demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (DAC). Gene ontology (GO) analysis suggests that these genes are involved in intracellular signaling cascades, regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Based on previously reported association with breast cancer, estrogen signaling and/or DNA methylation, CpG island prediction and GO analysis, we selected six genes (BTG3, FHL2, PMAIP1, BTG2, CDKN1A and TGFB2) for further analysis. Tamoxifen reverses the effect of E2 on the expression of all selected genes, suggesting that they are direct targets of estrogen receptor. Furthermore, DAC treatment reactivates the expression of all selected genes in a dose-dependent manner. Promoter CpG island methylation status analysis revealed that only the promoters of BTG3 and FHL2 genes are methylated, with DAC inducing demethylation, suggesting DNA methylation directs repression of these genes in MCF-7 cells. In a further analysis of the potential interplay between estrogen signaling and DNA methylation, E2 treatment

  3. Historical Perspective on the Current Renaissance for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Donald B

    2017-10-01

    Gene therapy using hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) has developed over the past 3 decades, with progressive improvements in the efficacy and safety. Autologous transplantation of HSC modified with murine gammaretroviral vectors first showed clinical benefits for patients with several primary immune deficiencies, but some of these patients suffered complications from vector-related genotoxicity. Lentiviral vectors have been used recently for gene addition to HSC and have yielded clinical benefits for primary immune deficiencies, metabolic diseases, and hemoglobinopathies, without vector-related complications. Gene editing using site-specific endonucleases is emerging as a promising technology for gene therapy and is moving into clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Validation of cell-free culture using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and gene expression studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R; Elankumaran, Y; Hijjawi, N; Ryan, U

    2015-06-01

    A cell-free culture system for Cryptosporidium parvum was analysed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to characterise life cycle stages and compare gene expression in cell-free culture and cell culture using HCT-8 cells. Cryptosporidium parvum samples were harvested at 2 h, 8 h, 14 h, 26 h, 50 h, 74 h, 98 h, 122 h and 170 h, chemically fixed and specimens were observed using a Zeiss 1555 scanning electron microscope. The presence of sporozoites, trophozoites and type I merozoites were identified by SEM. Gene expression in cell culture and cell-free culture was studied using reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) of the sporozoite surface antigen protein (cp15), the glycoprotein 900 (gp900), the Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) and 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes in both cell free and conventional cell culture. In cell culture, cp15 expression peaked at 74 h, gp900 expression peaked at 74 h and 98 h and COWP expression peaked at 50 h. In cell-free culture, CP15 expression peaked at 98 h, gp900 expression peaked at 74 h and COWP expression peaked at 122 h. The present study is the first to compare gene expression of C. parvum in cell culture and cell-free culture and to characterise life cycle stages of C. parvum in cell-free culture using SEM. Findings from this study showed that gene expression patterns in cell culture and cell-free culture were similar but in cell-free culture, gene expression was delayed for CP15 and COWP in cell free culture compared with the cell culture system and was lower. Although three life cycle stageswere conclusively identified, improvements in SEM methodology should lead to the detection of more life cycle stages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Screening of radiation-induced genes in human lymphoblastoid cells irradiated with 20 cGy of γ-ray by gene chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Huiping; Long Xianhui; Xu Qinzhi; Bai Bei; Sui Jianli; Zhou Pingkun

    2006-01-01

    cDNA gene chip was used to detect the transcriptional profile of human lymphoblasts cells irradiated with 20 cGy of 60 Co γ-ray. The microarray contains 14112 cDNA probing corresponding to 14112 human genes. The results showed that the transcription level of 83 genes changed; among which 21 genes were up-regulated. Most of them were associated with signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, cellular immunity, cytoskeleton and movement, etc. It indicated that low-dose irradiation can modulate the expression of a series of functional genes, which is the primary molecular basis of cellular responses to radiation. (authors)

  6. Differentiation of PDX1 gene-modified human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells into insulin-producing cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dongmei; Wang, Juan; Gao, Yangjun; Zhang, Yuan

    2011-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have significant advantages over other stem cell types, and greater potential for immediate clinical application. MSCs would be an interesting cellular source for treatment of type 1 diabetes. In this study, MSCs from human umbilical cord were differentiated into functional insulin-producing cells in vitro by introduction of the pancreatic and duodenal homeobox factor 1 (PDX1) and in the presence of induction factors. The expressions of cell surface antigens were detected by flow cytometry. After induction in an adipogenic medium or an osteogenic medium, the cells were observed by Oil Red O staining and alkaline phosphatase staining. Recombinant adenovirus carrying the PDX1 gene was constructed and MSCs were infected by the recombinant adenovirus, then treated with several inducing factors for differentiation into islet β-like cells. The expression of the genes and protein related to islet β-cells was detected by immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Insulin and C-peptide secretion were assayed. Our results show that the morphology and immunophenotype of MSCs from human umbilical cord were similar to those present in human bone marrow. The MSCs could be induced to differentiate into osteocytes and adipocytes. After induction by recombined adenovirus vector with induction factors, MSCs were aggregated and presented islet-like bodies. Dithizone staining of these cells was positive. The genes' expression related to islet β-cells was found. After induction, insulin and C-peptide secretion in the supernatant were significantly increased. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that PDX1 gene-modified human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells could be differentiated into insulin-producing cells in vitro.

  7. Gene expression of panaxydol-treated human melanoma cells using radioactive cDNA microarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Joong Youn; Yu, Su Jin; Soh, Jeong Won; Kim, Meyoung Kon [College of Medicine, Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    Polyacetylenic alcohols derived from Panax ginseng have been studied to be an anticancer reagent previously. One of the Panax ginseng polyacetylenic alcohols, i.e., panaxydol, has been studied to possess an antiproliferative effect on human melanoma cell line (SK-MEL-1). In ths study, radioactive cDNA microarrays enabled an efficient approach to analyze the pattern of gene expression (3.194 genes in a total) simultaneously. The bioinformatics selection of human cDNAs, which is specifically designed for immunology, apoptosis and signal transduction, were arrayed on nylon membranes. Using with {sup 33}P labeled probes, this method provided highly sensitive gene expression profiles of our interest including apoptosis, cell proliferation, cell cycle, and signal transduction. Gene expression profiles were also classified into several categories in accordance with the duration of panaxydol treatment. Consequently, the gene profiles of our interest were significantly up (199 genes, > 2.0 of Z-ratio) or down-(196 genes, < 2.0 of Z-ratio) regulated in panaxydol-treated human melanoma cells.

  8. Gene expression of panaxydol-treated human melanoma cells using radioactive cDNA microarrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Joong Youn; Yu, Su Jin; Soh, Jeong Won; Kim, Meyoung Kon

    2001-01-01

    Polyacetylenic alcohols derived from Panax ginseng have been studied to be an anticancer reagent previously. One of the Panax ginseng polyacetylenic alcohols, i.e., panaxydol, has been studied to possess an antiproliferative effect on human melanoma cell line (SK-MEL-1). In ths study, radioactive cDNA microarrays enabled an efficient approach to analyze the pattern of gene expression (3.194 genes in a total) simultaneously. The bioinformatics selection of human cDNAs, which is specifically designed for immunology, apoptosis and signal transduction, were arrayed on nylon membranes. Using with 33 P labeled probes, this method provided highly sensitive gene expression profiles of our interest including apoptosis, cell proliferation, cell cycle, and signal transduction. Gene expression profiles were also classified into several categories in accordance with the duration of panaxydol treatment. Consequently, the gene profiles of our interest were significantly up (199 genes, > 2.0 of Z-ratio) or down-(196 genes, < 2.0 of Z-ratio) regulated in panaxydol-treated human melanoma cells

  9. A Cbx8-containing polycomb complex facilitates the transition to gene activation during ES cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Creppe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Polycomb proteins play an essential role in maintaining the repression of developmental genes in self-renewing embryonic stem cells. The exact mechanism allowing the derepression of polycomb target genes during cell differentiation remains unclear. Our project aimed to identify Cbx8 binding sites in differentiating mouse embryonic stem cells. Therefore, we used a genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation of endogenous Cbx8 coupled to direct massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq. Our analysis identified 171 high confidence peaks. By crossing our data with previously published microarray analysis, we show that several differentiation genes transiently recruit Cbx8 during their early activation. Depletion of Cbx8 partially impairs the transcriptional activation of these genes. Both interaction analysis, as well as chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments support the idea that activating Cbx8 acts in the context of an intact PRC1 complex. Prolonged gene activation results in eviction of PRC1 despite persisting H3K27me3 and H2A ubiquitination. The composition of PRC1 is highly modular and changes when embryonic stem cells commit to differentiation. We further demonstrate that the exchange of Cbx7 for Cbx8 is required for the effective activation of differentiation genes. Taken together, our results establish a function for a Cbx8-containing complex in facilitating the transition from a Polycomb-repressed chromatin state to an active state. As this affects several key regulatory differentiation genes this mechanism is likely to contribute to the robust execution of differentiation programs.

  10. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of nucleotide excision repair genes in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefkofsky, Hailey B. [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Veloso, Artur [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bioinformatics Program, Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ljungman, Mats, E-mail: ljungman@umich.edu [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes DNA helix-distorting lesions induced by UV light and various chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. These lesions efficiently block the elongation of transcription and need to be rapidly removed by transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) to avoid the induction of apoptosis. Twenty-nine genes have been classified to code for proteins participating in nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells. Here we explored the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of these NER genes across 13 human cell lines using Bru-seq and BruChase-seq, respectively. Many NER genes are relatively large in size and therefore will be easily inactivated by UV-induced transcription-blocking lesions. Furthermore, many of these genes produce transcripts that are rather unstable. Thus, these genes are expected to rapidly lose expression leading to a diminished function of NER. One such gene is ERCC6 that codes for the CSB protein critical for TC-NER. Due to its large gene size and high RNA turnover rate, the ERCC6 gene may act as dosimeter of DNA damage so that at high levels of damage, ERCC6 RNA levels would be diminished leading to the loss of CSB expression, inhibition of TC-NER and the promotion of cell death.