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Sample records for genes potentially involved

  1. Characterisation of Campylobacter jejuni genes potentially involved in phosphonate degradation

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    Hartley Lauren E

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Potential biological roles of the Campylobacter jejuni genes cj0641, cj0774c and cj1663 were investigated. The proteins encoded by these genes showed sequence similarities to the phosphonate utilisation PhnH, K and L gene products of Escherichia coli. The genes cj0641, cj0774c and cj1663 were amplified from the pathogenic C. jejuni strain 81116, sequenced, and cloned into pGEM-T Easy vectors. Recombinant plasmids were used to disrupt each one of the genes by inserting a kanamycin resistance (KmR cassette employing site-directed mutagenesis or inverse PCR. Campylobacter jejuni 81116 isogenic mutants were generated by integration of the mutated genes into the genome of the wild-type strain. The C. jejuni mutants grew on primary isolation plates, but they could not be purified by subsequent passages owing to cell death. The mutant C. jejuni strains survived and proliferated in co-cultures with wild-type bacteria or in media in which wild-type C. jejuni had been previously grown. PCR analyses of mixed wild-type/mutant cultures served to verify the presence of the mutated gene in the genome of a fraction of the total bacterial population. The data suggested that each mutation inactivated a gene essential for survival. Rates of phosphonate catabolism in lysates of E. coli strain DH5α were determined using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Whole-cell lysates of the wild-type degraded phosphonoacetate, phenylphosphonate and aminomethylphosphonate. Significant differences in the rates of phosphonate degradation were observed between lysates of wild-type E. coli, and of bacteria transformed with each one of the vectors carrying one of the C. jejuni genes, suggesting that these genes were involved in phosphonate catabolism.

  2. Compatibility in the Biomphalaria glabrata/Echinostoma caproni model: potential involvement of adhesion genes.

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    Bouchut, A; Roger, E; Coustau, C; Gourbal, B; Mitta, G

    2006-02-01

    Because susceptibility or resistance of Biomphalaria glabrata to the trematode Echinostoma caproni correlates with differential hemocytic adhesive properties, we compared the expression of genes involved in adhesion processes between hemocytes from susceptible and resistant snails. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis revealed four genes whose transcripts were differentially represented between hemocytes from resistant and susceptible snails. These genes encode two dermatopontin-like, one matrilin-like and one cadherin-like proteins. Expression analyses performed following parasite exposure suggested that dermatopontins may be involved in the compatibility differences between these strains. We also investigated expression levels on whole snails of different genes potentially involved in extracellular matrix structure or coagulation. Our results support the hypothesis that susceptible snails possess a hemolymph coagulation-like system that is more potent than that of resistant snails. This system may prevent hemocyte migration towards the parasite larvae and therefore facilitate parasite settlement in susceptible snails.

  3. Microarray technology reveals potentially novel genes and pathways involved in non-functioning pituitary adenomas

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    Qiao, X; Wang, H; Wang, X; Zhao, B

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Microarray data of non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs) were analyzed to disclose novel genes and pathways involved in NFPA tumorigenesis. Raw microarray data were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus. Data pre-treatment and differential analysis were conducted using packages in R. Functional and pathway enrichment analyses were performed using package GOs-tats. A protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed using server STRING and Cytoscape. Known genes involved in pituitary adenomas (PAs), were obtained from the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database. A total of 604 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identifed between NFPAs and controls, including 177 up- and 427 down-regulated genes. Jak-STAT and p53 signaling pathways were significantly enriched by DEGs. The PPI network of DEGs was constructed, containing 99 up- and 288 down-regulated known disease genes (e.g. EGFR and ESR1) as well as 16 up- and 17 down-regulated potential novel NFPAs-related genes (e.g. COL4A5, LHX3, MSN, and GHSR). Genes like COL4A5, LHX3, MSN, and GHSR and pathways such as p53 signaling and Jak-STAT signaling, might participate in NFPA development. Although further validations are required, these findings might provide guidance for future basic and therapy researches. PMID:28289583

  4. Identification and Characterization of Genes Involved in Leishmania Pathogenesis: The Potential for Drug Target Selection

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    Robert Duncan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying and characterizing Leishmania donovani genes and the proteins they encode for their role in pathogenesis can reveal the value of this approach for finding new drug targets. Effective drug targets are likely to be proteins differentially expressed or required in the amastigote life cycle stage found in the patient. Several examples and their potential for chemotherapeutic disruption are presented. A pathway nearly ubiquitous in living cells targeted by anticancer drugs, the ubiquitin system, is examined. New findings in ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers in Leishmania show how disruption of those pathways could point to additional drug targets. The programmed cell death pathway, now recognized among protozoan parasites, is reviewed for some of its components and evidence that suggests they could be targeted for antiparasitic drug therapy. Finally, the endoplasmic reticulum quality control system is involved in secretion of many virulence factors. How disruptions in this pathway reduce virulence as evidence for potential drug targets is presented.

  5. Silicon Regulates Potential Genes Involved in Major Physiological Processes in Plants to Combat Stress

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    Abinaya Manivannan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Silicon (Si, the quasi-essential element occurs as the second most abundant element in the earth's crust. Biological importance of Si in plant kingdom has become inevitable particularly under stressed environment. In general, plants are classified as high, medium, and low silicon accumulators based on the ability of roots to absorb Si. The uptake of Si directly influence the positive effects attributed to the plant but Si supplementation proves to mitigate stress and recover plant growth even in low accumulating plants like tomato. The application of Si in soil as well as soil-less cultivation systems have resulted in the enhancement of quantitative and qualitative traits of plants even under stressed environment. Silicon possesses several mechanisms to regulate the physiological, biochemical, and antioxidant metabolism in plants to combat abiotic and biotic stresses. Nevertheless, very few reports are available on the aspect of Si-mediated molecular regulation of genes with potential role in stress tolerance. The recent advancements in the era of genomics and transcriptomics have opened an avenue for the determination of molecular rationale associated with the Si amendment to the stress alleviation in plants. Therefore, the present endeavor has attempted to describe the recent discoveries related to the regulation of vital genes involved in photosynthesis, transcription regulation, defense, water transport, polyamine synthesis, and housekeeping genes during abiotic and biotic stress alleviation by Si. Furthermore, an overview of Si-mediated modulation of multiple genes involved in stress response pathways such as phenylpropanoid pathway, jasmonic acid pathway, ABA-dependent or independent regulatory pathway have been discussed in this review.

  6. ZFP91-a newly described gene potentially involved in prostate pathology.

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    Paschke, Lukasz; Rucinski, Marcin; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Zemleduch, Tomasz; Malendowicz, Witold; Kwias, Zbigniew; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2014-04-01

    In search for novel molecular targets in benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH), a PCR Array based screening of 84 genes was performed. Of those, expression of ZFP91 (ZFP91 zinc finger protein) was notably upregulated. Limited data concerning the function of ZFP91 product show that it is a potential transcription factor upregulated in human acute myelogenous leukemia and most recently found to be the non-canonical NF-κB pathway regulator. In order to test this finding on a larger number of samples, prostate specimens were obtained from patients undergoing adenomectomy for BPH (n = 21), and as a control, from patients undergoing radical cystectomy for bladder cancer (prostates unchanged pathologically, n = 18). Similar studies were performed on cultured human prostate cancer cell lines: LNCaP, DU145, 22Rv1, PC-3; as well as normal prostate epithelial cells-PrEC. Methods employed included: Human Obesity PCR Array (Qiagen), QPCR and Western blotting. QPCR studies confirmed significant overexpression of ZFP91 in BPH samples. On a protein level, however, comparison between normal and BPH prostates revealed insignificant differences. As for prostate cell lines examined, all expressed ZFP91 mRNA. Western blotting analysis showed markedly higher protein levels of ZFP91 in all cancer cell lines in comparison with normal (PrEC) cells. In conclusion, the upregulated ZFP91 mRNA in BPH, not accompanied by parallel changes in ZFP91 protein levels, together with ZFP91 protein abundance in prostate cancer cell lines suggest ZFP91 involvement in these prostate diseases.

  7. Gene expression profiling reveals potential key pathways involved in pyrazinamide-mediated hepatotoxicity in Wistar rats.

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    Zhang, Yun; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Su, Yijing; Chen, Mi; Li, Fu; Liu, Li; Sun, Lixin; Wang, Yun; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Luyong

    2013-08-01

    Pyrazinamide (PZA) is an important sterilizing prodrug that shortens the duration of tuberculosis therapy. However, hepatotoxicity has been reported during clinical trials investigating PZA. To determine the hepatotoxic effects of PZA in vivo and to further investigate the underlying cellular mechanism, we profiled the gene expression patterns of PZA-treated rat livers by microarray analysis. Wistar rats of both sexes were orally administered PZA at doses of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 g kg(-1) for 28 days. Body weight, absolute and relative liver weight, biochemical analysis, histopathology, oxidative stress parameters in liver homogenates and changes in global transcriptomic expression were evaluated to study the hepatotoxic effects of PZA. Our results confirm the dose-dependent and sex-related hepatotoxicity of PZA. Female rats were more sensitive to PZA-induced hepatotoxicity than males. Furthermore, changes in the activity of major antioxidant enzymes and nonenzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, total antioxidant capacity, glutathione and malondialdehyde), indicating the development of oxidative stress, were more significant in the PZA-treated group. PZA-induced gene expression changes were related to pathways involved in drug metabolism, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) signaling, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Real-time polymerase chain reaction confirmed the regulation of selected genes involved in PZA-hepatotoxicity (Ephx1, Cyp2b1, Gstm1, Gstp1, Fabp7, Acaa1, Cpt-1b, Cyp8b1, Hmox1 and Ntrk1). We observed for the first time that these genes have effects on PZA-induced hepatotoxicity. In addition, drug metabolism and PPAR signaling pathways may play an important role in PZA hepatotoxicity. Taken together, these findings will be useful for future PZA hepatotoxicity studies.

  8. Dynamic chromatin states in human ES cells reveal potential regulatory sequences and genes involved in pluripotency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R David Hawkins; Zhen Ye; Samantha Kuan; Pengzhi Yu; Hui Liu; Xinmin Zhang; Roland D Green; Victor V Lobanenkov; Ron Stewart; James A Thomson; Bing Ren; Gary C Hon; Chuhu Yang; Jessica E Antosiewicz-Bourget; LeonardKLee; Que-Minh Ngo; Sarit Klugman; Keith A Ching; Lee E Edsall

    2011-01-01

    Pluripotency,the ability of a cell to differentiate and give rise to all embryonic lineages,defines a small number of mammalian cell types such as embryonic stem (ES) cells.While it has been generally held that pluripotency is the product of a transcriptional regulatory network that activates and maintains the expression of key stem cell genes,accumulating evidence is pointing to a critical role for epigenetic processes in establishing and safeguarding the pluripotency of ES cells,as well as maintaining the identity of differentiated cell types.In order to better understand the role of epigenetic mechanisms in pluripotency,we have examined the dynamics of chromatin modifications genomewide in human ES cells (hESCs) undergoing differentiation into a mesendodermal lineage.We found that chromatin modifications at promoters remain largely invariant during differentiation,except at a small number of promoters where a dynamic switch between acetylation and methylation at H3K27 marks the transition between activation and silencing of gene expression,suggesting a hierarchy in cell fate commitment over most differentially expressed genes.We also mapped over 50 000 potential enhancers,and observed much greater dynamics in chromatin modifications,especially H3K4mel and H3K27ac,which correlate with expression of their potential target genes.Further analysis of these enhancers revealed potentially key transcriptional regulators of pluripotency and a chromatin signature indicative of a poised state that may confer developmental competence in hESCs.Our results provide new evidence supporting the role of chromatin modifications in defining enhancers and pluripotency.

  9. ZFP91—A Newly Described Gene Potentially Involved in Prostate Pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Paschke, Lukasz; Rucinski, Marcin; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Zemleduch, Tomasz; Malendowicz, Witold; Kwias, Zbigniew; Malendowicz, Ludwik K.

    2013-01-01

    In search for novel molecular targets in benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH), a PCR Array based screening of 84 genes was performed. Of those, expression of ZFP91 (ZFP91 zinc finger protein) was notably upregulated. Limited data concerning the function of ZFP91 product show that it is a potential transcription factor upregulated in human acute myelogenous leukemia and most recently found to be the non-canonical NF-κB pathway regulator. In order to test this finding on a larger number of samples...

  10. Transcriptome Analyses Reveal Candidate Genes Potentially Involved in Al Stress Response in Alfalfa

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    Liu, Wenxian; Xiong, Conghui; Yan, Longfeng; Zhang, Zhengshe; Ma, Lichao; Wang, Yanrong; Liu, Yajie; Liu, Zhipeng

    2017-01-01

    Alfalfa is the most extensively cultivated forage legume, yet most alfalfa cultivars are not aluminum tolerant, and the molecular mechanisms underlying alfalfa responses to Al stress are largely unknown. In this study, we aimed to understand how alfalfa responds to Al stress by identifying and analyzing Al-stress-responsive genes in alfalfa roots at the whole-genome scale. The transcriptome changes in alfalfa roots under Al stress for 4, 8, or 24 h were analyzed using Illumina high-throughput sequencing platforms. A total of 2464 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified, and most were up-regulated at early (4 h) and/or late (24 h) Al exposure time points rather than at the middle exposure time point (8 h). Metabolic pathway enrichment analysis demonstrated that the DEGs involved in ribosome, protein biosynthesis, and process, the citrate cycle, membrane transport, and hormonal regulation were preferentially enriched and regulated. Biosynthesis inhibition and signal transduction downstream of auxin- and ethylene-mediated signals occur during alfalfa responses to root growth inhibition. The internal Al detoxification mechanisms play important roles in alfalfa roots under Al stress. These findings provide valuable information for identifying and characterizing important components in the Al signaling network in alfalfa and enhance understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying alfalfa responses to Al stress. PMID:28217130

  11. Identification of genes potentially involved in solute stress response in Sphingomonas wittichii RW1 by transposon mutant recovery

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    Edith eCoronado

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The term water stress refers to the effects of low water availability on microbial growth and physiology. Water availability has been proposed as a major constraint for the use of microorganisms in contaminated sites with the purpose of bioremediation. Sphingomonas wittichii RW1 is a bacterium capable of degrading the xenobiotic compounds dibenzofuran and dibenzo-p-dioxin, and has potential to be used for targeted bioremediation. The aim of the current work was to identify genes implicated in water stress in RW1 by means of transposon mutagenesis and mutant growth experiments. Conditions of low water potential were mimicked by adding NaCl to the growth media. Three different mutant selection or separation method were tested, which, however recovered different mutants. Recovered transposon mutants with poorer growth under salt-induced water stress carried insertions in genes involved in proline and glutamate biosynthesis, and further in a gene putatively involved in aromatic compound catabolism. Transposon mutants growing poorer on medium with lowered water potential also included ones that had insertions in genes involved in more general functions such as transcriptional regulation, elongation factor, cell division protein, RNA polymerase β or an aconitase.

  12. A transcriptomic scan for potential candidate genes involved in osmoregulation in an obligate freshwater palaemonid prawn (Macrobrachium australiense

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    Azam Moshtaghi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Understanding the genomic basis of osmoregulation (candidate genes and/or molecular mechanisms controlling the phenotype addresses one of the fundamental questions in evolutionary ecology. Species distributions and adaptive radiations are thought to be controlled by environmental salinity levels, and efficient osmoregulatory (ionic balance ability is the main mechanism to overcome the problems related to environmental salinity gradients. Methods To better understand how osmoregulatory performance in freshwater (FW crustaceans allow individuals to acclimate and adapt to raised salinity conditions, here we (i, reviewed the literature on genes that have been identified to be associated with osmoregulation in FW crustaceans, and (ii, performed a transcriptomic analysis using cDNA libraries developed from mRNA isolated from three important osmoregulatory tissues (gill, antennal gland, hepatopancreas and total mRNA from post larvae taken from the freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium australiense using Illumina deep sequencing technology. This species was targeted because it can complete its life cycle totally in freshwater but, like many Macrobrachium sp., can also tolerate brackish water conditions and hence should have genes associated with tolerance of both FW and saline conditions. Results We obtained between 55.4 and 65.2 million Illumina read pairs from four cDNA libraries. Overall, paired end sequences assembled into a total of 125,196 non-redundant contigs (≥200 bp with an N50 length of 2,282 bp and an average contig length of 968 bp. Transcriptomic analysis of M. australiense identified 32 different gene families that were potentially involved with osmoregulatory capacity. A total of 32,597 transcripts were specified with gene ontology (GO terms identified on the basis of GO categories. Abundance estimation of expressed genes based on TPM (transcript per million ≥20 showed 1625 transcripts commonly expressed in all four libraries

  13. A transcriptomic scan for potential candidate genes involved in osmoregulation in an obligate freshwater palaemonid prawn (Macrobrachium australiense)

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    Rahi, Md. Lifat; Nguyen, Viet Tuan; Mather, Peter B.; Hurwood, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding the genomic basis of osmoregulation (candidate genes and/or molecular mechanisms controlling the phenotype) addresses one of the fundamental questions in evolutionary ecology. Species distributions and adaptive radiations are thought to be controlled by environmental salinity levels, and efficient osmoregulatory (ionic balance) ability is the main mechanism to overcome the problems related to environmental salinity gradients. Methods To better understand how osmoregulatory performance in freshwater (FW) crustaceans allow individuals to acclimate and adapt to raised salinity conditions, here we (i), reviewed the literature on genes that have been identified to be associated with osmoregulation in FW crustaceans, and (ii), performed a transcriptomic analysis using cDNA libraries developed from mRNA isolated from three important osmoregulatory tissues (gill, antennal gland, hepatopancreas) and total mRNA from post larvae taken from the freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium australiense using Illumina deep sequencing technology. This species was targeted because it can complete its life cycle totally in freshwater but, like many Macrobrachium sp., can also tolerate brackish water conditions and hence should have genes associated with tolerance of both FW and saline conditions. Results We obtained between 55.4 and 65.2 million Illumina read pairs from four cDNA libraries. Overall, paired end sequences assembled into a total of 125,196 non-redundant contigs (≥200 bp) with an N50 length of 2,282 bp and an average contig length of 968 bp. Transcriptomic analysis of M. australiense identified 32 different gene families that were potentially involved with osmoregulatory capacity. A total of 32,597 transcripts were specified with gene ontology (GO) terms identified on the basis of GO categories. Abundance estimation of expressed genes based on TPM (transcript per million) ≥20 showed 1625 transcripts commonly expressed in all four libraries. Among the

  14. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveal Candidate Genes Potentially Involved in Regulation of Primocane Apex Rooting in Raspberry (Rubus spp.

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    Jianfeng Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Raspberries (Rubus spp. exhibit a unique rooting process that is initiated from the stem apex of primocane, conferring an unusual asexual mode of reproduction to this plant. However, the full complement of genes involved in this process has not been identified. To this end, the present study analyzed the transcriptomes of the Rubus primocane and floricane stem apex at three developmental stages by Digital Gene Expression profiling to identify genes that regulate rooting. Sequencing and de novo assembly yielded 26.82 Gb of nucleotides and 59,173 unigenes; 498, 7,346, 4,110, 7,900, 9,397, and 4,776 differently expressed genes were identified in paired comparisons of SAF1 (floricane at developmental stage 1 vs. SAP1 (primocane at developmental stage 1, SAF2 vs. SAP2, SAF3 vs. SAP3, SAP1 vs. SAP2, SAP1 vs. SAP3, and SAP2 vs. SAP3, respectively. SAP1 maintains an extension growth pattern; SAP2 then exhibits growth arrest and vertical (downward gravitropic deflection; and finally, short roots begin to form on the apex of SAP3. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes enrichment analysis of SAP1 vs. SAP2 revealed 12 pathways that were activated in response to shoot growth arrest and root differentiation, including circadian rhythm—plant (ko04712 and plant hormone signal transduction (ko04075. Our results indicate that genes related to circadian rhythm, ethylene and auxin signaling, shoot growth, and root development are potentially involved in the regulation of primocane apex rooting in Rubus. These findings provide a basis for elucidating the molecular mechanisms of primocane apex rooting in this economically valuable crop.

  15. Characterization of the mantle transcriptome of yesso scallop (Patinopecten yessoensis): identification of genes potentially involved in biomineralization and pigmentation.

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    Sun, Xiujun; Yang, Aiguo; Wu, Biao; Zhou, Liqing; Liu, Zhihong

    2015-01-01

    The Yesso scallop Patinopecten yessoensis is an economically important marine bivalve species in aquaculture and fishery in Asian countries. However, limited genomic resources are available for this scallop, which hampers investigations into molecular mechanisms underlying their unique biological characteristics, such as shell formation and pigmentation. Mantle is the special tissue of P. yessoensis that secretes biomineralization proteins inducing shell deposition as well as pigmentation on the shells. However, a current deficiency of transcriptome information limits insight into mechanisms of shell formation and pigmentation in this species. In this study, the transcriptome of the mantle of P. yessoensis was deeply sequenced and characterized using Illumina RNA-seq technology. A total of 86,521 unique transcripts are assembled from 55,884,122 reads that passed quality filters, and annotated, using Gene Ontology classification. A total of 259 pathways are identified in the mantle transcriptome, including the calcium signaling and melanogenesis pathways. A total of 237 unigenes that are homologous to 102 reported biomineralization genes are identified, and 121 unigenes that are homologous to 93 known proteins related to melanin biosynthesis are found. Twenty-three annotated unigenes, which are mainly homologous to calmodulin and related proteins, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, adenylate/guanylate cyclase, and tyrosinase family are potentially involved in both biomineralization and melanin biosynthesis. It is suggested that these genes are probably not limited in function to induce shell deposition by calcium metabolism, but may also be involved in pigmentation of the shells of the scallop. This potentially supports the idea that there might be a link between calcium metabolism and melanin biosynthesis, which was previously found in vertebrates. The findings presented here will notably advance the understanding of the sophisticated processes of shell

  16. Comparative Analysis of WRKY Genes Potentially Involved in Salt Stress Responses in Triticum turgidum L. ssp. durum

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    Yousfi, Fatma-Ezzahra; Makhloufi, Emna; Marande, William; Ghorbel, Abdel W.; Bouzayen, Mondher; Bergès, Hélène

    2017-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors are involved in multiple aspects of plant growth, development and responses to biotic stresses. Although they have been found to play roles in regulating plant responses to environmental stresses, these roles still need to be explored, especially those pertaining to crops. Durum wheat is the second most widely produced cereal in the world. Complex, large and unsequenced genomes, in addition to a lack of genomic resources, hinder the molecular characterization of tolerance mechanisms. This paper describes the isolation and characterization of five TdWRKY genes from durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. ssp. durum). A PCR-based screening of a T. turgidum BAC genomic library using primers within the conserved region of WRKY genes resulted in the isolation of five BAC clones. Following sequencing fully the five BACs, fine annotation through Triannot pipeline revealed 74.6% of the entire sequences as transposable elements and a 3.2% gene content with genes organized as islands within oceans of TEs. Each BAC clone harbored a TdWRKY gene. The study showed a very extensive conservation of genomic structure between TdWRKYs and their orthologs from Brachypodium, barley, and T. aestivum. The structural features of TdWRKY proteins suggested that they are novel members of the WRKY family in durum wheat. TdWRKY1/2/4, TdWRKY3, and TdWRKY5 belong to the group Ia, IIa, and IIc, respectively. Enrichment of cis-regulatory elements related to stress responses in the promoters of some TdWRKY genes indicated their potential roles in mediating plant responses to a wide variety of environmental stresses. TdWRKY genes displayed different expression patterns in response to salt stress that distinguishes two durum wheat genotypes with contrasting salt stress tolerance phenotypes. TdWRKY genes tended to react earlier with a down-regulation in sensitive genotype leaves and with an up-regulation in tolerant genotype leaves. The TdWRKY transcripts levels in roots increased

  17. De novo sequencing of Hypericum perforatum transcriptome to identify potential genes involved in the biosynthesis of active metabolites.

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    Miao He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypericum perforatum L. (St. John's wort is a medicinal plant with pharmacological properties that are antidepressant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, anti-cancer, and antibacterial. Its major active metabolites are hypericins, hyperforins, and melatonin. However, little genetic information is available for this species, especially that concerning the biosynthetic pathways for active ingredients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using de novo transcriptome analysis, we obtained 59,184 unigenes covering the entire life cycle of these plants. In all, 40,813 unigenes (68.86% were annotated and 2,359 were assigned to secondary metabolic pathways. Among them, 260 unigenes are involved in the production of hypericin, hyperforin, and melatonin. Another 2,291 unigenes are classified as potential Type III polyketide synthase. Our BlastX search against the AGRIS database reveals 1,772 unigenes that are homologous to 47 known Arabidopsis transcription factor families. Further analysis shows that 10.61% (6,277 of these unigenes contain 7,643 SSRs. CONCLUSION: We have identified a set of putative genes involved in several secondary metabolism pathways, especially those related to the synthesis of its active ingredients. Our results will serve as an important platform for public information about gene expression, genomics, and functional genomics in H. perforatum.

  18. Co-expression analysis reveals a group of genes potentially involved in regulation of plant response to iron-deficiency.

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    Li, Hua; Wang, Lei; Yang, Zhi Min

    2015-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential element for plant growth and development. Iron deficiency results in abnormal metabolisms from respiration to photosynthesis. Exploration of Fe-deficient responsive genes and their networks is critically important to understand molecular mechanisms leading to the plant adaptation to soil Fe-limitation. Co-expression genes are a cluster of genes that have a similar expression pattern to execute relatively biological functions at a stage of development or under a certain environmental condition. They may share a common regulatory mechanism. In this study, we investigated Fe-starved-related co-expression genes from Arabidopsis. From the biological process GO annotation of TAIR (The Arabidopsis Information Resource), 180 iron-deficient responsive genes were detected. Using ATTED-II database, we generated six gene co-expression networks. Among these, two modules of PYE and IRT1 were successfully constructed. There are 30 co-expression genes that are incorporated in the two modules (12 in PYE-module and 18 in IRT1-module). Sixteen of the co-expression genes were well characterized. The remaining genes (14) are poorly or not functionally identified with iron stress. Validation of the 14 genes using real-time PCR showed differential expression under iron-deficiency. Most of the co-expression genes (23/30) could be validated in pye and fit mutant plants with iron-deficiency. We further identified iron-responsive cis-elements upstream of the co-expression genes and found that 22 out of 30 genes contain the iron-responsive motif IDE1. Furthermore, some auxin and ethylene-responsive elements were detected in the promoters of the co-expression genes. These results suggest that some of the genes can be also involved in iron stress response through the phytohormone-responsive pathways.

  19. Evaluation of potential candidate genes involved in salinity tolerance in striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) using an RNA-Seq approach.

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    Nguyen, Tuan Viet; Jung, Hyungtaek; Nguyen, Thanh Minh; Hurwood, David; Mather, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Increasing salinity levels in freshwater and coastal environments caused by sea level rise linked to climate change is now recognized to be a major factor that can impact fish growth negatively, especially for freshwater teleost species. Striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) is an important freshwater teleost that is now widely farmed across the Mekong River Delta in Vietnam. Understanding the basis for tolerance and adaptation to raised environmental salinity conditions can assist the regional culture industry to mitigate predicted impacts of climate change across this region. Attempt of next generation sequencing using the ion proton platform results in more than 174 million raw reads from three tissue libraries (gill, kidney and intestine). Reads were filtered and de novo assembled using a variety of assemblers and then clustered together to generate a combined reference transcriptome. Downstream analysis resulted in a final reference transcriptome that contained 60,585 transcripts with an N50 of 683 bp. This resource was further annotated using a variety of bioinformatics databases, followed by differential gene expression analysis that resulted in 3062 transcripts that were differentially expressed in catfish samples raised under two experimental conditions (0 and 15 ppt). A number of transcripts with a potential role in salinity tolerance were then classified into six different functional gene categories based on their gene ontology assignments. These included; energy metabolism, ion transportation, detoxification, signal transduction, structural organization and detoxification. Finally, we combined the data on functional salinity tolerance genes into a hypothetical schematic model that attempted to describe potential relationships and interactions among target genes to explain the molecular pathways that control adaptive salinity responses in P. hypophthalmus. Our results indicate that P. hypophthalmus exhibit predictable plastic regulatory responses

  20. Transcriptome profiling of khat (Catha edulis and Ephedra sinica reveals gene candidates potentially involved in amphetamine-type alkaloid biosynthesis.

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    Ryan A Groves

    Full Text Available Amphetamine analogues are produced by plants in the genus Ephedra and by khat (Catha edulis, and include the widely used decongestants and appetite suppressants (1S,2S-pseudoephedrine and (1R,2S-ephedrine. The production of these metabolites, which derive from L-phenylalanine, involves a multi-step pathway partially mapped out at the biochemical level using knowledge of benzoic acid metabolism established in other plants, and direct evidence using khat and Ephedra species as model systems. Despite the commercial importance of amphetamine-type alkaloids, only a single step in their biosynthesis has been elucidated at the molecular level. We have employed Illumina next-generation sequencing technology, paired with Trinity and Velvet-Oases assembly platforms, to establish data-mining frameworks for Ephedra sinica and khat plants. Sequence libraries representing a combined 200,000 unigenes were subjected to an annotation pipeline involving direct searches against public databases. Annotations included the assignment of Gene Ontology (GO terms used to allocate unigenes to functional categories. As part of our functional genomics program aimed at novel gene discovery, the databases were mined for enzyme candidates putatively involved in alkaloid biosynthesis. Queries used for mining included enzymes with established roles in benzoic acid metabolism, as well as enzymes catalyzing reactions similar to those predicted for amphetamine alkaloid metabolism. Gene candidates were evaluated based on phylogenetic relationships, FPKM-based expression data, and mechanistic considerations. Establishment of expansive sequence resources is a critical step toward pathway characterization, a goal with both academic and industrial implications.

  1. Exploring Genetic Factors Involved in Huntington Disease Age of Onset: E2F2 as a New Potential Modifier Gene.

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    Leire Valcárcel-Ocete

    Full Text Available Age of onset (AO of Huntington disease (HD is mainly determined by the length of the CAG repeat expansion (CAGexp in exon 1 of the HTT gene. Additional genetic variation has been suggested to contribute to AO, although the mechanism by which it could affect AO is presently unknown. The aim of this study is to explore the contribution of candidate genetic factors to HD AO in order to gain insight into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying this disorder. For that purpose, two AO definitions were used: the earliest age with unequivocal signs of HD (earliest AO or eAO, and the first motor symptoms age (motor AO or mAO. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed between genetic variation within 20 candidate genes and eAO or mAO, using DNA and clinical information of 253 HD patients from REGISTRY project. Gene expression analyses were carried out by RT-qPCR with an independent sample of 35 HD patients from Basque Country Hospitals. We found suggestive association signals between HD eAO and/or mAO and genetic variation within the E2F2, ATF7IP, GRIN2A, GRIN2B, LINC01559, HIP1 and GRIK2 genes. Among them, the most significant was the association between eAO and rs2742976, mapping to the promoter region of E2F2 transcription factor. Furthermore, rs2742976 T allele patient carriers exhibited significantly lower lymphocyte E2F2 gene expression, suggesting a possible implication of E2F2-dependent transcriptional activity in HD pathogenesis. Thus, E2F2 emerges as a new potential HD AO modifier factor.

  2. Isolation of Two Unknown Genes Potentially Involved in Differentiation of the Hematopoietic Pathway, and Studies of Spermidine/Spermine Acetyltransferase Regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubera, C.; Gavin, I.; Huberman, E.

    2002-01-01

    Differential display identified a number of candidate genes involved with growth and differentiation in the human leukemia cell lines HL-60 and HL-525. Two of these genes were previously unknown, and one is the gene for the enzyme spermidine/spermine acetyltransferase (SSAT). One of our objectives is to isolate and sequence the unknown genes, 631A1 and 510C1, in order to characterize them and determine their functions. The other is to determine how SSAT is regulated, and look at how the polyamines that SSAT regulates effect macrophage differentiation. By screening the CEM T-cell DNA library and the fetal brain library, we were able to identify clones that had inserts with homology to the 631A1 cDNA probe sequence. The insert was amplified using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and is currently being sent to the University of Chicago for automated sequencing. The library screens for 510C1 are currently underway, but hybridization of the 510C1 cDNA probe with nylon membranes containing CEM library phage DNA produced strong signal, indicating the gene is there. SSAT experiments identified that the rate-limiting enzyme that marks the polyamines spermidine and spermine for degradation is regulated by PKC and a transcription factor called Nrf2. The knowledge of regulation and function of these genes involved in macrophage differentiation will provide new insight into this cellular process, potentially making it possible to discover the roots of the problems that cause cancerous diseases.

  3. Interspecific proteomic comparisons reveal ash phloem genes potentially involved in constitutive resistance to the emerald ash borer.

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    Justin G A Whitehill

    Full Text Available The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis is an invasive wood-boring beetle that has killed millions of ash trees since its accidental introduction to North America. All North American ash species (Fraxinus spp. that emerald ash borer has encountered so far are susceptible, while an Asian species, Manchurian ash (F. mandshurica, which shares an evolutionary history with emerald ash borer, is resistant. Phylogenetic evidence places North American black ash (F. nigra and Manchurian ash in the same clade and section, yet black ash is highly susceptible to the emerald ash borer. This contrast provides an opportunity to compare the genetic traits of the two species and identify those with a potential role in defense/resistance. We used Difference Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE to compare the phloem proteomes of resistant Manchurian to susceptible black, green, and white ash. Differentially expressed proteins associated with the resistant Manchurian ash when compared to the susceptible ash species were identified using nano-LC-MS/MS and putative identities assigned. Proteomic differences were strongly associated with the phylogenetic relationships among the four species. Proteins identified in Manchurian ash potentially associated with its resistance to emerald ash borer include a PR-10 protein, an aspartic protease, a phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase (PCBER, and a thylakoid-bound ascorbate peroxidase. Discovery of resistance-related proteins in Asian species will inform approaches in which resistance genes can be introgressed into North American ash species. The generation of resistant North American ash genotypes can be used in forest ecosystem restoration and urban plantings following the wake of the emerald ash borer invasion.

  4. Interspecific proteomic comparisons reveal ash phloem genes potentially involved in constitutive resistance to the emerald ash borer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehill, Justin G A; Popova-Butler, Alexandra; Green-Church, Kari B; Koch, Jennifer L; Herms, Daniel A; Bonello, Pierluigi

    2011-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) is an invasive wood-boring beetle that has killed millions of ash trees since its accidental introduction to North America. All North American ash species (Fraxinus spp.) that emerald ash borer has encountered so far are susceptible, while an Asian species, Manchurian ash (F. mandshurica), which shares an evolutionary history with emerald ash borer, is resistant. Phylogenetic evidence places North American black ash (F. nigra) and Manchurian ash in the same clade and section, yet black ash is highly susceptible to the emerald ash borer. This contrast provides an opportunity to compare the genetic traits of the two species and identify those with a potential role in defense/resistance. We used Difference Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE) to compare the phloem proteomes of resistant Manchurian to susceptible black, green, and white ash. Differentially expressed proteins associated with the resistant Manchurian ash when compared to the susceptible ash species were identified using nano-LC-MS/MS and putative identities assigned. Proteomic differences were strongly associated with the phylogenetic relationships among the four species. Proteins identified in Manchurian ash potentially associated with its resistance to emerald ash borer include a PR-10 protein, an aspartic protease, a phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase (PCBER), and a thylakoid-bound ascorbate peroxidase. Discovery of resistance-related proteins in Asian species will inform approaches in which resistance genes can be introgressed into North American ash species. The generation of resistant North American ash genotypes can be used in forest ecosystem restoration and urban plantings following the wake of the emerald ash borer invasion.

  5. Expressed sequence tags from larval gut of the European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis: Exploring candidate genes potentially involved in Bacillus thuringiensis toxicity and resistance

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    Crespo Andre LB

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lepidoptera represents more than 160,000 insect species which include some of the most devastating pests of crops, forests, and stored products. However, the genomic information on lepidopteran insects is very limited. Only a few studies have focused on developing expressed sequence tag (EST libraries from the guts of lepidopteran larvae. Knowledge of the genes that are expressed in the insect gut are crucial for understanding basic physiology of food digestion, their interactions with Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt toxins, and for discovering new targets for novel toxins for use in pest management. This study analyzed the ESTs generated from the larval gut of the European corn borer (ECB, Ostrinia nubilalis, one of the most destructive pests of corn in North America and the western world. Our goals were to establish an ECB larval gut-specific EST database as a genomic resource for future research and to explore candidate genes potentially involved in insect-Bt interactions and Bt resistance in ECB. Results We constructed two cDNA libraries from the guts of the fifth-instar larvae of ECB and sequenced a total of 15,000 ESTs from these libraries. A total of 12,519 ESTs (83.4% appeared to be high quality with an average length of 656 bp. These ESTs represented 2,895 unique sequences, including 1,738 singletons and 1,157 contigs. Among the unique sequences, 62.7% encoded putative proteins that shared significant sequence similarities (E-value ≤ 10-3with the sequences available in GenBank. Our EST analysis revealed 52 candidate genes that potentially have roles in Bt toxicity and resistance. These genes encode 18 trypsin-like proteases, 18 chymotrypsin-like proteases, 13 aminopeptidases, 2 alkaline phosphatases and 1 cadherin-like protein. Comparisons of expression profiles of 41 selected candidate genes between Cry1Ab-susceptible and resistant strains of ECB by RT-PCR showed apparently decreased expressions in 2 trypsin-like and 2

  6. Genotoxic potential of montmorillonite clay mineral and alteration in the expression of genes involved in toxicity mechanisms in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maisanaba, Sara, E-mail: saramh@us.es [Area of Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Sevilla, Profesor García González no. 2, 41012 Seville (Spain); Hercog, Klara; Filipic, Metka [National Institute of Biology, Department for Genetic Toxicology and Cancer Biology, Vecna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jos, Ángeles [Area of Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Sevilla, Profesor García González no. 2, 41012 Seville (Spain); Zegura, Bojana [National Institute of Biology, Department for Genetic Toxicology and Cancer Biology, Vecna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2016-03-05

    Highlights: • Cloisite{sup ®}Na{sup +} has a wide range of well-documented and novel applications. • Cloisite{sup ®}Na{sup +} induces micronucleus, but not nuclear bridges or nuclear buds in HepG2 cells. • Cloisite{sup ®}Na{sup +} induces changes in the gene expression. • Gene alteration is presented mainly after 24 h of exposure to Cloisite{sup ®}Na{sup +}. - Abstract: Montmorillonite, also known as Cloisite{sup ®}Na{sup +} (CNa{sup +}), is a natural clay with a wide range of well-documented and novel applications, such as pharmaceutical products or food packaging. Although considered a low toxic product, the expected increased exposure to CNa{sup +} arises concern on the potential consequences on human and environmental health especially as its genotoxicity has scarcely been investigated so far. Thus, we investigated, for the first time, the influence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of CNa{sup +} (15.65, 31.25 and 62.5 μg/mL) on genomic instability of human hepatoma cell line (HepG2) by determining the formation of micronuclei (MNi), nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs) and nuclear buds (NBUDs) with the Cytokinesis block micronucleus cytome assay. Further on we studied the influence of CNa{sup +} on the expression of several genes involved in toxicity mechanisms using the real-time quantitative PCR. The results showed that CNa{sup +} increased the number of MNi, while the numbers of NBUDs and NPBs were not affected. In addition it deregulated genes in all the groups studied, mainly after longer time of exposure. These findings provide the evidence that CNa{sup +} is potentially genotoxic. Therefore further studies that will elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in toxic activity of CNa{sup +} are needed for hazard identification and human safety assessment.

  7. Systematic identification of genes involved in metabolic acid stress resistance in yeast and their potential as cancer targets

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    John J. Shin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of all primary and metastatic tumours is their high rate of glucose uptake and glycolysis. A consequence of the glycolytic phenotype is the accumulation of metabolic acid; hence, tumour cells experience considerable intracellular acid stress. To compensate, tumour cells upregulate acid pumps, which expel the metabolic acid into the surrounding tumour environment, resulting in alkalization of intracellular pH and acidification of the tumour microenvironment. Nevertheless, we have only a limited understanding of the consequences of altered intracellular pH on cell physiology, or of the genes and pathways that respond to metabolic acid stress. We have used yeast as a genetic model for metabolic acid stress with the rationale that the metabolic changes that occur in cancer that lead to intracellular acid stress are likely fundamental. Using a quantitative systems biology approach we identified 129 genes required for optimal growth under conditions of metabolic acid stress. We identified six highly conserved protein complexes with functions related to oxidative phosphorylation (mitochondrial respiratory chain complex III and IV, mitochondrial tRNA biosynthesis [glutamyl-tRNA(Gln amidotransferase complex], histone methylation (Set1C–COMPASS, lysosome biogenesis (AP-3 adapter complex, and mRNA processing and P-body formation (PAN complex. We tested roles for two of these, AP-3 adapter complex and PAN deadenylase complex, in resistance to acid stress using a myeloid leukaemia-derived human cell line that we determined to be acid stress resistant. Loss of either complex inhibited growth of Hap1 cells at neutral pH and caused sensitivity to acid stress, indicating that AP-3 and PAN complexes are promising new targets in the treatment of cancer. Additionally, our data suggests that tumours may be genetically sensitized to acid stress and hence susceptible to acid stress-directed therapies, as many tumours accumulate mutations in mitochondrial

  8. Genotoxic potential of montmorillonite clay mineral and alteration in the expression of genes involved in toxicity mechanisms in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisanaba, Sara; Hercog, Klara; Filipic, Metka; Jos, Ángeles; Zegura, Bojana

    2016-03-01

    Montmorillonite, also known as Cloisite(®)Na(+) (CNa(+)), is a natural clay with a wide range of well-documented and novel applications, such as pharmaceutical products or food packaging. Although considered a low toxic product, the expected increased exposure to CNa(+) arises concern on the potential consequences on human and environmental health especially as its genotoxicity has scarcely been investigated so far. Thus, we investigated, for the first time, the influence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of CNa(+) (15.65, 31.25 and 62.5 μg/mL) on genomic instability of human hepatoma cell line (HepG2) by determining the formation of micronuclei (MNi), nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs) and nuclear buds (NBUDs) with the Cytokinesis block micronucleus cytome assay. Further on we studied the influence of CNa(+) on the expression of several genes involved in toxicity mechanisms using the real-time quantitative PCR. The results showed that CNa(+) increased the number of MNi, while the numbers of NBUDs and NPBs were not affected. In addition it deregulated genes in all the groups studied, mainly after longer time of exposure. These findings provide the evidence that CNa(+) is potentially genotoxic. Therefore further studies that will elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in toxic activity of CNa(+) are needed for hazard identification and human safety assessment.

  9. Characterization of two candidate genes, NCoA3 and IRF8, potentially involved in the control of HIV-1 latency

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    Gumez Audrey

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The persistence of latent HIV-1 reservoirs is the principal barrier preventing the eradication of HIV-1 infection in patients by current antiretroviral therapy. It is thus crucial to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the establishment, maintenance and reactivation of HIV-1 latency. Since chromatin remodeling has been implicated in the transcriptional reactivation of the HIV-1 promoter, we assessed the role of the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate (NaB on two HIV-1 latently infected cell lines (U1 and ACH-2 gene expression. Results Analysis of microarrays data led us to select two candidate genes: NCoA3 (Nuclear Receptor Coactivator 3, a nuclear receptor coactivator and IRF8 (Interferon Regulatory Factor 8, an interferon regulatory factor. NCoA3 gene expression is upregulated following NaB treatment of latently infected cells whereas IRF8 gene expression is strongly downregulated in the promonocytic cell line following NaB treatment. Their differential expressions were confirmed at the transcriptional and translational levels. Moreover, NCoA3 gene expression was also upregulated after treatment of U1 and ACH-2 cells with phorbol myristyl acetate (PMA but not trichostatin A (TSA and after treatment with NaB of two others HIV-1 latently infected cell lines (OM10.1 and J1.1. IRF8 gene is only expressed in U1 cells and was also downregulated after treatment with PMA or TSA. Functional analyses confirmed that NCoA3 synergizes with Tat to enhance HIV-1 promoter transcription and that IRF8 represses the IRF1-mediated activation through the HIV-1 promoter Interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE. Conclusion These results led us to postulate that NCoA3 could be involved in the transcriptional reactivation of the HIV-1 promoter from latency and that IRF8 may contribute to the maintenance of the latent state in the promonocytic cell line. Implication of these factors in the maintenance or reactivation of the

  10. Systematic analysis of O-methyltransferase gene family and identification of potential members involved in the formation of O-methylated flavonoids in Citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaogang; Luo, Yan; Wu, Hongkun; Xi, Wanpeng; Yu, Jie; Zhang, Qiuyun; Zhou, Zhiqin

    2016-01-10

    The O-methylation of various secondary metabolites is mainly catalyzed by S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM)-dependent O-methyltransferase (OMT) proteins that are encoded by the O-methyltransferase gene family. Citrus fruits are a rich source of O-methylated flavonoids that have a broad spectrum of biological activities, including anti-inflammatory, anticarcinogenic, and antiatherogenic properties. However, little is known about this gene family and its members that are involved in the O-methylation of flavonoids and their regulation in Citrus. In this study, 58 OMT genes were identified from the entire Citrus sinensis genome and compared with those from 3 other representative dicot plants. A comprehensive analysis was performed, including functional/substrate predictions, identification of chromosomal locations, phylogenetic relationships, gene structures, and conserved motifs. Distribution mapping revealed that the 58 OMT genes were unevenly distributed on the 9 citrus chromosomes. Phylogenetic analysis of 164 OMT proteins from C.sinensis, Arabidopsis thaliana, Populus trichocarpa, and Vitis vinifera showed that these proteins were categorized into group I (COMT subfamily) and group II (CCoAOMT subfamily), which were further divided into 10 and 2 subgroups, respectively. Finally, digital gene expression and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that citrus OMT genes had distinct temporal and spatial expression patterns in different tissues and developmental stages. Interestingly, 18 and 11 of the 27 genes predicted to be involved in O-methylation of flavonoids had higher expression in the peel and pulp during fruit development, respectively. The citrus OMT gene family identified in this study might help in the selection of appropriate candidate genes and facilitate functional studies in Citrus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Reconstruction of the gene regulatory network involved in the sonic hedgehog pathway with a potential role in early development of the mouse brain.

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    Jinhua Liu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling pathway is crucial for pattern formation in early central nervous system development. By systematically analyzing high-throughput in situ hybridization data of E11.5 mouse brain, we found that Shh and its receptor Ptch1 define two adjacent mutually exclusive gene expression domains: Shh+Ptch1- and Shh-Ptch1+. These two domains are associated respectively with Foxa2 and Gata3, two transcription factors that play key roles in specifying them. Gata3 ChIP-seq experiments and RNA-seq assays on Gata3-knockdown cells revealed that Gata3 up-regulates the genes that are enriched in the Shh-Ptch1+ domain. Important Gata3 targets include Slit2 and Slit3, which are involved in the process of axon guidance, as well as Slc18a1, Th and Qdpr, which are associated with neurotransmitter synthesis and release. By contrast, Foxa2 both up-regulates the genes expressed in the Shh+Ptch1- domain and down-regulates the genes characteristic of the Shh-Ptch1+ domain. From these and other data, we were able to reconstruct a gene regulatory network governing both domains. Our work provides the first genome-wide characterization of the gene regulatory network involved in the Shh pathway that underlies pattern formation in the early mouse brain.

  12. The midgut transcriptome of Aedes aegypti fed with saline or protein meals containing chikungunya virus reveals genes potentially involved in viral midgut escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shengzhang; Behura, Susanta K; Franz, Alexander W E

    2017-05-15

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti is the primary vector for medically important arthropod-borne viruses, including chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Following oral acquisition, an arbovirus has to persistently infect several organs in the mosquito before becoming transmissible to another vertebrate host. A major obstacle an arbovirus has to overcome during its infection cycle inside the mosquito is the midgut escape barrier, representing the exit mechanism arboviruses utilize when disseminating from the midgut. To understand the transcriptomic basis of midgut escape and to reveal genes involved in the process, we conducted a comparative transcriptomic analysis of midgut samples from mosquitoes which had received a saline meal (SM) or a protein meal (PM) (not) containing CHIKV. CHIKV which was orally acquired by a mosquito along with a SM or PM productively infected the midgut epithelium and disseminated to secondary tissues. A total of 27 RNA-Seq libraries from midguts of mosquitoes that had received PM or SM (not) containing CHIKV at 1 and 2 days post-feeding were generated and sequenced. Fewer than 80 genes responded differentially to the presence of CHIKV in midguts of mosquitoes that had acquired the virus along with SM or PM. SM feeding induced differential expression (DE) of 479 genes at day 1 and 314 genes at day 2 when compared to midguts of sugarfed mosquitoes. By comparison, PM feeding induced 6029 DE genes at day 1 and 7368 genes at day 2. Twenty-three DE genes encoding trypsins, metalloproteinases, and serine-type endopeptidases were significantly upregulated in midguts of mosquitoes at day 1 following SM or PM ingestion. Two of these genes were Ae. aegypti late trypsin (AeLT) and serine collagenase 1 precursor (AeSP1). In vitro, recombinant AeLT showed strong matrix metalloproteinase activity whereas recombinant AeSP1 did not. By substituting a bloodmeal for SM, we identified midgut-expressed genes not involved in blood or protein digestion. These included genes

  13. Immunity related genes in dipterans share common enrichment of AT-rich motifs in their 5' regulatory regions that are potentially involved in nucleosome formation

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    Rodriguez Mario H

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the transcriptional regulation mechanisms in response to environmental challenges is of fundamental importance in biology. Transcription factors associated to response elements and the chromatin structure had proven to play important roles in gene expression regulation. We have analyzed promoter regions of dipteran genes induced in response to immune challenge, in search for particular sequence patterns involved in their transcriptional regulation. Results 5' upstream regions of D. melanogaster and A. gambiae immunity-induced genes and their corresponding orthologous genes in 11 non-melanogaster drosophilid species and Ae. aegypti share enrichment in AT-rich short motifs. AT-rich motifs are associated with nucleosome formation as predicted by two different algorithms. In A. gambiae and D. melanogaster, many immunity genes 5' upstream sequences also showed NFκB response elements, located within 500 bp from the transcription start site. In A. gambiae, the frequency of ATAA motif near the NFκB response elements was increased, suggesting a functional link between nucleosome formation/remodelling and NFκB regulation of transcription. Conclusion AT-rich motif enrichment in 5' upstream sequences in A. gambiae, Ae. aegypti and the Drosophila genus immunity genes suggests a particular pattern of nucleosome formation/chromatin organization. The co-occurrence of such motifs with the NFκB response elements suggests that these sequence signatures may be functionally involved in transcriptional activation during dipteran immune response. AT-rich motif enrichment in regulatory regions in this group of co-regulated genes could represent an evolutionary constrained signature in dipterans and perhaps other distantly species.

  14. Apolipoprotein gene involved in lipid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Edward; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2007-07-03

    Methods and materials for studying the effects of a newly identified human gene, APOAV, and the corresponding mouse gene apoAV. The sequences of the genes are given, and transgenic animals which either contain the gene or have the endogenous gene knocked out are described. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the gene are described and characterized. It is demonstrated that certain SNPs are associated with diseases involving lipids and triglycerides and other metabolic diseases. These SNPs may be used alone or with SNPs from other genes to study individual risk factors. Methods for intervention in lipid diseases, including the screening of drugs to treat lipid-related or diabetic diseases are also disclosed.

  15. Comparative De Novo Transcriptome Analysis of Fertilized Ovules in Xanthoceras sorbifolium Uncovered a Pool of Genes Expressed Specifically or Preferentially in the Selfed Ovule That Are Potentially Involved in Late-Acting Self-Incompatibility.

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    Qingyuan Zhou

    Full Text Available Xanthoceras sorbifolium, a tree species endemic to northern China, has high oil content in its seeds and is recognized as an important biodiesel crop. The plant is characterized by late-acting self-incompatibility (LSI. LSI was found to occur in many angiosperm species and plays an important role in reducing inbreeding and its harmful effects, as do gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI and sporophytic self-incompatibility (SSI. Molecular mechanisms of conventional GSI and SSI have been well characterized in several families, but no effort has been made to identify the genes involved in the LSI process. The present studies indicated that there were no significant differences in structural and histological features between the self- and cross-pollinated ovules during the early stages of ovule development until 5 days after pollination (DAP. This suggests that 5 DAP is likely to be a turning point for the development of the selfed ovules. Comparative de novo transcriptome analysis of the selfed and crossed ovules at 5 DAP identified 274 genes expressed specifically or preferentially in the selfed ovules. These genes contained a significant proportion of genes predicted to function in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, consistent with our histological observations in the fertilized ovules. The genes encoding signal transduction-related components, such as protein kinases and protein phosphatases, are overrepresented in the selfed ovules. X. sorbifolium selfed ovules also specifically or preferentially express many unique transcription factor (TF genes that could potentially be involved in the novel mechanisms of LSI. We also identified 42 genes significantly up-regulated in the crossed ovules compared to the selfed ovules. The expression of all 16 genes selected from the RNA-seq data was validated using PCR in the selfed and crossed ovules. This study represents the first genome-wide identification of genes expressed in the fertilized

  16. A novel gene EaF82a from variegated Epipremnum aureum and its potential involvement in light associated auxin action in shoot meristems

    Science.gov (United States)

    EaF82, a gene identified in previous studies of the variegated plant Epipremnum aureum, exhibited a unique expression pattern with greater transcript abundance in yellow sectors than green sectors of variegated leaves, but lower abundance in regenerated pale yellow plants than in green plants derive...

  17. Genes involved in cell division in mycoplasmas

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    Frank Alarcón

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cell division has been studied mainly in model systems such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, where it is described as a complex process with the participation of a group of proteins which assemble into a multiprotein complex called the septal ring. Mycoplasmas are cell wall-less bacteria presenting a reduced genome. Thus, it was important to compare their genomes to analyze putative genes involved in cell division processes. The division and cell wall (dcw cluster, which in E. coli and B. subtilis is composed of 16 and 17 genes, respectively, is represented by only three to four genes in mycoplasmas. Even the most conserved protein, FtsZ, is not present in all mycoplasma genomes analyzed so far. A model for the FtsZ protein from Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma synoviae has been constructed. The conserved residues, essential for GTP/GDP binding, are present in FtsZ from both species. A strong conservation of hydrophobic amino acid patterns is observed, and is probably necessary for the structural stability of the protein when active. M. synoviae FtsZ presents an extended amino acid sequence at the C-terminal portion of the protein, which may participate in interactions with other still unknown proteins crucial for the cell division process.

  18. Plant members of the alpha1->3/4-fucosyltransferase gene family encode an alpha1-> 4 fucosyltransferase potentially involved in Lewisa biosynthesis and two core alpha1->3-fucosyltransferases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, H.; Schijlen, E.; Vries, de T.; Schiphorst, W.E.C.M.; Jordi, W.J.R.M.; Lommen, A.; Bosch, H.J.; Die, van I.

    2001-01-01

    Three putative alpha1-->3/4-fucosyltransferase (alpha1-->3/4-FucT) genes have been detected in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. The products of two of these genes have been identified in vivo as core alpha1-->3-FucTs involved in N-glycosylation. An orthologue of the third gene was isolated

  19. Prospecting sugarcane genes involved in aluminum tolerance

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    Rodrigo D. Drummond

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum is one of the major factors that affect plant development in acid soils, causing a substantial reduction in yield in many crops. In South America, about 66% of the land surface is made up of acid soils where high aluminum saturation is one of the main limiting factors for agriculture. The biochemical and molecular basis of aluminum tolerance in plants is far from being completely understood despite a growing number of studies, and in the specific case of sugarcane there are virtually no reports on the effects of gene regulation on aluminum stress. The objective of the work presented in this paper was to prospect the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST data bank for sugarcane genes related to several biochemical pathways known to be involved in the responses to aluminum toxicity in other plant species and yeast. Sugarcane genes similar to most of these genes were found, including those coding for enzymes that alleviate oxidative stress or combat infection by pathogens and those which code for proteins responsible for the release of organic acids and signal transducers. The role of these genes in aluminum tolerance mechanisms is reviewed. Due to the high level of genomic conservation in related grasses such as maize, barley, sorghum and sugarcane, these genes may be valuable tools which will help us to better understand and to manipulate aluminum tolerance in these species.Alumínio (Al é um dos principais fatores que afetam o desenvolvimento de plantas em solos ácidos, reduzindo substancialmente a produtividade agrícola. Na América do Sul, cerca de 66% da superfície do solo apresenta acidez, onde a alta saturação de alumínio é uma das maiores limitações à prática agrícola. Apesar do crescente número de estudos, uma compreensão completa das bases bioquímicas e moleculares da tolerância ao alumínio em plantas está longe de ser alcançada. No caso da cana-de-açúcar, não há nada publicado sobre a regulação g

  20. Genes and translocations involved in POF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlessinger, David; Herrera, Luisa; Crisponi, Laura; Mumm, Steven; Percesepe, Antonio; Pellegrini, Massimo; Pilia, Giuseppe; Forabosco, Antonino

    2002-08-15

    Changes at a single autosomal locus and many X-linked loci have been implicated in women with gonadal dysgenesis [premature ovarian failure (POF) with deficits in ovarian follicles]. For the chromosome 3 locus, a forkhead transcription factor gene (FOXL2) has been identified, in which lesions result in decreased follicles by haploinsufficiency. In contrast, sporadic X; autosomal translocations are distributed at many points on the X, but concentrate in a critical region on Xq. The association of the breakpoints with genes involved in ovarian function is thus far weak (in four analyzed cases) and has not been related to pathology in other POF patients. While many more translocations can be analyzed in detail as the human genome sequence is refined, it remains possible that translocations like X monosomy (Turner syndrome) lead to POF not by interrupting specific genes important in ovarian development, but by causing aberrations in pairing or X-inactivation during folliculogenesis. It is noted that the critical region has unusual features, neighboring the X-inactivation center and including an 18 Mb region of very low recombination. These suggest that chromosome dynamics in the region may be sensitive to structural changes, and when modified by translocations might provoke apoptosis at meiotic checkpoints. Choices among models for the etiology of POF should be feasible based on studies of ovarian follicle development and attrition in mouse models. Studies would prominently include gene expression profiling of developmental-specific pathways in nascent ovaries with controlled levels of Foxl2 and interacting proteins, or with defined changes in the X chromosome.

  1. A study of genes involved in adipocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shunming; Cheng, Gong; Zhu, Huolan; Guan, Gongchang

    2015-01-01

    With the use of the microarray technique, genes expressed in the late phase of adipocyte differentiation were investigated. These genes play an important role in stimulating adipocyte growth and lipid droplet formation. Therefore, they contribute a great deal to the onset of obesity. With the use of SW872 adipocytes and the microarray technique, genes related to adipocyte differentiation were tested and compared with undifferentiated preadipocytes 14 days after induction. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used for confirmation. More than 21,329 transcriptors were expressed and determined, of which 1326 increased and 687 decreased undifferentiated adipocytes. Among them, 21 were highly expressed by more than 10-fold. With RT-PCR, 12 were confirmed, including apelin, CIDEC, PID1, LYRM1, ADD1, PPARγ2, ANGPTL4, ADIPOQ, ACOX1, FIP1L1, MAP3K2 and PEX14. Furthermore, genes involved in lipid metabolism, signal transduction, DNA replication, redox status and transcription factors were determined as well. Novel genes involved in adipogenesis (e.g., apelin) were detected. A variety of genes were discovered and validated with RT-PCR at the late phase of adipocyte differentiation. This may help us better understand the onset of obesity and the potential role of adipocytes in other organs.

  2. MicroRNAs: potential regulators involved in human anencephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiping; Chang, Huibo; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Ting; Zou, Jizhen; Zheng, Xiaoying; Wu, Jianxin

    2010-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are posttranscriptional regulators of messenger RNA activity. Neural tube defects (NTDs) are severe congenital anomalies that substantially impact an infant's morbidity and mortality. The miRNAs are known to be dynamically regulated during neurodevelopment; their role in human NTDs, however, is still unknown. In this study, we show the presence of a specific miRNA expression profile from tissues of fetuses with anencephaly, one of the most severe forms of NTDs. Furthermore, we map the target genes of these miRNAs in the human genome. In comparison to healthy human fetal brain tissues, tissues from fetuses with anencephaly exhibited 97 down-regulated and 116 up-regulated miRNAs. The microarray findings were extended using real-time qRT-PCR for nine miRNAs. Specifically, of these validated miRNAs, miR-126, miR-198, and miR-451 were up-regulated, while miR-9, miR-212, miR-124, miR-138, and miR-103/107 were down-regulated in the tissues of fetuses with anencephaly. A bioinformatic analysis showed 881 potential target genes that are regulated by the validated miRNAs. Seventy-nine of these potential genes are involved in a protein interaction network. There were 6 co-occurrence annotations within the GOSlim process and 7 co-occurrence annotations within the GOSlim function found by GeneCodis 2.0. Our results suggest that miRNA dysregulation is possibly involved in the pathogenesis of anencephaly.

  3. Strategies to identify long noncoding RNAs involved in gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Catherine

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs have been detected in nearly every cell type and found to be fundamentally involved in many biological processes. The characterization of lncRNAs has immense potential to advance our comprehensive understanding of cellular processes and gene regulation, along with implications for the treatment of human disease. The recent ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements study reported 9,640 lncRNA loci in the human genome, which corresponds to around half the number of protein-coding genes. Because of this sheer number and their functional diversity, it is crucial to identify a pool of potentially relevant lncRNAs early on in a given study. In this review, we evaluate the methods for isolating lncRNAs by immunoprecipitation and review the advantages, disadvantages, and applications of three widely used approaches – microarray, tiling array, and RNA-seq – for identifying lncRNAs involved in gene regulation. We also look at ways in which data from publicly available databases such as ENCODE can support the study of lncRNAs.

  4. Hormonal Involvement in Breast Cancer Gene Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    and s ubsequently amp lified at the Yale University sequenc ing facility for Illumina sequencing. However, it required a lot of effort to obtain this...and Polyak K. (2008). Genome-wide functi onal synergy between amp lified and mutated genes in human breast cancer. Cancer Res. 68: 9532-9540...east cancer patient samples. Other co-amp lified genes, within the HER2 amplicon and/or at other regions, could serve as additional novel target s for

  5. A forskolin derivative, FSK88, induces apoptosis in human gastric cancer BGC823 cells through caspase activation involving regulation of Bcl-2 family gene expression, dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome c release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhonghai; Wang, Jingze

    2006-11-01

    FSK88, a forskolin derivative, was extracted and purified from cultured tropical plant roots, Coleus forskohlii. Our previous studies have demonstrated that FSK88 can inhibit HL-60 cell proliferation and induce the differentiation of HL-60 cells to monocyte macrophages. In this study, we showed that FSK88 can induce apoptotic death of human gastric cancer BGC823 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Results showed that FSK88-induced apoptosis was accompanied by the mitochondrial release of cytochrome c and activation of caspase-3 in BGC823 cells. Furthermore, treatment with caspase-3 inhibitor (z-DEVD-fmk) was capable of preventing the FSK88-induced caspase-3 activity and apoptosis. FSK88-induced apoptosis in human gastric cancer BGC823 cells was also accompanied by the up-regulation of Bax, Bad and down-regulation of Bcl-2. Theses results clearly demonstrated that the induction of apoptosis by FSK88 involved multiple cellular and molecular pathways and strongly suggest that pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family genes, mitochondrial membrane potential (Deltapsi(m)), cytochrome c, and caspase-3, participate in the FSK88-induced apoptotic process in human gastric cancer BGC823 cells.

  6. Identifying genes and gene networks involved in chromium metabolism and detoxification in Crambe abyssinica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zulfiqar, Asma, E-mail: asmazulfiqar08@yahoo.com [Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, 270 Stockbridge Road, University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Paulose, Bibin, E-mail: bpaulose@psis.umass.edu [Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, 270 Stockbridge Road, University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Chhikara, Sudesh, E-mail: sudesh@psis.umass.edu [Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, 270 Stockbridge Road, University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Dhankher, Om Parkash, E-mail: parkash@psis.umass.edu [Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, 270 Stockbridge Road, University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Chromium pollution is a serious environmental problem with few cost-effective remediation strategies available. Crambe abyssinica (a member of Brassicaseae), a non-food, fast growing high biomass crop, is an ideal candidate for phytoremediation of heavy metals contaminated soils. The present study used a PCR-Select Suppression Subtraction Hybridization approach in C. abyssinica to isolate differentially expressed genes in response to Cr exposure. A total of 72 differentially expressed subtracted cDNAs were sequenced and found to represent 43 genes. The subtracted cDNAs suggest that Cr stress significantly affects pathways related to stress/defense, ion transporters, sulfur assimilation, cell signaling, protein degradation, photosynthesis and cell metabolism. The regulation of these genes in response to Cr exposure was further confirmed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Characterization of these differentially expressed genes may enable the engineering of non-food, high-biomass plants, including C. abyssinica, for phytoremediation of Cr-contaminated soils and sediments. - Highlights: > Molecular mechanism of Cr uptake and detoxification in plants is not well known. > We identified differentially regulated genes upon Cr exposure in Crambe abyssinica. > 72 Cr-induced subtracted cDNAs were sequenced and found to represent 43 genes. > Pathways linked to stress, ion transport, and sulfur assimilation were affected. > This is the first Cr transcriptome study in a crop with phytoremediation potential. - This study describes the identification and isolation of differentially expressed genes involved in chromium metabolism and detoxification in a non-food industrial oil crop Crambe abyssinica.

  7. Host genes involved in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soltani, Jalal

    2009-01-01

    Agrobacterium is the nature’s genetic engineer that can transfer genes across the kingdom barriers to both prokaryotic and eukaryotic host cells. The host genes which are involved in Agrobacterium-mediated transformatiom (AMT) are not well known. Here, I studied in a systematic way to identify the

  8. Host genes involved in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soltani, Jalal

    2009-01-01

    Agrobacterium is the nature’s genetic engineer that can transfer genes across the kingdom barriers to both prokaryotic and eukaryotic host cells. The host genes which are involved in Agrobacterium-mediated transformatiom (AMT) are not well known. Here, I studied in a systematic way to identify the w

  9. A sulphur deficiency-induced gene, sdi1, involved in the utilization of stored sulphate pools under sulphur-limiting conditions has potential as a diagnostic indicator of sulphur nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, Jonathan R; Parmar, Saroj; Barraclough, Peter B; Hawkesford, Malcolm J

    2009-02-01

    A sulphate deficiency-induced gene, sdi1, has been identified by cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis utilizing field-grown, nutrient-deficient wheat (Triticum aestivum var. Hereward). The expression of sdi1 was specifically induced in leaf and root tissues in response to sulphate deficiency, but was not induced by nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium or magnesium deficiency. Expression was also shown to increase in plant tissues as the external sulphate concentration in hydroponically grown plants was reduced from 1.0 to 0.0 mm. On this basis, sdi1 gene expression has potential as a sensitive indicator of sulphur nutritional status in wheat. Genome-walking techniques were used to clone the 2.7-kb region upstream of sdi1 from genomic DNA, revealing several cis-element motifs previously identified as being associated with sulphur responses in plants. The Arabidopsis thaliana gene most highly homologous to sdi1 is At5g48850, which was also demonstrated to be induced by sulphur deficiency, an observation confirmed by the analysis of microarray data available in the public domain. The expression of Atsdi1 was induced more rapidly than previously characterized sulphur-responsive genes in the period immediately following the transfer of plants to sulphur-deficient medium. Atsdi1 T-DNA 'knockout' mutants were shown to maintain higher tissue sulphate concentrations than wild-type plants under sulphur-limiting conditions, indicating a role in the utilization of stored sulphate under sulphur-deficient conditions. The structural features of the sdi1 gene and its application in the genetic determination of the sulphur nutritional status of wheat crops are discussed.

  10. Identification of genes involved in radioresistance of nasopharyngeal carcinoma by integrating gene ontology and protein-protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ya; Zhu, Xiao-Dong; Qu, Song; Li, Ling; Su, Fang; Li, Ye; Huang, Shi-Ting; Li, Dan-Rong

    2012-01-01

    Radioresistance remains one of the important factors in relapse and metastasis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Thus, it is imperative to identify genes involved in radioresistance and explore the underlying biological processes in the development of radioresistance. In this study, we used cDNA microarrays to select differential genes between radioresistant CNE-2R and parental CNE-2 cell lines. One hundred and eighty-three significantly differentially expressed genes (pgenes were upregulated and 45 genes were downregulated in CNE-2R. We further employed publicly available bioinformatics related software, such as GOEAST and STRING to examine the relationship among differentially expressed genes. The results show that these genes were involved in type I interferon-mediated signaling pathway biological processes; the nodes tended to have high connectivity with the EGFR pathway, IFN-related pathways, NF-κB. The node STAT1 has high connectivity with other nodes in the protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. Finally, the reliability of microarray data was validated for selected genes by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. The results were consistent with the microarray data. Our study suggests that microarrays combined with gene ontology and protein interaction networks have great value in the identification of genes of radioresistance in nasopharyngeal carcinoma; genes involved in several biological processes and protein interaction networks may be relevant to NPC radioresistance; in particular, the verified genes CCL5, STAT1-α, STAT2 and GSTP1 may become potential biomarkers for predicting NPC response to radiotherapy.

  11. Genes involved in convergent evolution of eusociality in bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, S Hollis; Fischman, Brielle J; Venkat, Aarti; Hudson, Matt E; Varala, Kranthi; Cameron, Sydney A; Clark, Andrew G; Robinson, Gene E

    2011-05-03

    Eusociality has arisen independently at least 11 times in insects. Despite this convergence, there are striking differences among eusocial lifestyles, ranging from species living in small colonies with overt conflict over reproduction to species in which colonies contain hundreds of thousands of highly specialized sterile workers produced by one or a few queens. Although the evolution of eusociality has been intensively studied, the genetic changes involved in the evolution of eusociality are relatively unknown. We examined patterns of molecular evolution across three independent origins of eusociality by sequencing transcriptomes of nine socially diverse bee species and combining these data with genome sequence from the honey bee Apis mellifera to generate orthologous sequence alignments for 3,647 genes. We found a shared set of 212 genes with a molecular signature of accelerated evolution across all eusocial lineages studied, as well as unique sets of 173 and 218 genes with a signature of accelerated evolution specific to either highly or primitively eusocial lineages, respectively. These results demonstrate that convergent evolution can involve a mosaic pattern of molecular changes in both shared and lineage-specific sets of genes. Genes involved in signal transduction, gland development, and carbohydrate metabolism are among the most prominent rapidly evolving genes in eusocial lineages. These findings provide a starting point for linking specific genetic changes to the evolution of eusociality.

  12. Gene Therapy: Potential, Pros, Cons and Ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananth Nanjunda Rao

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Genetic technology poses risks along with its rewards, just as any technology has in the past. To stop its development and forfeit the benefits gene therapy could offer would be a far greater mistake than forging ahead could ever be. People must always try to be responsible with their new technology, but gene therapy has the potential to be the future of medicine and its possibilities must be explored.

  13. [Obesity based on mutation of genes involved in energy balance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainerová, I

    2007-01-01

    Within the last decade an intensive research led to an identification of several genes which are involved in a regulation of energy balance. In most cases, carriers of these gene mutations do not exhibit further characteristic phenotypic features except for a severe obesity. Obesity based on mutation of one gene product is called monogenic obesity. Mutations in genes for leptin, leptin receptor, proopiomelanocortin, prohormone convertase 1, melanocortin 4 and 3 receptor disrupt the physiological humoral signalization between peripheral signals and the hypothalamic centres of satiety and hunger. Defects of all above mentioned genes lead to phenotype of abnormal eating behaviour followed by a development of severe early-onset obesity. Mutations of melanocortin 4 receptor gene represent the most common cause of monogenic obesity because they are detected in almost 6 % children with early-onset severe obesity. Mutations of the other genes involved in energy homeostasis are very rare. Although these mutations are sporadic we assume that further research of monogenic forms of obesity might lead to our understanding of physiology and pathophysiology of regulation of the energy homeostasis and eating behaviour. Additionally, they may open new approach to the management of eating behaviour and to the treatment of obesity.

  14. Involvement of astrocyte and oligodendrocyte gene sets in migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eising, Else; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Min, Josine L; Anttila, Verneri; Verheijen, Mark Hg; Terwindt, Gisela M; Dichgans, Martin; Freilinger, Tobias; Kubisch, Christian; Ferrari, Michel D; Smit, August B; de Vries, Boukje; Palotie, Aarno; van den Maagdenberg, Arn Mjm; Posthuma, Danielle

    2016-06-01

    Migraine is a common episodic brain disorder characterized by recurrent attacks of severe unilateral headache and additional neurological symptoms. Two main migraine types can be distinguished based on the presence of aura symptoms that can accompany the headache: migraine with aura and migraine without aura. Multiple genetic and environmental factors confer disease susceptibility. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) indicate that migraine susceptibility genes are involved in various pathways, including neurotransmission, which have already been implicated in genetic studies of monogenic familial hemiplegic migraine, a subtype of migraine with aura. To further explore the genetic background of migraine, we performed a gene set analysis of migraine GWAS data of 4954 clinic-based patients with migraine, as well as 13,390 controls. Curated sets of synaptic genes and sets of genes predominantly expressed in three glial cell types (astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes) were investigated. Our results show that gene sets containing astrocyte- and oligodendrocyte-related genes are associated with migraine, which is especially true for gene sets involved in protein modification and signal transduction. Observed differences between migraine with aura and migraine without aura indicate that both migraine types, at least in part, seem to have a different genetic background. © International Headache Society 2015.

  15. Diverse chromatin remodeling genes antagonize the Rb-involved SynMuv pathways in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxue Cui

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available In Caenorhabditis elegans, vulval cell-fate specification involves the activities of multiple signal transduction and regulatory pathways that include a receptor tyrosine kinase/Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway and synthetic multivulva (SynMuv pathways. Many genes in the SynMuv pathways encode transcription factors including the homologs of mammalian Rb, E2F, and components of the nucleosome-remodeling deacetylase complex. To further elucidate the functions of the SynMuv genes, we performed a genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi screen to search for genes that antagonize the SynMuv gene activities. Among those that displayed a varying degree of suppression of the SynMuv phenotype, 32 genes are potentially involved in chromatin remodeling (called SynMuv suppressor genes herein. Genetic mutations of two representative genes (zfp-1 and mes-4 were used to further characterize their positive roles in vulval induction and relationships with Ras function. Our analysis revealed antagonistic roles of the SynMuv suppressor genes and the SynMuv B genes in germline-soma distinction, RNAi, somatic transgene silencing, and tissue specific expression of pgl-1 and the lag-2/Delta genes. The opposite roles of these SynMuv B and SynMuv suppressor genes on transcriptional regulation were confirmed in somatic transgene silencing. We also report the identifications of ten new genes in the RNAi pathway and six new genes in germline silencing. Among the ten new RNAi genes, three encode homologs of proteins involved in both protein degradation and chromatin remodeling. Our findings suggest that multiple chromatin remodeling complexes are involved in regulating the expression of specific genes that play critical roles in developmental decisions.

  16. In vitro antioxidant and antigenotoxic potentials of myricetin-3-o-galactoside and myricetin-3-o-rhamnoside from Myrtus communis: modulation of expression of genes involved in cell defence system using cDNA microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayder, Nawel; Bouhlel, Ines; Skandrani, Ines; Kadri, Malika; Steiman, Régine; Guiraud, Pascale; Mariotte, Anne-Marie; Ghedira, Kamel; Dijoux-Franca, Marie-Geneviève; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2008-04-01

    Antioxidant activity of myricetin-3-o-galactoside and myricetin-3-o-rhamnoside, isolated from the leaves of Myrtus communis, was determined by the ability of each compound to inhibit xanthine oxidase activity, lipid peroxidation and to scavenge the free radical 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl. Antimutagenic activity was assessed using the SOS chromotest and the Comet assay. The IC50 values of lipid peroxidation by myricetin-3-o-galactoside and myricetin-3-o-rhamnoside are respectively 160 microg/ml and 220 microg/ml. At a concentration of 100 microg/ml, the two compounds showed the most potent inhibitory effect of xanthine oxidase activity by respectively, 57% and 59%. Myricetin-3-o-rhamnoside was a very potent radical scavenger with an IC50 value of 1.4 microg/ml. Moreover, these two compounds induced an inhibitory activity against nifuroxazide, aflatoxine B1 and H2O2 induced mutagenicity. The protective effect exhibited by these molecules was also determined by analysis of gene expression as response to an oxidative stress using a cDNA micro-array. Myricetin-3-o-galactoside and myricetin-3-o-rhamnoside modulated the expression patterns of cellular genes involved in oxidative stress, respectively (GPX1, TXN, AOE372, SEPW1, SHC1) and (TXNRD1, TXN, SOD1 AOE372, SEPW1), in DNA damaging repair, respectively (XPC, LIG4, RPA3, PCNA, DDIT3, POLD1, XRCC5, MPG) and (TDG, PCNA, LIG4, XRCC5, DDIT3, MSH2, ERCC5, RPA3, POLD1), and in apoptosis (PARP).

  17. Standard Electrode Potentials Involving Radicals in Aqueous Solution: Inorganic Radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, David A.; Huie, Robert E.; Koppenol, Willem H.; Lymar, Sergei V.; Merenyi, Gabor; Neta, Pedatsur; Ruscic, Branko; Stanbury, David M.; Steenken, Steen; Wardman, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Recommendations are made for standard potentials involving select inorganic radicals in aqueous solution at 25 °C. These recommendations are based on a critical and thorough literature review and also by performing derivations from various literature reports. The recommended data are summarized in tables of standard potentials, Gibbs energies of formation, radical pKa’s, and hemicolligation equilibrium constants. In all cases, current best estimates of the uncertainties are provided. An extensive set of Data Sheets is appended that provide original literature references, summarize the experimental results, and describe the decisions and procedures leading to each of the recommendations

  18. Studies of Genes Involved in Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar K. Ghosh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease (CHD affects the intricate structure and function of the heart and is one of the leading causes of death in newborns. The genetic basis of CHD is beginning to emerge. Our laboratory has been engaged in identifying mutations in genes linked to CHD both in families and in sporadic cases. Over the last two decades, we have employed linkage analysis, targeted gene sequencing and genome wide association studies to identify genes involved in CHDs. Cardiac specific genes that encode transcription factors and sarcomeric proteins have been identified and linked to CHD. Functional analysis of the relevant mutant proteins has established the molecular mechanisms of CHDs in our studies.

  19. Genes involved in translation of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma synoviae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica de Oliveira Santos

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a report on the analysis of genes involved in translation of the complete genomes of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae strain J and 7448 and Mycoplasma synoviae. In both genomes 31 ORFs encoding large ribosomal subunit proteins and 19 ORFs encoding small ribosomal subunit proteins were found. Ten ribosomal protein gene clusters encoding 42 ribosomal proteins were found in M. synoviae, while 8 clusters encoding 39 ribosomal proteins were found in both M. hyopneumoniae strains. The L33 gene of the M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448 presented two copies in different locations. The genes encoding initiation factors (IF-1, IF-2 and IF-3, elongation factors (EF-G, EF-Tu, EF-Ts and EF-P, and the genes encoding the ribosome recycling factor (frr and one polypeptide release factor (prfA were present in the genomes of M. hyopneumoniae and M. synoviae. Nineteen aminoacyl-tRNA synthases had been previously identified in both mycoplasmas. In the two strains of M. hyopneumoniae, J and 7448, only one set of 5S, 16S and 23S rRNAs had been identified. Two sets of 16S and 23S rRNA genes and three sets of 5S rRNA genes had been identified in the M. synoviae genome.

  20. Integrative computational in-depth analysis of dysregulated miRNA-mRNA interactions in drug-resistant pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells: an attempt to obtain new potential gene-miRNA pathways involved in response to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesrian Tanha, Hamzeh; Mojtabavi Naeini, Marjan; Rahgozar, Soheila; Moafi, Alireza; Honardoost, Mohammad Amin

    2016-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the major neoplasia type among children. Despite the tremendous success of current treatment strategies, drug resistance still remains a major cause of chemotherapy failure and relapse in pediatric patients. Overwhelming evidence illustrates that microRNAs (miRNAs) act as post-transcriptional regulators of drug-resistance-related genes. The current study was aimed at how dysregulated miRNA-mRNA-signaling pathway interaction networks mediate resistance to four commonly used chemotherapy agents in pediatric ALL, including asparaginase, daunorubicin, prednisolone, and vincristine. Using public expression microarray datasets, a holistic in silico approach was utilized to investigate candidate drug resistance miRNA-mRNA-signaling pathway interaction networks in pediatric ALL. Our systems biology approach nominated significant drug resistance and cross-resistance miRNAs, mRNAs, and cell signaling pathways based on anti-correlative relationship between miRNA and mRNA expression pattern. To sum up, our systemic analysis disclosed either a new potential role of miRNAs, or a possible mechanism of cellular drug resistance, in chemotherapy resistance of pediatric ALL. The current study may shed light on predicting drug response and overcoming drug resistance in childhood ALL for subsequent generations of chemotherapies.

  1. Repression of genes involved in melanocyte differentiation in uveal melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Marjorie-Allison; Champagne, Sophie; Gaudreault, Manon; Deschambeault, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Uveal melanoma (UM) has been the subject of intense interest due to its distinctive metastatic pattern, which involves hematogenous dissemination of cancerous cells toward the liver in 50% of patients. To search for new UM prognostic markers, the Suppressive Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) technique was used to isolate genes that are differentially expressed between UM primary tumors and normal uveal melanocytes (UVM). Methods A subtracted cDNA library was prepared using cDNA from uncultured UM primary tumors and UVM. The expression level of selected genes was further validated by cDNA microarray, semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and immunofluorescence analyses. Results One hundred-fifteen genes were identified using the SSH technique. Microarray analyses comparing the gene expression profiles of UM primary tumors to UVM validated a significant differential expression for 48% of these genes. The expression pattern of selected genes was then analyzed by semi-quantitative RT–PCR and was found to be consistent with the SSH and cDNA microarray findings. A down-regulation of genes associated with melanocyte differentiation was confirmed in UM primary tumors. Presence of undifferentiated cells in the UM was demonstrated by the expression of stem cell markers ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2) and octamer-binding protein 4 (OCT4). Conclusions We demonstrated that the SSH technique is efficient to detect differentially expressed genes between UM and UVM. The genes identified in this study represent valuable candidates for further functional analysis in UM and should be informative in studying the biology of this tumor. In addition, deregulation of the melanocyte differentiation pathway revealed the presence of UM cells exhibiting a stem cell-like phenotype. PMID:22815634

  2. Genes involved in Drosophila glutamate receptor expression and localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Featherstone David E

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A clear picture of the mechanisms controlling glutamate receptor expression, localization, and stability remains elusive, possibly due to an incomplete understanding of the proteins involved. We screened transposon mutants generated by the ongoing Drosophila Gene Disruption Project in an effort to identify the different types of genes required for glutamate receptor cluster development. Results To enrich for non-silent insertions with severe disruptions in glutamate receptor clustering, we identified and focused on homozygous lethal mutants in a collection of 2185 BG and KG transposon mutants generated by the BDGP Gene Disruption Project. 202 lethal mutant lines were individually dissected to expose glutamatergic neuromuscular junctions, stained using antibodies that recognize neuronal membrane and the glutamate receptor subunit GluRIIA, and viewed using laser-scanning confocal microscopy. We identified 57 mutants with qualitative differences in GluRIIA expression and/or localization. 84% of mutants showed loss of receptors and/or clusters; 16% of mutants showed an increase in receptors. Insertion loci encode a variety of protein types, including cytoskeleton proteins and regulators, kinases, phosphatases, ubiquitin ligases, mucins, cell adhesion proteins, transporters, proteins controlling gene expression and protein translation, and proteins of unknown/novel function. Expression pattern analyses and complementation tests, however, suggest that any single mutant – even if a mutant gene is uniquely tagged – must be interpreted with caution until the mutation is validated genetically and phenotypically. Conclusion Our study identified 57 transposon mutants with qualitative differences in glutamate receptor expression and localization. Despite transposon tagging of every insertion locus, extensive validation is needed before one can have confidence in the role of any individual gene. Alternatively, one can focus on the

  3. Polymorphisms in genes involved in neurotransmission in relation to smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arinami, T; Ishiguro, H; Onaivi, E S

    2000-12-27

    Smoking behavior is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. The genetic contribution to smoking behavior is at least as great as its contribution to alcoholism. Much progress has been achieved in genomic research related to cigarette-smoking within recent years. Linkage studies indicate that there are several loci linked to smoking, and candidate genes that are related to neurotransmission have been examined. Possible associated genes include cytochrome P450 subfamily polypeptide 6 (CYP2A6), dopamine D(1), D(2), and D(4) receptors, dopamine transporter, and serotonin transporter genes. There are other important candidate genes but studies evaluating the link with smoking have not been reported. These include genes encoding the dopamine D(3) and D(5) receptors, serotonin receptors, tyrosine hydroxylase, trytophan 2,3-dioxygenase, opioid receptors, and cannabinoid receptors. Since smoking-related factors are extremely complex, studies of diverse populations and of many aspects of smoking behavior including initiation, maintenance, cessation, relapse, and influence of environmental factors are needed to identify smoking-associated genes. We now review genetic polymorphisms reported to be involved in neurotransmission in relation to smoking.

  4. Plant Genes Involved in Symbiotic Sinal Perception/Signal Transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binder, A; Soyano, T; Hayashi, H

    2014-01-01

    to nodule primordia formation, and the infection thread initiation in the root hairs guiding bacteria towards dividing cortical cells. This chapter focuses on the plant genes involved in the recognition of the symbiotic signal produced by rhizobia, and the downstream genes, which are part of a complex......A host genetic programme that is initiated upon recognition of specific rhizobial Nod factors governs the symbiosis of legumes with nitrogen-fixing bacteria. This programme coordinates two major developmental processes that run in parallel in legume roots: de novo cortical cell division leading...... symbiotic signalling pathway that leads to the generation of calcium spiking in the nuclear regions and activation of transcription factors controlling symbiotic genes induction...

  5. Gene Expression Analysis for the Identification of Genes Involved in Early Tumour Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Stefano; Scarpulla, Salvatore; Lagana, Alessandro; Memeo, Lorenzo; Gulisano, Massimo

    Prostatic tissues can undergo to cancer insurgence and prostate cancer is one of the most common types of malignancies affecting adult men in the United States. Primary adenocarcinoma of the seminal vesi-cles (SVCA) is a very rare neoplasm with only 48 histologically confirmed cases reported in the European and United States literature. Prostatic tissues, seminal vesicles and epididymis belongs all to the same microenvironment, shows a very close morphology and share the same embryological origin. Despite these common features the rate of cancer occurrence is very different. The understanding of molecular differences between non neoplastic prostatic tissues and non neoplastic epididymis or seminal vesicles may suggest potential mechanisms of resistance to tumour occurrence. The comparison of expression patterns of non neoplastic prostatic and seminal vesicles tissues to identify differentially expressed genes can help researchers in the identification of biological actors involved in the early stages of the tumour development.

  6. Plant genes involved in harbouring symbiotic rhizobia or pathogenic nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiani, Isabelle; Baldacci-Cresp, Fabien; Hopkins, Julie; Andrio, Emilie; Balzergue, Sandrine; Lecomte, Philippe; Puppo, Alain; Abad, Pierre; Favery, Bruno; Hérouart, Didier

    2012-04-01

    The establishment and development of plant-microorganism interactions involve impressive transcriptomic reprogramming of target plant genes. The symbiont (Sinorhizobium meliloti) and the root knot-nematode pathogen (Meloidogyne incognita) induce the formation of new root organs, the nodule and the gall, respectively. Using laser-assisted microdissection, we specifically monitored, at the cell level, Medicago gene expression in nodule zone II cells, which are preparing to receive rhizobia, and in gall giant and surrounding cells, which play an essential role in nematode feeding and constitute the typical root swollen structure, respectively. We revealed an important reprogramming of hormone pathways and C1 metabolism in both interactions, which may play key roles in nodule and gall neoformation, rhizobia endocytosis and nematode feeding. Common functions targeted by rhizobia and nematodes were mainly down-regulated, whereas the specificity of the interaction appeared to involve up-regulated genes. Our transcriptomic results provide powerful datasets to unravel the mechanisms involved in the accommodation of rhizobia and root-knot nematodes. Moreover, they raise the question of host specificity and the evolution of plant infection mechanisms by a symbiont and a pathogen.

  7. Sites and gene products involved in lambdoid phage DNA packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M P; Feiss, M

    1993-04-01

    21 is a temperate lambdoid coliphage, and the genes that encode the head proteins of lambda and 21 are descended from a common ancestral bacteriophage. The sequencing of terminase genes 1 and 2 of 21 was completed, along with that of a segment at the right end of 21 DNA that includes the R4 sequence. The R4 sequence, a site that is likely involved in termination of DNA packaging, was found to be very similar to the R4 sequences of lambda and phi 80, suggesting that R4 is a recognition site that is not phage specific. DNA packaging by 21 is dependent on a host protein, integration host factor. A series of mutations in gene 1 (her mutations), which allow integration host factor-independent DNA packaging by 21, were found to be missense changes that affect predicted alpha-helixes in gp1. gp2, the large terminase subunit, is predicted to contain an ATP-binding domain and, perhaps, a second domain important for the cos-cutting activity of terminase. orf1, an open reading frame analogous in position to FI, a lambda gene involved in DNA packaging, shares some sequence identity with FI. orf1 was inactivated with nonsense and insertion mutations; these mutations were found not to affect phage growth. 21 was also not able to complement a lambda FI mutant.

  8. Mouse models for genes involved in impaired spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryan, M K; de Kretser, D

    2006-02-01

    Since the introduction of molecular biology and gene ablation technologies there have been substantial advances in our understanding of how sperm are made and fertilization occurs. There have been at least 150 different models of specifically altered gene function produced that have resulted in male infertility spanning virtually all aspects of the spermatogenic, sperm maturation and fertilization processes. While each has, or potentially will reveal, novel aspects of these processes, there is still much of which we have little knowledge. The current review is by no means a comprehensive list of these mouse models, rather it gives an overview of the potential for such models which up to this point have generally been 'knockouts'; it presents alternative strategies for the production of new models and emphasizes the importance of thorough phenotypic analysis in order to extract a maximum amount of information from each model.

  9. Pneumococcal gene complex involved in resistance to extracellular oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andisi, Vahid Farshchi; Hinojosa, Cecilia A; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P; Orihuela, Carlos J; Bijlsma, Jetta J E

    2012-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a gram-positive bacterium which is a member of the normal human nasopharyngeal flora but can also cause serious disease such as pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis. Throughout its life cycle, S. pneumoniae is exposed to significant oxidative stress derived from endogenously produced hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and from the host through the oxidative burst. How S. pneumoniae, an aerotolerant anaerobic bacterium that lacks catalase, protects itself against hydrogen peroxide stress is still unclear. Bioinformatic analysis of its genome identified a hypothetical open reading frame belonging to the thiol-specific antioxidant (TlpA/TSA) family, located in an operon consisting of three open reading frames. For all four strains tested, deletion of the gene resulted in an approximately 10-fold reduction in survival when strains were exposed to external peroxide stress. However, no role for this gene in survival of internal superoxide stress was observed. Mutagenesis and complementation analysis demonstrated that all three genes are necessary and sufficient for protection against oxidative stress. Interestingly, in a competitive index mouse pneumonia model, deletion of the operon had no impact shortly after infection but was detrimental during the later stages of disease. Thus, we have identified a gene complex involved in the protection of S. pneumoniae against external oxidative stress, which plays an important role during invasive disease.

  10. Involving, Sharing, Analysing—Potential of the Participatory Photo Interview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Kolb

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the photo interview method used in a participatory inter- and transdisciplinary research setting. The photo interview has proven particularly useful for sustainability and environmental studies in which eliciting community points of view is crucial to the research effort. Based on experiences in several countries, the author describes and analyses the photo interview process and its three phases—involving, sharing and analysing—and explores potential influences on data quality. In the first phase, researchers use the photo interview method to involve community residents from different levels of society in the research process. In the second phase, the photo interview method encourages community residents and scientists to share insights and perspectives and to partner in developing a common understanding of local structures, processes, and possible solutions. In the third phase, the photo interview method allows researchers to analyse visual and textual data as a representation of a local societal context. In decoding images, researchers ground the analysis in subjective perspectives, use residents' visual codes along with other methods to further analyse community data, and explore the wider societal context in which the study is embedded. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0803127

  11. Potential Involvement of IL-17F in Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoko Ota

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The expression of IL-17F is seen in the airway of asthmatics and its level is correlated with disease severity. Several studies have demonstrated that IL-17F plays a pivotal role in allergic airway inflammation and induces several asthma-related molecules such as CCL20. IL-17F-induced CCL20 may attract Th17 cells into the airway resulting in the recruitment of additional Th17 cells to enhance allergic airway inflammation. We have recently identified, for the first time, that bronchial epithelial cells are its novel cell source in response to IL-33 via ST2-ERK1/2-MSK1 signaling pathway. The receptor for IL-17F is the heterodimeric complex of IL-17RA and IL-17RC, and IL-17F activates many signaling pathways. In a case-control study of 867 unrelated Japanese subjects, a His161 to Arg161 (H161R substitution in the third exon of the IL-17F gene was associated with asthma. In atopic patients with asthma, prebronchodilator baseline FEV1/FVC values showed a significant association with the H161R variant. Moreover, this variant is a natural antagonist for the wild-type IL-17F. Moreover, IL-17F is involved in airway remodeling and steroid resistance. Hence, IL-17F may play an orchestrating role in the pathogenesis of asthma and may provide a valuable therapeutic target for development of novel strategies.

  12. Identification and characterization of nuclear genes involved in photosynthesis in Populus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bowen; Du, Qingzhang; Yang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Deqiang

    2014-03-27

    The gap between the real and potential photosynthetic rate under field conditions suggests that photosynthesis could potentially be improved. Nuclear genes provide possible targets for improving photosynthetic efficiency. Hence, genome-wide identification and characterization of the nuclear genes affecting photosynthetic traits in woody plants would provide key insights on genetic regulation of photosynthesis and identify candidate processes for improvement of photosynthesis. Using microarray and bulked segregant analysis strategies, we identified differentially expressed nuclear genes for photosynthesis traits in a segregating population of poplar. We identified 515 differentially expressed genes in this population (FC ≥ 2 or FC ≤ 0.5, P photosynthesis by the nuclear genome mainly involves transport, metabolism and response to stimulus functions. This study provides new genome-scale strategies for the discovery of potential candidate genes affecting photosynthesis in Populus, and for identification of the functions of genes involved in regulation of photosynthesis. This work also suggests that improving photosynthetic efficiency under field conditions will require the consideration of multiple factors, such as stress responses.

  13. Identification and characterization of nuclear genes involved in photosynthesis in Populus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The gap between the real and potential photosynthetic rate under field conditions suggests that photosynthesis could potentially be improved. Nuclear genes provide possible targets for improving photosynthetic efficiency. Hence, genome-wide identification and characterization of the nuclear genes affecting photosynthetic traits in woody plants would provide key insights on genetic regulation of photosynthesis and identify candidate processes for improvement of photosynthesis. Results Using microarray and bulked segregant analysis strategies, we identified differentially expressed nuclear genes for photosynthesis traits in a segregating population of poplar. We identified 515 differentially expressed genes in this population (FC ≥ 2 or FC ≤ 0.5, P photosynthesis by the nuclear genome mainly involves transport, metabolism and response to stimulus functions. Conclusions This study provides new genome-scale strategies for the discovery of potential candidate genes affecting photosynthesis in Populus, and for identification of the functions of genes involved in regulation of photosynthesis. This work also suggests that improving photosynthetic efficiency under field conditions will require the consideration of multiple factors, such as stress responses. PMID:24673936

  14. Search for the genes involved in oocyte maturation and early embryo development in the hen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blesbois Elisabeth

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The initial stages of development depend on mRNA and proteins accumulated in the oocyte, and during these stages, certain genes are essential for fertilization, first cleavage and embryonic genome activation. The aim of this study was first to search for avian oocyte-specific genes using an in silico and a microarray approaches, then to investigate the temporal and spatial dynamics of the expression of some of these genes during follicular maturation and early embryogenesis. Results The in silico approach allowed us to identify 18 chicken homologs of mouse potential oocyte genes found by digital differential display. Using the chicken Affymetrix microarray, we identified 461 genes overexpressed in granulosa cells (GCs and 250 genes overexpressed in the germinal disc (GD of the hen oocyte. Six genes were identified using both in silico and microarray approaches. Based on GO annotations, GC and GD genes were differentially involved in biological processes, reflecting different physiological destinations of these two cell layers. Finally we studied the spatial and temporal dynamics of the expression of 21 chicken genes. According to their expression patterns all these genes are involved in different stages of final follicular maturation and/or early embryogenesis in the chicken. Among them, 8 genes (btg4, chkmos, wee, zpA, dazL, cvh, zar1 and ktfn were preferentially expressed in the maturing occyte and cvh, zar1 and ktfn were also highly expressed in the early embryo. Conclusion We showed that in silico and Affymetrix microarray approaches were relevant and complementary in order to find new avian genes potentially involved in oocyte maturation and/or early embryo development, and allowed the discovery of new potential chicken mature oocyte and chicken granulosa cell markers for future studies. Moreover, detailed study of the expression of some of these genes revealed promising candidates for maternal effect genes in the

  15. Identification of transcription factors potentially involved in the juvenile to adult phase transition in Citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Mari-Cruz; Forment, Javier; Gadea, José; Carrasco, Jose Luis; Juarez, José; Navarro, Luís; Ancillo, Gema

    2013-11-01

    without Arabidopsis orthologues have also been characterized. The potential involvement of the genes in the JAT is discussed.

  16. Phylogeographic support for horizontal gene transfer involving sympatric bruchid species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grill Andrea

    2006-07-01

    , hybridization, and pseudogenisation. However, none of these seem able to explain the patterns observed. A fourth hypothesis, involving recent horizontal gene transfer (HGT between A. obtectus and A. obvelatus, and from one of these species to Z. subfasciatus in the Mexican Altiplano, seems the only plausible explanation. The HGT between our study species seems to have occurred recently, and only in a zone where the three beetles are sympatric and share common host plants. This suggests that transfer could have been effected by some external vector such as a eukaryotic or viral parasite, which might still host the transferred fragment. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Eric Bapteste, Adam Eyre-Walker and Alexey Kondrashov.

  17. Identification of Phytophthora sojae genes involved in asexual sporogenesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ziying Wang; Xhaoxia Wang; Jie Shen; Guangyue Wang; Xiaoxi Zhu; Hongxia Lu

    2009-08-01

    To explore the molecular mechanisms involved in asexual spore development in Phytophthora sojae, the zoospores of strain PS26 were treated with ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. After selection, a mutant progeny, termed PS26-U03, was obtained and demonstrated to exhibit no oospore production. A suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) approach was developed to investigate differences in gene expression between PS26 and PS26-U03 during asexual sporogenesis. Of the 126 sequences chosen for examination, 39 putative unigenes were identified that exhibit high expression in PS26. These sequences are predicted to encode proteins involved in metabolism, cell cycle, protein biosynthesis, cell signalling, cell defence, and transcription regulation. Seven clones were selected for temporal expression analysis using RT-PCR based on the results of the dot-blot screens. Three of the selected genes, developmental protein DG1037 (UB88), glycoside hydrolase (UB149) and a hypothetical protein (UB145), were expressed only in PS26, whereas the transcripts of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase (UB36), FAD-dependent pyridine nucleotide-disulphide oxidoreductase (UB226) and sugar transporter (UB256) were expressed at very low levels in PS26-U03 but at high levels in PS26.

  18. Fetal exposure to teratogens: evidence of genes involved in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour-Rainfray, Diane; Vourc'h, Patrick; Tourlet, Sébastien; Guilloteau, Denis; Chalon, Sylvie; Andres, Christian R

    2011-04-01

    Environmental challenges during the prenatal period can result in behavioral abnormalities and cognitive deficits that appear later in life such as autism. Prenatal exposure to valproic acid, ethanol, thalidomide and misoprostol has been shown to be associated with an increased incidence of autism. In addition, rodents exposed in utero to some of these drugs show autism-like abnormalities, including brain changes and lifelong behavior dysfunction. Our aim is to summarize current understanding of the relationship between in utero exposure to these drugs and autism in humans and in autism-like animal model phenotypes. It also highlights the importance of these models to understanding the neurobiology of autism, particularly in the identification of susceptibility genes. These drugs are able to modulate the expression of many genes involved in processes such as proliferation, apoptosis, neuronal differentiation and migration, synaptogenesis and synaptic activity. It seems essential to focus research on genes expressed during early neurodevelopment which may be the target of mutations or affected by drugs such as those included in this review.

  19. Genes involved in virulence of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero-Jiménez, Claudio A; Wiegers, Harm; Zwaan, Bas J; Koenraadt, Constantianus J M; van Kan, Jan A L

    2016-01-01

    Pest insects cause severe damage to global crop production and pose a threat to human health by transmitting diseases. Traditionally, chemical pesticides (insecticides) have been used to control such pests and have proven to be effective only for a limited amount of time because of the rapid spread of genetic insecticide resistance. The basis of this resistance is mostly caused by (co)dominant mutations in single genes, which explains why insecticide use alone is an unsustainable solution. Therefore, robust solutions for insect pest control need to be sought in alternative methods such as biological control agents for which single-gene resistance is less likely to evolve. The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana has shown potential as a biological control agent of insects, and insight into the mechanisms of virulence is essential to show the robustness of its use. With the recent availability of the whole genome sequence of B. bassiana, progress in understanding the genetics that constitute virulence toward insects can be made more quickly. In this review we divide the infection process into distinct steps and provide an overview of what is currently known about genes and mechanisms influencing virulence in B. bassiana. We also discuss the need for novel strategies and experimental methods to better understand the infection mechanisms deployed by entomopathogenic fungi. Such knowledge can help improve biocontrol agents, not only by selecting the most virulent genotypes, but also by selecting the genotypes that use combinations of virulence mechanisms for which resistance in the insect host is least likely to develop.

  20. Differential Expression of Genes Involved in Host Recognition, Attachment, and Degradation in the Mycoparasite Tolypocladium ophioglossoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Alisha Quandt

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability of a fungus to infect novel hosts is dependent on changes in gene content, expression, or regulation. Examining gene expression under simulated host conditions can explore which genes may contribute to host jumping. Insect pathogenesis is the inferred ancestral character state for species of Tolypocladium, however several species are parasites of truffles, including Tolypocladium ophioglossoides. To identify potentially crucial genes in this interkingdom host switch, T. ophioglossoides was grown on four media conditions: media containing the inner and outer portions of its natural host (truffles of Elaphomyces, cuticles from an ancestral host (beetle, and a rich medium (Yeast Malt. Through high-throughput RNASeq of mRNA from these conditions, many differentially expressed genes were identified in the experiment. These included PTH11-related G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs hypothesized to be involved in host recognition, and also found to be upregulated in insect pathogens. A divergent chitinase with a signal peptide was also found to be highly upregulated on media containing truffle tissue, suggesting an exogenous degradative activity in the presence of the truffle host. The adhesin gene, Mad1, was highly expressed on truffle media as well. A BiNGO analysis of overrepresented GO terms from genes expressed during each growth condition found that genes involved in redox reactions and transmembrane transport were the most overrepresented during T. ophioglossoides growth on truffle media, suggesting their importance in growth on fungal tissue as compared to other hosts and environments. Genes involved in secondary metabolism were most highly expressed during growth on insect tissue, suggesting that their products may not be necessary during parasitism of Elaphomyces. This study provides clues into understanding genetic mechanisms underlying the transition from insect to truffle parasitism.

  1. Identification and validation of genes involved in cervical tumourigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bose Mayil

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical cancer is the most common cancer among Indian women. This cancer has well defined pre-cancerous stages and evolves over 10-15 years or more. This study was undertaken to identify differentially expressed genes between normal, dysplastic and invasive cervical cancer. Materials and methods A total of 28 invasive cervical cancers, 4 CIN3/CIS, 4 CIN1/CIN2 and 5 Normal cervix samples were studied. We have used microarray technique followed by validation of the significant genes by relative quantitation using Taqman Low Density Array Real Time PCR. Immunohistochemistry was used to study the protein expression of MMP3, UBE2C and p16 in normal, dysplasia and cancers of the cervix. The effect of a dominant negative UBE2C on the growth of the SiHa cells was assessed using a MTT assay. Results Our study, for the first time, has identified 20 genes to be up-regulated and 14 down-regulated in cervical cancers and 5 up-regulated in CIN3. In addition, 26 genes identified by other studies, as to playing a role in cervical cancer, were also confirmed in our study. UBE2C, CCNB1, CCNB2, PLOD2, NUP210, MELK, CDC20 genes were overexpressed in tumours and in CIN3/CIS relative to both Normal and CIN1/CIN2, suggesting that they could have a role to play in the early phase of tumorigenesis. IL8, INDO, ISG15, ISG20, AGRN, DTXL, MMP1, MMP3, CCL18, TOP2A AND STAT1 were found to be upregulated in tumours. Using Immunohistochemistry, we showed over-expression of MMP3, UBE2C and p16 in cancers compared to normal cervical epithelium and varying grades of dysplasia. A dominant negative UBE2C was found to produce growth inhibition in SiHa cells, which over-expresses UBE2C 4 fold more than HEK293 cells. Conclusions Several novel genes were found to be differentially expressed in cervical cancer. MMP3, UBE2C and p16 protein overexpression in cervical cancers was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. These will need to be validated further in a larger

  2. A Potential Therapeutic Strategy for Malignant Mesothelioma with Gene Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Tada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant mesothelioma, closely linked with occupational asbestos exposure, is relatively rare in the frequency, but the patient numbers are going to increase in the next few decades all over the world. The current treatment modalities are not effective in terms of the overall survival and the quality of life. Mesothelioma mainly develops in the thoracic cavity and infrequently metastasizes to extrapleural organs. A local treatment can thereby be beneficial to the patients, and gene therapy with an intrapleural administration of vectors is one of the potential therapeutics. Preclinical studies demonstrated the efficacy of gene medicine for mesothelioma, and clinical trials with adenovirus vectors showed the safety of an intrapleural injection and a possible involvement of antitumor immune responses. Nevertheless, low transduction efficiency remains the main hurdle that hinders further clinical applications. Moreover, rapid generation of antivector antibody also inhibits transgene expressions. In this paper, we review the current status of preclinical and clinical gene therapy for malignant mesothelioma and discuss potential clinical directions of gene medicine in terms of a combinatory use with anticancer agents and with immunotherapy.

  3. HLA genes and other candidate genes involved in susceptibility for (pre)neoplastic cervical disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoodsma, M; Nolte, IM; Meerman, GJT; De Vries, EGE; Van Der Zee, AGJ

    2005-01-01

    This review focuses on common and genetic risk factors such as HLA and other genes that may be involved in susceptibility for (pre)neoplastic cervical disease. The goal of this review is the evaluation of polymorphisms that are either associated with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and/or c

  4. HLA genes and other candidate genes involved in susceptibility for (pre)neoplastic cervical disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoodsma, M; Nolte, IM; Meerman, GJT; De Vries, EGE; Van Der Zee, AGJ

    2005-01-01

    This review focuses on common and genetic risk factors such as HLA and other genes that may be involved in susceptibility for (pre)neoplastic cervical disease. The goal of this review is the evaluation of polymorphisms that are either associated with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and/or c

  5. Variation in genes involved in epigenetic processes offers insights into tropically adapted cattle diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laercio R Porto-Neto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the relevance of the BovineHD Illumina SNP chip with respect to genes involved in epigenetic processes. Genotypes for 729,068 SNP on two tropical cattle breeds of Australia were used: Brahman (n = 2,112 and Tropical Composite (n = 2,550. We used data mining approaches to compile a list of bovine protein-coding genes involved in epigenetic processes. These genes represent 9 functional categories that contain between one (histone demethylases and 99 (chromatin remodelling factors genes. A total of 3,091 SNP mapped to positions within 3,000 bp of the 193 coding regions of those genes, including 113 SNP in transcribed regions, 2,738 in intronic regions and 240 in up- or down-stream regions. For all these SNP categories, we observed differences in the allelic frequencies between Brahman and Tropical Composite cattle. These differences were larger than those observed for the entire set of 729,068 SNP (P = 1.79 x 10-5. A multidimensional scaling analysis using only the 113 SNP in transcribed regions allowed for the separation of the two populations and this separation was comparable to the one obtained with a random set of 113 SNP (Principal Component 1 r2 > 0.84. To further characterise the differences between the breeds we defined a gene-differentiation metric based on the average genotypic frequencies of SNP connected to each gene and compared both cattle populations. The 10% most differentiated genes were distributed across 10 chromosomes, with significant (P < 0.05 enrichment on BTA 3 and 10. The 10% most conserved genes were located in 12 chromosomes. We conclude that there is variation between cattle populations in genes connected to epigenetic processes, and this variation can be used to differentiate cattle breeds. More research is needed to fully characterise the use of these SNP and its potential as means to further our understanding of biological variation and epigenetic processes.

  6. Variation in genes involved in epigenetic processes offers insights into tropically adapted cattle diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto-Neto, Laercio R.; Fortes, Marina R. S.; McWilliam, Sean M.; Lehnert, Sigrid A.; Reverter, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the relevance of the BovineHD Illumina SNP chip with respect to genes involved in epigenetic processes. Genotypes for 729,068 SNP on two tropical cattle breeds of Australia were used: Brahman (n = 2112) and Tropical Composite (n = 2550). We used data mining approaches to compile a list of bovine protein-coding genes involved in epigenetic processes. These genes represent 9 functional categories that contain between one (histone demethylases) and 99 (chromatin remodeling factors) genes. A total of 3091 SNP mapped to positions within 3000 bp of the 193 coding regions of those genes, including 113 SNP in transcribed regions, 2738 in intronic regions and 240 in up- or down-stream regions. For all these SNP categories, we observed differences in the allelic frequencies between Brahman and Tropical Composite cattle. These differences were larger than those observed for the entire set of 729,068 SNP (P = 1.79 x 10−5). A multidimensional scaling analysis using only the 113 SNP in transcribed regions allowed for the separation of the two populations and this separation was comparable to the one obtained with a random set of 113 SNP (Principal Component 1 r2 > 0.84). To further characterize the differences between the breeds we defined a gene-differentiation metric based on the average genotypic frequencies of SNP connected to each gene and compared both cattle populations. The 10% most differentiated genes were distributed across 10 chromosomes, with significant (P < 0.05) enrichment on BTA 3 and 10. The 10% most conserved genes were located in 12 chromosomes. We conclude that there is variation between cattle populations in genes connected to epigenetic processes, and this variation can be used to differentiate cattle breeds. More research is needed to fully characterize the use of these SNP and its potential as means to further our understanding of biological variation and epigenetic processes. PMID:24795751

  7. NDRG2: a Myc-repressed gene involved in cancer and cell stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Libo Yao; Jian Zhang; Xuewu Liu

    2008-01-01

    As a master switch for cell proliferation and differentiation,Myc exerts its biological functions mainly through transcriptional regulation of its target genes,which are involved in cells' interaction and communication with their external environment.The N-Myc downstream-regulated gene (NDRG) family is composed ofNDRG1,NDRG2,NDRG3 and NDRG4,which are important in cell proliferation and differentiation.This review summarizes the recent studies on the structure,tissue distribution and functions of NDRG2 that try to show its significance in studying cancer and its therapeutic potential.

  8. WRKY Transcription Factors Involved in Activation of SA Biosynthesis Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bol John F

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased defense against a variety of pathogens in plants is achieved through activation of a mechanism known as systemic acquired resistance (SAR. The broad-spectrum resistance brought about by SAR is mediated through salicylic acid (SA. An important step in SA biosynthesis in Arabidopsis is the conversion of chorismate to isochorismate through the action of isochorismate synthase, encoded by the ICS1 gene. Also AVRPPHB SUSCEPTIBLE 3 (PBS3 plays an important role in SA metabolism, as pbs3 mutants accumulate drastically reduced levels of SA-glucoside, a putative storage form of SA. Bioinformatics analysis previously performed by us identified WRKY28 and WRKY46 as possible regulators of ICS1 and PBS3. Results Expression studies with ICS1 promoter::β-glucuronidase (GUS genes in Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts cotransfected with 35S::WRKY28 showed that over expression of WRKY28 resulted in a strong increase in GUS expression. Moreover, qRT-PCR analyses indicated that the endogenous ICS1 and PBS3 genes were highly expressed in protoplasts overexpressing WRKY28 or WRKY46, respectively. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays indentified potential WRKY28 binding sites in the ICS1 promoter, positioned -445 and -460 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site. Mutation of these sites in protoplast transactivation assays showed that these binding sites are functionally important for activation of the ICS1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays with haemagglutinin-epitope-tagged WRKY28 showed that the region of the ICS1 promoter containing the binding sites at -445 and -460 was highly enriched in the immunoprecipitated DNA. Conclusions The results obtained here confirm results from our multiple microarray co-expression analyses indicating that WRKY28 and WRKY46 are transcriptional activators of ICS1 and PBS3, respectively, and support this in silico screening as a powerful tool for identifying new components of stress

  9. Functional analysis of soybean genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis by virus-induced gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamatsu, Atsushi; Masuta, Chikara; Senda, Mineo; Matsuura, Hideyuki; Kasai, Atsushi; Hong, Jin-Sung; Kitamura, Keisuke; Abe, Jun; Kanazawa, Akira

    2007-11-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a powerful tool for functional analysis of genes in plants. A wide-host-range VIGS vector, which was developed based on the Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), was tested for its ability to silence endogenous genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis in soybean. Symptomless infection was established using a pseudorecombinant virus, which enabled detection of specific changes in metabolite content by VIGS. It has been demonstrated that the yellow seed coat phenotype of various cultivated soybean lines that lack anthocyanin pigmentation is induced by natural degradation of chalcone synthase (CHS) mRNA. When soybean plants with brown seed coats were infected with a virus that contains the CHS gene sequence, the colour of the seed coats changed to yellow, which indicates that the naturally occurring RNA silencing is reproduced by VIGS. In addition, CHS VIGS consequently led to a decrease in isoflavone content in seeds. VIGS was also tested on the putative flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H) gene in the pathway. This experiment resulted in a decrease in the content of quercetin relative to kaempferol in the upper leaves after viral infection, which suggests that the putative gene actually encodes the F3'H protein. In both experiments, a marked decrease in the target mRNA and accumulation of short interfering RNAs were detected, indicating that sequence-specific mRNA degradation was induced. The present report is a successful demonstration of the application of VIGS for genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis in plants; the CMV-based VIGS system provides an efficient tool for functional analysis of soybean genes.

  10. Identification and validation of genes involved in gastric tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Sundersingh

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastric cancer is one of the common cancers seen in south India. Unfortunately more than 90% are advanced by the time they report to a tertiary centre in the country. There is an urgent need to characterize these cancers and try to identify potential biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets. Materials and methods We used 24 gastric cancers, 20 Paired normal (PN and 5 apparently normal gastric tissues obtained from patients with non-gastric cancers (Apparently normal - AN for the microarray study followed by validation of the significant genes (n = 63 by relative quantitation using Taqman Low Density Array Real Time PCR. We then used a custom made Quantibody protein array to validate the expression of 15 proteins in gastric tissues (4 AN, 9 PN and 9 gastric cancers. The same array format was used to study the plasma levels of these proteins in 58 patients with gastric cancers and 18 from patients with normal/non-malignant gastric conditions. Results Seventeen genes (ASPN, CCL15/MIP-1δ, MMP3, SPON2, PRSS2, CCL3, TMEPAI/PMEPAI, SIX3, MFNG, SOSTDC1, SGNE1, SST, IGHA1, AKR1B10, FCGBP, ATP4B, NCAPH2 were shown to be differentially expressed between the tumours and the paired normal, for the first time. EpCAM (p = 0.0001, IL8 (p = 0.0003, CCL4/MIP-1β (p = 0.0026, CCL20/MIP-3α (p = 0.039 and TIMP1 (p = 0.0017 tissue protein levels were significantly different (Mann Whitney U test between tumours versus AN & PN. In addition, median plasma levels of IL8, CXCL9/MIG, CCL3/MIP-1α, CCL20/MIP-3α, PDGFR-B and TIMP1 proteins were significantly different between the non-malignant group and the gastric cancer group. The post-surgical levels of EpCAM, IGFBP3, IL8, CXCL10/IP10, CXCL9/MIG, CCL3/MIP-1α, CCL20/MIP-3α, SPP1/OPN and PDGFR-B showed a uniform drop in all the samples studied. Conclusions Our study has identified several genes differentially expressed in gastric cancers, some for the first time. Some of these have been confirmed at

  11. Olive oil and immune system functions: potential involvement in immunonutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvarez de Cienfuegos, Gerardo

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Olive oil plays a crucial role as a main component of the Mediterranean diet, which has shown important benefits for the human health. According to the current knowledge, the administration of diets containing olive oil exerts some beneficial effects on the immune system functions due likely to the action of oleic acid rather than other substances contained in this fat. In the last few years, epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies have evidenced the potential of certain dietary lipids (containing polyunsaturated or monounsaturated fatty acids as modulators of immune system functions due to their ability to suppress several functions of immune system in both humans and animals. As a result, these fats have been applied in the reduction of symptoms from diseases characterized by an overactivation of the immune system (autoimmune diseases or in the reduction of cancer risk. Here, we review several relevant experimental and clinical data associated with the beneficial effects of olive oil upon the health, the mechanisms of action and the immune function susceptible of being be altered by the administration of dietary lipids and particularly of olive oil. In addition, we will also discuss the detrimental effects on the immune system functions caused by the administration of certain dietary lipids attributed mainly to a reduction of host natural resistance against infectious microorganisms as well as the involvement of olive oil diets in the regulation of immune resistance.El aceite de oliva tiene un papel crucial como componente de la dieta Mediterránea, con importantes beneficios sobre la salud humana. Dietas conteniendo aceite de oliva actúan de manera favorable en las funciones del sistema inmune por la acción sobretodo del ácido oleico. Los estudios epidemiológicos, clínicos y experimentales publicados en los últimos años demuestran que ciertos lípidos de la dieta [ácidos grasos monoinsaturados (MUFA y poliinsaturados (PUFA

  12. Gene expression correlation analysis predicts involvement of high- and low-confidence risk genes in different stages of prostate carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Kojiro

    2010-12-01

    Whole genome association studies have identified many loci associated with the risk of prostate cancer (PC). However, very few of the genes associated with these loci have been related to specific processes of prostate carcinogenesis. Therefore I inferred biological functions associated with these risk genes using gene expression correlation analysis. PC risk genes reported in the literature were classified as having high (Plow (Phigh-confidence genes and other genes in the microarray dataset, whereas correlation between low-confidence genes and other genes in PC showed smaller decrease. Genes involved in developmental processes were significantly correlated with all risk gene categories. Ectoderm development genes, which may be related to squamous metaplasia, and genes enriched in fetal prostate stem cells (PSCs) showed strong association with the high-confidence genes. The association between the PSC genes and the low-confidence genes was weak, but genes related to neural system genes showed strong association with low-confidence genes. The high-confidence risk genes may be associated with an early stage of prostate carcinogenesis, possibly involving PSCs and squamous metaplasia. The low-confidence genes may be involved in a later stage of carcinogenesis. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Genes related to antioxidant metabolism are involved in Methylobacterium mesophilicum-soybean interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Welington Luiz; Santos, Daiene Souza; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Salgueiro-Londoño, Jennifer Katherine; Camargo-Neves, Aline Aparecida; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Dourado, Manuella Nóbrega

    2015-10-01

    The genus Methylobacterium is composed of pink-pigmented methylotrophic bacterial species that are widespread in natural environments, such as soils, stream water and plants. When in association with plants, this genus colonizes the host plant epiphytically and/or endophytically. This association is known to promote plant growth, induce plant systemic resistance and inhibit plant infection by phytopathogens. In the present study, we focused on evaluating the colonization of soybean seedling-roots by Methylobacterium mesophilicum strain SR1.6/6. We focused on the identification of the key genes involved in the initial step of soybean colonization by methylotrophic bacteria, which includes the plant exudate recognition and adaptation by planktonic bacteria. Visualization by scanning electron microscopy revealed that M. mesophilicum SR1.6/6 colonizes soybean roots surface effectively at 48 h after inoculation, suggesting a mechanism for root recognition and adaptation before this period. The colonization proceeds by the development of a mature biofilm on roots at 96 h after inoculation. Transcriptomic analysis of the planktonic bacteria (with plant) revealed the expression of several genes involved in membrane transport, thus confirming an initial metabolic activation of bacterial responses when in the presence of plant root exudates. Moreover, antioxidant genes were mostly expressed during the interaction with the plant exudates. Further evaluation of stress- and methylotrophic-related genes expression by qPCR showed that glutathione peroxidase and glutathione synthetase genes were up-regulated during the Methylobacterium-soybean interaction. These findings support that glutathione (GSH) is potentially a key molecule involved in cellular detoxification during plant root colonization. In addition to methylotrophic metabolism, antioxidant genes, mainly glutathione-related genes, play a key role during soybean exudate recognition and adaptation, the first step in

  14. Mapping of Candidate Genes Involved in Bud Dormancy and Flowering Time in Sweet Cherry (Prunus avium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castède, Sophie; Campoy, José Antonio; Le Dantec, Loïck; Quero-García, José; Barreneche, Teresa; Wenden, Bénédicte; Dirlewanger, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    The timing of flowering in perennial plants is crucial for their survival in temperate climates and is regulated by the duration of bud dormancy. Bud dormancy release and bud break depend on the perception of cumulative chilling during endodormancy and heat during the bud development. The objectives of this work were to identify candidate genes involved in dormancy and flowering processes in sweet cherry, their mapping in two mapping progenies 'Regina' × 'Garnet' and 'Regina' × 'Lapins', and to select those candidate genes which co-localized with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with temperature requirements for bud dormancy release and flowering. Based on available data on flowering processes in various species, a list of 79 candidate genes was established. The peach and sweet cherry orthologs were identified and primers were designed to amplify sweet cherry candidate gene fragments. Based on the amplified sequences of the three parents of the mapping progenies, SNPs segregations in the progenies were identified. Thirty five candidate genes were genetically mapped in at least one of the two progenies and all were in silico mapped. Co-localization between candidate genes and QTLs associated with temperature requirements and flowering date were identified for the first time in sweet cherry. The allelic composition of the candidate genes located in the major QTL for heat requirements and flowering date located on linkage group 4 have a significant effect on these two traits indicating their potential use for breeding programs in sweet cherry to select new varieties adapted to putative future climatic conditions.

  15. IMP2, a gene involved in the expression of glucose-repressible genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodi, T; Goffrini, P; Ferrero, I; Donnini, C

    1995-09-01

    Two mutants carrying different deletions of the IMP2 coding sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, delta T1, which encodes a protein lacking the last 26 C-terminal amino acids, and delta T2, which completely lacks the coding region, were analysed for derepression of glucose-repressible maltose, galactose, raffinose and ethanol utilization pathways in response to glucose limitation. The role of the IMP2 gene product in the regulation of carbon catabolite repressible enzymes maltase, invertase, alcohol dehydrogenase, NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) and L-lactate:ferricytochrome-c oxidoreductase (L-LCR) was also analysed. The IMP2 gene product is required for the rapid glucose derepression of all above-mentioned carbon source utilization pathways and of all the enzymes except for L-LCR. NAD-GDH is regulated by IMP2 in the opposite way and, in fact, this enzyme was released at higher levels in both imp2 mutants than in the wild-type strain. Therefore, the product of IMP2 appears to be involved in positive and negative regulation. Both deletions result in growth and catalytic defects; in some cases partial modification of the gene product yielded more dramatic effects than its complete absence. Moreover, evidence is provided that the IMP2 gene product regulates galactose- and maltose-inducible genes at the transcriptional level and is a positive regulator of maltase, maltose permease and galactose permease gene expression.

  16. Microarray analysis of potential genes in the pathogenesis of recurrent oral ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jingying; He, Zhiwei; Li, Kun; Hou, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent oral ulcer seriously threatens patients' daily life and health. This study investigated potential genes and pathways that participate in the pathogenesis of recurrent oral ulcer by high throughput bioinformatic analysis. RT-PCR and Western blot were applied to further verify screened interleukins effect. Recurrent oral ulcer related genes were collected from websites and papers, and further found out from Human Genome 280 6.0 microarray data. Each pathway of recurrent oral ulcer related genes were got through chip hybridization. RT-PCR was applied to test four recurrent oral ulcer related genes to verify the microarray data. Data transformation, scatter plot, clustering analysis, and expression pattern analysis were used to analyze recurrent oral ulcer related gene expression changes. Recurrent oral ulcer gene microarray was successfully established. Microarray showed that 551 genes involved in recurrent oral ulcer activity and 196 genes were recurrent oral ulcer related genes. Of them, 76 genes up-regulated, 62 genes down-regulated, and 58 genes up-/down-regulated. Total expression level up-regulated 752 times (60%) and down-regulated 485 times (40%). IL-2 plays an important role in the occurrence, development and recurrence of recurrent oral ulcer on the mRNA and protein levels. Gene microarray can be used to analyze potential genes and pathways in recurrent oral ulcer. IL-2 may be involved in the pathogenesis of recurrent oral ulcer.

  17. Identification of genes involved in the drought adaptation and recovery in Portulaca oleracea by differential display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Rodrigo Matías; Triassi, Agustina; Casas, María Isabel; Andreo, Carlos Santiago; Lara, María Valeria

    2015-05-01

    Portulaca oleracea is one of the richest plant sources of ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids and other compounds potentially valuable for nutrition. It is broadly established in arid, semiarid and well-watered fields, thus making it a promising candidate for research on abiotic stress resistance mechanisms. It is capable of withstanding severe drought and then of recovering upon rehydration. Here, the adaptation to drought and the posterior recovery was evaluated at transcriptomic level by differential display validated by qRT-PCR. Of the 2279 transcript-derived fragments amplified, 202 presented differential expression. Ninety of them were successfully isolated and sequenced. Selected genes were tested against different abiotic stresses in P. oleracea and the behavior of their orthologous genes in Arabidopsis thaliana was also explored to seek for conserved response mechanisms. In drought adapted and in recovered plants changes in expression of many protein metabolism-, lipid metabolism- and stress-related genes were observed. Many genes with unknown function were detected, which also respond to other abiotic stresses. Some of them are also involved in the seed desiccation/imbibition process and thus would be of great interest for further research. The potential use of candidate genes to engineer drought tolerance improvement and recovery is discussed.

  18. Comparison of gene expression in segregating families identifies genes and genomic regions involved in a novel adaptation, zinc hyperaccumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatov, Victor; Dowdle, John; Smirnoff, Nicholas; Ford-Lloyd, Brian; Newbury, H John; Macnair, Mark R

    2006-09-01

    One of the challenges of comparative genomics is to identify specific genetic changes associated with the evolution of a novel adaptation or trait. We need to be able to disassociate the genes involved with a particular character from all the other genetic changes that take place as lineages diverge. Here we show that by comparing the transcriptional profile of segregating families with that of parent species differing in a novel trait, it is possible to narrow down substantially the list of potential target genes. In addition, by assuming synteny with a related model organism for which the complete genome sequence is available, it is possible to use the cosegregation of markers differing in transcription level to identify regions of the genome which probably contain quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for the character. This novel combination of genomics and classical genetics provides a very powerful tool to identify candidate genes. We use this methodology to investigate zinc hyperaccumulation in Arabidopsis halleri, the sister species to the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. We compare the transcriptional profile of A. halleri with that of its sister nonaccumulator species, Arabidopsis petraea, and between accumulator and nonaccumulator F(3)s derived from the cross between the two species. We identify eight genes which consistently show greater expression in accumulator phenotypes in both roots and shoots, including two metal transporter genes (NRAMP3 and ZIP6), and cytoplasmic aconitase, a gene involved in iron homeostasis in mammals. We also show that there appear to be two QTLs for zinc accumulation, on chromosomes 3 and 7.

  19. Involvement of flocculin in negative potential-applied ITO electrode adhesion of yeast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Sumihiro; Tsubouchi, Taishi; Usui, Keiko; Uematsu, Katsuyuki; Tame, Akihiro; Nogi, Yuichi; Ohta, Yukari; Hatada, Yuji; Kato, Chiaki; Miwa, Tetsuya; Toyofuku, Takashi; Nagahama, Takehiko; Konishi, Masaaki; Nagano, Yuriko; Abe, Fumiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop novel methods for attachment and cultivation of specifically positioned single yeast cells on a microelectrode surface with the application of a weak electrical potential. Saccharomyces cerevisiae diploid strains attached to an indium tin oxide/glass (ITO) electrode to which a negative potential between −0.2 and −0.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl was applied, while they did not adhere to a gallium-doped zinc oxide/glass electrode surface. The yeast cells attached to the negative potential-applied ITO electrodes showed normal cell proliferation. We found that the flocculin FLO10 gene-disrupted diploid BY4743 mutant strain (flo10Δ /flo10Δ) almost completely lost the ability to adhere to the negative potential-applied ITO electrode. Our results indicate that the mechanisms of diploid BY4743 S. cerevisiae adhesion involve interaction between the negative potential-applied ITO electrode and the Flo10 protein on the cell wall surface. A combination of micropatterning techniques of living single yeast cell on the ITO electrode and omics technologies holds potential of novel, highly parallelized, microchip-based single-cell analysis that will contribute to new screening concepts and applications. PMID:26187908

  20. Are TMEM genes potential candidate genes for panic disorder?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Noomi O; Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Hedemand, Anne

    2014-01-01

    We analysed single nucleotide polymorphisms in two transmembrane genes (TMEM98 and TMEM132E) in panic disorder (PD) patients and control individuals from the Faroe Islands, Denmark and Germany. The genes encode single-pass membrane proteins and are located within chromosome 17q11.2-q12...

  1. Potential misuse and inappropriate prescription practices involving opioid analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Logan, Joseph E; Paulozzi, Leonard J; Zhang, Kun; Jones, Christopher M

    2013-08-01

    Opioid misuse and abuse are growing concerns among the medical and public health communities. To examine the prevalence of indicators for potential opioid misuse in a large, commercially insured adult population. We adapted existing indicators developed by expert panels to include having overlapping opioid prescriptions, overlapping opioid and benzodiazepine prescriptions, long-acting/ extended release (LA/ER) opioids for acute pain,and high daily doses of opioids (>100 morphine milligram equivalents). These indicators were assessed among continuously enrolled individuals aged 18-64 years from the 2009 Truven Health MarketScan databases. Analyses were stratified by sex. We identified 3,391,599 eligible enrollees who received at least 1 opioid prescription. On average, enrollees obtained 3.3 opioid prescriptions, and the average annual days of supply was 47 days. Twice as many enrollees received opioid prescriptions for acute pain as for chronic pain. About a quarter of the enrollees had at least 1 indicator of either potential misuse by patients or inappropriate prescription practices by providers. About 15% of enrollees had high daily doses;7.8% had opioid overlap; and 7.9% had opioid and benzodiazepine overlap. Among those prescribed LA/ER opioids, 24.3% were treated for acute pain. Overlap indicators were more common among women. Our findings underscore the critical need to develop programs aimed at promoting appropriate use of opioids. Retrospective opioid utilization reviews similar to our analyses can potentially help managed care organizations and healthcare providers improve patient care and reduce the risk of adverse outcomes related to these medications.

  2. The potential role of regucalcin in kidney cell regulation: Involvement in renal failure (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi

    2015-11-01

    The kidneys play a physiologic role in the regulation of urine formation and nutrient reabsorption in the proximal tubule epithelial cells. Kidney development has been shown to be regulated through calcium (Ca2+) signaling processes that are present through numerous steps of tubulogenesis and nephron induction during embryonic development of the kidneys. Ca2+-binding proteins, such as calbindin-D28k and regucalcin are important proteins that are commonly used as biomarkers in pronephric tubules, and the ureteric bud and metanephric mesenchyme. Previous research on regucalcin focused on Ca2+ sensors that are involved in renal organogenesis and the link between Ca2+-dependent signals and polycystins. Moreover, regucalcin has been highlighted to play a multifunctional role in kidney cell regulation. The regucalcin gene, which is localized on the X chromosome, is regulated through various transcription factors. Regucalcin has been found to regulate intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis in kidney proximal tubule epithelial cells. Regucalcin has been demonstrated to regulate the activity of various enzymes that are involved in intracellular signaling pathways. It has been noted that regucalcin suppresses DNA synthesis and regulates the gene expression of various proteins related to mineral transport, transcription factors, cell proliferation and apoptosis. The overexpression of regucalcin has been shown to exert suppressive effects on cell proliferation and apoptotic cell death, which are stimulated by various stimulatory factors. Moreover, regucalcin gene expression was found to to be involved in various pathophysiological states, including renal failure. This review discusses recent findings concerning the potential role of regucalcin as a regulatory protein in the kidney proximal tubule epithelial cells.

  3. Identification of sugarcane genes involved in the purine synthesis pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario A. Jancso

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide synthesis is of central importance to all cells. In most organisms, the purine nucleotides are synthesized de novo from non-nucleotide precursors such as amino acids, ammonia and carbon dioxide. An understanding of the enzymes involved in sugarcane purine synthesis opens the possibility of using these enzymes as targets for chemicals which may be effective in combating phytopathogen. Such an approach has already been applied to several parasites and types of cancer. The strategy described in this paper was applied to identify sugarcane clusters for each step of the de novo purine synthesis pathway. Representative sequences of this pathway were chosen from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI database and used to search the translated sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database using the available basic local alignment search tool (BLAST facility. Retrieved clusters were further tested for the statistical significance of the alignment by an implementation (PRSS3 of the Monte Carlo shuffling algorithm calibrated using known protein sequences of divergent taxa along the phylogenetic tree. The sequences were compared to each other and to the sugarcane clusters selected using BLAST analysis, with the resulting table of p-values indicating the degree of divergence of each enzyme within different taxa and in relation to the sugarcane clusters. The results obtained by this strategy allowed us to identify the sugarcane proteins participating in the purine synthesis pathway.A via de síntese de purino nucleotídeos é considerada uma via de central importância para todas as células. Na maioria dos organismos, os purino nucleotídeos são sintetizados ''de novo'' a partir de precursores não-nucleotídicos como amino ácidos, amônia e dióxido de carbono. O conhecimento das enzimas envolvidas na via de síntese de purinas da cana-de-açúcar vai abrir a possibilidade do uso dessas enzimas como alvos no desenho

  4. Transient receptor potential (TRP gene superfamily encoding cation channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Zan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transient receptor potential (TRP non-selective cation channels constitute a superfamily, which contains 28 different genes. In mammals, this superfamily is divided into six subfamilies based on differences in amino acid sequence homology between the different gene products. Proteins within a subfamily aggregate to form heteromeric or homomeric tetrameric configurations. These different groupings have very variable permeability ratios for calcium versus sodium ions. TRP expression is widely distributed in neuronal tissues, as well as a host of other tissues, including epithelial and endothelial cells. They are activated by environmental stresses that include tissue injury, changes in temperature, pH and osmolarity, as well as volatile chemicals, cytokines and plant compounds. Their activation induces, via intracellular calcium signalling, a host of responses, including stimulation of cell proliferation, migration, regulatory volume behaviour and the release of a host of cytokines. Their activation is greatly potentiated by phospholipase C (PLC activation mediated by coupled GTP-binding proteins and tyrosine receptors. In addition to their importance in maintaining tissue homeostasis, some of these responses may involve various underlying diseases. Given the wealth of literature describing the multiple roles of TRP in physiology in a very wide range of different mammalian tissues, this review limits itself to the literature describing the multiple roles of TRP channels in different ocular tissues. Accordingly, their importance to the corneal, trabecular meshwork, lens, ciliary muscle, retinal, microglial and retinal pigment epithelial physiology and pathology is reviewed.

  5. Mitochondrial membrane potential: a trait involved in organelle inheritance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Liliana

    2015-10-01

    Which mitochondria are inherited across generations? Are transmitted mitochondria functionally silenced to preserve the integrity of their genetic information, or rather are those mitochondria with the highest levels of function (as indicated by membrane potential Δψm) preferentially transmitted? Based on observations of the unusual system of doubly uniparental inheritance of mitochondria and of the common strictly maternal inheritance mode, I formulate a general hypothesis to explain which mitochondria reach the primordial germ cells (PGCs), and how this happens. Several studies indicate that mitochondrial movements are driven by microtubules and that mitochondria with high Δψm are preferentially transported. This can be applied also to the mitochondria that eventually populate embryonic PGCs, so I propose that Δψm may be a trait that allows for the preferential transmission of the most active (and healthy) mitochondria. The topics discussed here are fundamental in cell biology and genetics but remain controversial and a subject of heated debate; I propose an explanation for how a Δψm-dependent mechanism can cause the observed differences in mitochondrial transmission.

  6. ICTs for rural development: potential applications and barriers involved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Stratigea

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Rural policy nowadays is at the heart of the policy discussion in many countries all over the world, in the effort to address and effectively support the specific needs and opportunities of rural places and their population in the new era. Along these lines, the focus of the present paper is twofold: on the one hand it attempts to shed light on the role of ICTs and their applications as enabling tools empowering rural development; while on the other hand it explores the barriers appearing towards the adoption and use of ICTs in rural regions. In such a context, it firstly places emphasis on the evolving new rural development paradigm. Then, the range and potential of ICTs applications is explored, that can serve the implementation of the new policy paradigm in rural regions. It follows a discussion on the steps that are needed in order to develop value-added ICTs applications in rural regions and the barriers appearing in the adoption and use of ICTs in these regions. Finally, are presented some issues of policy concern in respect to the adoption and use of ICTs in a rural development perspective.

  7. Sleeping Beauty mouse models identify candidate genes involved in gliomagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyazunova, Irina; Maklakova, Vilena I; Berman, Samuel; De, Ishani; Steffen, Megan D; Hong, Won; Lincoln, Hayley; Morrissy, A Sorana; Taylor, Michael D; Akagi, Keiko; Brennan, Cameron W; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Collier, Lara S

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma.

  8. Using SCOPE to identify potential regulatory motifs in coregulated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyanov, Viktor; Gross, Robert H

    2011-05-31

    SCOPE is an ensemble motif finder that uses three component algorithms in parallel to identify potential regulatory motifs by over-representation and motif position preference. Each component algorithm is optimized to find a different kind of motif. By taking the best of these three approaches, SCOPE performs better than any single algorithm, even in the presence of noisy data. In this article, we utilize a web version of SCOPE to examine genes that are involved in telomere maintenance. SCOPE has been incorporated into at least two other motif finding programs and has been used in other studies. The three algorithms that comprise SCOPE are BEAM, which finds non-degenerate motifs (ACCGGT), PRISM, which finds degenerate motifs (ASCGWT), and SPACER, which finds longer bipartite motifs (ACCnnnnnnnnGGT). These three algorithms have been optimized to find their corresponding type of motif. Together, they allow SCOPE to perform extremely well. Once a gene set has been analyzed and candidate motifs identified, SCOPE can look for other genes that contain the motif which, when added to the original set, will improve the motif score. This can occur through over-representation or motif position preference. Working with partial gene sets that have biologically verified transcription factor binding sites, SCOPE was able to identify most of the rest of the genes also regulated by the given transcription factor. Output from SCOPE shows candidate motifs, their significance, and other information both as a table and as a graphical motif map. FAQs and video tutorials are available at the SCOPE web site which also includes a "Sample Search" button that allows the user to perform a trial run. Scope has a very friendly user interface that enables novice users to access the algorithm's full power without having to become an expert in the bioinformatics of motif finding. As input, SCOPE can take a list of genes, or FASTA sequences. These can be entered in browser text fields, or read from

  9. Functions of genes and enzymes involved in phenalinolactone biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daum, Martina; Schnell, Hans-Jörg; Herrmann, Simone; Günther, Andreas; Murillo, Renato; Müller, Rolf; Bisel, Philippe; Müller, Michael; Bechthold, Andreas

    2010-07-05

    Phenalinolactones are novel terpene glycoside antibiotics produced by Streptomyces sp. Tü6071. Inactivation of three oxygenase genes (plaO2, plaO3 and plaO5), two dehydrogenase genes (plaU, plaZ) and one putative acetyltransferase gene (plaV) led to the production of novel phenalinolactone derivatives (PL HS6, PL HS7, PL HS2 and PL X1). Furthermore, the exact biosynthetic functions of two enzymes were determined, and their in vitro activities were demonstrated. PlaO1, an Fe(II)/alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase, is responsible for the key step in gamma-butyrolactone formation, whereas PlaO5, a cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase, catalyses the 1-C-hydroxylation of phenalinolactone D. In addition, stable isotope feeding experiments with biosynthetic precursors shed light on the origin of the carbons in the gamma-butyrolactone moiety.

  10. Phytoremediation potential of the novel atrazine tolerant Lolium multiflorum and studies on the mechanisms involved

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merini, Luciano J. [Catedra de Microbiologia Industrial y Biotecnologia, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bobillo, Cecilia [Servicio de Huellas Digitales Geneticas, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica, Microbiologia Industrial y Biotecnologia, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Junin 956, BS As (Argentina); Cuadrado, Virginia [Catedra de Microbiologia Industrial y Biotecnologia, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Corach, Daniel [Servicio de Huellas Digitales Geneticas, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica, Microbiologia Industrial y Biotecnologia, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Junin 956, BS As (Argentina); Giulietti, Ana M., E-mail: agiule@ffyb.uba.a [Catedra de Microbiologia Industrial y Biotecnologia, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-11-15

    Atrazine impact on human health and the environment have been extensively studied. Phytoremediation emerged as a low cost, environmental friendly biotechnological solution for atrazine pollution in soil and water. In vitro atrazine tolerance assays were performed and Lolium multiflorum was found as a novel tolerant species, able to germinate and grow in the presence of 1 mg kg{sup -1} of the herbicide. L. multiflorum presented 20% higher atrazine removal capacity than the natural attenuation, with high initial degradation rate in microcosms. The mechanisms involved in atrazine tolerance such as mutation in psbA gene, enzymatic detoxification via P{sub 450} or chemical hydrolysis through benzoxazinones were evaluated. It was demonstrated that atrazine tolerance is conferred by enhanced enzymatic detoxification via P{sub 450}. Due to its atrazine degradation capacity in soil and its agronomical properties, L. multiflorum is a candidate for designing phytoremediation strategies for atrazine contaminated agricultural soils, especially those involving run-off avoiding. - Finding of a novel atrazine-tolerant species, as a potential candidate for phytoremediating herbicide-contaminated agriculture soils and elucidation of the mechanisms involved in tolerance.

  11. Transcriptomic Analysis Using Olive Varieties and Breeding Progenies Identifies Candidate Genes Involved in Plant Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Plaza, Juan J; Ortiz-Martín, Inmaculada; Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; García-López, Carmen; Sánchez-Sevilla, José F; Luque, Francisco; Trelles, Oswaldo; Bejarano, Eduardo R; De La Rosa, Raúl; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Beuzón, Carmen R

    2016-01-01

    Plant architecture is a critical trait in fruit crops that can significantly influence yield, pruning, planting density and harvesting. Little is known about how plant architecture is genetically determined in olive, were most of the existing varieties are traditional with an architecture poorly suited for modern growing and harvesting systems. In the present study, we have carried out microarray analysis of meristematic tissue to compare expression profiles of olive varieties displaying differences in architecture, as well as seedlings from their cross pooled on the basis of their sharing architecture-related phenotypes. The microarray used, previously developed by our group has already been applied to identify candidates genes involved in regulating juvenile to adult transition in the shoot apex of seedlings. Varieties with distinct architecture phenotypes and individuals from segregating progenies displaying opposite architecture features were used to link phenotype to expression. Here, we identify 2252 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated to differences in plant architecture. Microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR carried out on genes with functional annotation likely related to plant architecture. Twelve of these genes were further analyzed in individual seedlings of the corresponding pool. We also examined Arabidopsis mutants in putative orthologs of these targeted candidate genes, finding altered architecture for most of them. This supports a functional conservation between species and potential biological relevance of the candidate genes identified. This study is the first to identify genes associated to plant architecture in olive, and the results obtained could be of great help in future programs aimed at selecting phenotypes adapted to modern cultivation practices in this species.

  12. Transcriptomic analysis using olive varieties and breeding progenies identify candidate genes involved in plant architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José eGonzález Plaza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Plant architecture is a critical trait in fruit crops that can significantly influence yield, pruning, planting density and harvesting. Little is known about how plant architecture is genetically determined in olive, were most of the existing varieties are traditional with an architecture poorly suited for modern growing and harvesting systems. In the present study, we have carried out microarray analysis of meristematic tissue to compare expression profiles of olive varieties displaying differences in architecture, as well as seedlings from their cross pooled on the basis of their sharing architecture-related phenotypes. The microarray used, previously developed by our group has already been applied to identify candidates genes involved in regulating juvenile to adult transition in the shoot apex of seedlings. Varieties with distinct architecture phenotypes and individuals from segregating progenies displaying opposite architecture features were used to link phenotype to expression. Here, we identify 2,252 differentially expressed genes associated to differences in plant architecture. Microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR carried out on genes with functional annotation likely related to plant architecture. Twelve of these genes were further analyzed in individual seedlings of the corresponding pool. We also examined Arabidopsis mutants in putative orthologs of these targeted candidate genes, finding altered architecture for most of them. This supports a functional conservation between species and potential biological relevance of the candidate genes identified. This study is the first to identify genes associated to plant architecture in olive, and the results obtained could be of great help in future programs aimed at selecting phenotypes adapted to modern cultivation practices in this species.

  13. Mapping of Candidate Genes Involved in Bud Dormancy and Flowering Time in Sweet Cherry (Prunus avium.

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    Sophie Castède

    Full Text Available The timing of flowering in perennial plants is crucial for their survival in temperate climates and is regulated by the duration of bud dormancy. Bud dormancy release and bud break depend on the perception of cumulative chilling during endodormancy and heat during the bud development. The objectives of this work were to identify candidate genes involved in dormancy and flowering processes in sweet cherry, their mapping in two mapping progenies 'Regina' × 'Garnet' and 'Regina' × 'Lapins', and to select those candidate genes which co-localized with quantitative trait loci (QTLs associated with temperature requirements for bud dormancy release and flowering. Based on available data on flowering processes in various species, a list of 79 candidate genes was established. The peach and sweet cherry orthologs were identified and primers were designed to amplify sweet cherry candidate gene fragments. Based on the amplified sequences of the three parents of the mapping progenies, SNPs segregations in the progenies were identified. Thirty five candidate genes were genetically mapped in at least one of the two progenies and all were in silico mapped. Co-localization between candidate genes and QTLs associated with temperature requirements and flowering date were identified for the first time in sweet cherry. The allelic composition of the candidate genes located in the major QTL for heat requirements and flowering date located on linkage group 4 have a significant effect on these two traits indicating their potential use for breeding programs in sweet cherry to select new varieties adapted to putative future climatic conditions.

  14. A genome scan for candidate genes involved in the adaptation of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas, Román; Vandamme, Sara G; Vera, Manuel; Bouza, Carmen; Maes, Gregory E; Volckaert, Filip A M; Martínez, Paulino

    2015-10-01

    Partitioning phenotypic variance in genotypic and environmental variance may benefit from the population genomic assignment of genes putatively involved in adaptation. We analyzed a total of 256 markers (120 microsatellites and 136 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms - SNPs), several of them associated to Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) for growth and resistance to pathologies, with the aim to identify potential adaptive variation in turbot Scophthalmus maximus L. The study area in the Northeastern Atlantic Ocean, from Iberian Peninsula to the Baltic Sea, involves a gradual change in temperature and an abrupt change in salinity conditions. We detected 27 candidate loci putatively under selection. At least four of the five SNPs identified as outliers are located within genes coding for ribosomal proteins or directly related with the production of cellular proteins. One of the detected outliers, previously identified as part of a QTL for growth, is a microsatellite linked to a gene coding for a growth factor receptor. A similar set of outliers was detected when natural populations were compared with a sample subjected to strong artificial selection for growth along four generations. The observed association between FST outliers and growth-related QTL supports the hypothesis of changes in growth as an adaptation to differences in temperature and salinity conditions. However, further work is needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  15. Sleeping Beauty mouse models identify candidate genes involved in gliomagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Vyazunova

    Full Text Available Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma.

  16. Sleeping Beauty Mouse Models Identify Candidate Genes Involved in Gliomagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyazunova, Irina; Maklakova, Vilena I.; Berman, Samuel; De, Ishani; Steffen, Megan D.; Hong, Won; Lincoln, Hayley; Morrissy, A. Sorana; Taylor, Michael D.; Akagi, Keiko; Brennan, Cameron W.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Collier, Lara S.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma. PMID:25423036

  17. Genes involved in bovine milk-fat composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schennink, A.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the research described in this thesis was to identify genes that underlie the genetic variation in bovine milk-fat composition. The fat composition of milk samples from approximately 2,000 Dutch Holstein Friesian cows in their first lactation was measured by gas chromatography. Quantita

  18. Identification of genes involved in the response of Arabidopsis to simultaneous biotic and abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Nicky J; Lilley, Catherine J; Urwin, Peter E

    2013-08-01

    In field conditions, plants may experience numerous environmental stresses at any one time. Research suggests that the plant response to multiple stresses is different from that for individual stresses, producing nonadditive effects. In particular, the molecular signaling pathways controlling biotic and abiotic stress responses may interact and antagonize one another. The transcriptome response of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) to concurrent water deficit (abiotic stress) and infection with the plant-parasitic nematode Heterodera schachtii (biotic stress) was analyzed by microarray. A unique program of gene expression was activated in response to a combination of water deficit and nematode stress, with 50 specifically multiple-stress-regulated genes. Candidate genes with potential roles in controlling the response to multiple stresses were selected and functionally characterized. RAPID ALKALINIZATION FACTOR-LIKE8 (AtRALFL8) was induced in roots by joint stresses but conferred susceptibility to drought stress and nematode infection when overexpressed. Constitutively expressing plants had stunted root systems and extended root hairs. Plants may produce signal peptides such as AtRALFL8 to induce cell wall remodeling in response to multiple stresses. The methionine homeostasis gene METHIONINE GAMMA LYASE (AtMGL) was up-regulated by dual stress in leaves, conferring resistance to nematodes when overexpressed. It may regulate methionine metabolism under conditions of multiple stresses. AZELAIC ACID INDUCED1 (AZI1), involved in defense priming in systemic plant immunity, was down-regulated in leaves by joint stress and conferred drought susceptibility when overexpressed, potentially as part of abscisic acid-induced repression of pathogen response genes. The results highlight the complex nature of multiple stress responses and confirm the importance of studying plant stress factors in combination.

  19. Parallel analysis of tagged deletion mutants efficiently identifies genes involved in endoplasmic reticulum biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Robin; Parrish, Mark L; Cadera, Emily; Larson, Lynnelle; Matson, Clinton K; Garrett-Engele, Philip; Armour, Chris; Lum, Pek Yee; Shoemaker, Daniel D

    2003-07-30

    Increased levels of HMG-CoA reductase induce cell type- and isozyme-specific proliferation of the endoplasmic reticulum. In yeast, the ER proliferations induced by Hmg1p consist of nuclear-associated stacks of smooth ER membranes known as karmellae. To identify genes required for karmellae assembly, we compared the composition of populations of homozygous diploid S. cerevisiae deletion mutants following 20 generations of growth with and without karmellae. Using an initial population of 1,557 deletion mutants, 120 potential mutants were identified as a result of three independent experiments. Each experiment produced a largely non-overlapping set of potential mutants, suggesting that differences in specific growth conditions could be used to maximize the comprehensiveness of similar parallel analysis screens. Only two genes, UBC7 and YAL011W, were identified in all three experiments. Subsequent analysis of individual mutant strains confirmed that each experiment was identifying valid mutations, based on the mutant's sensitivity to elevated HMG-CoA reductase and inability to assemble normal karmellae. The largest class of HMG-CoA reductase-sensitive mutations was a subset of genes that are involved in chromatin structure and transcriptional regulation, suggesting that karmellae assembly requires changes in transcription or that the presence of karmellae may interfere with normal transcriptional regulation.

  20. Involvement of distinct PKC gene products in T cell functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottfried eBaier

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that members of the Protein kinase C(PKC family seem to have important roles in T cells. Focusing on the physiological and non-redundant PKC functions established in primary mouse T cells via germline gene-targeting approaches, our current knowledge defines two particularly critical PKC gene products, PKCθ and PKCα, as the flavor of PKC in T cells that appear to have a positive role in signaling pathways that are necessary for full antigen receptor-mediated T cell activation ex vivo and T cell-mediated immunity in vivo. Consistently, in spite of the current dogma that PKCθ inhibition might be sufficient to achieve complete immunosuppressive effects, more recent results have indicated that the pharmacological inhibition of PKCθ, and additionally, at least PKCα, appears to be needed to provide a successful approach for the prevention of allograft rejection and treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  1. Machine learning techniques to identify putative genes involved in nitrogen catabolite repression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontos, Kevin; Godard, Patrice; André, Bruno; van Helden, Jacques; Bontempi, Gianluca

    2008-01-01

    Background Nitrogen is an essential nutrient for all life forms. Like most unicellular organisms, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae transports and catabolizes good nitrogen sources in preference to poor ones. Nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) refers to this selection mechanism. All known nitrogen catabolite pathways are regulated by four regulators. The ultimate goal is to infer the complete nitrogen catabolite pathways. Bioinformatics approaches offer the possibility to identify putative NCR genes and to discard uninteresting genes. Results We present a machine learning approach where the identification of putative NCR genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is formulated as a supervised two-class classification problem. Classifiers predict whether genes are NCR-sensitive or not from a large number of variables related to the GATA motif in the upstream non-coding sequences of the genes. The positive and negative training sets are composed of annotated NCR genes and manually-selected genes known to be insensitive to NCR, respectively. Different classifiers and variable selection methods are compared. We show that all classifiers make significant and biologically valid predictions by comparing these predictions to annotated and putative NCR genes, and by performing several negative controls. In particular, the inferred NCR genes significantly overlap with putative NCR genes identified in three genome-wide experimental and bioinformatics studies. Conclusion These results suggest that our approach can successfully identify potential NCR genes. Hence, the dimensionality of the problem of identifying all genes involved in NCR is drastically reduced. PMID:19091052

  2. Isolation and characterization of maize PMP3 genes involved in salt stress tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Fu

    Full Text Available Plasma membrane protein 3 (PMP3, a class of small hydrophobic polypeptides with high sequence similarity, is responsible for salt, drought, cold, and abscisic acid. These small hydrophobic ploypeptides play important roles in maintenance of ion homeostasis. In this study, eight ZmPMP3 genes were cloned from maize and responsive to salt, drought, cold and abscisic acid. The eight ZmPMP3s were membrane proteins and their sequences in trans-membrane regions were highly conserved. Phylogenetic analysis showed that they were categorized into three groups. All members of group II were responsive to ABA. Functional complementation showed that with the exception of ZmPMP3-6, all were capable of maintaining membrane potential, which in turn allows for regulation of intracellular ion homeostasis. This process was independent of the presence of Ca(2+. Lastly, over-expression of ZmPMP3-1 enhanced growth of transgenic Arabidopsis under salt condition. Through expression analysis of deduced downstream genes in transgenic plants, expression levels of three ion transporter genes and four important antioxidant genes in ROS scavenging system were increased significantly in transgenic plants during salt stress. This tolerance was likely achieved through diminishing oxidative stress due to the possibility of ZmPMP3-1's involvement in regulation of ion homeostasis, and suggests that the modulation of these conserved small hydrophobic polypeptides could be an effective way to improve salt tolerance in plants.

  3. The expression of type III hyperlipoproteinemia: involvement of lipolysis genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, Peter; van der Sman-de Beer, Femke; Moghaddam, Payman Hanifi; Huijts, Petra; Stalenhoef, Anton FH; Kastelein, John JP; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Havekes, Louis M; Frants, Rune R; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Smelt, Augustinus HM

    2009-01-01

    Type III hyperlipoproteinemia (HLP) is mainly found in homozygous apolipoprotein (APO) E2 (R158C) carriers. Genetic factors contributing to the expression of type III HLP were investigated in 113 hyper- and 52 normolipidemic E2/2 subjects, by testing for polymorphisms in APOC3, APOA5, HL (hepatic lipase) and LPL (lipoprotein lipase) genes. In addition, 188 normolipidemic Dutch control panels (NDCP) and 141 hypertriglyceridemic (HTG) patients were genotyped as well. No associations were found for four HL gene polymorphisms and two LPL gene polymorphisms and type III HLP. The frequency of the rare allele of APOC3 3238 G>C and APOA5 −1131 T>C (in linkage disequilibrium) was significantly higher in type III HLP patients when compared with normolipidemic E2/2 subjects, 15.6 vs 6.9% and 15.1 vs 5.8%, respectively, (PC polymorphism and LPL c.27 G>A mutation were higher in type III HLP patients, though not significant. Some 58% of the type III HLP patients carried either the APOA5 −1131 T>C, c.56 G>C and/or LPL c.27 G>A mutation as compared to 27% of the normolipidemic APOE2/2 subjects (odds ratio 3.7, 95% confidence interval=1.8–7.5, PC/APOA5 −1131 T>C polymorphism showed a more severe hyperlipidemia than patients without this polymorphism. Polymorphisms in lipolysis genes associate with the expression and severity of type III HLP in APOE2/2. PMID:19034316

  4. Characterization of the Gene Cluster Involved in Isoprene Metabolism in Rhodococcus sp. Strain AD45

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E.T.; Leemhuis, Hans; Lutje Spelberg, Jeffrey H.; Janssen, Dick B.

    2000-01-01

    The genes involved in isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) utilization in Rhodococcus sp. strain AD45 were cloned and characterized. Sequence analysis of an 8.5-kb DNA fragment showed the presence of 10 genes of which 2 encoded enzymes which were previously found to be involved in isoprene degradation:

  5. Identification of a novel gene (Hsdr4) involved in water-stress tolerance in wild barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suprunova, Tatiana; Krugman, Tamar; Distelfeld, Assaf; Fahima, Tzion; Nevo, Eviatar; Korol, Abraham

    2007-05-01

    Drought is one of the most severe stresses limiting plant growth and yield. Genes involved in water stress tolerance of wild barley (Hordeum spontaneoum), the progenitor of cultivated barley, were investigated using genotypes contrasting in their response to water stress. Gene expression profiles of water-stress tolerant vs. water-stress sensitive wild barley genotypes, under severe dehydration stress applied at the seedling stage, were compared using cDNA-AFLP analysis. Of the 1100 transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) amplified about 70 displayed differential expression between control and stress conditions. Eleven of them showed clear difference (up- or down-regulation) between tolerant and susceptible genotypes. These TDFs were isolated, sequenced and tested by RT-PCR. The differential expression of seven TDFs was confirmed by RT-PCR, and TDF-4 was selected as a promising candidate gene for water-stress tolerance. The corresponding gene, designated Hsdr4 (Hordeum spontaneum dehydration-responsive), was sequenced and the transcribed and flanking regions were determined. The deduced amino acid sequence has similarity to the rice Rho-GTPase-activating protein-like with a Sec14 p-like lipid-binding domain. Analysis of Hsdr4 promoter region that was isolated by screening a barley BAC library, revealed a new putative miniature inverted-repeat transposable element (MITE), and several potential stress-related binding sites for transcription factors (MYC, MYB, LTRE, and GT-1), suggesting a role of the Hsdr4 gene in plant tolerance to dehydration stress. Furthermore, the Hsdr4 gene was mapped using wild barley mapping population to the long arm of chromosome 3H between markers EBmac541 and EBmag705, within a region that previously was shown to affect osmotic adaptation in barley.

  6. Transcriptome assembly and candidate genes involved in nutritional programming in the swordtail fish Xiphophorus multilineatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuan; Klimovich, Charlotte M; Robeson, Kalen Z; Boswell, William; Ríos-Cardenas, Oscar; Walter, Ronald B; Morris, Molly R

    2017-01-01

    Nutritional programming takes place in early development. Variation in the quality and/or quantity of nutrients in early development can influence long-term health and viability. However, little is known about the mechanisms of nutritional programming. The live-bearing fish Xiphophorus multilineatus has the potential to be a new model for understanding these mechanisms, given prior evidence of nutritional programming influencing behavior and juvenile growth rate. We tested the hypotheses that nutritional programming would influence behaviors involved in energy homeostasis as well gene expression in X. multilineatus. We first examined the influence of both juvenile environment (varied in nutrition and density) and adult environment (varied in nutrition) on behaviors involved in energy acquisition and energy expenditure in adult male X. multilineatus. We also compared the behavioral responses across the genetically influenced size classes of males. Males stop growing at sexual maturity, and the size classes of can be identified based on phenotypes (adult size and pigment patterns). To study the molecular signatures of nutritional programming, we assembled a de novo transcriptome for X. multilineatus using RNA from brain, liver, skin, testis and gonad tissues, and used RNA-Seq to profile gene expression in the brains of males reared in low quality (reduced food, increased density) and high quality (increased food, decreased density) juvenile environments. We found that both the juvenile and adult environments influenced the energy intake behavior, while only the adult environment influenced energy expenditure. In addition, there were significant interactions between the genetically influenced size classes and the environments that influenced energy intake and energy expenditure, with males from one of the four size classes (Y-II) responding in the opposite direction as compared to the other males examined. When we compared the brains of males of the Y-II size class

  7. Genes Involved in Human Ribosome Biogenesis areTranscriptionally Upregulated in Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansilla, Francisco; Lamy, Philippe; Ørntoft, Torben Falck

    2009-01-01

    Microarray gene expression profiling comprising 168 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 10 normal mucosas showed that over 79% of the genes involved in human ribosome biogenesis are significantly upregulated (log2>0.5, p<10-3) when compared to normal mucosa. Overexpression was independent of microsate......Microarray gene expression profiling comprising 168 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 10 normal mucosas showed that over 79% of the genes involved in human ribosome biogenesis are significantly upregulated (log2>0.5, p... of rRNA processing genes points towards a coordinated process enabling the overproduction of matured ribosomal structures....

  8. The WSB1 gene is involved in pancreatic cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cendrine Archange

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer cells generate metastases because they can survive the stress imposed by the new environment of the host tissue. To mimic this process, pancreatic cancer cells which are not stressed in standard culture conditions are injected into nude mice. Because they develop xenografts, they should have developed adequate stress response. Characterizing that response might provide new strategies to interfere with pancreatic cancer metastasis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the human pancreatic cancer cell lines Panc-1, Mia-PaCa2, Capan-1, Capan-2 and BxPC3, we used Affymetrix DNA microarrays to compare the expressions of 22.000 genes in vitro and in the corresponding xenografts. We identified 228 genes overexpressed in xenografts and characterized the implication of one of them, WSB1, in the control of apoptosis and cell proliferation. WSB1 generates 3 alternatively spliced transcripts encoding distinct protein isoforms. In xenografts and in human pancreatic tumors, global expression of WSB1 mRNA is modestly increased whereas isoform 3 is strongly overexpressed and isoforms 1 and 2 are down-regulated. Treating Mia-PaCa2 cells with stress-inducing agents induced similar changes. Whereas retrovirus-forced expression of WSB1 isoforms 1 and 2 promoted cell growth and sensitized the cells to gemcitabine- and doxorubicin-induced apoptosis, WSB1 isoform 3 expression reduced cell proliferation and enhanced resistance to apoptosis, showing that stress-induced modulation of WSB1 alternative splicing increases resistance to apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Data on WSB1 regulation support the hypothesis that activation of stress-response mechanisms helps cancer cells establishing metastases and suggest relevance to cancer development of other genes overexpressed in xenografts.

  9. Identification of potential target genes of ROR-alpha in THP1 and HUVEC cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulec, Cagri; Coban, Neslihan; Ozsait-Selcuk, Bilge; Sirma-Ekmekci, Sema; Yildirim, Ozlem; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan

    2017-04-01

    ROR-alpha is a nuclear receptor, activity of which can be modulated by natural or synthetic ligands. Due to its possible involvement in, and potential therapeutic target for atherosclerosis, we aimed to identify ROR-alpha target genes in monocytic and endothelial cell lines. We performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by tiling array (ChIP-on-chip) for ROR-alpha in monocytic cell line THP1 and endothelial cell line HUVEC. Following bioinformatic analysis of the array data, we tested four candidate genes in terms of dependence of their expression level on ligand-mediated ROR-alpha activity, and two of them in terms of promoter occupancy by ROR-alpha. Bioinformatic analyses of ChIP-on-chip data suggested that ROR-alpha binds to genomic regions near the transcription start site (TSS) of more than 3000 genes in THP1 and HUVEC. Potential ROR-alpha target genes in both cell types seem to be involved mainly in membrane receptor activity, signal transduction and ion transport. While SPP1 and IKBKA were shown to be direct target genes of ROR-alpha in THP1 monocytes, inflammation related gene HMOX1 and heat shock protein gene HSPA8 were shown to be potential target genes of ROR-alpha. Our results suggest that ROR-alpha may regulate signaling receptor activity, and transmembrane transport activity through its potential target genes. ROR-alpha seems also to play role in cellular sensitivity to environmental substances like arsenite and chloroprene. Although, the expression analyses have shown that synthetic ROR-alpha ligands can modulate some of potential ROR-alpha target genes, functional significance of ligand-dependent modulation of gene expression needs to be confirmed with further analyses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evidence suggesting possible SCA1 gene involvement in schizophrenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, S.R.; Wange, S.; Sun, C. [NIDR, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Several findings suggest a possible role for the SCA1 gene on chromosome 6p in some cases of schizophrenia. First, linkage analyses in Irish pedigrees provided LOD scores up to 3.0 for one model tested using microsatellites closely linked to SCA1. Reanalysis of these data using affected sibpair methods yielded a significant result (p = 0.01) for one marker. An attempt to replicate this linkage finding was made using 44 NIMH families (206 individuals, 80 affected) and 12 Utah families (120 individuals, 49 affected). LOD scores were negative in these new families, even allowing for heterogeneity, as were results using affected sibpair methods. However, one Utah family provided a LOD score of 1.3. We also screened the SCA1 trinucleotide repeat to search for expansions characteristic of this disorder in these families and in 38 additional unrelated schizophrenics. We found 1 schizophrenic with 41 repeats, which is substantially larger than the maximum size of 36 repeats observed in previous studies of several hundred controls. We are now assessing whether the distribution of SCA1 repeats differs significantly in schizophrenia versus controls. Recent reports suggest possible anticipation in schizophrenia (also characteristic of SCA1) and a few cases of psychiatric symptoms suggesting schizophrenia have been observed in the highly related disorder DRPLA (SCA2), which is also based on trinucleotide repeat expansion. These findings suggest that further investigations of this gene and chromosome region may be a priority.

  11. Identification of potentially hazardous human gene products in GMO risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmans, Hans; Logie, Colin; Van Maanen, Kees; Hermsen, Harm; Meredyth, Michelle; Van Der Vlugt, Cécile

    2008-01-01

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs), e.g. viral vectors, could threaten the environment if by their release they spread hazardous gene products. Even in contained use, to prevent adverse consequences, viral vectors carrying genes from mammals or humans should be especially scrutinized as to whether gene products that they synthesize could be hazardous in their new context. Examples of such potentially hazardous gene products (PHGPs) are: protein toxins, products of dominant alleles that have a role in hereditary diseases, gene products and sequences involved in genome rearrangements, gene products involved in immunomodulation or with an endocrine function, gene products involved in apoptosis, activated proto-oncogenes. For contained use of a GMO that carries a construct encoding a PHGP, the precautionary principle dictates that safety measures should be applied on a "worst case" basis, until the risks of the specific case have been assessed. The potential hazard of cloned genes can be estimated before empirical data on the actual GMO become available. Preliminary data may be used to focus hazard identification and risk assessment. Both predictive and empirical data may also help to identify what further information is needed to assess the risk of the GMO. A two-step approach, whereby a PHGP is evaluated for its conceptual dangers, then checked by data bank searches, is delineated here.

  12. Sequence signatures involved in targeting the male-specific lethal complex to X-chromosomal genes in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Philge

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Drosophila melanogaster, the dosage-compensation system that equalizes X-linked gene expression between males and females, thereby assuring that an appropriate balance is maintained between the expression of genes on the X chromosome(s and the autosomes, is at least partially mediated by the Male-Specific Lethal (MSL complex. This complex binds to genes with a preference for exons on the male X chromosome with a 3' bias, and it targets most expressed genes on the X chromosome. However, a number of genes are expressed but not targeted by the complex. High affinity sites seem to be responsible for initial recruitment of the complex to the X chromosome, but the targeting to and within individual genes is poorly understood. Results We have extensively examined X chromosome sequence variation within five types of gene features (promoters, 5' UTRs, coding sequences, introns, 3' UTRs and intergenic sequences, and assessed its potential involvement in dosage compensation. Presented results show that: the X chromosome has a distinct sequence composition within its gene features; some of the detected variation correlates with genes targeted by the MSL-complex; the insulator protein BEAF-32 preferentially binds upstream of MSL-bound genes; BEAF-32 and MOF co-localizes in promoters; and that bound genes have a distinct sequence composition that shows a 3' bias within coding sequence. Conclusions Although, many strongly bound genes are close to a high affinity site neither our promoter motif nor our coding sequence signatures show any correlation to HAS. Based on the results presented here, we believe that there are sequences in the promoters and coding sequences of targeted genes that have the potential to direct the secondary spreading of the MSL-complex to nearby genes.

  13. Sequence signatures involved in targeting the Male-Specific Lethal complex to X-chromosomal genes in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Philge; Pettersson, Fredrik; Stenberg, Per

    2012-03-19

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the dosage-compensation system that equalizes X-linked gene expression between males and females, thereby assuring that an appropriate balance is maintained between the expression of genes on the X chromosome(s) and the autosomes, is at least partially mediated by the Male-Specific Lethal (MSL) complex. This complex binds to genes with a preference for exons on the male X chromosome with a 3' bias, and it targets most expressed genes on the X chromosome. However, a number of genes are expressed but not targeted by the complex. High affinity sites seem to be responsible for initial recruitment of the complex to the X chromosome, but the targeting to and within individual genes is poorly understood. We have extensively examined X chromosome sequence variation within five types of gene features (promoters, 5' UTRs, coding sequences, introns, 3' UTRs) and intergenic sequences, and assessed its potential involvement in dosage compensation. Presented results show that: the X chromosome has a distinct sequence composition within its gene features; some of the detected variation correlates with genes targeted by the MSL-complex; the insulator protein BEAF-32 preferentially binds upstream of MSL-bound genes; BEAF-32 and MOF co-localizes in promoters; and that bound genes have a distinct sequence composition that shows a 3' bias within coding sequence. Although, many strongly bound genes are close to a high affinity site neither our promoter motif nor our coding sequence signatures show any correlation to HAS. Based on the results presented here, we believe that there are sequences in the promoters and coding sequences of targeted genes that have the potential to direct the secondary spreading of the MSL-complex to nearby genes.

  14. Characterization of genes involved in ceramide metabolism in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timmins-Schiffman Emma

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lipid signaling molecule, ceramide, is a key component of the vertebrate stress response, however, there is limited information concerning its role in invertebrate species. In order to identify genes involved in ceramide metabolism in bivalve molluscs, Pacific oyster genomic resources were examined for genes associated with ceramide metabolism and signaling. Results Several genes were identified including full-length sequences characterized for serine palmitoyltransferase-1, 3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase, acid ceramidase, and ceramide glucosyltransferase. Genes involved in ceramide synthesis and metabolism are conserved across taxa in both form and function. Expression analysis as assessed by quantitative PCR indicated all genes were expressed at high levels in gill tissue. The role of the ceramide pathway genes in the invertebrate stress response was also explored by measuring expression levels in adult oysters exposed to Vibrio vulnificus. Two genes demonstrated increased expression during the bacterial challenge: a gene involved in hydrolytic breakdown of ceramide (acid ceramidase and a gene involved in de novo generation of ceramide (3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase, suggesting a possible role of ceramide in the invertebrate stress and immune responses. Conclusions In silico and laboratory results support that Pacific oysters have the basic components of the ceramide metabolism pathway. These results also indicate that ceramide may have analogous functions in vertebrates and invertebrates. The gene expression pattern of acid ceramidase and 3-kethodihydrosphingosine reductase in response to bacterial exposure especially supports that ceramide and sphingolipid metabolism may be involved in the oyster’s stress and/or immune responses.

  15. Characterization of genes involved in ceramide metabolism in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins-Schiffman, Emma; Roberts, Steven

    2012-09-13

    The lipid signaling molecule, ceramide, is a key component of the vertebrate stress response, however, there is limited information concerning its role in invertebrate species. In order to identify genes involved in ceramide metabolism in bivalve molluscs, Pacific oyster genomic resources were examined for genes associated with ceramide metabolism and signaling. Several genes were identified including full-length sequences characterized for serine palmitoyltransferase-1, 3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase, acid ceramidase, and ceramide glucosyltransferase. Genes involved in ceramide synthesis and metabolism are conserved across taxa in both form and function. Expression analysis as assessed by quantitative PCR indicated all genes were expressed at high levels in gill tissue. The role of the ceramide pathway genes in the invertebrate stress response was also explored by measuring expression levels in adult oysters exposed to Vibrio vulnificus. Two genes demonstrated increased expression during the bacterial challenge: a gene involved in hydrolytic breakdown of ceramide (acid ceramidase) and a gene involved in de novo generation of ceramide (3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase), suggesting a possible role of ceramide in the invertebrate stress and immune responses. In silico and laboratory results support that Pacific oysters have the basic components of the ceramide metabolism pathway. These results also indicate that ceramide may have analogous functions in vertebrates and invertebrates. The gene expression pattern of acid ceramidase and 3-kethodihydrosphingosine reductase in response to bacterial exposure especially supports that ceramide and sphingolipid metabolism may be involved in the oyster's stress and/or immune responses.

  16. Morphogenesis of the C. elegans Intestine Involves Axon Guidance Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asan, Alparsan; Raiders, Stephan A; Priess, James R

    2016-04-01

    Genetic and molecular studies have provided considerable insight into how various tissue progenitors are specified in early embryogenesis, but much less is known about how those progenitors create three-dimensional tissues and organs. The C. elegans intestine provides a simple system for studying how a single progenitor, the E blastomere, builds an epithelial tube of 20 cells. As the E descendants divide, they form a primordium that transitions between different shapes over time. We used cell contours, traced from confocal optical z-stacks, to build a 3D graphic reconstruction of intestine development. The reconstruction revealed several new aspects of morphogenesis that extend and clarify previous observations. The first 8 E descendants form a plane of four right cells and four left cells; the plane arises through oriented cell divisions and VANG-1/Van Gogh-dependent repositioning of any non-planar cells. LIN-12/Notch signaling affects the left cells in the E8 primordium, and initiates later asymmetry in cell packing. The next few stages involve cell repositioning and intercalation events that shuttle cells to their final positions, like shifting blocks in a Rubik's cube. Repositioning involves breaking and replacing specific adhesive contacts, and some of these events involve EFN-4/Ephrin, MAB-20/semaphorin-2a, and SAX-3/Robo. Once cells in the primordium align along a common axis and in the correct order, cells at the anterior end rotate clockwise around the axis of the intestine. The anterior rotation appears to align segments of the developing lumen into a continuous structure, and requires the secreted ligand UNC-6/netrin, the receptor UNC-40/DCC, and an interacting protein called MADD-2. Previous studies showed that rotation requires a second round of LIN-12/Notch signaling in cells on the right side of the primordium, and we show that MADD-2-GFP appears to be downregulated in those cells.

  17. Morphogenesis of the C. elegans Intestine Involves Axon Guidance Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alparsan Asan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Genetic and molecular studies have provided considerable insight into how various tissue progenitors are specified in early embryogenesis, but much less is known about how those progenitors create three-dimensional tissues and organs. The C. elegans intestine provides a simple system for studying how a single progenitor, the E blastomere, builds an epithelial tube of 20 cells. As the E descendants divide, they form a primordium that transitions between different shapes over time. We used cell contours, traced from confocal optical z-stacks, to build a 3D graphic reconstruction of intestine development. The reconstruction revealed several new aspects of morphogenesis that extend and clarify previous observations. The first 8 E descendants form a plane of four right cells and four left cells; the plane arises through oriented cell divisions and VANG-1/Van Gogh-dependent repositioning of any non-planar cells. LIN-12/Notch signaling affects the left cells in the E8 primordium, and initiates later asymmetry in cell packing. The next few stages involve cell repositioning and intercalation events that shuttle cells to their final positions, like shifting blocks in a Rubik's cube. Repositioning involves breaking and replacing specific adhesive contacts, and some of these events involve EFN-4/Ephrin, MAB-20/semaphorin-2a, and SAX-3/Robo. Once cells in the primordium align along a common axis and in the correct order, cells at the anterior end rotate clockwise around the axis of the intestine. The anterior rotation appears to align segments of the developing lumen into a continuous structure, and requires the secreted ligand UNC-6/netrin, the receptor UNC-40/DCC, and an interacting protein called MADD-2. Previous studies showed that rotation requires a second round of LIN-12/Notch signaling in cells on the right side of the primordium, and we show that MADD-2-GFP appears to be downregulated in those cells.

  18. Enzymes and Genes Involved in Aerobic Alkane Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongze eShao

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Alkanes are major constituents of crude oil. They are also present at low concentrations in diverse non-contaminated because many living organisms produce them as chemo-attractants or as protecting agents against water loss. Alkane degradation is a widespread phenomenon in nature. The numerous microorganisms, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic, capable of utilizing alkanes as a carbon and energy source, have been isolated and characterized. This review summarizes the current knowledge of how bacteria metabolize alkanes aerobically, with a particular emphasis on the oxidation of long-chain alkanes, including factors that are responsible for chemotaxis to alkanes , transport across cell membrane of alkanes , the regulation of alkane degradation gene and initial oxidation.

  19. Involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, L H; Jacobsen, V B; Haderslev, P A

    2008-01-01

    mug/min) or placebo for 20 min was studied in 12 patients with migraine without aura outside attacks. Xenon-133 inhalation SPECT-determined regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and transcranial Doppler (TCD)-determined blood velocity (V (mean)) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA), as well as the heart......Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing nerves are closely associated with cranial blood vessels. CGRP is the most potent vasodilator known in isolated cerebral blood vessels. CGRP can induce migraine attacks, and two selective CGRP receptor antagonists are effective in the treatment...... of migraine attacks. It is therefore important to investigate its mechanism of action in patients with migraine. We here investigate the effects of intravenous human alpha-CGRP (halphaCGRP) on intracranial hemodynamics. In a double-blind, cross-over study, the effect of intravenous infusion of halphaCGRP (2...

  20. Effects of Radiation and Dietary Iron on Expression of Genes and Proteins Involved in Drug Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, K. M.; Wotring, V. E.

    2014-01-01

    Liver function, especially the rate of metabolic enzyme activities, determines the concentration of circulating drugs and the duration of their efficacy. Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver, and clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result in the case of a liver that is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism, we want to understand any effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver. Dietary factors and exposure to radiation are aspects of spaceflight that are potential oxidative stressors and both can be modeled in ground experiments. In this experiment, we examined the effects of high dietary iron and low dose gamma radiation (individually and combined) on the gene expression of enzymes involved in drug metabolism, redox homeostasis, and DNA repair. METHODS All procedures were approved by the JSC Animal Care and Use Committee. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups (n=8); control, high Fe diet (650 mg iron/kg), radiation (fractionated 3 Gy exposure from a Cs- 137 source) and combined high Fe diet + radiation exposure. Animals were euthanized 24h after the last treatment of radiation; livers were removed immediately and flash -frozen in liquid nitrogen. Expression of genes thought to be involved in redox homeostasis, drug metabolism and DNA damage repair was measured by RT-qPCR. Where possible, protein expression of the same genes was measured by western blotting. All data are expressed as % change in expression normalized to reference gene expression; comparisons were then made of each treatment group to the sham exposed/ normal diet control group. Data was considered significant at pmetabolism

  1. Expression profiling of Crambe abyssinica under arsenate stress identifies genes and gene networks involved in arsenic metabolism and detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandasamy Suganthi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic contamination is widespread throughout the world and this toxic metalloid is known to cause cancers of organs such as liver, kidney, skin, and lung in human. In spite of a recent surge in arsenic related studies, we are still far from a comprehensive understanding of arsenic uptake, detoxification, and sequestration in plants. Crambe abyssinica, commonly known as 'abyssinian mustard', is a non-food, high biomass oil seed crop that is naturally tolerant to heavy metals. Moreover, it accumulates significantly higher levels of arsenic as compared to other species of the Brassicaceae family. Thus, C. abyssinica has great potential to be utilized as an ideal inedible crop for phytoremediation of heavy metals and metalloids. However, the mechanism of arsenic metabolism in higher plants, including C. abyssinica, remains elusive. Results To identify the differentially expressed transcripts and the pathways involved in arsenic metabolism and detoxification, C. abyssinica plants were subjected to arsenate stress and a PCR-Select Suppression Subtraction Hybridization (SSH approach was employed. A total of 105 differentially expressed subtracted cDNAs were sequenced which were found to represent 38 genes. Those genes encode proteins functioning as antioxidants, metal transporters, reductases, enzymes involved in the protein degradation pathway, and several novel uncharacterized proteins. The transcripts corresponding to the subtracted cDNAs showed strong upregulation by arsenate stress as confirmed by the semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Conclusions Our study revealed novel insights into the plant defense mechanisms and the regulation of genes and gene networks in response to arsenate toxicity. The differential expression of transcripts encoding glutathione-S-transferases, antioxidants, sulfur metabolism, heat-shock proteins, metal transporters, and enzymes in the ubiquitination pathway of protein degradation as well as several unknown

  2. Metastin is not involved in metastatic potential of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapanagiotou, Eleni M; Dilana, Kalliopi D; Gkiozos, Ioannis; Gratsias, Ioannis; Tsimpoukis, Sotirios; Polyzos, Aris; Syrigos, Kostas N

    2011-06-01

    Metastin, the product of the KISS-1 gene, seems to represent a strong suppressant of metastasis for some types of cancer. The aim of this study is to explore whether circulating levels of metastin could be used as a marker for the metastatic potential of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as well as a diagnostic marker in NSCLC patients. The possible correlation between metastin and leptin circulating levels was also evaluated. Fasting serum levels of metastin and leptin were determined in 96 NSCLC patients at diagnosis (76 with metastatic disease and 21 with locally advanced disease) and 49 healthy volunteers using commercial available ELISA. Serum metastin levels presented no differences between NSCLC patients and healthy volunteers (1.18 ± 0.98 vs. 1.17 ± 0.39 ng/ml, P = 0.979) as well as between patients with metastatic and locally advanced disease (1.17 ± 1.05 vs. 1.21 ± 0.64 ng/ml, P = 0.872). There was no statistically significant correlation between circulating metastin and leptin levels in NSCLC patients and patients with locally advanced and metastatic disease. This study shows a lack of direct involvement of metastin in the diagnosis and metastatic potential of NSCLC.

  3. Comparative Genome Analysis of Trichophyton rubrum and Related Dermatophytes Reveals Candidate Genes Involved in Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Diego A.; Oliver, Brian G.; Gräser, Yvonne; Goldberg, Jonathan M.; Li, Wenjun; Martinez-Rossi, Nilce M.; Monod, Michel; Shelest, Ekaterina; Barton, Richard C.; Birch, Elizabeth; Brakhage, Axel A.; Chen, Zehua; Gurr, Sarah J.; Heiman, David; Heitman, Joseph; Kosti, Idit; Rossi, Antonio; Saif, Sakina; Samalova, Marketa; Saunders, Charles W.; Shea, Terrance; Summerbell, Richard C.; Xu, Jun; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Birren, Bruce W.; Cuomo, Christina A.; White, Theodore C.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The major cause of athlete’s foot is Trichophyton rubrum, a dermatophyte or fungal pathogen of human skin. To facilitate molecular analyses of the dermatophytes, we sequenced T. rubrum and four related species, Trichophyton tonsurans, Trichophyton equinum, Microsporum canis, and Microsporum gypseum. These species differ in host range, mating, and disease progression. The dermatophyte genomes are highly colinear yet contain gene family expansions not found in other human-associated fungi. Dermatophyte genomes are enriched for gene families containing the LysM domain, which binds chitin and potentially related carbohydrates. These LysM domains differ in sequence from those in other species in regions of the peptide that could affect substrate binding. The dermatophytes also encode novel sets of fungus-specific kinases with unknown specificity, including nonfunctional pseudokinases, which may inhibit phosphorylation by competing for kinase sites within substrates, acting as allosteric effectors, or acting as scaffolds for signaling. The dermatophytes are also enriched for a large number of enzymes that synthesize secondary metabolites, including dermatophyte-specific genes that could synthesize novel compounds. Finally, dermatophytes are enriched in several classes of proteases that are necessary for fungal growth and nutrient acquisition on keratinized tissues. Despite differences in mating ability, genes involved in mating and meiosis are conserved across species, suggesting the possibility of cryptic mating in species where it has not been previously detected. These genome analyses identify gene families that are important to our understanding of how dermatophytes cause chronic infections, how they interact with epithelial cells, and how they respond to the host immune response. PMID:22951933

  4. In silico Analysis of Candidate Genes Involved in Sanfilippo Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehreen Zaka

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sanfilippo syndrome is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder, caused by the deficiency of enzymes that play an important role in degradation of glycosaminoglycans and also called mucopolysaccharidosis III. Mucopolysaccharidosis is genetic disorder. Here, we searched the candidate genes for Sanfilippo syndrome by using BLAST with the query sequence. As no suitable homology was found against the query sequence we moved towards threading approach. The threading approach was carried out by employing online CPH models and LOMETS tools. Through present research, domains of the proteins were predicted by utilizing the Domain Sweep tools, GNS and two domains were reported. Motif search reported the maximum number of motifs for Type D protein as compared to other types. All four proteins were totally soluble proteins and no transmembrane domains were found. In future, these results and predicted 3D structures can be used for the molecular docking studies, binding activities and protein-protein interactions for all the four types of Sanfilippo syndrome.

  5. The hnRNP 2H9 gene, which is involved in the splicing reaction, is a multiply spliced gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B

    2000-01-01

    The hnRNP 2H9 gene products are involved in the splicing process and participate in early heat shock-induced splicing arrest. By combining low/high stringency hybridisation, database search, Northern and Western blotting it is shown that the gene is alternatively spliced into at least six transcr...

  6. Transcriptomic study for screening genes involved in the oxidative bioconversions of Streptomyces avermitilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyo-Jeong; Choi, Kwon-Young; Jung, Da-Hye; Jung, Joon-Young; Jung, Eunok; Yang, Yung-Hun; Kim, Byung-Gee; Oh, Min-Kyu

    2013-11-01

    Streptomyces avermitilis is a well known organism producing avermectin antibiotics, and has been utilized as an industrial host for oxidation bioconversion processes. Recently, gene screening strategies related to bioconversions have received much focus, as attempts are made to optimize oxidation and biodegradation pathways to maximize yield and productivity. Here, we have demonstrated the oxidative metabolisms of three molecules, daidzein, p-coumaric acid and mevastatin, where S. avermitilis converted each substrate to 3',4',7-trihydroxyisoflavone, caffeic acid and hydroxyl-mevastatin to yield 9.3, 32.5 and 15.0 %, respectively. Microarray technology was exploited to investigate genome-wide analysis of gene expression changes, which were induced upon the addition of each substrate. Cytochrome P450 hydroxylases (pteC, cyp28 and olmB), diooxygenases (xylE, cdo1 and putatives) and LuxAB-like oxygenase were identified. One of them, cyp28, was indeed a gene encoding P450 hydroxylase responsible for the oxidative reaction of daidzein. Furthermore, possible electron transfer chain (fdrC → pteE → pteC) supporting cytochrome P450 dependent hydroxylation of daidzein has been suggested based on the interpretation of expression profiles. The result provided a potential application of transcriptomic study on uncovering enzymes involved in oxidative bioconversions of S. avermitilis.

  7. Screening and identification of microRNA involved in unstable angina using gene-chip analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Si; Sun, Ya-Nan; Zhou, Yun-Tao; Zhang, Chun-Lai; Lu, Feng; Liu, Jia; Shang, Xiao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has suggested that microRNA (miRNA) may play a role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, which has led to a greater understanding of the complex pathophysiological processes underlying unstable angina (UA). The present study aimed to investigate changes in the miRNA expression profiles of patients with UA using gene-chip analysis, in order to further elucidate the pathogenesis of UA. Total RNA was extracted and purified from plasma samples collected from patients with UA and healthy controls. The samples underwent microarray analysis using an Exiqon miRCURY LNA™ microRNA Array. Differentially expressed miRNAs were identified by volcano plot filtering, and were validated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). In addition, functional annotation of the differentially expressed miRNAs involved gene ontology analyses. Among the 212 miRNAs differentially expressed between the two groups, 82 were upregulated and 130 were downregulated. Notably, the results of the RT-qPCR were consistent with the gene-chip results. The miRNAs identified in the present study may be potential novel biomarkers for the prevention and early diagnosis of UA. Furthermore, the results of the present study suggested that UA occurs as a result of complex and dynamic processes regulated by numerous factors, including multiple miRNAs.

  8. A negative element involved in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded ORF11 gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Lei [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The ORF11 of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a lytic viral gene with delayed-early expression kinetics. How the ORF11 gene expression is regulated in the KSHV lytic cascade is largely unknown. Here we report that the deletion of the KSHV viral IL-6 gene from the viral genome leads to deregulated ORF11 gene expression. The KSHV-encoded viral IL-6 protein was found not to be essentially involved in the regulation of ORF11, suggesting a potential transcriptional cis-regulation. A negative element was identified downstream of the ORF11 gene, which suppresses the ORF11 basal promoter activity in a position-independent manner.

  9. New Genes Involved in Osmotic Stress Tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Ramon; Morales, Pilar; Tronchoni, Jordi; Cordero-Bueso, Gustavo; Vaudano, Enrico; Quirós, Manuel; Novo, Maite; Torres-Pérez, Rafael; Valero, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to changes in osmolarity is fundamental for the survival of living cells, and has implications in food and industrial biotechnology. It has been extensively studied in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where the Hog1 stress activated protein kinase was discovered about 20 years ago. Hog1 is the core of the intracellular signaling pathway that governs the adaptive response to osmotic stress in this species. The main endpoint of this program is synthesis and intracellular retention of glycerol, as a compatible osmolyte. Despite many details of the signaling pathways and yeast responses to osmotic challenges have already been described, genome-wide approaches are contributing to refine our knowledge of yeast adaptation to hypertonic media. In this work, we used a quantitative fitness analysis approach in order to deepen our understanding of the interplay between yeast cells and the osmotic environment. Genetic requirements for proper growth under osmotic stress showed both common and specific features when hypertonic conditions were induced by either glucose or sorbitol. Tolerance to high-glucose content requires mitochondrial function, while defective protein targeting to peroxisome, GID-complex function (involved in negative regulation of gluconeogenesis), or chromatin dynamics, result in poor survival to sorbitol-induced osmotic stress. On the other side, the competitive disadvantage of yeast strains defective in the endomembrane system is relieved by hypertonic conditions. This finding points to the Golgi-endosome system as one of the main cell components negatively affected by hyperosmolarity. Most of the biological processes highlighted in this analysis had not been previously related to osmotic stress but are probably relevant in an ecological and evolutionary context. PMID:27733850

  10. Genes of both parental origins are differentially involved in early embryogenesis of a tobacco interspecies hybrid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-E Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In animals, early embryonic development is largely dependent on maternal transcripts synthesized during gametogenesis. However, in higher plants, the extent of maternal control over zygote development and early embryogenesis is not fully understood yet. Nothing is known about the activity of the parental genomes during seed formation of interspecies hybrids. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we report that an interspecies hybridization system between SR1 (Nicotiana tabacum and Hamayan (N. rustica has been successfully established. Based on the system we selected 58 genes that have polymorphic sites between SR1 and Hamayan, and analyzed the allele-specific expression of 28 genes in their hybrid zygotes (Hamayan x SR1. Finally the allele-specific expressions of 8 genes in hybrid zygotes were repeatedly confirmed. Among them, 4 genes were of paternal origin, 1 gene was of maternal origin and 3 genes were of biparental origin. These results revealed obvious biparental involvement and differentially contribution of parental-origin genes to zygote development in the interspecies hybrid. We further detected the expression pattern of the genes at 8-celled embryo stage found that the involvement of the parental-origin genes may change at different stages of embryogenesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We reveal that genes of both parental origins are differentially involved in early embryogenesis of a tobacco interspecies hybrid and functions in a developmental stage-dependent manner. This finding may open a window to seek for the possible molecular mechanism of hybrid vigor.

  11. Population genetics of fungal and oomycete effectors involved in gene-for-gene interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stukenbrock, Eva H; McDonald, Bruce A

    2009-04-01

    Antagonistic coevolution between plants and pathogens has generated a broad array of attack and defense mechanisms. In the classical avirulence (Avr) gene-for-gene model, the pathogen gene evolves to escape host recognition while the host resistance (R) gene evolves to track the evolving pathogen elicitor. In the case of host-specific toxins (HST), the evolutionary arms race may be inverted, with the gene encoding the pathogen toxin evolving to maintain recognition of the host sensitivity target while the host sensitivity gene evolves to escape binding with the toxin. Pathogen effector genes, including those encoding Avr elicitors and HST, often show elevated levels of polymorphism reflecting the coevolutionary arms race between host and pathogen. However, selection can also eliminate variation in the coevolved gene and its neighboring regions when advantageous alleles are swept to fixation. The distribution and diversity of corresponding host genes will have a major impact on the distribution and diversity of effectors in the pathogen population. Population genetic analyses including both hosts and their pathogens provide an essential tool to understand the diversity and dynamics of effector genes. Here, we summarize current knowledge about the population genetics of fungal and oomycete effector genes, focusing on recent studies that have used both spatial and temporal collections to assess the diversity and distribution of alleles and to monitor changes in allele frequencies over time. These studies illustrate that effector genes exhibit a significant degree of diversity at both small and large sampling scales, suggesting that local selection plays an important role in their evolution. They also illustrate that Avr elicitors and HST may be recognizing the same R genes in plants, leading to evolutionary outcomes that differ for necrotrophs and biotrophs while affecting the evolution of the corresponding R genes. Under this scenario, the optimal number of R genes

  12. Digital Gene Expression Analysis Provides Insight into the Transcript Profile of the Genes Involved in Aporphine Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mei; Zhu, Lingping; Li, Ling; Li, Juanjuan; Xu, Liming; Feng, Ji; Liu, Yanling

    2017-01-01

    The predominant alkaloids in lotus leaves are aporphine alkaloids. These are the most important active components and have many pharmacological properties, but little is known about their biosynthesis. We used digital gene expression (DGE) technology to identify differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) between two lotus cultivars with different alkaloid contents at four leaf development stages. We also predicted potential genes involved in aporphine alkaloid biosynthesis by weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA). Approximately 335 billion nucleotides were generated; and 94% of which were aligned against the reference genome. Of 22 thousand expressed genes, 19,000 were differentially expressed between the two cultivars at the four stages. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis revealed that catalytic activity and oxidoreductase activity were enriched significantly in most pairwise comparisons. In Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis, dozens of DEGs were assigned to the categories of biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, isoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis, and flavonoid biosynthesis. The genes encoding norcoclaurine synthase (NCS), norcoclaurine 6-O-methyltransferase (6OMT), coclaurine N-methyltransferase (CNMT), N-methylcoclaurine 3′-hydroxylase (NMCH), and 3′-hydroxy-N-methylcoclaurine 4′-O-methyltransferase (4′OMT) in the common pathways of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis and the ones encoding corytuberine synthase (CTS) in aporphine alkaloid biosynthetic pathway, which have been characterized in other plants, were identified in lotus. These genes had positive effects on alkaloid content, albeit with phenotypic lag. The WGCNA of DEGs revealed that one network module was associated with the dynamic change of alkaloid content. Eleven genes encoding proteins with methyltransferase, oxidoreductase and CYP450 activities were identified. These were surmised to be genes involved in aporphine alkaloid biosynthesis. This

  13. Gene Therapy – Potential, Pros, Cons and Ethics

    OpenAIRE

    Ananth Nanjunda Rao

    2002-01-01

    Genetic technology poses risks along with its rewards, just as any technology has in the past. To stop its development and forfeit the benefits gene therapy could offer would be a far greater mistake than forging ahead could ever be. People must always try to be responsible with their new technology, but gene therapy has the potential to be the future of medicine and its possibilities must be explored.

  14. A songbird forebrain area potentially involved in auditory discrimination and memory formation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raphael Pinaud; Thomas A Terleph

    2008-03-01

    Songbirds rely on auditory processing of natural communication signals for a number of social behaviors, including mate selection, individual recognition and the rare behavior of vocal learning – the ability to learn vocalizations through imitation of an adult model, rather than by instinct. Like mammals, songbirds possess a set of interconnected ascending and descending auditory brain pathways that process acoustic information and that are presumably involved in the perceptual processing of vocal communication signals. Most auditory areas studied to date are located in the caudomedial forebrain of the songbird and include the thalamo-recipient field L (subfields L1, L2 and L3), the caudomedial and caudolateral mesopallium (CMM and CLM, respectively) and the caudomedial nidopallium (NCM). This review focuses on NCM, an auditory area previously proposed to be analogous to parts of the primary auditory cortex in mammals. Stimulation of songbirds with auditory stimuli drives vigorous electrophysiological responses and the expression of several activity-regulated genes in NCM. Interestingly, NCM neurons are tuned to species-specific songs and undergo some forms of experience-dependent plasticity in-vivo. These activity-dependent changes may underlie long-term modifications in the functional performance of NCM and constitute a potential neural substrate for auditory discrimination. We end this review by discussing evidence that suggests that NCM may be a site of auditory memory formation and/or storage.

  15. Genes Involved in Initial Follicle Recruitment May Be Associated with Age at Menopause

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorhuis, Marlies; Broekmans, Frank J.; Fauser, Bart C. J. M.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Timing of menopause is largely influenced by genetic factors. Because menopause occurs when the follicle pool in the ovaries has become exhausted, genes involved in primordial follicle recruitment can be considered as candidate genes for timing of menopause. Objective: The aim was to study

  16. Regulation of the expression of key genes involved in HDL metabolism by unsaturated fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects, and possible mechanisms of action, of unsaturated fatty acids on the expression of genes involved in HDL metabolism in HepG2 cells. The mRNA concentration of target genes was assessed by real time PCR. Protein concentrations were determined by wes...

  17. Genes Involved in Initial Follicle Recruitment May Be Associated with Age at Menopause

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorhuis, Marlies; Broekmans, Frank J.; Fauser, Bart C. J. M.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.

    Context: Timing of menopause is largely influenced by genetic factors. Because menopause occurs when the follicle pool in the ovaries has become exhausted, genes involved in primordial follicle recruitment can be considered as candidate genes for timing of menopause. Objective: The aim was to study

  18. Are PECTIN ESTERASE INHIBITOR Genes Involved in Mediating Resistance to Rhynchosporium commune in Barley?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzin, Stephan; Hanemann, Anja; Sharma, Shailendra; Hensel, Götz; Kumlehn, Jochen; Schweizer, Günther; Röder, Marion S

    2016-01-01

    A family of putative PECTIN ESTERASE INHIBITOR (PEI) genes, which were detected in the genomic region co-segregating with the resistance gene Rrs2 against scald caused by Rhynchosporium commune in barley, were characterized and tested for their possible involvement in mediating resistance to the pathogen by complementation and overexpression analysis. The sequences of the respective genes were derived from two BAC contigs originating from the susceptible cultivar 'Morex'. For the genes HvPEI2, HvPEI3, HvPEI4 and HvPEI6, specific haplotypes for 18 resistant and 23 susceptible cultivars were detected after PCR-amplification and haplotype-specific CAPS-markers were developed. None of the tested candidate genes HvPEI2, HvPEI3 and HvPEI4 alone conferred a high resistance level in transgenic over-expression plants, though an improvement of the resistance level was observed especially with OE-lines for gene HvPEI4. These results do not confirm but also do not exclude an involvement of the PEI gene family in the response to the pathogen. A candidate for the resistance gene Rrs2 could not be identified yet. It is possible that Rrs2 is a PEI gene or another type of gene which has not been detected in the susceptible cultivar 'Morex' or the full resistance reaction requires the presence of several PEI genes.

  19. Characterization of genes involved in ceramide metabolism in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas)

    OpenAIRE

    Timmins-Schiffman Emma; Roberts Steven

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The lipid signaling molecule, ceramide, is a key component of the vertebrate stress response, however, there is limited information concerning its role in invertebrate species. In order to identify genes involved in ceramide metabolism in bivalve molluscs, Pacific oyster genomic resources were examined for genes associated with ceramide metabolism and signaling. Results Several genes were identified including full-length sequences characterized for serine palmitoyltransfer...

  20. Characterization of differentially expressed genes involved in pathways associated with gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Li

    Full Text Available To explore the patterns of gene expression in gastric cancer, a total of 26 paired gastric cancer and noncancerous tissues from patients were enrolled for gene expression microarray analyses. Limma methods were applied to analyze the data, and genes were considered to be significantly differentially expressed if the False Discovery Rate (FDR value was 2. Subsequently, Gene Ontology (GO categories were used to analyze the main functions of the differentially expressed genes. According to the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG database, we found pathways significantly associated with the differential genes. Gene-Act network and co-expression network were built respectively based on the relationships among the genes, proteins and compounds in the database. 2371 mRNAs and 350 lncRNAs considered as significantly differentially expressed genes were selected for the further analysis. The GO categories, pathway analyses and the Gene-Act network showed a consistent result that up-regulated genes were responsible for tumorigenesis, migration, angiogenesis and microenvironment formation, while down-regulated genes were involved in metabolism. These results of this study provide some novel findings on coding RNAs, lncRNAs, pathways and the co-expression network in gastric cancer which will be useful to guide further investigation and target therapy for this disease.

  1. Featured Article: Transcriptional landscape analysis identifies differently expressed genes involved in follicle-stimulating hormone induced postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maasalu, Katre; Laius, Ott; Zhytnik, Lidiia; Kõks, Sulev; Prans, Ele; Reimann, Ene; Märtson, Aare

    2017-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a disorder associated with bone tissue reorganization, bone mass, and mineral density. Osteoporosis can severely affect postmenopausal women, causing bone fragility and osteoporotic fractures. The aim of the current study was to compare blood mRNA profiles of postmenopausal women with and without osteoporosis, with the aim of finding different gene expressions and thus targets for future osteoporosis biomarker studies. Our study consisted of transcriptome analysis of whole blood serum from 12 elderly female osteoporotic patients and 12 non-osteoporotic elderly female controls. The transcriptome analysis was performed with RNA sequencing technology. For data analysis, the edgeR package of R Bioconductor was used. Two hundred and fourteen genes were expressed differently in osteoporotic compared with non-osteoporotic patients. Statistical analysis revealed 20 differently expressed genes with a false discovery rate of less than 1.47 × 10(-4) among osteoporotic patients. The expression of 10 genes were up-regulated and 10 down-regulated. Further statistical analysis identified a potential osteoporosis mRNA biomarker pattern consisting of six genes: CACNA1G, ALG13, SBK1, GGT7, MBNL3, and RIOK3. Functional ingenuity pathway analysis identified the strongest candidate genes with regard to potential involvement in a follicle-stimulating hormone activated network of increased osteoclast activity and hypogonadal bone loss. The differentially expressed genes identified in this study may contribute to future research of postmenopausal osteoporosis blood biomarkers.

  2. Molecular Basis of Gene-Gene Interaction: Cyclic Cross-Regulation of Gene Expression and Post-GWAS Gene-Gene Interaction Involved in Atrial Fibrillation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufeng Huang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common cardiac arrhythmia at the clinic. Recent GWAS identified several variants associated with AF, but they account for <10% of heritability. Gene-gene interaction is assumed to account for a significant portion of missing heritability. Among GWAS loci for AF, only three were replicated in the Chinese Han population, including SNP rs2106261 (G/A substitution in ZFHX3, rs2200733 (C/T substitution near PITX2c, and rs3807989 (A/G substitution in CAV1. Thus, we analyzed the interaction among these three AF loci. We demonstrated significant interaction between rs2106261 and rs2200733 in three independent populations and combined population with 2,020 cases/5,315 controls. Compared to non-risk genotype GGCC, two-locus risk genotype AATT showed the highest odds ratio in three independent populations and the combined population (OR=5.36 (95% CI 3.87-7.43, P=8.00×10-24. The OR of 5.36 for AATT was significantly higher than the combined OR of 3.31 for both GGTT and AACC, suggesting a synergistic interaction between rs2106261 and rs2200733. Relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI analysis also revealed significant interaction between rs2106261 and rs2200733 when exposed two copies of risk alleles (RERI=2.87, P<1.00×10-4 or exposed to one additional copy of risk allele (RERI=1.29, P<1.00×10-4. The INTERSNP program identified significant genotypic interaction between rs2106261 and rs2200733 under an additive by additive model (OR=0.85, 95% CI: 0.74-0.97, P=0.02. Mechanistically, PITX2c negatively regulates expression of miR-1, which negatively regulates expression of ZFHX3, resulting in a positive regulation of ZFHX3 by PITX2c; ZFHX3 positively regulates expression of PITX2C, resulting in a cyclic loop of cross-regulation between ZFHX3 and PITX2c. Both ZFHX3 and PITX2c regulate expression of NPPA, TBX5 and NKX2.5. These results suggest that cyclic cross-regulation of gene expression is a molecular basis for gene-gene

  3. Differentially expressed genes in human peripheral blood as potential markers for statin response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Hong-Hee; Kim, Suk Ran; Bang, Oh Young; Lee, Sang-Chol; Huh, Wooseong; Ko, Jae-Wook; Kim, Hyung-Gun; McLeod, Howard L; O'Connell, Thomas M; Kim, Jong-Won; Lee, Soo-Youn

    2012-02-01

    There is a considerable inter-individual variation in response to statin therapy and one third of patients do not meet their treatment goals. We aimed to identify differentially expressed genes that might be involved in the effects of statin treatment and to suggest potential markers to guide statin therapy. Forty-six healthy Korean subjects received atorvastatin; their whole-genome expression profiles in peripheral blood were analyzed before and after atorvastatin administration in relation with changes in lipid profiles. The expression patterns of the differentially expressed genes were also compared with the data of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) patients and controls. Pairwise comparison analyses revealed differentially expressed genes involved in diverse biological processes and molecular functions related with immune responses. Atorvastain mainly affected antigen binding, immune or inflammatory response including interleukin pathways. Similar expression patterns of the genes were observed in patients with FH and controls. The Charcol-Leyden crystal (CLC), CCR2, CX3CR1, LRRN3, FOS, LDLR, HLA-DRB1, ERMN, and TCN1 genes were significantly associated with cholesterol levels or statin response. Interestingly, the CLC gene, which was significantly altered by atorvastatin administration and differentially expressed between FH patients and controls, showed much bigger change in high-responsive group than in low-responsive group. We identified differentially expressed genes that might be involved in mechanisms underlying the known pleiotropic effects of atorvastatin, baseline cholesterol levels, and drug response. Our findings suggest CLC as a new candidate marker for statin response, and further validation is needed.

  4. Identification of genes directly involved in shell formation and their functions in pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Fang

    Full Text Available Mollusk shell formation is a fascinating aspect of biomineralization research. Shell matrix proteins play crucial roles in the control of calcium carbonate crystallization during shell formation in the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata. Characterization of biomineralization-related genes during larval development could enhance our understanding of shell formation. Genes involved in shell biomineralization were isolated by constructing three suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH libraries that represented genes expressed at key points during larval shell formation. A total of 2,923 ESTs from these libraries were sequenced and gave 990 unigenes. Unigenes coding for secreted proteins and proteins with tandem-arranged repeat units were screened in the three SSH libraries. A set of sequences coding for genes involved in shell formation was obtained. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization assays were carried out on five genes to investigate their spatial expression in several tissues, especially the mantle tissue. They all showed a different expression pattern from known biomineralization-related genes. Inhibition of the five genes by RNA interference resulted in different defects of the nacreous layer, indicating that they all were involved in aragonite crystallization. Intriguingly, one gene (UD_Cluster94.seq.Singlet1 was restricted to the 'aragonitic line'. The current data has yielded for the first time, to our knowledge, a suite of biomineralization-related genes active during the developmental stages of P. fucata, five of which were responsible for nacreous layer formation. This provides a useful starting point for isolating new genes involved in shell formation. The effects of genes on the formation of the 'aragonitic line', and other areas of the nacreous layer, suggests a different control mechanism for aragonite crystallization initiation from that of mature aragonite growth.

  5. A small interfering RNA screen of genes involved in DNA repair identifies tumor-specific radiosensitization by POLQ knockdown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Higgins, Geoff S; Prevo, Remko; Lee, Yin-Fai

    2010-01-01

    radiosensitivity are largely unknown. We have conducted a small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen of 200 genes involved in DNA damage repair aimed at identifying genes whose knockdown increased tumor radiosensitivity. Parallel siRNA screens were conducted in irradiated and unirradiated tumor cells (SQ20B...... polymerase ) as a potential tumor-specific target. Subsequent investigations showed that POLQ knockdown resulted in radiosensitization of a panel of tumor cell lines from different primary sites while having little or no effect on normal tissue cell lines. These findings raise the possibility that POLQ...

  6. Heteroconium chaetospira induces resistance to clubroot via upregulation of host genes involved in jasmonic acid, ethylene, and auxin biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid Lahlali

    Full Text Available An endophytic fungus, Heteroconium chaetospira isolate BC2HB1 (Hc, suppressed clubroot (Plasmodiophora brassicae -Pb on canola in growth-cabinet trials. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that Hc penetrated canola roots and colonized cortical tissues. Based on qPCR analysis, the amount of Hc DNA found in canola roots at 14 days after treatment was negatively correlated (r = 0.92, P<0.001 with the severity of clubroot at 5 weeks after treatment at a low (2×10(5 spores pot(-1 but not high (2×10(5 spores pot(-1 dose of pathogen inoculum. Transcript levels of nine B. napus (Bn genes in roots treated with Hc plus Pb, Pb alone and a nontreated control were analyzed using qPCR supplemented with biochemical analysis for the activity of phenylalanine ammonia lyases (PAL. These genes encode enzymes involved in several biosynthetic pathways related potentially to plant defence. Hc plus Pb increased the activity of PAL but not that of the other two genes (BnCCR and BnOPCL involved also in phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, relative to Pb inoculation alone. In contrast, expression of several genes involved in the jasmonic acid (BnOPR2, ethylene (BnACO, auxin (BnAAO1, and PR-2 protein (BnPR-2 biosynthesis were upregulated by 63, 48, 3, and 3 fold, respectively, by Hc plus Pb over Pb alone. This indicates that these genes may be involved in inducing resistance in canola by Hc against clubroot. The upregulation of BnAAO1 appears to be related to both pathogenesis of clubroot and induced defence mechanisms in canola roots. This is the first report on regulation of specific host genes involved in induced plant resistance by a non-mycorrhizal endophyte.

  7. Characterization of a transcription factor involved in mother cell specific transcription of the yeast HO gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Stillman, D J; Bankier, A T; Seddon, A; Groenhout, E G; Nasmyth, K A

    1988-01-01

    The yeast HO gene, which encodes an endonuclease involved in initiating mating type interconversion, is expressed in mother cells but not in daughters. It has been demonstrated that the SWI5 gene, which is an activator of HO expression, plays a critical role in this differential mother/daughter expression of HO. In this paper we describe the cloning and sequencing of the SWI5 gene. The predicted amino acid sequence derived from the cloned SWI5 gene shows homology with the repeated DNA-binding...

  8. Gene transcripts as potential diagnostic markers for allergic contact dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Malene Barré; Skov, Lone; Menné, Torkil;

    2005-01-01

    The standard procedure for diagnosing allergic contact dermatitis is to perform a patch test. Because this has several disadvantages, the development of a new in vitro test system would be of immense value. Gene transcripts that distinguish allergics from non-allergics may have the potential...

  9. Gene therapy and editing: Novel potential treatments for neuronal channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wykes, R C; Lignani, G

    2017-05-28

    Pharmaceutical treatment can be inadequate, non-effective, or intolerable for many people suffering from a neuronal channelopathy. Development of novel treatment options, particularly those with the potential to be curative is warranted. Gene therapy approaches can permit cell-specific modification of neuronal and circuit excitability and have been investigated experimentally as a therapy for numerous neurological disorders, with clinical trials for several neurodegenerative diseases ongoing. Channelopathies can arise from a wide array of gene mutations; however they usually result in periods of aberrant network excitability. Therefore gene therapy strategies based on up or downregulation of genes that modulate neuronal excitability may be effective therapy for a wide range of neuronal channelopathies. As many channelopathies are paroxysmal in nature, optogenetic or chemogenetic approaches may be well suited to treat the symptoms of these diseases. Recent advances in gene-editing technologies such as the CRISPR-Cas9 system could in the future result in entirely novel treatment for a channelopathy by repairing disease-causing channel mutations at the germline level. As the brain may develop and wire abnormally as a consequence of an inherited or de novo channelopathy, the choice of optimal gene therapy or gene editing strategy will depend on the time of intervention (germline, neonatal or adult). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. [Identification and cloning of a novel gene involved in EPS biosynthesis of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guang-Tao; Tang, Ji-Liang; He, Yong-Qiang; Chen, Bao-Shan; Tang, Dong-Jie

    2003-11-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris ( Xcc), causative agent of the black rot disease of cruciferous crops worldwide, produces large amount of extracellular polysaccharide( EPS), which has found wide applications in industry. In order to clone genes involved in EPS biosynthesis, Xcc wild-type strain 8004 was mutagenized with transposon Tn5gus A5, and a number of EPS-defective mutants were isolated. The Tn5gusA5 insertion sites in the mutants were analyzed by using thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR(TAIL-PCR), and the corresponding genes were identified by homology blast to the completely sequenced genome of Xcc 8004 strain. A novel gene, waxE, identified from the EPS-defective mutant 151D09, was found to be disrupted by the insertion of Tn5gusA5 in the open reading frame(ORF) with genome coordinates 4478998bp to 4479819bp.This gene showed 52% similarity to the kdtX gene of Serratia marcescens and 50% to the waaE of Klebsiella pneumoniae at amino acid level, with characteristics of glycostransferase 2 family domain. In order to identify the function of waxE gene, waxE gene deletion mutant of Xcc 8004 was constructed by gene replacement strategy in which waxE gene of genome was replaced by kanamycin resistant gene kan. The waxE gene deletion mutant strain, named Xcc 8570, was confirmed by both PCR and southern analysis. The growth rate of the deletion mutant 8570 in rich medium was not affected, but the EPS yield reduced by 35% as compared with the wildtype strain 8004. The deletion mutant could be completmented in trans with plasmid pLATC8976 harboring an intact waxE gene, and the EPS yield of the mutant was restored. The combined data showed that waxE gene involved in EPS biosynthesis in Xcc.

  11. Transcriptome analysis reveals key differentially expressed genes involved in wheat grain development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yonglong Yu; Dong Zhu; Chaoying Ma; Hui Cao; Yaping Wang; Yanhao Xu; Wenying Zhang; Yueming Yan

    2016-01-01

    Wheat seed development is an important physiological process of seed maturation and directly affects wheat yield and quality. In this study, we performed dynamic transcriptome microarray analysis of an elite Chinese bread wheat cultivar (Jimai 20) during grain development using the GeneChip Wheat Genome Array. Grain morphology and scanning electron microscope observations showed that the period of 11–15 days post-anthesis (DPA) was a key stage for the synthesis and accumulation of seed starch. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling and significance analysis of microarrays revealed that the period from 11 to 15 DPA was more important than the 15–20 DPA stage for the synthesis and accumulation of nutritive reserves. Series test of cluster analysis of differential genes revealed five statistically significant gene expression profiles. Gene ontology annotation and enrichment analysis gave further informa-tion about differentially expressed genes, and MapMan analysis revealed expression changes within functional groups during seed development. Metabolic pathway network analysis showed that major and minor metabolic pathways regulate one another to ensure regular seed development and nutritive reserve accumulation. We performed gene co-expression network analysis to identify genes that play vital roles in seed development and identified several key genes involved in important metabolic pathways. The transcriptional expression of eight key genes involved in starch and protein synthesis and stress defense was further validated by qRT-PCR. Our results provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms of wheat seed development and the determinants of yield and quality.

  12. Transcriptome analysis reveals key differentially expressed genes involved in wheat grain development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonglong Yu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Wheat seed development is an important physiological process of seed maturation and directly affects wheat yield and quality. In this study, we performed dynamic transcriptome microarray analysis of an elite Chinese bread wheat cultivar (Jimai 20 during grain development using the GeneChip Wheat Genome Array. Grain morphology and scanning electron microscope observations showed that the period of 11–15 days post-anthesis (DPA was a key stage for the synthesis and accumulation of seed starch. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling and significance analysis of microarrays revealed that the period from 11 to 15 DPA was more important than the 15–20 DPA stage for the synthesis and accumulation of nutritive reserves. Series test of cluster analysis of differential genes revealed five statistically significant gene expression profiles. Gene ontology annotation and enrichment analysis gave further information about differentially expressed genes, and MapMan analysis revealed expression changes within functional groups during seed development. Metabolic pathway network analysis showed that major and minor metabolic pathways regulate one another to ensure regular seed development and nutritive reserve accumulation. We performed gene co-expression network analysis to identify genes that play vital roles in seed development and identified several key genes involved in important metabolic pathways. The transcriptional expression of eight key genes involved in starch and protein synthesis and stress defense was further validated by qRT-PCR. Our results provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms of wheat seed development and the determinants of yield and quality.

  13. ADAM28: a potential oncogene involved in asbestos-related lung adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Casey M; Larsen, Jill E; Hayward, Nicholas K; Martins, Maria U; Tan, Maxine E; Davidson, Morgan R; Savarimuthu, Santiyagu M; McLachlan, Rebecca E; Passmore, Linda H; Windsor, Morgan N; Clarke, Belinda E; Duhig, Edwina E; Yang, Ian A; Bowman, Rayleen V; Fong, Kwun M

    2010-08-01

    Asbestos-related lung cancer accounts for 4-12% of all lung cancers worldwide. Since putative mechanisms of carcinogenesis differ between asbestos and tobacco induced lung cancers, tumors induced by the two agents may be genetically distinct. To identify gene expression biomarkers associated with asbestos-related lung tumorigenicity we performed gene expression array analysis on tumors of 36 patients with primary lung adenocarcinoma, comparing 12 patients with lung asbestos body counts above levels associated with urban dwelling (ARLC-AC: asbestos-related lung cancer-adenocarcinoma) with 24 patients with no asbestos bodies (NARLC-AC: non-asbestos related lung cancer-adenocarcinoma). Genes differentially expressed between ARLC-AC and NARLC-AC were identified on fold change and P value, and then prioritized using gene ontology. Candidates included ZNRF3, ADAM28, PPP1CA, IRF6, RAB3D, and PRDX1. Expression of these six genes was technically and biologically replicated by qRT-PCR in the training set and biologically validated in three independent test sets. ADAM28, encoding a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain protein that interacts with integrins, was consistently upregulated in ARLC across all four datasets. Further studies are being designed to investigate the possible role of this gene in asbestos lung tumorigenicity, its potential utility as a marker of asbestos related lung cancer for purposes of causal attribution, and its potential as a treatment target for lung cancers arising in asbestos exposed persons.

  14. MIM, a Potential Metastasis Suppressor Gene in Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Goo Lee

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a modified version of the mRNA differential display technique, five human bladder cancer cell lines from low grade to metastatic were analyzed to identify differences in gene expression. A 316-bp cDNA (C11300 was isolated that was not expressed in the metastatic cell line TccSuP. Sequence analysis revealed that this gene was identical to KIAA 0429, has a 5.3-kb transcript that mapped to 8824.1. The protein is predicted to be 356 amino acids in size and has an actin-binding WH2 domain. Northern blot revealed expression in multiple normal tissues, but none in a metastatic breast cancer cell line (SKBR3 or in metastatic prostatic cancer cell lines (LNCaP, PC3. We have named this gene Missing in Metastasis (MIM and our data suggest that it may be involved in cytoskeletal organization.

  15. Transcription profiling provides insights into gene pathways involved in horn and scurs development in cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehnert Sigrid A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two types of horns are evident in cattle - fixed horns attached to the skull and a variation called scurs, which refers to small loosely attached horns. Cattle lacking horns are referred to as polled. Although both the Poll and Scurs loci have been mapped to BTA1 and 19 respectively, the underlying genetic basis of these phenotypes is unknown, and so far, no candidate genes regulating these developmental processes have been described. This study is the first reported attempt at transcript profiling to identify genes and pathways contributing to horn and scurs development in Brahman cattle, relative to polled counterparts. Results Expression patterns in polled, horned and scurs tissues were obtained using the Agilent 44 k bovine array. The most notable feature when comparing transcriptional profiles of developing horn tissues against polled was the down regulation of genes coding for elements of the cadherin junction as well as those involved in epidermal development. We hypothesize this as a key event involved in keratinocyte migration and subsequent horn development. In the polled-scurs comparison, the most prevalent differentially expressed transcripts code for genes involved in extracellular matrix remodelling, which were up regulated in scurs tissues relative to polled. Conclusion For this first time we describe networks of genes involved in horn and scurs development. Interestingly, we did not observe differential expression in any of the genes present on the fine mapped region of BTA1 known to contain the Poll locus.

  16. Functional Gene Diversity and Metabolic Potential of the Microbial Community in an Estuary-Shelf Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbes play crucial roles in various biogeochemical processes in the ocean, including carbon (C, nitrogen (N, and phosphorus (P cycling. Functional gene diversity and the structure of the microbial community determines its metabolic potential and therefore its ecological function in the marine ecosystem. However, little is known about the functional gene composition and metabolic potential of bacterioplankton in estuary areas. The East China Sea (ECS is a dynamic marginal ecosystem in the western Pacific Ocean that is mainly affected by input from the Changjiang River and the Kuroshio Current. Here, using a high-throughput functional gene microarray (GeoChip, we analyzed the functional gene diversity, composition, structure, and metabolic potential of microbial assemblages in different ECS water masses. Four water masses determined by temperature and salinity relationship showed different patterns of functional gene diversity and composition. Generally, functional gene diversity [Shannon–Weaner’s H and reciprocal of Simpson’s 1/(1-D] in the surface water masses was higher than that in the bottom water masses. The different presence and proportion of functional genes involved in C, N, and P cycling among the bacteria of the different water masses showed different metabolic preferences of the microbial populations in the ECS. Genes involved in starch metabolism (amyA and nplT showed higher proportion in microbial communities of the surface water masses than of the bottom water masses. In contrast, a higher proportion of genes involved in chitin degradation was observed in microorganisms of the bottom water masses. Moreover, we found a higher proportion of nitrogen fixation (nifH, transformation of hydroxylamine to nitrite (hao and ammonification (gdh genes in the microbial communities of the bottom water masses compared with those of the surface water masses. The spatial variation of microbial functional genes was significantly correlated

  17. Identification of novel type 2 diabetes candidate genes involved in the crosstalk between the mitochondrial and the insulin signaling systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M Mercader

    Full Text Available Type 2 Diabetes (T2D is a highly prevalent chronic metabolic disease with strong co-morbidity with obesity and cardiovascular diseases. There is growing evidence supporting the notion that a crosstalk between mitochondria and the insulin signaling cascade could be involved in the etiology of T2D and insulin resistance. In this study we investigated the molecular basis of this crosstalk by using systems biology approaches. We combined, filtered, and interrogated different types of functional interaction data, such as direct protein-protein interactions, co-expression analyses, and metabolic and signaling dependencies. As a result, we constructed the mitochondria-insulin (MITIN network, which highlights 286 genes as candidate functional linkers between these two systems. The results of internal gene expression analysis of three independent experimental models of mitochondria and insulin signaling perturbations further support the connecting roles of these genes. In addition, we further assessed whether these genes are involved in the etiology of T2D using the genome-wide association study meta-analysis from the DIAGRAM consortium, involving 8,130 T2D cases and 38,987 controls. We found modest enrichment of genes associated with T2D amongst our linker genes (p = 0.0549, including three already validated T2D SNPs and 15 additional SNPs, which, when combined, were collectively associated to increased fasting glucose levels according to MAGIC genome wide meta-analysis (p = 8.12×10(-5. This study highlights the potential of combining systems biology, experimental, and genome-wide association data mining for identifying novel genes and related variants that increase vulnerability to complex diseases.

  18. Transcriptome analysis identifies genes involved in ethanol response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Agave tequilana juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Córdova, Jesús; Drnevich, Jenny; Madrigal-Pulido, Jaime Alberto; Arrizon, Javier; Allen, Kirk; Martínez-Velázquez, Moisés; Alvarez-Maya, Ikuri

    2012-08-01

    During ethanol fermentation, yeast cells are exposed to stress due to the accumulation of ethanol, cell growth is altered and the output of the target product is reduced. For Agave beverages, like tequila, no reports have been published on the global gene expression under ethanol stress. In this work, we used microarray analysis to identify Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in the ethanol response. Gene expression of a tequila yeast strain of S. cerevisiae (AR5) was explored by comparing global gene expression with that of laboratory strain S288C, both after ethanol exposure. Additionally, we used two different culture conditions, cells grown in Agave tequilana juice as a natural fermentation media or grown in yeast-extract peptone dextrose as artificial media. Of the 6368 S. cerevisiae genes in the microarray, 657 genes were identified that had different expression responses to ethanol stress due to strain and/or media. A cluster of 28 genes was found over-expressed specifically in the AR5 tequila strain that could be involved in the adaptation to tequila yeast fermentation, 14 of which are unknown such as yor343c, ylr162w, ygr182c, ymr265c, yer053c-a or ydr415c. These could be the most suitable genes for transforming tequila yeast to increase ethanol tolerance in the tequila fermentation process. Other genes involved in response to stress (RFC4, TSA1, MLH1, PAU3, RAD53) or transport (CYB2, TIP20, QCR9) were expressed in the same cluster. Unknown genes could be good candidates for the development of recombinant yeasts with ethanol tolerance for use in industrial tequila fermentation.

  19. Identification and functional analysis of gene cluster involvement in biosynthesis of the cyclic lipopeptide antibiotic pelgipeptin produced by Paenibacillus elgii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Chao-Dong

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pelgipeptin, a potent antibacterial and antifungal agent, is a non-ribosomally synthesised lipopeptide antibiotic. This compound consists of a β-hydroxy fatty acid and nine amino acids. To date, there is no information about its biosynthetic pathway. Results A potential pelgipeptin synthetase gene cluster (plp was identified from Paenibacillus elgii B69 through genome analysis. The gene cluster spans 40.8 kb with eight open reading frames. Among the genes in this cluster, three large genes, plpD, plpE, and plpF, were shown to encode non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs, with one, seven, and one module(s, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis of the substrate specificity of all nine adenylation domains indicated that the sequence of the NRPS modules is well collinear with the order of amino acids in pelgipeptin. Additional biochemical analysis of four recombinant adenylation domains (PlpD A1, PlpE A1, PlpE A3, and PlpF A1 provided further evidence that the plp gene cluster involved in pelgipeptin biosynthesis. Conclusions In this study, a gene cluster (plp responsible for the biosynthesis of pelgipeptin was identified from the genome sequence of Paenibacillus elgii B69. The identification of the plp gene cluster provides an opportunity to develop novel lipopeptide antibiotics by genetic engineering.

  20. Regional repression of a Drosophila POU box gene in the endoderm involves inductive interactions between germ layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affolter, M; Walldorf, U; Kloter, U; Schier, A F; Gehring, W J

    1993-04-01

    An induction process occurring between the mesodermal and the endodermal germ layers has recently been described in the regulation of the Drosophila homeotic gene labial (lab). We report here that proper spatial regulation of the Drosophila POU box gene pdm-1 products also involves interaction between these two germ layers. pdm-1 transcripts are initially present in both the anterior and the posterior endodermal midgut primordia. Upon fusion of the two primordia, transcripts disappear from two regions in the endoderm, a central domain and an anterior domain. The anterior repression domain of pdm-1 is independent of the expression of known homeotic genes and genes encoding secreted signalling molecules in the visceral mesoderm, both for its positioning and its repression. Repression in the central domain requires both the homeotic gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx) and the decapentaplegic (dpp) gene, which encodes a secreted protein. Both of these genes are also required for lab induction. However, the analysis of pdm-1 expression in various mutant backgrounds indicates that the regulation of lab and pdm-1 across germ layers is controlled by different genetic cascades. Our study indicates that dpp is not the signal that dictates central pdm-1 repression across germ layers and suggests that in the same midgut region, different signalling pathways result in the differential activation or repression of potential transcription factors.

  1. Genes involved in cell adhesion and signaling: a new repertoire of retinoic acid receptor target genes in mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Tanoury, Ziad; Piskunov, Aleksandr; Andriamoratsiresy, Dina; Gaouar, Samia; Lutzing, Régis; Ye, Tao; Jost, Bernard; Keime, Céline; Rochette-Egly, Cécile

    2014-02-01

    Nuclear retinoic acid (RA) receptors (RARα, β and γ) are ligand-dependent transcription factors that regulate the expression of a battery of genes involved in cell differentiation and proliferation. They are also phosphoproteins and we previously showed the importance of their phosphorylation in their transcriptional activity. In the study reported here, we conducted a genome-wide analysis of the genes that are regulated by RARs in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) by comparing wild-type MEFs to MEFs lacking the three RARs. We found that in the absence of RA, RARs control the expression of several gene transcripts associated with cell adhesion. Consequently the knockout MEFs are unable to adhere and to spread on substrates and they display a disrupted network of actin filaments, compared with the WT cells. In contrast, in the presence of the ligand, RARs control the expression of other genes involved in signaling and in RA metabolism. Taking advantage of rescue cell lines expressing the RARα or RARγ subtypes (either wild-type or mutated at the N-terminal phosphorylation sites) in the null background, we found that the expression of RA-target genes can be controlled either by a specific single RAR or by a combination of RAR isotypes, depending on the gene. We also selected genes that require the phosphorylation of the receptors for their regulation by RA. Our results increase the repertoire of genes that are regulated by RARs and highlight the complexity and diversity of the transcriptional programs regulated by RARs, depending on the gene.

  2. An in silico analysis of the key genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis in Citrus sinensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano R. Lucheta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrus species are known by their high content of phenolic compounds, including a wide range of flavonoids. In plants, these compounds are involved in protection against biotic and abiotic stresses, cell structure, UV protection, attraction of pollinators and seed dispersal. In humans, flavonoid consumption has been related to increasing overall health and fighting some important diseases. The goals of this study were to identify expressed sequence tags (EST in Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck corresponding to genes involved in general phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and the key genes involved in the main flavonoids pathways (flavanones, flavones, flavonols, leucoanthocyanidins, anthocyanins and isoflavonoids. A thorough analysis of all related putative genes from the Citrus EST (CitEST database revealed several interesting aspects associated to these pathways and brought novel information with promising usefulness for both basic and biotechnological applications.

  3. EST analysis of Prorocentrum donghaiense with emphasis on genes involved in PCD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xiufang; Liu Yongjian; Yang Guanpin; Zhu Mingyuan; Li Ruixiang

    2009-01-01

    Prorocentrum donghaiense has caused large-scale red tides off the Chinese coast in recent years. Expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis was carried out for this dinoflagellate in order to identify the functional genes involved in its biological processes. A cDNA library was constructed for P. donghaiense at exponential growth phase, and 565 usable sequencing reads were obtained from 700 clones selected randomly. Messenger RNA corresponding reads were clustered into 36 contigs and 272 singletons (EST groups). Twenty-two EST groups were found to tag the genes involved in diverse biological processes including programmed cell death (PCD). Two EST groups showed significant homologies with the encoding genes of cysteine protease (caspase) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen, respectively, two key proteins involved in PCD.

  4. Identification of genes and pathways involved in retinal neovascularization by microarray analysis of two animal models of retinal angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recchia, Franco M; Xu, Lili; Penn, John S; Boone, Braden; Dexheimer, Phillip J

    2010-02-01

    Comparative retinal gene expression analysis in two rodent models of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) was performed to identify the genes and pathways involved in retinal neovascularization. Three independent experimental runs were conducted for each species, according to standard protocols for induction of OIR. Total retinal RNA was isolated at two time points, corresponding to the early response to relative hypoxia (P13 in mouse, P15 in rat) and to the later phase of maximum retinal neovascularization (P18 in mouse, P20 in rat) and was used to prepare labeled probes for hybridization. Gene expression was compared between normal and experimental conditions for each species at each time point. Probesets with a false-discovery rate of genes were confirmed by quantitative rtPCR. At the early time point, there were changes in 43 genes in each species, with two in common. Increased expression of members of the VEGF and ephrin receptor signaling pathways were identified in both models. At the later time point, there were changes in 26 genes in the rat and in 1622 in the mouse, with 13 in common. Four pathways were identified in both models. Genes and pathways known to be involved in angiogenesis, as well as other biologically plausible genes and pathways, were identified. This work serves as a comprehensive resource for the study of retinal neovascularization and identification of potential rational targets for antiangiogenic therapy.

  5. Investigation of yeast genes possibly involved in mtDNA stability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phelim Isichei

    function and structure on mtDNA stability in yeast, our results did not support those ... most studied model organism for acquisition of basic ... RNA interference of genes involved in mtDNA replication ... polymerase, results in reduced mtDNA copy number but .... found that RNAi of 4 genes (M01E5.2, T27F6.5, T26A5.6.

  6. Aquatic contaminants alter genes involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and gonadotropin release in largemouth bass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martyniuk, Christopher J. [Department of Physiological Sciences and Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Sanchez, Brian C. [Department of Forestry and Natural Resources and School of Civil Engineering, 195 Marsteller St., Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Szabo, Nancy J.; Denslow, Nancy D. [Department of Physiological Sciences and Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Sepulveda, Maria S., E-mail: mssepulv@purdue.edu [Department of Forestry and Natural Resources and School of Civil Engineering, 195 Marsteller St., Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2009-10-19

    Many aquatic contaminants potentially affect the central nervous system, however the underlying mechanisms of how toxicants alter normal brain function are not well understood. The objectives of this study were to compare the effects of emerging and prevalent environmental contaminants on the expression of brain transcripts with a role in neurotransmitter synthesis and reproduction. Adult male largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) were injected once for a 96 h duration with control (water or oil) or with one of two doses of a single chemical to achieve the following body burdens ({mu}g/g): atrazine (0.3 and 3.0), toxaphene (10 and 100), cadmium (CdCl{sub 2}) (0.000067 and 0.00067), polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) 126 (0.25 and 2.5), and phenanthrene (5 and 50). Partial largemouth bass gene segments were cloned for enzymes involved in neurotransmitter (glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, GAD65; tyrosine hydroxylase) and estrogen (brain aromatase; CYP19b) synthesis for real-time PCR assays. In addition, neuropeptides regulating feeding (neuropeptide Y) and reproduction (chicken GnRH-II, cGnRH-II; salmon GnRH, sGnRH) were also investigated. Of the chemicals tested, only cadmium, PCB 126, and phenanthrene showed any significant effects on the genes tested, while atrazine and toxaphene did not. Cadmium (0.000067 {mu}g/g) significantly increased cGnRH-II mRNA while PCB 126 (0.25 {mu}g/g) decreased GAD65 mRNA. Phenanthrene decreased GAD65 and tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA levels at the highest dose (50 {mu}g/g) but increased cGnRH-II mRNA at the lowest dose (5 {mu}g/g). CYP19b, NPY, and sGnRH mRNA levels were unaffected by any of the treatments. A hierarchical clustering dendrogram grouped PCB 126 and phenanthrene more closely than other chemicals with respect to the genes tested. This study demonstrates that brain transcripts important for neurotransmitter synthesis neuroendocrine function are potential targets for emerging and prevalent aquatic contaminants.

  7. sugE: A gene involved in tributyltin (TBT) resistance of Aeromonas molluscorum Av27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Andreia; Micaelo, Nuno; Félix, Vitor; Song, Jun-Young; Kitamura, Shin-Ichi; Suzuki, Satoru; Mendo, Sónia

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of bacterial resistance to tributyltin (TBT) is still unclear. The results herein presented contribute to clarify that mechanism in the TBT-resistant bacterium Aeromonas molluscorum Av27. We have identified and cloned a new gene that is involved in TBT resistance in this strain. The gene is highly homologous (84%) to the Aeromonas hydrophila-sugE gene belonging to the small multidrug resistance gene family (SMR), which includes genes involved in the transport of lipophilic drugs. In Av27, expression of the Av27-sugE was observed at the early logarithmic growth phase in the presence of a high TBT concentration (500 μM), thus suggesting the contribution of this gene for TBT resistance. E. coli cells transformed with Av27-sugE become resistant to ethidium bromide (EtBr), chloramphenicol (CP) and tetracycline (TE), besides TBT. According to the Moriguchi logP (miLogP) values, EtBr, CP and TE have similar properties and are substrates for the sugE-efflux system. Despite the different miLogP of TBT, E. coli cells transformed with Av27-sugE become resistant to this compound. So it seems that TBT is also a substrate for the SugE protein. The modelling studies performed also support this hypothesis. The data herein presented clearly indicate that sugE is involved in TBT resistance of this bacterium.

  8. An RNAi Screen for Genes Involved in Nanoscale Protrusion Formation on Corneal Lens in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Ryunosuke; Sato, Chiaki; Yamahama, Yumi; Kubo, Hideo; Hariyama, Takahiko; Kimura, Ken-Ichi

    2016-12-01

    The "moth-eye" structure, which is observed on the surface of corneal lens in several insects, supports anti-reflective and self-cleaning functions due to nanoscale protrusions known as corneal nipples. Although the morphology and function of the "moth-eye" structure, are relatively well studied, the mechanism of protrusion formation from cell-secreted substances is unknown. In Drosophila melanogaster, a compound eye consists of approximately 800 facets, the surface of which is formed by the corneal lens with nanoscale protrusions. In the present study, we sought to identify genes involved in "moth-eye" structure, formation in order to elucidate the developmental mechanism of the protrusions in Drosophila. We re-examined the aberrant patterns in classical glossy-eye mutants by scanning electron microscope and classified the aberrant patterns into groups. Next, we screened genes encoding putative structural cuticular proteins and genes involved in cuticular formation using eye specific RNAi silencing methods combined with the Gal4/UAS expression system. We identified 12 of 100 candidate genes, such as cuticular proteins family genes (Cuticular protein 23B and Cuticular protein 49Ah), cuticle secretion-related genes (Syntaxin 1A and Sec61 ββ subunit), ecdysone signaling and biosynthesis-related genes (Ecdysone receptor, Blimp-1, and shroud), and genes involved in cell polarity/cell architecture (Actin 5C, shotgun, armadillo, discs large1, and coracle). Although some of the genes we identified may affect corneal protrusion formation indirectly through general patterning defects in eye formation, these initial findings have encouraged us to more systematically explore the precise mechanisms underlying the formation of nanoscale protrusions in Drosophila.

  9. Identification by Gene Coregulation Mapping of Novel Genes involved in Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, J.L.A.; Dartel, van D.A.M.; Pronk, T.E.; Hendriksen, P.J.M.; Piersma, A.H.

    2011-01-01

    A combined analysis of data from a series of literature studies can lead to more reliable results than that based on a single study. A common problem in performing combined analyses of literature microarray gene expression data is that the original raw data are not always available and not always ea

  10. Intracellular delivery of potential therapeutic genes: prospects in cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Athirah; Sayyad, Mustak; Rosli, Rozita; Maruyama, Atsushi; Chowdhury, Ezharul H

    2014-01-01

    Conventional therapies for malignant cancer such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy are associated with poor survival rates owing to the development of cellular resistance to cancer drugs and the lack of targetability, resulting in unwanted adverse effects on healthy cells and necessitating the lowering of therapeutic dose with consequential lower efficacy of the treatment. Gene therapy employing different types of viral and non-viral carriers to transport gene(s) of interest and facilitating production of the desirable therapeutic protein(s) has tremendous prospects in cancer treatments due to the high-level of specificity in therapeutic action of the expressed protein(s) with diminished off-target effects, although cancer cell-specific delivery of transgene(s) still poses some challenges to be addressed. Depending on the potential therapeutic target genes, cancer gene therapy could be categorized into tumor suppressor gene replacement therapy, immune gene therapy and enzyme- or prodrug-based therapy. This review would shed light on the current progress of delivery of potentially therapeutic genes into various cancer cells in vitro and animal models utilizing a variety of viral and non-viral vectors.

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of genes involved in mycosporine-like amino acid biosynthesis in symbiotic dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosic, Nedeljka N

    2012-04-01

    Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) are multifunctional secondary metabolites involved in photoprotection in many marine organisms. As well as having broad ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectra (310-362 nm), these biological sunscreens are also involved in the prevention of oxidative stress. More than 20 different MAAs have been discovered so far, characterized by distinctive chemical structures and a broad ecological distribution. Additionally, UV-screening MAA metabolites have been investigated and used in biotechnology and cosmetics. The biosynthesis of MAAs has been suggested to occur via either the shikimate or pentose phosphate pathways. Despite their wide distribution in marine and freshwater species and also the commercial application in cosmetic products, there are still a number of uncertainties regarding the genetic, biochemical, and evolutionary origin of MAAs. Here, using a transcriptome-mining approach, we identify the gene counterparts from the shikimate or pentose phosphate pathway involved in MAA biosynthesis within the sequences of the reef-building coral symbiotic dinoflagellates (genus Symbiodinium). We also report the highly similar sequences of genes from the proposed MAA biosynthetic pathway involved in the metabolism of 4-deoxygadusol (direct MAA precursor) in various Symbiodinium strains confirming their algal origin and conserved nature. Finally, we reveal the separate identity of two O-methyltransferase genes, possibly involved in MAA biosynthesis, as well as nonribosomal peptide synthetase and adenosine triphosphate grasp homologs in symbiotic dinoflagellates. This study provides a biochemical and phylogenetic overview of the genes from the proposed MAA biosynthetic pathway with a focus on coral endosymbionts.

  12. Association analysis of schizophrenia on 18 genes involved in neuronal migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kähler, Anna K; Djurovic, Srdjan; Kulle, Bettina

    2008-01-01

    Several lines of evidence support the theory of schizophrenia (SZ) being a neurodevelopmental disorder. The structural, cytoarchitectural and functional brain abnormalities reported in patients with SZ, might be due to aberrant neuronal migration, since the final position of neurons affects...... neuronal function, morphology, and formation of synaptic connections. We have investigated the putative association between SZ and gene variants engaged in the neuronal migration process, by performing an association study on 839 cases and 1,473 controls of Scandinavian origin. Using a gene-wide approach......, tagSNPs in 18 candidate genes have been genotyped, with gene products involved in the neuron-to-glial cell adhesion, interactions with the DISC1 protein and/or rearrangements of the cytoskeleton. Of the 289 markers tested, 19 markers located in genes MDGA1, RELN, ITGA3, DLX1, SPARCL1, and ASTN1...

  13. Prevalence of chromosomal rearrangements involving non-ETS genes in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluth, Martina; Galal, Rami; Krohn, Antje; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Tsourlakis, Christina; Paustian, Lisa; Ahrary, Ramin; Ahmed, Malik; Scherzai, Sekander; Meyer, Anne; Sirma, Hüseyin; Korbel, Jan; Sauter, Guido; Schlomm, Thorsten; Simon, Ronald; Minner, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    Prostate cancer is characterized by structural rearrangements, most frequently including translocations between androgen-dependent genes and members of the ETS family of transcription factor like TMPRSS2:ERG. In a recent whole genome sequencing study we identified 140 gene fusions that were unrelated to ETS genes in 11 prostate cancers. The aim of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of non-ETS gene fusions. We randomly selected 27 of these rearrangements and analyzed them by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in a tissue microarray format containing 500 prostate cancers. Using break-apart FISH probes for one fusion partner each, we found rearrangements of 13 (48%) of the 27 analyzed genes in 300-400 analyzable cancers per gene. Recurrent breakage, often accompanied by partial deletion of the genes, was found for NCKAP5, SH3BGR and TTC3 in 3 (0.8%) tumors each, as well as for ARNTL2 and ENOX1 in 2 (0.5%) cancers each. One rearranged tumor sample was observed for each of VCL, ZNF578, IMMP2L, SLC16A12, PANK1, GPHN, LRP1 and ZHX2. Balanced rearrangements, indicating possible gene fusion, were found for ZNF578, SH3BGR, LPR12 and ZHX2 in individual cancers only. The results of the present study confirm that rearrangements involving non-ETS genes occur in prostate cancer, but demonstrate that they are highly individual and typically non-recurrent.

  14. Molecular characterization of genes encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase involved in proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in apple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuepeng eHan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Proanthocyanidins (PAs are the major component of phenolics in apple, but mechanisms involved in PA biosynthesis remain unclear. Here, the relationship between the PA biosynthesis and the expression of genes encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR and anthocyanidin reductase (ANR was investigated in fruit skin of one apple cultivar and three crabapples. Transcript levels of LAR1 and ANR2 genes were significantly correlated with the contents of catechin and epicatechin, respectively, which suggests their active roles in PA synthesis. Surprisingly, transcript levels for both LAR1 and LAR2 genes were almost undetectable in two crabapples that accumulated both flavan-3-ols and PAs. This contradicts the previous finding that LAR1 gene is a strong candidate regulating the accumulation of metabolites such as epicatechin and PAs in apple. Ectopic expression of apple MdLAR1 gene in tobacco suppresses expression of the late genes in anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway, resulting in loss of anthocyanin in flowers. Interestingly, a decrease in PA biosynthesis was also observed in flowers of transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing the MdLAR1 gene, which could be attributed to decreased expression of both the NtANR1 and NtANR2 genes. Our study not only confirms the in vivo function of apple LAR1 gene, but it is also helpful for understanding the mechanism of PA biosynthesis.

  15. Investigation of genes involved in nisin production in Enterococcus spp. strains isolated from raw goat milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perin, Luana Martins; Todorov, Svetoslav Dimitrov; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2016-09-01

    Different strains of Lactococcus lactis are capable of producing the bacteriocin nisin. However, genetic transfer mechanisms allow the natural occurrence of genes involved in nisin production in members of other bacterial genera, such as Enterococcus spp. In a previous study, nisA was identified in eight enterococci capable of producing antimicrobial substances. The aim of this study was to verify the presence of genes involved in nisin production in Enterococcus spp. strains, as well as nisin expression. The nisA genes from eight Enterococcus spp. strains were sequenced and the translated amino acid sequences were compared to nisin amino-acid sequences previously described in databases. Although containing nisin structural and maturation related genes, the enterococci strains tested in the present study did not present the immunity related genes (nisFEG and nisI). The translated sequences of nisA showed some point mutations, identical to those presented by Lactococcus strains isolated from goat milk. All enterococci were inhibited by nisin, indicating the absence of immunity and thus that nisin cannot be expressed. This study demonstrated for the first time the natural occurrence of nisin structural genes in Enterococcus strains and highlights the importance of providing evidence of a link between the presence of bacteriocin genes and their expression.

  16. Identification of genes involved in the response of banana to crown rot disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassois, Ludivine; Frettinger, Patrick; de Lapeyre de Bellaire, Luc; Lepoivre, Philippe; Jijakli, Haissam

    2011-01-01

    Variations in banana susceptibility to crown rot disease have been observed but the molecular mechanisms underlying these quantitative host-pathogen relationships are still unknown. This study was designed to compare gene expression between crowns of banana fruit showing a high susceptibility (S(+)) and crowns showing a low susceptibility (S(-)) to the disease. Comparisons were performed at two situation times: i) between crowns (S(+) and S(-)) collected 1 h before inoculation and ii) between crowns (S+ and S-) collected 13 days after inoculation. Gene expression comparisons were performed with cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and results were confirmed by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Among genes identified as differentially expressed between S(+) and S(-) crowns, two were involved in signal transduction, three in proteolytic machinery, two had similarity to pathogenesis-related protein 14, one to a CCR4-associated factor protein, and one to a cellulose synthase. Paradoxically, the overexpression of the cellulose synthase gene was associated with banana showing a high susceptibility in both pre- and post-inoculation situations. Finally, the cDNA-AFLP identified a gene that seems to be associated with the quantitative banana responses to crown rot disease; this gene encodes a dopamine-β-monooxygenase, which is involved in the catecholamine pathway. To our knowledge, this work is the first to address both pre- and post-infection gene expression with the same host-pathogen combination and distinct susceptibility levels.

  17. The gene bap, involved in biofilm production, is present in Staphylococcus spp. strains from nosocomial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Amina; Ceotto, Hilana; Giambiagi-Demarval, Marcia; dos Santos, Kátia Regina Netto; Nes, Ingolf F; Bastos, Maria do Carmo de Freire

    2009-06-01

    This study analyzed ten strains of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) involved in nosocomial infections in three Brazilian hospitals. Their antibiotic susceptibility profile showed that most strains exhibited multiple antibiotic resistance and possessed the mecA gene. The ability of these strains to adhere to polystyrene microtiter plates was also tested and nine of them proved to be biofilm producers at least in one of the three conditions tested: growth in TSB, in TSB supplemented with NaCl, or in TSB supplemented with glucose. The presence of the bap gene, which codes for the biofilm-associated protein (Bap), was investigated in all ten strains by PCR. AU strains were bop-positive and DNA sequencing experiments confirmed that the fragments amplified were indeed part of a bap gene. The presence of the icaA gene, one of the genes involved in polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA) formation, was also detected by PCR in eight of the ten strains tested. The two icaA-negative strains were either weak biofilm producer or no biofilm producer, although they were bop-positive. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the presence of the bap gene in nosocomial isolates of CNS, being also the first report on the presence of this gene in Staphylococcus haemolyticus and S. cohnii.

  18. De novo transcriptome sequencing of Momordica cochinchinensis to identify genes involved in the carotenoid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Tae Kyung; Rim, Yeonggil; Jang, Hui-Jeong; Kim, Cheol Hong; Park, Jongsun; Kumar, Ritesh; Lee, Sunghoon; Kim, Byung Chul; Bhak, Jong; Nguyen-Quoc, Binh; Kim, Seon-Won; Lee, Sang Yeol; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2012-07-01

    The ripe fruit of Momordica cochinchinensis Spreng, known as gac, is featured by very high carotenoid content. Although this plant might be a good resource for carotenoid metabolic engineering, so far, the genes involved in the carotenoid metabolic pathways in gac were unidentified due to lack of genomic information in the public database. In order to expedite the process of gene discovery, we have undertaken Illumina deep sequencing of mRNA prepared from aril of gac fruit. From 51,446,670 high-quality reads, we obtained 81,404 assembled unigenes with average length of 388 base pairs. At the protein level, gac aril transcripts showed about 81.5% similarity with cucumber proteomes. In addition 17,104 unigenes have been assigned to specific metabolic pathways in Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, and all of known enzymes involved in terpenoid backbones biosynthetic and carotenoid biosynthetic pathways were also identified in our library. To analyze the relationship between putative carotenoid biosynthesis genes and alteration of carotenoid content during fruit ripening, digital gene expression analysis was performed on three different ripening stages of aril. This study has revealed putative phytoene synthase, 15-cis-phytone desaturase, zeta-carotene desaturase, carotenoid isomerase and lycopene epsilon cyclase might be key factors for controlling carotenoid contents during aril ripening. Taken together, this study has also made availability of a large gene database. This unique information for gac gene discovery would be helpful to facilitate functional studies for improving carotenoid quantities.

  19. Transcriptome analysis identifies genes involved in adventitious branches formation of Gracilaria lichenoides in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenlei; Li, Huanqin; Lin, Xiangzhi; Yang, Shanjun; Wang, Zhaokai; Fang, Baishan

    2015-12-11

    Tissue culture could solve the problems associated with Gracilaria cultivation, including the consistent supply of high-quality seed stock, strain improvement, and efficient mass culture of high-yielding commercial strains. However, STC lags behind that of higher plants because of the paucity of genomic information. Transcriptome analysis and the identification of potential unigenes involved in the formation and regeneration of callus or direct induction of ABs are essential. Herein, the CK, EWAB and NPA G. lichenoides transcriptomes were analyzed using the Illumina sequencing platform in first time. A total of 17,922,453,300 nucleotide clean bases were generated and assembled into 21,294 unigenes, providing a total gene space of 400,912,038 nucleotides with an average length of 1,883 and N 50 of 5,055 nucleotides and a G + C content of 52.02%. BLAST analysis resulted in the assignment of 13,724 (97.5%), 3,740 (26.6%), 9,934 (70.6%), 10,611 (75.4%), 9,490 (67.4%), and 7,773 (55.2%) unigenes were annotated to the NR, NT, Swiss-Prot, KEGG, COG, and GO databases, respectively, and the total of annotated unigenes was 14,070. A total of 17,099 transcripts were predicted to possess open reading frames, including 3,238 predicted and 13,861 blasted based on protein databases. In addition, 3,287 SSRs were detected in G.lichenoides, providing further support for genetic variation and marker-assisted selection in the future. Our results suggest that auxin polar transport, auxin signal transduction, crosstalk with other endogenous plant hormones and antioxidant systems, play important roles for ABs formation in G. lichenoides explants in vitro. The present findings will facilitate further studies on gene discovery and on the molecular mechanisms underlying the tissue culture of seaweed.

  20. Involvement of the PRKCB1 gene in autistic disorder: significant genetic association and reduced neocortical gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintas, C; Sacco, R; Garbett, K; Mirnics, K; Militerni, R; Bravaccio, C; Curatolo, P; Manzi, B; Schneider, C; Melmed, R; Elia, M; Pascucci, T; Puglisi-Allegra, S; Reichelt, K-L; Persico, A M

    2009-07-01

    Protein kinase C enzymes play an important role in signal transduction, regulation of gene expression and control of cell division and differentiation. The fsI and betaII isoenzymes result from the alternative splicing of the PKCbeta gene (PRKCB1), previously found to be associated with autism. We performed a family-based association study in 229 simplex and 5 multiplex families, and a postmortem study of PRKCB1 gene expression in temporocortical gray matter (BA41/42) of 11 autistic patients and controls. PRKCB1 gene haplotypes are significantly associated with autism (Pautism-associated alleles displayed mRNA levels comparable to those of controls. Whole genome expression analysis unveiled a partial disruption in the coordinated expression of PKCbeta-driven genes, including several cytokines. These results confirm the association between autism and PRKCB1 gene variants, point toward PKCbeta roles in altered epithelial permeability, demonstrate a significant downregulation of brain PRKCB1 gene expression in autism and suggest that it could represent a compensatory adjustment aimed at limiting an ongoing dysreactive immune process. Altogether, these data underscore potential PKCbeta roles in autism pathogenesis and spur interest in the identification and functional characterization of PRKCB1 gene variants conferring autism vulnerability.

  1. Genes and Gene Networks Involved in Sodium Fluoride-Elicited Cell Death Accompanying Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Oral Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Tabuchi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Here, to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying cell death induced by sodium fluoride (NaF, we analyzed gene expression patterns in rat oral epithelial ROE2 cells exposed to NaF using global-scale microarrays and bioinformatics tools. A relatively high concentration of NaF (2 mM induced cell death concomitant with decreases in mitochondrial membrane potential, chromatin condensation and caspase-3 activation. Using 980 probe sets, we identified 432 up-regulated and 548 down-regulated genes, that were differentially expressed by >2.5-fold in the cells treated with 2 mM of NaF and categorized them into 4 groups by K-means clustering. Ingenuity® pathway analysis revealed several gene networks from gene clusters. The gene networks Up-I and Up-II included many up-regulated genes that were mainly associated with the biological function of induction or prevention of cell death, respectively, such as Atf3, Ddit3 and Fos (for Up-I and Atf4 and Hspa5 (for Up-II. Interestingly, knockdown of Ddit3 and Hspa5 significantly increased and decreased the number of viable cells, respectively. Moreover, several endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress-related genes including, Ddit3, Atf4 and Hapa5, were observed in these gene networks. These findings will provide further insight into the molecular mechanisms of NaF-induced cell death accompanying ER stress in oral epithelial cells.

  2. The ctnG gene encodes carbonic anhydrase involved in mycotoxin citrinin biosynthesis from Monascus aurantiacus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Ping; Tang, Xiao; Wu, Wei; Xu, Yang; Huang, Zhi-Bing; He, Qing-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Citrinin, a fungal secondary metabolite of polyketide origin, is moderately nephrotoxic to vertebrates, including humans. Citrinin is synthesised by condensation of acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA. Six genes involved in the citrinin biosynthesis, including pksCT, ctnA and ctnB, have been cloned in Monascus purpureus. The pksCT gene encodes a polyketide synthase; ctnA is a regulatory factor; and ctnB encodes an oxidoreductase. When the three genes were respectively disrupted, the disruption strains drastically decreased citrinin production or barely produced citrinin. Ten new genes have been discovered in Monascus aurantiacus besides the above six genes. One of these gene displayed the highest similarity to the β-carbonic anhydrase gene from Aspergillus oryzae (74% similarity) and was designated ctnG. To learn more about the citrinin biosynthetic pathway, a ctnG-replacement vector was constructed to disrupt ctnG with the hygromycin resistance gene as the selection marker, then transformed into M. aurantiacus Li AS3.4384 by a protoplast-PEG method. The citrinin content of three disruptants was reduced to about 50%, meanwhile pigment production decreased by 23%, respectively, over those of the wild-type strains. ctnG was deduced to be involved in the formation of malonyl-CoA as a common precursor of red pigments and citrinin. Therefore, the disruption of the ctnG gene decreased citrinin and pigment production. M. aurantiacus Li AS3.4384 can produce higher concentrations of citrinin than other strains such as M. purpureus and M. ruber. Establishing the function of citrinin biosynthetic genes in M. aurantiacus is helpful in understanding the citrinin synthetic pathway and adopting some strategies to control contamination.

  3. [The gene wxcA of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris 8004 strain involved in EPS yield].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guang-Tao; Tang, Ji-Liang; Wei, Guang-Ning; He, Yong-Qiang; Chen, Bao-Shan

    2004-07-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), the pathogenic agent of black rot disease in cruciferous plants, produces large amount of extracellular polysaccharide (EPS), which has found wide applications in industry. For the great commercial value of the xanthan gum, many of the genes involved in EPS biosynthesis have been cloned and the mechanism of EPS biosynthesis also has been studied. In order to clone genes involved in EPS biosynthesis, Xcc wild-type strain 8004 was mutagenized with transposon Tn5 gusA5, and a number of EPS-defective mutants were isolated in our previous work. The Tn5 gusA5 inserted sites of these mutants were located by using thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR, and results showed that two EPS-defective mutants were insertion mutants of the gene wxcA which involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis. The gene wxcA involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis but dose not extracellular polysaccharide in others' report. wxcA::Tn5 gusA5 mutant 021C12, the polar mutant, was complemented with recombinant plasmid pLATC8570 harboring an intact wxcA gene in this work, but the yield of EPS of the wxcA::Tn5 gusA5 mutant was not restored. In order to identify the function of wxcA gene of Xcc 8004 strain, the gene wxcA was deleted by gene replacement strategy, and the no-polar mutant of wxcA was obtained. DeltawxcA mutant strain, named Xcc 8570, was confirmed by using both PCR and southern analysis. Beside the LPS biosynthesis of deltawxcA mutant was affected, The EPS yield of deltawxcA mutant strain reduced by 50% as compared with the wild-type strain 8004. DeltawxcA mutant could be complemented in trans with the intact wxcA gene, and the EPS yield of the mutant was restored. The combined data showed that wxcA gene not only involved in LPS biosynthesis but also EPS yield in Xcc 8004 strain.

  4. Transcriptome Analysis in Rat Kidneys: Importance of Genes Involved in Programmed Hypertension

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    You-Lin Tain

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Suboptimal conditions in pregnancy can elicit long-term effects on the health of offspring. The most common outcome is programmed hypertension. We examined whether there are common genes and pathways in the kidney are responsible for generating programmed hypertension among three different models using next generation RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq technology. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats received dexamethasone (DEX, 0.1 mg/kg from gestational day 16 to 22, 60% high-fructose (HF diet, or NG-nitro-l-arginine-methyester (l-NAME, 60 mg/kg/day to conduct DEX, HF, or l-NAME model respectively. All three models elicited programmed hypertension in adult male offspring. We observed five shared genes (Bcl6, Dmrtc1c, Egr1, Inmt, and Olr1668 among three different models. The identified differential genes (DEGs that are related to regulation of blood pressure included Aqp2, Ptgs1, Eph2x, Hba-a2, Apln, Guca2b, Hmox1, and Npy. RNA-Seq identified genes in arachidonic acid metabolism are potentially gatekeeper genes contributing to programmed hypertension. In addition, HF and DEX increased expression and activity of soluble epoxide hydrolase (Ephx2 gene encoding protein. Conclusively, the DEGs in arachidonic acid metabolism are potentially gatekeeper genes in programmed hypertension. The roles of DEGs identified by the RNA-Seq in this study deserve further clarification, to develop the potential interventions in the prevention of programmed hypertension.

  5. EFFECTS OF AMINO ACIDS ON THE MEMBRANE POTENTIAL OF TOAD OOCYTES AND THE MECHANISMS INVOLVED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGYu-Feng; CHENGJiun; CHENGZhi-Ping

    1989-01-01

    The etTects of 23 amino acids on the membrane potential of toad ( Bufo bufo gargarizans ) oocytes and the mechanisms involved were investigated in vitro by means of microelectrode. At a concentration of I mmol/L-alanine, leucine and lyaine induced signfiant depolarization, and tryptophan provoked a marked hyperpolarization during

  6. RET is a potential tumor suppressor gene in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yanxin; Tsuchiya, Karen D.; Park, Dong Il; Fausel, Rebecca; Kanngurn, Samornmas; Welcsh, Piri; Dzieciatkowski, Slavomir; Wang, Jianping; Grady, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer arises as the consequence of mutations and epigenetic alterations that activate oncogenes and inactivate tumor suppressor genes. Through a genome-wide screen for methylated genes in colon neoplasms, we identified aberrantly methylated RET in colorectal cancer. RET, a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase and a receptor for the GDNF-family ligands, was one of the first oncogenes to be identified and has been shown to be an oncogene in thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma. However, unexpectedly, we found RET is methylated in 27% of colon adenomas and in 63% of colorectal cancers, and now provide evidence that RET has tumor suppressor activity in colon cancer. The aberrant methylation of RET correlates with decreased RET expression, whereas the restoration of RET in colorectal cancer cell lines results in apoptosis. Furthermore, in support of a tumor suppressor function of RET, mutant RET has also been found in primary colorectal cancer. We now show that these mutations inactivate RET, which is consistent with RET being a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. These findings suggest that the aberrant methylation of RET and the mutational inactivation of RET promote colorectal cancer formation and that RET can serve as a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. Moreover, the increased frequency of methylated RET in colon cancers compared to adenomas suggests RET inactivation is involved in the progression of colon adenomas to cancer. PMID:22751117

  7. ESTs analysis reveals putative genes involved in symbiotic seed germination in Dendrobium officinale.

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    Ming-Ming Zhao

    Full Text Available Dendrobiumofficinale (Orchidaceae is one of the world's most endangered plants with great medicinal value. In nature, D. officinale seeds must establish symbiotic relationships with fungi to germinate. However, the molecular events involved in the interaction between fungus and plant during this process are poorly understood. To isolate the genes involved in symbiotic germination, a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH cDNA library of symbiotically germinated D. officinale seeds was constructed. From this library, 1437 expressed sequence tags (ESTs were clustered to 1074 Unigenes (including 902 singletons and 172 contigs, which were searched against the NCBI non-redundant (NR protein database (E-value cutoff, e(-5. Based on sequence similarity with known proteins, 579 differentially expressed genes in D. officinale were identified and classified into different functional categories by Gene Ontology (GO, Clusters of orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathways. The expression levels of 15 selected genes emblematic of symbiotic germination were confirmed via real-time quantitative PCR. These genes were classified into various categories, including defense and stress response, metabolism, transcriptional regulation, transport process and signal transduction pathways. All transcripts were upregulated in the symbiotically germinated seeds (SGS. The functions of these genes in symbiotic germination were predicted. Furthermore, two fungus-induced calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs, which were upregulated 6.76- and 26.69-fold in SGS compared with un-germinated seeds (UGS, were cloned from D. officinale and characterized for the first time. This study provides the first global overview of genes putatively involved in D. officinale symbiotic seed germination and provides a foundation for further functional research regarding symbiotic relationships in orchids.

  8. Field transcriptome revealed critical developmental and physiological transitions involved in the expression of growth potential in japonica rice

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    Kamatsuki Kaori

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant growth depends on synergistic interactions between internal and external signals, and yield potential of crops is a manifestation of how these complex factors interact, particularly at critical stages of development. As an initial step towards developing a systems-level understanding of the biological processes underlying the expression of overall agronomic potential in cereal crops, a high-resolution transcriptome analysis of rice was conducted throughout life cycle of rice grown under natural field conditions. Results A wide range of gene expression profiles based on 48 organs and tissues at various developmental stages identified 731 organ/tissue specific genes as well as 215 growth stage-specific expressed genes universally in leaf blade, leaf sheath, and root. Continuous transcriptome profiling of leaf from transplanting until harvesting further elucidated the growth-stage specificity of gene expression and uncovered two major drastic changes in the leaf transcriptional program. The first major change occurred before the panicle differentiation, accompanied by the expression of RFT1, a putative florigen gene in long day conditions, and the downregulation of the precursors of two microRNAs. This transcriptome change was also associated with physiological alterations including phosphate-homeostasis state as evident from the behavior of several key regulators such as miR399. The second major transcriptome change occurred just after flowering, and based on analysis of sterile mutant lines, we further revealed that the formation of strong sink, i.e., a developing grain, is not the major cause but is rather a promoter of this change. Conclusions Our study provides not only the genetic basis for functional genomics in rice but also new insight into understanding the critical physiological processes involved in flowering and seed development, that could lead to novel strategies for optimizing crop productivity.

  9. Molecular Cloning, Expression, and Identification of Bre Genes Involved in Glycosphingolipids Synthesis in Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dandan; Xiao, Yutao; Hussain Dhiloo, Khalid; Soberon, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra; Wu, Kongming

    2016-05-17

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) play important roles in the cellular biology of vertebrate and invertebrate organisms, such as cell differentiation, tumor metastasis, and cell coordination. GSLs also serve as receptors for different bacterial toxins. For example, in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, GSLs function as receptors of the insecticidal Cry toxins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), and mutations in bre genes involved in GSLs synthesis resulted in resistance to Cry5 toxin in this organism. However, the information of GSLs function in insects is still limited. In this study, three genes for glycosyltransferases, bre2, bre3, and bre4, from Helicoverpa armigera were identified and cloned. The previously reported bre5 gene from H. armigera was also analyzed. Protein sequence alignments revealed that proteins codified by H. armigera Bre shared high identity with homologous proteins from other organisms. Expression profile analysis revealed that the expressions of bre genes varied in the different tissues and also in the different developmental stages of H. armigera. Finally, the heterologous expression of bre genes in Trichoplusia ni Hi5 cell line showed that the corresponding translated proteins were localized in the cytoplasm of Hi5 cells. These results provide the bases for further functional studies of bre genes and analyzing potential roles of GSLs in mode of action of Cry1A toxin in H. armigera.

  10. Gene expression changes in phosphorus deficient potato (Solanum tuberosum L. leaves and the potential for diagnostic gene expression markers.

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    John P Hammond

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are compelling economic and environmental reasons to reduce our reliance on inorganic phosphate (Pi fertilisers. Better management of Pi fertiliser applications is one option to improve the efficiency of Pi fertiliser use, whilst maintaining crop yields. Application rates of Pi fertilisers are traditionally determined from analyses of soil or plant tissues. Alternatively, diagnostic genes with altered expression under Pi limiting conditions that suggest a physiological requirement for Pi fertilisation, could be used to manage Pifertiliser applications, and might be more precise than indirect measurements of soil or tissue samples. RESULTS: We grew potato (Solanum tuberosum L. plants hydroponically, under glasshouse conditions, to control their nutrient status accurately. Samples of total leaf RNA taken periodically after Pi was removed from the nutrient solution were labelled and hybridised to potato oligonucleotide arrays. A total of 1,659 genes were significantly differentially expressed following Pi withdrawal. These included genes that encode proteins involved in lipid, protein, and carbohydrate metabolism, characteristic of Pi deficient leaves and included potential novel roles for genes encoding patatin like proteins in potatoes. The array data were analysed using a support vector machine algorithm to identify groups of genes that could predict the Pi status of the crop. These groups of diagnostic genes were tested using field grown potatoes that had either been fertilised or unfertilised. A group of 200 genes could correctly predict the Pi status of field grown potatoes. CONCLUSIONS: This paper provides a proof-of-concept demonstration for using microarrays and class prediction tools to predict the Pi status of a field grown potato crop. There is potential to develop this technology for other biotic and abiotic stresses in field grown crops. Ultimately, a better understanding of crop stresses may improve our management

  11. Human amniotic fluid stem cells as a model for functional studies of genes involved in human genetic diseases or oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Margit; Dolznig, Helmut; Schipany, Katharina; Mikula, Mario; Brandau, Oliver; Hengstschläger, Markus

    2011-09-01

    Besides their putative usage for therapies, stem cells are a promising tool for functional studies of genes involved in human genetic diseases or oncogenesis. For this purpose induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be derived from patients harbouring specific mutations. In contrast to adult stem cells, iPS cells are pluripotent and can efficiently be grown in culture. However, iPS cells are modulated due to the ectopic induction of pluripotency, harbour other somatic mutations accumulated during the life span of the source cells, exhibit only imperfectly cleared epigenetic memory of the source cell, and are often genomically instable. In addition, iPS cells from patients only allow the investigation of mutations, which are not prenatally lethal. Embryonic stem (ES) cells have a high proliferation and differentiation potential, but raise ethical issues. Human embryos, which are not transferred in the course of in vitro fertilization, because of preimplantation genetic diagnosis of a genetic defect, are still rarely donated for the establishment of ES cell lines. In addition, their usage for studies on gene functions for oncogenesis is hampered by the fact the ES cells are already tumorigenic per se. In 2003 amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells have been discovered, which meanwhile have been demonstrated to harbour the potential to differentiate into cells of all three germ layers. Monoclonal human AFS cell lines derived from amniocenteses have a high proliferative potential, are genomically stable and are not associated with ethical controversies. Worldwide amniocenteses are performed for routine human genetic diagnosis. We here discuss how generation and banking of monoclonal human AFS cell lines with specific chromosomal aberrations or monogenic disease mutations would allow to study the functional consequences of disease causing mutations. In addition, recently a protocol for efficient and highly reproducible siRNA-mediated long-term knockdown of endogenous gene

  12. Eucalyptus hairy roots, a fast, efficient and versatile tool to explore function and expression of genes involved in wood formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasencia, Anna; Soler, Marçal; Dupas, Annabelle; Ladouce, Nathalie; Silva-Martins, Guilherme; Martinez, Yves; Lapierre, Catherine; Franche, Claudine; Truchet, Isabelle; Grima-Pettenati, Jacqueline

    2016-06-01

    Eucalyptus are of tremendous economic importance being the most planted hardwoods worldwide for pulp and paper, timber and bioenergy. The recent release of the Eucalyptus grandis genome sequence pointed out many new candidate genes potentially involved in secondary growth, wood formation or lineage-specific biosynthetic pathways. Their functional characterization is, however, hindered by the tedious, time-consuming and inefficient transformation systems available hitherto for eucalypts. To overcome this limitation, we developed a fast, reliable and efficient protocol to obtain and easily detect co-transformed E. grandis hairy roots using fluorescent markers, with an average efficiency of 62%. We set up conditions both to cultivate excised roots in vitro and to harden composite plants and verified that hairy root morphology and vascular system anatomy were similar to wild-type ones. We further demonstrated that co-transformed hairy roots are suitable for medium-throughput functional studies enabling, for instance, protein subcellular localization, gene expression patterns through RT-qPCR and promoter expression, as well as the modulation of endogenous gene expression. Down-regulation of the Eucalyptus cinnamoyl-CoA reductase1 (EgCCR1) gene, encoding a key enzyme in lignin biosynthesis, led to transgenic roots with reduced lignin levels and thinner cell walls. This gene was used as a proof of concept to demonstrate that the function of genes involved in secondary cell wall biosynthesis and wood formation can be elucidated in transgenic hairy roots using histochemical, transcriptomic and biochemical approaches. The method described here is timely because it will accelerate gene mining of the genome for both basic research and industry purposes.

  13. Isolation of genes (nif/hup cosmids) involved in hydrogenase and nitrogenase activities in Rhizobium japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hom, S S; Graham, L A; Maier, R J

    1985-03-01

    Recombinant cosmids containing a Rhizobium japonicum gene involved in both hydrogenase (Hup) and nitrogenase (Nif) activities were isolated. An R. japonicum gene bank utilizing broad-host-range cosmid pLAFR1 was conjugated into Hup- Nif- R. japonicum strain SR139. Transconjugants containing the nif/hup cosmid were identified by their resistance to tetracycline (Tcr) and ability to grow chemoautotrophically (Aut+) with hydrogen. All Tcr Aut+ transconjugants possessed high levels of H2 uptake activity, as determined amperometrically. Moreover, all Hup+ transconjugants tested possessed the ability to reduce acetylene (Nif+) in soybean nodules. Cosmid DNAs from 19 Hup+ transconjugants were transferred to Escherichia coli by transformation. When the cosmids were restricted with EcoRI, 15 of the 19 cosmids had a restriction pattern with 13.2-, 4.0-, 3.0-, and 2.5-kilobase DNA fragments. Six E. coli transformants containing the nif/hup cosmids were conjugated with strain SR139. All strain SR139 transconjugants were Hup+ Nif+. Moreover, one nif/hup cosmid was transferred to 15 other R. japonicum Hup- mutants. Hup+ transconjugants of six of the Hup- mutants appeared at a frequency of 1.0, whereas the transconjugants of the other nine mutants remained Hup-. These results indicate that the nif/hup gene cosmids contain a gene involved in both nitrogenase and hydrogenase activities and at least one and perhaps other hup genes which are exclusively involved in H2 uptake activity.

  14. A Pilot Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Potential Metabolic Pathways Involved in Tinnitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, Annick; Van Camp, Guy; Van de Heyning, Paul; Fransen, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Tinnitus, the perception of an auditory phantom sound in the form of ringing, buzzing, roaring, or hissing in the absence of an external sound source, is perceived by ~15% of the population and 2.5% experiences a severely bothersome tinnitus. The contribution of genes on the development of tinnitus is still under debate. The current manuscript reports a pilot Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) into tinnitus, in a small cohort of 167 independent tinnitus subjects, and 749 non-tinnitus controls, who were collected as part of a cross-sectional study. After genotyping, imputation, and quality checking, the association between the tinnitus phenotype and 4,000,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was tested followed by gene set enrichment analysis. None of the SNPs reached the threshold for genome-wide significance (p tinnitus phenotype. Despite the lack of genome-wide significant SNPs, which is, at least in part, due to the limited sample size of the current study, evidence was found for a genetic involvement in tinnitus. Gene set enrichment analysis showed several metabolic pathways to be significantly enriched with SNPs having a low p-value in the GWAS. These pathways are involved in oxidative stress, endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) stress, and serotonin reception mediated signaling. These results are a promising basis for further research into the genetic basis of tinnitus, including GWAS with larger sample sizes and considering tinnitus subtypes for which a greater genetic contribution is more likely. PMID:28303087

  15. Variable phenotypes associated with 10q23 microdeletions involving the PTEN and BMPR1A genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menko, F.H.; Kneepkens, C.M.; Leeuw, N. de; Peeters, E.A.; Maldergem, L Van; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Davidson, R.; Rozendaal, L.; Lasham, C.A.; Peeters-Scholte, C.M.; Jansweijer, M.C.E.; Hilhorst-Hofstee, Y.; Gille, J.J.P.; Heins, Y.M.; Nieuwint, A.W.; Sistermans, E.A.

    2008-01-01

    Infantile juvenile polyposis is a rare disease with severe gastrointestinal symptoms and a grave clinical course. Recently, 10q23 microdeletions involving the PTEN and BMPR1A genes were found in four patients with infantile juvenile polyposis. It was hypothesized that a combined and synergistic effe

  16. Modulation of genes involved in inflammation and cell death in atherosclerosis-susceptible mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zadelaar, Anna Susanne Maria

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis we focus on atherosclerosis as the main cause of cardiovascular disease. Since inflammation and cell death are important processes in the onset and progression of atherosclerosis, we investigate the role of several genes involved in inflammation and cell death in the vessel wall and

  17. Proteomics of Wheat Endosperm: a Tool to Find Genes Involved in Kernel Composition and Quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G. Branlard; E. Bancel; I. Nadaud

    2007-01-01

    @@ The composition of the wheat kernel is the result of the expression of thousands of genes translated in enzymes involved in all the biochemical pathways that are needed for endosperm cell functions and also for the accumulation of storage proteins and starch.

  18. Alcohol-induced histone acetylation reveals a gene network involved in alcohol tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Ghezzi

    Full Text Available Sustained or repeated exposure to sedating drugs, such as alcohol, triggers homeostatic adaptations in the brain that lead to the development of drug tolerance and dependence. These adaptations involve long-term changes in the transcription of drug-responsive genes as well as an epigenetic restructuring of chromosomal regions that is thought to signal and maintain the altered transcriptional state. Alcohol-induced epigenetic changes have been shown to be important in the long-term adaptation that leads to alcohol tolerance and dependence endophenotypes. A major constraint impeding progress is that alcohol produces a surfeit of changes in gene expression, most of which may not make any meaningful contribution to the ethanol response under study. Here we used a novel genomic epigenetic approach to find genes relevant for functional alcohol tolerance by exploiting the commonalities of two chemically distinct alcohols. In Drosophila melanogaster, ethanol and benzyl alcohol induce mutual cross-tolerance, indicating that they share a common mechanism for producing tolerance. We surveyed the genome-wide changes in histone acetylation that occur in response to these drugs. Each drug induces modifications in a large number of genes. The genes that respond similarly to either treatment, however, represent a subgroup enriched for genes important for the common tolerance response. Genes were functionally tested for behavioral tolerance to the sedative effects of ethanol and benzyl alcohol using mutant and inducible RNAi stocks. We identified a network of genes that are essential for the development of tolerance to sedation by alcohol.

  19. Global analysis of WRKY transcription factor superfamily in Setaria identifies potential candidates involved in abiotic stress signalling

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    Mehanathan eMuthamilarasan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors (TFs are major players in stress signalling and constitute an integral part of signalling networks. Among the major TFs, WRKY proteins play pivotal roles in regulation of transcriptional reprogramming associated with stress responses. In view of this, genome- and transcriptome-wide identification of WRKY TF family was performed in the C4 model plants, Setaria italica (SiWRKY and S. viridis (SvWRKY, respectively. The study identified 105 SiWRKY and 44 SvWRKY proteins that were computationally analysed for their physicochemical properties. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis classified these proteins into three major groups, namely I, II and III with majority of WRKY proteins belonging to group II (53 SiWRKY and 23 SvWRKY, followed by group III (39 SiWRKY and 11 SvWRKY and group I (10 SiWRKY and 6 SvWRKY. Group II proteins were further classified into 5 subgroups (IIa to IIe based on their phylogeny. Domain analysis showed the presence of WRKY motif and zinc finger-like structures in these proteins along with additional domains in a few proteins. All SiWRKY genes were physically mapped on the S. italica genome and their duplication analysis revealed that 10 and 8 gene pairs underwent tandem and segmental duplications, respectively. Comparative mapping of SiWRKY and SvWRKY genes in related C4 panicoid genomes demonstrated the orthologous relationships between these genomes. In silico expression analysis of SiWRKY and SvWRKY genes showed their differential expression patterns in different tissues and stress conditions. Expression profiling of candidate SiWRKY genes in response to stress (dehydration and salinity and hormone treatments (abscisic acid, salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate suggested the putative involvement of SiWRKY066 and SiWRKY082 in stress and hormone signalling. These genes could be potential candidates for further characterization to delineate their functional roles in abiotic stress signalling.

  20. Integration of gene expression and GWAS results supports involvement of calcium signaling in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzberg, L; Katsel, P; Roussos, P; Haroutunian, V; Domany, E

    2015-05-01

    The number of Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) of schizophrenia is rapidly growing. However, the small effect of individual genes limits the number of reliably implicated genes, which are too few and too diverse to perform reliable pathway analysis; hence the biological roles of the genes implicated in schizophrenia are unclear. To overcome these limitations we combine GWAS with genome-wide expression data from human post-mortem brain samples of schizophrenia patients and controls, taking these steps: 1) Identify 36 GWAS-based genes which are expressed in our dataset. 2) Find a cluster of 19 genes with highly correlated expression. We show that this correlation pattern is robust and statistically significant. 3) GO-enrichment analysis of these 19 genes reveals significant enrichment of ion channels and calcium-related processes. This finding (based on analyzing a small number of coherently expressed genes) is validated and enhanced in two ways: First, the emergence of calcium channels and calcium signaling is corroborated by identifying proteins that interact with those encoded by the cluster of 19. Second, extend the 19 cluster genes into 1028 genes, whose expression is highly correlated with the cluster's average profile. When GO-enrichment analysis is performed on this extended set, many schizophrenia related pathways appear, with calcium-related processes enriched with high statistical significance. Our results give further, expression-based validation to GWAS results, support a central role of calcium-signaling in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, and point to additional pathways potentially related to the disease.

  1. Identification of novel genes involved in gastric carcinogenesis by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottaghi-Dastjerdi, N; Soltany-Rezaee-Rad, M; Sepehrizadeh, Z; Roshandel, G; Ebrahimifard, F; Setayesh, N

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most common and life-threatening types of malignancies. Identification of the differentially expressed genes in GC is one of the best approaches for establishing new diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Furthermore, these investigations could advance our knowledge about molecular biology and the carcinogenesis of this cancer. To screen for the overexpressed genes in gastric adenocarcinoma, we performed suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) on gastric adenocarcinoma tissue and the corresponding normal gastric tissue, and eight genes were found to be overexpressed in the tumor compared with those of the normal tissue. The genes were ribosomal protein L18A, RNase H2 subunit B, SEC13, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4A1, tetraspanin 8, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2, NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4, and mitochondrially encoded ATP synthase 6. The common functions among the identified genes include involvement in protein synthesis, involvement in genomic stability maintenance, metastasis, metabolic improvement, cell signaling pathways, and chemoresistance. Our results provide new insights into the molecular biology of GC and drug discovery: each of the identified genes could be further investigated as targets for prognosis evaluation, diagnosis, treatment, evaluation of the response to new anticancer drugs, and determination of the molecular pathogenesis of GC.

  2. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Putative Genes Involved in Iridoid Biosynthesis in Rehmannia glutinosa

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    Xianen Li

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Rehmannia glutinosa, one of the most widely used herbal medicines in the Orient, is rich in biologically active iridoids. Despite their medicinal importance, no molecular information about the iridoid biosynthesis in this plant is presently available. To explore the transcriptome of R. glutinosa and investigate genes involved in iridoid biosynthesis, we used massively parallel pyrosequencing on the 454 GS FLX Titanium platform to generate a substantial EST dataset. Based on sequence similarity searches against the public sequence databases, the sequences were first annotated and then subjected to Gene Ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG based analysis. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that the 454 assembly contained a set of genes putatively involved in iridoid biosynthesis. Significantly, homologues of the secoiridoid pathway genes that were only identified in terpenoid indole alkaloid producing plants were also identified, whose presence implied that route II iridoids and route I iridoids share common enzyme steps in the early stage of biosynthesis. The gene expression patterns of four prenyltransferase transcripts were analyzed using qRT-PCR, which shed light on their putative functions in tissues of R. glutinosa. The data explored in this study will provide valuable information for further studies concerning iridoid biosynthesis.

  3. Regulation of genes involved in cell wall synthesis and structure during Ustilago maydis dimorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo-Briones, Mariana; Ruiz-Herrera, José

    2013-02-01

    The cell wall is the structure that provides the shape to fungal cells and protects them from the difference in osmotic pressure existing between the cytosol and the external medium. Accordingly, changes in structure and composition of the fungal wall must occur during cell differentiation, including the dimorphic transition of fungi. We analyzed, by use of microarrays, the transcriptional regulation of the 639 genes identified to be involved in cell wall synthesis and structure plus the secretome of the Basidiomycota species Ustilago maydis during its dimorphic transition induced by a change in pH. Of these, 189 were differentially expressed during the process, and using as control two monomorphic mutants, one yeast like and the other mycelium constitutive, 66 genes specific of dimorphism were identified. Most of these genes were up-regulated in the mycelial phase. These included CHS genes, genes involved in β-1,6-glucan synthesis, N-glycosylation, and proteins containing a residue of glycosylphosphatidylinositol, and a number of genes from the secretome. The possible significance of these data on cell wall plasticity is discussed.

  4. Spatial and temporal distribution of genes involved in polyamine metabolism during tomato fruit development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaniklidis, Georgios; Kotsiras, Anastasios; Tsafouros, Athanasios; Roussos, Peter A; Aivalakis, Georgios; Katinakis, Panagiotis; Delis, Costas

    2016-03-01

    Polyamines are organic compounds involved in various biological roles in plants, including cell growth and organ development. In the present study, the expression profile, the accumulation of free polyamines and the transcript localisation of the genes involved in Put metabolism, such as Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), Arginine decarboxylase (ADC) and copper containing Amine oxidase (CuAO), were examined during Solanum lycopersicum cv. Chiou fruit development and maturation. Moreover, the expression of genes coding for enzymes involved in higher polyamine metabolism, including Spermidine synthase (SPDS), Spermine synthase (SPMS), S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC) and Polyamine oxidase (PAO), were studied. Most genes participating in PAs biosynthesis and metabolism exhibited an increased accumulation of transcripts at the early stages of fruit development. In contrast, CuAO and SPMS were mostly expressed later, during the development stages of the fruits where a massive increase in fruit volume occurs, while the SPDS1 gene exhibited a rather constant expression with a peak at the red ripe stage. Although Put, Spd and Spm were all exhibited decreasing levels in developing immature fruits, Put levels maxed late during fruit ripening. In contrast to Put both Spd and Spm levels continue to decrease gradually until full ripening. It is worth noticing that in situ RNA-RNA hybridisation is reported for the first time in tomato fruits. The localisation of ADC2, ODC1 and CuAO gene transcripts at tissues such as the locular parenchyma and the vascular bundles fruits, supports the theory that all genes involved in Put biosynthesis and catabolism are mostly expressed in fast growing tissues. The relatively high expression levels of CuAO at the ImG4 stage of fruit development (fruits with a diameter of 3 cm), mature green and breaker stages could possibly be attributed to the implication of polyamines in physiological processes taking place during fruit ripening.

  5. Identification of Bicarbonate as a Trigger and Genes Involved with Extracellular DNA Export in Mycobacterial Biofilms.

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    Rose, Sasha J; Bermudez, Luiz E

    2016-12-06

    Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is an integral biofilm matrix component of numerous pathogens, including nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). Cell lysis is the source of eDNA in certain bacteria, but the source of eDNA remains unidentified for NTM, as well as for other eDNA-containing bacterial species. In this study, conditions affecting eDNA export were examined, and genes involved with the eDNA export mechanism were identified. After a method for monitoring eDNA in real time in undisturbed biofilms was established, different conditions affecting eDNA were investigated. Bicarbonate positively influenced eDNA export in a pH-independent manner in Mycobacterium avium, M. abscessus, and M. chelonae The surface-exposed proteome of M. avium in eDNA-containing biofilms revealed abundant carbonic anhydrases. Chemical inhibition of carbonic anhydrases with ethoxzolamide significantly reduced eDNA export. An unbiased transposon mutant library screen for eDNA export in M. avium identified many severely eDNA-attenuated mutants, including one not expressing a unique FtsK/SpoIIIE-like DNA-transporting pore, two with inactivation of carbonic anhydrases, and nine with inactivation of genes belonging to a unique genomic region, as well as numerous mutants involved in metabolism and energy production. Complementation of nine mutants that included the FtsK/SpoIIIE and carbonic anhydrase significantly restored eDNA export. Interestingly, several attenuated eDNA mutants have mutations in genes encoding proteins that were found with the surface proteomics, and many more mutations are localized in operons potentially encoding surface proteins. Collectively, our data strengthen the evidence of eDNA export being an active mechanism that is activated by the bacterium responding to bicarbonate. Many bacteria contain extracellular DNA (eDNA) in their biofilm matrix, as it has various biological and physical functions. We recently reported that nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) can contain

  6. Characterization of the promoter region of biosynthetic enzyme genes involved in berberine biosynthesis in Coptis japonica

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    Yasuyuki Yamada

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of alkaloids is rather specific to certain plant species. However, berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, is relatively broadly distributed in the plant kingdom. Thus, berberine biosynthesis has been intensively investigated, especially using Coptis japonica cell cultures. Almost all biosynthetic enzyme genes have already been characterized at the molecular level. Particularly, two transcription factors (TFs, a plant-specific WRKY-type transcription factor, CjWRKY1, and a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor, CjbHLH1, were shown to comprehensively regulate berberine biosynthesis in C. japonica cells. In this study, we characterized the promoter region of some biosynthetic enzyme genes and associated cis-acting elements involved in the transcriptional regulation via two TFs. The promoter regions of three berberine biosynthetic enzyme genes (CYP80B2, 4’OMT and CYP719A1 were isolated, and their promoter activities were dissected by a transient assay involving the sequentially truncated promoter::luciferase (LUC reporter constructs. Furthermore, transactivation activities of CjWRKY1 were determined using the truncated promoter::LUC reporter constructs or constructs with mutated cis-elements. These results suggest the involvement of a putative W-box in the regulation of biosynthetic enzyme genes. Direct binding of CjWRKY1 to the W-box DNA sequence was also confirmed by an electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA and by a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay. In addition, CjbHLH1 also activated transcription from truncated 4’OMT and CYP719A1 promoters independently of CjWRKY1, suggesting the involvement of a putative E-box. Unexpected transcriptional activation of biosynthetic enzyme genes via a non-W-box sequence and by CjWRKY1 as well as the possible involvement of a GCC-box in berberine biosynthesis in C. japonica are discussed.

  7. Identification and expression analysis of candidate genes involved in carotenoid biosynthesis in chickpea seeds

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    Mohammad Kazem Rezaei

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant carotenoids have a key role in preventing various diseases in human because of their antioxidant and provitamin A properties. Chickpea is a good source of carotenoid among legumes and its diverse germplasm and genome accessibility makes it a good model for carotenogenesis studies. The structure, location and copy numbers of genes involved in carotenoid biosynthesis were retrieved from the chickpea genome. The majority of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs within these genes across five diverse chickpea cultivars was synonymous mutation. We examined the expression of the carotenogenesis genes and their association with carotenoid concentration at different seed development stages of five chickpea cultivars. Total carotenoid concentration ranged from 22 μg g-1 in yellow cotyledon kabuli to 44 μg g-1 in green cotyledon desi at 32 days post anthesis (DPA. The majority of carotenoids in chickpea seeds consists of lutein and zeaxanthin. The expression of the selected 19 genes involved in carotenoid biosynthesis pathway showed common pattern across five cultivars with higher expression at 8 and/or 16 DPA then dropped considerably at 24 and 32 DPA. Almost all genes were up-regulated in CDC Jade cultivar. Correlation analysis between gene expression and carotenoid concentration showed that the genes involved in the primary step of carotenoid biosynthesis pathway including carotenoid desaturase and isomerase positively correlated with various carotenoid components in chickpea seeds. A negative correlation was found between hydroxylation activity and provitamin A concentration in the seeds. The highest provitamin A concentration including β-carotene and β-cryptoxanthin were found in green cotyledon chickpea cultivars.

  8. Involvement of plastid, mitochondrial and nuclear genomes in plant-to-plant horizontal gene transfer

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    Maria Virginia Sanchez-Puerta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on plant-to-plant horizontal gene transfer (HGT involving the three DNA-containing cellular compartments. It highlights the great incidence of HGT in the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA of angiosperms, the increasing number of examples in plant nuclear genomes, and the lack of any convincing evidence for HGT in the well-studied plastid genome of land plants. Most of the foreign mitochondrial genes are non-functional, generally found as pseudogenes in the recipient plant mtDNA that maintains its functional native genes. The few exceptions involve chimeric HGT, in which foreign and native copies recombine leading to a functional and single copy of the gene. Maintenance of foreign genes in plant mitochondria is probably the result of genetic drift, but a possible evolutionary advantage may be conferred through the generation of genetic diversity by gene conversion between native and foreign copies. Conversely, a few cases of nuclear HGT in plants involve functional transfers of novel genes that resulted in adaptive evolution. Direct cell-to-cell contact between plants (e.g. host-parasite relationships or natural grafting facilitate the exchange of genetic material, in which HGT has been reported for both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, and in the form of genomic DNA, instead of RNA. A thorough review of the literature indicates that HGT in mitochondrial and nuclear genomes of angiosperms is much more frequent than previously expected and that the evolutionary impact and mechanisms underlying plant-to-plant HGT remain to be uncovered.

  9. Gene expression profiling reveals new potential players of gonad differentiation in the chicken embryo.

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    Gwenn-Aël Carré

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In birds as in mammals, a genetic switch determines whether the undifferentiated gonad develops into an ovary or a testis. However, understanding of the molecular pathway(s involved in gonad differentiation is still incomplete. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: With the aim of improving characterization of the molecular pathway(s involved in gonad differentiation in the chicken embryo, we developed a large scale real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction approach on 110 selected genes for evaluation of their expression profiles during chicken gonad differentiation between days 5.5 and 19 of incubation. Hierarchical clustering analysis of the resulting datasets discriminated gene clusters expressed preferentially in the ovary or the testis, and/or at early or later periods of embryonic gonad development. Fitting a linear model and testing the comparisons of interest allowed the identification of new potential actors of gonad differentiation, such as Z-linked ADAMTS12, LOC427192 (corresponding to NIM1 protein and CFC1, that are upregulated in the developing testis, and BMP3 and Z-linked ADAMTSL1, that are preferentially expressed in the developing ovary. Interestingly, the expression patterns of several members of the transforming growth factor β family were sexually dimorphic, with inhibin subunits upregulated in the testis, and bone morphogenetic protein subfamily members including BMP2, BMP3, BMP4 and BMP7, upregulated in the ovary. This study also highlighted several genes displaying asymmetric expression profiles such as GREM1 and BMP3 that are potentially involved in different aspects of gonad left-right asymmetry. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study supports the overall conservation of vertebrate sex differentiation pathways but also reveals some particular feature of gene expression patterns during gonad development in the chicken. In particular, our study revealed new candidate genes which may be potential actors

  10. Sarcosine Up-Regulates Expression of Genes Involved in Cell Cycle Progression of Metastatic Models of Prostate Cancer

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    Heger, Zbynek; Merlos Rodrigo, Miguel Angel; Michalek, Petr; Polanska, Hana; Masarik, Michal; Vit, Vitezslav; Plevova, Mariana; Pacik, Dalibor; Eckschlager, Tomas; Stiborova, Marie

    2016-01-01

    The effects of sarcosine on the processes driving prostate cancer (PCa) development remain still unclear. Herein, we show that a supplementation of metastatic PCa cells (androgen independent PC-3 and androgen dependent LNCaP) with sarcosine stimulates cells proliferation in vitro. Similar stimulatory effects were observed also in PCa murine xenografts, in which sarcosine treatment induced a tumor growth and significantly reduced weight of treated mice (p < 0.05). Determination of sarcosine metabolism-related amino acids and enzymes within tumor mass revealed significantly increased glycine, serine and sarcosine concentrations after treatment accompanied with the increased amount of sarcosine dehydrogenase. In both tumor types, dimethylglycine and glycine-N-methyltransferase were affected slightly, only. To identify the effects of sarcosine treatment on the expression of genes involved in any aspect of cancer development, we further investigated expression profiles of excised tumors using cDNA electrochemical microarray followed by validation using the semi-quantitative PCR. We found 25 differentially expressed genes in PC-3, 32 in LNCaP tumors and 18 overlapping genes. Bioinformatical processing revealed strong sarcosine-related induction of genes involved particularly in a cell cycle progression. Our exploratory study demonstrates that sarcosine stimulates PCa metastatic cells irrespectively of androgen dependence. Overall, the obtained data provides valuable information towards understanding the role of sarcosine in PCa progression and adds another piece of puzzle into a picture of sarcosine oncometabolic potential. PMID:27824899

  11. Identification of new genes involved in human adipogenesis and fat storage.

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    Jörn Söhle

    Full Text Available Since the worldwide increase in obesity represents a growing challenge for health care systems, new approaches are needed to effectively treat obesity and its associated diseases. One prerequisite for advances in this field is the identification of genes involved in adipogenesis and/or lipid storage. To provide a systematic analysis of genes that regulate adipose tissue biology and to establish a target-oriented compound screening, we performed a high throughput siRNA screen with primary (preadipocytes, using a druggable siRNA library targeting 7,784 human genes. The primary screen showed that 459 genes affected adipogenesis and/or lipid accumulation after knock-down. Out of these hits, 333 could be validated in a secondary screen using independent siRNAs and 110 genes were further regulated on the gene expression level during adipogenesis. Assuming that these genes are involved in neutral lipid storage and/or adipocyte differentiation, we performed InCell-Western analysis for the most striking hits to distinguish between the two phenotypes. Beside well known regulators of adipogenesis and neutral lipid storage (i.e. PPARγ, RXR, Perilipin A the screening revealed a large number of genes which have not been previously described in the context of fatty tissue biology such as axonemal dyneins. Five out of ten axonemal dyneins were identified in our screen and quantitative RT-PCR-analysis revealed that these genes are expressed in preadipocytes and/or maturing adipocytes. Finally, to show that the genes identified in our screen are per se druggable we performed a proof of principle experiment using an antagonist for HTR2B. The results showed a very similar phenotype compared to knock-down experiments proofing the "druggability". Thus, we identified new adipogenesis-associated genes and those involved in neutral lipid storage. Moreover, by using a druggable siRNA library the screen data provides a very attractive starting point to identify anti

  12. Dynamics of the Transcriptome during Human Spermatogenesis: Predicting the Potential Key Genes Regulating Male Gametes Generation.

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    Zhu, Zijue; Li, Chong; Yang, Shi; Tian, Ruhui; Wang, Junlong; Yuan, Qingqing; Dong, Hui; He, Zuping; Wang, Shengyue; Li, Zheng

    2016-01-12

    Many infertile men are the victims of spermatogenesis disorder. However, conventional clinical test could not provide efficient information on the causes of spermatogenesis disorder and guide the doctor how to treat it. More effective diagnosis and treating methods could be developed if the key genes that regulate spermatogenesis were determined. Many works have been done on animal models, while there are few works on human beings due to the limited sample resources. In current work, testis tissues were obtained from 27 patients with obstructive azoospermia via surgery. The combination of Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting and Magnetic Activated Cell Sorting was chosen as the efficient method to sort typical germ cells during spermatogenesis. RNA Sequencing was carried out to screen the change of transcriptomic profile of the germ cells during spermatogenesis. Differential expressed genes were clustered according to their expression patterns. Gene Ontology annotation, pathway analysis, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis were carried out on genes with specific expression patterns and the potential key genes such as HOXs, JUN, SP1, and TCF3 which were involved in the regulation of spermatogenesis, with the potential value serve as molecular tools for clinical purpose, were predicted.

  13. Expression analysis for genes involved in arachidonic acid biosynthesis in Mortierella alpina CBS 754.68.

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    Samadlouie, Hamid-Reza; Hamidi-Esfahani, Zohreh; Alavi, Seyed-Mehdi; Varastegani, Boshra

    2014-01-01

    The time courses for production of fungal biomass, lipid, phenolic and arachidonic acid (ARA) as well as expression of the genes involved in biosynthesis of ARA and lipid were examined in Mortierella alpina CBS 754.68. A significant increase in the arachidonic acid content in lipids that coincided with reduced levels of lipid was obtained. Reduced gene expression occurred presumably due to the steady reduction of carbon and nitrogen resources. However, these energy resources were inefficiently compensated by the breakdown of the accumulated lipids that in turn, induced up-regulated expression of the candidate genes. The results further indicated that the expression of the GLELO encoding gene is a rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of ARA in the early growth phase.

  14. Expression analysis for genes involved in arachidonic acid biosynthesis in Mortierella alpina CBS 754.68

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    Hamid-Reza Samadlouie

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The time courses for production of fungal biomass, lipid, phenolic and arachidonic acid (ARA as well as expression of the genes involved in biosynthesis of ARA and lipid were examined in Mortierella alpina CBS 754.68. A significant increase in the arachidonic acid content in lipids that coincided with reduced levels of lipid was obtained. Reduced gene expression occurred presumably due to the steady reduction of carbon and nitrogen resources. However, these energy resources were inefficiently compensated by the breakdown of the accumulated lipids that in turn, induced up-regulated expression of the candidate genes. The results further indicated that the expression of the GLELO encoding gene is a rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of ARA in the early growth phase.

  15. Expression Analysis of Dihydroflavonol 4-Reductase Genes Involved in Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in Purple Grains of Wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mao-Sen LIU; Fang WANG; Yu-Xiu DONG; Xian-Sheng ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    The grain color of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is an important characteristic in crop production.Dihydroflavonol 4-reductase genes (DFR) encode the key enzyme dihydroflavonol 4-reductase, which is involved in the pigmentation of plant tissues. To investigate the molecular mechanism of anthocyanin deposition in grains of wheat, we determined the expression of the wheat DFR gene in purple grains of cultivar Heimai 76. The results showed that DFR transcripts were localized in the seed coat of purple grains rather than in the pericarp, whereas anthocyanins were accumulated in both tissues of purple grains,suggesting that anthocyanin deposition was mainly regulated at the transcriptional level. Overexpression of the TaDFR-A gene in Arabidopsis showed that TaDFR-A was responsible for the pigmentation of Arabidopsis plant tissues, indicating TaDFR-A gene has the same role in Arabidopsis.

  16. Transcriptome profiling for discovery of genes involved in shoot apical meristem and flower development

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    Vikash K. Singh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Flower development is one of the major developmental processes that governs seed setting in angiosperms. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying flower development in legumes. Employing RNA-seq for various stages of flower development and few vegetative tissues in chickpea, we identified differentially expressed genes in flower tissues/stages in comparison to vegetative tissues, which are related to various biological processes and molecular functions during flower development. Here, we provide details of experimental methods, RNA-seq data (available at Gene Expression Omnibus database under GSE42679 and analysis pipeline published by Singh and colleagues in the Plant Biotechnology Journal (Singh et al., 2013, along with additional analysis for discovery of genes involved in shoot apical meristem (SAM development. Our data provide a resource for exploring the complex molecular mechanisms underlying SAM and flower development and identification of gene targets for functional and applied genomics in legumes.

  17. Identification and functional characterization of pfm, a novel gene involved in swimming motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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    Bai, Fang; Li, Yingli; Xu, Haijing; Xia, Huiming; Yin, Tengfei; Yao, Hongming; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Xiuming; Bai, Yanling; Jin, Shouguang; Qiao, Mingqiang

    2007-10-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important opportunistic pathogen, has a single polar flagellum which is an important virulence and colonization factor by providing swimming motility. This paper describes the functional characterization of a novel gene pfm (PA2950) of P. aeruginosa. The pfm encodes a protein that is similar to a number of short-chain alcohol dehydrogenases of other bacterial species. Mutation of this gene results in a defect in swimming motility which can be completed back to that of wild type by a plasmid containing the pfm. Interestingly, the pfm mutant possesses an intact flagellum which does not rotate, thus giving rise to a non-motile phenotype. The pfm gene is encoded on an operon together with two upstream genes which code for electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF). Yeast two-hybrid tests indicated that the PFM interacts with the ETF, suggesting that the putative dehydrogenase (PFM) is involved in energy metabolism that is critical for the rotation of flagellum in P. aeruginosa.

  18. Profiling spermatogenic failure in adult testes bearing Sox9-deficient Sertoli cells identifies genes involved in feminization, inflammation and stress

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    Barrionuevo Francisco

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sox9 (Sry box containing gene 9 is a DNA-binding transcription factor involved in chondrocyte development and sex determination. The protein's absence in testicular Sertoli nurse cells has been shown to disrupt testicular function in adults but little is known at the genome-wide level about molecular events concomitant with testicular break-down. Methods To determine the genome-wide effect on mRNA concentrations triggered by the absence of Sox9 in Sertoli cells we analysed adult testicular tissue from wild-type versus mutant mice with high-density oligonucleotide microarrays and integrated the output of this experiment with regulatory motif predictions and protein-protein network data. Results We report the genome-wide mRNA signature of adult testes lacking Sox9 in Sertoli cells before and after the onset of late spermatogenic failure as compared to fertile controls. The GeneChip data integrated with evolutionarily conserved Sox9 DNA binding motifs and regulatory network data identified genes involved in feminization, stress response and inflammation. Conclusions Our results extend previous observations that genes required for female gonadogenesis are up-regulated in the absence of Sox9 in fetal Sertoli cells to the adult stage. Importantly, we identify gene networks involved in immunological processes and stress response which is reminiscent of a phenomenon occurring in a sub-group of infertile men. This suggests mice lacking Sox9 in their Sertoli cells to be a potentially useful model for adult human testicular failure.

  19. Gender-associated genes in filarial nematodes are important for reproduction and potential intervention targets.

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    Ben-Wen Li

    also striking gender differences in environmental information processing and cell communication pathways. Many proteins encoded by GA genes are secreted by Brugia malayi, and these encode immunomodulatory molecules such as antioxidants and host cytokine mimics. Expression of many GA genes has been recently reported to be suppressed by tetracycline, which blocks reproduction in female Brugia malayi. Our localization of GA transcripts in filarial reproductive organs supports the hypothesis that these genes encode proteins involved in reproduction. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Genome-wide expression profiling coupled with a robust bioinformatics analysis has greatly expanded our understanding of the molecular biology of reproduction in filarial nematodes. This study has highlighted key molecules and pathways associated with reproductive and other biological processes and identified numerous potential candidates for rational drug design to target reproductive processes.

  20. Genes involved in complex adaptive processes tend to have highly conserved upstream regions in mammalian genomes

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    Kohane Isaac

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent advances in genome sequencing suggest a remarkable conservation in gene content of mammalian organisms. The similarity in gene repertoire present in different organisms has increased interest in studying regulatory mechanisms of gene expression aimed at elucidating the differences in phenotypes. In particular, a proximal promoter region contains a large number of regulatory elements that control the expression of its downstream gene. Although many studies have focused on identification of these elements, a broader picture on the complexity of transcriptional regulation of different biological processes has not been addressed in mammals. The regulatory complexity may strongly correlate with gene function, as different evolutionary forces must act on the regulatory systems under different biological conditions. We investigate this hypothesis by comparing the conservation of promoters upstream of genes classified in different functional categories. Results By conducting a rank correlation analysis between functional annotation and upstream sequence alignment scores obtained by human-mouse and human-dog comparison, we found a significantly greater conservation of the upstream sequence of genes involved in development, cell communication, neural functions and signaling processes than those involved in more basic processes shared with unicellular organisms such as metabolism and ribosomal function. This observation persists after controlling for G+C content. Considering conservation as a functional signature, we hypothesize a higher density of cis-regulatory elements upstream of genes participating in complex and adaptive processes. Conclusion We identified a class of functions that are associated with either high or low promoter conservation in mammals. We detected a significant tendency that points to complex and adaptive processes were associated with higher promoter conservation, despite the fact that they have emerged

  1. Mining genes involved in insecticide resistance of Liposcelis bostrychophila Badonnel by transcriptome and expression profile analysis.

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    Wei Dou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies indicate that infestations of psocids pose a new risk for global food security. Among the psocids species, Liposcelis bostrychophila Badonnel has gained recognition in importance because of its parthenogenic reproduction, rapid adaptation, and increased worldwide distribution. To date, the molecular data available for L. bostrychophila is largely limited to genes identified through homology. Also, no transcriptome data relevant to psocids infection is available. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we generated de novo assembly of L. bostrychophila transcriptome performed through the short read sequencing technology (Illumina. In a single run, we obtained more than 51 million sequencing reads that were assembled into 60,012 unigenes (mean size = 711 bp by Trinity. The transcriptome sequences from different developmental stages of L. bostrychophila including egg, nymph and adult were annotated with non-redundant (Nr protein database, gene ontology (GO, cluster of orthologous groups of proteins (COG, and KEGG orthology (KO. The analysis revealed three major enzyme families involved in insecticide metabolism as differentially expressed in the L. bostrychophila transcriptome. A total of 49 P450-, 31 GST- and 21 CES-specific genes representing the three enzyme families were identified. Besides, 16 transcripts were identified to contain target site sequences of resistance genes. Furthermore, we profiled gene expression patterns upon insecticide (malathion and deltamethrin exposure using the tag-based digital gene expression (DGE method. CONCLUSION: The L. bostrychophila transcriptome and DGE data provide gene expression data that would further our understanding of molecular mechanisms in psocids. In particular, the findings of this investigation will facilitate identification of genes involved in insecticide resistance and designing of new compounds for control of psocids.

  2. Specific genes involved in synthesis and editing of heparan sulfate proteoglycans show altered expression patterns in breast cancer

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    Fernández-Vega Iván

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression of a specific set of genes controls the different structures of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs, which are involved in the growth, invasion and metastatic properties of cancerous cells. The purpose of this study is to increase knowledge of HSPG alterations in breast cancer. Methods Twenty-three infiltrating ductal adenocarcinomas (IDCs, both metastatic and non-metastatic were studied. A transcriptomic approach to the structure of heparan sulfate (HS chains was used, employing qPCR to analyze both the expression of the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis and editing, as well as the proteoglycan core proteins. Since some of these proteoglycans can also carry chondroitin sulfate chains, we extended the study to include the genes involved in the biosynthesis of these glycosaminoglycans. Histochemical techniques were also used to analyze tissular expression of particular genes showing significant expression differences, of potential interest. Results No significant change in transcription was detected in approximately 70% of analyzed genes. However, 13 demonstrated changes in both tumor types (40% showing more intense deregulation in the metastatic, while 5 genes showed changes only in non-metastatic tumors. Changes were related to 3 core proteins: overexpression of syndecan-1 and underexpression of glypican-3 and perlecan. HS synthesis was affected by lower levels of some 3-O-sulfotransferase transcripts, the expression of NDST4 and, only in non metastatic tumors, higher levels of extracellular sulfatases. Furthermore, the expression of chondroitin sulfate also was considerably affected, involving both the synthesis of the saccharidic chains and sulfations at all locations. However, the pro-metastatic enzyme heparanase did not exhibit significant changes in mRNA expression, although in metastatic tumors it appeared related to increased levels of the most stable form of mRNA. Finally, the expression of

  3. Phytoremediation potential of the novel atrazine tolerant Lolium multiflorum and studies on the mechanisms involved.

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    Merini, Luciano J; Bobillo, Cecilia; Cuadrado, Virginia; Corach, Daniel; Giulietti, Ana M

    2009-11-01

    Atrazine impact on human health and the environment have been extensively studied. Phytoremediation emerged as a low cost, environmental friendly biotechnological solution for atrazine pollution in soil and water. In vitro atrazine tolerance assays were performed and Lolium multiflorum was found as a novel tolerant species, able to germinate and grow in the presence of 1 mg kg(-1) of the herbicide. L. multiflorum presented 20% higher atrazine removal capacity than the natural attenuation, with high initial degradation rate in microcosms. The mechanisms involved in atrazine tolerance such as mutation in psbA gene, enzymatic detoxification via P(450) or chemical hydrolysis through benzoxazinones were evaluated. It was demonstrated that atrazine tolerance is conferred by enhanced enzymatic detoxification via P(450). Due to its atrazine degradation capacity in soil and its agronomical properties, L. multiflorum is a candidate for designing phytoremediation strategies for atrazine contaminated agricultural soils, especially those involving run-off avoiding.

  4. Strategies for functional validation of genes involved in reproductive stages of orchids.

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    Lu, Hsiang-Chia; Chen, Hong-Hwa; Tsai, Wen-Chieh; Chen, Wen-Huei; Su, Hong-Ji; Chang, Doris Chi-Ning; Yeh, Hsin-Hung

    2007-02-01

    Plants in the largest family of angiosperms, Orchidaceae, are diverse in both specialized pollination and ecological strategies and provide a rich source for investigating evolutionary relationships and developmental biology. However, studies in orchids have been hindered by several challenges that include low transformation efficiency and long regeneration time. To overcome such obstacles, we selected a symptomless cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV) isolate for constructing virus-induced gene-silencing vectors. The feasibility of the virus vectors was first assessed with use of an orchid phytoene desaturase gene. The vector was able to induce gene silencing in orchids; however, because of the slow growth of orchids, the commonly used phytoene desaturase gene was not a good visual marker in orchids. We inserted a 150-nucleotide unique region of a B-class MADS-box family gene, PeMADS6, into pCymMV-pro60. The transcription level of PeMADS6 in inoculated Phalaenopsis plants was reduced by up to 73%, but no effect was observed for other MADS-box family genes. In contrast, in Phalaenopsis plants inoculated with CymMV transcripts containing 500 nucleotides of PeMADS6, a conserved region among MADS-box genes, the transcription level of PeMADS6 and the B- and C-class MADS-box genes was reduced by up to 97.8% as compared with plants inoculated with the vector alone. Flower morphology was affected in the MADS-box family gene-silenced plants as well. This in vivo experiment demonstrates an efficient way to study genes involved in the reproductive stage of plants with a long life cycle.

  5. Achromatopsia as a potential candidate for gene therapy.

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    Pang, Ji-Jing; Alexander, John; Lei, Bo; Deng, Wentao; Zhang, Keqing; Li, Qiuhong; Chang, Bo; Hauswirth, William W

    2010-01-01

    Achromatopsia is an autosomal recessive retinal disease involving loss of cone function that afflicts approximately 1 in 30,000 individuals. Patients with achromatopsia usually have visual acuities lower than 20/200 because of the central vision loss, photophobia, complete color blindness and reduced cone-mediated electroretinographic (ERG) amplitudes. Mutations in three genes have been found to be the primary causes of achromatopsia, including CNGB3 (beta subunit of the cone cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel), CNGA3 (alpha subunit of the cone cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel), and GNAT2 (cone specific alpha subunit of transducin). Naturally occurring mouse models with mutations in Cnga3 (cpfl5 mice) and Gnat2 (cpfl3 mice) were discovered at The Jackson Laboratory. A natural occurring canine model with CNGB3 mutations has also been found. These animal models have many of the central phenotypic features of the corresponding human diseases. Using adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy, we and others show that cone function can be restored in all three models. These data suggest that human achromatopsia may be a good candidate for corrective gene therapy.

  6. Whole-genome resequencing and transcriptomic analysis to identify genes involved in leaf-color diversity in ornamental rice plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Kug Kim

    Full Text Available Rice field art is a large-scale art form in which people design rice fields using various kinds of ornamental rice plants with different leaf colors. Leaf color-related genes play an important role in the study of chlorophyll biosynthesis, chloroplast structure and function, and anthocyanin biosynthesis. Despite the role of different metabolites in the traditional relationship between leaf and color, comprehensive color-specific metabolite studies of ornamental rice have been limited. We performed whole-genome resequencing and transcriptomic analysis of regulatory patterns and genetic diversity among different rice cultivars to discover new genetic mechanisms that promote enhanced levels of various leaf colors. We resequenced the genomes of 10 rice leaf-color accessions to an average of 40× reads depth and >95% coverage and performed 30 RNA-seq experiments using the 10 rice accessions sampled at three developmental stages. The sequencing results yielded a total of 1,814 × 106 reads and identified an average of 713,114 SNPs per rice accession. Based on our analysis of the DNA variation and gene expression, we selected 47 candidate genes. We used an integrated analysis of the whole-genome resequencing data and the RNA-seq data to divide the candidate genes into two groups: genes related to macronutrient (i.e., magnesium and sulfur transport and genes related to flavonoid pathways, including anthocyanidin biosynthesis. We verified the candidate genes with quantitative real-time PCR using transgenic T-DNA insertion mutants. Our study demonstrates the potential of integrated screening methods combined with genetic-variation and transcriptomic data to isolate genes involved in complex biosynthetic networks and pathways.

  7. Identification of bap and icaA genes involved in biofilm formation in coagulase negative staphylococci isolated from feline conjunctiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płoneczka-Janeczko, Katarzyna; Lis, Paweł; Bierowiec, Karolina; Rypuła, Krzysztof; Chorbiński, Paweł

    2014-12-01

    Bap and icaA genes are commonly known to be involved in the biofilm formation. The prevalence of bap and icaA genes and biofilm formation was determined in conjunctival isolates of coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS) collected from cats. The study was conducted on 90 archival CNS isolates collected from feline conjunctiva obtained from clinically healthy cats and cats with ocular problems. Biofilm formation was examined using the microtiter plate (MTP) method. The prevalence of icaA and bap genes was determined using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Genetic profiles of the bap-positive isolates were examined using the modified random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method. Of the 90 CNS isolates investigated, 58.9% (53/90) were confirmed to form biofilms on a polystyrene plate after 24 h, and the intensity of the biofilm production varied strongly between positive strains. Among the biofilm-producing isolates, 24.5% (13/53) carried the icaA gene and 3.8% (2/53) carried the bap gene. Among the isolates that did not produce biofilms, the icaA gene and bap gene were detected in 8.1% (3/37) and 2.7% (1/37) of isolates, respectively. This is the first report demonstrating that CNS isolated from feline conjunctiva can potentially be a bap gene reservoir. Preliminary comparison of the genetic profiles of three bap-positive isolates collected from cats showed that each of the isolates has a different genetic background with a high similarity with the human strain of S. epidermidis.

  8. Whole-Genome Resequencing and Transcriptomic Analysis to Identify Genes Involved in Leaf-Color Diversity in Ornamental Rice Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Younhee; Lim, Hye-Min; Lee, Gang-Seob; Kim, A-Ram; Lee, Tae-Ho; Lee, Jae-Hee; Park, Dong-Suk; Yoo, Seungil; Kim, Yong-Hwan; Kim, Yong-Kab

    2015-01-01

    Rice field art is a large-scale art form in which people design rice fields using various kinds of ornamental rice plants with different leaf colors. Leaf color-related genes play an important role in the study of chlorophyll biosynthesis, chloroplast structure and function, and anthocyanin biosynthesis. Despite the role of different metabolites in the traditional relationship between leaf and color, comprehensive color-specific metabolite studies of ornamental rice have been limited. We performed whole-genome resequencing and transcriptomic analysis of regulatory patterns and genetic diversity among different rice cultivars to discover new genetic mechanisms that promote enhanced levels of various leaf colors. We resequenced the genomes of 10 rice leaf-color accessions to an average of 40× reads depth and >95% coverage and performed 30 RNA-seq experiments using the 10 rice accessions sampled at three developmental stages. The sequencing results yielded a total of 1,814 × 106 reads and identified an average of 713,114 SNPs per rice accession. Based on our analysis of the DNA variation and gene expression, we selected 47 candidate genes. We used an integrated analysis of the whole-genome resequencing data and the RNA-seq data to divide the candidate genes into two groups: genes related to macronutrient (i.e., magnesium and sulfur) transport and genes related to flavonoid pathways, including anthocyanidin biosynthesis. We verified the candidate genes with quantitative real-time PCR using transgenic T-DNA insertion mutants. Our study demonstrates the potential of integrated screening methods combined with genetic-variation and transcriptomic data to isolate genes involved in complex biosynthetic networks and pathways. PMID:25897514

  9. Sucrose in bloom-forming cyanobacteria: loss and gain of genes involved in its biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolman, María A; Salerno, Graciela L

    2016-02-01

    Bloom-forming cyanobacteria are widely distributed in freshwater ecosystems. To cope with salinity fluctuations, cyanobacteria synthesize compatible solutes, such as sucrose, to maintain the intracellular osmotic balance. The screening of cyanobacterial genomes revealed that homologues to sucrose metabolism-related genes only occur in few bloom-forming strains, mostly belonging to Nostocales and Stigonematales orders. Remarkably, among Chroococcales and Oscillatoriales strains, homologues were only found in M. aeruginosa PCC 7806 and Leptolyngbya boryana PCC 6306, suggesting a massive loss of sucrose metabolism in bloom-forming strains of these orders. After a complete functional characterization of sucrose genes in M. aeruginosa PCC 7806, we showed that sucrose metabolism depends on the expression of a gene cluster that defines a transcriptional unit, unique among all sucrose-containing cyanobacteria. It was also demonstrated that the expression of the encoding genes of sucrose-related proteins is stimulated by salt. In view of its ancestral origin in cyanobacteria, the fact that most bloom-forming strains lack sucrose metabolism indicates that the genes involved might have been lost during evolution. However, in a particular strain, like M. aeruginosa PCC 7806, sucrose synthesis genes were probably regained by horizontal gene transfer, which could be hypothesized as a response to salinity fluctuations.

  10. A ketoreductase gene from Streptomyces mycarofaciens 1748 DNA involved in biosynthesis of a spore pigment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏焕章; 王以光

    1997-01-01

    An efficient plasmid transformation system for S. mycarofaciens 1748 has been established. In order to determine the function of MKR gene in S. mycarofaciens 1748, the gene disruption experiment was carried out. For this purpose the plasmid pKC1139 was used. A recombinant strain with white spore appeared, in contrast to the grey-colour spore of S. mycarofaciens 1748. This suggested that homologous recombination between plasmid-borne MKR gene sequence and the chromosome of S. mycarofaciens 1748 had occurred. A Southern hybridization experiment using α- P-labelled MKR gene as probe indicated that the desired integration event had occurred in the re-combinant. The result of gene disruption showed that the alteration of this gene in the chromosome of S. mycarofa-ciens 1748 made sporulating colonies remain white instead of taking on the typical grey colour of sporulating wild type colonies, suggesting that MKR gene is involved in the biosynthesis of a spore pigment. The recombinant strain was in-cubated wit

  11. Characterization of Pneumococcal Genes Involved in Bloodstream Invasion in a Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layla K Mahdi

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus continues to account for significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, causing life-threatening diseases such as pneumonia, bacteremia and meningitis, as well as less serious infections such as sinusitis, conjunctivitis and otitis media. Current polysaccharide vaccines are strictly serotype-specific and also drive the emergence of non-vaccine serotype strains. In this study, we used microarray analysis to compare gene expression patterns of either serotype 4 or serotype 6A pneumococci in the nasopharynx and blood of mice, as a model to identify genes involved in invasion of blood in the context of occult bacteremia in humans. In this manner, we identified 26 genes that were significantly up-regulated in the nasopharynx and 36 genes that were significantly up-regulated in the blood that were common to both strains. Gene Ontology classification revealed that transporter and DNA binding (transcription factor activities constitute the significantly different molecular functional categories for genes up-regulated in the nasopharynx and blood. Targeted mutagenesis of selected genes from both niches and subsequent virulence and pathogenesis studies identified the manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (SodA as most likely to be essential for colonization, and the cell wall-associated serine protease (PrtA as important for invasion of blood. This work extends our previous analyses and suggests that both PrtA and SodA warrant examination in future studies aimed at prevention and/or control of pneumococcal disease.

  12. Development-related expression patterns of protein-coding and miRNA genes involved in porcine muscle growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F J; Jin, L; Guo, Y Q; Liu, R; He, M N; Li, M Z; Li, X W

    2014-11-27

    Muscle growth and development is associated with remarkable changes in protein-coding and microRNA (miRNA) gene expression. To determine the expression patterns of genes and miRNAs related to muscle growth and development, we measured the expression levels of 25 protein-coding and 16 miRNA genes in skeletal and cardiac muscles throughout 5 developmental stages by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The Short Time-Series Expression Miner (STEM) software clustering results showed that growth-related genes were downregulated at all developmental stages in both the psoas major and longissimus dorsi muscles, indicating their involvement in early developmental stages. Furthermore, genes related to muscle atrophy, such as forkhead box 1 and muscle ring finger, showed unregulated expression with increasing age, suggesting a decrease in protein synthesis during the later stages of skeletal muscle development. We found that development of the cardiac muscle was a complex process in which growth-related genes were highly expressed during embryonic development, but they did not show uniform postnatal expression patterns. Moreover, the expression level of miR-499, which enhances the expression of the β-myosin heavy chain, was significantly different in the psoas major and longissimus dorsi muscles, suggesting the involvement of miR-499 in the determination of skeletal muscle fiber types. We also performed correlation analyses of messenger RNA and miRNA expression. We found negative relationships between miR-486 and forkhead box 1, and miR-133a and serum response factor at all developmental stages, suggesting that forkhead box 1 and serum response factor are potential targets of miR-486 and miR-133a, respectively.

  13. The ACACA gene is a potential candidate gene for fat content in sheep milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moioli, B; Scatà, M C; De Matteis, G; Annicchiarico, G; Catillo, G; Napolitano, F

    2013-08-01

    No major gene has yet been reported in sheep that explains the variation of milk fat content. The coding region of the acetyl-CoA carboxylase alpha (ACACA) gene, which plays an important role in de novo fatty acid synthesis, had been investigated, but no non-synonymous mutations have been reported. In this study, the genomic regions encoding the three promoters of the ACACA gene were directly sequenced in 264 sheep of three different breeds, and 10 SNPs were identified. Allele frequencies of most SNPs significantly differed (P = 0.05-0.0001) between breeds. The SNPs that potentially altered either gene regulatory elements or putative binding sites of transcription factors were made evident through in silico analysis. The association analysis with milk traits, performed for one SNP of PIII (GenBank AJ292286, g.1330G>T), showed a significant allelic substitution effect (+0.33%, P sheep milk.

  14. BCIP: a gene-centered platform for identifying potential regulatory genes in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiaqi; Hu, Shuofeng; Chen, Yaowen; Li, Zongcheng; Zhang, Jian; Yuan, Hanyu; Shi, Qiang; Shao, Ningsheng; Ying, Xiaomin

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is a disease with high heterogeneity. Many issues on tumorigenesis and progression are still elusive. It is critical to identify genes that play important roles in the progression of tumors, especially for tumors with poor prognosis such as basal-like breast cancer and tumors in very young women. To facilitate the identification of potential regulatory or driver genes, we present the Breast Cancer Integrative Platform (BCIP, http://omics.bmi.ac.cn/bcancer/). BCIP maintains multi-omics data selected with strict quality control and processed with uniform normalization methods, including gene expression profiles from 9,005 tumor and 376 normal tissue samples, copy number variation information from 3,035 tumor samples, microRNA-target interactions, co-expressed genes, KEGG pathways, and mammary tissue-specific gene functional networks. This platform provides a user-friendly interface integrating comprehensive and flexible analysis tools on differential gene expression, copy number variation, and survival analysis. The prominent characteristic of BCIP is that users can perform analysis by customizing subgroups with single or combined clinical features, including subtypes, histological grades, pathologic stages, metastasis status, lymph node status, ER/PR/HER2 status, TP53 mutation status, menopause status, age, tumor size, therapy responses, and prognosis. BCIP will help to identify regulatory or driver genes and candidate biomarkers for further research in breast cancer. PMID:28327601

  15. Genetics and Gene Expression Involving Stress and Distress Pathways in Fibromyalgia with and without Comorbid Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen C. Light

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In complex multisymptom disorders like fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS that are defined primarily by subjective symptoms, genetic and gene expression profiles can provide very useful objective information. This paper summarizes research on genes that may be linked to increased susceptibility in developing and maintaining these disorders, and research on resting and stressor-evoked changes in leukocyte gene expression, highlighting physiological pathways linked to stress and distress. These include the adrenergic nervous system, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and serotonergic pathways, and exercise responsive metabolite-detecting ion channels. The findings to date provide some support for both inherited susceptibility and/or physiological dysregulation in all three systems, particularly for catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT genes, the glucocorticoid and the related mineralocorticoid receptors (NR3C1, NR3C2, and the purinergic 2X4 (P2X4 ion channel involved as a sensory receptor for muscle pain and fatigue and also in upregulation of spinal microglia in chronic pain models. Methodological concerns for future research, including potential influences of comorbid clinical depression and antidepressants and other medications, on gene expression are also addressed.

  16. Genes involved in thoracic exoskeleton formation during the pupal-to-adult molt in a social insect model, Apis mellifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Michelle Prioli Miranda; Barchuk, Angel Roberto; Simões, Ana Carolina Quirino; Dos Santos Cristino, Alexandre; de Paula Freitas, Flávia Cristina; Canhos, Luísa Lange; Bitondi, Márcia Maria Gentile

    2013-08-28

    The insect exoskeleton provides shape, waterproofing, and locomotion via attached somatic muscles. The exoskeleton is renewed during molting, a process regulated by ecdysteroid hormones. The holometabolous pupa transforms into an adult during the imaginal molt, when the epidermis synthe3sizes the definitive exoskeleton that then differentiates progressively. An important issue in insect development concerns how the exoskeletal regions are constructed to provide their morphological, physiological and mechanical functions. We used whole-genome oligonucleotide microarrays to screen for genes involved in exoskeletal formation in the honeybee thoracic dorsum. Our analysis included three sampling times during the pupal-to-adult molt, i.e., before, during and after the ecdysteroid-induced apolysis that triggers synthesis of the adult exoskeleton. Gene ontology annotation based on orthologous relationships with Drosophila melanogaster genes placed the honeybee differentially expressed genes (DEGs) into distinct categories of Biological Process and Molecular Function, depending on developmental time, revealing the functional elements required for adult exoskeleton formation. Of the 1,253 unique DEGs, 547 were upregulated in the thoracic dorsum after apolysis, suggesting induction by the ecdysteroid pulse. The upregulated gene set included 20 of the 47 cuticular protein (CP) genes that were previously identified in the honeybee genome, and three novel putative CP genes that do not belong to a known CP family. In situ hybridization showed that two of the novel genes were abundantly expressed in the epidermis during adult exoskeleton formation, strongly implicating them as genuine CP genes. Conserved sequence motifs identified the CP genes as members of the CPR, Tweedle, Apidermin, CPF, CPLCP1 and Analogous-to-Peritrophins families. Furthermore, 28 of the 36 muscle-related DEGs were upregulated during the de novo formation of striated fibers attached to the exoskeleton. A

  17. Symbiotic fungi produce laccases potentially involved in phenol degradation in fungus combs of fungus-growing termites in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taprab, Yaovapa; Johjima, Toru; Maeda, Yoshimasa; Moriya, Shigeharu; Trakulnaleamsai, Savitr; Noparatnaraporn, Napavarn; Ohkuma, Moriya; Kudo, Toshiaki

    2005-12-01

    Fungus-growing termites efficiently decompose plant litter through their symbiotic relationship with basidiomycete fungi of the genus Termitomyces. Here, we investigated phenol-oxidizing enzymes in symbiotic fungi and fungus combs (a substrate used to cultivate symbiotic fungi) from termites belonging to the genera Macrotermes, Odontotermes, and Microtermes in Thailand, because these enzymes are potentially involved in the degradation of phenolic compounds during fungus comb aging. Laccase activity was detected in all the fungus combs examined as well as in the culture supernatants of isolated symbiotic fungi. Conversely, no peroxidase activity was detected in any of the fungus combs or the symbiotic fungal cultures. The laccase cDNA fragments were amplified directly from RNA extracted from fungus combs of five termite species and a fungal isolate using degenerate primers targeting conserved copper binding domains of basidiomycete laccases, resulting in a total of 13 putative laccase cDNA sequences being identified. The full-length sequences of the laccase cDNA and the corresponding gene, lcc1-2, were identified from the fungus comb of Macrotermes gilvus and a Termitomyces strain isolated from the same fungus comb, respectively. Partial purification of laccase from the fungus comb showed that the lcc1-2 gene product was a dominant laccase in the fungus comb. These findings indicate that the symbiotic fungus secretes laccase to the fungus comb. In addition to laccase, we report novel genes that showed a significant similarity with fungal laccases, but the gene product lacked laccase activity. Interestingly, these genes were highly expressed in symbiotic fungi of all the termite hosts examined.

  18. Integrative analysis for finding genes and networks involved in diabetes and other complex diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergholdt, R.; Størling, Zenia, Marian; Hansen, Kasper Lage;

    2007-01-01

    identified a number of new protein network modules and novel candidate genes/proteins for type 1 diabetes. We propose this type of integrative analysis as a general method for the elucidation of genes and networks involved in diabetes and other complex diseases.......We have developed an integrative analysis method combining genetic interactions, identified using type 1 diabetes genome scan data, and a high-confidence human protein interaction network. Resulting networks were ranked by the significance of the enrichment of proteins from interacting regions. We...

  19. Profiling of promoter occupancy by the SND1 transcriptional coactivator identifies downstream glycerolipid metabolic genes involved in TNFα response in human hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arretxe, Enara; Armengol, Sandra; Mula, Sarai; Chico, Yolanda; Ochoa, Begoña; Martínez, María José

    2015-12-15

    The NF-κB-inducible Staphylococcal nuclease and tudor domain-containing 1 gene (SND1) encodes a coactivator involved in inflammatory responses and tumorigenesis. While SND1 is known to interact with certain transcription factors and activate client gene expression, no comprehensive mapping of SND1 target genes has been reported. Here, we have approached this question by performing ChIP-chip assays on human hepatoma HepG2 cells and analyzing SND1 binding modulation by proinflammatory TNFα. We show that SND1 binds 645 gene promoters in control cells and 281 additional genes in TNFα-treated cells. Transcription factor binding site analysis of bound probes identified motifs for established partners and for novel transcription factors including HSF, ATF, STAT3, MEIS1/AHOXA9, E2F and p300/CREB. Major target genes were involved in gene expression and RNA metabolism regulation, as well as development and cellular metabolism. We confirmed SND1 binding to 21 previously unrecognized genes, including a set of glycerolipid genes. Knocking-down experiments revealed that SND1 deficiency compromises the glycerolipid gene reprogramming and lipid phenotypic responses to TNFα. Overall, our findings uncover an unexpected large set of potential SND1 target genes and partners and reveal SND1 to be a determinant downstream effector of TNFα that contributes to support glycerophospholipid homeostasis in human hepatocellular carcinoma during inflammation.

  20. Two transcription factors, CabA and CabR, are independently involved in multilevel regulation of the biosynthetic gene cluster encoding the novel aminocoumarin, cacibiocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolański, Marcin; Łebkowski, Tomasz; Kois-Ostrowska, Agnieszka; Zettler, Judith; Apel, Alexander K; Jakimowicz, Dagmara; Zakrzewska-Czerwińska, Jolanta

    2016-04-01

    Aminocoumarins are potent antibiotics belonging to a relatively small group of secondary metabolites produced by actinomycetes. Genome mining of Catenulispora acidiphila has recently led to the discovery of a gene cluster responsible for biosynthesis of novel aminocoumarins, cacibiocins. However, regulation of the expression of this novel gene cluster has not yet been analyzed. In this study, we identify transcriptional regulators of the cacibiocin gene cluster. Using a heterologous expression system, we show that the CabA and CabR proteins encoded by cabA and cabR genes in the cacibiocin gene cluster control the expression of genes involved in the biosynthesis, modification, regulation, and potentially, efflux/resistance of cacibiocins. CabA positively regulates the expression of cabH (the first gene in the cabHIYJKL operon) and cabhal genes encoding key enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis and halogenation of the aminocoumarin moiety, respectively. We provide evidence that CabA is a direct inducer of cacibiocin production, whereas the second transcriptional factor, CabR, is involved in the negative regulation of its own gene and cabT-the latter of which encodes a putative cacibiocin transporter. We also demonstrate that CabR activity is negatively regulated in vitro by aminocoumarin compounds, suggesting the existence of analogous regulation in vivo. Finally, we propose a model of multilevel regulation of gene transcription in the cacibiocin gene cluster by CabA and CabR.

  1. DIFFERENTIAL EXPRESSION OF GENES INVOLVED IN METABOLISM BETWEEN TUMORIGENITIC HUMAN LEUKEMIA CELL LINES K562 AND K562-n

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕书晴; 许小平; 夏放; 居小萍; 李瑶; 应康; 毛裕民

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the molecular mechanism of different tumorigenicity in nude mice of human leukemia cell lines K562-n and K562. Methods: To analyze the genes differently expressed between K562 and K562-n cells by using cDNA microarray technique. Results: Among the 12800 genes detected, some genes involved in material metabolism and material transport were differently expressed between K562-n and K562 cells. These genes include homo sapiens placenta-specific ATP-binding cassette transporter gene, dihydrodiol dehydrogenase gene, hepatic dihydrodiol dehydrogenase gene, NAD-dependent methylene tetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase cyclohydrolase, lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase, alpha gene, argininosuccinate lyase gene, mitochondrial isocitrtate dehydrogenase, adhesion protein SQM1 gene, dimethylarginine dimethylamino-hydrolase gene, M1 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase and farnesyl pyrophosphate synthetase gene. Conclusion: The high tumorigenicity of K562-n cells is related to the different expression of some genes concerned with cell metabolism and material transpoert.

  2. An evolutionary genomic approach to identify genes involved in human birth timing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jevon Plunkett

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Coordination of fetal maturation with birth timing is essential for mammalian reproduction. In humans, preterm birth is a disorder of profound global health significance. The signals initiating parturition in humans have remained elusive, due to divergence in physiological mechanisms between humans and model organisms typically studied. Because of relatively large human head size and narrow birth canal cross-sectional area compared to other primates, we hypothesized that genes involved in parturition would display accelerated evolution along the human and/or higher primate phylogenetic lineages to decrease the length of gestation and promote delivery of a smaller fetus that transits the birth canal more readily. Further, we tested whether current variation in such accelerated genes contributes to preterm birth risk. Evidence from allometric scaling of gestational age suggests human gestation has been shortened relative to other primates. Consistent with our hypothesis, many genes involved in reproduction show human acceleration in their coding or adjacent noncoding regions. We screened >8,400 SNPs in 150 human accelerated genes in 165 Finnish preterm and 163 control mothers for association with preterm birth. In this cohort, the most significant association was in FSHR, and 8 of the 10 most significant SNPs were in this gene. Further evidence for association of a linkage disequilibrium block of SNPs in FSHR, rs11686474, rs11680730, rs12473870, and rs1247381 was found in African Americans. By considering human acceleration, we identified a novel gene that may be associated with preterm birth, FSHR. We anticipate other human accelerated genes will similarly be associated with preterm birth risk and elucidate essential pathways for human parturition.

  3. Identification and analysis of novel genes involved in gravitropism of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Miyo T.; Tasaka, Masao; Masatoshi Taniguchi, .

    2012-07-01

    Gravitropism is a continuous control with regard to the orientation and juxtaposition of the various parts of the plant body in response to gravity. In higher plants, the relative directional change of gravity is mainly suscepted in specialized cells called statocytes, followed by signal conversion from physical information into physiological information within the statocytes. We have studied the early process of shoot gravitropism, gravity sensing and signaling process, mainly by molecular genetic approach. In Arabidopsis shoot, statocytes are the endodermal cells. sgr1/scarcrow (scr) and sgr7/short-root (shr) mutants fail to form the endodermis and to respond to gravity in their inflorescence stems. Since both SGR1/SCR and SGR7/SHR are transcriptional factors, at least a subset of their downstream genes can be expected to be involved in gravitropism. In addition, eal1 (endodermal-amyloplast less 1), which exhibits no gravitropism in inflorescence stem but retains ability to form endodermis, is a hypomorphic allele of sgr7/shr. Take advantage of these mutants, we performed DNA microarray analysis and compared gene expression profiles between wild type and the mutants. We found that approx. 40 genes were commonly down-regulated in these mutants and termed them DGE (DOWN-REGULATED GENE IN EAL1) genes. DGE1 has sequence similarity to Oryza sativa LAZY1 that is involved in shoot gravitropism of rice. DGE2 has a short region homologous to DGE1. DTL (DGE TWO-LIKE}) that has 54% identity to DGE2 is found in Arabidopsis genome. All three genes are conserved in angiosperm but have no known functional domains or motifs. We analyzed T-DNA insertion for these genes in single or multiple combinations. In dge1 dge2 dtl triple mutant, gravitropic response of shoot, hypocotyl and root dramatically reduced. Now we are carrying out further physiological and molecular genetic analysis of the triple mutant.

  4. Ectopic expression of MYB46 identifies transcriptional regulatory genes involved in secondary wall biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jae-Heung; Kim, Won-Chan; Han, Kyung-Hwan

    2009-11-01

    MYB46 functions as a transcriptional switch that turns on the genes necessary for secondary wall biosynthesis. Elucidating the transcriptional regulatory network immediately downstream of MYB46 is crucial to our understanding of the molecular and biochemical processes involved in the biosynthesis and deposition of secondary walls in plants. To gain insights into MYB46-mediated transcriptional regulation, we first established an inducible secondary wall thickening system in Arabidopsis by expressing MYB46 under the control of dexamethasone-inducible promoter. Then, we used an ATH1 GeneChip microarray and Illumina digital gene expression system to obtain a series of transcriptome profiles with regard to the induction of secondary wall development. These analyses allowed us to identify a group of transcription factors whose expression coincided with or preceded the induction of secondary wall biosynthetic genes. A transient transcriptional activation assay was used to confirm the hierarchical relationships among the transcription factors in the network. The in vivo assay showed that MYB46 transcriptionally activates downstream target transcription factors, three of which (AtC3H14, MYB52 and MYB63) were shown to be able to activate secondary wall biosynthesis genes. AtC3H14 activated the transcription of all of the secondary wall biosynthesis genes tested, suggesting that AtC3H14 may be another master regulator of secondary wall biosynthesis. The transcription factors identified here may include direct activators of secondary wall biosynthesis genes. The present study discovered novel hierarchical relationships among the transcription factors involved in the transcriptional regulation of secondary wall biosynthesis, and generated several testable hypotheses.

  5. Genome-Wide Identification and Functional Characterization of UDP-Glucosyltransferase Genes Involved in Flavonoid Biosynthesis in Glycine max.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qinggang; Shen, Guoan; Di, Shaokang; Fan, Cunying; Chang, Zhenzhan; Pang, Yongzhen

    2017-09-01

    Flavonoids, natural products abundant in the model legume Glycine max, confer benefits to plants and to animal health. Flavonoids are present in soybean mainly as glycoconjugates. However, the mechanisms of biosynthesis of flavonoid glycosides are largely unknown in G. max. In the present study, 212 putative UDP-glycosyltransferase (UGT) genes were identified in G. max by genome-wide searching. The GmUGT genes were distributed differentially among the 20 chromosomes, and they were expressed in various tissues with distinct expression profiles. We further analyzed the enzymatic activities of 11 GmUGTs that are potentially involved in flavonoid glycosylation, and found that six of them (UGT72X4, UGT72Z3, UGT73C20, UGT88A13, UGT88E19 and UGT92G4) exhibited activity toward flavonol, isoflavone, flavone and flavanol aglycones with different kinetic properties. Among them, UGT72X4, UGT72Z3 and UGT92G4 are flavonol-specific UGTs, and UGT73C20 and UGT88E19 exhibited activity toward both flavonol and isoflavone aglycones. In particular, UGT88A13 exhibited activity toward epicatechin, but not for the flavonol aglycones kaempferol and quercetin. Overexpression of these six GmUGT genes significantly increased the contents of isoflavone and flavonol glucosides in soybean hairy roots. In addition, overexpression of these six GmUGT genes also affected flavonol glycoside contents differently in seedlings and seeds of transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana. We provide valuable information on the identification of all UGT genes in soybean, and candidate GmUGT genes for potential metabolic engineering of flavonoid compounds in both Escherichia coli and plants. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. RNA-Sequencing Analyses Demonstrate the Involvement of Canonical Transient Receptor Potential Channels in Rat Tooth Germ Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tooth development depends on multiple molecular interactions between the dental epithelium and mesenchyme, which are derived from ectodermal and ectomesenchymal cells, respectively. We report on a systematic RNA sequencing analysis of transcriptional expression levels from the bud to hard tissue formation stages of rat tooth germ development. We found that GNAO1, ENO1, EFNB1, CALM1, SIAH2, ATP6V0A1, KDELR2, GTPBP1, POLR2C, SORT1, and members of the canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC channel family are involved in tooth germ development. Furthermore, Cell Counting Kit 8 (CCK8 and Transwell migration assays were performed to explore the effects of these differentially expressed genes (DEGs on the proliferation and migration of dental pulp stem cells. Immunostaining revealed that TRPC channels are expressed at varying levels during odontogenesis. The identified genes represent novel candidates that are likely to be vital for rat tooth germ development. Together, the results provide a valuable resource to elucidate the gene regulatory mechanisms underlying mammalian tooth germ development.

  7. Identification of differentially expressed genes in mouse hepatocarcinoma ascites cell line with low potential of lymphogenous metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Nan Cui; Jian-Wu Tang; Li Hou; Bo Song; Li-Ying Ban

    2006-01-01

    AIM:To identify genes differentially expressed in mouse hepatocarcinoma ascites cell line with low potential of lymphogenous metastasis.METHODS:A subtracted cDNA library of mouse hepatocarcinoma cell line with low potential of lymphogenous metastasis Hca-P and its synogenetic cell line Hca-F with high metastatic potential was constructed by suppression subtracted hybridization (SSH) method. The screened clones of the subtracted library were sequenced and GenBank homology search was performed.RESULTS:Fifteen differentially expressed cDNA fragments of Hca-P were obtained which revealed 8 known genes, 4 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and 3 cDNAs showed no homology.CONCLUSION:Tumor metastasis is an incident involving multiple genes. SSH is a useful technique to detect differentially expressed genes and an effective method to clone novel genes.

  8. An integrative systems genetics approach reveals potential causal genes and pathways related to obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kogelman, Lisette; Zhernakova, Daria V.; Westra, Harm-Jan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity is a multi-factorial health problem in which genetic factors play an important role. Limited results have been obtained in single-gene studies using either genomic or transcriptomic data. RNA sequencing technology has shown its potential in gaining accurate knowledge about...... the transcriptome, and may reveal novel genes affecting complex diseases. Integration of genomic and transcriptomic variation (expression quantitative trait loci [eQTL] mapping) has identified causal variants that affect complex diseases. We integrated transcriptomic data from adipose tissue and genomic data from...... a porcine model to investigate the mechanisms involved in obesity using a systems genetics approach. METHODS: Using a selective gene expression profiling approach, we selected 36 animals based on a previously created genomic Obesity Index for RNA sequencing of subcutaneous adipose tissue. Differential...

  9. Undifferentiated pulp cells and odontoblast-like cells share genes involved in the process of odontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Maidy Rehder Wimmers; Dernowsek, Janaína; Passos, Geraldo A; Bombonato-Prado, Karina Fittipaldi

    2015-04-01

    Expression of a large number of genes during differentiation of undifferentiated pulp cells into odontoblastic cells is still unknown, hence the aim of this investigation was to compare undifferentiated pulp cells (OD-21) and odontoblast-like cells (MDPC-23) through the assessment of cell stimulation and gene expression profiling. The cells were cultured and after the experimental periods, there were evaluated cell proliferation and viability as well as alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) and mineralization nodules. To evaluate gene expression it was used fluorescence cDNA microarray technology in addition to bioinformatics programmes such as SAM (significance analysis of microarrays). Gene expression was validated by Real Time PCR (qPCR). The results showed that viability was above 80% in both cells, cell proliferation and ALP activity was higher in MDPC-23 cells and mineralization nodules were present only in the cultures of odontoblast-like cells. There were observed genes associated to odontogenesis with similar behaviour in both cell types, such as Il10, Traf6, Lef1 and Hspa8. Regions of the heatmap showed differences in induction and repression of genes such as Jak2 and Fas. OD-21 cells share many genes with similar behaviour to MDPC-23 cells, suggesting their potential to differentiate into odontoblasts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Genes involved in the biosynthesis of photosynthetic pigments in the purple sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Thiocapsa roseopersicina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Akos T; Rákhely, Gábor; Kovács, Kornél L

    2003-06-01

    A pigment mutant strain of the purple sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Thiocapsa roseopersicina BBS was isolated by plasposon mutagenesis. Nineteen open reading frame, most of which are thought to be genes involved in the biosynthesis of carotenoids, bacteriochlorophyll, and the photosynthetic reaction center, were identified surrounding the plasposon in a 22-kb-long chromosomal locus. The general arrangement of the photosynthetic genes was similar to that in other purple photosynthetic bacteria; however, the locations of a few genes occurring in this region were unusual. Most of the gene products showed the highest similarity to the corresponding proteins in Rubrivivax gelatinosus. The plasposon was inserted into the crtD gene, likely inactivating crtC as well, and the carotenoid composition of the mutant strain corresponded to the aborted spirilloxanthin pathway. Homologous and heterologous complementation experiments indicated a conserved function of CrtC and CrtD in the purple photosynthetic bacteria. The crtDC and crtE genes were shown to be regulated by oxygen, and a role of CrtJ in aerobic repression was suggested.

  11. Identification of genes involved in cold-shock response in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ANDREAS BORCHEL; MARIEKE VERLEIH; ALEXANDER REBL; TOM GOLDAMMER

    2017-09-01

    A rapid decline in temperature poses a major challenge for poikilothermic fish, as their entire metabolism depends on ambient temperature. The gene expression of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss having undergone such a cold shock (0◦C) was compared to a control (5◦C) in a microarray and quantitative real-time PCR based study. The tissues of gill, kidney and liver were examined. The most differently expressed genes were found in liver, many of them contributing to the network ‘cellular compromise, cellular growth and proliferation’.However, the number of genes found to be regulated at 0◦Cwas surprisingly low. Instead of classical genes involved in temperature shock, the three genes encoding fibroblast growth factor 1 (fgf1), growth arrest and DNA-damageinducible,alpha (gadd45a) and sclerostin domain-containing protein 1 (sostdc1) were upregulated in the liver upon cold shock in two different rainbow trout strains, suggesting that these genes may be considered as general biomarkers for cold shock in rainbow trout.

  12. Mapping and identification of a Cicer arietinum NSP2 gene involved in nodulation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, L; Madrid, E; Varshney, R K; Azam, S; Millan, T; Rubio, J; Gil, J

    2014-02-01

    For the first time the putative NSP2 gene in chickpea has been identified using pairs of NILs differing for the Rn1 / rn1 nodulation gene that was located in LG5 of chickpea genetic map. An intraspecific cross between the mutant non-nodulating genotype PM233, carrying the recessive gene rn1, and the wild-type CA2139 was used to develop two pairs of near-isogenic lines (NILs) for nodulation in chickpea. These pairs of NILs were characterized using sequence tagged microsatellite site (STMS) markers distributed across different linkage groups (LGs) of the chickpea genetic map leading to the detection of polymorphic markers located in LG5. Using this information, together with the genome annotation in Medicago truncatula, a candidate gene (NSP2) known to be involved in nodulation pathway was selected for mapping in chickpea. The full length sequence obtained in chickpea wild-type (CaNSP2) was 1,503 bp. Linkage analysis in an F3 population of 118 plants derived from the cross between the pair of NILS NIL7-2A (nod) × NIL7-2B (non-nod) revealed a co-localization between CaNSP2 and Rn1 gene. These data implicate the CaNSP2 gene as a candidate for identity to Rn1, and suggest that it could act in the nodulation signaling transduction pathway similarly to that in other legumes species.

  13. Rj (rj) genes involved in nitrogen-fixing root nodule formation in soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Masaki; Saeki, Yuichi; Haga, Michiyo; Harada, Kyuya; Kouchi, Hiroshi; Umehara, Yosuke

    2012-01-01

    It has long been known that formation of symbiotic root nodules in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) is controlled by several host genes referred to as Rj (rj) genes, but molecular cloning of these genes has been hampered by soybean’s complicated genome structure and large genome size. Progress in molecular identification of legume genes involved in root nodule symbiosis have been mostly achieved by using two model legumes, Lotus japonicus and Medicago truncatula, that have relatively simple and small genomes and are capable of molecular transfection. However, recent development of resources for soybean molecular genetic research, such as genome sequencing, large EST databases, and high-density linkage maps, have enabled us to isolate several Rj genes. This progress has been achieved in connection with systematic utilization of the information obtained from molecular genetics of the model legumes. In this review, we summarize the current status of knowledge of host-controlled nodulation in soybean based on information from recent studies on Rj genes, and discuss the future research prospects. PMID:23136493

  14. Characterization of aid1, a novel gene involved in Fusobacterium nucleatum interspecies interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Aida; Kaplan, Christopher W; He, Xuesong; McHardy, Ian; Shi, Wenyuan; Lux, Renate

    2014-08-01

    The oral opportunistic pathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum is known to interact with a large number of different bacterial species residing in the oral cavity. It adheres to a variety of Gram-positive bacteria, including oral streptococci via the arginine-inhibitable adhesin RadD. In this study, we describe a novel protein encoded by the predicted open reading frame FN1253 that appears to play a role in interspecies interactions of F. nucleatum, particularly with oral streptococci and related Gram-positive species. We designated FN1253 as aid1 (Adherence Inducing Determinant 1). Expression analyses demonstrated that this gene was induced in F. nucleatum single species biofilms, while the presence of representative members of the oral microbiota known to adhere to F. nucleatum triggered its suppression. Inactivation as well as overexpression of aid1 affected the ability of F. nucleatum to coaggregate with oral streptococci and the closely related Enterococcus faecalis, but not other Gram-positive oral species tested. Furthermore, overexpression of aid1 led to a drastic change in the structure of dual species biofilms of F. nucleatum with oral streptococci. Aid1 function was abolished in the presence of arginine and found to be dependent on RadD. Interestingly, differential expression of aid1 did not affect messenger RNA and protein levels of RadD. These findings indicate that RadD-mediated adhesion to oral streptococci involves more complex cellular processes than the simple interaction of adhesins on the surface of partner strains. Aid1 could potentially play an important role in facilitating RadD-mediated interaction with oral streptococci by increasing binding specificity of F. nucleatum to other microbial species.

  15. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Candidate Genes Involved in Gibberellin-Induced Fruit Setting in Triploid Loquat (Eriobotrya japonica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shuang; Luo, Jun; Xu, Fanjie; Zhang, Xueying

    2016-01-01

    The triploid loquat (Eriobotrya japonica) is a new germplasm with a high edible fruit rate. Under natural conditions, the triploid loquat has a low fruit setting ratio (not more than 10 fruits in a tree), reflecting fertilization failure. To unravel the molecular mechanism of gibberellin (GA) treatment to induce parthenocarpy in triploid loquats, a transcriptome analysis of fruit setting induced by GA3 was analyzed using RNA-seq at four different stages during the development of young fruit. Approximately 344 million high quality reads in seven libraries were de novo assembled, yielding 153,900 unique transcripts with more than 79.9% functionally annotated transcripts. A total of 2,220, 2,974, and 1,614 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were observed at 3, 7, and 14 days after GA treatment, respectively. The weighted gene co-expression network and Venn diagram analysis of DEGs revealed that sixteen candidate genes may play critical roles in the fruit setting after GA treatment. Five genes were related to auxin, in which one auxin synthesis gene of yucca was upregulated, suggesting that auxin may act as a signal for fruit setting. Furthermore, ABA 8′-hydroxylase was upregulated, while ethylene-forming enzyme was downregulated, suggesting that multiple hormones may be involved in GA signaling. Four transcription factors, NAC7, NAC23, bHLH35, and HD16, were potentially negatively regulated in fruit setting, and two cell division-related genes, arr9 and CYCA3, were upregulated. In addition, the expression of the GA receptor gid1 was downregulated by GA treatment, suggesting that the negative feedback mechanism in GA signaling may be regulated by gid1. Altogether, the results of the present study provide information from a comprehensive gene expression analysis and insight into the molecular mechanism underlying fruit setting under GA treatment in E. japonica. PMID:28066478

  16. Clinical incidents involving students on placement: an analysis of incident reports to identify potential risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaida, J E; Maloney, S; Lo, K; Morgan, P

    2015-06-01

    Students are sometimes involved in incidents during clinical training. To the authors' knowledge, no quantitative studies of incidents specifically involving physiotherapy students on clinical placement are available in the literature. A retrospective audit (2008 to 2011) of incident reports involving physiotherapy students was conducted to identify the nature and features of incidents. The study aimed to determine if injuries to a student or patient were more or less likely when the supervisor was in close proximity, and whether students with lower academic performance in their preclinical semester were more likely to be involved in an incident. There were 19 care-delivery-related and three equipment-related incidents. There were no incidents of violent, aggressive or demeaning behaviour towards students. The incident rate was 9.0/100,000 student-hours for third-year students and 6.8/100,000 student-hours for fourth-year students. The majority of incidents (55%) occurred from 11 am to 12-noon and from 3 pm to 3.30 pm. Incidents more often resulted in patient or student injury when the supervisor was not in close proximity (approximately 50% vs approximately 20%), although the difference was not significant (P=0.336). The academic results of students involved in incidents were equivalent to the whole cohort in their preclinical semester {mean 75 [standard deviation (SD) 6] vs 76 (SD 7); P=0.488}. The unexpected temporal clustering of incidents warrants further investigation. Student fatigue may warrant attention as a potential contributor; however, contextual factors, such as staff workload, along with organisational systems, structures and procedures may be more relevant. The potential relationship between supervisor proximity and injury also warrants further exploration. The findings of the present study should be integrated into clinical education curricula and communicated to clinical educators. Copyright © 2014 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by

  17. Beyond an AFLP genome scan towards the identification of immune genes involved in plague resistance in Rattus rattus from Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollenaere, C; Jacquet, S; Ivanova, S; Loiseau, A; Duplantier, J-M; Streiff, R; Brouat, C

    2013-01-01

    Genome scans using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers became popular in nonmodel species within the last 10 years, but few studies have tried to characterize the anonymous outliers identified. This study follows on from an AFLP genome scan in the black rat (Rattus rattus), the reservoir of plague (Yersinia pestis infection) in Madagascar. We successfully sequenced 17 of the 22 markers previously shown to be potentially affected by plague-mediated selection and associated with a plague resistance phenotype. Searching these sequences in the genome of the closely related species Rattus norvegicus assigned them to 14 genomic regions, revealing a random distribution of outliers in the genome (no clustering). We compared these results with those of an in silico AFLP study of the R. norvegicus genome, which showed that outlier sequences could not have been inferred by this method in R. rattus (only four of the 15 sequences were predicted). However, in silico analysis allowed the prediction of AFLP markers distribution and the estimation of homoplasy rates, confirming its potential utility for designing AFLP studies in nonmodel species. The 14 genomic regions surrounding AFLP outliers (less than 300 kb from the marker) contained 75 genes encoding proteins of known function, including nine involved in immune function and pathogen defence. We identified the two interleukin 1 genes (Il1a and Il1b) that share homology with an antigen of Y. pestis, as the best candidates for genes subject to plague-mediated natural selection. At least six other genes known to be involved in proinflammatory pathways may also be affected by plague-mediated selection. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Potential clinical insights into microRNAs and their target genes in esophageal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Su Q; Wang, He M; Cao, Xiu F

    2011-12-01

    Esophageal carcinoma (EC) are characterized by dysregulation of microRNAs, which play an important roles as a posttranscriptional regulators in protein synthesis, and are involved in cellular processes, such as proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. Recently, altered miRNAs expression has been comprehensively studied in EC by high-throughput technology. Increased understanding of miRNAs target genes and their potential regulatory mechanisms have clarified the miRNAs activities and may provide exciting opportunities for cancer diagnosis and miRNA-based genetherapy. Here, we reviewed the most recently discovered miRNA target genes, with particular emphasis on the deciphering of their possible mechanisms and the potential roles in miRNAs-based tumour therapeutics.

  19. Identification of genes involved in the biology of atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumours using Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeibmann, Astrid; Eikmeier, Kristin; Linge, Anna; Kool, Marcel; Koos, Björn; Schulz, Jacqueline; Albrecht, Stefanie; Bartelheim, Kerstin; Frühwald, Michael C.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Paulus, Werner; Hasselblatt, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumours (AT/RT) are malignant brain tumours. Unlike most other human brain tumours, AT/RT are characterized by inactivation of one single gene, SMARCB1. SMARCB1 is a member of the evolutionarily conserved SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex, which has an important role in the control of cell differentiation and proliferation. Little is known, however, about the pathways involved in the oncogenic effects of SMARCB1 inactivation, which might also represent targets for treatment. Here we report a comprehensive genetic screen in the fruit fly that revealed several genes not yet associated with loss of snr1, the Drosophila homologue of SMARCB1. We confirm the functional role of identified genes (including merlin, kibra and expanded, known to regulate hippo signalling pathway activity) in human rhabdoid tumour cell lines and AT/RT tumour samples. These results demonstrate that fly models can be employed for the identification of clinically relevant pathways in human cancer.

  20. UFO: an Arabidopsis gene involved in both floral meristem and floral organ development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, J Z; Meyerowitz, E M

    1995-05-01

    We describe the role of the UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) gene in Arabidopsis floral development based on a genetic and molecular characterization of the phenotypes of nine ufo alleles. UFO is required for the proper identity of the floral meristem and acts in three different aspects of the process that distinguishes flowers from shoots. UFO is involved in establishing the whorled pattern of floral organs, controlling the determinacy of the floral meristem, and activating the APETALA3 and PISTILLATA genes required for petal and stamen identity. In many respects, UFO acts in a manner similar to LEAFY, but the ufo mutant phenotype also suggests an additional role for UFO in defining boundaries within the floral primordia or controlling cell proliferation during floral organ growth. Finally, genetic interactions that prevent flower formation and lead to the generation of filamentous structures implicate UFO as a member of a new, large, and diverse class of genes in Arabidopsis necessary for flower formation.

  1. Constitutive components and induced gene expression are involved in the desiccation tolerance of Selaginella tamariscina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mao-Sen; Chien, Ching-Te; Lin, Tsan-Piao

    2008-04-01

    Selaginella tamariscina, one of the most primitive vascular plants, can remain alive in a desiccated state and resurrect when water becomes available. To evaluate the nature of desiccation tolerance in this plant, we compared the composition of soluble sugars and saturation ratios of phospholipids (PLs) between hydrated and desiccated tissues of S. tamariscina using gas chromatography. In this study, differences in gene expression and ABA contents were also analyzed during dehydration. The results revealed that trehalose (at >130 mg g(-1) DW) was the major soluble sugar, and low saturated fatty acid content in PLs (0.31) was maintained in both hydrated and desiccated tissues. In addition, the ABA content of S. tamariscina increased 3-fold, and genes involved in ABA signaling and cellular protection were up-regulated while photosystem-related genes were down-regulated during dehydration. The biochemical and molecular findings suggest that both constitutive and inducible protective molecules contribute to desiccation tolerance of S. tamariscina.

  2. Functional characterization of two SOS-regulated genes involved in mitomycin C resistance in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Kulishev, Carina O; Alves, Ingrid R; Valencia, Estela Y; Pidhirnyj, María I; Fernández-Silva, Frank S; Rodrigues, Ticiane R; Guzzo, Cristiane R; Galhardo, Rodrigo S

    2015-09-01

    The SOS response is a universal bacterial regulon involved in the cellular response to DNA damage and other forms of stress. In Caulobacter crescentus, previous work has identified a plethora of genes that are part of the SOS regulon, but the biological roles of several of them remain to be determined. In this study, we report that two genes, hereafter named mmcA and mmcB, are involved in the defense against DNA damage caused by mitomycin C (MMC), but not against lesions induced by other common DNA damaging agents, such as UVC light, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and hydrogen peroxide. mmcA is a conserved gene that encodes a member of the glyoxalases/dioxygenases protein family, and acts independently of known DNA repair pathways. On the other hand, epistasis analysis showed that mmcB acts in the same pathway as imuC (dnaE2), and is required specifically for MMC-induced mutagenesis, but not for that induced by UV light, suggesting a role for MmcB in translesion synthesis-dependent repair of MMC damage. We show that the lack of MMC-induced mutability in the mmcB strain is not caused by lack of proper SOS induction of the imuABC operon, involved in translesion synthesis (TLS) in C. crescentus. Based on this data and on structural analysis of a close homolog, we propose that MmcB is an endonuclease which creates substrates for ImuABC-mediated TLS patches.

  3. Similar Microbial Consortia and Genes Are Involved in the Biodegradation of Benzalkonium Chlorides in Different Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertekin, Emine; Hatt, Janet K; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T; Tezel, Ulas

    2016-04-19

    Benzalkonium chlorides (BACs) are emerging pollutants. Identification of microorganisms and the genes involved in the biodegradation of BACs is crucial for better understanding the fate of BACs in the environment and developing treatment strategies. Four microbial communities degrading BACs were developed from sewage (SEW), activated sludge (AS), soil (SOIL) and sea sediment (SEA) samples. According to 16S rRNA pyrosequencing and shotgun metagenome sequencing analyses, the most abundant species represented uncharacterized members of the Pseudomonas and Achromobacter genera. BAC biotransformation rates of the enriched microbial communities were 2.8, 3.2, 17.8, and 24.3 μM hr(-1) for SEA, AS, SOIL, and SEW, respectively, and were positively correlated with the relative abundance of a particular Pseudomonas sp. strain, BIOMIG1. The strain BIOMIG1 mineralizes BACs at a rate up to 2.40 μmol hr(-1) 10(-11) cells. Genomes of four BAC degrading and nondegrading BIOMIG1 phenotypes were sequenced and differentially compared with each other. As a result, a gene cluster encoding for transporters, an integrase and a dioxygenase were involved in BAC biotransformation. Our results suggest that BIOMIG1 plays a key role on the fate of BACs in the environment and genes, other than those reported to date, are involved in BAC biotransformation in various habitats.

  4. Key intestinal genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism are downregulated in dyslipidemic men with insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, Patrick; Tremblay, André J; Kelly, Isabelle; Lemelin, Valéry; Droit, Arnaud; Lamarche, Benoît

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is associated with elevated plasma levels of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) of intestinal origin. However, the mechanisms underlying the overaccumulation of apolipoprotein (apo)B-48-containing TRLs in individuals with IR are not yet fully understood. This study examined the relationships between apoB-48-containing TRL kinetics and the expression of key intestinal genes and proteins involved in lipid/lipoprotein metabolism in 14 obese nondiabetic men with IR compared with 10 insulin-sensitive (IS) men matched for waist circumference. The in vivo kinetics of TRL apoB-48 were assessed using a primed-constant infusion of L-[5,5,5-D₃]leucine for 12 h with the participants in a constantly fed state. The expression of key intestinal genes and proteins involved in lipid/lipoprotein metabolism was assessed by performing real-time PCR quantification and LC-MS/MS on duodenal biopsy specimens. The TRL apoB-48 pool size and production rate were 102% (P < 0.0001) and 87% (P = 0.01) greater, respectively, in the men with IR versus the IS men. On the other hand, intestinal mRNA levels of sterol regulatory element binding factor-2, hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α, and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein were significantly lower in the men with IR than in the IS men. These data indicate that IR is associated with intestinal overproduction of lipoproteins and significant downregulation of key intestinal genes involved in lipid/lipoprotein metabolism.

  5. Identification and characterization of Arabidopsis thaliana genes involved in xylem secondary cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Ryusuke; Nishitani, Kazuhiko

    2006-05-01

    The xylem of higher plants offers support to aerial portions of the plant body and serves as conduit for the translocation of water and nutrients. Terminal differentiation of xylem cells typically involves deposition of thick secondary cell walls. This is a dynamic cellular process accompanied by enhanced rates of cellulose deposition and the induction of synthesis of specific secondary-wall matrix polysaccharides and lignin. The secondary cell wall is essential for the function of conductive and supportive xylem tissues. Recently, significant progress has been made in identifying the genes responsible for xylem secondary cell wall formation. However, our present knowledge is still insufficient to account for the molecular processes by which this complex system operates. To acquire further information about xylem secondary cell walls, we initially focused our research effort on a set of genes specifically implicated in secondary cell wall formation, as well as on loss-of-function mutants. Results from two microarray screens identified several key candidate genes responsible for secondary cell wall formation. Reverse genetic analyses led to the identification of a glycine-rich protein involved in maintaining the stable structure of protoxylem, which is essential for the transport of water and nutrients. A combination of expression analyses and reverse genetics allows us to systematically identify new genes required for the development of physical properties of the xylem secondary wall.

  6. Genes involved in cysteine metabolism of Chironomus tepperi are regulated differently by copper and by cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppe, Katherine J; Carew, Melissa E; Long, Sara M; Lee, Siu F; Pettigrove, Vincent; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2014-05-01

    Freshwater invertebrates are often exposed to metal contamination, and changes in gene expression patterns can help understand mechanisms underlying toxicity and act as pollutant-specific biomarkers. In this study the expressions of genes involved in cysteine metabolism are characterized in the midge Chironomus tepperi during exposures to sublethal concentrations of cadmium and copper. These metals altered gene expression of the cysteine metabolism differently. Both metals decreased S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase expression and did not change the expression of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase. Cadmium exposure likely increased cystathionine production by up-regulating cystathionine-β-synthase (CβS) expression, while maintaining control level cysteine production via cystathionine-γ-lyase (CγL) expression. Conversely, copper down-regulated CβS expression and up-regulated CγL expression, which in turn could diminish cystathionine to favor cysteine production. Both metals up-regulated glutathione related expression (γ-glutamylcysteine synthase and glutathione synthetase). Only cadmium up-regulated metallothionein expression and glutathione S-transferase d1 expression was up-regulated only by copper exposure. These different transcription responses of genes involved in cysteine metabolism in C. tepperi point to metal-specific detoxification pathways and suggest that the transsulfuration pathway could provide biomarkers for identifying specific metals.

  7. Reversible Histone Acetylation Involved in Transcriptional Regulation of WT1 Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yangguang SHAO; Jun LU; Cao CHENG; Liguo CUI; Guoping ZHANG; Baiqu HUANG

    2007-01-01

    To validate the involvement of reversible histone acetylation in the transcriptional regulation of human Wilms' tumor 1 gene (WT1), we analyzed the roles of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and histone acetyltransferase in this epigenetic process. Of the six HDACs (HDAC1-6) examined, HDAC4 and HDAC5 were found to have significant repressing effects on the activity of the WT1 reporter gene, as revealed by luciferase reporter assays and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays.Luciferase reporter assays showed that the histone acetyltransferase p300 was able to counteract the HDAC4/HDAC5-mediated repression and that p300/CBP synergized with transcription factors Sp1, c-Myb, and Ets-1 in activation of the WT1 reporter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments showed that p300 promotes the acetylation level of histone H3 at the WT1 intronic enhancer. Based on these data, we proposed a hypothetical model for the involvement of reversible histone acetylation in transcriptional regulation of the WT1 gene. This study provides further insight into the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of the WT1 gene and WT1-associated diseases treatment.

  8. Homeodomain Protein Scr Regulates the Transcription of Genes Involved in Juvenile Hormone Biosynthesis in the Silkworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Meng; Liu, Chun; Peng, Jian; Qian, Wenliang; Qian, Heying; Tian, Ling; Li, Jiarui; Dai, Dandan; Xu, Anying; Li, Sheng; Xia, Qingyou; Cheng, Daojun

    2015-11-02

    The silkworm Dominant trimolting (Moltinism, M³) mutant undergoes three larval molts and exhibits precocious metamorphosis. In this study, we found that compared with the wild-type (WT) that undergoes four larval molts, both the juvenile hormone (JH) concentration and the expression of the JH-responsive gene Krüppel homolog 1 (Kr-h1) began to be greater in the second instar of the M³ mutant. A positional cloning analysis revealed that only the homeodomain transcription factor gene Sex combs reduced (Scr) is located in the genomic region that is tightly linked to the M³ locus. The expression level of the Scr gene in the brain-corpora cardiaca-corpora allata (Br-CC-CA) complex, which controls the synthesis of JH, was very low in the final larval instar of both the M³ and WT larvae, and exhibited a positive correlation with JH titer changes. Importantly, luciferase reporter analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) demonstrated that the Scr protein could promote the transcription of genes involved in JH biosynthesis by directly binding to the cis-regulatory elements (CREs) of homeodomain protein on their promoters. These results conclude that the homeodomain protein Scr is transcriptionally involved in the regulation of JH biosynthesis in the silkworm.

  9. Candidate driver genes involved in genome maintenance and DNA repair in Sézary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollard, Wesley J; Pullabhatla, Venu; Lorenc, Anna; Patel, Varsha M; Butler, Rosie M; Bayega, Anthony; Begum, Nelema; Bakr, Farrah; Dedhia, Kiran; Fisher, Joshua; Aguilar-Duran, Silvia; Flanagan, Charlotte; Ghasemi, Aria A; Hoffmann, Ricarda M; Castillo-Mosquera, Nubia; Nuttall, Elisabeth A; Paul, Arisa; Roberts, Ceri A; Solomonidis, Emmanouil G; Tarrant, Rebecca; Yoxall, Antoinette; Beyers, Carl Z; Ferreira, Silvia; Tosi, Isabella; Simpson, Michael A; de Rinaldis, Emanuele; Mitchell, Tracey J; Whittaker, Sean J

    2016-06-30

    Sézary syndrome (SS) is a leukemic variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) and represents an ideal model for study of T-cell transformation. We describe whole-exome and single-nucleotide polymorphism array-based copy number analyses of CD4(+) tumor cells from untreated patients at diagnosis and targeted resequencing of 101 SS cases. A total of 824 somatic nonsynonymous gene variants were identified including indels, stop-gain/loss, splice variants, and recurrent gene variants indicative of considerable molecular heterogeneity. Driver genes identified using MutSigCV include POT1, which has not been previously reported in CTCL; and TP53 and DNMT3A, which were also identified consistent with previous reports. Mutations in PLCG1 were detected in 11% of tumors including novel variants not previously described in SS. This study is also the first to show BRCA2 defects in a significant proportion (14%) of SS tumors. Aberrations in PRKCQ were found to occur in 20% of tumors highlighting selection for activation of T-cell receptor/NF-κB signaling. A complex but consistent pattern of copy number variants (CNVs) was detected and many CNVs involved genes identified as putative drivers. Frequent defects involving the POT1 and ATM genes responsible for telomere maintenance were detected and may contribute to genomic instability in SS. Genomic aberrations identified were enriched for genes implicated in cell survival and fate, specifically PDGFR, ERK, JAK STAT, MAPK, and TCR/NF-κB signaling; epigenetic regulation (DNMT3A, ASLX3, TET1-3); and homologous recombination (RAD51C, BRCA2, POLD1). This study now provides the basis for a detailed functional analysis of malignant transformation of mature T cells and improved patient stratification and treatment.

  10. De Novo assembly of the Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus spleen transcriptome to identify putative genes involved in immunity.

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    Lin Huang

    Full Text Available Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus is an economically important marine fish in Asia and has suffered from disease outbreaks caused by various pathogens, which requires more information for immune relevant genes on genome background. However, genomic and transcriptomic data for Japanese flounder remain scarce, which limits studies on the immune system of this species. In this study, we characterized the Japanese flounder spleen transcriptome using an Illumina paired-end sequencing platform to identify putative genes involved in immunity.A cDNA library from the spleen of P. olivaceus was constructed and randomly sequenced using an Illumina technique. The removal of low quality reads generated 12,196,968 trimmed reads, which assembled into 96,627 unigenes. A total of 21,391 unigenes (22.14% were annotated in the NCBI Nr database, and only 1.1% of the BLASTx top-hits matched P. olivaceus protein sequences. Approximately 12,503 (58.45% unigenes were categorized into three Gene Ontology groups, 19,547 (91.38% were classified into 26 Cluster of Orthologous Groups, and 10,649 (49.78% were assigned to six Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. Furthermore, 40,928 putative simple sequence repeats and 47, 362 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified. Importantly, we identified 1,563 putative immune-associated unigenes that mapped to 15 immune signaling pathways.The P. olivaceus transciptome data provides a rich source to discover and identify new genes, and the immune-relevant sequences identified here will facilitate our understanding of the mechanisms involved in the immune response. Furthermore, the plentiful potential SSRs and SNPs found in this study are important resources with respect to future development of a linkage map or marker assisted breeding programs for the flounder.

  11. Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni Harbors Two lexA Genes Involved in SOS Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Luciane S.; da Silva, Josefa B.; Milanez, Juliana S.; Monteiro-Vitorello, Claudia B.; Momo, Leonardo; de Morais, Zenaide M.; Vasconcellos, Silvio A.; Marques, Marilis V.; Ho, Paulo L.; da Costa, Renata M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria activate a regulatory network in response to the challenges imposed by DNA damage to genetic material, known as the SOS response. This system is regulated by the RecA recombinase and by the transcriptional repressor lexA. Leptospira interrogans is a pathogen capable of surviving in the environment for weeks, being exposed to a great variety of stress agents and yet retaining its ability to infect the host. This study aims to investigate the behavior of L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni after the stress induced by DNA damage. We show that L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni genome contains two genes encoding putative LexA proteins (lexA1 and lexA2) one of them being potentially acquired by lateral gene transfer. Both genes are induced after DNA damage, but the steady state levels of both LexA proteins drop, probably due to auto-proteolytic activity triggered in this condition. In addition, seven other genes were up-regulated following UV-C irradiation, recA, recN, dinP, and four genes encoding hypothetical proteins. This set of genes is potentially regulated by LexA1, as it showed binding to their promoter regions. All these regions contain degenerated sequences in relation to the previously described SOS box, TTTGN 5CAAA. On the other hand, LexA2 was able to bind to the palindrome TTGTAN 10TACAA, found in its own promoter region, but not in the others. Therefore, the L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni SOS regulon may be even more complex, as a result of LexA1 and LexA2 binding to divergent motifs. New possibilities for DNA damage response in Leptospira are expected, with potential influence in other biological responses such as virulence. PMID:24098496

  12. Leptospira interrogans serovar copenhageni harbors two lexA genes involved in SOS response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Luciane S; da Silva, Josefa B; Milanez, Juliana S; Monteiro-Vitorello, Claudia B; Momo, Leonardo; de Morais, Zenaide M; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Marques, Marilis V; Ho, Paulo L; da Costa, Renata M A

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria activate a regulatory network in response to the challenges imposed by DNA damage to genetic material, known as the SOS response. This system is regulated by the RecA recombinase and by the transcriptional repressor lexA. Leptospira interrogans is a pathogen capable of surviving in the environment for weeks, being exposed to a great variety of stress agents and yet retaining its ability to infect the host. This study aims to investigate the behavior of L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni after the stress induced by DNA damage. We show that L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni genome contains two genes encoding putative LexA proteins (lexA1 and lexA2) one of them being potentially acquired by lateral gene transfer. Both genes are induced after DNA damage, but the steady state levels of both LexA proteins drop, probably due to auto-proteolytic activity triggered in this condition. In addition, seven other genes were up-regulated following UV-C irradiation, recA, recN, dinP, and four genes encoding hypothetical proteins. This set of genes is potentially regulated by LexA1, as it showed binding to their promoter regions. All these regions contain degenerated sequences in relation to the previously described SOS box, TTTGN 5CAAA. On the other hand, LexA2 was able to bind to the palindrome TTGTAN10TACAA, found in its own promoter region, but not in the others. Therefore, the L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni SOS regulon may be even more complex, as a result of LexA1 and LexA2 binding to divergent motifs. New possibilities for DNA damage response in Leptospira are expected, with potential influence in other biological responses such as virulence.

  13. Leptospira interrogans serovar copenhageni harbors two lexA genes involved in SOS response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane S Fonseca

    Full Text Available Bacteria activate a regulatory network in response to the challenges imposed by DNA damage to genetic material, known as the SOS response. This system is regulated by the RecA recombinase and by the transcriptional repressor lexA. Leptospira interrogans is a pathogen capable of surviving in the environment for weeks, being exposed to a great variety of stress agents and yet retaining its ability to infect the host. This study aims to investigate the behavior of L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni after the stress induced by DNA damage. We show that L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni genome contains two genes encoding putative LexA proteins (lexA1 and lexA2 one of them being potentially acquired by lateral gene transfer. Both genes are induced after DNA damage, but the steady state levels of both LexA proteins drop, probably due to auto-proteolytic activity triggered in this condition. In addition, seven other genes were up-regulated following UV-C irradiation, recA, recN, dinP, and four genes encoding hypothetical proteins. This set of genes is potentially regulated by LexA1, as it showed binding to their promoter regions. All these regions contain degenerated sequences in relation to the previously described SOS box, TTTGN 5CAAA. On the other hand, LexA2 was able to bind to the palindrome TTGTAN10TACAA, found in its own promoter region, but not in the others. Therefore, the L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni SOS regulon may be even more complex, as a result of LexA1 and LexA2 binding to divergent motifs. New possibilities for DNA damage response in Leptospira are expected, with potential influence in other biological responses such as virulence.

  14. Increased urinary lysophosphatidic acid in mouse with subtotal nephrectomy: potential involvement in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzoyan, Koryun; Baïotto, Anna; Dupuy, Aude; Marsal, Dimitri; Denis, Colette; Vinel, Claire; Sicard, Pierre; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Schanstra, Joost P; Klein, Julie; Saulnier-Blache, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-12-01

    Increased incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) with consecutive progression to end-stage renal disease represents a significant burden to healthcare systems. Renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis (TIF) is a classical hallmark of CKD and is well correlated with the loss of renal function. The bioactive lysophospholipid lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), acting through specific G-protein-coupled receptors, was previously shown to be involved in TIF development in a mouse model of unilateral ureteral obstruction. Here, we study the role of LPA in a mouse subjected to subtotal nephrectomy (SNx), a more chronic and progressive model of CKD. Five months after surgical nephron reduction, SNx mice showed massive albuminuria, extensive TIF, and glomerular hypertrophy when compared to sham-operated animals. Urinary and plasma levels of LPA were analyzed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. LPA was significantly increased in SNx urine, not in plasma, and was significantly correlated with albuminuria and TIF. Moreover, SNx mice showed significant downregulation in the renal expression of lipid phosphate phosphohydrolases (LPP1, 2, and 3) that might be involved in reduced LPA bioavailability through dephosphorylation. We concluded that SNx increases urinary LPA through a mechanism that could involve co-excretion of plasma LPA with albumin associated with a reduction of its catabolism in the kidney. Because of the previously demonstrated profibrotic activity of LPA, the association of urinary LPA with TIF suggests the potential involvement of LPA in the development of advanced CKD in the SNx mouse model. Targeting LPA metabolism might represent an interesting approach in CKD treatment.

  15. LMI1-like genes involved in leaf margin development of Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Xiyuan; Liu, Han; Huang, Jixiang; Zhao, Jianyi

    2017-06-01

    In rapeseed (Brassica napus L.), leaf margins are variable and can be entire, serrate, or lobed. In our previous study, the lobed-leaf gene (LOBED-LEAF 1, BnLL1) was mapped to a 32.1 kb section of B. napus A10. Two LMI1-like genes, BnaA10g26320D and BnaA10g26330D, were considered the potential genes that controlled the lobed-leaf trait in rapeseed. In the present study, these two genes and another homologous gene (BnaC04g00850D) were transformed into Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. plants to identify their functions. All three LMI1-like genes of B. napus produced serrate leaf margins. The expression analysis indicated that the expression level of BnaA10g26320D determined the difference between lobed- and entire-leaved lines in rapeseed. Therefore, it is likely that BnaA10g26320D corresponds to BnLL1.

  16. Candida famata (Debaryomyces hansenii) DNA sequences containing genes involved in riboflavin synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronovsky, Andriy Y; Abbas, Charles A; Dmytruk, Kostyantyn V; Ishchuk, Olena P; Kshanovska, Barbara V; Sybirna, Kateryna A; Gaillardin, Claude; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2004-11-01

    Previously cloned Candida famata (Debaryomyces hansenii) strain VKM Y-9 genomic DNA fragments containing genes RIB1 (codes for GTP cyclohydrolase II), RIB2 (encodes specific reductase), RIB5 (codes for dimethylribityllumazine synthase), RIB6 (encodes dihydroxybutanone phosphate synthase) and RIB7 (codes for riboflavin synthase) were sequenced. The derived amino acid sequences of C. famata RIB genes showed extensive homology to the corresponding sequences of riboflavin synthesis enzymes of other yeast species. The highest identity was observed to homologues of D. hansenii CBS767, as C. famata is the anamorph of this hemiascomycetous yeast. The D. hansenii CBS767 RIB3 gene encoding specific deaminase was cloned. This gene successfully complemented riboflavin auxotrophy of the rib3 mutant of flavinogenic yeast, Pichia guilliermondii. Putative iron-responsive elements (potential sites for binding of the transcription factors Fep1p or Aft1p and Aft2p) were found in the upstream regions of some C. famata and D. hansenii RIB genes. The sequences of C. famata RIB genes have been submitted to the EMBL data library under Accession Nos AJ810169-AJ810173.

  17. Analysis of Pigeon (Columba) Ovary Transcriptomes to Identify Genes Involved in Blue Light Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Ding, Jia-Tong; Yang, Hai-Ming; Yan, Zheng-Jie; Cao, Wei; Li, Yang-Bai

    2015-01-01

    Monochromatic light is widely applied to promote poultry reproductive performance, yet little is currently known regarding the mechanism by which light wavelengths affect pigeon reproduction. Recently, high-throughput sequencing technologies have been used to provide genomic information for solving this problem. In this study, we employed Illumina Hiseq 2000 to identify differentially expressed genes in ovary tissue from pigeons under blue and white light conditions and de novo transcriptome assembly to construct a comprehensive sequence database containing information on the mechanisms of follicle development. A total of 157,774 unigenes (mean length: 790 bp) were obtained by the Trinity program, and 35.83% of these unigenes were matched to genes in a non-redundant protein database. Gene description, gene ontology, and the clustering of orthologous group terms were performed to annotate the transcriptome assembly. Differentially expressed genes between blue and white light conditions included those related to oocyte maturation, hormone biosynthesis, and circadian rhythm. Furthermore, 17,574 SSRs and 533,887 potential SNPs were identified in this transcriptome assembly. This work is the first transcriptome analysis of the Columba ovary using Illumina technology, and the resulting transcriptome and differentially expressed gene data can facilitate further investigations into the molecular mechanism of the effect of blue light on follicle development and reproduction in pigeons and other bird species.

  18. Analysis of Pigeon (Columba Ovary Transcriptomes to Identify Genes Involved in Blue Light Regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wang

    Full Text Available Monochromatic light is widely applied to promote poultry reproductive performance, yet little is currently known regarding the mechanism by which light wavelengths affect pigeon reproduction. Recently, high-throughput sequencing technologies have been used to provide genomic information for solving this problem. In this study, we employed Illumina Hiseq 2000 to identify differentially expressed genes in ovary tissue from pigeons under blue and white light conditions and de novo transcriptome assembly to construct a comprehensive sequence database containing information on the mechanisms of follicle development. A total of 157,774 unigenes (mean length: 790 bp were obtained by the Trinity program, and 35.83% of these unigenes were matched to genes in a non-redundant protein database. Gene description, gene ontology, and the clustering of orthologous group terms were performed to annotate the transcriptome assembly. Differentially expressed genes between blue and white light conditions included those related to oocyte maturation, hormone biosynthesis, and circadian rhythm. Furthermore, 17,574 SSRs and 533,887 potential SNPs were identified in this transcriptome assembly. This work is the first transcriptome analysis of the Columba ovary using Illumina technology, and the resulting transcriptome and differentially expressed gene data can facilitate further investigations into the molecular mechanism of the effect of blue light on follicle development and reproduction in pigeons and other bird species.

  19. Metabonomic analysis of potential biomarkers and drug targets involved in diabetic nephropathy mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tingting; Zhao, Liangcai; Jia, Jianmin; Xia, Huanhuan; Du, Yao; Lin, Qiuting; Lin, Xiaodong; Ye, Xinjian; Yan, Zhihan; Gao, Hongchang

    2015-07-07

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the lethal manifestations of diabetic systemic microvascular disease. Elucidation of characteristic metabolic alterations during diabetic progression is critical to understand its pathogenesis and identify potential biomarkers and drug targets involved in the disease. In this study, (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR)-based metabonomics with correlative analysis was performed to study the characteristic metabolites, as well as the related pathways in urine and kidney samples of db/db diabetic mice, compared with age-matched wildtype mice. The time trajectory plot of db/db mice revealed alterations, in an age-dependent manner, in urinary metabolic profiles along with progression of renal damage and dysfunction. Age-dependent and correlated metabolite analysis identified that cis-aconitate and allantoin could serve as biomarkers for the diagnosis of DN. Further correlative analysis revealed that the enzymes dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH), guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH I), and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase (HMG-CoA lyase) were involved in dimethylamine metabolism, ketogenesis and GTP metabolism pathways, respectively, and could be potential therapeutic targets for DN. Our results highlight that metabonomic analysis can be used as a tool to identify potential biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the initiation and progression of diseases.

  20. Genes and mechanisms involved in beta-amyloid generation and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, H; Capell, A; Leimer, U; Haass, C

    1999-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the invariable accumulation of senile plaques that are predominantly composed of amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta). Abeta is generated by proteolytic processing of the beta-amyloid precursor protein (betaAPP) involving the combined action of beta- and gamma-secretase. Cleavage within the Abeta domain by alpha-secretase prevents Abeta generation. In some very rare cases of familial AD (FAD), mutations have been identified within the betaAPP gene. These mutations are located close to or at the cleavage sites of the secretases and pathologically effect betaAPP processing by increasing Abeta production, specifically its highly amyloidogenic 42 amino acid variant (Abeta42). Most of the mutations associated with FAD have been identified in the two presenilin (PS) genes, particularly the PS1 gene. Like the mutations identified within the betaAPP gene, mutations in PS1 and PS2 cause the increased generation of Abeta42. PS1 has been shown to be functionally involved in Notch signaling, a key process in cellular differentation, and in betaAPP processing. A gene knock out of PS1 in mice leads to an embryonic lethal phenotype similar to that of mice lacking Notch. In addition, absence of PS1 results in reduced gamma-secretase cleavage and leads to an accumulation of betaAPP C-terminal fragments and decreased amounts of Abeta. Recent work may suggest that PS1 could be the gamma-secretase itself, exhibiting the properties of a novel aspartyl protease. Mutagenesis of either of two highly conserved intramembraneous aspartate residues of PS1 leads to reduced Abeta production as observed in the PS1 knockout. A corresponding mutation in PS2 interfered with betaAPP processing and Notch signaling suggesting a functional redundancy of both presenilins. In this issue, some of the recent work on the molecular mechanisms involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD) as well as novel diagnostic approaches and risk factors for AD will be discussed. In the first

  1. Genomic imbalances in esophageal carcinoma cell lines involve Wnt pathway genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jacqueline Brown; Hannelie Bothma; Robin Veale; Pascale Willem

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To identify molecular markers shared across South African esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cell lines using cytogenetics, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array copy number analysis. METHODS: We used conventional cytogenetics, FISH, and multicolor FISH to characterize the chromosomal rearrangements of five ESCC cell lines established in South Africa. The whole genome copy number profile was established from 250K SNP arrays, and data was analyzed with the CNAT 4.0 and GISTIC software. RESULTS: We detected common translocation breakpoints involving chromosomes 1p11-12 and 3p11.2, the latter correlated with the deletion, or interruption of the EPHA3 gene. The most significant amplifications involved the following chromosomal regions and genes: 11q13.3 ( CCND1, FGF3, FGF4, FGF19, MYEOV), 8q24.21( C-MYC, FAM84B), 11q22.1-q22.3 ( BIRC2, BIRC3), 5p15.2 ( CTNND2), 3q11.2-q12.2 ( MINA) and 18p11.32 ( TYMS, YES1). The significant deletions included 1p31.2-p31.1 ( CTH, GADD45α, DIRAS3), 2q22.1 ( LRP1B), 3p12.1-p14.2 ( FHIT), 4q22.1-q32.1 ( CASP6, SMAD1), 8p23.2-q11.1 ( BNIP3L) and 18q21.1-q21.2 ( SMAD4, DCC). The 3p11.2 translocation breakpoint was shared across four cell lines, supporting a role for genes involved at this site, in particular, the EPHA3 gene which has previously been reported to be deleted in ESCC. CONCLUSION: The finding that a significant number of genes that were amplified (FGF3 , FGF4 , FGF19 , CCND1 and C-MYC ) or deleted (SFRP2 gene) are involved in the Wnt and fibroblast growth factor signaling pathways, suggests that these pathways may be activated in these cell lines.

  2. Design and fine-tuning redox potentials of metalloproteins involved in electron transfer in bioenergetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Parisa; Lu, Yi

    2016-05-01

    Redox potentials are a major contributor in controlling the electron transfer (ET) rates and thus regulating the ET processes in the bioenergetics. To maximize the efficiency of the ET process, one needs to master the art of tuning the redox potential, especially in metalloproteins, as they represent major classes of ET proteins. In this review, we first describe the importance of tuning the redox potential of ET centers and its role in regulating the ET in bioenergetic processes including photosynthesis and respiration. The main focus of this review is to summarize recent work in designing the ET centers, namely cupredoxins, cytochromes, and iron-sulfur proteins, and examples in design of protein networks involved these ET centers. We then discuss the factors that affect redox potentials of these ET centers including metal ion, the ligands to metal center and interactions beyond the primary ligand, especially non-covalent secondary coordination sphere interactions. We provide examples of strategies to fine-tune the redox potential using both natural and unnatural amino acids and native and nonnative cofactors. Several case studies are used to illustrate recent successes in this area. Outlooks for future endeavors are also provided. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson.

  3. SAMP8 mice have altered hippocampal gene expression in long term potentiation, phosphatidylinositol signaling, and endocytosis pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbrecht, Harvey J; Siddiqui, Akbar M; Green, Michael; Farr, Susan A; Kumar, Vijaya B; Banks, William A; Patrick, Ping; Shah, Gul N; Morley, John E

    2014-01-01

    The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAMP8) strain exhibits decreased learning and memory and increased amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide accumulation at 12 months. To detect differences in gene expression in SAMP8 mice, we used a control mouse that was a 50% cross between SAMP8 and CD-1 mice and which showed no memory deficits (50% SAMs). We then compared gene expression in the hippocampus of 4- and 12-month-old SAMP8 and control mice using Affymetrix gene arrays. At 12 months, but not at 4 months, pathway analysis revealed significant differences in the long term potentiation (6 genes), phosphatidylinositol signaling (6 genes), and endocytosis (10 genes) pathways. The changes in long term potentiation included mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling (N-ras, cAMP responsive element binding protein [CREB], protein phosphatase inhibitor 1) and Ca-dependent signaling (inositol triphosphate [ITP] receptors 1 and 2 and phospholipase C). Changes in phosphatidylinositol signaling genes suggested altered signaling through phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, and Western blotting revealed phosphorylation changes in serine/threonine protein kinase AKT and 70S6K. Changes in the endocytosis pathway involved genes related to clathrin-mediated endocytosis (dynamin and clathrin). Endocytosis is required for receptor recycling, is involved in Aβ metabolism, and is regulated by phosphatidylinositol signaling. In summary, these studies demonstrate altered gene expression in 3 SAMP8 hippocampal pathways associated with memory formation and consolidation. These pathways might provide new therapeutic targets in addition to targeting Aβ metabolism itself.

  4. Transcriptome analysis in Cucumis sativus identifies genes involved in multicellular trichome development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jun-Long; Pan, Jun-Song; Guan, Yuan; Nie, Jing-Tao; Yang, Jun-Jun; Qu, Mei-Ling; He, Huan-Le; Cai, Run

    2015-05-01

    The regulatory gene network of unicellular trichome development in Arabidopsis thaliana has been studied intensively, but that of multicellular remains unclear. In the present study, we characterized cucumber trichomes as representative multicellular and unbranched structures, but in a spontaneous mutant, mict (micro-trichome), all trichomes showed a micro-size and stunted morphologies. We revealed the transcriptome profile using Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing technology, and determined that a total of 1391 genes exhibited differential expression. We further validated the accuracy of the transcriptome data by RT-qPCR and found that 43 genes encoding critical transcription factors were likely involved in multicellular trichome development. These 43 candidate genes were subdivided into seven groups: homeodomain, MYB-domain, WRKY-domain, bHLH-domain, ethylene-responsive, zinc finger and other transcription factor genes. Our findings also serve as a powerful tool to further study the relevant molecular networks, and provide a new perspective for investigating this complex and species-specific developmental process.

  5. HIV-1 infection causes a down-regulation of genes involved in ribosome biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia L Kleinman

    Full Text Available HIV-1 preferentially infects CD4+ T cells, causing fundamental changes that eventually lead to the release of new viral particles and cell death. To investigate in detail alterations in the transcriptome of the CD4+ T cells upon viral infection, we sequenced polyadenylated RNA isolated from Jurkat cells infected or not with HIV-1. We found a marked global alteration of gene expression following infection, with an overall trend toward induction of genes, indicating widespread modification of the host biology. Annotation and pathway analysis of the most deregulated genes showed that viral infection produces a down-regulation of genes associated with the nucleolus, in particular those implicated in regulating the different steps of ribosome biogenesis, such as ribosomal RNA (rRNA transcription, pre-rRNA processing, and ribosome maturation. The impact of HIV-1 infection on genes involved in ribosome biogenesis was further validated in primary CD4+ T cells. Moreover, we provided evidence by Northern Blot experiments, that host pre-rRNA processing in Jurkat cells might be perturbed during HIV-1 infection, thus strengthening the hypothesis of a crosstalk between nucleolar functions and viral pathogenesis.

  6. Adaptive evolution of the chrysanthemyl diphosphate synthase gene involved in irregular monoterpene metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Ping-Li

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chrysanthemyl diphosphate synthase (CDS is a key enzyme in biosynthetic pathways producing pyrethrins and irregular monoterpenes. These compounds are confined to plants of the tribe Anthemideae of the Asteraceae, and play an important role in defending the plants against herbivorous insects. It has been proposed that the CDS genes arose from duplication of the farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FDS gene and have different function from FDSs. However, the duplication time toward the origin of CDS and the evolutionary force behind the functional divergence of the CDS gene are still unknown. Results Two duplication events were detected in the evolutionary history of the FDS gene family in the Asteraceae, and the second duplication led to the origin of CDS. CDS occurred after the divergence of the tribe Mutisieae from other tribes of Asteraceae but before the birth of the Anthemideae tribe. After its origin, CDS accumulated four mutations in sites homologous to the substrate-binding and catalysis sites of FDS. Of these, two sites were involved in the binding of the nucleophilic substrate isopentenyl diphosphate in FDS. Maximum likelihood analyses showed that some sites in CDS were under positive selection and were scattered throughout primary sequences, whereas in the three-dimensional structure model they clustered in the large central cavity. Conclusion Positive selection associated with gene duplication played a major role in the evolution of CDS.

  7. Identification of Corynebacterium diphtheriae gene involved in adherence to epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodkina, Valentina; Denisevich, Tatyana; Titov, Leonid

    2011-03-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae the causative pathogen of human diphtheria infects the nasopharynx or skin. Although diphtheria has been extensively studied, little is known about the two key aspects of C. diphtheriae invasiveness: colonization and invasion. The role of adhesive properties in establishing the infection of C. diphtheriae strains, independent of toxin production, still needs to be clarified. In this study, we describe a novel gene involved in adherence to epithelial cells. Transformation of C. diphtheriae 225, biotype gravis, ribotype St-Petersburg by EZ:TN(KAN-2)Tnp Transposome was undertaken. A C. diphtheriae 225 Tn5 insertion library of 2800 mutants was created. Five hundred and eighty five transformants were qualitatively screened for reduced adherence to HEp-2 cells by an adherence assay. One mutant strain consistently exhibiting 15.2% of the wild-type adherence was isolated. The DNA flanking the transposon was identified by inverse PCR and subsequent sequencing. The disrupted gene was 94% identical to the C. diphtheriae DIP1621 gene that belongs to unclassified genes. In conclusion, the disruption of the C. diphtheriae DIP1621 gene led to decreased adherence to epithelial cells; its exact function remains to be established.

  8. Transcriptomic analysis illuminates genes involved in chlorophyll synthesis after nitrogen starvation in Acaryochloris sp. CCMEE 5410.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Aki; Wittmann, Bruce J; King, Jeremy D; Blankenship, Robert E; Dantas, Gautam

    2016-08-01

    Acaryochloris species are a genus of cyanobacteria that utilize chlorophyll (chl) d as their primary chlorophyll molecule during oxygenic photosynthesis. Chl d allows Acaryochloris to harvest red-shifted light, which gives them the ability to live in filtered light environments that are depleted in visible light. Although genomes of multiple Acaryochloris species have been sequenced, their analysis has not revealed how chl d is synthesized. Here, we demonstrate that Acaryochloris sp. CCMEE 5410 cells undergo chlorosis by nitrogen depletion and exhibit robust regeneration of chl d by nitrogen repletion. We performed a time course RNA-Seq experiment to quantify global transcriptomic changes during chlorophyll recovery. We observed upregulation of numerous known chl biosynthesis genes and also identified an oxygenase gene with a similar transcriptional profile as these chl biosynthesis genes, suggesting its possible involvement in chl d biosynthesis. Moreover, our data suggest that multiple prochlorophyte chlorophyll-binding homologs are important during chlorophyll recovery, and light-independent chl synthesis genes are more dominant than the light-dependent gene at the transcription level. Transcriptomic characterization of this organism provides crucial clues toward mechanistic elucidation of chl d biosynthesis.

  9. ESKIMO1 is a key gene involved in water economy as well as cold acclimation and salt tolerance

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    Yu Agnes

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drought is a major social and economic problem resulting in huge yield reduction in the field. Today's challenge is to develop plants with reduced water requirements and stable yields in fluctuating environmental conditions. Arabidopsis thaliana is an excellent model for identifying potential targets for plant breeding. Drought tolerance in the field was successfully conferred to crops by transferring genes from this model species. While involved in a plant genomics programme, which aims to identify new genes responsible for plant response to abiotic stress, we identified ESKIMO1 as a key gene involved in plant water economy as well as cold acclimation and salt tolerance. Results All esk1 mutants were more tolerant to freezing, after acclimation, than their wild type counterpart. esk1 mutants also showed increased tolerance to mild water deficit for all traits measured. The mutant's improved tolerance to reduced water supply may be explained by its lower transpiration rate and better water use efficiency (WUE, which was assessed by carbon isotope discrimination and gas exchange measurements. esk1 alleles were also shown to be more tolerant to salt stress. Transcriptomic analysis of one mutant line and its wild-type background was carried out. Under control watering conditions a number of genes were differentially expressed between the mutant and the wild type whereas under mild drought stress this list of genes was reduced. Among the genes that were differentially expressed between the wild type and mutant, two functional categories related to the response to stress or biotic and abiotic stimulus were over-represented. Under salt stress conditions, all gene functional categories were represented equally in both the mutant and wild type. Based on this transcriptome analysis we hypothesise that in control conditions the esk1 mutant behaves as if it was exposed to drought stress. Conclusion Overall our findings suggest that the

  10. Meta-analysis of QTL involved in silage quality of maize and comparison with the position of candidate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truntzler, M; Barrière, Y; Sawkins, M C; Lespinasse, D; Betran, J; Charcosset, A; Moreau, L

    2010-11-01

    A meta-analysis of quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with plant digestibility and cell wall composition in maize was carried out using results from 11 different mapping experiments. Statistical methods implemented in "MetaQTL" software were used to build a consensus map, project QTL positions and perform meta-analysis. Fifty-nine QTL for traits associated with digestibility and 150 QTL for traits associated with cell wall composition were included in the analysis. We identified 26 and 42 metaQTL for digestibility and cell wall composition traits, respectively. Fifteen metaQTL with confidence interval (CI) smaller than 10 cM were identified. As expected from trait correlations, 42% of metaQTL for digestibility displayed overlapping CIs with metaQTL for cell wall composition traits. Coincidences were particularly strong on chromosomes 1 and 3. In a second step, 356 genes selected from the MAIZEWALL database as candidates for the cell wall biosynthesis pathway were positioned on our consensus map. Colocalizations between candidate genes and metaQTL positions appeared globally significant based on χ(2) tests. This study contributed in identifying key chromosomal regions involved in silage quality and potentially associated genes for most of these regions. These genes deserve further investigation, in particular through association mapping.

  11. Positive selection in development and growth rate regulation genes involved in species divergence of the genus Radix.

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    Feldmeyer, Barbara; Greshake, Bastian; Funke, Elisabeth; Ebersberger, Ingo; Pfenninger, Markus

    2015-08-19

    Life history traits like developmental time, age and size at maturity are directly related to fitness in all organisms and play a major role in adaptive evolution and speciation processes. Comparative genomic or transcriptomic approaches to identify positively selected genes involved in species divergence can help to generate hypotheses on the driving forces behind speciation. Here we use a bottom-up approach to investigate this hypothesis by comparative analysis of orthologous transcripts of four closely related European Radix species. Snails of the genus Radix occupy species specific distribution ranges with distinct climatic niches, indicating a potential for natural selection driven speciation based on ecological niche differentiation. We then inferred phylogenetic relationships among the four Radix species based on whole mt-genomes plus 23 nuclear loci. Three different tests to infer selection and changes in amino acid properties yielded a total of 134 genes with signatures of positive selection. The majority of these genes belonged to the functional gene ontology categories "reproduction" and "genitalia" with an overrepresentation of the functions "development" and "growth rate". We show here that Radix species divergence may be primarily enforced by selection on life history traits such as (larval-) development and growth rate. We thus hypothesise that life history differences may confer advantages under the according climate regimes, e.g., species occupying warmer and dryer habitats might have a fitness advantage with fast developing susceptible life stages, which are more tolerant to habitat desiccation.

  12. A high-density association screen of 155 ion transport genes for involvement with common migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyholt, Dale R.; LaForge, K. Steven; Kallela, Mikko; Alakurtti, Kirsi; Anttila, Verneri; Färkkilä, Markus; Hämaläinen, Eija; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kaunisto, Mari A.; Heath, Andrew C.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Göbel, Hartmut; Todt, Unda; Ferrari, Michel D.; Launer, Lenore J.; Frants, Rune R.; Terwindt, Gisela M.; de Vries, Boukje; Verschuren, W.M. Monique; Brand, Jan; Freilinger, Tobias; Pfaffenrath, Volker; Straube, Andreas; Ballinger, Dennis G.; Zhan, Yiping; Daly, Mark J.; Cox, David R.; Dichgans, Martin; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M.J.M.; Kubisch, Christian; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wessman, Maija; Peltonen, Leena; Palotie, Aarno

    2008-01-01

    The clinical overlap between monogenic Familial Hemiplegic Migraine (FHM) and common migraine subtypes, and the fact that all three FHM genes are involved in the transport of ions, suggest that ion transport genes may underlie susceptibility to common forms of migraine. To test this leading hypothesis, we examined common variation in 155 ion transport genes using 5257 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a Finnish sample of 841 unrelated migraine with aura cases and 884 unrelated non-migraine controls. The top signals were then tested for replication in four independent migraine case–control samples from the Netherlands, Germany and Australia, totalling 2835 unrelated migraine cases and 2740 unrelated controls. SNPs within 12 genes (KCNB2, KCNQ3, CLIC5, ATP2C2, CACNA1E, CACNB2, KCNE2, KCNK12, KCNK2, KCNS3, SCN5A and SCN9A) with promising nominal association (0.00041 < P < 0.005) in the Finnish sample were selected for replication. Although no variant remained significant after adjusting for multiple testing nor produced consistent evidence for association across all cohorts, a significant epistatic interaction between KCNB2 SNP rs1431656 (chromosome 8q13.3) and CACNB2 SNP rs7076100 (chromosome 10p12.33) (pointwise P = 0.00002; global P = 0.02) was observed in the Finnish case–control sample. We conclude that common variants of moderate effect size in ion transport genes do not play a major role in susceptibility to common migraine within these European populations, although there is some evidence for epistatic interaction between potassium and calcium channel genes, KCNB2 and CACNB2. Multiple rare variants or trans-regulatory elements of these genes are not ruled out. PMID:18676988

  13. Pyrosequencing of the Camptotheca acuminata transcriptome reveals putative genes involved in camptothecin biosynthesis and transport

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    Sun Yongzhen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Camptotheca acuminata is a Nyssaceae plant, often called the "happy tree", which is indigenous in Southern China. C. acuminata produces the terpenoid indole alkaloid, camptothecin (CPT, which exhibits clinical effects in various cancer treatments. Despite its importance, little is known about the transcriptome of C. acuminata and the mechanism of CPT biosynthesis, as only few nucleotide sequences are included in the GenBank database. Results From a constructed cDNA library of young C. acuminata leaves, a total of 30,358 unigenes, with an average length of 403 bp, were obtained after assembly of 74,858 high quality reads using GS De Novo assembler software. Through functional annotation, a total of 21,213 unigenes were annotated at least once against the NCBI nucleotide (Nt, non-redundant protein (Nr, Uniprot/SwissProt, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG, and Arabidopsis thaliana proteome (TAIR databases. Further analysis identified 521 ESTs representing 20 enzyme genes that are involved in the backbone of the CPT biosynthetic pathway in the library. Three putative genes in the upstream pathway, including genes for geraniol-10-hydroxylase (CaPG10H, secologanin synthase (CaPSCS, and strictosidine synthase (CaPSTR were cloned and analyzed. The expression level of the three genes was also detected using qRT-PCR in C. acuminata. With respect to the branch pathway of CPT synthesis, six cytochrome P450s transcripts were selected as candidate transcripts by detection of transcript expression in different tissues using qRT-PCR. In addition, one glucosidase gene was identified that might participate in CPT biosynthesis. For CPT transport, three of 21 transcripts for multidrug resistance protein (MDR transporters were also screened from the dataset by their annotation result and gene expression analysis. Conclusion This study produced a large amount of transcriptome data from C. acuminata by 454 pyrosequencing. According to

  14. SETDB1 is involved in postembryonic DNA methylation and gene silencing in Drosophila.

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    Dawei Gou

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is fundamental for the stability and activity of genomes. Drosophila melanogaster and vertebrates establish a global DNA methylation pattern of their genome during early embryogenesis. Large-scale analyses of DNA methylation patterns have uncovered revealed that DNA methylation patterns are dynamic rather than static and change in a gene-specific fashion during development and in diseased cells. However, the factors and mechanisms involved in dynamic, postembryonic DNA methylation remain unclear. Methylation of lysine 9 in histone H3 (H3-K9 by members of the Su(var3-9 family of histone methyltransferases (HMTs triggers embryonic DNA methylation in Arthropods and Chordates. Here, we demonstrate that Drosophila SETDB1 (dSETDB1 can mediate DNA methylation and silencing of genes and retrotransposons. We found that dSETDB1 tri-methylates H3-K9 and binds methylated CpA motifs. Tri-methylation of H3-K9 by dSETDB1 mediates recruitment of DNA methyltransferase 2 (Dnmt2 and Su(var205, the Drosophila ortholog of mammalian "Heterochromatin Protein 1", to target genes for dSETDB1. By enlisting Dnmt2 and Su(var205, dSETDB1 triggers DNA methylation and silencing of genes and retrotransposons in Drosophila cells. DSETDB1 is involved in postembryonic DNA methylation and silencing of Rt1b{} retrotransposons and the tumor suppressor gene retinoblastoma family protein 1 (Rb in imaginal discs. Collectively, our findings implicate dSETDB1 in postembryonic DNA methylation, provide a model for silencing of the tumor suppressor Rb, and uncover a role for cell type-specific DNA methylation in Drosophila development.

  15. Extracellular complementation and the identification of additional genes involved in aerial mycelium formation in Streptomyces coelicolor.

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    Nodwell, J R; Yang, M; Kuo, D; Losick, R

    1999-02-01

    Morphogenesis in the bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor involves the formation of a lawn of hair-like aerial hyphae on the colony surface that stands up in the air and differentiates into chains of spores. bld mutants are defective in the formation of this aerial mycelium and grow as smooth, hairless colonies. When certain pairs of bld mutants are grown close to one another on rich sporulation medium, they exhibit extracellular complementation such that one mutant restores aerial mycelium formation to the other. The extracellular complementation relationships of most of the previously isolated bld mutants placed them in a hierarchy of extracellular complementation groups. We have screened for further bld mutants with precautions intended to maximize the discovery of additional genes. Most of the 50 newly isolated mutant strains occupy one of three of the previously described positions in the hierarchy, behaving like bldK, bldC, or bldD mutants. We show that the mutations in some of the strains that behave like bldK are bldK alleles but that others fall in a cluster at a position on the chromosome distinct from that of any known bld gene. We name this locus bldL. By introducing cloned genes into the strains that exhibit bldC or bldD-like extracellular complementation phenotypes, we show that most of these strains are likely to contain mutations in genes other than bldC or bldD. These results indicate that the genetic control of aerial mycelium formation is more complex than previously recognized and support the idea that a high proportion of bld genes are directly or indirectly involved in the production of substances that are exchanged between cells during morphological differentiation.

  16. Investigation of polymorphisms in genes involved in estrogen metabolism in menstrual migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Heidi G; Champion, Morgane; Plays, Amelie; Stuart, Shani; Haupt, Larisa M; Frith, Alison; MacGregor, E Anne; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2017-04-05

    Migraine is a common, disabling headache disorder, which is influenced by multiple genes and environmental triggers. After puberty, the prevalence of migraine in women is three times higher than in men and >50% of females suffering from migraine report a menstrual association, suggesting hormonal fluctuations can influence the risk of migraine attacks. It has been hypothesized that the drop in estrogen during menses is an important trigger for menstrual migraine. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes are involved in estrogen synthesis and metabolism. Functional polymorphisms in these genes can influence estrogen levels and therefore may be associated with risk of menstrual migraine. In this study we investigated four single nucleotide polymorphisms in three genes involved in estrogen metabolism that have been reported to impact enzyme levels or function, in a specific menstrual migraine cohort. 268 menstrual migraine cases and 142 controls were genotyped for rs4680 in COMT (Val158Met), rs4646903 and rs1048943 in CYP1A1 (T3801C and Ile462Val) and rs700519 in CYP19A1 (Cys264Arg). Neither genotype nor allele frequencies for the COMT and CYP SNPs genotyped were found to be significantly different between menstrual migraineurs and controls by chi-square analysis (P>0.05). Therefore we did not find association of functional polymorphisms in the estrogen metabolism genes COMT, CYP1A1 or CYP19A1 with menstrual migraine. Further studies are required to assess whether menstrual migraine is genetically distinct from the common migraine subtypes and identify genes that influence risk.

  17. Connexin37: a potential modifier gene of inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanson, Marc; Kwak, Brenda R

    2007-08-01

    There is an increasing appreciation of the importance of gap junction proteins (connexins) in modulating the severity of inflammatory diseases. Multiple epidemiological gene association studies have detected a link between a single nucleotide polymorphism in the human connexin37 (Cx37) gene and coronary artery disease or myocardial infarction in various populations. This C1019T polymorphism causes a proline-to-serine substitution (P319S) in the regulatory C terminal tail of Cx37, a protein that is expressed in the vascular endothelium as well as in monocytes and macrophages. Indeed, these three cell types are key players in atherogenesis. In the early phases of atherosclerosis, blood monocytes are recruited to the sites of injury in response to chemotactic factors. Monocytes adhere to the dysfunctional endothelium and transmigrate across endothelial cells to penetrate the arterial intima. In the intima, monocytes proliferate, mature, and accumulate lipids to progress into macrophage foam cells. This review focuses on Cx37 and its impact on the cellular and molecular events underlying tissue function, with particular emphasis of the contribution of the C1019T polymorphism in atherosclerosis. We will also discuss evidence for a potential mechanism by which allelic variants of Cx37 are differentially predictive of increased risk for inflammatory diseases.

  18. Transcriptomic Profiling of Egg Quality in Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) Sheds Light on Genes Involved in Ubiquitination and Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żarski, Daniel; Nguyen, Thaovi; Le Cam, Aurélie; Montfort, Jérôme; Dutto, Gilbert; Vidal, Marie Odile; Fauvel, Christian; Bobe, Julien

    2017-02-01

    Variable and low egg quality is a major limiting factor for the development of efficient aquaculture production. This stems from limited knowledge on the mechanisms underlying egg quality in cultured fish. Molecular analyses, such as transcriptomic studies, are valuable tools to identify the most important processes modulating egg quality. However, very few studies have been devoted to this aspect so far. Within this study, the microarray-based transcriptomic analysis of eggs (of different quality) of sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) was performed. An Agilent oligo microarray experiment was performed on labelled mRNA extracted from 16 batches of eggs (each batch obtained from a different female) of sea bass, in which over 24,000 published probe arrays were used. We identified 39 differentially expressed genes exhibiting a differential expression between the groups of low (fertilization rate  60 %) quality. The mRNA levels of eight genes were further analyzed by quantitative PCR. Seven genes were confirmed by qPCR to be differentially expressed in eggs of low and high quality. This study confirmed the importance of some of the genes already reported to be potential molecular quality indicators (mainly rnf213 and irf7), but we also found new genes (mainly usp5, mem-prot, plec, cenpf), which had not yet been reported to be quality-dependent in fish. These results suggest the importance of genes involved in several important processes, such as protein ubiquitination, translation, DNA repair, and cell structure and architecture; these probably being the mechanisms that contribute to egg developmental competence in sea bass.

  19. Association of Polymorphisms in BDNF, MTHFR, and Genes Involved in the Dopaminergic Pathway with Memory in a Healthy Chinese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Ting-Kuang; Hu, Chung-Yi; Yeh, Ting-Chi; Lin, Pei-Jung; Wu, Chung-Hsin; Lee, Po-Lei; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2012-01-01

    The contribution of genetic factors to the memory is widely acknowledged. Research suggests that these factors include genes involved in the dopaminergic pathway, as well as the genes for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR). The activity of the products of these genes is affected by single…

  20. Association of Polymorphisms in BDNF, MTHFR, and Genes Involved in the Dopaminergic Pathway with Memory in a Healthy Chinese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Ting-Kuang; Hu, Chung-Yi; Yeh, Ting-Chi; Lin, Pei-Jung; Wu, Chung-Hsin; Lee, Po-Lei; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2012-01-01

    The contribution of genetic factors to the memory is widely acknowledged. Research suggests that these factors include genes involved in the dopaminergic pathway, as well as the genes for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR). The activity of the products of these genes is affected by single…

  1. The potential involvement of the cofactor of BRCA1 in hepatocellular carcinoma pathogenesis

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    Aya Youssef

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The cofactor of BRCA1 (COBRA1, which also refers to negative elongation factor polypeptide B (NELF-B, is a negative elongation factor (NELF subunit that has been implicated in the development and progression of several cancers. While reduced COBRA1 expression has been associated with metastatic breast cancer, COBRA1 negatively regulates the activator protein-1 (AP-1 complex, leading to the down-regulation of trefoil factor-1 (TFF1 expression in gastric cancer cell lines. The involvement of COBRA1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC tumor formation and progression is not known. Here, we investigated the expression of COBRA1, the AP-1 complex, and TFF1 in several HCC cell lines; ranging from low- to high-grade HCC cell lines generated from patients with different stages of the disease. Our results showed that the COBRA1 protein was highly expressed in the low-grade HCC cell line, while significantly down-regulated in high-grade HCC cell lines. TFF1, previously regarded as a COBRA1 target gene, was only expressed in the low-grade HCC cell line and the control cells. Our results suggest that COBRA1 may play a role in HCC pathogenesis and progression. The TFF1 mRNA expression profile was uncorrelated to that of the AP-1 complex subunit proteins, which suggests the involvement of other regulatory pathways in TFF1 expression; however, this requires further study.

  2. Genes involved in protein metabolism of the probiotic lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus delbrueckii UFV H2b20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do Carmo, A P; da Silva, D F; De Oliveira, M N V; Borges, A C; De Carvalho, A F; De Moraes, C A

    2011-09-01

    A basic requirement for the prediction of the potential use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in the dairy industry is the identification of specific genes involved in flavour-forming pathways. The probiotic Lactobacillus delbrueckii UFV H2b20 was submitted to a genetic characterisation and phylogenetic analysis of genes involved in protein catabolism. Eight genes belonging to this system were identified, which possess a closely phylogenetic relationship to NCFM strains representative, as it was demonstrated for oppC and oppBII, encoding oligopeptide transport system components. PepC, PepN, and PepX might be essential for growth of LAB, probiotic or not, since the correspondent genes are always present, including in L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20 genome. For pepX gene, a probable link between carbohydrate catabolism and PepX expression may exists, where it is regulated by PepR1/CcpA-like, a common feature between Lactobacillus strains and also in L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20. The well conserved evolutionary history of the ilvE gene is evidence that the pathways leading to branched-chain amino acid degradation, such as isoleucine and valine, are similar among L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strains and L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20. Thus, the involvement of succinate in flavour formation can be attributed to IlvE activity. The presence of aminopeptidase G in L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20 genome, which is absent in several strains, might improve the proteolytic activity and effectiveness. The nucleotide sequence encoding PepG revealed that it is a cysteine endopeptidase, belonging to Peptidase C1 superfamily; sequence analysis showed 99% identity with L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus ATCC 11842 pepG, whereas protein sequence analysis revealed 100% similarity with PepG from the same organism. The present study proposes a schematic model to explain how the proteolytic system of the probiotic L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20 works, based on the components identified so far.

  3. Ca2+ involvement in the action potential generation of myenteric neurones in the rat oesophagus.

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    De Laet, A; Cornelissen, W; Adriaensen, D; Van Bogaert, P-P; Scheuermann, D W; Timmermans, J-P

    2002-04-01

    Intracellular recordings were used to study the physiological behaviour of rat oesophageal myenteric neurones, which are embedded in striated muscle. Injection of depolarizing pulses evoked action potentials with a clear 'shoulder' in all neurones. This shoulder disappeared under low Ca2+/high Mg2+ conditions. Tetrodotoxin (TTX; 1 micromol L-1) did not impede spike firing, whereas under combined TTX and low Ca2+/high Mg2+ conditions the action potentials were completely abolished, indicating that TTX- resistant action potentials are mediated by a Ca2+ current. Further experiments with omega-conotoxin GVIA (100 nmol L-1) revealed that these Ca2+ currents enter the cell via N-type voltage-activated Ca2+ channels (see also accompanying paper). Tetraethylammonium (10 mmol L-1) caused broadening of the action potentials, which probably resulted from prolonged Ca2+ influx due to blockade of the delayed rectifier K+ channel. Although Ca2+ appears to be involved in the spike generation of all rat oesophageal myenteric neurones, only a minority (14%) shows a slow afterhyperpolarization. Thus, no strict correlation exists between the presence of a shoulder and a slow afterhyperpolarization. Furthermore, morphological identification of 25 of the impaled neurones revealed that there was no strict correlation between morphology and electrophysiological behaviour. Consequently, rat oesophageal myenteric neurones appear to differ in several aspects from myenteric neurones in smooth muscle regions of the gastrointestinal tract.

  4. Complement regulatory protein genes in channel catfish and their involvement in disease defense response.

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    Jiang, Chen; Zhang, Jiaren; Yao, Jun; Liu, Shikai; Li, Yun; Song, Lin; Li, Chao; Wang, Xiaozhu; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2015-11-01

    Complement system is one of the most important defense systems of innate immunity, which plays a crucial role in disease defense responses in channel catfish. However, inappropriate and excessive complement activation could lead to potential damage to the host cells. Therefore the complement system is controlled by a set of complement regulatory proteins to allow normal defensive functions, but prevent hazardous complement activation to host tissues. In this study, we identified nine complement regulatory protein genes from the channel catfish genome. Phylogenetic and syntenic analyses were conducted to determine their orthology relationships, supporting their correct annotation and potential functional inferences. The expression profiles of the complement regulatory protein genes were determined in channel catfish healthy tissues and after infection with the two main bacterial pathogens, Edwardsiella ictaluri and Flavobacterium columnare. The vast majority of complement regulatory protein genes were significantly regulated after bacterial infections, but interestingly were generally up-regulated after E. ictaluri infection while mostly down-regulated after F. columnare infection, suggesting a pathogen-specific pattern of regulation. Collectively, these findings suggested that complement regulatory protein genes may play complex roles in the host immune responses to bacterial pathogens in channel catfish.

  5. Labellum transcriptome reveals alkene biosynthetic genes involved in orchid sexual deception and pollination-induced senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Filipa; Sebastiana, Mónica; Figueiredo, Andreia; Sousa, Lisete; Cotrim, Helena C; Pais, Maria Salomé

    2012-11-01

    One of the most remarkable pollination strategy in orchids biology is pollination by sexual deception, in which the modified petal labellum lures pollinators by mimicking the chemical (e.g. sex pheromones), visual (e.g. colour and shape/size) and tactile (e.g. labellum trichomes) cues of the receptive female insect species. The present study aimed to characterize the transcriptional changes occurring after pollination in the labellum of a sexually deceptive orchid (Ophrys fusca Link) in order to identify genes involved on signals responsible for pollinator attraction, the major goal of floral tissues. Novel information on alterations in the orchid petal labellum gene expression occurring after pollination demonstrates a reduction in the expression of alkene biosynthetic genes using O. fusca Link as the species under study. Petal labellum transcriptional analysis revealed downregulation of transcripts involved in both pigment machinery and scent compounds, acting as visual and olfactory cues, respectively, important in sexual mimicry. Regulation of petal labellum senescence was revealed by transcripts related to macromolecules breakdown, protein synthesis and remobilization of nutrients.

  6. Mild copper deficiency alters gene expression of proteins involved in iron metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auclair, Sylvain; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Coudray, Charles; Schneider, Susanne; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Mazur, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    Iron and copper homeostasis share common proteins and are therefore closely linked to each other. For example, copper-containing proteins like ceruloplasmin and hephaestin oxidize Fe(2+) during cellular export processes for transport in the circulation bound to transferrin. Indeed, copper deficiency provokes iron metabolism disorders leading to anemia and liver iron accumulation. The aim of the present work was to understand the cross-talk between copper status and iron metabolism. For this purpose we have established dietary copper deficiency in C57BL6 male mice during twelve weeks. Hematological parameters, copper and iron status were evaluated. cDNA microarray studies were performed to investigate gene expression profiles of proteins involved in iron metabolism in the liver, duodenum and spleen. Our results showed that copper deficiency induces microcytic and hypochromic anemia as well as liver iron overload. Gene expression profiles, however, indicate that hepatic and intestinal mRNA expression neither compensates for hepatic iron overload nor the anemia observed in this mouse model. Instead, major modifications of gene expression occurred in the spleen. We observed increased mRNA levels of the transferrin receptors 1 and 2 and of several proteins involved in the heme biosynthesis pathway (ferrochelatase, UroD, UroS,...). These results suggest that copper-deficient mice respond to the deficiency induced anemia by an adaptation leading to an increase in erythrocyte synthesis.

  7. Brownie, a gene involved in building complex respiratory devices in insect eggshells.

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    Paula Irles

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insect eggshells must combine protection for the yolk and embryo with provisions for respiration and for the entry of sperm, which are ensured by aeropyles and micropyles, respectively. Insects which oviposit the eggs in an egg-case have a double problem of respiration as gas exchange then involves two barriers. An example of this situation is found in the cockroach Blattella germanica, where the aeropyle and the micropyle are combined in a complex structure called the sponge-like body. The sponge-like body has been well described morphologically, but nothing is known about how it is built up. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a library designed to find genes expressed during late chorion formation in B. germanica, we isolated the novel sequence Bg30009 (now called Brownie, which was outstanding due to its high copy number. In the present work, we show that Brownie is expressed in the follicle cells localized in the anterior pole of the oocyte in late choriogenesis. RNA interference (RNAi of Brownie impaired correct formation of the sponge-like body and, as a result, the egg-case was also ill-formed and the eggs were not viable. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results indicate that the novel gene Brownie plays a pivotal role in building up the sponge-like body. Brownie is the first reported gene involved in the construction of complex eggshell respiratory structures.

  8. Diversity of ABC transporter genes across the plant kingdom and their potential utility in biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Thomas S; Rempe, Caroline S; Davitt, Jack; Staton, Margaret E; Peng, Yanhui; Soltis, Douglas Edward; Melkonian, Michael; Deyholos, Michael; Leebens-Mack, James H; Chase, Mark; Rothfels, Carl J; Stevenson, Dennis; Graham, Sean W; Yu, Jun; Liu, Tao; Pires, J Chris; Edger, Patrick P; Zhang, Yong; Xie, Yinlong; Zhu, Ying; Carpenter, Eric; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Stewart, C Neal

    2016-05-31

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene superfamily is ubiquitous among extant organisms and prominently represented in plants. ABC transporters act to transport compounds across cellular membranes and are involved in a diverse range of biological processes. Thus, the applicability to biotechnology is vast, including cancer resistance in humans, drug resistance among vertebrates, and herbicide and other xenobiotic resistance in plants. In addition, plants appear to harbor the highest diversity of ABC transporter genes compared with any other group of organisms. This study applied transcriptome analysis to survey the kingdom-wide ABC transporter diversity in plants and suggest biotechnology applications of this diversity. We utilized sequence similarity-based informatics techniques to infer the identity of ABC transporter gene candidates from 1295 phylogenetically-diverse plant transcriptomes. A total of 97,149 putative (approximately 25 % were full-length) ABC transporter gene members were identified; each RNA-Seq library (plant sample) had 88 ± 30 gene members. As expected, simpler organisms, such as algae, had fewer unique members than vascular land plants. Differences were also noted in the richness of certain ABC transporter subfamilies. Land plants had more unique ABCB, ABCC, and ABCG transporter gene members on average (p plant groups (p plant groups. An increase in the number of gene family members present in the ABCB, ABCC, and ABCD transporter subfamilies may indicate an expansion of the ABC transporter superfamily among green land plants, which include all crop species. The striking difference between the number of ABCA subfamily transporter gene members between ferns and other plant taxa is surprising and merits further investigation. Discussed is the potential exploitation of ABC transporters in plant biotechnology, with an emphasis on crops.

  9. A POTENTIAL TUMOR SUPPRESSOR GENE:Doc-1R

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    生秀杰; 周伟强; 姜莉; 张梅英; 王太一; 张学

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To detect the expression and the genomic sequence of Doc-1R gene in mice. Methods: The gene specific primers were designed and synthesized according to the eDNA sequence of Doc-1R gene. The sequence of Doc-1R gene was cloned by nested PCR. The expression of Doe-1R gene was examined by RT-PCR in thirteen kinds of tissues of mice. Results: The mouse Doc-1R gene has been obtained by two times genomic walking, which spans 2787bp and contains four exons and three introns. All of the splice donor/aeceptor site sequences are in accordance with the consensus "GT-AG" rule. There was expression of Doc-1R gene in the thirteen tissues. Conclusion: The mouse Doc-1R gene was cloned successfully. The expression pattern suggests that Doc-1R gene is a housekeeping gene,which is important to keep the function of tissues and organs.

  10. Pain pathways involved in fear conditioning measured with fear-potentiated startle: lesion studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, C; Davis, M

    1999-01-01

    It is well established that the basolateral amygdala is critically involved in the association between an unconditioned stimulus (US), such as a foot shock, and a conditioned stimulus (CS), such as a light, during classic fear conditioning. However, little is known about how the US (pain) inputs are relayed to the basolateral amygdala. The present studies were designed to define potential US pathways to the amygdala using lesion methods. Electrolytic lesions before or after training were placed in caudal granular/dysgranular insular cortex (IC) alone or in conjunction with the posterior intralaminar nuclei of the thalamus (PoT/PIL), and the effects on fear conditioning were examined. Pretraining lesions of both IC and PoT/PIL, but not lesions of IC alone, blocked the acquisition of fear-potentiated startle. However, post-training combined lesions of IC and PoT/PIL did not prevent expression of conditioned fear. Given that previous studies have shown that lesions of PoT/PIL alone had no effect on acquisition of conditioned fear, these results suggest that two parallel cortical (insula-amygdala) and subcortical (PoT/PIL-amygdala) pathways are involved in relaying shock information to the basolateral amygdala during fear conditioning.

  11. Cervical and ocular vestibular evoked potentials in Machado-Joseph disease: Functional involvement of otolith pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Rodrigo Souza; Pereira, Melissa Marques; Pedroso, José Luiz; Braga-Neto, Pedro; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani Povoas; Manzano, Gilberto Mastrocola

    2015-11-15

    Machado-Joseph disease is defined as an autosomal dominant ataxic disorder caused by degeneration of the cerebellum and its connections and is associated with a broad range of clinical symptoms. The involvement of the vestibular system is responsible for several symptoms and signs observed in the individuals affected by the disease. We measured cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in a sample of Machado-Joseph disease patients in order to assess functional pathways involved. Bilateral measures of cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP and oVEMP) were obtained from 14 symptomatic patients with genetically proven Machado-Joseph disease and compared with those from a control group of 20 healthy subjects. Thirteen (93%) patients showed at least one abnormal test result; oVEMP and cVEMP responses were absent in 17/28 (61%) and 11/28 (39%) measures, respectively; and prolonged latency of cVEMP was found in 3/28 (11%) measures. Of the 13 patients with abnormal responses, 9/13 (69%) patients showed discordant abnormal responses: four with absent oVEMP and present cVEMP, two with absent cVEMP and present oVEMP, and three showed unilateral prolonged cVEMP latencies. Both otolith-related vestibulocollic and vestibulo-ocular pathways are severely affected in Machado-Joseph disease patients evaluated by VEMPs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Potential Mechanisms Involved in Ceramide-induced Apoptosis in Human Colon Cancer HT29 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING WANG; XIAO-WEN LV; YU-GUO DU

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the potential mechanisms of cell death after the treatment with ceramide. Methods MTT assay,DNA ladder, reporter assay, FACS and Western blot assay were employed to investigate the potential mechanisms of cell death after the treatment with C2-ceramide. Results A short-time treatment with C2-ceramide induced cell death, which was associated with p38 MAP kinase activation, but had no links with typical caspase activation or PARP degradation. Rather than caspase inhibitor, Inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase blocked cell death induced by a short-time treatment with ceramide (12 h). Moreover, incubation of cells with ceramide for a long time (>12 h) increased subGl, but reduced S phase accompanied by caspase-dependent and caspase-independent changes including NFκB activation. Conclusion Ceramide-induced cell apoptosis involves both caspase-dependent and -independent signaling pathway. Caspase-independent cell death occurring in a relatively early stage, which is mediated via p38 MAP kinase, can progress into a stage involving both caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms accompanied by cell signaling of MAPKs and NFκB.

  13. Diffusion tensor imaging to determine the potential motor network connectivity between the involved and non-involved hemispheres in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min-Hee; Shin, Yong-Il; Lee, Sang Hyeon; Cha, Young Joo; Kim, Dong Youn; Han, Bong Soo; You, Sung H

    2015-01-01

    Hemiparetic stroke is a common motor network disorder that affects a wide range of functional movements due to cortical and subcortical network lesions in stroke patients. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used to examine structural brain damage, but the integrity and connectivity of the whole brain are poorly understood. Hence, advanced neuroimaging with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been developed to better localize fiber architecture and connectivity in the motor network or pathways that are responsible for motor impairments in hemiparetic stroke. To ascertain motor network connectivity between the involved and non-involved hemispheres in stroke patients, we analyzed the DTI data from all right hemiparetic stroke patients using fractional anisotropy (FA) and network parameters, including node degree and edge betweenness centrality (EBC). The FA values were substantially lower in the left hemisphere than the right hemisphere. Similarly, the node degree and EBC were significantly lower in the left hemisphere than the right hemisphere. The present brain network analysis may provide a useful neuropathway marker for accurate diagnosis and therapeutic intervention.

  14. Potential scenarios for broadening stakeholder involvement in the implementing geological disposal technology platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martell, Meritxell [Merience Strategic Thinking, Barcelona (Spain); Bergmans, Anne [University of Antwerp, Antwerp (Belgium)

    2013-07-01

    This paper analyses the potential for the involvement of different types of stakeholders in the Implementing Geological Disposal Technology Platform (IGD-TP). This analysis was conducted as part of the InSOTEC project, a three-year (2011- 2014) collaborative research project funded under the 7. Euratom Framework Programme (Grant Agreement nr. 269906). In our analysis, we consider the extent to which the IGDTP's practice as regards to stakeholder involvement matches its discourse, and what potential for improvement exists given its structural organisation as a European Technology Platform (ETPs). Technology Platforms (TPs) can be understood as knowledge networks, deliberately set up to influence (research) policy in a specific domain. We therefore use knowledge networks as a conceptual approach and look at the IGD-TP as a complex network which includes actors, knowledge and practices across different countries, focusing on a very specific topic (i.e. implementing geological disposal). We compare the way different stakeholders are involved in the IGD-TP to the practice of other ETPs, and explore how the IGD-TP is viewed by its members and by outsiders to the platform Applying Callon's framework of knowledge co-production (1999) we come to define different degrees of interaction between science, society and policy in view of defining research and development (R and D) priorities [1]. Subsequently we describe how these interactions could be conceptualised and interpreted for the IGD-TP. The current approach of the IGDTP can be mainly understood as classical model involving mainly expert stakeholders and scientists. Where there seems to be a good representation among IGD-TP members of industry, research institutes, and some members of the academic community this is not the case for other types of stakeholders, such as public authorities or civil society. At this stage, the overall approach of the IGD-TP would seem to restrict the scope of stakeholder

  15. Functional characterisation of wheat Pgip genes reveals their involvement in the local response to wounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janni, M; Bozzini, T; Moscetti, I; Volpi, C; D'Ovidio, R

    2013-11-01

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are cell wall leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins involved in plant defence. The hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum, genome AABBDD) genome contains one Pgip gene per genome. Tapgip1 (B genome) and Tapgip2 (D genome) are expressed in all tissues, whereas Tapgip3 (A genome) is inactive because of a long terminal repeat, Copia retrotransposon insertion within the coding region. To verify whether Tapgip1 and Tapgip2 encode active PGIPs and are involved in the wheat defence response, we expressed them transiently and analysed their expression under stress conditions. Neither TaPGIP1 nor TaPGIP2 showed inhibition activity in vitro against fungal polygalacturonases. Moreover, a wheat genotype (T. turgidum ssp. dicoccoides) lacking active homologues of Tapgip1 or Tapgip2 possesses PGIP activity. At transcript level, Tapgip1 and Tapgip2 were both up-regulated after fungal infection and strongly induced following wounding. This latter result has been confirmed in transgenic wheat plants expressing the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene under control of the 5'-flanking region of Tdpgip1, a homologue of Tapgip1 with an identical sequence. Strong and transient GUS staining was mainly restricted to the damaged tissues and was not observed in adjacent tissues. Taken together, these results suggest that Tapgips and their homologues are involved in the wheat defence response by acting at the site of the lesion caused by pathogen infection.

  16. Global prevalence and distribution of genes and microorganisms involved in mercury methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podar, Mircea; Gilmour, Cynthia C; Brandt, Craig C; Soren, Allyson; Brown, Steven D; Crable, Bryan R; Palumbo, Anthony V; Somenahally, Anil C; Elias, Dwayne A

    2015-10-01

    Mercury (Hg) methylation produces the neurotoxic, highly bioaccumulative methylmercury (MeHg). The highly conserved nature of the recently identified Hg methylation genes hgcAB provides a foundation for broadly evaluating spatial and niche-specific patterns of microbial Hg methylation potential in nature. We queried hgcAB diversity and distribution in >3500 publicly available microbial metagenomes, encompassing a broad range of environments and generating a new global view of Hg methylation potential. The hgcAB genes were found in nearly all anaerobic (but not aerobic) environments, including oxygenated layers of the open ocean. Critically, hgcAB was effectively absent in ~1500 human and mammalian microbiomes, suggesting a low risk of endogenous MeHg production. New potential methylation habitats were identified, including invertebrate digestive tracts, thawing permafrost soils, coastal "dead zones," soils, sediments, and extreme environments, suggesting multiple routes for MeHg entry into food webs. Several new taxonomic groups capable of methylating Hg emerged, including lineages having no cultured representatives. Phylogenetic analysis points to an evolutionary relationship between hgcA and genes encoding corrinoid iron-sulfur proteins functioning in the ancient Wood-Ljungdahl carbon fixation pathway, suggesting that methanogenic Archaea may have been the first to perform these biotransformations.

  17. Identification of amino acids involved in histamine potentiation of GABA(A receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike eThiel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Histamine is a neurotransmitter involved in a number of physiological and neuronal functions. In mammals, such as humans and rodents, the histaminergic neurons found in the tuberomamillary nucleus (TMN project widely throughout the central nervous system (CNS. Histamine acts as positive modulator of GABA(A receptors (GABA(ARs and, in high concentrations (10 mM, as negative modulator of the strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor. However, the exact molecular mechanisms by which histamine acts on GABA(ARs are unknown. In our study, we aimed to identify amino acids potentially involved in the modulatory effect of histamine on GABA(ARs. We expressed GABA(ARs with 12 different point mutations in Xenopus laevis oocytes and characterized the effect of histamine on GABA-induced currents using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. Our data demonstrate that the amino acid residues ß2(N265 and ß2(M286, which are important for modulation by propofol, are not involved in the action of histamine. However, we found that histamine modulation is dependent on the amino acid residues alpha1(R120, ß2(Y157, ß3(D163, ß3(V175 and ß3(Q185. We showed that the amino acid residues ß2(Y157 and ß3(Q185 mediate the positive modulatory effect of histamine on GABA-induced currents, whereas alpha1(R120 and ß2(D163 form a potential histamine interaction site in GABA(ARs.

  18. Identification of PEX7 as the second gene involved in Refsum disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brink, Daan M; Brites, Pedro; Haasjes, Janet; Wierzbicki, Anthony S; Mitchell, John; Lambert-Hamill, Michelle; de Belleroche, Jacqueline; Jansen, Gerbert A; Waterham, Hans R; Wanders, Ronald J A

    2003-02-01

    Patients affected with Refsum disease (RD) have elevated levels of phytanic acid due to a deficiency of the peroxisomal enzyme phytanoyl-CoA hydroxylase (PhyH). In most patients with RD, disease-causing mutations in the PHYH gene have been identified, but, in a subset, no mutations could be found, indicating that the condition is genetically heterogeneous. Linkage analysis of a few patients diagnosed with RD, but without mutations in PHYH, suggested a second locus on chromosome 6q22-24. This region includes the PEX7 gene, which codes for the peroxin 7 receptor protein required for peroxisomal import of proteins containing a peroxisomal targeting signal type 2. Mutations in PEX7 normally cause rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata type 1, a severe peroxisomal disorder. Biochemical analyses of the patients with RD revealed defects not only in phytanic acid alpha-oxidation but also in plasmalogen synthesis and peroxisomal thiolase. Furthermore, we identified mutations in the PEX7 gene. Our data show that mutations in the PEX7 gene may result in a broad clinical spectrum ranging from severe rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata to relatively mild RD and that clinical diagnosis of conditions involving retinitis pigmentosa, ataxia, and polyneuropathy may require a full screen of peroxisomal functions.

  19. Disruption of a cystine transporter downregulates expression of genes involved in sulfur regulation and cellular respiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A. Simpkins

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cystine and cysteine are important molecules for pathways such as redox signaling and regulation, and thus identifying cellular deficits upon deletion of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cystine transporter Ers1p allows for a further understanding of cystine homeostasis. Previous complementation studies using the human ortholog suggest yeast Ers1p is a cystine transporter. Human CTNS encodes the protein Cystinosin, a cystine transporter that is embedded in the lysosomal membrane and facilitates the export of cystine from the lysosome. When CTNS is mutated, cystine transport is disrupted, leading to cystine accumulation, the diagnostic hallmark of the lysosomal storage disorder cystinosis. Here, we provide biochemical evidence for Ers1p-dependent cystine transport. However, the accumulation of intracellular cystine is not observed when the ERS1 gene is deleted from ers1-Δ yeast, supporting the existence of modifier genes that provide a mechanism in ers1-Δ yeast that prevents or corrects cystine accumulation. Upon comparison of the transcriptomes of isogenic ERS1+ and ers1-Δ strains of S. cerevisiae by DNA microarray followed by targeted qPCR, sixteen genes were identified as being differentially expressed between the two genotypes. Genes that encode proteins functioning in sulfur regulation, cellular respiration, and general transport were enriched in our screen, demonstrating pleiotropic effects of ers1-Δ. These results give insight into yeast cystine regulation and the multiple, seemingly distal, pathways that involve proper cystine recycling.

  20. Disruption of a cystine transporter downregulates expression of genes involved in sulfur regulation and cellular respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpkins, Jessica A.; Rickel, Kirby E.; Madeo, Marianna; Ahlers, Bethany A.; Carlisle, Gabriel B.; Nelson, Heidi J.; Cardillo, Andrew L.; Weber, Emily A.; Vitiello, Peter F.; Pearce, David A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cystine and cysteine are important molecules for pathways such as redox signaling and regulation, and thus identifying cellular deficits upon deletion of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cystine transporter Ers1p allows for a further understanding of cystine homeostasis. Previous complementation studies using the human ortholog suggest yeast Ers1p is a cystine transporter. Human CTNS encodes the protein Cystinosin, a cystine transporter that is embedded in the lysosomal membrane and facilitates the export of cystine from the lysosome. When CTNS is mutated, cystine transport is disrupted, leading to cystine accumulation, the diagnostic hallmark of the lysosomal storage disorder cystinosis. Here, we provide biochemical evidence for Ers1p-dependent cystine transport. However, the accumulation of intracellular cystine is not observed when the ERS1 gene is deleted from ers1-Δ yeast, supporting the existence of modifier genes that provide a mechanism in ers1-Δ yeast that prevents or corrects cystine accumulation. Upon comparison of the transcriptomes of isogenic ERS1+ and ers1-Δ strains of S. cerevisiae by DNA microarray followed by targeted qPCR, sixteen genes were identified as being differentially expressed between the two genotypes. Genes that encode proteins functioning in sulfur regulation, cellular respiration, and general transport were enriched in our screen, demonstrating pleiotropic effects of ers1-Δ. These results give insight into yeast cystine regulation and the multiple, seemingly distal, pathways that involve proper cystine recycling. PMID:27142334

  1. INVOLVEMENT OF SYNAPTIC GENES IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS: THE CASE OF SYNAPSINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eGiovedi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs are heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by deficits in social interaction and social communication, restricted interests and repetitive behaviors. Many synaptic protein genes are linked to the pathogenesis of ASDs, making them prototypical synaptopathies. An array of mutations in the synapsin (Syn genes in humans have been recently associated with ASD and epilepsy, diseases that display a frequent comorbidity. Synapsins are presynaptic proteins regulating synaptic vesicle traffic, neurotransmitter release and short-term synaptic plasticity. In doing so, Syn isoforms control the tone of activity of neural circuits and the balance between excitation and inhibition. As ASD pathogenesis is believed to result from dysfunctions in the balance between excitatory and inhibitory transmissions in neocortical areas, Syns are novel ASD candidate genes. Accordingly, deletion of single Syn genes in mice, in addition to epilepsy, causes core symptoms of ASD by affecting social behavior, social communication and repetitive behaviors. Thus, Syn knockout mice represent a good experimental model to define synaptic alterations involved in the pathogenesis of ASD and epilepsy.

  2. Discovery of genes involved with learning and memory: an experimental synthesis of Hirschian and Benzerian perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, T

    1996-11-26

    The biological bases of learning and memory are being revealed today with a wide array of molecular approaches, most of which entail the analysis of dysfunction produced by gene disruptions. This perspective derives both from early "genetic dissections" of learning in mutant Drosophila by Seymour Benzer and colleagues and from earlier behavior-genetic analyses of learning and in Diptera by Jerry Hirsh and coworkers. Three quantitative-genetic insights derived from these latter studies serve as guiding principles for the former. First, interacting polygenes underlie complex traits. Consequently, learning/memory defects associated with single-gene mutants can be quantified accurately only in equilibrated, heterogeneous genetic backgrounds. Second, complex behavioral responses will be composed of genetically distinct functional components. Thus, genetic dissection of complex traits into specific biobehavioral properties is likely. Finally, disruptions of genes involved with learning/memory are likely to have pleiotropic effects. As a result, task-relevant sensorimotor responses required for normal learning must be assessed carefully to interpret performance in learning/memory experiments. In addition, more specific conclusions will be obtained from reverse-genetic experiments, in which gene disruptions are restricted in time and/or space.

  3. Transcriptome analysis in Ceratitis capitata to unveil genes involved in ageing-maturation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. San Andrés

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The sterile insect technique (SIT is widely used in integrated programmes against the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann (Diptera: Tephritidae. Information on the age distribution of insects, and more particularly, the knowledge of wild female reproductive status (mature or not at the time of the sterile male release is one of the key factors for the success of the SIT. In recent years, sequencing analysis has become an important tool in molecular biology. In this work we present a genome-wide expression analysis based on SSH (substractive sequence hybridization and EST (expressed sequence tag sequencing and macroarray expression analysis to identify signature genes related to the ageing-maturing process in C. capitata, leading to the successful identification of new putative candidate genes of reproductive status in medfly that would serve as molecular markers for ageing. We have sorted out 94 unigenes from 873 single-pass ESTs, of which 57% have homology with known genes. Ageing-maturing process in C. capitata presents a marked expression pattern accompanied by the increase of transcription level of genes involved in reproduction (vitellogenins, chorion proteins and male-specific serum proteins. Other identified cDNAs (43% with a differential expression pattern would be also candidates but deserve further studies, as they belong to the unknown function class.

  4. Key genes involved in desiccation tolerance and dormancy across life forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Maria Cecília D; Farrant, Jill M; Oliver, Melvin J; Ligterink, Wilco; Buitink, Julia; Hilhorst, Henk M W

    2016-10-01

    Desiccation tolerance (DT, the ability of certain organisms to survive severe dehydration) was a key trait in the evolution of life in terrestrial environments. Likely, the development of desiccation-tolerant life forms was accompanied by the acquisition of dormancy or a dormancy-like stage as a second powerful adaptation to cope with variations in the terrestrial environment. These naturally stress tolerant life forms may be a good source of genetic information to generate stress tolerant crops to face a future with predicted higher occurrence of drought. By mining for key genes and mechanisms related to DT and dormancy conserved across different species and life forms, unique candidate key genes may be identified. Here we identify several of these putative key genes, shared among multiple organisms, encoding for proteins involved in protection, growth and energy metabolism. Mutating a selection of these genes in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in clear DT-, dormancy- and other seed-associated phenotypes, showing the efficiency and power of our approach and paves the way for the development of drought-stress tolerant crops. Our analysis supports a co-evolution of DT and dormancy by shared mechanisms that favour survival and adaptation to ever-changing environments with strong seasonal fluctuations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. BRCA1 haploinsufficiency leads to altered expression of genes involved in cellular proliferation and development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet E Feilotter

    Full Text Available The assessment of BRCA1 and BRCA2 coding sequences to identify pathogenic mutations associated with inherited breast/ovarian cancer syndrome has provided a method to identify high-risk individuals, allowing them to seek preventative treatments and strategies. However, the current test is expensive, and cannot differentiate between pathogenic variants and those that may be benign. Focusing only on one of the two BRCA partners, we have developed a biological assay for haploinsufficiency of BRCA1. Using a series of EBV-transformed cell lines, we explored gene expression patterns in cells that were BRCA1 wildtype compared to those that carried (heterozygous BRCA1 pathogenic mutations. We identified a subset of 43 genes whose combined expression pattern is a sensitive predictor of BRCA1 status. The gene set was disproportionately made up of genes involved in cellular differentiation, lending credence to the hypothesis that single copy loss of BRCA1 function may impact differentiation, rendering cells more susceptible to undergoing malignant processes.

  6. [Receptor tyrosine kinase KIT may regulate expression of genes involved in spontaneous regression of neuroblastoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, T D; Spirin, P V; Suntsova, M V; Ivanova, A V; Buzdin, A A; Prokofjeva, M M; Rubtsov, P M; Prassolov, V S

    2015-01-01

    Hallmark of neuroblastoma is an ability of this malignant tumor to undergo spontaneous regression or differentiation into benign tumor during any stage of the disease, but it is little known about mechanisms of these phenomena. We studied effect of receptor tyrosine kinase receptor KIT on expression of genes, which may be involved in tumor spontaneous regression. Downregulation of KIT expression by RNA interference in SH-SY5Y cells causes suppression of neurotrophin receptor NGFR expression that may promote the loss of sensibility of cells to nerve growth factors, also it causes upregulation of TrkA receptor expression which can stimulate cell differentiation or apoptosis in NGF dependent manner. Furthermore there is an upregulation of genes which stimulate malignant cell detection by immune system, such as genes of major histocompatibility complex HLA class I HLA-B and HLA-C, and interferon-γ receptors IFNGR1 and IFNGR2 genes. Thus KIT can mediate neuroblastoma cell sensibility to neurotrophins and immune system components--two factors directly contributing to spontaneous regression of neuroblastoma.

  7. New type IV pili-related genes involved in early stages of Ralstonia solanacearum potato infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siri, María Inés; Sanabria, Analía; Boucher, Christian; Pianzzola, María Julia

    2014-07-01

    This study provides insights into the pathogenesis of Ralstonia solanacearum, in particular with regards to strains belonging to phylotype IIB, sequevar 1 (IIB-1) and their interaction with potato, its natural host. We performed a comparative genomic analysis among IIB-1 R. solanacearum strains with different levels of virulence in order to identify candidate virulence genes. With this approach, we identified a 33.7-kb deletion in a strain showing reduced virulence on potato. This region contains a cluster of six genes putatively involved in type IV pili (Tfp) biogenesis. Functional analysis suggests that these proteins contribute to several Tfp-related functions such as twitching motility and biofilm formation. In addition, this genetic cluster was found to contribute to early bacterial wilt pathogenesis and colonization fitness of potato roots.

  8. Analysis and interpretation of RNA splicing alterations in genes involved in genetic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreeswijk, Maaike P G; van der Klift, Heleen M

    2012-01-01

    Germ line mutations in genes involved in hereditary cancer syndromes, such as BRCA1 and BRCA2 in breast cancer and MSH2, MSH6, MLH1, and PSM2 in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC, more recently indicated as Lynch syndrome), confer a high risk to develop cancer. Mutation analysis in these genes has resulted in the identification of a large number of sequence variants, of which mutations causing frame shifts and nonsense codons are considered undoubtedly to be pathogenic. Many variants, however, cannot be classified as either disease-causing mutations or neutral variants and are therefore called unclassified variants (UVs). A subset of these variants may have an effect on RNA splicing. Appropriate RNA analysis will enable the characterization of the exact molecular nature of this effect and hence, is essential to determine the clinical relevance of the genomic variant. This chapter describes the design and implementation of RNA analysis as an indispensible tool in today's clinical diagnostic setting.

  9. Bioinformatics analysis of potential essential genes that response to the high intraocular pressure on astrocyte due to glaucoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang; Yang; Jing-Zhu; Duan; Yu; Di; Dong-Mei; Gui; Dian-Wen; Gao

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the gene expression response and predict the network in cell due to pressure effects on optic nerve injury of glaucoma.METHODS: We used glaucoma related microarray data in public database [Gene Expression Omnibus(GEO)] to explore the potential gene expression changes as well as correspondent biological process alterations due to increased pressure in astrocytes during glaucoma development.RESULTS: A total of six genes were identified to be related with pressure increasing. Through the annotation and network analysis, we found these genes might be involved in cell morphological remodeling, angiogenesis,mismatch repair.CONCLUSION: Increasing pressure in glaucoma on astrocytes might cause gene expression alterations,which might induce some cellular responses changes.

  10. Functional genes reveal the intrinsic PAH biodegradation potential in creosote-contaminated groundwater following in situ biostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyyssönen, Mari; Kapanen, Anu; Piskonen, Reetta; Lukkari, Tuomas; Itävaara, Merja

    2009-08-01

    A small-scale functional gene array containing 15 functional gene probes targeting aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation pathways was used to investigate the effect of a pilot-scale air sparging and nutrient infiltration treatment on hydrocarbon biodegradation in creosote-contaminated groundwater. Genes involved in the different phases of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) biodegradation were detected with the functional gene array in the contaminant plume, thus indicating the presence of intrinsic biodegradation potential. However, the low aerobic fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of 16S rRNA genes closely similar to sulphate-reducing and denitrifying bacteria and the negligible decrease in contaminant concentrations showed that aerobic PAH biodegradation was limited in the anoxic groundwater. Increased abundance of PAH biodegradation genes was detected by functional gene array in the monitoring well located at the rear end of the biostimulated area, which indicated that air sparging and nutrient infiltration enhanced the intrinsic, aerobic PAH biodegradation. Furthermore, ten times higher naphthalene dioxygenase gene copy numbers were detected by real-time PCR in the biostimulated area, which was in good agreement with the functional gene array data. As a result, functional gene array analysis was demonstrated to provide a potential tool for evaluating the efficiency of the bioremediation treatment for enhancing hydrocarbon biodegradation in field-scale applications.

  11. Altered gene regulation and potential association with metabolic resistance development to imidacloprid in the tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yu Cheng; Luttrell, Randall

    2015-01-01

    Chemical spray on cotton is almost an exclusive method for controlling tarnished plant bug (TPB), Lygus lineolaris. Frequent use of imidacloprid is a concern for neonicotinoid resistance in this key pest. Information of how and why TPB becomes less susceptible to imidacloprid is essential for effective monitoring and managing resistance. Microarray analysis of 6688 genes in imidacloprid-selected TPB (Im1500FF) revealed 955 upregulated and 1277 downregulated (≥twofold) genes in Im1500FF, with 369 and 485 of them annotated. Five P450 and nine esterase genes were significantly upregulated, and only one esterase gene and no P450 genes were downregulated. Other upregulated genes include helicases, phosphodiesterases, ATPases and kinases. Pathway analyses identified 65 upregulated cDNAs that encode 51 different enzymes involved in 62 different pathways, including P450 and esterase genes for drug and xenobiotic metabolisms. Sixty-four downregulated cDNAs code only 17 enzymes that are associated with only 23 pathways mostly related to food digestion. This study demonstrated a significant change in gene expression related to metabolic processes in imidacloprid-selected TPB, resulting in overexpression of P450 and esterase genes for potential excess detoxification and cross/multiple resistance development. The identification of these and other enzyme genes establishes a foundation to explore the complicity of potential imidacloprid resistance in TPB. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  12. Transcriptional regulation of genes involved in retinoic acid metabolism in Senegalese sole larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boglino, Anaïs; Ponce, Marian; Cousin, Xavier; Gisbert, Enric; Manchado, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was the characterization of transcriptional regulatory pathways mediated by retinoic acid (RA) in Senegalese sole larvae. For this purpose, pre-metamorphic larvae were treated with a low concentration of DEAB, an inhibitor of RALDH enzyme, until the end of metamorphosis. No differences in growth, eye migration or survival were observed. Nevertheless, gene expression analysis revealed a total of 20 transcripts differentially expressed during larval development and only six related with DEAB treatments directly involved in RA metabolism and actions (rdh10a, aldh1a2, crbp1, igf2r, rarg and cyp26a1) to adapt to a low-RA environment. In a second experiment, post-metamorphic larvae were exposed to the all-trans RA (atRA) observing an opposite regulation for those genes involved in RA synthesis and degradation (rdh10a, aldh1a2, crbp1 and cyp26a1) as well as other related with thyroid- (dio2) and IGF-axes (igfbp1, igf2r and igfbp5) to balance RA levels. In a third experiment, DEAB-pretreated post-metamorphic larvae were exposed to atRA and TTNPB (a specific RAR agonist). Both drugs down-regulated rdh10a and aldh1a2 and up-regulated cyp26a1 expression demonstrating their important role in RA homeostasis. Moreover, five retinoic receptors that mediate RA actions, the thyroid receptor thrb, and five IGF binding proteins changed differentially their expression. Overall, this study demonstrates that exogenous RA modulates the expression of some genes involved in the RA synthesis, degradation and cellular transport through RAR-mediated regulatory pathways establishing a negative feedback regulatory mechanism necessary to balance endogenous RA levels and gradients.

  13. Daily Rhythms of the Expression of Key Genes Involved in Steroidogenesis and Gonadal Function in Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rosa, Viviana; López-Olmeda, Jose Fernando; Burguillo, Ana; Frigato, Elena; Bertolucci, Cristiano; Piferrer, Francesc; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    Fish present daily and seasonal rhythms in spawning and plasmatic levels of steroids that control reproduction. However, the existence of the rhythms of expression of the genes that underlie the endocrine mechanisms responsible for processes such as steroidogenesis and reproduction in fish have still been poorly explored to date. Here we investigated the daily pattern of the expression of key genes involved in sex steroid production that ultimately set the sex ratio in fish. Adult zebrafish were maintained under a 12:12 h light-dark cycle at a constant temperature of 27°C and were sampled every 4 h during a 24-hour cycle. The expression of key genes in the gonads and brains of female and male individuals were analyzed. In gonads, the expression of aromatase (cyp19a1a, ovarian aromatase) and the antimüllerian hormone (amh, testis) was rhythmic, with almost opposite acrophases: ZT 5:13 h (in the light phase) and ZT 15:39 h (at night), respectively. The expression of foxl2 (forkhead box L2) was also rhythmic in the ovary (acrophase located at ZT 5:02 h) and the expression of dmrt1 (doublesex and mab-3-related transcription factor 1) was rhythmic in testes (acrophase at ZT 18:36 h). In the brain, cyp19a1b (brain aromatase) and cyp11b (11beta-hydroxylase) presented daily differences, especially in males, where the expression peaked at night. These results provide the first evidence for marked time-of-the-day-dependent differences in the expression of the genes involved in sex ratio control, which should be considered when investigating processes such as reproduction, sex differentiation and steroidogenesis in fish. PMID:27322588

  14. The HP0256 gene product is involved in motility and cell envelope architecture of Helicobacter pylori

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Douillard, Francois P

    2010-04-08

    Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori is the causative agent for gastritis, and peptic and duodenal ulcers. The bacterium displays 5-6 polar sheathed flagella that are essential for colonisation and persistence in the gastric mucosa. The biochemistry and genetics of flagellar biogenesis in H. pylori has not been fully elucidated. Bioinformatics analysis suggested that the gene HP0256, annotated as hypothetical, was a FliJ homologue. In Salmonella, FliJ is a chaperone escort protein for FlgN and FliT, two proteins that themselves display chaperone activity for components of the hook, the rod and the filament. Results Ablation of the HP0256 gene in H. pylori significantly reduced motility. However, flagellin and hook protein synthesis was not affected in the HP0256 mutant. Transmission electron transmission microscopy revealed that the HP0256 mutant cells displayed a normal flagellum configuration, suggesting that HP0256 was not essential for assembly and polar localisation of the flagella in the cell. Interestingly, whole genome microarrays of an HP0256 mutant revealed transcriptional changes in a number of genes associated with the flagellar regulon and the cell envelope, such as outer membrane proteins and adhesins. Consistent with the array data, lack of the HP0256 gene significantly reduced adhesion and the inflammatory response in host cells. Conclusions We conclude that HP0256 is not a functional counterpart of FliJ in H. pylori. However, it is required for full motility and it is involved, possibly indirectly, in expression of outer membrane proteins and adhesins involved in pathogenesis and adhesion.

  15. Functional characterization of an α-esterase gene involving malathion detoxification in Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luo-Luo; Lu, Xue-Ping; Meng, Li-Wei; Huang, Yong; Wei, Dong; Jiang, Hong-Bo; Smagghe, Guy; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Extensive use of insecticides in many orchards has prompted resistance development in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel). In this study, a laboratory selected strain of B. dorsalis (MR) with a 21-fold higher resistance to malathion was used to examine the resistance mechanisms to this organophosphate insecticide. Carboxylesterase (CarE) was found to be involved in malathion resistance in B. dorsalis from the synergism bioassay by CarE-specific inhibitor triphenylphosphate (TPP). Molecular studies further identified a previously uncharacterized α-esterase gene, BdCarE2, that may function in the development of malathion resistance in B. dorsalis via gene upregulation. This gene is predominantly expressed in the Malpighian tubules, a key insect tissue for detoxification. The transcript levels of BdCarE2 were also compared between the MR and a malathion-susceptible (MS) strain of B. dorsalis, and it was significantly more abundant in the MR strain. No sequence mutation or gene copy changes were detected between the two strains. Functional studies using RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of BdCarE2 significantly increased the malathion susceptibility in the adult files. Furthermore, heterologous expression of BdCarE2 combined with cytotoxicity assay in Sf9 cells demonstrated that BdCarE2 could probably detoxify malathion. Taken together, the current study bring new molecular evidence supporting the involvement of CarE-mediated metabolism in resistance development against malathion in B. dorsalis and also provide bases on functional analysis of insect α-esterase associated with insecticide resistance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Daily Rhythms of the Expression of Key Genes Involved in Steroidogenesis and Gonadal Function in Zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Di Rosa

    Full Text Available Fish present daily and seasonal rhythms in spawning and plasmatic levels of steroids that control reproduction. However, the existence of the rhythms of expression of the genes that underlie the endocrine mechanisms responsible for processes such as steroidogenesis and reproduction in fish have still been poorly explored to date. Here we investigated the daily pattern of the expression of key genes involved in sex steroid production that ultimately set the sex ratio in fish. Adult zebrafish were maintained under a 12:12 h light-dark cycle at a constant temperature of 27°C and were sampled every 4 h during a 24-hour cycle. The expression of key genes in the gonads and brains of female and male individuals were analyzed. In gonads, the expression of aromatase (cyp19a1a, ovarian aromatase and the antimüllerian hormone (amh, testis was rhythmic, with almost opposite acrophases: ZT 5:13 h (in the light phase and ZT 15:39 h (at night, respectively. The expression of foxl2 (forkhead box L2 was also rhythmic in the ovary (acrophase located at ZT 5:02 h and the expression of dmrt1 (doublesex and mab-3-related transcription factor 1 was rhythmic in testes (acrophase at ZT 18:36 h. In the brain, cyp19a1b (brain aromatase and cyp11b (11beta-hydroxylase presented daily differences, especially in males, where the expression peaked at night. These results provide the first evidence for marked time-of-the-day-dependent differences in the expression of the genes involved in sex ratio control, which should be considered when investigating processes such as reproduction, sex differentiation and steroidogenesis in fish.

  17. An integrative systems genetics approach reveals potential causal genes and pathways related to obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogelman, Lisette J A; Zhernakova, Daria V; Westra, Harm-Jan; Cirera, Susanna; Fredholm, Merete; Franke, Lude; Kadarmideen, Haja N

    2015-10-20

    Obesity is a multi-factorial health problem in which genetic factors play an important role. Limited results have been obtained in single-gene studies using either genomic or transcriptomic data. RNA sequencing technology has shown its potential in gaining accurate knowledge about the transcriptome, and may reveal novel genes affecting complex diseases. Integration of genomic and transcriptomic variation (expression quantitative trait loci [eQTL] mapping) has identified causal variants that affect complex diseases. We integrated transcriptomic data from adipose tissue and genomic data from a porcine model to investigate the mechanisms involved in obesity using a systems genetics approach. Using a selective gene expression profiling approach, we selected 36 animals based on a previously created genomic Obesity Index for RNA sequencing of subcutaneous adipose tissue. Differential expression analysis was performed using the Obesity Index as a continuous variable in a linear model. eQTL mapping was then performed to integrate 60 K porcine SNP chip data with the RNA sequencing data. Results were restricted based on genome-wide significant single nucleotide polymorphisms, detected differentially expressed genes, and previously detected co-expressed gene modules. Further data integration was performed by detecting co-expression patterns among eQTLs and integration with protein data. Differential expression analysis of RNA sequencing data revealed 458 differentially expressed genes. The eQTL mapping resulted in 987 cis-eQTLs and 73 trans-eQTLs (false discovery rate genes and disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms to detect obesity-related genes and pathways. Building a co-expression network using eQTLs resulted in the detection of a module strongly associated with lipid pathways. Furthermore, we detected several obesity candidate genes, for example, ENPP1, CTSL, and ABHD12B. To our knowledge, this is the first study to perform an integrated genomics and

  18. Transcriptome analysis of Bupleurum chinense focusing on genes involved in the biosynthesis of saikosaponins

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    Yang Chengmin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bupleurum chinense DC. is a widely used traditional Chinese medicinal plant. Saikosaponins are the major bioactive constituents of B. chinense, but relatively little is known about saikosaponin biosynthesis. The 454 pyrosequencing technology provides a promising opportunity for finding novel genes that participate in plant metabolism. Consequently, this technology may help to identify the candidate genes involved in the saikosaponin biosynthetic pathway. Results One-quarter of the 454 pyrosequencing runs produced a total of 195, 088 high-quality reads, with an average read length of 356 bases (NCBI SRA accession SRA039388. A de novo assembly generated 24, 037 unique sequences (22, 748 contigs and 1, 289 singletons, 12, 649 (52.6% of which were annotated against three public protein databases using a basic local alignment search tool (E-value ≤1e-10. All unique sequences were compared with NCBI expressed sequence tags (ESTs (237 and encoding sequences (44 from the Bupleurum genus, and with a Sanger-sequenced EST dataset (3, 111. The 23, 173 (96.4% unique sequences obtained in the present study represent novel Bupleurum genes. The ESTs of genes related to saikosaponin biosynthesis were found to encode known enzymes that catalyze the formation of the saikosaponin backbone; 246 cytochrome P450 (P450s and 102 glycosyltransferases (GTs unique sequences were also found in the 454 dataset. Full length cDNAs of 7 P450s and 7 uridine diphosphate GTs (UGTs were verified by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction or by cloning using 5' and/or 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends. Two P450s and three UGTs were identified as the most likely candidates involved in saikosaponin biosynthesis. This finding was based on the coordinate up-regulation of their expression with β-AS in methyl jasmonate-treated adventitious roots and on their similar expression patterns with β-AS in various B. chinense tissues. Conclusions A collection of

  19. Genes involved in angiogenesis and mTOR pathways are frequently mutated in Asian patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Wen-Chi; Lin, Po-Han; Yeh, Yi-Chen; Shyr, Yi-Ming; Fang, Wen-Liang; Wang, Shin-E; Liu, Chun-Yu; Chang, Peter Mu-Hsin; Chen, Ming-Han; Hung, Yi-Ping; Li, Chung-Pin; Chao, Yee; Chen, Ming-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: To address the issue of limited data on and inconsistent findings for genetic alterations in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs), we analyzed sequences of known pNET-associated genes for their impact on clinical outcomes in a Taiwanese cohort. Methods: Tissue samples from 40 patients with sporadic pNETs were sequenced using a customized sequencing panel that analyzed 43 genes with either an established or potential association with pNETs. Genetic mutations and clinical outcomes were analyzed for potential associations. Results: Thirty-three patients (82.5%) survived for a median 5.9 years (range, 0.3-18.4) of follow up. The median number of mutations per patient was 3 (range, 0-16). The most frequent mutations were in ATRX (28%), MEN1 (28%), ASCL1 (28%), TP53 (20%), mTOR (20%), ARID1A (20%), and VHL (20%). The mutation frequencies in the MEN1 (including MEN1/PSIP1/ARID1A), mTOR (including mTOR/PIK3CA/AKT1/PTEN /TS1/TSC2/ATM), DAXX/ATRX, and angiogenesis (including VHL/ANGPT1/ANGPT2 /HIF1A) pathways were 48%, 48%, 38%, and 45%, respectively. Mutations in ATRX were associated with WHO grade I pNET (vs. grade II or III, p = 0.043), and so were those in genes involved in angiogenesis (p = 0.002). Patients with mutated MEN1 and DAXX/ATRX pathways showed a trend toward better survival, compared to patients with the wild-type genes (p = 0.08 and 0.12, respectively). Conclusion: Genetic profiles of Asian patients with pNETs were distinct from Caucasian patient profiles. Asian patients with pNETs were more frequently mutated for the mTOR and angiogenesis pathways. This could partially explain the better outcome observed for targeted therapy in Asian patients with pNETs. PMID:27994516

  20. Drosophila germline invasion by the endogenous retrovirus gypsy: involvement of the viral env gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelisson, A; Mejlumian, L; Robert, V; Terzian, C; Bucheton, A

    2002-10-01

    The endogenous retrovirus gypsy is expressed at high levels in mutant flamenco female flies. Gypsy viral particles extracted from such flies can infect naive flamenco individuals raised in the presence of these extracts mixed into their food. This results in the integration of new proviruses into the germline genome. These proviruses can then increase their copy number by (1) expression in the flamenco female somatic cells, (2) transfer into the oocyte and (3) integration into the genome of the progeny. Surprisingly, unlike the infection observed in the feeding experiments, this strategy of endogenous proviral multiplication does not seem to involve the expression of the viral env gene.

  1. Identification and analysis of signaling networks potentially involved in breast carcinoma metastasis to the brain.

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    Feng Li

    Full Text Available Brain is a common site of breast cancer metastasis associated with significant neurologic morbidity, decreased quality of life, and greatly shortened survival. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underpinning brain colonization by breast carcinoma cells are poorly understood. Here, we used 2D-DIGE (Difference in Gel Electrophoresis proteomic analysis followed by LC-tandem mass spectrometry to identify the proteins differentially expressed in brain-targeting breast carcinoma cells (MB231-Br compared with parental MDA-MB-231 cell line. Between the two cell lines, we identified 12 proteins consistently exhibiting greater than 2-fold (p<0.05 difference in expression, which were associated by the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA with two major signaling networks involving TNFα/TGFβ-, NFκB-, HSP-70-, TP53-, and IFNγ-associated pathways. Remarkably, highly related networks were revealed by the IPA analysis of a list of 19 brain-metastasis-associated proteins identified recently by the group of Dr. A. Sierra using MDA-MB-435-based experimental system (Martin et al., J Proteome Res 2008 7:908-20, or a 17-gene classifier associated with breast cancer brain relapse reported by the group of Dr. J. Massague based on a microarray analysis of clinically annotated breast tumors from 368 patients (Bos et al., Nature 2009 459: 1005-9. These findings, showing that different experimental systems and approaches (2D-DIGE proteomics used on brain targeting cell lines or gene expression analysis of patient samples with documented brain relapse yield highly related signaling networks, suggest strongly that these signaling networks could be essential for a successful colonization of the brain by metastatic breast carcinoma cells.

  2. Gene expression profiling to identify eggshell proteins involved in physical defense of the chicken egg

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    Sibut Vonick

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As uricoletic animals, chickens produce cleidoic eggs, which are self-contained bacteria-resistant biological packages for extra-uterine development of the chick embryo. The eggshell constitutes a natural physical barrier against bacterial penetration if it forms correctly and remains intact. The eggshell's remarkable mechanical properties are due to interactions among mineral components and the organic matrix proteins. The purpose of our study was to identify novel eggshell proteins by examining the transcriptome of the uterus during calcification of the eggshell. An extensive bioinformatic analysis on genes over-expressed in the uterus allowed us to identify novel eggshell proteins that contribute to the egg's natural defenses. Results Our 14 K Del-Mar Chicken Integrated Systems microarray was used for transcriptional profiling in the hen's uterus during eggshell deposition. A total of 605 transcripts were over-expressed in the uterus compared with the magnum or white isthmus across a wide range of abundance (1.1- to 79.4-fold difference. The 605 highly-expressed uterine transcripts correspond to 469 unique genes, which encode 437 different proteins. Gene Ontology (GO analysis was used for interpretation of protein function. The most over-represented GO terms are related to genes encoding ion transport proteins, which provide eggshell mineral precursors. Signal peptide sequence was found for 54 putative proteins secreted by the uterus during eggshell formation. Many functional proteins are involved in calcium binding or biomineralization--prerequisites for interacting with the mineral phase during eggshell fabrication. While another large group of proteins could be involved in proper folding of the eggshell matrix. Many secreted uterine proteins possess antibacterial properties, which would protect the egg against microbial invasion. A final group includes proteases and protease inhibitors that regulate protein activity in

  3. Study of the Genes and Mechanism Involved in the Radioadaptive Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Pushan R.

    2009-01-01

    The radioadaptive response is a phenomenon where exposure to a prior low dose of radiation reduces the level of damage induced by a subsequent high radiation dose. The molecular mechanism behind this is still not well understood. Learning more about the radioadaptive response is critical for long duration spaceflight since astronauts are exposed to low levels of cosmic radiation. The micronucleus assay was used to measure the level of damage caused by radiation. Although cells which were not washed with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) after a low priming dose of 5cGy did not show adaptation to the challenge dose, washing the cells with PBS and giving the cells fresh media after the low dose did allow radioadaptation to occur. This is consistent with the results of a previous publication by another research group. In the present study, genes involved in DNA damage signaling and the oxidative stress response were studied using RT PCR techniques in order to look at changes in expression level after the low dose with or without washing. Our preliminary results indicate that upregulation of oxidative stress response genes ANGPTL7, NCF2, TTN, and SRXN1 may be involved in the radioadaptive response. The low dose of radiation alone was found to activate the oxidative stress response genes GPR156 and MTL5, whereas, washing the cells alone caused relatively robust upregulation of the oxidative stress response genes DUSP1 and PTGS2. Washing after the priming dose showed some changes in the expression level of several DNA damage signaling genes. In addition, we studied whether washing the cells after the priming dose has an effect on the level of nitric oxide in both the media and cells, since nitric oxide levels are known to increase in the media of the cells after a high dose of radiation only if the cells were already exposed to a low priming dose. Based on this preliminary study, we propose that washing the cells after priming exposure actually eliminates some factor

  4. Identification of genes involved in Epstein-Barr virus-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junguo; Mei, Fang; Gao, Xia; Wang, Shoulin

    2016-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is the most common cancer originating from the nasopharynx, and can be induced by infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). To study the mechanisms of EBV-associated NPC, a microarray of the GSE12452 dataset was analyzed. GSE12452 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus and consisted of 31 NPC samples and 10 normal healthy nasopharyngeal tissue samples. The differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) were screened using the linear models for microarray data package in R. Using Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery software, potential functions of the DEGs were predicted by Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analyses. With the information from the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins database, the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was visualized by Cytoscape. Furthermore, modules of the PPI network were searched using ClusterONE in Cytoscape. A total of 951 DEGs were screened in the NPC samples compared with the normal healthy nasopharyngeal tissue samples. Function enrichment indicated that the upregulated genes were associated with the cell cycle, cytoskeleton organization and DNA metabolism. Meanwhile, the downregulated genes were mainly associated with cell differentiation, hormone metabolism, inflammatory response and immune response. PPI networks for the DEGs suggested that upregulated mitotic arrest deficient 2-like 1 (MAD2L1; degree=133), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA; degree=125) and cyclin B1 (CCNB1; degree=115), and downregulated member A1 of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1A1; degree=15) may be of great importance as they exhibited higher degrees on interaction. Mucin 1 (MUC1) was a key node of module 4. Overall, the study indicated that MAD2L1, CCNB1, PCNA, ALDH1A1 and MUC1 may have a correlation with EBV-associated NPC. PMID:27698802

  5. Transcriptome analysis and discovery of genes involved in immune pathways from hepatopancreas of microbial challenged mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis.

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    Xihong Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis is an important economic crustacean and has been seriously attacked by various diseases, which requires more and more information for immune relevant genes on genome background. Recently, high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq technology provides a powerful and efficient method for transcript analysis and immune gene discovery. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A cDNA library from hepatopancreas of E. sinensis challenged by a mixture of three pathogen strains (Gram-positive bacteria Micrococcus luteus, Gram-negative bacteria Vibrio alginolyticus and fungi Pichia pastoris; 10(8 cfu·mL(-1 was constructed and randomly sequenced using Illumina technique. Totally 39.76 million clean reads were assembled to 70,300 unigenes. After ruling out short-length and low-quality sequences, 52,074 non-redundant unigenes were compared to public databases for homology searching and 17,617 of them showed high similarity to sequences in NCBI non-redundant protein (Nr database. For function classification and pathway assignment, 18,734 (36.00% unigenes were categorized to three Gene Ontology (GO categories, 12,243 (23.51% were classified to 25 Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG, and 8,983 (17.25% were assigned to six Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathways. Potentially, 24, 14, 47 and 132 unigenes were characterized to be involved in Toll, IMD, JAK-STAT and MAPK pathways, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first systematical transcriptome analysis of components relating to innate immune pathways in E. sinensis. Functional genes and putative pathways identified here will contribute to better understand immune system and prevent various diseases in crab.

  6. A Genome-Wide Identification of the WRKY Family Genes and a Survey of Potential WRKY Target Genes in Dendrobium officinale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chunmei; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Tan, Jianwen; Zhang, Jianxia; Pan, Xiaoping; Li, Mingzhi; Luo, Jianping; Duan, Jun

    2017-08-23

    The WRKY family, one of the largest families of transcription factors, plays important roles in the regulation of various biological processes, including growth, development and stress responses in plants. In the present study, 63 DoWRKY genes were identified from the Dendrobium officinale genome. These were classified into groups I, II, III and a non-group, each with 14, 28, 10 and 11 members, respectively. ABA-responsive, sulfur-responsive and low temperature-responsive elements were identified in the 1-k upstream regulatory region of DoWRKY genes. Subsequently, the expression of the 63 DoWRKY genes under cold stress was assessed, and the expression profiles of a large number of these genes were regulated by low temperature in roots and stems. To further understand the regulatory mechanism of DoWRKY genes in biological processes, potential WRKY target genes were investigated. Among them, most stress-related genes contained multiple W-box elements in their promoters. In addition, the genes involved in polysaccharide synthesis and hydrolysis contained W-box elements in their 1-k upstream regulatory regions, suggesting that DoWRKY genes may play a role in polysaccharide metabolism. These results provide a basis for investigating the function of WRKY genes and help to understand the downstream regulation network in plants within the Orchidaceae.

  7. Transcriptome characterization of Gnetum parvifolium reveals candidate genes involved in important secondary metabolic pathways of flavonoids and stilbenoids

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    Nan eDeng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gnetum is a small, unique group of Gnetophyta with a controversial phylogenetic position. G. parvifolium is an important Chinese traditional medicinal plant, which is rich in bioactive compounds such as flavonoids and stilbenoids. These compounds provide significant medicinal effects, mostly as antioxidant, anticancer and antibacterial agents. However, the mechanisms involved in the biosynthesis and regulation of these compounds in G. parvifolium are still unknown. In this study, we found that flavonoid and stilbene compounds accumulated at different levels in various tissues of G. parvifolium. We further obtained and analyzed massive sequence information from pooled samples of G. parvifolium by transcriptome sequencing, which generated 94,816 unigenes with an average length of 724 bp. Functional annotation of all these unigenes revealed that many of them were associated with several important secondary metabolism pathways including flavonoids and stilbenoids. In particular, several candidate unigenes (PAL-, C4H-, 4CL- and STS-like genes involved in stilbenoids biosynthesis were highly expressed in leaves and mature fruits. Furthermore, high temperature and UV-C strongly induced the expression of these genes and enhanced stilbene production (ie. resveratrol and piceatannol in leaves of young seedlings. Our present transcriptomic and biochemical data on secondary metabolites in G. parvifolium should encourage further investigation on evolution, ecology, functional genomics and breeding of this plant with strong pharmaceutical potential.

  8. Expression of specific genes involved in Cd uptake, translocation, vacuolar compartmentalisation and recycling in Populus alba Villafranca clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romè, Chiara; Huang, Xin-Yuan; Danku, John; Salt, David E; Sebastiani, Luca

    2016-09-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a heavy metal toxic to humans and its occurrence in soils represents a significant environmental problem. Poplar trees may provide one possible option to help remove Cd contamination from soil. However, before this is practicable, the ability of poplar to accumulate Cd needs to be enhanced. A better understanding of the genes involved in Cd accumulation in poplar would help to achieve this goal. Here, we monitored the expression of genes known to be involved in Cd uptake, accumulation and translocation from other species, in order to provide information on their potential role in Cd accumulation in poplar. Cd concentration in poplar was significantly higher in roots than in stem and leaves in Cd treated plants. Expression of the poplar homologues of IRT1, NRAMP and OPT3 was initially increased after exposure to Cd but reduced after longer term Cd exposure. Exposure to Cd also influenced the accumulation of Fe, Ca, Cu, Mg and Mn in poplar. In particular, Cd treated plants had a higher concentration of Fe, Ca, Cu, and Mg in leaves and stem compared to control plants after one day and one week of experiment; while in roots after one month Cd treated plants had a lower concentration of Mn, Fe, Cu, Co, and Mg.

  9. Identification of new regulatory genes involved in the pathogenic functions of the rice-pathogenic bacterium Burkholderia glumae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Rebecca A; Barphagha, Inderjit; Osti, Surendra; Lelis, Tiago P; Karki, Hari S; Chen, Ruoxi; Shrestha, Bishnu K; Ham, Jong Hyun

    2017-02-01

    Burkholderia glumae is an emerging plant-pathogenic bacterium that causes disease in rice in several of the major rice-producing areas throughout the world. In the southern United States, B. glumae is the major causal agent of bacterial panicle blight of rice and has caused severe yield losses in recent decades. Despite its importance, few management options are available for diseases caused by B. glumae, and knowledge of how this pathogen causes disease is limited. In an effort to identify novel factors that contribute to the pathogenicity of B. glumae, random mutagenesis using the miniTn5gus transposon was performed on two strains of B. glumae. Resultant mutants were screened in the laboratory for altered phenotypes in various known or putative virulence factors, including toxoflavin, lipase and extracellular polysaccharides. Mutants that exhibited altered phenotypes compared to their parent strain were selected and subsequently characterized using a PCR-based method to identify the approximate location of the transposon insertion. Altogether, approximately 20 000 random mutants were screened and 51 different genes were identified as having potential involvement in the production of toxoflavin, lipase and/or extracellular polysaccharide. Especially, two regulatory genes, ntpR and tepR, encoding a LysR-type transcriptional regulator and a σ54-dependent response regulator, respectively, were discovered in this study as new negative regulatory factors for the production of toxoflavin, the major phytotoxin synthesized by B. glumae and involved in bacterial pathogenesis.

  10. Expression patterns of genes involved in the defense and stress response of Spiroplasma citri infected Madagascar Periwinkle Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejat, Naghmeh; Vadamalai, Ganesan; Dickinson, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Madagascar periwinkle is an ornamental and a medicinal plant, and is also an indicator plant that is highly susceptible to phytoplasma and spiroplasma infections from different crops. Periwinkle lethal yellows, caused by Spiroplasma citri, is one of the most devastating diseases of periwinkle. The response of plants to S. citri infection is very little known at the transcriptome level. In this study, quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to investigate the expression levels of four selected genes involved in defense and stress responses in naturally and experimentally Spiroplasma citri infected periwinkles. Strictosidine β-glucosidase involved in terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) biosynthesis pathway showed significant upregulation in experimentally and naturally infected periwinkles. The transcript level of extensin increased in leaves of periwinkles experimentally infected by S. citri in comparison to healthy ones. A similar level of heat shock protein 90 and metallothionein expression was observed in healthy, naturally and experimentally spiroplasma-diseased periwinkles. Overexpression of Strictosidine β-glucosidase demonstrates the potential utility of this gene as a host biomarker to increase the fidelity of S. citri detection and can also be used in breeding programs to develop stable disease-resistance varieties.

  11. Expression Patterns of Genes Involved in the Defense and Stress Response of Spiroplasma citri Infected Madagascar Periwinkle Catharanthus roseus

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    Naghmeh Nejat

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Madagascar periwinkle is an ornamental and a medicinal plant, and is also an indicator plant that is highly susceptible to phytoplasma and spiroplasma infections from different crops. Periwinkle lethal yellows, caused by Spiroplasma citri, is one of the most devastating diseases of periwinkle. The response of plants to S. citri infection is very little known at the transcriptome level. In this study, quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR was used to investigate the expression levels of four selected genes involved in defense and stress responses in naturally and experimentally Spiroplasma citri infected periwinkles. Strictosidine β-glucosidase involved in terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs biosynthesis pathway showed significant upregulation in experimentally and naturally infected periwinkles. The transcript level of extensin increased in leaves of periwinkles experimentally infected by S. citri in comparison to healthy ones. A similar level of heat shock protein 90 and metallothionein expression was observed in healthy, naturally and experimentally spiroplasma-diseased periwinkles. Overexpression of Strictosidine β-glucosidase demonstrates the potential utility of this gene as a host biomarker to increase the fidelity of S. citri detection and can also be used in breeding programs to develop stable disease-resistance varieties.

  12. Genes Involved in the Endoplasmic Reticulum N-Glycosylation Pathway of the Red Microalga Porphyridium sp.: A Bioinformatic Study

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    Oshrat Levy-Ontman

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available N-glycosylation is one of the most important post-translational modifications that influence protein polymorphism, including protein structures and their functions. Although this important biological process has been extensively studied in mammals, only limited knowledge exists regarding glycosylation in algae. The current research is focused on the red microalga Porphyridium sp., which is a potentially valuable source for various applications, such as skin therapy, food, and pharmaceuticals. The enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and processing of N-glycans remain undefined in this species, and the mechanism(s of their genetic regulation is completely unknown. In this study, we describe our pioneering attempt to understand the endoplasmic reticulum N-Glycosylation pathway in Porphyridium sp., using a bioinformatic approach. Homology searches, based on sequence similarities with genes encoding proteins involved in the ER N-glycosylation pathway (including their conserved parts were conducted using the TBLASTN function on the algae DNA scaffold contigs database. This approach led to the identification of 24 encoded-genes implicated with the ER N-glycosylation pathway in Porphyridium sp. Homologs were found for almost all known N-glycosylation protein sequences in the ER pathway of Porphyridium sp.; thus, suggesting that the ER-pathway is conserved; as it is in other organisms (animals, plants, yeasts, etc..

  13. Adaptive evolution of genes involved in the regulation of germline stem cells in Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Heather A; DuMont, Vanessa L Bauer; Fatoo, Aalya; Hubbard, Diana; Hijji, Mohammed; Barbash, Daniel A; Aquadro, Charles F

    2015-02-09

    Population genetic and comparative analyses in diverse taxa have shown that numerous genes involved in reproduction are adaptively evolving. Two genes involved in germline stem cell regulation, bag of marbles (bam) and benign gonial cell neoplasm (bgcn), have been shown previously to experience recurrent, adaptive evolution in both Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans. Here we report a population genetic survey on eight additional genes involved in germline stem cell regulation in D. melanogaster and D. simulans that reveals all eight of these genes reject a neutral model of evolution in at least one test and one species after correction for multiple testing using a false-discovery rate of 0.05. These genes play diverse roles in the regulation of germline stem cells, suggesting that positive selection in response to several evolutionary pressures may be acting to drive the adaptive evolution of these genes.

  14. In planta assays involving epigenetically silenced genes reveal inhibition of cytosine methylation by genistein

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    Arase Sachiko

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytosine methylation is involved in epigenetic control of gene expression in a wide range of organisms. An increasing number of examples indicate that changing the frequency of cytosine methylation in the genome is a feasible tool to engineer novel traits in plants. Although demethylating effects of compounds have been analyzed in human cultured cells in terms of suppressing cancer, their effect in plant cells has not been analyzed extensively. Here, we developed in planta assay systems to detect inhibition of cytosine methylation using plants that contain a transgene transcriptionally silenced by an epigenetic mechanism. Results Seeds of two transgenic plants were used: a petunia line that has been identified as a revertant of the co-suppression of the chalcone synthase-A (CHS-A gene and contains CHS-A transgenes whose transcription is repressed; Nicotiana benthamiana plants that contain the green fluorescent protein (GFP reporter gene whose transcription is repressed through virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing. Seeds of these plants were sown on a medium that contained a demethylating agent, either 5-azacytidine or trichostatin A, and the restoration of the transcriptionally active state of the transgene was detected in seedlings. Using these systems, we found that genistein, a major isoflavonoid compound, inhibits cytosine methylation, thus restoring transgene transcription. Genistein also restored the transcription of an epigenetically silenced endogenous gene in Arabidopsis plants. Conclusions Our assay systems allowed us to assess the inhibition of cytosine methylation, in particular of maintenance of methylation, by compounds in plant cells. These results suggest a novel role of flavonoids in plant cells and that genistein is useful for modifying the epigenetic state of plant genomes.

  15. Expression of Some Genes Involved in Epigenetic in Breast Cancer Cell Lines: The Effect of Quercetin

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    fahime mohamadian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers among women. Incorrect pattern of gene expression involved in epigenetic including APOBEC3B, DNMT-1, and TET-1 can develop breast cancer. Quercetin is a natural flavonoid with antioxidant and anti-cancer properties that have been reported in other studies. To investigate the effect mechanism of quercetin, this study examined the effect of quercetin on the expression of genes which were referred to in two classes of breast cancer cell lines. Materials & Methods: Cell lines including MCF-7 and MDA-MB-453 in separate boxes in the control group and the treated groups with two dosages of 50 and 100 mm of quercetin were cultured for 24 and 48 hours, respectively. RNA was extracted from the cells and then was converted to cDNA. Real-time PCR was used for APOBEC3B, DNMT_1, and TET-1 expression. Results: The results showed that quercetin had conflicting results after 24 hours in two cell lines as there was a decrease in the gene expression of APQBEC3B and an increase in that of DNMT-1 in MCF-7 cell line. In contrast, the cell line of MDA-MB-453, APOBEC3B, and DNMT-1 gene expression increased. While the 48-hour results showed that quercetin reduced the gene expression of APOBEC3B and DNMT-1 and increased that of the TET-1 in both cell lines. Conclusion: Due to the satisfactory effects of quercetin on breast cancer cells after 48 hours, these effects can be probably applied through epigenetic mechanisms. However, the final decision needs further investigation.

  16. The repertoire of λ light chains causing predominant amyloid heart involvement and identification of a preferentially involved germline gene, IGLV1-44.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfetti, Vittorio; Palladini, Giovanni; Casarini, Simona; Navazza, Valentina; Rognoni, Paola; Obici, Laura; Invernizzi, Rosangela; Perlini, Stefano; Klersy, Catherine; Merlini, Giampaolo

    2012-01-05

    Monoclonal Ig light chains (LC) can be responsible for pathologic conditions in humans, as in systemic amyloid light amyloidosis. Protean clinical manifestations characterize this disorder with the most varied combination of symptoms generated by different degrees of diverse organ involvement. Kidney and heart are most frequently interested, with major heart involvement as the most relevant prognostic factor. The identification of the underlying mechanism involved in organ targeting is of major relevance for the pathobiology of this disorder. To this aim, we characterized the repertoire of variable region germline genes of λ LC preferentially targeting the heart and compared it with the repertoire of LC that do not in a case-control study. We found that the repertoires were highly restricted, showing preferential use of the same few germline genes but with a different frequency pattern. A single gene, IGVL1-44, was found associated with a 5-fold increase in the odds of dominant heart involvement (after adjusting for confounders in a multivariable logistic model). These results support an involvement of LC genetics in the determination of organ targeting. Study of the characteristics of IGVL1-44-LC with, and of the minority without, heart involvement might lead to identification of LC/tissue interactions.

  17. The inhibitor of growth (ING) gene family: potential role in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, Mehmet; Gunduz, Esra; Rivera, Rosario S; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi

    2008-06-01

    The discovery of ING1 gene paved the way to the identification of other ING members (ING2-5) and their isoforms associated with cell cycle, apoptosis and senescence. The ING family has been an emerging putative tumor suppressor gene (TSG) in which the major mechanism is through interaction with the determinants of chromatin function and gene-specific transcription factors. The regulatory mechanism highly involves the conserved plant homeodomain (PHD), which binds to histones in a methylation-sensitive manner, suggesting that ING proteins may contribute to the maintenance of the epigenetic code. Furthermore, ING family members contain nuclear localization signals and N-terminal sequences important in the interaction with histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and histone deacetyltransferase (HDAC) that regulate gene promoter activity within chromatin. Although ING proteins have the same PHD motif, the variation in the N-terminal dictates the differences in tumor the suppressive ability of ING in various tumors. Inactivation of the normal function is achieved through allelic loss of genomic regions containing the ING gene, alteration in the ING promoter region, variation of mRNA splicing efficacy or reduced mRNA stability. It is most probably the apparent combination of these aberrant mechanisms that resulted in reduced availability of functional ING protein. In cancer cells, ING transcript levels are often suppressed but the genes are rarely mutated. The mechanism of suppression of ING expression may have to do with the abnormally high methylation levels of the ING gene promoter, which have been correlated with low transcript levels. Emerging evidence on the function of ING and related regulatory mechanisms strongly points to ING as a candidate TSG and therefore a potential target in the molecular therapy of some types of tumor.

  18. Potential of gene therapy as a treatment for heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Advances in understanding the molecular basis of myocardial dysfunction, together with the evolution of increasingly efficient gene transfer technology, make gene-based therapy a promising treatment option for heart conditions. Cardiovascular gene therapy has benefitted from recent advancements in vector technology, design, and delivery modalities. There is a critical need to explore new therapeutic approaches in heart failure, and gene therapy has emerged as a viable alternative. Advances in...

  19. Chronic Binge Alcohol Administration Dysregulates Hippocampal Genes Involved in Immunity and Neurogenesis in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Macaques

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    John K. Maxi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol use disorders (AUD exacerbate neurocognitive dysfunction in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV+ patients. We have shown that chronic binge alcohol (CBA administration (13–14 g EtOH/kg/wk prior to and during simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV infection in rhesus macaques unmasks learning deficits in operant learning and memory tasks. The underlying mechanisms of neurocognitive alterations due to alcohol and SIV are not known. This exploratory study examined the CBA-induced differential expression of hippocampal genes in SIV-infected (CBA/SIV+; n = 2 macaques in contrast to those of sucrose administered, SIV-infected (SUC/SIV+; n = 2 macaques. Transcriptomes of hippocampal samples dissected from brains obtained at necropsy (16 months post-SIV inoculation were analyzed to determine differentially expressed genes. MetaCore from Thomson Reuters revealed enrichment of genes involved in inflammation, immune responses, and neurodevelopment. Functional relevance of these alterations was examined in vitro by exposing murine neural progenitor cells (NPCs to ethanol (EtOH and HIV trans-activator of transcription (Tat protein. EtOH impaired NPC differentiation as indicated by decreased βIII tubulin expression. These findings suggest a role for neuroinflammation and neurogenesis in CBA/SIV neuropathogenesis and warrant further investigation of their potential contribution to CBA-mediated neurobehavioral deficits.

  20. Deletion of genes involved in glutamate metabolism to improve poly-gamma-glutamic acid production in B. amyloliquefaciens LL3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; He, Yulian; Gao, Weixia; Feng, Jun; Cao, Mingfeng; Yang, Chao; Song, Cunjiang; Wang, Shufang

    2015-02-01

    Here, we attempted to elevate poly-gamma-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) production by modifying genes involved in glutamate metabolism in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens LL3. Products of rocR, rocG and gudB facilitate the conversion from glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate in Bacillus subtillis. The gene odhA is responsible for the synthesis of a component of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate to succinyl coenzyme A. In-frame deletions of these four genes were performed. In shake flask experiments the gudB/rocG double mutant presented enhanced production of γ-PGA, a 38 % increase compared with wild type. When fermented in a 5-L fermenter with pH control, the γ-PGA yield of the rocR mutant was increased to 5.83 g/L from 4.55 g/L for shake flask experiments. The gudB/rocG double mutant produced 5.68 g/L γ-PGA compared with that of 4.03 g/L for the wild type, a 40 % increase. Those results indicated the possibility of improving γ-PGA production by modifying glutamate metabolism, and identified potential genetic targets to improve γ-PGA production.

  1. Evaluating HapMap SNP data transferability in a large-scale genotyping project involving 175 cancer-associated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, Gloria; González-Neira, Anna; Salas, Antonio; Milne, Roger L; Vega, Ana; Carracedo, Begoña; González, Emilio; Barroso, Eva; Fernández, Lara P; Yankilevich, Patricio; Robledo, Mercedes; Carracedo, Angel; Benítez, Javier

    2006-02-01

    One of the many potential uses of the HapMap project is its application to the investigation of complex disease aetiology among a wide range of populations. This study aims to assess the transferability of HapMap SNP data to the Spanish population in the context of cancer research. We have carried out a genotyping study in Spanish subjects involving 175 candidate cancer genes using an indirect gene-based approach and compared results with those for HapMap CEU subjects. Allele frequencies were very consistent between the two samples, with a high positive correlation (R) of 0.91 (PHapMap CEU data using pairwise r (2) thresholds of 0.8 and 0.5 was assessed by applying these to the Spanish and current HapMap data for 66 genes. In general, the HapMap tagSNPs performed very well. Our results show generally high concordance with HapMap data in allele frequencies and haplotype distributions and confirm the applicability of HapMap SNP data to the study of complex diseases among the Spanish population.

  2. Expression profiling identifies genes involved in neoplastic transformation of serous ovarian cancer

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    Green Adèle C

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The malignant potential of serous ovarian tumors, the most common ovarian tumor subtype, varies from benign to low malignant potential (LMP tumors to frankly invasive cancers. Given the uncertainty about the relationship between these different forms, we compared their patterns of gene expression. Methods Expression profiling was carried out on samples of 7 benign, 7 LMP and 28 invasive (moderate and poorly differentiated serous tumors and four whole normal ovaries using oligonucleotide microarrays representing over 21,000 genes. Results We identified 311 transcripts that distinguished invasive from benign tumors, and 20 transcripts that were significantly differentially expressed between invasive and LMP tumors at p SLPI and WNT7A and down-regulation of C6orf31, PDGFRA and GLTSCR2 were measured in invasive and LMP compared with benign and normal tissues. Over-expression of WNT7A in an ovarian cancer cell line led to increased migration and invasive capacity. Conclusion These results highlight several genes that may play an important role across the spectrum of serous ovarian tumorigenesis.

  3. Class I BASIC PENTACYSTEINE factors regulate HOMEOBOX genes involved in meristem size maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonini, Sara; Kater, Martin M

    2014-04-01

    The BASIC PENTACYSTEINE (BCP) family is a poorly characterized plant transcription factor family of GAGA BINDING PROTEINS. In Arabidopsis, there are seven members (BPC1-7) that are broadly expressed, and they can potentially bind more than 3000 Arabidopsis GAGA-repeat-containing genes. To date, BPCs are known to be direct regulators of the INNER NO OUTER (INO), SEEDSTICK (STK), and LEAFY COTYLEDON 2 (LEC2) genes. Because of the high functional redundancy, neither single knockout nor double bpc mutant combinations cause aberrant phenotypes. The bpc1-2 bpc2 bpc3 triple mutant shows several pleiotropic developmental defects, including enlargement of the inflorescence meristem and flowers with supernumerary floral organs. Here, we demonstrated through expression analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays that this phenotype is probably due to deregulation of the expression of the SHOOTMERISTEMLESS (STM) and BREVIPEDICELLUS/KNAT1 (BP) genes, which are both direct targets of BPCs. Moreover, we assigned a role to BPCs in the fine regulation of the cytokinin content in the meristem, as both ISOPENTENYLTRANSFERASE 7 (IPT7) and ARABIDOPSIS RESPONSE REGULATOR 7 (ARR7) genes were shown to be overexpressed in the bpc1-2 bpc2 bpc3 triple mutant.

  4. Gene delivery with cationic lipids : fundamentals and potential applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wasungu, Luc Bakomma

    2006-01-01

    Principle of gene therapy. Although the objectives and principles of gene therapy have been well-defined over the last decades, its application as a versatile, therapeutically successful approach has not yet met expectations. At the onset, the primary goal of gene therapy was to replace a deficient

  5. Gene delivery with cationic lipids : fundamentals and potential applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wasungu, Luc Bakomma

    2006-01-01

    Principle of gene therapy. Although the objectives and principles of gene therapy have been well-defined over the last decades, its application as a versatile, therapeutically successful approach has not yet met expectations. At the onset, the primary goal of gene therapy was to replace a deficient

  6. Gene delivery with cationic lipids : fundamentals and potential applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wasungu, L.B.

    2006-01-01

    Principle of gene therapy.Although the objectives and principles of gene therapy have been well-defined over the last decades, its application as a versatile, therapeutically successful approach has not yet met expectations. At the onset, the primary goal of gene therapy was to replace a deficient g

  7. Identification of genes involved in the ACC-mediated control of root cell elongation in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Markakis Marios

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Along the root axis of Arabidopsis thaliana, cells pass through different developmental stages. In the apical meristem repeated cycles of division increase the numbers of cells. Upon leaving the meristem, these cells pass the transition zone where they are physiologically and mechanically prepared to undergo subsequent rapid elongation. During the process of elongation epidermal cells increase their length by 300% in a couple of hours. When elongation ceases, the cells acquire their final size, shape and functions (in the differentiation zone. Ethylene administered as its precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC is capable of inhibiting elongation in a concentration-dependent way. Using a microarray analysis, genes and/or processes involved in this elongation arrest are identified. Results Using a CATMA-microarray analysis performed on control and 3h ACC-treated roots, 240 differentially expressed genes were identified. Quantitative Real-Time RT-PCR analysis of the 10 most up and down regulated genes combined with literature search confirmed the accurateness of the analysis. This revealed that inhibition of cell elongation is, at least partly, caused by restricting the events that under normal growth conditions initiate elongation and by increasing the processes that normally stop cellular elongation at the end of the elongation/onset of differentiation zone. Conclusions ACC interferes with cell elongation in the Arabidopsis thaliana roots by inhibiting cells from entering the elongation process and by immediately stimulating the formation of cross-links in cell wall components, diminishing the remaining elongation capacity. From the analysis of the differentially expressed genes, it becomes clear that many genes identified in this response, are also involved in several other kind of stress responses. This suggests that many responses originate from individual elicitors, but that somewhere in the downstream

  8. A compendium of human genes regulating feeding behavior and body weight, its functional characterization and identification of GWAS genes involved in brain-specific PPI network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatieva, Elena V; Afonnikov, Dmitry A; Saik, Olga V; Rogaev, Evgeny I; Kolchanov, Nikolay A

    2016-12-22

    Obesity is heritable. It predisposes to many diseases. The objectives of this study were to create a compendium of genes relevant to feeding behavior (FB) and/or body weight (BW) regulation; to construct and to analyze networks formed by associations between genes/proteins; and to identify the most significant genes, biological processes/pathways, and tissues/organs involved in BW regulation. The compendium of genes controlling FB or BW includes 578 human genes. Candidate genes were identified from various sources, including previously published original research and review articles, GWAS meta-analyses, and OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man). All genes were ranked according to knowledge about their biological role in body weight regulation and classified according to expression patterns or functional characteristics. Substantial and overrepresented numbers of genes from the compendium encoded cell surface receptors, signaling molecules (hormones, neuropeptides, cytokines), transcription factors, signal transduction proteins, cilium and BBSome components, and lipid binding proteins or were present in the brain-specific list of tissue-enriched genes identified with TSEA tool. We identified 27 pathways from KEGG, REACTOME and BIOCARTA whose genes were overrepresented in the compendium. Networks formed by physical interactions or homological relationships between proteins or interactions between proteins involved in biochemical/signaling pathways were reconstructed and analyzed. Subnetworks and clusters identified by the MCODE tool included genes/proteins associated with cilium morphogenesis, signal transduction proteins (particularly, G protein-coupled receptors, kinases or proteins involved in response to insulin stimulus) and transcription regulation (particularly nuclear receptors). We ranked GWAS genes according to the number of neighbors in three networks and revealed 22 GWAS genes involved in the brain-specific PPI network. On the base of the most

  9. Molecular characterization of HIV-1 subtype C gp-120 regions potentially involved in virus adaptive mechanisms.

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    Alessandra Cenci

    Full Text Available The role of variable regions of HIV-1 gp120 in immune escape of HIV has been investigated. However, there is scant information on how conserved gp120 regions contribute to virus escaping. Here we have studied how molecular sequence characteristics of conserved C3, C4 and V3 regions of clade C HIV-1 gp120 that are involved in HIV entry and are target of the immune response, are modulated during the disease course. We found an increase of "shifting" putative N-glycosylation sites (PNGSs in the α2 helix (in C3 and in C4 and an increase of sites under positive selection pressure in the α2 helix during the chronic stage of disease. These sites are close to CD4 and to co-receptor binding sites. We also found a negative correlation between electric charges of C3 and V4 during the late stage of disease counteracted by a positive correlation of electric charges of α2 helix and V5 during the same stage. These data allow us to hypothesize possible mechanisms of virus escape involving constant and variable regions of gp120. In particular, new mutations, including new PNGSs occurring near the CD4 and CCR5 binding sites could potentially affect receptor binding affinity and shield the virus from the immune response.

  10. Involvement of fengycin-type lipopeptides in the multifaceted biocontrol potential of Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongena, Marc; Jacques, Philippe; Touré, Yacine; Destain, Jacqueline; Jabrane, Abdelhamid; Thonart, Philippe

    2005-11-01

    In this work, the potential of Bacillus subtilis strain M4 at protecting plants against fungal diseases was demonstrated in different pathosystems. We provide evidence for the role of secreted lipopeptides, and more particularly of fengycins, in the protective effect afforded by the strain against damping-off of bean seedlings caused by Pythium ultimum and against gray mold of apple in post-harvest disease. This role was demonstrated by the strong biocontrol activity of lipopeptide-enriched extracts and through the detection of inhibitory quantities of fengycins in infected tissues. Beside such a direct antagonism of the pathogen, we show that root pre-inoculation with M4 enabled the host plant to react more efficiently to subsequent pathogen infection on leaves. Fengycins could also be involved in this systemic resistance-eliciting effect of strain M4, as these molecules may induce the synthesis of plant phenolics involved in or derived from the defense-related phenylpropanoid metabolism. Much remains to be discovered about the mechanisms by which Bacillus spp suppress disease. Through this study on strain M4, we reinforce the interest in B. subtilis as a pathogen antagonist and plant defense-inducing agent. The secretion of cyclic fengycin-type lipopeptides may be tightly related to the expression of these two biocontrol traits.

  11. Copy number variants in extended autism spectrum disorder families reveal candidates potentially involved in autism risk.

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    Daria Salyakina

    Full Text Available Copy number variations (CNVs are a major cause of genetic disruption in the human genome with far more nucleotides being altered by duplications and deletions than by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. In the multifaceted etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs, CNVs appear to contribute significantly to our understanding of the pathogenesis of this complex disease. A unique resource of 42 extended ASD families was genotyped for over 1 million SNPs to detect CNVs that may contribute to ASD susceptibility. Each family has at least one avuncular or cousin pair with ASD. Families were then evaluated for co-segregation of CNVs in ASD patients. We identified a total of five deletions and seven duplications in eleven families that co-segregated with ASD. Two of the CNVs overlap with regions on 7p21.3 and 15q24.1 that have been previously reported in ASD individuals and two additional CNVs on 3p26.3 and 12q24.32 occur near regions associated with schizophrenia. These findings provide further evidence for the involvement of ICA1 and NXPH1 on 7p21.3 in ASD susceptibility and highlight novel ASD candidates, including CHL1, FGFBP3 and POUF41. These studies highlight the power of using extended families for gene discovery in traits with a complex etiology.

  12. MicroRNAs in Pancreatic Cancer: Involvement in Carcinogenesis and Potential Use for Diagnosis and Prognosis

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    Tereza Halkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is one of the most fatal malignancies with increasing incidence and high mortality. Possibilities for early diagnosis are limited and there is currently no efficient therapy. Molecular markers that have been introduced into diagnosis and treatment of other solid tumors remain unreciprocated in this disease. Recent discoveries have shown that certain microRNAs (miRNAs take part in fundamental molecular processes associated with pancreatic cancer initiation and progression including cell cycle, DNA repair, apoptosis, invasivity, and metastasis. The mechanism involves both positive and negative regulation of expression of protooncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Various miRNAs are expressed at different levels among normal pancreatic tissue, chronic pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer and may therefore serve as a tool to differentiate chronic pancreatitis from early stages of cancer. Other miRNAs can indicate the probable course of the disease or determine the survival prognosis. In addition, there is a growing interest directed at the understanding of miRNA-induced molecular mechanisms. The possibility of intervention in the molecular mechanisms of miRNAs regulation could begin a new generation of pancreatic cancer therapies. This review summarizes the recent reports describing functions of miRNAs in cellular processes underlying pancreatic cancerogenesis and their utility in diagnosis, survival prognosis, and therapy.

  13. Transcriptome analysis reveals candidate genes involved in luciferin metabolism in Luciola aquatilis (Coleoptera: Lampyridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongsangnak, Wanwipa; Chumnanpuen, Pramote

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence, which living organisms such as fireflies emit light, has been studied extensively for over half a century. This intriguing reaction, having its origins in nature where glowing insects can signal things such as attraction or defense, is now widely used in biotechnology with applications of bioluminescence and chemiluminescence. Luciferase, a key enzyme in this reaction, has been well characterized; however, the enzymes involved in the biosynthetic pathway of its substrate, luciferin, remains unsolved at present. To elucidate the luciferin metabolism, we performed a de novo transcriptome analysis using larvae of the firefly species, Luciola aquatilis. Here, a comparative analysis is performed with the model coleopteran insect Tribolium casteneum to elucidate the metabolic pathways in L. aquatilis. Based on a template luciferin biosynthetic pathway, combined with a range of protein and pathway databases, and various prediction tools for functional annotation, the candidate genes, enzymes, and biochemical reactions involved in luciferin metabolism are proposed for L. aquatilis. The candidate gene expression is validated in the adult L. aquatilis using reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). This study provides useful information on the bio-production of luciferin in the firefly and will benefit to future applications of the valuable firefly bioluminescence system. PMID:27761329

  14. Identification of gene expression patterns crucially involved in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and multiple sclerosis

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    Martin M. Herrmann

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available After encounter with a central nervous system (CNS-derived autoantigen, lymphocytes leave the lymph nodes and enter the CNS. This event leads only rarely to subsequent tissue damage. Genes relevant to CNS pathology after cell infiltration are largely undefined. Myelin-oligodendrocyte-glycoprotein (MOG-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE is an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS, a chronic autoimmune disease of the CNS that results in disability. To assess genes that are involved in encephalitogenicity and subsequent tissue damage mediated by CNS-infiltrating cells, we performed a DNA microarray analysis from cells derived from lymph nodes and eluted from CNS in LEW.1AV1 (RT1av1 rats immunized with MOG 91-108. The data was compared to immunizations with adjuvant alone or naive rats and to immunizations with the immunogenic but not encephalitogenic MOG 73-90 peptide. Here, we show involvement of Cd38, Cxcr4 and Akt and confirm these findings by the use of Cd38-knockout (B6.129P2-Cd38tm1Lnd/J mice, S1P-receptor modulation during EAE and quantitative expression analysis in individuals with MS. The hereby-defined underlying pathways indicate cellular activation and migration pathways mediated by G-protein-coupled receptors as crucial events in CNS tissue damage. These pathways can be further explored for novel therapeutic interventions.

  15. RPL1, a Gene Involved in Epigenetic Processes Regulates Phenotypic Plasticity in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui-Cui Zhang; Wen-Ya Yuan; Qi-Fa Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Organisms can adjust their phenotype in response to changing environmental conditions.This phenomenon is termed phenotypic plasticity.Despite its ubiquitous occurrence,there has been very little study on the molecular mechanism of phenotypic plasticity.In this study,we isolated a rice (Oryza sativa L.) mutant,rice plasticity 1 (rpl1),that displayed increased environment-dependent phenotypic variations.RPL1 was expressed in all tissues examined.The protein was localized in the nucleus and its distribution in the nucleus overlapped with heterochromatin.The rpl1 mutation led to an increase in DNA methylation on repetitive sequences and a decrease in overall histone acetylation.In addition,the mutation affected responses of the rice plant to phytohormones such as brassinosteroid,gibberellin,and cytokinin.Analysis of the putative rice brassinosteroid receptor OsBRI1,a key hormone signaling gene,indicated that RPL1 may be involved in the regulation of epigenomic modification of the gene.These data suggest that RPL1 regulated phenotypic plasticity likely through its involvement in epigenetic processes affecting responses of the plant to phytohormones.

  16. Involvement of Multiple Gene-Silencing Pathways in a Paramutation-like Phenomenon in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin Zheng

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Paramutation is an epigenetic phenomenon that has been observed in a number of multicellular organisms. The epigenetically silenced state of paramutated alleles is not only meiotically stable but also “infectious” to active homologous alleles. The molecular mechanism of paramutation remains unclear, but components involved in RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM are required. Here, we report a multi-copy pRD29A-LUC transgene in Arabidopsis thaliana that behaves like a paramutation locus. The silent state of LUC is induced by mutations in the DNA glycosylase gene ROS1. The silent alleles of LUC are not only meiotically stable but also able to transform active LUC alleles into silent ones, in the absence of ros1 mutations. Maintaining silencing at the LUC gene requires action of multiple pathways besides RdDM. Our study identified specific factors that are involved in the paramutation-like phenomenon and established a model system for the study of paramutation in Arabidopsis.

  17. Fetal Globin Gene Inducers: Novel Agents & New Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrine, Susan P.; Castaneda, Serguei A.; Chui, David H.; Faller, Douglas V.; Berenson, Ronald J.; Fucharoen, Suthat

    2013-01-01

    Inducing expression of endogenous fetal globin (γ-globin) gene expression to 60-70% of alpha globin synthesis produces β-thalassemia trait globin synthetic ratios and can reduce anemia to a mild level. Several classes of therapeutics have induced γ-globin expression in beta thalassemia patients and subsequently raised total hemoglobin levels, demonstrating proof-of-concept of the approach. Butyrate treatment eliminated transfusion requirements in formerly transfusion-dependent patients with treatment for as long as 7 years. However, prior generations were not readily applicable for widespread use. Currently, a novel oral dual-action therapeutic sodium 2,2-dimethylbutyrate is in clinical trials, an oral decitabine formulation is under development, and agents with complementary mechanisms of action can be applied in combined regimens. Identification of 3 major genetic trait loci which modulate clinical severity provides avenues for developing tailored regimens. These refinements offer renewed potential to apply fetal globin induction as a treatment approach in patient-friendly regimens that can be used world-wide. PMID:20712788

  18. Cloning and Characterization of Farnesyl Diphosphate Synthase Gene Involved in Triterpenoids Biosynthesis from Poria cocos

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    Jianrong Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Poria cocos (P. cocos has long been used as traditional Chinese medicine and triterpenoids are the most important pharmacologically active constituents of this fungus. Farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (FPS is a key enzyme of triterpenoids biosynthesis. The gene encoding FPS was cloned from P. cocos by degenerate PCR, inverse PCR and cassette PCR. The open reading frame of the gene is 1086 bp in length, corresponding to a predicted polypeptide of 361 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 41.2 kDa. Comparison of the P. cocos FPS deduced amino acid sequence with other species showed the highest identity with Ganoderma lucidum (74%. The predicted P. cocos FPS shares at least four conserved regions involved in the enzymatic activity with the FPSs of varied species. The recombinant protein was expressed in Pichia pastoris and purified. Gas chromatography analysis showed that the recombinant FPS could catalyze the formation of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP from geranyl diphosphate (GPP and isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP. Furthermore, the expression profile of the FPS gene and content of total triterpenoids under different stages of development and methyl jasmonate treatments were determined. The results indicated that there is a positive correlation between the activity of FPS and the amount of total triterpenoids produced in P. cocos.

  19. Genes and quantitative genetic variation involved with senescence in cells, organs and the whole plant

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    Benoit ePujol

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Senescence, the deterioration of morphological, physiological and reproductive functions with age that ends with the death of the organism, was widely studied in plants. Genes were identified that are linked to the deterioration of cells, organs and the whole plant. It is however unclear whether those genes are the source of age dependent deterioration or get activated to regulate such deterioration. Furthermore, it is also unclear whether such genes are active as a direct consequence of age or because they are specifically involved in some developmental stages. At the individual level, it is the relationship between quantitative genetic variation and age that can be used to detect the genetic signature of senescence. Surprisingly, the latter approach was only scarcely applied to plants. This may be the consequence of the demanding requirements for such approaches and/or the fact that most research interest was directed towards plants that avoid senescence. Here, I review those aspects in turn and call for an integrative genetic theory of senescence in plants. Such conceptual development would have implications for the management of plant genetic resources and generate progress on fundamental questions raised by ageing research.

  20. Cloning and characterization of farnesyl diphosphate synthase gene involved in triterpenoids biosynthesis from Poria cocos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianrong; Li, Yangyuan; Liu, Danni

    2014-12-02

    Poria cocos (P. cocos) has long been used as traditional Chinese medicine and triterpenoids are the most important pharmacologically active constituents of this fungus. Farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (FPS) is a key enzyme of triterpenoids biosynthesis. The gene encoding FPS was cloned from P. cocos by degenerate PCR, inverse PCR and cassette PCR. The open reading frame of the gene is 1086 bp in length, corresponding to a predicted polypeptide of 361 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 41.2 kDa. Comparison of the P. cocos FPS deduced amino acid sequence with other species showed the highest identity with Ganoderma lucidum (74%). The predicted P. cocos FPS shares at least four conserved regions involved in the enzymatic activity with the FPSs of varied species. The recombinant protein was expressed in Pichia pastoris and purified. Gas chromatography analysis showed that the recombinant FPS could catalyze the formation of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) from geranyl diphosphate (GPP) and isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). Furthermore, the expression profile of the FPS gene and content of total triterpenoids under different stages of development and methyl jasmonate treatments were determined. The results indicated that there is a positive correlation between the activity of FPS and the amount of total triterpenoids produced in P. cocos.

  1. Arsenate induces the expression of fungal genes involved in As transport in arbuscular mycorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Chávez, Ma del Carmen A; Ortega-Larrocea, María del Pilar; Carrillo-González, Rogelio; López-Meyer, Melina; Xoconostle-Cázares, Beatriz; Gomez, Susana K; Harrison, Maria J; Figueroa-López, Alejandro Miguel; Maldonado-Mendoza, Ignacio E

    2011-12-01

    We utilized the two-compartment system to study the effect of arsenic (As) on the expression of the Glomus intraradices high-affinity phosphate transporter GiPT, and the GiArsA gene, a novel protein with a possible putative role as part of an arsenite efflux pump and similar to ArsA ATPase. Our results show that induction of GiPT expression correlates with As(V) uptake in the extra-radical mycelium of G. intraradices. We showed a time-concerted induction of transcript levels first of GiPT, followed by GiArsA, as well as the location of gene expression using laser microdissection of these two genes not only in the extra-radical mycelium but also in arbuscules. This work represents the first report showing the dissection of the molecular players involved in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF)-mediated As tolerance in plants, and suggests that tolerance mediated by AMF may be caused by an As exclusion mechanism, where fungal structures such as the extra-radical mycelium and arbuscules may be playing an important role. Our results extend knowledge of the mechanisms underlying As efflux in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and mechanisms related to As tolerance. Copyright © 2011 British Mycological Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Bioinformatics Analysis for Coding SNPs of the HLADQA1 Gene Involved in Susceptibility to Cervical Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanyun Li; Jun Xing; Linsheng Zhao; Yanni Li; Yuchuan Wang; Weiming Zhang

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze coding SNPs of the HLA-DQA1 gene involved in susceptibility for cervical cancer by a bioinformatics approach, and to choose some SNPs that may have an association with cervical cancer.METHODS By a SNPper tool we extracted SNPs from a public database (dbSNP), exporting them in FASTA formats suitable for subsequent use.Then we used PARSESNP as a tool for the analysis of the cSNPs.RESULTS In the cSNPs of the HLA-DQA1 gene, we find that rs9272693and rs9272703, are made up of missense mutations which convert a codon for one amino acid into a codon for a different amino acid. We chose a PSSM Difference >10 as a lower level for the scores of changes predicted to be deldterious.CONCLUSION We used a bioinformatics approach for cSNPs analysis of the HLA-DQA1 gene. This method can select the variants in a conserved region, and give a PSSM Difference score. But the results need to be verified in cervical cancer patients and a control population.

  3. An ENU mutagenesis screen identifies novel and known genes involved in epigenetic processes in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daxinger, Lucia; Harten, Sarah K; Oey, Harald; Epp, Trevor; Isbel, Luke; Huang, Edward; Whitelaw, Nadia; Apedaile, Anwyn; Sorolla, Anabel; Yong, Joan; Bharti, Vandhana; Sutton, Joanne; Ashe, Alyson; Pang, Zhenyi; Wallace, Nathan; Gerhardt, Daniel J; Blewitt, Marnie E; Jeddeloh, Jeffrey A; Whitelaw, Emma

    2013-01-01

    We have used a sensitized ENU mutagenesis screen to produce mouse lines that carry mutations in genes required for epigenetic regulation. We call these lines Modifiers of murine metastable epialleles (Mommes). We report a basic molecular and phenotypic characterization for twenty of the Momme mouse lines, and in each case we also identify the causative mutation. Three of the lines carry a mutation in a novel epigenetic modifier, Rearranged L-myc fusion (Rlf), and one gene, Rap-interacting factor 1 (Rif1), has not previously been reported to be involved in transcriptional regulation in mammals. Many of the other lines are novel alleles of known epigenetic regulators. For two genes, Rlf and Widely-interspaced zinc finger (Wiz), we describe the first mouse mutants. All of the Momme mutants show some degree of homozygous embryonic lethality, emphasizing the importance of epigenetic processes. The penetrance of lethality is incomplete in a number of cases. Similarly ,abnormalities in phenotype seen in the heterozygous individuals of some lines occur with incomplete penetrance. Recent advances in sequencing enhance the power of sensitized mutagenesis screens to identify the function of previously uncharacterized factors and to discover additional functions for previously characterized proteins. The observation of incomplete penetrance of phenotypes in these inbred mutant mice, at various stages of development, is of interest. Overall, the Momme collection of mouse mutants provides a valuable resource for researchers across many disciplines.

  4. Association between age at diagnosis of Graves' disease and variants in genes involved in immune response.

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    Beata Jurecka-Lubieniecka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Graves' disease (GD is a complex disease in which genetic predisposition is modified by environmental factors. The aim of the study was to examine the association between genetic variants in genes encoding proteins involved in immune response and the age at diagnosis of GD. METHODS: 735 GD patients and 1216 healthy controls from Poland were included into the study. Eight genetic variants in the HLA-DRB1, TNF, CTLA4, CD40, NFKb, PTPN22, IL4 and IL10 genes were genotyped. Patients were stratified by the age at diagnosis of GD and the association with genotype was analysed. RESULTS: Polymorphism in the HLA-DRB1, TNF and CTLA4 genes were associated with GD. The carriers of the HLA DRB1*03 allele were more frequent in patients with age at GD diagnosis ≤30 years than in patients with older age at GD diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: HLADRB1*03 allele is associated with young age at diagnosis of Graves' disease in Polish population.

  5. Gene expression modulation and the molecular mechanisms involved in Nelfinavir resistance in Leishmania donovani axenic amastigotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pranav; Lodge, Robert; Raymond, Frédéric; Ritt, Jean-François; Jalaguier, Pascal; Corbeil, Jacques; Ouellette, Marc; Tremblay, Michel J

    2013-08-01

    Drug resistance is a major public health challenge in leishmaniasis chemotherapy, particularly in the case of emerging Leishmania/HIV-1 co-infections. We have delineated the mechanism of cell death induced by the HIV-1 protease inhibitor, Nelfinavir, in the Leishmania parasite. In order to further study Nelfinavir-Leishmania interactions, we selected Nelfinavir-resistant axenic amastigotes in vitro and characterized them. RNA expression profiling analyses and comparative genomic hybridizations of closely related Leishmania species were used as a screening tool to compare Nelfinavir-resistant and -sensitive parasites in order to identify candidate genes involved in drug resistance. Microarray analyses of Nelfinavir-resistant and -sensitive Leishmania amastigotes suggest that parasites regulate mRNA levels either by modulating gene copy numbers through chromosome aneuploidy, or gene deletion/duplication by homologous recombination. Interestingly, supernumerary chromosomes 6 and 11 in the resistant parasites lead to upregulation of the ABC class of transporters. Transporter assays using radiolabelled Nelfinavir suggest a greater drug accumulation in the resistant parasites and in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, high-resolution electron microscopy and measurements of intracellular polyphosphate levels showed an increased number of cytoplasmic vesicular compartments known as acidocalcisomes in Nelfinavir-resistant parasites. Together these results suggest that Nelfinavir is rapidly and dramatically sequestered in drug-induced intracellular vesicles.

  6. Candidate genes involved in the biosynthesis of triterpenoid saponins in Platycodon grandiflorum identified by transcriptome analysis

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    Chunhua eMa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Platycodon grandiflorum is the only species in the genus Platycodon of the family Campanulaceae, which has been traditionally used as a medicinal plant for its lung-heat-clearing, antitussive, and expectorant properties in China, Japanese and Korean. Oleanane-type triterpenoid saponins were the main chemical components of P. grandiflorum and platycodin D was the abundant and main bioactive component, but little is known about their biosynthesis in plants. Hence, P. grandiflorum is an ideal medicinal plant for studying the biosynthesis of Oleanane-type saponins. In addition, the genomic information of this important herbal plant is unavailable.Principal Findings:A total of 58,580,566 clean reads were obtained, which were assembled into 34,053 unigenes, with an average length of 936 bp and N50 of 1,661 bp by analyzing the transcriptome data of P. grandiflorum. Among these 34,053 unigenes, 22,409 unigenes (65.80% were annotated based on the information available from public databases, including Nr, NCBI, Swiss-Prot, KOG and KEGG. Furthermore, 21 candidate cytochrome P450 genes and 17 candidate UDP-glycosyltransferase genes most likely involved in triterpenoid saponins biosynthesis pathway were discovered from the transcriptome sequencing of P. grandiflorum. In addition, 10,626 SSRs were identified based on the transcriptome data, which would provide abundant candidates of molecular markers for genetic diversity and genetic map for this medicinal plant.Conclusion:The genomic data obtained from P. grandiflorum, especially the identification of putative genes involved in triterpenoid saponins biosynthesis pathway, will facilitate our understanding of the biosynthesis of triterpenoid saponins at molecular level.

  7. Human reporter genes: potential use in clinical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serganova, Inna [Department of Neurology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Ponomarev, Vladimir [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Blasberg, Ronald [Department of Neurology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States)], E-mail: blasberg@neuro1.mskcc.org

    2007-10-15

    The clinical application of positron-emission-tomography-based reporter gene imaging will expand over the next several years. The translation of reporter gene imaging technology into clinical applications is the focus of this review, with emphasis on the development and use of human reporter genes. Human reporter genes will play an increasingly more important role in this development, and it is likely that one or more reporter systems (human gene and complimentary radiopharmaceutical) will take leading roles. Three classes of human reporter genes are discussed and compared: receptors, transporters and enzymes. Examples of highly expressed cell membrane receptors include specific membrane somatostatin receptors (hSSTrs). The transporter group includes the sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) and the norepinephrine transporter (hNET). The endogenous enzyme classification includes human mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 (hTK2). In addition, we also discuss the nonhuman dopamine 2 receptor and two viral reporter genes, the wild-type herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene and the HSV1-tk mutant (HSV1-sr39tk). Initial applications of reporter gene imaging in patients will be developed within two different clinical disciplines: (a) gene therapy and (b) adoptive cell-based therapies. These studies will benefit from the availability of efficient human reporter systems that can provide critical monitoring information for adenoviral-based, retroviral-based and lenteviral-based gene therapies, oncolytic bacterial and viral therapies, and adoptive cell-based therapies. Translational applications of noninvasive in vivo reporter gene imaging are likely to include: (a) quantitative monitoring of gene therapy vectors for targeting and transduction efficacy in clinical protocols by imaging the location, extent and duration of transgene expression; (b) monitoring of cell trafficking, targeting, replication and activation in adoptive T-cell and stem/progenitor cell therapies

  8. Possible involvement of plasmin in long-term potentiation of rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, A; Saito, H; Matsuki, N

    1996-11-11

    Effects of proteases and protease inhibitors on generation of long-term potentiation (LTP) were investigated in the CA1 and dentate regions of rat hippocampus. Plasmin, a serine protease, and its precursor plasminogen significantly enhanced short-term potentiation (STP) induced by a weak tetanic stimulation, without affecting basal responses. The STP-enhancing effect of plasmin disappeared by concomitant perfusion of alpha 2-antiplasmin, an endogenous plasmin inhibitor. Other proteases, such as thrombin, trypsin and cathepsin B, did not affect STP. On the other hand, alpha 2-antiplasmin and leupeptin significantly attenuated LTP induced by a strong tetanus though plasminogen or plasmin itself did not influence LTP. Furthermore, plasminogen and plasmin did not affect NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic responses in the absence of extracellular Mg2+. These results suggest that endogenous plasmin is involved in the mechanism of LTP in CA1 and dentate regions of rat hippocampus and that the STP-enhancing effect of plasmin is independent of NMDA receptors.

  9. The impact of emotional involvement on online service buying decisions: an event-related potentials perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meina; Wang, Jing; Han, Weiwei

    2015-12-02

    When examining a buying process, changes in human brain signals and their event-related potential (ERP) components can be considered a reflection of the consumers' emotions. In this experiment, participants were shown 12 products and related services that were available for purchase. After recording ERP components, we used a questionnaire to measure the individuals' emotional involvement toward the services (i.e. the same services shown in the stimuli) of the 12 products to measure the emotional valence of the services. The emotional ERP components and the late positive potential (LPP) were elicited under the service conditions and distributed over the left frontal regions. We determined that the services may evoke an LPP and that services with a high emotional value may evoke a larger LPP, which suggests that positive emotion may be measured using the LPP amplitude in the left frontal regions. This result helps elucidate whether positive emotions are stimulated during the product-service system decision-making process and helps understand the emotional valences of different services. Our analysis of the emotional motivation of the consumer suggests that the LPP may be useful as an emotional indicator for measuring consumers' evaluation of services that provides a neural view of product-service system buying decisions.

  10. Vimentin is involved in regulation of mitochondrial motility and membrane potential by Rac1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena A. Matveeva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study we show that binding of mitochondria to vimentin intermediate filaments (VIF is regulated by GTPase Rac1. The activation of Rac1 leads to a redoubling of mitochondrial motility in murine fibroblasts. Using double-mutants Rac1(G12V, F37L and Rac1(G12V, Y40H that are capable to activate different effectors of Rac1, we show that mitochondrial movements are regulated through PAK1 kinase. The involvement of PAK1 kinase is also confirmed by the fact that expression of its auto inhibitory domain (PID blocks the effect of activated Rac1 on mitochondrial motility. The observed effect of Rac1 and PAK1 kinase on mitochondria depends on phosphorylation of the Ser-55 of vimentin. Besides the effect on motility Rac1 activation also decreases the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP which is detected by ∼20% drop of the fluorescence intensity of mitochondria stained with the potential sensitive dye TMRM. One of important consequences of the discovered regulation of MMP by Rac1 and PAK1 is a spatial differentiation of mitochondria in polarized fibroblasts: at the front of the cell they are less energized (by ∼25% than at the rear part.

  11. Prolactin regulatory element-binding protein is involved in suppression of the adiponectin gene in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X Z; Imachi, H; Lyu, J Y; Fukunaga, K; Sato, S; Ibata, T; Kobayashi, T; Yoshimoto, T; Kikuchi, F; Dong, T; Murao, K

    2017-04-01

    Prolactin regulatory element-binding protein (PREB), a member of the WD-repeat protein family, has been recognized as a transcriptional factor that regulates prolactin promoter activity in the anterior pituitary of rats. PREB is expressed not only in the pituitary but also in various other tissues, including the adipose tissue. Previous studies have shown that PREB acts as a transcriptional regulator and suppresses the expression of the adiponectin gene in cultured 3T3L1 preadipocytes. The aim of this study was to further examine the potential role of PREB in adipose tissue in vivo. Transgenic mice that overexpressing PREB (PREB transgenic mice) were generated. Insulin resistance was evaluated in PREB transgenic mice using glucose and insulin tolerance tests. Adiponectin expression in the adipose tissue was examined by western blot analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The expression levels of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (Scd) and adiponectin receptor 2(ADIPOR2) were quantified by qPCR. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests revealed insulin resistance in PREB transgenic mice. Serum adiponectin and leptin concentrations were decreased. Adiponectin gene expression was decreased in the adipose tissue, which was confirmed by the downregulation of the adiponectin-dependent hepatic Scd gene and upregulation of the ADIPOR2 gene in the liver of PREB transgenic mice. We also found that pioglitazone, an agonist for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-r, improved the insulin resistance in the PREB transgenic mice after a 10-day feeding period. These results demonstrated that PREB might contribute to the regulation of adiponectin gene expression in vivo.

  12. Polymorphisms in genes involved in EGFR-turnover are predictive for cetuximab efficacy in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stintzing, Sebastian; Zhang, Wu; Heinemann, Volker; Neureiter, Daniel; Kemmerling, Ralf; Kirchner, Thomas; Jung, Andreas; Folwaczny, Matthias; Yang, Dongyun; Ning, Yan; Sebio, Ana; Stremitzer, Stefan; Sunakawa, Yu; Matsusaka, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Shinichi; Loupakis, Fotios; Cremolini, Chiara; Falcone, Alfredo; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2015-01-01

    Transmembrane receptors such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are regulated by their turnover, which is dependent on the ubiquitin-proteasome-system (UPS). We tested in two independent study cohorts whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in EGFR turnover predict clinical outcome in cetuximab treated metastatic colorectal cancer patients. The following SNPs involved in EGFR degradation were analyzed in a screening cohort of 108 patients treated with cetuximab in the chemorefractory setting: c-CBL (rs7105971; rs4938637; rs4938638; rs251837), EPS15 (rs17567; rs7308; rs1065754), NAE1 (rs363169; rs363170; rs363172); SH3KBP1 (rs7051590; rs5955820; rs1017874; rs11795873); SGIP1 (rs604737; rs6570808; rs7526812); UBE2M (rs895364; rs895374); UBE2L3 (rs5754216). SNPs showing an association with response or survival were analyzed in BRAF and RAS wild-type samples from the FIRE-3 study. 153 FOLFIRI plus cetuximab treated patients served as validation set, 168 patients of the FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab arm served as controls. EGFR FISH was done in 138 samples to test whether significant SNPs were associated with EGFR expression. UBE2M rs895374 was significantly associated with PFS (logrank-p = 0.005; HR 0.60) within cetuximab treated patients. No association with bevacizumab treated patients (n=168) could be established (p= 0.56, HR: 0.90). rs895374 genotype did not affect EGFR FISH measurements. EGFR recycling is an interesting mechanism of secondary resistance to cetuximab in mCRC. This is the first report suggesting that germline polymorphisms in the degradation process predict efficacy of cetuximab in patients with mCRC. Genes involved in EGFR turnover may be new targets in the treatment of mCRC. PMID:26206335

  13. Identification of pathogenic factors potentially involved in Staphylococcus aureus keratitis using proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shamila; Cole, Nerida; Hume, Emma B H; Garthwaite, Linda L; Nguyen-Khuong, Terry; Walsh, Bradley J; Willcox, Mark D P

    2016-10-01

    Staphylococcus is a leading cause of microbial keratitis, characterized by destruction of the cornea by bacterial exoproteins and host-associated factors. The aim of this study was to compare extracellular and cell-associated proteins produced by two different isolates of S. aureus, a virulent clinical isolate (Staph 38) and a laboratory strain (Staphylococcus aureus 8325-4) of weaker virulence in the mouse keratitis model. Proteins were analyzed using 2D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and identified by subsequent mass spectrometry. Activity of staphylococcal adhesins was assessed by allowing strains to bind to various proteins adsorbed onto polymethylmethacrylate squares. Thirteen proteins in the extracellular fraction and eight proteins in the cell-associated fractions after bacterial growth were produced in increased amounts in the clinical isolate Staph 38. Four of these proteins were S. aureus virulence factor adhesins, fibronectin binding protein A, staphopain, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 2 and extracellular adherence protein. The clinical isolate Staph 38 adhered to a greater extent to all mammalian proteins tested, indicating the potential of the adhesins to be active on its surface. Other proteins with increased expression in Staph 38 included potential moonlighting proteins and proteins involved in transcription or translation. This is the first demonstration of the proteome of S. aureus isolates from keratitis. These results indicate that the virulent clinical isolate produces more potentially important virulence factors compared to the less virulent laboratory strain and these may be associated with the ability of a S. aureus strain to cause more severe keratitis.

  14. Involvement of Three Esterase Genes from Panonychus citri (McGregor in Fenpropathrin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Min Shen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The citrus red mite, Panonychus citri (McGregor, is a major citrus pest with a worldwide distribution and an extensive record of pesticide resistance. However, the underlying molecular mechanism associated with fenpropathrin resistance in this species have not yet been reported. In this study, synergist triphenyl phosphate (TPP dramatically increased the toxicity of fenpropathrin, suggesting involvement of carboxylesterases (CarEs in the metabolic detoxification of this insecticide. The subsequent spatiotemporal expression pattern analysis of PcE1, PcE7 and PcE9 showed that three CarEs genes were all over-expressed after insecticide exposure and higher transcripts levels were observed in different field resistant strains of P. citri. Heterologous expression combined with 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetra-zolium bromide (MTT cytotoxicity assay in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9 cells revealed that PcE1-, PcE7- or PcE9-expressing cells showed significantly higher cytoprotective capability than parental Sf9 cells against fenpropathrin, demonstrating that PcEs probably detoxify fenpropathrin. Moreover, gene silencing through the method of leaf-mediated dsRNA feeding followed by insecticide bioassay increased the mortalities of fenpropathrin-treated mites by 31% (PcE1, 27% (PcE7 and 22% (PcE9, respectively, after individual PcE gene dsRNA treatment. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that PcE1, PcE7 and PcE9 are functional genes mediated in fenpropathrin resistance in P. citri and enrich molecular understanding of CarEs during the resistance development of the mite.

  15. Genes involved in alkane degradation in the Alcanivorax hongdengensis strain A-11-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wanpeng; Shao, Zongze

    2012-04-01

    Alcanivorax hongdengensis A-11-3 is a newly identified type strain isolated from the surface water of the Malacca and Singapore Straits that can degrade a wide range of alkanes. To understand the degradation mechanism of this strain, the genes encoding alkane hydroxylases were obtained by PCR screening and shotgun sequencing of a genomic fosmid library. Six genes involved in alkane degradation were found, including alkB1, alkB2, p450-1, p450-2, p450-3 and almA. Heterogeneous expression analysis confirmed their functions as alkane oxidases in Pseudomonas putida GPo12 (pGEc47ΔB) or Pseudomonas fluorescens KOB2Δ1. Q-PCR revealed that the transcription of alkB1 and alkB2 was enhanced in the presence of n-alkanes C(12) to C(24); three p450 genes were up-regulated by C(8)-C(16) n-alkanes at different levels, whereas enhanced expression of almA was observed when strain A-11-3 grew with long-chain alkanes (C(24) to C(36)). In the case of branched alkanes, pristane significantly enhanced the expression of alkB1, p450-3 and almA. The six genes enable strain A-11-3 to degrade short (C(8)) to long (C(36)) alkanes that are straight or branched. The ability of A. hongdengensis A-11-3 to thrive in oil-polluted marine environments may be due to this strain's multiple systems for alkane degradation and its range of substrates.

  16. Isolation of UmRrm75, a gene involved in dimorphism and virulence of Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Kessler, Margarita; Baeza-Montañez, Lourdes; García-Pedrajas, María D; Tapia-Moreno, Alejandro; Gold, Scott; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan F; Ruiz-Herrera, José

    2012-05-20

    Ustilago maydis displays dimorphic growth, alternating between a saprophytic haploid yeast form and a filamentous dikaryon, generated by mating of haploid cells and which is an obligate parasite. Induction of the dimorphic transition of haploid strains in vitro by change in ambient pH has been used to understand the mechanisms governing this differentiation process. In this study we used suppression subtractive hybridization to generate a cDNA library of U. maydis genes up-regulated in the filamentous form induced in vitro at acid pH. Expression analysis using quantitative RT-PCR showed that the induction of two unigenes identified in this library coincided with the establishment of filamentous growth in the acid pH medium. This expression pattern suggested that they were specifically associated to hyphal development rather than merely acid pH-induced genes. One of these genes, UmRrm75, encodes a protein containing three RNA recognition motifs and glycine-rich repeats and was selected for further study. The UmRrm75 gene contains 4 introns, and produces a splicing variant by a 3'-alternative splicing site within the third exon. Mutants deleted for UmRrm75 showed a slower growth rate than wild type strains in liquid and solid media, and their colonies showed a donut-like morphology on solid medium. Interestingly, although ΔUmRrm75 strains were not affected in filamentous growth induced by acid pH and oleic acid, they exhibited reduced mating, post-mating filamentous growth and virulence. Our data suggest that UmRrm75 is probably involved in cell growth, morphogenesis, and pathogenicity in U. maydis.

  17. Involvement of Three Esterase Genes from Panonychus citri (McGregor) in Fenpropathrin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiao-Min; Liao, Chong-Yu; Lu, Xue-Ping; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Jin-Jun; Dou, Wei

    2016-08-19

    The citrus red mite, Panonychus citri (McGregor), is a major citrus pest with a worldwide distribution and an extensive record of pesticide resistance. However, the underlying molecular mechanism associated with fenpropathrin resistance in this species have not yet been reported. In this study, synergist triphenyl phosphate (TPP) dramatically increased the toxicity of fenpropathrin, suggesting involvement of carboxylesterases (CarEs) in the metabolic detoxification of this insecticide. The subsequent spatiotemporal expression pattern analysis of PcE1, PcE7 and PcE9 showed that three CarEs genes were all over-expressed after insecticide exposure and higher transcripts levels were observed in different field resistant strains of P. citri. Heterologous expression combined with 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetra-zolium bromide (MTT) cytotoxicity assay in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells revealed that PcE1-, PcE7- or PcE9-expressing cells showed significantly higher cytoprotective capability than parental Sf9 cells against fenpropathrin, demonstrating that PcEs probably detoxify fenpropathrin. Moreover, gene silencing through the method of leaf-mediated dsRNA feeding followed by insecticide bioassay increased the mortalities of fenpropathrin-treated mites by 31% (PcE1), 27% (PcE7) and 22% (PcE9), respectively, after individual PcE gene dsRNA treatment. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that PcE1, PcE7 and PcE9 are functional genes mediated in fenpropathrin resistance in P. citri and enrich molecular understanding of CarEs during the resistance development of the mite.

  18. Genes involved in centrosome-independent mitotic spindle assembly in Drosophila S2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutinho-Pereira, Sara; Stuurman, Nico; Afonso, Olga; Hornsveld, Marten; Aguiar, Paulo; Goshima, Gohta; Vale, Ronald D; Maiato, Helder

    2013-12-01

    Animal mitotic spindle assembly relies on centrosome-dependent and centrosome-independent mechanisms, but their relative contributions remain unknown. Here, we investigated the molecular basis of the centrosome-independent spindle assembly pathway by performing a whole-genome RNAi screen in Drosophila S2 cells lacking functional centrosomes. This screen identified 197 genes involved in acentrosomal spindle assembly, eight of which had no previously described mitotic phenotypes and produced defective and/or short spindles. All 197 genes also produced RNAi phenotypes when centrosomes were present, indicating that none were entirely selective for the acentrosomal pathway. However, a subset of genes produced a selective defect in pole focusing when centrosomes were absent, suggesting that centrosomes compensate for this shape defect. Another subset of genes was specifically associated with the formation of multipolar spindles only when centrosomes were present. We further show that the chromosomal passenger complex orchestrates multiple centrosome-independent processes required for mitotic spindle assembly/maintenance. On the other hand, despite the formation of a chromosome-enriched RanGTP gradient, S2 cells depleted of RCC1, the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor for Ran on chromosomes, established functional bipolar spindles. Finally, we show that cells without functional centrosomes have a delay in chromosome congression and anaphase onset, which can be explained by the lack of polar ejection forces. Overall, these findings establish the constitutive nature of a centrosome-independent spindle assembly program and how this program is adapted to the presence/absence of centrosomes in animal somatic cells.

  19. Involvement of the leucine response transcription factor LeuO in regulation of the genes for sulfa drug efflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Ishihama, Akira

    2009-07-01

    LeuO, a LysR family transcription factor, exists in a wide variety of bacteria of the family Enterobacteriaceae and is involved in the regulation of as yet unidentified genes affecting the stress response and pathogenesis expression. Using genomic screening by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) in vitro, a total of 106 DNA sequences were isolated from 12 different regions of the Escherichia coli genome. All of the SELEX fragments formed complexes in vitro with purified LeuO. After Northern blot analysis of the putative target genes located downstream of the respective LeuO-binding sequence, a total of nine genes were found to be activated by LeuO, while three genes were repressed by LeuO. The LeuO target gene collection included several multidrug resistance genes. A phenotype microarray assay was conducted to identify the gene(s) responsible for drug resistance and the drug species that are under the control of the LeuO target gene(s). The results described herein indicate that the yjcRQP operon, one of the LeuO targets, is involved in sensitivity control against sulfa drugs. We propose to rename the yjcRQP genes the sdsRQP genes (sulfa drug sensitivity determinant).

  20. Inhibition of corticosteroid-binding globulin gene expression by glucocorticoids involves C/EBPβ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolette Verhoog

    Full Text Available Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG, a negative acute phase protein produced primarily in the liver, is responsible for the transport of glucocorticoids (GCs. It also modulates the bioavailability of GCs, as only free or unbound steroids are biologically active. Fluctuations in CBG levels therefore can directly affect GC bioavailability. This study investigates the molecular mechanism whereby GCs inhibit the expression of CBG. GCs regulate gene expression via the glucocorticoid receptor (GR, which either directly binds to DNA or acts indirectly via tethering to other DNA-bound transcription factors. Although no GC-response elements (GRE are present in the Cbg promoter, putative binding sites for C/EBPβ, able to tether to the GR, as well as HNF3α involved in GR signaling, are present. C/EBPβ, but not HNF3α, was identified as an important mediator of DEX-mediated inhibition of Cbg promoter activity by using specific deletion and mutant promoter reporter constructs of Cbg. Furthermore, knockdown of C/EBPβ protein expression reduced DEX-induced repression of CBG mRNA, confirming C/EBPβ's involvement in GC-mediated CBG repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP after DEX treatment indicated increased co-recruitment of C/EBPβ and GR to the Cbg promoter, while C/EBPβ knockdown prevented GR recruitment. Together, the results suggest that DEX repression of CBG involves tethering of the GR to C/EBPβ.

  1. Potential Genes for Regulation of Milk Protein Synthesis in Dairy Goat Mammary Gland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Dan; Zhang Na; Nan Xue-mei; Li Qing-zhang; Gao Xue-jun

    2016-01-01

    The lactating mammary gland is a prodigious protein-producing factory, but the milk protein synthesis mechanisms are not well understood. The major objective of this paper was to elucidate which genes and pathways were involved in the regulation of milk protein synthesis in the dairy goat mammary gland. Total 36 primiparous Guanzhong dairy goats were allotted in 12 groups according to their mammary development stages: days 90 and 150 of virgin, days 30, 90, and 150 of pregnancy, days 1, 10, 35, and 60 of lactation and days 3, 7, and 21 of involution (three animals per group). Mammary tissue RNA was isolated for quantitative real-time RT-PCR of four casein genes alpha-s1 casein (CSN1S1), alpha-s2 casein (CSN1S2), beta-casein (CSN2) and casein kappa (CSN3), four whey protein genes lactoglobulin (LGB), lactalbumin (LALBA), lactofarrin (LTF), and Whey acidic protein (WAP) and the genes which were potentially to regulate dairy goat milk protein synthesis at the level of transcription or translation [prolactin receptor (PRLR), AKT1, signal transducers and activators of transcription 5 (STAT5), E74-Like Factor 5 (ELF5), eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (EIF4E-BP1), S6kinase (S6K) and caveolin 1]. The results showed that all genes were up-regulated in lactation period. The expressions of PRLR, AKT1, STAT5, ELF5, and S6K were similar to mRNA expressions of milk proteins. Our results indicated that milk protein synthesis in dairy goat mammary gland was possibly regulated by these genes.

  2. The light gene of Drosophila melanogaster encodes a homologue of VPS41, a yeast gene involved in cellular-protein trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, T S; Sinclair, D A; Fitzpatrick, K A; Singh, M; Devlin, R H; Honda, B M

    1998-04-01

    Mutations in a number of genes affect eye colour in Drosophila melanogaster; some of these "eye-colour" genes have been shown to be involved in various aspects of cellular transport processes. In addition, combinations of viable mutant alleles of some of these genes, such as carnation (car) combined with either light (lt) or deep-orange (dor) mutants, show lethal interactions. Recently, dor was shown to be homologous to the yeast gene PEP3 (VPS18), which is known to be involved in intracellular trafficking. We have undertaken to extend our earlier work on the lt gene, in order to examine in more detail its expression pattern and to characterize its gene product via sequencing of a cloned cDNA. The gene appears to be expressed at relatively high levels in all stages and tissues examined, and shows strong homology to VPS41, a gene involved in cellular-protein trafficking in yeast and higher eukaryotes. Further genetic experiments also point to a role for lt in transport processes: we describe lethal interactions between viable alleles of lt and dor, as well as phenotypic interactions (reductions in eye pigment) between allels of lt and another eye-colour gene, garnet (g), whose gene product has close homology to a subunit of the human adaptor complex, AP-3.

  3. Genes involved in sex pheromone discrimination in Drosophila melanogaster and their background-dependent effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Houot

    Full Text Available Mate choice is based on the comparison of the sensory quality of potential mating partners, and sex pheromones play an important role in this process. In Drosophila melanogaster, contact pheromones differ between male and female in their content and in their effects on male courtship, both inhibitory and stimulatory. To investigate the genetic basis of sex pheromone discrimination, we experimentally selected males showing either a higher or lower ability to discriminate sex pheromones over 20 generations. This experimental selection was carried out in parallel on two different genetic backgrounds: wild-type and desat1 mutant, in which parental males showed high and low sex pheromone discrimination ability respectively. Male perception of male and female pheromones was separately affected during the process of selection. A comparison of transcriptomic activity between high and low discrimination lines revealed genes not only that varied according to the starting genetic background, but varied reciprocally. Mutants in two of these genes, Shaker and quick-to-court, were capable of producing similar effects on discrimination on their own, in some instances mimicking the selected lines, in others not. This suggests that discrimination of sex pheromones depends on genes whose activity is sensitive to genetic context and provides a rare, genetically defined example of the phenomenon known as "allele flips," in which interactions have reciprocal effects on different genetic backgrounds.

  4. Over half of breakpoints in gene pairs involved in cancer-specific recurrent translocations are mapped to human chromosomal fragile sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierce Levi CT

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene rearrangements such as chromosomal translocations have been shown to contribute to cancer development. Human chromosomal fragile sites are regions of the genome especially prone to breakage, and have been implicated in various chromosome abnormalities found in cancer. However, there has been no comprehensive and quantitative examination of the location of fragile sites in relation to all chromosomal aberrations. Results Using up-to-date databases containing all cancer-specific recurrent translocations, we have examined 444 unique pairs of genes involved in these translocations to determine the correlation of translocation breakpoints and fragile sites in the gene pairs. We found that over half (52% of translocation breakpoints in at least one gene of these gene pairs are mapped to fragile sites. Among these, we examined the DNA sequences within and flanking three randomly selected pairs of translocation-prone genes, and found that they exhibit characteristic features of fragile DNA, with frequent AT-rich flexibility islands and the potential of forming highly stable secondary structures. Conclusion Our study is the first to examine gene pairs involved in all recurrent chromosomal translocations observed in tumor cells, and to correlate the location of more than half of breakpoints to positions of known fragile sites. These results provide strong evidence to support a causative role for fragile sites in the generation of cancer-specific chromosomal rearrangements.

  5. A tandem sequence motif acts as a distance-dependent enhancer in a set of genes involved in translation by binding the proteins NonO and SFPQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roepcke Stefan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bioinformatic analyses of expression control sequences in promoters of co-expressed or functionally related genes enable the discovery of common regulatory sequence motifs that might be involved in co-ordinated gene expression. By studying promoter sequences of the human ribosomal protein genes we recently identified a novel highly specific Localized Tandem Sequence Motif (LTSM. In this work we sought to identify additional genes and LTSM-binding proteins to elucidate potential regulatory mechanisms. Results Genome-wide analyses allowed finding a considerable number of additional LTSM-positive genes, the products of which are involved in translation, among them, translation initiation and elongation factors, and 5S rRNA. Electromobility shift assays then showed specific signals demonstrating the binding of protein complexes to LTSM in ribosomal protein gene promoters. Pull-down assays with LTSM-containing oligonucleotides and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis identified the related multifunctional nucleotide binding proteins NonO and SFPQ in the binding complex. Functional characterization then revealed that LTSM enhances the transcriptional activity of the promoters in dependency of the distance from the transcription start site. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the power of bioinformatic analyses for the identification of biologically relevant sequence motifs. LTSM and the here found LTSM-binding proteins NonO and SFPQ were discovered through a synergistic combination of bioinformatic and biochemical methods and are regulators of the expression of a set of genes of the translational apparatus in a distance-dependent manner.

  6. Functional analysis of the gene cluster involved in production of the bacteriocin circularin A by Clostridium beijerinckii ATCC 25752

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemperman, R; Jonker, M; Nauta, A; Kuipers, OP; Kok, J

    2003-01-01

    A region of 12 kb flanking the structural gene of the cyclic antibacterial peptide circularin A of Clostridium beijerinckii ATCC 25752 was sequenced, and the putative proteins involved in the production and secretion of circularin A were identified. The genes are tightly organized in overlapping ope

  7. Cadmium-mediated disruption of cortisol biosynthesis involves suppression of corticosteroidogenic genes in rainbow trout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, Navdeep [Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Vijayan, Mathilakath M., E-mail: mvijayan@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2011-05-15

    Cadmium is widely distributed in the aquatic environment and is toxic to fish even at sublethal concentrations. This metal is an endocrine disruptor, and one well established role in teleosts is the suppression of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH)-stimulated cortisol biosynthesis by the interrenal tissue. However the mechanism(s) leading to this steroid suppression is poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that cadmium targets genes encoding proteins critical for corticosteroid biosynthesis, including melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). To test this, head kidney slices (containing the interrenal tissues) were incubated in vitro with cadmium chloride (0, 10, 100 and 1000 nM) for 4 h either in the presence or absence of ACTH (0.5 IU/mL). In the unstimulated head kidney slices, cadmium exposure did not affect basal cortisol secretion and the mRNA levels of MC2R and P450scc, while StAR gene expression was significantly reduced. Cadmium exposure significantly suppressed ACTH-stimulated cortisol production in a dose-related fashion. This cadmium-mediated suppression in corticosteroidogenesis corresponded with a significant reduction in MC2R, StAR and P450scc mRNA levels in trout head kidney slices. The inhibition of ACTH-stimulated cortisol production and suppression of genes involved in corticosteroidogenesis by cadmium were completely abolished in the presence of 8-Bromo-cAMP (a cAMP analog). Overall, cadmium disrupts the expression of genes critical for corticosteroid biosynthesis in rainbow trout head kidney slices. However, the rescue of cortisol production as well as StAR and P450scc gene expressions by cAMP analog suggests that cadmium impact occurs upstream of cAMP production. We propose that MC2R signaling, the primary step in ACTH-induced cortocosteroidogenesis, is a key target for cadmium-mediated disruption of

  8. Polymorphisms in genes involved in the estrogen pathway and mammographic density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumas Isabelle

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in genes involved in the estrogen pathway appear to be associated with breast cancer risk and possibly with mammographic density (MD, but little is known of these associations among premenopausal women. This study examines the association of 11 polymorphisms in five estrogen-related genes (estrogen receptors alpha and beta (ERα, ERβ, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (HSD17B1, catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT, cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1 with premenopausal MD. Effect modification of four estrogen-related factors (parity, age at menarche, hormonal derivatives use and body mass index (BMI on this relation is also assessed. Methods Polymorphisms were genotyped in 741 premenopausal Caucasian women whose MD was measured in absolute density (AD, cm2 and percent density using a computer-assisted method. Multivariate linear models were used to examine the associations (Ptrend and interactions (Pi. Results None of the SNPs showed a statistically significant association with AD. However, each additional rare allele of rs1056836 CYP1B1 was associated with a reduction in AD among nulliparous women (Ptrend = 0.004, while no association was observed among parous women (Ptrend = 0.62; Pi = 0.02. An increase in the number of rare alleles of the HSD17B1 SNP (rs598126 and rs2010750 was associated with an increase in AD among women who never used hormonal derivatives (Ptrend = 0.06 and Ptrend = 0.04, respectively, but with a decrease in AD among past hormonal derivatives users (Ptrend = 0.04; Pi = 0.02 and Ptrend = 0.08; Pi = 0.01, respectively. Moreover, a negative association of rs598126 HSD17B1 SNP with AD was observed among women with higher BMI (>median (Ptrend = 0.01; Pi = 0.02. A negative association between an increased number of rare alleles of COMT rs4680 SNP and AD was limited to women who never used hormonal derivatives (Ptrend = 0.02; Pi = 0.03 or with late age at menarche (>median

  9. Sphingolipids regulate telomere clustering by affecting the transcription of genes involved in telomere homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Atsuko; Muneoka, Tetsuya; Murakami, Suguru; Hirota, Ayaka; Yabuki, Yukari; Karashima, Takefumi; Nakazono, Kota; Tsuruno, Masahiro; Pichler, Harald; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Kodama, Yukiko; Shimamoto, Toshi; Mizuta, Keiko; Funato, Kouichi

    2015-07-15

    In eukaryotic organisms, including mammals, nematodes and yeasts, the ends of chromosomes, telomeres are clustered at the nuclear periphery. Telomere clustering is assumed to be functionally important because proper organization of chromosomes is necessary for proper genome function and stability. However, the mechanisms and physiological roles of telomere clustering remain poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate a role for sphingolipids in telomere clustering in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because abnormal sphingolipid metabolism causes downregulation of expression levels of genes involved in telomere organization, sphingolipids appear to control telomere clustering at the transcriptional level. In addition, the data presented here provide evidence that telomere clustering is required to protect chromosome ends from DNA-damage checkpoint signaling. As sphingolipids are found in all eukaryotes, we speculate that sphingolipid-based regulation of telomere clustering and the protective role of telomere clusters in maintaining genome stability might be conserved in eukaryotes.

  10. Early-Onset Alzheimer Disease and Candidate Risk Genes Involved in Endolysosomal Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkle, Brian W; Vardarajan, Badri N; Naj, Adam C; Whitehead, Patrice L; Rolati, Sophie; Slifer, Susan; Carney, Regina M; Cuccaro, Michael L; Vance, Jeffery M; Gilbert, John R; Wang, Li-San; Farrer, Lindsay A; Reitz, Christiane; Haines, Jonathan L; Beecham, Gary W; Martin, Eden R; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Mayeux, Richard P; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A

    2017-09-01

    gene RIN3 showed suggestive evidence of association with EOAD after Bonferroni correction (OR, 4.56; 95% CI, 1.26-16.48; P = .02, BP = 0.091). In addition, a missense variant in RUFY1 identified in 2 NHW EOAD cases showed suggestive evidence of an association with EOAD as well (OR, 18.63; 95% CI, 1.62-213.45; P = .003; BP = 0.129). The genes PSD2, TCIRG1, RIN3, and RUFY1 all may be involved in endolysosomal transport-a process known to be important to development of AD. Furthermore, this study identified shared risk genes between EOAD and LOAD similar to previously reported genes, such as SORL1, PSEN2, and TREM2.

  11. Identification of miRNAs Potentially Involved in Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome: A Computational Study.