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Sample records for genes exhibit unexpected

  1. The p53 cofactor Strap exhibits an unexpected TPR motif and oligonucleotide-binding (OB)-fold structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Cassandra J; Pike, Ashley C W; Maniam, Sandra; Sharpe, Timothy D; Coutts, Amanda S; Knapp, Stefan; La Thangue, Nicholas B; Bullock, Alex N

    2012-03-01

    Activation of p53 target genes for tumor suppression depends on the stress-specific regulation of transcriptional coactivator complexes. Strap (stress-responsive activator of p300) is activated upon DNA damage by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and Chk2 kinases and is a key regulator of the p53 response. In addition to antagonizing Mdm2, Strap facilitates the recruitment of p53 coactivators, including JMY and p300. Strap is a predicted TPR-repeat protein, but shows only limited sequence identity with any protein of known structure. To address this and to elucidate the molecular mechanism of Strap activity we determined the crystal structure of the full-length protein at 2.05 Å resolution. The structure of Strap reveals an atypical six tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) protein that also contains an unexpected oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB)-fold domain. This previously unseen domain organization provides an extended superhelical scaffold allowing for protein-protein as well as protein-DNA interaction. We show that both of the TPR and OB-fold domains localize to the chromatin of p53 target genes and exhibit intrinsic regulatory activity necessary for the Strap-dependent p53 response.

  2. Exhibition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    China[Guangzheu] International Trade Fair for Home Textiles Date:March 18th- March 21st,2011 Venue:China Import and Export Fair Complex(Guangzhou,China) Organizers:China National Textile&Apparel Council China Foreign Trade Center(Group) China Home Textile Association China Foreign Trade Guangzhou Exhibition Corp.

  3. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    A Look of Hope Islam Mahmoud Sweity From 19 to 30 June 2017 CERN Meyrin, Main Building Islam Mahmoud Sweity Islam Mahmoud Sweity was born in 1997 at Beit Awwa, Palestine. She is currently following a course to get an Art diploma of Painting at the college of Fine Arts at An-Najah National University under the supervision of Esmat Al As'aad. Her portraits, landscapes and still life paintings are full of life and shining colours. Charged of emotional empathy they catch the attention of the viewer and are reminding us that life is beautiful and worth living in spite of all difficulties we have to go through. She participated in many exhibitions and has exposed her drawings in 2015 at CERN and in France in the framework of the exhibition "The Origin“, and in 2017 in the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Palestina and Jordan. In this exhibition the oil paintings made in the past year will be presented. For more information : staff.association@cern.ch | T&eacu...

  4. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Encounters Hanne Blitz From February 1st to 12th 2016 CERN Meyrin, Main Building What is our reaction to a first encounter with a tourist attraction? Contemporary Dutch painter Hanne Blitz captures visitors' responses to art and architecture, sweeping vistas and symbolic memorials. Encounters, a series of oil paintings curated specially for this CERN exhibition, depicts tourists visiting cultural highlights around the world. A thought-provoking journey not to be missed, and a tip of the hat to CERN's large Hadron Collider.

  5. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Sintropie Flavio Pellegrini From 13 to 24 March 2017 CERN Meyrin, Main Building Energia imprigionata - Flavio Pellegrini. The exhibition is composed by eleven wood artworks with the expression of movement as theme. The artworks are the result of harmonics math applied to sculpture. The powerful black colour is dominated by the light source, generating reflexes and modulations. The result is a continuous variation of perspective visions. The works generate, at a first approach, an emotion of mystery and incomprehension, only a deeper contemplation lets one discover entangling and mutative details, evidencing the elegance of the lines and letting the meaning emerge. For more information : staff.association@cern.ch | Tél: 022 766 37 38

  6. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of tomato elicits unexpected flower phenotypes with similar gene expression profiles.

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    Yi-Hong Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic transformation mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens is known to cause unexpected phenotypes. Mutations of a specific set of homeotic genes can result in altered floral structure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Previously we identified two genes (LeTGA1 and SOLly GLB1 induced by nutrient availability in tomato. To further elucidate their function, we sought to knock out the genes using antisense RNAi. When antisense constructs for the two different tomato genes were each transformed into Micro-Tina tomato plants, one primary transformant with similar mutant flower phenotypes was identified from transformation of each construct. Microarray analysis shows that a similar set of genes were up- or downregulated in both mutants. Sequencing of insertion sites indicates that each is inserted into a repetitive region which could impact expression of affected genes but direct alteration of floral homeotic gene sequences was not detected. CONCLUSION: This is the first report that dominant flower mutations could be caused by genetic transformation designed to knock out two nutrient stress related genes.

  7. Dithizone staining of intracellular zinc: an unexpected and versatile counterscreen for auxotrophic marker genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Daniel S Yuan

    Full Text Available Auxotrophic marker genes such as URA3, LEU2, and HIS3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have long been used to select cells that have been successfully transformed with recombinant DNA. A longstanding challenge in working with these genes is that counterselection procedures are often lacking. This paper describes the unexpected discovery of a simple plate assay that imparts a bright red stain to cells experiencing nutritional stress from the lack of a marker gene. The procedure specifically stains a zinc-rich vesicular compartment analogous to the zinc-rich secretory vesicles found in insulin-secreting pancreatic islet cells and glutamate-secreting neurons. Staining was greatly diminished in zap1 mutants, which lack a homeostatic activator of zinc uptake, and in cot1 zrc1 double mutants, which lack the two yeast homologs of mammalian vesicle-specific zinc export proteins. Only one of 93 strains with temperature-sensitive alleles of essential genes exhibited an increase in dithizone staining at its non-permissive temperature, indicating that staining is not simply a sign of growth-arrested or dying cells. Remarkably, the procedure works with most commonly used marker genes, highlights subtle defects, uses no reporter constructs or expensive reagents, requires only a few hours of incubation, yields visually striking results without any instrumentation, and is not toxic to the cells. Many potential applications exist for dithizone staining, both as a versatile counterscreen for auxotrophic marker genes and as a powerful new tool for the genetic analysis of a biomedically important vesicular organelle.

  8. Metagenomics of hydrocarbon resource environments indicates aerobic taxa and genes to be unexpectedly common.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Dongshan; Caffrey, Sean M; Soh, Jung; Agrawal, Akhil; Brown, Damon; Budwill, Karen; Dong, Xiaoli; Dunfield, Peter F; Foght, Julia; Gieg, Lisa M; Hallam, Steven J; Hanson, Niels W; He, Zhiguo; Jack, Thomas R; Klassen, Jonathan; Konwar, Kishori M; Kuatsjah, Eugene; Li, Carmen; Larter, Steve; Leopatra, Verlyn; Nesbø, Camilla L; Oldenburg, Thomas; Pagé, Antoine P; Ramos-Padron, Esther; Rochman, Fauziah F; Saidi-Mehrabad, Alireeza; Sensen, Christoph W; Sipahimalani, Payal; Song, Young C; Wilson, Sandra; Wolbring, Gregor; Wong, Man-Ling; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2013-09-17

    Oil in subsurface reservoirs is biodegraded by resident microbial communities. Water-mediated, anaerobic conversion of hydrocarbons to methane and CO2, catalyzed by syntrophic bacteria and methanogenic archaea, is thought to be one of the dominant processes. We compared 160 microbial community compositions in ten hydrocarbon resource environments (HREs) and sequenced twelve metagenomes to characterize their metabolic potential. Although anaerobic communities were common, cores from oil sands and coal beds had unexpectedly high proportions of aerobic hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria. Likewise, most metagenomes had high proportions of genes for enzymes involved in aerobic hydrocarbon metabolism. Hence, although HREs may have been strictly anaerobic and typically methanogenic for much of their history, this may not hold today for coal beds and for the Alberta oil sands, one of the largest remaining oil reservoirs in the world. This finding may influence strategies to recover energy or chemicals from these HREs by in situ microbial processes.

  9. How do 'housekeeping' genes control organogenesis?--Unexpected new findings on the role of housekeeping genes in cell and organ differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukaya, Hirokazu; Byrne, Mary E; Horiguchi, Gorou; Sugiyama, Munetaka; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke; Lenhard, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of mutations in what would appear to be 'housekeeping genes' have been identified as having unexpectedly specific defects in multicellular organogenesis. This is also the case for organogenesis in seed plants. Although it is not surprising that loss-of-function mutations in 'housekeeping' genes result in lethality or growth retardation, it is surprising when (1) the mutant phenotype results from the loss of function of a 'housekeeping' gene and (2) the mutant phenotype is specific. In this review, by defining housekeeping genes as those encoding proteins that work in basic metabolic and cellular functions, we discuss unexpected links between housekeeping genes and specific developmental processes. In a surprising number of cases housekeeping genes coding for enzymes or proteins with functions in basic cellular processes such as transcription, post-transcriptional modification, and translation affect plant development.

  10. Epilepsy-related sudden unexpected death: targeted molecular analysis of inherited heart disease genes using next-generation DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Yukiko; Yoshida, Koji; Kinoshita, Koshi; Nishida, Naoki

    2017-05-01

    Inherited heart disease causing electric instability in the heart has been suggested to be a risk factor for sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). The purpose of this study was to reveal the correlation between epilepsy-related sudden unexpected death (SUD) and inherited heart disease. Twelve epilepsy-related SUD cases (seven males and five females, aged 11-78 years) were examined. Nine cases fulfilled the criteria of SUDEP, and three cases died by drowning. In addition to examining three major epilepsy-related genes, we used next-generation sequencing (NGS) to examine 73 inherited heart disease-related genes. We detected both known pathogenic variants and rare variants with minor allele frequencies of heart disease may be a significant risk factor for SUD in some epilepsy cases, even if pathological findings of the heart had not progressed to an advanced stage of the disease. A combination of detailed pathological examination of the heart and gene analysis using NGS may be useful for evaluating arrhythmogenic potential of epilepsy-related SUD. © 2016 International Society of Neuropathology.

  11. Carotenoids in unexpected places: gall midges, lateral gene transfer, and carotenoid biosynthesis in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbs, Cassidy; Heath, Jeremy; Stireman, John O; Abbot, Patrick

    2013-08-01

    Carotenoids are conjugated isoprenoid molecules with many important physiological functions in organisms, including roles in photosynthesis, oxidative stress reduction, vision, diapause, photoperiodism, and immunity. Until recently, it was believed that only plants, microorganisms, and fungi were capable of synthesizing carotenoids and that animals acquired them from their diet, but recent studies have demonstrated that two arthropods (pea aphid and spider mite) possess a pair of genes homologous to those required for the first step of carotenoid biosynthesis. Absent in all other known animal genomes, these genes appear to have been acquired by aphids and spider mites in one or several lateral gene transfer events from a fungal donor. We report the third case of fungal carotenoid biosynthesis gene homologs in an arthropod: flies from the family Cecidomyiidae, commonly known as gall midges. Using phylogenetic analyses we show that it is unlikely that lycopene cyclase/phytoene synthase and phytoene desaturase homologs were transferred singly to an ancient arthropod ancestor; instead we propose that genes were transferred independently from related fungal donors after divergence of the major arthropod lineages. We also examine variation in intron placement and copy number of the carotenoid genes that may underlie function in the midges. This trans-kingdom transfer of carotenoid genes may represent a key innovation, underlying the evolution of phytophagy and plant-galling in gall midges and facilitating their extensive diversification across plant lineages.

  12. Unexpected functional similarities between gatekeeper tumour suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes revealed by systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongzhong; Epstein, Richard J

    2011-05-01

    Familial tumor suppressor genes comprise two subgroups: caretaker genes (CTs) that repair DNA, and gatekeeper genes (GKs) that trigger cell death. Since GKs may also induce cell cycle delay and thus enhance cell survival by facilitating DNA repair, we hypothesized that the prosurvival phenotype of GKs could be selected during cancer progression, and we used a multivariable systems biology approach to test this. We performed multidimensional data analysis, non-negative matrix factorization and logistic regression to compare the features of GKs with those of their putative antagonists, the proto-oncogenes (POs), as well as with control groups of CTs and functionally unrelated congenital heart disease genes (HDs). GKs and POs closely resemble each other, but not CTs or HDs, in terms of gene structure (P<0.001), expression level and breadth (P<0.01), DNA methylation signature (P<0.001) and evolutionary rate (P<0.001). The similar selection pressures and epigenetic trajectories of GKs and POs so implied suggest a common functional attribute that is strongly negatively selected-that is, a shared phenotype that enhances cell survival. The counterintuitive finding of similar evolutionary pressures affecting GKs and POs raises an intriguing possibility: namely, that cancer microevolution is accelerated by an epistatic cascade in which upstream suppressor gene defects subvert the normal bifunctionality of wild-type GKs by constitutively shifting the phenotype away from apoptosis towards survival. If correct, this interpretation would explain the hitherto unexplained phenomenon of frequent wild-type GK (for example, p53) overexpression in tumors.

  13. Unexpected detection of animal VP7 genes among common rotavirus strains isolated from children in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, A R; Ibarra, V; Ruiz-Palacios, G; Guerrero, M L; Glass, R I; Gentsch, J R

    2003-09-01

    In the course of characterizing 103 rotaviruses from children in Mexico, we found that the majority of strains were globally common types (55.4% of total), while uncommon types represented 5.7%, mixed infections with common types represented 14.8%, and partially or fully nontypeable isolates represented about 24%. Serotype G9 was detected for the first time in Mexico. We sequenced a subset of strains that were G nontypeable by reverse transcriptase PCR and found surprisingly that two strains having common human rotavirus P genotypes (8 and 6) had serotype G3 and G4 VP7 gene sequences that shared closer homology with canine and porcine strains, respectively, than with human strains, suggesting that these isolates represented reassortants between human and animal rotaviruses.

  14. Abundantly and rarely expressed Lhc protein genes exhibit distinct regulation patterns in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimmek, Frank; Sjödin, Andreas; Noutsos, Christos; Leister, Dario; Jansson, Stefan

    2006-03-01

    We have analyzed gene regulation of the Lhc supergene family in poplar (Populus spp.) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using digital expression profiling. Multivariate analysis of the tissue-specific, environmental, and developmental Lhc expression patterns in Arabidopsis and poplar was employed to characterize four rarely expressed Lhc genes, Lhca5, Lhca6, Lhcb7, and Lhcb4.3. Those genes have high expression levels under different conditions and in different tissues than the abundantly expressed Lhca1 to 4 and Lhcb1 to 6 genes that code for the 10 major types of higher plant light-harvesting proteins. However, in some of the datasets analyzed, the Lhcb4 and Lhcb6 genes as well as an Arabidopsis gene not present in poplar (Lhcb2.3) exhibited minor differences to the main cooperative Lhc gene expression pattern. The pattern of the rarely expressed Lhc genes was always found to be more similar to that of PsbS and the various light-harvesting-like genes, which might indicate distinct physiological functions for the rarely and abundantly expressed Lhc proteins. The previously undetected Lhcb7 gene encodes a novel plant Lhcb-type protein that possibly contains an additional, fourth, transmembrane N-terminal helix with a highly conserved motif. As the Lhcb4.3 gene seems to be present only in Eurosid species and as its regulation pattern varies significantly from that of Lhcb4.1 and Lhcb4.2, we conclude it to encode a distinct Lhc protein type, Lhcb8.

  15. Transgenic Citrus Expressing an Arabidopsis NPR1 Gene Exhibit Enhanced Resistance against Huanglongbing (HLB; Citrus Greening).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, Manjul; Barthe, Gary; Irey, Michael; Grosser, Jude

    2015-01-01

    Commercial sweet orange cultivars lack resistance to Huanglongbing (HLB), a serious phloem limited bacterial disease that is usually fatal. In order to develop sustained disease resistance to HLB, transgenic sweet orange cultivars 'Hamlin' and 'Valencia' expressing an Arabidopsis thaliana NPR1 gene under the control of a constitutive CaMV 35S promoter or a phloem specific Arabidopsis SUC2 (AtSUC2) promoter were produced. Overexpression of AtNPR1 resulted in trees with normal phenotypes that exhibited enhanced resistance to HLB. Phloem specific expression of NPR1 was equally effective for enhancing disease resistance. Transgenic trees exhibited reduced diseased severity and a few lines remained disease-free even after 36 months of planting in a high-disease pressure field site. Expression of the NPR1 gene induced expression of several native genes involved in the plant defense signaling pathways. The AtNPR1 gene being plant derived can serve as a component for the development of an all plant T-DNA derived consumer friendly GM tree.

  16. Transgenic Citrus Expressing an Arabidopsis NPR1 Gene Exhibit Enhanced Resistance against Huanglongbing (HLB; Citrus Greening.

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    Manjul Dutt

    Full Text Available Commercial sweet orange cultivars lack resistance to Huanglongbing (HLB, a serious phloem limited bacterial disease that is usually fatal. In order to develop sustained disease resistance to HLB, transgenic sweet orange cultivars 'Hamlin' and 'Valencia' expressing an Arabidopsis thaliana NPR1 gene under the control of a constitutive CaMV 35S promoter or a phloem specific Arabidopsis SUC2 (AtSUC2 promoter were produced. Overexpression of AtNPR1 resulted in trees with normal phenotypes that exhibited enhanced resistance to HLB. Phloem specific expression of NPR1 was equally effective for enhancing disease resistance. Transgenic trees exhibited reduced diseased severity and a few lines remained disease-free even after 36 months of planting in a high-disease pressure field site. Expression of the NPR1 gene induced expression of several native genes involved in the plant defense signaling pathways. The AtNPR1 gene being plant derived can serve as a component for the development of an all plant T-DNA derived consumer friendly GM tree.

  17. Transgenic citrus expressing synthesized cecropin B genes in the phloem exhibits decreased susceptibility to Huanglongbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xiuping; Jiang, Xueyou; Xu, Lanzhen; Lei, Tiangang; Peng, Aihong; He, Yongrui; Yao, Lixiao; Chen, Shanchun

    2017-03-01

    Expression of synthesized cecropin B genes in the citrus phloem, where Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus resides, significantly decreased host susceptibility to Huanglongbing. Huanglongbing (HLB), associated with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus bacteria, is the most destructive disease of citrus worldwide. All of the commercial sweet orange cultivars lack resistance to this disease. The cationic lytic peptide cecropin B, isolated from the Chinese tasar moth (Antheraea pernyi), has been shown to effectively eliminate bacteria. In this study, we demonstrated that transgenic citrus (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) expressing the cecropin B gene specifically in the phloem had a decreased susceptibility to HLB. Three plant codon-optimized synthetic cecropin B genes, which were designed to secrete the cecropin B peptide into three specific sites, the extracellular space, the cytoplasm, and the endoplasmic reticulum, were constructed. Under the control of the selected phloem-specific promoter GRP1.8, these constructs were transferred into the citrus genome. All of the cecropin B genes were efficiently expressed in the phloem of transgenic plants. Over more than a year of evaluation, the transgenic lines exhibited reduced disease severity. Bacterial populations in transgenic lines were significantly lower than in the controls. Two lines, in which bacterial populations were significantly lower than in others, showed no visible symptoms. Thus, we demonstrated the potential application of the phloem-specific expression of an antimicrobial peptide gene to protect citrus plants from HLB.

  18. Colon cancer associated genes exhibit signatures of positive selection at functionally significant positions

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    Morgan Claire C

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer, much like most human disease, is routinely studied by utilizing model organisms. Of these model organisms, mice are often dominant. However, our assumptions of functional equivalence fail to consider the opportunity for divergence conferred by ~180 Million Years (MY of independent evolution between these species. For a given set of human disease related genes, it is therefore important to determine if functional equivalency has been retained between species. In this study we test the hypothesis that cancer associated genes have different patterns of substitution akin to adaptive evolution in different mammal lineages. Results Our analysis of the current literature and colon cancer databases identified 22 genes exhibiting colon cancer associated germline mutations. We identified orthologs for these 22 genes across a set of high coverage (>6X vertebrate genomes. Analysis of these orthologous datasets revealed significant levels of positive selection. Evidence of lineage-specific positive selection was identified in 14 genes in both ancestral and extant lineages. Lineage-specific positive selection was detected in the ancestral Euarchontoglires and Hominidae lineages for STK11, in the ancestral primate lineage for CDH1, in the ancestral Murinae lineage for both SDHC and MSH6 genes and the ancestral Muridae lineage for TSC1. Conclusion Identifying positive selection in the Primate, Hominidae, Muridae and Murinae lineages suggests an ancestral functional shift in these genes between the rodent and primate lineages. Analyses such as this, combining evolutionary theory and predictions - along with medically relevant data, can thus provide us with important clues for modeling human diseases.

  19. Colon cancer associated genes exhibit signatures of positive selection at functionally significant positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Cancer, much like most human disease, is routinely studied by utilizing model organisms. Of these model organisms, mice are often dominant. However, our assumptions of functional equivalence fail to consider the opportunity for divergence conferred by ~180 Million Years (MY) of independent evolution between these species. For a given set of human disease related genes, it is therefore important to determine if functional equivalency has been retained between species. In this study we test the hypothesis that cancer associated genes have different patterns of substitution akin to adaptive evolution in different mammal lineages. Results Our analysis of the current literature and colon cancer databases identified 22 genes exhibiting colon cancer associated germline mutations. We identified orthologs for these 22 genes across a set of high coverage (>6X) vertebrate genomes. Analysis of these orthologous datasets revealed significant levels of positive selection. Evidence of lineage-specific positive selection was identified in 14 genes in both ancestral and extant lineages. Lineage-specific positive selection was detected in the ancestral Euarchontoglires and Hominidae lineages for STK11, in the ancestral primate lineage for CDH1, in the ancestral Murinae lineage for both SDHC and MSH6 genes and the ancestral Muridae lineage for TSC1. Conclusion Identifying positive selection in the Primate, Hominidae, Muridae and Murinae lineages suggests an ancestral functional shift in these genes between the rodent and primate lineages. Analyses such as this, combining evolutionary theory and predictions - along with medically relevant data, can thus provide us with important clues for modeling human diseases. PMID:22788692

  20. Human breast cancer associated fibroblasts exhibit subtype specific gene expression profiles

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    Tchou Julia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease for which prognosis and treatment strategies are largely governed by the receptor status (estrogen, progesterone and Her2 of the tumor cells. Gene expression profiling of whole breast tumors further stratifies breast cancer into several molecular subtypes which also co-segregate with the receptor status of the tumor cells. We postulated that cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs within the tumor stroma may exhibit subtype specific gene expression profiles and thus contribute to the biology of the disease in a subtype specific manner. Several studies have reported gene expression profile differences between CAFs and normal breast fibroblasts but in none of these studies were the results stratified based on tumor subtypes. Methods To address whether gene expression in breast cancer associated fibroblasts varies between breast cancer subtypes, we compared the gene expression profiles of early passage primary CAFs isolated from twenty human breast cancer samples representing three main subtypes; seven ER+, seven triple negative (TNBC and six Her2+. Results We observed significant expression differences between CAFs derived from Her2+ breast cancer and CAFs from TNBC and ER + cancers, particularly in pathways associated with cytoskeleton and integrin signaling. In the case of Her2+ breast cancer, the signaling pathways found to be selectively up regulated in CAFs likely contribute to the enhanced migration of breast cancer cells in transwell assays and may contribute to the unfavorable prognosis of Her2+ breast cancer. Conclusions These data demonstrate that in addition to the distinct molecular profiles that characterize the neoplastic cells, CAF gene expression is also differentially regulated in distinct subtypes of breast cancer.

  1. Transgenic Alfalfa Plants Expressing the Sweetpotato Orange Gene Exhibit Enhanced Abiotic Stress Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi; Ke, Qingbo; Kim, Myoung Duck; Kim, Sun Ha; Ji, Chang Yoon; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Park, Woo Sung; Ahn, Mi-Jeong; Li, Hongbing; Xu, Bingcheng; Deng, Xiping; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Lim, Yong Pyo; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), a perennial forage crop with high nutritional content, is widely distributed in various environments worldwide. We recently demonstrated that the sweetpotato Orange gene (IbOr) is involved in increasing carotenoid accumulation and enhancing resistance to multiple abiotic stresses. In this study, in an effort to improve the nutritional quality and environmental stress tolerance of alfalfa, we transferred the IbOr gene into alfalfa (cv. Xinjiang Daye) under the control of an oxidative stress-inducible peroxidase (SWPA2) promoter through Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Among the 11 transgenic alfalfa lines (referred to as SOR plants), three lines (SOR2, SOR3, and SOR8) selected based on their IbOr transcript levels were examined for their tolerance to methyl viologen (MV)-induced oxidative stress in a leaf disc assay. The SOR plants exhibited less damage in response to MV-mediated oxidative stress and salt stress than non-transgenic plants. The SOR plants also exhibited enhanced tolerance to drought stress, along with higher total carotenoid levels. The results suggest that SOR alfalfa plants would be useful as forage crops with improved nutritional value and increased tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses, which would enhance the development of sustainable agriculture on marginal lands. PMID:25946429

  2. Transgenic alfalfa plants expressing the sweetpotato Orange gene exhibit enhanced abiotic stress tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Wang

    Full Text Available Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L., a perennial forage crop with high nutritional content, is widely distributed in various environments worldwide. We recently demonstrated that the sweetpotato Orange gene (IbOr is involved in increasing carotenoid accumulation and enhancing resistance to multiple abiotic stresses. In this study, in an effort to improve the nutritional quality and environmental stress tolerance of alfalfa, we transferred the IbOr gene into alfalfa (cv. Xinjiang Daye under the control of an oxidative stress-inducible peroxidase (SWPA2 promoter through Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Among the 11 transgenic alfalfa lines (referred to as SOR plants, three lines (SOR2, SOR3, and SOR8 selected based on their IbOr transcript levels were examined for their tolerance to methyl viologen (MV-induced oxidative stress in a leaf disc assay. The SOR plants exhibited less damage in response to MV-mediated oxidative stress and salt stress than non-transgenic plants. The SOR plants also exhibited enhanced tolerance to drought stress, along with higher total carotenoid levels. The results suggest that SOR alfalfa plants would be useful as forage crops with improved nutritional value and increased tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses, which would enhance the development of sustainable agriculture on marginal lands.

  3. Mice with a targeted deletion of the tetranectin gene exhibit a spinal deformity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iba, K; Durkin, M E; Johnsen, L;

    2001-01-01

    and muscle. To test the functional role of tetranectin directly, we have generated mice with a targeted disruption of the gene. We report that the tetranectin-deficient mice exhibit kyphosis, a type of spinal deformity characterized by an increased curvature of the thoracic spine. The kyphotic angles were...... in the morphology of the vertebrae. Histological analysis of the spines of these mice revealed an apparently asymmetric development of the growth plate and of the intervertebral disks of the vertebrae. In the most advanced cases, the growth plates appeared disorganized and irregular, with the disk material...... protruding through the growth plate. Tetranectin-null mice had a normal peak bone mass density and were not more susceptible to ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis than were their littermates as determined by dual-emission X-ray absorptiometry scanning. These results demonstrate that tetranectin plays a role...

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa AES-1 exhibits increased virulence gene expression during chronic infection of cystic fibrosis lung.

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    Sharna Naughton

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in people with cystic fibrosis (CF, adapts for survival in the CF lung through both mutation and gene expression changes. Frequent clonal strains such as the Australian Epidemic Strain-1 (AES-1, have increased ability to establish infection in the CF lung and to superimpose and replace infrequent clonal strains. Little is known about the factors underpinning these properties. Analysis has been hampered by lack of expression array templates containing CF-strain specific genes. We sequenced the genome of an acute infection AES-1 isolate from a CF infant (AES-1R and constructed a non-redundant micro-array (PANarray comprising AES-1R and seven other sequenced P. aeruginosa genomes. The unclosed AES-1R genome comprised 6.254Mbp and contained 6957 putative genes, including 338 not found in the other seven genomes. The PANarray contained 12,543 gene probe spots; comprising 12,147 P. aeruginosa gene probes, 326 quality-control probes and 70 probes for non-P. aeruginosa genes, including phage and plant genes. We grew AES-1R and its isogenic pair AES-1M, taken from the same patient 10.5 years later and not eradicated in the intervening period, in our validated artificial sputum medium (ASMDM and used the PANarray to compare gene expression of both in duplicate. 675 genes were differentially expressed between the isogenic pairs, including upregulation of alginate, biofilm, persistence genes and virulence-related genes such as dihydroorotase, uridylate kinase and cardiolipin synthase, in AES-1M. Non-PAO1 genes upregulated in AES-1M included pathogenesis-related (PAGI-5 genes present in strains PACS2 and PA7, and numerous phage genes. Elucidation of these genes' roles could lead to targeted treatment strategies for chronically infected CF patients.

  5. Positive Darwinian selection in Vipera palaestinae phospholipase A2 genes is unexpectedly limited to the third exon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordis, D; Bdolah, A; Gubensek, F

    1998-10-20

    The venom of Vipera palaestinae contains a two-component toxin, consisting of an acidic phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and a basic protein. Here we report the cloning and sequence analysis of the complete V. palaestinae PLA2 genes. Since in all Viperidae PLA2 multigene families the 5' and 3' flanking regions are highly conserved, we designed oligonucleotide primers that allow amplification of the whole PLA2 multigene family in a single step. The structural organization of both genes is the same as in the Vipera ammodytes PLA2 multigene family, there being five exons separated by four introns. Comparison of V. palaestinae PLA2 genes with other Viperidae PLA2 genes has shown that the structural organization of the genes and the nucleotide sequence of all introns and flanking regions are highly conserved, whereas the third exon clearly shows a higher number of amino acid replacements, an indication of positive Darwinian selection. The positive Darwinian selection is surprisingly limited to the third exon, in contrast to other Viperidae PLA2 genes, where it is present in all mature protein coding exons. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  6. Exploring the gene: Interactive exhibits on genetics and the human genome. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    Under funding by the United States Department of Energy, the Exploratorium has substantially completed the prototype development of four exhibits on the nature of DNA and genetics, and substantially completed the production of ed exhibits based on these prototypes. Individually these genetic exhibits have been designed to elucidate specific themes, such as, the molecular properties of DNA, the encoding of genetic information, the expression of genetic information, and technological manipulation. The exhibits are titled Dancing DNA, Marching Bands, Protein Production Line, and Genetic Playbook. Specific exhibit projects are detailed below. In all the exhibits we have sought to draw a relationship between the nature of DNA and its expression in organisms. For most visitors, DNA exists as an invisible abstract molecule with marginal connections to their lives, while organisms exist as a familiar tangible entities. Inclusion of this broad thematic connection provides the crucial bridge between the abstract principles and the real world, and serves to underpin scientific, medical, and public interest in the topic.

  7. Mice deficient in the ALS2 gene exhibit lymphopenia and abnormal hematopietic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erie, Elizabeth A; Shim, Hoon; Smith, Aleah L; Lin, Xian; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Xie, Chengsong; Chen, Jichun; Cai, Huaibin

    2007-01-01

    One form of juvenile onset autosomal recessive amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS2) has been linked to the dysfunction of the ALS2 gene. The ALS2 gene is expressed in lymphoblasts, however, whether ALS2-deficiency affects periphery blood is unclear. Here we report that ALS2 knockout (ALS2(-/-)) mice developed peripheral lymphopenia but had higher proportions of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in which the stem cell factor-induced cell proliferation was up-regulated. Our findings reveal a novel function of the ALS2 gene in the lymphopoiesis and hematopoiesis, suggesting that the immune system is involved in the pathogenesis of ALS2.

  8. Transcript profiling of candidate genes in testis of pigs exhibiting large differences in androstenone levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oeth Paul

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Boar taint is an unpleasant odor and flavor of the meat and occurs in a high proportion of uncastrated male pigs. Androstenone, a steroid produced in testis and acting as a sex pheromone regulating reproductive function in female pigs, is one of the main compounds responsible for boar taint. The primary goal of the present investigation was to determine the differential gene expression of selected candidate genes related to levels of androstenone in pigs. Results Altogether 2560 boars from the Norwegian Landrace and Duroc populations were included in this study. Testicle samples from the 192 boars with most extreme high or low levels of androstenone in fat were used for RNA extraction, and 15 candidate genes were selected and analyzed by real-competitive PCR analysis. The genes Cytochrome P450 c17 (CYP17A1, Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR, Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C4 (AKR1C4, Short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family member 4 (DHRS4, Ferritin light polypeptide (FTL, Sulfotransferase family 2A, dehydroepiandrosterone-preferring member 1 (SULT2A1, Cytochrome P450 subfamily XIA polypeptide 1 (CYP11A1, Cytochrome b5 (CYB5A, and 17-beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase IV (HSD17B4 were all found to be significantly (P CYP19A2 was down-regulated and progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1 was up-regulated in high-androstenone Duroc boars only, while CYP21 was significantly down-regulated (2.5 in high-androstenone Landrace only. The genes Nuclear Receptor co-activator 4 (NCOA4, Sphingomyrlin phosphodiesterase 1 (SMPD1 and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD3B were not significantly differentially expressed in any breeds. Additionally, association studies were performed for the genes with one or more detected SNPs. Association between SNP and androstenone level was observed in CYB5A only, suggesting cis-regulation of the differential transcription in this gene. Conclusion A large pig material of

  9. Eukaryotic genomes may exhibit up to 10 generic classes of gene promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagniuc Paul

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main function of gene promoters appears to be the integration of different gene products in their biological pathways in order to maintain homeostasis. Generally, promoters have been classified in two major classes, namely TATA and CpG. Nevertheless, many genes using the same combinatorial formation of transcription factors have different gene expression patterns. Accordingly, we tried to ask ourselves some fundamental questions: Why certain genes have an overall predisposition for higher gene expression levels than others? What causes such a predisposition? Is there a structural relationship of these sequences in different tissues? Is there a strong phylogenetic relationship between promoters of closely related species? Results In order to gain valuable insights into different promoter regions, we obtained a series of image-based patterns which allowed us to identify 10 generic classes of promoters. A comprehensive analysis was undertaken for promoter sequences from Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster, Homo sapiens and Oryza sativa, and a more extensive analysis of tissue-specific promoters in humans. We observed a clear preference for these species to use certain classes of promoters for specific biological processes. Moreover, in humans, we found that different tissues use distinct classes of promoters, reflecting an emerging promoter network. Depending on the tissue type, comparisons made between these classes of promoters reveal a complementarity between their patterns whereas some other classes of promoters have been observed to occur in competition. Furthermore, we also noticed the existence of some transitional states between these classes of promoters that may explain certain evolutionary mechanisms, which suggest a possible predisposition for specific levels of gene expression and perhaps for a different number of factors responsible for triggering gene expression. Our conclusions are based on

  10. The Arabidopsis Adh gene exhibits diverse nucleosome arrangements within a small DNase I-sensitive domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Palas, M A; Ferl, R J

    1995-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene from Arabidopsis shows enhanced sensitivity to DNase I in cells that express the gene. This generalized sensitivity to DNase I is demarcated by position -500 on the 5' side and the end of the mRNA on the 3' side. Thus, the gene defined as the promoter and mRNA coding region corresponds very closely in size with the gene defined as a nuclease-sensitive domain. This is a remarkably close correspondence between a sensitive domain and a eukaryotic transcriptional unit, because previously reported DNase I-sensitive domains include large regions of DNA that are not transcribed. Nucleosomes are present in the coding region of the Adh gene when it is expressed, indicating that the transcriptional elongation process causes nucleosome disruption rather than release of nucleosomes from the coding region. In addition, the regulatory region contains a loosely positioned nucleosome that is separated from adjacent nucleosomes by internucleosomic DNA segments longer than the average linker DNA in bulk chromatin. This specific array of nucleosomes coexists with bound transcription factors that could contribute to the organization of the nucleosome arrangement. These results enhance our understanding of the complex interactions among DNA, nucleosomes, and transcription factors during gene expression in plants. PMID:8535143

  11. Highly and moderately aggressive mouse ovarian cancer cell lines exhibit differential gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wensheng; Kale, Shubha P.; McFerrin, Harris; Davenport, Ian; Wang, Guangdi; Skripnikova, Elena; Li, Xiao-Lin; Bowen, Nathan J.; McDaniels, Leticia B; Meng, Yuan-Xiang; Polk, Paula; Liu, Yong-Yu; Zhang, Qian-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer often experience disease recurrence after standard therapies, a critical factor in determining their five-year survival rate. Recent reports indicated that long-term or short-term survival is associated with varied gene expression of cancer cells. Thus, identification of novel prognostic biomarkers should be considered. Since the mouse genome is similar to the human genome, we explored potential prognostic biomarkers using two groups of mouse ovarian cancer cell lines (group 1: IG-10, IG-10pw, and IG-10pw/agar; group 2: IG-10 clones 2, 3, and 11) which display highly and moderately aggressive phenotypes in vivo. Mice injected with these cell lines have different survival time and rates, capacities of tumor, and ascites formations, reflecting different prognostic potentials. Using an Affymetrix Mouse Genome 430 2.0 Array, a total of 181 genes were differentially expressed (Pdeath. None of the genes from a set of the 72 genes overexpressed in the moderately aggressive cell lines had a function annotation in the David database. Our results suggested that the overexpressed MYC and 109 gene set represented highly aggressive ovarian cancer potential biomarkers while overexpressed AR and 72 gene set represented moderately aggressive ovarian cancer potential biomarkers. Based on our knowledge, the current study is first time to report the potential biomarkers relevant to different aggressive ovarian cancer. These potential biomarkers provide important information for investigating human ovarian cancer prognosis. PMID:26935058

  12. Illegitimate translation causes unexpected gene expression from on-target out-of-frame alleles created by CRISPR-Cas9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Shigeru; Fukumura, Ryutaro; Gondo, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 is efficient enough to knock out both alleles directly by introducing out-of-frame mutations. We succeeded in making biallelic on-target frameshift mutations of the endogenous Gli3 gene; however, the GLI3 protein was expressed in all six of the established cell lines carrying homozygous out-of-frame mutations. We developed a dual-tagged expression vector and proved that illegitimate translation (ITL) was the cause of the unexpected Gli3 expression. Thus, gene expression must be examined even if designed on-target out-of-frame sequences are introduced by genome editing. In addition, it is highly recommended to pre-examine the occurrence of ITL in vitro prior to the design and construction of any genome-editing vectors. In vitro assay systems such as the dual-tagged ITL assay system developed in this study should aid the identification and elucidation of ITL-based human diseases and gene expression. PMID:28000783

  13. Amygdala nuclei critical for emotional learning exhibit unique gene expression patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partin, Alexander C; Hosek, Matthew P; Luong, Jonathan A; Lella, Srihari K; Sharma, Sachein A R; Ploski, Jonathan E

    2013-09-01

    The amygdala is a heterogeneous, medial temporal lobe structure that has been implicated in the formation, expression and extinction of emotional memories. This structure is composed of numerous nuclei that vary in cytoarchitectonics and neural connections. In particular the lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA), central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), and the basal (B) nucleus contribute an essential role to emotional learning. However, to date it is still unclear to what extent these nuclei differ at the molecular level. Therefore we have performed whole genome gene expression analysis on these nuclei to gain a better understanding of the molecular differences and similarities among these nuclei. Specifically the LA, CeA and B nuclei were laser microdissected from the rat brain, and total RNA was isolated from these nuclei and subjected to RNA amplification. Amplified RNA was analyzed by whole genome microarray analysis which revealed that 129 genes are differentially expressed among these nuclei. Notably gene expression patterns differed between the CeA nucleus and the LA and B nuclei. However gene expression differences were not considerably different between the LA and B nuclei. Secondary confirmation of numerous genes was performed by in situ hybridization to validate the microarray findings, which also revealed that for many genes, expression differences among these nuclei were consistent with the embryological origins of these nuclei. Knowing the stable gene expression differences among these nuclei will provide novel avenues of investigation into how these nuclei contribute to emotional arousal and emotional learning, and potentially offer new genetic targets to manipulate emotional learning and memory.

  14. The progeny of Arabidopsis thaliana plants exposed to salt exhibit changes in DNA methylation, histone modifications and gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andriy Bilichak

    Full Text Available Plants are able to acclimate to new growth conditions on a relatively short time-scale. Recently, we showed that the progeny of plants exposed to various abiotic stresses exhibited changes in genome stability, methylation patterns and stress tolerance. Here, we performed a more detailed analysis of methylation patterns in the progeny of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis plants exposed to 25 and 75 mM sodium chloride. We found that the majority of gene promoters exhibiting changes in methylation were hypermethylated, and this group was overrepresented by regulators of the chromatin structure. The analysis of DNA methylation at gene bodies showed that hypermethylation in the progeny of stressed plants was primarily due to changes in the 5' and 3' ends as well as in exons rather than introns. All but one hypermethylated gene tested had lower gene expression. The analysis of histone modifications in the promoters and coding sequences showed that hypermethylation and lower gene expression correlated with the enrichment of H3K9me2 and depletion of H3K9ac histones. Thus, our work demonstrated a high degree of correlation between changes in DNA methylation, histone modifications and gene expression in the progeny of salt-stressed plants.

  15. Genes encoding FAD-binding proteins in Volvariella volvacea exhibit differential expression in homokaryons and heterokaryons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Li; Yan, Junjie; Xie, Baogui; Li, Yu; Chen, Bingzhi; Liu, Shuyan; Li, Dan; Yang, Zhiyun; Zeng, Xiancheng; Deng, Youjin; Jiang, Yuji

    2013-10-01

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-binding proteins play a vital role in energy transfer and utilization during fungal growth and mycelia aggregation. We sequenced the genome of Volvariella volvacea, an economically important edible fungus, and discovered 41 genes encoding FAD-binding proteins. Gene expression profiles revealed that the expression levels of four distinctly differentially expressed genes in heterokaryotic strain H1521 were higher than in homokaryotic strains PYd15 and PYd21 combined. These observations were validated by quantitative real-time PCR. The results suggest that the differential expression of FAD-binding proteins may be important in revealing the distinction between homokaryons and heterokaryons on the basis of FAD-binding protein functionality.

  16. Mice deficient in the ALS2 gene exhibit lymphopenia and abnormal hematopietic function

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    One form of juvenile onset autosomal recessive amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS2) has been linked to the dysfunction of the ALS2 gene. The ALS2 gene is expressed in lymphoblasts, however, whether ALS2-deficiency affects periphery blood is unclear. Here we report that ALS2 knockout (ALS2−/−) mice developed peripheral lymphopenia but had higher proportions of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in which the stem cell factor-induced cell proliferation was up-regulated. Our findings reveal ...

  17. Genetic investigations of sudden unexpected deaths in infancy using next-generation sequencing of 100 genes associated with cardiac diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Christin Loeth; Christiansen, Sofie Lindgren; Larsen, Maiken Kudahl

    2016-01-01

    -generation sequencing (NGS), the coding regions of 100 genes associated with inherited channelopathies and cardiomyopathies were captured and sequenced on the Illumina MiSeq platform. Sixteen (34%) of the SUDI cases had variants with likely functional effects, based on conservation, computational prediction and allele...... victims is important in the forensic setting and a valuable supplement to the clinical investigation in all cases of sudden death.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 9 September 2015; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2015.198....

  18. Synthesis of 5-radioiodoarabinosyl uridine analog for probing HSV-1 thymidine kinase gene: an unexpected chelating effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, C.-S. [Department of Nuclear Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: csyu@mx.nthu.edu.tw; Chiang, L.-W. [Department of Nuclear Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Wu, C.-H. [Department of Nuclear Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Wang, R.-T. [Department of Nuclear Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Chen, S.-W. [Department of Nuclear Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Wang, H.-Y. [Department of Nuclear Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Yeh, C.-H. [Department of Nuclear Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2006-04-15

    Tumor cells transduced with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene has been intensively applied to the field of positron emission tomography via imaging of its substrate. As a pilot synthesis approach, a facial preparation of 5-[{sup 125}I]iodoarabinosyl uridine starting from commercial available uridine is reported herein. Interestingly, the tin group in 5-trimethylstannyl arabinosyluridine was easily removed during purification. The destannylation through the formation of a six-ligand coordination involving 2'-hydroxyl and tin was thereby proposed.

  19. Refined anatomical isolation of functional sleep circuits exhibits distinctive regional and circadian gene transcriptional profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winrow, Christopher J; Tanis, Keith Q; Rigby, Alison M; Taylor, Rhonda R; Serikawa, Kyle; McWhorter, Mollie; Tokiwa, George Y; Marton, Matthew J; Stone, David J; Koblan, Kenneth S; Renger, John J

    2009-05-19

    Powerful new approaches to study molecular variation in distinct neuronal populations have recently been developed enabling a more precise investigation of the control of neural circuits involved in complex behaviors such as wake and sleep. We applied laser capture microdissection (LCM) to isolate precise brain nuclei from rat CNS at opposing circadian time points associated with wake and sleep. Discrete anatomical and temporal analysis was performed to examine the extent of variation in the transcriptional control associated with both identifiable anatomical nuclei and with light/dark cycle. Precise isolation of specific brain nuclei regulating sleep and arousal, including the LC, SCN, TMN, VTA, and VLPO, demonstrated robust changes in gene expression. Many of these differences were not observed in previous studies where whole brain lysates or gross dissections were used to probe for changes in gene expression. The robust and differential profiles of genomic data obtained from the approaches used herein underscore the requirement for careful anatomical refinement in CNS gene expression studies designed to understand genomic control within behaviorally-linked, but functionally isolated brain nuclei.

  20. Vampire bats exhibit evolutionary reduction of bitter taste receptor genes common to other bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei; Zhao, Huabin

    2014-08-01

    The bitter taste serves as an important natural defence against the ingestion of poisonous foods and is thus believed to be indispensable in animals. However, vampire bats are obligate blood feeders that show a reduced behavioural response towards bitter-tasting compounds. To test whether bitter taste receptor genes (T2Rs) have been relaxed from selective constraint in vampire bats, we sampled all three vampire bat species and 11 non-vampire bats, and sequenced nine one-to-one orthologous T2Rs that are assumed to be functionally conserved in all bats. We generated 85 T2R sequences and found that vampire bats have a significantly greater percentage of pseudogenes than other bats. These results strongly suggest a relaxation of selective constraint and a reduction of bitter taste function in vampire bats. We also found that vampire bats retain many intact T2Rs, and that the taste signalling pathway gene Calhm1 remains complete and intact with strong functional constraint. These results suggest the presence of some bitter taste function in vampire bats, although it is not likely to play a major role in food selection. Together, our study suggests that the evolutionary reduction of bitter taste function in animals is more pervasive than previously believed, and highlights the importance of extra-oral functions of taste receptor genes.

  1. The phosphoprotein gene of a dolphin morbillivirus isolate exhibits genomic variation at the editing site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolt, G; Alexandersen, S; Blixenkrone-Møller, M

    1995-12-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the phosphoprotein (P) gene of a dolphin morbillivirus (DMV) isolate was determined. Like those of other morbilliviruses the DMV P gene encoded P and C proteins in overlapping open reading frames and V protein by editing the P gene transcript. Among P mRNA based clones the editing site variants GGGC, GGGG, GAGC and GGGGGGC predicting a P protein, and the variants GGGGC and GGGGGG predicting a V protein, were found. Surprisingly, the three variants GGGC, GGGG and GAGC were also found among clones generated from genomic RNA of the DMV isolate. Thus, more than one viral genome type appeared to be present in cells infected with the DMV isolate. By a similar analysis of the virus genomes in the tissue from which the DMV isolate was obtained, only the GGGC type was found, indicating that the GGGG and GAGC types arose during adaptation of the virus to growth in cell cultures. No editing site variants likely to have arisen by editing the GAGC type were encountered, and it remains ot be determined whether mRNA encoding V protein can be transcribed from genomes with this editing site. Using antisera raised against the common N terminus and unique C termini of the predicted P and V proteins, the in vivo expression of these proteins was demonstrated.

  2. Bacteriophage T4D Gene 42 Mutants Exhibit a Defective Genetic Exclusion Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    an adaptive mecanism for promoting individual fitness since the protected re3lource _s used for the production of the primary infecting 1nae𔃽 own...with the direction of transcription toward gene 42 has been mapped to the 26.3 kb region (Gram et al., 1984) (Fig. 2). All of this taken together...i i I I I IN122 E498 NG411 imm- E21x3 I I 1269x3 <------------------direction of transcription NG93 Fig. 3: A genetic map of the amber mutation sites

  3. [HNF1B-related disease: paradigm of a developmental gene and unexpected recognition of a new renal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauveau, Dominique; Faguer, Stanislas; Bandin, Flavio; Guigonis, Vincent; Chassaing, Nicolas; Decramer, Stéphane

    2013-11-01

    HNF1B encodes for a transcription factor involved in the early development of the kidney, pancreas, liver and genital tract. Mutations in HNF1B are dominantly inherited and consist of whole-gene deletion, or small mutation. De novo mutation occurs in half of tested kindreds. HNF1B-related disease combines renal and non-renal manifestations. Renal involvement is heterogeneous and may escape early recognition. During fetal life and childhood, it mostly consists of hyperechogenic kidneys or bilateral renal cystic hypodysplasia. The adult phenotype encompasses tubulointerstitial profile at presentation and slowly progressive renal decline (-2 ml/min/year). Renal involvement includes renal cysts (mostly few cortical cysts), a solitary kidney, pelvi-caliceal abnormalities, hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia related to tubular leak, and more rarely, Fanconi syndrome and chromophobe renal carcinoma. The latter warrants ultrasound screening. Extrarenal phenotype consists of diabetes mellitus (MODY-5), exocrine pancreas failure and pancreas atrophy; fluctuation liver tests abnormalities; diverse genital tract abnormalities in females or infertility in males; and mild mental retardation in rare individuals. Phenotype heterogeneity within families is striking. Individuals progressing to end-stage renal disease are eligible for kidney transplantation (or combined pancreas and kidney transplantation for diabetic individuals). While HNF1B disease was still unknown one decade ago, it has emerged as the second most prevalent dominantly inherited kidney disease. Data available pave the way for early recognition and improved specific management, including genetic counselling.

  4. Transgenic Amorphophallus konjac expressing synthesized acyl-homoserine lactonase (aiiA) gene exhibit enhanced resistance to soft rot disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Huifang; Chai, Xinli; Lin, Yongjun; Zhou, Ying; Peng, Donghai; Zhou, Yi; Zou, Yulan; Yu, Ziniu; Sun, Ming

    2009-12-01

    Amorphophallus konjac is an important economic crop widely used in health products and biomaterials. However, this monocotyledonous plant's production is seriously restricted by soft rot disease. Some Bacillus thuringiensis strains generate an endocellular acyl homoserine lactonase (AiiA), which has inhibitory effect on soft rot pathogen through disrupting the signal molecules (N-acylhomoserine lactones, AHL) of their Quorum Sensing system. The aim of our study is to obtain transgenic A. konjac expressing AiiA protein and exhibiting resistance to soft rot. But till now, there is not any report about exogenous gene transformation in A. konjac. In this research, an Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation system was constructed. An aiiA gene was synthesized according to the codon usage in A. konjac. Embryogenic callus was infected with the A. tumefaciens strain EHA105 harboring the plant transformation plasmid pU1301 plus synthesized aiiA gene. After antibiotics screening, 34 plants were obtained. PCR analysis showed that positive amplified fragments were present in 21 out of these 34 lines. Southern blot analysis indicated that aiiA gene had integrated into the genome of A. konjac. Western blotting demonstrated that the target protein of interest was reactive with the antibody against AiiA. Further disease resistance detection revealed that all of the tested transgenic A. konjac lines exhibited high resistance to soft rot bacteria Erwinia carotovora subsp. Carotovora (Ecc) SCG1. The protocol is useful for the quality improvement of A. konjac through genetic transformation.

  5. Rapid Genotyping of the Human Renin (REN Gene by the LightCycler® Instrument: Identification of Unexpected Nucleotide Substitutions within the Selected Hybridization Probe Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Line Wee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a serious disorder affecting nearly 3% of all in the Western world. It is associated with hypertension and proteinuria, and several lines of evidence suggest that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS may be involved in the development of hypertension at different stages of a preeclamptic pregnancy. In this study, we developed rapid genotyping assays on the LightCycler® instrument to allow the detection of genetic variants in the renin gene (REN that may predispose to preeclampsia. The method is based on real-time PCR and allele-specific hybridization probes, followed by fluorescent melting curve analysis to expose a change in melting temperature (Tm. Ninety-two mother-father-child triads (n=276 from preeclamptic pregnancies were genotyped for three haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (htSNPs in REN. All three htSNPs (rs5705, rs1464816 and rs3795575 were successfully genotyped. Furthermore, two unexpected nucleotide substitutions (rs11571084 and rs61757041 were identified within the selected hybridization probe area of rs1464816 and rs3795575 due to aberrant melting peaks. In conclusion, genotyping on the LightCycler® instrument proved to be rapid and highly reproducible. The ability to uncover additional nucleotide substitutions is particularly important in that it allows the identification of potentially etiological variants that might otherwise be overlooked by other genotyping methods.

  6. Centrosomal-ciliary gene CEP290/NPHP6 mutations result in blindness with unexpected sparing of photoreceptors and visual brain: implications for therapy of Leber congenital amaurosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cideciyan, Artur V; Aleman, Tomas S; Jacobson, Samuel G; Khanna, Hemant; Sumaroka, Alexander; Aguirre, Geoffrey K; Schwartz, Sharon B; Windsor, Elizabeth A M; He, Shirley; Chang, Bo; Stone, Edwin M; Swaroop, Anand

    2007-11-01

    Mutations in the centrosomal-ciliary gene CEP290/NPHP6 are associated with Joubert syndrome and are the most common cause of the childhood recessive blindness known as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). An in-frame deletion in Cep290 shows rapid degeneration in the rod-rich mouse retina. To explore the mechanisms of the human retinal disease, we studied CEP290-LCA in patients of different ages (7-48 years) and compared results to Cep290-mutant mice. Unexpectedly, blind CEP290-mutant human retinas retained photoreceptor and inner laminar architecture in the cone-rich central retina, independent of severity of visual loss. Surrounding the cone-rich island was photoreceptor loss and distorted retina, suggesting neural-glial remodeling. The mutant mouse retina at 4-6 weeks of age showed similar features of retinal remodeling, with altered neural and synaptic laminae and Muller glial activation. The visual brain pathways in CEP290-LCA were anatomically intact. Our findings of preserved foveal cones and visual brain anatomy in LCA with CEP290 mutations, despite severe blindness and rapid rod cell death, suggest an opportunity for visual restoration of central vision in this common form of inherited blindness.

  7. Spontaneously immortalised bovine mammary epithelial cells exhibit a distinct gene expression pattern from the breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Qianqian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spontaneous immortalisation of cultured mammary epithelial cells (MECs is an extremely rare event, and the molecular mechanism behind spontaneous immortalisation of MECs is unclear. Here, we report the establishment of a spontaneously immortalised bovine mammary epithelial cell line (BME65Cs and the changes in gene expression associated with BME65Cs cells. Results BME65Cs cells maintain the general characteristics of normal mammary epithelial cells in morphology, karyotype and immunohistochemistry, and are accompanied by the activation of endogenous bTERT (bovine Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase and stabilisation of the telomere. Currently, BME65Cs cells have been passed for more than 220 generations, and these cells exhibit non-malignant transformation. The expression of multiple genes was investigated in BME65Cs cells, senescent BMECs (bovine MECs cells, early passage BMECs cells and MCF-7 cells (a human breast cancer cell line. In comparison with early passage BMECs cells, the expression of senescence-relevant apoptosis-related gene were significantly changed in BME65Cs cells. P16INK4a was downregulated, p53 was low expressed and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio was reversed. Moreover, a slight upregulation of the oncogene c-Myc, along with an undetectable level of breast tumor-related gene Bag-1 and TRPS-1, was observed in BME65Cs cells while these genes are all highly expressed in MCF-7. In addition, DNMT1 is upregulated in BME65Cs. These results suggest that the inhibition of both senescence and mitochondrial apoptosis signalling pathways contribute to the immortality of BME65Cs cells. The expression of p53 and p16INK4a in BME65Cs was altered in the pattern of down-regulation but not "loss", suggesting that this spontaneous immortalization is possibly initiated by other mechanism rather than gene mutation of p53 or p16INK4a. Conclusions Spontaneously immortalised BME65Cs cells maintain many characteristics of normal BMEC cells and

  8. Mono-anionic phosphopeptides produced by unexpected histidine alkylation exhibit high Plk1 polo-box domain-binding affinities and enhanced antiproliferative effects in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Wen-Jian; Park, Jung-Eun; Lim, Dan; Lai, Christopher C; Kelley, James A; Park, Suk-Youl; Lee, Ki Won; Yaffe, Michael B; Lee, Kyung S; Burke, Terrence R

    2014-11-01

    Binding of polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) polo-box domains (PBDs) to phosphothreonine (pThr)/phosphoserine (pSer)-containing sequences is critical for the proper function of Plk1. Although high-affinity synthetic pThr-containing peptides provide starting points for developing PBD-directed inhibitors, to date the efficacy of such peptides in whole cell assays has been poor. This potentially reflects limited cell membrane permeability arising, in part, from the di-anionic nature of the phosphoryl group or its mimetics. In our current article we report the unanticipated on-resin N(τ)-alkylation of histidine residues already bearing a N(π)- alkyl group. This resulted in cationic imidazolium-containing pThr peptides, several of which exhibit single-digit nanomolar PBD-binding affinities in extracellular assays and improved antimitotic efficacies in intact cells. We enhanced the cellular efficacies of these peptides further by applying bio-reversible pivaloyloxymethyl (POM) phosphoryl protection. New structural insights presented in our current study, including the potential utility of intramolecular charge masking, may be useful for the further development of PBD-binding peptides and peptide mimetics. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Aquaporin family genes exhibit developmentally-regulated and host-dependent transcription patterns in the sea louse Caligus rogercresseyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farlora, Rodolfo; Valenzuela-Muñoz, Valentina; Chávez-Mardones, Jacqueline; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian

    2016-07-01

    Aquaporins are small integral membrane proteins that function as pore channels for the transport of water and other small solutes across the cell membrane. Considering the important roles of these proteins in several biological processes, including host-parasite interactions, there has been increased research on aquaporin proteins recently. The present study expands on the knowledge of aquaporin family genes in parasitic copepods, examining diversity and expression during the ontogeny of the sea louse Caligus rogercresseyi. Furthermore, aquaporin expression was evaluated during the early infestation of Atlantic (Salmo salar) and Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). Deep transcriptome sequencing data revealed eight full length and two partial open reading frames belonging to the aquaporin protein family. Clustering analyses with identified Caligidae sequences revealed three major clades of aquaglyceroporins (Cr-Glp), classical aquaporin channels (Cr-Bib and Cr-PripL), and unorthodox aquaporins (Cr-Aqp12-like). In silico analysis revealed differential expression of aquaporin genes between developmental stages and between sexes. Male-biased expression of Cr-Glp1_v1 and female-biased expression of Cr-Bib were further confirmed in adults by RT-qPCR. Additionally, gene expressions were measured for seven aquaporins during the early infestation stage. The majority of aquaporin genes showed significant differential transcription expressions between sea lice parasitizing different hosts, with Atlantic salmon sea lice exhibiting overall reduced expression as compared to Coho salmon. The observed differences in the regulation of aquaporin genes may reveal osmoregulatory adaptations associated with nutrient ingestion and metabolite waste export, exposing complex host-parasite relationships in C. rogercresseyi.

  10. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing a grass PpEXP1 gene exhibit enhanced tolerance to heat stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Xu

    Full Text Available Heat stress is a detrimental abiotic stress limiting the growth of many plant species and is associated with various cellular and physiological damages. Expansins are a family of proteins which are known to play roles in regulating cell wall elongation and expansion, as well as other growth and developmental processes. The in vitro roles of expansins regulating plant heat tolerance are not well understood. The objectives of this study were to isolate and clone an expansin gene in a perennial grass species (Poa pratensis and to determine whether over-expression of expansin may improve plant heat tolerance. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum was used as the model plant for gene transformation and an expansin gene PpEXP1 from Poa pratensis was cloned. Sequence analysis showed PpEXP1 belonged to α-expansins and was closely related to two expansin genes in other perennial grass species (Festuca pratensis and Agrostis stolonifera as well as Triticum aestivum, Oryza sativa, and Brachypodium distachyon. Transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing PpEXP1 were generated through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Under heat stress (42°C in growth chambers, transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing the PpEXP1 gene exhibited a less structural damage to cells, lower electrolyte leakage, lower levels of membrane lipid peroxidation, and lower content of hydrogen peroxide, as well as higher chlorophyll content, net photosynthetic rate, relative water content, activity of antioxidant enzyme, and seed germination rates, compared to the wild-type plants. These results demonstrated the positive roles of PpEXP1 in enhancing plant tolerance to heat stress and the possibility of using expansins for genetic modification of cool-season perennial grasses in the development of heat-tolerant germplasm and cultivars.

  11. Transgenic mice expressing mutant Pinin exhibit muscular dystrophy, nebulin deficiency and elevated expression of slow-type muscle fiber genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hsu-Pin; Hsu, Shu-Yuan [Department of Anatomy, Chang Gung University Medical College, Taiwan (China); Wu, Wen-Ai; Hu, Ji-Wei [Transgenic Mouse Core Laboratory, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Ouyang, Pin, E-mail: ouyang@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Anatomy, Chang Gung University Medical College, Taiwan (China); Transgenic Mouse Core Laboratory, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Molecular Medicine Research Center, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Pnn CCD domain functions as a dominant negative mutant regulating Pnn expression and function. •Pnn CCD mutant Tg mice have a muscle wasting phenotype during development and show dystrophic histological features. •Pnn mutant muscles are susceptible to slow fiber type gene transition and NEB reduction. •The Tg mouse generated by overexpression of the Pnn CCD domain displays many characteristics resembling NEB{sup +/−} mice. -- Abstract: Pinin (Pnn) is a nuclear speckle-associated SR-like protein. The N-terminal region of the Pnn protein sequence is highly conserved from mammals to insects, but the C-terminal RS domain-containing region is absent in lower species. The N-terminal coiled-coil domain (CCD) is, therefore, of interest not only from a functional point of view, but also from an evolutionarily standpoint. To explore the biological role of the Pnn CCD in a physiological context, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing Pnn mutant in skeletal muscle. We found that overexpression of the CCD reduces endogenous Pnn expression in cultured cell lines as well as in transgenic skeletal muscle fibers. Pnn mutant mice exhibited reduced body mass and impaired muscle function during development. Mutant skeletal muscles show dystrophic histological features with muscle fibers heavily loaded with centrally located myonuclei. Expression profiling and pathway analysis identified over-representation of genes in gene categories associated with muscle contraction, specifically those related to slow type fiber. In addition nebulin (NEB) expression level is repressed in Pnn mutant skeletal muscle. We conclude that Pnn downregulation in skeletal muscle causes a muscular dystrophic phenotype associated with NEB deficiency and the CCD domain is incapable of replacing full length Pnn in terms of functional capacity.

  12. An unexpected pulmonary bystander

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouthuyzen-Bakker, M.; Vorm, van der P. A.; Koning, K. J.; van der Werf, T. S.

    2016-01-01

    A 30-year-old man from Eritrea was admitted with a pulmonary bacterial abscess. Unexpectedly, histopathology of the resected lobe also revealed an infection with Schistosoma mansoni with surrounding granulomatous tissue and fibrosis. Patients from endemic areas are often asymptomatic with blood eosi

  13. Pathogenesis-related gene, JcPR-10a from Jatropha curcas exhibit RNase and antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Parinita; Bhatt, Vacha; Singh, Rekha; Das, Mamali; Sopory, Sudhir K; Chikara, Jitendra

    2013-06-01

    The pathogenesis-related proteins have a broad spectrum of roles, ranging from seed germination, development to resistance. The PR-10 is a multigene family differing from other PR proteins in being intracellular, small and acidic with similar 3D structures. We have isolated JcPR-10a cDNA with an ORF of 483 bp from J. curcas, an important biofuel crop grown in the wastelands of India. JcPR-10a gets clustered with dicots in phylogenetic tree. The genomic organisation analysis of JcPR-10a revealed the presence of an intron at conserved 185 bp position. Transcript expression of JcPR-10a was upregulated in response to different stimuli such as NaCl, salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate and M. phaseolina. In response to SA and Macrophomina the transcript was found increased at 48 h, however, in case of NaCl and MeJa a strong induction was observed at 12 h which decreased at 48 h. We first time report the transcript up regulation of PR-10 gene by Macrophomina, a pathogen causing collar rot in Jatropha. The recombinant E. coli cells showed better growth in LB medium supplemented with NaCl, whereas growth of recombinant cells was inhibited in LB medium supplemented with KCl, mannitol, sorbitol, methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid. The JcPR-10a protein was overexpressed in E. coli cells, and was purified to homogeneity, the purified protein exhibited RNase and DNase activity. Furthermore, the protein also showed antifungal activity against Macrophomina, indicating that JcPR-10a can serve as an important candidate to engineer stress tolerance in Jatropha as well as other plants susceptible to collar rot by Macrophomina.

  14. The SKP1-like gene family of Arabidopsis exhibits a high degree of differential gene expression and gene product interaction during development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad H Dezfulian

    Full Text Available The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes several families of polypeptides that are known or predicted to participate in the formation of the SCF-class of E3-ubiquitin ligase complexes. One such gene family encodes the Skp1-like class of polypeptide subunits, where 21 genes have been identified and are known to be expressed in Arabidopsis. Phylogenetic analysis based on deduced polypeptide sequence organizes the family of ASK proteins into 7 clades. The complexity of the ASK gene family, together with the close structural similarity among its members raises the prospect of significant functional redundancy among select paralogs. We have assessed the potential for functional redundancy within the ASK gene family by analyzing an expanded set of criteria that define redundancy with higher resolution. The criteria used include quantitative expression of locus-specific transcripts using qRT-PCR, assessment of the sub-cellular localization of individual ASK:YFP auto-fluorescent fusion proteins expressed in vivo as well as the in planta assessment of individual ASK-F-Box protein interactions using bimolecular fluorescent complementation techniques in combination with confocal imagery in live cells. The results indicate significant functional divergence of steady state transcript abundance and protein-protein interaction specificity involving ASK proteins in a pattern that is poorly predicted by sequence-based phylogeny. The information emerging from this and related studies will prove important for defining the functional intersection of expression, localization and gene product interaction that better predicts the formation of discrete SCF complexes, as a prelude to investigating their molecular mode of action.

  15. The SKP1-like gene family of Arabidopsis exhibits a high degree of differential gene expression and gene product interaction during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezfulian, Mohammad H; Soulliere, Danielle M; Dhaliwal, Rajdeep K; Sareen, Madhulika; Crosby, William L

    2012-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes several families of polypeptides that are known or predicted to participate in the formation of the SCF-class of E3-ubiquitin ligase complexes. One such gene family encodes the Skp1-like class of polypeptide subunits, where 21 genes have been identified and are known to be expressed in Arabidopsis. Phylogenetic analysis based on deduced polypeptide sequence organizes the family of ASK proteins into 7 clades. The complexity of the ASK gene family, together with the close structural similarity among its members raises the prospect of significant functional redundancy among select paralogs. We have assessed the potential for functional redundancy within the ASK gene family by analyzing an expanded set of criteria that define redundancy with higher resolution. The criteria used include quantitative expression of locus-specific transcripts using qRT-PCR, assessment of the sub-cellular localization of individual ASK:YFP auto-fluorescent fusion proteins expressed in vivo as well as the in planta assessment of individual ASK-F-Box protein interactions using bimolecular fluorescent complementation techniques in combination with confocal imagery in live cells. The results indicate significant functional divergence of steady state transcript abundance and protein-protein interaction specificity involving ASK proteins in a pattern that is poorly predicted by sequence-based phylogeny. The information emerging from this and related studies will prove important for defining the functional intersection of expression, localization and gene product interaction that better predicts the formation of discrete SCF complexes, as a prelude to investigating their molecular mode of action.

  16. Exhibit Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Marianne Foss

    ) a synthesis of the findings from the first two studies with findings from the literature to generate two types of results: a coherent series of suggestions for a design iteration of the studied exhibit as well as a more general normative model for exhibit engineering. Finally, another perspective...

  17. Human Exhibitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Rikke

    From 1870s to 1910s, more than 50 exhibitions of so-called exotic people took place in Denmark. Here large numbers of people of Asian and African origin were exhibited for the entertainment and ‘education’ of a mass audience. Several of these exhibitions took place in Copenhagen Zoo. Here different...... light on the staging of exhibitions, the daily life of the exhibitees, the wider connections between shows across Europe and the thinking of the time on matters of race, science, gender and sexuality. A window onto contemporary racial understandings, the book presents interviews with the descendants...... of displayed people, connecting the attitudes and science of the past with both our (continued) modern fascination with ‘the exotic’, and contemporary language and popular culture. As such, it will be of interest to scholars of sociology, anthropology and history working in the areas of gender and sexuality...

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms exposed to imipenem exhibit changes in global gene expression and beta-lactamase and alginate production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, N.; Schuster, M.; Hentzer, Morten

    2004-01-01

    . As expected, the most strongly induced gene was ampC, which codes for chromosomal beta-lactamase. We also found that genes coding for alginate biosynthesis were induced by exposure to imipenem. Alginate production is correlated to the development of impaired lung function, and P. aeruginosa strains isolated...

  19. Human imprinted retrogenes exhibit non-canonical imprint chromatin signatures and reside in non-imprinted host genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, David; Arnaud, Philippe; Frost, Jennifer M.; Wood, Andrew J.; Cowley, Michael; Martin-Trujillo, Alejandro; Guillaumet-Adkins, Amy; Iglesias Platas, Isabel; Camprubi, Cristina; Bourc’his, Deborah; Feil, Robert; Moore, Gudrun E.; Oakey, Rebecca J.

    2011-01-01

    Imprinted retrotransposed genes share a common genomic organization including a promoter-associated differentially methylated region (DMR) and a position within the intron of a multi-exonic ‘host’ gene. In the mouse, at least one transcript of the host gene is also subject to genomic imprinting. Human retrogene orthologues are imprinted and we reveal that human host genes are not imprinted. This coincides with genomic rearrangements that occurred during primate evolution, which increase the separation between the retrogene DMRs and the host genes. To address the mechanisms governing imprinted retrogene expression, histone modifications were assayed at the DMRs. For the mouse retrogenes, the active mark H3K4me2 was associated with the unmethylated paternal allele, while the methylated maternal allele was enriched in repressive marks including H3K9me3 and H4K20me3. Two human retrogenes showed monoallelic enrichment of active, but not of repressive marks suggesting a partial uncoupling of the relationship between DNA methylation and repressive histone methylation, possibly due to the smaller size and lower CpG density of these DMRs. Finally, we show that the genes immediately flanking the host genes in mouse and human are biallelically expressed in a range of tissues, suggesting that these loci are distinct from large imprinted clusters. PMID:21300645

  20. Complete mitochondrial DNA sequence of the endangered frog Odorrana ishikawae (family Ranidae) and unexpected diversity of mt gene arrangements in ranids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurabayashi, Atsushi; Yoshikawa, Natsuhiko; Sato, Naoki; Hayashi, Yoko; Oumi, Shohei; Fujii, Tamotsu; Sumida, Masayuki

    2010-08-01

    We determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial (mt) genome of an endangered Japanese frog, Odorrana ishikawae (family Ranidae). We also sequenced partial mt genomes of three other Odorrana and six ranid species to survey the diversity of genomic organizations and elucidate the phylogenetic problems remaining in this frog family. The O. ishikawae mt genome contained the 37 mt genes and single control region (CR) typically found in vertebrate mtDNAs, but the region of Light-strand replication origin (OL) was triplicated in this species. Four protein-encoding genes (atp6, nd2, nd3, and nd5) were found to have high sequence divergence and to be usable for population genetics studies on this endangered species. Among the surveyed ranids, only two species (Rana and Lithobates) manifested the typical neobatrachian-type mt gene arrangement. In contrast, relatively large gene rearrangements were found in Amolops, Babina, and Staurois species; and translocations of single tRNA genes (trns) were observed in Glandirana and Odorrana species. Though the inter-generic and interspecific relationships of ranid taxa remain to be elucidated based on 12S and 16S rrn sequence data, some of the derived mt gene orders were found to have synapomorphic features useful for solving problematic ranid phylogenies. The tandem duplication and random loss (TDRL) model, the traditional model for mt gene rearrangement, failed to easily explain several of the mt gene rearrangements observed here. Indeed, the recent recombination-based gene rearrangement models seemed to be more suitable for this purpose. The high frequency of gene translocations involving a specific trn block (trnH-trnS1) and several single tRNA genes suggest that there may be a retrotranslocation in ranid mt genomes.

  1. An integrated analysis of genes and pathways exhibiting metabolic differences between estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davie James R

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sex hormone estrogen (E2 is pivotal to normal mammary gland growth and differentiation and in breast carcinogenesis. In this in silico study, we examined metabolic differences between ER(+ve breast cancer cells during E2 deprivation. Methods Public repositories of SAGE and MA gene expression data generated from E2 deprived ER(+ve breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and ZR75-1 were compared with normal breast tissue. We analyzed gene ontology (GO, enrichment, clustering, chromosome localization, and pathway profiles and performed multiple comparisons with cell lines and tumors with different ER status. Results In all GO terms, biological process (BP, molecular function (MF, and cellular component (CC, MCF-7 had higher gene utilization than ZR75-1. Various analyses showed a down-regulated immune function, an up-regulated protein (ZR75-1 and glucose metabolism (MCF-7. A greater percentage of 77 common genes localized to the q arm of all chromosomes, but in ZR75-1 chromosomes 11, 16, and 19 harbored more overexpressed genes. Despite differences in gene utilization (electron transport, proteasome, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and expression (ribosome in both cells, there was an overall similarity of ZR75-1 with ER(-ve cell lines and ER(+ve/ER(-ve breast tumors. Conclusion This study demonstrates integral metabolic differences may exist within the same cell subtype (luminal A in representative ER(+ve cell line models. Selectivity of gene and pathway usage for strategies such as energy requirement minimization, sugar utilization by ZR75-1 contrasted with MCF-7 cells, expressing genes whose protein products require ATP utilization. Such characteristics may impart aggressiveness to ZR75-1 and may be prognostic determinants of ER(+ve breast tumors.

  2. Exhibit Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Marianne Foss

    of tools and processes to guide the design of educational science exhibits. The guiding paradigm for this development is design-based research, which is characterised by an iterative cycle of design, enactment, and analysis. In the design phase, an educational intervention is planned and carried out based...... on a hypothesised learning process and the means of supporting it. In the enactment phase, the educational intervention is implemented (i.e. the planned lesson is taught, or the museum exhibit is opened to the public). Finally, the analysis phase establishes causality between emergent characteristics...... of the learning outcomes and the design characteristics of the intervention. The analysis process can yield two types of outcomes: Suggestions for the refinement of the specific design in question, and “humble” theory, which is theory that can guide the design of a category of educational interventions...

  3. Case report: an unexpected link between partial deletion of the SHANK3 gene and Heller's dementia infantilis, a rare subtype of autism spectrum disorder

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Philippe, Anne; Craus, Yann; Rio, Marlène; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Boddaert, Nathalie; Malan, Valérie; Bonnefont, Jean-Paul; Robel, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Deletions and mutations involving the SHANK3 gene lead to a nonspecific clinical presentation with moderate to profound intellectual disability, severely delayed or absent speech, and autism spectrum disorders (ASD...

  4. Mouse Nkd1, a Wnt antagonist, exhibits oscillatory gene expression in the PSM under the control of Notch signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Aki; Kitajima, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yu; Kokubo, Hiroki; Kanno, Jun; Inoue, Tohru; Saga, Yumiko

    2004-12-01

    During vertebrate embryogenesis, the formation of reiterated structures along the body axis is dependent upon the generation of the somite by segmentation of the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). Notch signaling plays a crucial role in both the generation and regulation of the molecular clock that provides the spatial information for PSM cells to form somites. In a screen for novel genes involved in somitogenesis, we identified a gene encoding a Wnt antagonist, Nkd1, which is transcribed in an oscillatory manner, and may represent a new member of the molecular clock constituents. The transcription of nkd1 is extremely downregulated in the PSM of vestigial tail (vt/vt), a hypomorphic mutant of Wnt3a, whereas nkd1 oscillations have a similar phase to lunatic fringe (L-fng) transcription and they are arrested in Hes7 (a negative regulator of Notch signaling) deficient embryos. These results suggest that the transcription of nkd1 requires Wnt3a, and that its oscillation patterns depend upon the function of Hes7. Wnt signaling has been postulated to be upstream of Notch signaling but we demonstrate in this study that a Wnt-signal-related gene may also be regulated by Notch signaling. Collectively, our data suggest that the reciprocal interaction of Notch and Wnt signals, and of their respective negative feedback loops, function to organize the segmentation clock required for somitogenesis.

  5. Unexpected distribution of the fluoroquinolone-resistance gene qnrB in Escherichia coli isolates from different human and poultry origins in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas-Freire, Paulina I; Trueba, Gabriel; Proaño-Bolaños, Carolina; Levy, Karen; Zhang, Lixin; Marrs, Carl F; Cevallos, William; Eisenberg, Joseph N S

    2015-06-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance can be conferred through chromosomal mutations or by the acquisition of plasmids carrying genes such as the quinolone resistance gene (qnr). In this study, 3,309 strains of commensal Escherichia coli were isolated in Ecuador from: (i) humans and chickens in a rural northern coastal area (n = 2368, 71.5%) and (ii) chickens from an industrial poultry operation (n = 827, 25%). In addition, 114 fluoroquinolone-resistant strains from patients with urinary tract infections who were treated at three urban hospitals in Quito, Ecuador were analyzed. All of the isolates were subjected to antibiotic susceptibility screening. Fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates (FRIs) were then screened for the presence of qnrB genes. A significantly higher phenotypic resistance to fluoroquinolones was determined in E. coli strains from chickens in both the rural area (22%) and the industrial operation (10%) than in strains isolated from humans in the rural communities (3%). However, the rates of qnrB genes in E. coli isolates from healthy humans in the rural communities (11 of 35 isolates, 31%) was higher than in chickens from either the industrial operations (3 of 81 isolates, 6%) or the rural communities (7 of 251 isolates, 2.8%). The occurrence of qnrB genes in human FRIs obtained from urban hospitals was low (1 of 114 isolates, 0.9%). These results suggested that the qnrB gene is more widely distributed in rural settings, where antibiotic usage is low, than in urban hospitals and industrial poultry operations. The role of qnrB in clinical resistance to fluoroquinolones is thus far unknown.

  6. Loss of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 2 (RDR2 function causes widespread and unexpected changes in the expression of transposons, genes, and 24-nt small RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Jia

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Transposable elements (TEs comprise a substantial portion of many eukaryotic genomes and are typically transcriptionally silenced. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 2 (RDR2 is a component of the RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM silencing pathway. In maize, loss of mediator of paramutation1 (mop1 encoded RDR2 function results in reactivation of transcriptionally silenced Mu transposons and a substantial reduction in the accumulation of 24 nt short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs that recruit RNA silencing components. An RNA-seq experiment conducted on shoot apical meristems (SAMs revealed that, as expected based on a model in which RDR2 generates 24 nt siRNAs that suppress expression, most differentially expressed DNA TEs (78% were up-regulated in the mop1 mutant. In contrast, most differentially expressed retrotransposons (68% were down-regulated. This striking difference suggests that distinct silencing mechanisms are applied to different silencing templates. In addition, >6,000 genes (24% of analyzed genes, including nearly 80% (286/361 of genes in chromatin modification pathways, were differentially expressed. Overall, two-thirds of differentially regulated genes were down-regulated in the mop1 mutant. This finding suggests that RDR2 plays a significant role in regulating the expression of not only transposons, but also of genes. A re-analysis of existing small RNA data identified both RDR2-sensitive and RDR2-resistant species of 24 nt siRNAs that we hypothesize may at least partially explain the complex changes in the expression of genes and transposons observed in the mop1 mutant.

  7. Different vitamin D receptor agonists exhibit differential effects on endothelial function and aortic gene expression in 5/6 nephrectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu-Wong, J Ruth; Li, Xinmin; Chen, Yung-Wu

    2015-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunction, common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), significantly increases cardiovascular disease risk in CKD patients. This study investigates whether different vitamin D receptor agonists exhibit different effects on endothelial function and on aortic gene expression in an animal CKD model. The 5/6 nephrectomized (NX) rat was treated with or without alfacalcidol (0.02, 0.04 and 0.08μg/kg), paricalcitol (0.04 and 0.08μg/kg), or VS-105 (0.004, 0.01 and 0.16μg/kg). All three compounds at the test doses suppressed serum parathyroid hormone effectively. Alfacalcidol at 0.08μg/kg raised serum calcium significantly. Endothelial function was assessed by pre-contracting thoracic aortic rings with phenylephrine, followed by treatment with acetylcholine or sodium nitroprusside. Uremia significantly affected endothelial-dependent aortic relaxation, which was improved by all three compounds in a dose-dependent manner with alfacalcidol and paricalcitol exhibiting a lesser effect. DNA microarray analysis of aorta samples revealed that uremia impacted the expression of numerous aortic genes, many of which were normalized by the vitamin D analogs. Real-time RT-PCR analysis confirmed that selected genes such as Abra, Apoa4, Fabp2, Hsd17b2, and Hspa1b affected by uremia were normalized by the vitamin D analogs with alfacalcidol exhibiting less of an effect. These results demonstrate that different vitamin D analogs exhibit different effects on endothelial function and aortic gene expression in 5/6 NX rats. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '17th Vitamin D Workshop'.

  8. Two P5CS genes from common bean exhibiting different tolerance to salt stress in transgenic Arabidopsis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ji Bao Chen; Jian Wei Yang; Zhao Yuan Zhang; Xiao Fan Feng; Shu Min Wang

    2013-12-01

    Many plants accumulate proline in response to salt stress. -pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS) is the rate-limiting enzyme in proline biosynthesis in plants. Plasmid DNA (pCHF3-PvP5CS1 and pCHF3-PvP5CS2) containing the selectable neomycin phosphotransferase gene for kanamycin resistance and Phaseolus vulgaris P5CS (PvP5CS1 and PvP5CS2) cDNA was introduced into Arabidopsis plants using Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer. Southern blot, northern blot and RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that the foreign genes were integrated into Arabidopsis chromosomal DNA and expressed. Single-gene transformants were analysed in this study. Transgenic plants expressed higher levels of PvP5CS1 and PvP5CS2 transcripts under salt stress conditions than under normal conditions. When treated with 0, 100 and 200 mM NaCl, the average proline content in leaves of transgenic plants was significantly higher $(P \\lt 0.01)$ than control plants. The average relative electrical conductivity (REC) of transgenic lines was significantly lower $(P \\lt 0.01)$ than control plants under salt stress condition. Biomass production of transgenic lines was significantly higher $(P \\lt 0.05)$ than control plants under 200 mM NaCl stress treatment. These results indicated that introducing PvP5CS1 and PvP5CS2 cDNA into transgenic Arabidopsis caused proline overproduction, increasing salt tolerance. Although the expression of PvP5CS1 in L4 lines and PvP5CS2 in S4 lines was the same under salt stress condition, the S4 lines accumulated 1.6 and 1.9 times more proline than the L4 lines under 100 and 200 mM NaCl treatments, respectively. The REC of S4 plants was 0.5 (100 mM NaCl) and 0.6 times (200 mM NaCl) that of L4 plants. The biomass production of S4 plants was 1.6 times (200 mM NaCl) more than in L4 plants. Total P5CS enzyme activity of S4 was significantly higher than that of L4. These results implied that the PvP5CS2 protein had stronger capacity to catalyze proline synthesis than PvP5CS1 under salt

  9. Avian hepatitis E virus identified in Russian chicken flocks exhibits high genetic divergence based on the ORF2 capsid gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprygin, A V; Nikonova, Z B; Zinyakov, N G

    2012-10-01

    A total of 79 liver samples from clinically sick and asymptomatic chickens were tested for avian hepatitis E virus (aHEV). Samples were received from 19 farms, five of which tested positive with primers targeting the ORF2 capsid gene. The phylogenetic analysis of a 242-base-pair fragment demonstrated that the Russian aHEV isolates share between 78.2 and 96.2% over the fragment sequenced, whereas the nucleotide sequence identities between the Russian isolates and the other representatives from GeneBank varied from 76.3 to 96.2%. The homology between the studied hepatitis E viruses and swine hepatitis E virus varied between 46.9 to 48.1%. The most divergent isolate aHEV16050 showed homology of 82.6% as compared with the strains in the dendrogram. The three positive hepatitis E virus samples (aHEV16279, aHEV16050 and aHEV18196) did not cluster with the European genotype 3 as expected due to the close location of Russia to Europe, nor did they with the other two genotypes, separating to a distinct branch. The aHEV16211 grouped together with European and Chinese isolates, and the aHEV18198 with Canadian ones.

  10. Human U2 snRNA genes exhibit a persistently open transcriptional state and promoter disassembly at metaphase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelitz, Thomas; Bailey, Arnold D; Elco, Christopher P; Weiner, Alan M

    2008-06-01

    In mammals, small multigene families generate spliceosomal U snRNAs that are nearly as abundant as rRNA. Using the tandemly repeated human U2 genes as a model, we show by footprinting with DNase I and permanganate that nearly all sequences between the enhancer-like distal sequence element and the initiation site are protected during interphase whereas the upstream half of the U2 snRNA coding region is exposed. We also show by chromatin immunoprecipitation that the SNAPc complex, which binds the TATA-like proximal sequence element, is removed at metaphase but remains bound under conditions that induce locus-specific metaphase fragility of the U2 genes, such as loss of CSB, BRCA1, or BRCA2 function, treatment with actinomycin D, or overexpression of the tetrameric p53 C terminus. We propose that the U2 snRNA promoter establishes a persistently open state to facilitate rapid reinitiation and perhaps also to bypass TFIIH-dependent promoter melting; this open state would then be disassembled to allow metaphase chromatin condensation.

  11. Transgenic rice plants expressing the snowdrop lectin gene (gna) exhibit high-level resistance to the whitebacked planthopper (Sogatella furcifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagadhara, D; Ramesh, S; Pasalu, I C; Rao, Y Kondala; Sarma, N P; Reddy, V D; Rao, K V

    2004-11-01

    Transgenic rice plants, expressing snowdrop lectin [Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)], obtained by Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation, were evaluated for resistance against the insect, the whitebacked planthopper (WBPH). The transgene gna was driven by the phloem-specific, rice-sucrose synthase promoter RSs1, and the bar was driven by the CaMV 35S promoter. In our previous study, the transgenic status of these lines was confirmed by Southern, Northern and Western blot analyses. Both the transgenes, gna and bar, were stably inherited and co-segregated into progenies in T1 to T5 generations. Insect bioassays on transgenic plants revealed the potent entomotoxic effects of GNA on the WBPH. Also, significant decreases were observed in the survival, development and fecundity of the insects fed on transgenic plants. Furthermore, intact GNA was detected in the total proteins of WBPHs fed on these plants. Western blot analysis revealed stable and consistent expression of GNA throughout the growth and development of transgenic plants. Transgenic lines expressing GNA exhibited high-level resistance against the WBPH. As reported earlier, these transgenics also showed substantial resistance against the brown planthopper and green leafhopper.

  12. Dancing together and separate again: gymnosperms exhibit frequent changes of fundamental 5S and 35S rRNA gene (rDNA) organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, S; Kovařík, A

    2013-07-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the 5S rRNA genes occur in tandem units and are arranged either separately (S-type arrangement) or linked to other repeated genes, in most cases to rDNA locus encoding 18S-5.8S-26S genes (L-type arrangement). Here we used Southern blot hybridisation, PCR and sequencing approaches to analyse genomic organisation of rRNA genes in all large gymnosperm groups, including Coniferales, Ginkgoales, Gnetales and Cycadales. The data are provided for 27 species (21 genera). The 5S units linked to the 35S rDNA units occur in some but not all Gnetales, Coniferales and in Ginkgo (∼30% of the species analysed), while the remaining exhibit separate organisation. The linked 5S rRNA genes may occur as single-copy insertions or as short tandems embedded in the 26S-18S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS). The 5S transcript may be encoded by the same (Ginkgo, Ephedra) or opposite (Podocarpus) DNA strand as the 18S-5.8S-26S genes. In addition, pseudogenised 5S copies were also found in some IGS types. Both L- and S-type units have been largely homogenised across the genomes. Phylogenetic relationships based on the comparison of 5S coding sequences suggest that the 5S genes independently inserted IGS at least three times in the course of gymnosperm evolution. Frequent transpositions and rearrangements of basic units indicate relatively relaxed selection pressures imposed on genomic organisation of 5S genes in plants.

  13. An unexpected wide population variation of the G1733A polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene: data on the Mediterranean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, E; Via, M; González-Pérez, E; Santamaría, J; Dugoujon, J M; Vona, G; Harich, N; Luna, F; Saetta, A A; Bissar, N; Moral, P

    2005-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) has been proposed as a candidate gene for several cancers (breast, prostate, uterine endometrium, colon, and esophagus). Ethnicity is considered an associated risk factor for some of these cancers. Several case-control genetic studies have been focused in samples of the main ethnic groups, but little is known about the distribution of risk polymorphisms in current populations with accurate ethnic and/or geographic origins. The A allele of the G1733A polymorphism of the AR gene has been associated with increased risk of prostate cancer. We provide data from this marker in 12 samples from 7 Mediterranean countries such as Spain, Italy (Sardinia), Greece, Turkey, Morocco, Algeria, and Egypt. A sample from Ivory Coast has also been analyzed. The A allele distribution shows a frequency in the Ivory Coast population (65.17%) that contrasts with the low values found in Northern Mediterraneans (mean average value of 13.98%). North African populations present two-times higher frequencies (average value of 27.19%) than Europeans. The wide population variation range found for the A allele strengthens the potential interest of further screening as a baseline to the design of future preventive and population health programs. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  14. Ethnic-specific splicing mutation of the carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase gene in a Chinese neonate presenting with sudden unexpected death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林青云; 赖志刚; 周镇邦; 汤瑞芳; 袁月冰; 麦婉芳; 陈恩和

    2003-01-01

    Carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase (CACT) deficiency (OMIM 212138) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations of the SLC25A20 gene [solute carrier family 25 (carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase), member 20]. The gene has an open reading frame of 903 bp,1 mapped to chromosome 3p21.31 by in situ hybridization,2 and encodes a protein having three repeated homologous domains, each about 100 amino acids in length-a characteristic feature of mitochondrial transport proteins.3,4 CACT is essential in long-chain fatty acid oxidation because CACT is located in the inner side of the inner mitochondrial membrane, shuttling long-chain acylcarnitines in the intermembranous space against carnitine in the mitochondrial matrix. The first patient with CACT deficiency reported in the United States,5 and the first patient reported in the United Kingdom6 are both of mixed ethnicity with one of the parents being Chinese. Intriguingly, there is no single case of CACT deficiency reported in Chinese populations, suggesting that this disease may be underdiagnosed in Chinese populations. In this study, we have confirmed that CACT deficiency can be a cause of sudden neonatal death in Chinese.

  15. Transcriptome analysis reveals an unexpected role of a collagen tyrosine kinase receptor gene, Ddr2, as a regulator of ovarian function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Hirokazu; Kano, Kiyoshi; Marín de Evsikova, Caralina; Young, James A; Nishina, Patsy M; Naggert, Jürgen K; Naito, Kunihiko

    2009-10-07

    Mice homozygous for the smallie (slie) mutation lack a collagen receptor, discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2), and are dwarfed and infertile due to peripheral dysregulation of the endocrine system of unknown etiology. We used a systems biology approach to identify biological networks affected by Ddr2(slie/slie) mutation in ovaries using microarray analysis and validate findings using molecular, cellular, and functional biological assays. Transcriptome analysis indicated several altered gene categories in Ddr2(slie/slie) mutants, including gonadal development, ovulation, antiapoptosis, and steroid hormones. Subsequent biological experiments confirmed the transcriptome analysis predictions. For instance, a significant increase of TUNEL-positive follicles was found in Ddr2(slie/slie) mutants vs. wild type, which confirm the transcriptome prediction for decreased chromatin maintenance and antiapoptosis. Decreases in gene expression were confirmed by RT-PCR and/or qPCR; luteinizing hormone receptor and prostaglandin type E and F receptors in Ddr2(slie/slie) mutants, compared with wild type, confirm hormonal signaling pathways involved in ovulation. Furthermore, deficiencies in immunohistochemistry for DDR2 and luteinizing hormone receptor in the somatic cells, but not the oocytes, of Ddr2(slie/slie) mutant ovaries suggest against an intrinsic defect in germ cells. Indeed, Ddr2(slie/slie) mutants ovulated significantly fewer oocytes; their oocytes were competent to complete meiosis and fertilization in vitro. Taken together, our convergent data signify DDR2 as a novel critical player in ovarian function, which acts upon classical endocrine pathways in somatic, rather than germline, cells.

  16. Missense and nonsense mutations in melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R gene of different goat breeds: association with red and black coat colour phenotypes but with unexpected evidences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davoli Roberta

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Agouti and Extension loci control the relative amount of eumelanin and pheomelanin production in melanocytes that, in turn, affects pigmentation of skin and hair. The Extension locus encodes the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R whose permanent activation, caused by functional mutations, results in black coat colour, whereas other inactivating mutations cause red coat colour in different mammals. Results The whole coding region of the MC1R gene was sequenced in goats of six different breeds showing different coat colours (Girgentana, white cream with usually small red spots in the face; Maltese, white with black cheeks and ears; Derivata di Siria, solid red; Murciano-Granadina, solid black or solid brown; Camosciata delle Alpi, brown with black stripes; Saanen, white; F1 goats and the parental animals. Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were identified: one nonsense mutation (p.Q225X, three missense mutations (p.A81V, p.F250V, and p.C267W, and one silent mutation. The stop codon at position 225 should cause the production of a shorter MC1R protein whose functionality may be altered. These SNPs were investigated in a larger sample of animals belonging to the six breeds. The Girgentana breed was almost fixed for the p.225X allele. However, there was not complete association between the presence of red spots in the face and the presence of this allele in homozygous condition. The same allele was identified in the Derivata di Siria breed. However, its frequency was only 33%, despite the fact that these animals are completely red. The p.267W allele was present in all Murciano-Granadina black goats, whereas it was never identified in the brown ones. Moreover, the same substitution was present in almost all Maltese goats providing evidence of association between this mutation and black coat colour. Conclusion According to the results obtained in the investigated goat breeds, MC1R mutations may determine eumelanic and pheomelanic

  17. A nuclear mutant of Chlamydomonas that exhibits increased sensitivity to UV irradiation, reduced recombination of nuclear genes, and altered transmission of chloroplast genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, H; Newman, S M; Boynton, J E; Gillham, N W

    1991-01-01

    Meiotic progeny of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii normally receive chloroplast genomes only from the mt+ parent. However, exceptional zygotes, which transmit the chloroplast genomes of both parents or, more rarely, only those of the mt- parent, arise at a low frequency. Mutations at the mt(+)-linked mat-3 locus were found previously to elevate the transmission of chloroplast genomes from the mt- parent, resulting in a much higher than normal frequency of exceptional zygotes. In this paper we demonstrate that an ultraviolet-sensitive nuclear mutation mapping at the uvsE1 locus, which is unlinked to mating type, also promotes chloroplast genome transmission from the mt- parent. This mutant, which was previously shown to reduce recombination of nuclear genes in meiosis, acts synergistically with the mat-3-3 mutation to produce an extremely high frequency of exceptional zygotes. Through the use of restriction fragment length polymorphisms existing in the chloroplast genomes of C. reinhardtii and the interfertile strain C. smithii, we show that chloroplast DNA fragments from the mt- parent normally begin to disappear shortly after zygote formation. However, this process appears to be blocked totally in the absence of wild-type uvsE1 and mat-3 gene products. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that both gene products contribute to the mechanism responsible for uniparental inheritance of the chloroplast genome from the mt+ parent.

  18. Subgroup C avian metapneumovirus (MPV) and the recently isolated human MPV exhibit a common organization but have extensive sequence divergence in their putative SH and G genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toquin, D; de Boisseson, C; Beven, V; Senne, D A; Eterradossi, N

    2003-08-01

    The genes encoding the putative small hydrophobic (SH), attachment (G) and polymerase (L) proteins of the Colorado isolate of subgroup C avian pneumovirus (APV) were entirely or partially sequenced. They all included metapneumovirus (MPV)-like gene start and gene end sequences. The deduced Colorado SH protein shared 26.9 and 21.7 % aa identity with its counterpart in human MPV (hMPV) and APV subgroup A, respectively, but its only significant aa similarities were to hMPV. Conserved features included a common hydrophobicity profile with an unique transmembrane domain and the conservation of most extracellular cysteine residues. The Colorado putative G gene encoded several ORFs, the longer of which encoded a 252 aa long type II glycoprotein with aa similarities to hMPV G only (20.6 % overall aa identity with seven conserved N-terminal residues). The putative Colorado G protein shared, at best, 21.0 % aa identity with its counterparts in the other APV subgroups and did not contain the extracellular cysteine residues and short aa stretch highly conserved in other APVs. The N-terminal end of the Colorado L protein exhibited 73.6 and 54.9 % aa identity with hMPV and APV subgroup A, respectively, with four aa blocks highly conserved among Pneumovirus: Phylogenetic analysis performed on the nt sequences confirmed that the L sequences from MPVs were genetically related, whereas analysis of the G sequences revealed that among MPVs, only APV subgroups A, B and D clustered together, independently of both the Colorado isolate and hMPV, which shared weak genetic relatedness at the G gene level.

  19. Trinucleotide repeat variants in the promoter of the thiopurine S-methyltransferase gene of patients exhibiting ultra-high enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Rebecca L; Gearry, Richard B; Bland, Michael V; Sies, Christiaan W; George, Peter M; Burt, Michael; Marinaki, Anthony M; Arenas, Monica; Barclay, Murray L; Kennedy, Martin A

    2008-05-01

    Thiopurine S-methyl transferase (TPMT) is a cytosolic enzyme that catalyses the S-methylation of the thiopurine immunosuppressants. To date, 22 variants have been identified that are predictive of decreased TPMT activity. In contrast, no molecular explanation has been found for the 1-2% of Caucasians who exhibit ultra-high TPMT activity. Here, we report the characterization of polymorphisms within a trinucleotide (GCC) repeat element of the TPMT promoter in two patients with inflammatory bowel disease exhibiting the highest TPMT activity from two testing centres. The first patient was heterozygous for a variant allele carrying seven GCC repeats [(GCC)7], whereas the second patient was heterozygous for a variant allele containing five GCC repeats [(GCC)5]. Fifty patients with inflammatory bowel disease with normal TPMT activity were all homozygous for six GCC repeats [(GCC)6]. Of 200 healthy controls, five were found to be heterozygous for the (GCC)7 variant. Within in vitro reporter gene assays, the mean luciferase activities of the (GCC)6, (GCC)7, and (GCC)5 constructs were 8.0+/-0.26, 13.2+/-0.10 and 12.3+/-0.12, respectively. The significant increase in activity observed for (GCC)5 and (GCC)7 compared with (GCC)6 (P-value

  20. Transgenic rice expressing a cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) plasma membrane gene MePMP3-2 exhibits enhanced tolerance to salt and drought stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y; Cui, Y C; Ren, C; Rocha, P S C F; Peng, M; Xu, G Y; Wang, M L; Xia, X J

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteolipid 3 (PMP3) is a class of small hydrophobic proteins found in many organisms including higher plants. Some plant PMP3 genes have been shown to respond to abiotic stresses and to participate in the processes of plant stress tolerance. In this study, we isolated the cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) MePMP3-2 gene and functionally characterized its role in tolerance to abiotic stress by expressing it in rice (Oryza sativa L.). MePMP3-2 encodes a 77-amino acid protein belonging to a subgroup of plant PMP3s that have long hydrophylic C-terminal tails of unknown function. In silico analysis and co-localization studies indicated that MePMP3-2 is a plasma membrane protein with two transmembrane domains, similar to other PMP3s. In cassava leaves, MePMP3-2 expression was up-regulated by salt and drought stresses. Heterologous constitutive expression of MePMP3-2 in rice did not alter plant growth and development but increased tolerance to salt and drought stresses. In addition, under stress conditions MePMP3-2 transgenic plants accumulated less malondialdehyde, had increased levels of proline, and exhibited greater up-regulation of the stress-related genes OsProT and OsP5CS, but led to only minor changes in OsDREB2A and OsLEA3 expression. These findings indicate that MePMP3-2 may play an important role in salt and drought stress tolerance in transgenic rice.

  1. TrmB, a sugar sensing regulator of ABC transporter genes in Pyrococcus furiosus exhibits dual promoter specificity and is controlled by different inducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Jae; Moulakakis, Christina; Koning, Sonja M; Hausner, Winfried; Thomm, Michael; Boos, Winfried

    2005-09-01

    TrmB is the transcriptional repressor for the gene cluster of the trehalose/maltose ABC transporter of the hyperthermophilic archaea Thermococcus litoralis and Pyrococcus furiosus (malE or TM operon), with maltose and trehalose acting as inducers. We found that TrmB (the protein is identical in both organisms) also regulated the transcription of genes encoding a separate maltodextrin ABC transporter in P. furiosus (mdxE or MD operon) with maltotriose, longer maltodextrins and sucrose acting as inducers, but not with maltose or trehalose. In vitro transcription of the malE and the mdxE operons was inhibited by TrmB binding to the different operator sequences. Inhibition of the TM operon was released by maltose and trehalose whereas inhibition of the MD operon was released by maltotriose and larger maltodextrins as well as by sucrose. Scanning mutagenesis of the TM operator revealed the role of the palindromic TACTNNNAGTA sequence for TrmB recognition. TrmB exhibits a broad spectrum of sugar-binding specificity, binding maltose, sucrose, maltotriose and trehalose in decreasing order of affinity, half-maximal binding occurring at 20, 60, 250 and 500 microM substrate concentration respectively. Of all substrates, only maltose shows sigmoidal binding characteristics with a Hill coefficient of 2. As measured by molecular sieve chromatography and cross-linking TrmB behaved as dimer in dilute buffer solution at room temperature. We conclude that TrmB acts as a bifunctional transcriptional regulator acting on two different promoters and being differentially controlled by binding to different sugars. We believe this to represent a novel strategy of prokaryotic transcription regulation.

  2. Short hairpin RNA targeting 2B gene of coxsackievirus B3 exhibits potential antiviral effects both in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Hailan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coxsackievirus B3 is an important infectious agent of viral myocarditis, pancreatitis and aseptic meningitis, but there are no specific antiviral therapeutic reagents in clinical use. RNA interference-based technology has been developed to prevent the viral infection. Methods To evaluate the impact of RNA interference on viral replication, cytopathogenicity and animal survival, short hairpin RNAs targeting the viral 2B region (shRNA-2B expressed by a recombinant vector (pGCL-2B or a recombinant lentivirus (Lenti-2B were tansfected in HeLa cells or transduced in mice infected with CVB3. Results ShRNA-2B exhibited a significant effect on inhibition of viral production in HeLa cells. Furthermore, shRNA-2B improved mouse survival rate, reduced the viral tissues titers and attenuated tissue damage compared with those of the shRNA-NC treated control group. Lenti-2B displayed more effective role in inhibition of viral replication than pGCL-2B in vivo. Conclusions Coxsackievirus B3 2B is an effective target of gene silencing against coxsackievirus B3 infection, suggesting that shRNA-2B is a potential agent for further development into a treatment for enterviral diseases.

  3. Are rogue waves really unexpected?

    CERN Document Server

    Fedele, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We present a third-order nonlinear model for the statistics of unexpected waves drawing on the work of Gemmrich & Garrett (2008). The model is verified by way of Monte Carlo simulations of Gaussian seas and comparisons to oceanic measurements. In particular, the analysis of oceanic data suggests that both skewness and kurtosis effects must be accounted for to obtain accurate predictions. As a specific application, the unexpectedness of the Andrea and WACSIS rogue wave events is examined in detail. Observations indicate that the crests of these waves have nearly the same amplitude ratio $h/H_s\\sim1.6$, where $H_s$ is the significant wave height. Both waves appeared without warning and they were nearly two-times larger than the surrounding $O(10)$ waves, and thus unexpected. The model developed here predicts that the two rogue waves are stochastically similar as they occur on average once every $10^{4}$ waves. Further, the maximum crest height actually observed is nearly the same as the threshold $h_{10^{6}...

  4. A fungal catalase reacts selectively with the 13S fatty acid hydroperoxide products of the adjacent lipoxygenase gene and exhibits 13S-hydroperoxide-dependent peroxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teder, Tarvi; Boeglin, William E; Schneider, Claus; Brash, Alan R

    2017-03-28

    The genome of the fungal plant pathogen Fusarium graminearum harbors six catalases, one of which has the sequence characteristics of a fatty acid peroxide-metabolizing catalase. We cloned and expressed this hemoprotein (designated as Fg-cat) along with its immediate neighbor, a 13S-lipoxygenase (cf. Brodhun et al., PloS One, e64919, 2013) that we considered might supply a fatty acid hydroperoxide substrate. Indeed, Fg-cat reacts abruptly with the 13S-hydroperoxide of linoleic acid (13S-HPODE) with an initial rate of 700-1300s(-1). By comparison there was no reaction with 9R- or 9S-HPODEs and extremely weak reaction with 13R-HPODE (~0.5% of the rate with 13S-HPODE). Although we considered Fg-cat as a candidate for the allene oxide synthase of the jasmonate pathway in fungi, the main product formed from 13S-HPODE was identified by UV, MS, and NMR as 9-oxo-10E-12,13-cis-epoxy-octadecenoic acid (with no traces of AOS activity). The corresponding analog is formed from the 13S-hydroperoxide of α-linolenic acid along with novel diepoxy-ketones and two C13 aldehyde derivatives, the reaction mechanisms of which are proposed. In a peroxidase assay monitoring the oxidation of ABTS, Fg-cat exhibited robust activity (kcat 550s(-1)) using the 13S-hydroperoxy-C18 fatty acids as the oxidizing co-substrate. There was no detectable peroxidase activity using the corresponding 9S-hydroperoxides, nor with t-butyl hydroperoxide, and very weak activity with H2O2 or cumene hydroperoxide at micromolar concentrations of Fg-cat. Fg-cat and the associated lipoxygenase gene are present together in fungal genera Fusarium, Metarhizium and Fonsecaea and appear to constitute a partnership for oxidations in fungal metabolism or defense.

  5. Fournier gangrene and unexpected death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bury, Danielle; Byard, Roger W

    2012-11-01

    Fournier gangrene represents a rare but progressive perineal infection that may result in rapid death. A 70-year-old man with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and alcohol abuse is reported who was found unexpectedly dead. He had last been contacted the night before his death. At autopsy, the most striking finding was deep necrotic ulceration of the scrotum with exposure of underlying deep muscles and testicles, with blood cultures positive for Escherichia coli. Death was, therefore, attributed to necrotic ulceration/gangrene of the perineum (Fournier gangrene) that was due to E. coli sepsis with underlying contributing factors of diabetes mellitus and alcoholism. In addition there was morbid obesity (body mass index 46.9), cirrhosis of the liver, and marked focal coronary artery atherosclerosis with significant cardiomegaly. Fournier gangrene may be an extremely aggressive condition that can result in rapid death, as was demonstrated by the rapid progression in the reported case.

  6. Parallel Exhibits: Combining Physical and Virtual Exhibits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Lischke; T. Dingler; S. Schneegaß; A. Schmidt; M. van der Vaart; P. Wozniak

    2014-01-01

    People have a special fascination for original physical objects, their texture, and visible history. However, the digitization of exhibits and the use of these data is a current challenge for museums. We believe that museums need to capitalize on the affordances of physical exhibits to help users na

  7. Britain exhibition at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Bertin; CERN PhotoLab

    1969-01-01

    The United Kingdom inaugurated the Industrial Exhibitions in 1968, and it wasn't till 1971 that other countries staged exhibitions at CERN. This photo was taken in 1969, at the second British exhibition, where 16 companies were present.

  8. Homo sapiens exhibit a distinct pattern of CNV genes regulation: an important role of miRNAs and SNPs in expression plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dweep, Harsh; Kubikova, Nada; Gretz, Norbert; Voskarides, Konstantinos; Felekkis, Kyriacos

    2015-07-16

    Gene expression regulation is a complex and highly organized process involving a variety of genomic factors. It is widely accepted that differences in gene expression can contribute to the phenotypic variability between species, and that their interpretation can aid in the understanding of the physiologic variability. CNVs and miRNAs are two major players in the regulation of expression plasticity and may be responsible for the unique phenotypic characteristics observed in different lineages. We have previously demonstrated that a close interaction between these two genomic elements may have contributed to the regulation of gene expression during evolution. This work presents the molecular interactions between CNV and non CNV genes with miRNAs and other genomic elements in eight different species. A comprehensive analysis of these interactions indicates a unique nature of human CNV genes regulation as compared to other species. By using genes with short 3' UTR that abolish the "canonical" miRNA-dependent regulation, as a model, we demonstrate a distinct and tight regulation of human genes that might explain some of the unique features of human physiology. In addition, comparison of gene expression regulation between species indicated that there is a significant difference between humans and mice possibly questioning the effectiveness of the latest as experimental models of human diseases.

  9. Identification of 9 uterine genes that are regulated during mouse pregnancy and exhibit abnormal levels in the cyclooxygenase-1 knockout mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soper Jessica

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preterm birth is the leading cause of all infant mortality. In 2004, 12.5% of all births were preterm. In order to understand preterm labor, we must first understand normal labor. Since many of the myometrial changes that occur during pregnancy are similar in mice and humans and mouse gestation is short, we have studied the uterine genes that change in the mouse during pregnancy. Here, we used microarray analysis to identify uterine genes in the gravid mouse that are differentially regulated in the cyclooxygenase-1 knockout mouse model of delayed parturition. Methods Gestational d18.0 uteri (n = 4 were collected from pregnant wild-type and cyclooxygenase-1 knockout mice. Part of the uterus was used for frozen sections and RNA was isolated from the remainder. Microarray analysis was performed at the Indiana University School of Medicine Genomic Core and analyzed using the Microarray Data Portal. Northern analysis was performed to confirm microarray data and the genes localized in the gravid uterus by in situ hybridization. Results We identified 277 genes that are abnormally expressed in the gravid d18.0 cyclooxygenase-1 knockout mouse. Nine of these genes are also regulated in the normal murine uterus during the last half of gestation. Many of these genes are involved in the immune response, consistent with an important role of the immune system in parturition. Expression of 4 of these genes; arginase I, IgJ, Tnfrsf9 and troponin; was confirmed by Northern analysis to be mis-regulated during pregnancy in the knockout mouse. In situ hybridization of these genes demonstrated a similar location in the gravid wild-type and Cox-1 knockout mouse uteri. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first work to demonstrate the uterine location of these 4 genes in the mouse during late pregnancy. There are several putative transcription factor binding sites that are shared by many of the 9 genes identified here including; estrogen and

  10. Feminized tassels of maize mop1 and ts1 mutants exhibit altered levels of miR156 and specific SBP-box genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultquist, Judd F; Dorweiler, Jane E

    2008-12-01

    Development of the unisexual maize inflorescences requires the abortion of pistillate primordia in the florets of the developing tassel and the arrest of staminate primordia in the florets of the developing ears. Mutations of many genes that lie within this sexual differentiation pathway, such as tasselseed1 (ts1), or that influence this pathway, such as mediator of paramutation 1 (mop1), result in feminization of the normally male tassel. Here, we show the loss of mop1 or ts1 function results in increased mRNA levels for several members of the SBP-box gene family. Our analyses of this family expand the number of maize SBP-box genes from 9 to 31 members. Intron-exon structures as well as phylogenetic data support the division of these family members into six groups. The SBP-box genes upregulated in feminized tassels fall into two groups, share common structural motifs and include the presence of a target site for miR156. Small RNA blots show miR156 levels are decreased in both mop1 and ts1 mutants. While there is a correlation between miR156 levels and SBP-box gene transcript levels, this correlation is not absolute, and thus we hypothesize that decreased levels of miR156 may provide competency for SBP-box gene upregulation by other common factors yet to be identified. We present a model that provides a putative link between ts1, ts2, ts4, Ts6, and mop1 in the sex-determination pathway.

  11. Digital collections and exhibits

    CERN Document Server

    Denzer, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Today's libraries are taking advantage of cutting-edge technologies such as flat panel displays using touch, sound, and hands-free motions to design amazing exhibits using everything from simple computer hardware to advanced technologies such as the Microsoft Kinect. Libraries of all types are striving to add new interactive experiences for their patrons through exciting digital exhibits, both online and off. Digital Collections and Exhibits takes away the mystery of designing stunning digital exhibits to spotlight library trea

  12. Etruscan Culture Exhibition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    EARLY this year an exhibition on the ancient civilization of Etruria was held at the Beijing-based China Millennium Monument.The theme of the exhibition was Etruscan Culture and on show were the most representative cultural and historical relics of this ancient civilization unearthed in the past 20 years. The 349 exhibits from various

  13. Ethics on Exhibit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick, Randy M.

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses ethical questions raised by an exhibition of work by an artist with a history of mental illness and the exhibition's relevance to art therapy and “outsider art” discourse on the subject. Considerations for how such an exhibit could be handled had the circumstances included an art therapist and art therapy client are…

  14. Tribolium castaneum immune defense genes are differentially expressed in response to Bacillus thuringiensis toxins sharing common receptor molecules and exhibiting disparate toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Estefanía; Benito-Jardón, María; López-Galiano, M José; Real, M Dolores; Rausell, Carolina

    2015-06-01

    In Tribolium castaneum larvae we have demonstrated by RNA interference knockdown that the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Ba toxin receptors Cadherin-like and Sodium solute symporter proteins are also functional receptors of the less active Cry3Aa toxin. Differences in susceptibility to B. thuringiensis infection might not only rely on toxin-receptor interaction but also on host defense mechanisms. We compared the expression of the immune related genes encoding Apolipophorin-III and two antimicrobial peptides, Defensin3 and Defensin2 after B. thuringiensis challenge. All three genes were up-regulated following Cry3Ba spore-crystal intoxication whereas only Defensins gene expression was induced upon Cry3Aa spore-crystal treatment, evidencing a possible association between host immune response and larval susceptibility to B. thuringiensis. We assessed the antimicrobial activity spectra of T. castaneum defensins peptide fragments and found that a peptide fragment of Defensin3 was effective against the human microbial pathogens, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans, being S. aureus the most susceptible one.

  15. Saturn's Rings Reveal Unexpected Phenomena

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李颖

    2004-01-01

    Safely in orbit around Saturn, NASA's Cassini spacecraft sent back its first close-up images of the massive planet's rings on July 1, revealing an unexpectedly varied terrain featuring surprisingly sharp edges, braids and delicate ridges.

  16. Nitrogen transporter and assimilation genes exhibit developmental stage-selective expression in maize (Zea mays L.) associated with distinct cis-acting promoter motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liseron-Monfils, Christophe; Bi, Yong-Mei; Downs, Gregory S; Wu, Wenqing; Signorelli, Tara; Lu, Guangwen; Chen, Xi; Bondo, Eddie; Zhu, Tong; Lukens, Lewis N; Colasanti, Joseph; Rothstein, Steven J; Raizada, Manish N

    2013-10-01

    Nitrogen is considered the most limiting nutrient for maize (Zea mays L.), but there is limited understanding of the regulation of nitrogen-related genes during maize development. An Affymetrix 82K maize array was used to analyze the expression of ≤ 46 unique nitrogen uptake and assimilation probes in 50 maize tissues from seedling emergence to 31 d after pollination. Four nitrogen-related expression clusters were identified in roots and shoots corresponding to, or overlapping, juvenile, adult, and reproductive phases of development. Quantitative real time PCR data was consistent with the existence of these distinct expression clusters. Promoters corresponding to each cluster were screened for over-represented cis-acting elements. The 8-bp distal motif of the Arabidopsis 43-bp nitrogen response element (NRE) was over-represented in nitrogen-related maize gene promoters. This conserved motif, referred to here as NRE43-d8, was previously shown to be critical for nitrate-activated transcription of nitrate reductase (NIA1) and nitrite reductase (NIR1) by the NIN-LIKE PROTEIN 6 (NLP6) in Arabidopsis. Here, NRE43-d8 was over-represented in the promoters of maize nitrate and ammonium transporter genes, specifically those that showed peak expression during early-stage vegetative development. This result predicts an expansion of the NRE-NLP6 regulon and suggests that it may have a developmental component in maize. We also report leaf expression of putative orthologs of nitrite transporters (NiTR1), a transporter not previously reported in maize. We conclude by discussing how each of the four transcriptional modules may be responsible for the different nitrogen uptake and assimilation requirements of leaves and roots at different stages of maize development.

  17. Exhibiting Mozart: Rethinking Biography

    OpenAIRE

    Spring, Ulrike

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: The article analyses the new permanent exhibition in the composer Wolfgang A. Mozart’s apartment in Vienna, opened in 2006, from the curator’s perspective. The exhibition presents an approach to biographical display in which the exhibited person becomes part of a multifaceted web of contexts, and the article argues for the active deployment of the polysemic character of objects as a means of grasping the complexity of a person’s biography. Presenting a concept for the...

  18. Molecular cloning and characterization of the Ehrlichia chaffeensis variable-length PCR target: an antigen-expressing gene that exhibits interstrain variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, J W; Childs, J E; Paddock, C D

    1999-05-01

    A clone expressing an immunoreactive protein with an apparent molecular mass of 44 kDa was selected from an Ehrlichia chaffeensis Arkansas genomic library by probing with anti-E. chaffeensis hyperimmune mouse ascitic fluid. Nucleotide sequencing revealed an open reading frame (ORF) capable of encoding a 198-amino-acid polypeptide. The ORF contained four imperfect, direct, tandem 90-bp repeats. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences did not show close homologies to entries in the molecular databases. PCR with primers whose sequences matched the sequences flanking the ORF was performed with DNA samples extracted from cell cultures infected with nine different isolates of E. chaffeensis, blood samples from seven patients with monocytic ehrlichiosis, and Amblyomma americanum ticks collected in four different states. The resulting amplicons varied in length, containing three to six repeat units. This gene, designated the variable-length PCR target, is useful for PCR detection of E. chaffeensis and differentiation of isolates.

  19. Wistar Rats Resistant to the Hypertensive Effects of Ouabain Exhibit Enhanced Cardiac Vagal Activity and Elevated Plasma Levels of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadhanfar, Elham; Al-Bader, Maie; Turcani, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Ouabain is a cardiac glycoside produced in the adrenal glands and hypothalamus. It affects the function of all cells by binding to Na+/K+-ATPase. Several lines of evidence suggest that endogenous ouabain could be involved in the pathogenesis of essential (particularly, salt-sensitive) hypertension. However, information regarding the postulated hypertensive effect of the long-term administration of low-dose exogenous ouabain is inconsistent. This study was designed to help settle this controversy through the use of telemetric monitoring of arterial blood pressure and to elucidate the ouabain-induced alterations that could either promote or prevent hypertension. Ouabain (63 and 324 µg/kg/day) was administered subcutaneously to male Wistar rats. Radiotelemetry was used to monitor blood pressure, heart rate and measures of cardiovascular variability and baroreflex sensitivity. The continuous administration of ouabain for 3 months did not elevate arterial blood pressure. The low-frequency power of systolic pressure variability, urinary excretion of catecholamines, and cardiovascular response to restraint stress and a high-salt diet as well as the responsiveness to α1-adrenergic stimulation were all unaltered by ouabain administration, suggesting that the activity of the sympathetic nervous system was not increased. However, surrogate indices of cardiac vagal nerve activity based on heart rate variability were elevated. Molecular remodeling in mesenteric arteries that could support the development of hypertension (increased expression of the genes for the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and Na+/K+-ATPase α2 isoform) was not evident. Instead, the plasma level of vasodilatory calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) significantly rose from 55 (11, SD) in the control group to 89 (20, SD) pg/ml in the ouabain-treated rats (PTukey's = 18.10−5). These data show that long-term administration of exogenous ouabain does not necessarily cause hypertension in rodents. The augmented

  20. Two grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 5 genes exhibit different yet conserved functions in development and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guo-Dong; Zhou, Chun-Xue; Lin, Si-Tong; Chen, Jie; Jiang, Xia-Yun; Zou, Shu-Ming

    2017-02-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding-protein 5 (igfbp5), the most conserved member of the IGFBP family in vertebrates, plays a critical role in controlling cell survival, growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. Here, we characterized the expression patterns of igfbp5a and igfbp5b in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella), which are retained in many fish species, likely from the teleost-specific whole-genome duplication. Both igfbp5a and igfbp5b encode 268- and 263-aa peptides, respectively, which share a sequence identity of 71%. Their mRNAs are not detected in zygotes. At 14hpf, grass carp igfbp5b mRNA was detected in the somites, while igfbp5a mRNA has some possible signal around the eye and head region. At 24hpf, both igfbp5a and igfbp5b mRNA appear to be limited to the presomitic mesoderm. At 36hpf, igfbp5a mRNA was only detected in the midbrain, while igfbp5b mRNA was detected in both the midbrain and notochord. Overall, both mRNAs were expressed in most adult tissues. igfbp5a and igfbp5b were significantly upregulated in the muscle and liver after injection of 10μg per kilogram body weight of zebrafish growth hormone (zGH), while their hepatic expression was downregulated by 50μg zGH. During fasting, both igfbp5a and igfbp5b mRNAs were significantly downregulated in the muscle but upregulated in the liver. Collectively, the results suggest that the two igfbp5 genes play important but different roles in the regulation of growth and development in grass carp.

  1. Expression and secretion of Salmonella pathogenicity island-2 virulence genes in response to acidification exhibit differential requirements of a functional type III secretion apparatus and SsaL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, Brian K; Brown, Nat F; Valdez, Yanet; Brumell, John H; Finlay, B Brett

    2004-11-26

    Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI)-2 is pivotal to the intracellular survival of Salmonella and for virulence in mammals. SPI-2 encodes virulence factors (called effectors) that are translocated into the host cell, a type III secretion apparatus and a two-component regulatory system that regulates intracellular expression of SPI-2. Salmonella SPI-2 secretion activity appears to be induced in response to acidification of the vacuole in which it replicates. Here we show that the expression of the SPI-2 proteins, SseB and SseD (filament and pore forming components of the secretion apparatus, respectively) in response to acidification requires an intact secretion system and SsaL, a Salmonella homologue of SepL, a regulator required for type III-dependent secretion of translocators but not effectors in attaching and effacing gastrointestinal pathogens. We show that the expression of SPI-2-encoded effectors is acid-regulated but can be uncoupled from the expression of filament and translocon components, thus showing a differential requirement of SsaL for expression. The secretion and translocation of SPI-2-encoded effectors requires SsaL, but SsaL is dispensable for the secretion of SPI-2 effectors encoded in other pathogenicity loci, suggesting a secretion regulation function for SsaL. Further, we demonstrate that the differential expression of adjacent genes within the sseA operon (sseD and sseE) occurs at the transcriptional level. These data indicate that a Salmonella SPI-2 activation state is achieved by an acidregulated response that requires SsaL. These data also suggest the existence of a previously unrecognized regulatory element within SPI-2 for the "effector operon" region downstream of sseD that might demarcate the expression of translocators and effectors.

  2. Zebrafish fed on recombinant Artemia expressing epinecidin-1 exhibit increased survival and altered expression of immunomodulatory genes upon Vibrio vulnificus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jheng, Yu-Hsuan; Lee, Lin-Han; Ting, Chen-Hung; Pan, Chieh-Yu; Hui, Cho-Fat; Chen, Jyh-Yih

    2015-01-01

    Artemia has been used extensively in aquaculture as fodder for larval fish, shrimp, and shellfish. Epinecidin-1, an antimicrobial peptide, was isolated from grouper (Epinephelus coioides) in 2005. Epinecidin-1 has been previously reported to possess antimicrobial activity against several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species, including Staphylococcus coagulase, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Vibrio vulnificus. In this study, we used electroporation to introduce plasmid DNA encoding a green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-epinecidin-1 fusion protein under the control of the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter into decapsulated Artemia cysts. Optimization of various properties (including cyst weight (0.2 g), plasmid concentration (50 μg/100 μl), and pulse voltage (150 V), length (10 ms), and number (2)) resulted in a hatching rate of 41.15%, a transfection efficiency of 49.81%, and a fluorescence intensity (A.U.) of 47.46. The expression of EGFP-epinecidin-1 was first detected by quantitative RT-PCR at 120 h post-electroporation, and protein was identified by Western blot at the same time. Furthermore, the EGFP-epinecidin-1 protein inhibited V. vulnificus (204) growth, as demonstrated by zone of inhibition studies. Zebrafish fed on transgenic Artemia expressing CMV-gfp-epi combined with commercial fodder were more resistant to infection by V. vulnificus (204): survival rate was enhanced by over 70% at 7, 14, and 21 days post-infection, and bacterial numbers in the liver and intestine were reduced. In addition, feeding of transgenic Artemia to zebrafish affected the immunomodulatory response to V. vulnificus (204) infection; expression of immune-responsive genes, including hepcidin and defbl2, was altered, as shown by qPCR. These findings suggest that feeding transgenic Artemia expressing CMV-gfp-epi to larval fish has antimicrobial effects, without the drawbacks of introducing drug residues or inducing bacterial drug resistance.

  3. Discovering the Unexpected in Astronomical Survey Data

    CERN Document Server

    Norris, Ray P

    2016-01-01

    Most major discoveries in astronomy are unplanned, and result from surveying the Universe in a new way, rather than by testing a hypothesis or conducting an investigation with planned outcomes. For example, of the 10 greatest discoveries made by the Hubble Space Telescope, only one was listed in its key science goals. So a telescope that merely achieves its stated science goals is not achieving its potential scientific productivity. Several next-generation astronomical survey telescopes are currently being designed and constructed that will significantly expand the volume of observational parameter space, and should in principle discover unexpected new phenomena and new types of object. However, the complexity of the telescopes and the large data volumes mean that these discoveries are unlikely to be found by chance. Therefore, it is necessary to plan explicitly for these unexpected discoveries in the design and construction of the telescope. Two types of discovery are recognised: unexpected objects, and unex...

  4. Circadian variation in unexpected postoperative death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Pedersen, M H; Ramsing, T

    1992-01-01

    Unexpected deaths still occur following major surgical procedures. The cause is often unknown but may be cardiac or thromboembolic in nature. Postoperative ischaemia, infarction and sudden cardiac death may be triggered by episodic or constant arterial hypoxaemia, which increases during the night....... This study examined the circadian variation of sudden unexpected death following abdominal surgery between 1985 and 1989 inclusive. Deaths were divided into those occurring during the day (08.00-16.00 hours), evening (16.00-24.00 hours) and night (24.00-08.00 hours). Twenty-three deaths were considered...... to have been totally unexpected. Of 16 such patients undergoing autopsy, pulmonary embolism was the cause of death in five. In the remaining 11 patients, death occurred at night in eight (P

  5. Test Control Center exhibit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Have you ever wondered how the engineers at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., test fire a Space Shuttle Main Engine? The Test Control Center exhibit at StenniSphere can answer your questions by simulating the test firing of a Space Shuttle Main Engine. A recreation of one of NASA's test control centers, the exhibit explains and portrays the 'shake, rattle and roar' that happens during a real test firing.

  6. Unexpected finding of a whole HNF1B gene deletion during the screening of rare MODY types in a series of Brazilian patients negative for GCK and HNF1A mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotto, Renata P; Giuffrida, Fernando M A; Franco, Luciana; Mathez, Andreia L G; Weinert, Leticia S; Silveiro, Sandra P; Sa, Joao R; Reis, Andre F; Dias-da-Silva, Magnus R

    2016-06-01

    Thirty-two patients with diabetes negative for point mutations in GCK and HNF1A underwent further molecular screening of GCK, HNF1A, HNF4A, and HNF1B by MLPA analysis. We described the first Brazilian case of MODY5 due to a heterozygous whole-gene deletion in HNF1B, who developed rapidly progressive renal failure and death.

  7. Anal fistula: Intraoperative difficulties and unexpected findings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmed A Abou-Zeid

    2011-01-01

    Anal fistula surgery is a commonly performed procedure. The diverse anatomy of anal fistulae and their proximity to anal sphincters make accurate preoperative diagnosis essential to avoid recurrence and fecal incontinence. De-spite the fact that proper preoperative diagnosis can be reached in the majority of patients by simple clinical ex-amination, endoanal ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging, on many occasions, unexpected findings can be encountered during surgery that can make the oper-ation difficult and correct decision-making crucial. In this article we discuss the difficulties and unexpected find-ings that can be encountered during anal fistula sur-gery and how to overcome them.

  8. Anal fistula: intraoperative difficulties and unexpected findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Zeid, Ahmed A

    2011-07-28

    Anal fistula surgery is a commonly performed procedure. The diverse anatomy of anal fistulae and their proximity to anal sphincters make accurate preoperative diagnosis essential to avoid recurrence and fecal incontinence. Despite the fact that proper preoperative diagnosis can be reached in the majority of patients by simple clinical examination, endoanal ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging, on many occasions, unexpected findings can be encountered during surgery that can make the operation difficult and correct decision-making crucial. In this article we discuss the difficulties and unexpected findings that can be encountered during anal fistula surgery and how to overcome them.

  9. EXHIBITION: Accelerated Particles

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    An exhibition of plastic arts and two evenings of performances by sound and visual artists as part of CERN's 50th anniversary celebrations. Fifty candles for CERN, an international laboratory renowned for fundamental research, is a cause for celebration. Since March this year, Geneva and neighbouring parts of France have been the venues for a wealth of small and large-scale events, which will continue until November. Given CERN's location in the commune of Meyrin, the ForuMeyrin is hosting exhibitions of plastic arts and performances entitled: Accelerated Particles. Several works will be exhibited and performed in two 'salons'. Salon des matières: An exhibition of plastic arts From Tues 12 October to Wed 3 November 2004 Tuesdays to Fridays: 16:00 to 19:00 Saturdays: 14:00 to 18:00 Exhibition open late on performance nights, entrance free Salon des particules: Musical and visual performances Tues 12 and Mon 25 October from 20:00 to 23:00 Preview evening for both events: Tues 12 October from 18:...

  10. Council Chamber exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    To complete the revamp of CERN’s Council Chamber, a new exhibition is being installed just in time for the June Council meetings.   Panels will showcase highlights of CERN’s history, using some of the content prepared for the exhibitions marking 50 years of the PS, which were displayed in the main building last November. The previous photo exhibition in the Council Chamber stopped at the 1970s. To avoid the new panels becoming quickly out of date, photos are grouped together around specific infrastructures, rather than following a classic time-line. “We have put the focus on the accelerators – the world-class facilities that CERN has been offering researchers over the years, from the well-known large colliders to the lesser-known smaller facilities,” says Emma Sanders, who worked on the content. The new exhibition will be featured in a future issue of the Bulletin with photos and an interview with Fabienne Marcastel, designer of the exhibit...

  11. A Constitutively Mannose-Sensitive Agglutinating Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strain, Carrying a Transposon in the Fimbrial Usher Gene stbC, Exhibits Multidrug Resistance and Flagellated Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Hsun Wu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Static broth culture favors Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium to produce type 1 fimbriae, while solid agar inhibits its expression. A transposon inserted in stbC, which would encode an usher for Stb fimbriae of a non-flagellar Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium LB5010 strain, conferred it to agglutinate yeast cells on both cultures. RT-PCR revealed that the expression of the fimbrial subunit gene fimA, and fimZ, a regulatory gene of fimA, were both increased in the stbC mutant when grown on LB agar; fimW, a repressor gene of fimA, exhibited lower expression. Flagella were observed in the stbC mutant and this phenotype was correlated with the motile phenotype. Microarray data and RT-PCR indicated that the expression of three genes, motA, motB, and cheM, was enhanced in the stbC mutant. The stbC mutant was resistant to several antibiotics, consistent with the finding that expression of yhcQ and ramA was enhanced. A complementation test revealed that transforming a recombinant plasmid possessing the stbC restored the mannose-sensitive agglutination phenotype to the stbC mutant much as that in the parental Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium LB5010 strain, indicating the possibility of an interplay of different fimbrial systems in coordinating their expression.

  12. Some Unexpected Results Using Computer Algebra Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Felix; Garcia, Alfonsa; Garcia, Francisco; Hoya, Sara; Rodriguez, Gerardo; de la Villa, Agustin

    2001-01-01

    Shows how teachers can often use unexpected outputs from Computer Algebra Systems (CAS) to reinforce concepts and to show students the importance of thinking about how they use the software and reflecting on their results. Presents different examples where DERIVE, MAPLE, or Mathematica does not work as expected and suggests how to use them as a…

  13. Unexpected uncertainty, volatility and decision-making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Rachel Bland

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of uncertainty in decision making is receiving greater attention in the fields of cognitive and computational neuroscience. Several lines of evidence are beginning to elucidate different variants of uncertainty. Particularly, risk, ambiguity and expected and unexpected forms of uncertainty are well articulated in the literature. In this article we review both empirical and theoretical evidence arguing for the potential distinction between three forms of uncertainty; expected uncertainty, unexpected uncertainty and volatility. Particular attention will be devoted to exploring the distinction between unexpected uncertainty and volatility which has been less appreciated in the literature. This includes evidence from computational modelling, neuromodulation, neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies. We further address the possible differentiation of cognitive control mechanisms used to deal with these forms of uncertainty. Particularly we explore a role for conflict monitoring and the temporal integration of information into working memory. Finally, we explore whether the Dual Modes of Control theory provides a theoretical framework for understanding the distinction between unexpected uncertainty and volatility.

  14. Unexpected Translations in Urban Policy Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zapata, Patrik; Zapata Campos, Maria José

    2015-01-01

    such as prototypes in order to travel. It was made mobile via relational sites or situations providing safe and accessible connections with Chureca residents. Paradoxically, these places also allowed extraordinary connections between actors located in different scales and spaces, facilitating unexpected local...

  15. Unexpected complications of bonded mandibular lingual retainers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katsaros, C.; Livas, C.; Renkema, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The flexible spiral wire (FSW) retainer is the most frequently used type of fixed retainer bonded on all 6 anterior teeth. Our aim in this article was to demonstrate unexpected posttreatment changes in the labiolingual position of the mandibular anterior teeth associated with the use o

  16. Exhibition in Sight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Burton

    1978-01-01

    Ludwig Mies van der Rohe is known primarily as an architect. However, he also designed chairs and tables. Discusses an exhibit held in New York City a few months ago which showed how well the famous architect achieved his goals in the area of furniture design. (Author/RK)

  17. Exhibitions in Sight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Burton

    1977-01-01

    Today, few artists make serving vessels on a monumental scale. Here artists compete in this unique area of specialization prompted by the Campbell Museum in Camden, New Jersey, which is dedicated to collecting and exhibiting the very best in soup tureens. (Author/RK)

  18. EXHIBITION: Accelerated Particles

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    http://www.cern.ch/cern50/ An exhibition of plastic arts and two evenings of performances by sound and visual artists as part of CERN's fiftieth anniversary celebrations. The fiftieth anniversary of a world famous organization like CERN, an international laboratory specializing in fundamental research, is a cause for celebration. Since March this year, Geneva and neighbouring parts of France have been the venues for a wealth of small and large-scale events, which will continue until November. Given CERN's location in the commune of Meyrin, the ForuMeyrin is hosting two "salons" consisting of an exhibition of plastic arts and evenings of music and visual arts performances with the collective title of "Accelerated Particles". Several works will be exhibited and performed. Salon des matières: An exhibition of plastic arts Until Wednesday 3 November 2004. Tuesdays to Fridays: 4.00 p.m. to 7.00 p.m. Saturdays: 2.00 p.m. to 6.00 p.m. Doors open late on the evening of the performances. Salon des ...

  19. DRPLA transgenic mouse substrains carrying single copy of full-length mutant human DRPLA gene with variable sizes of expanded CAG repeats exhibit CAG repeat length- and age-dependent changes in behavioral abnormalities and gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kazushi; Zhou, Jiayi; Sato, Toshiya; Takao, Keizo; Miyagawa, Tsuyoshi; Oyake, Mutsuo; Yamada, Mitunori; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Yuji; Goto, Jun; Tsuji, Shoji

    2012-05-01

    Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is an autosomal dominant progressive neurodegenerative disorder with intellectual deterioration and various motor deficits including ataxia, choreoathetosis, and myoclonus, caused by an abnormal expansion of CAG repeats in the DRPLA gene. Longer expanded CAG repeats contribute to an earlier age of onset, faster progression, and more severe neurological symptoms in DRPLA patients. In this study, we have established DRPLA transgenic mouse lines (sublines) harboring a single copy of the full-length mutant human DRPLA gene carrying various lengths of expanded CAG repeats (Q76, Q96, Q113, and Q129), which have clearly shown motor deficits and memory disturbance whose severity increases with the length of expanded CAG repeats and age, and successfully replicated the CAG repeat length- and age-dependent features of DRPLA patients. Neuronal intranuclear accumulation of the mutant DRPLA protein has been suggested to cause transcriptional dysregulation, leading to alteration in gene expression and neuronal dysfunction. In this study, we have conducted a comprehensive analysis of gene expression profiles in the cerebrum and cerebellum of transgenic mouse lines at 4, 8, and 12 weeks using multiple microarray platforms, and demonstrated that both the number and expression levels of the altered genes are highly dependent on CAG repeat length and age in both brain regions. Specific groups of genes and their function categories were identified by further agglomerative cluster analysis and gene functional annotation analysis. Calcium signaling and neuropeptide signaling, among others, were implicated in the pathophysiology of DRPLA. Our study provides unprecedented CAG-repeat-length-dependent mouse models of DRPLA, which are highly valuable not only for elucidating the CAG-repeat-length-dependent pathophysiology of DRPLA but also for developing therapeutic strategies for DRPLA.

  20. CERN permanent exhibitions

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Explore by yourself the issues CERN's physicists are trying to solve: given that the entire universe is made of particles, where do they come from? Why do they behave in the way they do? Discover the massive apparatus used by physicists at CERN, like the LHC, and see how each part works. And if you have more time on site, follow the LHC circuit at ground level to understand in situ this giant machine. Enter our exhibitions. Welcome!

  1. Droplet Lamp Design exhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Unver, Ertu; Dean, Lionel Theodore

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes experiments in the use of digital fluid simulation techniques within a\\ud product design context. It discusses the adoption and adaptation of virtual modelling tools in\\ud 3D creative practice. This work is exhibited at EuroMold, the world-wide fair in Germany for\\ud mold making, tooling, design and application development with around 60.000 visitors and lasts\\ud 4 days. The fair brings together professionals from design, prototyping and manufacturing.

  2. Upcycling CERN Exhibitions

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Summer is coming - and with it, a new Microcosm exhibition showcasing CERN (see here). But while the new exhibit is preparing to enchant visitors, many have been asking about the site's former content. Will it simply be out with the old and in with the new? Not as such!   The plasma ball from Microcosm is now on display at the LHCb site. As Microcosm's new content is moving in, its old content is moving up. From LHCb to IdeaSquare, former Microcosm displays and objects are being installed across the CERN site. "Microcosm featured many elements that were well suited to life outside of the exhibition," says Emma Sanders, Microcosm project leader in the EDU group. "We didn't want this popular content to go to waste, and so set out to find them new homes across CERN." The LHCb experiment has received a number of Microcosm favourites, including the Rutherford experiment, the cosmic ray display and the Thomson experiment. "We&...

  3. Online Exhibits & Concept Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douma, M.

    2009-12-01

    Presenting the complexity of geosciences to the public via the Internet poses a number of challenges. For example, utilizing various - and sometimes redundant - Web 2.0 tools can quickly devour limited time. Do you tweet? Do you write press releases? Do you create an exhibit or concept map? The presentation will provide participants with a context for utilizing Web 2.0 tools by briefly highlighting methods of online scientific communication across several dimensions. It will address issues of: * breadth and depth (e.g. from narrow topics to well-rounded views), * presentation methods (e.g. from text to multimedia, from momentary to enduring), * sources and audiences (e.g. for experts or for the public, content developed by producers to that developed by users), * content display (e.g. from linear to non-linear, from instructive to entertaining), * barriers to entry (e.g. from an incumbent advantage to neophyte accessible, from amateur to professional), * cost and reach (e.g. from cheap to expensive), and * impact (e.g. the amount learned, from anonymity to brand awareness). Against this backdrop, the presentation will provide an overview of two methods of online information dissemination, exhibits and concept maps, using the WebExhibits online museum (www.webexhibits.org) and SpicyNodes information visualization tool (www.spicynodes.org) as examples, with tips on how geoscientists can use either to communicate their science. Richly interactive online exhibits can serve to engage a large audience, appeal to visitors with multiple learning styles, prompt exploration and discovery, and present a topic’s breadth and depth. WebExhibits, which was among the first online museums, delivers interactive information, virtual experiments, and hands-on activities to the public. While large, multidisciplinary exhibits on topics like “Color Vision and Art” or “Calendars Through the Ages” require teams of scholars, user interface experts, professional writers and editors

  4. Unexpected Molecular Weight Effect in Polymer Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shiwang; Holt, Adam P; Wang, Huiqun; Fan, Fei; Bocharova, Vera; Martin, Halie; Etampawala, Thusitha; White, B Tyler; Saito, Tomonori; Kang, Nam-Goo; Dadmun, Mark D; Mays, Jimmy W; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2016-01-22

    The properties of the interfacial layer between the polymer matrix and nanoparticles largely determine the macroscopic properties of polymer nanocomposites (PNCs). Although the static thickness of the interfacial layer was found to increase with the molecular weight (MW), the influence of MW on segmental relaxation and the glass transition in this layer remains to be explored. In this Letter, we show an unexpected MW dependence of the interfacial properties in PNC with attractive polymer-nanoparticle interactions: the thickness of the interfacial layer with hindered segmental relaxation decreases as MW increases, in sharp contrast to theoretical predictions. Further analyses reveal a reduction in mass density of the interfacial layer with increasing MW, which can elucidate these unexpected dynamic effects. Our observations call for a significant revision of the current understandings of PNCs and suggest interesting ways to tailor their properties.

  5. Unexpected Translations in Urban Policy Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zapata, Patrik; Zapata Campos, Maria José

    such as prototypes in order to travel. It was made mobile via relational sites or situations providing safe and accessible connections with Chureca residents. Paradoxically, these places also allowed extraordinary connections between actors located in different scales and spaces, facilitating unexpected local...... of plans into reality, but as an uncontrollable process in which multiple translations twist policies and plans from below. The significant question is therefore not whether plans succeed, but how they succeed....

  6. Space Shuttle Cockpit exhibit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Want to sit in the cockpit of the Space Shuttle and watch astronauts work in outer space? At StenniSphere, you can do that and much more. StenniSphere, the visitor center at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., presents 14,000-square-feet of interactive exhibits that depict America's race for space as well as a glimpse of the future. StenniSphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  7. Anniversary Exhibition. Nechvolodov.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    - -

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available On the 10th of August, 2005 in Tartu (the second biggest educational and cultural city in Estonia Stanislav Nechvolodov's exhibition was opened to show the 5-year cycle of his work, traditional for the author and his admirers. At the opening ceremony Nechvolodov said that the exhibition was the last one and appointed on his 70th anniversary.The architectural and building society in Irkutsk remembers Stanislav Nechvolodov as an architect working on dwelling and civil buildings in 1960-70s. Below are some extracts from the Estonian press.«Postimees» newspaper, December 1993. The interview «Expressionistic naturalist, conservative Nechvolodov» by journalist Eric Linnumyagi. He asks about all the details and describes the troubles experienced by Nechvolodov during the perestroika period in Estonia, for example: the Tartu University refused to install the sculpture of Socrat, the art school refused to engage him as an instructor, the sculpture of Socrat moved to Vrotzlav, Poland, and Nechvolodov moved to Poland to read lectures there.«Tartu» newspaper, November 2000. Mats Oun, artist, says in the article «Nechvolodov: a man of Renaissance»: «Nechvolodov works in Estonia, his works are placed in many local and foreign museums. Regardless some insignificant faults, he deserves a high estimation, and his manysided open exhibition can be an example for other artists. He is a man of Renaissance».

  8. Spectrometric mixture analysis: An unexpected wrinkle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Robert De Levie

    2009-09-01

    The spectrometric analysis of a mixture of two chemically and spectroscopically similar compounds is illustrated for the simultaneous spectrometric determination of caffeine and theobromine, the primary stimulants in coffee and tea, based on their ultraviolet absorbances. Their analysis indicates that such measurements may need an unexpectedly high precision to yield accurate answers, because of an artifact of inverse cancellation, in which a small noise or drift signal is misinterpreted in terms of a concentration difference. The computed sum of the concentrations is not affected.

  9. 2007Fairs & Exhibitions in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The 6th China (Guangzhou) International Seasoning Exhibition Date: May 11-13 Founded in: 2003.05 Venues: Guangzhou Int'l Convention &Exhibition Center (Pazhou) Exhibits: Seasonings, food additives, relevant material,equipment, service and publications

  10. 2005 Fairs & Exhibitions in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Harbin China International Winter Goods Exhibition DATE: Jan. 5-9 FREQUENCY: Annual FOUNDED TIME: Dec. 2001 VENUE: Harbin China International Conference & Exhibition Center EXHIBITS: winter sports goods and outdoor devices

  11. Unexpected events induce motor slowing via a brain mechanism for action-stopping with global suppressive effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Jan R; Aron, Adam R

    2013-11-20

    When an unexpected event occurs in everyday life (e.g., a car honking), one experiences a slowing down of ongoing action (e.g., of walking into the street). Motor slowing following unexpected events is a ubiquitous phenomenon, both in laboratory experiments as well as such everyday situations, yet the underlying mechanism is unknown. We hypothesized that unexpected events recruit the same inhibition network in the brain as does complete cancellation of an action (i.e., action-stopping). Using electroencephalography and independent component analysis in humans, we show that a brain signature of successful outright action-stopping also exhibits activity following unexpected events, and more so in blocks with greater motor slowing. Further, using transcranial magnetic stimulation to measure corticospinal excitability, we show that an unexpected event has a global motor suppressive effect, just like outright action-stopping. Thus, unexpected events recruit a common mechanism with outright action-stopping, moreover with global suppressive effects. These findings imply that we can now leverage the considerable extant knowledge of the neural architecture and functional properties of the stopping system to better understand the processing of unexpected events, including perhaps how they induce distraction via global suppression.

  12. Unexpected consequences of midwifery in the NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Jane

    2015-11-01

    This article presents information from the Caring for the carers conference held at George Eliot Hospital in July 2015. For many midwives, feelings of stress are an unexpected consequence of rising birth rates, low staffing levels and negative organisational cultures, so our aim was that delegates would take away skills for 'surviving' in maternity services. The conference was the catalyst to a project at George Eliot NHS Trust to improve the wellbeing of staff so that they can develop a positive outlook towards the care which they offer. As part of the project, a toolkit for survival was produced which helps to prompt maternity workers to remember their own wellbeing. This project is continuing to grow and the results will be available next year.

  13. Assigning cause for sudden unexpected infant death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Carl E; Darnall, Robert A; McEntire, Betty L; Hyma, Bruce A

    2015-06-01

    We have reached a conundrum in assigning cause of death for sudden unexpected infant deaths. We summarize the discordant perspectives and approaches and how they have occurred, and recommend a pathway toward improved consistency. This lack of consistency affects pediatricians and other health care professionals, scientific investigators, medical examiners and coroners, law enforcement agencies, families, and support or advocacy groups. We recommend that an interdisciplinary international committee be organized to review current approaches for assigning cause of death, and to identify a consensus strategy for improving consistency. This effort will need to encompass intrinsic risk factors or infant vulnerability in addition to known environmental risk factors including unsafe sleep settings, and must be sufficiently flexible to accommodate a progressively expanding knowledge base.

  14. Sudden unexpected death in infancy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkel, Bo Gregers; Holst, Anders Gaarsdal; Theilade, Juliane;

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background. Incidence of sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) differs among studies and non-autopsied cases are difficult to assess. Objectives. To investigate causes of sudden death in infancy in a nationwide setting. Validate the use...... of the ICD-10 code for SIDS (R95) in the Danish Cause of Death registry. Design. A retrospective analysis of all infant deaths (death certificates and autopsy reports were read. Results. We identified 192 SUDI cases (10% of total deaths, 0.42 per 1000 births......) with autopsy performed in 87% of cases. In total, 49% of autopsied SUDI cases were defined as SIDS (5% of all deaths, 0.22 per 1000 births); Cardiac cause of death was denoted in 24% of cases. The Danish Cause of Death Registry misclassified 30% of SIDS cases. Conclusions. A large proportion of infant deaths...

  15. Unexpected flood loss correlations across Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Naomi; Boyd, Jessica

    2017-04-01

    Floods don't observe country borders, as highlighted by major events across Europe that resulted in heavy economic and insured losses in 1999, 2002, 2009 and 2013. Flood loss correlations between some countries occur along multi-country river systems or between neighbouring nations affected by the same weather systems. However, correlations are not so obvious and whilst flooding in multiple locations across Europe may appear independent, for a re/insurer providing cover across the continent, these unexpected correlations can lead to high loss accumulations. A consistent, continental-scale method that allows quantification and comparison of losses, and identifies correlations in loss between European countries is therefore essential. A probabilistic model for European river flooding was developed that allows estimation of potential losses to pan-European property portfolios. By combining flood hazard and exposure information in a catastrophe modelling platform, we can consider correlations between river basins across Europe rather than being restricted to country boundaries. A key feature of the model is its statistical event set based on extreme value theory. Using historical river flow data, the event set captures spatial and temporal patterns of flooding across Europe and simulates thousands of events representing a full range of possible scenarios. Some known correlations were identified, such as between neighbouring Belgium and Luxembourg where 28% of events that affect either country produce a loss in both. However, our model identified some unexpected correlations including between Austria and Poland, and Poland and France, which are geographically distant. These correlations in flood loss may be missed by traditional methods and are key for re/insurers with risks in multiple countries. The model also identified that 46% of European river flood events affect more than one country. For more extreme events with a return period higher than 200 years, all events

  16. Water in stars: expected and unexpected

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, T.; Aoki, W.; Ohnaka, K.

    1999-03-01

    We have confirmed the presence of water in the early M giant α Cet (M1.5III) and supergiant KK Per (M2Iab) by the highest resolution grating mode of SWS, but this result is quite unexpected from present model atmospheres. In late M giant and supergiant stars, water observed originates partly in the photosphere as expected by the model atmospheres, but ISO SWS has revealed that the 2.7 mic\\ absorption bands appear to be somewhat stronger than predicted while 6.5 mic\\ bands weaker, indicating the contamination by an emission component. In the mid-infrared region extending to 45 mic, pure rotation lines of hho\\ appear as distinct emission on the high resolution SWS spectra of 30g Her (M7III) and S Per (M4-7Ia), along with the dust emission at 10, 13, 20 mic\\ and a new unidentified feature at 30 mic. Thus, together with the dust, water contributes to the thermal balance of the outer atmosphere already in the mid-infrared. The excitation temperature of hho\\ gas is estimated to be 500 - 1000 K. In view of this result for late M (super)giants, unexpected water observed in early M (super)giants should also be of non-photospheric in origin. Thus, ISO has finally established the presence of a new component of the outer atmosphere - a warm molecular envelope - in red giant and supergiant stars from early to late types. Such a rather warm molecular envelope will be a site of various activities such as chemical reactions, dust formation, mass-outflow etc.

  17. Shikonin, a constituent of Lithospermum erythrorhizon exhibits anti-allergic effects by suppressing orphan nuclear receptor Nr4a family gene expression as a new prototype of calcineurin inhibitors in mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Hayashi, Shusaku; Umezaki, Masahito; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Kageyama-Yahara, Natsuko; Kondo, Takashi; Kadowaki, Makoto

    2014-12-05

    Over the last few decades, food allergy (FA) has become a common disease in infants in advanced countries. However, anti-allergic medicines available in the market have no effect on FA, and consequently effective drug therapies for FA are not yet available. We have already demonstrated that mucosal mast cells play an essential role in the development of FA in a murine model. Thus, we screened many constituents from medicinal herbs for the ability to inhibit rat basophilic leukemia-2H3 mast-like cell degranulation, and found that shikonin, a naphthoquinone dye from Lithospermum erythrorhizon, exhibited the most potent inhibitory effect among them. Furthermore, shikonin extremely inhibited the IgE/antigen-induced and calcium ionophore-induced upregulation of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α mRNA expression in mucosal-type bone marrow-derived mast cells (mBMMCs). Global gene expression analysis confirmed by real-time PCR revealed that shikonin drastically inhibited the IgE/antigen-induced and calcium ionophore-induced upregulation of mRNA expression of the nuclear orphan receptor 4a family (Nr4a1, Nr4a2 and Nr4a3) in mBMMCs, and knockdown of Nr4a1 or Nr4a2 suppressed the IgE/antigen-induced upregulation of TNF-α mRNA expression. Computational docking simulation of a small molecule for a target protein is a useful technique to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of drugs. Therefore, the simulation revealed that the predicted binding sites of shikonin to immunophilins (cyclophilin A and FK506 binding protein (FKBP) 12) were almost the same as the binding sites of immunosuppressants (cyclosporin A and FK506) to immunophilins. Indeed, shikonin inhibited the calcineurin activity to a similar extent as cyclosporin A that markedly suppressed the IgE/antigen-enhanced mRNA expression of TNF-α and the Nr4a family in mBMMCs. These findings suggest that shikonin suppresses mucosal mast cell activation by reducing Nr4a family gene expression through the

  18. Theory of mind for processing unexpected events across contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dungan, James A; Stepanovic, Michael; Young, Liane

    2016-08-01

    Theory of mind, or mental state reasoning, may be particularly useful for making sense of unexpected events. Here, we investigated unexpected behavior across both social and non-social contexts in order to characterize the precise role of theory of mind in processing unexpected events. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine how people respond to unexpected outcomes when initial expectations were based on (i) an object's prior behavior, (ii) an agent's prior behavior and (iii) an agent's mental states. Consistent with prior work, brain regions for theory of mind were preferentially recruited when people first formed expectations about social agents vs non-social objects. Critically, unexpected vs expected outcomes elicited greater activity in dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, which also discriminated in its spatial pattern of activity between unexpected and expected outcomes for social events. In contrast, social vs non-social events elicited greater activity in precuneus across both expected and unexpected outcomes. Finally, given prior information about an agent's behavior, unexpected vs expected outcomes elicited an especially robust response in right temporoparietal junction, and the magnitude of this difference across participants correlated negatively with autistic-like traits. Together, these findings illuminate the distinct contributions of brain regions for theory of mind for processing unexpected events across contexts. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Gaïa Manuella Cany Du 10 au 28 avril 2017 CERN Meyrin, Bâtiment principal Oiseau - Manuella Cany. Tableaux abstraits inspirés de vues satellites ou photos prises du ciel. Certains sont à la frontière du figuratif alors que d'autres permettent de laisser libre cours à son imagination. Aux détails infinis, ces tableaux sont faits pour être vus de loin et de près grâce à une attention toute particulière apportée aux effets de matières et aux couleurs le long de volutes tantôt nuancées tantôt contrastées.   Pour plus d’informations : staff.association@cern.ch | Tél: 022 766 37 38

  20. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      Parallels vision Astronomical subjects which evoke extrasensory kinetic visions Alberto Di Fabio From 8 to 10 October, CERN Meyrin, Main Building In the framework of Italy@cern, the Staff Association presents Alberto Di Fabio. Di Fabio’s work is inspired by the fundamental laws of the physical world, as well as organic elements and their interrelation. His paintings and works on paper merge the worlds of art and science, depicting natural forms and biological structures in vivid colour and imaginative detail. For all additional information: staff.association@cern.ch | Tel: 022 767 28 19

  1. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Jan Hladky, physicien de l'Institut de Physique de l'Académie des Sciences de la République tchèque, et membre de la collaboration Alice, expose ses œuvres au Bâtiment principal du 20 avril au 6 mai. Son exposition est dédiée aux victimes du séisme de Sendai. Des copies de ses œuvres seront mises en vente et les sommes récoltées seront versées au profit des victimes.

  2. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    The Elementary Particles of Painting Alfonso Fratteggiani Bianchi and Ermanno Imbergamo From September 26 to October 7, 2016 CERN Meyrin, Main Building With intentions similar to those of CERN physicists, the artist Alfonso Fratteggiani Bianchi investigates the color pigment, studying its interaction with light and with the support on which it is deposited. He creates monochrome paintings by spreading the color pigment in the pure state on stones, without using glue or any other type of adhesive. With intentions similar to artists, the physicist Ermanno Imbergamo investigates the use of luminescent wavelength shifters, materials commonly used in Particle Physics, for art. He creates other monochrome artworks, which disclose further aspects of interaction among light, color pigments and support. For more information: staff.association@cern.ch | Tel: 022 767 28 19

  3. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    La mosaïque ou quand détruire permet de construire Lauren Decamps Du 28 novembre au 9 décembre 2016 CERN Meyrin, Bâtiment principal Paysage d'Amsterdam - Lauren Decamps On ne doit jamais rien détruire qu'on ne soit sûr de pouvoir remplacer aussi avantageusement " écrivait Plutarque dans ses Œuvres morales du 1er siècle après JC. L'artiste mosaïste Lauren Decamps adhère à cette idée et tente à sa manière de donner une nouvelle vie à ses matériaux en les taillant puis les réassemblant, créant ainsi des œuvres abstraites et figuratives.

  4. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Le Point Isabelle Gailland Du 20 février au 3 mars 2017 CERN Meyrin, Bâtiment principal La Diagonale - Isabelle Gailland. Au départ, un toujours même point minuscule posé au centre de ce que la toile est un espace. Une réplique d'autres points, condensés, alignés, isolés, disséminés construiront dans leur extension, la ligne. Ces lignes, croisées, courbées, déviées, prolongées, seront la structure contenant et séparant la matière des couleurs. La rotation de chaque toile en cours d'exécution va offrir un accès illimité à la non-forme et à la forme. Le point final sera l'ouverture sur différents points de vue de ce que le point et la ligne sont devenus une représentation pour l'œil et l'im...

  5. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    COLORATION Sandra Duchêne From September 5 to 16, 2016 CERN Meyrin, Main Building La recherche de l’Universel. Après tout ! C’est de l’Amour ! What else to say ? …La couleur, l’ENERGIE de la vie…

  6. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Œuvres recentes Fabienne Wyler Du 6 au 17 février 2017 CERN Meyrin, Bâtiment principal L'escalier du diable B - aquarelle, encre de Chine XLV - Fabienne Wyler. En relation avec certains procédés d’écriture contemporaine (par ex. Webern ou certaines musiques conçues par ordinateur), les compositions picturales de Fabienne Wyler s’élaborent à partir de « modules » (groupes de quadrangles) qu’elle reproduit en leur faisant subir toutes sortes de transformations et de déplacements : étirements, renversements, rotations, effet miroir, transpositions, déphasages, superpositions, etc., et ceci à toutes les échelles. Au fil des œuvres sont apparues des séries intitulées, Bifurcations, Intermittences, Attracteurs étranges, Polyrythmies. Ces titres ont un lien &e...

  7. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Energie sombre, matière noire J.-J. Dalmais - J. Maréchal Du 11 au 27 novembre 2014, CERN Meyrin, Bâtiment principal A l’image des particules atomiques qui ont tissé des liens pour créer la matière, deux artistes haut bugistes croisent leurs regards et conjuguent leurs expressions singulières pour faire naître une vision commune de l’univers, produit des forces primordiales. Les sculptures de Jean-Jacques Dalmais et les peintures de Jacki Maréchal se rencontrent pour la première fois et se racontent par un enrichissement mutuel la belle histoire de la Vie. Dialogue magique des œuvres en mouvement qui questionnent en écho l’énergie sombre et la matière noire. Cette harmonieuse confluence de jeux de miroir et de résonnance illumine de poésie et de sobriété l’espace expos&...

  8. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Harmonie Nathalie Lenoir Du 4 au 15 septembre 2017 CERN Meyrin, Bâtiment principal Peindre est un langage. Le tracé du pinceau sur le lin en est l'expression. A qui appartient un tableau en définitive ? A celui qui l'a peint ? A celui qui le regarde ? A celui qui l'emporte ? La peinture est une émotion partagée... Laissez-vous projeter de l'autre côté de la toile, prenez un moment pour rêver, en harmonie avec les éléments, parce-que la peinture parle à votre âme… Pour plus d’informations et demandes d’accès : staff.association@cern.ch | Tél : 022 766 37 38

  9. Exhibition

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Firmament des toiles Joëlle Lalagüe Du 6 au 16 juin 2017 CERN Meyrin, Bâtiment principal Phylaë Voyage - Joëlle Lalagüe. Each picture is an invitation for a cosmic trip. This is a whispering of soul, which comes from origins. A symphony of the world, some notes of love, a harmony for us to fly to infinity. Pour plus d’informations et demandes d'accès : staff.association@cern.ch | Tél: 022 766 37 38

  10. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    La couleur des jours oriSio Du 2 au 12 mai 2017 CERN Meyrin, Bâtiment principal oriSio - Motus Suite à un fort intérêt pour la Chine et une curiosité pour un médium très ancien, la laque ! Je réinterprète cet art à travers un style abstrait. Je présente ici des laques sur aluminium, travaillés au plasma et ensuite colorés à l’aide de pigments pour l’essentiel. Mes œuvres je les veux brutes, déchirées, évanescentes, gondolées, voire trouées mais avec une belle approche de profondeur de la couleur.   Pour plus d’informations : staff.association@cern.ch | Tél: 022 766 37 38

  11. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    La mosaïque ou quand détruire permet de construire Lauren Decamps Du 28 novembre au 9 décembre 2016 CERN Meyrin, Bâtiment principal Paysage d'Amsterdam - Lauren Decamps On ne doit jamais rien détruire qu'on ne soit sûr de pouvoir remplacer aussi avantageusement " écrivait Plutarque dans ses Œuvres morales du 1er siècle après JC. L'artiste mosaïste Lauren Decamps adhère à cette idée et tente à sa manière de donner une nouvelle vie à ses matériaux en les taillant puis les réassemblant, créant ainsi des œuvres abstraites et figuratives.

  12. Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Still Life Jérémy Bajulaz Du 25 septembre au 6 octobre 2017 CERN Meyrin, Main Building (Aubergine - Jérémy Bajulaz) Né en 1991 en Haute-Savoie, France. Diplômé de l'Ecole Emile Cohl à Lyon, Jérémy Bajulaz intègre en 2014 le programme d'artiste en résidence au Centre Genevois de Gravure Contemporaine. C'est là que son travail prendra corps, autour de la lumière et de ses vibrations aux travers de sujets comme le portrait et la nature morte, dans le souci de l'observation; le regard prenant une place importante dans le processus créatif. Lauréat 2017 du VII Premio AAAC, son travail a été présenté dans de nombreuses expositions collectives, en 2015 au Bâtiment d’Art Contemporain de Genève, en 2016 au 89e Salon de Lyon et du S...

  13. Sudden unexpected death associated with lymphocytic thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergaard, Vibeke; Drostrup, Dorthe Høj; Thomsen, Jørgen L

    2007-04-01

    A forensic autopsy study comprising 125 cases was carried out retrospectively in order to evaluate pathological changes in the thyroid gland in different groups of death. The five groups selected consecutively were: (i) opiate addicts who died from an overdose, (ii) alcoholics who died as a result of their alcohol abuse, (iii) cases of fatal poisoning other than opiate addicts, (iv) unknown cause of death and (v) controls without prior disease. Tissue samples from the thyroid gland were cut and stained with haematoxylin and eosin and van Gieson. Histology examinations were subsequently performed blind with semiquantitative assessment of the following six parameters: (a) height of the follicular epithelium, (b) the amount of lymphocytes, (c) the presence of plasma cells, (d) hyperplastic follicular changes, (e) oxyphilic changes, and (f) fibrosis. The most striking result was the finding of extensive lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid parenchyma in five of the 124 cases, of which four belonged in the group of 'unknown cause of death'. This discovery leads to reflections regarding lymphocytic thyroiditis as a cause of death, either by itself or in combination with other disorders. Silent (painless) thyroiditis, especially, is easily overlooked at autopsy as there are no macroscopic changes and often no prior symptoms or history of thyroid disease pointing towards this condition. Analyses of thyroid hormones are unreliable in predicting endocrine status in life. Routine microscopy of the thyroid gland is therefore advocated in cases of sudden unexpected death in order to diagnose thyroid disease, in particular silent (painless) thyroiditis.

  14. Ombud's Corner: unexpected turn in the conversation?

    CERN Multimedia

    Sudeshna Datta-Cockerill

    2014-01-01

    Regular informal conversations with colleagues play a very important part in weaving the fabric of team spirit. They allow us to build the working relationships that are vital to the success of our projects and to create an environment of good will that is instrumental in averting potential conflict or crises. However, sometimes they can come with unexpected surprises…   Eric and his colleagues always meet on Monday mornings to have coffee together, before starting the working week. This is a very privileged moment for the team when there are no formal barriers or professional concerns: Mary may talk about a film that she saw at the weekend, Eric often goes hiking in the Jura with his friend Stefan, Hans has always got a story about his son’s prowess on the school football team and occasionally there is a bit of special news such as Louisa’s recent marriage, Pierre’s baby’s christening or Claude’s daughter’s graduation&...

  15. Cannibalistic-morph Tiger Salamanders in unexpected ecological contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Kyle I.; Stockwell, Craig A.; Mushet, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Barred tiger salamanders [Ambystoma mavortium (Baird, 1850)] exhibit two trophic morphologies; a typical and a cannibalistic morph. Cannibalistic morphs, distinguished by enlarged vomerine teeth, wide heads, slender bodies, and cannibalistic tendencies, are often found where conspecifics occur at high density. During 2012 and 2013, 162 North Dakota wetlands and lakes were sampled for salamanders. Fifty-one contained A. mavortium populations; four of these contained cannibalistic morph individuals. Two populations with cannibalistic morphs occurred at sites with high abundances of conspecifics. However, the other two populations occurred at sites with unexpectedly low conspecific but high fathead minnow [Pimephales promelas (Rafinesque, 1820)] abundances. Further, no typical morphs were observed in either of these later two populations, contrasting with earlier research suggesting cannibalistic morphs only occur at low frequencies in salamander populations. Another anomaly of all four populations was the occurrence of cannibalistic morphs in permanent water sites, suggesting their presence was due to factors other than faster growth allowing them to occupy ephemeral habitats. Therefore, our findings suggest environmental factors inducing the cannibalistic morphism may be more complex than previously thought.

  16. Unexpected (π , π) order in Fe1.1Te

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fobes, David; Zaliznyak, Igor; Xu, Zhijun; Gu, Genda; Tranquada, John M.; Singh, Deepak

    2013-03-01

    We have studied the evolution of the magnetic and crystal structure in single crystalline Fe1.1Te, an iron-rich parent of the chalcogenide superconductor family. While a structural transition to a monoclinic symmetry occurs at ~ 60 K, magnetic peaks at 2 π . (0 . 48 , 0) only arise below TN ~ 58 K, and can be understood as bicollinear magnetism with discommensuration defects. [2] Unexpectedly, we have also observed resolution limited peaks at approximately (π , π) , arising at the same temperature TN, and exhibiting temperature hysteresis similar to that seen in magnetic susceptibility, perhaps indicating that these peaks are of magnetic origin. Additionally, the position of these peaks is nearly the same as in the parent compounds of the iron pnictide family of superconductors, where magnetic order is simple collinear commensurate antiferromagnetism. The origin of these new peaks near (π , π) and their relationship to the dominant bicollinear magnetic order observed in Fe1.1Te presents a puzzle. Work at BNL supported by Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US DOE, under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886. We acknowledge the support of NIST, US Department of Commerce, in providing the neutron research facilities used in this work.

  17. Unexpectedly large charge radii of neutron-rich calcium isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia Ruiz, R F; Blaum, K; Ekström, A; Frömmgen, N; Hagen, G; Hammen, M; Hebeler, K; Holt, J D; Jansen, G R; Kowalska, M; Kreim, K; Nazarewicz, W; Neugart, R; Neyens, G; Nörtershäuser, W; Papenbrock, T; Papuga, J; Schwenk, A; Simonis, J; Wendt, K A; Yordanov, D T

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a complex many-body system, the atomic nucleus exhibits simple structures for certain ‘magic’ numbers of protons and neutrons. The calcium chain in particular is both unique and puzzling: evidence of doubly magic features are known in 40,48Ca, and recently suggested in two radioactive isotopes, 52,54Ca. Although many properties of experimentally known calcium isotopes have been successfully described by nuclear theory, it is still a challenge to predict the evolution of their charge radii. Here we present the first measurements of the charge radii of 49,51,52Ca, obtained from laser spectroscopy experiments at ISOLDE, CERN. The experimental results are complemented by state-of-the-art theoretical calculations. The large and unexpected increase of the size of the neutron-rich calcium isotopes beyond N = 28 challenges the doubly magic nature of 52Ca and opens new intriguing questions on the evolution of nuclear sizes away from stability, which are of importance for our understanding of neutron-...

  18. Unexpectedly large charge radii of neutron-rich calcium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Bissell, M. L.; Blaum, K.; Ekström, A.; Frömmgen, N.; Hagen, G.; Hammen, M.; Hebeler, K.; Holt, J. D.; Jansen, G. R.; Kowalska, M.; Kreim, K.; Nazarewicz, W.; Neugart, R.; Neyens, G.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Papenbrock, T.; Papuga, J.; Schwenk, A.; Simonis, J.; Wendt, K. A.; Yordanov, D. T.

    2016-06-01

    Despite being a complex many-body system, the atomic nucleus exhibits simple structures for certain `magic’ numbers of protons and neutrons. The calcium chain in particular is both unique and puzzling: evidence of doubly magic features are known in 40,48Ca, and recently suggested in two radioactive isotopes, 52,54Ca. Although many properties of experimentally known calcium isotopes have been successfully described by nuclear theory, it is still a challenge to predict the evolution of their charge radii. Here we present the first measurements of the charge radii of 49,51,52Ca, obtained from laser spectroscopy experiments at ISOLDE, CERN. The experimental results are complemented by state-of-the-art theoretical calculations. The large and unexpected increase of the size of the neutron-rich calcium isotopes beyond N = 28 challenges the doubly magic nature of 52Ca and opens new intriguing questions on the evolution of nuclear sizes away from stability, which are of importance for our understanding of neutron-rich atomic nuclei.

  19. Unexpected Patterns of Plastic Energy Allocation in Stochastic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Barbara; Taborsky, Barbara; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    When environmental conditions vary stochastically, individuals accrue fitness benefits by exhibiting phenotypic plasticity. Here we analyze a general dynamic-programming model describing an individual’s optimal energy allocation in a stochastic environment. After maturation, individuals repeatedly decide how to allocate incoming energy between reproduction and maintenance. We analyze the optimal fraction of energy invested in reproduction and the resultant degree of plasticity in dependence on environmental variability and predictability. Our analyses reveal unexpected patterns of optimal energy allocation. When energy availability is low, all energy is allocated to reproduction, although this implies that individuals will not survive after reproduction. Above a certain threshold of energy availability, the optimal reproductive investment decreases to a minimum and even vanishes entirely in highly variable environments. With further improving energy availability, optimal reproductive investment gradually increases again. Costs of plasticity affect this allocation pattern only quantitatively. Our results show that optimal reproductive investment does not increase monotonically with growing energy availability and that small changes in energy availability can lead to major variations in optimal energy allocation. Our results help to unify two apparently opposing predictions from life-history theory, that organisms should increase reproductive investment both with improved environmental conditions and when conditions deteriorate (“terminal investment”). PMID:19196158

  20. 42 CFR 493.861 - Standard; Unexpected antibody detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; Unexpected antibody detection. 493.861 Section 493.861 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.861 Standard; Unexpected antibody detection. (a) Failure...

  1. The World of Virtual Exhibitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Eiselt

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available EXTENDED ABSTRACTSpecial collections of the National and University Library (NUK hide a lot of items of precious value. The Slovenian cultural heritage is stored on paper or on other media as a part of the library’s Manuscripts, Incunabula and Rare Books Collection, Old Prints Collection, Maps and Pictorial Collection, Music Collection, Ephemera Collection, Serials Collection, and Slovenian Diaspora Publications Collection. Only a small part of the treasures is temporary revealed to the public on special exhibitions. The idea of virtual exhibitions of library treasures was born in 2005. The library aimed to exhibit precious items of special collections of high historical or artistic value. In 2008 the first two virtual exhibitions were created in-house offering access to the rich collections of old postcards of Ljubljana at the beginning of 20th century kept in the Maps and Pictorial Collection of NUK. They were soon followed by other virtual exhibitions. At the beginning they were organised in the same way as physical exhibitions, afterwards different programs were used for creation of special effects (for ex. 3D wall. About two years ago it was decided that the creation of virtual exhibitions will be simplified. Files of digitised and borndigital library materials in jpg format are imported to MS PowerPoint 2010. Each jpg file is now formatted by adding a frame, a description … to the slides which are saved as jpg files. The last step is the import of jpg files into Cooliris application used for NUK web exhibitions. In the paper the virtual exhibition design and creation, the technical point of view and criteria for the selection of exhibition content are explained following the example of the virtual exhibitions the Old Postcards of Ljubljana, Photo Ateliers in Slovenia, a collection of photographs Four Seasons by Fran Krašovec and photos of Post-Earthquake Ljubljana in 1895.

  2. Unexpected relationships of substructured populations in Chinese Locusta migratoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Ya-Jie

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly migratory species are usually expected to have minimal population substructure because strong gene flow has the effect of homogenizing genetic variation over geographical populations, counteracting random drift, selection and mutation. The migratory locust Locusta migratoria belongs to a monotypic genus, and is an infamous pest insect with exceptional migratory ability – with dispersal documented over a thousand kilometers. Its distributional area is greater than that of any other locust or grasshopper, occurring in practically all the temperate and tropical regions of the eastern hemisphere. Consequently, minimal population substructuring is expected. However, in marked contrast to its high dispersal ability, three geographical subspecies have been distinguished in China, with more than nine being biologically and morphologically identified in the world. Such subspecies status has been under considerable debate. Results By multilocus microsatellite genotyping analysis, we provide ample genetic evidence for strong population substructure in this highly migratory insect that conforms to geography. More importantly, our genetic data identified an unexpected cryptic subdivision and demonstrated a strong affiliation of the East China locusts to those in Northwest/Northern China. The migratory locusts in China formed three distinct groups, viz. (1 the Tibetan group, comprising locusts from Tibet and nearby West China high mountain regions; this is congruent with the previously recognized Tibetan subspecies, L. m. tibetensis; (2 the South China group, containing locusts from the Hainan islands; this corresponds to the Southeast Asia oriental tropical subspecies L. m. manilensis; (3 the North China group, including locusts from the Northwest and Northern China (the Asiatic subspecies L. m. migratoria, Central China and Eastern China regions. Therefore, the traditional concept on Locusta subspecies status established from

  3. Expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, p-hydroxybenzoate-m-geranyltransferase and genes of phenylpropanoid pathway exhibits positive correlation with shikonins content in arnebia [Arnebia euchroma (Royle Johnston

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Madhu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geranyl pyrophosphate (GPP and p-hydroxybenzoate (PHB are the basic precursors involved in shikonins biosynthesis. GPP is derived from mevalonate (MVA and/or 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP pathway(s, depending upon the metabolite and the plant system under consideration. PHB, however, is synthesized by only phenylpropanoid (PP pathway. GPP and PHB are central moieties to yield shikonins through the synthesis of m-geranyl-p-hydroxybenzoate (GHB. Enzyme p-hydroxybenzoate-m-geranyltransferase (PGT catalyses the coupling of GPP and PHB to yield GHB. The present research was carried out in shikonins yielding plant arnebia [Arnebia euchroma (Royle Johnston], wherein no molecular work has been reported so far. The objective of the work was to identify the preferred GPP synthesizing pathway for shikonins biosynthesis, and to determine the regulatory genes involved in the biosynthesis of GPP, PHB and GHB. Results A cell suspension culture-based, low and high shikonins production systems were developed to facilitate pathway identification and finding the regulatory gene. Studies with mevinolin and fosmidomycin, inhibitors of MVA and MEP pathway, respectively suggested MVA as a preferred route of GPP supply for shikonins biosynthesis in arnebia. Accordingly, genes of MVA pathway (eight genes, PP pathway (three genes, and GHB biosynthesis were cloned. Expression studies showed down-regulation of all the genes in response to mevinolin treatment, whereas gene expression was not influenced by fosmidomycin. Expression of all the twelve genes vis-à-vis shikonins content in low and high shikonins production system, over a period of twelve days at frequent intervals, identified critical genes of shikonins biosynthesis in arnebia. Conclusion A positive correlation between shikonins content and expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (AeHMGR and AePGT suggested critical role played by these genes in shikonins

  4. An unexpectedly high degree of specialization and a widespread involvement in sterol metabolism among the C. elegans putative aminophospholipid translocases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miteva Yana

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background P-type ATPases in subfamily IV are exclusively eukaryotic transmembrane proteins that have been proposed to directly translocate the aminophospholipids phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine from the exofacial to the cytofacial monolayer of the plasma membrane. Eukaryotic genomes contain many genes encoding members of this subfamily. At present it is unclear why there are so many genes of this kind per organism or what individual roles these genes perform in organism development. Results We have systematically investigated expression and developmental function of the six, tat-1 through 6, subfamily IV P-type ATPase genes encoded in the Caenorhabditis elegans genome. tat-5 is the only ubiquitously-expressed essential gene in the group. tat-6 is a poorly-transcribed recent duplicate of tat-5. tat-2 through 4 exhibit tissue-specific developmentally-regulated expression patterns. Strong expression of both tat-2 and tat-4 occurs in the intestine and certain other cells of the alimentary system. The two are also expressed in the uterus, during spermatogenesis and in the fully-formed spermatheca. tat-2 alone is expressed in the pharyngeal gland cells, the excretory system and a few cells of the developing vulva. The expression pattern of tat-3 is almost completely different from those of tat-2 and tat-4. tat-3 expression is detectable in the steroidogenic tissues: the hypodermis and the XXX cells, as well as in most cells of the pharynx (except gland, various tissues of the reproductive system (except uterus and spermatheca and seam cells. Deletion of tat-1 through 4 individually interferes little or not at all with the regular progression of organism growth and development under normal conditions. However, tat-2 through 4 become essential for reproductive growth during sterol starvation. Conclusion tat-5 likely encodes a housekeeping protein that performs the proposed aminophospholipid translocase function routinely

  5. Early Transcriptomic Adaptation to Na2CO3 Stress Altered the Expression of a Quarter of the Total Genes in the Maize Genome and Exhibited Shared and Distinctive Profiles with NaCl and High pH Stresses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiMin Zhang; XiangGuo Liu; XinNing Qu; Ying Yu; SiPing Han; Yao Dou; YaoYao Xu; HaiChun Jing; DongYun Hao

    2013-01-01

    Sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) presents a huge challenge to plants by the combined damaging effects of Naþ, high pH, and CO32-. Little is known about the cellular responses to Na2CO3 stress. In this study, the transcriptome of maize (Zea mays L. cv. B73) roots exposed to Na2CO3 stress for 5 h was compared with those of NaCl and NaOH stresses. The expression of 8,319 genes, representing over a quarter of the total number of genes in the maize genome, was altered by Na2CO3 stress, and the downregulated genes (5,232) outnumbered the upregulated genes (3,087). The effects of Na2CO3 differed from those of NaCl and NaOH, primarily by downregulating different categories of genes. Pathways commonly altered by Na2CO3, NaCl, and NaOH were enriched in phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, as well as the metabolism of secondary metabolites. Genes for brassinosteroid biosynthesis were specifically upregulated by Na2CO3, while genes involved in ascorbate and aldarate metabolism, protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum and by N-glycosylation, fatty acid biosynthesis, and the circadian rhythm were downregulated. This work provides the first holistic picture of early transcriptomic adaptation to Na2CO3 stress, and highlights potential molecular pathways that could be manipulated to improve tolerance in maize.

  6. Whole-Exome Sequencing Reveals CLCNKB Mutations in a Case of Sudden Unexpected Infant Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Hector U; Haverfield, Eden; Chung, Wendy K

    2015-01-01

    Cases of sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) leave many families devastated, especially in those without an identified cause of death. Here, we describe the case of an apparently healthy 15-day-old infant who died suddenly and unexpectedly. Through whole-exome sequencing, the infant was posthumously found to have 2 mutations in the CLCNKB gene, leading to a molecular diagnosis of Bartter syndrome type III, the likely cause of death. This case illustrates the potential utility of exome sequencing in cases of SUID to suggest a diagnosis, with important implications for families, allowing them to come to closure over the cause of death, informing their future reproductive decisions, and minimizing the risk of recurrence.

  7. Unexpected Activity of a Novel Kunitz-type Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David; Tikhonova, Irina G.; Jewhurst, Heather L.; Drysdale, Orla C.; Dvořák, Jan; Robinson, Mark W.; Cwiklinski, Krystyna; Dalton, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Kunitz-type (KT) protease inhibitors are low molecular weight proteins classically defined as serine protease inhibitors. We identified a novel secreted KT inhibitor associated with the gut and parenchymal tissues of the infective juvenile stage of Fasciola hepatica, a helminth parasite of medical and veterinary importance. Unexpectedly, recombinant KT inhibitor (rFhKT1) exhibited no inhibitory activity toward serine proteases but was a potent inhibitor of the major secreted cathepsin L cysteine proteases of F. hepatica, FhCL1 and FhCL2, and of human cathepsins L and K (Ki = 0.4-27 nm). FhKT1 prevented the auto-catalytic activation of FhCL1 and FhCL2 and formed stable complexes with the mature enzymes. Pulldown experiments from adult parasite culture medium showed that rFhKT1 interacts specifically with native secreted FhCL1, FhCL2, and FhCL5. Substitution of the unusual P1 Leu15 within the exposed reactive loop of FhKT1 for the more commonly found Arg (FhKT1Leu15/Arg15) had modest adverse effects on the cysteine protease inhibition but conferred potent activity against the serine protease trypsin (Ki = 1.5 nm). Computational docking and sequence analysis provided hypotheses for the exclusive binding of FhKT1 to cysteine proteases, the importance of the Leu15 in anchoring the inhibitor into the S2 active site pocket, and the inhibitor's selectivity toward FhCL1, FhCL2, and human cathepsins L and K. FhKT1 represents a novel evolutionary adaptation of KT protease inhibitors by F. hepatica, with its prime purpose likely in the regulation of the major parasite-secreted proteases and/or cathepsin L-like proteases of its host. PMID:27422822

  8. Auto Technology Exhibition in Tianjing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ The 4th International Automotive Technology Exhibition Tianjing2009,jointly hosted by the Society of Automotive Engineers of China(SAE-China),China Automotive Technology and Research Center(CATRC)and Tianjin Economic-Technological Development Area(TETD),is to be held in Tianjin Binhai International Convention and Exhibition Center from August 27 to August 30 this year.In line with China's national 11th Five-year Plan,The Automobile Industry Revitalization and Adjustments Planning and The Equipment Manufacturing Revitalization and Adjustments Planning,this Exhibition,centered on the theme of automobile and equipment manufacturing,arranges the exhibition halls respectively for private autos,commercial autos and equipment manufacturing etc.

  9. Photowalk Exhibition opens at Microcosm

    CERN Document Server

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    The winning photographs from the 2010 Global Particle Physics Photowalk competition will go on display at Microcosm from 11 February to 2 April. The exhibition is part of a global photography event taking place over three continents, with Photowalk exhibitions opening simultaneously at Fermilab in the US, KEK in Japan and here at CERN.   DESY wire chamber - First place people's choice; second place global jury competition. Photographer: Hans-Peter Hildebrandt  If you were one of the 1,300 photography lovers who voted in last year’s Photowalk competition, this exhibition is your chance to see the winning entries in print. The exhibition will take place in the downstairs gallery of Microcosm, overlooking the garden. 15 photographs will be on display, with each of the laboratories that participated in Photowalk represented by their 3 winning entries. Among them will be the “people’s choice” sunburst photo of a particle detector at DESY (Photo 1), and...

  10. Staged Venture Capital Investment considering Unexpected Major Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yindong Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a dynamic model of capital financing, taking into consideration unexpected major events occurring within continuous time model. We are considering a special jump-diffusion model first described by Samuelson (1973 while using traditional geometric Brownian motion. This paper seeks to accurately show the innovative project valuation when unexpected major events occur and get the analytical results of the project option value. Furthermore, we analyzed the impact of multistaged financing; results indicated that both sources of uncertainty positively impact the project option value; particularly, the option price when considering unexpected major events occurrence is larger than the option price without unexpected major events. Based on a comparative-static analysis, new propositions for optimal amount of investment and optimal level of project are derived from simulations.

  11. Globe exhibit wins international acclaim

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    The Globe’s “Universe of Particles” exhibition has recently received four prestigious awards for its avant-garde design. This external praise is great encouragement for the CERN exhibitions currently on the drawing board.   The Universe of Particles exhibition has won 4 awards for its avant-garde design. Back in 2008, the design company Atelier Brückner was presented with a challenge: to design the layout of a new permanent exhibition for CERN, one that would epitomize both the Organization and its research. The brief was concise but complex: the exhibit had to be symbolic of the Organization, use modern technology, engage and immerse visitors, and, preferably, use touch-screen technology. With the help of IArt, an interactive technology firm, and based on the content provided by CERN’s Education Group, Atelier Brückner developed the “Universe of Particles” exhibit as it is today. Its principal concept centred on the s...

  12. Greenhouse Earth: A Traveling Exhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booth, W.H.; Caesar, S.

    1992-09-01

    The Franklin Institute Science Museum provided an exhibit entitled the Greenhouse Earth: A Traveling Exhibition. This 3500 square-foot exhibit on global climate change was developed in collaboration with the Association of Science-Technology Centers. The exhibit opened at The Franklin Institute on February 14, 1992, welcoming 291,000 visitors over its three-month stay. During its three-year tour, Greenhouse Earth will travel to ten US cities, reaching two million visitors. Greenhouse Earth aims to deepen public understanding of the scientific issues of global warming and the conservation measures that can be taken to slow its effects. The exhibit features hands-on exhibitry, interactive computer programs and videos, a theater production, a demonstration cart,'' guided tours, and lectures. supplemental educational programs at the Institute included a teachers preview, a symposium on climate change, and a satellite field trip.'' The development of Greenhouse Earth included front-end and formative evaluation procedures. Evaluation includes interviews with visitors, prototypes, and summative surveys for participating museums. During its stay in Philadelphia, Greenhouse Earth was covered by the local and national press, with reviews in print and broadcast media. Greenhouse Earth is the first large-scale museum exhibit to address global climate change.

  13. Unexpected Expectations The Curiosities of a Mathematical Crystal Ball

    CERN Document Server

    Wapner, Leonard M

    2012-01-01

    Unexpected Expectations: The Curiosities of a Mathematical Crystal Ball explores how paradoxical challenges involving mathematical expectation often necessitate a reexamination of basic premises. The author takes you through mathematical paradoxes associated with seemingly straightforward applications of mathematical expectation and shows how these unexpected contradictions may push you to reconsider the legitimacy of the applications. The book requires only an understanding of basic algebraic operations and includes supplemental mathematical background in chapter appendices. After a history o

  14. Healthy first-degree relatives of patients with type 1 diabetes exhibit significant differences in basal gene expression pattern of immunocompetent cells compared to controls: expression pattern as predeterminant of autoimmune diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stechova, K; Kolar, M; Blatny, R; Halbhuber, Z; Vcelakova, J; Hubackova, M; Petruzelkova, L; Sumnik, Z; Obermannova, B; Pithova, P; Stavikova, V; Krivjanska, M; Neuwirth, A; Kolouskova, S; Filipp, D

    2012-02-01

    Expression features of genetic landscape which predispose an individual to the type 1 diabetes are poorly understood. We addressed this question by comparing gene expression profile of freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from either patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D), or their first-degree relatives or healthy controls. Our aim was to establish whether a distinct type of 'prodiabetogenic' gene expression pattern in the group of relatives of patients with T1D could be identified. Whole-genome expression profile of nine patients with T1D, their ten first-degree relatives and ten healthy controls was analysed using the human high-density expression microarray chip. Functional aspects of candidate genes were assessed using the MetaCore software. The highest number of differentially expressed genes (547) was found between the autoantibody-negative healthy relatives and the healthy controls. Some of them represent genes critically involved in the regulation of innate immune responses such as TLR signalling and CCR3 signalling in eosinophiles, humoral immune reactions such as BCR pathway, costimulation and cytokine responses mediated by CD137, CD40 and CD28 signalling and IL-1 proinflammatory pathway. Our data demonstrate that expression profile of healthy relatives of patients with T1D is clearly distinct from the pattern found in the healthy controls. That especially concerns differential activation status of genes and signalling pathways involved in proinflammatory processes and those of innate immunity and humoral reactivity. Thus, we posit that the study of the healthy relative's gene expression pattern is instrumental for the identification of novel markers associated with the development of diabetes.

  15. Human bronchial epithelial cells exposed in vitro to diesel exhaust particles exhibit alterations in cell rheology and cytotoxicity associated with decrease in antioxidant defenses and imbalance in pro- and anti-apoptotic gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seriani, Robson; de Souza, Claudia Emanuele Carvalho; Krempel, Paloma Gava; Frias, Daniela Perroni; Matsuda, Monique; Correia, Aristides Tadeu; Ferreira, Márcia Zotti Justo; Alencar, Adriano Mesquita; Negri, Elnara Marcia; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Mauad, Thais; Macchione, Mariangela

    2016-05-01

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) from diesel engines produce adverse alterations in cells of the airways by activating intracellular signaling pathways and apoptotic gene overexpression, and also by influencing metabolism and cytoskeleton changes. This study used human bronchial epithelium cells (BEAS-2B) in culture and evaluates their exposure to DEPs (15ug/mL for 1 and 2 h) in order to determine changes to cell rheology (viscoelasticity) and gene expression of the enzymes involved in oxidative stress, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity. BEAS-2B cells exposed to DEPs were found to have a significant loss in stiffness, membrane stability, and mitochondrial activity. The genes involved in apoptosis [B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2 and caspase-3)] presented inversely proportional expressions (p = 0.05, p = 0.01, respectively), low expression of the genes involved in antioxidant responses [SOD1 (superoxide dismutase 1); SOD2 (superoxide dismutase 2), and GPx (glutathione peroxidase) (p = 0.01)], along with an increase in cytochrome P450, family 1, subfamily A, polypeptide 1 (CYP1A1) (p = 0.01). These results suggest that alterations in cell rheology and cytotoxicity could be associated with oxidative stress and imbalance between pro- and anti-apoptotic genes.

  16. The Unexpected Past of a Dwarf Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-08-01

    New Light on Cannibalism in the Local Group of Galaxies The Local Group of Galaxies consists of a few large spiral galaxies - for instance the Milky Way galaxy in which we live, and the Andromeda galaxy that is visible to the unaided eye in the northern constellation of the same name - as well as two dozen much smaller galaxies of mostly irregular shape. Whereas the larger galaxies have extended halos of very old stars, no such halos have ever been seen around the smaller ones. Now, however, Dante Minniti and Albert Zijlstra [1], working at the ESO 3.5-metre New Technology Telescope (NTT), have found a large halo of old and metal-poor stars around one of the dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. This finding is quite unexpected. It revises our understanding of star formation in these galaxies and provides important information about the past evolution of galaxies [2]. Galaxy halos The Milky Way galaxy is surrounded by a large, roughly spherical halo of old stars. The diameter is about 100,000 light years and the stars therein, known as Population II stars, are among the oldest known, with ages of 10 billion years or even more. They also differ from the younger stars nearer to the main plane of the Milky Way (in which our 4.7 billion year old Sun is located) by being very metal-poor. Many of the halo stars consist almost solely of hydrogen and helium, reflecting the composition of matter in the young Universe. This halo is important for our understanding of the processes that led to the formation of the Milky Way galaxy. It is believed that many of the halo stars and those of the same type found in globular clusters existed already before the Milky Way had fully formed. Galaxy cannibalism Many astronomers suspect that galaxies evolve and gradually grow larger and heavier by practising cannibalism on their own kind. In this picture, when two galaxies collide in space, the stars and nebulae in the smaller one will disperse and soon be taken over by the larger one, which

  17. Exhibition - Mathematics, A Beautiful Elsewhere

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    From 21 October 2011 to 18 March 2012, the Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain will present the exhibition Mathematics: A Beautiful Elsewhere, an exhibition developed in association with the Institut des Hautes Études Scientifiques (IHÉS) and under the patronage of UNESCO. For this unprecedented event, the foundation invited mathematicians to work with artists with whom it has previously worked to create an exhibition that allows visitors to see, hear, do, interpret and think about mathematics. By bringing mathematics into its premises, the Fondation Cartier is itself undergoing the “sudden change of scenery” described by mathematician Alexandre Grothendieck. More information is available here. Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain 261, boulevard Raspail 75014 Paris http://fondation.cartier.com Private Visit For professors, researchers and all the staff of Mathematics departments...

  18. Escherichia coli O157:H7 Cells Exposed to Lettuce Leaf Lysate in Refrigerated Conditions Exhibit Differential Expression of Selected Virulence and Adhesion-Related Genes with Altered Mammalian Cell Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Nicole M; Mukherjee, Nabanita; Banerjee, Pratik

    2016-07-01

    Contamination by and persistence of pathogenic bacteria in ready-to-eat produce have emerged as significant food safety and public health concerns. Viable produceborne pathogens cope with several stresses (e.g., temperature fluctuations and lowtemperature storage) during production and storage of the commodities. In this study, we investigated the impact of transient cold shock on Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EcO157) cells in a produce matrix (romaine lettuce leaf lysate). EcO157 cells were exposed to 25°C for 1 h, 4°C for 1 h, and 4°C for 10 min in lettuce lysate. The expression of selected genes coding for virulence, stress response, and heat and cold shock proteins was quantified by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR assay. Treated EcO157 cells adhered to MAC-T mammalian cells were enumerated by in vitro bioassay. Expression of the Shiga toxin 1 gene (stx1a) was upregulated significantly (P < 0.05) upon cold shock treatments, but virulence genes related to EcO157 attachment (eaeA, lpfA, and hcpA) were down-regulated. Two key members of the cold shock regulon, cold shock protein (cspA) and gyrA, were significantly induced (P < 0.05) at the refrigeration temperature (4°C). Significant upregulation of an SOS response gene, recA, was also observed. E. coli heat shock regulon member grpE was induced, but a universal stress protein (uspA) was downregulated at the refrigeration temperatures in lettuce lysate. The adhesion assay revealed a temperature-dependent reduction in the attachment of cold-shocked EcO157 cells. The results of the current study indicate a reduction in the attachment of cold-shocked EcO157 to epithelial cells and higher levels of Shiga toxin gene expression at the molecular level.

  19. Development of Exhibit on Arctic Climate Change Called The Arctic: A Friend Acting Strangely Exhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauffer, Barbara W.

    2006-04-01

    The exhibition, The Arctic: A Friend Acting Strangely, was developed at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) as a part of the museum’s Forces of Change exhibit series on global change. It opened to the public in Spring 2006, in conjunction with another Forces of Change exhibit on the Earth’s atmosphere called Change Is in the Air. The exhibit was a 2000 square-foot presentation that explored the forces and consequences of the changing Arctic as documented by scientists and native residents alike. Native peoples of the Arctic have always lived with year-to-year fluctuations in weather and ice conditions. In recent decades, they have witnessed that the climate has become unpredictable, the land and sea unfamiliar. An elder in Arctic Canada recently described the weather as uggianaqtuq —an Inuit word that can suggest strange, unexpected behavior, sometimes described as that of “a friend acting strangely.” Scientists too have been documenting dramatic changes in the Arctic. Air temperatures have warmed over most—though not all—of the Arctic since the 1950s; Arctic precipitation may have increased by as much as 8%; seasonal melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet has increased on average by 16% since 1979; polar-orbiting satellites have measured a 15¬–20% decline in sea ice extent since the 1970s; aircraft reconnaissance and ship observations show a steady decrease in sea ice since the 1950s. In response to this warming, plant distributions have begun to shift and animals are changing their migration routes. Some of these changes may have beneficial effects while others may bring hardship or have costly implications. And, many scientists consider arctic change to be a ‘bell-weather’ for large-scale changes in other regions of the world. The exhibition included text, photos artifacts, hands-on interactives and other exhibitry that illustrated the changes being documented by indigenous people and scientists alike.

  20. Green Revolution for Exhibition Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Manman

    2010-01-01

    @@ Shanghai World Expo is widely regarded as another grand international pageant, so many people thought that the opening ceremony must be as much magnificent and brilliant as the opening ceremony for Beijing Olympics.However, it was revealed by Wan Jifei, Executive Director of the ExecutiveCommittee of the Shanghai World Expo that the opening ceremony of the Expo was not that luxurious and extravagant as that for the Beijing Olympics, but would have its own characteristics under the elaborate design and thorough arrangement conducted by the host. The veto against that luxurious opening ceremony was actually a practice echoing for the concept of Green World Expo, which would be applied for every corner from the beginning to the end of the Expo, including the construction of exhibition hall, building of exhibition stand and advertisement etc.

  1. World Expo and Exhibition Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Liqin

    2010-01-01

    @@ February 8 witnessed the construction of 2010 World Expo's China Pavilion completed after two years' work. The pavilion, in the shape of an oriental crown,showcases the spirit of traditional Chinese culture. It is significant since all other nation's pavilion constructed only for temporary exhibition, but China's Pavilion will be lasting architecture as the symbol of world civilization. Another similar famous case is Eiffel Tower which was built as the entrance of the world expo held in. 1889.

  2. A New Exhibition in Microcosm

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Sebastien Pelletier explains states of matter to an enthusiastic group of youngsters during the opening of a new exhibition in Microcosm last week. The Fun with Physics workshop will be offered to all 13-14 year olds in school groups visiting CERN this year. The new Microcosm contents have been developed in collaboration with the local teaching community, and cover particles and the forces that act between them.

  3. "Big Science" exhibition at Balexert

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    CERN is going out to meet those members of the general public who were unable to attend the recent Open Day. The Laboratory will be taking its "Big Science" exhibition from the Globe of Science and Innovation to the Balexert shopping centre from 19 to 31 May 2008. The exhibition, which shows the LHC and its experiments through the eyes of a photographer, features around thirty spectacular photographs measuring 4.5 metres high and 2.5 metres wide. Welcomed and guided around the exhibition by CERN volunteers, shoppers at Balexert will also have the opportunity to discover LHC components on display and watch films. "Fun with Physics" workshops will be held at certain times of the day. Main hall of the Balexert shopping centre, ground floor, from 9.00 a.m. to 7.00 p.m. Monday to Friday and from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on the two Saturdays. Call for volunteers All members of the CERN personnel are invited to enrol as volunteers to help welcom...

  4. Mobile Technologies in Museum Exhibitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Medić

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to be up–to–date and give visitors a memorable and unique experience, museums are including usage of digital technologies in their exhibitions. Even though museums in Serbia are very important part of tourism offer, they still have traditional settings that are poorly interpreted. The majority of them have a scientific and historical review which is unattractive for various target groups of visitors and for museums it’s important to continually try out new ways in interpretation of their settings. Because technology continues to rapidly change the way we communicate, cultural institutions should adapt to new ways of communication with their visitors. This paper examines mobile technologies that can be used in museums to give visitors a different experience and transfer the knowledge innovatively. In that way it will be presented the modern concept of presentation of museum exhibitions, focusing on usage of mobile devices through mobile applications and QR codes. The paper provides the broad understanding of usage mobile technologies in museum exhibitions with its advantages and limitations. The research results can help the museums management to improve interpretation and communication with visitors and enrich the visitor experience.

  5. Evaluating impacts of unexpected earning on precision of profit estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Kazemi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Precision in earning report has always been a concern among investors, and when there are some negative adjustments on earning, investor may find it challenging to decide whether they should hold or sell their shares. This paper studies the impact of earning precision and unexpected earning adjustments on firms whose share are listed on Tehran Stock Exchange. The proposed study of this paper considers three hypotheses including whether earning precision has negative relationship with unexpected profit, whether it has a negative with unexpected decline in profit and finally, whether, in prediction on negative news compared with positive news, there is a negative relationship between stronger earnings forecast and precision of earning forecast. The study gathers the necessary data from official news released for some firms whose shares were active over the period 2003-2012. The study uses two regression models and the results of regression analysis have confirmed all hypotheses of this survey.

  6. Unexpected marked seizure improvement in paediatric epilepsy surgery candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Mathiasen, René; Uldall, Peter

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Epilepsy surgery is performed based on the assumption that medical refractory epilepsy will continue. Rarely seizure freedom occurs before surgery is performed, while the patient is being evaluated as an epilepsy surgery candidate. The aim of this study was to describe the number......: At the first evaluation point in 2012, 13 patients were withdrawn from the epilepsy surgery programme due to unexpected marked improvement. In 2015, 6 of them were still seizure free. They had unexpected seizure freedom due to change in AED treatment (n=3) or after a febrile episode (n=3). The mean number...... of children withdrawn from an epilepsy surgery programme due to unexpected seizure improvement. METHODS: We retrospectively studied 173 children under 18 years with medical refractory epilepsy referred for epilepsy surgery between 1996 and 2010. Medical records were reviewed in 2012 and 2015. RESULTS...

  7. 人前脑啡肽基因修饰人胚胎肾细胞的构建%Construction of human embryonic kidney cells exhibiting human preproenkephalin gene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白凤; 杨保仲; 薛朝霞; 潘喻飞; 黄平

    2012-01-01

    Objective To construct human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) modified with human preproenkephalin (hPPE) gene.Methods hPPE gene fragments were obtained from recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.1( + )/hPPE by using restriction endonuelease Hind Ⅲ and Not Ⅰ.Homologous recombination of lentivirus and hPPE gene was produced by using recombinant DNA technology.HEK293 cells were then transfected with the recombinant lentivirus vectors.The expression of hPPE gene in HEK293 cells was detected by Western blot.Results The results of DNA sequencing indicated that the positive clone of recombinant lentivirus was completely consistent with sequencing of hPPE in Genebank.The titer of the concentrated virus was 2.07 × 108 TU/ml.GFP fluorescence was not seen in HEK293 cells transfected with the lentiviral vector under fluorescence microscope.A strong fluorescence was seen in HEK293 cells transfected with Ubc-GFP-L.V.empty viral vector.Positive expression of hPPE was demonstrated in HEK293 cells transfected with lentiviral vector by Western blot.Conclusion HEK293 cells modified with hPPE gene were successfully constructed and the target gene hPPE was stably expressed in HEK293 cells.%目的 构建人前脑啡肽基因(hPPE)修饰的人胚胎肾细胞(HEK293细胞).方法 重组质粒pcDNA3.1(+)/hPPE经限制性内切酶HindⅢ和Not Ⅰ进行双酶切获得hPPE基因,运用基因重组技术将hPPE基因与表达载体同源重组,转染293T细胞进行慢病毒包装、扩增、纯化,测定病毒滴度,再将重组的慢病毒载体转染HEK293细胞.用Western blot法检测hPPE基因在HEK293细胞中的表达.结果 重组慢病毒载体阳性克隆测序结果和基因库的hPPE基因序列完全一致.含有hPPE基因的慢病毒载体,滴度为2.07×108TU/ml.转染慢病毒载体后的HEK293细胞,在荧光显微镜下未见到GFP荧光.转染Ubc-GFP-L.V.空病毒载体的HEK293细胞,可见到较强的荧光.Western blot法检测到经慢病毒载体转染后的HEK293细胞中h

  8. Drosophila larvae lacking the bcl-2 gene, buffy, are sensitive to nutrient stress, maintain increased basal target of rapamycin (Tor signaling and exhibit characteristics of altered basal energy metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monserrate Jessica P

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2 proteins are the central regulators of apoptosis. The two bcl-2 genes in Drosophila modulate the response to stress-induced cell death, but not developmental cell death. Because null mutants are viable, Drosophila provides an optimum model system to investigate alternate functions of Bcl-2 proteins. In this report, we explore the role of one bcl-2 gene in nutrient stress responses. Results We report that starvation of Drosophila larvae lacking the bcl-2 gene, buffy, decreases survival rate by more than twofold relative to wild-type larvae. The buffy null mutant reacted to starvation with the expected responses such as inhibition of target of rapamycin (Tor signaling, autophagy initiation and mobilization of stored lipids. However, the autophagic response to starvation initiated faster in larvae lacking buffy and was inhibited by ectopic buffy. We demonstrate that unusually high basal Tor signaling, indicated by more phosphorylated S6K, was detected in the buffy mutant and that removal of a genomic copy of S6K, but not inactivation of Tor by rapamycin, reverted the precocious autophagy phenotype. Instead, Tor inactivation also required loss of a positive nutrient signal to trigger autophagy and loss of both was sufficient to activate autophagy in the buffy mutant even in the presence of enforced phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K signaling. Prior to starvation, the fed buffy mutant stored less lipid and glycogen, had high lactate levels and maintained a reduced pool of cellular ATP. These observations, together with the inability of buffy mutant larvae to adapt to nutrient restriction, indicate altered energy metabolism in the absence of buffy. Conclusions All animals in their natural habitats are faced with periods of reduced nutrient availability. This study demonstrates that buffy is required for adaptation to both starvation and nutrient restriction. Thus, Buffy is a Bcl-2 protein that plays an

  9. Unexpected Coexisting Myocardial Infarction Detected by Delayed Enhancement MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edouard Gerbaud

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of an unexpected coexisting anterior myocardial infarction detected by delayed enhancement MRI in a 41-year-old man following a presentation with a first episode of chest pain during inferior acute myocardial infarction. This second necrotic area was not initially suspected because there were no ECG changes in the anterior leads and the left descending coronary artery did not present any significant stenoses on emergency coronary angiography. Unrecognised myocardial infarction may carry important prognostic implications. CMR is currently the best imaging technique to detect unexpected infarcts.

  10. Borneo 2007. Three European Exhibitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Sellato

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The year 2007 appears to have been an exceptionally good one for Borneo in Europe. Two exhibitions were held in France, and one in Switzerland, which prominently featured the big island, its forests, its peoples, its cultures, and its arts. Here a brief review of these three events. Bornéo... Dayak et Punan. Peuples de la forêt tropicale humide, Musée d’Art et d’Archéologie, Laon, France, 25 November 2006 – 11 March 2007 The beautiful city of Laon, only a short distance by train or by car fro...

  11. CERN Permanent exhibitions short version

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Visits Explore by yourself the issues CERN's physicists are trying to solve: given that the entire universe is made of particles, where do they come from? Why do they behave in the way they do? Discover the massive apparatus used by physicists at CERN, like the LHC, and see how each part works. CERN invites the public to discover the mysteries of the Universe and the work of the world's biggest physics laboratory through free of charge guided tours and permanent exhibitions. As a group, with friends, individually, on foot, on your bike, come and discover CERN or explore it virtually. Welcome!

  12. Genes encoding two Theileria parva antigens recognized by CD8+ T-cells exhibit sequence diversity in South Sudanese cattle populations but the majority of alleles are similar to the Muguga component of the live vaccine cocktail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelle, Roger; Mwacharo, Joram M.; Njahira, Moses N.; Marcellino, Wani L.; Kiara, Henry; Malak, Agol K.; EL Hussein, Abdel Rahim M.; Bishop, Richard; Skilton, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    East Coast fever (ECF), caused by Theileria parva infection, is a frequently fatal disease of cattle in eastern, central and southern Africa, and an emerging disease in South Sudan. Immunization using the infection and treatment method (ITM) is increasingly being used for control in countries affected by ECF, but not yet in South Sudan. It has been reported that CD8+ T-cell lymphocytes specific for parasitized cells play a central role in the immunity induced by ITM and a number of T. parva antigens recognized by parasite-specific CD8+ T-cells have been identified. In this study we determined the sequence diversity among two of these antigens, Tp1 and Tp2, which are under evaluation as candidates for inclusion in a sub-unit vaccine. T. parva samples (n = 81) obtained from cattle in four geographical regions of South Sudan were studied for sequence polymorphism in partial sequences of the Tp1 and Tp2 genes. Eight positions (1.97%) in Tp1 and 78 positions (15.48%) in Tp2 were shown to be polymorphic, giving rise to four and 14 antigen variants in Tp1 and Tp2, respectively. The overall nucleotide diversity in the Tp1 and Tp2 genes was π = 1.65% and π = 4.76%, respectively. The parasites were sampled from regions approximately 300 km apart, but there was limited evidence for genetic differentiation between populations. Analyses of the sequences revealed limited numbers of amino acid polymorphisms both overall and in residues within the mapped CD8+ T-cell epitopes. Although novel epitopes were identified in the samples from South Sudan, a large number of the samples harboured several epitopes in both antigens that were similar to those in the T. parva Muguga reference stock, which is a key component in the widely used live vaccine cocktail. PMID:28231338

  13. Thallium-201 accumulation in cerebral candidiasis: Unexpected finding on SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonami, N.; Matsuda, H.; Ooba, H.; Yokoyama, K.; Hisada, K.; Ikeda, K.; Yamashita, J. (Kanazawa Univ. (Japan))

    1990-06-01

    The authors present an unexpected finding of Tl-201 uptake in the intracerebral lesions due to candidiasis. SPECT demonstrated the extent of the lesions and a high target-to-background ratio. The regions where abnormal Tl-201 accumulation was seen were nearly consistent with CT scans of those enhanced by a contrast agent. After treatment, most of the abnormal Tl-201 accumulation disappeared.

  14. Enrico Fermi exhibition at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    A touring exhibition celebrating the centenary of Enrico Fermi's birth in 1901 will be on display at CERN (Main Building, Mezzanine) from 12-27 September. You are cordially invited to the opening celebration on Thursday 12 September at 16:00 (Main Building, Council Chamber), which will include speechs from: Luciano Maiani Welcome and Introduction Arnaldo Stefanini Celebrating Fermi's Centenary in Documents and Pictures Antonino Zichichi The New 'Centro Enrico Fermi' at Via Panisperna Ugo Amaldi Fermi at Via Panisperna and the birth of Nuclear Medicine Jack Steinberger Fermi in Chicago Valentin Telegdi A Close-up of Fermi and the screening of a documentary video about Fermi: Scienziati a Pisa: Enrico Fermi (Scientists at Pisa: Enrico Fermi) created by Francesco Andreotti for La Limonaia from early film, photographs and sound recordings (In Italian, with English subtitles - c. 30 mins). This will be followed by an aperitif on the Mezz...

  15. Crows spontaneously exhibit analogical reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Anna; Zorina, Zoya; Obozova, Tanya; Wasserman, Edward

    2015-01-19

    Analogical reasoning is vital to advanced cognition and behavioral adaptation. Many theorists deem analogical thinking to be uniquely human and to be foundational to categorization, creative problem solving, and scientific discovery. Comparative psychologists have long been interested in the species generality of analogical reasoning, but they initially found it difficult to obtain empirical support for such thinking in nonhuman animals (for pioneering efforts, see [2, 3]). Researchers have since mustered considerable evidence and argument that relational matching-to-sample (RMTS) effectively captures the essence of analogy, in which the relevant logical arguments are presented visually. In RMTS, choice of test pair BB would be correct if the sample pair were AA, whereas choice of test pair EF would be correct if the sample pair were CD. Critically, no items in the correct test pair physically match items in the sample pair, thus demanding that only relational sameness or differentness is available to support accurate choice responding. Initial evidence suggested that only humans and apes can successfully learn RMTS with pairs of sample and test items; however, monkeys have subsequently done so. Here, we report that crows too exhibit relational matching behavior. Even more importantly, crows spontaneously display relational responding without ever having been trained on RMTS; they had only been trained on identity matching-to-sample (IMTS). Such robust and uninstructed relational matching behavior represents the most convincing evidence yet of analogical reasoning in a nonprimate species, as apes alone have spontaneously exhibited RMTS behavior after only IMTS training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  17. Gene transcripts encoding hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) exhibit tissue- and muscle fiber type-dependent responses to hypoxia and hypercapnic hypoxia in the Atlantic blue crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Kristin M; Follett, Chandler R; Burnett, Louis E; Lema, Sean C

    2012-09-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) is a transcription factor that under low environmental oxygen regulates the expression of suites of genes involved in metabolism, angiogenesis, erythropoiesis, immune function, and growth. Here, we isolated and sequenced partial cDNAs encoding hif-α and arnt/hif-β from the Atlantic blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, an estuarine species that frequently encounters concurrent hypoxia (low O(2)) and hypercapnia (elevated CO(2)). We then examined the effects of acute exposure (1h) to hypoxia (H) and hypercapnic hypoxia (HH) on relative transcript abundance for hif-α and arnt/hif-β in different tissues (glycolytic muscle, oxidative muscle, hepatopancreas, gill, and gonads) using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Our results indicate that hif-α and arnt/hif-β mRNAs were constitutively present under well-aerated normoxia (N) conditions in all tissues examined. Further, H and HH exposure resulted in both tissue-specific and muscle fiber type-specific effects on relative hif-α transcript abundance. In the gill and glycolytic muscle, relative hif-α mRNA levels were significantly lower under H and HH, compared to N, while no change (or a slight increase) was detected in oxidative muscle, hepatopancreas and gonadal tissues. H and HH did not affect relative transcript abundance for arnt/hif-β in any tissue or muscle fiber type. Thus, in crustaceans the HIF response to H and HH appears to involve changes in hif transcript abundance, with variation in hif-α and arnt/hif-β transcriptional dynamics occurring in both a tissue- and muscle fiber type-dependent manner. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Isolation of cyanobacterial mutants exhibiting growth defects under microoxic conditions by transposon tagging mutagenesis of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terauchi, Kazuki; Sobue, Riho; Furutani, Yuho; Aoki, Rina; Fujita, Yuichi

    2017-05-12

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes that perform oxygenic photosynthesis by extracting electrons from water, with the generation of oxygen as a byproduct. Cyanobacteria use oxygen not only for respiration to produce energy in the dark but also for biosynthesis of various metabolites, such as heme and chlorophyll. Oxygen levels dynamically fluctuate in the field environments, from hyperoxic at daytime to almost anaerobic at night. Thus, adaptation to anaerobiosis should be important for cyanobacteria to survive in low-oxygen and anaerobic environments. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of cyanobacterial anaerobiosis because cyanobacteria have been regarded as aerobic organisms. As a first step to elucidate cyanobacterial adaptation mechanisms to low-oxygen environments, we isolated five mutants, T-1-T-5, exhibiting growth defects under microoxic conditions. The mutants were obtained from a transposon-tagged mutant library of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, which was produced by in vitro transposon tagging of cyanobacterial genomic DNA. Southern blot analysis indicated that a kanamycin resistance gene was inserted in the genome as a single copy. We identified the chromosomal transposon-tagged locus in T-5. Two open reading frames (sll0577 and sll0578) were partially deleted by the insertion of the kanamycin resistance gene in T-5. A reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction suggested that these co-transcribed genes are constitutively expressed under both aerobic and microoxic conditions. Then, we isolated two mutants in which one of the two genes was individually disrupted. Only the mutants partially lacking an intact sll0578 gene showed growth defects under microoxic conditions, whereas it grew normally under aerobic conditions. sll0578 is annotated as purK encoding N(5)-carboxy-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthetase involved in purine metabolism. This result implies the unexpected physiological importance of Pur

  19. Directed Evolution Reveals Unexpected Epistatic Interactions That Alter Metabolic Regulation and Enable Anaerobic Xylose Use by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremaine, Mary; Hebert, Alexander S.; Myers, Kevin S.; Sardi, Maria; Dickinson, Quinn; Reed, Jennifer L.; Zhang, Yaoping; Coon, Joshua J.; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Gasch, Audrey P.; Landick, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The inability of native Saccharomyces cerevisiae to convert xylose from plant biomass into biofuels remains a major challenge for the production of renewable bioenergy. Despite extensive knowledge of the regulatory networks controlling carbon metabolism in yeast, little is known about how to reprogram S. cerevisiae to ferment xylose at rates comparable to glucose. Here we combined genome sequencing, proteomic profiling, and metabolomic analyses to identify and characterize the responsible mutations in a series of evolved strains capable of metabolizing xylose aerobically or anaerobically. We report that rapid xylose conversion by engineered and evolved S. cerevisiae strains depends upon epistatic interactions among genes encoding a xylose reductase (GRE3), a component of MAP Kinase (MAPK) signaling (HOG1), a regulator of Protein Kinase A (PKA) signaling (IRA2), and a scaffolding protein for mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis (ISU1). Interestingly, the mutation in IRA2 only impacted anaerobic xylose consumption and required the loss of ISU1 function, indicating a previously unknown connection between PKA signaling, Fe-S cluster biogenesis, and anaerobiosis. Proteomic and metabolomic comparisons revealed that the xylose-metabolizing mutant strains exhibit altered metabolic pathways relative to the parental strain when grown in xylose. Further analyses revealed that interacting mutations in HOG1 and ISU1 unexpectedly elevated mitochondrial respiratory proteins and enabled rapid aerobic respiration of xylose and other non-fermentable carbon substrates. Our findings suggest a surprising connection between Fe-S cluster biogenesis and signaling that facilitates aerobic respiration and anaerobic fermentation of xylose, underscoring how much remains unknown about the eukaryotic signaling systems that regulate carbon metabolism. PMID:27741250

  20. Fenofibrate unexpectedly induces cardiac hypertrophy in mice lacking MuRF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Traci L; Desai, Gopal; Schisler, Jonathan C; Li, Luge; Quintana, Megan T; Stanley, Natalie; Lockyer, Pamela; Patterson, Cam; Willis, Monte S

    2016-01-01

    The muscle-specific ubiquitin ligase muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF1) is critical in regulating both pathological and physiological cardiac hypertrophy in vivo. Previous work from our group has identified MuRF1's ability to inhibit serum response factor and insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling pathways (via targeted inhibition of cJun as underlying mechanisms). More recently, we have identified that MuRF1 inhibits fatty acid metabolism by targeting peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) for nuclear export via mono-ubiquitination. Since MuRF1-/- mice have an estimated fivefold increase in PPARα activity, we sought to determine how challenge with the PPARα agonist fenofibrate, a PPARα ligand, would affect the heart physiologically. In as little as 3 weeks, feeding with fenofibrate/chow (0.05% wt/wt) induced unexpected pathological cardiac hypertrophy not present in age-matched sibling wild-type (MuRF1+/+) mice, identified by echocardiography, cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area, and increased beta-myosin heavy chain, brain natriuretic peptide, and skeletal muscle α-actin mRNA. In addition to pathological hypertrophy, MuRF1-/- mice had an unexpected differential expression in genes associated with the pleiotropic effects of fenofibrate involved in the extracellular matrix, protease inhibition, hemostasis, and the sarcomere. At both 3 and 8 weeks of fenofibrate treatment, the differentially expressed MuRF1-/- genes most commonly had SREBP-1 and E2F1/E2F promoter regions by TRANSFAC analysis (54 and 50 genes, respectively, of the 111 of the genes >4 and cardiac hypertrophy, and hemostasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cystamine preparations exhibit anticoagulant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Maria M; Holle, Lori A; Stember, Katherine G; Devette, Christa I; Monroe, Dougald M; Wolberg, Alisa S

    2015-01-01

    Transglutaminases are a superfamily of isoenzymes found in cells and plasma. These enzymes catalyze the formation of ε-N-(γ-glutamyl)-lysyl crosslinks between proteins. Cystamine blocks transglutaminase activity and is used in vitro in human samples and in vivo in mice and rats in studies of coagulation, immune dysfunction, and inflammatory disease. These studies have suggested cystamine blocks fibrin crosslinking and has anti-inflammatory effects, implicating transglutaminase activity in the pathogenesis of several diseases. We measured the effects of cystamine on fibrin crosslinking, tissue factor-triggered plasma clot formation and thrombin generation, and coagulation factor enzymatic activity. At concentrations that blocked fibrin crosslinking, cystamine also inhibited plasma clot formation and reduced thrombin generation. Cystamine inhibited the amidolytic activity of coagulation factor XI and thrombin towards chromogenic substrates. These findings demonstrate that cystamine exhibits anticoagulant activity during coagulation. Given the close relationship between coagulation and inflammation, these findings suggest prior studies that used cystamine to implicate transglutaminase activity in disease pathogenesis warrant re-examination.

  2. Cystamine preparations exhibit anticoagulant activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria M Aleman

    Full Text Available Transglutaminases are a superfamily of isoenzymes found in cells and plasma. These enzymes catalyze the formation of ε-N-(γ-glutamyl-lysyl crosslinks between proteins. Cystamine blocks transglutaminase activity and is used in vitro in human samples and in vivo in mice and rats in studies of coagulation, immune dysfunction, and inflammatory disease. These studies have suggested cystamine blocks fibrin crosslinking and has anti-inflammatory effects, implicating transglutaminase activity in the pathogenesis of several diseases. We measured the effects of cystamine on fibrin crosslinking, tissue factor-triggered plasma clot formation and thrombin generation, and coagulation factor enzymatic activity. At concentrations that blocked fibrin crosslinking, cystamine also inhibited plasma clot formation and reduced thrombin generation. Cystamine inhibited the amidolytic activity of coagulation factor XI and thrombin towards chromogenic substrates. These findings demonstrate that cystamine exhibits anticoagulant activity during coagulation. Given the close relationship between coagulation and inflammation, these findings suggest prior studies that used cystamine to implicate transglutaminase activity in disease pathogenesis warrant re-examination.

  3. EU Climate Change Exhibition Held

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>On April 25, the CPAFFC, the China-EU Association (CEUA) and the Delegation of the European Commission to China jointly held the opening ceremony for the EU Exhibition on Climate Change in the CPAFFC. He Luli, former vice chairperson of the NPC Standing Committee and honorary president of the CEUA, Jose Manuel Barroso, president of the European Commission, and Li Jianping, vice president of the CPAFFC, attended the opening ceremony and made speeches. Honorary President He Luli highly praised the achievements made by China and the EU in their longtime cooperation of mutual benefits in various fields including environmental protection. She said, for many years China and EU have both committed to the development of all-round strategic partnership and establishment of a multi-level mechanism of political dialogue. She expressed, with increasing enthusiasm the CEUA would continue to actively carry out nongovernmental exchanges between China and the EU, and promote cooperation between the two sides in the fields of economy, society, environmental protection, science and technology, culture, etc.

  4. Crude oil as a microbial seed bank with unexpected functional potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Man; Nie, Yong; Chi, Chang-Qiao; Tang, Yue-Qin; Li, Yan; Wang, Xing-Biao; Liu, Ze-Shen; Yang, Yunfeng; Zhou, Jizhong; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2015-11-01

    It was widely believed that oil is a harsh habitat for microbes because of its high toxicity and hydrophobicity. However, accumulating evidence has revealed the presence of live microbes in crude oil. Therefore, it’s of value to conduct an in-depth investigation on microbial communities in crude oil. To this end, microorganisms in oil and water phases were collected from four oil-well production mixtures in Qinghai Oilfield, China, and analyzed for their taxonomic and functional compositions via pyrosequencing and GeoChip, respectively. Hierarchical clustering of 16S rRNA gene sequences and functional genes clearly separated crude oil and water phases, suggestive of distinct taxonomic and functional gene compositions between crude oil and water phases. Unexpectedly, Pseudomonas dominated oil phase where diverse functional gene groups were identified, which significantly differed from those in the corresponding water phases. Meanwhile, most functional genes were significantly more abundant in oil phase, which was consistent with their important roles in facilitating survival of their host organisms in crude oil. These findings provide strong evidence that crude oil could be a “seed bank” of functional microorganisms with rich functional potentials. This offers novel insights for industrial applications of microbial-enhanced oil recovery and bioremediation of petroleum-polluted environments.

  5. Fuzzy Concepts in the Detection of Unexpected Situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bíla

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper establishes three essential classes of unexpected situations (UX1, UX2, UX3, and concentrates attention on UX3 detection. Theconcepts of a special Model of System of Situations (MSS and a Model of a System of Faults (MSF are introduced. An original method isproposed for detecting unexpected situations indicating a violation of a proper invariant of MSS (MSF. The presented approach offers apromising application for starting and ending phases of complex processes, for knowledge discoveries on data and knowledge basesdeveloped with incomplete experience, and for modeling communication processes with unknown (disguised communication subjects. Thepaper also presents a way to utilize ill-separable situations for UX3 detection. The paper deals with the conceptual background for detectingUX3 situations, recapitulates recent results in this field and opens the ways for further research.

  6. Unexpected but Incidental Positive Outcomes Predict Real-World Gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, A Ross; Fleming, Stephen M; Glimcher, Paul W

    2016-03-01

    Positive mood can affect a person's tendency to gamble, possibly because positive mood fosters unrealistic optimism. At the same time, unexpected positive outcomes, often called prediction errors, influence mood. However, a linkage between positive prediction errors-the difference between expected and obtained outcomes-and consequent risk taking has yet to be demonstrated. Using a large data set of New York City lottery gambling and a model inspired by computational accounts of reward learning, we found that people gamble more when incidental outcomes in the environment (e.g., local sporting events and sunshine) are better than expected. When local sports teams performed better than expected, or a sunny day followed a streak of cloudy days, residents gambled more. The observed relationship between prediction errors and gambling was ubiquitous across the city's socioeconomically diverse neighborhoods and was specific to sports and weather events occurring locally in New York City. Our results suggest that unexpected but incidental positive outcomes influence risk taking.

  7. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy: Identifying risk and preventing mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhatoo, Samden; Noebels, Jeffrey; Whittemore, Vicky

    2015-11-01

    Premature death among individuals with epilepsy is higher than in the general population, and sudden unexpected death is the most common cause of this mortality. A new multisite collaborative research consortium, the Center for sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) Research (CSR), has received major funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to examine the possible biologic mechanisms underlying this potentially preventable comorbidity and develop predictive biomarkers for interventions that could lower SUDEP incidence. This inaugural report describes the structure of the CSR, its priorities for human and experimental research, and the strategic collaborations and advanced tools under development to reduce this catastrophic outcome of epilepsy. The CSR Partners Program will work closely with committed volunteer agencies, industry, and academic institutions to accelerate and communicate these advances to the professional and lay community.

  8. Responding to Rapid and Unexpected Retail Innovations: Planning Retail Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Fujie

    Retail areas within cities have traditionally not only satisfied the demands for various goods and services, but also promoted community sustainability and healthy lifestyles. Since the end of World War II (WWII), retail innovations have occurred rapidly and unexpectedly. In retail development, economic efficiency is highly prioritized over other functions, in opposition to sustainable development. In retail planning, a communicative approach frequently results in the public responses by "Not In My Back Yard" sentiments, contradicting the projected cooperation between different stakeholders. This research implements the resilience theory to tackle the shocks created by these rapid and unexpected retail changes, based on a comparative case of Edmonton (Alberta, Canada) and Portland (Oregon, USA). Primarily through interviews with senior planners in both cities, it is found that adaptive retail management, polycentric retail planning, a well-informed public, and the use of consensus building could better stimulates resilient retail outcomes.

  9. Unexpected marked seizure improvement in paediatric epilepsy surgery candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Mathiasen, René; Uldall, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Epilepsy surgery is performed based on the assumption that medical refractory epilepsy will continue. Rarely seizure freedom occurs before surgery is performed, while the patient is being evaluated as an epilepsy surgery candidate. The aim of this study was to describe the number of children withdrawn from an epilepsy surgery programme due to unexpected seizure improvement. We retrospectively studied 173 children under 18 years with medical refractory epilepsy referred for epilepsy surgery between 1996 and 2010. Medical records were reviewed in 2012 and 2015. At the first evaluation point in 2012, 13 patients were withdrawn from the epilepsy surgery programme due to unexpected marked improvement. In 2015, 6 of them were still seizure free. They had unexpected seizure freedom due to change in AED treatment (n=3) or after a febrile episode (n=3). The mean number of years they had had seizures was 3.4 years (range 0.6-6.2 years) and the number of seizures at inclusion was 209 per month (range 6-750 per month). The duration of follow-up was 6.6 years after inclusion into the epilepsy surgery programme (range 4.0-13.0 years). The aetiology of the epilepsy for these patients was heterotopia (n=1), focal cortical dysplasia (n=3), infarction (n=1) and unknown, with normal MRI (n=1). They all had an IQ in the normal range. Two of the remaining 7 children were operated later. Unexpected seizure control may occur during epilepsy surgery evaluation. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Study on Unexpected Cycloaddition Reactions of Imines with THF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An unexpected tricyclic compound 2,3,3a,4,5,9b-hexahydrophenylfuro[3,2-c] quinoline 4 and its aromatized product 6 were obtained when the cycloaddtion of imine 1 and substituted norbornene 2 was carried out in THF with a catalytic amount of boron trifluoride. The structures of the products were determined by spectral data, and the mechanism of reaction was substantiated by the imitation reaction.

  11. Medicolegal Approach to Sudden Unexpected Death in Epileptic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdal Özer

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP is defined as sudden, unexpected, witnessed or unwitnessed, non-traumatic and non-drowning death in patients with epilepsy, with or without evidence for a seizure and excluding documented status epilepticus, in which post-mortem examination does not reveal a toxicological or anatomical cause for death. SUDEP has long been recognised although excess mortality in epilepsy has not always been accepted. In the 1960’s it was suggested that there is no reason why an epileptic should not live as long as one who did not have epilepsy. SUDEP’s occurrence is still not widely recognised and epidemiological studies to evaluate risk factors are fraught with problems. It has been estimated that the risk of sudden death for someone with epilepsy is almost 24 times higher than for someone without epilepsy. Although SUDEP has been reported since the turn of the century, the incidence and pathophysiology of this phenomenon are not well understood. The incidence of SUDEP, possible mechanisms involved, potential risk factors and current research strategies are reviewed and examined with a perspective of forensic science practice in our country. Key Words: Epilepsy, sudden unexpected death, forensic medicine.

  12. Mining unexpected temporal associations: applications in detecting adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Huidong Warren; Chen, Jie; He, Hongxing; Williams, Graham J; Kelman, Chris; O'Keefe, Christine M

    2008-07-01

    In various real-world applications, it is very useful mining unanticipated episodes where certain event patterns unexpectedly lead to outcomes, e.g., taking two medicines together sometimes causing an adverse reaction. These unanticipated episodes are usually unexpected and infrequent, which makes existing data mining techniques, mainly designed to find frequent patterns, ineffective. In this paper, we propose unexpected temporal association rules (UTARs) to describe them. To handle the unexpectedness, we introduce a new interestingness measure, residual-leverage, and develop a novel case-based exclusion technique for its calculation. Combining it with an event-oriented data preparation technique to handle the infrequency, we develop a new algorithm MUTARC to find pairwise UTARs. The MUTARC is applied to generate adverse drug reaction (ADR) signals from real-world healthcare administrative databases. It reliably shortlists not only six known ADRs, but also another ADR, flucloxacillin possibly causing hepatitis, which our algorithm designers and experiment runners have not known before the experiments. The MUTARC performs much more effectively than existing techniques. This paper clearly illustrates the great potential along the new direction of ADR signal generation from healthcare administrative databases.

  13. Liu Hong: no trivial on exhibitions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To Work for Tomorrow Liu Hong, General Manager of TUTTI Exhibition Service (Xiamen) Co., Ltd, has set up TUTTI Exhibition Service (Xiamen) Co., Ltd in 2001, when exhibition industry firstly appear in Xiamen. Furthermore, the company has developed rapidly in recent years. As Liu Hong regards, exhibition industry, as well as advertisement industry, is an industry filled with challenges and followed

  14. Genetics of leprosy: Expected-and unexpected-developments and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Monica E D; Salomão, Heloisa; Ramos, Geovana B; D'Espindula, Helena R S; Rodrigues, Rafael S A; Macedo, Wilian C; Sindeaux, Renata H M; Mira, Marcelo T

    2016-01-01

    A solid body of evidence produced over decades of intense research supports the hypothesis that leprosy phenotypes are largely dependent on the genetic characteristics of the host. The early evidence of a major gene effect controlling susceptibility to leprosy came from studies of familial aggregation, twins, and complex segregation analysis. Later, linkage and association analysis, first applied to the investigation of candidate genes and chromosomal regions and more recently, to genome-wide scans, have revealed several HLA and non-HLA gene variants as risk factors for leprosy phenotypes such as disease per se, its clinical forms, and leprosy reactions. In addition, powerful, hypothesis-free strategies such as genome-wide association studies have led to an exciting, unexpected development: Leprosy susceptibility genes seem to be shared with Crohn's and Parkinson's disease. Today, a major challenge is to find the exact variants causing the biological effect underlying the genetic associations. New technologies, such as Next Generation Sequencing-that allows, for the first time, the cost- and time-effective sequencing of a complete human genome-hold the promise to reveal such variants; thus, strategies can be developed to study the functional impact of these variants in the context of infection, hopefully leading to the development of new targets for leprosy treatment and prevention.

  15. Unexpected death holograms: Animitas urban appeal in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lautaro Ojeda Ledesma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at performing an integral analysis of the relation between popular religiousness and urban space in Chilean animitas [little shrines] practices. In order to do this, we propose a multipurpose analysis scheme, holding the concept of "unexpected death hologram". This scheme puts forward three supplementary classifications: animita as a holographic subject, as a holographic object and as a holographic place. Finally, these three classifications supplemented by interviews and topologic analyses show almost all the sociospatial factors present in this practice, accounting for the urban importance that this type of popular practice has

  16. Signs of illness preceding sudden unexpected death in infants.

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, R. E.; Fleming, P J; Azaz, Y; Rudd, P. T.

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether signs of illness reported by parents can be used to identify babies at risk from the sudden infant death syndrome. DESIGN--A two year prospective case-controlled study based in a geographically defined area. SETTING--Four health districts in Avon and north Somerset. SUBJECTS--Babies who had died suddenly and unexpectedly aged between 1 week and 2 years (index babies) and two control babies for each index baby selected from the same health visitor's list and mat...

  17. Alopecia associated with unexpected leakage from electron cone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, B.C.; Pennington, E.C.; Hussey, D.H.; Jani, S.K.

    1989-06-01

    Excessive irradiation due to unexpected leakage was found on a patient receiving electron beam therapy. The cause of this leakage was analyzed and the amount of leakage was measured for different electron beam energies. The highest leakage occurred with a 6 x 6 cm cone using a 12 MeV electron beam. The leakage dose measured along the side of the cone could be as great as 40%. Until the cones are modified or redesigned, it is advised that all patient setups be carefully reviewed to assure that no significant patient areas are in the side scatter region.

  18. Cucurbitacin IIb exhibits anti-inflammatory activity through modulating multiple cellular behaviors of mouse lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Wang

    Full Text Available Cucurbitacin IIb (CuIIb is one of the major active compounds in Hemsleyadine tablets which have been used for clinical treatment of bacillary dysentery, enteritis and acute tonsilitis. However, its action mechanism has not been completely understood. This study aimed to explore the anti-inflammatory activity of CuIIb and its underlying mechanism in mitogen-activated lymphocytes isolated from mouse mesenteric lymph nodes. The results showed that CuIIb inhibited the proliferation of concanavalin A (Con A-activated lymphocytes in a time- and dose-dependent manner. CuIIb treatment arrested their cell cycle in S and G2/M phases probably due to the disruption of the actin cytoskeleton and the modulation of p27(Kip1 and cyclin levels. Moreover, the surface expression of activation markers CD69 and CD25 on Con A-activated CD3(+ T lymphocytes was suppressed by CuIIb treatment. Both Con A- and phorbol ester plus ionomycin-induced expression of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-6 proteins was attenuated upon exposure to CuIIb. Mechanistically, CuIIb treatment suppressed the phosphorylation of JNK and Erk1/2 but not p38 in Con A-activated lymphocytes. Although CuIIb unexpectedly enhanced the phosphorylation of IκB and NF-κB (p65, it blocked the nuclear translocation of NF-κB (p65. In support of this, CuIIb significantly decreased the mRNA levels of IκBα and TNF-α, two target genes of NF-κB, in Con A-activated lymphocytes. In addition, CuIIb downregulated Con A-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and increased cell apoptosis. Collectively, these results suggest that CuIIb exhibits its anti-inflammatory activity through modulating multiple cellular behaviors and signaling pathways, leading to the suppression of the adaptive immune response.

  19. Unexpected Death of a Child with Complex Febrile Seizures-Pathophysiology Similar to Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlouhy, Brian J; Ciliberto, Michael A; Cifra, Christina L; Kirby, Patricia A; Shrock, Devin L; Nashelsky, Marcus; Richerson, George B

    2017-01-01

    Febrile seizures are usually considered relatively benign. Although some cases of sudden unexplained death in childhood have a history of febrile seizures, no documented case of febrile seizure-induced death has been reported. Here, we describe a child with complex febrile seizures who died suddenly and unexpectedly after a suspected seizure while in bed at night during the beginning phases of sleep. She was resuscitated and pronounced brain dead 2 days later at our regional medical center. Autopsy revealed multiorgan effects of hypoperfusion and did not reveal an underlying (precipitating) disease, injury, or toxicological cause of death. Although a seizure was not witnessed, it was suspected as the underlying cause of death based on the medical examiner and forensic pathologist (author Marcus Nashelsky) investigation, the post-resuscitation clinical findings, and multiple aspects of the clinical history. The child had a history of complex febrile seizures that had previously caused apnea and oxygen desaturation. She had two febrile seizures earlier on the same day of the fatal event. Interestingly, her mother also experienced a febrile seizure as a child, which led to respiratory arrest requiring cardiorespiratory resuscitation. This case suggests that in a child with complex febrile seizures, a seizure can induce death in a manner that is consistent with the majority of cases of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). Further work is needed to better understand how and why certain individuals, with a history of epilepsy or not, die suddenly and unexpectedly from seizures. This will only occur through better understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying epileptic and febrile seizures and death from seizures including SUDEP.

  20. Droplets sliding down inclined planes: unexpected dynamics on elastomer plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourlier-Fargette, Aurelie; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Neukirch, Sebastien

    2016-11-01

    Droplet dynamics on an angled surface results from a competition between the weight of the droplet, capillary forces, and viscous dissipation inside the drop. The motion of droplets on stiff surfaces has been investigated for a long time, both experimentally and theoretically, while recent studies have shown the interesting physics underlying the sliding of droplets on soft surfaces. We focus on the dynamics of water-glycerol mixture droplets sliding down vertical plates of silicone elastomers, highlighting an unexpected behavior: the droplet dynamics on such a surface includes two regimes with different constant speeds. These results contrast with those found in the literature for droplets sliding on materials such as treated glass. We investigate the universality of this behavior on various elastomers, and study in detail the two regimes and the sharp transition observed between them. Different candidates can be responsible for the sudden speed change: bistability, chemical interaction with the substrate, softness of the material, etc. Our experiments to clarify the role of each of them reveal an unexpected link between microscopic phenomena at the scale of the polymer matrix and the macroscopic dynamics of a droplet.

  1. Unexpected arousal modulates the influence of sensory noise on confidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Micah; Frank, Darya; Schwarzkopf, D Samuel; Fardo, Francesca; Winston, Joel S; Hauser, Tobias U; Rees, Geraint

    2016-01-01

    Human perception is invariably accompanied by a graded feeling of confidence that guides metacognitive awareness and decision-making. It is often assumed that this arises solely from the feed-forward encoding of the strength or precision of sensory inputs. In contrast, interoceptive inference models suggest that confidence reflects a weighted integration of sensory precision and expectations about internal states, such as arousal. Here we test this hypothesis using a novel psychophysical paradigm, in which unseen disgust-cues induced unexpected, unconscious arousal just before participants discriminated motion signals of variable precision. Across measures of perceptual bias, uncertainty, and physiological arousal we found that arousing disgust cues modulated the encoding of sensory noise. Furthermore, the degree to which trial-by-trial pupil fluctuations encoded this nonlinear interaction correlated with trial level confidence. Our results suggest that unexpected arousal regulates perceptual precision, such that subjective confidence reflects the integration of both external sensory and internal, embodied states. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18103.001 PMID:27776633

  2. VNU Exhibitions Asia: Two factors are crucial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Reporter: How to appraises the Chinese exhibition industry market? Jime Essink :The Chinese exhibition market will experience a fast growth in the coming years. This will mainly be the result of an increase of international visitors who

  3. Report on Exhibition Industry in Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ 1. General Characteristics of Shanghai Exhibitions As the leader of economic development in the Yangtze River Delta,Shanghai has basically formed a certain scale and strength in the aspects of urban transportation, exhibition venues, supporting facilities, service levels, etc.

  4. ETIOLOGY, TRIGGERS AND NEUROCHEMICAL CIRCUITS ASSOCIATED WITH UNEXPECTED, EXPECTED, AND LABORATORY-INDUCED PANIC ATTACKS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Philip L.; Federici, Lauren M.; Shekhar, Anantha

    2014-01-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is a severe anxiety disorder that is characterized by recurrent panic attacks (PA), which can be unexpected (uPA, i.e., no clear identifiable trigger) or expected (ePA). Panic typically involves an abrupt feeling of catastrophic fear or distress accompanied by physiological symptoms such as palpitations, racing heart, thermal sensations, and sweating. Recurrent uPA and ePA can also lead to agoraphobia, where subjects with PD avoid situations that were associated with PA. Here we will review recent developments in our understanding of PD, which includes discussions on: symptoms and signs associated with uPA and ePAs; Diagnosis of PD and the new DSM-V; biological etiology such as heritability and gene x environment and gene x hormonal development interactions; comparisons between laboratory and naturally occurring uPAs and ePAs; neurochemical systems that are associated with clinical PAs (e.g. gene associations; targets for triggering or treating PAs), adaptive fear and panic response concepts in the context of new NIH RDoc approach; and finally strengths and weaknesses of translational animal models of adaptive and pathological panic states. PMID:25130976

  5. Development Report on Exhibition Industry in Guangzhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ Ⅰ. Generat Features of Guangzhou Exhibitions (Ⅰ) Quantity of Exhibitions and Industry Features. Overall, after suf-fering from global financial crisis in 2008 as well as the interference of Beijing Olympic Games and other major events, the exhibition industry in Guangzhou has still not encountered an easy condition in 2009.

  6. Beijing Lack of "Carrier"Exhibition Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    An Interview towards Mr. Chu Xiangyin, Vice Chairman of Beijing Subcouncil, CCPIT Reporter: Would you please tell us development of exhibition industry in Beijing? Chu Xiangyin: Beijing Statistical Bureau and us have been designing and analyzing statistical system for exhibition industry from 2003. As the largest exhibition center in Beijing,

  7. Affordances and distributed cognition in museum exhibitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, Marianne; May, Michael; Marandino, Martha

    2014-01-01

    consistent framework. Here, we invoke the notions of affordance and distributed cognition to explain in a coherent way how visitors interact with exhibits and exhibit spaces and make meaning from those interactions, and we exemplify our points using observations of twelve visitors to exhibits at a natural...... history museum. We show how differences in exhibit characteristics give rise to differences in the interpretive strategies used by visitors in their meaning-making process, and conclude by discussing how the notions of affordance and distributed cognition can be used in an exhibit design perspective....

  8. Castleman Disease: An Unexpected Cause of a Solitary Pleural Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiachra Moloney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Castleman disease (CD is a rare benign lymphoproliferative disorder, the etiology of which is unclear. Clinically it may manifest as localized disease (unicentric or disseminated disease (multicentric. CD occurs in the thorax in 70% of cases, abdomen and pelvis in 15%, and in the neck in 10–15% of cases. We present a case of a pleural mass located posteriorly in a paraspinal location, which was discovered incidentally in a 50-year-old man and was subsequently resected followed by an unexpected diagnosis of Castleman disease on histological examination. In this report, we review the clinical and histological findings in a rare presentation of Castleman disease and discuss the findings in this case as part of an overall review of the typical radiological findings seen in Castleman disease.

  9. Detecting the unexpected: a research framework for ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Catherine A; Esbaugh, Andrew J; Frieder, Christina A; Baumann, Hannes; Bockmon, Emily E; White, Meredith M; Carter, Brendan R; Benway, Heather M; Blanchette, Carol A; Carrington, Emily; McClintock, James B; McCorkle, Daniel C; McGillis, Wade R; Mooney, T Aran; Ziveri, Patrizia

    2014-09-01

    The threat that ocean acidification (OA) poses to marine ecosystems is now recognized and U.S. funding agencies have designated specific funding for the study of OA. We present a research framework for studying OA that describes it as a biogeochemical event that impacts individual species and ecosystems in potentially unexpected ways. We draw upon specific lessons learned about ecosystem responses from research on acid rain, carbon dioxide enrichment in terrestrial plant communities, and nitrogen deposition. We further characterize the links between carbon chemistry changes and effects on individuals and ecosystems, and enumerate key hypotheses for testing. Finally, we quantify how U.S. research funding has been distributed among these linkages, concluding that there is an urgent need for research programs designed to anticipate how the effects of OA will reverberate throughout assemblages of species.

  10. The unexpected clustering of the optical afterglow luminosities

    CERN Document Server

    Nardini, M; Ghirlanda, G; Tavecchio, F; Firmani, C; Lazzati, D

    2006-01-01

    We studied the behaviour of the optical afterglow lightcurves of a sample of 24 Gamma--Ray Bursts (GRBs) with known redshift and published estimates of the optical extinction in the source frame, detected before the SWIFT satellite launch. We found an unexpected clustering of the optical luminosities at 12 hours in the source frame. The distribution of the optical luminosities is narrower than the distribution of X-ray luminosities at the same time. Few (3) bursts stand apart from the main optical distribution, being fainter by a factor of about 15. We also analysed the optical luminosities of the SWIFT burst with known redshift finding that the luminosity distribution is similar to the pre SWIFT GRBs one, even if they have a different mean redshift. These results can suggest the existence of a family of intrinsically optically under--luminous dark GRBs.

  11. Cambrian stalked echinoderms show unexpected plasticity of arm construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, S; Smith, A B

    2012-01-22

    Feeding arms carrying coelomic extensions of the theca are thought to be unique to crinoids among stemmed echinoderms. However, a new two-armed echinoderm from the earliest Middle Cambrian of Spain displays a highly unexpected morphology. X-ray microtomographic analysis of its arms shows they are polyplated in their proximal part with a dorsal series of uniserial elements enclosing a large coelomic lumen. Distally, the arm transforms into the more standard biserial structure of a blastozoan brachiole. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrates that this taxon lies basal to rhombiferans as sister-group to pleurocystitid and glyptocystitid blastozoans, drawing those clades deep into the Cambrian. We demonstrate that Cambrian echinoderms show surprising variability in the way their appendages are constructed, and that the appendages of at least some blastozoans arose as direct outgrowths of the body in much the same way as the arms of crinoids.

  12. Unexpectedly wide rf-induced synchrotron sideband depolarizing resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, C. M.; Ellison, T. J.; Lee, S. Y.; Rinckel, T.; Schwandt, P.; Sperisen, F.; von Przewoski, B.; Anferov, V. A.; Blinov, B. B.; Bychkov, M. A.; Caussyn, D. D.; Courant, E. D.; Crandell, D. A.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Kaufman, W. A.; Krisch, A. D.; Lorenzon, W.; Nurushev, T. S.; Phelps, R. A.; Ratner, L. G.; Wong, V. K.; Ohmori, C.; Minty, M. G.; Martin, P. S.; Russell, A. D.; Sivers, D. W.

    1998-10-01

    Using an rf solenoid magnet, we studied the depolarization of a stored 104.1 MeV vertically polarized proton beam. The two primary rf depolarizing resonances were properly centered around the protons' circulation frequency fc, at fc(3-νs) and fc(νs-1), where νs is the spin tune; moreover, each resonance was roughly consistent with the expected width of about 720 Hz. Each primary rf resonance had two synchrotron sideband resonances at the expected frequencies. The two νs-1 sidebands were deep dips while the two 3-νs sidebands were very shallow; this was not expected. Moreover, all four sideband resonances were unexpectedly wider than the two primary resonances.

  13. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy genetics: Molecular diagnostics and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Alica M; Behr, Elijah R; Semsarian, Christopher; Bagnall, Richard D; Sisodiya, Sanjay; Cooper, Paul N

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies clearly document the public health burden of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). Clinical and experimental studies have uncovered dynamic cardiorespiratory dysfunction, both interictally and at the time of sudden death due to epilepsy. Genetic analyses in humans and in model systems have facilitated our current molecular understanding of SUDEP. Many discoveries have been informed by progress in the field of sudden cardiac death and sudden infant death syndrome. It is becoming apparent that SUDEP genomic complexity parallels that of sudden cardiac death, and that there is a pauci1ty of analytically useful postmortem material. Because many challenges remain, future progress in SUDEP research, molecular diagnostics, and prevention rests in international, collaborative, and transdisciplinary dialogue in human and experimental translational research of sudden death.

  14. The Unexpected Awakening of Chaitén Volcano, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carn, Simon A.; Zogorski, John S.; Lara, Luis; Ewert, John W.; Watt, Sebastian; Prata, Alfred J.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Villarosa, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    On 2 May 2008, a large eruption began unexpectedly at the inconspicuous Chaitén volcano in Chile's southern volcanic zone. Ash columns abruptly jetted from the volcano into the stratosphere, followed by lava dome effusion and continuous low-altitude ash plumes [Lara, 2009]. Apocalyptic photographs of eruption plumes suffused with lightning were circulated globally. Effects of the eruption were extensive. Floods and lahars inundated the town of Chaitén, and its 4625 residents were evacuated. Widespread ashfall and drifting ash clouds closed regional airports and cancelled hundreds of domestic flights in Argentina and Chile and numerous international flights [Guffanti et al., 2008]. Ash heavily affected the aquaculture industry in the nearby Gulf of Corcovado, curtailed ecotourism, and closed regional nature preserves. To better prepare for future eruptions, the Chilean government has boosted support for monitoring and hazard mitigation at Chaitén and at 42 other highly hazardous, active volcanoes in Chile.

  15. FROM PIONS TO PROTON DECAY: Tales of the Unexpected

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, D. H.

    2005-12-01

    This account recalls early observations of elementary particles from cosmic ray experiments, using the nuclear emulsion technique. Discoveries in this field in the 1940s and 50s led to the development of high energy particle accelerators and associated detectors, resulting eventually in the observation of the quark and lepton constituents of matter and of the fundamental interactions between them, as described in the Standard Model. The concept of unification of the fundamental interactions led to the prediction of proton decay, and although this has not been observed, the unwanted background due to atmospheric neutrino interactions led to the discovery of neutrino oscillations and neutrino mass, and the first indications of new physics beyond that of the Standard Model. In all this research, unexpected developments have often played an important role.

  16. A "present" for the future: the unexpected value of rediscovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Kim, Tami; Brooks, Alison Wood; Gino, Francesca; Norton, Michael I

    2014-10-01

    Although documenting everyday activities may seem trivial, four studies reveal that creating records of the present generates unexpected benefits by allowing future rediscoveries. In Study 1, we used a time-capsule paradigm to show that individuals underestimate the extent to which rediscovering experiences from the past will be curiosity provoking and interesting in the future. In Studies 2 and 3, we found that people are particularly likely to underestimate the pleasure of rediscovering ordinary, mundane experiences, as opposed to extraordinary experiences. Finally, Study 4 demonstrates that underestimating the pleasure of rediscovery leads to time-inconsistent choices: Individuals forgo opportunities to document the present but then prefer rediscovering those moments in the future to engaging in an alternative fun activity. Underestimating the value of rediscovery is linked to people's erroneous faith in their memory of everyday events. By documenting the present, people provide themselves with the opportunity to rediscover mundane moments that may otherwise have been forgotten.

  17. Unexpected fold in the circumsporozoite protein target of malaria vaccines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doud, Michael B.; Koksal, Adem C.; Mi, Li-Zhi; Song, Gaojie; Lu, Chafen; Springer, Timothy A. (Harvard-Med)

    2012-10-09

    Circumsporozoite (CS) protein is the major surface component of Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites and is essential for host cell invasion. A vaccine containing tandem repeats, region III, and thrombospondin type-I repeat (TSR) of CS is efficacious in phase III trials but gives only a 35% reduction in severe malaria in the first year postimmunization. We solved crystal structures showing that region III and TSR fold into a single unit, an '{alpha}TSR' domain. The {alpha}TSR domain possesses a hydrophobic pocket and core, missing in TSR domains. CS binds heparin, but {alpha}TSR does not. Interestingly, polymorphic T-cell epitopes map to specialized {alpha}TSR regions. The N and C termini are unexpectedly close, providing clues for sporozoite sheath organization. Elucidation of a unique structure of a domain within CS enables rational design of next-generation subunit vaccines and functional and medicinal chemical investigation of the conserved hydrophobic pocket.

  18. The Unexpected Awakening of Chaitén Volcano, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carn, Simon A.; Pallister, John S.; Lara, Luis; Ewert, John W.; Watt, Sebastian; Prata, Alfred J.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Villarosa, Gustavo

    2009-06-01

    On 2 May 2008, a large eruption began unexpectedly at the inconspicuous Chaitén volcano in Chile's southern volcanic zone. Ash columns abruptly jetted from the volcano into the stratosphere, followed by lava dome effusion and continuous low-altitude ash plumes [Lara, 2009]. Apocalyptic photographs of eruption plumes suffused with lightning were circulated globally. Effects of the eruption were extensive. Floods and lahars inundated the town of Chaitén, and its 4625 residents were evacuated. Widespread ashfall and drifting ash clouds closed regional airports and cancelled hundreds of domestic flights in Argentina and Chile and numerous international flights [Guffanti et al., 2008]. Ash heavily affected the aquaculture industry in the nearby Gulf of Corcovado, curtailed ecotourism, and closed regional nature preserves. To better prepare for future eruptions, the Chilean government has boosted support for monitoring and hazard mitigation at Chaitén and at 42 other highly hazardous, active volcanoes in Chile.

  19. Sudden and unexpected death from pituitary tumor apoplexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Lisa B E; Balko, M Gregory; Hunsaker, John C

    2012-01-01

    Pituitary tumor apoplexy refers to a clinical syndrome precipitated by the expansion of a pituitary adenoma by hemorrhage or infarction. Individuals may present with myriad signs, including sudden onset of severe headache, visual changes, altered mental status, cranial nerve palsies, and hormonal dysfunction. This disorder constitutes a medical emergency and warrants an expedited evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment to prevent the potential sequelae of permanent visual loss, endocrine abnormalities, or death. We report a case of sudden death from undiagnosed pituitary tumor apoplexy. The decedent was evaluated by medical personnel on three occasions in the week prior to her death for severe headache, nausea, vomiting, and photophobia. Postmortem examination demonstrated a hemorrhagic infarction of a pituitary adenoma with necrosis and expansion out of the sella turcica. The recognition of and treatment for a patient with pituitary tumor apoplexy requires a rapid multidisciplinary effort. Failure of prompt diagnosis may be fatal and require a medico-legal death investigation for sudden and unexpected death.

  20. Unexpected response of high Alpine Lake waters to climate warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thies, Hansjörg; Nickus, Ulrike; Mair, Volkmar; Tessadri, Richard; Tait, Danilo; Thaler, Bertha; Psenner, Roland

    2007-11-01

    Over the past two decades, we have observed a substantial rise in solute concentration at two remote high mountain lakes in catchments of metamorphic rocks in the European Alps. At Rasass See, the electrical conductivity increased 18-fold. Unexpectedly high nickel concentrations at Rasass See, which exceeded the limit in drinking water by more than 1 order of magnitude, cannot be related to catchment geology. We attribute these changes in lake water quality to solute release from the ice of an active rock glacier in the catchment as a response to climate warming. Similar processes occurred at the higher elevation lake Schwarzsee ob Sölden, where electrical conductivity has risen 3-fold during the past two decades.

  1. Unexpectedly ease surgery for a worrisome abdominal mass: Pedunculated GISTs☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskiran, Adil; Otan, Emrah; Aydin, Cemalettin; Kayaalp, Cuneyt

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Discovery of abdominal masses often poses significant diagnostic difficulties. GISTs are mesenchymal masses, with specific histological features. Dimensions may vary from millimeters to giant tumours. We would like to present our case, which had an unexpectedly easy operative course which was easily handled with a simple surgical excision with a short operative duration. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 38 years old female patient was diagnosed to have an abdominal heterogen mass of 15 cm × 12 cm × 10 cm in dimension. Abdominal computed tomography revealed the solid mass between the stomach and pancreas corpus and tail, possibly orginating from the pancreas. With the preoperative diagnosis of locally invasive distal pancreas cancer the patient underwent laparotomy, following the dissection, the mass was observed to be originating from the posterior gastric Wall, extending exophytically with a peduncle of 5 cm in width, without any visual evidence for peritoneal invasion and metastasis. The tumour and the peduncle was resected with stapler device. Total operation time was 30 min. Postoperative course was uneventful. Pathologic diagnosis was gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST). DISCUSSION Pedunculated large GISTs are not frequent and they can enlarge as 15 cm in diameter and compress the neighbouring organs. When they were huge, it is difficult to differentiate the origin of the masses. GISTs should be considered in differential diagnosis of giant abdominal masses. CONCLUSION When GISTs are huge and pedunculated, it can be difficult to differentiate the origin of the masses. This case report presents unexpectedly ease surgery for a worrysome abdominal mass. PMID:23999120

  2. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy: Evaluation of forensic autopsy cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Luo; Zhang, Yang; Zielke, H Ronald; Levine, Barry; Zhang, Xiang; Chang, Lin; Fowler, David; Li, Ling

    2012-11-30

    Epilepsy is a common chronic neurological disorder characterized by seizures. Mortality is significantly increased in patients with epilepsy. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the most common seizure-related category of death. A retrospective study of forensic autopsy cases from 2007 to 2009 at the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner (OCME) yielded a total of 104 sudden unexpected deaths directly or indirectly caused by an epilepsy/seizure disorder in the State of Maryland. Of these deaths, 74 cases met a general accepted definition of SUDEP. The age of SUDEP individuals ranged from 14 to 63 with the majority of subjects in the ages between 21 and 50 years (58 cases, 78.4%). Males were slightly more likely than females to die of SUDEP (male:female=1.5:1 based on the rate). The onset age of epilepsy was documented in 47.3% of cases (35/74) based on investigation and medical records. Of the 35 cases, 12 subjects had early onset epilepsy (onset ages 1-15 years) and 20 subjects had duration of epilepsy for more than 10 years. The majority of deaths (61 of the 74 cases, 82.4%) were unwitnessed. Death scene investigation showed that 71 deaths (95.9%) occurred inside their residence with 50 subjects (70.4%) found either in bed or on the bedroom floor near the bed. Forty-three out of 74 cases (58.1%) showed neuropathological lesions. Per history, 50 subjects were reported as being on anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). However, postmortem toxicological analysis revealed that only 26 subjects (35.1%) had detectable AEDs. Of the 74 cases, seizure disorder or epilepsy was listed as primary cause of death in 66 cases and the term of SUDEP as official cause of death in only 8 cases. This report focuses on the characteristics of death scene investigation and postmortem examination findings of SUDEP cases.

  3. Redundancy complicates the definition of essential genes for vaccinia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Bianca M; Tscharke, David C

    2015-11-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) genes are characterized as either essential or non-essential for growth in culture. It seems intuitively obvious that if a gene can be deleted without imparting a growth defect in vitro it does not have a function related to basic replication or spread. However, this interpretation relies on the untested assumption that there is no redundancy across the genes that have roles in growth in cell culture. First, we provide a comprehensive summary of the literature that describes the essential genes of VACV. Next, we looked for interactions between large blocks of non-essential genes located at the ends of the genome by investigating sets of VACVs with large deletions at the genomic termini. Viruses with deletions at either end of the genome behaved as expected, exhibiting only mild or host-range defects. In contrast, combining deletions at both ends of the genome for the VACV Western Reserve (WR) strain caused a devastating growth defect on all cell lines tested. Unexpectedly, we found that the well-studied VACV growth factor homologue encoded by C11R has a role in growth in vitro that is exposed when 42 genes are absent from the left end of the VACV WR genome. These results demonstrate that some non-essential genes contribute to basic viral growth, but redundancy means these functions are not revealed by single-gene-deletion mutants.

  4. Investigating Design Research Landscapes through Exhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Li; Hansen, Flemming Tvede; Mäkelä, Maarit;

    2013-01-01

    What characterizes a design research exhibition compared to a traditional design and art exhibition? How do you show the very materialities of the design experiments as a means for communicating knowledge of research and of practice? How do you present, review and utilize such an exhibition......? With those questions in mind, the intention and challenge for the Nordes 2013 Design Research Exhibition was to expand on current notions of staging research enquires in design research conference contexts. Artefacts, installations, performances, and other materialities that relate to the theme...... of the conference - Experiments in Design Research – were displayed as tools to express and communicate different design research enquires. Through this paper we will describe the Nordes exhibition as a specific case that renders questions visible in relation to how to utilize a design research exhibition...

  5. Genome-wide Polygenic Burden of Rare Deleterious Variants in Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costin Leu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP represents the most severe degree of the spectrum of epilepsy severity and is the commonest cause of epilepsy-related premature mortality. The precise pathophysiology and the genetic architecture of SUDEP remain elusive. Aiming to elucidate the genetic basis of SUDEP, we analysed rare, protein-changing variants from whole-exome sequences of 18 people who died of SUDEP, 87 living people with epilepsy and 1479 non-epilepsy disease controls. Association analysis revealed a significantly increased genome-wide polygenic burden per individual in the SUDEP cohort when compared to epilepsy (P = 5.7 × 10−3 and non-epilepsy disease controls (P = 1.2 × 10−3. The polygenic burden was driven both by the number of variants per individual, and over-representation of variants likely to be deleterious in the SUDEP cohort. As determined by this study, more than a thousand genes contribute to the observed polygenic burden within the framework of this study. Subsequent gene-based association analysis revealed five possible candidate genes significantly associated with SUDEP or epilepsy, but no one single gene emerges as common to the SUDEP cases. Our findings provide further evidence for a genetic susceptibility to SUDEP, and suggest an extensive polygenic contribution to SUDEP causation. Thus, an overall increased burden of deleterious variants in a highly polygenic background might be important in rendering a given individual more susceptible to SUDEP. Our findings suggest that exome sequencing in people with epilepsy might eventually contribute to generating SUDEP risk estimates, promoting stratified medicine in epilepsy, with the eventual aim of reducing an individual patient's risk of SUDEP.

  6. Unexpected Stability of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes Communities in Laboratory Biogas Reactors Fed with Different Defined Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratering, S.; Kramer, I.; Schmidt, M.; Zerr, W.; Schnell, S.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, bacterial communities in 200-liter biogas reactors containing liquid manure consecutively fed with casein, starch, and cream were investigated over a period of up to 33 days. A 16S rRNA gene clone library identified Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes as the most abundant bacterial groups in the starting material, at 58.9% and 30.1% of sequences, respectively. The community development of both groups was monitored by real-time PCR and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. The Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes communities were unexpectedly stable and hardly influenced by batch-feeding events. The continuous feeding of starch led to community shifts that nevertheless contributed to a stable reactor performance. A longer starving period and a change in the pH value resulted in further community shifts within the Bacteroidetes but did not influence the Firmicutes. Predominant DNA bands from SSCP gels were cloned and sequenced. Sequences related to Peptococcaceae, Cytophagales, and Petrimonas sulfuriphila were found in all samples from all experiments. Real-time PCR demonstrated the abundance of members of the phylum Bacteroidetes and also reflected changes in gene copy numbers in conjunction with a changing pH value and acetate accumulation. PMID:22247168

  7. Unexpected multiplicity of QRFP receptors in early vertebrate evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larhammar, Dan; Xu, Bo; Bergqvist, Christina A

    2014-01-01

    The neuropeptide QRFP, also called 26RFa, and its G protein-coupled receptor GPR103 have been identified in all vertebrates investigated. In mammals, this peptide-receptor pair has been found to have several effects including stimulation of appetite. Recently, we reported that a QRFP peptide is present in amphioxus, Branchiostoma floridae, and we also identified a QRFP receptor (QRFPR) that mediates a functional response to sub-nanomolar concentrations of the amphioxus peptide as well as short and long human QRFP (Xu et al., submitted). Because the ancestral vertebrate underwent two tetraploidizations, it might be expected that duplicates of the QRFP gene and its receptor gene may exist. Indeed, we report here the identification of multiple vertebrate QRFPR genes. Three QRFPR genes are present in the coelacanth Latimeria chalumnae, representing an early diverging sarcopterygian lineage. Three QRFPR genes are present in the basal actinopterygian fish, the spotted gar. Phylogenetic and chromosomal analyses show that only two of these receptor genes are orthologous between the two species, thus demonstrating a total of four distinct vertebrate genes. Three of the QRFPR genes resulted from the early vertebrate tetraploidizations and were copied along with syntenic neuropeptide Y receptor genes. The fourth QRFPR gene may be an even older and distinct lineage. Because mammals and birds have only a single QRFPR gene, this means that three genes have been lost in these lineages, and at least one of these was lost independently in mammals and birds because it is still present in a turtle. In conclusion, these results show that the QRFP system gained considerable complexity in the early stages of vertebrate evolution and still maintains much of this in some lineages, and that it has been secondarily reduced in mammals.

  8. Unexpected multiplicity of QRFP receptors in early vertebrate evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan eLarhammar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The neuropeptide QRFP, also called 26RFa, and its G protein-coupled receptor GPR103 have been identified in all vertebrates investigated. In mammals, this peptide-receptor pair has been found to have several effects including stimulation of appetite. Recently, we reported that a QRFP peptide is present in amphioxus, Branchiostoma floridae, and we also identified a QRFP receptor (QRFPR that mediates a functional response to sub-nanomolar concentrations of the amphioxus peptide as well as short and long human QRFP (Xu et al., submitted. Because the ancestral vertebrate underwent two tetraploidizations, it might be expected that duplicates of the QRFP gene and its receptor gene may exist. Indeed, we report here the identification of multiple vertebrate QRFPR genes. Three QRFPR genes are present in the coelacanth Latimeria chalumnae, representing an early diverging sarcopterygian lineage. Three QRFP receptor genes are present in the basal actinopterygian fish, the spotted gar. Phylogenetic and chromosomal analyses show that only two of these receptor genes are orthologous between the two species, thus demonstrating a total of four distinct vertebrate genes. Three of the QRFPR genes resulted from the early vertebrate tetraploidizations and were copied along with syntenic neuropeptide Y receptor genes. The fourth QRFPR gene may be an even older and distinct lineage. Because mammals and birds have only a single QRFP receptor gene, this means that three genes have been lost in these lineages, and at least one of these was lost independently in mammals and birds because it is still present in a turtle. In conclusion, these results show that the QRFP system gained considerable complexity in the early stages of vertebrate evolution and still does so in some lineages, and that it has been secondarily reduced in mammals.

  9. Artefacts and the performance of an exhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie

    2008-01-01

    The article explores the role of mediating artefacts in children's encounters with a museum of natural history. Using actor network theory it explores how a specific artefact shapes the way users relate to exhibited objects and how the artefact guides users' movements in the exhibition. The media...

  10. Encountering Nanotechnology in an Interactive Exhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murriello, Sandra E.; Knobel, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    This article offers findings from a learning sciences-informed evaluation of a nanoscience and nanotechnology exhibition called Nano-Aventura (NanoAdventure), based on four interactive-collaborative games and two narrated videos. This traveling exhibition was developed in Brazil by the Museu Exploratorio de Ciencias for children and teenagers…

  11. Exhibition Economy Set to Boost City Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhen

    2010-01-01

    @@ Awell-developed exhibition industry is usually regarded as an important cri terion in measuring a city's economic and social development level. In recent years, much attention has been paid to exhibition economy for its positive effect on dining, transportation, tourism, advertising, and shopping.

  12. Science Fiction Exhibits as STEM Gateways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robie, Samantha

    Women continue to hold less than a quarter of all STEM jobs in the United States, prompting many museums to develop programs and exhibits with the express goal of interesting young girls in scientific fields. At the same time, a number of recent museum exhibits have harnessed the popularity of pop culture and science fiction in order to interest general audiences in STEM subject matter, as well as using the exhibits as springboards to expand or shift mission goals and focus. Because science fiction appears to be successful at raising interest in STEM fields, it may be an effective way to garner the interest of young girls in STEM in particular. This research seeks to describe the ways in which museums are currently using science fiction exhibits to interest young girls in STEM fields and careers. Research focused on four institutions across the country hosting three separate exhibits, and included staff interviews and content analysis of exhibit descriptions, promotional materials, a summative evaluation and supplementary exhibit productions. In some ways, science fiction exhibits do serve young girls, primarily through the inclusion of female role models, staff awareness, and prototype testing to ensure interactives are attractive to girls as well as to boys. However, STEM appears to be underutilized, which may be partly due to a concern within the field that the outcome of targeting a specific gender could be construed as "stereotyping".

  13. Encountering Nanotechnology in an Interactive Exhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murriello, Sandra E.; Knobel, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    This article offers findings from a learning sciences-informed evaluation of a nanoscience and nanotechnology exhibition called Nano-Aventura (NanoAdventure), based on four interactive-collaborative games and two narrated videos. This traveling exhibition was developed in Brazil by the Museu Exploratorio de Ciencias for children and teenagers…

  14. Exhibition-based Immersive Performance Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie

    2017-01-01

    Art”. This exhibition concept has been awarded the prize “Bikubens Udstillings Visionspris” 2016 for its innovative take on exhibitions. In the Sister’s Academy Boarding School visitors ‘move into’ and inhabit an exhibition for a longer period of time, for example 24 or 48 hours. This radically breaks...... with the conventional 1½ hour duration of museum visits and creates new possibilities of and challenges for presence in museums. The paper analyzes exhibition experience as an engagement, which with its immersive and emergent qualities, radically breaks with visual modes of appreciation. The visitor does not ‘stand...... to the everyday and to conventional modes of being, interaction and communication. The exhibition thus becomes a space of potential; a critical and utopian space for trying out new forms of being and new modes of engagement. Theoretically the paper focuses on Berleant’s environmental aesthetics and the notion...

  15. The Culture of Exhibitions and Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Doumas

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The article reflects on temporary exhibitions from a theoretical as well as practical perspective. Regarded as a particularly effective mass-communication medium, exhibitions have a dual nature: they are scholarly undertakings, bringing off a curator’s vision and, simultaneously, they are projects with economic implications that need to be well managed and administered. The role of conservation in the making of temporary exhibitions, either in-house or touring, is here discussed in relation to how work is planned and prioritized as well as how time is managed and staff is allocated. Reference to weaknesses that lessen the crucial input of conservation in the decision-making process is also made. Much of the debate, which focuses on art exhibitions, concerns practicalities encountered in a private museum that extend from the very early stages of selecting objects for display to the mounting of an exhibition.

  16. High Quality Virtual Reality for Architectural Exhibitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreutzberg, Anette

    2016-01-01

    This paper will summarise the findings from creating and implementing a visually high quality Virtual Reality (VR) experiment as part of an international architecture exhibition. It was the aim to represent the architectural spatial qualities as well as the atmosphere created from combining natural...... and artificial lighting in a prominent not yet built project. The outcome is twofold: Findings concerning the integration of VR in an exhibition space and findings concerning the experience of the virtual space itself. In the exhibition, an important aspect was the unmanned exhibition space, requiring the VR...... and quantitative methods at two different occasions and setups after the exhibition, both showing a high degree of immersion and experience of reality....

  17. Holland at CERN – Industrial exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    Sponsored by EVD, an agency of the Dutch Ministry of the Economy From 8 to 11 November 2010 Industrial Exhibition Administration Building Bldg. 61 9-00 - 17-30 Twenty seven companies will present their latest technology at the industrial exhibition "Holland at CERN". Dutch industry will exhibit products and technologies which are related to the field of particle physics. Individual interviews will take place directly at the stands in the Main Building. The firms will contact relevant users/technicians but any user wishing to make contact with a particular firm is welcome to use the contact details which are available from each departmental secretariat or at the following URL: http://gs-dep.web.cern.ch/gs-dep/groups/sem/ls/Industrial_Exhibitions.htm#Industrial_exhibitions You will find the list of exhibitors below. LIST OF EXHIBITORS: Schelde Exotech Vernooy BV Triumph Group INCAA Computers DeMaCo Holland bv TNO Science & Industry Janssen Precision Engi...

  18. A mini-exhibition with maximum content

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2011-01-01

    The University of Budapest has been hosting a CERN mini-exhibition since 8 May. While smaller than the main travelling exhibition it has a number of major advantages: its compact design alleviates transport difficulties and makes it easier to find suitable venues in the Member States. Its content can be updated almost instantaneously and it will become even more interactive and high-tech as time goes by.   The exhibition on display in Budapest. The purpose of CERN's new mini-exhibition is to be more interactive and easier to install. Due to its size, the main travelling exhibition cannot be moved around quickly, which is why it stays in the same country for 4 to 6 months. But this means a long waiting list for the other Member States. To solve this problem, the Education Group has designed a new exhibition, which is smaller and thus easier to install. Smaller maybe, but no less rich in content, as the new exhibition conveys exactly the same messages as its larger counterpart. However, in the slimm...

  19. Ascaris lumbricoides: To Expect the Unexpected during a Routine Colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanneganti, Kalyan; Makker, Jasbir S; Remy, Prospere

    2013-01-01

    Ascaris lumbricoides is a common nematode infecting humans worldwide with increased prevalence in tropical and subtropical areas of less developed countries. Recently, it has been estimated that over one billion individuals are infected with ascariasis worldwide with 7% in USA. Although most of these cases are due to increasing immigration and travel outside America it is worth recognizing that prevalence of ascariasis is high in southeastern parts of USA due to their temperate climate. Infections of A. lumbricoides are largely asymptomatic, and hence a large population of people carrying this worm remains undetected for years until they develop some symptoms. Due to a large group of asymptomatic individuals with intestinal ascariasis, these worms are occasionally and unexpectedly identified during routine endoscopic procedures. Here, we present a case of an intestinal ascariasis found during routine colonoscopy in an African-American man from the Bronx with perianal itching. He denied any history of travel outside USA but reported frequent visits to South Carolina. This case illustrates the fact that ascariasis should be suspected even if immigration or travel outside USA is not involved. It should be suspected even in cases of travel within USA to the south east where endemic cases are reported.

  20. Ascaris lumbricoides: To Expect the Unexpected during a Routine Colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyan Kanneganti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ascaris lumbricoides is a common nematode infecting humans worldwide with increased prevalence in tropical and subtropical areas of less developed countries. Recently, it has been estimated that over one billion individuals are infected with ascariasis worldwide with 7% in USA. Although most of these cases are due to increasing immigration and travel outside America it is worth recognizing that prevalence of ascariasis is high in southeastern parts of USA due to their temperate climate. Infections of A. lumbricoides are largely asymptomatic, and hence a large population of people carrying this worm remains undetected for years until they develop some symptoms. Due to a large group of asymptomatic individuals with intestinal ascariasis, these worms are occasionally and unexpectedly identified during routine endoscopic procedures. Here, we present a case of an intestinal ascariasis found during routine colonoscopy in an African-American man from the Bronx with perianal itching. He denied any history of travel outside USA but reported frequent visits to South Carolina. This case illustrates the fact that ascariasis should be suspected even if immigration or travel outside USA is not involved. It should be suspected even in cases of travel within USA to the south east where endemic cases are reported.

  1. An Unexpected Near Term Pregnancy in a Rudimentary Uterine Horn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabete Gonçalves

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Unicornuate uterus occurs due to a complete or partial nondevelopment of one Mullerian duct; sometimes it is associated with a rudimentary horn, which can communicate or not with uterine cavity or contain functional endometrium. Pregnancy in a rudimentary horn is rare and the outcome almost always unfavorable, usually ending in rupture during the first or second trimester with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite the availability and advances on imagiologic procedures, recognition of this ectopic pregnancy is frequently made at laparotomy after abdominal pain and collapse. The authors describe a case of a primigravida with 34 weeks of gestation admitted with a preeclampsia with severity criteria. A cesarean for fetal malpresentation was done and, unexpectedly, a rudimentary horn pregnancy was found with a live newborn. In the literature, few reports of a horn pregnancy reaching the viability with a live newborn are described, enhancing the clinical importance of this case. A review of literature concerning the epidemics, clinical presentation, and appropriate management of uterine horn pregnancies is made.

  2. Unexpected Molecular Sieving Properties of Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework-8

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Chen

    2012-08-16

    We studied molecular sieving properties of zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) by estimating the thermodynamically corrected diffusivities of probe molecules at 35 °C. From helium (2.6 Å) to iso-C 4H 10 (5.0 Å), the corrected diffusivity drops 14 orders of magnitude. Our results further suggest that the effective aperture size of ZIF-8 for molecular sieving is in the range of 4.0 to 4.2 Å, which is significantly larger than the XRD-derived value (3.4 Å) and between the well-known aperture size of zeolite 4A (3.8 Å) and 5A (4.3 Å). Interestingly, because of aperture flexibility, the studied C 4 hydrocarbon molecules that are larger than this effective aperture size still adsorb in the micropores of ZIF-8 with kinetic selectivities for iso-C 4H 8/iso-C 4H 10 of 180 and n-C 4H 10/iso-C 4H 10 of 2.5 × 10 6. These unexpected molecular sieving properties open up new opportunities for ZIF materials for separations that cannot be economically achieved by traditional microporous adsorbents such as synthetic zeolites. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  3. Olivine in an unexpected location on Vesta's surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammannito, E; De Sanctis, M C; Palomba, E; Longobardo, A; Mittlefehldt, D W; McSween, H Y; Marchi, S; Capria, M T; Capaccioni, F; Frigeri, A; Pieters, C M; Ruesch, O; Tosi, F; Zambon, F; Carraro, F; Fonte, S; Hiesinger, H; Magni, G; McFadden, L A; Raymond, C A; Russell, C T; Sunshine, J M

    2013-12-05

    Olivine is a major component of the mantle of differentiated bodies, including Earth. Howardite, eucrite and diogenite (HED) meteorites represent regolith, basaltic-crust, lower-crust and possibly ultramafic-mantle samples of asteroid Vesta, which is the lone surviving, large, differentiated, basaltic rocky protoplanet in the Solar System. Only a few of these meteorites, the orthopyroxene-rich diogenites, contain olivine, typically with a concentration of less than 25 per cent by volume. Olivine was tentatively identified on Vesta, on the basis of spectral and colour data, but other observations did not confirm its presence. Here we report that olivine is indeed present locally on Vesta's surface but that, unexpectedly, it has not been found within the deep, south-pole basins, which are thought to be excavated mantle rocks. Instead, it occurs as near-surface materials in the northern hemisphere. Unlike the meteorites, the olivine-rich (more than 50 per cent by volume) material is not associated with diogenite but seems to be mixed with howardite, the most common surface material. Olivine is exposed in crater walls and in ejecta scattered diffusely over a broad area. The size of the olivine exposures and the absence of associated diogenite favour a mantle source, but the exposures are located far from the deep impact basins. The amount and distribution of observed olivine-rich material suggest a complex evolutionary history for Vesta.

  4. Unexpected properties of interactions of high energy protons

    CERN Document Server

    Dremin, I M

    2016-01-01

    Experimental data on proton-proton interactions in high energy collisions show quite a special and unexpected behaviour of the proportion of elastic scattering compared to inelastic processes with increasing energy. It decreases at the beginning (at comparatively low energies) but then starts increasing. From Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) energies of 23.5 - 62.5 GeV up to higher energies 7 - 13 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) it increases by a factor more than 1.5! According to intuitive classical ideas we would expect a stable tendency with increasing proportion of the break-down of protons compared to their survival probability. One can assume that either the asymptotic freedom or the extremely short time of flight of high energy protons through each other are in charge of such a surprising effect. The unquestionable principle of unitarity combined with the available experimental data on elastic scattering is used to get new conclusions about the shape of the interaction region of colliding proton...

  5. Unexpected demography in the recovery of an endangered primate population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen B Strier

    Full Text Available Assessments of the status of endangered species have focused on population sizes, often without knowledge of demographic and behavioral processes underlying population recovery. We analyzed demographic data from a 28-year study of a critically endangered primate, the northern muriqui, to investigate possible changes in demographic rates as this population recovered from near extirpation. As the population increased from 60 to nearly 300 individuals, its growth rate declined due to increased mortality and male-biased birth sex ratios; the increased mortality was not uniform across ages and sexes, and there has been a recent increase in mortality of prime-aged males. If not for a concurrent increase in fertility rates, the population would have stabilized at 200 individuals instead of continuing to grow. The unexpected increase in fertility rates and in adult male mortality can be attributed to the muriquis' expansion of their habitat by spending more time on the ground. The demographic consequences of this behavioral shift must be incorporated into management tactics for this population and emphasize the importance of understanding demographic rates in the recovery of endangered species.

  6. Identifying unexpected therapeutic targets via chemical-protein interactome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun Yang

    Full Text Available Drug medications inevitably affect not only their intended protein targets but also other proteins as well. In this study we examined the hypothesis that drugs that share the same therapeutic effect also share a common therapeutic mechanism by targeting not only known drug targets, but also by interacting unexpectedly on the same cryptic targets. By constructing and mining an Alzheimer's disease (AD drug-oriented chemical-protein interactome (CPI using a matrix of 10 drug molecules known to treat AD towards 401 human protein pockets, we found that such cryptic targets exist. We recovered from CPI the only validated therapeutic target of AD, acetylcholinesterase (ACHE, and highlighted several other putative targets. For example, we discovered that estrogen receptor (ER and histone deacetylase (HDAC, which have recently been identified as two new therapeutic targets of AD, might already have been targeted by the marketed AD drugs. We further established that the CPI profile of a drug can reflect its interacting character towards multi-protein sets, and that drugs with the same therapeutic attribute will share a similar interacting profile. These findings indicate that the CPI could represent the landscape of chemical-protein interactions and uncover "behind-the-scenes" aspects of the therapeutic mechanisms of existing drugs, providing testable hypotheses of the key nodes for network pharmacology or brand new drug targets for one-target pharmacology paradigm.

  7. Unexpected high-energy γ emission from decaying exotic nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gottardo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The N=52 Ga83 β decay was studied at ALTO. The radioactive 83Ga beam was produced through the ISOL photofission technique and collected on a movable tape for the measurement of γ-ray emission following β decay. While β-delayed neutron emission has been measured to be 56–85% of the decay path, in this experiment an unexpected high-energy 5–9 MeV γ-ray yield of 16(4% was observed, coming from states several MeVs above the neutron separation threshold. This result is compared with cutting-edge QRPA calculations, which show that when neutrons deeply bound in the core of the nucleus decay into protons via a Gamow–Teller transition, they give rise to a dipolar oscillation of nuclear matter in the nucleus. This leads to large electromagnetic transition probabilities which can compete with neutron emission, thus affecting the β-decay path. This process is enhanced by an excess of neutrons on the nuclear surface and may thus be a common feature for very neutron-rich isotopes, challenging the present understanding of decay properties of exotic nuclei.

  8. Cardiac arrhythmias and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velagapudi, Poonam; Turagam, Mohit; Laurence, Thomas; Kocheril, Abraham

    2012-03-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is a major clinical problem in epilepsy patients in the United States, especially those with chronic, uncontrolled epilepsy. Several pathophysiological events contributing to SUDEP include cardiac arrhythmias, respiratory dysfunction, and dysregulation of systemic or cerebral circulation. There is a significant body of literature suggesting the prominent role of cardiac arrhythmias in the pathogenesis of SUDEP. There is evidence to say that long-standing epilepsy can cause physiological and anatomical autonomic instability resulting in life-threatening arrhythmias. Tachyarrhythmias, bradyarrhythmias, and asystole are commonly seen during ictal, interictal, and postictal phase in epilepsy patients. It is unclear if these rhythm disturbances need attention as some of them may be just benign findings. Evidence regarding prolonged cardiovascular monitoring or the benefit of pacemaker/defibrillator implantation for primary or secondary prevention in epilepsy patients is limited. Awareness regarding pathophysiology, cardiac effects, and management options of SUDEP will become useful in guiding more individualized treatment in the near future. (PACE 2011; 1-8).

  9. Unravelling the mysteries of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, K G; Rocamora Zuñiga, R; Quesada, C M

    2017-04-18

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the most frequent cause of premature death in epileptic patients. Most SUDEP events occur at night and frequently go unnoticed; the exact pathophysiological mechanisms of this phenomenon therefore remain undetermined. Nevertheless, most cases of SUDEP are attributed to an infrequent yet extremely severe complication of epileptic seizures. We conducted a systematic literature search on PubMed. Our review article summarises scientific evidence on the classification, pathophysiological mechanisms, risk factors, biomarkers, and prevention of SUDEP. Likewise, we propose new lines of research and critically analyse findings that are relevant to clinical practice. Current knowledge suggests that SUDEP is a heterogeneous phenomenon caused by multiple factors. In most cases, however, SUDEP is thought to be due to postictal cardiorespiratory failure triggered by generalised tonic-clonic seizures and ultimately leading to cardiac arrest. The underlying pathophysiological mechanism involves multiple factors, ranging from genetic predisposition to environmental factors. Risk of SUDEP is higher in young adults with uncontrolled generalised tonic-clonic seizures. However, patients apparently at lower risk may also experience SUDEP. Current research focuses on identifying genetic and neuroimaging biomarkers that may help determine which patients are at high risk for SUDEP. Antiepileptic treatment is the only preventive measure proven effective to date. Night-time monitoring together with early resuscitation may reduce the risk of SUDEP. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Electrocardiographic features of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyou, Janice Y; Friedman, Daniel; Cerrone, Marina; Slater, William; Guo, Yu; Taupin, Daniel; O'Rourke, Sean; Priori, Silvia G; Devinsky, Orrin

    2016-07-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the most common cause of epilepsy-related mortality. We hypothesized that electrocardiography (ECG) features may distinguish SUDEP cases from living subjects with epilepsy. Using a matched case-control design, we compared ECG studies of 12 consecutive cases of SUDEP over 10 years and 22 epilepsy controls matched for age, sex, epilepsy type (focal, generalized, or unknown/mixed type), concomitant antiepileptic, and psychotropic drug classes. Conduction intervals and prevalence of abnormal ventricular conduction diagnosis (QRS ≥110 msec), abnormal ventricular conduction pattern (QRS <110 msec, morphology of incomplete right or left bundle branch block or intraventricular conduction delay), early repolarization, and features of inherited cardiac channelopathies were assessed. Abnormal ventricular conduction diagnosis and pattern distinguished SUDEP cases from matched controls. Abnormal ventricular conduction diagnosis was present in two cases and no controls. Abnormal ventricular conduction pattern was more common in cases than controls (58% vs. 18%, p = 0.04). Early repolarization was similarly prevalent in cases and controls, but the overall prevalence exceeded that of published community-based cohorts. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  11. Competition can lead to unexpected patterns in tropical ant communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellwood, M. D. Farnon; Blüthgen, Nico; Fayle, Tom M.; Foster, William A.; Menzel, Florian

    2016-08-01

    Ecological communities are structured by competitive, predatory, mutualistic and parasitic interactions combined with chance events. Separating deterministic from stochastic processes is possible, but finding statistical evidence for specific biological interactions is challenging. We attempt to solve this problem for ant communities nesting in epiphytic bird's nest ferns (Asplenium nidus) in Borneo's lowland rainforest. By recording the frequencies with which each and every single ant species occurred together, we were able to test statistically for patterns associated with interspecific competition. We found evidence for competition, but the resulting co-occurrence pattern was the opposite of what we expected. Rather than detecting species segregation-the classical hallmark of competition-we found species aggregation. Moreover, our approach of testing individual pairwise interactions mostly revealed spatially positive rather than negative associations. Significant negative interactions were only detected among large ants, and among species of the subfamily Ponerinae. Remarkably, the results from this study, and from a corroborating analysis of ant communities known to be structured by competition, suggest that competition within the ants leads to species aggregation rather than segregation. We believe this unexpected result is linked with the displacement of species following asymmetric competition. We conclude that analysing co-occurrence frequencies across complete species assemblages, separately for each species, and for each unique pairwise combination of species, represents a subtle yet powerful way of detecting structure and compartmentalisation in ecological communities.

  12. Unexpected large room-temperature ferromagnetism in porous Cu{sub 2}O thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Xue [College of Physics Science & Information Engineering, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Films of Hebei Province, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China); Sun, Huiyuan, E-mail: huiyuansun@126.com [College of Physics Science & Information Engineering, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Films of Hebei Province, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China); Liu, Lihu; Jia, Xiaoxuan; Liu, Huiyuan [College of Physics Science & Information Engineering, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Films of Hebei Province, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Porous Cu{sub 2}O films have been fabricated on porous anodic alumina substrates using DC-reactive magnetron sputtering with pure Cu targets, and unexpectedly large room temperature ferromagnetism has been observed in the films. The maximum saturation magnetic moment along the out-of-plane direction was as high as 94 emu/cm{sup 3}. Photoluminescence spectra show that the ferromagnetism originates with oxygen vacancies. The ferromagnetism could be adjusted by changing the concentration of oxygen vacancies through annealing in an oxygen atmosphere. These observations suggest that the origin of the ferromagnetism is due to coupling between oxygen vacancies with local magnetic moments in the porous Cu{sub 2}O films, which can occur either directly through exchange interactions between oxygen vacancies, or through the mediation of conduction electrons. Such a ferromagnet without the presence of any ferromagnetic dopant may find applications in spintronic devices. - Highlights: • Porous Cu{sub 2}O films were deposited on porous anodic alumina (PAA) substrates. • Significant room-temperature ferromagnetism has been observed in porous Cu{sub 2}O films. • Ferromagnetism of Cu{sub 2}O films exhibited different magnetic signals with the field. • The saturation magnetization is 94 emu/cm{sup 3} with an out-of-plane.

  13. Rare and unexpected beta thalassemic mutations in Qazvin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-01-04

    Jan 4, 2010 ... Key words: Rare thalassemia mutations, beta globin gene, Qazvin, direct sequencing. INTRODUCTION ... Degree of incidence of various mutations in beta thalassemia major patients of ..... prevention and treatment. Leiden ...

  14. High Quality Virtual Reality for Architectural Exhibitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreutzberg, Anette

    2016-01-01

    This paper will summarise the findings from creating and implementing a visually high quality Virtual Reality (VR) experiment as part of an international architecture exhibition. It was the aim to represent the architectural spatial qualities as well as the atmosphere created from combining natural...... and artificial lighting in a prominent not yet built project. The outcome is twofold: Findings concerning the integration of VR in an exhibition space and findings concerning the experience of the virtual space itself. In the exhibition, an important aspect was the unmanned exhibition space, requiring the VR...... experience to be self-explanatory. Observations of different visitor reactions to the unmanned VR experience compared with visitor reactions at guided tours with personal instructions are evaluated. Data on perception of realism, spatial quality and light in the VR model were collected with qualitative...

  15. Footprints of China Auto Internatienal Exhibition Tour

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ November 2008,the Sixth China Auto International(Algeria & Egypt)Exhibition Tour is ready.Since the first session was held in 1995,the Chinese auto enterprises have been to Vietnam,Cambodia,Syria,and Russian.

  16. France at CERN – Industrial exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    FP Department

    2012-01-01

    Industrial Exhibition Administration Building Bldg 61 – 1st Floor Tuesday 27 March: 9 a.m. – 5.30 p.m. Wednesday 28 March: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.   About thirty French companies are presenting their latest technological advances during the industrial exhibition "France at CERN", featuring products and technologies specifically related to CERN activities. Individual B2B meetings can be organized with the sales and technical representatives of participating firms and will take place at either the companies’ exhibition stands or in conference rooms in the Main Building. Individuals wishing to make contact with one or more companies must use the contact details available from each secretariat of department or by using this link. B2B meetings will be coordinated by UBIFRANCE. You will also find the list of exhibiting and participating companies online here. This event is sponsored by the French subsidiary of RS Components, the most important distri...

  17. 49 CFR 250.2 - Required exhibits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and detail for Class II railroads. (14) As Exhibit 14, a statement showing actual cash balance at the beginning of each month and the actual cash receipts and disbursements during each month of the current...

  18. Exhibition 2004: Never-falling Stand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Another year for reform and development Reform and development, key words and melodies for present life, may reflect future changes definitely. Rapid progress of convention & exhibition industry undoubtedly predicates future development of this industry in China.

  19. The Report of Virtual Exhibition Software Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The main structure and key techniques of our Vir tual ExhibitionSoftware are summarized. It demonstrates the practice of Softwa re Engineering during the development of our project and discusses the use of UML in it.

  20. Genome-wide polymorphisms show unexpected targets of natural selection

    OpenAIRE

    Pespeni, Melissa H.; Garfield, David A.; Manier, Mollie K; Palumbi, Stephen R.

    2011-01-01

    Natural selection can act on all the expressed genes of an individual, leaving signatures of genetic differentiation or diversity at many loci across the genome. New power to assay these genome-wide effects of selection comes from associating multi-locus patterns of polymorphism with gene expression and function. Here, we performed one of the first genome-wide surveys in a marine species, comparing purple sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, from two distant locations along the species...

  1. Communicating Complex Sciences by Means of Exhibitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, S.

    2011-12-01

    Earth Sciences will have to take over the leading role in global sustainable policy and in discussions about climate change. Efforts to raise attention within the politically responsible communities as well as in the public are getting more and more support by executive and advisory boards all over the world. But how can you successfully communicate complex sciences? For example, to start communication about climate change, the first step is to encourage people to be concerned about climate change. After that, one has to start thinking about how to present data and how to include the presented data into an unprejudiced context. Therefore, the communication toolbox offers various methods to reach diverse audiences. The R&D programme GEOTECHNOLOGIEN conducts roving exhibitions as one of its most successful communication tools. With roving exhibitions GEOTECHNOLOGIEN is able to get in touch with different audiences at once. The main purpose and theme of these exhibitions is to convey the everyday means of climate change to the visitors. It is within the responsibility of science to communicate the effects of a phenomenon like climate change as well as the impact of research results to the everyday life of people. Currently, a GEOTECHNOLOGIEN roving exhibition on remote sensing with satellites deals with various issues of environmental research, including a chapter on climate change. By following the 3M-concept (Meaning - Memorable - Moving), exhibitions allow to connect the visitors daily environment and personal experiences with the presented issues and objects. Therefore, hands-on exhibits, exciting multimedia effects and high-tech artefacts have to be combined with interpretive text elements to highlight the daily significance of the scientific topics and the exhibition theme respectively. To create such an exhibition, strong conceptual planning has to be conducted. This includes the specification of stern financial as well as time wise milestones. In addition

  2. Reaching the Public through Traveling Exhibitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusenbery, P. B.; Harold, J. B.; Morrow, C. A.

    2004-11-01

    The Space Science Institute (SSI) of Boulder, Colorado has recently developed two museum exhibits called Alien Earths and MarsQuest. It has just started to develop another exhibit called Giant Planets. These exhibitions provide research scientists the opportunity to engage in a number of activities that are vital to the success of these major outreach programs. Alien Earths was developed in partnership with various research missions. The focus of the presentation will be on MarsQuest and Giant Planets. MarsQuest is a 5000 square-foot, \\$3M, traveling exhibition that is now touring the country. The exhibit's second 3-year tour will enable millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and learn more about their own planet in the process. The associated planetarium show and education program will also be described, with particular emphasis on workshops to orient museum staff (e.g. museum educators and docents) and workshops for master educators near host museums and science centers. The workshops make innovative connections between the exhibition's interactive experiences and lesson plans aligned with the National Science Education Standards. These exhibit programs are good models for actively involving scientists and their discoveries to help improve informal science education in the museum community and for forging a stronger connection between formal and informal education. The presentation will also discuss how Giant Planets, a proposed 3500 square-foot traveling exhibition on the mysteries and discoveries of the outer planets, will be able to take advantage of the connections and resources that have been developed by the MarsQuest project.

  3. An Astrobiology Microbes Exhibit and Education Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, Marilyn M.; Allen, Jaclyn S.; Stocco, Karen; Tobola, Kay; Olendzenski, Lorraine

    2001-01-01

    Telling the story of NASA-sponsored scientific research to the public in exhibits is best done by partnerships of scientists and museum professionals. Likewise, preparing classroom activities and training teachers to use them should be done by teams of teachers and scientists. Here we describe how we used such partnerships to develop a new astrobiology augmentation to the Microbes! traveling exhibit and a companion education module. "Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract."

  4. When Do Children Exhibit a "Yes" Bias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okanda, Mako; Itakura, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated whether one hundred and thirty-five 3- to 6-year-old children exhibit a yes bias to various yes-no questions and whether their knowledge status affects the production of a yes bias. Three-year-olds exhibited a yes bias to all yes-no questions such as "preference-object" and "knowledge-object" questions pertaining to…

  5. Exhibition by Gozitan artist Mark Sagona

    OpenAIRE

    Calleja, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    Mark Sagona's exhibition, entitled "Recent Insights" was held at the Banca Giuratale in Victoria, Gozo between the 24th January and the 8th February 2004. It brought together twenty-four paintings, all produced in 2003 and the majority of which were realised in oil on canvas. The exhibition was curated by Dr Joseph Paul Cassar, and inaugurated by the Minister for Gozo, the Hon. Giovanna Debono.

  6. [All-Russian hygienic exhibitions and museums].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzybaeva, M P

    2011-01-01

    The material about the popularization of hygiene and health education in Russia in the second half of the 19th century to early 20th century through exhibition and museum activities has been collected for the first time and analyzed in the paper. The role of scientists and scientific medical societies in this process is noted. The significance of museum and exhibition activities in this area for the development of medical science is defined.

  7. Unexpected diversity and photoperiod dependence of the zebrafish melanopsin system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Matos-Cruz

    Full Text Available Animals have evolved specialized photoreceptors in the retina and in extraocular tissues that allow them to measure light changes in their environment. In mammals, the retina is the only structure that detects light and relays this information to the brain. The classical photoreceptors, rods and cones, are responsible for vision through activation of rhodopsin and cone opsins. Melanopsin, another photopigment first discovered in Xenopus melanophores (Opn4x, is expressed in a small subset of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs in the mammalian retina, where it mediates non-image forming functions such as circadian photoentrainment and sleep. While mammals have a single melanopsin gene (opn4, zebrafish show remarkable diversity with two opn4x-related and three opn4-related genes expressed in distinct patterns in multiple neuronal cell types of the developing retina, including bipolar interneurons. The intronless opn4.1 gene is transcribed in photoreceptors as well as in horizontal cells and produces functional photopigment. Four genes are also expressed in the zebrafish embryonic brain, but not in the photoreceptive pineal gland. We discovered that photoperiod length influences expression of two of the opn4-related genes in retinal layers involved in signaling light information to RGCs. Moreover, both genes are expressed in a robust diurnal rhythm but with different phases in relation to the light-dark cycle. The results suggest that melanopsin has an expanded role in modulating the retinal circuitry of fish.

  8. Communication of Unexpected and Significant Findings on Chest Radiographs With an Automated PACS Alert System.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hayes, Sara A

    2014-08-01

    An integral part of realizing the enormous potential of imaging in patient care is close communication between radiologists and referring physicians. One key element of this process is the communication of unexpected significant findings. The authors examined the performance of a PACS-based alert system in the appropriate communication of reports containing unexpected significant findings to referring physicians.

  9. 78 FR 9569 - Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Relating to Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ...--Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Relating to Syria Memorandum of January 31, 2013--Delegation of... Determination No. 2013-04 of January 29, 2013 Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Relating to Syria... the crisis in Syria. You are authorized and directed to publish this memorandum in the...

  10. 3 CFR - Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Related to the Continuing Conflict in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs... Presidential Determination No. 2009-16 of March 11, 2009 Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Related... Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962 (the “Act”), as amended (22 U.S.C. 2601), I hereby...

  11. 3 CFR - Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Related to Gaza

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs... of January 27, 2009 Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Related to Gaza Memorandum for the..., including section 2(c)(1) of the Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962 (the “Act”), as amended (22...

  12. Unexpected Control Structure Interaction on International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Susan F.; Platonov, Valery; Medina, Elizabeth A.; Borisenko, Alexander; Bogachev, Alexey

    2017-01-01

    On June 23, 2011, the International Space Station (ISS) was performing a routine 180 degree yaw maneuver in support of a Russian vehicle docking when the on board Russian Segment (RS) software unexpectedly declared two attitude thrusters failed and switched thruster configurations in response to unanticipated ISS dynamic motion. Flight data analysis after the maneuver indicated that higher than predicted structural loads had been induced at various locations on the United States (U.S.) segment of the ISS. Further analysis revealed that the attitude control system was firing thrusters in response to both structural flex and rigid body rates, which resonated the structure and caused high loads and fatigue cycles. It was later determined that the thruster themselves were healthy. The RS software logic, which was intended to react to thruster failures, had instead been heavily influenced by interaction between the control system and structural flex. This paper will discuss the technical aspects of the control structure interaction problem that led to the RS control system firing thrusters in response to structural flex, the factors that led to insufficient preflight analysis of the thruster firings, and the ramifications the event had on the ISS. An immediate consequence included limiting which thrusters could be used for attitude control. This complicated the planning of on-orbit thruster events and necessitated the use of suboptimal thruster configurations that increased propellant usage and caused thruster lifetime usage concerns. In addition to the technical aspects of the problem, the team dynamics and communication shortcomings that led to such an event happening in an environment where extensive analysis is performed in support of human space flight will also be examined. Finally, the technical solution will be presented, which required a multidisciplinary effort between the U.S. and Russian control system engineers and loads and dynamics structural engineers to

  13. Unexpectedly high burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis in very young infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reilly Megan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highest incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis has generally been reported in children 6-24 months of age. Young infants are thought to be partially protected by maternal antibodies acquired transplacentally or via breast milk. The purpose of our study was to assess the age distribution of children with confirmed community-acquired rotavirus gastroenteritis presenting to an urban referral hospital. Methods Children presenting to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia with acute gastroenteritis have been monitored for the presence of rotavirus antigen in the stool by ELISA (followed by genotyping if ELISA-positive since the 1994-95 epidemic season. Results Over the last 12 rotavirus seasons prior to the introduction of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in 2006, stool specimens from 1646 patients tested positive for community-acquired rotavirus infection. Gender or age was not recorded in 6 and 5 cases, respectively. Overall, 58% of the cases occurred in boys. G1 was the predominant VP7 serotype, accounting for 72% of cases. The median (IQR age was 11 (5-21 months. A total of 790 (48% cases occurred in children outside the commonly quoted peak age range, with 27% in infants 24 months of age. A total of 220 (13% cases occurred during the first 3 months of life, and the highest number of episodes per month of age [97 (6%] was observed during the second month of life. Conclusions The incidence of community-acquired rotavirus gastroenteritis monitored over 12 seasons in the prevaccine era at a major university hospital was nearly constant for each month of age during the first year of life, revealing an unexpectedly high incidence of symptomatic rotavirus disease in infants

  14. Uniparental disomy as an unexpected cause of Meckel-Gruber syndrome: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruechle, Nadia Ortiz; Steuernagel, Peter; Zerres, Klaus; Kurth, Ingo; Eggermann, Thomas; Knopp, Cordula

    2017-06-15

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS, OMIM #607361) is a rare pre- or perinatal lethal autosomal recessive ciliopathy caused by mutations in at least 12 known genes. It has a clinical and genetic overlap with other viable ciliopathies, especially Joubert syndrome and Joubert syndrome-related disorders. MKS is characterized by multicystic kidney dysplasia, central nervous system malformations (usually occipital encephalocele), ductal plate malformation of the liver, and postaxial polydactyly. We identified a homozygous mutation in TMEM67 (MKS3) in a fetus affected by MKS; however, only the mother was a carrier of the respective mutation. Genotyping with polymorphic microsatellite markers and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array revealed a maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) of the entire chromosome 8 (upd(8)mat), harboring TMEM67. This is the first reported case of UPD as a cause of MKS. The possible underlying mechanisms for uniparental disomy (UPD) are reviewed. Even if rare, awareness of UPD and comprehensive work-up in the case of unexpected homozygosity for a recessive mutation is essential for accurate genetic counseling and assessment of the risk of recurrence.

  15. Curated exhibitions and Australian art history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine De Lorenzo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Australian Art history in all it guises has tended to bypass the impact of contemporary curated exhibitions on shaping the discipline. Yet an examination of a cluster of key contemporary exhibitions from the early 1970s onwards reveals their significance for the history of art in Australia. They reflect institutional judgements behind the selection, research and display the work of artists as well as the reception of such work by the public, artists, art critics and art historians. This is especially so in the last decades of the 20th century and the first decade of the 21st, as the country underwent major cultural changes. This paper focuses on selected exhibitions of Australian art from 1968 to 2008 and indicates how exhibitions also constitute a major form of contemporary Australian art historiography. As this period coincides with a transformation in the way exhibitions were funded, it also begins to investigate the question of the long term impact of public funding of the arts.

  16. CERN exhibition a big hit in Bulgaria

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The first CERN exhibition in Bulgaria attracted many visitors. In the first ever CERN exhibition to be held in Bulgaria, over 1,400 visitors, many of them students and young physicists, visited the 10-day event in Sofia. The CERN mini-exhibition took place at the National Earth and Mankind Museum between 8 and 17 November. Permanently staffed by young physicists from Sofia University, there were exhibits on display about research activities at CERN, as well as four additional posters describing Bulgaria's participation. The inauguration took place on the morning of 8 November in the presence of the Vice-Minister for Science and Education, Mrs. Vanya Dobreva, and some 200 guests. A series of short speeches were followed by a visit to the exhibition. CERN's representative at the event, Ray Lewis, was then asked by Professor Matey Mateev, President of the Union of Physicists in Bulgaria, to say a few words on behalf of the Organization. Numerous journalists were also present at the inauguration. A painting enti...

  17. The Gravity- Powered Calculator, a Galilean Exhibit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerreta, Pietro

    2014-04-01

    The Gravity-Powered Calculator is an exhibit of the Exploratorium in San Francisco. It is presented by its American creators as an amazing device that extracts the square roots of numbers, using only the force of gravity. But if you analyze his concept construction one can not help but recall the research of Galileo on falling bodies, the inclined plane and the projectile motion; exactly what the American creators did not put into prominence with their exhibit. Considering the equipment only for what it does, in my opinion, is very reductive compared to the historical roots of the Galilean mathematical physics contained therein. Moreover, if accurate deductions are contained in the famous study of S. Drake on the Galilean drawings and, in particular on Folio 167 v, the parabolic paths of the ball leaping from its launch pad after descending a slope really actualize Galileo's experiments. The exhibit therefore may be best known as a `Galilean calculator'.

  18. The exploration of the exhibition informatization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiankang

    2017-06-01

    The construction and management of exhibition informatization is the main task and choke point during the process of Chinese exhibition industry’s transformation and promotion. There are three key points expected to realize a breakthrough during the construction of Chinese exhibition informatization, and the three aspects respectively are adopting service outsourcing to construct and maintain the database, adopting advanced chest card technology to collect various kinds of information, developing statistics analysis to maintain good cutomer relations. The success of Chinese exhibition informatization mainly calls for mature suppliers who can provide construction and maintenance of database, the proven technology, a sense of data security, advanced chest card technology, the ability of data mining and analysis and the ability to improve the exhibition service basing on the commercial information got from the data analysis. Several data security measures are expected to apply during the process of system developing, including the measures of the terminal data security, the internet data security, the media data security, the storage data security and the application data security. The informatization of this process is based on the chest card designing. At present, there are several types of chest card technology: bar code chest card; two-dimension code card; magnetic stripe chest card; smart-chip chest card. The information got from the exhibition data will help the organizers to make relevant service strategies, quantify the accumulated indexes of the customers, and improve the level of the customer’s satisfaction and loyalty, what’s more, the information can also provide more additional services like the commercial trips, VIP ceremonial reception.

  19. Exhibits in libraries a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Mary E

    2005-01-01

    "Ccomprehensive...detailed"--Booklist; "thoroughly reseached...highly recommended"--Journal of Access Services. Library exhibits are more than entertainment for patrons. They can inspire and educate, stimulate an interest that can be explored in a book, or attract visitors who otherwise wouldn't stop by. Displays are also an opportunity for a library to put its creative foot forward or help patrons navigate the facility itself. This comprehensive "how-to" includes everything a librarian or staff member needs to know to put on an exhibit, from hatching ideas to evaluating the end result. Illustrations and photographs show practical methods of planning, labeling and displaying.

  20. Dealing with the unexpected: consumer responses to direct-access BRCA mutation testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uta Francke

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Inherited BRCA gene mutations convey a high risk for breast and ovarian cancer, but current guidelines limit BRCA mutation testing to women with early-onset cancer and relatives of mutation-positive cases. Benefits and risks of providing this information directly to consumers are unknown.Methods. To assess and quantify emotional and behavioral reactions of consumers to their 23andMe Personal Genome Service® report of three BRCA mutations that are common in Ashkenazi Jews, we invited all 136 BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation-positive individuals in the 23andMe customer database who had chosen to view their BRCA reports to participate in this IRB-approved study. We also invited 160 mutation-negative customers who were matched for age, sex and ancestry. Semi-structured phone interviews were completed for 32 mutation carriers, 16 women and 16 men, and 31 non-carriers. Questions addressed personal and family history of cancer, decision and timing of viewing the BRCA report, recollection of the result, emotional responses, perception of personal cancer risk, information sharing, and actions taken or planned.Results. Eleven women and 14 men had received the unexpected result that they are carriers of a BRCA1 185delAG or 5382insC, or BRCA2 6174delT mutation. None of them reported extreme anxiety and four experienced moderate anxiety that was transitory. Remarkably, five women and six men described their response as neutral. Most carrier women sought medical advice and four underwent risk-reducing procedures after confirmatory mutation testing. Male carriers realized that their test results implied genetic risk for female relatives, and several of them felt considerably burdened by this fact. Sharing mutation information with family members led to screening of at least 30 relatives and identification of 13 additional carriers. Non-carriers did not report inappropriate actions, such as foregoing cancer screening. All but one of the 32 mutation

  1. Dealing with the unexpected: consumer responses to direct-access BRCA mutation testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francke, Uta; Dijamco, Cheri; Kiefer, Amy K; Eriksson, Nicholas; Moiseff, Bianca; Tung, Joyce Y; Mountain, Joanna L

    2013-01-01

    Background. Inherited BRCA gene mutations convey a high risk for breast and ovarian cancer, but current guidelines limit BRCA mutation testing to women with early-onset cancer and relatives of mutation-positive cases. Benefits and risks of providing this information directly to consumers are unknown. Methods. To assess and quantify emotional and behavioral reactions of consumers to their 23andMe Personal Genome Service(®) report of three BRCA mutations that are common in Ashkenazi Jews, we invited all 136 BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation-positive individuals in the 23andMe customer database who had chosen to view their BRCA reports to participate in this IRB-approved study. We also invited 160 mutation-negative customers who were matched for age, sex and ancestry. Semi-structured phone interviews were completed for 32 mutation carriers, 16 women and 16 men, and 31 non-carriers. Questions addressed personal and family history of cancer, decision and timing of viewing the BRCA report, recollection of the result, emotional responses, perception of personal cancer risk, information sharing, and actions taken or planned. Results. Eleven women and 14 men had received the unexpected result that they are carriers of a BRCA1 185delAG or 5382insC, or BRCA2 6174delT mutation. None of them reported extreme anxiety and four experienced moderate anxiety that was transitory. Remarkably, five women and six men described their response as neutral. Most carrier women sought medical advice and four underwent risk-reducing procedures after confirmatory mutation testing. Male carriers realized that their test results implied genetic risk for female relatives, and several of them felt considerably burdened by this fact. Sharing mutation information with family members led to screening of at least 30 relatives and identification of 13 additional carriers. Non-carriers did not report inappropriate actions, such as foregoing cancer screening. All but one of the 32 mutation-positive participants

  2. Unexpectedly Streamlined Mitochondrial Genome of the Euglenozoan Euglena gracilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobáková, Eva; Flegontov, Pavel; Skalický, Tomáš; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-11-20

    In this study, we describe the mitochondrial genome of the excavate flagellate Euglena gracilis. Its gene complement is reduced as compared with the well-studied sister groups Diplonemea and Kinetoplastea. We have identified seven protein-coding genes: Three subunits of respiratory complex I (nad1, nad4, and nad5), one subunit of complex III (cob), and three subunits of complex IV (cox1, cox2, and a highly divergent cox3). Moreover, fragments of ribosomal RNA genes have also been identified. Genes encoding subunits of complex V, ribosomal proteins and tRNAs were missing, and are likely located in the nuclear genome. Although mitochondrial genomes of diplonemids and kinetoplastids possess the most complex RNA processing machineries known, including trans-splicing and editing of the uridine insertion/deletion type, respectively, our transcriptomic data suggest their total absence in E. gracilis. This finding supports a scenario in which the complex mitochondrial processing machineries of both sister groups evolved relatively late in evolution from a streamlined genome and transcriptome of their common predecessor.

  3. The unexpected signal in GRACE estimates of C_{20}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Minkang; Ries, John

    2017-08-01

    For science applications of the gravity recovery and climate experiment (GRACE) monthly solutions, the GRACE estimates of C_{20} (or J2) are typically replaced by the value determined from satellite laser ranging (SLR) due to an unexpectedly strong, clearly non-geophysical, variation at a period of ˜ 160 days. This signal has sometimes been referred to as a tide-like variation since the period is close to the perturbation period on the GRACE orbits due to the spherical harmonic coefficient pair C_{22}/S_{22} of S2 ocean tide. Errors in the S2 tide model used in GRACE data processing could produce a significant perturbation to the GRACE orbits, but it cannot contribute to the ˜ 160-day signal appearing in C_{20}. Since the dominant contribution to the GRACE estimate of C_{20} is from the global positioning system tracking data, a time series of 138 monthly solutions up to degree and order 10 (10× 10) were derived along with estimates of ocean tide parameters up to degree 6 for eight major tides. The results show that the ˜ 160-day signal remains in the C_{20} time series. Consequently, the anomalous signal in GRACE C_{20} cannot be attributed to aliasing from the errors in the S2 tide. A preliminary analysis of the cross-track forces acting on GRACE and the cross-track component of the accelerometer data suggests that a temperature-dependent systematic error in the accelerometer data could be a cause. Because a wide variety of science applications relies on the replacement values for C_{20}, it is essential that the SLR estimates are as reliable as possible. An ongoing concern has been the influence of higher degree even zonal terms on the SLR estimates of C_{20}, since only C_{20} and C_{40} are currently estimated. To investigate whether a better separation between C_{20} and the higher-degree terms could be achieved, several combinations of additional SLR satellites were investigated. In addition, a series of monthly gravity field solutions (60× 60) were

  4. Malaria's contribution to World War One - the unexpected adversary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabin, Bernard J

    2014-12-16

    Malaria in the First World War was an unexpected adversary. In 1914, the scientific community had access to new knowledge on transmission of malaria parasites and their control, but the military were unprepared, and underestimated the nature, magnitude and dispersion of this enemy. In summarizing available information for allied and axis military forces, this review contextualizes the challenge posed by malaria, because although data exist across historical, medical and military documents, descriptions are fragmented, often addressing context specific issues. Military malaria surveillance statistics have, therefore, been summarized for all theatres of the War, where available. These indicated that at least 1.5 million solders were infected, with case fatality ranging from 0.2 -5.0%. As more countries became engaged in the War, the problem grew in size, leading to major epidemics in Macedonia, Palestine, Mesopotamia and Italy. Trans-continental passages of parasites and human reservoirs of infection created ideal circumstances for parasite evolution. Details of these epidemics are reviewed, including major epidemics in England and Italy, which developed following home troop evacuations, and disruption of malaria control activities in Italy. Elsewhere, in sub-Saharan Africa many casualties resulted from high malaria exposure combined with minimal control efforts for soldiers considered semi-immune. Prevention activities eventually started but were initially poorly organized and dependent on local enthusiasm and initiative. Nets had to be designed for field use and were fundamental for personal protection. Multiple prevention approaches adopted in different settings and their relative utility are described. Clinical treatment primarily depended on quinine, although efficacy was poor as relapsing Plasmodium vivax and recrudescent Plasmodium falciparum infections were not distinguished and managed appropriately. Reasons for this are discussed and the clinical trial data

  5. Clinical approach to the patient with unexpected bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitel, J M

    2000-10-01

    Bleeding can be considered unexpected if it is disproportionate to the intensity of the haemostatic stress in a patient with no known haemorrhagic disorder or if it occurs in a patient in whom a bleeding disorder has been characterized but is adequately treated. A thorough history usually allows the clinician to predict reasonably accurately whether the patient is likely to have a systemic haemostatic defect (and if so whether it is congenital or acquired), or whether the bleeding likely has a purely anatomical basis. The nature of bleeding is instructive with respect to preliminary categorization. Thus, mucocutaneous bleeding suggests defects of primary haemostasis (disordered platelet-vascular interactions). Bleeding into deeper structures is more suggestive of coagulation defects leading to impaired fibrin clot formation, and delayed bleeding after primary haemostasis is characteristic of hyperfibrinolysis. Localized bleeding suggests an anatomical cause, although an underlying haemostatic defect may coexist. Where bleeding is so acutely threatening as to require urgent intervention, diagnosis and treatment must proceed simultaneously. In the case of minor haemorrhage (not threatening to life or limb) it may be preferable to defer therapy while the nature of the bleeding disorder is methodically investigated. Initial laboratory evaluation is guided by the preliminary clinical impression. The amount of blood loss can be inferred from the haematocrit or haemoglobin concentration, and the platelet count will quickly identify cases in which thrombocytopenia is the likely cause of bleeding. In the latter instance, examination of the red cell morphology, leucocyte differential, and mean platelet volume may allow the aetiological mechanism to be presumptively identified as hypoproliferative or consumptive. With regard to coagulation testing, the activated PTT, prothrombin time, and thrombin time usually constitute an adequate battery of screening tests, unless the

  6. Unexpected complexity of the Aquaporin gene family in the moss Physcomitrella patens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanson Urban

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aquaporins, also called major intrinsic proteins (MIPs, constitute an ancient superfamily of channel proteins that facilitate the transport of water and small solutes across cell membranes. MIPs are found in almost all living organisms and are particularly abundant in plants where they form a divergent group of proteins able to transport a wide selection of substrates. Results Analyses of the whole genome of Physcomitrella patens resulted in the identification of 23 MIPs, belonging to seven different subfamilies, of which only five have been previously described. Of the newly discovered subfamilies one was only identified in P. patens (Hybrid Intrinsic Protein, HIP whereas the other was found to be present in a wide variety of dicotyledonous plants and forms a major previously unrecognized MIP subfamily (X Intrinsic Proteins, XIPs. Surprisingly also some specific groups within subfamilies present in Arabidopsis thaliana and Zea mays could be identified in P. patens. Conclusion Our results suggest an early diversification of MIPs resulting in a large number of subfamilies already in primitive terrestrial plants. During the evolution of higher plants some of these subfamilies were subsequently lost while the remaining subfamilies expanded and in some cases diversified, resulting in the formation of more specialized groups within these subfamilies.

  7. 5S RRNA GENE DELETIONS CAUSE AN UNEXPECTEDLY HIGH FITNESS LOSS IN ESCHERICHIA COLI. (R825354)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  8. Robust passive dynamics of the musculoskeletal system compensate for unexpected surface changes during human hopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Krogt, Marjolein M; de Graaf, Wendy W; Farley, Claire T; Moritz, Chet T; Richard Casius, L J; Bobbert, Maarten F

    2009-09-01

    When human hoppers are surprised by a change in surface stiffness, they adapt almost instantly by changing leg stiffness, implying that neural feedback is not necessary. The goal of this simulation study was first to investigate whether leg stiffness can change without neural control adjustment when landing on an unexpected hard or unexpected compliant (soft) surface, and second to determine what underlying mechanisms are responsible for this change in leg stiffness. The muscle stimulation pattern of a forward dynamic musculoskeletal model was optimized to make the model match experimental hopping kinematics on hard and soft surfaces. Next, only surface stiffness was changed to determine how the mechanical interaction of the musculoskeletal model with the unexpected surface affected leg stiffness. It was found that leg stiffness adapted passively to both unexpected surfaces. On the unexpected hard surface, leg stiffness was lower than on the soft surface, resulting in close-to-normal center of mass displacement. This reduction in leg stiffness was a result of reduced joint stiffness caused by lower effective muscle stiffness. Faster flexion of the joints due to the interaction with the hard surface led to larger changes in muscle length, while the prescribed increase in active state and resulting muscle force remained nearly constant in time. Opposite effects were found on the unexpected soft surface, demonstrating the bidirectional stabilizing properties of passive dynamics. These passive adaptations to unexpected surfaces may be critical when negotiating disturbances during locomotion across variable terrain.

  9. How do exhibition visitors describe aesthetic qualities?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bente Dahl; Ravn, Anders Peter

    2007-01-01

    In this investigation, visitors to an art and design exhibition have used an interactive computer program to express the qualities they consider important for an art or design object (artefact). They have then used the program with their individually selected qualities to assess the artefacts. In...

  10. Autoimmune pancreatitis exhibiting multiple mass lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiokawa, Masahiro; Kodama, Yuzo; Hiramatsu, Yukiko; Kurita, Akira; Sawai, Yugo; Uza, Norimitsu; Watanabe, Tomohiro; Chiba, Tsutomu

    2011-09-01

    Our case is a first report of autoimmune pancreatitis with multiple masses within the pancreas which was pathologically diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration and treated by steroid. The masses disappeared by steroid therapy. Our case is informative to know that autoimmune pancreatitis sometimes exhibits multiple masses within the pancreas and to diagnose it without unnecessary surgery.

  11. Autoimmune Pancreatitis Exhibiting Multiple Mass Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Shiokawa

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Our case is a first report of autoimmune pancreatitis with multiple masses within the pancreas which was pathologically diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration and treated by steroid. The masses disappeared by steroid therapy. Our case is informative to know that autoimmune pancreatitis sometimes exhibits multiple masses within the pancreas and to diagnose it without unnecessary surgery.

  12. CERN exhibition wins yet another design prize

    CERN Multimedia

    Joannah Caborn Wengler

    2012-01-01

    The “Universe of Particles” exhibition in CERN’s Globe wins the silver design prize from the German direct business communications association FAMAB.   Not only do tens of thousands of people visit the “Universe of Particles” exhibition each year, but juries for design prizes are crossing its threshold more and more frequently too. In 2011 alone it claimed 8 awards, including winning outright the 2011 Annual Multimedia award, the iF Communication Design for Corporate Architecture award and the Modern Decoration Media award (the Bulletin already reported on some of these in July 2011). The FAMAB award is the latest to join the prestigious list. The jury of FAMAB’s “ADAM 2011” award was particularly impressed by the hands-on nature of the exhibition, which encourages visitors to get interested in science. They also appreciated the way that the space in the Globe is not just a container for the exhibits, but itself ...

  13. Comic Strips to Accompany Science Museum Exhibits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Beom Sun; Park, Eun-mi; Kim, Sang-Hee; Cho, Sook-kyoung; Chung, Min Suk

    2016-01-01

    Science museums make the effort to create exhibits with amusing explanations. However, existing explanation signs with lengthy text are not appealing, and as such, visitors do not pay attention to them. In contrast, conspicuous comic strips composed of simple drawings and humors can attract science museum visitors. This study attempted to reveal…

  14. 18 CFR 50.7 - Applications: exhibits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... data that represent system operating conditions. (i) Exhibit I—Project Cost and Financing. (1) A statement of estimated costs of any new construction or modification. (2) The estimated capital cost and...) Provide all files to model normal, single contingency, multiple contingency, and special...

  15. 32 CFR 705.24 - Exhibits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., or similar events. Also included are general purpose displays in public buildings or public locations... support local Navy recruiters. Requests for exhibits for community relations events will be considered... event). (2) The office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs) is the approving authority...

  16. 18 CFR 34.4 - Required exhibits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Cash Flows must be in the form prescribed for the “Statement of Cash Flows” of the FERC Form No. 1... Cash Flows and Computation of Interest Coverage on an actual basis and a pro forma basis for the most... the statement of corporate purposes from its articles of incorporation. (b) Exhibit B. A copy of all...

  17. CCPIT Machinery Exhibition Succeeded in Kuala Lumpur

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

      From August 18 to 20, 2005, China Council for the Promotion of International Trade(CCPIT) held China Machinery and Electronics Trade Exhibition, CME 2005 in Kuala Lumpur, the capital of Malaysia on behalf of China, a good job has been done.……

  18. CCPIT Machinery Exhibition Succeeded in Kuala Lumpur

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ From August 18 to 20, 2005, China Council for the Promotion of International Trade(CCPIT) held China Machinery and Electronics Trade Exhibition, CME 2005 in Kuala Lumpur, the capital of Malaysia on behalf of China, a good job has been done.

  19. Exhibition Ethics - An Overview of Major Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andromache Gazi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Museum ethics are about value judgements. In making such judgements museum personnel is constantly valuing one option over another. This holds true for every aspect of museum work; from collecting policies and conservation to store priorities and exhibition. In recent decades there has been a growing concern in addressing ethical issues in museums as museum workers have developed cultural sensitivity and social responsiveness to a degree unseen before. Most codes of ethics urge museums to give appropriate consideration to represented groups or beliefs. In light of this, it has been recognised that exhibition of sensitive material, for example, must be done with great tact and respect for the feelings of religious, ethnic or other groups represented. Another issue concerns the display of unprovenanced material and repatriation. Yet, these are not the only ethical issues which exhibition developers are faced with. As museum workers we should constantly be reminded that exhibitions are active agents in the construction of knowledge. This paper discusses the hidden assumptions on which museum presentation and interpretation are often based. Decisions about what to include and what to exclude, what is valued and what is not, the means of presentation, language, and so on, all lead to presentational styles which may shape the public’s perception in unintended ways.

  20. Retrospect of China International Auto Exhibition Tours

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ "Fengfan Cup" the Frist China International Auto Exhibition Tour In 1995, the first session gathered 28 national motorcycles and autos from four big groups---China North Industries Group Corporation, China Aviation Industry Corporation, China Aerospace Science and Industry Cooperation and PLA General Logistics Department.

  1. Do Online Students Exhibit Different Learning Styles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausler, Joel; Sanders, John W.; Young, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Do online students exhibit different learning styles from onsite students; and if so, what accommodations relating to learning style differences may be made for online students? Our ideas of best practices within this area have been evolving to keep up with our students. Various tactics have been used to make sure students understand what kinds of…

  2. Do Online Students Exhibit Different Learning Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausler, Joel; Sanders, John W.; Young, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    We examined the relationship between learning styles and student type. This research seeks to examine if online students exhibit different learning styles from onsite students; and, if so, what accommodations relating to learning style differences may be made for online students? Students (N = 80) were asked to complete an online survey in order…

  3. Unexpected Regularity in Swimming Behavior of Clausocalanus furcatus Revealed by a Telecentric 3D Computer Vision System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Bianco

    Full Text Available Planktonic copepods display a large repertoire of motion behaviors in a three-dimensional environment. Two-dimensional video observations demonstrated that the small copepod Clausocalanus furcatus, one the most widely distributed calanoids at low to medium latitudes, presented a unique swimming behavior that was continuous and fast and followed notably convoluted trajectories. Furthermore, previous observations indicated that the motion of C. furcatus resembled a random process. We characterized the swimming behavior of this species in three-dimensional space using a video system equipped with telecentric lenses, which allow tracking of zooplankton without the distortion errors inherent in common lenses. Our observations revealed unexpected regularities in the behavior of C. furcatus that appear primarily in the horizontal plane and could not have been identified in previous observations based on lateral views. Our results indicate that the swimming behavior of C. furcatus is based on a limited repertoire of basic kinematic modules but exhibits greater plasticity than previously thought.

  4. A substantial and unexpected enhancement of motion perception in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss-Feig, Jennifer H; Tadin, Duje; Schauder, Kimberly B; Cascio, Carissa J

    2013-05-08

    Atypical perceptual processing in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is well documented. In addition, growing evidence supports the hypothesis that an excitatory/inhibitory neurochemical imbalance might underlie ASD. Here we investigated putative behavioral consequences of the excitatory/inhibitory imbalance in the context of visual motion perception. As stimulus size increases, typical observers exhibit marked impairments in perceiving motion of high-contrast stimuli. This result, termed "spatial suppression," is believed to reflect inhibitory motion-processing mechanisms. Motion processing is also affected by gain control, an inhibitory mechanism that underlies saturation of neural responses at high contrast. Motivated by these behavioral correlates of inhibitory function, we investigated motion perception in human children with ASD (n = 20) and typical development (n = 26). At high contrast, both groups exhibited similar impairments in motion perception with increasing stimulus size, revealing no apparent differences in spatial suppression. However, there was a substantial enhancement of motion perception in ASD: children with ASD exhibited a consistent twofold improvement in perceiving motion. Hypothesizing that this enhancement might indicate abnormal weakening of response gain control, we repeated our measurements at low contrast, where the effects of gain control should be negligible. At low contrast, we indeed found no group differences in motion discrimination thresholds. These low-contrast results, however, revealed weaker spatial suppression in ASD, suggesting the possibility that gain control abnormalities in ASD might have masked spatial suppression differences at high contrast. Overall, we report a pattern of motion perception abnormalities in ASD that includes substantial enhancements at high contrast and is consistent with an underlying excitatory/inhibitory imbalance.

  5. A Pulsar and White Dwarf in an Unexpected Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    motion of the pulsar (black solid lines; current position marked with diamond) in our galaxy over the past 1.5 Gyr. This motion is typical for low-mass X-ray binary descendants, favoring a binary-evolution model over a 3-body-interaction model. [Antoniadis et al. 2016]In the first model, the eccentric binary was created via adynamic three-body formation channel. This possibility is deemed unlikely, as the white-dwarf properties and all the kinematic properties of the system point to normal binary evolution.In the secondmodel, the binary system gains its high eccentricity after mass transfer ends, when the pulsar progenitor experiences a spontaneous phase transition. The authors explore two options for this: one in which the neutron star implodes into a strange-quark star, and the other in which an over-massive white dwarf suffers a delayed collapse into a neutron star. Both cases are deemed unlikely, because the mass inferred for the pulsar progenitor is not consistent with either model.In the third model, the system forms a circumbinary disk fueled by material escaping the proto-white dwarf. After mass transfer has ended, interactions between the binary and its disk gradually increase the eccentricity of the system, pumping it up to what we observe today. All of the properties of the system measured by Antoniadis and collaborators are thus far consistent with this model.Further observations of this system and systems like it (several others have been detected, though not yet confirmed) will help determine whether binary evolution combined with interactions with a disk can indeed explain the formation of this unexpectedly eccentricsystem.CitationJohn Antoniadis et al 2016 ApJ 830 36. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/830/1/36

  6. The palaeontological exhibition: a venue for dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murriello, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the dialogue between museums and their visitors enables museums to subsist, undergo transformations and become consolidated as socially valued cultural venues. The Museo de La Plata (Argentina) was created in the late nineteenth century as a natural history museum, and this study shows that currently the museum is valued socially as a venue for family leisure and education, at which people make sense to the objects exhibited through characteristics conferred upon them by both the institution and the visitor. Nevertheless, such dialogue is somehow affected by the museographic proposal and the public interpretation of the institutional narrative, which could be analysed within the frame of contextual learning. As a consequence, the evolutionary idea that the museum aims to communicate is distorted by the public. This article highlights the importance of considering the visitors' interpretations when planning museum exhibitions, a perspective that has been rather absent in the Argentinian museums.

  7. Exhibition: Women and Sciences by Fiami

    CERN Multimedia

    Globe Info

    2011-01-01

    The 19-panel exhibition is on display at CERN's Microcosm from Monday to Saturday from 10.00 a.m. to 5.00 p.m.   Marie Curie won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry one hundred years ago. She is the only woman ever to win two Nobel Prizes, which is a testament to her remarkable work. But throughout history, women have played a role in science either in their own right or alongside other scientists. In this special exhibition, the comic-strip artist Fiami takes a look back at the relationship between women and science through his portraits of Mileva Einstein, Marie-Anne Lavoisier and, of course, Marie Curie. Fiami has recently published an entire album devoted to Marie Curie. Texts in French All ages - Entrance free Femmes et Sciences is on display at Microcosm: From Wednesday 21 September 2011 to Tuesday 20 December 2011.

  8. Active Cyber Defense Dynamics Exhibiting Rich Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Ren; Xu, Shouhuai

    2016-01-01

    The Internet is a man-made complex system under constant attacks (e.g., Advanced Persistent Threats and malwares). It is therefore important to understand the phenomena that can be induced by the interaction between cyber attacks and cyber defenses. In this paper, we explore the rich phenomena that can be exhibited when the defender employs active defense to combat cyber attacks. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that shows that {\\em active cyber defense dynamics} (or more generally, {\\em cybersecurity dynamics}) can exhibit the bifurcation and chaos phenomena. This has profound implications for cyber security measurement and prediction: (i) it is infeasible (or even impossible) to accurately measure and predict cyber security under certain circumstances; (ii) the defender must manipulate the dynamics to avoid such {\\em unmanageable situations} in real-life defense operations.

  9. CERN's new microcosm exhibition is now open

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    After a major revamp in 2015, CERN’s microcosm exhibition is once again open to visitors. The exhibition is free and open to all without reservation and visitors are encouraged to share their #microcosm @CERN experiences on social media. Read more: http://cern.ch/go/7HWC -Producer- CERN Video Productions -Director- Kate Kahle -Camera- indissoluble.com and Julien Ordan -Editor- Julien Ordan -Infography- Daniel Dominguez Noemi Caraban -Music- “Light Years” by Stellardrone http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Ste... You can follow us on: cern.ch youtube.com/cerntv google.com/+CERN facebook.com/cern twitter.com/cern/ linkedin.com/company/cern instagram.com/cern Copyright © 2016 CERN. Terms of use: http://copyright.web.cern.ch/

  10. Ikuo Hirayama Painting Exhibition Held in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>To celebrate the 30th anniversary of the signing of the Sino-Japanese Peace and Friendship Treaty, the Ikuo Hirayama Painting Exhibition jointly sponsored by the China-Japan Friendship Association (CJFA), the China International Culture Association (CICA) and the Japan-China Friendship Association (JCFA), was held in the National Art Museum of China from April 17 to 26. At the invitation of the CJFA, Tomiichi Murayama, former Japanese prime minister, and Ikuo Hirayama, president of the JCFA and famous painter, who led a delegation of over 200 people of various circles, paid a visit to China to attend the opening ceremony of the exhibition and take part in the relevant activities from April 16 to 20.

  11. LHC INAUGURATION, LHC Fest highlights: exhibition time!

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    David Gross, one of the twenty-one Nobel Laureates who have participated in the project.Tuesday 21 October 2008 Accelerating Nobels Colliding Charm, Atomic Cuisine, The Good Anomaly, A Quark Somewhere on the White Paper, Wire Proliferation, A Tale of Two Liquids … these are just some of the titles given to artworks by Physics Nobel Laureates who agreed to make drawings of their prize-winning discoveries (more or less reluctantly) during a special photo session. Science photographer Volker Steger made portraits of Physics Nobel Laureates and before the photo sessions he asked them to make a drawing of their most important discovery. The result is "Accelerating Nobels", an exhibition that combines unusual portraits of and original drawings by twenty-one Nobel laureates in physics whose work is closely related to CERN and the LHC. This exhibition will be one of the highlights of the LHC celebrations on 21 October in the SM18 hall b...

  12. Pingyao Traditional Cultural Exhibition Mounted in France

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ni; Yuan

    2014-01-01

    <正>On the initiative of Provins,a commune in the Nord Department of Northern France and a friendship city of Pingyao in Shanxi Province,an exhibition of Pingyao traditional cultural and art works was staged from June 14 to 17.On display in the ancient SaintQuiriace Collegiate Church were 40 artworks characteristic of the traditional folk art of North China including old photos of Pingyao,calligraphic works,paintings,paper-cut,embroidery and shadow puppets.

  13. Cinema Film Distribution and Exhibition in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    O'Donnell, Damien

    1992-01-01

    This study of cinema film distribution and exhibition practices In Ireland examines key aspects of the Industry: firstly, the basic mechanics of the Industry and Its operations: secondly, the various alignments between exhibitors and distributors and consequences of those alignments: thirdly, the impact of the arrival of British multiplex companies: fourthly, the costs of film censorship; and finally, the idea of an 'art-house' circuit In Ireland.

  14. PLATE: Product Lifetimes And The Environment Exhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Hanson, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The PLATE (Product Lifetimes And The Environment) Exhibition explored critical themes related to how long products last in contemporary society. The topic of product longevity is examined in innovative ways through prototypes, objects, artefacts, posters, photographs and films produced by designers, social businesses, artists, researchers, lecturers and students.\\ud \\ud Featuring household products, furniture, lighting, fashion, jewellery and artworks, this collection of visual work embraced ...

  15. Exhibition: Dialogue between Science and religion

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Can the theory of the Big Bang reached by physicists and the concept of creation beloved of religion ever be reconciled? The two approaches have at least one point in common: they do not provide a final answer to the mysteries of the birth of the Universe. And this means that dialogue is alays possible between the two. It is to show the potential of such an exchange that Geneva's Société Evangélique organization is opening an exhibition under the title 'Big Bang and Creation', at the Planète Charmilles shopping centre, to run from 19 to 30 March. View of the 'Big Bang and Creation' exhibition. The exhibition is divided into three sections, showing the views of the scientist and those of the believer without setting them up in opposition to one another. In the first section, under a representation of the vault of heaven, the visitor will discover the different ideas explaining the birth of the Universe: Genesis and the Big Bang, and the different dominant theories ...

  16. Synchronization in multicell systems exhibiting dynamic plasticity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C Suguna; Somdatta Sinha

    2008-08-01

    Collective behaviour in multicell systems arises from exchange of chemicals/signals between cells and may be different from their intrinsic behaviour. These chemicals are products of regulated networks of biochemical pathways that underlie cellular functions, and can exhibit a variety of dynamics arising from the non-linearity of the reaction processes. We have addressed the emergent synchronization properties of a ring of cells, diffusively coupled by the end product of an intracellular model biochemical pathway exhibiting non-robust birhythmic behaviour. The aim is to examine the role of intercellular interaction in stabilizing the non-robust dynamics in the emergent collective behaviour in the ring of cells. We show that, irrespective of the inherent frequencies of individual cells, depending on the coupling strength, the collective behaviour does synchronize to only one type of oscillations above a threshold number of cells. Using two perturbation analyses, we also show that this emergent synchronized dynamical state is fairly robust under external perturbations. Thus, the inherent plasticity in the oscillatory phenotypes in these model cells may get suppressed to exhibit collective dynamics of a single type in a multicell system, but environmental influences can sometimes expose this underlying plasticity in its collective dynamics.

  17. Art exhibit focuses on African astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-07-01

    Connections between Africans and astronomy are the focus of a new exhibition in the National Museum of African Art in Washington, D. C. "African Cosmos: Stellar Arts," which includes artwork, cultural items, and scientific displays from ancient to contemporary times, is the first major exhibit "that brings together arts and science focused on Africa's contribution to keen observations of the heavens over time," curator Christine Mullen Kreamer said at a 20 June news briefing. Among the exhibit's nearly 100 objects are an ancient Egyptian mummy board that includes a representation of the sky goddess Nut, sculptures by the Dogon people of Mali depicting figures in relation to the cosmos, a video that uses data from two square degrees of the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Evolution Survey, and a nearly floor-to-ceiling "Rainbow Serpent" constructed of plastic containers by Benin artist Hazoume. An untitled acrylic painting (Figure 1) by South African Gavin Jantjes evokes a myth of the Khoi San people of southern Africa, as it portrays a girl throwing evening fire embers into the night sky, where they remained as the Milky Way.

  18. Exhibition: Linus Pauling and the Twentieth Century

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    On April 28 the exhibit Linus Pauling and the Twentieth Century organised by UNIDIR (United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research) and SGI (Soka Gakkai International) as well as with the contributions of CERN and the University of Geneva, opened at the United Nations Office of Geneva. Linus Pauling is the only person to date to have won two unshared Nobel Prizes: Chemistry in 1954 and Peace in 1962. The first was awarded for his landmark research on the nature of the chemical bond and its application in understanding the structure of complex substances. The second one acknowledged his courageous protest against atmospheric nuclear testing and his championship of international peace. The exhibit, for audience of all ages, traces seven decades of Linus Pauling's life and influence on the 20th century. Before starting its European tour at the UNESCO headquarters in Paris, the exhibit opened in 1998 in San Francisco and then travelled within the United-States and to Japan with an attendance of more than one...

  19. Exhibition: Linus Pauling and the Twentieth Century

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On April 28 the exhibit Linus Pauling and the Twentieth Century organised by UNIDIR (United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research) and SGI (Soka Gakkai International) as well as with the contributions of CERN and the University of Geneva, opens at the United Nations Office of Geneva. Linus Pauling is the only person to date to have won two unshared Nobel Prizes: Chemistry in 1954 and Peace in 1962. The first was awarded for his landmark research on the nature of the chemical bond and its application in understanding the structure of complex substances. The second one acknowledged his courageous protest against atmospheric nuclear testing and his championship of international peace. The exhibit, for all ages' audiences, traces seven decades of Linus Pauling's life and influence on the 20th century. Before starting its European tour at the UNESCO headquarters in Paris, the exhibit opened in 1998 in San Francisco and then travelled within the United-States and to Japan with an attendance of more than one m...

  20. Unexpected Arrest-Related Deaths in America: 12 Months of Open Source Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho, Jeffrey D

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sudden, unexpected arrest-related death (ARD has been associated with drug abuse, extreme delirium or certain police practices. There is insufficient surveillance and causation data available. We report 12 months of surveillance data using a novel data collection methodology.Methods: We used an open-source, prospective method to collect 12 consecutive months of data, including demographics, behavior, illicit substance use, control methods used, and time of collapse after law enforcement contact. Descriptive analysis and chi-square testing were applied.Results: There were 162 ARD events reported that met inclusion criteria. The majority were male with mean age 36 years, and involved bizarre, agitated behavior and reports of drug abuse just prior to death. Law enforcement control techniques included none (14%; empty-hand techniques (69%; intermediate weapons such as TASER device, impact weapon or chemical irritant spray (52%; and deadly force (12%. Time from contact to subject collapse included instantaneous (13%, within the first hour (53% and 1-48 hours (35%. Significant collapse time associations occurred with the use of certain intermediate weapons.Conclusion: This surveillance report can be a foundation for discussing ARD. These data support the premise that ARDs primarily occur in persons with a certain demographic and behavior profile that includes middle-aged males exhibiting agitated, bizarre behavior generally following illicit drug abuse. Collapse time associations were demonstrated with the use of TASER devices and impact weapons. We recommend further study in this area to validate our data collection method and findings. [WestJEM. 2009;10:68-73.

  1. Citizen science reveals unexpected continental-scale evolutionary change in a model organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvertown, Jonathan; Cook, Laurence; Cameron, Robert; Dodd, Mike; McConway, Kevin; Worthington, Jenny; Skelton, Peter; Anton, Christian; Bossdorf, Oliver; Baur, Bruno; Schilthuizen, Menno; Fontaine, Benoît; Sattmann, Helmut; Bertorelle, Giorgio; Correia, Maria; Oliveira, Cristina; Pokryszko, Beata; Ożgo, Małgorzata; Stalažs, Arturs; Gill, Eoin; Rammul, Üllar; Sólymos, Péter; Féher, Zoltan; Juan, Xavier

    2011-04-27

    Organisms provide some of the most sensitive indicators of climate change and evolutionary responses are becoming apparent in species with short generation times. Large datasets on genetic polymorphism that can provide an historical benchmark against which to test for recent evolutionary responses are very rare, but an exception is found in the brown-lipped banded snail (Cepaea nemoralis). This species is sensitive to its thermal environment and exhibits several polymorphisms of shell colour and banding pattern affecting shell albedo in the majority of populations within its native range in Europe. We tested for evolutionary changes in shell albedo that might have been driven by the warming of the climate in Europe over the last half century by compiling an historical dataset for 6,515 native populations of C. nemoralis and comparing this with new data on nearly 3,000 populations. The new data were sampled mainly in 2009 through the Evolution MegaLab, a citizen science project that engaged thousands of volunteers in 15 countries throughout Europe in the biggest such exercise ever undertaken. A known geographic cline in the frequency of the colour phenotype with the highest albedo (yellow) was shown to have persisted and a difference in colour frequency between woodland and more open habitats was confirmed, but there was no general increase in the frequency of yellow shells. This may have been because snails adapted to a warming climate through behavioural thermoregulation. By contrast, we detected an unexpected decrease in the frequency of Unbanded shells and an increase in the Mid-banded morph. Neither of these evolutionary changes appears to be a direct response to climate change, indicating that the influence of other selective agents, possibly related to changing predation pressure and habitat change with effects on micro-climate.

  2. Citizen science reveals unexpected continental-scale evolutionary change in a model organism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Silvertown

    Full Text Available Organisms provide some of the most sensitive indicators of climate change and evolutionary responses are becoming apparent in species with short generation times. Large datasets on genetic polymorphism that can provide an historical benchmark against which to test for recent evolutionary responses are very rare, but an exception is found in the brown-lipped banded snail (Cepaea nemoralis. This species is sensitive to its thermal environment and exhibits several polymorphisms of shell colour and banding pattern affecting shell albedo in the majority of populations within its native range in Europe. We tested for evolutionary changes in shell albedo that might have been driven by the warming of the climate in Europe over the last half century by compiling an historical dataset for 6,515 native populations of C. nemoralis and comparing this with new data on nearly 3,000 populations. The new data were sampled mainly in 2009 through the Evolution MegaLab, a citizen science project that engaged thousands of volunteers in 15 countries throughout Europe in the biggest such exercise ever undertaken. A known geographic cline in the frequency of the colour phenotype with the highest albedo (yellow was shown to have persisted and a difference in colour frequency between woodland and more open habitats was confirmed, but there was no general increase in the frequency of yellow shells. This may have been because snails adapted to a warming climate through behavioural thermoregulation. By contrast, we detected an unexpected decrease in the frequency of Unbanded shells and an increase in the Mid-banded morph. Neither of these evolutionary changes appears to be a direct response to climate change, indicating that the influence of other selective agents, possibly related to changing predation pressure and habitat change with effects on micro-climate.

  3. An unexpected oxidation: NaK5Cl2(S2O6)2 revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, William T. A.; Plater, M. John

    2017-01-01

    The title compound, NaK5Cl2(S2O6)2 [systematic name: sodium penta­potassium dichloride bis­(di­thio­nate)], arose as an unexpected product from an organic synthesis that used di­thio­nite (S2O4 2−) ions as a reducing agent to destroy excess permanganate ions. Compared to the previous study [Stanley (1953 ▸). Acta Cryst. 6, 187–196], the present tetra­gonal structure exhibits a root 2a × root 2a × c super-cell due to subtle changes in the orientations of the di­thio­nate anions. The structure can be visualized as a three-dimensional framework of [001] columns of alternating trans-NaO4Cl2 and KO4Cl2 octa­hedra cross-linked by the di­thio­nate ions with the inter­stices occupied by KO6Cl2 polyhedra to generate a densely packed three-dimensional framework. The asymmetric unit comprises two sodium ions (site symmetries 4 and -4, four potassium ions (site symmetries = -4, 4, 1 and 1), three chloride ions (site symmetries = 4, 4 and 2) and two half-di­thio­nate ions (all atoms on general positions). Both di­thio­nate ions are completed by crystallographic inversion symmetry. The crystal chosen for data collection was found to be rotationally twinned by 180° about the [100] axis in reciprocal space with a 0.6298 (13):0.3702 (13) domain ratio. PMID:28217339

  4. The accrual anomaly - focus on changes in specific unexpected accruals results in new evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schøler, Finn

    it is demonstrated that different specific components of earnings have significantly different earnings persistence characteristics and that these differences are not fully reflected in share prices. In the analysis presented here the earnings persistence effect of two particular unexpected accrual components...... and unexpected accruals, estimated by the extended Jones model like in both some US-analyses and some international studies of the accrual anomaly phenomenon. It is found that the persistence of earnings is decreasing in the magnitude of the unexpected accrual components of earnings and that the persistence...... of current earnings performance is particularly decreasing in the magnitude of unexpected changes in inventory. The special accrual parts are related to the perceptions of earnings persistence implicit in the market prices, and it is found that the differences in earnings persistence are not rationally...

  5. Differences in investigations of sudden unexpected deaths in young people in a nationwide setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkel, Bo Gregers; Holst, Anders Gaarsdal; Theilade, Juliane;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inherited disease may be causative in many young sudden unexpected death cases. Autopsy is essential in the counselling of the bereaved, as the family of the victim may be at risk too. In a nationwide setting operating under the same set of laws, we hypothesized that regional...... investigations of young persons suffering a sudden unexpected death. This is probably not unique for Denmark although no data exist to confirm that. The results are worrying and call for a revision of the way these deaths are handled. Mandatory autopsy in sudden unexpected death in young persons is warranted...... differences exist in the investigation of young persons dying suddenly and unexpectedly. METHODS AND RESULTS: All deaths in persons aged 1-35 years in Denmark in 2000-2006 were included. Death certificates were read independently by two physicians. External examination as well as autopsy status was retrieved...

  6. Metatranscriptomic Analysis Reveals Unexpectedly Diverse Microbial Metabolism in a Biogeochemical Hot Spot in an Alluvial Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, Talia N. M.; Karaoz, Ulas; Bill, Markus; Chakraborty, Romy; Brodie, Eoin L.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Beller, Harry R.

    2017-01-01

    Organic matter deposits in alluvial aquifers have been shown to result in the formation of naturally reduced zones (NRZs), which can modulate aquifer redox status and influence the speciation and mobility of metals, affecting groundwater geochemistry. In this study, we sought to better understand how natural organic matter fuels microbial communities within anoxic biogeochemical hot spots (NRZs) in a shallow alluvial aquifer at the Rifle (CO) site. We conducted a 20-day microcosm experiment in which NRZ sediments, which were enriched in buried woody plant material, served as the sole source of electron donors and microorganisms. The microcosms were constructed and incubated under anaerobic conditions in serum bottles with an initial N2 headspace and were sampled every 5 days for metagenome and metatranscriptome profiles in combination with biogeochemical measurements. Biogeochemical data indicated that the decomposition of native organic matter occurred in different phases, beginning with mineralization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) to CO2 during the first week of incubation, followed by a pulse of acetogenesis that dominated carbon flux after 2 weeks. A pulse of methanogenesis co-occurred with acetogenesis, but only accounted for a small fraction of carbon flux. The depletion of DOM over time was strongly correlated with increases in expression of many genes associated with heterotrophy (e.g., amino acid, fatty acid, and carbohydrate metabolism) belonging to a Hydrogenophaga strain that accounted for a relatively large percentage (~8%) of the metatranscriptome. This Hydrogenophaga strain also expressed genes indicative of chemolithoautotrophy, including CO2 fixation, H2 oxidation, S-compound oxidation, and denitrification. The pulse of acetogenesis appears to have been collectively catalyzed by a number of different organisms and metabolisms, most prominently pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase. Unexpected genes were identified among the most highly expressed

  7. An Unexpected Case of Lyme Disease in a Soldier Serving in Northern Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    MILITARY MEDICINE, 175,5:367,2010 An Unexpected Case of Lyme Disease in a Soldier Serving in Northern Iraq CPT Jeremy B. Fisher, SP USA *; CPT...Christopher E. Curtis, MC USAt 188143 ABSTRACT Lyme disease is a tick-transmitted disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Cases have been...Turkey.3-S We report an unexpected case of Lyme disease from Iraq. CASE REPORT A 28-year-old active duty Army male, on a deployment to northern Iraq

  8. Unexpected macrophage-independent dyserythropoiesis in Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reihani, Nelly; Arlet, Jean-Benoit; Dussiot, Michael; de Villemeur, Thierry Billette; Belmatoug, Nadia; Rose, Christian; Colin-Aronovicz, Yves; Hermine, Olivier; Le Van Kim, Caroline; Franco, Melanie

    2016-12-01

    Gaucher disease is a rare inherited disease caused by a deficiency in glucocerebrosidase leading to lipid accumulation in cells of mononuclear-macrophage lineage known as Gaucher cells. Visceral enlargement, bone involvement, mild anemia and thrombocytopenia are the major manifestations of Gaucher disease. We have previously demonstrated that the red blood cells from patients exhibit abnormal properties, which indicates a new role in Gaucher disease pathophysiology. To investigate whether erythroid progenitors are affected, we examined the in vitro erythropoiesis from the peripheral CD34(+) cells of patients and controls. CD34- cells were differentiated into macrophages and co-cultivated with erythroblasts. We showed an accelerated differentiation of erythroid progenitors without maturation arrest from patients compared to controls. This abnormal differentiation persisted in the patients when the same experiments were performed without macrophages, which strongly suggested that dyserythropoiesis in Gaucher disease is secondary to an inherent defect in the erythroid progenitors. The accelerated differentiation was associated with reduced cell proliferation. As a result, less mature erythroid cells were generated in vitro in the Gaucher disease cultures compared to the control. We then compared the biological characteristics of untreated patients according to their anemic status. Compared to the non-anemic group, the anemic patients exhibit higher plasma levels of growth differentiation factor-15, a marker of ineffective erythropoiesis, but they had no indicators of hemolysis and similar reticulocyte counts. Taken together, these results demonstrated an unsuspected dyserythropoiesis that was independent of the macrophages and could participate, at least in part, to the basis of anemia in Gaucher disease.

  9. Near-Universal Prevalence of Pneumocystis and Associated Increase in Mucus in the Lungs of Infants With Sudden Unexpected Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Sergio L.; Ponce, Carolina A.; Gallo, Miriam; Pérez, Francisco; Astorga, J.-Felipe; Bustamante, Rebeca; Chabé, Magali; Durand-Joly, Isabelle; Iturra, Pablo; Miller, Robert F.; Aliouat, El Moukthar; Dei-Cas, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Background. Pneumocystis without obvious accompanying pathology is occasionally reported in autopsied infant lungs. Its prevalence and significance are unknown. Interestingly, this mild infection induces a strong activation of mucus secretion–related genes in young immunocompetent rodents that has not been explored in infants. Excess mucus is induced by multiple airway offenders through nonspecific pathways and would explain a cofactor role of Pneumocystis in respiratory disease. We undertook characterization of the prevalence of Pneumocystis and associated mucus in infant lungs. Methods. Samples from 128 infants (mean age, 101 days) who died suddenly and unexpectedly in Santiago during 1999–2004 were examined for Pneumocystis using nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) amplification of the P. jirovecii mtLSU ribosomal RNA gene and immunofluorescence microscopy (IF). Pneumocystis-negative infants 28 days and older and their age-closest positives were studied for MUC5AC expression and Pneumocystis burden by Western blot and quantitative PCR, respectively. Results. Pneumocystis DNA was detected by nPCR in 105 of the 128 infants (82.0%) and Pneumocystis organisms were visualized by IF in 99 (94.3%) of the DNA-positive infants. The infection was commonest at 3–4 months with 40 of 41 (97.6%) infants of that age testing positive. MUC5AC was significantly increased in Pneumocystis-positive tissue specimens (P = .013). Death was unexplained in 113 (88.3%) infants; Pneumocystis was detected in 95 (84.0%) of them vs 10 of 15 (66.7%) with explained death (P = .28). Conclusions. A highly focal Pneumocystis infection associated to increased mucus expression is almost universally present in the lungs of infants dying unexpectedly in the community regardless of autopsy diagnosis. PMID:23074306

  10. Mars in their eyes - a cartoon exhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillinger, Pi.

    Recently a collection of 120 cartoons which tell the story of Mars exploration and scientific discovery, past, present and future, was held in London. We discuss the aims of the exhibition, to what extent we believe the original aims were met and report on additional outreach opportunities resulting from the project. The overriding aim was to capitalise on the popular appeal of accessible art - most people admit to enjoying cartoons. This was strengthened by hanging the originals of cartoons which had, mostly, been published in newspapers and magazines in a wide selection of countries. The provenances served to indicate the attraction of Mars to a wide public. We were fortunate to work with the Cartoon Art Trust of the UK who was in the process of relocating to new premises and opening as The Cartoon Museum, in the tourist area of Bloomsbury, central London, very close to the British Museum. "Mars in their Eyes" ran for 10 weeks during April to July 2006; immediately following which a selection of the cartoons was displayed at the week-long Royal Society Summer Exhibition. We explore the differences between the two exhibitions and comment on the various audience responses. We use this comparison to discuss whether a project which is primarily art can be extended to explain science. Does the coupling merely result in dumbing-down of both cultures or is there a true synergy? The experience has led us to coin the phrase "extreme outreach". Projects which are as ambitious as "Mars in their Eyes", without the security of a safe, captive audience, for example at a Science Centre, must be judged by different criteria. Indeed if the project does not meet comparable targets like large visitor numbers, then the honest evaluation of such details can only inform future activities and must not be reflected in the future funding of only "safe" outreach activities.

  11. Art Therapy Exhibitions: Exploitation or Advocacy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Terri

    2017-01-01

    Promoting awareness of human trafficking by sharing trauma survivors' art and summaries of their life stories suggests ethical complexities that have been typically neglected by bioethicists. Although these survivors voluntarily share the objects they created during art therapy sessions, they are still at risk of harm, including further exploitation, due to their vulnerability, high rates of victim sensitivity, and the mental health consequences of their traumatic experiences. While some argue that the benefits of sublimation and art therapy for human trafficking survivors make sharing their art worth the risk, anti-trafficking organizations and supporters of such art exhibitions have responsibilities to be trauma informed. © 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Library exhibits and programs boost science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusenbery, Paul B.; Curtis, Lisa

    2012-05-01

    Science museums let visitors explore and discover, but for many families there are barriers—such as cost or distance—that prevent them from visiting museums and experiencing hands-on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning. Now educators are reaching underserved audiences by developing STEM exhibits and programs for public libraries. With more than 16,000 outlets in the United States, public libraries serve almost every community in the country. Nationwide, they receive about 1.5 billion visits per year, and they offer their services for free.

  13. An unexpected effect of TNF-α on F508del-CFTR maturation and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitam, Sara; Pranke, Iwona; Hollenhorst, Monika; Servel, Nathalie; Moquereau, Christelle; Tondelier, Danielle; Hatton, Aurélie; Urbach, Valérie; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Hinzpeter, Alexandre; Edelman, Aleksander

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multifactorial disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene ( CFTR), which encodes a cAMP-dependent Cl (-) channel. The most frequent mutation, F508del, leads to the synthesis of a prematurely degraded, otherwise partially functional protein. CFTR is expressed in many epithelia, with major consequences in the airways of patients with CF, characterized by both fluid transport abnormalities and persistent inflammatory responses. The relationship between the acute phase of inflammation and the expression of wild type (WT) CFTR or F508del-CFTR is poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate this effect. The results show that 10 min exposure to TNF-alpha (0.5-50ng/ml) of F508del-CFTR-transfected HeLa cells and human bronchial cells expressing F508del-CFTR in primary culture (HBE) leads to the maturation of F508del-CFTR and induces CFTR chloride currents. The enhanced CFTR expression and function upon TNFα is sustained, in HBE cells, for at least 24 h. The underlying mechanism of action involves a protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathway, and occurs through insertion of vesicles containing F508del-CFTR to the plasma membrane, with TNFα behaving as a corrector molecule. In conclusion, a novel and unexpected action of TNFα has been discovered and points to the importance of systematic studies on the roles of inflammatory mediators in the maturation of abnormally folded proteins in general and in the context of CF in particular.

  14. New Media Display Technology and Exhibition Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Wo Kuo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As the inheritor of Chinese civilization, the National Palace Museum (hereafter referred to as the NPM, houses a world-class collection of cultural art and artifacts. Since the NPM began promoting the National Digital Archives Project in 2002, its efforts have expanded to develop a digital museum and various e-learning programs. Extending the use of digital archives to its educational and cultural industrial endeavors, the NPM has maximized the value of its exhibitions, publications, and educational programs.  In 2013, the NPM integrated creative thinking and interdisciplinary technologies, such as floating projection, augmented reality, and other sensory interactive media, to recreate the historical circumstance of 19th century East Asian maritime cultures in “Rebuilding the Tong-an Ships—New Media Art Exhibition," which opened at Huashan 1914 Creative Park and later won the Gold Award at the 2014 Digital Education Innovation Competition. Through a thorough exploration of the factors contributing to the success of "Rebuilding the Tong-an Ships," this study has isolated the two main factors of the exhibition’s popularity, namely, the compactness of the metadata and the atmosphere created by the interactive display technology.

  15. Children's drawings exhibited in the Globe

    CERN Multimedia

    Elizabeth Roe

    2010-01-01

    "Draw Me A Physicist" has been a success. Members of the public visiting the exhibition in the Globe of Science and Innovation have praised the scientific and creative balance the children of neighbouring France and the Canton of Geneva have obtained through their visit to CERN.   The Draw Me a Physicist exhibition in the Globe For a six-month period 9 to 11-year olds from the Pays de Gex, Meyrin, Satigny and Vernier have been able to enjoy a balance between science and art, through drawing and defining their interpretations of a physicist. In May, eight pairs of drawings from each participating class were selected by the schools to be displayed on the second floor of the Globe. Since the images have been put up, the viewers have enjoyed the contrast between the "before" pictures of vibrant Albert Einsteins to the "after" pictures of casual people sitting in an office. The large room in the Globe has been transformed from a hollow shell int...

  16. CERN Inspires Art in Major New Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Signatures of the Invisible, an exhibition inspired by CERN, opened at the Atlantis Gallery in London on Thursday, 1 March before going on a world tour. The fruit of a close collaboration between CERN and the London Institute, the exhibition brings together works from many leading European contemporary artists. White wooden boxes on a grey floor... the lids opened, unveiling brilliant white light from a bunch of optical fibres carefully stuck together in the shape of a square. Another holds a treasure of lead glass surrounded by enigmatic black mirrors. What's it all about? Signatures of the Invisible, that's what, a joint project organised by the London Institute, one of the world's largest college of art, and our Laboratory. Damien Foresy from the EST workshop putting finishing touches to the spinning tops of French artist Jérôme Basserode. Monica Sand's boxes are just one of the many works based around materials used in particle detection at CERN that was admired at the opening o...

  17. Unexpected antitumorigenic effect of fenbendazole when combined with supplementary vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ping; Dang, Chi V; Watson, Julie

    2008-11-01

    Diet containing the anthelminthic fenbendazole is used often to treat rodent pinworm infections because it is easy to use and has few reported adverse effects on research. However, during fenbendazole treatment at our institution, an established human lymphoma xenograft model in C.B-17/Icr-prkdcscid/Crl (SCID) mice failed to grow. Further investigation revealed that the fenbendazole had been incorporated into a sterilizable diet supplemented with additional vitamins to compensate for loss during autoclaving, but the diet had not been autoclaved. To assess the role of fenbendazole and supplementary vitamins on tumor suppression, 20 vendor-supplied 4-wk-old SCID mice were assigned to 4 treatment groups: standard diet, diet plus fenbendazole, diet plus vitamins, and diet plus both vitamins and fenbendazole. Diet treatment was initiated 2 wk before subcutaneous flank implantation with 3 x 107 lymphoma cells. Tumor size was measured by caliper at 4-d intervals until the largest tumors reached a calculated volume of 1500 mm3. Neither diet supplemented with vitamins alone nor fenbendazole alone caused altered tumor growth as compared with that of controls. However, the group supplemented with both vitamins and fenbendazole exhibited significant inhibition of tumor growth. The mechanism for this synergy is unknown and deserves further investigation. Fenbendazole should be used with caution during tumor studies because it may interact with other treatments and confound research results.

  18. Unexpected Superoutburst and Rebrightening of AL Comae Berenices in 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, Mariko; Imada, Akira; Ikuta, Kai; Isogai, Keisuke; Dubovsky, Pavol A; Kiyota, Seiichiro; Pickard, Roger D; Miller, Ian; Pavlenko, Elena P; Sosnovskij, Aleksei A; Dvorak, Shawn; Nogami, Daisaku

    2015-01-01

    In 2015 March, the notable WZ Sge-type dwarf nova AL Com exhibited an unusual outburst with a recurrence time of ${\\sim}$1.5 yr, which is the shortest interval of superoutbursts among WZ Sge-type dwarf novae. Early superhumps in the superoutburst light curve were absent, and a precursor was observed at the onset of the superoutburst for the first time in WZ Sge-type dwarf novae. The present superoutburst can be interpreted as a result of the condition that the disk radius barely reached the 3:1 resonance radius, but did not reach the 2:1 resonance one. Ordinary superhumps immediately grew following the precursor. The initial part of the outburst is indistinguishable from those of superoutbursts of ordinary SU UMa-type dwarf novae. This observation supports the interpretation that the 2:1 resonance suppresses a growth of ordinary superhumps. The estimated superhump period and superhump period derivative are $P_{\\rm sh}$ = 0.0573185(11) d and $P_{\\rm dot} = +1.5(3.1) \\times 10^{-5}$, respectively. These values ...

  19. Relationship of disease-associated gene expression to cardiac phenotype is buffered by genetic diversity and chromatin regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbassi, Elaheh; Monte, Emma; Chapski, Douglas J; Lopez, Rachel; Rosa Garrido, Manuel; Kim, Joseph; Wisniewski, Nicholas; Rau, Christoph D; Wang, Jessica J; Weiss, James N; Wang, Yibin; Lusis, Aldons J; Vondriska, Thomas M

    2016-08-01

    Expression of a cohort of disease-associated genes, some of which are active in fetal myocardium, is considered a hallmark of transcriptional change in cardiac hypertrophy models. How this transcriptome remodeling is affected by the common genetic variation present in populations is unknown. We examined the role of genetics, as well as contributions of chromatin proteins, to regulate cardiac gene expression and heart failure susceptibility. We examined gene expression in 84 genetically distinct inbred strains of control and isoproterenol-treated mice, which exhibited varying degrees of disease. Unexpectedly, fetal gene expression was not correlated with hypertrophic phenotypes. Unbiased modeling identified 74 predictors of heart mass after isoproterenol-induced stress, but these predictors did not enrich for any cardiac pathways. However, expanded analysis of fetal genes and chromatin remodelers as groups correlated significantly with individual systemic phenotypes. Yet, cardiac transcription factors and genes shown by gain-/loss-of-function studies to contribute to hypertrophic signaling did not correlate with cardiac mass or function in disease. Because the relationship between gene expression and phenotype was strain specific, we examined genetic contribution to expression. Strikingly, strains with similar transcriptomes in the basal heart did not cluster together in the isoproterenol state, providing comprehensive evidence that there are different genetic contributors to physiological and pathological gene expression. Furthermore, the divergence in transcriptome similarity versus genetic similarity between strains is organ specific and genome-wide, suggesting chromatin is a critical buffer between genetics and gene expression.

  20. Exhibition Season: Annual Archaeological Exhibitions in London, 1880s-1930s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amara Thornton

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Annual archaeological exhibitions were a visible symbol of archaeological research. Held mainly in London, the displays encapsulated a network of archaeologists, artists, architects and curators, and showcased the work of the first generations of trained archaeologists. The exhibition catalogues and published reviews of the displays provide a unique method for exploring the reception and sponsorship of archaeological work overseas and its promotion to a fascinated, well connected and well moneyed public. The exhibitions were a space in which conversation and networking were as important as educational enrichment. This paper analyses the social history of the “annual exhibition” in archaeology, highlighting the development and maintenance of the networks behind archaeological research, the geography of London as a way to examine influence in archaeology, and the utility of exhibitions for archaeological publicity during this period of exploration.

  1. Unexpected novelty and familiarity orienting responses in lateral parietal cortex during recognition judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Antonio; Konkel, Alex; Dobbins, Ian G

    2013-05-01

    The role of lateral parietal cortex during recognition memory is heavily debated. We examined parietal activation during an Explicit Memory Cueing recognition paradigm that biases participants towards expecting novel or familiar stimuli on a trial-by-trial basis using anticipatory cues ("Likely Old", "Likely New"), compared to trials with neutral cues ("????"). Three qualitatively distinct patterns were observed in the left lateral parietal cortex. An unexpected novelty response occurred in left anterior intraparietal cortex (IPS)/post-central gyrus (PoCG) in which greater activation was observed for new vs. old materials following the "Likely Old" cue, but not following the "Likely New" cue. In contrast, anterior angular gyrus demonstrated an unexpected familiarity response with greater activation for old vs. new materials following the "Likely New" cue, but not the "Likely Old" cue. Thus these two regions demonstrated increased responses that were selective for either new or old materials respectively, but only when they were unexpected. In contrast, a mid IPS area demonstrated greater response for whichever class of memoranda was unanticipated given the cue condition (an unexpected memory response). Analogous response patterns in regions outside of parietal cortex, and the results of a resting state connectivity analysis, suggested these three response patterns were associated with visuo-spatial orienting following unexpected novelty, source monitoring operations following unexpected familiarity, and general executive control processes following violated expectations. These findings support a Memory Orienting Model of the left lateral parietal cortex in which the region is linked to the investigation of unexpected novelty or familiarity in the environment.

  2. Virtual auditorium concepts for exhibition halls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jack; Himmel, Chad; Knight, Sarah

    2002-11-01

    Many communities lack good performance facilities for symphonic music, opera, dramatic and musical arts, but have basic convention, exhibition or assembly spaces. It should be possible to develop performance space environments within large multipurpose facilities that will accommodate production and presentation of dramatic arts. Concepts for moderate-cost, temporary enhancements that transform boxy spaces into more intimate, acoustically articulated venues will be presented. Acoustical criteria and design parameters will be discussed in the context of creating a virtual auditorium within the building envelope. Physical, economic, and logistical limitations affect implementation. Sound reinforcement system augmentation can supplement the room conversion. Acceptable control of reflection patterns, reverberation, and to some extent, ambient noise, may be achieved with an array of nonpermanent reflector and absorber elements. These elements can sculpture an enclosure to approach the shape and acoustic characteristics of an auditorium. Plan and section illustrations will be included.

  3. Exhibiting health and medicine as culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bencard, Adam; Tybjerg, Karin; Whiteley, Louise;

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the potential role of medical museums in public engagement with health and medicine, based in the work of Medical Museion at the University of Copenhagen. Rather than asking if cultural venues such as museums can directly improve the wellbeing of their visitors, we instead...... focus on how museums should communicate about health and medicine. There is increasing emphasis on the need for health communication to recognize peoples’ multiple, lived cultures. We argue that we should also recognize that medical research and practice is itself a form of culture......, and as such is multiple and historically shifting. We suggest that museums are an ideal site for doing so, and can thereby contribute to public engagement with medicine that acknowledges multiplicity on both sides. The paper describes three examples of exhibitions at Medical Museion that attempt to display medicine...

  4. Ketogenic diet exhibits anti-inflammatory properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Nina; Curatolo, Niccolo; Benoist, Jean-François; Auvin, Stéphane

    2015-07-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is an established treatment for refractory epilepsy, including some inflammation-induced epileptic encephalopathies. In a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced fever model in rats, we found that animals given the KD for 14 days showed less fever and lower proinflammatory cytokine levels than control animals. However, KD rats exhibited a decrease in circulating levels of arachidonic acid and long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effect of KD was probably not due to an increase in anti-inflammatory n-3 PUFA derivatives. These properties might be of interest in some conditions such as fever-induced refractory epileptic encephalopathy in school-aged children.

  5. A Traveling Exhibit of Cassini Image Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Joseph A.; Hedman, M. M.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Ebel, D.; Mac Low, M.; Lovett, L. E.; Burns, J. K.; Schaff, N.; Bilson, E. M.

    2007-10-01

    An exhibit of Cassini's images will open at NYC's American Museum of Natural History in March 2008 and then visit the Johnson Art Museum (Cornell) throughout fall 2008, including during next year's DPS. It is under consideration by several other venues in the States and overseas. The exhibit will feature 40-50 images, ranging from letter size to large posters, taken by remote-sensing instruments aboard Cassini and Huygens. Photos will be organized into a half-dozen thematic clusters (e.g., organized by celestial target or by physical process); a panel will introduce each grouping with individual images identified briefly. The Saturn system is a perfect vehicle to educate citizens about planetary science and origins. The images’ beauty should capture the public's attention, allowing us to then engage their curiosity about the relevant science. Among the Saturn system's broad suite of objects are Enceladus and Titan, two satellites of astrobiological interest; moreover, the rings display many processes active in other astrophysical disks. Several auxiliary ideas will be implemented. In Ithaca, we will project images at night against the museum's sand-colored exterior walls. A 10-12 minute musical composition has been commissioned from Roberto Sierra to open the show. We will encourage school children to participate in a human orrery circling the museum and will seek volunteers to participate in several Saturnalia. At Cornell we will involve the university and local communities, by taping their reactions to the images’ exquisite beauty as well as to their scientific content. Cassini will be the E/PO focus of next year's DPS meeting; those materials will be employed throughout the fall at New York schools and be available to travel with the show. We intend to work with NYC partners to offer teacher credits for associated weekend courses. We will produce classroom materials, including a DVD, for teacher use.

  6. Extract from Ceratonia siliqua Exhibits Depigmentation Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lall, Namrita; Kishore, Navneet; Momtaz, Saeideh; Hussein, Ahmed; Naidoo, Sanushka; Nqephe, Mabatho; Crampton, Bridget

    2015-11-01

    Skin hyper-pigmentation is a condition initiated by the overproduction of melanin existing in the melanocytes. Melanin pigment is responsible for the colour of skin in humans. It is formed through a series of oxidative reactions involving the amino acid tyrosine in the presence of the key enzyme tyrosinase. In continuation with our efforts to identify tyrosinase inhibitors from plants sources, the methanol extract from leaf, bark and fruit of Ceratonia siliqua were screened for tyrosinase inhibition and diphenolase activity. The bark extract exhibited significant inhibition on mushroom tyrosinase using L-tyrosine as a substrate and showed diphenolase activity. The extract further significantly lowered tyrosinase mRNA levels in B16-F10 mouse melanocytes. Bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of six compounds. Compounds (-)-epicatechin-3-O-gallate, 1,2,3,6-tetra-O-galloyl-ß-D-glucose and gallocatechin-3-O-gallate showed tyrosinase inhibitions with the IC50 values of 27.52, 83.30 and 28.30 µg/mL, respectively. These compounds also exhibited L-DOPA activities with IC50 values of >200, 150 and 200 µg/mL, respectively. A clinical study was conducted using 20 volunteers in a patch testing trial for irritancy potential and skin depigmentation. The clinical results showed the sample to be non-irritant with irritancy potential of -34.21 and depigmentation trial showed an improvement in the even skin tone of UV induced pigmentation at 3% after 28 days of application.

  7. Root waving and skewing - unexpectedly in micro-g

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roux Stanley J

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gravity has major effects on both the form and overall length of root growth. Numerous papers have documented these effects (over 300 publications in the last 5 years, the most well-studied being gravitropism, which is a growth re-orientation directed by gravity toward the earth’s center. Less studied effects of gravity are undulations due to the regular periodic change in the direction root tips grow, called waving, and the slanted angle of growth roots exhibit when they are growing along a nearly-vertical surface, called skewing. Although diverse studies have led to the conclusion that a gravity stimulus is needed for plant roots to show waving and skewing, the novel results just published by Paul et al. (2012 reveal that this conclusion is not correct. In studies carried out in microgravity on the International Space Station, the authors used a new imaging system to collect digital photographs of plants every six hours during 15 days of spaceflight. The imaging system allowed them to observe how roots grew when their orientation was directed not by gravity but by overhead LED lights, which roots grew away from because they are negatively phototropic. Surprisingly, the authors observed both skewing and waving in spaceflight plants, thus demonstrating that both growth phenomena were gravity independent. Touch responses and differential auxin transport would be common features of root waving and skewing at 1-g and micro-g, and the novel results of Paul et al. will focus the attention of cell and molecular biologists more on these features as they try to decipher the signaling pathways that regulate root skewing and waving.

  8. Unexpected Drought Legacy Effects in Six North American Grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin-Nolan, R. J.; Collins, S. L.; Knapp, A.; Luo, Y.; Pockman, W.; Smith, M. D.

    2016-12-01

    Global climate models predict increases in the frequency and severity of drought in grasslands worldwide, yet grassland sensitivity to drought can vary widely at a regional scale. Legacy effects of drought (drought-induced alterations in ecosystems that affect function post-drought) have been widely reported from desert to forest ecosystems. Drought legacies are usually negative and reduce ecosystem function, particularly after extended drought. Ecosystems with low resistance to drought (high sensitivity) might be expected to exhibit the largest legacy effects the next year, but the relationship between ecosystem sensitivity to drought and subsequent legacy effects is unknown. We quantified legacy effects of a severe drought in 2012 on post-drought (2013) aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) in six central US grasslands. These ecosystems, spanning arid desert grasslands to mesic tallgrass prairie, varied by two-fold in their sensitivity to the natural drought in 2012. We predicted that (1) the magnitude of drought legacy effects measured in 2013 would be positively related to drought sensitivity in 2012, and (2) drought legacy effects would be negative (reducing 2013 ANPP relative to that expected given normal precipitation amounts). The magnitude of legacy effects measured in 2013 was strongly related (r2 = 0.96) to 2012 drought sensitivity across these six grasslands. However, contrary to expectations, positive legacy effects (greater than expected ANPP) were measured in most sites. Thus, while drought sensitivity may a useful predictor of the magnitude of legacy effects, short term (1-year) severe droughts may cause legacy effects that differ substantially from those observed after multi-year droughts.

  9. MAN1B1 deficiency: an unexpected CDG-II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy Rymen

    Full Text Available Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG are a group of rare metabolic diseases, due to impaired protein and lipid glycosylation. In the present study, exome sequencing was used to identify MAN1B1 as the culprit gene in an unsolved CDG-II patient. Subsequently, 6 additional cases with MAN1B1-CDG were found. All individuals presented slight facial dysmorphism, psychomotor retardation and truncal obesity. Generally, MAN1B1 is believed to be an ER resident alpha-1,2-mannosidase acting as a key factor in glycoprotein quality control by targeting misfolded proteins for ER-associated degradation (ERAD. However, recent studies indicated a Golgi localization of the endogenous MAN1B1, suggesting a more complex role for MAN1B1 in quality control. We were able to confirm that MAN1B1 is indeed localized to the Golgi complex instead of the ER. Furthermore, we observed an altered Golgi morphology in all patients' cells, with marked dilatation and fragmentation. We hypothesize that part of the phenotype is associated to this Golgi disruption. In conclusion, we linked mutations in MAN1B1 to a Golgi glycosylation disorder. Additionally, our results support the recent findings on MAN1B1 localization. However, more work is needed to pinpoint the exact function of MAN1B1 in glycoprotein quality control, and to understand the pathophysiology of its deficiency.

  10. A novel reducing graphene/polyaniline/cuprous oxide composite hydrogel with unexpected photocatalytic activity for the degradation of Congo red

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Jie; Xie, Anjian; Li, Shikuo; Huang, Fangzhi; Cao, Juan; Shen, Yuhua, E-mail: yhshen@ahu.edu.cn

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Excellent photocatalytic activity of the RGO/PANI/Cu{sub 2}O composite hydrogel for CR degradation under UV–vis light irradiation. - Highlights: • The RGO/PANI/Cu{sub 2}O composite hydrogel was first synthesized via a facile method. • Photocatalytic performance was studied under UV–vis light. • The ternary composite hydrogel shows unexpected photocatalytic activity. • A possible photocatalysis mechanism was illustrated. - Abstract: In this work, a novel reducing graphene/polyaniline/cuprous oxide (RGO/PANI/Cu{sub 2}O) composite hydrogel with a 3D porous network has been successfully prepared via a one-pot method in the presence of cubic Cu{sub 2}O nanoparticles. The as-synthesized ternary composites hydrogel shows unexpected photocatalytic activity such that Congo red (CR) degradation efficiency can reaches 97.91% in 20 min under UV–vis light irradiation, which is much higher than that of either the single component (Cu{sub 2}O nanoparticles), or two component systems (RGO/Cu{sub 2}O composite hydrogel and PANI/Cu{sub 2}O nanocomposites). Furthermore, the ternary composite hydrogel exhibits high stability and do not show any significant loss after five recycles. Such outstanding photocatalytic activity of the RGO/PANI/Cu{sub 2}O composite hydrogel was ascribed to the high absorption ability of the product for CR and the synergic effect among RGO, PANI and Cu{sub 2}O in photocatalytic process. The product of this work would provide a new sight for the construction of UV–vis light responsive photocatalyst with high performance.

  11. Exhibition of Stochastic Resonance in Vestibular Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan-Garza, R. C.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Oman, C. M.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during spaceflight, particularly during G-transitions. Post flight sensorimotor changes include spatial disorientation, along with postural and gait instability that may degrade operational capabilities of the astronauts and endanger the crew. A sensorimotor countermeasure that mitigates these effects would improve crewmember safety and decrease risk. The goal of this research is to investigate the potential use of stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a technology to improve sensorimotor function. We hypothesize that low levels of SVS will improve sensorimotor perception through the phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR), when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is enhanced by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. This study aims to advance the development of SVS as a potential countermeasure by 1) demonstrating the exhibition of stochastic resonance in vestibular perception, a vital component of sensorimotor function, 2) investigating the repeatability of SR exhibition, and 3) determining the relative contribution of the semicircular canals (SCC) and otolith (OTO) organs to vestibular perceptual SR. A constant current stimulator was used to deliver bilateral bipolar SVS via electrodes placed on each of the mastoid processes, as previously done. Vestibular perceptual motion recognition thresholds were measured using a 6-degree of freedom MOOG platform and a 150 trial 3-down/1-up staircase procedure. In the first test session, we measured vestibular perceptual thresholds in upright roll-tilt at 0.2 Hz (SCC+OTO) with SVS ranging from 0-700 µA. In a second test session a week later, we re-measured roll-tilt thresholds with 0, optimal (from test session 1), and 1500 µA SVS levels. A subset of these subjects, plus naive subjects, participated in two additional test sessions in which we measured thresholds in supine roll-rotation at 0.2 Hz (SCC) and upright y-translation at 1 Hz

  12. The Consequential Problems of Unexpected Events for Human Element and Construction Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Khosravi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Unexpected events are unpredictable or beyond the control of human. The aim of this study was to identify the consequential problems of unexpected events faced by construction managers and project managers. In undertaking this investigation, we used an exploratory semi-structured interview and a questionnaire survey method. The results of this research showed that the consequential problems of unexpected events were frequently wicked, wicked messes and messes types of problems. These wicked, wicked messes and messes problems grew rapidly by high behavioral complexity of human affected environment and high dynamic complexity of interdependent systems in construction projects. We discovered human behavioral problems as wicked kind of problems for human element could lead to noticeable effects on project manager, such as irresponsibility and making a bizarre decision. Also, we identified wicked messes and messes problems, including loss of reputation and litigation, for construction organizations could terminate the viability of organizations and projects. Furthermore, we found out that three most important factors for responding successfully to the consequential problems of unexpected events were: 1 organizations’ structure and support, 2 competent project manager and 3 immediate actions. The findings of the study revealed that leadership, communication skills and hard-working were essential attributes of the competent project manager in responding to the consequential problems of unexpected events. Lastly, this research suggests the development of managerial reactive skills and control of behavioral responses through learning practice as key components of the required approach that need further investigations in future researches.

  13. The detection of faked identity using unexpected questions and mouse dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaro, Merylin; Gamberini, Luciano

    2017-01-01

    The detection of faked identities is a major problem in security. Current memory-detection techniques cannot be used as they require prior knowledge of the respondent’s true identity. Here, we report a novel technique for detecting faked identities based on the use of unexpected questions that may be used to check the respondent identity without any prior autobiographical information. While truth-tellers respond automatically to unexpected questions, liars have to “build” and verify their responses. This lack of automaticity is reflected in the mouse movements used to record the responses as well as in the number of errors. Responses to unexpected questions are compared to responses to expected and control questions (i.e., questions to which a liar also must respond truthfully). Parameters that encode mouse movement were analyzed using machine learning classifiers and the results indicate that the mouse trajectories and errors on unexpected questions efficiently distinguish liars from truth-tellers. Furthermore, we showed that liars may be identified also when they are responding truthfully. Unexpected questions combined with the analysis of mouse movement may efficiently spot participants with faked identities without the need for any prior information on the examinee. PMID:28542248

  14. Colletotrichum lindemuthianum exhibits different patterns of nuclear division at different stages in its vegetative life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Francine H; Souza, Elaine A; Read, Nick D; Roca, M Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    Live-cell imaging with fluorescent protein labeling is providing major new insights into nuclear dynamics in filamentous fungi. With this approach we provide a detailed report of nuclear organization and behavior during mitosis in the bean pathogen Colletotrichum lindemuthianum. Nuclear division and nuclear migration were analyzed in ungerminated conidia, conidial germlings and the mature colony. Ungerminated conidia were uninucleate and completion of mitosis was found not to be essential for germ tube formation, conidial anastomosis tube (CAT) formation or fusion. Nuclei in fused conidial germlings exhibited asynchronous mitoses, and nuclear migration through fused CATs occurred after the nuclei had divided. Different patterns of nuclear division were found in vegetative hyphae of the mature colony. Synchronous, parasynchronous and asynchronous patterns of mitosis were observed in apical hyphal compartments at the colony border, while only synchronous and asynchronous mitoses occurred in subapical hyphal compartments. These findings have revealed unexpected diversity in the patterns of mitosis in different cells of C. lindemuthianum.

  15. Virtual Exhibition and Fruition of Archaeological Finds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manferdini, A. M.; Garagnani, S.

    2011-09-01

    During the last two decades, since digital technologies have become more sophisticated in acquiring real data and building faithful copies of them, their improvements have suggested interesting applications in the field of valorisation of Historical, Cultural and Artistic Heritage, with significant consequences in the share and widespread of knowledge. But although several technologies and methodologies for 3d digitization have recently been developed and improved, the lack of a standard procedure and the costs connected to their use still doesn't encourage the systematic digital acquisition of wide collections and heritage. The aim of this paper is to show the state of the art of a project whose aim is to provide a methodology and a procedure to create digital reproductions of artefacts for Institutions called to preserve, manage and enhance the fruition of archaeological finds inside museums or through digital exhibitions. Our project's aim is to find the most suitable procedure to digitally acquire archaeo logical artefacts that usually have small dimensions and have very complex and detailed surfaces. Within our methodology, particular attention has been paid to the use of widely shared and open-source visualization systems that enhance the involvement of the user by emphasizing three-dimensional characteristics of artefacts through virtual reality.

  16. Modern museum exhibition technology revolution for audience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Today's digital revolution leads to the increasing mobile device usage, which has changed people's life and work. However, the traditional static display and graphic version is unable to meet the requirements of the modern audience, which makes museums face the challenge in the distribution of knowledge. Meanwhile, the information storm produced by big data emerged a variety of new media, such as social media, Natural User Interface, Augmented Reality, and electronic publishing. This dizzying array of tools offered opportunities for museums all over the world to become more vibrant and accessible. Museums around the world have been constant changed and improved its presentation, which provides a valuable experience for us. The new Shanghai Natural History Museum has also applied information technology on exhibition, education, research and collection. But the change does not mean a complete subversion. Because the museum audience are di- verse, such as born in a different era, have different learning habits, museums need to control the change magnitude of display technology to meet the requirements of different audience.

  17. Rotating pigment cells exhibit an intrinsic chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Hiroaki; Kondo, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, cell properties, such as shape, size and function are important in morphogenesis and physiological functions. Recently, 'cellular chirality' has attracted attention as a cellular property because it can cause asymmetry in the bodies of animals. In recent in vitro studies, the left-right bias of cellular migration and of autonomous arrangement of cells under some specific culture conditions were discovered. However, it is difficult to identify the molecular mechanism underlying their intrinsic chirality because the left-right bias observed to date is subtle or is manifested in the stable orientation of cells. Here, we report that zebrafish (Danio rerio) melanophores exhibit clear cellular chirality by unidirectional counterclockwise rotational movement under isolated conditions without any special settings. The chirality is intrinsic to melanophores because the direction of the cellular rotation was not affected by the type of extracellular matrix. We further found that the cellular rotation was generated as a counter action of the clockwise movement of actin cytoskeleton. It suggested that the mechanism that directs actin cytoskeleton in the clockwise direction is pivotal for determining cellular chirality.

  18. Mendelian and non-Mendelian regulation of gene expression in maize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    Full Text Available Transcriptome variation plays an important role in affecting the phenotype of an organism. However, an understanding of the underlying mechanisms regulating transcriptome variation in segregating populations is still largely unknown. We sought to assess and map variation in transcript abundance in maize shoot apices in the intermated B73 × Mo17 recombinant inbred line population. RNA-based sequencing (RNA-seq allowed for the detection and quantification of the transcript abundance derived from 28,603 genes. For a majority of these genes, the population mean, coefficient of variation, and segregation patterns could be predicted by the parental expression levels. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL mapping identified 30,774 eQTL including 96 trans-eQTL "hotspots," each of which regulates the expression of a large number of genes. Interestingly, genes regulated by a trans-eQTL hotspot tend to be enriched for a specific function or act in the same genetic pathway. Also, genomic structural variation appeared to contribute to cis-regulation of gene expression. Besides genes showing Mendelian inheritance in the RIL population, we also found genes whose expression level and variation in the progeny could not be predicted based on parental difference, indicating that non-Mendelian factors also contribute to expression variation. Specifically, we found 145 genes that show patterns of expression reminiscent of paramutation such that all the progeny had expression levels similar to one of the two parents. Furthermore, we identified another 210 genes that exhibited unexpected patterns of transcript presence/absence. Many of these genes are likely to be gene fragments resulting from transposition, and the presence/absence of their transcripts could influence expression levels of their ancestral syntenic genes. Overall, our results contribute to the identification of novel expression patterns and broaden the understanding of transcriptional variation in

  19. Thoughts about populations with unexpected low prevalences of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, David Y; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Malaty, Hoda M

    2007-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the few remaining major pathogens that accompanied humans on their travels from Africa. A recently published study reports the unexpected finding of a low H. pylori prevalence among pregnant women in Zanzibar (Farag, T.H., Stolzfus, R.J., Khalfan, S.S., Tielsch, J.M., 2007. Unexpectedly low prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection among pregnant women on Pemba Island, Zanzibar. Trans. R. Soc. Trop. Med. Hyg. 101). The apparent epidemiology of higher prevalence with higher socioeconomic status and decrease with age are unprecedented. As with many 'unexpected' events, a search of the literature reveals evidence of low prevalence populations in Java and Malaysia, with clues dating back to the mid-twentieth century. Why some populations apparently lost H. pylori infection remains an open question. However, the tools needed to resolve the dilemma are readily available and we hope investigators will soon rise to the challenge.

  20. An unexpectedly large and loosely packed mitochondrial genome in the charophycean green alga Chlorokybus atmophyticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemieux Claude

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Streptophyta comprises all land plants and six groups of charophycean green algae. The scaly biflagellate Mesostigma viride (Mesostigmatales and the sarcinoid Chlorokybus atmophyticus (Chlorokybales represent the earliest diverging lineages of this phylum. In trees based on chloroplast genome data, these two charophycean green algae are nested in the same clade. To validate this relationship and gain insight into the ancestral state of the mitochondrial genome in the Charophyceae, we sequenced the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA of Chlorokybus and compared this genome sequence with those of three other charophycean green algae and the bryophytes Marchantia polymorpha and Physcomitrella patens. Results The Chlorokybus genome differs radically from its 42,424-bp Mesostigma counterpart in size, gene order, intron content and density of repeated elements. At 201,763-bp, it is the largest mtDNA yet reported for a green alga. The 70 conserved genes represent 41.4% of the genome sequence and include nad10 and trnL(gag, two genes reported for the first time in a streptophyte mtDNA. At the gene order level, the Chlorokybus genome shares with its Chara, Chaetosphaeridium and bryophyte homologues eight to ten gene clusters including about 20 genes. Notably, some of these clusters exhibit gene linkages not previously found outside the Streptophyta, suggesting that they originated early during streptophyte evolution. In addition to six group I and 14 group II introns, short repeated sequences accounting for 7.5% of the genome were identified. Mitochondrial trees were unable to resolve the correct position of Mesostigma, due to analytical problems arising from accelerated sequence evolution in this lineage. Conclusion The Chlorokybus and Mesostigma mtDNAs exemplify the marked fluidity of the mitochondrial genome in charophycean green algae. The notion that the mitochondrial genome was constrained to remain compact during charophycean

  1. Waves in geomaterials exhibiting negative stiffness behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esin, Maxim; Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Negative stiffness denotes the type of material behaviour when the force applied to the body decreases the body's deformation increases. Some geomaterials, for instance, rocks, demonstrate behaviour of this type at certain loads: during the compression tests the loading curves exhibit descending branch (post-peak softening). One of the possible mechanisms of the negative stiffness appearance in geomaterials is rotation of non-spherical grains. It is important to emphasize that in this case the descending branch may be reversible given that the testing machine is stiff enough (in general case it means an importance of boundary conditions). Existence of geomaterials with a negative modulus associated with rotations may have significant importance. In particular, important is understanding of the wave propagation in such materials. We study the stability of geomaterials with negative stiffness inclusions and wave propagation in it using two approaches: Cosserat continuum and discrete mass-spring models. In both cases we consider the rotational degrees of freedom in addition to the conventional translational ones. We show that despite non positiveness of the energy the materials with negative stiffness elements can be stable if certain conditions are met. In the case of Cosserat continuum the Cosserat shear modulus (the modulus relating the non-symmetrical part of shear stress and internal rotations) is allowed to assume negative values as long as its value does not exceed the value of the standard (positive) shear modulus. In the case of discrete mass-spring systems (with translational and rotational springs) the concentration of negative stiffness springs and the absolute values of negative spring stiffness are limited. The critical concentration when the system loses stability and the amplitude of the oscillations tends to infinity is equal to 1/2 and 3/5 for two- and three-dimensional cases respectively.

  2. Homologous gene clusters of nicotine catabolism, including a new ω-amidase for α-ketoglutaramate, in species of three genera of Gram-positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobzaru, Cristina; Ganas, Petra; Mihasan, Marius; Schleberger, Paula; Brandsch, Roderich

    2011-04-01

    Gram-positive soil bacteria Arthrobacter nicotinovorans, Nocardioides sp. JS614 and Rhodococcus opacus were shown to contain similarly organized clusters of homologous genes for nicotine catabolism. An uncharacterized gene of a predicted nitrilase within these gene clusters was cloned from A. nicotinovorans and biochemical data unexpectedly showed that the protein exhibited ω-amidase activity toward α-ketoglutaramate. Structural modelling of the protein suggested the presence of the catalytic triad Cys-Glu-Lys, characteristic of this class of enzymes, and supported α-ketoglutaramate as substrate. A-ketoglutaramate could be generated by hydrolytic cleavage of the C-N bond of the trihydroxypyridine ring produced by nicotine catabolism in these bacteria. This ω-amidase, together with glutamate dehydrogenase, may form a physiologically relevant enzyme couple, leading to transformation of metabolically inert α-ketoglutaramate derived from trihydroxypyridine into glutamate, a central compound of nitrogen metabolism.

  3. Marine cyanophages exhibit local and regional biogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Marcia F; Taylor, Samantha; Sme, Noel; Parsons, Rachel J; Noyes, Timothy J E; Martiny, Jennifer B H

    2013-05-01

    Biogeographic patterns have been demonstrated for a wide range of microorganisms. Nevertheless, the biogeography of marine viruses has been slower to emerge. Here we investigate biogeographic patterns of marine cyanophages that infect Synechococcus sp. WH7803 across multiple spatial and temporal scales. We compared cyanophage myoviral communities from nine coastal sites in Southern New England (SNE), USA, one site in Long Island NY, and four sites from Bermuda's inshore waters by assaying cyanophage isolates using the myoviral g43 DNA polymerase gene. Cyanophage community composition varied temporally at each of the sites. Further, 6 years of sampling at one Narragansett Bay site revealed annual seasonal variations in community composition, driven by the seasonal reoccurrence of specific viral taxa. Although the four Bermuda communities were similar to one another, they were significantly different than the North American coastal communities, with almost no overlap of taxa between the two regions. Among the SNE sites, cyanophage community composition also varied significantly and was correlated with the body of water sampled (e.g. Narragansett Bay, Cape Cod Bay, Vineyard Sound), although here, the same viral taxa were found at multiple sites. This study demonstrates that marine cyanophages display striking seasonal and spatial biogeographic patterns.

  4. Mature adipocyte-derived dedifferentiated fat cells exhibit multilineage potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Taro; Kano, Koichiro; Kondo, Daisuke; Fukuda, Noboru; Iribe, Yuji; Tanaka, Nobuaki; Matsubara, Yoshiyuki; Sakuma, Takahiro; Satomi, Aya; Otaki, Munenori; Ryu, Jyunnosuke; Mugishima, Hideo

    2008-04-01

    When mature adipocytes are subjected to an in vitro dedifferentiation strategy referred to as ceiling culture, these mature adipocytes can revert to a more primitive phenotype and gain cell proliferative ability. We refer to these cells as dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. In the present study, we examined the multilineage differentiation potential of DFAT cells. DFAT cells obtained from adipose tissues of 18 donors exhibited a fibroblast-like morphology and sustained high proliferative activity. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that DFAT cells comprised a highly homogeneous cell population compared with that of adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ASCs), although the cell-surface antigen profile of DFAT cells was very similar to that of ASCs. DFAT cells lost expression of mature adipocytes marker genes but retained or gained expression of mesenchymal lineage-committed marker genes such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), RUNX2, and SOX9. In vitro differentiation analysis revealed that DFAT cells could differentiate into adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts under appropriate culture conditions. DFAT cells also formed osteoid matrix when implanted subcutaneously into nude mice. In addition, clonally expanded porcine DFAT cells showed the ability to differentiate into multiple mesenchymal cell lineages. These results indicate that DFAT cells represent a type of multipotent progenitor cell. The accessibility and ease of culture of DFAT cells support their potential application for cell-based therapies.

  5. Different proteolipid protein mutants exhibit unique metabolic defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maik Hüttemann

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available PMD (Pelizaeus–Merzbacher disease, a CNS (central nervous system disease characterized by shortened lifespan and severe neural dysfunction, is caused by mutations of the PLP1 (X-linked myelin proteolipid protein gene. The majority of human PLP1 mutations are caused by duplications; almost all others are caused by missense mutations. The cellular events leading to the phenotype are unknown. The same mutations in non-humans make them ideal models to study the mechanisms that cause neurological sequelae. In the present study we show that mice with Plp1 duplications (Plp1tg have major mitochondrial deficits with a 50% reduction in ATP, a drastically reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and increased numbers of mitochondria. In contrast, the jp (jimpy mouse with a Plp1 missense mutation exhibits normal mitochondrial function. We show that PLP in the Plp1tg mice and in Plp1-transfected cells is targeted to mitochondria. PLP has motifs permissive for insertion into mitochondria and deletions near its N-terminus prevent its co-localization to mitochondria. These novel data show that Plp1 missense mutations and duplications of the native Plp1 gene initiate uniquely different cellular responses.

  6. A Case of Unexpected Symptomatic Vasospasm after Clipping Surgery for an Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Hiroaki; Kameda, Masahiro; Yasuhara, Takao; Date, Isao

    2016-03-01

    Delayed symptomatic vasospasm after clipping surgery for unruptured aneurysm is rarely reported. We report a case of a 62-year-old woman who presented with symptomatic vasospasm 11 days after clipping surgery for an unruptured aneurysm. We could not predict the existence of vasospasm until ischemic symptoms developed. We retrospectively found mild vasospasm in the computed tomography angiogram taken 8 days after the operation. The patient complained of a prolonged unexpected headache 1 week after the operation. We should recognize prolonged unexpected headache as a warning sign of vasospasm.

  7. Genome sequence of Rickettsia bellii illuminates the role of amoebae in gene exchanges between intracellular pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The recently sequenced Rickettsia felis genome revealed an unexpected plasmid carrying several genes usually associated with DNA transfer, suggesting that ancestral rickettsiae might have been endowed with a conjugation apparatus. Here we present the genome sequence of Rickettsia bellii, the earliest diverging species of known rickettsiae. The 1,552,076 base pair-long chromosome does not exhibit the colinearity observed between other rickettsia genomes, and encodes a complete set of putative conjugal DNA transfer genes most similar to homologues found in Protochlamydia amoebophila UWE25, an obligate symbiont of amoebae. The genome exhibits many other genes highly similar to homologues in intracellular bacteria of amoebae. We sought and observed sex pili-like cell surface appendages for R. bellii. We also found that R. bellii very efficiently multiplies in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells and survives in the phagocytic amoeba, Acanthamoeba polyphaga. These results suggest that amoeba-like ancestral protozoa could have served as a genetic "melting pot" where the ancestors of rickettsiae and other bacteria promiscuously exchanged genes, eventually leading to their adaptation to the intracellular lifestyle within eukaryotic cells.

  8. STONETECH 2007 BEIJING Held At International Exhibition Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ On March 4-7, the 14th China International Stone Processing Machinery,Equipment and Products Exhibition (STONETECH 2007 BEIJING) was held in all exhibition halls of Beijing International Exhibition Center.

  9. New application of intelligent agents in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis identifies unexpected specific genetic background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marocchi Alessandro

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few genetic factors predisposing to the sporadic form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS have been identified, but the pathology itself seems to be a true multifactorial disease in which complex interactions between environmental and genetic susceptibility factors take place. The purpose of this study was to approach genetic data with an innovative statistical method such as artificial neural networks to identify a possible genetic background predisposing to the disease. A DNA multiarray panel was applied to genotype more than 60 polymorphisms within 35 genes selected from pathways of lipid and homocysteine metabolism, regulation of blood pressure, coagulation, inflammation, cellular adhesion and matrix integrity, in 54 sporadic ALS patients and 208 controls. Advanced intelligent systems based on novel coupling of artificial neural networks and evolutionary algorithms have been applied. The results obtained have been compared with those derived from the use of standard neural networks and classical statistical analysis Results Advanced intelligent systems based on novel coupling of artificial neural networks and evolutionary algorithms have been applied. The results obtained have been compared with those derived from the use of standard neural networks and classical statistical analysis. An unexpected discovery of a strong genetic background in sporadic ALS using a DNA multiarray panel and analytical processing of the data with advanced artificial neural networks was found. The predictive accuracy obtained with Linear Discriminant Analysis and Standard Artificial Neural Networks ranged from 70% to 79% (average 75.31% and from 69.1 to 86.2% (average 76.6% respectively. The corresponding value obtained with Advanced Intelligent Systems reached an average of 96.0% (range 94.4 to 97.6%. This latter approach allowed the identification of seven genetic variants essential to differentiate cases from controls: apolipoprotein E arg

  10. Transcript profiling reveals rewiring of iron assimilation gene expression in Candida albicans and C. dubliniensis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Gary P

    2012-12-01

    Hyphal growth is repressed in Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis by the transcription factor Nrg1. Transcript profiling of a C. dubliniensis NRG1 mutant identified a common group of 28 NRG1-repressed genes in both species, including the hypha-specific genes HWP1, ECE1 and the regulator of cell elongation UME6. Unexpectedly, C. dubliniensis NRG1 was required for wild-type levels of expression of 10 genes required for iron uptake including seven ferric reductases, SIT1, FTR1 and RBT5. However, at alkaline pH and during filamentous growth in 10% serum, most of these genes were highly induced in C. dubliniensis. Conversely, RBT5, PGA10, FRE10 and FRP1 did not exhibit induction during hyphal growth when NRG1 is downregulated, indicating that in C. dubliniensis NRG1 is also required for optimal expression of these genes in alkaline environments. In iron-depleted medium at pH 4.5, reduced growth of the NRG1 mutant relative to wild type was observed; however, growth was restored to wild-type levels or greater at pH 6.5, indicating that alkaline induction of iron assimilation gene expression could rescue this phenotype. These data indicate that transcriptional control of iron assimilation and pseudohypha formation has been separated in C. albicans, perhaps promoting growth in a wider range of niches.

  11. Analysis of Arabidopsis JAZ gene expression during Pseudomonas syringae pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demianski, Agnes J; Chung, Kwi Mi; Kunkel, Barbara N

    2012-01-01

    The jasmonates (JAs) comprise a family of plant hormones that regulate several developmental processes and mediate responses to various abiotic and biotic stresses, including pathogens. JA signalling is manipulated by several strains of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, including P. syringae strain DC3000, using the virulence factor coronatine (COR) as a mimic of jasmonyl-L-isoleucine (JA-Ile). To better understand the JA-Ile-mediated processes contributing to P. syringae disease susceptibility, it is important to investigate the regulation of JA signalling during infection. In Arabidopsis thaliana, JASMONATE ZIM-DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins are negative regulators of JA signalling. The transcription factor JASMONATE INSENSITIVE1 (JIN1/ATMYC2) has been implicated in the regulation of JAZ gene expression. To investigate the regulation of JAZ genes during P. syringae pathogenesis, we examined JAZ gene expression during infection of Arabidopsis by DC3000. We found that eight of the 12 JAZ genes are induced during infection in a COR-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, the induction of the majority of JAZ genes during infection was not dependent on JIN1, indicating that JIN1 is not the only transcription factor regulating JAZ genes. A T-DNA insertion mutant and an RNA interference line disrupted for the expression of JAZ10, one of the few JAZ genes regulated by JIN1 during infection, exhibited enhanced JA sensitivity and increased susceptibility to DC3000, with the primary effect being increased disease symptom severity. Thus, JAZ10 is a negative regulator of both JA signalling and disease symptom development.

  12. First trial postural reactions to unexpected balance disturbances: a comparison with the acoustic startle reaction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Nijhuis, L.B.; Allum, J.H.J.; Valls-Sole, J.; Overeem, S.; Bloem, B.R.

    2010-01-01

    Unexpected support-surface movements delivered during stance elicit "first trial" postural reactions, which are larger and cause greater instability compared with habituated responses. The nature of this first trial reaction remains unknown. We hypothesized that first trial postural reactions consis

  13. The own and social effects of an unexpected income shock: Evidence from the Dutch Postcode Lottery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhn, P.J.; Kooreman, P.; Soetevent, A.R.; Kapteyn, A.

    2008-01-01

    In the Dutch Postcode Lottery a postal code (19 households on average) is randomly selected weekly, and prizes - consisting of cash and a new BMW - are awarded to lottery participants living in that postal code. On average, this generates a temporary, unexpected income shock equal to about eight mon

  14. All Intimate Grammars Leak: Reflections on "Indian Languages in Unexpected Places"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroskrity, Paul V.

    2011-01-01

    In this discussion of a set of studies that fits the trope of "Indian Languages in Unexpected Places," I explore the obvious necessity of developing a relevant notion of linguistic "leakage" following a famous image from the writings of the linguistic anthropologist Edward Sapir. Though in its original use, the concept applied more to the order of…

  15. Challenging Ideals of Reciprocity in Undergraduate Teaching: The Unexpected Benefits of Unpredictable Cross-Cultural Fieldwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammersley, Laura A.; Bilous, Rebecca H.; James, Sarah W.; Trau, Adam M.; Suchet-Pearson, Sandie

    2014-01-01

    Geographers are increasingly grappling with the theoretical and practical implications of integrating an ethics of reciprocity into undergraduate learning and teaching. This paper draws on the unexpected experiences of a third-year human geography research methods fieldtrip to examine the process of balancing undergraduate student learning and…

  16. Cobalt-catalyzed hydrogenation of esters to alcohols: unexpected reactivity trend indicates ester enolate intermediacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srimani, Dipankar; Mukherjee, Arup; Goldberg, Alexander F G; Leitus, Gregory; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Shimon, Linda J W; Ben David, Yehoshoa; Milstein, David

    2015-10-12

    The atom-efficient and environmentally benign catalytic hydrogenation of carboxylic acid esters to alcohols has been accomplished in recent years mainly with precious-metal-based catalysts, with few exceptions. Presented here is the first cobalt-catalyzed hydrogenation of esters to the corresponding alcohols. Unexpectedly, the evidence indicates the unprecedented involvement of ester enolate intermediates.

  17. Interlimb communication following unexpected changes in treadmill velocity during human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas; Geertsen, Svend Sparre; Sinkjær, Thomas;

    2015-01-01

    applied to the ipsilateral leg (iKnee) during the late stance phase of human gait (Stevenson et al. 2013). This interlimb reflex likely acts to slow the forward progression of the body in order to maintain dynamic stability following the perturbations. We examined this hypothesis by unexpectedly...

  18. Fear of the unexpected: hippocampus mediates novelty-induced return of extinguished fear in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maren, Stephen

    2014-02-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate an important role for the hippocampus in the recovery of fear memory after extinction. For example, hippocampal inactivation prevents the renewal of fear to an extinguished conditioned stimulus (CS) when it is presented outside the extinction context. Renewal of extinguished responding is accompanied by associative novelty (an unexpected occurrence of a familiar CS in a familiar place), the detection of which may require the hippocampus. We therefore examined whether the hippocampus also mediates the recovery of extinguished fear caused by other unexpected events, including presenting a familiar CS in a novel context or presenting a novel cue with the CS in a familiar context (e.g., external disinhibition). Rats underwent Pavlovian fear conditioning and extinction using an auditory CS and freezing behavior served as the index of conditioned fear. In Experiment 1, conditioned freezing to the extinguished CS was renewed in a novel context and this was eliminated by intra-hippocampal infusions of the GABAA agonist, muscimol, prior to the test. In Experiment 2, muscimol inactivation of the hippocampus reduced the external disinhibition of conditioned freezing that occurred when a novel white noise accompanied the extinguished tone CS. Collectively, these results suggest that the hippocampus mediates the return of fear when extinguished CSs are unexpected, or when unexpected stimuli accompany CS presentation. Ultimately, a violation of expectations about when, where, and with what other stimuli an extinguished CS will occur may form the basis of spontaneous recovery, renewal, and external disinhibition.

  19. 75 FR 67013 - Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Resulting from Violence in Kyrgyzstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... HOUSE, WASHINGTON, August 26, 2010 [FR Doc. 2010-27672 Filed 10-29-10; 8:45 am] Billing code 4710-10-P ... Documents#0;#0; ] Presidential Determination No. 2011-12 of August 26, 2010 Unexpected Urgent Refugee and...) of the Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962 (the ``Act''), as amended (22 U.S.C....

  20. 75 FR 67015 - Unexpected Urgent Refugee And Migration Needs Resulting From Flooding InPakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ....) THE WHITE HOUSE, WASHINGTON, September 3, 2010 [FR Doc. 2010-27673 Filed 10-29-10; 8:45 am] Billing... Documents#0;#0; ] Presidential Determination No. 2011-14 of September 3, 2010 Unexpected Urgent Refugee And...) of the Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962 (the ``Act''), as amended (22 U.S.C....

  1. Electromyographic and Neuromuscular Force Patterns Associated with Unexpectedly Loaded Rapid Limb Movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Charles; Simmons, Roger W.

    Bi-articular, unidirectional arm movements were studied to evaluate the electromyographic (EMG) and neuromuscular force patterns that occur when a limb is unexpectedly perturbed. A series of training trials were continued with a control load spring attached to the apparatus until a pre-specified criterion for learning was attained. The limb was…

  2. Three Perspectives of Facilitated Communication: Unexpected Literacy, Clever Hans, or Enigma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topics in Language Disorders, 1992

    1992-01-01

    The validity of facilitated communication's effects are viewed from three perspectives, labeled as the plausible perspective, which is unexpected literacy; the skeptical perspective, which claims that social-communicative variables unintentionally influence intervention outcomes; and the enigmatic perspective, which neither rejects outright the…

  3. Tourism Stocks in Times of Crises: An Econometric Investigation of Unexpected Non-macroeconomic Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Zopiatis (Anastasios); C.S. Savva (Christos); N. Lambertides (Neophytos); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractFollowing the recent terrorist attacks in Paris, the European media emphatically pronounced that billions of Euros were wiped from tourism related stocks. The theoretical relationship of the industry with such unexpected non-macro incidents received moderate academic coverage.

  4. Frequency, severity and causes of unexpected allergic reactions to food: A systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, A.; Knulst, A.C.; Kruizinga, A.G.; Michelsen, A.; Houben, G.F.; Baumert, J.L.; Os-Medendorp, H. van

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Food allergic patients have to deal with an avoidance diet. Confusing labelling terms or precautionary labels can result in misinterpretation and risk-taking behaviour. Even those patients that strictly adhere to their diet experience (sometimes severe) unexpected allergic reactions to

  5. An unexpected signature of Lorenz-Mie scattering observed in flowcytometric experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, A.G.; Doornbos, R.M.P.; Deurloo, K.E.I.; Noordmans, H.J.; de Grooth, B.G.; Sloot, P.M.A.; Maeda, M.

    1993-01-01

    Detailed analysis of elastic light scattering by spheresin FlowCytometers shows unexpected Lorenz-Miescattering patterns. The complete scattering matrix S ofspheres was measured. Two parameter scatterplots withx- and y- coordinates determined by the S11 + Sij andS11 - Sij values were obtained. Sampl

  6. Modulation of the Action Control System by Social Intention: Unexpected Social Requests Override Preplanned Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Luisa; Becchio, Cristina; Bulgheroni, Maria; Castiello, Umberto

    2009-01-01

    Four experiments investigated the influence of a sudden social request on the kinematics of a preplanned action. In Experiment 1, participants were requested to grasp an object and then locate it within a container (unperturbed trials). On 20% of trials, a human agent seated nearby the participant unexpectedly stretched out her arm and unfolded…

  7. Two Cases of Unexpected Martyrdom : Priscillian of Avila and Socrates of Athens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, L.

    2015-01-01

    The cases of Priscillian and Socrates show unexpected parallels, that suggest that the dynamics of martyrdom were active in the case of Priscillian. This is all the more remarkable for the reason, that neither Priscillian himself nor his opponents could have envisaged the fatal end of his career.

  8. Challenging Ideals of Reciprocity in Undergraduate Teaching: The Unexpected Benefits of Unpredictable Cross-Cultural Fieldwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammersley, Laura A.; Bilous, Rebecca H.; James, Sarah W.; Trau, Adam M.; Suchet-Pearson, Sandie

    2014-01-01

    Geographers are increasingly grappling with the theoretical and practical implications of integrating an ethics of reciprocity into undergraduate learning and teaching. This paper draws on the unexpected experiences of a third-year human geography research methods fieldtrip to examine the process of balancing undergraduate student learning and…

  9. Autistic Traits Affect P300 Response to Unexpected Events, regardless of Mental State Inferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiko Ishikawa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Limited use of contextual information has been suggested as a way of understanding cognition in people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. However, it has also been argued that individuals with ASD may have difficulties inferring others’ mental states. Here, we examined how individuals with different levels of autistic traits respond to contextual deviations by measuring event-related potentials that reflect context usage. The Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ was used to quantify autistic-like traits in 28 university students, and 19 participants were defined as Low or High AQ groups. To additionally examine inferences about mental state, two belief conditions (with or without false belief were included. Participants read short stories in which the final sentence included either an expected or an unexpected word and rated the word’s degree of deviation from expectation. P300 waveform analysis revealed that unexpected words were associated with larger P300 waveforms for the Low AQ group, but smaller P300 responses in the High AQ group. Additionally, AQ social skill subscores were positively correlated with evaluation times in the Unexpected condition, whether a character’s belief was false or not. This suggests that autistic traits can affect responses to unexpected events, possibly because of decreased availability of context information.

  10. Shift costs of predictable and unexpected set shifting in young and older adults.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Asselen, M.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.

    2000-01-01

    Examined the extent to which predictable, unexpected, and mixed costs associated with task shifts are subject to the effects of aging. 17 university students (aged 18-25 yrs) and 17 community residents (aged 66-81 yrs) completed a series of pure and mixed tasks. Results show that the costs of an

  11. An Unexpected and Efficient Synthesis of Open-chain Derivatives of Bistetronic Acid under Microwave Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Feng; MA Ning; ZHOU Dianxiang; ZHANG Ge; JIANG Bo; TU Shujiang

    2009-01-01

    An unexpected and efficient synthesis of novel open-chain derivatives of bistetronic acid has been successfully achieved in glyclol under microwave irradiation (MW).This method has the prominent advantages of short reaction time,high yield,operational simplicity as well as environmental friendliness.

  12. Surfactin from Bacillus subtilis displays an unexpected anti-Legionella activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiseau, Clémence; Schlusselhuber, Margot; Bigot, Renaud; Bertaux, Joanne; Berjeaud, Jean-Marc; Verdon, Julien

    2015-06-01

    A contaminant bacterial strain was found to exhibit an antagonistic activity against Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. The bacterial strain was identified as a Bacillus subtilis and named B. subtilis AM1. PCR analysis revealed the presence of the sfp gene, involved in the biosynthesis of surfactin, a lipopeptide with versatile bioactive properties. The bioactive substances were extracted from AM1 cell-free supernatant with ethyl acetate and purified using reversed phase HPLC (RP-HPLC). Subsequent ESI-MS analyses indicated the presence of two active substances with protonated molecular ions at m/z 1008 and 1036 Da, corresponding to surfactin isoforms. Structures of lipopeptides were further determined by tandem mass spectrometry and compared to the spectra of a commercially available surfactin mixture. Surfactin displays an antibacterial spectrum almost restricted to the Legionella genus (MICs range 1-4 μg/mL) and also exhibits a weak activity toward the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii, known to be the natural reservoir of L. pneumophila. Anti-biofilm assays demonstrated that 66 μg/mL of surfactin successfully eliminated 90 % of a 6-day-old biofilm. In conclusion, this study reveals for the first time the potent activity of surfactin against Legionella sp. and preformed biofilms thus providing new directions toward the use and the development of lipopeptides for the control of Legionella spread in the environment.

  13. "Unexpected" Logic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Dao: As India always astonishes the world in many ways, the final result of the May election in India also makes people surprised. We know that while Bharatiya Janata Party (hereinafter refers to as BJP) took power, India's economy grew steadily, political situation remained stable, its international status was on the increase, and India took on a momentum of "quick rise."

  14. Unexpected Effect of Nb Addition as a Microalloying Element on Mechanical Properties ofδ-TRIP Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sajad Gholami SHIRI; Seyed Ahmad Jenabali JAHROMI; Yahya PALIZDAR; Majid BELBASI

    2016-01-01

    The concept of microalloying was applied to theδ-TRIP (transformation-induced plasticity)steel to inves-tigate the feasibility of increasing the mechanical properties and understanding the effect of microalloying on the morphology and structure of the steel.A hot rolledδ-TRIP steel with three different contents of Nb (0,0.03, 0.07 mass%)was subjected to the microstructural and mechanical examination.The high Al and Si concentration in these steels guaranteed the presence of the considerableδ-ferrite phase in the microstructure after the casting and the subsequent hot rolling.The obtained results showed that Nb dramatically affects the microstructure,the dynamic re-covery and recrystallization behavior,as well as the grain shape and thus the stability of austenite after the thermo-mechanical process of hot rolling.The results also revealed an unexpected effect of Nb on the mechanical properties. The addition of Nb to theδ-TRIP steel led to a significant decrease in the ultimate strength (from 1 144 to 917 MPa) and an increase in ductility (from 24% to 28%).These unconventional results could be explained by the change in the steel microstructure.The work-hardening behaviors of all samples exhibit three stages of the work-hardening rate evolution.At the stage 2,the work-hardening rate of the studied steels increased,being attributed to the TRIP effect and the transformation of austenite to martensite.

  15. Urinary hormone metabolites identify sex and imply unexpected winter breeding in an endangered, subterranean-nesting frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germano, J M; Molinia, F C; Bishop, P J; Bell, B D; Cree, A

    2012-02-01

    Urinary hormone analysis has proved accurate for identifying sex and breeding periods in dimorphic amphibians with known reproductive cycles. We examined whether these techniques could provide this much needed information for a monomorphic anuran with an unconfirmed mating season in the wild. We analysed urinary estrone conjugate, testosterone, and progesterone metabolites to infer the time of breeding and to identify sex in the endangered Maud Island frog, Leiopelma pakeka. Testosterone metabolites in males and estrone and progesterone metabolites in females were at their peak during winter for both wild and captive frogs. These urinary metabolite patterns were consistent with the high proportion of females exhibiting enlarged ovarian follicles in winter months. Sex identification based on urinary estrone metabolite levels was 94% correct in this monomorphic species, in which the sexes overlap in snout-to-vent length (SVL) for over half of their adult size range and in which no other sexually dimorphic trait is known. The seasonal profiles imply unexpected winter or early spring breeding in L. pakeka. Overall, these results demonstrate use of urinary hormone metabolites for reproductive monitoring and sex identification in one of the world's most threatened and evolutionarily distinct amphibians.

  16. Creating Virtual Exhibitions for Educational and Cultural Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela DUMITRESCU

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents different tools and mechanisms to implement a virtual exhibition in different cultural areas, such as museums and libraries. Quality characteristics of virtual exhibitions are identified and described. The possibility to create native mobile applications for virtual exhibitions presentation is analyzed. The functional flow of creating a virtual exhibition is presented and discussed. The Seals - History Treasure exhibition is presented and significant historical documents are revealed.

  17. Ants exhibit asymmetric hybridization in a mosaic hybrid zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Jessica; Zahnd, Sacha; Athanasiades, Anouk; Türler, Rebecca; Chapuisat, Michel; Brelsford, Alan

    2016-10-01

    Research on hybridization between species provides unparalleled insights into the pre- and postzygotic isolating mechanisms that drive speciation. In social organisms, colony-level incompatibilities may provide additional reproductive barriers not present in solitary species, and hybrid zones offer an opportunity to identify these barriers. Here, we use genotyping-by-sequencing to sequence hundreds of markers in a hybrid zone between two socially polymorphic ant species, Formica selysi and Formica cinerea. We characterize the zone, determine the frequency of hybrid workers, infer whether hybrid queens or males are produced and investigate whether hybridization is influenced by colony social organization. We also compare cuticular hydrocarbon profiles and aggression levels between the two species. The hybrid zone exhibits a mosaic structure. The asymmetric distribution of hybrids skewed towards F. cinerea suggests a pattern of unidirectional nuclear gene flow from F. selysi into F. cinerea. The occurrence of backcrossed individuals indicates that hybrid queens and/or males are fertile, and the presence of the F. cinerea mitochondrial haplotype in 97% of hybrids shows that successful F1 hybrids will generally have F. cinerea mothers and F. selysi fathers. We found no evidence that social organization contributes to speciation, because hybrids occur in both single-queen and multiple-queen colonies. Strongly differentiated cuticular hydrocarbon profiles and heightened interspecific aggression further reveal that species recognition cues are both present and perceived. The discovery of fertile hybrids and asymmetrical gene flow is unusual in ants, and this hybrid zone will therefore provide an ideal system with which to investigate speciation in social insects.

  18. Arabidopsis mutant bik1 exhibits strong resistance to Plasmodiophora brassicae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Botrytis-induced kinase1 (BIK1, a receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase, plays an important role in resistance against pathogens and insects in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, it remains unknown whether BIK1 functions against Plasmodiophora brassicae, an obligate biotrophic protist that attacks cruciferous plants and induces gall formation on roots. Here, we investigated the potential roles of receptors FLS2, BAK1 and BIK1 in the infection of P. brassicae cruciferous plants. Wild-type plants, fls2 and bak1 mutants showed typical symptom on roots, and the galls were filled with large quantities of resting spores, while bik1 mutant plants exhibited strong resistance to P. brassicae. Compared with that of the wild-type plants, the root hair and cortical infection rate of bik1 mutant were significantly reduced by about 40-50%. A considerable portion of bik1 roots failed to form typical galls. Even if some small galls were formed, they were filled with multinucleate secondary plasmodia. The bik1 plants accumulated less reactive oxygen species (ROS at infected roots than other mutants and wild-type plants. Exogenous salicylic acid (SA treatment alleviated the clubroot symptoms in wild-type plants, and the expression of the SA signaling marker gene PR1 was significantly increased in bik1. Both sid2 (salicylic acid induction-deficient 2 and npr1-1 (non-expresser of PR genes that regulate systemic acquired resistance (SAR mutants showed increased susceptibility to P. brassicae compared with wild-type plants. These results suggest that the resistance of bik1 to P. brassicae is possibly mediated by SA inducible mechanisms enhance the resistance to clubroot disease.

  19. Lower incidence of unexpected in-hospital death after interprofessional implementation of a bedside track-and-trigger system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, Gitte; Samuelson, Karin Samuelsonkarin; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    In-hospital patients may suffer unexpected death because of suboptimal monitoring. Early recognition of deviating physiological parameters may enable staff to prevent unexpected in-hospital death. The aim of this study was to evaluate short- and long-term effects of systematic interprofessional u...

  20. Investigating Teachers' Appraisal of Unexpected Moments and Underlying Values: An Exploratory Case in the Context of Changing Mathematics Classroom Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanna, Jillian M.; Herbel-Eisenmann, Beth; Seah, Wee Tiong

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an exploratory case study that examines what one teacher indicated as unexpected as she worked to become more purposeful about her classroom discourse practices. We found that she highlighted three areas as being unexpected: (1) aspects of lesson enactment; (2) characteristics of student learning and (3) her own…

  1. Apoptotic HPV positive cancer cells exhibit transforming properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Gaiffe

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that DNA can be transferred from dying engineered cells to neighboring cells through the phagocytosis of apoptotic bodies, which leads to cellular transformation. Here, we provide evidence of an uptake of apoptotic-derived cervical cancer cells by human mesenchymal cells. Interestingly, HeLa (HPV 18+ or Ca Ski (HPV16+ cells, harboring integrated high-risk HPV DNA but not C-33 A cells (HPV-, were able to transform the recipient cells. Human primary fibroblasts engulfed the apoptotic bodies effectively within 30 minutes after co-cultivation. This mechanism is active and involves the actin cytoskeleton. In situ hybridization of transformed fibroblasts revealed the presence of HPV DNA in the nucleus of a subset of phagocytosing cells. These cells expressed the HPV16/18 E6 gene, which contributes to the disruption of the p53/p21 pathway, and the cells exhibited a tumorigenic phenotype, including an increased proliferation rate, polyploidy and anchorage independence growth. Such horizontal transfer of viral oncogenes to surrounding cells that lack receptors for HPV could facilitate the persistence of the virus, the main risk factor for cervical cancer development. This process might contribute to HPV-associated disease progression in vivo.

  2. Isolation and characterization of novel bacterial strains exhibiting ligninolytic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandounas Luaine

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To expand on the range of products which can be obtained from lignocellulosic biomass, the lignin component should be utilized as feedstock for value-added chemicals such as substituted aromatics, instead of being incinerated for heat and energy. Enzymes could provide an effective means for lignin depolymerization into products of interest. In this study, soil bacteria were isolated by enrichment on Kraft lignin and evaluated for their ligninolytic potential as a source of novel enzymes for waste lignin valorization. Results Based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phenotypic characterization, the organisms were identified as Pandoraea norimbergensis LD001, Pseudomonas sp LD002 and Bacillus sp LD003. The ligninolytic capability of each of these isolates was assessed by growth on high-molecular weight and low-molecular weight lignin fractions, utilization of lignin-associated aromatic monomers and degradation of ligninolytic indicator dyes. Pandoraea norimbergensis LD001 and Pseudomonas sp. LD002 exhibited best growth on lignin fractions, but limited dye-decolourizing capacity. Bacillus sp. LD003, however, showed least efficient growth on lignin fractions but extensive dye-decolourizing capacity, with a particular preference for the recalcitrant phenothiazine dye class (Azure B, Methylene Blue and Toluidene Blue O. Conclusions Bacillus sp. LD003 was selected as a promising source of novel types of ligninolytic enzymes. Our observations suggested that lignin mineralization and depolymerization are separate events which place additional challenges on the screening of ligninolytic microorganisms for specific ligninolytic enzymes.

  3. Exhibiting eugenics: response and resistance to a hidden history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brave, Ralph; Sylva, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    Human Plants, Human Harvest: The Hidden History of California Eugenics is the first-ever exhibition on the history of eugenics in California. The disappearance of this history for half a century, and the consequent absence of a "collective menory", were the primary factors determining the exhibit's sttrcture and content. Responses to the exhibit confirmed that most visitors "never knew" about this history. The exhibit is described in some detail, with selected imagery from the exhibit reproduced. After the initial exhibition, responses of other museums and foundation officials revealed a continuing resistance to this history being publicly displayed, though the sources of resistance varied.

  4. Staphylococcus aureus aconitase inactivation unexpectedly inhibits post-exponential-phase growth and enhances stationary-phase survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Greg A; Chaussee, Michael S; Morgan, Carrie I; Fitzgerald, J Ross; Dorward, David W; Reitzer, Lawrence J; Musser, James M

    2002-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus preferentially catabolizes glucose, generating pyruvate, which is subsequently oxidized to acetate under aerobic growth conditions. Catabolite repression of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle results in the accumulation of acetate. TCA cycle derepression coincides with exit from the exponential growth phase, the onset of acetate catabolism, and the maximal expression of secreted virulence factors. These data suggest that carbon and energy for post-exponential-phase growth and virulence factor production are derived from the catabolism of acetate mediated by the TCA cycle. To test this hypothesis, the aconitase gene was genetically inactivated in a human isolate of S. aureus, and the effects on physiology, morphology, virulence factor production, virulence for mice, and stationary-phase survival were examined. TCA cycle inactivation prevented the post-exponential growth phase catabolism of acetate, resulting in premature entry into the stationary phase. This phenotype was accompanied by a significant reduction in the production of several virulence factors and alteration in host-pathogen interaction. Unexpectedly, aconitase inactivation enhanced stationary-phase survival relative to the wild-type strain. Aconitase is an iron-sulfur cluster-containing enzyme that is highly susceptible to oxidative inactivation. We speculate that reversible loss of the iron-sulfur cluster in wild-type organisms is a survival strategy used to circumvent oxidative stress induced during host-pathogen interactions. Taken together, these data demonstrate the importance of the TCA cycle in the life cycle of this medically important pathogen.

  5. A Neonate with Susceptibility to Long QT Syndrome Type 6 who Presented with Ventricular Fibrillation and Sudden Unexpected Infant Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Charles W; Marc-Aurele, Krishelle L

    2016-07-28

    BACKGROUND This is a case of a neonate with susceptibility to long QT syndrome (LQTS) who presented with a sudden unexpected infant death. Experts continue to debate whether universal electrocardiogram (ECG) screening of all newborns is feasible, practical, and cost-effective. CASE REPORT A 19-day-old neonate was found unresponsive by her mother. ECG showed ventricular fibrillation and a combination of a lidocaine drip plus multiple defibrillations converted the rhythm to normal sinus. Unfortunately, MRI brain imaging showed multiple infarcts and EEG showed burst suppression pattern with frequent seizures; life supportive treatment was stopped and the infant died. Genetic testing revealed two mutations in the KCNE2 gene consistent with susceptibility to LQTS type 6. CONCLUSIONS We believe this case is the first to demonstrate both a precipitating electrocardiographic and genetic cause of death for an infant with LQTS, showing a cause-and-effect relationship between LQTS mutation, ventricular arrhythmia, and death. We wonder whether universal ECG newborn screening to prevent LQTS death could have saved this baby.

  6. Post-genomic analyses of fungal lignocellulosic biomass degradation reveal the unexpected potential of the plant pathogen Ustilago maydis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couturier Marie

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Filamentous fungi are potent biomass degraders due to their ability to thrive in ligno(hemicellulose-rich environments. During the last decade, fungal genome sequencing initiatives have yielded abundant information on the genes that are putatively involved in lignocellulose degradation. At present, additional experimental studies are essential to provide insights into the fungal secreted enzymatic pools involved in lignocellulose degradation. Results In this study, we performed a wide analysis of 20 filamentous fungi for which genomic data are available to investigate their biomass-hydrolysis potential. A comparison of fungal genomes and secretomes using enzyme activity profiling revealed discrepancies in carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes sets dedicated to plant cell wall. Investigation of the contribution made by each secretome to the saccharification of wheat straw demonstrated that most of them individually supplemented the industrial Trichoderma reesei CL847 enzymatic cocktail. Unexpectedly, the most striking effect was obtained with the phytopathogen Ustilago maydis that improved the release of total sugars by 57% and of glucose by 22%. Proteomic analyses of the best-performing secretomes indicated a specific enzymatic mechanism of U. maydis that is likely to involve oxido-reductases and hemicellulases. Conclusion This study provides insight into the lignocellulose-degradation mechanisms by filamentous fungi and allows for the identification of a number of enzymes that are potentially useful to further improve the industrial lignocellulose bioconversion process.

  7. Incidentally found and unexpected tumors discovered by MRI examination for temporomandibular joint arthrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagi, Yoshinobu; Asaumi, Jun-ichi E-mail: asaumi@md.okayama-u.ac.jp; Maki, Yuu; Murakami, Jun; Hisatomi, Miki; Matsuzaki, Hidenobu; Konouchi, Hironobu; Honda, Yosutoshi; Kishi, Kanji

    2003-07-01

    We examined the frequency of incidentally found or unexpected tumors discovered at the time of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region for patients with suspicion of TMJ arthrosis. Five MR images (T1-weighted transverse scout image and proton density and T2-weighted oblique sagittal images at the open and closed mouth) were acquired. In 2776 MRI examinations of TMJ arthrosis, two tumors were discovered. They consisted of an adenoid cystic carcinoma in the deep portion of the parotid gland, and a malignant tumor extending from the infratemporal fossa to the parapharyngeal space. The rate of incidentally founded or unexpected tumors in TMJ examinations was low (0.072%), but the two tumors found were malignant tumors, and therefore, scout image should be carefully examined, not only used for positing the slice.

  8. Sudden unexpected infant death: differentiating natural from abusive causes in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtel, Kirsten

    2012-10-01

    Sudden unexpected infant deaths (SUIDs) are deaths in infants younger than 12 months that occur suddenly, unexpectedly, and without obvious cause in the emergency department (ED). Sudden infant death syndrome, the leading cause of SUID in the United States, is much more common, but fatal child abuse and neglect have been sometimes mistaken for sudden infant death syndrome. The distinction between these 2 entities can only be made after a thorough investigation of the scene, interview of caregivers, and a complete forensic autopsy. Development of ED guidelines for the reporting and evaluation of SUID, in collaboration with the local medical examiner and child death review teams, will enable ED practitioners to collect important information in a compassionate manner that will be valuable to the investigating personnel.

  9. Openness to the unexpected: Our Pathways to Careers in a Federal Research Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Kurt R.; Bunnell, David B.; Hondorp, Darryl W.; Taylor, William W.; Lynch, Abigail J.; Leonard, Nancy J.

    2014-01-01

    Many fisheries professionals may not be in the job they originally envisioned for themselves when they began their undergraduate studies. Rather, their current positions could be the result of unexpected, opportunistic, or perhaps even “lucky” open doors that led them down an unexpected path. In many cases, a mentor helped facilitate the unforeseen trajectory. We offer three unique stories about joining a federal fisheries research laboratory, from the perspective of a scientist, a joint manager-scientist, and a manager. We also use our various experiences to form recommendations that should help the next generation of fisheries professionals succeed in any stop along their journey, including being open to opportunities, setting high expectations, and finding a strong and supportive team environment to work in.

  10. Performance of cumulant-based rank reduction estimator in presence of unexpected modeling errors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鼎

    2015-01-01

    Compared with the rank reduction estimator (RARE) based on second-order statistics (called SOS-RARE), the RARE based on fourth-order cumulants (referred to as FOC-RARE) can handle more sources and restrain the negative impacts of the Gaussian colored noise. However, the unexpected modeling errors appearing in practice are known to significantly degrade the performance of the RARE. Therefore, the direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation performance of the FOC-RARE is quantitatively derived. The explicit expression for direction-finding (DF) error is derived via the first-order perturbation analysis, and then the theoretical formula for the mean square error (MSE) is given. Simulation results demonstrate the validation of the theoretical analysis and reveal that the FOC-RARE is more robust to the unexpected modeling errors than the SOS-RARE.

  11. Fish consumption, contaminants and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy: many more benefits than risks

    OpenAIRE

    FA. Scorza; RM. Cysneiros; RM. Arida; VC. Terra; Machado HR; GMM. Rabello; de Albuquerque, M.; Cavalheiro EA

    2010-01-01

    People with epilepsy have an increased risk of dying prematurely and the most common epilepsy-related category of death is sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). SUDEP is mainly a problem for patients with chronic uncontrolled epilepsy. The ultimate goal of research in SUDEP is to develop new methods to prevent it and actions other than medical and surgical therapies that could be very useful. Nutritional aspects, i.e., omega-3 fatty acids deficiency, could have an interesting role in t...

  12. Moral and Spirtual Support to İndividuals Faced with Unexpected and Undesirable Events.

    OpenAIRE

    KULA, Naci

    2006-01-01

    This study aims at analysing the attributes and the importance of moral and spirtual support to individuals facing with unexpected and undesirable events. For this aim, the analysis focused on the studies on the 1999 Marmara eartquake survivors and physically disabled persons. The results of the study suggest that the support to these individuals should have the following attributes; learning- centered evaluation of the event, inflicting the sense of hope, emphasis on self respect, religious ...

  13. New and unexpected properties from polycyanurate networks prepared from bio based monomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-02

    p,p-orientation of – OCN groups, no other aromatic substituents, symmetry, and one- carbon backbone bridge, among others 7DISTRIBUTION A: Approved...thermal stability of resveratrol and dihydroresveratrol is unexpected based on its chemical structure (two- carbon bridge backbone), but these...fire resistance, likely because they combine uncommon structural elements in a new way, thus their performance is not captured by QSAR considerations

  14. Effects of unexpected chords and of performer's expression on brain responses and electrodermal activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Koelsch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is lack of neuroscientific studies investigating music processing with naturalistic stimuli, and brain responses to real music are, thus, largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study investigates event-related brain potentials (ERPs, skin conductance responses (SCRs and heart rate (HR elicited by unexpected chords of piano sonatas as they were originally arranged by composers, and as they were played by professional pianists. From the musical excerpts played by the pianists (with emotional expression, we also created versions without variations in tempo and loudness (without musical expression to investigate effects of musical expression on ERPs and SCRs. Compared to expected chords, unexpected chords elicited an early right anterior negativity (ERAN, reflecting music-syntactic processing and an N5 (reflecting processing of meaning information in the ERPs, as well as clear changes in the SCRs (reflecting that unexpected chords also elicited emotional responses. The ERAN was not influenced by emotional expression, whereas N5 potentials elicited by chords in general (regardless of their chord function differed between the expressive and the non-expressive condition. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results show that the neural mechanisms of music-syntactic processing operate independently of the emotional qualities of a stimulus, justifying the use of stimuli without emotional expression to investigate the cognitive processing of musical structure. Moreover, the data indicate that musical expression affects the neural mechanisms underlying the processing of musical meaning. Our data are the first to reveal influences of musical performance on ERPs and SCRs, and to show physiological responses to unexpected chords in naturalistic music.

  15. Designing museum exhibits that facilitate visitor reflection and discussion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skydsgaard, Morten Arnika; Andersen, Hanne Møller; King, Heather

    2016-01-01

    personal reflection but also prompted discussion. Participation, defined as including both physical interaction with exhibits, and dialogic interaction between visitors, facilitated the sharing of ideas and feelings between visitors. Exhibits with elements of curiosity and challenge were found to attract...

  16. Progressive Primary Pulmonary Tuberculosis Presenting as the Sudden Unexpected Death in Infancy: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempers, Johan; Sens, Mary Ann; Wadee, Shabbir Ahmed; Kinney, Hannah C.; Odendaal, Hein J.; Wright, Colleen A.

    2010-01-01

    The classification of an unexpected infant death as the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) depends upon a complete autopsy and death scene investigation to exclude known causes of death. Here we report the death of a four-month-old infant in a tuberculosis endemic area that presented as a sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) with no apparent explanation based on the death scene characteristics. The autopsy, however, revealed progressive primary pulmonary tuberculosis with intrathoracic adenopathy, compression of the tracheobronchial tree and miliary lesions in the liver. This case underscores the clinical difficulties in the diagnosis of infantile tuberculosis, as well as the possibility of sudden death as part of its protean manifestations. The pathology and clinical progression of tuberculosis in infants differs from older children and adults due to the immature immune response in infants. This case dramatically highlights the need for complete autopsies in all sudden and unexpected infant deaths, as well as the public health issues in a sentinel infant tuberculosis diagnosis. PMID:20705406

  17. Simultaneous repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm and resection of unexpected, associated abdominal malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Calio', Francesco G; D'Urso, Antonio; Lorusso, Riccardo; Ceccanei, Gianluca; Vietri, Francesco

    2004-12-15

    The management of unexpected intra-abdominal malignancy, discovered at laparotomy for elective treatment of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), is controversial. It is still unclear whether both conditions should be treated simultaneously or a staged approach is to be preferred. To contribute in improving treatment guidelines, we retrospectively reviewed the records of patients undergoing laparotomy for elective AAA repair. From January 1994 to March 2003, 253 patients underwent elective, trans-peritoneal repair of an AAA. In four patients (1.6%), an associated, unexpected neoplasm was detected at abdominal exploration, consisting of one renal, one gastric, one ileal carcinoid, and one ascending colon tumor. All of them were treated at the same operation, after aortic repair and careful isolation of the prosthetic graft. The whole series' operative mortality was 3.6%. None of the patients simultaneously treated for AAA and tumor resection died in the postoperative period. No graft-related infections were observed. Simultaneous treatment of AAA and tumor did not prolong significantly the mean length of stay in the hospital, compared to standard treatment of AAA alone. Except for malignancies of organs requiring major surgical resections, simultaneous AAA repair and resection of an associated, unexpected abdominal neoplasm can be safely performed, in most of the patients, sparing the need for a second procedure. Endovascular grafting of the AAA can be a valuable tool in simplifying simultaneous treatment, or in staging the procedures with a very short delay.

  18. Metatranscriptomic analysis of a high-sulfide aquatic spring reveals insights into sulfur cycling and unexpected aerobic metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M. Spain

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Zodletone spring is a sulfide-rich spring in southwestern Oklahoma characterized by shallow, microoxic, light-exposed spring water overlaying anoxic sediments. Previously, culture-independent 16S rRNA gene based diversity surveys have revealed that Zodletone spring source sediments harbor a highly diverse microbial community, with multiple lineages putatively involved in various sulfur-cycling processes. Here, we conducted a metatranscriptomic survey of microbial populations in Zodletone spring source sediments to characterize the relative prevalence and importance of putative phototrophic, chemolithotrophic, and heterotrophic microorganisms in the sulfur cycle, the identity of lineages actively involved in various sulfur cycling processes, and the interaction between sulfur cycling and other geochemical processes at the spring source. Sediment samples at the spring’s source were taken at three different times within a 24-h period for geochemical analyses and RNA sequencing. In depth mining of datasets for sulfur cycling transcripts revealed major sulfur cycling pathways and taxa involved, including an unexpected potential role of Actinobacteria in sulfide oxidation and thiosulfate transformation. Surprisingly, transcripts coding for the cyanobacterial Photosystem II D1 protein, methane monooxygenase, and terminal cytochrome oxidases were encountered, indicating that genes for oxygen production and aerobic modes of metabolism are actively being transcribed, despite below-detectable levels (<1 µM of oxygen in source sediment. Results highlight transcripts involved in sulfur, methane, and oxygen cycles, propose that oxygenic photosynthesis could support aerobic methane and sulfide oxidation in anoxic sediments exposed to sunlight, and provide a viewpoint of microbial metabolic lifestyles under conditions similar to those seen during late Archaean and Proterozoic eons.

  19. Metatranscriptomic analysis of a high-sulfide aquatic spring reveals insights into sulfur cycling and unexpected aerobic metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshahed, Mostafa S.; Najar, Fares Z.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2015-01-01

    Zodletone spring is a sulfide-rich spring in southwestern Oklahoma characterized by shallow, microoxic, light-exposed spring water overlaying anoxic sediments. Previously, culture-independent 16S rRNA gene based diversity surveys have revealed that Zodletone spring source sediments harbor a highly diverse microbial community, with multiple lineages putatively involved in various sulfur-cycling processes. Here, we conducted a metatranscriptomic survey of microbial populations in Zodletone spring source sediments to characterize the relative prevalence and importance of putative phototrophic, chemolithotrophic, and heterotrophic microorganisms in the sulfur cycle, the identity of lineages actively involved in various sulfur cycling processes, and the interaction between sulfur cycling and other geochemical processes at the spring source. Sediment samples at the spring’s source were taken at three different times within a 24-h period for geochemical analyses and RNA sequencing. In depth mining of datasets for sulfur cycling transcripts revealed major sulfur cycling pathways and taxa involved, including an unexpected potential role of Actinobacteria in sulfide oxidation and thiosulfate transformation. Surprisingly, transcripts coding for the cyanobacterial Photosystem II D1 protein, methane monooxygenase, and terminal cytochrome oxidases were encountered, indicating that genes for oxygen production and aerobic modes of metabolism are actively being transcribed, despite below-detectable levels (oxygen in source sediment. Results highlight transcripts involved in sulfur, methane, and oxygen cycles, propose that oxygenic photosynthesis could support aerobic methane and sulfide oxidation in anoxic sediments exposed to sunlight, and provide a viewpoint of microbial metabolic lifestyles under conditions similar to those seen during late Archaean and Proterozoic eons. PMID:26417542

  20. Annual Report On China's Exhibition Industry 2009 (III)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    China Council for the Promotion of International T

    2010-01-01

    @@ To better understand China's exhibition industry's development trend, and its policy regulation features, and industrial market characteristics, China Council for the Promotion of International Trade (CCPIT) organizes experts and scholars of the exhibition industry to compile and publish Annual Report on China's Exhibition Industry in both Chinese and English every year since 2004. After years of efforts, the Report has become a significant window for domestic and overseas insiders to know about Chinas exhibition industry.

  1. Exhibition of Design, Development and Manufacturing of Scalp Cooling Cap

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Exhibition Narrative:\\ud University of Huddersfield and Paxman Coolers Limited showcased the output of a collaborative project that resulted in an innovative scalp-cooling cap at Arab Health 2016 Exhibition Dubai, UEA. In collaboration with Medilink Yorkshire & Humber at the Stand No: Z1G57. The Arab Health 2016 exhibition showcased more than 4,000 companies exhibiting their latest innovations to more than 130,000 healthcare professionals attending from 163 countries.

  2. A Phenomenological Investigation of Science Center Exhibition Developers' Expertise Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Denise L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the exhibition developer role in the context of United States (U.S.) science centers, and more specifically, to investigate the way science center exhibition developers build their professional expertise. This research investigated how successfully practicing exhibition developers described their current…

  3. Ms.Brown is introducing their exhibition to Miss Jiang.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Miss Jiang:I want to know more about the International HouseholdUtensil Exhibition.Ms.Brown:It is an exhibition with a 32-year history,catering to clientsfrom South Africa and Mexico.Over the past 32 years,the exhibition hasbeen well known for its high efficiency in signing contracts.

  4. Online Cultural Heritage Exhibitions: A Survey of Strategic Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Chern Li

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to report findings from a study that looked at a range of strategic issues faced in the development, management and maintenance of online cultural heritage exhibitions. The study examined exhibitions from different types of cultural agencies and asked questions about whether, for instance, the exhibitions are part of the…

  5. 76 FR 68808 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ... Exhibition Determinations: ``Transition to Christianity: Art of Late Antiquity, 3rd-7th Century AD'' SUMMARY... objects to be included in the exhibition ``Transition to Christianity: Art of Late Antiquity, 3rd-7th Century AD,'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition within the United States, are of...

  6. Weight lifting can facilitate appreciative comprehension for museum exhibits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki eYamada

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Appreciation of exhibits in a museum can be equated to a virtual experience of lives in the contexts originally surrounding the exhibits. Here we focus on the importance of weight information, and hence tested whether experiencing a weight during museum exhibit appreciation affects the beholders’ satisfaction and recognition memory for the exhibits. An experiment was performed at a museum exhibiting skeletal preparations of animals. We used nine preparations and prepared four weight stimuli as weight cues in accordance with the actual weight of four of the preparations: Remaining five preparations was displayed without weight stimuli. In the cued condition, participants were asked to lift up the weight stimuli during their observation of the four exhibits. In the uncued condition, participants observed the exhibits without touching the weight stimuli. After observation of the exhibits, the participants responded to a questionnaire that measured their impressions of the exhibits and the museum, and performed a recognition test on the exhibits. Results showed that memory performance was better and viewing duration was longer with weight lifting instruction than without instruction. A factor analysis on the questionnaires revealed four factors (likeability, contentment, value, and quality. A path analysis showed indirect effects of viewing duration on memory performance and willingness-to-pay for the museum appreciation through the impression factors. Our findings provide insight into a new interactive exhibition that enables long appreciation producing positive effects on visitors’ impression, memory, and value estimation for exhibits.

  7. 45 CFR 1160.5 - Eligibility for domestic exhibitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... AND ARTIFACTS INDEMNITY ACT § 1160.5 Eligibility for domestic exhibitions. An indemnity agreement for...-owned objects; (B) Exhibitions outside of the United States of domestic-owned objects; or (C) Exhibitions in the United States of both foreign- and domestic-owned objects, with the foreign-owned...

  8. Annual Report On China's Exhibition Industry 2009(II)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ Section II Features of China's Exhibition Market To better reflect the features of China's exhibition market,based on the research results from 2005 t0 2008,the research team in 2009 continued to make a thorough survey of the exhibition market in Beijing,Shanghai and Guangzhou.

  9. Genes and Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  10. An Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded Protein Complex Requires an Origin of Lytic Replication In Cis to Mediate Late Gene Transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Djavadian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus lytic replication is accomplished by an intricate cascade of gene expression that integrates viral DNA replication and structural protein synthesis. Most genes encoding structural proteins exhibit "true" late kinetics-their expression is strictly dependent on lytic DNA replication. Recently, the EBV BcRF1 gene was reported to encode a TATA box binding protein homolog, which preferentially recognizes the TATT sequence found in true late gene promoters. BcRF1 is one of seven EBV genes with homologs found in other β- and γ-, but not in α-herpesviruses. Using EBV BACmids, we systematically disrupted each of these "βγ" genes. We found that six of them, including BcRF1, exhibited an identical phenotype: intact viral DNA replication with loss of late gene expression. The proteins encoded by these six genes have been found by other investigators to form a viral protein complex that is essential for activation of TATT-containing reporters in EBV-negative 293 cells. Unexpectedly, in EBV infected 293 cells, we found that TATT reporter activation was weak and non-specific unless an EBV origin of lytic replication (OriLyt was present in cis. Using two different replication-defective EBV genomes, we demonstrated that OriLyt-mediated DNA replication is required in cis for TATT reporter activation and for late gene expression from the EBV genome. We further demonstrate by fluorescence in situ hybridization that the late BcLF1 mRNA localizes to EBV DNA replication factories. These findings support a model in which EBV true late genes are only transcribed from newly replicated viral genomes.

  11. Digital Natives: Creating Emergent Exhibitions through Digital Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Rachel Charlotte; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Dindler, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Digital Technology can support the creation of dialogical spaces in the museum, both playful and reflective, that allow audiences to engage in the ongoing construction and reproduction of cultural heritage creating novel connections between self and others and between past, present and future....... In this way, digital technology can contribute to the creation of emergent exhibitions in which the exhibition is created in dialogue between audiences and the museum. We present experiences from a current research project, the Digital Natives exhibition, in which digital technology was designed...... as an integral part of the exhibition to encourage dialogue between audiences and the exhibition materials and thereby investigate how the exhibition emerge as a result of this dialogic co-construction inside the exhibition space. In short, the opportunities offered by digital technologies prompts us to consider...

  12. Unexpected role of interferon-γ in regulating neuronal connectivity and social behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filiano, Anthony J; Xu, Yang; Tustison, Nicholas J; Marsh, Rachel L; Baker, Wendy; Smirnov, Igor; Overall, Christopher C; Gadani, Sachin P; Turner, Stephen D; Weng, Zhiping; Peerzade, Sayeda Najamussahar; Chen, Hao; Lee, Kevin S; Scott, Michael M; Beenhakker, Mark P; Litvak, Vladimir; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2016-07-21

    Immune dysfunction is commonly associated with several neurological and mental disorders. Although the mechanisms by which peripheral immunity may influence neuronal function are largely unknown, recent findings implicate meningeal immunity influencing behaviour, such as spatial learning and memory. Here we show that meningeal immunity is also critical for social behaviour; mice deficient in adaptive immunity exhibit social deficits and hyper-connectivity of fronto-cortical brain regions. Associations between rodent transcriptomes from brain and cellular transcriptomes in response to T-cell-derived cytokines suggest a strong interaction between social behaviour and interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-driven responses. Concordantly, we demonstrate that inhibitory neurons respond to IFN-γ and increase GABAergic (γ-aminobutyric-acid) currents in projection neurons, suggesting that IFN-γ is a molecular link between meningeal immunity and neural circuits recruited for social behaviour. Meta-analysis of the transcriptomes of a range of organisms reveals that rodents, fish, and flies elevate IFN-γ/JAK-STAT-dependent gene signatures in a social context, suggesting that the IFN-γ signalling pathway could mediate a co-evolutionary link between social/aggregation behaviour and an efficient anti-pathogen response. This study implicates adaptive immune dysfunction, in particular IFN-γ, in disorders characterized by social dysfunction and suggests a co-evolutionary link between social behaviour and an anti-pathogen immune response driven by IFN-γ signalling.

  13. NMR spectroscopy reveals unexpected structural variation at the protein-protein interface in MHC class I molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beerbaum, Monika; Ballaschk, Martin; Erdmann, Natalja [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) (Germany); Schnick, Christina [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Institut fuer Immungenetik, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Diehl, Anne [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) (Germany); Uchanska-Ziegler, Barbara; Ziegler, Andreas [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Institut fuer Immungenetik, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Schmieder, Peter, E-mail: schmieder@fmp-berlin.de [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    {beta}{sub 2}-Microglobulin ({beta}{sub 2}m) is a small, monomorphic protein non-covalently bound to the heavy chain (HC) in polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Given the high evolutionary conservation of structural features of {beta}{sub 2}m in various MHC molecules as shown by X-ray crystallography, {beta}{sub 2}m is often considered as a mere scaffolding protein. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we investigate here whether {beta}{sub 2}m residues at the interface to the HC exhibit changes depending on HC polymorphisms and the peptides bound to the complex in solution. First we show that human {beta}{sub 2}m can effectively be produced in deuterated form using high-cell-density-fermentation and we employ the NMR resonance assignments obtained for triple-labeled {beta}{sub 2}m bound to the HLA-B*27:09 HC to examine the {beta}{sub 2}m-HC interface. We then proceed to compare the resonances of {beta}{sub 2}m in two minimally distinct subtypes, HLA-B*27:09 and HLA-B*27:05, that are differentially associated with the spondyloarthropathy Ankylosing Spondylitis. Each of these subtypes is complexed with four distinct peptides for which structural information is already available. We find that only the resonances at the {beta}{sub 2}m-HC interface show a variation of their chemical shifts between the different complexes. This indicates the existence of an unexpected plasticity that enables {beta}{sub 2}m to accommodate changes that depend on HC polymorphism as well as on the bound peptide through subtle structural variations of the protein-protein interface.

  14. Ribosomal RNA gene diversity, effective population size, and evolutionary longevity in asexual glomeromycota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vankuren, Nicholas W; den Bakker, Henk C; Morton, Joseph B; Pawlowska, Teresa E

    2013-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (phylum Glomeromycota) are among the oldest and most successful symbionts of land plants. With no evidence of sexual reproduction, their evolutionary success is inconsistent with the prediction that asexual taxa are vulnerable to extinction due to accumulation of deleterious mutations. To explore why Glomeromycota defy this prediction, we studied ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene evolution in the Claroideoglomus lineage and estimated effective population size, N(e) , in C. etunicatum. We found that rRNA genes of these fungi exhibit unusual and complex patterns of molecular evolution. In C. etunicatum, these patterns can be collectively explained by an unexpectedly large N(e) combined with imperfect genome-wide and population-level rRNA gene repeat homogenization. The mutations accumulated in rRNA gene sequences indicate that natural selection is effective at purging deleterious mutations in the Claroideoglomus lineage, which is also consistent with the large N(e) of C. etunicatum. We propose that in the near absence of recombination, asexual reproduction involving massively multinucleate spores typical for Glomeromycota is responsible for the improved efficacy of selection relative to drift. We postulate that large effective population sizes contribute to the evolutionary longevity of Glomeromycota.

  15. Ceruloplasmin gene-deficient mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis show attenuated early disease evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresle, Melissa M; Schulz, Katrin; Jonas, Anna; Perreau, Victoria M; Cipriani, Tania; Baxter, Alan G; Miranda-Hernandez, Socorro; Field, Judith; Jokubaitis, Vilija G; Cherny, Robert; Volitakis, Irene; David, Samuel; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; Butzkueven, Helmut

    2014-06-01

    We conducted a microarray study to identify genes that are differentially regulated in the spinal cords of mice with the inflammatory disease experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) relative to healthy mice. In total 181 genes with at least a two-fold increase in expression were identified, and most of these genes were associated with immune function. Unexpectedly, ceruloplasmin (Cp), a ferroxidase that converts toxic ferrous iron to its nontoxic ferric form and also promotes the efflux of iron from astrocytes in the CNS, was shown to be highly upregulated (13.2-fold increase) in EAE spinal cord. Expression of Cp protein is known to be increased in several neurological conditions, but the role of Cp regulation in CNS autoimmune disease is not known. To investigate this, we induced EAE in Cp gene knockout, heterozygous, and wild-type mice. Cp knockout mice were found to have slower disease evolution than wild-type mice (EAE days 13-17; P = 0.05). Interestingly, Cp knockout mice also exhibited a significant increase in the number of astrocytes with reactive morphology in early EAE compared with wild-type mice at the same stage of disease. CNS iron levels were not increased with EAE in these mice. Based on these observations, we propose that an increase in Cp expression could contribute to tissue damage in early EAE. In addition, endogenous CP either directly or indirectly inhibits astrocyte reactivity during early disease, which could also worsen early disease evolution.

  16. 76 FR 35719 - Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Related to Libya and C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-20

    ... Determination No. 2011-11 of June 8, 2011 Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Related to Libya and C... to the humanitarian crises resulting from the violence in Libya and C[ocirc]te d'Ivoire. You...

  17. An unexpected reaction of cyanothioacetamide: Novel preparation of pyrazolo[3,4-b]-pyridine derivatives under MWI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Sen Fan; Xia Wang; Xiao Yan Li

    2008-01-01

    An unexpected multi-component reaction of cyanothioacetamide with aldehyde and aminopyrazole under MWI was reported. Through this reaction, a series of pyrazolo[3,4-b]-pyridine derivatives was prepared in high yields via simple operational procedure.

  18. CERN exhibition attracts over 100,000 visitors in Belgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    “This must be an 'all-time record',” says Ray Lewis, CERN travelling exhibition manager. “In all my time with the various permanent and travelling exhibitions that have taken place locally and within our Member States I have never experienced such figures.”   Zarko Obradovic (left), Serbian Minister of Education, Science and Technology, and Rolf Heuer (right), CERN Director-General, at the CERN travelling exhibition in Belgrade. Indeed, in approximately 20 days of exhibition time about 120,000 people, mainly school visiters and the general public, visited the 100 m2 CERN mini-exhibition. It was set up in the centre of Belgrade in October, in association with the meeting of the Restricted European Committee for Future Accelerators (RECFA). After attending the RECFA meeting, CERN's Director-General Rofl Heuer opened the CERN exhibition on the evening of 19 October. Lectures about CERN were held every afternoon, and two public de...

  19. The Exhibition Performance Appraisal Index System Based on Stakeholder Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Shu-min; HAO Qi-hui

    2009-01-01

    Exhibition performance should be evaluated from different perspectives of stakeholders. The benefits of each stakeholder can not be satisfied when evaluating the exhibition performance from a single perspective or. only evaluating the economic performance of the exhibition. In this paper, the stakeholders are defined on the basis of questionnaire investigation and classified by mathematical statistical method. According to the requirements of the stakeholders, the exhibition performance appraisal indicators are extracted and, simplified by factor analysis, which leads to the formation of a set of performance appraisal index system. It is an instructive attempt to work out the exhibition performance appraisal model from the perspective of stakeholders, which may provide theoretical foundation and practice instruction for exhibition performance appraisal in our country.

  20. A content-oriented model for science exhibit engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    : as a means to operationalize the link between exhibit features and visitor activities; and as a template to transform scientists’ practices in the research context into visitors’ activities in the exhibit context. The resulting model of science exhibit engineering is presented and exemplified, and its...... in prompting visitors to carry out intended actions, exhibits do not necessarily promote the intended interpretations of these actions among visitors. Here, the notion of praxeology from didactics research is suggested as a model to remedy this shortcoming. The suggested role of praxeology is twofold......Recently, science museums have begun to review their educational purposes and redesign their pedagogies. At the most basic level, this entails accounting for the performance of individual exhibits, and indeed, in some cases, research indicates shortcomings in exhibit design: While often successful...

  1. Prenatal diagnosis of medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency in a family with a previous fatal case of sudden unexpected death in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, N; Winter, V; Jensen, P K;

    1995-01-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency is a potentially fatal inherited disease with a carrier frequency of approximately 1:100 in most Caucasian populations. The disease is implicated in sudden unexpected death in childhood. A prevalent disease-causing point mutation (A985G......) in the MCAD gene has been characterized, thus rendering diagnosis easy in the majority of cases. Since the clinical spectrum of MCAD deficiency ranges from death in the first days of life to an asymptomatic life, there are probably other genetic factors--in addition to MCAD mutations......--involved in the expression of the disease. Thus, families who have experienced the death of a child from MCAD deficiency might have an increased risk of a seriously affected subsequent child. In such a family we have therefore performed a prenatal diagnosis on a chorionic villus sample by a highly specific and sensitive...

  2. Risk factors and consequences of unexpected trapping for ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Fukuda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: While clipping cerebral aneurysms at the neck is optimal, in some cases this is not possible and other strategies are necessary. The purpose of this study was to describe the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes for inability to clip reconstruct ruptured anterior communicating artery (ACoA aneurysms. Methods: Of the 70 cases of ruptured ACoA aneurysms between January 2006 and December 2013, our institutional experience revealed four cases of small ACoA aneurysms that had been considered clippable prior to operation but required trapping. When a unilateral A2 segment of anterior cerebral artery (ACA was compromised by trapping, revascularization was performed by bypass surgery. Clinical presentation, angiographic characteristics, operative approach, intraoperative findings, and treatment outcomes were assessed. Results: Very small aneurysm under 3 mm was a risk factor for unexpected trapping. The reason for unexpected trapping was laceration of the aneurysmal neck in two cases, and lack of clippaple component due to disintegration of entire aneurysmal wall at the time of rupture in the others. Aneurysms with bilateral A1 were treated with sole trapping through pterional approach in two cases. The other two cases had hypoplastic unilateral A1 segment of ACA and were treated with combination of aneurysm trapping and revascularization of A2 segment of ACA through interhemispheric approach. No patients had new cerebral infarctions of cortical ACA territory from surgery. Cognitive dysfunction was observed in three cases, but all patients became independent at 12-month follow up. Conclusions: Unexpected trapping was performed when ruptured ACoA aneurysms were unclippable. Trapping with or without bypass can result in reasonable outcomes, with acceptable risk of cognitive dysfunction.

  3. Sudden unexpected nocturnal death in Chiari type 1 malformation and potential role of opioid analgesics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereydoon Roohi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chiari malformation type 1 (CM1 is a common congenital anomaly of the craniocervical junction. CM1 is reported to run a usually benign course and patients typically experience no symptoms or chronic, slowly progressive symptoms. However, recent reports indicate that a subset of patients with CM1 may present with acute deterioration and sudden unexpected death (SUD. We report a case of SUD during sleep in a young man with CM1, which we believe was related to the administration of common and therapeutic doses of narcotic analgesics for the management of pain. We will clarify the pathophysiology of acute deterioration and SUD in CM1 and the possibility that the adverse effects of opiate analgesics likely were the leading cause of death in our patient. Case Description: In this review, we present a 29-year-old male with worsening headache secondary to previously diagnosed CM1. The patient died suddenly and unexpectedly after administration of common and therapeutic doses of narcotic analgesics for the management of pain. Conclusion: The mechanism(s of acute neurological deterioration and sudden death in patients with CM1 remains poorly understood. We believe the rapid fatal deterioration in our patient following administration of opioids suggests that this category of medication may cause sudden unexpected "neurogenic" cardiac death in CM1 patients by inducing sleep-related breathing difficulties and associated hypercapnia. Hypercapnia by further increasing intracranial pressure can result in a sudden pressure-induced decompensation of the cardiopulmonary control centers in the brain stem and cause instantaneous cardiorespiratory arrest.

  4. Sudden unexpected nocturnal death in Chiari type 1 malformation and potential role of opioid analgesics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohi, Fereydoon; Gropen, Toby; Kula, Roger W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chiari malformation type 1 (CM1) is a common congenital anomaly of the craniocervical junction. CM1 is reported to run a usually benign course and patients typically experience no symptoms or chronic, slowly progressive symptoms. However, recent reports indicate that a subset of patients with CM1 may present with acute deterioration and sudden unexpected death (SUD). We report a case of SUD during sleep in a young man with CM1, which we believe was related to the administration of common and therapeutic doses of narcotic analgesics for the management of pain. We will clarify the pathophysiology of acute deterioration and SUD in CM1 and the possibility that the adverse effects of opiate analgesics likely were the leading cause of death in our patient. Case Description: In this review, we present a 29-year-old male with worsening headache secondary to previously diagnosed CM1. The patient died suddenly and unexpectedly after administration of common and therapeutic doses of narcotic analgesics for the management of pain. Conclusion: The mechanism(s) of acute neurological deterioration and sudden death in patients with CM1 remains poorly understood. We believe the rapid fatal deterioration in our patient following administration of opioids suggests that this category of medication may cause sudden unexpected “neurogenic” cardiac death in CM1 patients by inducing sleep-related breathing difficulties and associated hypercapnia. Hypercapnia by further increasing intracranial pressure can result in a sudden pressure-induced decompensation of the cardiopulmonary control centers in the brain stem and cause instantaneous cardiorespiratory arrest. PMID:24778905

  5. Attentional gain and processing capacity limits predict the propensity to neglect unexpected visual stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papera, Massimiliano; Richards, Anne

    2016-05-01

    Exogenous allocation of attentional resources allows the visual system to encode and maintain representations of stimuli in visual working memory (VWM). However, limits in the processing capacity to allocate resources can prevent unexpected visual stimuli from gaining access to VWM and thereby to consciousness. Using a novel approach to create unbiased stimuli of increasing saliency, we investigated visual processing during a visual search task in individuals who show a high or low propensity to neglect unexpected stimuli. When propensity to inattention is high, ERP recordings show a diminished amplification concomitantly with a decrease in theta band power during the N1 latency, followed by a poor target enhancement during the N2 latency. Furthermore, a later modulation in the P3 latency was also found in individuals showing propensity to visual neglect, suggesting that more effort is required for conscious maintenance of visual information in VWM. Effects during early stages of processing (N80 and P1) were also observed suggesting that sensitivity to contrasts and medium-to-high spatial frequencies may be modulated by low-level saliency (albeit no statistical group differences were found). In accordance with the Global Workplace Model, our data indicate that a lack of resources in low-level processors and visual attention may be responsible for the failure to "ignite" a state of high-level activity spread across several brain areas that is necessary for stimuli to access awareness. These findings may aid in the development of diagnostic tests and intervention to detect/reduce inattention propensity to visual neglect of unexpected stimuli.

  6. Environmental air pollution is an aggravating event for sudden unexpected death in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla A. Scorza

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available It is extremely difficult to estimate the occurrence of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP. On the other hand, discovering and carefully evaluating new risk factors that may contribute to the onset of cardiovascular abnormalities in people with refractory epilepsy may prevent fatal events in these individuals. In this context, we should not ignore that urban air pollution is a leading problem for environmental health and is able to cause serious cardiovascular dysfunctions that culminate in sudden death. In this regard, we aimed to determine whether environmental exposure to air pollution is an aggravating event for SUDEP.

  7. The topological pressure-temperature phase diagram of fluoxetine nitrate: monotropy unexpectedly turning into enantiotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céolin, René; Rietveld, Ivo B.

    2017-04-01

    The phase behavior of pharmaceuticals is important for regulatory requirements and dosage form development. Racemic fluoxetine nitrate possesses two crystalline forms for which initial measurements indicated that they have a monotropic relationship with form I the only stable form. By constructing the topological pressure-temperature phase diagram, it has been shown that unexpectedly form II has a stable domain in the phase diagram and can be easily obtained by heating and grinding. The pressure necessary to obtain form II is only 11 MPa, which is much lower than most pressure used for tableting in the pharmaceutical industry.

  8. Unexpected red shift of C-H vibrational band of Methyl benzoate

    CERN Document Server

    Maiti, Kiran Sankar; Scheurer, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The C-H vibrational bands become more and more important in the structural determination of biological molecules with the development of CARS microscopy and 2DIR spectroscopy. Due to the congested pattern, near degeneracy, and strong anharmonicity of the C-H stretch vibrations, assignment of the C-H vibrational bands are often misleading. Anharmonic vibrational spectra calculation with multidimensional potential energy surface interprets the C-H vibrational spectra more accurately. In this article we have presented the importance of multidimensional potential energy surface in anharmonic vibrational spectra calculation and discuss the unexpected red shift of C-H vibrational band of Methyl benzoate.

  9. Unexpected synthesis of cinnamaldehyde-dimedone adduct using samarium (III) chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahyana, A. H.; Nadila, A.; Ardiansah, B.

    2017-07-01

    In the present work, 1,8-dioxooctahydroxanthene cannot be obtained from the reaction between cinnamaldehyde and dimedone (ratio 1:2) using samarium(III) chloride as a Lewis acid catalyst. The unexpected product formed is 5,5-dimethyl-2-(3-phenylallylidene)cyclohexane-1,3-dione as a result of 1:1 adduct. The product is obtained in a low to good yield and the optimum protocol can be achieved by running the reaction using 10% mol SmCl3 in water at room temperature for 2 h. This product is preliminary screened for its radical scavenging test with moderate activity.

  10. Ornstein-Uhlenbeck diffusion of hermitian and non-hermitian matrices—unexpected links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaizot, Jean-Paul; Grela, Jacek; Nowak, Maciej A.; Tarnowski, Wojciech; Warchoł, Piotr

    2016-05-01

    We compare the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process for the Gaussian unitary ensemble to its non-hermitian counterpart—for the complex Ginibre ensemble. We exploit the mathematical framework based on the generalized Green’s functions, which involves a new, hidden complex variable, in comparison to the standard treatment of the resolvents. This new variable turns out to be crucial to understand the pattern of the evolution of non-hermitian systems. The new feature is the emergence of the coupling between the flow of eigenvalues and that of left/right eigenvectors. We analyze local and global equilibria for both systems. Finally, we highlight some unexpected links between both ensembles.

  11. Potential Central Nervous System Involvement in Sudden Unexpected Infant Deaths and the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thach, Bradley T

    2015-07-01

    Sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) in infancy which includes Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is the commonest diagnosed cause of death in the United States for infants 1 month to 1 year of age. Central nervous system mechanisms likely contribute to many of these deaths. We discuss some of these including seizure disorders, prolonged breath holding, arousal from sleep and its habituation, laryngeal reflex apnea potentiated by upper airway infection, and failure of brainstem-mediated autoresuscitation. In the conclusions section, we speculate how lives saved through back sleeping might result in later developmental problems in certain infants who otherwise might have died while sleeping prone.

  12. The role of temperature with unexpected ejection of gas and rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somosvari, Z.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis is conducted of the physical and chemical laws for storing gas. The effect of the temperature of the rock on the content of gas in a gas storage facility and the pressure of the gas are studied. It is established that in the formation of an unexpected gas and rock ejection the temperature of the rock only has an indirect role which effects the pressure of the gas in the pores. It is also pointed out that with slow liberation of gas the temperature of the rock may play a more specific role.

  13. Genetic analysis reveals an unexpected role of BMP7 in initiation of ureteric bud outgrowth in mouse embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Gonçalves

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic analysis in the mouse revealed that GREMLIN1 (GREM1-mediated antagonism of BMP4 is essential for ureteric epithelial branching as the disruption of ureteric bud outgrowth and renal agenesis in Grem1-deficient embryos is restored by additional inactivation of one Bmp4 allele. Another BMP ligand, BMP7, was shown to control the proliferative expansion of nephrogenic progenitors and its requirement for nephrogenesis can be genetically substituted by Bmp4. Therefore, we investigated whether BMP7 in turn also participates in inhibiting ureteric bud outgrowth during the initiation of metanephric kidney development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Genetic inactivation of one Bmp7 allele in Grem1-deficient mouse embryos does not alleviate the bilateral renal agenesis, while complete inactivation of Bmp7 restores ureteric bud outgrowth and branching. In mouse embryos lacking both Grem1 and Bmp7, GDNF/WNT11 feedback signaling and the expression of the Etv4 target gene, which regulates formation of the invading ureteric bud tip, are restored. In contrast to the restoration of ureteric bud outgrowth and branching, nephrogenesis remains aberrant as revealed by the premature loss of Six2 expressing nephrogenic progenitor cells. Therefore, very few nephrons develop in kidneys lacking both Grem1 and Bmp7 and the resulting dysplastic phenotype is indistinguishable from the one of Bmp7-deficient mouse embryos. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study reveals an unexpected inhibitory role of BMP7 during the onset of ureteric bud outgrowth. As BMP4, BMP7 and GREM1 are expressed in distinct mesenchymal and epithelial domains, the localized antagonistic interactions of GREM1 with BMPs could restrict and guide ureteric bud outgrowth and branching. The robustness and likely significant redundancy of the underlying signaling system is evidenced by the fact that global reduction of Bmp4 or inactivation of Bmp7 are both able to restore ureteric bud outgrowth

  14. Ultralong Persistent Room Temperature Phosphorescence of Metal Coordination Polymers Exhibiting Reversible pH-Responsive Emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongsheng; Wang, Ke-Zhi; Yan, Dongpeng

    2016-06-22

    Ultra-long-persistent room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) materials have attracted much attention and present various applications in illumination, displays, and the bioimaging field; however, the persistent RTP is generally from the inorganic phosphor materials to date. Herein, we show that the metal coordination polymers (CPs) could be new types of emerging long-lived RTP materials for potential sensor applications. First, two kinds of Cd-based CPs, Cd(m-BDC)(H2O) (1) and Cd(m-BDC)(BIM) (2) (m-BDC = 1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid; BIM = benzimidazole), were obtained through a hydrothermal process, and the samples were found to exhibit two-dimensional layered structures, which are stabilized by interlayer C-H···π interaction and π···π interaction, respectively. The CPs show unexpected second-time-scale ultra-long-persistent RTP after the removal of UV excitation, and this persistent emission can be detected easily on a time scale of 0-10 s. The CPs also feature a tunable luminescence decay lifetime by adjusting their coordination situation and packing fashion of ligands. Theoretical calculation further indicates that the introduction of the second ligand could highly influence the electronic structure and intermolecular electron transfer toward tailoring the RTP of the CP materials. Moreover, CP 2 exhibits well-defined pH- and temperature-dependent phosphorescence responses. Therefore, this work provides a facile way to develop new type of CPs with steady-state and dynamic tuning of the RTP properties from both experimental and theoretical perspectives, which have potential applications in the areas of displays, pH/temperature sensors, and phosphorescence logic gates. On account of suitable incorporation of inorganic and organic building blocks, it can be expected that the ultra-long-persistent RTP CPs can be extended to other similar systems due to the highly tunable structures and facile synthesis routes.

  15. Spin-offs from Research Exhibition Science Bringing Nations Together

    CERN Multimedia

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that the results of fundamental research can have unexpected and suc-cessful applications in different fields of human activity. A good example is that of nuclear track membranes. These membranes are produced by exposing polymer films to ion beams at isochronous cyclotrons in JINR. They are used in all fields that require reliable and ecologically safe filters; e.g. in medicine and in the food and elec-tronics industries. It is not surprising that Finnish businessmen readily accepted the proposal of the specialists from JINR's Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions to establish a joint venture for production of household water filters, and that these simple but effective devices are now used in many countries.

  16. 22 CFR Exhibit B to Part 204 - Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assignment B Exhibit B to Part 204 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT HOUSING GUARANTY STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS Pt. 204, Exh. B Exhibit B to Part 204—Assignment The undersigned, being the registered owner of a Note in the...

  17. FOTON Motor Crowns 4th China Auto International Circuit Exhibition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu; Yan

    2005-01-01

      In order to provide more opportuni ties for the high-developing Chinese auto industry including autos and motos to do export, and to enlarge the international influence of Chinese cars,the 4th China Auto International Circuit Exhibition will be held in Syria. The exhibition has been held for three times.……

  18. FOTON Motor Crowns 4th China Auto International Circuit Exhibition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Yan

    2005-01-01

    @@ In order to provide more opportuni ties for the high-developing Chinese auto industry including autos and motos to do export, and to enlarge the international influence of Chinese cars,the 4th China Auto International Circuit Exhibition will be held in Syria. The exhibition has been held for three times.

  19. EXHIBITION TAKES GREAT EMPEROR’S LIFE TO FRANCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SuSan

    2003-01-01

    “Court Life of Great Emperor Kang Xi a grand-scale exhibition organized by the Forbidden City Museum, will be held in Versailles, Paris in October 2003. The exhibition will be a highlight of the "China Cultural Year in France”.

  20. Perspectives on ... Multiculturalism and Library Exhibits: Sites of Contested Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, Gwendolyn J.

    2005-01-01

    This article analyzes a multicultural library exhibit presenting the Palestinian/Israeli conflict as a site of contested representation. Qualitative methodology is used to interrogate the exhibit and its audience reception. Drawing on insights from critical pedagogy, implications for libraries arising from this case study are given and suggestions…

  1. Presentation and exhibition activities for promoting theexportof transport services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darya Vladimirovna Nesterova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Development of presentation and exhibition activities is considered as an important factor in providing new competitive advantages at the strategic markets for exporting of transportation services. A specific role for exhibition activities as a factor to overcome market failures arose from imperfect information and incomplete markets is displayed. Exhibitions are considered as a true reflection of most market parameters, as a means to get correct information concerning market capacity and its borders, as an instrument to access to new markets. At the firm level presentation and branding activities should be considered as a modern technology (especially it concerns Russian companies which provide to hold up already existed markets and to conquer new ones. Presentation and branding activities are an effective technology to promote company trade-mark, competitive advantages for market demand increasing. Comparative analysis of the main exhibitions on transport and logistics issues is fulfilled on the data basecollected by authors. Data observes geographical distribution of transport exhibition and exhibition facilities development at several regions for the last years. The analyses allow to revealing a geographical structure of the exhibitions and its distribution by type of transport. The most promising and economically favorable exhibition areas for the promotion of Russian transport services are shown.

  2. CERN Industrials Exhibitions - Over 30 Years of Tradition

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Industrial exhibitions have been part of the CERN landscape for 33 years. At least once each year several companies from the same country come to CERN to present their products and services. Now, a new scheme of one-day visits is giving potential exhibitors at CERN a lighter option. The United Kingdom inaugurated the Industrial Exhibitions in 1968, and it wasn't till 1971 that other countries staged exhibitions at CERN. This photo was taken in 1969, at the second British exhibition, where 16 companies were present. Four years after joining CERN, Poland inaugurated its first exhibition at CERN in 1995 in the presence of the former Director-General Chris Llewellyn-Smith. Almost all the Member States have held industrial exhibitions at the Organization. May '68 wasn't only revolutionary in Paris. For the very first time, an industrial exhibition took place at CERN. Great Britain was first to come with eight companies and remains until this day the most devoted country to the programme with 17 exhibitions and ...

  3. The Signatures of the Invisible exhibition in Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The artist Paola Pivi with her work at the Signatures of the Invisible exhibition in Geneva during February 2002. This piece with needles suspended on nylon thread 'detects' people as they approach. The exhibition was for art inspired by research carried out at CERN.

  4. Online Cultural Heritage Exhibitions: A Survey of Information Retrieval Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Chern Li

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: What kinds of online cultural heritage exhibitions are now available on the internet? How far have these cultural heritage institutions voyaged in terms of harnessing the power of information and communication technology and the interactivity of multimedia systems to exhibit cultural heritage resources? This study aims to highlight the…

  5. 78 FR 7849 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... Opulence: British Art at the Dawn of the Twentieth Century,'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition... Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Edwardian Opulence: British Art at the Dawn of the Twentieth Century'' SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of the following...

  6. Outreach to Science Faculty and Students through Research Exhibitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tina; Hebblethwaite, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Penfield Library at the State University of New York at Oswego (SUNY Oswego) has a gallery exhibit space near the front entrance that is used to showcase student-faculty research and art class projects. This article features the library's outreach efforts to science faculty and students through research exhibitions. The library held an exhibition…

  7. Using Museum Exhibits: An Innovation in Experiential Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Satarupa

    2015-01-01

    Museum exhibits can be a tool in experiential learning. While instructors have documented various methods of experiential learning, they have not sufficiently explored such learning from museum exhibits. Museum researchers, however, have long found a satisfying cognitive component to museum visits. This paper narrates the author's design to…

  8. Healthy Development of Exhibition Industry——CCPIT's Deep Concern

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ 2008: National Exhibition Industrial Association should be established as soon as possible Exhibition industry, often renowned as the locomotive of the tertiary industry, is highly profitable smokeless industry (the profit rate is up to 20%-25% in the developed countries).

  9. Using Museum Exhibits: An Innovation in Experiential Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Satarupa

    2015-01-01

    Museum exhibits can be a tool in experiential learning. While instructors have documented various methods of experiential learning, they have not sufficiently explored such learning from museum exhibits. Museum researchers, however, have long found a satisfying cognitive component to museum visits. This paper narrates the author's design to…

  10. 45 CFR 1160.4 - Eligibility for international exhibitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... AND ARTIFACTS INDEMNITY ACT § 1160.4 Eligibility for international exhibitions. An indemnity agreement...- and domestic-owned objects in an international exhibition. The foreign-owned objects are eligible for indemnity coverage under paragraph (a) of this section, and the domestic-owned objects may be eligible...

  11. Beijing's Convention and Exhibition Industry Maintains Good Momentum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong Jiuling

    2011-01-01

    @@ In recent years, Beijing's conven-tion and exhibition industry has maintained a good development momentum with expanding scale and improving facilities, becoming an inseparable part of the city's modern service sector.The development of the convention and exhibition industry has played an active role in perfecting the capital's functions, optimizing the industrial structure and enhancing the city's radiation capabilities.

  12. How Children View Their World: Three Exhibitions of Children's Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Judith

    1979-01-01

    Describes three traveling art exhibitions assembled by the U.S. Committee for UNICEF from its collection to mark the International Year of the Child. Exhibitions of children's paintings, drawings, and prints from virtually every nation in the world will tour American cities through the spring of 1980. (RH)

  13. Exhibition at CERN's Globe of Science and Innovation

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2006-01-01

    Here we see pictures of displays at one of the exhibitions held at the Globe of Science and Innovation taken in September 2006. Located opposite the main CERN site, the Globe houses many public exhibitions throughout the year covering many topics from astronomy to particle physics.

  14. Sponsorship and exhibitions at Nordic science centres and museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsson, Eva; Sørensen, Helene

    2010-01-01

    Science and technology centres (STC) and science museums tend increasingly to rely on external economic support in order to create new exhibitions. But in what ways may the economic situation affect what is presented in their exhibitions? This article aims to explore how staff members consider...

  15. Data Collection Methods for Evaluating Museum Programs and Exhibitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Amy Crack; Cohn, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Museums often evaluate various aspects of their audiences' experiences, be it what they learn from a program or how they react to an exhibition. Each museum program or exhibition has its own set of goals, which can drive what an evaluator studies and how an evaluation evolves. When designing an evaluation, data collection methods are purposefully…

  16. Isolation of botulinolysin, a thiol-activated hemolysin, from serotype D Clostridium botulinum: A species-specific gene duplication in Clostridia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tomonori; Nagano, Thomas; Niwa, Koichi; Mutoh, Shingo; Uchino, Masataka; Tomizawa, Motohiro; Sagane, Yoshimasa; Watanabe, Toshihiro

    2016-12-01

    Botulinolysin (BLY) is a toxin produced by Clostridium botulinum that belongs to a group of thiol-activated hemolysins. In this study, a protein exhibiting hemolytic activity was purified from the culture supernatant of C. botulinum serotype D strain 4947. The purified protein displayed a single band by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with a molecular mass of 55kDa, and its N-terminal and internal amino acid sequences exhibited high similarity to a group of thiol-activated hemolysins produced by gram-positive bacteria. Thus, the purified protein was identified as the BLY. Using the nucleotide sequences of previously cloned genes for hemolysins, two types of genes encoding BLY-like proteins were cloned unexpectedly. Molecular modeling analysis indicated that the products of both genes displayed very similar structures, despite the low sequence similarity. In silico screening revealed a specific duplication of the hemolysin gene restricted to serotypes C and D of C. botulinum and their related species among thiol-activated hemolysin-producing bacteria. Our findings provide important insights into the genetic characteristics of pathogenic bacteria.

  17. CERN’s travelling exhibition goes to Austria

    CERN Document Server

    Mélissa Lanaro

    2011-01-01

    Since April 2009 CERN’s travelling exhibition has been touring through some of the Organization's Member States. After Italy and Denmark it has been on show since February at Austria’s Hartberg Ökopark, a very popular science museum situated some one hundred kilometres from Vienna. To coincide with the CERN exhibition, Austria’s scientific community has organised a series of events for the general public which have had marked success. The exhibition's next destination will be Portugal and preparations are already underway to ensure that it is another resounding success   The travelling exhibition was designed in collaboration with the University of Geneva, as part of the celebrations for its 450th anniversary, and has already notched up a good number of kilometres as it travels from country to country. “In 2010 the exhibition already had around 55,000 visitors,” explains Rolf Landua, who heads the Education Group. Since its inauguration ...

  18. First trial postural reactions to unexpected balance disturbances: a comparison with the acoustic startle reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Nijhuis, Lars B; Allum, John H J; Valls-Solé, Josep; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2010-11-01

    Unexpected support-surface movements delivered during stance elicit "first trial" postural reactions, which are larger and cause greater instability compared with habituated responses. The nature of this first trial reaction remains unknown. We hypothesized that first trial postural reactions consist of a generalized startle reaction, with a similar muscle synergy as the acoustic startle response, combined with an automatic postural reaction. Therefore we compared acoustic startle responses to first trial postural reactions. Eight healthy subjects stood on a support surface that unexpectedly rotated backwards 10 times, followed by 10 startling acoustic stimuli, or vice versa. Outcome measures included full body kinematics and surface EMG from muscles involved in startle reactions or postural control. Postural perturbations and startling acoustic stimuli both elicited a clear first trial reaction, as reflected by larger kinematic and EMG responses. The ensuing habituation rate to repeated identical stimuli was comparable for neck and trunk muscles in both conditions. Onset latencies in neck muscles occurred significantly later for first trial perturbations compared with startle responses, but earlier in trunk muscles. Our results show that platform tilting initially induces reactions larger than needed to maintain equilibrium. For neck and trunk muscles, these first trial postural reactions resembled acoustic startle reflexes. First trial postural reactions may be triggered by interaction of afferent volleys formed by somatosensory and vestibular inputs. Acoustic startle reactions may also be partially triggered by vestibular inputs. Similar muscle activation driven by vestibular inputs may be the common element of first trial postural responses and acoustic startle reactions.

  19. Rural families' interpretations of experiencing unexpected transition in the wake of a natural disaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Cristina Manfrini Fernandes

    Full Text Available Abstract: Natural disasters affect populations in various parts of the world. The impacts of disasters can cause many problems to the health of people and disruption to family life, potentially leading to an unexpected transition. The objective of this paper is to present the unexpected transitional experiences of rural families following a natural disaster. A multiple case study of six families was conducted with children and adolescents in a rural area affected by a 2008 disaster in southern Brazil. For data collection, we used participant observation, narrative interviews, genograms, ecomaps and an instrument called calendar routine. The analysis of the data resulted in different family interpretations about the changes resulting from the storm and compared life before and after the disaster. The loss of homes and loved ones, migration, unemployment, and losses from the farm were the main changes associated with new development tasks. The experiences of family transition after the disaster revealed that losses influenced social lives, daily routines and the preservation of cultural values.

  20. Unexpected findings at imaging: Predicting frequency in various types of studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumbreras, Blanca [Public Health Department, Miguel Hernandez University (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (Spain)], E-mail: blumbreras@umh.es; Gonzalez-Alvarez, Isabel [Radiodiagnostic Department, San Juan Hospital, 03550 Alicante (Spain)], E-mail: gonzalez_isa@gva.es; Lorente, Ma Fernanda [Radiodiagnostic Department, San Juan Hospital, 03550 Alicante (Spain)], E-mail: MARFERLORENTE@telefonica.net; Calbo, Jorge [Radiodiagnostic Department, San Juan Hospital, 03550 Alicante (Spain)], E-mail: jocalma@hotmail.com; Aranaz, Jesus [Preventive Medicine Department, San Juan Hospital, 03550 Alicante (Spain)], E-mail: aranaz_jes@gva.es; Hernandez-Aguado, Ildefonso [Public Health Department, Miguel Hernandez University (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (Spain)], E-mail: ihernandez@umh.es

    2010-04-15

    Objective: The objective was to evaluate the prevalence and associated variables of unsuspected findings from imaging tests in clinical practice. Material and Methods: Cross-sectional study of patients referred for an imaging test in 2006. Two independent radiologists classified the imaging tests according to the presence or absence of an unexpected finding in relation with the causes that prompted the test (kappa = 0.95). A thorough chart review of these patients was carried out as a quality control. Results: Out of 3259 patients in the study, 488 revealed unsuspected findings (15.0%). The prevalence of abnormal findings varied according to age: from 20.4% (150/734) in the over 74-group to 9.0% (76/847) in the under 43-group. The largest prevalence was in the category of infectious diseases (14/49, 28.6%) and in CT (260/901, 28.9%) and ultrasound (138/668, 20.7%). Studies showing moderate clinical information on the referral form were less likely to show unexpected findings than those with null or minor information (OR 0.51; 95% CI 0.36-0.73). Conclusion: Clinicians should expect the frequency of diseases detectable by imaging to increase in the future. Further research with follow-up of these findings is needed to estimate the effect of imaging technologies on final health outcomes.