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  1. Role of the NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase NQR and the cytochrome b AIR12 in controlling superoxide generation at the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biniek, Catherine; Heyno, Eiri; Kruk, Jerzy; Sparla, Francesca; Trost, Paolo; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2017-04-01

    The quinone reductase NQR and the b-type cytochrome AIR12 of the plasma membrane are important for the control of reactive oxygen species in the apoplast. AIR12 and NQR are two proteins attached to the plant plasma membrane which may be important for generating and controlling levels of reactive oxygen species in the apoplast. AIR12 (Auxin Induced in Root culture) is a single gene of Arabidopsis that codes for a mono-heme cytochrome b. The NADPH quinone oxidoreductase NQR is a two-electron-transferring flavoenzyme that contributes to the generation of O 2(•-) in isolated plasma membranes. A. thaliana double knockout plants of both NQR and AIR12 generated more O 2(•-) and germinated faster than the single mutant affected in AIR12. To test whether NQR and AIR12 are able to interact functionally, recombinant purified proteins were added to plasma membranes isolated from soybean hypocotyls. In vitro NADH-dependent O 2(•-) production at the plasma membrane in the presence of NQR was reduced upon addition of AIR12. Electron donation from semi-reduced menadione to AIR12 was shown to take place. Biochemical analysis showed that purified plasma membrane from soybean hypocotyls or roots contained phylloquinone and menaquinone-4 as redox carriers. This is the first report on the occurrence of menaquinone-4 in eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms. We propose that NQR and AIR12 interact via the quinone, allowing an electron transfer from cytosolic NAD(P)H to apoplastic monodehydroascorbate and control thereby the level of reactive oxygen production and the redox state of the apoplast.

  2. Hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes originating from long non-coding RNAs.

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    Chen Xie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tinkering with pre-existing genes has long been known as a major way to create new genes. Recently, however, motherless protein-coding genes have been found to have emerged de novo from ancestral non-coding DNAs. How these genes originated is not well addressed to date. Here we identified 24 hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes with precise origination timing in vertebrate phylogeny. Strand-specific RNA-Seq analyses were performed in five rhesus macaque tissues (liver, prefrontal cortex, skeletal muscle, adipose, and testis, which were then integrated with public transcriptome data from human, chimpanzee, and rhesus macaque. On the basis of comparing the RNA expression profiles in the three species, we found that most of the hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes encoded polyadenylated non-coding RNAs in rhesus macaque or chimpanzee with a similar transcript structure and correlated tissue expression profile. According to the rule of parsimony, the majority of these hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes appear to have acquired a regulated transcript structure and expression profile before acquiring coding potential. Interestingly, although the expression profile was largely correlated, the coding genes in human often showed higher transcriptional abundance than their non-coding counterparts in rhesus macaque. The major findings we report in this manuscript are robust and insensitive to the parameters used in the identification and analysis of de novo genes. Our results suggest that at least a portion of long non-coding RNAs, especially those with active and regulated transcription, may serve as a birth pool for protein-coding genes, which are then further optimized at the transcriptional level.

  3. Hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes originating from long non-coding RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tinkering with pre-existing genes has long been known as a major way to create new genes. Recently, however, motherless protein-coding genes have been found to have emerged de novo from ancestral non-coding DNAs. How these genes originated is not well addressed to date. Here we identified 24 hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes with precise origination timing in vertebrate phylogeny. Strand-specific RNA-Seq analyses were performed in five rhesus macaque tissues (liver, prefrontal cortex, skeletal muscle, adipose, and testis, which were then integrated with public transcriptome data from human, chimpanzee, and rhesus macaque. On the basis of comparing the RNA expression profiles in the three species, we found that most of the hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes encoded polyadenylated non-coding RNAs in rhesus macaque or chimpanzee with a similar transcript structure and correlated tissue expression profile. According to the rule of parsimony, the majority of these hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes appear to have acquired a regulated transcript structure and expression profile before acquiring coding potential. Interestingly, although the expression profile was largely correlated, the coding genes in human often showed higher transcriptional abundance than their non-coding counterparts in rhesus macaque. The major findings we report in this manuscript are robust and insensitive to the parameters used in the identification and analysis of de novo genes. Our results suggest that at least a portion of long non-coding RNAs, especially those with active and regulated transcription, may serve as a birth pool for protein-coding genes, which are then further optimized at the transcriptional level.

  4. Concerted evolution of duplicated protein-coding genes in Drosophila.

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    Hickey, D A; Bally-Cuif, L; Abukashawa, S; Payant, V; Benkel, B F

    1991-03-01

    Very rapid rates of gene conversion were observed between duplicated alpha-amylase-coding sequences in Drosophila melanogaster. This gene conversion process was also seen in the related species Drosophila erecta. Specifically, there is virtual sequence identity between the coding regions of the two genes within each species, while the sequence divergence between species is close to that expected based on their phylogenetic relationship. The flanking, noncoding regions are much more highly diverged and do not appear to be subject to gene conversion. Comparison of amylase sequences between the two species provides a clear demonstration that recurrent gene conversion does indeed lead to the concerted evolution of the gene pair.

  5. Concerted evolution of duplicated protein-coding genes in Drosophila.

    OpenAIRE

    Hickey, D. A.; Bally-Cuif, L.; Abukashawa, S; Payant, V; Benkel, B F

    1991-01-01

    Very rapid rates of gene conversion were observed between duplicated alpha-amylase-coding sequences in Drosophila melanogaster. This gene conversion process was also seen in the related species Drosophila erecta. Specifically, there is virtual sequence identity between the coding regions of the two genes within each species, while the sequence divergence between species is close to that expected based on their phylogenetic relationship. The flanking, noncoding regions are much more highly div...

  6. De Novo Origin of Human Protein-Coding Genes

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    Wu, Dong-Dong; Irwin, David M.; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The de novo origin of a new protein-coding gene from non-coding DNA is considered to be a very rare occurrence in genomes. Here we identify 60 new protein-coding genes that originated de novo on the human lineage since divergence from the chimpanzee. The functionality of these genes is supported by both transcriptional and proteomic evidence. RNA–seq data indicate that these genes have their highest expression levels in the cerebral cortex and testes, which might suggest that these genes contribute to phenotypic traits that are unique to humans, such as improved cognitive ability. Our results are inconsistent with the traditional view that the de novo origin of new genes is very rare, thus there should be greater appreciation of the importance of the de novo origination of genes. PMID:22102831

  7. ARC Code TI: JavaGenes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — JavaGenes is a fairly general purpose evolutionary software system written in Java. It implements several versions of the genetic algorithm, simulated annealing,...

  8. Selection on protein-coding genes of natural cyanobacterial populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mes, T.H.M.; Doeleman, M.W.; Lodders, N.; Nübel, U.; Stal, L.J.

    2006-01-01

    We examined the distribution of synonymous and non-synonymous changes in 12 protein-coding genes of natural populations of cyanobacteria to infer changes in gene functionality. By comparing mutation distributions within and across species using the McDonald–Kreitman test, we found data sets to conta

  9. Mammalian BEX, WEX and GASP genes: Coding and non-coding chimaerism sustained by gene conversion events

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    Ponting Chris P

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of sequence innovations in the genomes of mammals facilitates understanding of human gene function, as well as sheds light on the molecular mechanisms which underlie these changes. Although gene duplication plays a major role in genome evolution, studies regarding concerted evolution events among gene family members have been limited in scope and restricted to protein-coding regions, where high sequence similarity is easily detectable. Results We describe a mammalian-specific expansion of more than 20 rapidly-evolving genes on human chromosome Xq22.1. Many of these are highly divergent in their protein-coding regions yet contain a conserved sequence motif in their 5' UTRs which appears to have been maintained by multiple events of concerted evolution. These events have led to the generation of chimaeric genes, each with a 5' UTR and a protein-coding region that possess independent evolutionary histories. We suggest that concerted evolution has occurred via gene conversion independently in different mammalian lineages, and these events have resulted in elevated G+C levels in the encompassing genomic regions. These concerted evolution events occurred within and between genes from three separate protein families ('brain-expressed X-linked' [BEX], WWbp5-like X-linked [WEX] and G-protein-coupled receptor-associated sorting protein [GASP], which often are expressed in mammalian brains and associated with receptor mediated signalling and apoptosis. Conclusion Despite high protein-coding divergence among mammalian-specific genes, we identified a DNA motif common to these genes' 5' UTR exons. The motif has undergone concerted evolution events independently of its neighbouring protein-coding regions, leading to formation of evolutionary chimaeric genes. These findings have implications for the identification of non protein-coding regulatory elements and their lineage-specific evolution in mammals.

  10. An improved canine genome and a comprehensive catalogue of coding genes and non-coding transcripts.

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    Marc P Hoeppner

    Full Text Available The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, is a well-established model system for mapping trait and disease loci. While the original draft sequence was of good quality, gaps were abundant particularly in promoter regions of the genome, negatively impacting the annotation and study of candidate genes. Here, we present an improved genome build, canFam3.1, which includes 85 MB of novel sequence and now covers 99.8% of the euchromatic portion of the genome. We also present multiple RNA-Sequencing data sets from 10 different canine tissues to catalog ∼175,000 expressed loci. While about 90% of the coding genes previously annotated by EnsEMBL have measurable expression in at least one sample, the number of transcript isoforms detected by our data expands the EnsEMBL annotations by a factor of four. Syntenic comparison with the human genome revealed an additional ∼3,000 loci that are characterized as protein coding in human and were also expressed in the dog, suggesting that those were previously not annotated in the EnsEMBL canine gene set. In addition to ∼20,700 high-confidence protein coding loci, we found ∼4,600 antisense transcripts overlapping exons of protein coding genes, ∼7,200 intergenic multi-exon transcripts without coding potential, likely candidates for long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs and ∼11,000 transcripts were reported by two different library construction methods but did not fit any of the above categories. Of the lincRNAs, about 6,000 have no annotated orthologs in human or mouse. Functional analysis of two novel transcripts with shRNA in a mouse kidney cell line altered cell morphology and motility. All in all, we provide a much-improved annotation of the canine genome and suggest regulatory functions for several of the novel non-coding transcripts.

  11. Evolution of coding and non-coding genes in HOX clusters of a marsupial

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    Yu Hongshi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HOX gene clusters are thought to be highly conserved amongst mammals and other vertebrates, but the long non-coding RNAs have only been studied in detail in human and mouse. The sequencing of the kangaroo genome provides an opportunity to use comparative analyses to compare the HOX clusters of a mammal with a distinct body plan to those of other mammals. Results Here we report a comparative analysis of HOX gene clusters between an Australian marsupial of the kangaroo family and the eutherians. There was a strikingly high level of conservation of HOX gene sequence and structure and non-protein coding genes including the microRNAs miR-196a, miR-196b, miR-10a and miR-10b and the long non-coding RNAs HOTAIR, HOTAIRM1 and HOXA11AS that play critical roles in regulating gene expression and controlling development. By microRNA deep sequencing and comparative genomic analyses, two conserved microRNAs (miR-10a and miR-10b were identified and one new candidate microRNA with typical hairpin precursor structure that is expressed in both fibroblasts and testes was found. The prediction of microRNA target analysis showed that several known microRNA targets, such as miR-10, miR-414 and miR-464, were found in the tammar HOX clusters. In addition, several novel and putative miRNAs were identified that originated from elsewhere in the tammar genome and that target the tammar HOXB and HOXD clusters. Conclusions This study confirms that the emergence of known long non-coding RNAs in the HOX clusters clearly predate the marsupial-eutherian divergence 160 Ma ago. It also identified a new potentially functional microRNA as well as conserved miRNAs. These non-coding RNAs may participate in the regulation of HOX genes to influence the body plan of this marsupial.

  12. Regulation of Coding and Non-coding Genes : New insights obtained through analysis of high-throughput sequencing data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Rooijers (Koos)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThe genetic code of a cell is kept in its DNA. However, a vast number of functions of a cell are carried out by proteins. Through gene expression the genetic code can be expressed and give rise to proteins. The expression of genes into proteins follows two steps: transcription of DNA

  13. Regulation of Coding and Non-coding Genes : New insights obtained through analysis of high-throughput sequencing data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Rooijers (Koos)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThe genetic code of a cell is kept in its DNA. However, a vast number of functions of a cell are carried out by proteins. Through gene expression the genetic code can be expressed and give rise to proteins. The expression of genes into proteins follows two steps: transcription of

  14. Kinetic models of gene expression including non-coding RNAs

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    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2011-03-01

    In cells, genes are transcribed into mRNAs, and the latter are translated into proteins. Due to the feedbacks between these processes, the kinetics of gene expression may be complex even in the simplest genetic networks. The corresponding models have already been reviewed in the literature. A new avenue in this field is related to the recognition that the conventional scenario of gene expression is fully applicable only to prokaryotes whose genomes consist of tightly packed protein-coding sequences. In eukaryotic cells, in contrast, such sequences are relatively rare, and the rest of the genome includes numerous transcript units representing non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). During the past decade, it has become clear that such RNAs play a crucial role in gene expression and accordingly influence a multitude of cellular processes both in the normal state and during diseases. The numerous biological functions of ncRNAs are based primarily on their abilities to silence genes via pairing with a target mRNA and subsequently preventing its translation or facilitating degradation of the mRNA-ncRNA complex. Many other abilities of ncRNAs have been discovered as well. Our review is focused on the available kinetic models describing the mRNA, ncRNA and protein interplay. In particular, we systematically present the simplest models without kinetic feedbacks, models containing feedbacks and predicting bistability and oscillations in simple genetic networks, and models describing the effect of ncRNAs on complex genetic networks. Mathematically, the presentation is based primarily on temporal mean-field kinetic equations. The stochastic and spatio-temporal effects are also briefly discussed.

  15. Fact or fiction: updates on how protein-coding genes might emerge de novo from previously non-coding DNA

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    Schmitz, Jonathan F; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich

    2017-01-01

    Over the last few years, there has been an increasing amount of evidence for the de novo emergence of protein-coding genes, i.e. out of non-coding DNA. Here, we review the current literature and summarize the state of the field. We focus specifically on open questions and challenges in the study of de novo protein-coding genes such as the identification and verification of de novo-emerged genes. The greatest obstacle to date is the lack of high-quality genomic data with very short divergence times which could help precisely pin down the location of origin of a de novo gene. We conclude that, while there is plenty of evidence from a genetics perspective, there is a lack of functional studies of bona fide de novo genes and almost no knowledge about protein structures and how they come about during the emergence of de novo protein-coding genes. We suggest that future studies should concentrate on the functional and structural characterization of de novo protein-coding genes as well as the detailed study of the emergence of functional de novo protein-coding genes.

  16. A New Method Of Gene Coding For A Genetic Algorithm Designed For Parametric Optimization

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    Radu BELEA

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In a parametric optimization problem the genes code the real parameters of the fitness function. There are two coding techniques known under the names of: binary coded genes and real coded genes. The comparison between these two is a controversial subject since the first papers about parametric optimization have appeared. An objective analysis regarding the advantages and disadvantages of the two coding techniques is difficult to be done while different format information is compared. The present paper suggests a gene coding technique that uses the same format for both binary coded genes and for the real coded genes. After unifying the real parameters representation, the next criterion is going to be applied: the differences between the two techniques are statistically measured by the effect of the genetic operators over some random generated fellows.

  17. Gene Perturbation Atlas (GPA): a single-gene perturbation repository for characterizing functional mechanisms of coding and non-coding genes.

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    Xiao, Yun; Gong, Yonghui; Lv, Yanling; Lan, Yujia; Hu, Jing; Li, Feng; Xu, Jinyuan; Bai, Jing; Deng, Yulan; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Guanxiong; Yu, Fulong; Li, Xia

    2015-06-03

    Genome-wide transcriptome profiling after gene perturbation is a powerful means of elucidating gene functional mechanisms in diverse contexts. The comprehensive collection and analysis of the resulting transcriptome profiles would help to systematically characterize context-dependent gene functional mechanisms and conduct experiments in biomedical research. To this end, we collected and curated over 3000 transcriptome profiles in human and mouse from diverse gene perturbation experiments, which involved 1585 different perturbed genes (microRNAs, lncRNAs and protein-coding genes) across 1170 different cell lines/tissues. For each profile, we identified differential genes and their associated functions and pathways, constructed perturbation networks, predicted transcription regulation and cancer/drug associations, and assessed cooperative perturbed genes. Based on these transcriptome analyses, the Gene Perturbation Atlas (GPA) can be used to detect (i) novel or cell-specific functions and pathways affected by perturbed genes, (ii) protein interactions and regulatory cascades affected by perturbed genes, and (iii) perturbed gene-mediated cooperative effects. The GPA is a user-friendly database to support the rapid searching and exploration of gene perturbations. Particularly, we visualized functional effects of perturbed genes from multiple perspectives. In summary, the GPA is a valuable resource for characterizing gene functions and regulatory mechanisms after single-gene perturbations. The GPA is freely accessible at http://biocc.hrbmu.edu.cn/GPA/.

  18. Transcriptional Truncation of the Long Coding Imprinted Gene Usp29.

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    Hongzhi He

    Full Text Available Usp29 (Ubiquitin-specific protease 29 is a paternally expressed gene located upstream of another imprinted gene Peg3. In the current study, the transcription of this long coding gene spanning a 250-kb genomic distance was truncated using a knockin allele. According to the results, paternal transmission of the mutant allele resulted in reduced body and litter sizes whereas the maternal transmission caused no obvious effects. In the paternal mutant, the expression levels of Usp29 were reduced to 14-18% level of the wild-type littermates due to the Poly-A signal included in the knockin cassette. Expression analyses further revealed an unusual female-specific up-regulation of the adjacent imprinted gene Zfp264 in the mutant. Consistent with this, the promoter of Zfp264 was hypomethylated only in the female mutant. Interestingly, this female-specific hypomethylation by the knockin allele was not detected in the offspring of an interspecific crossing, indicating its sensitivity to genetic background. Overall, the results suggest that the transcription of Usp29 may be involved in DNA methylation setting of Zfp264 promoter in a sex-specific manner.

  19. Promoter Analysis Reveals Globally Differential Regulation of Human Long Non-Coding RNA and Protein-Coding Genes

    KAUST Repository

    Alam, Tanvir

    2014-10-02

    Transcriptional regulation of protein-coding genes is increasingly well-understood on a global scale, yet no comparable information exists for long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) genes, which were recently recognized to be as numerous as protein-coding genes in mammalian genomes. We performed a genome-wide comparative analysis of the promoters of human lncRNA and protein-coding genes, finding global differences in specific genetic and epigenetic features relevant to transcriptional regulation. These two groups of genes are hence subject to separate transcriptional regulatory programs, including distinct transcription factor (TF) proteins that significantly favor lncRNA, rather than coding-gene, promoters. We report a specific signature of promoter-proximal transcriptional regulation of lncRNA genes, including several distinct transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). Experimental DNase I hypersensitive site profiles are consistent with active configurations of these lncRNA TFBS sets in diverse human cell types. TFBS ChIP-seq datasets confirm the binding events that we predicted using computational approaches for a subset of factors. For several TFs known to be directly regulated by lncRNAs, we find that their putative TFBSs are enriched at lncRNA promoters, suggesting that the TFs and the lncRNAs may participate in a bidirectional feedback loop regulatory network. Accordingly, cells may be able to modulate lncRNA expression levels independently of mRNA levels via distinct regulatory pathways. Our results also raise the possibility that, given the historical reliance on protein-coding gene catalogs to define the chromatin states of active promoters, a revision of these chromatin signature profiles to incorporate expressed lncRNA genes is warranted in the future.

  20. A first look at ARFome: dual-coding genes in mammalian genomes.

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    Wen-Yu Chung

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Coding of multiple proteins by overlapping reading frames is not a feature one would associate with eukaryotic genes. Indeed, codependency between codons of overlapping protein-coding regions imposes a unique set of evolutionary constraints, making it a costly arrangement. Yet in cases of tightly coexpressed interacting proteins, dual coding may be advantageous. Here we show that although dual coding is nearly impossible by chance, a number of human transcripts contain overlapping coding regions. Using newly developed statistical techniques, we identified 40 candidate genes with evolutionarily conserved overlapping coding regions. Because our approach is conservative, we expect mammals to possess more dual-coding genes. Our results emphasize that the skepticism surrounding eukaryotic dual coding is unwarranted: rather than being artifacts, overlapping reading frames are often hallmarks of fascinating biology.

  1. Dietary Intervention by Phytochemicals and Their Role in Modulating Coding and Non-Coding Genes in Cancer

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    Liviuta Budisan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemicals are natural compounds synthesized as secondary metabolites in plants, representing an important source of molecules with a wide range of therapeutic applications. These natural agents are important regulators of key pathological processes/conditions, including cancer, as they are able to modulate the expression of coding and non-coding transcripts with an oncogenic or tumour suppressor role. These natural agents are currently exploited for the development of therapeutic strategies alone or in tandem with conventional treatments for cancer. The aim of this paper is to review the recent studies regarding the role of these natural phytochemicals in different processes related to cancer inhibition, including apoptosis activation, angiogenesis and metastasis suppression. From the large palette of phytochemicals we selected epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE, genistein, morin and kaempferol, due to their increased activity in modulating multiple coding and non-coding genes, targeting the main hallmarks of cancer.

  2. Sub-grouping of Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 var genes based on sequence analysis of coding and non-coding regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavstsen, Thomas; Salanti, Ali; Jensen, Anja T R;

    2003-01-01

    and organization of the 3D7 PfEMP1 repertoire was investigated on the basis of the complete genome sequence. METHODS: Using two tree-building methods we analysed the coding and non-coding sequences of 3D7 var and rif genes as well as var genes of other parasite strains. RESULTS: var genes can be sub...

  3. Differential DNA methylation profiles of coding and non-coding genes define hippocampal sclerosis in human temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Miller-Delaney, Suzanne F C; Bryan, Kenneth; Das, Sudipto; McKiernan, Ross C; Bray, Isabella M; Reynolds, James P; Gwinn, Ryder; Stallings, Raymond L; Henshall, David C

    2015-03-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with large-scale, wide-ranging changes in gene expression in the hippocampus. Epigenetic changes to DNA are attractive mechanisms to explain the sustained hyperexcitability of chronic epilepsy. Here, through methylation analysis of all annotated C-phosphate-G islands and promoter regions in the human genome, we report a pilot study of the methylation profiles of temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis. Furthermore, by comparative analysis of expression and promoter methylation, we identify methylation sensitive non-coding RNA in human temporal lobe epilepsy. A total of 146 protein-coding genes exhibited altered DNA methylation in temporal lobe epilepsy hippocampus (n = 9) when compared to control (n = 5), with 81.5% of the promoters of these genes displaying hypermethylation. Unique methylation profiles were evident in temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis, in addition to a common methylation profile regardless of pathology grade. Gene ontology terms associated with development, neuron remodelling and neuron maturation were over-represented in the methylation profile of Watson Grade 1 samples (mild hippocampal sclerosis). In addition to genes associated with neuronal, neurotransmitter/synaptic transmission and cell death functions, differential hypermethylation of genes associated with transcriptional regulation was evident in temporal lobe epilepsy, but overall few genes previously associated with epilepsy were among the differentially methylated. Finally, a panel of 13, methylation-sensitive microRNA were identified in temporal lobe epilepsy including MIR27A, miR-193a-5p (MIR193A) and miR-876-3p (MIR876), and the differential methylation of long non-coding RNA documented for the first time. The present study therefore reports select, genome-wide DNA methylation changes in human temporal lobe epilepsy that may contribute to the molecular architecture of the epileptic brain.

  4. Differential DNA methylation profiles of coding and non-coding genes define hippocampal sclerosis in human temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Delaney, Suzanne F.C.; Bryan, Kenneth; Das, Sudipto; McKiernan, Ross C.; Bray, Isabella M.; Reynolds, James P.; Gwinn, Ryder; Stallings, Raymond L.

    2015-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with large-scale, wide-ranging changes in gene expression in the hippocampus. Epigenetic changes to DNA are attractive mechanisms to explain the sustained hyperexcitability of chronic epilepsy. Here, through methylation analysis of all annotated C-phosphate-G islands and promoter regions in the human genome, we report a pilot study of the methylation profiles of temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis. Furthermore, by comparative analysis of expression and promoter methylation, we identify methylation sensitive non-coding RNA in human temporal lobe epilepsy. A total of 146 protein-coding genes exhibited altered DNA methylation in temporal lobe epilepsy hippocampus (n = 9) when compared to control (n = 5), with 81.5% of the promoters of these genes displaying hypermethylation. Unique methylation profiles were evident in temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis, in addition to a common methylation profile regardless of pathology grade. Gene ontology terms associated with development, neuron remodelling and neuron maturation were over-represented in the methylation profile of Watson Grade 1 samples (mild hippocampal sclerosis). In addition to genes associated with neuronal, neurotransmitter/synaptic transmission and cell death functions, differential hypermethylation of genes associated with transcriptional regulation was evident in temporal lobe epilepsy, but overall few genes previously associated with epilepsy were among the differentially methylated. Finally, a panel of 13, methylation-sensitive microRNA were identified in temporal lobe epilepsy including MIR27A, miR-193a-5p (MIR193A) and miR-876-3p (MIR876), and the differential methylation of long non-coding RNA documented for the first time. The present study therefore reports select, genome-wide DNA methylation changes in human temporal lobe epilepsy that may contribute to the molecular architecture of the epileptic brain. PMID

  5. Expression of protein-coding genes embedded in ribosomal DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Steinar D; Haugen, Peik; Nielsen, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) is a specialised chromosomal location that is dedicated to high-level transcription of ribosomal RNA genes. Interestingly, rDNAs are frequently interrupted by parasitic elements, some of which carry protein genes. These are non-LTR retrotransposons and group II introns...... that encode reverse transcriptase-like genes, and group I introns and archaeal introns that encode homing endonuclease genes (HEGs). Although rDNA-embedded protein genes are widespread in nuclei, organelles and bacteria, there is surprisingly little information available on how these genes are expressed....... Exceptions include a handful of HEGs from group I introns. Recent studies have revealed unusual and essential roles of group I and group I-like ribozymes in the endogenous expression of HEGs. Here we discuss general aspects of rDNA-embedded protein genes and focus on HEG expression from group I introns...

  6. Evolutionary hallmarks of the human proteome: chasing the age and coregulation of protein-coding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Katia de Paiva; Campos-Laborie, Francisco José; Vialle, Ricardo Assunção; Ortega, José Miguel; De Las Rivas, Javier

    2016-10-25

    The development of large-scale technologies for quantitative transcriptomics has enabled comprehensive analysis of the gene expression profiles in complete genomes. RNA-Seq allows the measurement of gene expression levels in a manner far more precise and global than previous methods. Studies using this technology are altering our view about the extent and complexity of the eukaryotic transcriptomes. In this respect, multiple efforts have been done to determine and analyse the gene expression patterns of human cell types in different conditions, either in normal or pathological states. However, until recently, little has been reported about the evolutionary marks present in human protein-coding genes, particularly from the combined perspective of gene expression and protein evolution. We present a combined analysis of human protein-coding gene expression profiling and time-scale ancestry mapping, that places the genes in taxonomy clades and reveals eight evolutionary major steps ("hallmarks"), that include clusters of functionally coherent proteins. The human expressed genes are analysed using a RNA-Seq dataset of 116 samples from 32 tissues. The evolutionary analysis of the human proteins is performed combining the information from: (i) a database of orthologous proteins (OMA), (ii) the taxonomy mapping of genes to lineage clades (from NCBI Taxonomy) and (iii) the evolution time-scale mapping provided by TimeTree (Timescale of Life). The human protein-coding genes are also placed in a relational context based in the construction of a robust gene coexpression network, that reveals tighter links between age-related protein-coding genes and finds functionally coherent gene modules. Understanding the relational landscape of the human protein-coding genes is essential for interpreting the functional elements and modules of our active genome. Moreover, decoding the evolutionary history of the human genes can provide very valuable information to reveal or uncover their

  7. Evolutionary hallmarks of the human proteome: chasing the age and coregulation of protein-coding genes

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    Katia de Paiva Lopes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of large-scale technologies for quantitative transcriptomics has enabled comprehensive analysis of the gene expression profiles in complete genomes. RNA-Seq allows the measurement of gene expression levels in a manner far more precise and global than previous methods. Studies using this technology are altering our view about the extent and complexity of the eukaryotic transcriptomes. In this respect, multiple efforts have been done to determine and analyse the gene expression patterns of human cell types in different conditions, either in normal or pathological states. However, until recently, little has been reported about the evolutionary marks present in human protein-coding genes, particularly from the combined perspective of gene expression and protein evolution. Results We present a combined analysis of human protein-coding gene expression profiling and time-scale ancestry mapping, that places the genes in taxonomy clades and reveals eight evolutionary major steps (“hallmarks”, that include clusters of functionally coherent proteins. The human expressed genes are analysed using a RNA-Seq dataset of 116 samples from 32 tissues. The evolutionary analysis of the human proteins is performed combining the information from: (i a database of orthologous proteins (OMA, (ii the taxonomy mapping of genes to lineage clades (from NCBI Taxonomy and (iii the evolution time-scale mapping provided by TimeTree (Timescale of Life. The human protein-coding genes are also placed in a relational context based in the construction of a robust gene coexpression network, that reveals tighter links between age-related protein-coding genes and finds functionally coherent gene modules. Conclusions Understanding the relational landscape of the human protein-coding genes is essential for interpreting the functional elements and modules of our active genome. Moreover, decoding the evolutionary history of the human genes can

  8. Non-random retention of protein-coding overlapping genes in Metazoa

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    Bork Peer

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the overlap of transcriptional units occurs frequently in eukaryotic genomes, its evolutionary and biological significance remains largely unclear. Here we report a comparative analysis of overlaps between genes coding for well-annotated proteins in five metazoan genomes (human, mouse, zebrafish, fruit fly and worm. Results For all analyzed species the observed number of overlapping genes is always lower than expected assuming functional neutrality, suggesting that gene overlap is negatively selected. The comparison to the random distribution also shows that retained overlaps do not exhibit random features: antiparallel overlaps are significantly enriched, while overlaps lying on the same strand and those involving coding sequences are highly underrepresented. We confirm that overlap is mostly species-specific and provide evidence that it frequently originates through the acquisition of terminal, non-coding exons. Finally, we show that overlapping genes tend to be significantly co-expressed in a breast cancer cDNA library obtained by 454 deep sequencing, and that different overlap types display different patterns of reciprocal expression. Conclusion Our data suggest that overlap between protein-coding genes is selected against in Metazoa. However, when retained it may be used as a species-specific mechanism for the reciprocal regulation of neighboring genes. The tendency of overlaps to involve non-coding regions of the genes leads to the speculation that the advantages achieved by an overlapping arrangement may be optimized by evolving regulatory non-coding transcripts.

  9. DNA methylation patterns of protein-coding genes and long non-coding RNAs in males with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Qi; Wang, Yunliang; Cheng, Jia; Dai, Dongjun; Zhou, Xingyu; Zhang, Yuzheng; Li, Jinfeng; Yin, Honglei; Gao, Shugui; Duan, Shiwei

    2015-11-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is one of the most complex mental illnesses affecting ~1% of the population worldwide. SCZ pathogenesis is considered to be a result of genetic as well as epigenetic alterations. Previous studies have aimed to identify the causative genes of SCZ. However, DNA methylation of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) involved in SCZ has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, a comprehensive genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation was conducted using samples from two male patients with paranoid and undifferentiated SCZ, respectively. Methyl-CpG binding domain protein-enriched genome sequencing was used. In the two patients with paranoid and undifferentiated SCZ, 1,397 and 1,437 peaks were identified, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that peaks were enriched in protein-coding genes, which exhibited nervous system and brain functions. A number of these peaks in gene promoter regions may affect gene expression and, therefore, influence SCZ-associated pathways. Furthermore, 7 and 20 lncRNAs, respectively, in the Refseq database were hypermethylated. According to the lncRNA dataset in the NONCODE database, ~30% of intergenic peaks overlapped with novel lncRNA loci. The results of the present study demonstrated that aberrant hypermethylation of lncRNA genes may be an important epigenetic factor associated with SCZ. However, further studies using larger sample sizes are required.

  10. Unresolved orthology and peculiar coding sequence properties of lamprey genes: the KCNA gene family as test case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuraku Shigehiro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In understanding the evolutionary process of vertebrates, cyclostomes (hagfishes and lamprey occupy crucial positions. Resolving molecular phylogenetic relationships of cyclostome genes with gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates genes is indispensable in deciphering both the species tree and gene trees. However, molecular phylogenetic analyses, especially those including lamprey genes, have produced highly discordant results between gene families. To efficiently scrutinize this problem using partial genome assemblies of early vertebrates, we focused on the potassium voltage-gated channel, shaker-related (KCNA family, whose members are mostly single-exon. Results Seven sea lamprey KCNA genes as well as six elephant shark genes were identified, and their orthologies to bony vertebrate subgroups were assessed. In contrast to robustly supported orthology of the elephant shark genes to gnathostome subgroups, clear orthology of any sea lamprey gene could not be established. Notably, sea lamprey KCNA sequences displayed unique codon usage pattern and amino acid composition, probably associated with exceptionally high GC-content in their coding regions. This lamprey-specific property of coding sequences was also observed generally for genes outside this gene family. Conclusions Our results suggest that secondary modifications of sequence properties unique to the lamprey lineage may be one of the factors preventing robust orthology assessments of lamprey genes, which deserves further genome-wide validation. The lamprey lineage-specific alteration of protein-coding sequence properties needs to be taken into consideration in tackling the key questions about early vertebrate evolution.

  11. Origin and evolution of the long non-coding genes in the X-inactivation center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romito, Antonio; Rougeulle, Claire

    2011-11-01

    Random X chromosome inactivation (XCI), the eutherian mechanism of X-linked gene dosage compensation, is controlled by a cis-acting locus termed the X-inactivation center (Xic). One of the striking features that characterize the Xic landscape is the abundance of loci transcribing non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), including Xist, the master regulator of the inactivation process. Recent comparative genomic analyses have depicted the evolutionary scenario behind the origin of the X-inactivation center, revealing that this locus evolved from a region harboring protein-coding genes. During mammalian radiation, this ancestral protein-coding region was disrupted in the marsupial group, whilst it provided in eutherian lineage the starting material for the non-translated RNAs of the X-inactivation center. The emergence of non-coding genes occurred by a dual mechanism involving loss of protein-coding function of the pre-existing genes and integration of different classes of mobile elements, some of which modeled the structure and sequence of the non-coding genes in a species-specific manner. The rising genes started to produce transcripts that acquired function in regulating the epigenetic status of the X chromosome, as shown for Xist, its antisense Tsix, Jpx, and recently suggested for Ftx. Thus, the appearance of the Xic, which occurred after the divergence between eutherians and marsupials, was the basis for the evolution of random X inactivation as a strategy to achieve dosage compensation.

  12. Transcriptional enhancers in protein-coding exons of vertebrate developmental genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah I Ritter

    Full Text Available Many conserved noncoding sequences function as transcriptional enhancers that regulate gene expression. Here, we report that protein-coding DNA also frequently contains enhancers functioning at the transcriptional level. We tested the enhancer activity of 31 protein-coding exons, which we chose based on strong sequence conservation between zebrafish and human, and occurrence in developmental genes, using a Tol2 transposable GFP reporter assay in zebrafish. For each exon we measured GFP expression in hundreds of embryos in 10 anatomies via a novel system that implements the voice-recognition capabilities of a cellular phone. We find that 24/31 (77% exons drive GFP expression compared to a minimal promoter control, and 14/24 are anatomy-specific (expression in four anatomies or less. GFP expression driven by these coding enhancers frequently overlaps the anatomies where the host gene is expressed (60%, suggesting self-regulation. Highly conserved coding sequences and highly conserved noncoding sequences do not significantly differ in enhancer activity (coding: 24/31 vs. noncoding: 105/147 or tissue-specificity (coding: 14/24 vs. noncoding: 50/105. Furthermore, coding and noncoding enhancers display similar levels of the enhancer-related histone modification H3K4me1 (coding: 9/24 vs noncoding: 34/81. Meanwhile, coding enhancers are over three times as likely to contain an H3K4me1 mark as other exons of the host gene. Our work suggests that developmental transcriptional enhancers do not discriminate between coding and noncoding DNA and reveals widespread dual functions in protein-coding DNA.

  13. A recombinant lactobacillus strain expressing genes coding for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-08-06

    Aug 6, 2007 ... bacteria do not naturally produce restriction enzymes, but rather, have a number of putative alien genes of the type. ..... recurrent bacterial vaginosis. J. Med. ... ty than OBR alone in HIV treatment experienced patients. Program.

  14. Revisiting the missing protein-coding gene catalog of the domestic dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galibert Francis

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among mammals for which there is a high sequence coverage, the whole genome assembly of the dog is unique in that it predicts a low number of protein-coding genes, ~19,000, compared to the over 20,000 reported for other mammalian species. Of particular interest are the more than 400 of genes annotated in primates and rodent genomes, but missing in dog. Results Using over 14,000 orthologous genes between human, chimpanzee, mouse rat and dog, we built multiple pairwise synteny maps to infer short orthologous intervals that were targeted for characterizing the canine missing genes. Based on gene prediction and a functionality test using the ratio of replacement to silent nucleotide substitution rates (dN/dS, we provide compelling structural and functional evidence for the identification of 232 new protein-coding genes in the canine genome and 69 gene losses, characterized as undetected gene or pseudogenes. Gene loss phyletic pattern analysis using ten species from chicken to human allowed us to characterize 28 canine-specific gene losses that have functional orthologs continuously from chicken or marsupials through human, and 10 genes that arose specifically in the evolutionary lineage leading to rodent and primates. Conclusion This study demonstrates the central role of comparative genomics for refining gene catalogs and exploring the evolutionary history of gene repertoires, particularly as applied for the characterization of species-specific gene gains and losses.

  15. The Drosophila gene CG9918 codes for a pyrokinin-1 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Torp, Malene; Hauser, Frank

    2005-01-01

    The database from the Drosophila Genome Project contains a gene, CG9918, annotated to code for a G protein-coupled receptor. We cloned the cDNA of this gene and functionally expressed it in Chinese hamster ovary cells. We tested a library of about 25 Drosophila and other insect neuropeptides, and...

  16. Inheritable and precise large genomic deletions of non-coding RNA genes in zebrafish using TALENs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Liu

    Full Text Available Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs have so far been applied to disrupt protein-coding genes which constitute only 2-3% of the genome in animals. The majority (70-90% of the animal genome is actually transcribed as non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs, yet the lack of efficient tools to knockout ncRNA genes hinders studies on their in vivo functions. Here we have developed novel strategies using TALENs to achieve precise and inheritable large genomic deletions and knockout of ncRNA genes in zebrafish. We have demonstrated that individual miRNA genes could be disrupted using one pair of TALENs, whereas large microRNA (miRNA gene clusters and long non-coding RNA (lncRNA genes could be precisely deleted using two pairs of TALENs. We have generated large genomic deletions of two miRNA clusters (the 1.2 kb miR-17-92 cluster and the 79.8 kb miR-430 cluster and one long non-coding RNA (lncRNA gene (the 9.0 kb malat1, and the deletions are transmitted through the germline. Taken together, our results establish TALENs as a robust tool to engineer large genomic deletions and knockout of ncRNA genes, thus opening up new avenues in the application of TALENs to study the genome in vivo.

  17. An evaluation of mitochondrial tRNA gene evolution and its relation to the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedergren, R J

    1982-04-01

    Extensive sequence data on mitochondrial (mt) tRNAs give for the first time an opportunity to evaluate tRNA gene evolution in this organelle. Deductions from these gene structures relate to the evolution of tRNA genes in other cellular systems and to the origin of the genetic code. Mt tRNAs, in contrast to the prokaryotic nature of chloroplastic tRNA structure, can not at the present time be definitely related to either prokaryotic or eukaryotic tRNAs, probably because of a higher mutation rate in mitochondria. Fungal mt tRNAs having the same anticodon and function are generally similar enough to be considered homologous. Comparisons af all mt tRNA sequences contained in the same mitochondrion indicate that some tRNAs originated by duplication of a prototypic gene which, after divergence, led to tRNAs having different amino acid specificities. The deviant mt genetic code, although admittedly permitting a simpler decoding mechanism, is not useful in determining whether the origin of mitochondria had preceded or was derived from prokaryotes or eukaryotes, since the genetic code is variable even among mitochondria. Variants of the mt genetic code lead to speculation on the nature of the primordial code and its relation to the present "universal" code.

  18. Regulation of protein homeostasis in neurodegenerative diseases: the role of coding and non-coding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Olga; Nollen, Ellen A A

    2015-11-01

    Protein homeostasis is fundamental for cell function and survival, because proteins are involved in all aspects of cellular function, ranging from cell metabolism and cell division to the cell's response to environmental challenges. Protein homeostasis is tightly regulated by the synthesis, folding, trafficking and clearance of proteins, all of which act in an orchestrated manner to ensure proteome stability. The protein quality control system is enhanced by stress response pathways, which take action whenever the proteome is challenged by environmental or physiological stress. Aging, however, damages the proteome, and such proteome damage is thought to be associated with aging-related diseases. In this review, we discuss the different cellular processes that define the protein quality control system and focus on their role in protein conformational diseases. We highlight the power of using small organisms to model neurodegenerative diseases and how these models can be exploited to discover genetic modulators of protein aggregation and toxicity. We also link findings from small model organisms to the situation in higher organisms and describe how some of the genetic modifiers discovered in organisms such as worms are functionally conserved throughout evolution. Finally, we demonstrate that the non-coding genome also plays a role in maintaining protein homeostasis. In all, this review highlights the importance of protein and RNA homeostasis in neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. The nuclear protein-coding gene ANKRD23 negatively regulates myoblast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojing; Zeng, Rui; Xu, Haiyang; Xu, Zaiyan; Zuo, Bo

    2017-09-20

    Muscle fiber formation is a complex process and subject to fine regulation of a variety of protein-coding genes and non-coding RNA. In this study, we identified a nuclear protein-coding gene ANKRD23 which was highly expressed in muscle. Quantitative real-time PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence were used to detect the expression change of myoblast differentiation marker genes after knockdown and overexpression of ANKRD23. The results showed that the expression of myoblast differentiation marker genes were increased by interference and reduced by ANKRD23 overexpression, indicating that ANKRD23 played a negative role in the myoblast differentiation. Interestingly, we discovered a long non-coding RNA-AK004293 which was overlapped with the 3'UTR of ANKRD23 gene. Then we detected the effect of AK004293 on the expression of ANKRD23 and myoblast differentiation marker genes in C2C12 myoblasts. The results showed that AK004293 had no significant effect on the expression of myoblast differentiation maker genes and ANKRD23. In conclusion, our results established the foundation for further studies about the regulation mechanism of ANKRD23 in muscle development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Revisiting the protein-coding gene catalog of Drosophila melanogaster using 12 fly genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Michael F; Carlson, Joseph W; Crosby, Madeline A; Matthews, Beverley B; Yu, Charles; Park, Soo; Wan, Kenneth H; Schroeder, Andrew J; Gramates, L Sian; St Pierre, Susan E; Roark, Margaret; Wiley, Kenneth L; Kulathinal, Rob J; Zhang, Peili; Myrick, Kyl V; Antone, Jerry V; Celniker, Susan E; Gelbart, William M; Kellis, Manolis

    2007-12-01

    The availability of sequenced genomes from 12 Drosophila species has enabled the use of comparative genomics for the systematic discovery of functional elements conserved within this genus. We have developed quantitative metrics for the evolutionary signatures specific to protein-coding regions and applied them genome-wide, resulting in 1193 candidate new protein-coding exons in the D. melanogaster genome. We have reviewed these predictions by manual curation and validated a subset by directed cDNA screening and sequencing, revealing both new genes and new alternative splice forms of known genes. We also used these evolutionary signatures to evaluate existing gene annotations, resulting in the validation of 87% of genes lacking descriptive names and identifying 414 poorly conserved genes that are likely to be spurious predictions, noncoding, or species-specific genes. Furthermore, our methods suggest a variety of refinements to hundreds of existing gene models, such as modifications to translation start codons and exon splice boundaries. Finally, we performed directed genome-wide searches for unusual protein-coding structures, discovering 149 possible examples of stop codon readthrough, 125 new candidate ORFs of polycistronic mRNAs, and several candidate translational frameshifts. These results affect >10% of annotated fly genes and demonstrate the power of comparative genomics to enhance our understanding of genome organization, even in a model organism as intensively studied as Drosophila melanogaster.

  1. Transposable element insertions in long intergenic non-coding RNA genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakumar eKannan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transposable elements (TE are abundant in mammalian genomes and appear to have contributed to the evolution of their hosts by providing novel regulatory or coding sequences. We analyzed different regions of long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA genes in human and mouse genomes to systematically assess the potential contribution of TEs to the evolution of the structure and regulation of expression of lincRNA genes. Introns of lincRNA genes contain the highest percentage of TE-derived sequences, followed by exons and then promoter regions although the density of TEs is not significantly different between exons and promoters. Higher frequencies of ancient TEs in promoters and exons compared to introns implies that many lincRNA genes emerged before the split of primates and rodents. The content of TE-derived sequences in lincRNA genes is substantially higher than that in protein-coding genes, especially in exons and promoter regions. A significant positive correlation was detected between the content of TEs and evolutionary rate of lincRNAs indicating that inserted TEs are preferentially fixed in fast-evolving lincRNA genes. These results are consistent with the RIDL (Repeat Insertion Domains of LncRNAs hypothesis under which TEs have substantially contributed to the origin, evolution, and in particular functional diversification, of lincRNA genes.

  2. The y1 gene of maize codes for phytoene synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, B; Miguel, P S; Janick-Buckner, D; Bennetzen, J L

    1996-05-01

    The cloned y1 locus of maize was sequenced and found to encode phytoene synthase. Different "wild-type" alleles of the locus were found to differ by the insertion of transposable elements in their promoter and polyA addition regions, and by the length of a CCA tandem repeat series, without any obvious effect on function of the gene. A dominant Y1 ("wild-type") allele was observed to be expressed at highest levels in the seedling but also in the embryo and endosperm. The Mu3 transposable element insertion responsible for a pastel allele of y1, which gives lowered levels of carotenoids in the endosperm of kernels and seedlings grown at high temperatures, was located in the 5' end of the gene. Although the size of the transcript from this y1 mutation suggests that the Mu3 element provides the promoter for this allele, leaf tissue in this mutant line contained approximately normal amounts of y1 mRNA. A recessive allele of y1, which conditions normal levels of carotenoids in the embryo and seedling, but almost no carotenoids in the endosperm, was found to accumulate normal amounts of y1 mRNA in the seedling and embryo, while y1 transcripts were not detected in the endosperm.

  3. Intact coding region of the serotonin transporter gene in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altemus, M.; Murphy, D.L.; Greenberg, B. [NIMH, NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States); Lesch, K.P. [Univ. of Wuerzburg (Germany)

    1996-07-26

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that obsessive-compulsive disorder is genetically transmitted in some families, although no genetic abnormalities have been identified in individuals with this disorder. The selective response of obsessive-compulsive disorder to treatment with agents which block serotonin reuptake suggests the gene coding for the serotonin transporter as a candidate gene. The primary structure of the serotonin-transporter coding region was sequenced in 22 patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder, using direct PCR sequencing of cDNA synthesized from platelet serotonin-transporter mRNA. No variations in amino acid sequence were found among the obsessive-compulsive disorder patients or healthy controls. These results do not support a role for alteration in the primary structure of the coding region of the serotonin-transporter gene in the pathogenesis of obsessive-compulsive disorder. 27 refs.

  4. Naming 'junk': Human non-protein coding RNA (ncRNA gene nomenclature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wright Mathew W

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previously, the majority of the human genome was thought to be 'junk' DNA with no functional purpose. Over the past decade, the field of RNA research has rapidly expanded, with a concomitant increase in the number of non-protein coding RNA (ncRNA genes identified in this 'junk'. Many of the encoded ncRNAs have already been shown to be essential for a variety of vital functions, and this wealth of annotated human ncRNAs requires standardised naming in order to aid effective communication. The HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC is the only organisation authorised to assign standardised nomenclature to human genes. Of the 30,000 approved gene symbols currently listed in the HGNC database (http://www.genenames.org/search, the majority represent protein-coding genes; however, they also include pseudogenes, phenotypic loci and some genomic features. In recent years the list has also increased to include almost 3,000 named human ncRNA genes. HGNC is actively engaging with the RNA research community in order to provide unique symbols and names for each sequence that encodes an ncRNA. Most of the classical small ncRNA genes have now been provided with a unique nomenclature, and work on naming the long (> 200 nucleotides non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs is ongoing.

  5. Report of a chimeric origin of transposable elements in a bovine-coding gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, L M; Amaral, M E J; Silva, I T; Silva, W A; Riggs, P K; Carareto, C M

    2008-02-01

    Despite the wide distribution of transposable elements (TEs) in mammalian genomes, part of their evolutionary significance remains to be discovered. Today there is a substantial amount of evidence showing that TEs are involved in the generation of new exons in different species. In the present study, we searched 22,805 genes and reported the occurrence of TE-cassettes in coding sequences of 542 cow genes using the RepeatMasker program. Despite the significant number (542) of genes with TE insertions in exons only 14 (2.6%) of them were translated into protein, which we characterized as chimeric genes. From these chimeric genes, only the FAST kinase domains 3 (FASTKD3) gene, present on chromosome BTA 20, is a functional gene and showed evidence of the exaptation event. The genome sequence analysis showed that the last exon coding sequence of bovine FASTKD3 is approximately 85% similar to the ART2A retrotransposon sequence. In addition, comparison among FASTKD3 proteins shows that the last exon is very divergent from those of Homo sapiens, Pan troglodytes and Canis familiares. We suggest that the gene structure of bovine FASTKD3 gene could have originated by several ectopic recombinations between TE copies. Additionally, the absence of TE sequences in all other species analyzed suggests that the TE insertion is clade-specific, mainly in the ruminant lineage.

  6. Transcriptome interrogation of human myometrium identifies differentially expressed sense-antisense pairs of protein-coding and long non-coding RNA genes in spontaneous labor at term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Roberto; Tarca, Adi L; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Miranda, Jezid; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Jia, Hui; Hassan, Sonia S; Kalita, Cynthia A; Cai, Juan; Yeo, Lami; Lipovich, Leonard

    2014-09-01

    To identify differentially expressed long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) genes in human myometrium in women with spontaneous labor at term. Myometrium was obtained from women undergoing cesarean deliveries who were not in labor (n = 19) and women in spontaneous labor at term (n = 20). RNA was extracted and profiled using an Illumina® microarray platform. We have used computational approaches to bound the extent of long non-coding RNA representation on this platform, and to identify co-differentially expressed and correlated pairs of long non-coding RNA genes and protein-coding genes sharing the same genomic loci. We identified co-differential expression and correlation at two genomic loci that contain coding-lncRNA gene pairs: SOCS2-AK054607 and LMCD1-NR_024065 in women in spontaneous labor at term. This co-differential expression and correlation was validated by qRT-PCR, an experimental method completely independent of the microarray analysis. Intriguingly, one of the two lncRNA genes differentially expressed in term labor had a key genomic structure element, a splice site, that lacked evolutionary conservation beyond primates. We provide, for the first time, evidence for coordinated differential expression and correlation of cis-encoded antisense lncRNAs and protein-coding genes with known as well as novel roles in pregnancy in the myometrium of women in spontaneous labor at term.

  7. Successful Recovery of Nuclear Protein-Coding Genes from Small Insects in Museums Using Illumina Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Kojun; Pflug, James M; Sproul, John S; Dasenko, Mark A; Maddison, David R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we explore high-throughput Illumina sequencing of nuclear protein-coding, ribosomal, and mitochondrial genes in small, dried insects stored in natural history collections. We sequenced one tenebrionid beetle and 12 carabid beetles ranging in size from 3.7 to 9.7 mm in length that have been stored in various museums for 4 to 84 years. Although we chose a number of old, small specimens for which we expected low sequence recovery, we successfully recovered at least some low-copy nuclear protein-coding genes from all specimens. For example, in one 56-year-old beetle, 4.4 mm in length, our de novo assembly recovered about 63% of approximately 41,900 nucleotides in a target suite of 67 nuclear protein-coding gene fragments, and 70% using a reference-based assembly. Even in the least successfully sequenced carabid specimen, reference-based assembly yielded fragments that were at least 50% of the target length for 34 of 67 nuclear protein-coding gene fragments. Exploration of alternative references for reference-based assembly revealed few signs of bias created by the reference. For all specimens we recovered almost complete copies of ribosomal and mitochondrial genes. We verified the general accuracy of the sequences through comparisons with sequences obtained from PCR and Sanger sequencing, including of conspecific, fresh specimens, and through phylogenetic analysis that tested the placement of sequences in predicted regions. A few possible inaccuracies in the sequences were detected, but these rarely affected the phylogenetic placement of the samples. Although our sample sizes are low, an exploratory regression study suggests that the dominant factor in predicting success at recovering nuclear protein-coding genes is a high number of Illumina reads, with success at PCR of COI and killing by immersion in ethanol being secondary factors; in analyses of only high-read samples, the primary significant explanatory variable was body length, with small beetles

  8. The Maximal C³ Self-Complementary Trinucleotide Circular Code X in Genes of Bacteria, Archaea, Eukaryotes, Plasmids and Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Christian J

    2017-04-18

    In 1996, a set X of 20 trinucleotides was identified in genes of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes which has on average the highest occurrence in reading frame compared to its two shifted frames. Furthermore, this set X has an interesting mathematical property as X is a maximal C 3 self-complementary trinucleotide circular code. In 2015, by quantifying the inspection approach used in 1996, the circular code X was confirmed in the genes of bacteria and eukaryotes and was also identified in the genes of plasmids and viruses. The method was based on the preferential occurrence of trinucleotides among the three frames at the gene population level. We extend here this definition at the gene level. This new statistical approach considers all the genes, i.e., of large and small lengths, with the same weight for searching the circular code X . As a consequence, the concept of circular code, in particular the reading frame retrieval, is directly associated to each gene. At the gene level, the circular code X is strengthened in the genes of bacteria, eukaryotes, plasmids, and viruses, and is now also identified in the genes of archaea. The genes of mitochondria and chloroplasts contain a subset of the circular code X . Finally, by studying viral genes, the circular code X was found in DNA genomes, RNA genomes, double-stranded genomes, and single-stranded genomes.

  9. A systematic survey of loss-of-function variants in human protein-coding genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MacArthur, D.G.; Balasubramanian, S.; Frankish, A.; Huang, N.; Morris, J.; Walter, K.; Jostins, L.; Habegger, L.; Pickrell, J.K.; Montgomery, S.B.; Albers, C.A.; Zhang, Z.D.; Conrad, D.F.; Lunter, G.; Zheng, H.; Ayub, Q.; DePristo, M.A.; Banks, E.; Hu, M.; Handsaker, R.E.; Rosenfeld, J.A.; Fromer, M.; Jin, M.; Mu, X.J.; Khurana, E.; Ye, K.; Kay, M.; Saunders, G.I.; Suner, M.M.; Hunt, T.; Barnes, I.H.; Amid, C.; Carvalho-Silva, D.R.; Bignell, A.H.; Snow, C.; Yngvadottir, B.; Bumpstead, S.; Cooper, D.N.; Xue, Y.; Romero, I.G.; Genomes Project, C.; Wang, J.; Li, Y.; Gibbs, R.A.; McCarroll, S.A.; Dermitzakis, E.T.; Pritchard, J.K.; Barrett, J.C.; Harrow, J.; Hurles, M.E.; Gerstein, M.B.; Tyler-Smith, C.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-sequencing studies indicate that all humans carry many genetic variants predicted to cause loss of function (LoF) of protein-coding genes, suggesting unexpected redundancy in the human genome. Here we apply stringent filters to 2951 putative LoF variants obtained from 185 human genomes to det

  10. Polycistronic peptide coding genes in eukaryotes--how widespread are they?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tautz, Diethard

    2009-01-01

    The classical textbook assumption for the structure of an eukaryotic gene is that it codes for a single polypeptide of more than 100 amino acids in length. This is also the implicit assumption in most gene annotation pipelines. A gene family has now been discovered in insects that shows that an eukaryotic mRNA can code for peptides as short as eleven amino acids and that a single mRNA can code for several such peptides. This raises the question whether short open reading frames might also have a functional potential in other mRNAs, in particular those that occur in the 5'-UTR of many mRNAs. A number of these have been shown to act in cis to regulate the translation of the main open reading frame of the mRNA. But there may be others that could act in trans on other biological processes. The question of how many peptide-coding genes may exist is therefore worth revisiting. This poses new bioinformatic challenges that can only be resolved through multiple genome comparisons within a range of evolutionary distances.

  11. ANGIOGENES: knowledge database for protein-coding and noncoding RNA genes in endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Raphael; Weirick, Tyler; John, David; Militello, Giuseppe; Chen, Wei; Dimmeler, Stefanie; Uchida, Shizuka

    2016-09-01

    Increasing evidence indicates the presence of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) is specific to various cell types. Although lncRNAs are speculated to be more numerous than protein-coding genes, the annotations of lncRNAs remain primitive due to the lack of well-structured schemes for their identification and description. Here, we introduce a new knowledge database “ANGIOGENES” (http://angiogenes.uni-frankfurt.de) to allow for in silico screening of protein-coding genes and lncRNAs expressed in various types of endothelial cells, which are present in all tissues. Using the latest annotations of protein-coding genes and lncRNAs, publicly-available RNA-seq data was analyzed to identify transcripts that are expressed in endothelial cells of human, mouse and zebrafish. The analyzed data were incorporated into ANGIOGENES to provide a one-stop-shop for transcriptomics data to facilitate further biological validation. ANGIOGENES is an intuitive and easy-to-use database to allow in silico screening of expressed, enriched and/or specific endothelial transcripts under various conditions. We anticipate that ANGIOGENES serves as a starting point for functional studies to elucidate the roles of protein-coding genes and lncRNAs in angiogenesis.

  12. ANGIOGENES: knowledge database for protein-coding and noncoding RNA genes in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Raphael; Weirick, Tyler; John, David; Militello, Giuseppe; Chen, Wei; Dimmeler, Stefanie; Uchida, Shizuka

    2016-09-01

    Increasing evidence indicates the presence of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) is specific to various cell types. Although lncRNAs are speculated to be more numerous than protein-coding genes, the annotations of lncRNAs remain primitive due to the lack of well-structured schemes for their identification and description. Here, we introduce a new knowledge database "ANGIOGENES" (http://angiogenes.uni-frankfurt.de) to allow for in silico screening of protein-coding genes and lncRNAs expressed in various types of endothelial cells, which are present in all tissues. Using the latest annotations of protein-coding genes and lncRNAs, publicly-available RNA-seq data was analyzed to identify transcripts that are expressed in endothelial cells of human, mouse and zebrafish. The analyzed data were incorporated into ANGIOGENES to provide a one-stop-shop for transcriptomics data to facilitate further biological validation. ANGIOGENES is an intuitive and easy-to-use database to allow in silico screening of expressed, enriched and/or specific endothelial transcripts under various conditions. We anticipate that ANGIOGENES serves as a starting point for functional studies to elucidate the roles of protein-coding genes and lncRNAs in angiogenesis.

  13. Influence of Coding Variability in APP-Aβ Metabolism Genes in Sporadic Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celeste Sassi

    Full Text Available The cerebral deposition of Aβ42, a neurotoxic proteolytic derivate of amyloid precursor protein (APP, is a central event in Alzheimer's disease (AD(Amyloid hypothesis. Given the key role of APP-Aβ metabolism in AD pathogenesis, we selected 29 genes involved in APP processing, Aβ degradation and clearance. We then used exome and genome sequencing to investigate the single independent (single-variant association test and cumulative (gene-based association test effect of coding variants in these genes as potential susceptibility factors for AD, in a cohort composed of 332 sporadic and mainly late-onset AD cases and 676 elderly controls from North America and the UK. Our study shows that common coding variability in these genes does not play a major role for the disease development. In the single-variant association analysis, the main hits, none of which statistically significant after multiple testing correction (1.9e-4coding variants (0.009%genes mainly involved in Aβ extracellular degradation (TTR, ACE, clearance (LRP1 and APP trafficking and recycling (SORL1. These results were partially replicated in the gene-based analysis (c-alpha and SKAT tests, that reports ECE1, LYZ and TTR as nominally associated to AD (1.7e-3 coding variability in APP-Aβ genes is not a critical factor for AD development and 2 Aβ degradation and clearance, rather than Aβ production, may play a key role in the etiology of sporadic AD.

  14. Influence of Coding Variability in APP-Aβ Metabolism Genes in Sporadic Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Celeste; Ridge, Perry G.; Nalls, Michael A.; Gibbs, Raphael; Ding, Jinhui; Lupton, Michelle K.; Troakes, Claire; Lunnon, Katie; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Brown, Kristelle S.; Medway, Christopher; Lord, Jenny; Turton, James; Morgan, Kevin; Powell, John F.; Kauwe, John S.; Cruchaga, Carlos; Bras, Jose; Goate, Alison M.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Guerreiro, Rita; Hardy, John

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral deposition of Aβ42, a neurotoxic proteolytic derivate of amyloid precursor protein (APP), is a central event in Alzheimer’s disease (AD)(Amyloid hypothesis). Given the key role of APP-Aβ metabolism in AD pathogenesis, we selected 29 genes involved in APP processing, Aβ degradation and clearance. We then used exome and genome sequencing to investigate the single independent (single-variant association test) and cumulative (gene-based association test) effect of coding variants in these genes as potential susceptibility factors for AD, in a cohort composed of 332 sporadic and mainly late-onset AD cases and 676 elderly controls from North America and the UK. Our study shows that common coding variability in these genes does not play a major role for the disease development. In the single-variant association analysis, the main hits, none of which statistically significant after multiple testing correction (1.9e-4coding variants (0.009%genes mainly involved in Aβ extracellular degradation (TTR, ACE), clearance (LRP1) and APP trafficking and recycling (SORL1). These results were partially replicated in the gene-based analysis (c-alpha and SKAT tests), that reports ECE1, LYZ and TTR as nominally associated to AD (1.7e-3 coding variability in APP-Aβ genes is not a critical factor for AD development and 2) Aβ degradation and clearance, rather than Aβ production, may play a key role in the etiology of sporadic AD. PMID:27249223

  15. Glioma microvesicles carry selectively packaged coding and non-coding RNAs which alter gene expression in recipient cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheryl C Y; Eaton, Sally A; Young, Paul E; Lee, Maggie; Shuttleworth, Rupert; Humphreys, David T; Grau, Georges E; Combes, Valery; Bebawy, Mary; Gong, Joyce; Brammah, Susan; Buckland, Michael E; Suter, Catherine M

    2013-08-01

    Interactions between glioma cells and their local environment are critical determinants of brain tumor growth, infiltration and neovascularisation. Communication with host cells and stroma via microvesicles represents one pathway by which tumors can modify their surroundings to achieve a tumor-permissive environment. Here we have taken an unbiased approach to identifying RNAs in glioma-derived microvesicles, and explored their potential to regulate gene expression in recipient cells. We find that glioma microvesicles are predominantly of exosomal origin and contain complex populations of coding and noncoding RNAs in proportions that are distinct from those in the cells from which they are derived. Microvesicles show a relative depletion in microRNA compared with their cells of origin, and are enriched in unusual or novel noncoding RNAs, most of which have no known function. Short-term exposure of brain microvascular endothelial cells to glioma microvesicles results in many gene expression changes in the endothelial cells, most of which cannot be explained by direct delivery of transcripts. Our data suggest that the scope of potential actions of tumor-derived microvesicles is much broader and more complex than previously supposed, and highlight a number of new classes of small RNA that remain to be characterized.

  16. A gene-expression-based neural code for food abundance that modulates lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entchev, Eugeni V; Patel, Dhaval S; Zhan, Mei; Steele, Andrew J; Lu, Hang; Ch'ng, QueeLim

    2015-05-12

    How the nervous system internally represents environmental food availability is poorly understood. Here, we show that quantitative information about food abundance is encoded by combinatorial neuron-specific gene-expression of conserved TGFβ and serotonin pathway components in Caenorhabditis elegans. Crosstalk and auto-regulation between these pathways alters the shape, dynamic range, and population variance of the gene-expression responses of daf-7 (TGFβ) and tph-1 (tryptophan hydroxylase) to food availability. These intricate regulatory features provide distinct mechanisms for TGFβ and serotonin signaling to tune the accuracy of this multi-neuron code: daf-7 primarily regulates gene-expression variability, while tph-1 primarily regulates the dynamic range of gene-expression responses. This code is functional because daf-7 and tph-1 mutations bidirectionally attenuate food level-dependent changes in lifespan. Our results reveal a neural code for food abundance and demonstrate that gene expression serves as an additional layer of information processing in the nervous system to control long-term physiology.

  17. Enzyme-coding genes as molecular clocks: the molecular evolution of animal alpha-amylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, D A; Benkel, B F; Boer, P H; Genest, Y; Abukashawa, S; Ben-David, G

    1987-01-01

    We constructed a cDNA library for the beetle, Tribolium castaneum. This library was screened using a cloned amylase gene from Drosophila melanogaster as a molecular probe. Beetle amylase cDNA clones were isolated from this bank, and the nucleotide sequence was obtained for a cDNA clone with a coding capacity for 228 amino acids. Both the nucleotide sequence and predicted amino acid sequence were compared to our recent results for D. melanogaster alpha-amylases, along with published sequences for other alpha-amylases. The results show that animal alpha-amylases are highly conserved over their entire length. A broader comparison, which includes plant and microbial alpha-amylase sequences, indicates that parts of the gene are conserved between prokaryotes, plants, and animals. We discuss the potential importance of this and other enzyme-coding genes for the construction of molecular phylogenies and for the study of the general question of molecular clocks in evolution.

  18. miRNA gene counts in chromosomes vary widely in a species and biogenesis of miRNA largely depends on transcription or posttranscriptional processing of coding genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanu eGhorai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs target specific mRNA(s to silence its expression and thereby regulate various cellular processes. We have investigated miRNA gene counts in chromosomes for 20 different species and observed wide variation. Certain chromosomes have extremely high number of miRNA gene compared with others in all the species. For example, high number of miRNA gene in X chromosome and the least or absence of miRNA gene in Y chromosome was observed in all species. To search the criteria governing such variation of miRNA gene counts in chromosomes, we have selected three parameters- length, number of non-coding and coding genes in a chromosome. We have calculated Pearson’s correlation coefficient of miRNA gene counts with length, number of non-coding and coding genes in a chromosome for all 20 species. Major number of species showed that number of miRNA gene was not correlated with chromosome length. 85% of species under study showed strong positive correlation coefficient (r≥0.5 between the numbers of miRNA gene vs non-coding gene in chromosomes as expected because miRNA is a sub-set of non-coding genes. 55% species under study showed strong positive correlation coefficient (r≥0.5 between numbers of miRNA gene vs coding gene. We hypothesize biogenesis of miRNA largely depends on coding genes, an evolutionary conserved process. Chromosomes having higher number of miRNA genes will be most likely playing regulatory roles in several cellular processes including different disorders. In humans, cancer and cardiovascular disease associated miRNAs are mostly intergenic and located in Chromosome 19, X, 14 and 1.

  19. Complex organisation and structure of the ghrelin antisense strand gene GHRLOS, a candidate non-coding RNA gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herington Adrian C

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The peptide hormone ghrelin has many important physiological and pathophysiological roles, including the stimulation of growth hormone (GH release, appetite regulation, gut motility and proliferation of cancer cells. We previously identified a gene on the opposite strand of the ghrelin gene, ghrelinOS (GHRLOS, which spans the promoter and untranslated regions of the ghrelin gene (GHRL. Here we further characterise GHRLOS. Results We have described GHRLOS mRNA isoforms that extend over 1.4 kb of the promoter region and 106 nucleotides of exon 4 of the ghrelin gene, GHRL. These GHRLOS transcripts initiate 4.8 kb downstream of the terminal exon 4 of GHRL and are present in the 3' untranslated exon of the adjacent gene TATDN2 (TatD DNase domain containing 2. Interestingly, we have also identified a putative non-coding TATDN2-GHRLOS chimaeric transcript, indicating that GHRLOS RNA biogenesis is extremely complex. Moreover, we have discovered that the 3' region of GHRLOS is also antisense, in a tail-to-tail fashion to a novel terminal exon of the neighbouring SEC13 gene, which is important in protein transport. Sequence analyses revealed that GHRLOS is riddled with stop codons, and that there is little nucleotide and amino-acid sequence conservation of the GHRLOS gene between vertebrates. The gene spans 44 kb on 3p25.3, is extensively spliced and harbours multiple variable exons. We have also investigated the expression of GHRLOS and found evidence of differential tissue expression. It is highly expressed in tissues which are emerging as major sites of non-coding RNA expression (the thymus, brain, and testis, as well as in the ovary and uterus. In contrast, very low levels were found in the stomach where sense, GHRL derived RNAs are highly expressed. Conclusion GHRLOS RNA transcripts display several distinctive features of non-coding (ncRNA genes, including 5' capping, polyadenylation, extensive splicing and short open reading

  20. RNA polymerase V targets transcriptional silencing components to promoters of protein-coding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qi; Rowley, M Jordan; Böhmdorfer, Gudrun; Sandhu, Davinder; Gregory, Brian D; Wierzbicki, Andrzej T

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional gene silencing controls transposons and other repetitive elements through RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) and heterochromatin formation. A key component of the Arabidopsis RdDM pathway is ARGONAUTE4 (AGO4), which associates with siRNAs to mediate DNA methylation. Here, we show that AGO4 preferentially targets transposable elements embedded within promoters of protein-coding genes. This pattern of AGO4 binding cannot be simply explained by the sequences of AGO4-bound siRNAs; instead, AGO4 binding to specific gene promoters is also mediated by long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) produced by RNA polymerase V. lncRNA-mediated AGO4 binding to gene promoters directs asymmetric DNA methylation to these genomic regions and is involved in regulating the expression of targeted genes. Finally, AGO4 binding overlaps sites of DNA methylation affected by the biotic stress response. Based on these findings, we propose that the targets of AGO4-directed RdDM are regulatory units responsible for controlling gene expression under specific environmental conditions.

  1. The mitochondrial genome of Iberobaenia (Coleoptera: Iberobaeniidae): first rearrangement of protein-coding genes in the beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andujar, Carmelo; Arribas, Paula; Linard, Benjamin; Kundrata, Robin; Bocak, Ladislav; Vogler, Alfried P

    2017-03-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the recently discovered beetle family Iberobaeniidae is described and compared with known coleopteran mitogenomes. The mitochondrial sequence was obtained by shotgun metagenomic sequencing using the Illumina Miseq technology and resulted in an average coverage of 130 × and a minimum coverage of 35×. The mitochondrial genome of Iberobaeniidae includes 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNAs, 22 tRNAs genes, and 1 putative control region, and showed a unique rearrangement of protein-coding genes. This is the first rearrangement affecting the relative position of protein-coding and ribosomal genes reported for the order Coleoptera.

  2. A human-specific de novo protein-coding gene associated with human brain functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Yun Li

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available To understand whether any human-specific new genes may be associated with human brain functions, we computationally screened the genetic vulnerable factors identified through Genome-Wide Association Studies and linkage analyses of nicotine addiction and found one human-specific de novo protein-coding gene, FLJ33706 (alternative gene symbol C20orf203. Cross-species analysis revealed interesting evolutionary paths of how this gene had originated from noncoding DNA sequences: insertion of repeat elements especially Alu contributed to the formation of the first coding exon and six standard splice junctions on the branch leading to humans and chimpanzees, and two subsequent substitutions in the human lineage escaped two stop codons and created an open reading frame of 194 amino acids. We experimentally verified FLJ33706's mRNA and protein expression in the brain. Real-Time PCR in multiple tissues demonstrated that FLJ33706 was most abundantly expressed in brain. Human polymorphism data suggested that FLJ33706 encodes a protein under purifying selection. A specifically designed antibody detected its protein expression across human cortex, cerebellum and midbrain. Immunohistochemistry study in normal human brain cortex revealed the localization of FLJ33706 protein in neurons. Elevated expressions of FLJ33706 were detected in Alzheimer's brain samples, suggesting the role of this novel gene in human-specific pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. FLJ33706 provided the strongest evidence so far that human-specific de novo genes can have protein-coding potential and differential protein expression, and be involved in human brain functions.

  3. A human-specific de novo protein-coding gene associated with human brain functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Yun Li

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available To understand whether any human-specific new genes may be associated with human brain functions, we computationally screened the genetic vulnerable factors identified through Genome-Wide Association Studies and linkage analyses of nicotine addiction and found one human-specific de novo protein-coding gene, FLJ33706 (alternative gene symbol C20orf203. Cross-species analysis revealed interesting evolutionary paths of how this gene had originated from noncoding DNA sequences: insertion of repeat elements especially Alu contributed to the formation of the first coding exon and six standard splice junctions on the branch leading to humans and chimpanzees, and two subsequent substitutions in the human lineage escaped two stop codons and created an open reading frame of 194 amino acids. We experimentally verified FLJ33706's mRNA and protein expression in the brain. Real-Time PCR in multiple tissues demonstrated that FLJ33706 was most abundantly expressed in brain. Human polymorphism data suggested that FLJ33706 encodes a protein under purifying selection. A specifically designed antibody detected its protein expression across human cortex, cerebellum and midbrain. Immunohistochemistry study in normal human brain cortex revealed the localization of FLJ33706 protein in neurons. Elevated expressions of FLJ33706 were detected in Alzheimer's brain samples, suggesting the role of this novel gene in human-specific pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. FLJ33706 provided the strongest evidence so far that human-specific de novo genes can have protein-coding potential and differential protein expression, and be involved in human brain functions.

  4. Conserved syntenic clusters of protein coding genes are missing in birds

    OpenAIRE

    Lovell, Peter V.; Wirthlin, Morgan; Wilhelm, Larry; Minx, Patrick; Lazar, Nathan H.; Carbone, Lucia; Warren, Wesley C.; Mello, Claudio V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Birds are one of the most highly successful and diverse groups of vertebrates, having evolved a number of distinct characteristics, including feathers and wings, a sturdy lightweight skeleton and unique respiratory and urinary/excretion systems. However, the genetic basis of these traits is poorly understood. Results Using comparative genomics based on extensive searches of 60 avian genomes, we have found that birds lack approximately 274 protein coding genes that are present in th...

  5. Comparison of protein coding gene contents of the fungal phyla Pezizomycotina and Saccharomycotina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvas, Mikko; Kivioja, Teemu; Mitchell, Alex

    2007-01-01

    wide comparison of protein coding gene content of Saccharomycotina and Pezizomycotina, which include industrially important yeasts and filamentous fungi, respectively. RESULTS: Our analysis shows that based on genome redundancy, the traditional model organisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Neurospora......BACKGROUND: Several dozen fungi encompassing traditional model organisms, industrial production organisms and human and plant pathogens have been sequenced recently and their particular genomic features analysed in detail. In addition comparative genomics has been used to analyse specific sub...

  6. The artificial zinc finger coding gene 'Jazz' binds the utrophin promoter and activates transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbi, N; Libri, V; Fanciulli, M; Tinsley, J M; Davies, K E; Passananti, C

    2000-06-01

    Up-regulation of utrophin gene expression is recognized as a plausible therapeutic approach in the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We have designed and engineered new zinc finger-based transcription factors capable of binding and activating transcription from the promoter of the dystrophin-related gene, utrophin. Using the recognition 'code' that proposes specific rules between zinc finger primary structure and potential DNA binding sites, we engineered a new gene named 'Jazz' that encodes for a three-zinc finger peptide. Jazz belongs to the Cys2-His2 zinc finger type and was engineered to target the nine base pair DNA sequence: 5'-GCT-GCT-GCG-3', present in the promoter region of both the human and mouse utrophin gene. The entire zinc finger alpha-helix region, containing the amino acid positions that are crucial for DNA binding, was specifically chosen on the basis of the contacts more frequently represented in the available list of the 'code'. Here we demonstrate that Jazz protein binds specifically to the double-stranded DNA target, with a dissociation constant of about 32 nM. Band shift and super-shift experiments confirmed the high affinity and specificity of Jazz protein for its DNA target. Moreover, we show that chimeric proteins, named Gal4-Jazz and Sp1-Jazz, are able to drive the transcription of a test gene from the human utrophin promoter.

  7. RNA Editing Sites Exist in Protein-coding Genes in the Chloroplast Genome of Cycas taitungensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiyan Chen; Likun Deng; Yuan Jiang; Ping Lu; Jianing Yu

    2011-01-01

    RNA editing is a post-transcriptional process that results in modifications of ribonucleotides at specific locations.In land plants editing can occur in both mitochondria and chloroplasts and most commonly involves C-to-U changes,especially in seed plants.Using prediction and experimental determination,we investigated RNA editing in 40 protein-coding genes from the chloroplast genome of Cycas taitungensis.A total of 85 editing sites were identified in 25 transcripts.Comparison analysis of the published editotypes of these 25 transcripts in eight species showed that RNA editing events gradually disappear during plant evolution.The editing in the first and third codon position disappeared quicker than that in the second codon position,ndh genes have the highest editing frequency while serine and proline codons were more frequently edited than the codons of other amino acids.These results imply that retained RNA editing sites have imbalanced distribution in genes and most of them may function by changing protein structure or interaction.Mitochondrion protein-coding genes have three times the editing sites compared with chloroplast genes of Cycas,most likely due to slower evolution speed.

  8. Origins of gene, genetic code, protein and life: comprehensive view of life systems from a GNC-SNS primitive genetic code hypothesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Ikehara

    2002-03-01

    We have investigated the origin of genes, the genetic code, proteins and life using six indices (hydropathy, -helix, -sheet and -turn formabilities, acidic amino acid content and basic amino acid content) necessary for appropriate three-dimensional structure formation of globular proteins. From the analysis of microbial genes, we have concluded that newly-born genes are products of nonstop frames (NSF) on antisense strands of microbial GC-rich genes [GC-NSF(a)] and from SNS repeating sequences [(SNS)n] similar to the GC-NSF(a) (S and N mean G or C and either of four bases, respectively). We have also proposed that the universal genetic code used by most organisms on the earth presently could be derived from a GNC-SNS primitive genetic code. We have further presented the [GADV]-protein world hypothesis of the origin of life as well as a hypothesis of protein production, suggesting that proteins were originally produced by random peptide formation of amino acids restricted in specific amino acid compositions termed as GNC-, SNS- and GC-NSF(a)-0th order structures of proteins. The [GADV]-protein world hypothesis is primarily derived from the GNC-primitive genetic code hypothesis. It is also expected that basic properties of extant genes and proteins could be revealed by considerations based on the scenario with four stages.

  9. Expression of. Arabidopsis tryptophan biosynthetic pathway genes: effect of the 5’ coding region of phosphoribosylanthranilate isomerase gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何奕昆; 刘新仿; 李家洋

    1999-01-01

    There are three non-allelic isogenes encoding phosphoribosylanthranilate isomerase (PAI) in Arabidopsis thaliana. The expression plasmids were constructed by fusion of the GUS reporter gene to the three PAI promoters with or without the 5’ region encoding PAI N-terminal polypeptides and transferred into Arabidopsis plants by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Analysis of GUS activity revealed that the PAI 5’ coding region was necessary for high expression of GUS activity. GUS activity in transgenic plants transformed with the expression plasmids containing the 5’ coding region of PAI1 or PAI3 was 60—100-fold higher than that without the corresponding 5’ region. However, the effect of 5’ coding region of PAI2 gene on the GUS activity was very small (only about 1 time difference). The GUS histochemical staining showed a similar result as revealed by GUS activity assay. It was expressed in the mesophyll cells and guard cells, but not in the epidermic cells, indicating that the N-terminal polypeptides encoded by t

  10. The maximal C(3) self-complementary trinucleotide circular code X in genes of bacteria, eukaryotes, plasmids and viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Christian J

    2015-09-07

    In 1996, a set X of 20 trinucleotides is identified in genes of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes which has in average the highest occurrence in reading frame compared to the two shifted frames (Arquès and Michel, 1996). Furthermore, this set X has an interesting mathematical property as X is a maximal C(3) self-complementary trinucleotide circular code (Arquès and Michel, 1996). In 2014, the number of trinucleotides in prokaryotic genes has been multiplied by a factor of 527. Furthermore, two new gene kingdoms of plasmids and viruses contain enough trinucleotide data to be analysed. The approach used in 1996 for identifying a preferential frame for a trinucleotide is quantified here with a new definition analysing the occurrence probability of a complementary/permutation (CP) trinucleotide set in a gene kingdom. Furthermore, in order to increase the statistical significance of results compared to those of 1996, the circular code X is studied on several gene taxonomic groups in a kingdom. Based on this new statistical approach, the circular code X is strengthened in genes of prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and now also identified in genes of plasmids. A subset of X with 18 or 16 trinucleotides is identified in genes of viruses. Furthermore, a simple probabilistic model based on the independent occurrence of trinucleotides in reading frame of genes explains the circular code frequencies and asymmetries observed in the shifted frames in all studied gene kingdoms. Finally, the developed approach allows to identify variant X codes in genes, i.e. trinucleotide codes which differ from X. In genes of bacteria, eukaryotes and plasmids, 14 among the 47 studied gene taxonomic groups (about 30%) have variant X codes. Seven variant X codes are identified with at least 16 trinucleotides of X. Two variant X codes XA in cyanobacteria and plasmids of cyanobacteria, and XD in birds are self-complementary, without permuted trinucleotides but non-circular. Five variant X codes XB in

  11. DNA methylation patterns of protein coding genes and long noncoding RNAs in female schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Qi; Wang, Yunliang; Cheng, Jia; Dai, Dongjun; Zhou, Xingyu; Zhang, Yuzheng; Gao, Shugui; Duan, Shiwei

    2015-02-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a complex mental disorder contributed by both genetic and epigenetic factors. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) was recently found playing an important regulatory role in mental disorders. However, little was known about the DNA methylation of lncRNAs, although numerous SCZ studies have been performed on genetic polymorphisms or epigenetic marks in protein coding genes. We presented a comprehensive genome wide DNA methylation study of both protein coding genes and lncRNAs in female patients with paranoid and undifferentiated SCZ. Using the methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD) protein-enriched genome sequencing (MBD-seq), 8,163 and 764 peaks were identified in paranoid and undifferentiated SCZ, respectively (p Gene ontology analysis showed that the hypermethylated regions were enriched in the genes related to neuron system and brain for both paranoid and undifferentiated SCZ (p gene promoter regions that might affect gene expression and influence the SCZ related pathways. Interestingly, DNA methylation of 136 and 23 known lncRNAs in Refseq database were identified in paranoid and undifferentiated SCZ, respectively. In addition, ∼20% of intergenic peaks annotated based on Refseq genes were overlapped with lncRNAs in UCSC and gencode databases. In order to show the results well for most biological researchers, we created an online database to display and visualize the information of DNA methyation peaks in both types of SCZ (http://www.bioinfo.org/scz/scz.htm). Our results showed that the aberrant DNA methylation of lncRNAs might be another important epigenetic factor for SCZ.

  12. Isolation and Analysis of α-Gliadin Gene Coding Sequences from Triticum durum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Han-yan; WEI Yu-ming; ZE Hong-yan; ZHENG You-liang

    2007-01-01

    Three coding sequences of gliadins genes, designed as Gli2_Du1, Gli2_Du2 and Gli2_Du3, were isolated from the genomic DNA of Triticum durum accessions CItr5083. Gli2_Du1 and Gli2_Du2 contain 945 and 864 bp, encoding the mature proteins with 314 and 287 amino acid residues, respectively. Gli2_Du3 is recognized as a pseudogene due to the stop codon occurring in the coding region. The pseudogenes, commonly occurring in gliadins family, are attributed to the single base change C → T. The amino acid sequences deduced from these gene sequences were characterized with the typical structure of α-gliadin proteins, including the toxic sequences (PSQQQP). The peptide fraction PF(Y)PP(Q)is thought to be an extra unit of repetitive domain, slightly diverging from the previous report. Six cysteine residues were observed within two unique domains. Phylogenetic analysis showed Gli2_Du2 and Gli2_Du3 were closely related to the genes on chromosome 6A, whereas Gli2_Du1 seems to be more homologous with the genes on chromosome 6B.

  13. Multiple, non-allelic, intein-coding sequences in eukaryotic RNA polymerase genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butler Margaret I

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inteins are self-splicing protein elements. They are translated as inserts within host proteins that excise themselves and ligate the flanking portions of the host protein (exteins with a peptide bond. They are encoded as in-frame insertions within the genes for the host proteins. Inteins are found in all three domains of life and in viruses, but have a very sporadic distribution. Only a small number of intein coding sequences have been identified in eukaryotic nuclear genes, and all of these are from ascomycete or basidiomycete fungi. Results We identified seven intein coding sequences within nuclear genes coding for the second largest subunits of RNA polymerase. These sequences were found in diverse eukaryotes: one is in the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase I (RPA2 from the ascomycete fungus Phaeosphaeria nodorum, one is in the RNA polymerase III (RPC2 of the slime mould Dictyostelium discoideum and four intein coding sequences are in RNA polymerase II genes (RPB2, one each from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the zygomycete fungus Spiromyces aspiralis and the chytrid fungi Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and Coelomomyces stegomyiae. The remaining intein coding sequence is in a viral relic embedded within the genome of the oomycete Phytophthora ramorum. The Chlamydomonas and Dictyostelium inteins are the first nuclear-encoded inteins found outside of the fungi. These new inteins represent a unique dataset: they are found in homologous proteins that form a paralogous group. Although these paralogues diverged early in eukaryotic evolution, their sequences can be aligned over most of their length. The inteins are inserted at multiple distinct sites, each of which corresponds to a highly conserved region of RNA polymerase. This dataset supports earlier work suggesting that inteins preferentially occur in highly conserved regions of their host proteins. Conclusion The identification of these new inteins

  14. Porting Large HPC Applications to GPU Clusters: The Codes GENE and VERTEX

    CERN Document Server

    Dannert, Tilman; Rampp, Markus

    2013-01-01

    We have developed GPU versions for two major high-performance-computing (HPC) applications originating from two different scientific domains. GENE is a plasma microturbulence code which is employed for simulations of nuclear fusion plasmas. VERTEX is a neutrino-radiation hydrodynamics code for "first principles"-simulations of core-collapse supernova explosions. The codes are considered state of the art in their respective scientific domains, both concerning their scientific scope and functionality as well as the achievable compute performance, in particular parallel scalability on all relevant HPC platforms. GENE and VERTEX were ported by us to HPC cluster architectures with two NVidia Kepler GPUs mounted in each node in addition to two Intel Xeon CPUs of the Sandy Bridge family. On such platforms we achieve up to twofold gains in the overall application performance in the sense of a reduction of the time to solution for a given setup with respect to a pure CPU cluster. The paper describes our basic porting ...

  15. Mutation analysis of the coding sequence of the MECP2 gene in infantile autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Kim S; Blasi, Francesca; Bacchelli, Elena; Klauck, Sabine M; Maestrini, Elena; Poustka, Annemarie

    2002-10-01

    Mutations in the coding region of the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 ( MECP2) gene cause Rett syndrome and have also been reported in a number of X-linked mental retardation syndromes. Furthermore, such mutations have recently been described in a few autistic patients. In this study, a large sample of individuals with autism was screened in order to elucidate systematically whether specific mutations in MECP2 play a role in autism. The mutation analysis of the coding sequence of the gene was performed by denaturing high-pressure liquid chromatography and direct sequencing. Taken together, 14 sequence variants were identified in 152 autistic patients from 134 German families and 50 unrelated patients from the International Molecular Genetic Study of Autism Consortium affected relative-pair sample. Eleven of these variants were excluded for having an aetiological role as they were either silent mutations, did not cosegregate with autism in the pedigrees of the patients or represented known polymorphisms. The relevance of the three remaining mutations towards the aetiology of autism could not be ruled out, although they were not localised within functional domains of MeCP2 and may be rare polymorphisms. Taking into account the large size of our sample, we conclude that mutations in the coding region of MECP2 do not play a major role in autism susceptibility. Therefore, infantile autism and Rett syndrome probably represent two distinct entities at the molecular genetic level.

  16. Tissue-Specific Evolution of Protein Coding Genes in Human and Mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadezda Kryuchkova-Mostacci

    Full Text Available Protein-coding genes evolve at different rates, and the influence of different parameters, from gene size to expression level, has been extensively studied. While in yeast gene expression level is the major causal factor of gene evolutionary rate, the situation is more complex in animals. Here we investigate these relations further, especially taking in account gene expression in different organs as well as indirect correlations between parameters. We used RNA-seq data from two large datasets, covering 22 mouse tissues and 27 human tissues. Over all tissues, evolutionary rate only correlates weakly with levels and breadth of expression. The strongest explanatory factors of purifying selection are GC content, expression in many developmental stages, and expression in brain tissues. While the main component of evolutionary rate is purifying selection, we also find tissue-specific patterns for sites under neutral evolution and for positive selection. We observe fast evolution of genes expressed in testis, but also in other tissues, notably liver, which are explained by weak purifying selection rather than by positive selection.

  17. Understanding Epistatic Interactions between Genes Targeted by Non-coding Regulatory Elements in Complex Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Kyung Sung

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies have proven the highly polygenic architecture of complex diseases or traits; therefore, single-locus-based methods are usually unable to detect all involved loci, especially when individual loci exert small effects. Moreover, the majority of associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms resides in non-coding regions, making it difficult to understand their phenotypic contribution. In this work, we studied epistatic interactions associated with three common diseases using Korea Association Resource (KARE data: type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM, hypertension (HT, and coronary artery disease (CAD. We showed that epistatic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were enriched in enhancers, as well as in DNase I footprints (the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements [ENCODE] Project Consortium 2012, which suggested that the disruption of the regulatory regions where transcription factors bind may be involved in the disease mechanism. Accordingly, to identify the genes affected by the SNPs, we employed whole-genome multiple-cell-type enhancer data which discovered using DNase I profiles and Cap Analysis Gene Expression (CAGE. Assigned genes were significantly enriched in known disease associated gene sets, which were explored based on the literature, suggesting that this approach is useful for detecting relevant affected genes. In our knowledge-based epistatic network, the three diseases share many associated genes and are also closely related with each other through many epistatic interactions. These findings elucidate the genetic basis of the close relationship between DM, HT, and CAD.

  18. A novel coding method for gene mutation correction during protein translation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Tian, Fengchun; Wang, Shiyuan; Liu, Xiao

    2012-03-07

    In gene expression, gene mutations often lead to negative effect of protein translation in prokaryotic organisms. With consideration of the influences produced by gene mutation, a novel method based on error-correction coding theory is proposed for modeling and detection of translation initiation in this paper. In the proposed method, combined with a one-dimensional codebook from block coding, a decoding method based on the minimum hamming distance is designed for analysis of translation efficiency. The results show that the proposed method can recognize the biologically significant regions such as Shine-Dalgarno region within the mRNA leader sequences effectively. Also, a global analysis of single base and multiple bases mutations of the Shine-Dalgarno sequences are established. Compared with other published experimental methods for mutation analysis, the translation initiation can not be disturbed by multiple bases mutations using the proposed method, which shows the effectiveness of this method in improving the translation efficiency and its biological relevance for genetic regulatory system.

  19. Two lamprey Hedgehog genes share non-coding regulatory sequences and expression patterns with gnathostome Hedgehogs.

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    Shungo Kano

    Full Text Available Hedgehog (Hh genes play major roles in animal development and studies of their evolution, expression and function point to major differences among chordates. Here we focused on Hh genes in lampreys in order to characterize the evolution of Hh signalling at the emergence of vertebrates. Screening of a cosmid library of the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis and searching the preliminary genome assembly of the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus indicate that lampreys have two Hh genes, named Hha and Hhb. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that Hha and Hhb are lamprey-specific paralogs closely related to Sonic/Indian Hh genes. Expression analysis indicates that Hha and Hhb are expressed in a Sonic Hh-like pattern. The two transcripts are expressed in largely overlapping but not identical domains in the lamprey embryonic brain, including a newly-described expression domain in the nasohypophyseal placode. Global alignments of genomic sequences and local alignment with known gnathostome regulatory motifs show that lamprey Hhs share conserved non-coding elements (CNE with gnathostome Hhs albeit with sequences that have significantly diverged and dispersed. Functional assays using zebrafish embryos demonstrate gnathostome-like midline enhancer activity for CNEs contained in intron2. We conclude that lamprey Hh genes are gnathostome Shh-like in terms of expression and regulation. In addition, they show some lamprey-specific features, including duplication and structural (but not functional changes in the intronic/regulatory sequences.

  20. Gene arrangement convergence, diverse intron content, and genetic code modifications in mitochondrial genomes of sphaeropleales (chlorophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fučíková, Karolina; Lewis, Paul O; González-Halphen, Diego; Lewis, Louise A

    2014-08-08

    The majority of our knowledge about mitochondrial genomes of Viridiplantae comes from land plants, but much less is known about their green algal relatives. In the green algal order Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyta), only one representative mitochondrial genome is currently available-that of Acutodesmus obliquus. Our study adds nine completely sequenced and three partially sequenced mitochondrial genomes spanning the phylogenetic diversity of Sphaeropleales. We show not only a size range of 25-53 kb and variation in intron content (0-11) and gene order but also conservation of 13 core respiratory genes and fragmented ribosomal RNA genes. We also report an unusual case of gene arrangement convergence in Neochloris aquatica, where the two rns fragments were secondarily placed in close proximity. Finally, we report the unprecedented usage of UCG as stop codon in Pseudomuriella schumacherensis. In addition, phylogenetic analyses of the mitochondrial protein-coding genes yield a fully resolved, well-supported phylogeny, showing promise for addressing systematic challenges in green algae. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  1. SCREENING OF ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY AND GENES CODING POLYKETIDE SYNTHETASE AND NONRIBOSOMAL PEPTIDE SYNTHETASE OF ACTINOMYCETE ISOLATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Kovácsová

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to observe antimicrobial activity using agar plate diffusion method and screening genes coding polyketide synthetase (PKS-I and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS from actinomycetes. A total of 105 actinomycete strains were isolated from arable soil. Antimicrobial activity was demonstrated at 54 strains against at least 1 of total 12 indicator organisms. Antifungal properties were recorded more often than antibacterial properties. The presence of PKS-I and NRPS genes were founded at 61 of total 105 strains. The number of strains with mentioned biosynthetic enzyme gene fragments matching the anticipated length were 19 (18% and 50 (47% respectively. Overall, five actinomycete strains carried all the biosynthetical genes, yet no antimicrobial activity was found against any of tested pathogens. On the other hand, twenty-one strains showed antimicrobial activity even though we were not able to amplify any of the PKS or NRPS genes from them. Combination of the two methods showed broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity of actinomycetes isolated from arable soil, which indicate that actinomycetes are valuable reservoirs of novel bioactive compounds.

  2. Evidence for a novel exon in the coding region of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Ling; St. Denis, K.A.; Bapat, B. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada)

    1995-08-10

    Germline mutations of the tumor suppressor gene APC cause familial adenomatous polyposis. Somatic APC alterations are involved in several sporadic neoplasma, including colorectal, duodenal, gastric, and esophageal carcinoma. The APC mRNA is encoded by 15 exons. Additional transcripts have been reported, due to alternative splicing of coding as well as noncoding regions. Two mRNA isoforms occur due to a deletion of exon 7 or a partial deletion of exon 9. We have identified a novel exon, flanked by APC exons 10 and 11, which is expressed as an alternatively transcribed product of the gene. Further, we have shown that the novel exon consists of a heptad repeat motif and is conserved across species. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Chromosomal mapping of the structural gene coding for the mouse cell adhesion molecule uvomorulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eistetter, H.R.; Adolph, S.; Ringwald, M.; Simon-Chazottes, D.; Schuh, R.; Guenet, J.L.; Kemler, R. (Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Tuebingen (West Germany))

    1988-05-01

    The gene coding for the mouse cell adhesion molecule uvomorulin has been mapped to chromosome 8. Uvomorulin cDNA clone F5H3 identified restriction fragment length polymorphisms in Southern blots of genomic DNA from mouse species Mus musculus domesticus and Mus spretus. By analyzing the segregation pattern of the gene in 75 offspring from an interspecific backcross a single genetic locus, Um, was defined on chromosome 8. Recombination frequency between Um and the co-segregating loci serum esterase 1 (Es-1) and tyrosine aminotransferase (Tat) places Um about 14 centimorgan (cM) distal to Es-1, and 5 cM proximal to Tat. In situ hybridization of uvomorulin ({sup 3}H)cDNA to mouse metaphase chromosomes located the Um locus close to the distal end of chromosome 8 (bands C3-E1). Since uvomorulin is evolutionarily highly conserved, its chromosomal assignment adds an important marker to the mouse genetic map.

  4. Proteomic detection of non-annotated protein-coding genes in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wook; Silby, Mark W; Purvine, Sam O; Nicoll, Julie S; Hixson, Kim K; Monroe, Matt; Nicora, Carrie D; Lipton, Mary S; Levy, Stuart B

    2009-12-24

    Genome sequences are annotated by computational prediction of coding sequences, followed by similarity searches such as BLAST, which provide a layer of possible functional information. While the existence of processes such as alternative splicing complicates matters for eukaryote genomes, the view of bacterial genomes as a linear series of closely spaced genes leads to the assumption that computational annotations that predict such arrangements completely describe the coding capacity of bacterial genomes. We undertook a proteomic study to identify proteins expressed by Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 from genes that were not predicted during the genome annotation. Mapping peptides to the Pf0-1 genome sequence identified sixteen non-annotated protein-coding regions, of which nine were antisense to predicted genes, six were intergenic, and one read in the same direction as an annotated gene but in a different frame. The expression of all but one of the newly discovered genes was verified by RT-PCR. Few clues as to the function of the new genes were gleaned from informatic analyses, but potential orthologs in other Pseudomonas genomes were identified for eight of the new genes. The 16 newly identified genes improve the quality of the Pf0-1 genome annotation, and the detection of antisense protein-coding genes indicates the under-appreciated complexity of bacterial genome organization.

  5. Proteomic detection of non-annotated protein-coding genes in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wook Kim

    Full Text Available Genome sequences are annotated by computational prediction of coding sequences, followed by similarity searches such as BLAST, which provide a layer of possible functional information. While the existence of processes such as alternative splicing complicates matters for eukaryote genomes, the view of bacterial genomes as a linear series of closely spaced genes leads to the assumption that computational annotations that predict such arrangements completely describe the coding capacity of bacterial genomes. We undertook a proteomic study to identify proteins expressed by Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 from genes that were not predicted during the genome annotation. Mapping peptides to the Pf0-1 genome sequence identified sixteen non-annotated protein-coding regions, of which nine were antisense to predicted genes, six were intergenic, and one read in the same direction as an annotated gene but in a different frame. The expression of all but one of the newly discovered genes was verified by RT-PCR. Few clues as to the function of the new genes were gleaned from informatic analyses, but potential orthologs in other Pseudomonas genomes were identified for eight of the new genes. The 16 newly identified genes improve the quality of the Pf0-1 genome annotation, and the detection of antisense protein-coding genes indicates the under-appreciated complexity of bacterial genome organization.

  6. Proteomic Detection of Non-Annotated Protein-Coding Genes in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Wook; Silby, Mark W.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Nicoll, Julie S.; Hixson, Kim K.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Lipton, Mary S.; Levy, Stuart B.

    2009-12-24

    Genome sequences are annotated by computational prediction of coding sequences, followed by similarity searches such as BLAST, which provide a layer of (possible) functional information. While the existence of processes such as alternative splicing complicates matters for eukaryote genomes, the view of bacterial genomes as a linear series of closely spaced genes leads to the assumption that computational annotations which predict such arrangements completely describe the coding capacity of bacterial genomes. We undertook a proteomic study to identify proteins expressed by Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 from genes which were not predicted during the genome annotation. Mapping peptides to the Pf0-1 genome sequence identified sixteen non-annotated protein-coding regions, of which nine were antisense to predicted genes, six were intergenic, and one read in the same direction as an annotated gene but in a different frame. The expression of all but one of the newly discovered genes was verified by RT-PCR. Few clues as to the function of the new genes were gleaned from informatic analyses, but potential orthologues in other Pseudomonas genomes were identified for eight of the new genes. The 16 newly identified genes improve the quality of the Pf0-1 genome annotation, and the detection of antisense protein-coding genes indicates the under-appreciated complexity of bacterial genome organization.

  7. The evolution of small insertions and deletions in the coding genes of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Zechen; Zhai, Weiwei; Li, Chunyan; Gao, Min; Gong, Qiang; Ruan, Jue; Li, Juan; Jiang, Lan; Lv, Xuemei; Hungate, Eric; Wu, Chung-I

    2013-12-01

    Studies of protein evolution have focused on amino acid substitutions with much less systematic analysis on insertion and deletions (indels) in protein coding genes. We hence surveyed 7,500 genes between Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans, using D. yakuba as an outgroup for this purpose. The evolutionary rate of coding indels is indeed low, at only 3% of that of nonsynonymous substitutions. As coding indels follow a geometric distribution in size and tend to fall in low-complexity regions of proteins, it is unclear whether selection or mutation underlies this low rate. To resolve the issue, we collected genomic sequences from an isogenic African line of D. melanogaster (ZS30) at a high coverage of 70× and analyzed indel polymorphism between ZS30 and the reference genome. In comparing polymorphism and divergence, we found that the divergence to polymorphism ratio (i.e., fixation index) for smaller indels (size ≤ 10 bp) is very similar to that for synonymous changes, suggesting that most of the within-species polymorphism and between-species divergence for indels are selectively neutral. Interestingly, deletions of larger sizes (size ≥ 11 bp and ≤ 30 bp) have a much higher fixation index than synonymous mutations and 44.4% of fixed middle-sized deletions are estimated to be adaptive. To our surprise, this pattern is not found for insertions. Protein indel evolution appear to be in a dynamic flux of neutrally driven expansion (insertions) together with adaptive-driven contraction (deletions), and these observations provide important insights for understanding the fitness of new mutations as well as the evolutionary driving forces for genomic evolution in Drosophila species.

  8. [Incidence of alginate-coding gene in carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogiel, Tomasz; Kwiecińska-Piróg, Joanna; Kozuszko, Sylwia; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa rods are one of the most common isolated opportunistic nosocomial pathogens. Strains usually are capable to secret a capsule-like polysaccharide called alginate important for evasion of host defenses, especially during chronic pulmonary disease of patients with cystic fibrosis. Most genes for alginate biosynthesis and lysis are encoded by the operon. The aim of our study was to evaluate the incidence of algD sequence, generally use for alginate-coding gene detection, in 120 P. aeruginosa strains resistant to carbapenems. All isolates were obtained in the Department of Clinical Microbiology University Hospital no. 1 of dr A. Jurasz Collegium Medicum of L. Rydygier in Bydgoszcz Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń. Examined strains demonstrated resistance to carbenicillin (90,0%), ticarcillin (89,2%) and ticarcillin clavulanate (86,7%). All strains were susceptible to colistin. The majority of examined strains was susceptible to ceftazidime and cefepime (40,8% each) and norfloxacin (37,5%). Presence of algD gene - noted in 112 (93,3%) strains proves that not every strain is capable to produce alginate. It was also found out that differences in algD genes incidence in case of different clinical material that strains were isolated from were not statistically important.

  9. DNA bar coding and pyrosequencing to analyze adverse events in therapeutic gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gary P; Garrigue, Alexandrine; Ciuffi, Angela; Ronen, Keshet; Leipzig, Jeremy; Berry, Charles; Lagresle-Peyrou, Chantal; Benjelloun, Fatine; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Fischer, Alain; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Bushman, Frederic D

    2008-05-01

    Gene transfer has been used to correct inherited immunodeficiencies, but in several patients integration of therapeutic retroviral vectors activated proto-oncogenes and caused leukemia. Here, we describe improved methods for characterizing integration site populations from gene transfer studies using DNA bar coding and pyrosequencing. We characterized 160,232 integration site sequences in 28 tissue samples from eight mice, where Rag1 or Artemis deficiencies were corrected by introducing the missing gene with gamma-retroviral or lentiviral vectors. The integration sites were characterized for their genomic distributions, including proximity to proto-oncogenes. Several mice harbored abnormal lymphoproliferations following therapy--in these cases, comparison of the location and frequency of isolation of integration sites across multiple tissues helped clarify the contribution of specific proviruses to the adverse events. We also took advantage of the large number of pyrosequencing reads to show that recovery of integration sites can be highly biased by the use of restriction enzyme cleavage of genomic DNA, which is a limitation in all widely used methods, but describe improved approaches that take advantage of the power of pyrosequencing to overcome this problem. The methods described here should allow integration site populations from human gene therapy to be deeply characterized with spatial and temporal resolution.

  10. Accelerated evolution in the protein-coding regions is universal in crotalinae snake venom gland phospholipase A2 isozyme genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, K; Nobuhisa, I; Deshimaru, M; Nakai, M; Ogawa, T; Shimohigashi, Y; Fukumaki, Y; Hattori, M; Sakaki, Y; Hattori, S

    1995-06-06

    The nucleotide sequences of four genes encoding Trimeresurus gramineus (green habu snake, crotalinae) venom gland phospholipase A2 (PLA2; phosphatidylcholine 2-acylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.4) isozymes were compared internally and externally with those of six genes encoding Trimeresurus flavoviridis (habu snake, crotalinae) venom gland PLA2 isozymes. The numbers of nucleotide substitutions per site (KN) for the noncoding regions including introns were one-third to one-eighth of the numbers of nucleotide substitutions per synonymous site (KS) for the protein-coding regions of exons, indicating that the noncoding regions are much more conserved than the protein-coding regions. The KN values for the introns were found to be nearly equivalent to those of introns of T. gramineus and T. flavoviridis TATA box-binding protein genes, which are assumed to be a general (nonvenomous) gene. Thus, it is evident that the introns of venom gland PLA2 isozyme genes have evolved at a similar rate to those of nonvenomous genes. The numbers of nucleotide substitutions per nonsynonymous site (KA) were close to or larger than the KS values for the protein-coding regions in venom gland PLA2 isozyme genes. All of the data combined reveal that Darwinian-type accelerated evolution has universally occurred only in the protein-coding regions of crotalinae snake venom PLA2 isozyme genes.

  11. Polymorphisms in Genes Coding for Cytokines, Mannose-Binding Lectin, Collagen Metabolism and Thrombophilia in Women with Cervical Insufficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundtoft, Iben; Uldbjerg, Niels; Steffensen, Rudi

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the association between cervical insufficiency and single nucleotide polymorphisms in seven genes coding for pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine-related factors, mannose-binding lectin 2 (MBL2), collagen1α1 (COL1A1), factor II and factor V Leiden genes. METHODS: In a case-cont...

  12. Identification and expression profiling of Ceratitis capitata genes coding for β-hexosaminidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasini, Maria E; Intra, Jari; Gomulski, Ludvik M; Calvenzani, Valentina; Petroni, Katia; Briani, Federica; Perotti, Maria Elisa

    2011-02-15

    The goal of this study was to identify the genes coding for β-N-acetylhexosaminidases in the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly) Ceratitis capitata, one of the most destructive agricultural pests, belonging to the Tephritidae family, order Diptera. Two dimeric β-N-acetylhexosaminidases, HEXA and HEXB, have been recently identified on Drosophila sperm. These enzymes are involved in egg binding through interactions with complementary carbohydrates on the surface of the egg shell. Three genes, Hexosaminidase 1 (Hexo1), Hexosaminidase 2 (Hexo2) and fused lobes (fdl), encode for HEXA and HEXB subunits. The availability of C. capitata EST libraries derived from embryos and adult heads allowed us to identify three sequences homologous to the D. melanogaster Hexo1, Hexo2 and fdl genes. Here, we report the expression profile analysis of CcHexo1, CcHexo2 and Ccfdld in several tissues, organs and stages. Ccfdl expression was highest in heads of both sexes and in whole adult females. In the testis and ovary the three genes showed distinct spatial and temporal expression patterns. All the mRNAs were detectable in early stages of spermatogenesis; CcHexo2 and Ccfdl were also expressed in early elongating spermatid cysts. All three genes are expressed in the ovarian nurse cells. CcHexo1 and Ccfdl are stage specific, since they have been observed in stages 12 and 13 during oocyte growth, when programmed cell death occurs in nurse cells. The expression pattern of the three genes in medfly gonads suggests that, as their Drosophila counterparts, they may encode for proteins involved in gametogenesis and fertilization. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Poly(T) variation within mitochondrial protein-coding genes in Globodera (Nematoda: Heteroderidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riepsamen, Angelique H; Blok, Vivian C; Phillips, Mark; Gibson, Tracey; Dowton, Mark

    2008-03-01

    We sequenced a mitochondrial subgenome from the nematode Globodera rostochiensis, in two overlapping pieces. The subgenome was 9210 bp and contained four protein-coding genes (ND4, COIII, ND3, Cytb) and two tRNA genes (tRNA(Thr), tRNA(Gln)). Genome organization was similar to that of Globodera pallida, which is multipartite. Together with the small number of genes on this subgenome, this suggests that the mitochondrial genome of G. rostochiensis is also multipartite. In the initial clones sequenced, COIII and ND3 were full-length, while ND4 and Cytb were interrupted by premature stop codons and contained point indels that disrupted the reading frame. However, sequencing of multiple clones, from DNA extracted both from multiple individuals and from single cysts, revealed a predominant source of variation-in the length of polythymidine tracts. Comparison of our genomic sequences with ESTs similarly revealed variation in the length of polythymidine tracts. We subsequently sequenced both genomic DNA and mRNA from populations of G. pallida. In each case, variation in the length of polythymidine tracts was observed. The levels of expression of mitochondrial genes in G. pallida were representative of the subgenomes present: little evidence of differential expression was observed. These observations are consistent with the operation of posttranscriptional editing in Globodera mitochondria, although this is difficult to show conclusively in the presence of intraindividual gene sequence variation. Further, alternative explanations cannot be discounted; these include the operation of slippage during translation or that genomic copies of most genes are pseudogenes with a small proportion of full-length sequences able to maintain mitochondrial function.

  14. Analysis of non-synonymous-coding variants of Parkinson's disease-related pathogenic and susceptibility genes in East Asian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Jia Nee; Tan, Louis C; Liany, Herty; Koh, Tat Hung; Irwan, Ishak D; Ng, Yen Yek; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Au, Wing-Lok; Aung, Tin; Chan, Anne Y Y; Chong, Siow-Ann; Chung, Sun Ju; Jung, Yusun; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Kim, Juyeon; Lee, Jimmy; Lim, Shen-Yang; Mok, Vincent; Prakash, Kumar-M; Song, Kyuyoung; Tai, E-Shyong; Vithana, Eranga N; Wong, Tien-Yin; Tan, Eng-King; Liu, Jianjun

    2014-07-15

    To evaluate the contribution of non-synonymous-coding variants of known familial and genome-wide association studies (GWAS)-linked genes for Parkinson's disease (PD) to PD risk in the East Asian population, we sequenced all the coding exons of 39 PD-related disease genes and evaluated the accumulation of rare non-synonymous-coding variants in 375 early-onset PD cases and 399 controls. We also genotyped 782 non-synonymous-coding variants of these genes in 710 late-onset PD cases and 9046 population controls. Significant enrichment of LRRK2 variants was observed in both early- and late-onset PD (odds ratio = 1.58; 95% confidence interval = 1.29-1.93; P = 8.05 × 10(-6)). Moderate enrichment was also observed in FGF20, MCCC1, GBA and ITGA8. Half of the rare variants anticipated to cause loss of function of these genes were present in healthy controls. Overall, non-synonymous-coding variants of known familial and GWAS-linked genes appear to make a limited contribution to PD risk, suggesting that clinical sequencing of these genes will provide limited information for risk prediction and molecular diagnosis.

  15. Partitioning of genetic variation between regulatory and coding gene segments: the predominance of software variation in genes encoding introvert proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchison, A

    1997-01-01

    In considering genetic variation in eukaryotes, a fundamental distinction can be made between variation in regulatory (software) and coding (hardware) gene segments. For quantitative traits the bulk of variation, particularly that near the population mean, appears to reside in regulatory segments. The main exceptions to this rule concern proteins which handle extrinsic substances, here termed extrovert proteins. The immune system includes an unusually large proportion of this exceptional category, but even so its chief source of variation may well be polymorphism in regulatory gene segments. The main evidence for this view emerges from genome scanning for quantitative trait loci (QTL), which in the case of the immune system points to a major contribution of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes. Further support comes from sequencing of major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class II promoters, where a high level of polymorphism has been detected. These Mhc promoters appear to act, in part at least, by gating the back-signal from T cells into antigen-presenting cells. Both these forms of polymorphism are likely to be sustained by the need for flexibility in the immune response. Future work on promoter polymorphism is likely to benefit from the input from genome informatics.

  16. Conservation of the Exon-Intron Structure of Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNA Genes in Eutherian Mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Chernikova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The abundance of mammalian long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA genes is high, yet their functions remain largely unknown. One possible way to study this important question is to use large-scale comparisons of various characteristics of lincRNA with those of protein-coding genes for which a large body of functional information is available. A prominent feature of mammalian protein-coding genes is the high evolutionary conservation of the exon-intron structure. Comparative analysis of putative intron positions in lincRNA genes from various mammalian genomes suggests that some lincRNA introns have been conserved for over 100 million years, thus the primary and/or secondary structure of these molecules is likely to be functionally important.

  17. Mutational analysis of the promoter and the coding region of the 5-HT1A gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdmann, J.; Noethen, M.M.; Shimron-Abarbanell, D. [Univ. of Bonn (Germany)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Disturbances of serotonergic pathways have been implicated in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Serotonin (5HT) receptors can be subdivided into at least three major families (5HT1, 5HT2, and 5HT3). Five human 5HT1 receptor subtypes have been cloned, namely 1A, 1D{alpha}, 1D{beta}, 1E, and 1F. Of these, the 5HT1A receptor is the best characterized subtype. In the present study we sought to identify genetic variation in the 5HT1A receptor gene which through alteration of protein function or level of expression might contribute to the genetics of neuropsychiatric diseases. The coding region and the 5{prime} promoter region of the 5HT1A gene from 159 unrelated subjects (45 schizophrenic, 46 bipolar affective, and 43 patients with Tourette`s syndrome, as well as 25 controls) were analyzed using SSCA. SSCA revealed the presence of two mutations both located in the coding region of the 5HT1A receptor gene. The first mutation is a rare silent C{r_arrow}T substitution at nucleotide position 549. The second mutation is characterized by a base pair substitution (A{r_arrow}G) at the first position of codon 28 and results in an amino acid exchange (Ile{r_arrow}Val). Since Val28 was found only in a single schizophrenic patient and in none of the other patients or controls, we decided to extend our samples and to use a restriction assay for screening a further 74 schizophrenic, 95 bipolar affective, and 49 patients with Tourette`s syndrome, as well as 185 controls, for the presence of the mutation. In total, the mutation was found in 2 schizophrenic patients, in 3 bipolars, in 1 Tourette patient, and in 5 controls. To our knowledge the Ile-28-Val substitution reported here is the first natural occuring molecular variant which has been identified for a serotonin receptor so far.

  18. Identification and analysis of unitary loss of long-established protein-coding genes in Poaceae shows evidences for biased gene loss and putatively functional transcription of relics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi; Tang, Liang; Li, Zhe; Jin, Jinpu; Luo, Jingchu; Gao, Ge

    2015-04-18

    Long-established protein-coding genes may lose their coding potential during evolution ("unitary gene loss"). Members of the Poaceae family are a major food source and represent an ideal model clade for plant evolution research. However, the global pattern of unitary gene loss in Poaceae genomes as well as the evolutionary fate of lost genes are still less-investigated and remain largely elusive. Using a locally developed pipeline, we identified 129 unitary gene loss events for long-established protein-coding genes from four representative species of Poaceae, i.e. brachypodium, rice, sorghum and maize. Functional annotation suggested that the lost genes in all or most of Poaceae species are enriched for genes involved in development and response to endogenous stimulus. We also found that 44 mutated genomic loci of lost genes, which we referred as relics, were still actively transcribed, and of which 84% (37 of 44) showed significantly differential expression across different tissues. More interestingly, we found that there were totally five expressed relics may function as competitive endogenous RNA in brachypodium, rice and sorghum genome. Based on comparative genomics and transcriptome data, we firstly compiled a comprehensive catalogue of unitary gene loss events in Poaceae species and characterized a statistically significant functional preference for these lost genes as well showed the potential of relics functioning as competitive endogenous RNAs in Poaceae genomes.

  19. Resolving arthropod phylogeny: exploring phylogenetic signal within 41 kb of protein-coding nuclear gene sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regier, Jerome C; Shultz, Jeffrey W; Ganley, Austen R D; Hussey, April; Shi, Diane; Ball, Bernard; Zwick, Andreas; Stajich, Jason E; Cummings, Michael P; Martin, Joel W; Cunningham, Clifford W

    2008-12-01

    This study attempts to resolve relationships among and within the four basal arthropod lineages (Pancrustacea, Myriapoda, Euchelicerata, Pycnogonida) and to assess the widespread expectation that remaining phylogenetic problems will yield to increasing amounts of sequence data. Sixty-eight regions of 62 protein-coding nuclear genes (approximately 41 kilobases (kb)/taxon) were sequenced for 12 taxonomically diverse arthropod taxa and a tardigrade outgroup. Parsimony, likelihood, and Bayesian analyses of total nucleotide data generally strongly supported the monophyly of each of the basal lineages represented by more than one species. Other relationships within the Arthropoda were also supported, with support levels depending on method of analysis and inclusion/exclusion of synonymous changes. Removing third codon positions, where the assumption of base compositional homogeneity was rejected, altered the results. Removing the final class of synonymous mutations--first codon positions encoding leucine and arginine, which were also compositionally heterogeneous--yielded a data set that was consistent with a hypothesis of base compositional homogeneity. Furthermore, under such a data-exclusion regime, all 68 gene regions individually were consistent with base compositional homogeneity. Restricting likelihood analyses to nonsynonymous change recovered trees with strong support for the basal lineages but not for other groups that were variably supported with more inclusive data sets. In a further effort to increase phylogenetic signal, three types of data exploration were undertaken. (1) Individual genes were ranked by their average rate of nonsynonymous change, and three rate categories were assigned--fast, intermediate, and slow. Then, bootstrap analysis of each gene was performed separately to see which taxonomic groups received strong support. Five taxonomic groups were strongly supported independently by two or more genes, and these genes mostly belonged to the slow

  20. Emerging putative associations between non-coding RNAs and protein-coding genes in Neuropathic Pain. Added value from re-using microarray data.

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    Enrico Capobianco

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Regeneration of injured nerves is likely occurring in the peripheral nervous system, but not in the central nervous system. Although protein-coding gene expression has been assessed during nerve regeneration, little is currently known about the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs. This leaves open questions about the potential effects of ncRNAs at transcriptome level. Due to the limited availability of human neuropathic pain data, we have identified the most comprehensive time-course gene expression profile referred to sciatic nerve injury, and studied in a rat model, using two neuronal tissues, namely dorsal root ganglion (DRG and sciatic nerve (SN. We have developed a methodology to identify differentially expressed bioentities starting from microarray probes, and re-purposing them to annotate ncRNAs, while analyzing the expression profiles of protein-coding genes. The approach is designed to reuse microarray data and perform first profiling and then meta-analysis through three main steps. First, we used contextual analysis to identify what we considered putative or potential protein coding targets for selected ncRNAs. Relevance was therefore assigned to differential expression of neighbor protein-coding genes, with neighborhood defined by a fixed genomic distance from long or antisense ncRNA loci, and of parent genes associated with pseudogenes. Second, connectivity among putative targets was used to build networks, in turn useful to conduct inference at interactomic scale. Last, network paths were annotated to assess relevance to neuropathic pain. We found significant differential expression in long-intergenic ncRNAs (32 lincRNAs in SN, and 8 in DRG, antisense RNA (31 asRNA in SN, and 12 in DRG and pseudogenes (456 in SN, 56 in DRG. In particular, contextual analysis centered on pseudogenes revealed some targets with known association to neurodegeneration and/or neurogenesis processes. While modules of the olfactory receptors were clearly

  1. Emerging Putative Associations between Non-Coding RNAs and Protein-Coding Genes in Neuropathic Pain: Added Value from Reusing Microarray Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Hemalatha B.; Tsinoremas, Nicholas F.; Capobianco, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration of injured nerves is likely occurring in the peripheral nervous system, but not in the central nervous system. Although protein-coding gene expression has been assessed during nerve regeneration, little is currently known about the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). This leaves open questions about the potential effects of ncRNAs at transcriptome level. Due to the limited availability of human neuropathic pain (NP) data, we have identified the most comprehensive time-course gene expression profile referred to sciatic nerve (SN) injury and studied in a rat model using two neuronal tissues, namely dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and SN. We have developed a methodology to identify differentially expressed bioentities starting from microarray probes and repurposing them to annotate ncRNAs, while analyzing the expression profiles of protein-coding genes. The approach is designed to reuse microarray data and perform first profiling and then meta-analysis through three main steps. First, we used contextual analysis to identify what we considered putative or potential protein-coding targets for selected ncRNAs. Relevance was therefore assigned to differential expression of neighbor protein-coding genes, with neighborhood defined by a fixed genomic distance from long or antisense ncRNA loci, and of parental genes associated with pseudogenes. Second, connectivity among putative targets was used to build networks, in turn useful to conduct inference at interactomic scale. Last, network paths were annotated to assess relevance to NP. We found significant differential expression in long-intergenic ncRNAs (32 lincRNAs in SN and 8 in DRG), antisense RNA (31 asRNA in SN and 12 in DRG), and pseudogenes (456 in SN and 56 in DRG). In particular, contextual analysis centered on pseudogenes revealed some targets with known association to neurodegeneration and/or neurogenesis processes. While modules of the olfactory receptors were clearly identified in protein

  2. Cloning and Sequence Analysis on 3' Coding Region of Wild Boar and Cross Bred Pig Myostatin Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Di; YANG Xiu-qin; YANG Jia-fang

    2004-01-01

    Myostatin, with a highly conservative gene among breeds is a negative regulator of muscle. The 3' coding regions of wild boar and crossbred pig myostatin were cloned by RT-PCR and sequenced respectively. The homology of the nucleotide sequence between wild boar and crossbred pig was 100% and there was no difference in this region compared with pig myostatin gene of Genbank. This indicated that there was not change of gene sequence in this region during the evolution processes.

  3. Transcriptional mapping of a late gene coding for the p12 attachment protein of African swine fever virus.

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    The transcriptional characterization of the gene coding for the p12 attachment protein of the African swine fever virus is presented. The results obtained have been used to generate the first detailed transcriptional map of an African swine fever virus late gene. Novel experimental evidence indicating the existence of major differences between the mechanisms controlling the transcription of late genes in African swine fever virus and poxviruses is provided.

  4. Comparison of protein coding gene contents of the fungal phyla Pezizomycotina and Saccharomycotina

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    Ussery David

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several dozen fungi encompassing traditional model organisms, industrial production organisms and human and plant pathogens have been sequenced recently and their particular genomic features analysed in detail. In addition comparative genomics has been used to analyse specific sub groups of fungi. Notably, analysis of the phylum Saccharomycotina has revealed major events of evolution such as the recent genome duplication and subsequent gene loss. However, little has been done to gain a comprehensive comparative view to the fungal kingdom. We have carried out a computational genome wide comparison of protein coding gene content of Saccharomycotina and Pezizomycotina, which include industrially important yeasts and filamentous fungi, respectively. Results Our analysis shows that based on genome redundancy, the traditional model organisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Neurospora crassa are exceptional among fungi. This can be explained by the recent genome duplication in S. cerevisiae and the repeat induced point mutation mechanism in N. crassa. Interestingly in Pezizomycotina a subset of protein families related to plant biomass degradation and secondary metabolism are the only ones showing signs of recent expansion. In addition, Pezizomycotina have a wealth of phylum specific poorly characterised genes with a wide variety of predicted functions. These genes are well conserved in Pezizomycotina, but show no signs of recent expansion. The genes found in all fungi except Saccharomycotina are slightly better characterised and predicted to encode mainly enzymes. The genes specific to Saccharomycotina are enriched in transcription and mitochondrion related functions. Especially mitochondrial ribosomal proteins seem to have diverged from those of Pezizomycotina. In addition, we highlight several individual gene families with interesting phylogenetic distributions. Conclusion Our analysis predicts that all Pezizomycotina unlike

  5. Bioinformatics Analysis for Coding SNPs of the HLADQA1 Gene Involved in Susceptibility to Cervical Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanyun Li; Jun Xing; Linsheng Zhao; Yanni Li; Yuchuan Wang; Weiming Zhang

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze coding SNPs of the HLA-DQA1 gene involved in susceptibility for cervical cancer by a bioinformatics approach, and to choose some SNPs that may have an association with cervical cancer.METHODS By a SNPper tool we extracted SNPs from a public database (dbSNP), exporting them in FASTA formats suitable for subsequent use.Then we used PARSESNP as a tool for the analysis of the cSNPs.RESULTS In the cSNPs of the HLA-DQA1 gene, we find that rs9272693and rs9272703, are made up of missense mutations which convert a codon for one amino acid into a codon for a different amino acid. We chose a PSSM Difference >10 as a lower level for the scores of changes predicted to be deldterious.CONCLUSION We used a bioinformatics approach for cSNPs analysis of the HLA-DQA1 gene. This method can select the variants in a conserved region, and give a PSSM Difference score. But the results need to be verified in cervical cancer patients and a control population.

  6. Morphometric Analysis of Recognized Genes for Autism Spectrum Disorders and Obesity in Relationship to the Distribution of Protein-Coding Genes on Human Chromosomes

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    Austen B. McGuire

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian chromosomes are comprised of complex chromatin architecture with the specific assembly and configuration of each chromosome influencing gene expression and function in yet undefined ways by varying degrees of heterochromatinization that result in Giemsa (G negative euchromatic (light bands and G-positive heterochromatic (dark bands. We carried out morphometric measurements of high-resolution chromosome ideograms for the first time to characterize the total euchromatic and heterochromatic chromosome band length, distribution and localization of 20,145 known protein-coding genes, 790 recognized autism spectrum disorder (ASD genes and 365 obesity genes. The individual lengths of G-negative euchromatin and G-positive heterochromatin chromosome bands were measured in millimeters and recorded from scaled and stacked digital images of 850-band high-resolution ideograms supplied by the International Society of Chromosome Nomenclature (ISCN 2013. Our overall measurements followed established banding patterns based on chromosome size. G-negative euchromatic band regions contained 60% of protein-coding genes while the remaining 40% were distributed across the four heterochromatic dark band sub-types. ASD genes were disproportionately overrepresented in the darker heterochromatic sub-bands, while the obesity gene distribution pattern did not significantly differ from protein-coding genes. Our study supports recent trends implicating genes located in heterochromatin regions playing a role in biological processes including neurodevelopment and function, specifically genes associated with ASD.

  7. Morphometric Analysis of Recognized Genes for Autism Spectrum Disorders and Obesity in Relationship to the Distribution of Protein-Coding Genes on Human Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Austen B; Rafi, Syed K; Manzardo, Ann M; Butler, Merlin G

    2016-05-05

    Mammalian chromosomes are comprised of complex chromatin architecture with the specific assembly and configuration of each chromosome influencing gene expression and function in yet undefined ways by varying degrees of heterochromatinization that result in Giemsa (G) negative euchromatic (light) bands and G-positive heterochromatic (dark) bands. We carried out morphometric measurements of high-resolution chromosome ideograms for the first time to characterize the total euchromatic and heterochromatic chromosome band length, distribution and localization of 20,145 known protein-coding genes, 790 recognized autism spectrum disorder (ASD) genes and 365 obesity genes. The individual lengths of G-negative euchromatin and G-positive heterochromatin chromosome bands were measured in millimeters and recorded from scaled and stacked digital images of 850-band high-resolution ideograms supplied by the International Society of Chromosome Nomenclature (ISCN) 2013. Our overall measurements followed established banding patterns based on chromosome size. G-negative euchromatic band regions contained 60% of protein-coding genes while the remaining 40% were distributed across the four heterochromatic dark band sub-types. ASD genes were disproportionately overrepresented in the darker heterochromatic sub-bands, while the obesity gene distribution pattern did not significantly differ from protein-coding genes. Our study supports recent trends implicating genes located in heterochromatin regions playing a role in biological processes including neurodevelopment and function, specifically genes associated with ASD.

  8. Large-scale parsimony analysis of metazoan indels in protein-coding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belinky, Frida; Cohen, Ofir; Huchon, Dorothée

    2010-02-01

    Insertions and deletions (indels) are considered to be rare evolutionary events, the analysis of which may resolve controversial phylogenetic relationships. Indeed, indel characters are often assumed to be less homoplastic than amino acid and nucleotide substitutions and, consequently, more reliable markers for phylogenetic reconstruction. In this study, we analyzed indels from over 1,000 metazoan orthologous genes. We studied the impact of different species sampling, ortholog data sets, lengths of included indels, and indel-coding methods on the resulting metazoan tree. Our results show that, similar to sequence substitutions, indels are homoplastic characters, and their analysis is sensitive to the long-branch attraction artifact. Furthermore, improving the taxon sampling and choosing a closely related outgroup greatly impact the phylogenetic inference. Our indel-based inferences support the Ecdysozoa hypothesis over the Coelomata hypothesis and suggest that sponges are a sister clade to other animals.

  9. Basal jawed vertebrate phylogeny inferred from multiple nuclear DNA-coded genes

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    Ishida Osamu

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phylogenetic analyses of jawed vertebrates based on mitochondrial sequences often result in confusing inferences which are obviously inconsistent with generally accepted trees. In particular, in a hypothesis by Rasmussen and Arnason based on mitochondrial trees, cartilaginous fishes have a terminal position in a paraphyletic cluster of bony fishes. No previous analysis based on nuclear DNA-coded genes could significantly reject the mitochondrial trees of jawed vertebrates. Results We have cloned and sequenced seven nuclear DNA-coded genes from 13 vertebrate species. These sequences, together with sequences available from databases including 13 jawed vertebrates from eight major groups (cartilaginous fishes, bichir, chondrosteans, gar, bowfin, teleost fishes, lungfishes and tetrapods and an outgroup (a cyclostome and a lancelet, have been subjected to phylogenetic analyses based on the maximum likelihood method. Conclusion Cartilaginous fishes have been inferred to be basal to other jawed vertebrates, which is consistent with the generally accepted view. The minimum log-likelihood difference between the maximum likelihood tree and trees not supporting the basal position of cartilaginous fishes is 18.3 ± 13.1. The hypothesis by Rasmussen and Arnason has been significantly rejected with the minimum log-likelihood difference of 123 ± 23.3. Our tree has also shown that living holosteans, comprising bowfin and gar, form a monophyletic group which is the sister group to teleost fishes. This is consistent with a formerly prevalent view of vertebrate classification, although inconsistent with both of the current morphology-based and mitochondrial sequence-based trees. Furthermore, the bichir has been shown to be the basal ray-finned fish. Tetrapods and lungfish have formed a monophyletic cluster in the tree inferred from the concatenated alignment, being consistent with the currently prevalent view. It also remains possible that

  10. The gene coding for PGC-1α modifies age at onset in Huntington's Disease

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    Oberkofler Hannes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Huntington's disease (HD is one of the most common autosomal dominant inherited, neurodegenerative disorders. It is characterized by progressive motor, emotional and cognitive dysfunction. In addition metabolic abnormalities such as wasting and altered energy expenditure are increasingly recognized as clinical hallmarks of the disease. HD is caused by an unstable CAG repeat expansion in the HD gene (HTT, localized on chromosome 4p16.3. The number of CAG repeats in the HD gene is the main predictor of disease-onset, but the remaining variation is strongly heritable. Transcriptional dysregulation, mitochondrial dysfunction and enhanced oxidative stress have been implicated in the pathogenesis. Recent studies suggest that PGC-1α, a transcriptional master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and metabolism, is defective in HD. A genome wide search for modifier genes of HD age-of-onset had suggested linkage at chromosomal region 4p16-4p15, near the locus of PPARGC1A, the gene coding for PGC-1α. We now present data of 2-loci PPARGC1A block 2 haplotypes, showing an effect upon age-at-onset in 447 unrelated HD patients after statistical consideration of CAG repeat lengths in both HTT alleles. Block 1 haplotypes were not associated with the age-at-onset. Homozygosity for the 'protective' block 2 haplotype was associated with a significant delay in disease onset. To our knowledge this is the first study to show clinically relevant effects of the PGC-1α system on the course of Huntington's disease in humans.

  11. Evidence for gene-specific rather than transcription rate-dependent histone H3 exchange in yeast coding regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gat-Viks, Irit; Vingron, Martin

    2009-02-01

    In eukaryotic organisms, histones are dynamically exchanged independently of DNA replication. Recent reports show that different coding regions differ in their amount of replication-independent histone H3 exchange. The current paradigm is that this histone exchange variability among coding regions is a consequence of transcription rate. Here we put forward the idea that this variability might be also modulated in a gene-specific manner independently of transcription rate. To that end, we study transcription rate-independent replication-independent coding region histone H3 exchange. We term such events relative exchange. Our genome-wide analysis shows conclusively that in yeast, relative exchange is a novel consistent feature of coding regions. Outside of replication, each coding region has a characteristic pattern of histone H3 exchange that is either higher or lower than what was expected by its RNAPII transcription rate alone. Histone H3 exchange in coding regions might be a way to add or remove certain histone modifications that are important for transcription elongation. Therefore, our results that gene-specific coding region histone H3 exchange is decoupled from transcription rate might hint at a new epigenetic mechanism of transcription regulation.

  12. Rare coding variants in the phospholipase D3 gene confer risk for Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several risk variants for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). These common variants have replicable but small effects on LOAD risk and generally do not have obvious functional effects. Low-frequency coding variants, not detected by GWAS, are predicted to include functional variants with larger effects on risk. To identify low-frequency coding variants with large effects on LOAD risk, we carried out whole-exome sequencing (WES) in 14 large LOAD families and follow-up analyses of the candidate variants in several large LOAD case-control data sets. A rare variant in PLD3 (phospholipase D3; Val232Met) segregated with disease status in two independent families and doubled risk for Alzheimer's disease in seven independent case-control series with a total of more than 11,000 cases and controls of European descent. Gene-based burden analyses in 4,387 cases and controls of European descent and 302 African American cases and controls, with complete sequence data for PLD3, reveal that several variants in this gene increase risk for Alzheimer's disease in both populations. PLD3 is highly expressed in brain regions that are vulnerable to Alzheimer's disease pathology, including hippocampus and cortex, and is expressed at significantly lower levels in neurons from Alzheimer's disease brains compared to control brains. Overexpression of PLD3 leads to a significant decrease in intracellular amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) and extracellular Aβ42 and Aβ40 (the 42- and 40-residue isoforms of the amyloid-β peptide), and knockdown of PLD3 leads to a significant increase in extracellular Aβ42 and Aβ40. Together, our genetic and functional data indicate that carriers of PLD3 coding variants have a twofold increased risk for LOAD and that PLD3 influences APP processing. This study provides an example of how densely affected families may help to identify rare variants with large effects on risk for disease or other complex

  13. Phylogenomic analyses reveal the diversity of laccase-coding genes in Fonsecaea genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Peiying; Weiss, Vinicius Almir; Vicente, Vania Aparecida; Stielow, J. Benjamin; de Hoog, Sybren

    2017-01-01

    The genus Fonsecaea comprises black yeast-like fungi of clinical relevance, including etiologic agents of chromoblastomycosis and cerebral phaeohyphomycosis. Presence of melanin and assimilation of monoaromatic hydrocarbons and alkylbenzenes have been proposed as virulence factors. Multicopper oxidase (MCO) is a family of enzymes including laccases, ferroxidases and ascorbate oxidases which are able to catalyze the oxidation of various aromatic organic compounds with the reduction of molecular oxygen to water. Additionally, laccases are required for the production of fungal melanins, a cell-wall black pigment recognized as a key polymer for pathogenicity and extremotolerance in black yeast-like fungi. Although the activity of laccase enzymes has previously been reported in many wood-rotting fungi, the diversity of laccase genes in Fonsecaea has not yet been assessed. In this study, we identified and characterized laccase-coding genes and determined their genomic location in five clinical and environmental Fonsecaea species. The identification of laccases sensu stricto will provide insights into carbon acquisition strategies as well as melanin production in Fonsecaea. PMID:28187150

  14. Multiple transcription factor codes activate epidermal wound-response genes in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Joseph C; Juarez, Michelle T; Kim, Myungjin; Drivenes, Øyvind; McGinnis, William

    2009-02-17

    Wounds in Drosophila and mouse embryos induce similar genetic pathways to repair epidermal barriers. However, the transcription factors that transduce wound signals to repair epidermal barriers are largely unknown. We characterize the transcriptional regulatory enhancers of 4 genes-Ddc, ple, msn, and kkv-that are rapidly activated in epidermal cells surrounding wounds in late Drosophila embryos and early larvae. These epidermal wound enhancers all contain evolutionarily conserved sequences matching binding sites for JUN/FOS and GRH transcription factors, but vary widely in trans- and cis-requirements for these inputs and their binding sites. We propose that the combination of GRH and FOS is part of an ancient wound-response pathway still used in vertebrates and invertebrates, but that other mechanisms have evolved that result in similar transcriptional output. A common, but largely untested assumption of bioinformatic analyses of gene regulatory networks is that transcription units activated in the same spatial and temporal patterns will require the same cis-regulatory codes. Our results indicate that this is an overly simplistic view.

  15. Comparisons between Arabidopsis thaliana and Drosophila melanogaster in relation to Coding and Noncoding Sequence Length and Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Caldwell

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a continuing interest in the analysis of gene architecture and gene expression to determine the relationship that may exist. Advances in high-quality sequencing technologies and large-scale resource datasets have increased the understanding of relationships and cross-referencing of expression data to the large genome data. Although a negative correlation between expression level and gene (especially transcript length has been generally accepted, there have been some conflicting results arising from the literature concerning the impacts of different regions of genes, and the underlying reason is not well understood. The research aims to apply quantile regression techniques for statistical analysis of coding and noncoding sequence length and gene expression data in the plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, and fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, to determine if a relationship exists and if there is any variation or similarities between these species. The quantile regression analysis found that the coding sequence length and gene expression correlations varied, and similarities emerged for the noncoding sequence length (5′ and 3′ UTRs between animal and plant species. In conclusion, the information described in this study provides the basis for further exploration into gene regulation with regard to coding and noncoding sequence length.

  16. Identification and Molecular Characterization of Genes Coding Pharmaceutically Important Enzymes from Halo-Thermo Tolerant Bacillus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safary, Azam; Moniri, Rezvan; Hamzeh-Mivehroud, Maryam; Dastmalchi, Siavoush

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Robust pharmaceutical and industrial enzymes from extremophile microorganisms are main source of enzymes with tremendous stability under harsh conditions which make them potential tools for commercial and biotechnological applications. Methods: The genome of a Gram-positive halo-thermotolerant Bacillus sp. SL1, new isolate from Saline Lake, was investigated for the presence of genes coding for potentially pharmaceutical enzymes. We determined gene sequences for the enzymes laccase (CotA), l-asparaginase (ansA3, ansA1), glutamate-specific endopeptidase (blaSE), l-arabinose isomerase (araA2), endo-1,4-β mannosidase (gmuG), glutaminase (glsA), pectate lyase (pelA), cellulase (bglC1), aldehyde dehydrogenase (ycbD) and allantoinases (pucH) in the genome of Bacillus sp. SL1. Results: Based on the DNA sequence alignment results, six of the studied enzymes of Bacillus sp. SL-1 showed 100% similarity at the nucleotide level to the same genes of B. licheniformis 14580 demonstrating extensive organizational relationship between these two strains. Despite high similarities between the B. licheniformis and Bacillus sp. SL-1 genomes, there are minor differences in the sequences of some enzyme. Approximately 30% of the enzyme sequences revealed more than 99% identity with some variations in nucleotides leading to amino acid substitution in protein sequences. Conclusion: Molecular characterization of this new isolate provides useful information regarding evolutionary relationship between B. subtilis and B. licheniformis species. Since, the most industrial processes are often performed in harsh conditions, enzymes from such halo-thermotolerant bacteria may provide economically and industrially appealing biocatalysts to be used under specific physicochemical situations in medical, pharmaceutical, chemical and other industries. PMID:28101462

  17. Computational promoter analysis of mouse, rat and human antimicrobial peptide-coding genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Chikatoshi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are effectors of the innate immune response. A multitude of signals coming from pathways of mammalian pathogen/pattern recognition receptors and other proteins affect the expression of AMP-coding genes (AMPcgs. For many AMPcgs the promoter elements and transcription factors that control their tissue cell-specific expression have yet to be fully identified and characterized. Results Based upon the RIKEN full-length cDNA and public sequence data derived from human, mouse and rat, we identified 178 candidate AMP transcripts derived from 61 genes belonging to 29 AMP families. However, only for 31 mouse genes belonging to 22 AMP families we were able to determine true orthologous relationships with 30 human and 15 rat sequences. We screened the promoter regions of AMPcgs in the three species for motifs by an ab initio motif finding method and analyzed the derived promoter characteristics. Promoter models were developed for alpha-defensins, penk and zap AMP families. The results suggest a core set of transcription factors (TFs that regulate the transcription of AMPcg families in mouse, rat and human. The three most frequent core TFs groups include liver-, nervous system-specific and nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs. Out of 440 motifs analyzed, we found that three represent potentially novel TF-binding motifs enriched in promoters of AMPcgs, while the other four motifs appear to be species-specific. Conclusion Our large-scale computational analysis of promoters of 22 families of AMPcgs across three mammalian species suggests that their key transcriptional regulators are likely to be TFs of the liver-, nervous system-specific and NHR groups. The computationally inferred promoter elements and potential TF binding motifs provide a rich resource for targeted experimental validation of TF binding and signaling studies that aim at the regulation of mouse, rat or human AMPcgs.

  18. ChIPBase v2.0: decoding transcriptional regulatory networks of non-coding RNAs and protein-coding genes from ChIP-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ke-Ren; Liu, Shun; Sun, Wen-Ju; Zheng, Ling-Ling; Zhou, Hui; Yang, Jian-Hua; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2017-01-04

    The abnormal transcriptional regulation of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and protein-coding genes (PCGs) is contributed to various biological processes and linked with human diseases, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we developed ChIPBase v2.0 (http://rna.sysu.edu.cn/chipbase/) to explore the transcriptional regulatory networks of ncRNAs and PCGs. ChIPBase v2.0 has been expanded with ∼10 200 curated ChIP-seq datasets, which represent about 20 times expansion when comparing to the previous released version. We identified thousands of binding motif matrices and their binding sites from ChIP-seq data of DNA-binding proteins and predicted millions of transcriptional regulatory relationships between transcription factors (TFs) and genes. We constructed 'Regulator' module to predict hundreds of TFs and histone modifications that were involved in or affected transcription of ncRNAs and PCGs. Moreover, we built a web-based tool, Co-Expression, to explore the co-expression patterns between DNA-binding proteins and various types of genes by integrating the gene expression profiles of ∼10 000 tumor samples and ∼9100 normal tissues and cell lines. ChIPBase also provides a ChIP-Function tool and a genome browser to predict functions of diverse genes and visualize various ChIP-seq data. This study will greatly expand our understanding of the transcriptional regulations of ncRNAs and PCGs. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Expression of enterotoxin-coding genes in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from Mexican haemodialysis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Paniagua-Contreras, Gloria Luz; Monroy-Pérez, Eric; Vaca-Paniagua, Felipe; RODRÍGUEZ-MOCTEZUMA,JOSÉ RAYMUNDO; Vaca, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) causes severe catheter-related infections in haemodialysis patients ranging from local-site infections and septic thrombophlebitis to bacteraemia but the associated virulence factors and exotoxins remain unclear. Findings We employed an in vitro infection model using reconstituted human epithelium (RHE) to analyse the expression profiles of 4 virulence genes and 12 exotoxin-coding virulence genes in 21 MRSA strains isolated from ca...

  20. Functional and crystallographic characterization of Salmonella typhimurium Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase coded by the sodCI virulence gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pesce, A; Battistoni, A; Stroppolo, ME; Polizio, F; Nardini, M; Kroll, JS; Langford, PR; O'Neill, P; Sette, M; Desideri, A; Bolognesi, M

    2000-01-01

    The functional and three-dimensional structural features of Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase coded by the Salmonella typhimurium sodCI gene, have been characterized. Measurements of the catalytic rate indicate that this enzyme is the most efficient superoxide dismutase analyzed so far, a feature that may

  1. Natural selection on coding and noncoding DNA sequences is associated with virulence genes in a plant pathogenic fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rech, Gabriel E; Sanz-Martín, José M; Anisimova, Maria; Sukno, Serenella A; Thon, Michael R

    2014-09-04

    Natural selection leaves imprints on DNA, offering the opportunity to identify functionally important regions of the genome. Identifying the genomic regions affected by natural selection within pathogens can aid in the pursuit of effective strategies to control diseases. In this study, we analyzed genome-wide patterns of selection acting on different classes of sequences in a worldwide sample of eight strains of the model plant-pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum graminicola. We found evidence of selective sweeps, balancing selection, and positive selection affecting both protein-coding and noncoding DNA of pathogenicity-related sequences. Genes encoding putative effector proteins and secondary metabolite biosynthetic enzymes show evidence of positive selection acting on the coding sequence, consistent with an Arms Race model of evolution. The 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) of genes coding for effector proteins and genes upregulated during infection show an excess of high-frequency polymorphisms likely the consequence of balancing selection and consistent with the Red Queen hypothesis of evolution acting on these putative regulatory sequences. Based on the findings of this work, we propose that even though adaptive substitutions on coding sequences are important for proteins that interact directly with the host, polymorphisms in the regulatory sequences may confer flexibility of gene expression in the virulence processes of this important plant pathogen. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  2. Structural and functional studies of a family of Dictyostelium discoideum developmentally regulated, prestalk genes coding for small proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Escalante Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum executes a multicellular development program upon starvation. This morphogenetic process requires the differential regulation of a large number of genes and is coordinated by extracellular signals. The MADS-box transcription factor SrfA is required for several stages of development, including slug migration and spore terminal differentiation. Results Subtractive hybridization allowed the isolation of a gene, sigN (SrfA-induced gene N, that was dependent on the transcription factor SrfA for expression at the slug stage of development. Homology searches detected the existence of a large family of sigN-related genes in the Dictyostelium discoideum genome. The 13 most similar genes are grouped in two regions of chromosome 2 and have been named Group1 and Group2 sigN genes. The putative encoded proteins are 87–89 amino acids long. All these genes have a similar structure, composed of a first exon containing a 13 nucleotides long open reading frame and a second exon comprising the remaining of the putative coding region. The expression of these genes is induced at10 hours of development. Analyses of their promoter regions indicate that these genes are expressed in the prestalk region of developing structures. The addition of antibodies raised against SigN Group 2 proteins induced disintegration of multi-cellular structures at the mound stage of development. Conclusion A large family of genes coding for small proteins has been identified in D. discoideum. Two groups of very similar genes from this family have been shown to be specifically expressed in prestalk cells during development. Functional studies using antibodies raised against Group 2 SigN proteins indicate that these genes could play a role during multicellular development.

  3. Identification and characterisation of coding tandem repeat variants in incA gene of Chlamydophila pecorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef Mohamad, Khalil; Rekiki, Abdessalem; Myers, Garry; Bavoil, Patrik M; Rodolakis, Annie

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria of the family Chlamydiaceae are obligate intracellular pathogens of human and animals. Chlamydophila pecorum is associated with different pathological conditions in ruminants, swine and koala. To characterize a coding tandem repeat (CTR) identified at the 3' end of incA gene of C. pecorum, 51 strains of different chlamydial species were examined. The CTR were observed in 18 of 18 tested C. pecorum isolates including symptomatic and asymptomatic animals from diverse geographical origins. The CTR were also found in two strains of C. abortus respectively isolated from faeces from a healthy ewe and from a goat belonging to asymptomatic herds, but were absent in C. abortus strains isolated from clinical disease specimens, and in tested strains of C. psittaci, C. caviae, C. felis and C. trachomatis. The number of CTR repeats is variable and encode several motifs that are rich in alanine and proline. The CTR-derived variable structure of incA, which encode the Chlamydiaceae-specific type III secreted inclusion membrane protein, IncA, may be involved in the adaptation of C. pecorum to its environment by allowing it to persist in the host cell.

  4. A “GC-rich” method for mammalian gene expression:A dominant role of non-coding DNA GC content in the regulation of mammalian gene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gilbert; Rishton; Matthew; (Mizhou); HUI

    2010-01-01

    High mammalian gene expression was obtained for more than twenty different proteins in different cell types by just a few laboratory scale stable gene transfections for each protein.The stable expression vectors were constructed by inserting a naturally-occurring 1.006 kb or a synthetic 0.733 kb DNA fragment(including intron) of extremely GC-rich at the 5’ or/and 3’ flanking regions of these protein genes or their gene promoters.This experiment is the first experimental evidence showing that a non-coding extremely GC-rich DNA fragment is a super "chromatin opening element" and plays an important role in mammalian gene expression.This experiment has further indicated that chromatin-based regulation of mammalian gene expression is at least partially embedded in DNA primary structure,namely DNA GC-content.

  5. The gene coding for the DOPA dioxygenase involved in betalain biosynthesis in Amanita muscaria and its regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, U G; Fivaz, J; Girod, P A; Zyrd, J P

    1997-09-01

    Genomic and cDNA clones derived from the gene (dodA) coding for DOPA dioxygenase, a key enzyme in the betalain pathway, were obtained from the basidiomycete Amanita muscaria. A cDNA library was established in the phage lambda ZapII and dodA clones were isolated using polyclonal antibodies raised against the purified enzyme. Their identity was confirmed by comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with the sequence of several tryptic peptide fragments of DOPA dioxygenase. The gene coded for a 228-amino acid protein that showed no homology to published sequences. The coding region was interrupted by five short introns. Regulation was shown to occur at the transcriptional level; the mRNA accumulated to high levels only in the coloured cap tissue. dodA was found to be a single-copy gene in A. muscaria. To our knowledge, this is the first gene from the betalain pathway to be cloned. It encodes a type of aromatic ring-cleaving dioxygenase that has not been previously described.

  6. Deletions in a ribosomal protein-coding gene are associated with tigecycline resistance in Enterococcus faecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebel, Marc; Quick, Joshua; Prieto, Ana Maria Guzman; Hill, Robert L R; Pike, Rachel; Huber, Damon; David, Miruna; Hornsey, Michael; Wareham, David; Oppenheim, Beryl; Woodford, Neil; van Schaik, Willem; Loman, Nicholas

    2015-11-01

    Enterococcus faecium is an emerging nosocomial pathogen associated with antibiotic therapy in the hospital environment. Whole-genome sequences were determined for three pairs of related, consecutively collected E. faecium clinical isolates to determine putative mechanisms of resistance to tigecycline. The first isolates (1S, 2S and 3S) in each of the three pairs were sensitive to tigecycline [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.125 mg/L]. Following tigecycline therapy, the second isolate in each pair demonstrated increased resistance to tigecycline. Two isolates (1R and 2R) were resistant (MIC of 8 mg/L) and one isolate (3I) demonstrated reduced susceptibility (MIC of 0.5 mg/L). Mutations distinguishing each pair of sensitive and resistant isolates were determined through alignment to a reference genome and variant detection. In addition, a de novo assembly of each isolate genome was constructed to confirm mutations. A total of 16 mutations in eleven coding sequences were determined. Mutations in the rpsJ gene, which encodes a structural protein forming part of the 30S ribosomal subunit, were detected in each of the pairs. Mutations were in regions proximal to the predicted tigecycline-binding site. Predicted amino acid substitutions were detected in 1R and 3I. The resistant strains were additionally associated with deletions of 15 nucleotides (2R) and 3 nucleotides (1R). This study confirms that amino acid substitutions in rpsJ contribute towards reduced susceptibility to tigecycline and suggests that deletions may be required for tigecycline resistance in E. faecium.

  7. Biased gene conversion and GC-content evolution in the coding sequences of reptiles and vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figuet, Emeric; Ballenghien, Marion; Romiguier, Jonathan; Galtier, Nicolas

    2014-12-19

    Mammalian and avian genomes are characterized by a substantial spatial heterogeneity of GC-content, which is often interpreted as reflecting the effect of local GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC), a meiotic repair bias that favors G and C over A and T alleles in high-recombining genomic regions. Surprisingly, the first fully sequenced nonavian sauropsid (i.e., reptile), the green anole Anolis carolinensis, revealed a highly homogeneous genomic GC-content landscape, suggesting the possibility that gBGC might not be at work in this lineage. Here, we analyze GC-content evolution at third-codon positions (GC3) in 44 vertebrates species, including eight newly sequenced transcriptomes, with a specific focus on nonavian sauropsids. We report that reptiles, including the green anole, have a genome-wide distribution of GC3 similar to that of mammals and birds, and we infer a strong GC3-heterogeneity to be already present in the tetrapod ancestor. We further show that the dynamic of coding sequence GC-content is largely governed by karyotypic features in vertebrates, notably in the green anole, in agreement with the gBGC hypothesis. The discrepancy between third-codon positions and noncoding DNA regarding GC-content dynamics in the green anole could not be explained by the activity of transposable elements or selection on codon usage. This analysis highlights the unique value of third-codon positions as an insertion/deletion-free marker of nucleotide substitution biases that ultimately affect the evolution of proteins.

  8. Systematic screening for mutations in the promoter and the coding region of the 5-HT{sub 1A} gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdmann, J.; Shimron-Abarbanell, D.; Cichon, S. [Univ. of Bonn (Germany)] [and others

    1995-10-09

    In the present study we sought to identify genetic variation in the 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor gene which through alteration of protein function or level of expression might contribute to the genetic predisposition to neuropsychiatric diseases. Genomic DNA samples from 159 unrelated subjects (including 45 schizophrenic, 46 bipolar affective, and 43 patients with Tourette`s syndrome, as well as 25 healthy controls) were investigated by single-strand conformation analysis. Overlapping PCR (polymerase chain reaction) fragments covered the whole coding sequence as well as the 5{prime} untranslated region of the 5-HT{sub 1A} gene. The region upstream to the coding sequence we investigated contains a functional promoter. We found two rare nucleotide sequence variants. Both mutations are located in the coding region of the gene: a coding mutation (A{yields}G) in nucleotide position 82 which leads to an amino acid exchange (Ile{yields}Val) in position 28 of the receptor protein and a silent mutation (C{yields}T) in nucleotide position 549. The occurrence of the Ile-28-Val substitution was studied in an extended sample of patients (n = 352) and controls (n = 210) but was found in similar frequencies in all groups. Thus, this mutation is unlikely to play a significant role in the genetic predisposition to the diseases investigated. In conclusion, our study does not provide evidence that the 5-HT{sub 1A} gene plays either a major or a minor role in the genetic predisposition to schizophrenia, bipolar affective disorder, or Tourette`s syndrome. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Complete female mitochondrial genome of Anodonta anatina (Mollusca: Unionidae): confirmation of a novel protein-coding gene (F ORF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroka, Marianna; Burzyński, Artur

    2015-04-01

    Freshwater mussels are among animals having two different, gender-specific mitochondrial genomes. We sequenced complete female mitochondrial genomes from five individuals of Anodonta anatina, a bivalve species common in palearctic ecozone. The length of the genome was variable: 15,637-15,653 bp. This variation was almost entirely confined to the non-coding parts, which constituted approximately 5% of the genome. Nucleotide diversity was moderate, at 0.3%. Nucleotide composition was typically biased towards AT (66.0%). All genes normally seen in animal mtDNA were identified, as well as the ORF characteristic for unionid mitochondrial genomes, bringing the total number of genes present to 38. If this additional ORF does encode a protein, it must evolve under a very relaxed selection since all substitutions within this gene were non-synonymous. The gene order and structure of the genome were identical to those of all female mitochondrial genomes described in unionid bivalves except the Gonideini.

  10. Cloning and expression in Escherichia coli of a gene coding for a secondary alcohol dehydrogenase from Candida parapsilosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, H; Kawada, N; Matsuyama, A; Kobayashi, Y

    1999-06-01

    A gene encoding a stereo-specific secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (CpSADH) that catalyzed the oxidation of (S)-1,3-BDO to 4-hydroxy-2-butanone was cloned from Candida parapsilosis. This CpSADH-gene consisted of 1,009 nucleotides coding for a protein with M(r) 35,964. A recombinant Escherichia coli JM109 strain harboring the expression plasmid, pKK-CPA1, produced (R)-1,3-BDO (93.5% ee., 94.7% yield) from the racemate without any additive to regenerate NAD+ from NADH.

  11. Coding genes and molecular structures of the diffusible signalling proteins (pheromones) of the polar ciliate, Euplotes nobilii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallesi, Adriana; Alimenti, Claudio; Pedrini, Bill; Di Giuseppe, Graziano; Dini, Fernando; Wüthrich, Kurt; Luporini, Pierangelo

    2012-12-01

    In protozoan ciliates, diffusible signalling proteins (pheromones) regulate the vegetative growth and mating interactions. Here, the coding genes and the structures of the encoded pheromones were studied in genetically distinct wild-type strains representing interbreeding Antarctic and Arctic populations of the marine ciliate Euplotes nobilii. Determination of seven allelic pheromone-coding DNA sequences revealed that an unusual extension and high structural conservation of the 5' non-coding region are peculiar traits of this gene family, implying that this region is directly involved in the mechanism of pheromone gene expression, possibly through phenomena of intron splicing and/or frame-shifting. For four pheromones, the three-dimensional structures were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in solution. These structures show that the pheromones represent a protein family which adapts to its polar environment by combining a structurally stable core of a three-helix bundle with extended polypeptide segments that are devoid of regular secondary structures and concomitantly show enhanced structural flexibility. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Differential Regulation of Genes Coding for Organelle and Cytosolic ClpATPases under Biotic and Abiotic Stresses in Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthusamy, Senthilkumar K.; Dalal, Monika; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Bansal, Kailash C.

    2016-01-01

    A sub-group of class I Caseinolytic proteases (Clps) function as molecular chaperone and confer thermotolerance to plants. We identified class I Clp family consisting of five ClpB/HSP100, two ClpC, and two ClpD genes from bread wheat. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these genes were highly conserved across grass genomes. Subcellular localization prediction revealed that TaClpC and TaClpD subgroup proteins and TaClpB1 proteins are potentially targeted to chloroplast, while TaClpB5 to mitochondria, and TaClpB2, TaClpB3, and TaClpB4 to cytoplasm. Spatio-temporal expression pattern analysis revealed that four TaClpB and TaClpD2 genes are expressed in majority of all tissues and developmental stages of wheat. Real-time RT-PCR analysis of expression levels of Clp genes in seven wheat genotypes under different abiotic stresses revealed that genes coding for the cytosolic Clps namely TaClpB2 and TaClpB3 were upregulated under heat, salt and oxidative stress but were downregulated by cold stress in most genotypes. In contrast, genes coding for the chloroplastic Clps TaClpC1, TaClpC2, and TaClpD1 genes were significantly upregulated by mainly by cold stress in most genotypes, while TaClpD2 gene was upregulated >2 fold by salt stress in DBW16. The TaClpB5 gene coding for mitochondrial Clp was upregulated in all genotypes under heat, salt and oxidative stresses. In addition, we found that biotic stresses also upregulated TaClpB4 and TaClpD1. Among biotic stresses, Tilletia caries induced TaClpB2, TaClpB3, TaClpC1, and TaClpD1. Differential expression pattern under different abiotic and biotic stresses and predicted differential cellular localization of Clps suggest their non-redundant organelle and stress-specific roles. Our results also suggest the potential role of Clps in cold, salt and biotic stress responses in addition to the previously established role in thermotolerance of wheat. PMID:27446158

  13. Non-coding transcripts in the H19 imprinting control region mediate gene silencing in transgenic Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfelder, Stefan; Smits, Guillaume; Fraser, Peter; Reik, Wolf; Paro, Renato

    2007-11-01

    The imprinting control region (ICR) upstream of H19 is the key regulatory element conferring monoallelic expression on H19 and Igf2 (insulin-like growth factor 2). Epigenetic marks in the ICR regulate its interaction with the chromatin protein CCCTC-binding factor and with other control factors to coordinate gene silencing in the imprinting cluster. Here, we show that the H19 ICR is biallelically transcribed, producing both sense and antisense RNAs. We analyse the function of the non-coding transcripts in a Drosophila transgenic system in which the H19 upstream region silences the expression of a reporter gene. We show that knockdown of H19 ICR non-coding RNA (ncRNA) by RNA interference leads to the loss of reporter gene silencing. Our results are, to the best of our knowledge, the first to show that ncRNAs in the H19 ICR are functionally significant, and also indicate that they have a role in regulating gene expression and perhaps epigenetic marks at the H19/Igf2 locus.

  14. THE SC7/SC14 GENE FAMILY OF SCHIZOPHYLLUM-COMMUNE CODES FOR EXTRACELLULAR PROTEINS SPECIFICALLY EXPRESSED DURING FRUIT-BODY FORMATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHUREN, FHJ; ASGEIRSDOTTIR, SA; KOTHE, EM; SCHEER, JMJ; WESSELS, JGH

    The Sc7 and Sc14 genes are specifically expressed in the dikaryon of the basidiomycete fungus Schizophyllum commune during fruiting. These genes are closely linked (within 6 kb) and highly similar in gene structure and nucleotide sequence (70% identical nucleotides in their coding regions). The

  15. The water-born protein pheromones of the polar protozoan ciliate, Euplotes nobilii: Coding genes and molecular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallesi, Adriana; Alimenti, Claudio; Di Giuseppe, Graziano; Dini, Fernando; Pedrini, Bill; Wüthrich, Kurt; Luporini, Pierangelo

    2010-08-01

    The protozoan ciliate Euplotes nobilii found in Antarctic and Arctic coastal waters relies on secretion of water-soluble cell type-specific signal proteins (pheromones) to regulate its vegetative growth and sexual mating. For three of these psychrophilic pheromones we previously determined the three-dimensional structures by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with protein solutions purified from the natural sources, which led to evidence that their adaptation to cold is primarily achieved by increased flexibility through an extension of regions free of regular secondary structures, and by increased exposure of negative charges on the protein surface. Then we cloned the coding genes of these E. nobilii pheromones from the transcriptionally active cell somatic nucleus (macronucleus) and characterized the full-length sequences. These sequences all contain an open reading frame of 252-285 nucleotides, which is specific for a cytoplasmic pheromone precursor that requires two proteolytic cleavages to remove a signal peptide and a pro segment before release of the mature protein into the extracellular environment. The 5‧ and 3‧ non-coding regions are two- to three-fold longer than the coding region and appear to be tightly conserved, probably in relation to the inclusion of intron sequences destined to be alternatively removed to play key regulatory roles in the mechanism of the pheromone gene expression.

  16. Development-related expression patterns of protein-coding and miRNA genes involved in porcine muscle growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F J; Jin, L; Guo, Y Q; Liu, R; He, M N; Li, M Z; Li, X W

    2014-11-27

    Muscle growth and development is associated with remarkable changes in protein-coding and microRNA (miRNA) gene expression. To determine the expression patterns of genes and miRNAs related to muscle growth and development, we measured the expression levels of 25 protein-coding and 16 miRNA genes in skeletal and cardiac muscles throughout 5 developmental stages by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The Short Time-Series Expression Miner (STEM) software clustering results showed that growth-related genes were downregulated at all developmental stages in both the psoas major and longissimus dorsi muscles, indicating their involvement in early developmental stages. Furthermore, genes related to muscle atrophy, such as forkhead box 1 and muscle ring finger, showed unregulated expression with increasing age, suggesting a decrease in protein synthesis during the later stages of skeletal muscle development. We found that development of the cardiac muscle was a complex process in which growth-related genes were highly expressed during embryonic development, but they did not show uniform postnatal expression patterns. Moreover, the expression level of miR-499, which enhances the expression of the β-myosin heavy chain, was significantly different in the psoas major and longissimus dorsi muscles, suggesting the involvement of miR-499 in the determination of skeletal muscle fiber types. We also performed correlation analyses of messenger RNA and miRNA expression. We found negative relationships between miR-486 and forkhead box 1, and miR-133a and serum response factor at all developmental stages, suggesting that forkhead box 1 and serum response factor are potential targets of miR-486 and miR-133a, respectively.

  17. ATRX promotes gene expression by facilitating transcriptional elongation through guanine-rich coding regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Michael A; Kernohan, Kristin D; Jiang, Yan; Bérubé, Nathalie G

    2015-04-01

    ATRX is a chromatin remodeling protein involved in deposition of the histone variant H3.3 at telomeres and pericentromeric heterochromatin. It also influences the expression level of specific genes; however, deposition of H3.3 at transcribed genes is currently thought to occur independently of ATRX. We focused on a set of genes, including the autism susceptibility gene Neuroligin 4 (Nlgn4), that exhibit decreased expression in ATRX-null cells to investigate the mechanisms used by ATRX to promote gene transcription. Overall TERRA levels, as well as DNA methylation and histone modifications at ATRX target genes are not altered and thus cannot explain transcriptional dysregulation. We found that ATRX does not associate with the promoter of these genes, but rather binds within regions of the gene body corresponding to high H3.3 occupancy. These intragenic regions consist of guanine-rich DNA sequences predicted to form non-B DNA structures called G-quadruplexes during transcriptional elongation. We demonstrate that ATRX deficiency corresponds to reduced H3.3 incorporation and stalling of RNA polymerase II at these G-rich intragenic sites. These findings suggest that ATRX promotes the incorporation of histone H3.3 at particular transcribed genes and facilitates transcriptional elongation through G-rich sequences. The inability to transcribe genes such as Nlgn4 could cause deficits in neuronal connectivity and cognition associated with ATRX mutations in humans.

  18. Pathway Detection from Protein Interaction Networks and Gene Expression Data Using Color-Coding Methods and A* Search Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yu Yeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With the large availability of protein interaction networks and microarray data supported, to identify the linear paths that have biological significance in search of a potential pathway is a challenge issue. We proposed a color-coding method based on the characteristics of biological network topology and applied heuristic search to speed up color-coding method. In the experiments, we tested our methods by applying to two datasets: yeast and human prostate cancer networks and gene expression data set. The comparisons of our method with other existing methods on known yeast MAPK pathways in terms of precision and recall show that we can find maximum number of the proteins and perform comparably well. On the other hand, our method is more efficient than previous ones and detects the paths of length 10 within 40 seconds using CPU Intel 1.73GHz and 1GB main memory running under windows operating system.

  19. Natural selection on protein-coding genes in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bustamente, Carlos D.; Fledel-Alon, Adi; Williamson, Scott

    2005-01-01

    Comparisons of DNA polymorphism within species to divergence between species enables the discovery of molecular adaptation in evolutionarily constrained genes as well as the differentiation of weak from strong purifying selection 1, 2, 3, 4 . The extent to which weak negative and positive darwini......, show an excess of rapidly evolving genes, whereas others, such as cytoskeletal proteins, show an excess of genes with extensive amino acid polymorphism within humans and yet little amino acid divergence between humans and chimpanzees....

  20. RNA editing differently affects protein-coding genes in D. melanogaster and H. sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Luigi; Leoni, Guido; Tramontano, Anna

    2015-07-14

    When an RNA editing event occurs within a coding sequence it can lead to a different encoded amino acid. The biological significance of these events remains an open question: they can modulate protein functionality, increase the complexity of transcriptomes or arise from a loose specificity of the involved enzymes. We analysed the editing events in coding regions that produce or not a change in the encoded amino acid (nonsynonymous and synonymous events, respectively) in D. melanogaster and in H. sapiens and compared them with the appropriate random models. Interestingly, our results show that the phenomenon has rather different characteristics in the two organisms. For example, we confirm the observation that editing events occur more frequently in non-coding than in coding regions, and report that this effect is much more evident in H. sapiens. Additionally, in this latter organism, editing events tend to affect less conserved residues. The less frequently occurring editing events in Drosophila tend to avoid drastic amino acid changes. Interestingly, we find that, in Drosophila, changes from less frequently used codons to more frequently used ones are favoured, while this is not the case in H. sapiens.

  1. enod40, a gene expressed during nodule organogenesis, codes for a non-translatable RNA involved in plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, M D; Jurkevitch, E; Poiret, M; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Y; Petrovics, G; Kondorosi, E; Kondorosi, A

    1994-01-01

    Rhizobium meliloti can interact symbiotically with Medicago plants, thereby inducing root nodules. However, certain Medicago plants can form nodules spontaneously, in the absence of rhizobia. A differential screening was performed using spontaneous nodule versus root cDNAs from Medicago sativa ssp. varia. Transcripts of a differentially expressed clone, Msenod40, were detected in all differentiating cells of nodule primordia and spontaneous nodules, but were absent in fully differentiated cells. Msenod40 showed homology to a soybean early nodulin gene, Gmenod40, although no significant open reading frame (ORF) or coding capacity was found in the Medicago sequence. Furthermore, in the sequences of cDNAs and a genomic clone (Mtenod40) isolated from Medicago truncatula, a species containing a unique copy of this gene, no ORFs were found either. In vitro translation of purified Mtenod40 transcripts did not reveal any protein product. Evaluation of the RNA secondary structure indicated that both msenod40 and Gmenod40 transcripts showed a high degree of stability, a property shared with known non-coding RNAs. The Mtenod40 RNA was localized in the cytoplasm of cells in the nodule primordium. Infection with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains bearing antisense constructs of Mtenod40 arrested callus growth of Medicago explants, while overexpressing Mtenod40 embryos developed into teratomas. These data suggest that the enod40 genes might have a role in plant development, acting as 'riboregulators', a novel class of untranslated RNAs associated with growth control and differentiation. Images PMID:7957074

  2. Functional Class I and II Amino Acid-activating Enzymes Can Be Coded by Opposite Strands of the Same Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Rodriguez, Luis; Erdogan, Ozgün; Jimenez-Rodriguez, Mariel; Gonzalez-Rivera, Katiria; Williams, Tishan; Li, Li; Weinreb, Violetta; Collier, Martha; Chandrasekaran, Srinivas Niranj; Ambroggio, Xavier; Kuhlman, Brian; Carter, Charles W

    2015-08-07

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) catalyze both chemical steps that translate the universal genetic code. Rodin and Ohno offered an explanation for the existence of two aaRS classes, observing that codons for the most highly conserved Class I active-site residues are anticodons for corresponding Class II active-site residues. They proposed that the two classes arose simultaneously, by translation of opposite strands from the same gene. We have characterized wild-type 46-residue peptides containing ATP-binding sites of Class I and II synthetases and those coded by a gene designed by Rosetta to encode the corresponding peptides on opposite strands. Catalysis by WT and designed peptides is saturable, and the designed peptides are sensitive to active-site residue mutation. All have comparable apparent second-order rate constants 2.9-7.0E-3 M(-1) s(-1) or ∼750,000-1,300,000 times the uncatalyzed rate. The activities of the two complementary peptides demonstrate that the unique information in a gene can have two functional interpretations, one from each complementary strand. The peptides contain phylogenetic signatures of longer, more sophisticated catalysts we call Urzymes and are short enough to bridge the gap between them and simpler uncoded peptides. Thus, they directly substantiate the sense/antisense coding ancestry of Class I and II aaRS. Furthermore, designed 46-mers achieve similar catalytic proficiency to wild-type 46-mers by significant increases in both kcat and Km values, supporting suggestions that the earliest peptide catalysts activated ATP for biosynthetic purposes. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Detecting selection in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, using DNA sequence data from multiple nuclear protein-coding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yednock, Bree K; Neigel, Joseph E

    2014-01-01

    The identification of genes involved in the adaptive evolution of non-model organisms with uncharacterized genomes constitutes a major challenge. This study employed a rigorous and targeted candidate gene approach to test for positive selection on protein-coding genes of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. Four genes with putative roles in physiological adaptation to environmental stress were chosen as candidates. A fifth gene not expected to play a role in environmental adaptation was used as a control. Large samples (n>800) of DNA sequences from C. sapidus were used in tests of selective neutrality based on sequence polymorphisms. In combination with these, sequences from the congener C. similis were used in neutrality tests based on interspecific divergence. In multiple tests, significant departures from neutral expectations and indicative of positive selection were found for the candidate gene trehalose 6-phosphate synthase (tps). These departures could not be explained by any of the historical population expansion or bottleneck scenarios that were evaluated in coalescent simulations. Evidence was also found for balancing selection at ATP-synthase subunit 9 (atps) using a maximum likelihood version of the Hudson, Kreitmen, and Aguadé test, and positive selection favoring amino acid replacements within ATP/ADP translocase (ant) was detected using the McDonald-Kreitman test. In contrast, test statistics for the control gene, ribosomal protein L12 (rpl), which presumably has experienced the same demographic effects as the candidate loci, were not significantly different from neutral expectations and could readily be explained by demographic effects. Together, these findings demonstrate the utility of the candidate gene approach for investigating adaptation at the molecular level in a marine invertebrate for which extensive genomic resources are not available.

  4. Detecting selection in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, using DNA sequence data from multiple nuclear protein-coding genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bree K Yednock

    Full Text Available The identification of genes involved in the adaptive evolution of non-model organisms with uncharacterized genomes constitutes a major challenge. This study employed a rigorous and targeted candidate gene approach to test for positive selection on protein-coding genes of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. Four genes with putative roles in physiological adaptation to environmental stress were chosen as candidates. A fifth gene not expected to play a role in environmental adaptation was used as a control. Large samples (n>800 of DNA sequences from C. sapidus were used in tests of selective neutrality based on sequence polymorphisms. In combination with these, sequences from the congener C. similis were used in neutrality tests based on interspecific divergence. In multiple tests, significant departures from neutral expectations and indicative of positive selection were found for the candidate gene trehalose 6-phosphate synthase (tps. These departures could not be explained by any of the historical population expansion or bottleneck scenarios that were evaluated in coalescent simulations. Evidence was also found for balancing selection at ATP-synthase subunit 9 (atps using a maximum likelihood version of the Hudson, Kreitmen, and Aguadé test, and positive selection favoring amino acid replacements within ATP/ADP translocase (ant was detected using the McDonald-Kreitman test. In contrast, test statistics for the control gene, ribosomal protein L12 (rpl, which presumably has experienced the same demographic effects as the candidate loci, were not significantly different from neutral expectations and could readily be explained by demographic effects. Together, these findings demonstrate the utility of the candidate gene approach for investigating adaptation at the molecular level in a marine invertebrate for which extensive genomic resources are not available.

  5. A systematic genome-wide analysis of zebrafish protein-coding gene function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kettleborough, R.N.; Busch-Nentwich, E.M.; Harvey, S.A.; Dooley, C.M.; de Bruijn, E.; van Eeden, F.; Sealy, I.; White, R.J.; Herd, C.; Nijman, I.J.; Fenyes, F.; Mehroke, S.; Scahill, C.; Gibbons, R.; Wali, N.; Carruthers, S.; Hall, A.; Yen, J.; Cuppen, E.; Stemple, D.L.

    2013-01-01

    Since the publication of the human reference genome, the identities of specific genes associated with human diseases are being discovered at a rapid rate. A central problem is that the biological activity of these genes is often unclear. Detailed investigations in model vertebrate organisms, typical

  6. Genetic variants in promoters and coding regions of the muscle glycogen synthase and the insulin-responsive GLUT4 genes in NIDDM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørbaek, C; Echwald, Søren Morgenthaler; Hubricht, P

    1994-01-01

    regions and regions of importance for translation, as well as coding sequences of the two genes, were studied using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and DNA sequencing. The genetic analyses were performed in subgroups of 52 Caucasian NIDDM patients and 25 age-matched healthy......To examine the hypothesis that variants in the regulatory or coding regions of the glycogen synthase (GS) and insulin-responsive glucose transporter (GLUT4) genes contribute to insulin-resistant glucose processing of muscle from non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients, promoter......'-untranslated region, and the coding region of the GLUT4 gene showed four polymorphisms, all single nucleotide substitutions, positioned at -581, 1, 30, and 582. None of the three changes in the regulatory region of the gene had any major influence on expression of the GLUT4 gene in muscle. The variant at 582...

  7. Evolutionary mechanisms driving the evolution of a large polydnavirus gene family coding for protein tyrosine phosphatases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serbielle Céline

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene duplications have been proposed to be the main mechanism involved in genome evolution and in acquisition of new functions. Polydnaviruses (PDVs, symbiotic viruses associated with parasitoid wasps, are ideal model systems to study mechanisms of gene duplications given that PDV genomes consist of virulence genes organized into multigene families. In these systems the viral genome is integrated in a wasp chromosome as a provirus and virus particles containing circular double-stranded DNA are injected into the parasitoids’ hosts and are essential for parasitism success. The viral virulence factors, organized in gene families, are required collectively to induce host immune suppression and developmental arrest. The gene family which encodes protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs has undergone spectacular expansion in several PDV genomes with up to 42 genes. Results Here, we present strong indications that PTP gene family expansion occurred via classical mechanisms: by duplication of large segments of the chromosomally integrated form of the virus sequences (segmental duplication, by tandem duplications within this form and by dispersed duplications. We also propose a novel duplication mechanism specific to PDVs that involves viral circle reintegration into the wasp genome. The PTP copies produced were shown to undergo conservative evolution along with episodes of adaptive evolution. In particular recently produced copies have undergone positive selection in sites most likely involved in defining substrate selectivity. Conclusion The results provide evidence about the dynamic nature of polydnavirus proviral genomes. Classical and PDV-specific duplication mechanisms have been involved in the production of new gene copies. Selection pressures associated with antagonistic interactions with parasitized hosts have shaped these genes used to manipulate lepidopteran physiology with evidence for positive selection involved in

  8. An Abundant Class of Non-coding DNA Can Prevent Stochastic Gene Silencing in the C. elegans Germline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøkjær-Jensen, Christian; Jain, Nimit; Hansen, Loren

    2016-01-01

    Cells benefit from silencing foreign genetic elements but must simultaneously avoid inactivating endogenous genes. Although chromatin modifications and RNAs contribute to maintenance of silenced states, the establishment of silenced regions will inevitably reflect underlying DNA sequence and....../or structure. Here, we demonstrate that a pervasive non-coding DNA feature in Caenorhabditis elegans, characterized by 10-base pair periodic An/Tn-clusters (PATCs), can license transgenes for germline expression within repressive chromatin domains. Transgenes containing natural or synthetic PATCs are resistant...... that PATCs form the basis of a cellular immune system, identifying certain endogenous genes in heterochromatic contexts as privileged while foreign DNA can be suppressed with no requirement for a cellular memory of prior exposure....

  9. Cloned s-Lap Gene Coding Area, Expression and Localizationof s-Lap/GFP Fusion Protein in Mammal Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Yi-shu; SONG Zhi-yu; LI Hong-jun; Wu Yin; BAO Yong-li; TAN Da-peng; LI Yu-xin

    2005-01-01

    s-Lap is a new gene sequence from pig retinal pigment epithelial(RPE) cells, which was found and cloned in the early period of apoptosis of RPE cells damaged with visible light. We cloned the coding area sequence of the novel gene of s-Lap and constructed its recombinant eukaryotic plasmid pcDNA3.1-GFP/s-lap with the recombinant DNA technique. The expression and localization of s-lap/GFP fusion protein in CHO and B16 cell lines were studied with the instantaneously transfected pcDNA3.1-GFP/s-lap recombinant plasmid. s-Lap/GFP fusion protein can be expressed in CHO and B16 cells with a high rate expression in the nuclei.

  10. Developmental regulation and complex organization of the promoter of the non-coding hsr gene of Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S C Lakhotia; T K Rajendra; K V Prasanth

    2001-03-01

    The nucleus-limited large non-coding hsrω-n RNA product of the 93D or the hsrω gene of Drosophila melanogaster binds to a variety of RNA-binding proteins involved in nuclear RNA processing. We examined the developmental and heat shock induced expression of this gene by in situ hybridization of nonradioactively labelled riboprobe to cellular transcripts in intact embryos, larval and adult somatic tissues of wild type and an enhancer-trap line carrying the hsrω05241 allele due to insertion of a P-LacZ-rosy+ transposon at — 130 bp position of the hsrω promoter. We also examined LacZ expression in the enhancer-trap line and in two transgenic lines carrying different lengths of the hsrω promoter upstream of the LacZ reporter. The hsrω gene is expressed widely at all developmental stages; in later embryonic stages, its expression in the developing central nervous system was prominent. In spite of insertion of a big transposon in the promoter, expression of the hsrω05241 allele in the enhancer-trap line, as revealed by in situ hybridization to hsrω transcripts in cells, was similar to that of the wild type allele in all the embryonic, larval and adult somatic tissues examined. Expression of the LacZ gene in this enhancer-trap line was similar to that of the hsrω RNA in all diploid cell types in embryos and larvae but in the polytene cells, the LacZ gene did not express at all, neither during normal development nor after heat shock. Comparison of the expression patterns of hsrω gene and those of the LacZ reporter gene under its various promoter regions in the enhancer-trap and transgenic lines revealed a complex pattern of regulation, which seems to be essential for its dynamically varying expression in diverse cell types.

  11. prbA, a Gene Coding for an Esterase Hydrolyzing Parabens in Enterobacter cloacae and Enterobacter gergoviae Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkova, Nelly; Lépine, François; Bollet, Claude; Dupont, Maryse; Villemur, Richard

    2002-01-01

    The new gene prbA encodes an esterase responsible for the hydrolysis of the ester bond of parabens in Enterobacter cloacae strain EM. This gene is located on the chromosome of strain EM and was cloned by several PCR approaches. The prbA gene codes for an immature protein of 533 amino acids, the first 31 of which represent a proposed signal peptide yielding a mature protein of a putative molecular mass of 54.6 kDa. This enzyme presents analogies with other type B carboxylesterases, mainly of eukaryotic origin. The cloning and expression of the prbA gene in a strain of Escherichia coli previously unable to hydrolyze parabens resulted in the acquisition of a hydrolytic capacity comparable to the original activity of strain EM, along with an increased resistance of the transformed strain to methyl paraben. The presence of homologues of prbA was tested in additional ubiquitous bacteria, which may be causative factors in opportunistic infections, including Enterobacter gergoviae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Pseudomonas agglomerans, E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Burkholderia cepacia. Among the 41 total strains tested, 2 strains of E. gergoviae and 1 strain of Burkholderia cepacia were able to degrade almost completely 800 mg of methyl paraben liter−1. Two strains of E. gergoviae, named G1 and G12, contained a gene that showed high homology to the prbA gene of E. cloacae and demonstrated comparable paraben esterase activities. The significant geographical distance between the locations of the isolated E. cloacae and E. gergoviae strains suggests the possibility of an efficient transfer mechanism of the prbA gene, conferring additional resistance to parabens in ubiquitous bacteria that represent a common source of opportunistic infections. PMID:12193616

  12. A cytogenetic abnormality and rare coding variants identify ABCA13 as a candidate gene in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Helen M; Pickard, Benjamin S; Maclean, Alan; Malloy, Mary P; Soares, Dinesh C; McRae, Allan F; Condie, Alison; White, Angela; Hawkins, William; McGhee, Kevin; van Beck, Margaret; MacIntyre, Donald J; Starr, John M; Deary, Ian J; Visscher, Peter M; Porteous, David J; Cannon, Ronald E; St Clair, David; Muir, Walter J; Blackwood, Douglas H R

    2009-12-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are leading causes of morbidity across all populations, with heritability estimates of approximately 80% indicating a substantial genetic component. Population genetics and genome-wide association studies suggest an overlap of genetic risk factors between these illnesses but it is unclear how this genetic component is divided between common gene polymorphisms, rare genomic copy number variants, and rare gene sequence mutations. We report evidence that the lipid transporter gene ABCA13 is a susceptibility factor for both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. After the initial discovery of its disruption by a chromosome abnormality in a person with schizophrenia, we resequenced ABCA13 exons in 100 cases with schizophrenia and 100 controls. Multiple rare coding variants were identified including one nonsense and nine missense mutations and compound heterozygosity/homozygosity in six cases. Variants were genotyped in additional schizophrenia, bipolar, depression (n > 1600), and control (n > 950) cohorts and the frequency of all rare variants combined was greater than controls in schizophrenia (OR = 1.93, p = 0.0057) and bipolar disorder (OR = 2.71, p = 0.00007). The population attributable risk of these mutations was 2.2% for schizophrenia and 4.0% for bipolar disorder. In a study of 21 families of mutation carriers, we genotyped affected and unaffected relatives and found significant linkage (LOD = 4.3) of rare variants with a phenotype including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression. These data identify a candidate gene, highlight the genetic overlap between schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression, and suggest that rare coding variants may contribute significantly to risk of these disorders.

  13. Double hairpin elements and tandem repeats in the non-coding region of Adenoides eludens chloroplast gene minicircles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Martha J; Green, Beverley R

    2005-09-26

    Dinoflagellate plastid genomes are unique in having a reduced number of genes, most of which are found on unigenic minicircles of 2-3 kb. Although the dinoflagellate Adenoides eludens has larger minicircles of about 5 kb, they still carry only one gene. In addition, digenic circles of about 10 kb were detected and mapped by PCR. The non-coding regions of both unigenic and digenic circles share a number of common features including a pair of conserved cores in opposite orientation, four large families of tandem repeats and a number of double hairpin elements (DHEs). They most closely resemble the non-coding regions of the Symbiodinium psbA minicircles, but are much longer, less conserved and have an even greater variety of DHEs and tandem repeats. The presence of so many recombinogenic elements suggests models for the origin of minicircles from a multigenic ancestral chloroplast genome, and raises the possibility of recombination-directed replication rather than defined replication origins in the minicircles.

  14. Nucleotide Sequence of the Coat Protein Gene of the Malaysian Passiflora Virus and its 3' Non-Coding Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norzihan Abdullah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In this study, we identified the full length Coat Protein (CP gene of the Malaysian Passiflora Virus (MPV and its 3' non-coding region. The CP gene of the MPV contained 285 amino acid residues. Approach: Pairwise comparison of the MPV CP region with four other potyviruses, namely East Asian Passiflora Virus (EAPV, Passionfruit Woodiness Virus (PWV, Bean Common Mosaic Virus (BCMV and Soyabean Mosaic Virus (SMV revealed amino acid sequence similarities ranging from 72-95%. Results: The 3' non-coding region of the MPV, which consists of 255 nucleotides, showed 69-95% nucleotide sequence identity when compared with the four potyviruses. The highest (95% sequence similarities were detected with PWV and EAPV. An analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences revealed the presence of consensus motifs (DAG tripeptides characteristic of potyviruses. DAG tripeptides had been reported to be essential for aphid transmission. Conclusion: From the amino acid sequence alignment and identity level observed among the four other potyviruses, we concluded that MPV is a member of the genus Potyvirus and was closely related to both PWV and EAPV.

  15. Identification of coding exon 3 duplication in the BMPR1A gene in a patient with juvenile polyposis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Junya; Nagayama, Satoshi; Chino, Akiko; Sakata, Ai; Yamamoto, Noriko; Sato, Yuri; Ashihara, Yuumi; Kita, Mizuho; Nomura, Sachio; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Igarashi, Masahiro; Ueno, Masashi; Arai, Masami

    2014-10-01

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by multiple juvenile polyps arising in the gastrointestinal tract and an increased risk of gastrointestinal cancers, specifically colon cancer. BMPR1A and SMAD4 germline mutations have been found in patients with juvenile polyposis syndrome. We identified a BMPR1A mutation, which involves a duplication of coding exon 3 (c.230+452_333+441dup1995), on multiple ligation dependent probe amplification in a patient with juvenile polyposis syndrome. The mutation causes a frameshift, producing a truncated protein (p.D112NfsX2). Therefore, the mutation is believed to be pathogenic. We also identified a duplication breakpoint in which Alu sequences are located. These results suggest that the duplication event resulted from recombination between Alu sequences. To our knowledge, partial duplication in the BMPR1A gene has not been reported previously. This is the first case report to document coding exon 3 duplication in the BMPR1A gene in a patient with juvenile polyposis syndrome.

  16. Genomic Distribution and Divergence of Levansucrase-Coding Genes in Pseudomonas syringae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias S. Ullrich

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In the plant pathogenic bacterium, Pseudomonas syringae, the exopolysaccharide levan is synthesized by extracellular levansucrase (Lsc, which is encoded by two conserved 1,296-bp genes termed lscB and lscC in P. syringae strain PG4180. A third gene, lscA, is homologous to the 1,248-bp lsc gene of the bacterium Erwinia amylovora, causing fire blight. However, lscA is not expressed in P. syringae strain PG4180. Herein, PG4180 lscA was shown to be expressed from its native promoter in the Lsc-deficient E. amylovora mutant, Ea7/74-LS6, suggesting that lscA might be closely related to the E. amylovora lsc gene. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that lscB and lscC homologs in several P. syringae strains are part of a highly conserved 1.8-kb region containing the ORF, flanked by 450-452-bp and 49-51-bp up- and downstream sequences, respectively. Interestingly, the 450-452-bp upstream sequence, along with the initial 48-bp ORF sequence encoding for the N-terminal 16 amino acid residues of Lsc, were found to be highly similar to the respective sequence of a putatively prophage-borne glycosyl hydrolase-encoding gene in several P. syringae genomes. Minimal promoter regions of lscB and lscC were mapped in PG4180 by deletion analysis and were found to be located in similar positions upstream of lsc genes in three P. syringae genomes. Thus, a putative 498-500-bp promoter element was identified, which possesses the prophage-associated com gene and DNA encoding common N-terminal sequences of all 1,296-bp Lsc and two glycosyl hydrolases. Since the gene product of the non-expressed 1,248-bp lscA is lacking this conserved N-terminal region but is otherwise highly homologous to those of lscB and lscC, it was concluded that lscA might have been the ancestral lsc gene in E. amylovora and P. syringae. Our data indicated that its highly expressed paralogs in P. syringae are probably derived from subsequent recombination events initiated by insertion of the 498

  17. SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISM IN THE CODING REGION OF MYF5 GENE OF THE CAMEL (CAMELUS DROMEDARIUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. SHAH, A. S. QURESHI1, M. REISSMANN2 AND H. J. SCHWARTZ3

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The myogenic factors (MYF 5 and 6 are integral to the initiation and development of skeletal muscles and to the maintenance of their phenotypes. Thus, they are candidate genes for growth and meat quality-related traits. The MYF5 gene is expressed during proliferation of myoblasts and comprises 3 exons: 500, 76 and 191 bp long. Genomic DNA was isolated from the camel hair using NucleoSpin Tissue kit. Two animals of each of the six breeds namely, Marecha, Dhatti, Larri, Kohi, Sakrai and Cambelpuri were used for sequencing. For PCR amplification of the gene, a primer pair was designed from homolog regions of already published sequences of farm animals from GenBank. Results showed that exon 1 comprising of 422 bp of the dromedary MYF5 gene was more homologous (94% to the cattle than the dog and human. However, phylogram showed that a small number of mutations had been experienced by dromedary camels at their MYF5 gene and was more near to human than other farm animals.

  18. Rare, Low-Frequency, and Common Variants in the Protein-Coding Sequence of Biological Candidate Genes from GWASs Contribute to Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diogo, Dorothee; Kurreeman, Fina; Stahl, Eli A.; Liao, Katherine P.; Gupta, Namrata; Greenberg, Jeffrey D.; Rivas, Manuel A.; Hickey, Brendan; Flannick, Jason; Thomson, Brian; Guiducci, Candace; Ripke, Stephan; Adzhubey, Ivan; Barton, Anne; Kremer, Joel M.; Alfredsson, Lars; Sunyaev, Shamil; Martin, Javier; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Bowes, John; Eyre, Steve; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Plenge, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    The extent to which variants in the protein-coding sequence of genes contribute to risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is unknown. In this study, we addressed this issue by deep exon sequencing and large-scale genotyping of 25 biological candidate genes located within RA risk loci discovered by genome

  19. Translational Regulation of Gene Expression by an Anaerobically Induced Small Non-coding RNA in Escherichia coli*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boysen, Anders; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Kallipolitis, Birgitte; Valentin-Hansen, Poul; Overgaard, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sRNA) have emerged as important elements of gene regulatory circuits. In enterobacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella many of these sRNAs interact with the Hfq protein, an RNA chaperone similar to mammalian Sm-like proteins and act in the post-transcriptional regulation of many genes. A number of these highly conserved ribo-regulators are stringently regulated at the level of transcription and are part of major regulons that deal with the immediate response to various stress conditions, indicating that every major transcription factor may control the expression of at least one sRNA regulator. Here, we extend this view by the identification and characterization of a highly conserved, anaerobically induced small sRNA in E. coli, whose expression is strictly dependent on the anaerobic transcriptional fumarate and nitrate reductase regulator (FNR). The sRNA, named FnrS, possesses signatures of base-pairing RNAs, and we show by employing global proteomic and transcriptomic profiling that the expression of multiple genes is negatively regulated by the sRNA. Intriguingly, many of these genes encode enzymes with “aerobic” functions or enzymes linked to oxidative stress. Furthermore, in previous work most of the potential target genes have been shown to be repressed by FNR through an undetermined mechanism. Collectively, our results provide insight into the mechanism by which FNR negatively regulates genes such as sodA, sodB, cydDC, and metE, thereby demonstrating that adaptation to anaerobic growth involves the action of a small regulatory RNA. PMID:20075074

  20. Translational regulation of gene expression by an anaerobically induced small non-coding RNA in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boysen, Anders; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Kallipolitis, Birgitte; Valentin-Hansen, Poul; Overgaard, Martin

    2010-04-02

    Small non-coding RNAs (sRNA) have emerged as important elements of gene regulatory circuits. In enterobacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella many of these sRNAs interact with the Hfq protein, an RNA chaperone similar to mammalian Sm-like proteins and act in the post-transcriptional regulation of many genes. A number of these highly conserved ribo-regulators are stringently regulated at the level of transcription and are part of major regulons that deal with the immediate response to various stress conditions, indicating that every major transcription factor may control the expression of at least one sRNA regulator. Here, we extend this view by the identification and characterization of a highly conserved, anaerobically induced small sRNA in E. coli, whose expression is strictly dependent on the anaerobic transcriptional fumarate and nitrate reductase regulator (FNR). The sRNA, named FnrS, possesses signatures of base-pairing RNAs, and we show by employing global proteomic and transcriptomic profiling that the expression of multiple genes is negatively regulated by the sRNA. Intriguingly, many of these genes encode enzymes with "aerobic" functions or enzymes linked to oxidative stress. Furthermore, in previous work most of the potential target genes have been shown to be repressed by FNR through an undetermined mechanism. Collectively, our results provide insight into the mechanism by which FNR negatively regulates genes such as sodA, sodB, cydDC, and metE, thereby demonstrating that adaptation to anaerobic growth involves the action of a small regulatory RNA.

  1. Sources of signal in 62 protein-coding nuclear genes for higher-level phylogenetics of arthropods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome C Regier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study aims to investigate the strength of various sources of phylogenetic information that led to recent seemingly robust conclusions about higher-level arthropod phylogeny and to assess the role of excluding or downweighting synonymous change for arriving at those conclusions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The current study analyzes DNA sequences from 68 gene segments of 62 distinct protein-coding nuclear genes for 80 species. Gene segments analyzed individually support numerous nodes recovered in combined-gene analyses, but few of the higher-level nodes of greatest current interest. However, neither is there support for conflicting alternatives to these higher-level nodes. Gene segments with higher rates of nonsynonymous change tend to be more informative overall, but those with lower rates tend to provide stronger support for deeper nodes. Higher-level nodes with bootstrap values in the 80% - 99% range for the complete data matrix are markedly more sensitive to substantial drops in their bootstrap percentages after character subsampling than those with 100% bootstrap, suggesting that these nodes are likely not to have been strongly supported with many fewer data than in the full matrix. Data set partitioning of total data by (mostly synonymous and (mostly nonsynonymous change improves overall node support, but the result remains much inferior to analysis of (unpartitioned nonsynonymous change alone. Clusters of genes with similar nonsynonymous rate properties (e.g., faster vs. slower show some distinct patterns of node support but few conflicts. Synonymous change is shown to contribute little, if any, phylogenetic signal to the support of higher-level nodes, but it does contribute nonphylogenetic signal, probably through its underlying heterogeneous nucleotide composition. Analysis of seemingly conservative indels does not prove useful. CONCLUSIONS: Generating a robust molecular higher-level phylogeny of Arthropoda is

  2. Local gene regulation details a recognition code within the LacI transcriptional factor family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco M Camas

    Full Text Available The specific binding of regulatory proteins to DNA sequences exhibits no clear patterns of association between amino acids (AAs and nucleotides (NTs. This complexity of protein-DNA interactions raises the question of whether a simple set of wide-coverage recognition rules can ever be identified. Here, we analyzed this issue using the extensive LacI family of transcriptional factors (TFs. We searched for recognition patterns by introducing a new approach to phylogenetic footprinting, based on the pervasive presence of local regulation in prokaryotic transcriptional networks. We identified a set of specificity correlations--determined by two AAs of the TFs and two NTs in the binding sites--that is conserved throughout a dominant subgroup within the family regardless of the evolutionary distance, and that act as a relatively consistent recognition code. The proposed rules are confirmed with data of previous experimental studies and by events of convergent evolution in the phylogenetic tree. The presence of a code emphasizes the stable structural context of the LacI family, while defining a precise blueprint to reprogram TF specificity with many practical applications.

  3. Cloning and analysis of the four genes coding for Bpu10I restriction-modification enzymes.

    OpenAIRE

    Stankevicius, K; Lubys, A; Timinskas, A; Vaitkevicius, D; Janulaitis, A

    1998-01-01

    The Bpu 10I R-M system from Bacillus pumilus 10, which recognizes the asymmetric 5'-CCTNAGC sequence, has been cloned, sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli . The system comprises four adjacent, similarly oriented genes encoding two m5C MTases and two subunits of Bpu 10I ENase (34.5 and 34 kDa). Both bpu10IR genes either in cis or trans are needed for the manifestation of R. Bpu 10I activity. Subunits of R. Bpu 10I, purified to apparent homogeneity, are both required for cleavage activi...

  4. Could the gene coding for human uteroglobin (clara cell 10 kDa protein) be a candidate gene for atopy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, A.B.; Peri, A.; Miele, L. [SDG, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    It has been proposed that human immune response to allergens is genetically determined. Most of these allergic responses are directed to environmental proteins and are mediated by immunoglobulin E (IgE). These allergic disorders (eg. allergic asthma) are commonly known as atopy. IgE activates phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2}) which hydrolyzes cell membrane phospholipids generating free fatty acids, such as arachidonic acid (AA). AA is utilized as the substrate for the generation of pro-inflammatory eicosanoids and platelet activating factor (PAF). These agents can cause inflammation as well as bronchoconstriction, hallmarks of asthma. IgE-induced mast cell degranulation and accumulation of basophils and eosinophils in the lung are also characteristic immunological processes commonly found in atopic asthma. Recent investigations suggest that a group I PLA{sub 2} may be associated with the secretory granules of these cells. An inverse relationship between the levels of eicosanoids and hUG has been found in the nasopharyngeal lavage fluid of children with viral infections of the upper respiratory tract, often a precipitating factor in asthma. Results of genetic linkage studies mapped a putative atopy gene in human chromosome 11q{sup 13}, the same region in which we localized the hUG gene. Moreover, a genetic linkage between atopic IgE responses and chromosome 11q{sup 13} has been reported. In addition, hUG is: (i) a potent inhibitor of PLA{sub 2} activity, (ii) a potent antiinflammatory/immunomodulatory and antichemotactic protein and has a hitherto undetermined receptor-mediated activity. Taken together, these findings suggest that a mutation either in the hUG or its receptor genes may manifest symptoms characteristic of atopy. Hence, we raise the question whether hUG is a candidate gene for this disease.

  5. Sequence and structure of the mouse gene coding for the largest neurofilament subunit.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J-P. Julien (Jean-Pierre); F. Cote; L. Beaudet (Lucille); M. Sidky (Malak); D. Flavell (David); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); W. Mushynski (Walter)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractWe have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the mouse gene encoding the neurofilament NF-H protein. The C-terminal domain of NF-H is very rich in charged amino acids (aa) and contains a 3-aa sequence, Lys-Ser-Pro, that is repeated 51 times within a stretch of 368 aa. The

  6. A novel polymorphism in the coding region of the vasopressin type 2 receptor gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L. Rocha

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI is a rare disease characterized by renal inability to respond properly to arginine vasopressin due to mutations in the vasopressin type 2 receptor (V2(R gene in affected kindreds. In most kindreds thus far reported, the mode of inheritance follows an X chromosome-linked recessive pattern although autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive modes of inheritance have also been described. Studies demonstrating mutations in the V2(R gene in affected kindreds that modify the receptor structure, resulting in a dys- or nonfunctional receptor have been described, but phenotypically indistinguishable NDI patients with a structurally normal V2(R gene have also been reported. In the present study, we analyzed exon 3 of the V2(R gene in 20 unrelated individuals by direct sequencing. A C®T alteration in the third position of codon 331 (AGC®AGT, which did not alter the encoded amino acid, was found in nine individuals, including two unrelated patients with NDI. Taken together, these observations emphasize the molecular heterogeneity of a phenotypically homogeneous syndrome

  7. Characterization of genes coding for small hypervariable peptides in Globodera rostochiensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bers, van N.E.M.

    2008-01-01

    Plant parasitic nematodes secrete a cocktail of effector molecules, which are involved in several aspects of the interaction with the host, eg. in host defense suppression, in migration and in feeding cell formation. In this thesis, we performed the first study on 10 novel peptide genes, believed

  8. An in planta induced gene of Phytophthora infestans codes for ubiquitin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, C.M.J.; Risseeuw, E.P.; Davidse, L.C.

    1991-01-01

    An in planta induced gene of Phytophthora infestans (the causal organism of potato late blight) was selected from a genomic library by differential hybridization using labelled cDNA derived from poly(A)+ RNA of P. infestans grown in vitro and labelled cDNA made from potato-P. infestans interaction

  9. An in planta induced gene of Phytophthora infestans codes for ubiquitin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, C.M.J.; Risseeuw, E.P.; Davidse, L.C.

    1991-01-01

    An in planta induced gene of Phytophthora infestans (the causal organism of potato late blight) was isolated from a genomic library by differential hybridization using labelled cDNA derived from poly(A)⁺ RNA of P. infestans grown in vitro and labelled cDNA made from potato-P,

  10. The Halloween genes code for cytochrome P450 enzymes mediating synthesis of the insect molting hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rewitz, Kim; Rybczynski, Robert; Warren, James T.;

    2006-01-01

    during the fifth instar. Transcript levels of shd in the fat body and midgut closely parallel the enzyme activity measured in vitro. The data indicate that these Halloween genes are transcriptionally regulated to support the high biosynthetic activity that produces the cyclic ecdysteroid pulses...

  11. Streptococcus sp. and Staphylococcus aureus isolates from patients with psoriasis possess genes that code for toxins (superantigens): clinical and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ferezli, Jessica; Jenbazian, Lori; Rubeiz, Nelly; Kibbi, Abdul-Ghani; Zaynoun, Shukrallah; Abdelnoor, Alexander M

    2008-01-01

    Superantigens are powerful T lymphocyte-stimulating agents that are believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of certain diseases such as psoriasis. Toxins produced by Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus are superantigens. The aim of this study was to detect genes that code for superantigens in Streptococcus and Staphylococcus aureus isolates from psoriatic patients. Primers to amplify streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A, B, and C and streptolysin O genes and staphylococcal enterotoxin A, B, C, and D genes were used. Streptococcal exotoxin B was detected in five streptococcal isolates. Staphyloccocus aureus enterotoxin A and/or C genes were detected in nine S. aureus isolates. Isolates from 13 of 22 patients possesed gene(s) that code for toxin(s) (superantigens). These results might support the role of superantigens in the exacerbation of psoriasis.

  12. SNPs in the coding region of the metastasis-inducing gene MACC1 and clinical outcome in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Felicitas

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer is one of the main cancers in the Western world. About 90% of the deaths arise from formation of distant metastasis. The expression of the newly identified gene metastasis associated in colon cancer 1 (MACC1 is a prognostic indicator for colon cancer metastasis. Here, we analyzed for the first time the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the coding region of MACC1 for clinical outcome of colorectal cancer patients. Additionally, we screened met proto-oncogene (Met, the transcriptional target gene of MACC1, for mutations. Methods We sequenced the coding exons of MACC1 in 154 colorectal tumors (stages I, II and III and the crucial exons of Met in 60 colorectal tumors (stages I, II and III. We analyzed the association of MACC1 polymorphisms with clinical data, including metachronous metastasis, UICC stages, tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis and patients’ survival (n = 154, stages I, II and III. Furthermore, we performed biological assays in order to evaluate the functional impact of MACC1 SNPs on the motility of colorectal cancer cells. Results We genotyped three MACC1 SNPs in the coding region. Thirteen % of the tumors had the genotype cg (rs4721888, L31V, 48% a ct genotype (rs975263, S515L and 84% a gc or cc genotype (rs3735615, R804T. We found no association of these SNPs with clinicopathological parameters or with patients’ survival, when analyzing the entire patients’ cohort. An increased risk for a shorter metastasis-free survival of patients with a ct genotype (rs975263 was observed in younger colon cancer patients with stage I or II (P = 0.041, n = 18. In cell culture, MACC1 SNPs did not affect MACC1-induced cell motility and proliferation. Conclusion In summary, the identification of coding MACC1 SNPs in primary colorectal tumors does not improve the prediction for metastasis formation or for patients’ survival compared to MACC1 expression analysis alone. The ct genotype (rs

  13. CRNDE, a long non-coding RNA responsive to insulin/IGF signaling, regulates genes involved in central metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Blake C; Graham, Lloyd D; Molloy, Peter L

    2014-02-01

    Colorectal neoplasia differentially expressed (CRNDE) is a novel gene that is activated early in colorectal cancer but whose regulation and functions are unknown. CRNDE transcripts are recognized as long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), which potentially interact with chromatin-modifying complexes to regulate gene expression via epigenetic changes. Complex alternative splicing results in numerous transcripts from this gene, and we have identified novel transcripts containing a highly-conserved sequence within intron 4 ("gVC-In4"). In colorectal cancer cells, we demonstrate that treatment with insulin and insulin-like growth factors (IGF) repressed CRNDE nuclear transcripts, including those encompassing gVC-In4. These repressive effects were negated by use of inhibitors against either the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway or Raf/MAPK pathway, suggesting CRNDE is a downstream target of both signaling cascades. Expression array analyses revealed that siRNA-mediated knockdown of gVC-In4 transcripts affected the expression of many genes, which showed correlation with insulin/IGF signaling pathway components and responses, including glucose and lipid metabolism. Some of the genes are identical to those affected by insulin treatment in the same cell line. The results suggest that CRNDE expression promotes the metabolic changes by which cancer cells switch to aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect). This is the first report of a lncRNA regulated by insulin/IGFs, and our findings indicate a role for CRNDE nuclear transcripts in regulating cellular metabolism which may correlate with their upregulation in colorectal cancer. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Recombinant Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus containing Cry1Ac gene codes for 130-kDa toxin protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subashini, M; Moushumi Priya, A; Sundarakrishnan, B; Jayachandran, S

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus containing Cry1Ac gene from Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki borne on pKT230, shuttle vector, was generated. PCR amplification of Cry1Ac gene present in recombinant G. diazotrophicus yielded a 278-bp DNA product. The nitrogenase assay has revealed that the recombinant G. diazotrophicus in sugarcane stem produced similar levels of nitrogenase compared to wild-type G. diazotrophicus. The presence of 130-kDa protein in apoplastic fluid from sugarcane stem harvested from pots inoculated with recombinant G. diazotrophicus shows that the translocated G. diazotrophicus produces 130-kDa protein which is recognized by the hyperimmune antiserum raised against 130-kDa protein. The first instar Eldana saccharina neonate larvae that fed on artificial medium containing recombinant G. diazotrophicus died within 72 h after incubation.

  15. Cloning of a Gene Cluster from Cellvibrio mixtus which Codes for Cellulase, Chitinase, Amylase, and Pectinase

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    The soil isolate Cellvibrio mixtus UQM2294 degraded a variety of polysaccharides including microcrystalline cellulose. Among 6,000 cosmid clones carrying C. mixtus DNA, constructed in Escherichia coli with pHC79, 50 expressed the ability to degrade one or more of the following substrates: carboxymethyl cellulose, chitin, pectin (polygalacturonic acid), cellobiose, and starch. These degradative genes are encoded in a single 94.1-kilobase segment of the C. mixtus genome; a preliminary order of ...

  16. Role of horizontal gene transfer as a control on the coevolution of ribosomal proteins and the genetic code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woese, Carl R.; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2011-03-31

    Our main goal is to develop the conceptual and computational tools necessary to understand the evolution of the universal processes of translation and replication and to identify events of horizontal gene transfer that occurred within the components. We will attempt to uncover the major evolutionary transitions that accompanied the development of protein synthesis by the ribosome and associated components of the translation apparatus. Our project goes beyond standard genomic approaches to explore homologs that are represented at both the structure and sequence level. Accordingly, use of structural phylogenetic analysis allows us to probe further back into deep evolutionary time than competing approaches, permitting greater resolution of primitive folds and structures. Specifically, our work focuses on the elements of translation, ranging from the emergence of the canonical genetic code to the evolution of specific protein folds, mediated by the predominance of horizontal gene transfer in early life. A unique element of this study is the explicit accounting for the impact of phenotype selection on translation, through a coevolutionary control mechanism. Our work contributes to DOE mission objectives through: (1) sophisticated computer simulation of protein dynamics and evolution, and the further refinement of techniques for structural phylogeny, which complement sequence information, leading to improved annotation of genomic databases; (2) development of evolutionary approaches to exploring cellular function and machinery in an integrated way; and (3) documentation of the phenotype interaction with translation over evolutionary time, reflecting the system response to changing selection pressures through horizontal gene transfer.

  17. The small RNA content of human sperm reveals pseudogene-derived piRNAs complementary to protein-coding genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantano, Lorena; Jodar, Meritxell; Bak, Mads; Ballescà, Josep Lluís; Tommerup, Niels; Oliva, Rafael; Vavouri, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    At the end of mammalian sperm development, sperm cells expel most of their cytoplasm and dispose of the majority of their RNA. Yet, hundreds of RNA molecules remain in mature sperm. The biological significance of the vast majority of these molecules is unclear. To better understand the processes that generate sperm small RNAs and what roles they may have, we sequenced and characterized the small RNA content of sperm samples from two human fertile individuals. We detected 182 microRNAs, some of which are highly abundant. The most abundant microRNA in sperm is miR-1246 with predicted targets among sperm-specific genes. The most abundant class of small noncoding RNAs in sperm are PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). Surprisingly, we found that human sperm cells contain piRNAs processed from pseudogenes. Clusters of piRNAs from human testes contain pseudogenes transcribed in the antisense strand and processed into small RNAs. Several human protein-coding genes contain antisense predicted targets of pseudogene-derived piRNAs in the male germline and these piRNAs are still found in mature sperm. Our study provides the most extensive data set and annotation of human sperm small RNAs to date and is a resource for further functional studies on the roles of sperm small RNAs. In addition, we propose that some of the pseudogene-derived human piRNAs may regulate expression of their parent gene in the male germline. PMID:25904136

  18. Novel methods for the molecular discrimination of Fasciola spp. on the basis of nuclear protein-coding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoriki, Takuya; Ichikawa-Seki, Madoka; Suganuma, Keisuke; Naito, Ikunori; Hayashi, Kei; Nakao, Minoru; Aita, Junya; Mohanta, Uday Kumar; Inoue, Noboru; Murakami, Kenji; Itagaki, Tadashi

    2016-06-01

    Fasciolosis is an economically important disease of livestock caused by Fasciola hepatica, Fasciola gigantica, and aspermic Fasciola flukes. The aspermic Fasciola flukes have been discriminated morphologically from the two other species by the absence of sperm in their seminal vesicles. To date, the molecular discrimination of F. hepatica and F. gigantica has relied on the nucleotide sequences of the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) region. However, ITS1 genotypes of aspermic Fasciola flukes cannot be clearly differentiated from those of F. hepatica and F. gigantica. Therefore, more precise and robust methods are required to discriminate Fasciola spp. In this study, we developed PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism and multiplex PCR methods to discriminate F. hepatica, F. gigantica, and aspermic Fasciola flukes on the basis of the nuclear protein-coding genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and DNA polymerase delta, which are single locus genes in most eukaryotes. All aspermic Fasciola flukes used in this study had mixed fragment pattern of F. hepatica and F. gigantica for both of these genes, suggesting that the flukes are descended through hybridization between the two species. These molecular methods will facilitate the identification of F. hepatica, F. gigantica, and aspermic Fasciola flukes, and will also prove useful in etiological studies of fasciolosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Coding and Noncoding Gene Expression Biomarkers in Mood Disorders and Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoza Mamdani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mood disorders and schizophrenia are common and complex disorders with consistent evidence of genetic and environmental influences on predisposition. It is generally believed that the consequences of disease, gene expression, and allelic heterogeneity may be partly the explanation for the variability observed in treatment response. Correspondingly, while effective treatments are available for some patients, approximately half of the patients fail to respond to current neuropsychiatric treatments. A number of peripheral gene expression studies have been conducted to understand these brain-based disorders and mechanisms of treatment response with the aim of identifying suitable biomarkers and perhaps subgroups of patients based upon molecular fingerprint. In this review, we summarize the results from blood-derived gene expression studies implemented with the aim of discovering biomarkers for treatment response and classification of disorders. We include data from a biomarker study conducted in first-episode subjects with schizophrenia, where the results provide insight into possible individual biological differences that predict antipsychotic response. It is concluded that, while peripheral studies of expression are generating valuable results in pathways involving immune regulation and response, larger studies are required which hopefully will lead to robust biomarkers for treatment response and perhaps underlying variations relevant to these complex disorders.

  20. Cloning and analysis of the four genes coding for Bpu10I restriction-modification enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankevicius, K; Lubys, A; Timinskas, A; Vaitkevicius, D; Janulaitis, A

    1998-02-15

    The Bpu 10I R-M system from Bacillus pumilus 10, which recognizes the asymmetric 5'-CCTNAGC sequence, has been cloned, sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli . The system comprises four adjacent, similarly oriented genes encoding two m5C MTases and two subunits of Bpu 10I ENase (34.5 and 34 kDa). Both bpu10IR genes either in cis or trans are needed for the manifestation of R. Bpu 10I activity. Subunits of R. Bpu 10I, purified to apparent homogeneity, are both required for cleavage activity. This heterosubunit structure distinguishes the Bpu 10I restriction endonuclease from all other type II restriction enzymes described previously. The subunits reveal 25% amino acid identity. Significant similarity was also identified between a 43 amino acid region of R. Dde I and one of the regions of higher identity shared between the Bpu 10I subunits, a region that could possibly include the catalytic/Mg2+binding center. The similarity between Bpu 10I and Dde I MTases is not limited to the conserved motifs (CM) typical for m5C MTases. It extends into the variable region that lies between CMs VIII and IX. Duplication of a progenitor gene, encoding an enzyme recognizing a symmetric nucleotide sequence, followed by concerted divergent evolution, may provide a possible scenario leading to the emergence of the Bpu 10I ENase, which recognizes an overall asymmetric sequence and cleaves within it symmetrically.

  1. Identification of Genes Coding Aminoglycoside Modifying Enzymes in E. coli of UTI Patients in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rouf Mir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is to probe the pattern of antibiotic resistance against aminoglycosides and its mechanism in E. coli obtained from patients from Chennai, India. Isolation and identification of pathogens were done on MacConkey agar. Antimicrobial sensitivity testing was done by disc diffusion test. The identification of genes encoding aminoglycoside modifying enzymes was done by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR. Out of 98 isolates, 71 (72.45% isolates were identified as E. coli and the remaining 27 (27.55% as other bacteria. Disc diffusion method results showed a resistance level of 72.15% for streptomycin, 73.4% for gentamicin, 63.26% for neomycin, 57.14% for tobramycin, 47.9% for netilmicin, and 8.16% for amikacin in E. coli. PCR screening showed the presence of four genes, namely, rrs, aacC2, aacA-aphD, and aphA3, in their plasmid DNA. The results point towards the novel mechanism of drug resistance in E. coli from UTI patients in India as they confirm the presence of genes encoding enzymes that cause resistance to aminoglycoside drugs. This could be an alarm for drug prescription to UTI patients.

  2. Analysis of mutations in the entire coding sequence of the factor VIII gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidichadani, S.I.; Lanyon, W.G.; Connor, J.M. [Glascow Univ. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hemophilia A is a common X-linked recessive disorder of bleeding caused by deleterious mutations in the gene for clotting factor VIII. The large size of the factor VIII gene, the high frequency of de novo mutations and its tissue-specific expression complicate the detection of mutations. We have used a combination of RT-PCR of ectopic factor VIII transcripts and genomic DNA-PCRs to amplify the entire essential sequence of the factor VIII gene. This is followed by chemical mismatch cleavage analysis and direct sequencing in order to facilitate a comprehensive search for mutations. We describe the characterization of nine potentially pathogenic mutations, six of which are novel. In each case, a correlation of the genotype with the observed phenotype is presented. In order to evaluate the pathogenicity of the five missense mutations detected, we have analyzed them for evolutionary sequence conservation and for their involvement of sequence motifs catalogued in the PROSITE database of protein sites and patterns.

  3. Identification of Genes Coding Aminoglycoside Modifying Enzymes in E. coli of UTI Patients in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Yasir; Dar, Firdous Ahmad; Sekhar, M.

    2016-01-01

    This study is to probe the pattern of antibiotic resistance against aminoglycosides and its mechanism in E. coli obtained from patients from Chennai, India. Isolation and identification of pathogens were done on MacConkey agar. Antimicrobial sensitivity testing was done by disc diffusion test. The identification of genes encoding aminoglycoside modifying enzymes was done by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Out of 98 isolates, 71 (72.45%) isolates were identified as E. coli and the remaining 27 (27.55%) as other bacteria. Disc diffusion method results showed a resistance level of 72.15% for streptomycin, 73.4% for gentamicin, 63.26% for neomycin, 57.14% for tobramycin, 47.9% for netilmicin, and 8.16% for amikacin in E. coli. PCR screening showed the presence of four genes, namely, rrs, aacC2, aacA-aphD, and aphA3, in their plasmid DNA. The results point towards the novel mechanism of drug resistance in E. coli from UTI patients in India as they confirm the presence of genes encoding enzymes that cause resistance to aminoglycoside drugs. This could be an alarm for drug prescription to UTI patients. PMID:27403451

  4. A novel protein-coding ORF72.2 gene was identified from Marek's disease virus strain CVI988

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Ping

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Marek's disease is a highly contagious disease of poultry characterized by rapid-on set of T-cell lymphomas, which is caused by Marek's disease virus (MDV, but its pathogenic mechanism is still not very clear. Recently, some new progress were achieved in molecular character of MDV. Along with the genomic sequencing of MDV serotype 1, some novel open reading frames (ORFs were predicted, and ORF72.2 was one of them which have no homologues in other MDV serotypes or in other alphaherpesvirus. In the study, ORF72.2 was firstly identified as a protein-coding gene by the method of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, western blotting and indirect immunofluorescence assay. This study paved the way to conduct further studies to determine whether ORF72.2 plays a role in MDV replication and pathogenicity.

  5. Linkage relationships among five enzyme-coding gene loci in the copepod Tigriopus californicus: a genetic confirmation of achiasmiatic meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, R S; Feldman, M W; Swisher, S G

    1981-12-01

    Linkage relationships among five polymorphic enzyme-coding gene loci in the marine copepod Tigriopus californicus have been determined using electrophoretic analysis of progeny from laboratory matings. Phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI; EC 5.3.1.9) was found to be tightly linked to glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (GPT; EC 2.6..1.2), with only one recombinant observed in 364 progeny; glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT; EC 2.6.1.1) is linked to the PGI-GPT pair, with a recombination fraction of approximately 0.20 in male double heterozygotes. Phosphoglucomutase (PGM; EC 2.7.5.1) and an esterase (EST; EC 3.1.1.1) are not linked to the PGI, GPT, GOT grouping, which has been designated linkage group I. Reciprocal crosses have revealed that no recombination occurs in female T. californicus; this observation confirms a previous report that meiosis in female Tigriopus is achiasmatic.

  6. Overexpression Analysis of emv2 gene coding for Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein from Vigna radiata (Wilczek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh S.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA proteins are speculated to protect against water stress deficit in plants. An over expression system for mungbean late embryogenesis abundant protein, emv2 was constructed in a pET29a vector, designated pET-emv2 which is responsible for higher expression under the transcriptional/translational control of T7/lac promoter incorporated in the Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3.Induction protocol was optimized for pET recombinants harboring the target gene. Overexpressed EMV2 protein was purified to homogeneity and the protein profile monitored by SDS-PAGE.

  7. Pleiotropic consequences of misexpression of the developmentally active and stress-inducible non-coding hsr gene in Drosophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Moushami Mallik; Subhash C Lakhotia

    2011-06-01

    The non-coding hsr gene of Drosophila melanogaster is expressed in nearly all cell types and developmental stages. However, in the absence of conventional mutant alleles of this gene, its developmental functions remain largely unknown. In the present study, we used a variety of GAL4 drivers to overexpress or ablate this gene’s transcripts in specific tissues and examined the developmental consequences thereof. Our results show that a balanced expression of these non-coding transcripts is critical for survival and normal development in all the tissue types tested, since any change in cellular levels of these transcripts in a given cell type generally has detrimental effects, with extreme cases resulting in organismal lethality, although in a few cases the misexpression of these transcripts also suppresses the mutant phenotype due to other genetic conditions. Evidence is also presented for existence of a new spliced variant of the hsr-n nuclear transcript. Following the RNAi-mediated down-regulation of hsr transcripts, the omega speckles disappear so that the nucleoplasmic hnRNPs get diffusely distributed, while upregulation of these transcripts results in greater sequestration of these proteins into omega speckle clusters; either of these conditions would affect activities of the hnRNPs and other hsr-RNA interacting proteins, which is likely to have cascading consequences. The present findings, together with our earlier observations on effects of altered levels of the hsr transcripts on induced apoptosis and expanded polyQ-mediated neurodegeneration, further confirm that ncRNA species like the hsr, far from being evolutionary hangovers, provide critical information for important functions in normal cells.

  8. The conservation and application of three hypothetical protein coding gene for direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum specimens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianhua Qin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accurate and early diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB is of major importance in the control of TB. One of the most important technical advances in diagnosis of tuberculosis is the development of nucleic acid amplification (NAA tests. However, the choice of the target sequence remains controversial in NAA tests. Recently, interesting alternatives have been found in hypothetical protein coding sequences from mycobacterial genome. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To obtain rational biomarker for TB diagnosis, the conservation of three hypothetical genes was firstly evaluated in 714 mycobacterial strains. The results showed that SCAR1 (Sequenced Characterized Amplified Region based on Rv0264c coding gene showed the highest conservation (99.8% and SCAR2 based on Rv1508c gene showed the secondary high conservation (99.7% in M. tuberculosis (MTB strains. SCAR3 based on Rv2135c gene (3.2% and IS6110 (8% showed relatively high deletion rate in MTB strains. Secondly, three SCAR markers were evaluated in 307 clinical sputum from patients in whom TB was suspected or patients with diseases other than TB. The amplification of IS6110 and 16SrRNA sequences together with both clinical and bacteriological identification was as a protocol to evaluate the efficacy of SCAR markers. The sensitivities and specificities, positive predictive value (PPV and negative predictive value (NPV of all NAA tests were higher than those of bacteriological detection. In four NAA tests, IS6110 and SCAR3 showed the highest PPV (100% and low NPV (70% and 68.8%, respectively, and SCAR1 and SCAR2 showed the relatively high PPV and NPV (97% and 82.6%, 95.6% and 88.8%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our result indicated that SCAR1 and SCAR2 with a high degree of sequence conservation represent efficient and promising alternatives as NAA test targets in identification of MTB. Moreover, the targets developed from this study may provide more alternative targets for the

  9. Targeted deep resequencing identifies coding variants in the PEAR1 gene that play a role in platelet aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoonhee Kim

    Full Text Available Platelet aggregation is heritable, and genome-wide association studies have detected strong associations with a common intronic variant of the platelet endothelial aggregation receptor1 (PEAR1 gene both in African American and European American individuals. In this study, we used a sequencing approach to identify additional exonic variants in PEAR1 that may also determine variability in platelet aggregation in the GeneSTAR Study. A 0.3 Mb targeted region on chromosome 1q23.1 including the entire PEAR1 gene was Sanger sequenced in 104 subjects (45% male, 49% African American, age = 52±13 selected on the basis of hyper- and hypo- aggregation across three different agonists (collagen, epinephrine, and adenosine diphosphate. Single-variant and multi-variant burden tests for association were performed. Of the 235 variants identified through sequencing, 61 were novel, and three of these were missense variants. More rare variants (MAF<5% were noted in African Americans compared to European Americans (108 vs. 45. The common intronic GWAS-identified variant (rs12041331 demonstrated the most significant association signal in African Americans (p = 4.020×10(-4; no association was seen for additional exonic variants in this group. In contrast, multi-variant burden tests indicated that exonic variants play a more significant role in European Americans (p = 0.0099 for the collective coding variants compared to p = 0.0565 for intronic variant rs12041331. Imputation of the individual exonic variants in the rest of the GeneSTAR European American cohort (N = 1,965 supports the results noted in the sequenced discovery sample: p = 3.56×10(-4, 2.27×10(-7, 5.20×10(-5 for coding synonymous variant rs56260937 and collagen, epinephrine and adenosine diphosphate induced platelet aggregation, respectively. Sequencing approaches confirm that a common intronic variant has the strongest association with platelet aggregation in African Americans

  10. Resequencing of the common marmoset genome improves genome assemblies and gene-coding sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kengo; Kuroki, Yoko; Kumita, Wakako; Fujiyama, Asao; Toyoda, Atsushi; Kawai, Jun; Iriki, Atsushi; Sasaki, Erika; Okano, Hideyuki; Sakakibara, Yasubumi

    2015-11-20

    The first draft of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) genome was published by the Marmoset Genome Sequencing and Analysis Consortium. The draft was based on whole-genome shotgun sequencing, and the current assembly version is Callithrix_jacches-3.2.1, but there still exist 187,214 undetermined gap regions and supercontigs and relatively short contigs that are unmapped to chromosomes in the draft genome. We performed resequencing and assembly of the genome of common marmoset by deep sequencing with high-throughput sequencing technology. Several different sequence runs using Illumina sequencing platforms were executed, and 181 Gbp of high-quality bases including mate-pairs with long insert lengths of 3, 8, 20, and 40 Kbp were obtained, that is, approximately 60× coverage. The resequencing significantly improved the MGSAC draft genome sequence. The N50 of the contigs, which is a statistical measure used to evaluate assembly quality, doubled. As a result, 51% of the contigs (total length: 299 Mbp) that were unmapped to chromosomes in the MGSAC draft were merged with chromosomal contigs, and the improved genome sequence helped to detect 5,288 new genes that are homologous to human cDNAs and the gaps in 5,187 transcripts of the Ensembl gene annotations were completely filled.

  11. Interaction between effects of genes coding for dopamine and glutamate transmission on striatal and parahippocampal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Andreina; Prata, Diana P; Mechelli, Andrea; Picchioni, Marco; Fu, Cynthia H Y; Chaddock, Christopher A; Kane, Fergus; Kalidindi, Sridevi; McDonald, Colm; Kravariti, Eugenia; Toulopoulou, Timothea; Bramon, Elvira; Walshe, Muriel; Ehlert, Natascha; Georgiades, Anna; Murray, Robin; Collier, David A; McGuire, Philip

    2013-09-01

    The genes for the dopamine transporter (DAT) and the D-Amino acid oxidase activator (DAOA or G72) have been independently implicated in the risk for schizophrenia and in bipolar disorder and/or their related intermediate phenotypes. DAT and G72 respectively modulate central dopamine and glutamate transmission, the two systems most robustly implicated in these disorders. Contemporary studies have demonstrated that elevated dopamine function is associated with glutamatergic dysfunction in psychotic disorders. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging we examined whether there was an interaction between the effects of genes that influence dopamine and glutamate transmission (DAT and G72) on regional brain activation during verbal fluency, which is known to be abnormal in psychosis, in 80 healthy volunteers. Significant interactions between the effects of G72 and DAT polymorphisms on activation were evident in the striatum, parahippocampal gyrus, and supramarginal/angular gyri bilaterally, the right insula, in the right pre-/postcentral and the left posterior cingulate/retrosplenial gyri (P dopamine and the glutamate system, thought to be altered in psychosis, have an impact in executive processing which can be modulated by common genetic variation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley company.

  12. Multistep Model of Cervical Cancer: Participation of miRNAs and Coding Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Judith Granados López

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant miRNA expression is well recognized as an important step in the development of cancer. Close to 70 microRNAs (miRNAs have been implicated in cervical cancer up to now, nevertheless it is unknown if aberrant miRNA expression causes the onset of cervical cancer. One of the best ways to address this issue is through a multistep model of carcinogenesis. In the progression of cervical cancer there are three well-established steps to reach cancer that we used in the model proposed here. The first step of the model comprises the gene changes that occur in normal cells to be transformed into immortal cells (CIN 1, the second comprises immortal cell changes to tumorigenic cells (CIN 2, the third step includes cell changes to increase tumorigenic capacity (CIN 3, and the final step covers tumorigenic changes to carcinogenic cells. Altered miRNAs and their target genes are located in each one of the four steps of the multistep model of carcinogenesis. miRNA expression has shown discrepancies in different works; therefore, in this model we include miRNAs recording similar results in at least two studies. The present model is a useful insight into studying potential prognostic, diagnostic, and therapeutic miRNAs.

  13. Multistep Model of Cervical Cancer: Participation of miRNAs and Coding Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Angelica Judith Granados; López, Jesús Adrián

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant miRNA expression is well recognized as an important step in the development of cancer. Close to 70 microRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in cervical cancer up to now, nevertheless it is unknown if aberrant miRNA expression causes the onset of cervical cancer. One of the best ways to address this issue is through a multistep model of carcinogenesis. In the progression of cervical cancer there are three well-established steps to reach cancer that we used in the model proposed here. The first step of the model comprises the gene changes that occur in normal cells to be transformed into immortal cells (CIN 1), the second comprises immortal cell changes to tumorigenic cells (CIN 2), the third step includes cell changes to increase tumorigenic capacity (CIN 3), and the final step covers tumorigenic changes to carcinogenic cells. Altered miRNAs and their target genes are located in each one of the four steps of the multistep model of carcinogenesis. miRNA expression has shown discrepancies in different works; therefore, in this model we include miRNAs recording similar results in at least two studies. The present model is a useful insight into studying potential prognostic, diagnostic, and therapeutic miRNAs. PMID:25192291

  14. Phylogenetics and evolution of nematode-trapping fungi (Orbiliales) estimated from nuclear and protein coding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Hyde, Kevin D; Jeewon, Rajesh; Cai, Lei; Vijaykrishna, Dhanasekaran; Zhang, Keqin

    2005-01-01

    The systematic classification of nematode-trapping fungi is redefined based on phylogenies inferred from sequence analyses of 28S rDNA, 5.8S rDNA and beta-tubulin genes. Molecular data were analyzed with maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian analysis. An emended generic concept of nematode-trapping fungi is provided. Arthrobotrys is characterized by adhesive networks, Dactylellina by adhesive knobs, and Drechslerella by constricting-rings. Phylogenetic placement of taxa characterized by stalked adhesive knobs and non-constricting rings also is confirmed in Dactylellina. Species that produce unstalked adhesive knobs that grow out to form loops are transferred from Gamsylella to Dactylellina, and those that produce unstalked adhesive knobs that grow out to form networks are transferred from Gamsylella to Arthrobotrys. Gamsylella as currently circumscribed cannot be treated as a valid genus. A hypothesis for the evolution of trapping-devices is presented based on multiple gene data and morphological studies. Predatory and nonpredatory fungi appear to have been derived from nonpredatory members of Orbilia. The adhesive knob is considered to be the ancestral type of trapping device from which constricting rings and networks were derived via two pathways. In the first pathway adhesive knobs retained their adhesive material forming simple two-dimension networks, eventually forming complex three-dimension networks. In the second pathway adhesive knobs lost their adhesive materials, with their ends meeting to form nonconstricting rings and they in turn formed constricting rings with three inflated-cells.

  15. Screening of crucial long non-coding RNAs in oral epithelial dysplasia by serial analysis of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, X; Wei, Y B; Tian, G; Tang, Z; Gao, J Y; Xu, X G

    2015-10-02

    Oral epithelial dysplasia (OED) is a premalignant lesion of the oral mucosa. Considering the poor 5-year survival rate of oral cancer, further investigation is needed in order to determine the pathogenesis of OED. In the present study, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) data from patients with OED were compared to normal controls to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs). SAGE data were obtained from the Gene Expression Omnibus, and included samples from patients with mild, moderate, or severe dysplasia. The DEGs were identified using the edgeR software package and functional-enrichment analysis was performed with the DAVID (https://david.ncifcrf.gov/) software program. The co-expression network was constructed using the CoExpress software and target genes of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) were predicted according to the proximity between the lncRNAs and mRNAs in the genome. A total of 517 DEGs were identified, including 409 mRNAs and 108 lncRNAs. Functional-enrichment analysis showed that mRNAs and lncRNAs involved in epithelial cell differentiation, epithelium development, and epidermal cell differentiation were significantly enriched in the DEGs. Thirty-eight potential regulatory relationships were unveiled between lncRNAs and mRNAs, and two subnetworks were discovered by analyzing the topological properties of the co-expression network. In conclusion, we have identified key mRNAs and lncRNAs in OED, and these findings may aid in understanding the pathogenesis of OED and advance potential future treatments.

  16. Nucleotide sequence analyses of the MRP1 gene in four populations suggest negative selection on its coding region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Stephen

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The MRP1 gene encodes the 190 kDa multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1 and effluxes diverse drugs and xenobiotics. Sequence variations within this gene might account for differences in drug response in different individuals. To facilitate association studies of this gene with diseases and/or drug response, exons and flanking introns of MRP1 were screened for polymorphisms in 142 DNA samples from four different populations. Results Seventy-one polymorphisms, including 60 biallelic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, ten insertions/deletions (indel and one short tandem repeat (STR were identified. Thirty-four of these polymorphisms have not been previously reported. Interestingly, the STR polymorphism at the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR occurs at high but different frequencies in the different populations. Frequencies of common polymorphisms in our populations were comparable to those of similar populations in HAPMAP or Perlegen. Nucleotide diversity indices indicated that the coding region of MRP1 may have undergone negative selection or recent population expansion. SNPs E10/1299 G>T (R433S and E16/2012 G>T (G671V which occur at low frequency in only one or two of four populations examined were predicted to be functionally deleterious and hence are likely to be under negative selection. Conclusion Through in silico approaches, we identified two rare SNPs that are potentially negatively selected. These SNPs may be useful for studies associating this gene with rare events including adverse drug reactions.

  17. Biogenic mechanisms and utilization of small RNAs derived from human protein-coding genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valen, Eivind; Preker, Pascal; Andersen, Peter Refsing

    2011-01-01

    Efforts to catalog eukaryotic transcripts have uncovered many small RNAs (sRNAs) derived from gene termini and splice sites. Their biogenesis pathways are largely unknown, but a mechanism based on backtracking of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) has been suggested. By sequencing transcripts 12......-100 nucleotides in length from cells depleted of major RNA degradation enzymes and RNAs associated with Argonaute (AGO1/2) effector proteins, we provide mechanistic models for sRNA production. We suggest that neither splice site-associated (SSa) nor transcription start site-associated (TSSa) RNAs arise from...... RNAPII backtracking. Instead, SSa RNAs are largely degradation products of splicing intermediates, whereas TSSa RNAs probably derive from nascent RNAs protected by stalled RNAPII against nucleolysis. We also reveal new AGO1/2-associated RNAs derived from 3' ends of introns and from mRNA 3' UTRs...

  18. Nucleosome Stability Distinguishes Two Different Promoter Types at All Protein-Coding Genes in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubik, Slawomir; Bruzzone, Maria Jessica; Jacquet, Philippe; Falcone, Jean-Luc; Rougemont, Jacques; Shore, David

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies indicate that eukaryotic promoters display a stereotypical chromatin landscape characterized by a well-positioned +1 nucleosome near the transcription start site and an upstream -1 nucleosome that together demarcate a nucleosome-free (or -depleted) region. Here we present evidence that there are two distinct types of promoters distinguished by the resistance of the -1 nucleosome to micrococcal nuclease digestion. These different architectures are characterized by two sequence motifs that are broadly deployed at one set of promoters where a nuclease-sensitive ("fragile") nucleosome forms, but concentrated in a narrower, nucleosome-free region at all other promoters. The RSC nucleosome remodeler acts through the motifs to establish stable +1 and -1 nucleosome positions, while binding of a small set of general regulatory (pioneer) factors at fragile nucleosome promoters plays a key role in their destabilization. We propose that the fragile nucleosome promoter architecture is adapted for regulation of highly expressed, growth-related genes.

  19. A New Aspergillus fumigatus Typing Method Based on Hypervariable Tandem Repeats Located within Exons of Surface Protein Coding Genes (TRESP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Rubio, Rocio; Gil, Horacio; Monteiro, Maria Candida; Pelaez, Teresa; Mellado, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a saprotrophic mold fungus ubiquitously found in the environment and is the most common species causing invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised individuals. For A. fumigatus genotyping, the short tandem repeat method (STRAf) is widely accepted as the first choice. However, difficulties associated with PCR product size and required technology have encouraged the development of novel typing techniques. In this study, a new genotyping method based on hypervariable tandem repeats within exons of surface protein coding genes (TRESP) was designed. A. fumigatus isolates were characterized by PCR amplification and sequencing with a panel of three TRESP encoding genes: cell surface protein A; MP-2 antigenic galactomannan protein; and hypothetical protein with a CFEM domain. The allele sequence repeats of each of the three targets were combined to assign a specific genotype. For the evaluation of this method, 126 unrelated A. fumigatus strains were analyzed and 96 different genotypes were identified, showing a high level of discrimination [Simpson's index of diversity (D) 0.994]. In addition, 49 azole resistant strains were analyzed identifying 26 genotypes and showing a lower D value (0.890) among them. This value could indicate that these resistant strains are closely related and share a common origin, although more studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis. In summary, a novel genotyping method for A. fumigatus has been developed which is reproducible, easy to perform, highly discriminatory and could be especially useful for studying outbreaks.

  20. A New Aspergillus fumigatus Typing Method Based on Hypervariable Tandem Repeats Located within Exons of Surface Protein Coding Genes (TRESP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Rubio, Rocio; Gil, Horacio; Monteiro, Maria Candida; Pelaez, Teresa; Mellado, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a saprotrophic mold fungus ubiquitously found in the environment and is the most common species causing invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised individuals. For A. fumigatus genotyping, the short tandem repeat method (STRAf) is widely accepted as the first choice. However, difficulties associated with PCR product size and required technology have encouraged the development of novel typing techniques. In this study, a new genotyping method based on hypervariable tandem repeats within exons of surface protein coding genes (TRESP) was designed. A. fumigatus isolates were characterized by PCR amplification and sequencing with a panel of three TRESP encoding genes: cell surface protein A; MP-2 antigenic galactomannan protein; and hypothetical protein with a CFEM domain. The allele sequence repeats of each of the three targets were combined to assign a specific genotype. For the evaluation of this method, 126 unrelated A. fumigatus strains were analyzed and 96 different genotypes were identified, showing a high level of discrimination [Simpson’s index of diversity (D) 0.994]. In addition, 49 azole resistant strains were analyzed identifying 26 genotypes and showing a lower D value (0.890) among them. This value could indicate that these resistant strains are closely related and share a common origin, although more studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis. In summary, a novel genotyping method for A. fumigatus has been developed which is reproducible, easy to perform, highly discriminatory and could be especially useful for studying outbreaks. PMID:27701437

  1. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the apa gene coding for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 45/47-kilodalton secreted antigen complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laqueyrerie, A; Militzer, P; Romain, F; Eiglmeier, K; Cole, S; Marchal, G

    1995-01-01

    Effective protection against a virulent challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is induced mainly by previous immunization with living attenuated mycobacteria, and it has been hypothesized that secreted proteins serve as major targets in the specific immune response. To identify and purify molecules present in culture medium filtrate which are dominant antigens during effective vaccination, a two-step selection procedure was used to select antigens able to interact with T lymphocytes and/or antibodies induced by immunization with living bacteria and to counterselect antigens interacting with the immune effectors induced by immunization with dead bacteria. A Mycobacterium bovis BCG 45/47-kDa antigen complex, present in BCG culture filtrate, has been previously identified and isolated (F. Romain, A. Laqueyrerie, P. Militzer, P. Pescher, P. Chavarot, M. Lagranderie, G. Auregan, M. Gheorghiu, and G. Marchal, Infect. Immun. 61:742-750, 1993). Since the cognate antibodies recognize the very same antigens present in M. tuberculosis culture medium filtrates, a project was undertaken to clone, express, and sequence the corresponding gene of M. tuberculosis. An M. tuberculosis shuttle cosmid library was transferred in Mycobacterium smegmatis and screened with a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect the clones expressing the proteins. A clone containing a 40-kb DNA insert was selected, and by means of subcloning in Escherichia coli, a 2-kb fragment that coded for the molecules was identified. An open reading frame in the 2,061-nucleotide sequence codes for a secreted protein with a consensus signal peptide of 39 amino acids and a predicted molecular mass of 28,779 Da. The gene was referred to as apa because of the high percentages of proline (21.7%) and alanine (19%) in the purified protein. Southern hybridization analysis of digested total genomic DNA from M. tuberculosis (reference strains H37Rv and H37Ra) indicated that the apa gene was present as a

  2. Controlling HIV-1: Non-Coding RNA Gene Therapy Approaches to a Functional Cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlenstiel, Chantelle L; Suzuki, Kazuo; Marks, Katherine; Symonds, Geoff P; Kelleher, Anthony D

    2015-01-01

    The current treatment strategy for HIV-1 involves prolonged and intensive combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), which successfully suppresses plasma viremia. It has transformed HIV-1 infection into a chronic disease. However, despite the success of cART, a latent form of HIV-1 infection persists as integrated provirus in resting memory CD4(+) T cells. Virus can reactivate from this reservoir upon cessation of treatment, and hence HIV requires lifelong therapy. The reservoir represents a major barrier to eradication. Understanding molecular mechanisms regulating HIV-1 transcription and latency are crucial to develop alternate treatment strategies, which impact upon the reservoir and provide a path toward a "functional cure" in which there is no detectable viremia in the absence of cART. Numerous reports have suggested ncRNAs are involved in regulating viral transcription and latency. This review will discuss the latest developments in ncRNAs, specifically short interfering (si)RNA and short hairpin (sh)RNA, targeting molecular mechanisms of HIV-1 transcription, which may represent potential future therapeutics. It will also briefly address animal models for testing potential therapeutics and current gene therapy clinical trials.

  3. Fructan metabolism and expression of genes coding fructan metabolic enzymes during cold acclimation and overwintering in timothy (Phleum pratense).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Ken-ichi; Sanada, Yasuharu; Tase, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Midori

    2014-07-01

    Metabolism of fructans in temperate grasses dynamically fluctuates before and during winter and is involved in the overwintering activity of plants. We monitored three candidate factors that may be involved in seasonal fructan metabolism in timothy (Phleum pratense): transcription levels of two fructosyltransferase (PpFT1 and PpFT2) genes and one fructan exohydrolase (Pp6-FEH1) gene during fall and winter and under artificially cold conditions. Functional analysis using a recombinant enzyme for PpFT2, a novel fructosyltransferase cDNA, revealed that it encoded sucrose:fructan 6-fructosyltransferase, with enzymatic properties different from previously characterized PpFT1. PpFT1 transcripts decreased from September to December as the amount of fructans increased, whereas PpFT2 transcripts increased in timothy crowns. PpFT2 was transcriptionally more induced than PpFT1 in response to cold and sucrose in timothy seedlings. A rapid increase in Pp6-FEH1 transcripts and increased monosaccharide content were observed in timothy crowns when air temperature was continuously below 0°C and plants were not covered by snow. Transcriptional induction of Pp6-FEH1 by exposure to -3°C was also observed in seedlings. These findings suggest Pp6-FEH1 involvement in the second phase of hardening. PpFT1 and PpFT2 transcription levels decreased under snow cover, whereas Pp6-FEH1 transcription levels were constant, which corresponded with the fluctuation of fructosyltransferase and fructan exohydrolase activities. Inoculation with snow mold fungi (Typhula ishikariensis) increased Pp6-FEH1 transcription levels and accelerated hydrolysis of fructans. These results suggest that transcriptional regulation of genes coding fructan metabolizing enzymes is partially involved in the fluctuation of fructan metabolism during cold acclimation and overwintering.

  4. Genetic variants in promoters and coding regions of the muscle glycogen synthase and the insulin-responsive GLUT4 genes in NIDDM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørbaek, C; Echwald, Søren Morgenthaler; Hubricht, P

    1994-01-01

    regions and regions of importance for translation, as well as coding sequences of the two genes, were studied using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and DNA sequencing. The genetic analyses were performed in subgroups of 52 Caucasian NIDDM patients and 25 age-matched healthy......'-untranslated region, and the coding region of the GLUT4 gene showed four polymorphisms, all single nucleotide substitutions, positioned at -581, 1, 30, and 582. None of the three changes in the regulatory region of the gene had any major influence on expression of the GLUT4 gene in muscle. The variant at 582...... volunteers. By applying inverse polymerase chain reaction and direct DNA sequencing, 532 base pairs (bp) of the GS promoter were identified and the transcriptional start site determined by primer extension. SSCP scanning of the promoter region detected five single nucleotide substitutions, positioned at 42...

  5. Gene and genon concept: coding versus regulation. A conceptual and information-theoretic analysis of genetic storage and expression in the light of modern molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Klaus; Jost, Jürgen

    2007-10-01

    We analyse here the definition of the gene in order to distinguish, on the basis of modern insight in molecular biology, what the gene is coding for, namely a specific polypeptide, and how its expression is realized and controlled. Before the coding role of the DNA was discovered, a gene was identified with a specific phenotypic trait, from Mendel through Morgan up to Benzer. Subsequently, however, molecular biologists ventured to define a gene at the level of the DNA sequence in terms of coding. As is becoming ever more evident, the relations between information stored at DNA level and functional products are very intricate, and the regulatory aspects are as important and essential as the information coding for products. This approach led, thus, to a conceptual hybrid that confused coding, regulation and functional aspects. In this essay, we develop a definition of the gene that once again starts from the functional aspect. A cellular function can be represented by a polypeptide or an RNA. In the case of the polypeptide, its biochemical identity is determined by the mRNA prior to translation, and that is where we locate the gene. The steps from specific, but possibly separated sequence fragments at DNA level to that final mRNA then can be analysed in terms of regulation. For that purpose, we coin the new term "genon". In that manner, we can clearly separate product and regulative information while keeping the fundamental relation between coding and function without the need to introduce a conceptual hybrid. In mRNA, the program regulating the expression of a gene is superimposed onto and added to the coding sequence in cis - we call it the genon. The complementary external control of a given mRNA by trans-acting factors is incorporated in its transgenon. A consequence of this definition is that, in eukaryotes, the gene is, in most cases, not yet present at DNA level. Rather, it is assembled by RNA processing, including differential splicing, from various pieces

  6. The gene coding for glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) maps to chromosome 5p12-p13.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindelhauer, D.; Schuffenhauer, S.; Meitinger, T. [Maximiland-Universitaet, Munich (Germany)] [and others

    1995-08-10

    The gene coding for glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has biological properties that may have potential as a treatment for Parkinson`s and motoneuron diseases. Using the NIGMS Mapping Panel 2, we have localized the GDNF gene to human chromosome 5p12-p13.1. Large NruI and NotI fragments on chromosome 5 will facilitate the construction of a long-range map of the region. 26 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. Oxytocin receptor gene sequences in owl monkeys and other primates show remarkable interspecific regulatory and protein coding variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babb, Paul L; Fernandez-Duque, Eduardo; Schurr, Theodore G

    2015-10-01

    The oxytocin (OT) hormone pathway is involved in numerous physiological processes, and one of its receptor genes (OXTR) has been implicated in pair bonding behavior in mammalian lineages. This observation is important for understanding social monogamy in primates, which occurs in only a small subset of taxa, including Azara's owl monkey (Aotus azarae). To examine the potential relationship between social monogamy and OXTR variation, we sequenced its 5' regulatory (4936bp) and coding (1167bp) regions in 25 owl monkeys from the Argentinean Gran Chaco, and examined OXTR sequences from 1092 humans from the 1000 Genomes Project. We also assessed interspecific variation of OXTR in 25 primate and rodent species that represent a set of phylogenetically and behaviorally disparate taxa. Our analysis revealed substantial variation in the putative 5' regulatory region of OXTR, with marked structural differences across primate taxa, particularly for humans and chimpanzees, which exhibited unique patterns of large motifs of dinucleotide A+T repeats upstream of the OXTR 5' UTR. In addition, we observed a large number of amino acid substitutions in the OXTR CDS region among New World primate taxa that distinguish them from Old World primates. Furthermore, primate taxa traditionally defined as socially monogamous (e.g., gibbons, owl monkeys, titi monkeys, and saki monkeys) all exhibited different amino acid motifs for their respective OXTR protein coding sequences. These findings support the notion that monogamy has evolved independently in Old World and New World primates, and that it has done so through different molecular mechanisms, not exclusively through the oxytocin pathway.

  8. TCGA: Increased oncoprotein coding region mutations correlate with a greater expression of apoptosis-effector genes and a positive outcome for stomach adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavorski, John M; Blanck, George

    2016-08-17

    Oncogene mutations are primarily thought to facilitate uncontrolled cell growth. However, overexpression of oncoproteins likely leads to apoptosis in a feed forward mechanism, whereby a certain level of oncoprotein leads to the activation of pro-proliferation effector genes and higher levels lead to activation of pro-apoptotic effector genes. TCGA STAD barcodes having no oncoprotein coding region mutations represented reduced expression of the apoptosis-effector genes compared with barcodes with multiple oncoprotein coding region mutations. Furthermore, STAD barcodes in a "no-subsequent tumor" group, representing 224 samples, and in a "positive outcome" group, had more oncoprotein coding regions mutated, on average, than barcodes of the new tumor and negative outcome groups, respectively. BRAF, CTNNB1, KRAS and MTOR coding region mutations (as a group) had the strongest association with the no-subsequent tumor group. Tumor suppressor coding region mutations were also correlated with no-subsequent tumor. These results are consistent with an oncoprotein-mediated, feed-forward mechanism of apoptosis in patients. Importantly, the no-subsequent tumor group also had more overall mutations. This result leads to considerations of unhealthy cells or cells with more neo-antigens for immune rejection. However, a probabilistic aspect of mutagenesis is also consistent with more oncoprotein and tumor suppressor protein mutations, in cases of more overall mutations, and thus a higher likelihood of activation of feed forward apoptosis pathways.

  9. Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNA) regulate gene silencing and modify homeostatic status in animals faced with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has been established that reduced susceptibility to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has a genetic component. This genetic component may take the form of small non-coding RNAs (sncRNA), which are molecules that function as regulators of gene expression. Various sncRNAs ...

  10. The Drosophila genes CG14593 and CG30106 code for G-protein-coupled receptors specifically activated by the neuropeptides CCHamide-1 and CCHamide-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karina K; Hauser, Frank; Williamson, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Recently, a novel neuropeptide, CCHamide, was discovered in the silkworm Bombyx mori (L. Roller et al., Insect Biochem. Mol. Biol. 38 (2008) 1147-1157). We have now found that all insects with a sequenced genome have two genes, each coding for a different CCHamide, CCHamide-1 and -2. We have also...... flea Daphnia pulex (Crustacea) and the tick Ixodes scapularis (Chelicerata)....

  11. The frequency of a disease-causing point mutation in the gene coding for medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase in sudden infant death syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banner, Jytte; Gregersen, N; Kølvraa, S

    1993-01-01

    syndrome is still a matter of controversy. The present study investigated 120 well-defined cases of sudden infant death syndrome in order to detect the frequency of the most common disease-causing point mutation in the gene coding for medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (G985) compared with the frequency...

  12. Long non-coding RNA small nucleolar RNA host gene 12 (SNHG12) promotes cell proliferation and migration by upregulating angiomotin gene expression in human osteosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Wendong; Wang, Pei; Feng, Shiqing; Xue, Yuan; Li, Yulin

    2016-03-01

    The long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) small nucleolar RNA host gene 12 (SNHG12) has a role in cell proliferation and migration. Angiomotin, encoded by the AMOT gene, is a protein that regulates the migration and organization of endothelial cells. SNHG12 and AMOT have been shown to play a role in a variety of human cancers but have yet to be studied in detail in human osteosarcoma. Tissue samples from primary osteosarcoma (n = 20) and adjacent normal tissues (n = 20), the osteosarcoma cell lines, SAOS-2, MG-63, U-2 OS, and the human osteoblast cell line hFOB (OB3) were studied using Western blot for angiomotin, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for the expression of SNHG12 and AMOT. The expression of SNHG12 was knocked down using RNA interference. Cell migration assays were performed. Cell apoptosis was studied using flow cytometry. SNHG12 and AMOT messenger RNA (mRNA) expression was upregulated in osteosarcoma tissues and cell lines when compared with normal tissues and cells. Upregulation of AMOT mRNA was associated with upregulation of SNHG12. Knockdown of SNHG12 reduced the expression of angiomotin in osteosarcoma cells and suppressed cell proliferation and migration but did not affect cell apoptosis. This preliminary study has shown that the lncRNA SNHG12 promotes cell proliferation and migration by upregulating AMOT gene expression in osteosarcoma cells in vivo and in vitro. Further studies are recommended to investigate the role of SNHG12 and AMOT expression in tumor cell proliferation and migration and angiogenesis in osteosarcoma and a range of malignant mesenchymal tumors.

  13. Phylogenetic relationships within Echinococcus and Taenia tapeworms (Cestoda: Taeniidae): an inference from nuclear protein-coding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Jenny; Nakao, Minoru; Yanagida, Tetsuya; Okamoto, Munehiro; Saarma, Urmas; Lavikainen, Antti; Ito, Akira

    2011-12-01

    The family Taeniidae of tapeworms is composed of two genera, Echinococcus and Taenia, which obligately parasitize mammals including humans. Inferring phylogeny via molecular markers is the only way to trace back their evolutionary histories. However, molecular dating approaches are lacking so far. Here we established new markers from nuclear protein-coding genes for RNA polymerase II second largest subunit (rpb2), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (pepck) and DNA polymerase delta (pold). Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood analyses of the concatenated gene sequences allowed us to reconstruct phylogenetic trees for taeniid parasites. The tree topologies clearly demonstrated that Taenia is paraphyletic and that the clade of Echinococcus oligarthrus and Echinococcusvogeli is sister to all other members of Echinococcus. Both species are endemic in Central and South America, and their definitive hosts originated from carnivores that immigrated from North America after the formation of the Panamanian land bridge about 3 million years ago (Ma). A time-calibrated phylogeny was estimated by a Bayesian relaxed-clock method based on the assumption that the most recent common ancestor of E. oligarthrus and E. vogeli existed during the late Pliocene (3.0 Ma). The results suggest that a clade of Taenia including human-pathogenic species diversified primarily in the late Miocene (11.2 Ma), whereas Echinococcus started to diversify later, in the end of the Miocene (5.8 Ma). Close genetic relationships among the members of Echinococcus imply that the genus is a young group in which speciation and global radiation occurred rapidly. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Rare, Low-Frequency, and Common Variants in the Protein-Coding Sequence of Biological Candidate Genes from GWASs Contribute to Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogo, Dorothée; Kurreeman, Fina; Stahl, Eli A.; Liao, Katherine P.; Gupta, Namrata; Greenberg, Jeffrey D.; Rivas, Manuel A.; Hickey, Brendan; Flannick, Jason; Thomson, Brian; Guiducci, Candace; Ripke, Stephan; Adzhubey, Ivan; Barton, Anne; Kremer, Joel M.; Alfredsson, Lars; Sunyaev, Shamil; Martin, Javier; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Bowes, John; Eyre, Steve; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Plenge, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    The extent to which variants in the protein-coding sequence of genes contribute to risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is unknown. In this study, we addressed this issue by deep exon sequencing and large-scale genotyping of 25 biological candidate genes located within RA risk loci discovered by genome-wide association studies (GWASs). First, we assessed the contribution of rare coding variants in the 25 genes to the risk of RA in a pooled sequencing study of 500 RA cases and 650 controls of European ancestry. We observed an accumulation of rare nonsynonymous variants exclusive to RA cases in IL2RA and IL2RB (burden test: p = 0.007 and p = 0.018, respectively). Next, we assessed the aggregate contribution of low-frequency and common coding variants to the risk of RA by dense genotyping of the 25 gene loci in 10,609 RA cases and 35,605 controls. We observed a strong enrichment of coding variants with a nominal signal of association with RA (p A [p.His266Gln]), and a noncoding variant, rs624988, reside on distinct haplotypes and independently contribute to the risk of RA (p = 4.6 × 10−6). Overall, our results indicate that variants (distributed across the allele-frequency spectrum) within the protein-coding portion of a subset of biological candidate genes identified by GWASs contribute to the risk of RA. Further, we have demonstrated that very large sample sizes will be required for comprehensively identifying the independent alleles contributing to the missing heritability of RA. PMID:23261300

  15. Hypothalamic transcriptomes of 99 mouse strains reveal trans eQTL hotspots, splicing QTLs and novel non-coding genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasin-Brumshtein, Yehudit; Khan, Arshad H.; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Pan, Calvin; Parks, Brian W.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Brümmer, Anneke; Pellegrini, Matteo; Xiao, Xinshu; Eskin, Eleazar; Smith, Richard D.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Smith, Desmond J.

    2016-09-13

    Previous studies had shown that the integration of genome wide expression profiles, in metabolic tissues, with genetic and phenotypic variance, provided valuable insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms. We used RNA-Seq to characterize hypothalamic transcriptome in 99 inbred strains of mice from the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel (HMDP), a reference resource population for cardiovascular and metabolic traits. We report numerous novel transcripts supported by proteomic analyses, as well as novel non coding RNAs. High resolution genetic mapping of transcript levels in HMDP, reveals bothlocalandtransexpression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTLs) demonstrating 2transeQTL 'hotspots' associated with expression of hundreds of genes. We also report thousands of alternative splicing events regulated by genetic variants. Finally, comparison with about 150 metabolic and cardiovascular traits revealed many highly significant associations. Our data provide a rich resource for understanding the many physiologic functions mediated by the hypothalamus and their genetic regulation.

  16. Identification of a cell lineage-specific gene coding for a sea urchin alpha 2(IV)-like collagen chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposito, J Y; Suzuki, H; Geourjon, C; Garrone, R; Solursh, M; Ramirez, F

    1994-05-06

    We report the isolation of several overlapping cDNAs from an embryonic library of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus coding for a novel sea urchin collagen chain. The conceptual amino acid translation of the cDNAs indicated that the protein displays the structural features of a vertebrate type IV-like collagen alpha chain. In addition to a putative 31-residue signal peptide, the sea urchin molecule contains a 14-residue amino-terminal non-collagenous segment, a discontinuous 1,477-amino acid triple helical domain, and a 225-residue carboxyl-terminal domain rich in cysteines. The amino- and carboxyl-terminal non-collagenous regions of the echinoid molecule are remarkably similar to the 7 S and carboxyl-terminal non-collagenous (NC1) domains of the alpha 1 and alpha 2 chains of vertebrate type IV collagen. The sequence similarity and distinct structural features of the 7 S and NC1 domains strongly suggest that the sea urchin polypeptide is evolutionarily related to the alpha 2(IV) class of collagen chains. Finally, in situ hybridizations revealed that expression of this collagen gene is restricted to the mesenchyme cell lineage of the developing sea urchin embryo.

  17. Polypeptide composition and gag gene-coded products of type-D oncovirus from HEp-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, V A

    1982-01-01

    The protein composition of type-D oncovirus HEp-2, isolated from cell-free medium of continuous human HEp-2 cell line, has been investigated using electrophoresis on gradient polyacrylamide gels with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Labeling with 14C-amino acids revealed five viral polypeptides with molecular weights of 70 000 (gp70), 27 000 (p27), 19 000 (p19), 15 000 (p15), 12 000-10 000 (p12-10). The 70 000 dalton protein was shown to be the only glycoprotein by incorporation of radioactive glucosamine. A polypeptide with molecular weight of 78 000 has been specifically precipitated from pulse-labeled type-D oncovirus producing HEp-2 cells with goat anti Mason-Pfizer p27 serum. This protein was shown to be gag gene-coded polyprotein precursor (Pr78gag) of the major virus polypeptide p27. Pulse-labeled HEp-2 and Mason-Pfizer infected Tu 197 cells were rinsed, lysed, clarified and precipitated with goat anti Mason-Pfizer p27 serum. In both cases Pr78gag was detected.

  18. Long non-coding RNA-mediated transcriptional interference of a permease gene confers drug tolerance in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ard, Ryan; Tong, Pin; Allshire, Robin C

    2014-11-27

    Most long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) encoded by eukaryotic genomes remain uncharacterized. Here we focus on a set of intergenic lncRNAs in fission yeast. Deleting one of these lncRNAs exhibited a clear phenotype: drug sensitivity. Detailed analyses of the affected locus revealed that transcription of the nc-tgp1 lncRNA regulates drug tolerance by repressing the adjacent phosphate-responsive permease gene transporter for glycerophosphodiester 1 (tgp1(+)). We demonstrate that the act of transcribing nc-tgp1 over the tgp1(+) promoter increases nucleosome density, prevents transcription factor access and thus represses tgp1(+) without the need for RNA interference or heterochromatin components. We therefore conclude that tgp1(+) is regulated by transcriptional interference. Accordingly, decreased nc-tgp1 transcription permits tgp1(+) expression upon phosphate starvation. Furthermore, nc-tgp1 loss induces tgp1(+) even in repressive conditions. Notably, drug sensitivity results directly from tgp1(+) expression in the absence of the nc-tgp1 RNA. Thus, transcription of an lncRNA governs drug tolerance in fission yeast.

  19. Isolation and sequence analysis of Clpg1, a gene coding for an endopolygalacturonase of the phytopathogenic fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centis, S; Dumas, B; Fournier, J; Marolda, M; Esquerré-Tugayé, M T

    1996-04-17

    Oligodeoxyribonucleotide primers designed from the N-terminal amino acid (aa) sequence of the endopolygalacturonase (EndoPG) of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (Cl) race beta and from an internal sequence conserved among different fungal EndoPG were used in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify genomic related sequences of the fungus. A 542-bp fragment, designated pgA, was obtained and used as a probe to screen a partial genomic library of Cl. Among the positive clones, one was further analyzed. Nucleotide sequencing of this clone revealed on ORF encoding a 363-amino-acid (aa) polypeptide beginning with a signal peptide of 26 aa interrupted by an intron of 70 bp, and showing a high degree of homology to ten fungal EndoPG sequences. Consensus sequences were identified in the 5' non-coding region. This genomic clone was thereafter designated Clpg1. Southern analysis, performed with a Clpg1-specific probe, showed that this gene is present as a single copy in the Cl genome.

  20. Finite population analysis of the effect of horizontal gene transfer on the origin of an universal and optimal genetic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Neha; Vishwa Bandhu, Ashutosh; Sengupta, Supratim

    2016-06-01

    The origin of a universal and optimal genetic code remains a compelling mystery in molecular biology and marks an essential step in the origin of DNA and protein based life. We examine a collective evolution model of genetic code origin that allows for unconstrained horizontal transfer of genetic elements within a finite population of sequences each of which is associated with a genetic code selected from a pool of primordial codes. We find that when horizontal transfer of genetic elements is incorporated in this more realistic model of code-sequence coevolution in a finite population, it can increase the likelihood of emergence of a more optimal code eventually leading to its universality through fixation in the population. The establishment of such an optimal code depends on the probability of HGT events. Only when the probability of HGT events is above a critical threshold, we find that the ten amino acid code having a structure that is most consistent with the standard genetic code (SGC) often gets fixed in the population with the highest probability. We examine how the threshold is determined by factors like the population size, length of the sequences and selection coefficient. Our simulation results reveal the conditions under which sharing of coding innovations through horizontal transfer of genetic elements may have facilitated the emergence of a universal code having a structure similar to that of the SGC.

  1. Finite population analysis of the effect of horizontal gene transfer on the origin of an universal and optimal genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Neha; Bandhu, Ashutosh Vishwa; Sengupta, Supratim

    2016-05-27

    The origin of a universal and optimal genetic code remains a compelling mystery in molecular biology and marks an essential step in the origin of DNA and protein based life. We examine a collective evolution model of genetic code origin that allows for unconstrained horizontal transfer of genetic elements within a finite population of sequences each of which is associated with a genetic code selected from a pool of primordial codes. We find that when horizontal transfer of genetic elements is incorporated in this more realistic model of code-sequence coevolution in a finite population, it can increase the likelihood of emergence of a more optimal code eventually leading to its universality through fixation in the population. The establishment of such an optimal code depends on the probability of HGT events. Only when the probability of HGT events is above a critical threshold, we find that the ten amino acid code having a structure that is most consistent with the standard genetic code (SGC) often gets fixed in the population with the highest probability. We examine how the threshold is determined by factors like the population size, length of the sequences and selection coefficient. Our simulation results reveal the conditions under which sharing of coding innovations through horizontal transfer of genetic elements may have facilitated the emergence of a universal code having a structure similar to that of the SGC.

  2. Mitochondrial genomes of the jungle crow Corvus macrorhynchos (Passeriformes: Corvidae) from shed feathers and a phylogenetic analysis of genus Corvus using mitochondrial protein-coding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzeminska, Urszula; Wilson, Robyn; Rahman, Sadequr; Song, Beng Kah; Seneviratne, Sampath; Gan, Han Ming; Austin, Christopher M

    2016-07-01

    The complete mitochondrial genomes of two jungle crows (Corvus macrorhynchos) were sequenced. DNA was extracted from tissue samples obtained from shed feathers collected in the field in Sri Lanka and sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq Personal Sequencer. Jungle crow mitogenomes have a structural organization typical of the genus Corvus and are 16,927 bp and 17,066 bp in length, both comprising 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal subunit genes, and a non-coding control region. In addition, we complement already available house crow (Corvus spelendens) mitogenome resources by sequencing an individual from Singapore. A phylogenetic tree constructed from Corvidae family mitogenome sequences available on GenBank is presented. We confirm the monophyly of the genus Corvus and propose to use complete mitogenome resources for further intra- and interspecies genetic studies.

  3. Benchmarking the GENE and GYRO codes through the relative roles of electromagnetic and E  ×  B stabilization in JET high-performance discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravenec, R.; Citrin, J.; Candy, J.; Mantica, P.; Görler, T.; contributors, JET

    2016-12-01

    Nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations using the GENE code have previously predicted a significant nonlinear enhanced electromagnetic stabilization in certain JET discharges with high neutral-beam power and low core magnetic shear (Citrin et al 2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 111 155001, 2015 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 57 014032). This dominates over the impact of E  ×  B flow shear in these discharges. Furthermore, fast ions were shown to be a major contributor to the electromagnetic stabilization. These conclusions were based on results from the GENE gyrokinetic turbulence code. In this work we verify these results using the GYRO code. Comparing results (linear frequencies, eigenfunctions, and nonlinear fluxes) from different gyrokinetic codes as a means of verification (benchmarking) is only convincing if the codes agree for more than one discharge. Otherwise, agreement may simply be fortuitous. Therefore, we analyze three discharges, all with a carbon wall: a simplified, two-species, circular geometry case based on an actual JET discharge; an L-mode discharge with a significant fast-ion pressure fraction; and a low-triangularity high-β hybrid discharge. All discharges were analyzed at normalized toroidal flux coordinate ρ  =  0.33 where significant ion temperature peaking is observed. The GYRO simulations support the conclusion that electromagnetic stabilization is strong, and dominates E  ×  B shear stabilization.

  4. Thinking beside the box: Should we care about the non-coding strand of the 16S rRNA gene?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Mazcorro, Jose F; Barcenas-Walls, Jose R

    2016-08-01

    The 16S rRNA gene (16S rDNA) codes for RNA that plays a fundamental role during translation in the ribosome and is used extensively as a marker gene to establish relationships among bacteria. However, the complementary non-coding 16S rDNA (nc16S rDNA) has been ignored. An idea emerged in the course of analyzing bacterial 16S rDNA sequences in search for nucleotide composition and substitution patterns: Does the nc16S rDNA code? If so, what does it code for? More importantly: Does 16S rDNA evolution reflect its own evolution or the evolution of its counterpart nc16S rDNA? The objective of this minireview is to discuss these thoughts. nc strands often encode small RNAs (sRNAs), ancient components of gene regulation. nc16S rDNA sequences from different bacterial groups were used to search for possible matches in the Bacterial Small Regulatory RNA Database. Intriguingly, the sequence of one published sRNA obtained from Legionella pneumophila (GenBank: AE0173541) showed high non-random similarity with nc16S rDNA corresponding in part to the V5 region especially from Legionella and relatives. While the target(s) of this sRNA is unclear at the moment, its mere existence might open up a new chapter in the use of the 16S rDNA to study relationships among bacteria.

  5. Improvement of genome assembly completeness and identification of novel full-length protein-coding genes by RNA-seq in the giant panda genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meili; Hu, Yibo; Liu, Jingxing; Wu, Qi; Zhang, Chenglin; Yu, Jun; Xiao, Jingfa; Wei, Fuwen; Wu, Jiayan

    2015-12-11

    High-quality and complete gene models are the basis of whole genome analyses. The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) genome was the first genome sequenced on the basis of solely short reads, but the genome annotation had lacked the support of transcriptomic evidence. In this study, we applied RNA-seq to globally improve the genome assembly completeness and to detect novel expressed transcripts in 12 tissues from giant pandas, by using a transcriptome reconstruction strategy that combined reference-based and de novo methods. Several aspects of genome assembly completeness in the transcribed regions were effectively improved by the de novo assembled transcripts, including genome scaffolding, the detection of small-size assembly errors, the extension of scaffold/contig boundaries, and gap closure. Through expression and homology validation, we detected three groups of novel full-length protein-coding genes. A total of 12.62% of the novel protein-coding genes were validated by proteomic data. GO annotation analysis showed that some of the novel protein-coding genes were involved in pigmentation, anatomical structure formation and reproduction, which might be related to the development and evolution of the black-white pelage, pseudo-thumb and delayed embryonic implantation of giant pandas. The updated genome annotation will help further giant panda studies from both structural and functional perspectives.

  6. CLONING AND EXPRESSION OF THE GENE CODING FOR IL-2 (60)-PE40, A MOLECULAR TARGETED PROTEIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张萌; 赵雪; 李焕娄; 卢圣栋

    1995-01-01

    It has recently been shown that chimeric toxin composed of IL2 fused tp PE40,a mutant form of Pseu-domonas Exotoxin A devoid of its native cell recognition and binding domain was cytotoxic to IL-2 receptor bearing cells.We here amplified the gene IL-2 (60),which codes for the N-terminal 1-60 amino acids of human IL-2 by PCR.After that,we fused it to PE40 and the new chimteric protein IL-2 (60)-PE40 was expressed in E.coli.SDS-PAGE revealed that IL-2(60)-PE40 chimeric protein accounts for more than 18% of total cell proteins.As the region IL-2 binds with its receptor was defined in the N-terminal residuse 8-54 of IL-2,such fusion proteins will have the same activity with IL-2-PE40.Following primany purification,IL-2(60)-PE40 was shown to be very toxic to IL-2 receptor-positive cells but non measurable effect on the cells lacking IL-2 receptors.Such a structure has not been reported by now.The fusion pro-tein is useful for suppressing the immune response in cases of rejection of allografts and organ transplants and as therapeutic agents for the treatment of IL-2 receptor related diseases such as autoimmune disease,and as therapeutic agents for the treatment of IL-2 receptor related diseases such as autoimmune disease,ATL(adult T-cell leukemia),et al.

  7. Analysis of antisense expression by whole genome tiling microarrays and siRNAs suggests mis-annotation of Arabidopsis orphan protein-coding genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey R Richardson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs and trans-acting small-interfering RNAs (tasi-RNAs are small (20-22 nt long RNAs (smRNAs generated from hairpin secondary structures or antisense transcripts, respectively, that regulate gene expression by Watson-Crick pairing to a target mRNA and altering expression by mechanisms related to RNA interference. The high sequence homology of plant miRNAs to their targets has been the mainstay of miRNA prediction algorithms, which are limited in their predictive power for other kingdoms because miRNA complementarity is less conserved yet transitive processes (production of antisense smRNAs are active in eukaryotes. We hypothesize that antisense transcription and associated smRNAs are biomarkers which can be computationally modeled for gene discovery. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We explored rice (Oryza sativa sense and antisense gene expression in publicly available whole genome tiling array transcriptome data and sequenced smRNA libraries (as well as C. elegans and found evidence of transitivity of MIRNA genes similar to that found in Arabidopsis. Statistical analysis of antisense transcript abundances, presence of antisense ESTs, and association with smRNAs suggests several hundred Arabidopsis 'orphan' hypothetical genes are non-coding RNAs. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found novel Arabidopsis homologues of some MIRNA genes on the antisense strand of previously annotated protein-coding genes. A Support Vector Machine (SVM was applied using thermodynamic energy of binding plus novel expression features of sense/antisense transcription topology and siRNA abundances to build a prediction model of miRNA targets. The SVM when trained on targets could predict the "ancient" (deeply conserved class of validated Arabidopsis MIRNA genes with an accuracy of 84%, and 76% for "new" rapidly-evolving MIRNA genes. CONCLUSIONS: Antisense and smRNA expression features and computational methods may identify novel MIRNA genes and other non-coding

  8. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of the gene coding for the 57kDa soluble antigen of the salmonid fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Maw-Sheng; Gilbert , Teresa L.; Huang, Chienjin; Landolt, Marsha L.; O'Hara, Patrick J.; Winton, James R.

    1992-01-01

    The complete sequence coding for the 57-kDa major soluble antigen of the salmonid fish pathogen, Renibacterium salmoninarum, was determined. The gene contained an opening reading frame of 1671 nucleotides coding for a protein of 557 amino acids with a calculated Mr value of 57190. The first 26 amino acids constituted a signal peptide. The deduced sequence for amino acid residues 27–61 was in agreement with the 35 N-terminal amino acid residues determined by microsequencing, suggesting the protein in synthesized as a 557-amino acid precursor and processed to produce a mature protein of Mr 54505. Two regions of the protein contained imperfect direct repeats. The first region contained two copies of an 81-residue repeat, the second contained five copies of an unrelated 25-residue repeat. Also, a perfect inverted repeat (including three in-frame UAA stop codons) was observed at the carboxyl-terminus of the gene.

  9. Screening for Genes Coding for Putative Antitumor Compounds, Antimicrobial and Enzymatic Activities from Haloalkalitolerant and Haloalkaliphilic Bacteria Strains of Algerian Sahara Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okba Selama

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extreme environments may often contain unusual bacterial groups whose physiology is distinct from those of normal environments. To satisfy the need for new bioactive pharmaceuticals compounds and enzymes, we report here the isolation of novel bacteria from an extreme environment. Thirteen selected haloalkalitolerant and haloalkaliphilic bacteria were isolated from Algerian Sahara Desert soils. These isolates were screened for the presence of genes coding for putative antitumor compounds using PCR based methods. Enzymatic, antibacterial, and antifungal activities were determined by using cultural dependant methods. Several of these isolates are typical of desert and alkaline saline soils, but, in addition, we report for the first time the presence of a potential new member of the genus Nocardia with particular activity against the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition to their haloalkali character, the presence of genes coding for putative antitumor compounds, combined with the antimicrobial activity against a broad range of indicator strains and their enzymatic potential, makes them suitable for biotechnology applications.

  10. Screening for genes coding for putative antitumor compounds, antimicrobial and enzymatic activities from haloalkalitolerant and haloalkaliphilic bacteria strains of Algerian Sahara Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selama, Okba; Amos, Gregory C A; Djenane, Zahia; Borsetto, Chiara; Laidi, Rabah Forar; Porter, David; Nateche, Farida; Wellington, Elizabeth M H; Hacène, Hocine

    2014-01-01

    Extreme environments may often contain unusual bacterial groups whose physiology is distinct from those of normal environments. To satisfy the need for new bioactive pharmaceuticals compounds and enzymes, we report here the isolation of novel bacteria from an extreme environment. Thirteen selected haloalkalitolerant and haloalkaliphilic bacteria were isolated from Algerian Sahara Desert soils. These isolates were screened for the presence of genes coding for putative antitumor compounds using PCR based methods. Enzymatic, antibacterial, and antifungal activities were determined by using cultural dependant methods. Several of these isolates are typical of desert and alkaline saline soils, but, in addition, we report for the first time the presence of a potential new member of the genus Nocardia with particular activity against the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition to their haloalkali character, the presence of genes coding for putative antitumor compounds, combined with the antimicrobial activity against a broad range of indicator strains and their enzymatic potential, makes them suitable for biotechnology applications.

  11. Coat protein gene and 3′ non-coding region of tobacco mosaic virus and tomato mosaic virus are associated with viral pathogenesis in Nicotiana tabacum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The camellia isolate of tomato mosaic virus (ToMV-TL) can induce local necrotic lesions on the inoculated leaves in Nicotiana tabacum, whereas the broad bean isolate of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV-B) produces the mosaic symptom on systemic leaves. To examine viral determinant for differential infection phenotype in N. tabacum, the coat protein gene and the 3′ non-coding region of TMV was replaced with that of ToMV, the chimeric virus induced similar local necrotic lesions to that induced by ToMV. The results indicate that the coat protein gene and the 3′ non-coding region of TMV and ToMV influence the virus-induced pathogenesis in N. tabacum.

  12. Identification of kakusei, a nuclear non-coding RNA, as an immediate early gene from the honeybee, and its application for neuroethological study

    OpenAIRE

    Taketoshi Kiya; Atsushi Ugajin; Takekazu Kunieda; Takeo Kubo

    2012-01-01

    The honeybee is a social insect that exhibits various social behaviors. To elucidate the neural basis of honeybee behavior, we detected neural activity in freely-moving honeybee workers using an immediate early gene (IEG) that is expressed in a neural activity-dependent manner. In European honeybees (Apis mellifera), we identified a novel nuclear non-coding RNA, termed kakusei, as the first insect IEG, and revealed the neural activity pattern in foragers. In addition, we isolated a homologue ...

  13. Daily expression of genes coding for neurotransmitters in central and peripheral tissues of redheaded bunting: Implication for circadian regulation of physiology in songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ila; Singh, Devraj; Kumar, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    In birds, circadian control of tissue level communication is not well understood. The present study investigated this, by monitoring daily oscillation of genes coding for peptides (neuropeptide Y, NPY; vasoactive intestinal peptide, VIP; somatostatis, SST) and intermediary enzymes of amine and amino acid neurotransmitters (dopamine [tyrosine hydroxylase, TH]; glutamate [glutaminase, GLS; glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase 2, GOT2]; gamma amino butyric actid, GABA [glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, GAD65]) biosynthetic pathway, along with c-FOS as an activation marker, in different tissues of migratory redheaded buntings, Emberiza bruniceps. We cloned a partial sequence of these genes, and measured their mRNA expression in the 'central' clock (retina, hypothalamus) and peripheral (heart, stomach, gut, liver) tissues, collected at six times (ZT 2, 6, 11, 13, 18 and 23; ZT 0 = lights on) from birds (n = 4/ ZT) in the 12 h:12 h light-dark cycle. There were daily mRNA oscillations of all genes, although with a tissue-specific expression pattern as well as with the differential phase relationships in genes within and between tissues. These results support a conserved tissue level circadian regulation of genes coding for peptide, amine and amino acid neurotransmitters, and substantiate the expression and plausible role of neurotransmitters in the peripheral tissues. We suggest a tissue-specific contribution of neurotransmitters in the circadian regulation of physiology and behaviour in a seasonal migratory species, the redheaded bunting.

  14. Identification of Potential Key Long Non-Coding RNAs and Target Genes Associated with Pneumonia Using Long Non-Coding RNA Sequencing (lncRNA-Seq): A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sai; Feng, Cong; Chen, Li; Huang, Zhi; Zhou, Xuan; Li, Bei; Wang, Li-li; Chen, Wei; Lv, Fa-qin; Li, Tan-shi

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to identify the potential key long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and target genes associated with pneumonia using lncRNA sequencing (lncRNA-seq). Material/Methods A total of 9 peripheral blood samples from patients with mild pneumonia (n=3) and severe pneumonia (n=3), as well as volunteers without pneumonia (n=3), were received for lncRNA-seq. Based on the sequencing data, differentially expressed lncRNAs (DE-lncRNAs) were identified by the limma package. After the functional enrichment analysis, target genes of DE-lncRNAs were predicted, and the regulatory network was constructed. Results In total, 99 DE-lncRNAs (14 upregulated and 85 downregulated ones) were identified in the mild pneumonia group and 85 (72 upregulated and 13 downregulated ones) in the severe pneumonia group, compared with the control group. Among these DE-lncRNAs, 9 lncRNAs were upregulated in both the mild and severe pneumonia groups. A set of 868 genes were predicted to be targeted by these 9 DE-lncRNAs. In the network, RP11-248E9.5 and RP11-456D7.1 targeted the majority of genes. RP11-248E9.5 regulated several genes together with CTD-2300H10.2, such as QRFP and EPS8. Both upregulated RP11-456D7.1 and RP11-96C23.9 regulated several genes, such as PDK2. RP11-456D7.1 also positively regulated CCL21. Conclusions These novel lncRNAs and their target genes may be closely associated with the progression of pneumonia. PMID:27663962

  15. Phylogenetic performance of mitochondrial protein-coding genes of Oncomelania hupensis in resolving relationships between landscape populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Zhu LI; Li ZHANG; Lin MA; Wei HU; Shan LV; Qin LIU; Ying-Jun QIAN

    2013-01-01

    Oncomelania hupensis is the unique intermediate host of Schistosomajaponicum,which plays a key role in the transmission of human blood fluke Schistosoma.The complete mitochondrial (mt) genome of O.hupensis has been characterized; however,the phylogenetic performance of mt protein-coding genes (PCGs) of the snail remain unclear.In this study,11 whole mt genomes of snails collected from four different ecological settings in China and the Philippines were sequenced.The mt genome sizes ranged from 15 183 to 15 216 bp,with the G + C contents from 32.4% to 33.4%.A total of 15 251 characters were generated from the multiple sequence alignment.Of 2711 (17.8%)polymorphic sites,56.22% (1524) were parsimony sites.The mt genomes' phylogenetic trees were reconstructed using minimum evolution,neighbor joining,maximum likelihood,maximum parsimony,and Bayesian tree estimate methods,and two main distinct clades were identified:(i) the isolate from mountainous regions; (ii) the remaining isolate which included three inner branches.All phylogenetic trees of the 13 PCGs were generated by running 1000 bootstrap replicates and compared with the complete mtDNA tree,the classification accuracy ranging from 21.23% to 87.87%,the topological distance of phylogenetic trees between PCGs ranging from 5 to 14.Therefore,the performance of PCGs can be divided into good condition (COⅠ,ND2,ND5,and ND3),medium (COⅡ,ATP6,ND1,ND6,Cytb,ND4,and COⅢ),poor (ATP8 and ND4L).This study represents the first analysis ofmt genome diversity of the O.hupensis snail and phylogenetic performance of mt PCGs.It presents clear evidence that the snail populations can be separated into four landscape genetic populations in mainland China based on whole mt genomes.The identification of the phylogenetic performance of PCGs provides new insight into the intensive genetic diversity study using mtDNA markers for the snail.

  16. CHIR99021 promotes self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem cells by modulation of protein-encoding gene and long intergenic non-coding RNA expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yongyan [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Ai, Zhiying [Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); College of Life Sciences, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Yao, Kezhen [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Cao, Lixia; Du, Juan; Shi, Xiaoyan [Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); College of Life Sciences, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Guo, Zekun, E-mail: gzk@nwsuaf.edu.cn [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Zhang, Yong, E-mail: zhylab@hotmail.com [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A and F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China)

    2013-10-15

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can proliferate indefinitely in vitro and differentiate into cells of all three germ layers. These unique properties make them exceptionally valuable for drug discovery and regenerative medicine. However, the practical application of ESCs is limited because it is difficult to derive and culture ESCs. It has been demonstrated that CHIR99021 (CHIR) promotes self-renewal and enhances the derivation efficiency of mouse (m)ESCs. However, the downstream targets of CHIR are not fully understood. In this study, we identified CHIR-regulated genes in mESCs using microarray analysis. Our microarray data demonstrated that CHIR not only influenced the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by stabilizing β-catenin, but also modulated several other pluripotency-related signaling pathways such as TGF-β, Notch and MAPK signaling pathways. More detailed analysis demonstrated that CHIR inhibited Nodal signaling, while activating bone morphogenetic protein signaling in mESCs. In addition, we found that pluripotency-maintaining transcription factors were up-regulated by CHIR, while several developmental-related genes were down-regulated. Furthermore, we found that CHIR altered the expression of epigenetic regulatory genes and long intergenic non-coding RNAs. Quantitative real-time PCR results were consistent with microarray data, suggesting that CHIR alters the expression pattern of protein-encoding genes (especially transcription factors), epigenetic regulatory genes and non-coding RNAs to establish a relatively stable pluripotency-maintaining network. - Highlights: • Combined use of CHIR with LIF promotes self-renewal of J1 mESCs. • CHIR-regulated genes are involved in multiple pathways. • CHIR inhibits Nodal signaling and promotes Bmp4 expression to activate BMP signaling. • Expression of epigenetic regulatory genes and lincRNAs is altered by CHIR.

  17. The Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus resistance genes Ty-1 and Ty-3 are allelic and code for DFDGD-class RNA-dependent RNA polymerases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten G Verlaan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus Disease incited by Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV causes huge losses in tomato production worldwide and is caused by different related begomovirus species. Breeding for TYLCV resistance has been based on the introgression of multiple resistance genes originating from several wild tomato species. In this study we have fine-mapped the widely used Solanum chilense-derived Ty-1 and Ty-3 genes by screening nearly 12,000 plants for recombination events and generating recombinant inbred lines. Multiple molecular markers were developed and used in combination with disease tests to fine-map the genes to a small genomic region (approximately 70 kb. Using a Tobacco Rattle Virus-Virus Induced Gene Silencing approach, the resistance gene was identified. It is shown that Ty-1 and Ty-3 are allelic and that they code for a RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDR belonging to the RDRγ type, which has an atypical DFDGD motif in the catalytic domain. In contrast to the RDRα type, characterized by a catalytic DLDGD motif, no clear function has yet been described for the RDRγ type, and thus the Ty-1/Ty-3 gene unveils a completely new class of resistance gene. Although speculative, the resistance mechanism of Ty-1/Ty-3 and its specificity towards TYLCV are discussed in light of the function of the related RDRα class in the amplification of the RNAi response in plants and transcriptional silencing of geminiviruses in plants.

  18. The CAZyome of Phytophthora spp.: A comprehensive analysis of the gene complement coding for carbohydrate-active enzymes in species of the genus Phytophthora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laird Emma W

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism include Carbohydrate esterases (CE, Glycoside hydrolases (GH, Glycosyl transferases (GT, and Polysaccharide lyases (PL, commonly referred to as carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes. The CE, GH, and PL superfamilies are also known as cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDE due to their role in the disintegration of the plant cell wall by bacterial and fungal pathogens. In Phytophthora infestans, penetration of the plant cells occurs through a specialized hyphal structure called appressorium; however, it is likely that members of the genus Phytophthora also use CWDE for invasive growth because hyphal forces are below the level of tensile strength exhibited by the plant cell wall. Because information regarding the frequency and distribution of CAZyme coding genes in Phytophthora is currently unknown, we have scanned the genomes of P. infestans, P. sojae, and P. ramorum for the presence of CAZyme-coding genes using a homology-based approach and compared the gene collinearity in the three genomes. In addition, we have tested the expression of several genes coding for CE in cultures grown in vitro. Results We have found that P. infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum contain a total of 435, 379, and 310 CAZy homologs; in each genome, most homologs belong to the GH superfamily. Most GH and PL homologs code for enzymes that hydrolyze substances present in the pectin layer forming the middle lamella of the plant cells. In addition, a significant number of CE homologs catalyzing the deacetylation of compounds characteristic of the plant cell cuticle were found. In general, a high degree of gene location conservation was observed, as indicated by the presence of sequential orthologous pairs in the three genomes. Such collinearity was frequently observed among members of the GH superfamily. On the other hand, the CE and PL superfamilies showed less collinearity for some of their putative members

  19. Occurrence of genes coding for MSCRAMM and biofilm-associated protein Bap in Staphylococcus spp. isolated from bovine subclinical mastitis and relationship with somatic cell counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuniga, Eveline; Melville, Priscilla A; Saidenberg, André B S; Laes, Marco A; Gonsales, Fernanda F; Salaberry, Sandra R S; Gregori, Fabio; Brandão, Paulo E; dos Santos, Franklin G B; Lincopan, Nilton E; Benites, Nilson R

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to elucidate aspects of the epidemiology of bovine subclinical mastitis through the assessment of genes encoding MSCRAMM (microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules - a group of adhesins) and protein Bap (implicated in biofilm formation), in coagulase-positive (CPS) and coagulase-negative (CNS) Staphylococcus isolated from subclinical mastitis. Milk samples were collected for microbiological exams, somatic cell count (SCC) and a survey of the genes coding for MSCRAMM (cna, eno, ebpS, fnbA, fnbB and fib) and biofilm-associated protein Bap (bap) in 106 Staphylococcus spp. isolates using PCR. The frequencies of occurrence of eno (82.1%), fnbA (72.6%), fib (71.7%) and bap (56.6%) were higher (P Staphylococcus without the assessed genes (P < 0.05) and negative samples (P < 0.01), which indicated that the presence of these MSCRAMM may be related to a higher intensity of the inflammatory process.

  20. Construction of the coding sequence of the transcription variant 2 of the human Renalase gene and its expression in the prokaryotic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedchenko, Valerii I; Kaloshin, Alexei A; Mezhevikina, Lyudmila M; Buneeva, Olga A; Medvedev, Alexei E

    2013-06-19

    Renalase is a recently discovered protein, involved in regulation of blood pressure in humans and animals. Although several splice variants of human renalase mRNA transcripts have been recognized, only one protein product, hRenalase1, has been found so far. In this study, we have used polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based amplification of individual exons of the renalase gene and their joining for construction of full-length hRenalase2 coding sequence followed by expression of hRenalase2 as a polyHis recombinant protein in Escherichia coli cells. To date this is the first report on synthesis and purification of hRenalase2. Applicability of this approach was verified by constructing hRenalase1 coding sequence, its sequencing and expression in E. coli cells. hRenalase1 was used for generation of polyclonal antiserum in sheep. Western blot analysis has shown that polyclonal anti-renalase1 antibodies effectively interact with the hRenalase2 protein. The latter suggests that some functions and expression patterns of hRenalase1 documented by antibody-based data may be attributed to the presence of hRenalase2. The realized approach may be also used for construction of coding sequences of various (especially weakly expressible) genes, their transcript variants, etc.

  1. Construction of the Coding Sequence of the Transcription Variant 2 of the Human Renalase Gene and Its Expression in the Prokaryotic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei E. Medvedev

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Renalase is a recently discovered protein, involved in regulation of blood pressure in humans and animals. Although several splice variants of human renalase mRNA transcripts have been recognized, only one protein product, hRenalase1, has been found so far. In this study, we have used polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based amplification of individual exons of the renalase gene and their joining for construction of full-length hRenalase2 coding sequence followed by expression of hRenalase2 as a polyHis recombinant protein in Escherichia coli cells. To date this is the first report on synthesis and purification of hRenalase2. Applicability of this approach was verified by constructing hRenalase1 coding sequence, its sequencing and expression in E. coli cells. hRenalase1 was used for generation of polyclonal antiserum in sheep. Western blot analysis has shown that polyclonal anti-renalase1 antibodies effectively interact with the hRenalase2 protein. The latter suggests that some functions and expression patterns of hRenalase1 documented by antibody-based data may be attributed to the presence of hRenalase2. The realized approach may be also used for construction of coding sequences of various (especially weakly expressible genes, their transcript variants, etc.

  2. Identification of a long non-coding RNA gene, growth hormone secretagogue receptor opposite strand, which stimulates cell migration in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Eliza J; Seim, Inge; Pauli, Jana P; O'Keeffe, Angela J; Thomas, Patrick B; Carter, Shea L; Walpole, Carina M; Fung, Jenny N T; Josh, Peter; Herington, Adrian C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2013-08-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in non‑small cell lung cancer tumourigenesis are largely unknown; however, recent studies have suggested that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are likely to play a role. In this study, we used public databases to identify an mRNA-like, candidate long non-coding RNA, GHSROS (GHSR opposite strand), transcribed from the antisense strand of the ghrelin receptor gene, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR). Quantitative real-time RT-PCR revealed higher expression of GHSROS in lung cancer tissue compared to adjacent, non-tumour lung tissue. In common with many long non-coding RNAs, GHSROS is 5' capped and 3' polyadenylated (mRNA-like), lacks an extensive open reading frame and harbours a transposable element. Engineered overexpression of GHSROS stimulated cell migration in the A549 and NCI-H1299 non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, but suppressed cell migration in the Beas-2B normal lung-derived bronchoepithelial cell line. This suggests that GHSROS function may be dependent on the oncogenic context. The identification of GHSROS, which is expressed in lung cancer and stimulates cell migration in lung cancer cell lines, contributes to the growing number of non-coding RNAs that play a role in the regulation of tumourigenesis and metastatic cancer progression.

  3. The complete mitochondrial genome of the land snail Cornu aspersum (Helicidae: Mollusca: intra-specific divergence of protein-coding genes and phylogenetic considerations within Euthyneura.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Diego Gaitán-Espitia

    Full Text Available The complete sequences of three mitochondrial genomes from the land snail Cornu aspersum were determined. The mitogenome has a length of 14050 bp, and it encodes 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and two ribosomal RNA genes. It also includes nine small intergene spacers, and a large AT-rich intergenic spacer. The intra-specific divergence analysis revealed that COX1 has the lower genetic differentiation, while the most divergent genes were NADH1, NADH3 and NADH4. With the exception of Euhadra herklotsi, the structural comparisons showed the same gene order within the family Helicidae, and nearly identical gene organization to that found in order Pulmonata. Phylogenetic reconstruction recovered Basommatophora as polyphyletic group, whereas Eupulmonata and Pulmonata as paraphyletic groups. Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood analyses showed that C. aspersum is a close relative of Cepaea nemoralis, and with the other Helicidae species form a sister group of Albinaria caerulea, supporting the monophyly of the Stylommatophora clade.

  4. Non-coding RNAs at the Gnas and Snrpn-Ube3a imprinted gene loci and their involvement in hereditary disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonius ePlagge

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs have long been recognized at imprinted gene loci and provided early paradigms, to investigate their functions and molecular mechanisms of action. The characteristic feature of imprinted genes, their monoallelic, parental-origin-dependent expression, is achieved through complex epigenetic regulation, which is modulated by ncRNAs. This minireview focuses on two imprinted gene clusters, in which changes in ncRNA expression contribute to human disorders. At the GNAS locus loss of NESP RNA can cause autosomal dominant Pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1b (AD-PHP-Ib, while at the SNRPN-UBE3A locus a long ncRNA and processed snoRNAs play a role in Angelman-Syndrome (AS and Prader-Willi-Syndrome (PWS. The ncRNAs silence overlapping protein-coding transcripts in sense or anti-sense orientation through changes in histone modifications as well as DNA methylation at CpG-rich sequence motifs. Their epigenetic modulatory functions are required in early development in the pre-implantation embryo or already in the parental germ cells. However, it remains unclear whether the sequence homology-carrying ncRNA itself is required, or whether the process of its transcription through other promoters causes the silencing effect.

  5. Characterization of an inducible expression system in Aspergillus nidulans using alcA and tubulin-coding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, R B; May, G S; Morris, N R

    1989-06-30

    Plasmids have been constructed in which expression of a gene can be placed under the control of the inducible promoter of the alcA gene encoding alcohol dehydrogenase I in Aspergillus nidulans. Simplified shuttle vectors carrying pyr4 which complements pyrG89 mutations have also been constructed. These are based on pUC19 and retain alpha-peptide expression. The beta-tubulin genes, tubC and benA, have been placed under the control of alcA and their expression studied. Levels of expression can be assayed phenotypically because increased synthesis of beta-tubulin inhibits vegetative growth. Sensitivity of asexual spore formation to the anti-microtubule drug benomyl provides a means of detecting very low levels of expression of the chimeric genes. Glucose almost completely represses the chimeric genes. Induction is rapid and is maximal within an hour. When a strain carrying seven copies of an alcA::tubC gene fusion was grown under inducing conditions, 6.5% of total sulfate labelled protein consisted of tubC product. Cyclopentanone was the most potent inducer of the chimeric genes on solid media but it also partially inhibited growth. Chimeric alcA::tubC and alcA::benA genes were expressed to very similar levels despite the fact that tubC utilizes many rare codons.

  6. Translational regulation of gene expression by an anaerobically induced small non-coding RNA in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Anders; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Kallipolitis, Birgitte H.

    2010-01-01

    . Furthermore, in previous work most of the potential target genes have been shown to be repressed by FNR through an undetermined mechanism. Collectively, our results provide insight into the mechanism by which FNR negatively regulates genes such as sodA, sodB, cydDC, and metE, thereby demonstrating...

  7. Identification of kakusei, a Nuclear Non-Coding RNA, as an Immediate Early Gene from the Honeybee, and Its Application for Neuroethological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taketoshi Kiya

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The honeybee is a social insect that exhibits various social behaviors. To elucidate the neural basis of honeybee behavior, we detected neural activity in freely-moving honeybee workers using an immediate early gene (IEG that is expressed in a neural activity-dependent manner. In European honeybees (Apis mellifera, we identified a novel nuclear non-coding RNA, termed kakusei, as the first insect IEG, and revealed the neural activity pattern in foragers. In addition, we isolated a homologue of kakusei, termed Acks, from the Japanese honeybee (Apis cerana, and detected active neurons in workers fighting with the giant hornet.

  8. Identification of kakusei, a nuclear non-coding RNA, as an immediate early gene from the honeybee, and its application for neuroethological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiya, Taketoshi; Ugajin, Atsushi; Kunieda, Takekazu; Kubo, Takeo

    2012-11-22

    The honeybee is a social insect that exhibits various social behaviors. To elucidate the neural basis of honeybee behavior, we detected neural activity in freely-moving honeybee workers using an immediate early gene (IEG) that is expressed in a neural activity-dependent manner. In European honeybees (Apis mellifera), we identified a novel nuclear non-coding RNA, termed kakusei, as the first insect IEG, and revealed the neural activity pattern in foragers. In addition, we isolated a homologue of kakusei, termed Acks, from the Japanese honeybee (Apis cerana), and detected active neurons in workers fighting with the giant hornet.

  9. Integron-associated mobile gene cassettes code for folded proteins: the structure of Bal32a, a new member of the adaptable alpha+beta barrel family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Andrew; Wu, Peter S-C; Harrop, Stephen J; Schaeffer, Patrick M; Dosztányi, Zsuzsanna; Gillings, Michael R; Holmes, Andrew J; Nevalainen, K M Helena; Stokes, H W; Otting, Gottfried; Dixon, Nicholas E; Curmi, Paul M G; Mabbutt, Bridget C

    2005-03-11

    The wide-ranging physiology and large genetic variability observed for prokaryotes is largely attributed, not to the prokaryotic genome itself, but rather to mechanisms of lateral gene transfer. Cassette PCR has been used to sample the integron/gene cassette metagenome from different natural environments without laboratory cultivation of the host organism, and without prior knowledge of any target protein sequence. Since over 90% of cassette genes are unrelated to any sequence in the current databases, it is not clear whether these genes code for folded functional proteins. We have selected a sample of eight cassette-encoded genes with no known homologs; five have been isolated as soluble protein products and shown by biophysical techniques to be folded. In solution, at least three of these proteins organise as stable oligomeric assemblies. The tertiary structure of one of these, Bal32a derived from a contaminated soil site, has been solved by X-ray crystallography to 1.8 A resolution. From the three-dimensional structure, Bal32a is found to be a member of the highly adaptable alpha+beta barrel family of transport proteins and enzymes. In Bal32a, the barrel cavity is unusually deep and inaccessible to solvent. Polar side-chains in its interior are reminiscent of catalytic sites of limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolase and nogalonic acid methyl ester cyclase. These studies demonstrate the viability of direct sampling of mobile DNA as a route for the discovery of novel proteins.

  10. Nucleotide sequence of the capsid protein gene and 3' non-coding region of papaya mosaic virus RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouhaidar, M G

    1988-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of cDNA clones corresponding to the 3' OH end of papaya mosaic virus RNA have been determined. The 3'-terminal sequence obtained was 900 nucleotides in length, excluding the poly(A) tail, and contained an open reading frame capable of giving rise to a protein of 214 amino acid residues with an Mr of 22930. This protein was identified as the viral capsid protein. The 3' non-coding region of PMV genome RNA was about 121 nucleotides long [excluding the poly(A) tail] and homologous to the complementary sequence of the non-coding region at the 5' end of PMV RNA. A long open reading frame was also found in the predicted 5' end region of the negative strand.

  11. mraW, an essential gene at the dcw cluster of Escherichia coli codes for a cytoplasmic protein with methyltransferase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrión, M; Gómez, M J; Merchante-Schubert, R; Dongarrá, S; Ayala, J A

    1999-01-01

    Three new open reading frames, mraZ, mraW and mraR (also called ftsL), were revealed by DNA sequencing immediately upstream of gene pbpB in the dcw cluster of Escherichia coli. We have found that mraW and mraZ are active genes, coding for two proteins with relative molecular masses of 34 800 and 17 300, respectively. MraW is a cytoplasmic protein that under overproduction condition is also loosely bound to the membrane. Soluble MraW was purified up to 90% by a single high performance electrophoresis (HPEC) step from an extract of an overproducing strain. The protein exhibits a S-adenosyl-dependent methyltransferase activity on membrane-located substrates.

  12. Expression of lymphocyte coding genes in peripheral blood and lymphocyte infiltration in cardiac tissues influenced by cyclosporin A in heterotopic heart transplantation model in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiu-fang; Xin, Yi; Zhang, Ying; Huang, Yi-min; Li, Wen-bin; Li, Na; Lin, Zheng; Zhou, Yu-jie; Zhang, Zhao-guang

    2013-12-01

    To systematically compare the expression of coding genes with pathological changes of transplanted cardiac tissue and peripheral blood lymphocytes in an allo-heterotopic rat cardiac transplant model. Using SD rats as donors and Wistar rats as recipients, animals were divided into two groups, control and cyclosporine A intervention plus heart transplant groups. After transplant at 1, 3, 7, 10 and 12d, we assessed the ability of lymphocytes to infiltrate into cardiac tissues and levels of leukocyte coding genes in peripheral blood. Histopathological changes were monitored in cardiac tissue to determine the level of transplant rejection. (1) 24h after transplant peripheral blood lymphocytes' transcription and expression were temporarily reduced. (2) CD4(+) and CD8(+) lymphocytes infiltrate into cardiac tissue and Grade 1R pathological changes were observed 3d-7d after heart transplant. (3)Cyclosporine A was not able to completely block heart transplant rejection.(4) Although cyclosporine A was not able to effectively suppress CD4(+) T cell gene expression, it did suppress CD8(+) T cell gene transcription. (5) Cyclosporine A did not effectively reduce the rapid infiltration of CD4(+) or CD8(+) infiltration in 3d, but significantly reduced the degree of CD4(+) T cell infiltration in cardiac tissues between 3 and 7d. (6) Differential display (DD-PCR): Graft control group: there were differences in 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate, ribosomal protein S25, 12S ribosomal, gig18, MHC-III and ATPase H(+), which occurred 24h before CD4/CD8 surface protein expression. Cyclosporine A group: there were differences in thrombospondin-1, TCR, 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate, sodium channel beta-1, gig18 and TCR. In the cyclosporine A group 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate positive expression was observed 24h after the control group, which indicates that cyclosporine A slowed down the 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate transcription rate in peripheral lymphocytes and delayed its expression time. Cyclosporine A also

  13. Molecular Characterization of the Tumor Suppressor Candidate 5 Gene: Regulation by PPARγ and Identification of TUSC5 Coding Variants in Lean and Obese Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trina A. Knotts

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor suppressor candidate 5 (TUSC5 is a gene expressed abundantly in white adipose tissue (WAT, brown adipose tissue (BAT, and peripheral afferent neurons. Strong adipocyte expression and increased expression following peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ agonist treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes suggested a role for Tusc5 in fat cell proliferation and/or metabolism. However, the regulation of Tusc5 in WAT and its potential association with obesity phenotypes remain unclear. We tested the hypothesis that the TUSC5 gene is a bona fide PPARγ target and evaluated whether its WAT expression or single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the TUSC5 coding region are associated with human obesity. Induction of Tusc5 mRNA levels in 3T3-L1 adipocytes by troglitazone and GW1929 followed a dose-response consistent with these agents' binding affinities for PPARγ. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP experiments confirmed that PPARγ protein binds a ∼−1.1 kb promotor sequence of murine TUSC5 transiently during 3T3-L1 adipogenesis, concurrent with histone H3 acetylation. No change in Tusc5 mRNA or protein levels was evident in type 2 diabetic patients treated with pioglitazone. Tusc5 expression was not induced appreciably in liver preparations overexpressing PPARs, suggesting that tissue-specific factors regulate PPARγ responsiveness of the TUSC5 gene. Finally, we observed no differences in Tusc5 WAT expression or prevalence of coding region SNPs in lean versus obese human subjects. These studies firmly establish the murine TUSC5 gene locus as a PPARγ target, but the significance of Tusc5 in obesity phenotypes or in the pharmacologic actions of PPARγ agonists in humans remains equivocal.

  14. Cloning of a yeast gene coding for the glutamate synthase small subunit (GUS2) by complementation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli glutamate auxotrophs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, A; Membrillo-Hernández, J; Olivera, H; Aranda, C; Macino, G; Ballario, P

    1992-02-01

    A Saccharomyces cerevisiae glutamate auxotroph, lacking NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT) activities, was complemented with a yeast genomic library. Clones were obtained which still lacked NADP-GDH but showed GOGAT activity. Northern analysis revealed that the DNA fragment present in the complementing plasmids coded for a 1.5kb mRNA. Since the only GOGAT enzyme so far purified from S. cerevisiae is made up of a small and a large subunit, the size of the mRNA suggested that the cloned DNA fragment could code for the GOGAT small subunit. Plasmids were purified and used to transform Escherichia coli glutamate auxotrophs. Transformants were only recovered when the recipient strain was an E. coli GDH-less mutant lacking the small GOGAT subunit. These data show that we have cloned the structural gene coding for the yeast small subunit (GUS2). Evidence is also presented indicating that the GOGAT enzyme which is synthesized in the E. coli transformants is a hybrid comprising the large E. coli subunit and the small S. cerevisiae subunit.

  15. Synthesis of bacteriophage-coded gene products during infection of Escherichia coli with amber mutants of T3 and T7 defective in gene 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issinger, O G; Hausmann, R

    1973-01-01

    During nonpermissive infection by a T7 amber mutant in gene 1 (phage RNA polymerase-deficient), synthesis of the products of the phage genes 3 (endonuclease), 3, 5 (lysozyme), 5 (DNA polymerase), and 17 (serum blocking power) was shown to occur at about half the rate as during wild-type infection...

  16. Cell-surface area codes: mobile-element related gene switches generate precise and heritable cell-surface displays of address molecules that are used for constructing embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, W J; Roman-Dreyer, J

    1999-01-01

    We present an updated area code hypothesis supporting the proposal that cell surface display of seven-transmembrane olfactory receptors, protocadherins and other cell surface receptors provide codes that enable cells to find their correct partners as they sculpture embryos. The genetic mechanisms that program the expression of such displays have been largely unknown until very recently. However, increasing evidence now suggests that precise developmental control of the expression of these genes during embryogenesis is achieved in part by permanent and heritable changes in DNA. Using the developing immune system as a model, we discuss two different types of developmentally programmed genetic switches, each of which relies on recombination mechanisms related to mobile elements. We review new evidence suggesting the involvement of mobile element related switch mechanisms in the generation of protocadherin molecules, and their possible involvement in the control of expressions of olfactory receptors. As both recombinase and reverse transcriptase mechanisms play a role in the switching of the immunoglobulin genes, we searched the databases of expressed sequence tags (dbEST) for expression of related genes in other tissues. We present data revealing that transposases and reverse transcriptases are widely expressed in most tissues. We also searched these databases for expression of env (envelope) gene products, stimulated by provocative results suggesting that these molecules might function as cellular address receptors. We found that env genes are also expressed in large numbers in normal human tissues. One must assume that these three different types of mobile-element-related messenger RNA molecules (transposases, reverse transcriptases, and env proteins) are expressed for use in functions of value in the various tissues and have been preserved in the genome because of their selective advantages. We conclude that it is possible that many specific cell lineage decisions

  17. Investigating the role of rare coding variability in Mendelian dementia genes (APP, PSEN1, PSEN2, GRN, MAPT, and PRNP) in late-onset Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Celeste; Guerreiro, Rita; Gibbs, Raphael; Ding, Jinhui; Lupton, Michelle K.; Troakes, Claire; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Niblock, Michael; Gallo, Jean-Marc; Adnan, Jihad; Killick, Richard; Brown, Kristelle S.; Medway, Christopher; Lord, Jenny; Turton, James; Bras, Jose; Morgan, Kevin; Powell, John F.; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John

    2014-01-01

    The overlapping clinical and neuropathologic features between late-onset apparently sporadic Alzheimer's disease (LOAD), familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD), and other neurodegenerative dementias (frontotemporal dementia, corticobasal degeneration, progressive supranuclear palsy, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease) raise the question of whether shared genetic risk factors may explain the similar phenotype among these disparate disorders. To investigate this intriguing hypothesis, we analyzed rare coding variability in 6 Mendelian dementia genes (APP, PSEN1, PSEN2, GRN, MAPT, and PRNP), in 141 LOAD patients and 179 elderly controls, neuropathologically proven, from the UK. In our cohort, 14 LOAD cases (10%) and 11 controls (6%) carry at least 1 rare variant in the genes studied. We report a novel variant in PSEN1 (p.I168T) and a rare variant in PSEN2 (p.A237V), absent in controls and both likely pathogenic. Our findings support previous studies, suggesting that (1) rare coding variability in PSEN1 and PSEN2 may influence the susceptibility for LOAD and (2) GRN, MAPT, and PRNP are not major contributors to LOAD. Thus, genetic screening is pivotal for the clinical differential diagnosis of these neurodegenerative dementias. PMID:25104557

  18. Variation in seed fatty acid composition and sequence divergence in the FAD2 gene coding region between wild and cultivated sesame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenbang; Tonnis, Brandon; Morris, Brad; Wang, Richard B; Zhang, Amy L; Pinnow, David; Wang, Ming Li

    2014-12-03

    Sesame germplasm harbors genetic diversity which can be useful for sesame improvement in breeding programs. Seven accessions with different levels of oleic acid were selected from the entire USDA sesame germplasm collection (1232 accessions) and planted for morphological observation and re-examination of fatty acid composition. The coding region of the FAD2 gene for fatty acid desaturase (FAD) in these accessions was also sequenced. Cultivated sesame accessions flowered and matured earlier than the wild species. The cultivated sesame seeds contained a significantly higher percentage of oleic acid (40.4%) than the seeds of the wild species (26.1%). Nucleotide polymorphisms were identified in the FAD2 gene coding region between wild and cultivated species. Some nucleotide polymorphisms led to amino acid changes, one of which was located in the enzyme active site and may contribute to the altered fatty acid composition. Based on the morphology observation, chemical analysis, and sequence analysis, it was determined that two accessions were misnamed and need to be reclassified. The results obtained from this study are useful for sesame improvement in molecular breeding programs.

  19. Discovery and characterization of the first non-coding RNA that regulates gene expression,micF RNA:A historical perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nicholas; Delihas

    2015-01-01

    The first evidence that RNA can function as a regulator of gene expression came from experiments with prokaryotes in the 1980 s. It was shown that Escherichia coli micF isan independent gene,has its own promoter,and encodes a small non-coding RNA that base pairs with and inhibits translation of a target messenger RNA in response to environmental stress conditions. The mic F RNA was isolated,sequenced and shown to be a primary transcript. In vitro experiments showed binding to the target ompF mR NA. Secondary structure probing revealed an imperfect micF RNA/ompF RNA duplex interaction and the presence of a non-canonical base pair. Several transcription factors,including OmpR,regulate micF transcription in response to environmental factors. micF has also been found in other bacterial species,however,recently Gerhart Wagner and J?rg Vogel showed pleiotropic effects and found micF inhibits expression of multiple target mR NAs; importantly,one is the global regulatory gene lrp. In addition,micF RNA was found to interact with its targets in different ways; it either inhibits ribosome binding or induces degradation of the message. Thus the concept and initial experimental evidence that RNA can regulate gene expression was born with prokaryotes.

  20. The water-borne protein signals (pheromones) of the Antarctic ciliated protozoan Euplotes nobilii: structure of the gene coding for the En-6 pheromone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Terza, Antonietta; Dobri, Nicoleta; Alimenti, Claudio; Vallesi, Adriana; Luporini, Pierangelo

    2009-01-01

    The marine Antarctic ciliate, Euplotes nobilii, secretes a family of water-borne signal proteins, denoted as pheromones, which control vegetative proliferation and mating in the cell. Based on the knowledge of the amino acid sequences of a set of these pheromones isolated from the culture supernatant of wild-type strains, we designed probes to identify their encoding genes in the cell somatic nucleus (macronucleus). The full-length gene of the pheromone En-6 was determined and found to contain an open-reading frame specific for the synthesis of the En-6 cytoplasmic precursor (pre-pro-En-6), which requires 2 proteolytic cleavages to remove the signal peptide (pre) and the prosegment before secretion of the mature protein. In contrast to the sequence variability that distinguishes the secreted pheromones, the pre- and pro-sequences appear to be tightly conserved and useful for the construction of probes to clone every other E. nobilii pheromone gene. Potential intron sequences in the coding region of the En-6 gene imply the synthesis of more En-6 isoforms.

  1. Hybridization Capture-Based Next-Generation Sequencing to Evaluate Coding Sequence and Deep Intronic Mutations in the NF1 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Karin Soares; Oliveira, Nathalia Silva; Fausto, Anna Karoline; de Souza, Carolina Cruz; Gros, Audrey; Bandres, Thomas; Idrissi, Yamina; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; de Moura Neto, Rodrigo Soares; Silva, Rosane; Geller, Mauro; Cappellen, David

    2016-12-17

    Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) is one of the most common genetic disorders and is caused by mutations in the NF1 gene. NF1 gene mutational analysis presents a considerable challenge because of its large size, existence of highly homologous pseudogenes located throughout the human genome, absence of mutational hotspots, and diversity of mutations types, including deep intronic splicing mutations. We aimed to evaluate the use of hybridization capture-based next-generation sequencing to screen coding and noncoding NF1 regions. Hybridization capture-based next-generation sequencing, with genomic DNA as starting material, was used to sequence the whole NF1 gene (exons and introns) from 11 unrelated individuals and 1 relative, who all had NF1. All of them met the NF1 clinical diagnostic criteria. We showed a mutation detection rate of 91% (10 out of 11). We identified eight recurrent and two novel mutations, which were all confirmed by Sanger methodology. In the Sanger sequencing confirmation, we also included another three relatives with NF1. Splicing alterations accounted for 50% of the mutations. One of them was caused by a deep intronic mutation (c.1260 + 1604A > G). Frameshift truncation and missense mutations corresponded to 30% and 20% of the pathogenic variants, respectively. In conclusion, we show the use of a simple and fast approach to screen, at once, the entire NF1 gene (exons and introns) for different types of pathogenic variations, including the deep intronic splicing mutations.

  2. Hybridization Capture-Based Next-Generation Sequencing to Evaluate Coding Sequence and Deep Intronic Mutations in the NF1 Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Karin Soares; Oliveira, Nathalia Silva; Fausto, Anna Karoline; de Souza, Carolina Cruz; Gros, Audrey; Bandres, Thomas; Idrissi, Yamina; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; de Moura Neto, Rodrigo Soares; Silva, Rosane; Geller, Mauro; Cappellen, David

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) is one of the most common genetic disorders and is caused by mutations in the NF1 gene. NF1 gene mutational analysis presents a considerable challenge because of its large size, existence of highly homologous pseudogenes located throughout the human genome, absence of mutational hotspots, and diversity of mutations types, including deep intronic splicing mutations. We aimed to evaluate the use of hybridization capture-based next-generation sequencing to screen coding and noncoding NF1 regions. Hybridization capture-based next-generation sequencing, with genomic DNA as starting material, was used to sequence the whole NF1 gene (exons and introns) from 11 unrelated individuals and 1 relative, who all had NF1. All of them met the NF1 clinical diagnostic criteria. We showed a mutation detection rate of 91% (10 out of 11). We identified eight recurrent and two novel mutations, which were all confirmed by Sanger methodology. In the Sanger sequencing confirmation, we also included another three relatives with NF1. Splicing alterations accounted for 50% of the mutations. One of them was caused by a deep intronic mutation (c.1260 + 1604A > G). Frameshift truncation and missense mutations corresponded to 30% and 20% of the pathogenic variants, respectively. In conclusion, we show the use of a simple and fast approach to screen, at once, the entire NF1 gene (exons and introns) for different types of pathogenic variations, including the deep intronic splicing mutations. PMID:27999334

  3. Hybridization Capture-Based Next-Generation Sequencing to Evaluate Coding Sequence and Deep Intronic Mutations in the NF1 Gene

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    Karin Soares Cunha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1 is one of the most common genetic disorders and is caused by mutations in the NF1 gene. NF1 gene mutational analysis presents a considerable challenge because of its large size, existence of highly homologous pseudogenes located throughout the human genome, absence of mutational hotspots, and diversity of mutations types, including deep intronic splicing mutations. We aimed to evaluate the use of hybridization capture-based next-generation sequencing to screen coding and noncoding NF1 regions. Hybridization capture-based next-generation sequencing, with genomic DNA as starting material, was used to sequence the whole NF1 gene (exons and introns from 11 unrelated individuals and 1 relative, who all had NF1. All of them met the NF1 clinical diagnostic criteria. We showed a mutation detection rate of 91% (10 out of 11. We identified eight recurrent and two novel mutations, which were all confirmed by Sanger methodology. In the Sanger sequencing confirmation, we also included another three relatives with NF1. Splicing alterations accounted for 50% of the mutations. One of them was caused by a deep intronic mutation (c.1260 + 1604A > G. Frameshift truncation and missense mutations corresponded to 30% and 20% of the pathogenic variants, respectively. In conclusion, we show the use of a simple and fast approach to screen, at once, the entire NF1 gene (exons and introns for different types of pathogenic variations, including the deep intronic splicing mutations.

  4. Influenza virus PB1 and neuraminidase gene segments can cosegregate during vaccine reassortment driven by interactions in the PB1 coding region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbin, Joanna C A; Ong, Chi; Verity, Erin; Gilbertson, Brad P; Rockman, Steven P; Brown, Lorena E

    2014-08-01

    Egg-grown influenza vaccine yields are maximized by infection with a seed virus produced by "classical reassortment" of a seasonal isolate with a highly egg-adapted strain. Seed viruses are selected based on a high-growth phenotype and the presence of the seasonal hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) surface antigens. Retrospective analysis of H3N2 vaccine seed viruses indicated that, unlike other internal proteins that were predominantly derived from the high-growth parent A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8), the polymerase subunit PB1 could be derived from either parent depending on the seasonal strain. We have recently shown that A/Udorn/307/72 (Udorn) models a seasonal isolate that yields reassortants bearing the seasonal PB1 gene. This is despite the fact that the reverse genetics-derived virus that includes Udorn PB1 with Udorn HA and NA on a PR8 background has inferior growth compared to the corresponding virus with PR8 PB1. Here we use competitive plasmid transfections to investigate the mechanisms driving selection of a less fit virus and show that the Udorn PB1 gene segment cosegregates with the Udorn NA gene segment. Analysis of chimeric PB1 genes revealed that the coselection of NA and PB1 segments was not directed through the previously identified packaging sequences but through interactions involving the internal coding region of the PB1 gene. This study identifies associations between viral genes that can direct selection in classical reassortment for vaccine production and which may also be of relevance to the gene constellations observed in past antigenic shift events where creation of a pandemic virus has involved reassortment. Influenza vaccine must be produced and administered in a timely manner in order to provide protection during the winter season, and poor-growing vaccine seed viruses can compromise this process. To maximize vaccine yields, manufacturers create hybrid influenza viruses with gene segments encoding the surface antigens from a

  5. Anderson's disease/chylomicron retention disease in a Japanese patient with uniparental disomy 7 and a normal SAR1B gene protein coding sequence

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    Okada Tomoo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anderson's Disease (AD/Chylomicron Retention Disease (CMRD is a rare hereditary hypocholesterolemic disorder characterized by a malabsorption syndrome with steatorrhea, failure to thrive and the absence of chylomicrons and apolipoprotein B48 post-prandially. All patients studied to date exhibit a mutation in the SAR1B gene, which codes for an essential component of the vesicular coat protein complex II (COPII necessary for endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi transport. We describe here a patient with AD/CMRD, a normal SAR1B gene protein coding sequence and maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 7 (matUPD7. Methods and Results The patient, one of two siblings of a Japanese family, had diarrhea and steatorrhea beginning at five months of age. There was a white duodenal mucosa upon endoscopy. Light and electron microscopy showed that the intestinal villi were normal but that they had lipid laden enterocytes containing accumulations of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm and lipoprotein-size particles in membrane bound structures. Although there were decreased amounts in plasma of total- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoproteins AI and B and vitamin E levels, the triglycerides were normal, typical of AD/CMRD. The presence of low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein B in the plasma, although in decreased amounts, ruled out abetalipoproteinemia. The parents were asymptomatic with normal plasma cholesterol levels suggesting a recessive disorder and ruling out familial hypobetalipoproteinemia. Sequencing of genomic DNA showed that the 8 exons of the SAR1B gene were normal. Whole genome SNP analysis and karyotyping revealed matUPD7 with a normal karyotype. In contrast to other cases of AD/CMRD which have shown catch-up growth following vitamin supplementation and a fat restricted diet, our patient exhibits continued growth delay and other aspects of the matUPD7 and Silver-Russell Syndrome phenotypes. Conclusions This

  6. Identification of genes coding for B cell antigens of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides Small Colony (MmmSC by using phage display

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    Vilei Edy M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP is a mycoplasmal disease caused by Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC (MmmSC. Since the disease is a serious problem that can affect cattle production in parts of Africa, there is a need for an effective and economical vaccine. Identifying which of the causative agent's proteins trigger potentially protective immune responses is an important step towards developing a subunit vaccine. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to determine whether phage display combined with bioinformatics could be used to narrow the search for genes that code for potentially immunogenic proteins of MmmSC. Since the production of IgG2 and IgA are associated with a Th1 cellular immune response which is implicated in protection against CBPP, antigens which elicit these immunoglobulin subclasses may be useful in developing a subunit vaccine. Results A filamentous phage library displaying a repertoire of peptides expressed by fragments of the genome of MmmSC was constructed. It was subjected to selection using antibodies from naturally- and experimentally-infected cattle. Mycoplasmal genes were identified by matching the nucleotide sequences of DNA from immunoselected phage particles with the mycoplasmal genome. This allowed a catalogue of genes coding for the proteins that elicited an immune response to be compiled. Using this method together with computer algorithms designed to score parameters that influence surface accessibility and hence potential antigenicity, five genes (abc, gapN, glpO, lppB and ptsG were chosen to be expressed in Escherichia coli. After appropriate site-directed mutagenesis, polypeptides representing portions of each of these proteins were tested for immunoreactivity. Of these five, polypeptides representing expression products of abc and lppB were recognised on immunoblots by sera obtained from cattle during a natural outbreak of the disease. Conclusion Since phage display

  7. RNA-sequencing reveals previously unannotated protein- and microRNA-coding genes expressed in aleurone cells of rice seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kenneth A; Ringler, Patricia; Gu, Lingkun; Shen, Qingxi J

    2014-01-01

    The rice genome annotation has been greatly improved in recent years, largely due to the availability of full length cDNA sequences derived from many tissues. Among those yet to be studied is the aleurone layer, which produces hydrolases for mobilization of seed storage reserves during seed germination and post germination growth. Herein, we report transcriptomes of aleurone cells treated with the hormones abscisic acid, gibberellic acid, or both. Using a comprehensive approach, we identified hundreds of novel genes. To minimize the number of false positives, only transcripts that did not overlap with existing annotations, had a high level of expression, and showed a high level of uniqueness within the rice genome were considered to be novel genes. This approach led to the identification of 553 novel genes that encode proteins and/or microRNAs. The transcriptome data reported here will help to further improve the annotation of the rice genome.

  8. The walnut (Juglans regia) genome sequence reveals diversity in genes coding for the biosynthesis of non-structural polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, Pedro J; Crepeau, Marc W; Puiu, Daniela; Gonzalez-Ibeas, Daniel; Whalen, Jeanne; Stevens, Kristian A; Paul, Robin; Butterfield, Timothy S; Britton, Monica T; Reagan, Russell L; Chakraborty, Sandeep; Walawage, Sriema L; Vasquez-Gross, Hans A; Cardeno, Charis; Famula, Randi A; Pratt, Kevin; Kuruganti, Sowmya; Aradhya, Mallikarjuna K; Leslie, Charles A; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Salzberg, Steven L; Wegrzyn, Jill L; Langley, Charles H; Neale, David B

    2016-09-01

    The Persian walnut (Juglans regia L.), a diploid species native to the mountainous regions of Central Asia, is the major walnut species cultivated for nut production and is one of the most widespread tree nut species in the world. The high nutritional value of J. regia nuts is associated with a rich array of polyphenolic compounds, whose complete biosynthetic pathways are still unknown. A J. regia genome sequence was obtained from the cultivar 'Chandler' to discover target genes and additional unknown genes. The 667-Mbp genome was assembled using two different methods (SOAPdenovo2 and MaSuRCA), with an N50 scaffold size of 464 955 bp (based on a genome size of 606 Mbp), 221 640 contigs and a GC content of 37%. Annotation with MAKER-P and other genomic resources yielded 32 498 gene models. Previous studies in walnut relying on tissue-specific methods have only identified a single polyphenol oxidase (PPO) gene (JrPPO1). Enabled by the J. regia genome sequence, a second homolog of PPO (JrPPO2) was discovered. In addition, about 130 genes in the large gallate 1-β-glucosyltransferase (GGT) superfamily were detected. Specifically, two genes, JrGGT1 and JrGGT2, were significantly homologous to the GGT from Quercus robur (QrGGT), which is involved in the synthesis of 1-O-galloyl-β-d-glucose, a precursor for the synthesis of hydrolysable tannins. The reference genome for J. regia provides meaningful insight into the complex pathways required for the synthesis of polyphenols. The walnut genome sequence provides important tools and methods to accelerate breeding and to facilitate the genetic dissection of complex traits.

  9. Coding Partitions

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    Fabio Burderi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the study of decipherability conditions for codes weaker than Unique Decipherability (UD, we introduce the notion of coding partition. Such a notion generalizes that of UD code and, for codes that are not UD, allows to recover the ``unique decipherability" at the level of the classes of the partition. By tacking into account the natural order between the partitions, we define the characteristic partition of a code X as the finest coding partition of X. This leads to introduce the canonical decomposition of a code in at most one unambiguouscomponent and other (if any totally ambiguouscomponents. In the case the code is finite, we give an algorithm for computing its canonical partition. This, in particular, allows to decide whether a given partition of a finite code X is a coding partition. This last problem is then approached in the case the code is a rational set. We prove its decidability under the hypothesis that the partition contains a finite number of classes and each class is a rational set. Moreover we conjecture that the canonical partition satisfies such a hypothesis. Finally we consider also some relationships between coding partitions and varieties of codes.

  10. A non-synonymous coding variant (L616F in the TLR5 gene is potentially associated with Crohn's disease and influences responses to bacterial flagellin.

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    Jared Sheridan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Although numerous studies have implicated TLR5, or its ligands, bacterial flagellins, in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD, genome-wide association studies (GWAS have not reported associations with the TLR5 gene. We aimed to examine potential CD-associated TLR5 variants and assess whether they modified inflammatory responses to bacterial flagellins. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL RESULTS: A two-stage study was carried out. In stage 1, we genotyped tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (tag-SNPs in the TLR5 gene in a sample of CD cases (<20 years of age, N = 566 and controls (N = 536. Single SNP and haplotype analysis was carried out. In Stage 2, we assessed the functional significance of potential CD-associated variant(s vis-à-vis effects on the inflammatory response to bacterial flagellin using HEK293T cells. We observed marginal association between a non-synonymous coding SNP rs5744174 (p = 0.05 and CD. Associations between SNP rs851139 that is in high linkage disequilibrium (LD with SNP rs5744174 were also suggested (p = 0.07. Haplotype analysis revealed that a 3 marker haplotype was significantly associated with CD (p = 0.01. Functional studies showed that the risk allele (616F (corresponding to the C allele of SNP rs5744174 conferred significantly greater production of CCL20 in response to a range of flagellin doses than the comparator allele (616L. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that a non-synonymous coding variation in the TLR5 gene may confer modest susceptibility for CD.

  11. Sequence analysis and identification of new variations in the coding sequence of melatonin receptor gene (MTNR1A of Indian Chokla sheep breed

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    Vijay Kumar Saxena

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin receptor 1A gene is the prime receptor mediating the effect of melatonin at the neuroendocrine level for control of seasonal reproduction in sheep. The aims of this study were to examine the polymorphism pattern of coding sequence of MTNR1A gene in Chokla sheep, a breed of Indian arid tract and to identify new variations in relation to its aseasonal status. Genomic DNAs of 101 Chokla sheep were collected and an 824 bp coding sequence of Exon II was amplified. RFLP was performed with enzyme RsaI and MnlI to assess the presence of polymorphism at position C606T and G612A, respectively. Genotyping revealed significantly higher frequency of M and R alleles than m and r alleles. RR and MM were found to be dominantly present in the group of studied population. Cloning and sequencing of Exon II followed by mutation/polymorphism analysis revealed ten mutations of which three were non-synonymous mutations (G706A, C893A, G931C. G706A leads to substitution of valine by isoleucine Val125I (U14109 in the fifth transmembrane domain. C893A leads to substitution of alanine by aspartic acid in the third extracellular loop. G931C mutation brings about substitution of amino acid alanine by proline in the seventh transmembrane helix, can affect the conformational stability of the molecule. Polyphen-2 analysis revealed that the polymorphism at position 931 is potentially damaging while the mutations at positions 706 and 893 were benign. It is concluded that G931C mutation of MTNR 1A gene, may explain, in part, the importance of melatonin structure integrity in influencing seasonality in sheep.

  12. The dnaN gene codes for the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme of escherichia coli.

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    Burgers, P M; Kornberg, A; Sakakibara, Y

    1981-09-01

    An Escherichia coli mutant, dnaN59, stops DNA synthesis promptly upon a shift to a high temperature; the wild-type dnaN gene carried in a transducing phage encodes a polypeptide of about 41,000 daltons [Sakakibara, Y. & Mizukami, T. (1980) Mol. Gen. Genet. 178, 541-553; Yuasa, S. & Sakakibara, Y. (1980) Mol. Gen. Genet. 180, 267-273]. We now find that the product of dnaN gene is the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme, the principal DNA synthetic multipolypeptide complex in E. coli. The conclusion is based on the following observations: (i) Extracts from dnaN59 cells were defective in phage phi X174 and G4 DNA synthesis after the mutant cells had been exposed to the increased temperature. (ii) The enzymatic defect was overcome by addition of purified beta subunit but not by other subunits of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme or by other replication proteins required for phi X174 DNA synthesis. (iii) Partially purified beta subunit from the dnaN mutant, unlike that from the wild type, was inactive in reconstituting the holoenzyme when mixed with the other purified subunits. (iv) Increased dosage of the dnaN gene provided by a plasmid carrying the gene raised cellular levels of the beta subunit 5- to 6-fold.

  13. A "White" Anthocyanin-less Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) Caused by an Insertion in the Coding Region of the Leucoanthocyanidin Dioxygenase (LDOX; ANS) Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Simhon, Zohar; Judeinstein, Sylvie; Trainin, Taly; Harel-Beja, Rotem; Bar-Ya'akov, Irit; Borochov-Neori, Hamutal; Holland, Doron

    2015-01-01

    Color is an important determinant of pomegranate fruit quality and commercial value. To understand the genetic factors controlling color in pomegranate, chemical, molecular and genetic characterization of a "white" pomegranate was performed. This unique accession is lacking the typical pomegranate color rendered by anthocyanins in all tissues of the plant, including flowers, fruit (skin and arils) and leaves. Steady-state gene-expression analysis indicated that none of the analyzed "white" pomegranate tissues are able to synthesize mRNA corresponding to the PgLDOX gene (leucoanthocyanidin dioxygenase, also called ANS, anthocyanidin synthase), which is one of the central structural genes in the anthocyanin-biosynthesis pathway. HPLC analysis revealed that none of the "white" pomegranate tissues accumulate anthocyanins, whereas other flavonoids, corresponding to biochemical reactions upstream of LDOX, were present. Molecular analysis of the "white" pomegranate revealed the presence of an insertion and an SNP within the coding region of PgLDOX. It was found that the SNP does not change amino acid sequence and is not fully linked with the "white" phenotype in all pomegranate accessions from the collection. On the other hand, genotyping of pomegranate accessions from the collection and segregating populations for the "white" phenotype demonstrated its complete linkage with the insertion, inherited as a recessive single-gene trait. Taken together, the results indicate that the insertion in PgLDOX is responsible for the "white" anthocyanin-less phenotype. These data provide the first direct molecular, genetic and chemical evidence for the effect of a natural modification in the LDOX gene on color accumulation in a fruit-bearing woody perennial deciduous tree. This modification can be further utilized to elucidate the physiological role of anthocyanins in protecting the tree organs from harmful environmental conditions, such as temperature and UV radiation.

  14. A "White" Anthocyanin-less Pomegranate (Punica granatum L. Caused by an Insertion in the Coding Region of the Leucoanthocyanidin Dioxygenase (LDOX; ANS Gene.

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    Zohar Ben-Simhon

    Full Text Available Color is an important determinant of pomegranate fruit quality and commercial value. To understand the genetic factors controlling color in pomegranate, chemical, molecular and genetic characterization of a "white" pomegranate was performed. This unique accession is lacking the typical pomegranate color rendered by anthocyanins in all tissues of the plant, including flowers, fruit (skin and arils and leaves. Steady-state gene-expression analysis indicated that none of the analyzed "white" pomegranate tissues are able to synthesize mRNA corresponding to the PgLDOX gene (leucoanthocyanidin dioxygenase, also called ANS, anthocyanidin synthase, which is one of the central structural genes in the anthocyanin-biosynthesis pathway. HPLC analysis revealed that none of the "white" pomegranate tissues accumulate anthocyanins, whereas other flavonoids, corresponding to biochemical reactions upstream of LDOX, were present. Molecular analysis of the "white" pomegranate revealed the presence of an insertion and an SNP within the coding region of PgLDOX. It was found that the SNP does not change amino acid sequence and is not fully linked with the "white" phenotype in all pomegranate accessions from the collection. On the other hand, genotyping of pomegranate accessions from the collection and segregating populations for the "white" phenotype demonstrated its complete linkage with the insertion, inherited as a recessive single-gene trait. Taken together, the results indicate that the insertion in PgLDOX is responsible for the "white" anthocyanin-less phenotype. These data provide the first direct molecular, genetic and chemical evidence for the effect of a natural modification in the LDOX gene on color accumulation in a fruit-bearing woody perennial deciduous tree. This modification can be further utilized to elucidate the physiological role of anthocyanins in protecting the tree organs from harmful environmental conditions, such as temperature and UV

  15. Nuclear protein-coding genes support lungfish and not the coelacanth as the closest living relatives of land vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Henner; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Brenner, Sydney; Meyer, Axel

    2004-04-01

    The colonization of land by tetrapod ancestors is one of the major questions in the evolution of vertebrates. Despite intense molecular phylogenetic research on this problem during the last 15 years, there is, until now, no statistically supported answer to the question of whether coelacanths or lungfish are the closest living relatives of tetrapods. We determined DNA sequences of the nuclear-encoded recombination activating genes (Rag1 and Rag2) from all three major lungfish groups, the Australian Neoceratodis forsteri, the South American Lepidosiren paradoxa and the African lungfish Protopterus dolloi, and the Indonesian coelacanth Latimeria menadoensis. Phylogenetic analyses of both the single gene and the concatenated data sets of RAG1 and RAG2 found that the lungfishes are the closest living relatives of the land vertebrates. These results are supported by high bootstrap values, Bayesian posterior probabilities, and likelihood ratio tests.

  16. Nucleotide sequence of the GDH gene coding for the NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasu, T; Hall, B D

    1985-01-01

    The isolation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene for NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH) by cross hybridization to the Neurospora crassa am gene, known to encode for NADP-GDH is described. Two DNA fragments selected from a yeast genomic library in phage lambda gt11 were shown by restriction analysis to share 2.5 kb of common sequence. A yeast shuttle vector (CV13) carrying either to the cloned fragments complements the gdh- strain of S. cerevisiae and directs substantial overproduction of NADP-GDH. One of the cloned fragments was sequenced, and the deduced amino acid (aa) sequence of the yeast NADP-GDH is 64% homologous to N. crassa, 51% to Escherichia coli and 24% to bovine NADP-GDHs.

  17. Concentration of acrylamide in a polyacrylamide gel affects VP4 gene coding assignment of group A equine rotavirus strains with P[12] specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background It is universally acknowledged that genome segment 4 of group A rotavirus, the major etiologic agent of severe diarrhea in infants and neonatal farm animals, encodes outer capsid neutralization and protective antigen VP4. Results To determine which genome segment of three group A equine rotavirus strains (H-2, FI-14 and FI-23) with P[12] specificity encodes the VP4, we analyzed dsRNAs of strains H-2, FI-14 and FI-23 as well as their reassortants by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) at varying concentrations of acrylamide. The relative position of the VP4 gene of the three equine P[12] strains varied (either genome segment 3 or 4) depending upon the concentration of acrylamide. The VP4 gene bearing P[3], P[4], P[6], P[7], P[8] or P[18] specificity did not exhibit this phenomenon when the PAGE running conditions were varied. Conclusions The concentration of acrylamide in a PAGE gel affected VP4 gene coding assignment of equine rotavirus strains bearing P[12] specificity. PMID:20573245

  18. Cloning, nucleotide sequence, and overexpression of the gene coding for delta 5-3-ketosteroid isomerase from Pseudomonas putida biotype B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S W; Kim, C Y; Benisek, W F; Choi, K Y

    1994-11-01

    The structural gene coding for the delta 5-3-ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) of Pseudomonas putida biotype B has been cloned, and its entire nucleotide sequence has been determined by a dideoxynucleotide chain termination method. A 2.1-kb DNA fragment containing the ksi gene was cloned from a P. putida biotype B genomic library in lambda gt11. The open reading frame of ksi encodes 393 nucleotides, and the amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence agrees with the directly determined amino acid sequence (K. Linden and W. F. Benisek, J. Biol. Chem. 261:6454-6460, 1986). A putative purine-rich ribosome binding site was found 8 bp upstream of the ATG start codon. Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) transformed with the pKK-KSI plasmid containing the ksi gene expressed a high level of isomerase activity when induced by isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside. KSI was purified to homogeneity by a simple and rapid procedure utilizing fractional precipitation and an affinity column of deoxycholate-ethylenediamine-agarose as a major chromatographic step. The molecular weight of KSI was 14,535 (calculated, 14,536) as determined by electrospray mass spectrometry. The purified KSI showed a specific activity (39,807 mumol min-1 mg-1) and a Km (60 microM) which are close to those of KSI originally obtained from P. putida biotype B.

  19. Polymorphisms of the coding region of Slc11a1 (Nramp1 gene associated to natural resistance against bovine brucellosis

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    T.A. Paixão

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Brucelose bovina causada por Brucella abortus é uma importante doença zoonótica, caracterizada pela ocorrência de aborto durante o último trimestre da gestação, o que resulta em diminuição da fertilidade da produção de leite em vacas. A identificação de genes associados à resistência natural contra brucelose tem sido investigada com o objetivo de selecionar animais resistentes à doença. Em bovinos, é controversa a resistência natural contra B. abortus associada ao polimorfismo da região 3' UTR do gene Slc11A1 (Nramp1. Polimorfismos localizados na sequência codificadora de Slc11A1 têm sido identificados em bovinos, contudo a influência sobre a resistência natural contra brucelose não é conhecida. No presente estudo, três novos polimorfismos do gene Slc11A1 foram genotipados por análise conformacional de fita simples em vacas experimentalmente ou naturalmente infectadas por B. Abortus, e foram avaliadas a frequência de cada genótipo e sua associação com o fenótipo de resistência ou susceptibilidade à brucelose bovina. Os resultados deste estudo demonstram que alguns genótipos foram mais frequentes em animais considerados fenotipicamente susceptiveis à brucelose.

  20. The tep1 gene of Sinorhizobium meliloti coding for a putative transmembrane efflux protein and N-acetyl glucosamine affect nod gene expression and nodulation of alfalfa plants

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    Soto María

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soil bacteria collectively known as Rhizobium, characterized by their ability to establish beneficial symbiosis with legumes, share several common characteristics with pathogenic bacteria when infecting the host plant. Recently, it was demonstrated that a fadD mutant of Sinorhizobium meliloti is altered in the control of swarming, a type of co-ordinated movement previously associated with pathogenicity, and is also impaired in nodulation efficiency on alfalfa roots. In the phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris, a fadD homolog (rpfB forms part of a cluster of genes involved in the regulation of pathogenicity factors. In this work, we have investigated the role in swarming and symbiosis of SMc02161, a S. meliloti fadD-linked gene. Results The SMc02161 locus in S. meliloti shows similarities with members of the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS of transporters. A S. meliloti null-mutant shows increased sensitivity to chloramphenicol. This indication led us to rename the locus tep1 for transmembrane efflux protein. The lack of tep1 does not affect the appearance of swarming motility. Interestingly, nodule formation efficiency on alfalfa plants is improved in the tep1 mutant during the first days of the interaction though nod gene expression is lower than in the wild type strain. Curiously, a nodC mutation or the addition of N-acetyl glucosamine to the wild type strain lead to similar reductions in nod gene expression as in the tep1 mutant. Moreover, aminosugar precursors of Nod factors inhibit nodulation. Conclusion tep1 putatively encodes a transmembrane protein which can confer chloramphenicol resistance in S. meliloti by expelling the antibiotic outside the bacteria. The improved nodulation of alfalfa but reduced nod gene expression observed in the tep1 mutant suggests that Tep1 transports compounds which influence nodulation. In contrast to Bradyrhizobium japonicum, we show that in S. meliloti there is no feedback regulation

  1. The tep1 gene of Sinorhizobium meliloti coding for a putative transmembrane efflux protein and N-acetyl glucosamine affect nod gene expression and nodulation of alfalfa plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dillewijn, Pieter; Sanjuán, Juan; Olivares, José; Soto, María José

    2009-01-27

    Soil bacteria collectively known as Rhizobium, characterized by their ability to establish beneficial symbiosis with legumes, share several common characteristics with pathogenic bacteria when infecting the host plant. Recently, it was demonstrated that a fadD mutant of Sinorhizobium meliloti is altered in the control of swarming, a type of co-ordinated movement previously associated with pathogenicity, and is also impaired in nodulation efficiency on alfalfa roots. In the phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris, a fadD homolog (rpfB) forms part of a cluster of genes involved in the regulation of pathogenicity factors. In this work, we have investigated the role in swarming and symbiosis of SMc02161, a S. meliloti fadD-linked gene. The SMc02161 locus in S. meliloti shows similarities with members of the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) of transporters. A S. meliloti null-mutant shows increased sensitivity to chloramphenicol. This indication led us to rename the locus tep1 for transmembrane efflux protein. The lack of tep1 does not affect the appearance of swarming motility. Interestingly, nodule formation efficiency on alfalfa plants is improved in the tep1 mutant during the first days of the interaction though nod gene expression is lower than in the wild type strain. Curiously, a nodC mutation or the addition of N-acetyl glucosamine to the wild type strain lead to similar reductions in nod gene expression as in the tep1 mutant. Moreover, aminosugar precursors of Nod factors inhibit nodulation. tep1 putatively encodes a transmembrane protein which can confer chloramphenicol resistance in S. meliloti by expelling the antibiotic outside the bacteria. The improved nodulation of alfalfa but reduced nod gene expression observed in the tep1 mutant suggests that Tep1 transports compounds which influence nodulation. In contrast to Bradyrhizobium japonicum, we show that in S. meliloti there is no feedback regulation of nodulation genes. Moreover, the Nod factor precursor

  2. ChIPBase: a database for decoding the transcriptional regulation of long non-coding RNA and microRNA genes from ChIP-Seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian-Hua; Li, Jun-Hao; Jiang, Shan; Zhou, Hui; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2013-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) represent two classes of important non-coding RNAs in eukaryotes. Although these non-coding RNAs have been implicated in organismal development and in various human diseases, surprisingly little is known about their transcriptional regulation. Recent advances in chromatin immunoprecipitation with next-generation DNA sequencing (ChIP-Seq) have provided methods of detecting transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) with unprecedented sensitivity. In this study, we describe ChIPBase (http://deepbase.sysu.edu.cn/chipbase/), a novel database that we have developed to facilitate the comprehensive annotation and discovery of transcription factor binding maps and transcriptional regulatory relationships of lncRNAs and miRNAs from ChIP-Seq data. The current release of ChIPBase includes high-throughput sequencing data that were generated by 543 ChIP-Seq experiments in diverse tissues and cell lines from six organisms. By analysing millions of TFBSs, we identified tens of thousands of TF-lncRNA and TF-miRNA regulatory relationships. Furthermore, two web-based servers were developed to annotate and discover transcriptional regulatory relationships of lncRNAs and miRNAs from ChIP-Seq data. In addition, we developed two genome browsers, deepView and genomeView, to provide integrated views of multidimensional data. Moreover, our web implementation supports diverse query types and the exploration of TFs, lncRNAs, miRNAs, gene ontologies and pathways.

  3. Mapping of the serotonin 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} autoreceptor gene (HTR1D) on chromosome 1 using a silent polymorphism in the coding region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaki, N.; Lappalainen, J.; Linnoila, M. [National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Rockville, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-24

    Serotonin (5-HT){sub ID} receptors are 5-HT release-regulating autoreceptors in the human brain. Abnormalities in brain 5-HT function have been hypothesized in the pathophysiology of various psychiatric disorders, including obsessive-compulsive disorder, autism, mood disorders, eating disorders, impulsive violent behavior, and alcoholism. Thus, mutations occurring in 5-HT autoreceptors may cause or increase the vulnerability to any of these conditions. 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} and 5-HT{sub 1D{Beta}} subtypes have been previously localized to chromosomes 1p36.3-p34.3 and 6q13, respectively, using rodent-human hybrids and in situ localization. In this communication, we report the detection of a 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} receptor gene polymorphism by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the coding sequence. The polymorphism was used for fine scale linkage mapping of 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} on chromosome 1. This polymorphism should also be useful for linkage studies in populations and in families. Our analysis also demonstrates that functionally significant coding sequence variants of the 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} are probably not abundant either among alcoholics or in the general population. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. A nine-nucleotide deletion and splice variation in the coding region of the interferon induced ISG12 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smidt, Kamille; Hansen, Lise Lotte; Søgaard, T Max M;

    2003-01-01

    distributed between ISG12 and ISG12-S in breast carcinoma cells, in cancer cell lines and in cervical cytobrush material with neoplastic lesions. In addition, we have found a nine-nucleotide deletion situated in exon 4 of the ISG12 gene. This deletion leads to a three-amino-acid deletion (AMA) in the putative...... inducible splice variant of ISG12 lacking exon 2 leading to a putative truncated protein isoform of Mr 7400, ISG12-S. In cells from blood and cervical cytobrush material from healthy women, the level of ISG12-S expression was higher than ISG12 expression, whereas the expression pattern was more evenly...

  5. Antidepressive-drug-induced bodyweight gain is associated with polymorphisms in genes coding for COMT and TPH1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Anna; Bukh, Jens; Bock, Camilla;

    2009-01-01

    of a single depressive episode and who were under antidepressive treatment. Weight gainers were identified based on rating with the Udvalg for Kliniske Undersøgelser Side Effect Rating Scale. Polymorphisms in catechol-O-methyltransferase, tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH1), serotonin receptor 2C (HTR2C......) and serotonin transporter (SLC6A4) genes were identified and associated with bodyweight gain during treatment. The AG genotype of catechol-O-methyltransferase rs4680 and the AA genotype of TPH1 rs18532 were significantly associated with bodyweight gain during antidepressive treatment, when adjusted for age...

  6. Cloning of a human insulin-stimulated protein kinase (ISPK-1) gene and analysis of coding regions and mRNA levels of the ISPK-1 and the protein phosphatase-1 genes in muscle from NIDDM patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørbaek, C; Vik, T A; Echwald, S M

    1995-01-01

    with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). The human ISPK-1 cDNA was cloned from T-cell leukemia and placental cDNA libraries and mapped to the short arm of the human X chromosome. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis identified a total of six variations in the coding regions...... of the PP1 genes: two in PP1 alpha at codons 90 and 255; one in PP1 beta at codon 67; and three in PP1 gamma at codons 11,269, and 273, respectively. All were, however, silent single nucleotide substitutions. SSCP analysis of the ISPK-1 gene identified one silent polymorphism at codon 266 and one amino acid...

  7. An RNA Phage Lab: MS2 in Walter Fiers' laboratory of molecular biology in Ghent, from genetic code to gene and genome, 1963-1976.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrel, Jérôme

    2012-01-01

    The importance of viruses as model organisms is well-established in molecular biology and Max Delbrück's phage group set standards in the DNA phage field. In this paper, I argue that RNA phages, discovered in the 1960s, were also instrumental in the making of molecular biology. As part of experimental systems, RNA phages stood for messenger RNA (mRNA), genes and genome. RNA was thought to mediate information transfers between DNA and proteins. Furthermore, RNA was more manageable at the bench than DNA due to the availability of specific RNases, enzymes used as chemical tools to analyse RNA. Finally, RNA phages provided scientists with a pure source of mRNA to investigate the genetic code, genes and even a genome sequence. This paper focuses on Walter Fiers' laboratory at Ghent University (Belgium) and their work on the RNA phage MS2. When setting up his Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Fiers planned a comprehensive study of the virus with a strong emphasis on the issue of structure. In his lab, RNA sequencing, now a little-known technique, evolved gradually from a means to solve the genetic code, to a tool for completing the first genome sequence. Thus, I follow the research pathway of Fiers and his 'RNA phage lab' with their evolving experimental system from 1960 to the late 1970s. This study illuminates two decisive shifts in post-war biology: the emergence of molecular biology as a discipline in the 1960s in Europe and of genomics in the 1990s.

  8. A rare case of plastid protein-coding gene duplication in the chloroplast genome of Euglena archaeoplastidiata (Euglenophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Matthew S; Shiu, Shin-Han; Triemer, Richard E

    2017-03-12

    Gene duplication is an important evolutionary process that allows duplicate functions to diverge, or, in some cases, allows for new functional gains. However, in contrast to the nuclear genome, gene duplications within the chloroplast are extremely rare. Here, we present the chloroplast genome of the photosynthetic protist Euglena archaeoplastidiata. Upon annotation, it was found that the chloroplast genome contained a novel tandem direct duplication that encoded a portion of RuBisCO large subunit (rbcL) followed by a complete copy of ribosomal protein L32 (rpl32), as well as the associated intergenic sequences. Analyses of the duplicated rpl32 were inconclusive regarding selective pressures, although it was found that substitutions in the duplicated region, all non-synonymous, likely had a neutral functional effect. The duplicated region did not exhibit patterns consistent with previously described mechanisms for tandem direct duplications, and demonstrated an unknown mechanism of duplication. In addition, a comparison of this chloroplast genome to other previously characterized chloroplast genomes from the same family revealed characteristics that indicated E. archaeoplastidiata was probably more closely related to taxa in the genera Monomorphina, Cryptoglena, and Euglenaria than it was to other Euglena taxa. Taken together, the chloroplast genome of E. archaeoplastidiata demonstrated multiple characteristics unique to the euglenoid world, and has justified the longstanding curiosity regarding this enigmatic taxon.

  9. Correlation of rare coding variants in the gene encoding human glucokinase regulatory protein with phenotypic, cellular, and kinetic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Matthew G; Ng, David; Ruppert, Sarah; Turner, Clesson; Beer, Nicola L; Swift, Amy J; Morken, Mario A; Below, Jennifer E; Blech, Ilana; Mullikin, James C; McCarthy, Mark I; Biesecker, Leslie G; Gloyn, Anna L; Collins, Francis S

    2012-01-01

    Defining the genetic contribution of rare variants to common diseases is a major basic and clinical science challenge that could offer new insights into disease etiology and provide potential for directed gene- and pathway-based prevention and treatment. Common and rare nonsynonymous variants in the GCKR gene are associated with alterations in metabolic traits, most notably serum triglyceride levels. GCKR encodes glucokinase regulatory protein (GKRP), a predominantly nuclear protein that inhibits hepatic glucokinase (GCK) and plays a critical role in glucose homeostasis. The mode of action of rare GCKR variants remains unexplored. We identified 19 nonsynonymous GCKR variants among 800 individuals from the ClinSeq medical sequencing project. Excluding the previously described common missense variant p.Pro446Leu, all variants were rare in the cohort. Accordingly, we functionally characterized all variants to evaluate their potential phenotypic effects. Defects were observed for the majority of the rare variants after assessment of cellular localization, ability to interact with GCK, and kinetic activity of the encoded proteins. Comparing the individuals with functional rare variants to those without such variants showed associations with lipid phenotypes. Our findings suggest that, while nonsynonymous GCKR variants, excluding p.Pro446Leu, are rare in individuals of mixed European descent, the majority do affect protein function. In sum, this study utilizes computational, cell biological, and biochemical methods to present a model for interpreting the clinical significance of rare genetic variants in common disease.

  10. The rice OsSAG12-2 gene codes for a functional protease that negatively regulates stress-induced cell death

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SUBARAN SINGH; ANUPRIYA SINGH; ASHIS KUMAR NANDI

    2016-09-01

    Senescence is the final stage of plant development. Although expression of most of the genes is suppressed duringsenescence, a set of genes referred as senescence-associated genes (SAGs) is induced. Arabidopsis thaliana SAG12(AtSAG12) is one such gene that has been mostly studied for its strict association with senescence. AtSAG12 encodes apapain-like cysteine protease, expressed predominantly in senescence-associated vacuoles. Rice genome containsmultiple AtSAG12 homologues (OsSAGs). OsSAG12-1, the closest structural homologue of AtSAG12, is a negativeregulator of developmental and stress-induced cell death. Proteolytic activity has not been established for any SAG12homologues in vitro. Here, we report that OsSAG12-2, the second structural homologue of AtSAG12 from rice, codesfor a functional proteolytic enzyme. The recombinant OsSAG12-2 protein produced in Escherichia coli undergoesautolysis to generate a functional protease. The matured OsSAG12-2 protein shows 27% trypsin-equivalent proteolyticactivity on azocasein substrate. Dark-induced senescence activates OsSAG12-2 expression. Down-regulation of OsSAG12-2 in the transgenic artificial miRNA lines results in enhanced salt- and UV-induced cell death, even thoughit does not affect cell viability in the stress-free condition. Our results show that OsSAG12-2 codes for a functionalprotease that negatively regulates stress-induced cell death in rice.

  11. In silico Coding Sequence Analysis of Walnut GAI and PIP2 Genes and Comparison with Different Plant Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Mohseniazar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dwarfism is one of the important traits in breeding of crops and horticulture plants. A dwarfing rootstock will produce trees with 15-50% of standard trees size. In modern intensive fruit tree orchards, dwarfing rootstocks are commonly used to reduce trees size, enabling high-density planting and easy management, thus achieving higher yield. Trees on dwarfing rootstocks can also exhibit other economically important traits, such as precocious flowering, increased yield and increased disease resistance. Dwarf rootstocks have been extensively studied and released in stone and pome fruits, because of presence of genetic materials and the simplicity of budding methods. Control of tree size using genetically dwarf rootstocks for achievement to higher density and mechanized orchard systems is now very important for walnut production in the world especially in Iran. Many different genes can be involved in appear of this. Mutations in GAI and PIP2 genes cause dwarf trait by two different mechanisms in some plant species. In this case, we study in silico analysis of GAI and PIP2 genes consist of conserved sequences and domains, exon and intron number, function of their proteins, targeting, secondary and tertiary structure, and post translational modification. Materials and methods: The GAI and PIP2 mRNA and protein sequences (FASTA format belonging to 17 monocotyledon and dicotyledon were downloaded from NCBI (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov accessed, on September 2014. Several online web services and software were used for analysis of GAI and PIP2 mRNA and Proteins in plants. Comparative and bioinformatics analyses of PIP2 and GAI proteins were performed online at two websites NCBI (http://www.ncbi.nih.gov and EXPASY (http://expasy.org/tools. Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis (MEGA; version 4 program and CLUSTAL-W with default parameters were used for multiple alignments of sequences. The phylogenetic analysis of GAI and PIP2 protein was

  12. Dynamic transcription of long non-coding RNA genes during CD4+ T cell development and activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Xia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent evidence shows that long non-coding RNA (LncRNA play important regulatory roles in many biology process, including cell development, activation and oncogenesis. However, the roles of these LncRNAs in the development and activation of CD4+ T cells, which is an important component of immune response, remain unknown. RESULTS: To predict the function of LncRNA in the development and activation of CD4+ T cells, first, we examined the expression profiles of LncRNAs and mRNAs in CD4-CD8- (DN, CD4+CD8+ (DP, CD4+CD8-, and activated CD4+CD8- T cells in a microarray analysis and verified these results by real time PCRs (qPCR. We found that the expression of hundreds of LncRNAs significantly changed in each process of developmental transition, including DN into DP, DP into CD4+CD8-, and CD4+CD8- into activated CD4+ T cells. A Kendall distance analysis suggested that the expression of LncRNAs in DN, DP, CD4+CD8- T cells and activated CD4+ T cells were correlated with the expression of mRNAs in these T cells. The Blat algorithm and GO analysis suggested that LncRNAs may exert important roles in the development and activation of CD4+ T cells. These roles included proliferation, homeostasis, maturation, activation, migration, apoptosis and calcium ion transportation. CONCLUSION: The present study found that the expression profiles of LncRNAs in different stages of CD4+ T cells are distinguishable. LncRNAs are involved in the key biological process in CD4+ T cell development and activation.

  13. Improving the MVA vaccine potential by deleting the viral gene coding for the IL-18 binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Falivene

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA is an attenuated strain of Vaccinia virus (VACV currently employed in many clinical trials against HIV/AIDS and other diseases. MVA still retains genes involved in host immune response evasion, enabling its optimization by removing some of them. The aim of this study was to evaluate cellular immune responses (CIR induced by an IL-18 binding protein gene (C12L deleted vector (MVAΔC12L. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were immunized with different doses of MVAΔC12L or MVA wild type (MVAwt, then CIR to VACV epitopes in immunogenic proteins were evaluated in spleen and draining lymph nodes at acute and memory phases (7 and 40 days post-immunization respectively. Compared with parental MVAwt, MVAΔC12L immunization induced a significant increase of two to three-fold in CD8(+ and CD4(+ T-cell responses to different VACV epitopes, with increased percentage of anti-VACV cytotoxic CD8(+ T-cells (CD107a/b(+ during the acute phase of the response. Importantly, the immunogenicity enhancement was also observed after MVAΔC12L inoculation with different viral doses and by distinct routes (systemic and mucosal. Potentiation of MVA's CIR was also observed during the memory phase, in correlation with a higher protection against an intranasal challenge with VACV WR. Of note, we could also show a significant increase in the CIR against HIV antigens such as Env, Gag, Pol and Nef from different subtypes expressed from two recombinants of MVAΔC12L during heterologous DNA prime/MVA boost vaccination regimens. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates the relevance of IL-18 bp contribution in the immune response evasion during MVA infection. Our findings clearly show that the deletion of the viral IL-18 bp gene is an effective approach to increase MVA vaccine efficacy, as immunogenicity improvements were observed against vector antigens and more importantly to HIV antigens.

  14. Holographic codes

    CERN Document Server

    Latorre, Jose I

    2015-01-01

    There exists a remarkable four-qutrit state that carries absolute maximal entanglement in all its partitions. Employing this state, we construct a tensor network that delivers a holographic many body state, the H-code, where the physical properties of the boundary determine those of the bulk. This H-code is made of an even superposition of states whose relative Hamming distances are exponentially large with the size of the boundary. This property makes H-codes natural states for a quantum memory. H-codes exist on tori of definite sizes and get classified in three different sectors characterized by the sum of their qutrits on cycles wrapped through the boundaries of the system. We construct a parent Hamiltonian for the H-code which is highly non local and finally we compute the topological entanglement entropy of the H-code.

  15. The small RNA content of human sperm reveals pseudogene-derived piRNAs complementary to protein-coding genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantano, Lorena; Jodar, Meritxell; Bak, Mads

    2015-01-01

    At the end of mammalian sperm development, sperm cells expel most of their cytoplasm and dispose of the majority of their RNA. Yet, hundreds of RNA molecules remain in mature sperm. The biological significance of the vast majority of these molecules is unclear. To better understand the processes......-specific genes. The most abundant class of small noncoding RNAs in sperm are PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). Surprisingly, we found that human sperm cells contain piRNAs processed from pseudogenes. Clusters of piRNAs from human testes contain pseudogenes transcribed in the antisense strand and processed...... that generate sperm small RNAs and what roles they may have, we sequenced and characterized the small RNA content of sperm samples from two human fertile individuals. We detected 182 microRNAs, some of which are highly abundant. The most abundant microRNA in sperm is miR-1246 with predicted targets among sperm...

  16. Screening for coding variants in FTO and SH2B1 genes in Chinese patients with obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaojing Zheng

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate potential functional variants in FTO and SH2B1 genes among Chinese children with obesity. METHODS: Sanger sequencing of PCR products of all FTO and SH2B1 exons and their flanking regions were performed in 338 Chinese Han children with obesity and 221 age- and sex-matched lean controls. RESULTS: A total of seven and five rare non-synonymous variants were identified in FTO and SH2B1, respectively. The overall frequencies of FTO and SH2B1 rare non-synonymous variants were similar in obese and lean children (2.37% and 0.90% vs. 1.81% and 1.36%, P>0.05. However, four out of the seven variants in FTO were novel and all were unique to obese children (p>0.05. None of the novel variants was consistently being predicted to be deleterious. Four out of five variants in SH2B1 were novel and one was unique to obese children (p>0.05. One variant (L293R that was consistently being predicted as deleterious in SH2B1 gene was unique to lean control. While rare missense mutations were more frequently detected in girls from obesity as well as lean control than boys, the difference was not statistically significant. In addition, it's shown that the prevalence of rare missense mutations of FTO as well as SH2B1 was similar across different ethnic groups. CONCLUSION: The rare missense mutations of FTO and SH2B1 did not confer risks of obesity in Chinese Han children in our cohort.

  17. Screening for Coding Variants in FTO and SH2B1 Genes in Chinese Patients with Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaodong; Yang, Peirong; Li, Juan; Ding, Yu; Yao, Ru-en; Geng, Juan; Shen, Yongnian; Shen, Yiping; Fu, Qihua; Yu, Yongguo

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate potential functional variants in FTO and SH2B1 genes among Chinese children with obesity. Methods Sanger sequencing of PCR products of all FTO and SH2B1 exons and their flanking regions were performed in 338 Chinese Han children with obesity and 221 age- and sex-matched lean controls. Results A total of seven and five rare non-synonymous variants were identified in FTO and SH2B1, respectively. The overall frequencies of FTO and SH2B1 rare non-synonymous variants were similar in obese and lean children (2.37% and 0.90% vs. 1.81% and 1.36%, P>0.05). However, four out of the seven variants in FTO were novel and all were unique to obese children (p>0.05). None of the novel variants was consistently being predicted to be deleterious. Four out of five variants in SH2B1 were novel and one was unique to obese children (p>0.05). One variant (L293R) that was consistently being predicted as deleterious in SH2B1 gene was unique to lean control. While rare missense mutations were more frequently detected in girls from obesity as well as lean control than boys, the difference was not statistically significant. In addition, it's shown that the prevalence of rare missense mutations of FTO as well as SH2B1 was similar across different ethnic groups. Conclusion The rare missense mutations of FTO and SH2B1 did not confer risks of obesity in Chinese Han children in our cohort. PMID:23825611

  18. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the gene coding for enzymatically active fragments of the Bacillus polymyxa beta-amylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawazu, T; Nakanishi, Y; Uozumi, N; Sasaki, T; Yamagata, H; Tsukagoshi, N; Udaka, S

    1987-01-01

    The gene encoding beta-amylase was cloned from Bacillus polymyxa 72 into Escherichia coli HB101 by inserting HindIII-generated DNA fragments into the HindIII site of pBR322. The 4.8-kilobase insert was shown to direct the synthesis of beta-amylase. A 1.8-kilobase AccI-AccI fragment of the donor strain DNA was sufficient for the beta-amylase synthesis. Homologous DNA was found by Southern blot analysis to be present only in B. polymyxa 72 and not in other bacteria such as E. coli or B. subtilis. B. polymyxa, as well as E. coli harboring the cloned DNA, was found to produce enzymatically active fragments of beta-amylases (70,000, 56,000, or 58,000, and 42,000 daltons), which were detected in situ by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the cloned 3.1-kilobase DNA revealed that it contains one open reading frame of 2,808 nucleotides without a translational stop codon. The deduced amino acid sequence for these 2,808 nucleotides encoding a secretory precursor of the beta-amylase protein is 936 amino acids including a signal peptide of 33 or 35 residues at its amino-terminal end. The existence of a beta-amylase of larger than 100,000 daltons, which was predicted on the basis of the results of nucleotide sequence analysis of the gene, was confirmed by examining culture supernatants after various cultivation periods. It existed only transiently during cultivation, but the multiform beta-amylases described above existed for a long time. The large beta-amylase (approximately 160,000 daltons) existed for longer in the presence of a protease inhibitor such as chymostatin, suggesting that proteolytic cleavage is the cause of the formation of multiform beta-amylases. Images PMID:2435707

  19. Sharing code

    OpenAIRE

    Kubilius, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Sharing code is becoming increasingly important in the wake of Open Science. In this review I describe and compare two popular code-sharing utilities, GitHub and Open Science Framework (OSF). GitHub is a mature, industry-standard tool but lacks focus towards researchers. In comparison, OSF offers a one-stop solution for researchers but a lot of functionality is still under development. I conclude by listing alternative lesser-known tools for code and materials sharing.

  20. A Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals a Group of MocR Bacterial Transcriptional Regulators Linked to a Family of Genes Coding for Membrane Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Milano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The MocR bacterial transcriptional regulators are characterized by an N-terminal domain, 60 residues long on average, possessing the winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH architecture responsible for DNA recognition and binding, linked to a large C-terminal domain (350 residues on average that is homologous to fold type-I pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP dependent enzymes like aspartate aminotransferase (AAT. These regulators are involved in the expression of genes taking part in several metabolic pathways directly or indirectly connected to PLP chemistry, many of which are still uncharacterized. A bioinformatics analysis is here reported that studied the features of a distinct group of MocR regulators predicted to be functionally linked to a family of homologous genes coding for integral membrane proteins of unknown function. This group occurs mainly in the Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria phyla. An analysis of the multiple sequence alignments of their wHTH and AAT domains suggested the presence of specificity-determining positions (SDPs. Mapping of SDPs onto a homology model of the AAT domain hinted at possible structural/functional roles in effector recognition. Likewise, SDPs in wHTH domain suggested the basis of specificity of Transcription Factor Binding Site recognition. The results reported represent a framework for rational design of experiments and for bioinformatics analysis of other MocR subgroups.

  1. Exploring the structural and functional effect of pRB by significant nsSNP in the coding region of RB1 gene causing retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, R; Sethumadhavan, Rao

    2010-02-01

    In this study, we identified the most deleterious nsSNP in RB1 gene through structural and functional properties of its protein (pRB) and investigated its binding affinity with E2F-2. Out of 956 SNPs, we investigated 12 nsSNPs in coding region in which three of them (SNPids rs3092895, rs3092903 and rs3092905) are commonly found to be damaged by I-Mutant 2.0, SIFT and PolyPhen programs. With this effort, we modeled the mutant pRB proteins based on these deleterious nsSNPs. From a comparison of total energy, stabilizing residues and RMSD of these three mutant proteins with native pRB protein, we identified that the major mutation is from Glutamic acid to Glycine at the residue position of 746 of pRB. Further, we compared the binding efficiency of both native and mutant pRB (E746G) with E2F-2. We found that mutant pRB has less binding affinity with E2F-2 as compared to native type. This is due to sixteen hydrogen bonding and two salt bridges that exist between native type and E2F-2, whereas mutant type makes only thirteen hydrogen bonds and one salt bridge with E2F-2. Based on our investigation, we propose that the SNP with an id rs3092905 could be the most deleterious nsSNP in RB1 gene causing retinoblastoma.

  2. Blue light is required for survival of the tomato phytochrome-deficient aurea mutant and the expression of four nuclear genes coding for plastidic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelmüller, R; Kendrick, R E

    1991-02-01

    When dark-grown aurea mutant tomato seedlings which lack more than 95% of the phytochrome present in isogenic wild-type seedlings are kept in white or blue light, four nuclear-encoded transcripts coding for plastidic proteins (the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding protein of photosystem I and II [cab-PSII], plastocyanin and subunit 2 of photosystem I) are present in comparable amounts. These transcript levels in red light are strongly reduced in aurea seedlings when compared with those of wild type. Thus, blue light is required for normal expression of these genes in the mutant, while red light alone is not sufficient. Red light-grown aurea seedlings are very sensitive to blue light, even 10 minutes of blue light every day suffices to cause a measurable increase in cab-PSII transcript level. The action of blue light on the expression of cab-PSII in the mutant is under phytochrome control. After 8 days of blue light, phytochrome is almost as effective in inducing cab-PSII mRNA as in the isogenic wild type, whereas after 8 days of red light, only a small phytochrome response was observed in the mutant. It is concluded that blue light sensitizes the mutant to the residual phytochrome which allows normal gene expression and survival of the mutant under daylight conditions.

  3. A Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals a Group of MocR Bacterial Transcriptional Regulators Linked to a Family of Genes Coding for Membrane Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    The MocR bacterial transcriptional regulators are characterized by an N-terminal domain, 60 residues long on average, possessing the winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH) architecture responsible for DNA recognition and binding, linked to a large C-terminal domain (350 residues on average) that is homologous to fold type-I pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes like aspartate aminotransferase (AAT). These regulators are involved in the expression of genes taking part in several metabolic pathways directly or indirectly connected to PLP chemistry, many of which are still uncharacterized. A bioinformatics analysis is here reported that studied the features of a distinct group of MocR regulators predicted to be functionally linked to a family of homologous genes coding for integral membrane proteins of unknown function. This group occurs mainly in the Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria phyla. An analysis of the multiple sequence alignments of their wHTH and AAT domains suggested the presence of specificity-determining positions (SDPs). Mapping of SDPs onto a homology model of the AAT domain hinted at possible structural/functional roles in effector recognition. Likewise, SDPs in wHTH domain suggested the basis of specificity of Transcription Factor Binding Site recognition. The results reported represent a framework for rational design of experiments and for bioinformatics analysis of other MocR subgroups. PMID:27446613

  4. The Rab11-FIP1/RCP gene codes for multiple protein transcripts related to the plasma membrane recycling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Min; Goldenring, James R

    2006-06-01

    Rab11a is a member of the Rab11 small GTPase family, and plays an important role in plasma membrane recycling. Rab11-Family Interacting Protein 1 (Rab11-FIP1) binds to Rab11 through a carboxyl-terminal amphipathic alpha helix. We have identified eight alternatively spliced Rab11-FIP1 gene transcripts from human chromosome 8. Among them, Rab11-FIP1A-D have carboxyl terminal Rab11 binding domains, while Rab11-FIP1E-H do not contain the Rab11 binding domain. While Rab11-FIP1B and F gene transcripts are ubiquitous, other Rab11-FIP1 transcripts demonstrate more limited patterns of expression in human tissue cDNAs. EGFP-Rab11-FIP1A-D proteins over-expressed in HeLa cells targeted to Rab11a-containing membranes, while EGFP-Rab11-FIP1E/F and H proteins did not localize with recycling system membranes. However, transferrin trafficking was not significantly altered in HeLa cells over-expressing expressing any of the EGFP-Rab11-FIP1 proteins. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies specific for Rab11-FIP1B and Rab11-FIP1C/RCP demonstrated that Rab11-FIP1B and Rab11-FIP1C/RCP are expressed endogenously. Strikingly, endogenous staining for Rab11-FIP1C/RCP only partially co-localized with EGFP-Rab11-FIP1A, EGFP-Rab11-FIP1B, and EGFP-Rab11a in the perinuclear region, indicating that Rab11-FIP1C/RCP resides in a differentiable subcellular compartment within the plasma membrane recycling system compared with Rab11-FIP1A and Rab11-FIP1B. These data suggest that Rab11-FIP1 proteins may play coordinated roles in regulating plasma membrane recycling with regional specificity within the Rab11a-containing recycling system.

  5. Gene therapy of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis mice by in vivo administration of plasmid DNA coding for human interleukin-10

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGZhen-Lin; LINBo; YULu-Yang; SHENShui-Xian; ZHULi-Hua; WANGWui-Ping; GUOLi-He

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of interleukin-10 (IL-10) gene on experimental autoimmune thyroiditis mice.METHODS: Mice were immunized to induce autoimmune thyroiditis with porcine thyroglobulin (pTg), and thyroids of mice were injected with IL-10 DNA. On d 28 after immunization with pTg, mRNA expression of IL-10 inthyroid glands was detected and thyroid specimens were histopathological studied. RESULTS: The mRNA expression of IL-10 was detected in thyroid glands on d 7 and 14 after injection of IL-10 plasmid DNA or on COS-7 cells48 h after IL-10 plasmid DNA transfection. In addition, hlL-10 levels in culture media significantly increased 48 hand 72 h after IL-10 plasmid DNA transfection. Infiltration index of lymphocytes (1.1±0.4) in thyroids ofIL-10-treated mice was significantly lower than that of pcDNA3-null-treated mice (2.2±0.5) (P<0.01). Comparedwith pcDNA3-null control mice, IL-10-treated mice had lower levels of serum IFN-γ(P<0.01). CONCLUSION:The direct injection of DNA expression vectors encoding IL-10 into thyroid significantly inhibited development oflymphocytic infiltration of thyroid of autoimmune th,yroiditis mice, and alleviated the progression of this disease.

  6. A dynamic code of dorsal neural tube genes regulates the segregation between neurogenic and melanogenic neural crest cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzan, Erez; Krispin, Shlomo; Pfaltzgraff, Elise R; Klar, Avihu; Labosky, Patricia A; Kalcheim, Chaya

    2013-06-01

    Understanding when and how multipotent progenitors segregate into diverse fates is a key question during embryonic development. The neural crest (NC) is an exemplary model system with which to investigate the dynamics of progenitor cell specification, as it generates a multitude of derivatives. Based on 'in ovo' lineage analysis, we previously suggested an early fate restriction of premigratory trunk NC to generate neural versus melanogenic fates, yet the timing of fate segregation and the underlying mechanisms remained unknown. Analysis of progenitors expressing a Foxd3 reporter reveals that prospective melanoblasts downregulate Foxd3 and have already segregated from neural lineages before emigration. When this downregulation is prevented, late-emigrating avian precursors fail to upregulate the melanogenic markers Mitf and MC/1 and the guidance receptor Ednrb2, generating instead glial cells that express P0 and Fabp. In this context, Foxd3 lies downstream of Snail2 and Sox9, constituting a minimal network upstream of Mitf and Ednrb2 to link melanogenic specification with migration. Consistent with the gain-of-function data in avians, loss of Foxd3 function in mouse NC results in ectopic melanogenesis in the dorsal tube and sensory ganglia. Altogether, Foxd3 is part of a dynamically expressed gene network that is necessary and sufficient to regulate fate decisions in premigratory NC. Their timely downregulation in the dorsal neural tube is thus necessary for the switch between neural and melanocytic phases of NC development.

  7. Identification of genes coding for putative wax ester synthase/diacylglycerol acyltransferase enzymes in terrestrial and marine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranconi, Mariana P; Alvarez, Adrián F; Alvarez, Héctor M

    2015-12-01

    Synthesis of neutral lipids such as triacylglycerols (TAG) and wax esters (WE) is catalyzed in bacteria by wax ester synthase/diacylglycerol acyltransferase enzymes (WS/DGAT). We investigated the diversity of genes encoding this enzyme in contrasting natural environments from Patagonia (Argentina). The content of petroleum hydrocarbons in samples collected from oil-producing areas was measured. PCR-based analysis covered WS/DGAT occurrence in marine sediments and soil. No product was obtained in seawater samples. All clones retrieved from marine sediments affiliated with gammaproteobacterial sequences and within them, most phylotypes formed a unique cluster related to putative WS/DGAT belonging to marine OM60 clade. In contrast, soils samples contained phylotypes only related to actinomycetes. Among them, phylotypes affiliated with representatives largely or recently reported as oleaginous bacteria, as well as with others considered as possible lipid-accumulating bacteria based on the analysis of their annotated genomes. Our study shows for the first time that the environment could contain a higher variety of ws/dgat than that reported from bacterial isolates. The results of this study highlight the relevance of the environment in a natural process such as the synthesis and accumulation of neutral lipids. Particularly, both marine sediments and soil may serve as a useful source for novel WS/DGAT with biotechnological interest.

  8. Gene Expression Data from the Moon Jelly, Aurelia, Provide Insights into the Evolution of the Combinatorial Code Controlling Animal Sense Organ Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagayasu Nakanishi

    Full Text Available In Bilateria, Pax6, Six, Eya and Dach families of transcription factors underlie the development and evolution of morphologically and phyletically distinct eyes, including the compound eyes in Drosophila and the camera-type eyes in vertebrates, indicating that bilaterian eyes evolved under the strong influence of ancestral developmental gene regulation. However the conservation in eye developmental genetics deeper in the Eumetazoa, and the origin of the conserved gene regulatory apparatus controlling eye development remain unclear due to limited comparative developmental data from Cnidaria. Here we show in the eye-bearing scyphozoan cnidarian Aurelia that the ectodermal photosensory domain of the developing medusa sensory structure known as the rhopalium expresses sine oculis (so/six1/2 and eyes absent/eya, but not optix/six3/6 or pax (A&B. In addition, the so and eya co-expression domain encompasses the region of active cell proliferation, neurogenesis, and mechanoreceptor development in rhopalia. Consistent with the role of so and eya in rhopalial development, developmental transcriptome data across Aurelia life cycle stages show upregulation of so and eya, but not optix or pax (A&B, during medusa formation. Moreover, pax6 and dach are absent in the Aurelia genome, and thus are not required for eye development in Aurelia. Our data are consistent with so and eya, but not optix, pax or dach, having conserved functions in sensory structure specification across Eumetazoa. The lability of developmental components including Pax genes relative to so-eya is consistent with a model of sense organ development and evolution that involved the lineage specific modification of a combinatorial code that specifies animal sense organs.

  9. Gene Expression Data from the Moon Jelly, Aurelia, Provide Insights into the Evolution of the Combinatorial Code Controlling Animal Sense Organ Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Nagayasu; Camara, Anthony C; Yuan, David C; Gold, David A; Jacobs, David K

    2015-01-01

    In Bilateria, Pax6, Six, Eya and Dach families of transcription factors underlie the development and evolution of morphologically and phyletically distinct eyes, including the compound eyes in Drosophila and the camera-type eyes in vertebrates, indicating that bilaterian eyes evolved under the strong influence of ancestral developmental gene regulation. However the conservation in eye developmental genetics deeper in the Eumetazoa, and the origin of the conserved gene regulatory apparatus controlling eye development remain unclear due to limited comparative developmental data from Cnidaria. Here we show in the eye-bearing scyphozoan cnidarian Aurelia that the ectodermal photosensory domain of the developing medusa sensory structure known as the rhopalium expresses sine oculis (so)/six1/2 and eyes absent/eya, but not optix/six3/6 or pax (A&B). In addition, the so and eya co-expression domain encompasses the region of active cell proliferation, neurogenesis, and mechanoreceptor development in rhopalia. Consistent with the role of so and eya in rhopalial development, developmental transcriptome data across Aurelia life cycle stages show upregulation of so and eya, but not optix or pax (A&B), during medusa formation. Moreover, pax6 and dach are absent in the Aurelia genome, and thus are not required for eye development in Aurelia. Our data are consistent with so and eya, but not optix, pax or dach, having conserved functions in sensory structure specification across Eumetazoa. The lability of developmental components including Pax genes relative to so-eya is consistent with a model of sense organ development and evolution that involved the lineage specific modification of a combinatorial code that specifies animal sense organs.

  10. Bioinformatic Analysis of Deleterious Non-Synonymous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (nsSNPs in the Coding Regions of Human Prion Protein Gene (PRNP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kourosh Bamdad

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Single nucleotide polymorphisms are the cause of genetic variation to living organisms. Single nucleotide polymorphisms alter residues in the protein sequence. In this investigation, the relationship between prion protein gene polymorphisms and its relevance to pathogenicity was studied. Material & Method: Amino acid sequence of the main isoform from the human prion protein gene (PRNP was extracted from UniProt database and evaluated by FoldAmyloid and AmylPred servers. All non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs from SNP database (dbSNP were further analyzed by bioinformatics servers including SIFT, PolyPhen-2, I-Mutant-3.0, PANTHER, SNPs & GO, PHD-SNP, Meta-SNP, and MutPred to determine the most damaging nsSNPs. Results: The results of the first structure analyses by FoldAmyloid and AmylPerd servers implied that regions including 5-15, 174-178, 180-184, 211-217, and 240-252 were the most sensitive parts of the protein sequence to amyloidosis. Screening all nsSNPs of the main protein isoform using bioinformatic servers revealed that substitution of Aspartic acid with Valine at position 178 (ID code: rs11538766 was the most deleterious nsSNP in the protein structure. Conclusion:  Substitution of the Aspartic acid with Valine at position 178 (D178V was the most pathogenic mutation in the human prion protein gene. Analyses from the MutPred server also showed that beta-sheets’ increment in the secondary structure was the main reason behind the molecular mechanism of the prion protein aggregation.

  11. Evolutionary changes in gene expression, coding sequence and copy-number at the Cyp6g1 locus contribute to resistance to multiple insecticides in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W R Harrop

    Full Text Available Widespread use of insecticides has led to insecticide resistance in many populations of insects. In some populations, resistance has evolved to multiple pesticides. In Drosophila melanogaster, resistance to multiple classes of insecticide is due to the overexpression of a single cytochrome P450 gene, Cyp6g1. Overexpression of Cyp6g1 appears to have evolved in parallel in Drosophila simulans, a sibling species of D. melanogaster, where it is also associated with insecticide resistance. However, it is not known whether the ability of the CYP6G1 enzyme to provide resistance to multiple insecticides evolved recently in D. melanogaster or if this function is present in all Drosophila species. Here we show that duplication of the Cyp6g1 gene occurred at least four times during the evolution of different Drosophila species, and the ability of CYP6G1 to confer resistance to multiple insecticides exists in D. melanogaster and D. simulans but not in Drosophila willistoni or Drosophila virilis. In D. virilis, which has multiple copies of Cyp6g1, one copy confers resistance to DDT and another to nitenpyram, suggesting that the divergence of protein sequence between copies subsequent to the duplication affected the activity of the enzyme. All orthologs tested conferred resistance to one or more insecticides, suggesting that CYP6G1 had the capacity to provide resistance to anthropogenic chemicals before they existed. Finally, we show that expression of Cyp6g1 in the Malpighian tubules, which contributes to DDT resistance in D. melanogaster, is specific to the D. melanogaster-D. simulans lineage. Our results suggest that a combination of gene duplication, regulatory changes and protein coding changes has taken place at the Cyp6g1 locus during evolution and this locus may play a role in providing resistance to different environmental toxins in different Drosophila species.

  12. Sequence analysis of Epstein-Barr virus EBNA-2 gene coding amino acid 148-487 in nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xinying

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA-2 plays a key role in the B-cell growth transformation by initiating and maintaining the proliferation of infected B-cell upon EBV infection in vitro. Most studies about EBNA-2 have focused on its functions yet little is known for its intertypic polymorphisms. Results Coding region for amino acid (aa 148-487 of the EBNA-2 gene was sequenced in 25 EBV-associated gastric carcinomas (EBVaGCs, 56 nasopharyngeal carcinomas (NPCs and 32 throat washings (TWs from healthy donors in Northern China. Three variations (g48991t, c48998a, t49613a were detected in all of the samples (113/113, 100%. EBNA-2 could be classified into four distinct subtypes: E2-A, E2-B, E2-C and E2-D based on the deletion status of three aa (294Q, 357K and 358G. Subtypes E2-A and E2-C were detected in 56/113 (49.6%, 38/113 (33.6% samples, respectively. E2-A was observed more in EBVaGCs samples and subtype E2-D was only detected in the NPC samples. Variation analysis in EBNA-2 functional domains: the TAD residue (I438L and the NLS residues (E476G, P484H and I486T were only detected in NPC samples which located in the carboxyl terminus of EBNA-2 gene. Conclusions The subtypes E2-A and E2-C were the dominant genotypes of the EBNA-2 gene in Northern China. The subtype E2-D may be associated with the tumorigenesis of NPC. The NPC isolates were prone harbor to more mutations than the other two groups in the functional domains.

  13. Speaking Code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Geoff

    Speaking Code begins by invoking the “Hello World” convention used by programmers when learning a new language, helping to establish the interplay of text and code that runs through the book. Interweaving the voice of critical writing from the humanities with the tradition of computing and software...

  14. Polar Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    QPSK Gaussian channels . .......................................................................... 39 vi 1. INTRODUCTION Forward error correction (FEC...Capacity of BSC. 7 Figure 5. Capacity of AWGN channel . 8 4. INTRODUCTION TO POLAR CODES Polar codes were introduced by E. Arikan in [1]. This paper...Under authority of C. A. Wilgenbusch, Head ISR Division EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This report describes the results of the project “More reliable wireless

  15. Genetic predictions of prion disease susceptibility in carnivore species based on variability of the prion gene coding region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Stewart

    Full Text Available Mammalian species vary widely in their apparent susceptibility to prion diseases. For example, several felid species developed prion disease (feline spongiform encephalopathy or FSE during the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE epidemic in the United Kingdom, whereas no canine BSE cases were detected. Whether either of these or other groups of carnivore species can contract other prion diseases (e.g. chronic wasting disease or CWD remains an open question. Variation in the host-encoded prion protein (PrP(C largely explains observed disease susceptibility patterns within ruminant species, and may explain interspecies differences in susceptibility as well. We sequenced and compared the open reading frame of the PRNP gene encoding PrP(C protein from 609 animal samples comprising 29 species from 22 genera of the Order Carnivora; amongst these samples were 15 FSE cases. Our analysis revealed that FSE cases did not encode an identifiable disease-associated PrP polymorphism. However, all canid PrPs contained aspartic acid or glutamic acid at codon 163 which we propose provides a genetic basis for observed susceptibility differences between canids and felids. Among other carnivores studied, wolverine (Gulo gulo and pine marten (Martes martes were the only non-canid species to also express PrP-Asp163, which may impact on their prion diseases susceptibility. Populations of black bear (Ursus americanus and mountain lion (Puma concolor from Colorado showed little genetic variation in the PrP protein and no variants likely to be highly resistant to prions in general, suggesting that strain differences between BSE and CWD prions also may contribute to the limited apparent host range of the latter.

  16. Pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib is not caused by mutations in the coding exons of the human parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related peptide receptor gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schipani, E.; Bergwitz, C.; Iida-Klein, A. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib (PHP-Ib) is thought to be from caused by a PTH/PTH-related peptide (PTHrP) receptor defect. To search for receptor mutations in genomic DNA from 17 PHP-Ib patients, three recently isolated human genomic DNA clones were further characterized by restriction enzyme mapping and nucleotide sequencing across intron/exon borders. Regions including all 14 coding exons and their splice junctions were amplified by polymerase chain reaction, and the products were analyzed by either temperature gradient gel electrophoresis or direct nucleotide sequencing. Silent polymorphisms were identified in exons G (1 of 17), M4 (1 of 17), and M7 (15 of 17). Two base changes were found in introns, 1 at the splice-donor site of the intron between exons E2 and E3 (1 of 17) and the other between exons G and M1 (2 of 17). Total ribonucleic acid from COS-7 cells expressing minigenes with or without the base change between exons E2 and E3 showed no difference by either Northern blot analysis or reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Radioligand binding was indistinguishable for both transiently expressed constructs. A missense mutation (E546 to K546) in the receptor`s cytoplamic tail (3 of 17) was also found in 1 of 60 healthy individuals, and PTH/PTHrP receptors with this mutation were functionally indistinguishable from wild-type receptors. PHP-Ib thus appears to be rarely, if ever, caused by mutations in the coding exons of the PTH/PTHrP receptor gene. 58 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Structure of the gene for the F allele of complement receptor type 1 and sequence of the coding region unique to the S allele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vik, D.P. (Univ. of New Mexico School of Medicine, Alburquerque, NM (United States)); Wong, W.W. (BASF Bioresearch Corporation, Worcester, MA (United States))

    1993-12-01

    The genes for human complement receptor type 1 (CR1) F and S alleles have been cloned and span a region of 133-160 kb on chromosome 1. The F allele was found to comprise 39 exons and the S allele contain and additional 8 exons. The leader sequence and 5[prime]-untranslated region are contained in one exon. Each of the long homologous repeats (LHR), which contain seven short consensus repeats (SCR), is composed of 8 exons. Within a LHR, SCR 1,5, and 7 are each encoded by a single exon, SCR 2 and 6 are each encoded by 2 exons, and a single exon codes for SCR 3 and 4. The transmembrane region is encoded by 2 exons and the cytoplasmic domain and the 3[prime]-untranslated regions are coded for by separate exons. The sequences of the eight S allele-specific exons were very similar to those from LHR-A and -B, as was predicted by comparison of the genomic restriction maps. It had previously been suggested that the alleles of CR1 have arisen by a mechanism of unequal crossover. A comparison of intron sequences from LHR-A, -B, -C indicated that the crossover event between LHR-A and -C that gave rise to LHR-B probably occurred within the fourth exon of these LHR. Likewise, the crossover event between LHR-A and -B that produced LHR-S probably occurred within a 383 bp region around the sixth exon. Analysis of RNA from peripheral blood cells by the S1 nuclease assay indicated that the transcription start site is 111 bp upstream of the translation initiation codon ATG. The 5[prime] rapid amplification of cDNA ends confirmed this position as a transcription start site and revealed another possible start site 29 bp further upstream. 46 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Two rare deletions upstream of the NRXN1 gene (2p16.3) affecting the non-coding mRNA AK127244 segregate with diverse psychopathological phenotypes in a family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duong, L. T. T.; Hoeffding, L. K.; Petersen, K. B.

    2015-01-01

    CNVs spanning the 2p16.3 (NRXN1) and the 15q11.2 gene rich region have been associated with severe neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia. Recently, studies have also revealed that CNVs in non-coding regions play an essential role in genomic variability in addition to disease...

  19. A non-synonymous coding change in the CYP19A1 gene Arg264Cys (rs700519 does not affect circulating estradiol, bone structure or fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jenny Z

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biosynthesis of estrogens from androgens is catalyzed by aromatase P450 enzyme, coded by the CYP19A1 gene on chromosome 15q21.2. Genetic variation within the CYP19A1 gene sequence has been shown to alter the function of the enzyme. The aim of this study is to investigate whether a non-synonymous Arg264Cys (rs700519 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP is associated with altered levels of circulating estradiol, areal bone mineral density or fracture. Methods This population- based study of 1,022 elderly Caucasian women (mean age 74.95 ± 2.60 years was genotyped for the rs700519 SNP were analyzed to detect any association with endocrine and bone phenotypes. Results The genotype frequencies were 997 wildtype (97.6%, 24 heterozygous (2.3% and 1 homozygous (0.1%. When individuals were grouped by genotype, there was no association between the polymorphism and serum estradiol (wildtype 27.5 ± 16.0; variants 31.2 ± 18.4, P = 0.27. There was also no association seen on hip bone mineral density (wildtype 0.81 ± 0.12; 0.84 ± 0.14 for variants, P = 0.48 or femoral neck bone mineral density (0.69 ± 0.10 for wildtype; 0.70 ± 0.12 for variants, P = 0.54 before or after correction of the data with age, height, weight and calcium therapy. There were also no associations with quantitative ultrasound measures of bone structure (broadband ultrasound attenuation, speed of sound and average stiffness. Conclusions In a cohort of 1,022 elderly Western Australian women, the presence of Arg264Cys (rs700519 polymorphism was not found to be associated with serum estradiol, bone structure or phenotypes.

  20. Exploring the structural and functional effect of pRB by significant nsSNP in the coding region of RB1 gene causing retinoblastoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajasekaran; R; Rao; Sethumadhavan

    2010-01-01

    In this study,we identified the most deleterious nsSNP in RB1 gene through structural and functional properties of its protein (pRB) and investigated its binding affinity with E2F-2.Out of 956 SNPs,we investigated 12 nsSNPs in coding region in which three of them (SNPids rs3092895,rs3092903 and rs3092905) are commonly found to be damaged by I-Mutant 2.0,SIFT and PolyPhen programs.With this effort,we modeled the mutant pRB proteins based on these deleterious nsSNPs.From a comparison of total energy,stabilizing residues and RMSD of these three mutant proteins with native pRB protein,we identified that the major mutation is from Glutamic acid to Glycine at the residue position of 746 of pRB.Further,we compared the binding efficiency of both native and mutant pRB (E746G) with E2F-2.We found that mutant pRB has less binding affinity with E2F-2 as compared to native type.This is due to sixteen hydrogen bonding and two salt bridges that exist between native type and E2F-2,whereas mutant type makes only thirteen hydrogen bonds and one salt bridge with E2F-2.Based on our investigation,we propose that the SNP with an id rs3092905 could be the most deleterious nsSNP in RB1 gene causing retinoblastoma.

  1. Cloning and Expression of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Gene Coding for TbpA and Development of an Indirect TbpA-ELISA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Wang-wang; HE Qi-gai; CHEN Huan-chun; XU Di-ping; WU Rui; ZHANG Rong-rong

    2008-01-01

    This study presents the cloning and expression of gene encoding transferrin-binding protein A from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in Escherichia coli expression system and the development of an indirect TbpA-ELISA. The gene coding TbpA was amplified from the A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 genome using polymerase chain reaction and cloned to pET-28b expression vector under the control of strong, inducible T7 promoter. The recombinant plasmid was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3). The expressed fusion protein was analyzed using SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. The diagnostic potential of recombinant TbpA (rTbpA) was evaluated through an antibody-detection indirect ELISA based on the purified rTbpA. The TbpA antibodies were detectable in mice on day 7 after vaccination with purified rTbpA protein or infection with A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 10 with the TbpA-based ELISA. In addition, the TbpA-ELISA was able to detect 12 serotyping rabbit antisera postinoculation (PI) with A. pleuropneumoniae 12 serotypes experimentally. The comparable result was obtained by detecting the 117 clinical serum samples using, respectively, the TbpA-ELISA and indirect hemagglutination test (IHA) based on multiplex antigen. The result indicates that the TbpA-ELISA was the more sensitive method compared with the Mix-IHA method because of its consistent presence in A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes. In conclusion, the conserved TbpA of A. pleuropneumoniae can be used for the development of a cross-serotype diagnostic method for the detection of antibodies against A. pleuropneumoniae.

  2. Detection of genetic diversity and selection at the coding region of the melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R) gene in Tibetan pigs and Landrace pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Jin, Long; Long, Keren; Chai, Jie; Ma, Jideng; Tang, Qianzi; Tian, Shilin; Hu, Yaodong; Lin, Ling; Wang, Xun; Jiang, Anan; Li, Xuewei; Li, Mingzhou

    2016-01-10

    Domestication and subsequent selective pressures have produced a large variety of pig coat colors in different regions and breeds. The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene plays a crucial role in determining coat color of mammals. Here, we investigated genetic diversity and selection at the coding region of the porcine melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R) in Tibetan pigs and Landrace pigs. By contrast, genetic variability was much lower in Landrace pigs than in Tibetan pigs. Meanwhile, haplotype analysis showed that Tibetan pigs possessed shared haplotypes, suggesting a possibility of recent introgression event by way of crossbreeding with neighboring domestic pigs or shared ancestral polymorphism. Additionally, we detected positive selection at the MC1R in both Tibetan pigs and Landrace pigs through the dN/dS analysis. These findings suggested that novel phenotypic change (dark coat color) caused by novel mutations may help Tibetan pigs against intensive solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation and camouflage in wild environment, whereas white coat color in Landrace were intentionally selected by human after domestication. Furthermore, both the phylogenetic analysis and the network analysis provided clues that MC1R in Asian and European wild boars may have initially experienced different selective pressures, and MC1R alleles diversified in modern domesticated pigs.

  3. Upregulation of Haploinsufficient Gene Expression in the Brain by Targeting a Long Non-coding RNA Improves Seizure Phenotype in a Model of Dravet Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hsiao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Dravet syndrome is a devastating genetic brain disorder caused by heterozygous loss-of-function mutation in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene SCN1A. There are currently no treatments, but the upregulation of SCN1A healthy allele represents an appealing therapeutic strategy. In this study we identified a novel, evolutionary conserved mechanism controlling the expression of SCN1A that is mediated by an antisense non-coding RNA (SCN1ANAT. Using oligonucleotide-based compounds (AntagoNATs targeting SCN1ANAT we were able to induce specific upregulation of SCN1A both in vitro and in vivo, in the brain of Dravet knock-in mouse model and a non-human primate. AntagoNAT-mediated upregulation of Scn1a in postnatal Dravet mice led to significant improvements in seizure phenotype and excitability of hippocampal interneurons. These results further elucidate the pathophysiology of Dravet syndrome and outline a possible new approach for the treatment of this and other genetic disorders with similar etiology.

  4. GolS controls the response to gold by the hierarchical induction of Salmonella-specific genes that include a CBA efflux-coding operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontel, Lucas B; Audero, María E Pérez; Espariz, Martín; Checa, Susana K; Soncini, Fernando C

    2007-11-01

    Salmonella employs a specific set of proteins that allows it to detect the presence of gold salts in the environment and to mount the appropriate resistance response. This includes a P-type ATPase, GolT, and a small cytoplasmic metal binding protein, GolB. Their expression is controlled by a MerR-like sensor, GolS, which is highly selective for Au ions. Here, we identify a new GolS-controlled operon named gesABC which codes for a CBA efflux system, and establish its role in Au resistance. GesABC can also mediate drug resistance when induced by Au in a GolS-dependent manner, in a strain deleted in the main drug transporter acrAB. The GolS-controlled transcription of gesABC differs from the other GolS-regulated loci. It is activated by gold, but not induced by copper, even in a strain deleted of the main Cu transporter gene copA, which triggers a substantial GolS-dependent induction of golTS and golB. We demonstrate that the Au-dependent induction of gesABC transcription requires higher GolS levels than for the other members of the gol regulon. This correlates with a divergent GolS operator in the gesABC promoter. We propose that the hierarchical induction within the gol regulon allows Salmonella to cope with Au-contaminated environments.

  5. ICP4-binding sites in the promoter and coding regions of the herpes simplex virus gD gene contribute to activation of in vitro transcription by ICP4.

    OpenAIRE

    Tedder, D G; Everett, R D; Wilcox, K W; Beard, P; Pizer, L I

    1989-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus immediate-early gene product ICP4 activates the transcription of viral early and late genes. We characterized the DNA sequence elements of the early glycoprotein D (gD) gene that play a role in the response to ICP4 in vitro. Using gel mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting, we identified three ICP4-binding sites, two 5' to the mRNA start site and a third within the coding region. Site II, which gave a footprint between nucleotides -75 and -111 relative to the ...

  6. Speech coding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravishankar, C., Hughes Network Systems, Germantown, MD

    1998-05-08

    Speech is the predominant means of communication between human beings and since the invention of the telephone by Alexander Graham Bell in 1876, speech services have remained to be the core service in almost all telecommunication systems. Original analog methods of telephony had the disadvantage of speech signal getting corrupted by noise, cross-talk and distortion Long haul transmissions which use repeaters to compensate for the loss in signal strength on transmission links also increase the associated noise and distortion. On the other hand digital transmission is relatively immune to noise, cross-talk and distortion primarily because of the capability to faithfully regenerate digital signal at each repeater purely based on a binary decision. Hence end-to-end performance of the digital link essentially becomes independent of the length and operating frequency bands of the link Hence from a transmission point of view digital transmission has been the preferred approach due to its higher immunity to noise. The need to carry digital speech became extremely important from a service provision point of view as well. Modem requirements have introduced the need for robust, flexible and secure services that can carry a multitude of signal types (such as voice, data and video) without a fundamental change in infrastructure. Such a requirement could not have been easily met without the advent of digital transmission systems, thereby requiring speech to be coded digitally. The term Speech Coding is often referred to techniques that represent or code speech signals either directly as a waveform or as a set of parameters by analyzing the speech signal. In either case, the codes are transmitted to the distant end where speech is reconstructed or synthesized using the received set of codes. A more generic term that is applicable to these techniques that is often interchangeably used with speech coding is the term voice coding. This term is more generic in the sense that the

  7. Screening and association testing of common coding variation in steroid hormone receptor co-activator and co-repressor genes in relation to breast cancer risk: the Multiethnic Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stallcup Michael R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Only a limited number of studies have performed comprehensive investigations of coding variation in relation to breast cancer risk. Given the established role of estrogens in breast cancer, we hypothesized that coding variation in steroid receptor coactivator and corepressor genes may alter inter-individual response to estrogen and serve as markers of breast cancer risk. Methods We sequenced the coding exons of 17 genes (EP300, CCND1, NME1, NCOA1, NCOA2, NCOA3, SMARCA4, SMARCA2, CARM1, FOXA1, MPG, NCOR1, NCOR2, CALCOCO1, PRMT1, PPARBP and CREBBP suggested to influence transcriptional activation by steroid hormone receptors in a multiethnic panel of women with advanced breast cancer (n = 95: African Americans, Latinos, Japanese, Native Hawaiians and European Americans. Association testing of validated coding variants was conducted in a breast cancer case-control study (1,612 invasive cases and 1,961 controls nested in the Multiethnic Cohort. We used logistic regression to estimate odds ratios for allelic effects in ethnic-pooled analyses as well as in subgroups defined by disease stage and steroid hormone receptor status. We also investigated effect modification by established breast cancer risk factors that are associated with steroid hormone exposure. Results We identified 45 coding variants with frequencies ≥ 1% in any one ethnic group (43 non-synonymous variants. We observed nominally significant positive associations with two coding variants in ethnic-pooled analyses (NCOR2: His52Arg, OR = 1.79; 95% CI, 1.05–3.05; CALCOCO1: Arg12His, OR = 2.29; 95% CI, 1.00–5.26. A small number of variants were associated with risk in disease subgroup analyses and we observed no strong evidence of effect modification by breast cancer risk factors. Based on the large number of statistical tests conducted in this study, the nominally significant associations that we observed may be due to chance, and will need to be confirmed in other

  8. Speaking Code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Geoff

    ; alternatives to mainstream development, from performances of the live-coding scene to the organizational forms of commons-based peer production; the democratic promise of social media and their paradoxical role in suppressing political expression; and the market’s emptying out of possibilities for free...... development, Speaking Code unfolds an argument to undermine the distinctions between criticism and practice, and to emphasize the aesthetic and political aspects of software studies. Not reducible to its functional aspects, program code mirrors the instability inherent in the relationship of speech...... expression in the public realm. The book’s line of argument defends language against its invasion by economics, arguing that speech continues to underscore the human condition, however paradoxical this may seem in an era of pervasive computing....

  9. The Aster code; Code Aster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delbecq, J.M

    1999-07-01

    The Aster code is a 2D or 3D finite-element calculation code for structures developed by the R and D direction of Electricite de France (EdF). This dossier presents a complete overview of the characteristics and uses of the Aster code: introduction of version 4; the context of Aster (organisation of the code development, versions, systems and interfaces, development tools, quality assurance, independent validation); static mechanics (linear thermo-elasticity, Euler buckling, cables, Zarka-Casier method); non-linear mechanics (materials behaviour, big deformations, specific loads, unloading and loss of load proportionality indicators, global algorithm, contact and friction); rupture mechanics (G energy restitution level, restitution level in thermo-elasto-plasticity, 3D local energy restitution level, KI and KII stress intensity factors, calculation of limit loads for structures), specific treatments (fatigue, rupture, wear, error estimation); meshes and models (mesh generation, modeling, loads and boundary conditions, links between different modeling processes, resolution of linear systems, display of results etc..); vibration mechanics (modal and harmonic analysis, dynamics with shocks, direct transient dynamics, seismic analysis and aleatory dynamics, non-linear dynamics, dynamical sub-structuring); fluid-structure interactions (internal acoustics, mass, rigidity and damping); linear and non-linear thermal analysis; steels and metal industry (structure transformations); coupled problems (internal chaining, internal thermo-hydro-mechanical coupling, chaining with other codes); products and services. (J.S.)

  10. Non-Protein Coding RNAs

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, Nils G; Batey, Robert T

    2009-01-01

    This book assembles chapters from experts in the Biophysics of RNA to provide a broadly accessible snapshot of the current status of this rapidly expanding field. The 2006 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to the discoverers of RNA interference, highlighting just one example of a large number of non-protein coding RNAs. Because non-protein coding RNAs outnumber protein coding genes in mammals and other higher eukaryotes, it is now thought that the complexity of organisms is correlated with the fraction of their genome that encodes non-protein coding RNAs. Essential biological processes as diverse as cell differentiation, suppression of infecting viruses and parasitic transposons, higher-level organization of eukaryotic chromosomes, and gene expression itself are found to largely be directed by non-protein coding RNAs. The biophysical study of these RNAs employs X-ray crystallography, NMR, ensemble and single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, optical tweezers, cryo-electron microscopy, and ot...

  11. Functional Investigation of a Non-coding Variant Associated with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis in Zebrafish: Elevated Expression of the Ladybird Homeobox Gene Causes Body Axis Deformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we identified an adolescent idiopathic scoliosis susceptibility locus near human ladybird homeobox 1 (LBX1 and FLJ41350 by a genome-wide association study. Here, we characterized the associated non-coding variant and investigated the function of these genes. A chromosome conformation capture assay revealed that the genome region with the most significantly associated single nucleotide polymorphism (rs11190870 physically interacted with the promoter region of LBX1-FLJ41350. The promoter in the direction of LBX1, combined with a 590-bp region including rs11190870, had higher transcriptional activity with the risk allele than that with the non-risk allele in HEK 293T cells. The ubiquitous overexpression of human LBX1 or either of the zebrafish lbx genes (lbx1a, lbx1b, and lbx2, but not FLJ41350, in zebrafish embryos caused body curvature followed by death prior to vertebral column formation. Such body axis deformation was not observed in transcription activator-like effector nucleases mediated knockout zebrafish of lbx1b or lbx2. Mosaic expression of lbx1b driven by the GATA2 minimal promoter and the lbx1b enhancer in zebrafish significantly alleviated the embryonic lethal phenotype to allow observation of the later onset of the spinal curvature with or without vertebral malformation. Deformation of the embryonic body axis by lbx1b overexpression was associated with defects in convergent extension, which is a component of the main axis-elongation machinery in gastrulating embryos. In embryos overexpressing lbx1b, wnt5b, a ligand of the non-canonical Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP pathway, was significantly downregulated. Injection of mRNA for wnt5b or RhoA, a key downstream effector of Wnt/PCP signaling, rescued the defective convergent extension phenotype and attenuated the lbx1b-induced curvature of the body axis. Thus, our study presents a novel pathological feature of LBX1 and its zebrafish homologs in body axis deformation at

  12. Optimal codes as Tanner codes with cyclic component codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høholdt, Tom; Pinero, Fernando; Zeng, Peng

    2014-01-01

    In this article we study a class of graph codes with cyclic code component codes as affine variety codes. Within this class of Tanner codes we find some optimal binary codes. We use a particular subgraph of the point-line incidence plane of A(2,q) as the Tanner graph, and we are able to describe...... the codes succinctly using Gröbner bases....

  13. Primary structure and promoter analysis of leghemoglobin genes of the stem-nodulated tropical legume Sesbania rostrata: conserved coding sequences, cis-elements and trans-acting factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metz, B A; Welters, P; Hoffmann, H J;

    1988-01-01

    The primary structure of a leghemoglobin (lb) gene from the stem-nodulated, tropical legume Sesbania rostrata and two lb gene promoter regions was analysed. The S. rostrata lb gene structure and Lb amino acid composition were found to be highly conserved with previously described lb genes and Lb...

  14. NOVEL BIPHASE CODE -INTEGRATED SIDELOBE SUPPRESSION CODE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Feixue; Ou Gang; Zhuang Zhaowen

    2004-01-01

    A kind of novel binary phase code named sidelobe suppression code is proposed in this paper. It is defined to be the code whose corresponding optimal sidelobe suppression filter outputs the minimum sidelobes. It is shown that there do exist sidelobe suppression codes better than the conventional optimal codes-Barker codes. For example, the sidelobe suppression code of length 11 with filter of length 39 has better sidelobe level up to 17dB than that of Barker code with the same code length and filter length.

  15. From concatenated codes to graph codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Jørn; Høholdt, Tom

    2004-01-01

    We consider codes based on simple bipartite expander graphs. These codes may be seen as the first step leading from product type concatenated codes to more complex graph codes. We emphasize constructions of specific codes of realistic lengths, and study the details of decoding by message passing...

  16. Sequence of the intron/exon junctions of the coding region of the human androgen receptor gene and identification of a point mutation in a family with complete androgen insensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubahn, D.B.; Simental, J.A.; Higgs, H.N.; Wilson, E.M.; French, F.S. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (USA)); Brown, T.R.; Migeon, C.J. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Androgens act through a receptor protein (AR) to mediate sex differentiation and development of the male phenotype. The authors have isolated the eight exons in the amino acid coding region of the AR gene from a human X chromosome library. Nucleotide sequences of the AR gene intron/exon boundaries were determined for use in designing synthetic oligonucleotide primers to bracket coding exons for amplification by the polymerase chain reaction. Genomic DNA was amplified from 46, XY phenotypic female siblings with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome. AR binding affinity for dihydrotestosterone in the affected siblings was lower than in normal males, but the binding capacity was normal. Sequence analysis of amplified exons demonstrated within the AR steroid-binding domain (exon G) a single guanine to adenine mutation, resulting in replacement of valine with methionine at amino acid residue 866. As expected, the carrier mother had both normal and mutant AR genes. Thus, a single point mutation in the steroid-binding domain of the AR gene correlated with the expression of an AR protein ineffective in stimulating male sexual development.

  17. Good Codes From Generalised Algebraic Geometry Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Jibril, Mubarak; Ahmed, Mohammed Zaki; Tjhai, Cen

    2010-01-01

    Algebraic geometry codes or Goppa codes are defined with places of degree one. In constructing generalised algebraic geometry codes places of higher degree are used. In this paper we present 41 new codes over GF(16) which improve on the best known codes of the same length and rate. The construction method uses places of small degree with a technique originally published over 10 years ago for the construction of generalised algebraic geometry codes.

  18. The rluC gene of Escherichia coli codes for a pseudouridine synthase that is solely responsible for synthesis of pseudouridine at positions 955, 2504, and 2580 in 23 S ribosomal RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, J; Sun, D; Englund, N; Ofengand, J

    1998-07-17

    Escherichia coli ribosomal RNA contains 10 pseudouridines, one in the 16 S RNA and nine in the 23 S RNA. Previously, the gene for the synthase responsible for the 16 S RNA pseudouridine was identified and cloned, as was a gene for a synthase that makes a single pseudouridine in 23 S RNA. The yceC open reading frame of E. coli is one of a set of genes homologous to these previously identified ribosomal RNA pseudouridine synthases. In this work, the gene was cloned, overexpressed, and shown to code for a pseudouridine synthase able to react with in vitro transcripts of 23 S ribosomal RNA. Deletion of the gene and analysis of the 23 S RNA from the deletion strain for the presence of pseudouridine at its nine known sites revealed that this synthase is solely responsible in vivo for the synthesis of three of the nine pseudouridine residues, at positions 955, 2504, and 2580. Therefore, this gene has been renamed rluC. Despite the absence of one-third of the normal complement of pseudouridines, there was no change in the exponential growth rate in either LB or M-9 medium at temperatures ranging from 24 to 42 degrees C. From this work and our previous studies, we have now identified three synthases that account for 50% of the pseudouridines in the E. coli ribosome.

  19. Nitrogen control of the glnN gene that codes for GS type III, the only glutamine synthetase in the cyanobacterium Pseudanabaena sp. PCC 6903.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, J L; García-Domínguez, M; Florencio, F J

    1998-12-01

    Pseudanabaena sp. strain PCC 6903 is the first cyanobacteria lacking the typical prokaryotic glutamine synthetase type I encoded by the glnA gene. The glnN gene product, glutamine synthetase type III, is the only glutamine synthetase activity present in this cyanobacterium. Analysis of glnN expression clearly indicated a nitrogen-dependent regulation. Pseudanabaena glnN gene expression and GSIII activity were upregulated under nitrogen starvation or using nitrate as a nitrogen source, while low levels of transcript and activity were found in ammonium-containing medium. Primer extension analysis showed that the glnN gene promoter structure resembled that of the NtcA-related promoters. Mobility shift assays demonstrated that Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 NtcA protein, expressed and purified from Escherichia coli, bound to the promoter of the Pseudanabaena 6903 glnN gene. The NtcA control of the glnN gene in this cyanobacterium suggested that, in the absence of a glnA gene, NtcA took control of the only glutamine synthetase gene in a fashion similar to the way the glnA gene is governed in those cyanobacteria harbouring a glnA gene.

  20. Two perspectives on the origin of the standard genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Supratim; Aggarwal, Neha; Bandhu, Ashutosh Vishwa

    2014-12-01

    The origin of a genetic code made it possible to create ordered sequences of amino acids. In this article we provide two perspectives on code origin by carrying out simulations of code-sequence coevolution in finite populations with the aim of examining how the standard genetic code may have evolved from more primitive code(s) encoding a small number of amino acids. We determine the efficacy of the physico-chemical hypothesis of code origin in the absence and presence of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) by allowing a diverse collection of code-sequence sets to compete with each other. We find that in the absence of horizontal gene transfer, natural selection between competing codes distinguished by differences in the degree of physico-chemical optimization is unable to explain the structure of the standard genetic code. However, for certain probabilities of the horizontal transfer events, a universal code emerges having a structure that is consistent with the standard genetic code.

  1. In silico comparison of genomic regions containing genes coding for enzymes and transcription factors for the phenylpropanoid pathway in Phaseolus vulgaris L. and Glycine max L. Merr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yarmilla eReinprecht

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Legumes contain a variety of phytochemicals derived from the phenylpropanoid pathway that have important effects on human health as well as seed coat color, plant disease resistance and nodulation. However, the information about the genes involved in this important pathway is fragmentary in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.. The objectives of this research were to isolate genes that function in and control the phenylpropanoid pathway in common bean, determine their genomic locations in silico in common bean and soybean, and analyze sequences of the 4CL gene family in two common bean genotypes. Sequences of phenylpropanoid pathway genes available for common bean or other plant species were aligned, and the conserved regions were used to design sequence-specific primers. The PCR products were cloned and sequenced and the gene sequences along with common bean gene-based (g markers were BLASTed against the Glycine max v.1.0 genome and the P. vulgaris v.1.0 (Andean early release genome. In addition, gene sequences were BLASTed against the OAC Rex (Mesoamerican genome sequence assembly. In total, fragments of 46 structural and regulatory phenylpropanoid pathway genes were characterized in this way and placed in silico on common bean and soybean sequence maps. The maps contain over 250 common bean g and SSR (simple sequence repeat markers and identify the positions of more than 60 additional phenylpropanoid pathway gene sequences, plus the putative locations of seed coat color genes. The majority of cloned phenylpropanoid pathway gene sequences were mapped to one location in the common bean genome but had two positions in soybean. The comparison of the genomic maps confirmed previous studies, which show that common bean and soybean share genomic regions, including those containing phenylpropanoid pathway gene sequences, with conserved synteny. Indels identified in the comparison of Andean and Mesoamerican common bean sequences might be used to develop

  2. A second gene for acyl-(acyl-carrier-protein): glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase in squash, Cucurbita moschata cv. Shirogikuza(*), codes for an oleate-selective isozyme: molecular cloning and protein purification studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, I; Sugiura, M; Enju, A; Nakamura, M

    2000-12-01

    A new isogene for acyl-(acyl-carrier-protein):glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT; EC 2.3.1.15) in squash has been cloned and the gene product was identified as oleate-selective GPAT. Using PCR primers that could hybridise with exons for a previously cloned squash GPAT, we obtained two PCR products of different size: one coded for a previously cloned squash GPAT corresponding to non-selective isoforms AT2 and AT3, and the other for a new isozyme, probably the oleate-selective isoform AT1. Full-length amino acid sequences of respective isozymes were deduced from the nucleotide sequences of genomic genes and cDNAs, which were cloned by a series of PCR-based methods. Thus, we designated the new gene CmATS1;1 and the other one CmATS1;2. Genome blot analysis revealed that the squash genome contained the two isogenes at non-allelic loci. AT1-active fractions were partially purified, and three polypeptide bands were identified as being AT1 polypeptides, which exhibited relative molecular masses of 39.5-40.5 kDa, pI values of 6.75-7.15, and oleate selectivity over palmitate. Partial amino-terminal sequences obtained from two of these bands verified that the new isogene codes for AT1 polypeptides.

  3. Cloning and sequencing of the genes coding for the A and B subunits of vacuolar-type Na(+)-ATPase from Enterococcus hirae. Coexistence of vacuolar- and F0F1-type ATPases in one bacterial cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, K; Yamato, I; Kakinuma, Y

    1993-06-05

    The eubacterium Enterococcus hirae ATCC 9790 possesses a H(+)-translocating ATPase, and the deduced amino acid sequences of the genes coding for this enzyme have indicated that it is a typical F0F1-type ATPase (Shibata, C., Ehara, T., Tomura, K., Igarashi, K., and Kobayashi, H. (1992) J. Bacteriol. 174, 6117-6124). We cloned the ntpA and ntpB genes coding for the A and B subunits, respectively, of Na(+)-translocating ATPase from the same bacterium, and the full amino acid sequences of the two subunits were deduced from the nucleotide sequence. The A (593 amino acid residues) and B (458 amino acid residues) subunits were highly homologous (48-60% identical) to the A (large or alpha) and the B (small or beta) subunits, respectively, of vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPases which have been found in eukaryotic endomembrane systems (Neurospora crassa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, and carrot) and archaebacterial cell membranes (Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and Methanosarcina barkeri). The A and B subunits of Na(+)-ATPase showed about 23-28% identities with the beta and alpha subunits of E. hirae F1-ATPase and of Escherichia coli F1-ATPase, respectively. These results indicate that E. hirae Na(+)-ATPase belongs to the vacuolar-type ATPase. This is the first demonstration that both genes for V- and F-type ATPases are functionally expressed in one bacterial cell.

  4. Reconsideration of systematic relationships within the order Euplotida (Protista, Ciliophora) using new sequences of the gene coding for small-subunit rRNA and testing the use of combined data sets to construct phylogenies of the Diophrys-complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhenzhen; Song, Weibo; Clamp, John C; Chen, Zigui; Gao, Shan; Zhang, Qianqian

    2009-03-01

    Comprehensive molecular analyses of phylogenetic relationships within euplotid ciliates are relatively rare, and the relationships among some families remain questionable. We performed phylogenetic analyses of the order Euplotida based on new sequences of the gene coding for small-subunit RNA (SSrRNA) from a variety of taxa across the entire order as well as sequences from some of these taxa of other genes (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and histone H4) that have not been included in previous analyses. Phylogenetic trees based on SSrRNA gene sequences constructed with four different methods had a consistent branching pattern that included the following features: (1) the "typical" euplotids comprised a paraphyletic assemblage composed of two divergent clades (family Uronychiidae and families Euplotidae-Certesiidae-Aspidiscidae-Gastrocirrhidae), (2) in the family Uronychiidae, the genera Uronychia and Paradiophrys formed a clearly outlined, well-supported clade that seemed to be rather divergent from Diophrys and Diophryopsis, suggesting that the Diophrys-complex may have had a longer and more separate evolutionary history than previously supposed, (3) inclusion of 12 new SSrRNA sequences in analyses of Euplotidae revealed two new clades of species within the family and cast additional doubt on the present classification of genera within the family, and (4) the intraspecific divergence among five species of Aspidisca was far greater than those of closely related genera. The ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 coding regions and partial histone H4 genes of six morphospecies in the Diophrys-complex were sequenced along with their SSrRNA genes and used to compare phylogenies constructed from single data sets to those constructed from combined sets. Results indicated that combined analyses could be used to construct more reliable, less ambiguous phylogenies of complex groups like the order Euplotida, because they provide a greater amount and diversity of information.

  5. Space Time Codes from Permutation Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Henkel, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    A new class of space time codes with high performance is presented. The code design utilizes tailor-made permutation codes, which are known to have large minimal distances as spherical codes. A geometric connection between spherical and space time codes has been used to translate them into the final space time codes. Simulations demonstrate that the performance increases with the block lengths, a result that has been conjectured already in previous work. Further, the connection to permutation codes allows for moderate complex en-/decoding algorithms.

  6. Characterization of tissue expression and full-length coding sequence of a novel human gene mapping at 3q12.1 and transcribed in oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayein, Nicole-Adeline; Stankoff, Bruno; Auffray, Charles; Devignes, Marie-Dominique

    2002-05-01

    Macro-array differential hybridization of a collection of 5058 human gene transcripts represented in an IMAGE infant brain cDNA library has led to the identification of transcripts displaying preferential or specific expression in brain (Genome Res. 9 (1999) 195; http://idefix.upr420.vjf.cnrs.fr/IMAGE). Most of these genes correspond to as yet undescribed functions. Detailed characterization of the expression, sequence, and genome assignment of one of these genes named C3orf4, is reported here. The full-length sequence of the transcript was obtained by 5' extension RT-PCR. The gene transcript (2.8 kb) encodes a 253 amino acid long protein, with four transmembrane domains. The position of the C3orf4 gene was determined at 3q12.1 thanks to the draft sequence of the human genome. It is composed of five exons spanning more than 7 kb. No TATAA box but a CpG island was found upstream of the beginning of the gene. Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization revealed a predominant expression in myelinated structures such as corpus callosum and spinal cord. RT-PCR showed expression of the C3orf4 gene in rat optic nerve and cultured oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the central nervous system, but not in astrocytes. This work supports further investigations aimed at determining the role of the C3orf4 gene in myelinating cells.

  7. ASSIGNMENT OF THE GENE CODING FOR HUMAN CYTOCHROME-C-OXIDASE SUBUNIT-VIB TO CHROMOSOME-19, BAND-Q13.1, BY FLUORESCENCE INSITU HYBRIDIZATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TAANMAN, JW; VANDERVEEN, AY; SCHRAGE, C; DEVRIES, H; BUYS, CHCM

    1991-01-01

    A cloned, 40 kb, genomic DNA fragment, containing the last exon of the gene for human cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIb and its flanking sequences, was used as a probe to localize the subunit VIb gene on human metaphase chromosomes. The probe was labelled with Bio-11-dUTP and detected by fluorescence

  8. The evaluation of an identification algorithm for Mycobacterium species using the 16S rRNA coding gene and rpoB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Kazumi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The 16S rRNA gene identification is a rapid and prevalent method but still has some limitations. Therefore, the stepwise combination of rpoB with 16S rRNA gene analysis is an effective system for the identification of Mycobacterium species.

  9. Recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) with inserted gene coding for GM-CSF as a new vector for cancer immunogene therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janke, M.; Peeters, B.P.H.; Leeuw, de O.S.; Moormann, R.J.M.; Arnold, A.; Fournier, P.; Schirrmacher, V.

    2007-01-01

    This is the first report describing recombinant (rec) Newcastle disease virus (NDV) as vector for gene therapy of cancer. The gene encoding granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was inserted as an additional transcription unit at two different positions into the NDV genome. The r

  10. Fundamentals of convolutional coding

    CERN Document Server

    Johannesson, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Fundamentals of Convolutional Coding, Second Edition, regarded as a bible of convolutional coding brings you a clear and comprehensive discussion of the basic principles of this field * Two new chapters on low-density parity-check (LDPC) convolutional codes and iterative coding * Viterbi, BCJR, BEAST, list, and sequential decoding of convolutional codes * Distance properties of convolutional codes * Includes a downloadable solutions manual

  11. In silico comparison of genomic regions containing genes coding for enzymes and transcription factors for the phenylpropanoid pathway in Phaseolus vulgaris L. and Glycine max L. Merr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinprecht, Yarmilla; Yadegari, Zeinab; Perry, Gregory E.; Siddiqua, Mahbuba; Wright, Lori C.; McClean, Phillip E.; Pauls, K. Peter

    2013-01-01

    Legumes contain a variety of phytochemicals derived from the phenylpropanoid pathway that have important effects on human health as well as seed coat color, plant disease resistance and nodulation. However, the information about the genes involved in this important pathway is fragmentary in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). The objectives of this research were to isolate genes that function in and control the phenylpropanoid pathway in common bean, determine their genomic locations in silico in common bean and soybean, and analyze sequences of the 4CL gene family in two common bean genotypes. Sequences of phenylpropanoid pathway genes available for common bean or other plant species were aligned, and the conserved regions were used to design sequence-specific primers. The PCR products were cloned and sequenced and the gene sequences along with common bean gene-based (g) markers were BLASTed against the Glycine max v.1.0 genome and the P. vulgaris v.1.0 (Andean) early release genome. In addition, gene sequences were BLASTed against the OAC Rex (Mesoamerican) genome sequence assembly. In total, fragments of 46 structural and regulatory phenylpropanoid pathway genes were characterized in this way and placed in silico on common bean and soybean sequence maps. The maps contain over 250 common bean g and SSR (simple sequence repeat) markers and identify the positions of more than 60 additional phenylpropanoid pathway gene sequences, plus the putative locations of seed coat color genes. The majority of cloned phenylpropanoid pathway gene sequences were mapped to one location in the common bean genome but had two positions in soybean. The comparison of the genomic maps confirmed previous studies, which show that common bean and soybean share genomic regions, including those containing phenylpropanoid pathway gene sequences, with conserved synteny. Indels identified in the comparison of Andean and Mesoamerican common bean 4CL gene sequences might be used to develop inter

  12. Determination of the number of copies of genes coding for 5s-rRNA and tRNA in the genomes of 43 species of wheat and Aegilops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vakhitov, V.A.; Gimalov, F.R.; Nikonorov, Yu.M.

    1986-10-01

    The number of 5s-rRNA and tRNA genes has been studied in 43 species of wheat and Aegilops differing in ploidy level, genomic composition and origin. It has been demonstrated that the repeatability of the 5s-rRNA and tRNA genes increases in wheat with increasing ploidy level, but not in proportion to the genome size. In Aegilops, in distinction from wheat, the relative as well as absolute number of 5s-RNA genes increases with increasing ploidy level. The proportion of the sequences coding for tRNA in the dipoloid and polyploid Aegilops species is practically similar, while the number of tRNA genes increases almost 2-3 times with increasing ploidy level. Large variability has been recorded between the species with similar genomic composition and ploidy level in respect of the number of the 5s-rRNA and tRNA genes. It has been demonstrated that integration of the initial genomes of the amphidiploids is accompanied by elimination of a particular part of these genomes. It has been concluded that the mechanisms of establishment and evolution of genomes in the intra- and intergeneric allopolyploids are not identical.

  13. Maturity-onset diabetes of the young caused by a balanced translocation where the 20q12 break point results in disruption upstream of the coding region of hepatocyte nuclear factor-4alpha (HNF4A) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloyn, Anna L; Ellard, Sian; Shepherd, Maggie; Howell, Rodney T; Parry, Elizabeth M; Jefferson, Andrew; Levy, Elaine R; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2002-07-01

    Monogenic human disorders have been used as paradigms for complex genetic disease and as tools for establishing important insights into mechanisms of gene regulation and transcriptional control. Maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is a monogenic dominantly inherited form of diabetes that is characterized by defective insulin secretion from the pancreatic beta-cells. A wide variety of mutation types in five different genes have been identified that result in this condition. There have been no reports of a chromosome deletion or translocation resulting in MODY. We report a pedigree where MODY cosegregates with a balanced translocation [karyotype 46, XX t(3;20) (p21.2;q12)]. The chromosome 20 break point, 20q12, is within the region of one of the known MODY genes, hepatocyte nuclear factor-4alpha (HNF4A). Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis demonstrated that the break point does not disrupt the coding region of this gene, but it lies at least 6 kb upstream of the conventional promoter (P1). We propose that this mutation disrupts the spatial relationship between the recently described alternate distal pancreatic promoter (P2) and HNF4A. This is the first case of MODY due to a balanced translocation, and it provides evidence to confirm the crucial role of an upstream regulator of HNF4A gene expression in the beta-cell.

  14. Stimulation of chondrocytes in vitro by gene transfer with plasmids coding for epidermal growth factor (hEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, H; Mehlhorn, A T; Zwingmann, J

    2005-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) influence critical characteristics of chondrocytes. The effects on metabolism and differentiation were evaluated following transfection using specific plasmids coding for both cytokines. Chondrocytes were isolated from...... of recombinant hEGF and bFGF resulted in a significant increase in cell proliferation and glucosaminoglycan production. Chondrocytes were transfected with vectors coding for either hEGF or bFGF and the production of these proteins was measured in supernatants by ELISA. Expression kinetics showed different...... patterns: hEGF was detectable 2.5 days following transfection and peaked at day 5.5, whereas bFGF-production reached its maximum 1.5 days after transfection, declining thereafter. Chondrocytes endogenously produced significant amounts of bFGF within 5 days following isolation. Proliferation of h...

  15. Genes coding for intermediate filament proteins closely related to the hagfish "thread keratins (TK)" alpha and gamma also exist in lamprey, teleosts and amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffeld, Michael; Schultess, Jan

    2006-05-15

    The "thread keratins (TK)" alpha and gamma so far have been considered highly specialized intermediate filament (IF) proteins restricted to hagfish. From lamprey, we now have sequenced five novel IF proteins closely related to TKalpha and TKgamma, respectively. Moreover, we have detected corresponding sequences in EST and genomic databases of teleosts and amphibians. The structure of the TKalpha genes and the positions of their deduced amino acid sequences in a phylogenetic tree clearly support their classification as type II keratins. The genes encoding TKgamma show a structure typical for type III IF proteins, whereas their positions in phylogenetic trees favor a close relationship to the type I keratins. Considering that most keratin-like sequences detected in the lancelet also exhibit a gene structure typical for type III IF proteins, it seems likely that the keratin gene(s) originated from an ancient type III IF protein gene. According to EST analyses, the expression of the thread keratins in teleost fish and amphibians may be particularly restricted to larval stages, which, in conjunction with the observed absence of TKalpha and TKgamma genes in any of the available Amniota databases, indicates a thread keratin function closely related to larval development in an aquatic environment.

  16. Novel overlapping coding sequences in Chlamydia trachomatis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Klaus Thorleif; Petersen, Lise; Falk, Søren;

    2006-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the aetiological agent of trachoma and sexually transmitted infections. The C. trachomatis genome sequence revealed an organism adapted to the intracellular habitat with a high coding ratio and a small genome consisting of 1.042-kilobase (kb) with 895 annotated protein...... of the novel genes in C. trachomatis Serovar A and Chlamydia muridarum. Several of the genes have typical gene-like and protein-like features. Furthermore, we confirm transcriptional activity from 10 of the putative genes. The combined evidence suggests that at least seven of the 15 are protein coding genes...

  17. Strong Trinucleotide Circular Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian J. Michel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, we identified a hierarchy relation between trinucleotide comma-free codes and trinucleotide circular codes (see our previous works. Here, we extend our hierarchy with two new classes of codes, called DLD and LDL codes, which are stronger than the comma-free codes. We also prove that no circular code with 20 trinucleotides is a DLD code and that a circular code with 20 trinucleotides is comma-free if and only if it is a LDL code. Finally, we point out the possible role of the symmetric group ∑4 in the mathematical study of trinucleotide circular codes.

  18. Schrödinger's code-script: not a genetic cipher but a code of development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsby, A E; Hodge, M J S

    2017-06-01

    In his book What is Life? Erwin Schrödinger coined the term 'code-script', thought by some to be the first published suggestion of a hereditary code and perhaps a forerunner of the genetic code. The etymology of 'code' suggests three meanings relevant to 'code-script which we distinguish as 'cipher-code', 'word-code' and 'rule-code'. Cipher-codes and word-codes entail translation of one set of characters into another. The genetic code comprises not one but two cipher-codes: the first is the DNA 'base-pairing cipher'; the second is the 'nucleotide-amino-acid cipher', which involves the translation of DNA base sequences into amino-acid sequences. We suggest that Schrödinger's code-script is a form of 'rule-code', a set of rules that, like the 'highway code' or 'penal code', requires no translation of a message. Schrödinger first relates his code-script to chromosomal genes made of protein. Ignorant of its properties, however, he later abandons 'protein' and adopts in its place a hypothetical, isomeric 'aperiodic solid' whose atoms he imagines rearranged in countless different conformations, which together are responsible for the patterns of ontogenetic development. In an attempt to explain the large number of combinations required, Schrödinger referred to the Morse code (a cipher) but in doing so unwittingly misled readers into believing that he intended a cipher-code resembling the genetic code. We argue that the modern equivalent of Schrödinger's code-script is a rule-code of organismal development based largely on the synthesis, folding, properties and interactions of numerous proteins, each performing a specific task. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Further Studies on Structure of nodD3 Gene in Rhizobium meliloti——Analysis of 5’Non-Coding Region of nodD3 and Its Evolutionary Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞冠翘; 朱家璧; 高云峰; 沈善炯

    1994-01-01

    R.meliloti nodD3 gene is transcriptionally controlled by two promoters.Gel retardationexperiments show that SyrM and NodD3 are binding to the first promoter region of nodD3,while no proteinfactor is found to bind to the second promoter region of the gene.Comparison has been made between 5′ non-coding region of nodD3 and the corresponding region upstream of nodD1.The presence of nod-box andnodA-like sequences in the 5′ noncoding region of nodD3 supports the hypothesis that nodD3 evolves withthe duplication of the nodD1-nodA fragment during the speciation of R.meliloti.

  20. Systematic survey on the prevalence of genes coding for staphylococcal enterotoxins SElM, SElO, and SElN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Karsten; Friedrich, Alexander W; Peters, Georg; von Eiff, Christof

    2004-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus remains a leading cause of food-poisoning with substantial impact on public health. Using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction-DNA enzyme immunoassay (PCR-DEIA), we studied the presence of genes encoding staphylococcal enterotoxin-like (SEl) superantigens sem, sen, and seo, associated with the enterotoxin gene cluster (egc), in 429 clinical Staphylococcus aureus isolates. 294 (68.5%) isolates tested positive for at least one of the three SEl genes. In contrast to the fixed gene combination seg/sei also located on egc, a substantial number of isolates (n = 108) were found to bear only one or two of the genes encoding SElM, SElN, and SElO. Regarding the origin of the S. aureus isolates, a significant difference (P = 0.022) was found for the possession of seo (61.2% of blood isolates versus 42.9% of nasal strains). Also sem (not significantly) was found more common in blood isolates (52.1% versus 40.5%). The survey of the newly described SEl genes sem-seo supports the concept that most clinical S. aureus isolates harbor subsets of pyrogenic toxin superantigens. The potential contribution of seo and sem to the pathogenic potential of S. aureus has to be further evaluated.

  1. Joint source channel coding using arithmetic codes

    CERN Document Server

    Bi, Dongsheng

    2009-01-01

    Based on the encoding process, arithmetic codes can be viewed as tree codes and current proposals for decoding arithmetic codes with forbidden symbols belong to sequential decoding algorithms and their variants. In this monograph, we propose a new way of looking at arithmetic codes with forbidden symbols. If a limit is imposed on the maximum value of a key parameter in the encoder, this modified arithmetic encoder can also be modeled as a finite state machine and the code generated can be treated as a variable-length trellis code. The number of states used can be reduced and techniques used fo

  2. The genes coding for the conversion of carbazole to catechol are flanked by IS6100 elements in Sphingomonas sp. strain XLDN2-5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghui Gai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Carbazole is a recalcitrant compound with a dioxin-like structure and possesses mutagenic and toxic activities. Bacteria respond to a xenobiotic by recruiting exogenous genes to establish a pathway to degrade the xenobiotic, which is necessary for their adaptation and survival. Usually, this process is mediated by mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, transposons, and insertion sequences. FINDINGS: The genes encoding the enzymes responsible for the degradation of carbazole to catechol via anthranilate were cloned, sequenced, and characterized from a carbazole-degrading Sphingomonas sp. strain XLDN2-5. The car gene cluster (carRAaBaBbCAc and fdr gene were accompanied on both sides by two copies of IS6100 elements, and organized as IS6100::ISSsp1-ORF1-carRAaBaBbCAc-ORF8-IS6100-fdr-IS6100. Carbazole was converted by carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (CARDO, CarAaAcFdr, meta-cleavage enzyme (CarBaBb, and hydrolase (CarC to anthranilate and 2-hydroxypenta-2,4-dienoate. The fdr gene encoded a novel ferredoxin reductase whose absence resulted in lower transformation activity of carbazole by CarAa and CarAc. The ant gene cluster (antRAcAdAbAa which was involved in the conversion of anthranilate to catechol was also sandwiched between two IS6100 elements as IS6100-antRAcAdAbAa-IS6100. Anthranilate 1,2-dioxygenase (ANTDO was composed of a reductase (AntAa, a ferredoxin (AntAb, and a two-subunit terminal oxygenase (AntAcAd. Reverse transcription-PCR results suggested that carAaBaBbCAc gene cluster, fdr, and antRAcAdAbAa gene cluster were induced when strain XLDN2-5 was exposed to carbazole. Expression of both CARDO and ANTDO in Escherichia coli required the presence of the natural reductases for full enzymatic activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We predict that IS6100 might play an important role in the establishment of carbazole-degrading pathway, which endows the host to adapt to novel compounds in the environment. The organization of the car

  3. Detecting non-coding selective pressure in coding regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanchette Mathieu

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative genomics approaches, where orthologous DNA regions are compared and inter-species conserved regions are identified, have proven extremely powerful for identifying non-coding regulatory regions located in intergenic or intronic regions. However, non-coding functional elements can also be located within coding region, as is common for exonic splicing enhancers, some transcription factor binding sites, and RNA secondary structure elements affecting mRNA stability, localization, or translation. Since these functional elements are located in regions that are themselves highly conserved because they are coding for a protein, they generally escaped detection by comparative genomics approaches. Results We introduce a comparative genomics approach for detecting non-coding functional elements located within coding regions. Codon evolution is modeled as a mixture of codon substitution models, where each component of the mixture describes the evolution of codons under a specific type of coding selective pressure. We show how to compute the posterior distribution of the entropy and parsimony scores under this null model of codon evolution. The method is applied to a set of growth hormone 1 orthologous mRNA sequences and a known exonic splicing elements is detected. The analysis of a set of CORTBP2 orthologous genes reveals a region of several hundred base pairs under strong non-coding selective pressure whose function remains unknown. Conclusion Non-coding functional elements, in particular those involved in post-transcriptional regulation, are likely to be much more prevalent than is currently known. With the numerous genome sequencing projects underway, comparative genomics approaches like that proposed here are likely to become increasingly powerful at detecting such elements.

  4. The ccoNOQP gene cluster codes for a cb-type cytochrome oxidase that functions in aerobic respiration of Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thöny-Meyer, L; Beck, C; Preisig, O; Hennecke, H

    1994-11-01

    The genes for a new type of a haem-copper cytochrome oxidase were cloned from Rhodobacter capsulatus strain 37b4, using the Bradyrhizobium japonicum fixNOQP gene region as a hybridizing probe. Four genes, probably organized in an operon (ccoNOQP), were identified; their products share extensive amino acid sequence similarity with the FixN, O, Q and P proteins that have recently been shown to be the subunits of a cb-type oxidase. CcoN is a b-type cytochrome, CcoO and CcoP are membrane-bound mono- and dihaem c-type cytochromes and CcoQ is a small membrane protein of unknown function. Genes for a similar oxidase are also present in other non-rhizobial bacterial species such as Azotobacter vinelandii, Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as revealed by polymerase chain reaction analysis. A ccoN mutant was constructed whose phenotype, in combination with the structural information on the gene products, provides evidence that the CcoNOQP oxidase is a cytochrome c oxidase of the cb type, which supports aerobic respiration in R. capsulatus and which is probably identical to the cbb3-type oxidase that was recently purified from a different strain of the same species. Mutant analysis also showed that this oxidase has no influence on photosynthetic growth and nitrogen-fixation activity.

  5. Identification of a novel Drosophila melanogaster heat-shock gene, lethal(2)denticleless [l(2)dtl], coding for an 83-kDa protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzik-Dumke, U; Neubauer, M; Debes, A

    1996-06-01

    In this study, we describe the identification of a novel Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) gene, l(2)dtl, characterized by elevated expression under heat-shock (HS) conditions. It encodes a protein of 83 kDa with no homology to known members of the HSP90 family and other proteins. Gene l(2)dtl is located on the right arm of the second chromosome at locus 59F5, close to the tumor suppressor gene l(2)tid, a homolog of the dnaJ encoding a chaperone strongly conserved in evolution. In the following, we present the sequence of l(2)dtl, the putative protein it encodes, and its molecular localization in a closely interspaced gene cluster consisting of at least four nested genes spanning an approximately 10-kb genomic interval. Furthermore, we present the temporal expression of l(2)dtl in the wild type under normal and HS conditions, and describe the isolation and the phenotype of eight embryonic lethal l(2)dtl mutants.

  6. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  7. Model Children's Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque. American Indian Law Center.

    The Model Children's Code was developed to provide a legally correct model code that American Indian tribes can use to enact children's codes that fulfill their legal, cultural and economic needs. Code sections cover the court system, jurisdiction, juvenile offender procedures, minor-in-need-of-care, and termination. Almost every Code section is…

  8. A Novel Genetic Variant in Long Non-coding RNA Gene NEXN-AS1 is Associated with Risk of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hua; Liu, Hongliang; Liu, Zhensheng; Owzar, Kouros; Han, Younghun; Su, Li; Wei, Yongyue; Hung, Rayjean J.; McLaughlin, John; Brhane, Yonathan; Brennan, Paul; Bickeboeller, Heike; Rosenberger, Albert; Houlston, Richard S.; Caporaso, Neil; Landi, Maria Teresa; Heinrich, Joachim; Risch, Angela; Christiani, David C.; Gümüş, Zeynep H.; Klein, Robert J.; Amos, Christopher I.; Wei, Qingyi

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer etiology is multifactorial, and growing evidence has indicated that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are important players in lung carcinogenesis. We performed a large-scale meta-analysis of 690,564 SNPs in 15,531 autosomal lncRNAs by using datasets from six previously published genome-wide association studies (GWASs) from the Transdisciplinary Research in Cancer of the Lung (TRICL) consortium in populations of European ancestry. Previously unreported significant SNPs (P value < 1 × 10−7) were further validated in two additional independent lung cancer GWAS datasets from Harvard University and deCODE. In the final meta-analysis of all eight GWAS datasets with 17,153 cases and 239,337 controls, a novel risk SNP rs114020893 in the lncRNA NEXN-AS1 region at 1p31.1 remained statistically significant (odds ratio = 1.17; 95% confidence interval = 1.11–1.24; P = 8.31 × 10−9). In further in silico analysis, rs114020893 was predicted to change the secondary structure of the lncRNA. Our finding indicates that SNP rs114020893 of NEXN-AS1 at 1p31.1 may contribute to lung cancer susceptibility. PMID:27713484

  9. Microcollinearity in an ethylene receptor coding gene region of the Coffea canephora genome is extensively conserved with Vitis vinifera and other distant dicotyledonous sequenced genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campa Claudine

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coffea canephora, also called Robusta, belongs to the Rubiaceae, the fourth largest angiosperm family. This diploid species (2x = 2n = 22 has a fairly small genome size of ≈ 690 Mb and despite its extreme economic importance, particularly for developing countries, knowledge on the genome composition, structure and evolution remain very limited. Here, we report the 160 kb of the first C. canephora Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC clone ever sequenced and its fine analysis. Results This clone contains the CcEIN4 gene, encoding an ethylene receptor, and twenty other predicted genes showing a high gene density of one gene per 7.8 kb. Most of them display perfect matches with C. canephora expressed sequence tags or show transcriptional activities through PCR amplifications on cDNA libraries. Twenty-three transposable elements, mainly Class II transposon derivatives, were identified at this locus. Most of these Class II elements are Miniature Inverted-repeat Transposable Elements (MITE known to be closely associated with plant genes. This BAC composition gives a pattern similar to those found in gene rich regions of Solanum lycopersicum and Medicago truncatula genomes indicating that the CcEIN4 regions may belong to a gene rich region in the C. canephora genome. Comparative sequence analysis indicated an extensive conservation between C. canephora and most of the reference dicotyledonous genomes studied in this work, such as tomato (S. lycopersicum, grapevine (V. vinifera, barrel medic M. truncatula, black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa and Arabidopsis thaliana. The higher degree of microcollinearity was found between C. canephora and V. vinifera, which belong respectively to the Asterids and Rosids, two clades that diverged more than 114 million years ago. Conclusion This study provides a first glimpse of C. canephora genome composition and evolution. Our data revealed a remarkable conservation of the microcollinearity

  10. MBL2 gene variants coding for mannose-binding lectin deficiency are associated with increased risk of nephritis in Danish patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanha, N; Troelsen, L; From Hermansen, M-L;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Autoimmunity may in part result from deficiencies in the processing of apoptotic debris. As mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is involved in such processes, we hypothesized that the variants in the MBL2 gene resulting in MBL deficiency confer an increased risk of nephritis in systemic lupus...... erythematosus (SLE). METHODS: A total of 171 SLE patients attending a Danish tertiary rheumatology referral center were included. Common variant alleles in exon 1 of the MBL2 gene (R52C, rs5030737; G54D, rs1800450; G57E, rs1800451) were genotyped. The normal allele and variant alleles are termed A and O...

  11. The coding region of the UFGT gene is a source of diagnostic SNP markers that allow single-locus DNA genotyping for the assessment of cultivar identity and ancestry in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Vitis vinifera L. is one of society’s most important agricultural crops with a broad genetic variability. The difficulty in recognizing grapevine genotypes based on ampelographic traits and secondary metabolites prompted the development of molecular markers suitable for achieving variety genetic identification. Findings Here, we propose a comparison between a multi-locus barcoding approach based on six chloroplast markers and a single-copy nuclear gene sequencing method using five coding regions combined with a character-based system with the aim of reconstructing cultivar-specific haplotypes and genotypes to be exploited for the molecular characterization of 157 V. vinifera accessions. The analysis of the chloroplast target regions proved the inadequacy of the DNA barcoding approach at the subspecies level, and hence further DNA genotyping analyses were targeted on the sequences of five nuclear single-copy genes amplified across all of the accessions. The sequencing of the coding region of the UFGT nuclear gene (UDP-glucose: flavonoid 3-0-glucosyltransferase, the key enzyme for the accumulation of anthocyanins in berry skins) enabled the discovery of discriminant SNPs (1/34 bp) and the reconstruction of 130 V. vinifera distinct genotypes. Most of the genotypes proved to be cultivar-specific, and only few genotypes were shared by more, although strictly related, cultivars. Conclusion On the whole, this technique was successful for inferring SNP-based genotypes of grapevine accessions suitable for assessing the genetic identity and ancestry of international cultivars and also useful for corroborating some hypotheses regarding the origin of local varieties, suggesting several issues of misidentification (synonymy/homonymy). PMID:24298902

  12. The YMR315W gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae codes for an alcohol dehydrogenase and is required for full resistance to oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ymr315w protein levels have been shown to increase in cells grown on xylose. The mRNA level for the YMR315W gene was also seen to increase in cells grown on xylose, indicating an important function for YMR315W during growth on xylose. YMR315W encodes for a highly conserved protein of unknown funct...

  13. Systematic survey on the prevalence of genes coding for staphylococcal enterotoxins SElM, SElO, and SElN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, Karsten; Friedrich, Alexander W; Peters, Georg; von Eiff, Christof

    2004-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus remains a leading cause of food-poisoning with substantial impact on public health. Using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction-DNA enzyme immunoassay (PCR-DEIA), we studied the presence of genes encoding staphylococcal enterotoxin-like (SEl) superantigens sem, sen, and seo, as

  14. Characterisation of Toxoplasma gondii isolates using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the non-coding Toxoplasma gondii (TGR)-gene sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdall, Estrid; Vuust, Jens; Lind, Peter;

    2000-01-01

    of using TGR gene variants as markers to distinguish among T. gondii isolates from different animals and different geographical sources. Based on the band patterns obtained by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified TGR sequences, the T...

  15. Ptc6 is required for proper rapamycin-induced down-regulation of the genes coding for ribosomal and rRNA processing proteins in S. cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asier González

    Full Text Available Ptc6 is one of the seven components (Ptc1-Ptc7 of the protein phosphatase 2C family in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to other type 2C phosphatases, the cellular role of this isoform is poorly understood. We present here a comprehensive characterization of this gene product. Cells lacking Ptc6 are sensitive to zinc ions, and somewhat tolerant to cell-wall damaging agents and to Li(+. Ptc6 mutants are sensitive to rapamycin, albeit to lesser extent than ptc1 cells. This phenotype is not rescued by overexpression of PTC1 and mutation of ptc6 does not reproduce the characteristic genetic interactions of the ptc1 mutation with components of the TOR pathway, thus suggesting different cellular roles for both isoforms. We show here that the rapamycin-sensitive phenotype of ptc6 cells is unrelated to the reported role of Pt6 in controlling pyruvate dehydrogenase activity. Lack of Ptc6 results in substantial attenuation of the transcriptional response to rapamycin, particularly in the subset of repressed genes encoding ribosomal proteins or involved in rRNA processing. In contrast, repressed genes involved in translation are Ptc6-independent. These effects cannot be attributed to the regulation of the Sch9 kinase, but they could involve modulation of the binding of the Ifh1 co-activator to specific gene promoters.

  16. Multiplexed color-coded probe-based gene expression assessment for clinical molecular diagnostics in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human renal allograft tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Benjamin; Afzali, Bahman; Dominy, Katherine M; Chapman, Erin; Gill, Reeda; Hidalgo, Luis G; Roufosse, Candice; Sis, Banu; Mengel, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Histopathologic diagnoses in transplantation can be improved with molecular testing. Preferably, molecular diagnostics should fit into standard-of-care workflows for transplant biopsies, that is, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) processing. The NanoString(®) gene expression platform has recently been shown to work with FFPE samples. We aimed to evaluate its methodological robustness and feasibility for gene expression studies in human FFPE renal allograft samples. A literature-derived antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) 34-gene set, comprised of endothelial, NK cell, and inflammation transcripts, was analyzed in different retrospective biopsy cohorts and showed potential to molecularly discriminate ABMR cases, including FFPE samples. NanoString(®) results were reproducible across a range of RNA input quantities (r = 0.998), with different operators (r = 0.998), and between different reagent lots (r = 0.983). There was moderate correlation between NanoString(®) with FFPE tissue and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with corresponding dedicated fresh-stabilized tissue (r = 0.487). Better overall correlation with histology was observed with NanoString(®) (r = 0.354) than with qRT-PCR (r = 0.146). Our results demonstrate the feasibility of multiplexed gene expression quantification from FFPE renal allograft tissue. This represents a method for prospective and retrospective validation of molecular diagnostics and its adoption in clinical transplantation pathology.

  17. Insight into durum wheat Lpx-B1: a small gene family coding for the lipoxygenase responsible for carotenoid bleaching in mature grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cattivelli Luigi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The yellow colour of pasta products is one of the main criteria used by consumers to assess pasta quality. This character is due to the presence of carotenoid pigments in semolina. During pasta processing, oxidative degradation of carotenoid pigments occurs mainly due to lipoxygenase (LOX. In durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf., two Lpx-1 genes have been identified on chromosome 4B, Lpx-B1.1 and Lpx-B1.2, and evidences have been reported that the deletion of Lpx-B1.1 is associated with a strong reduction in LOX activity in semolina. In the present study, we characterised the Lpx-B1 gene family identified in a durum wheat germplasm collection and related the distribution and expression of the Lpx-B1 genes and alleles to variations in LOX activity in the mature grains. Results In addition to the already known Lpx-B1.1 and Lpx-B1.2 genes, a new gene was identified, Lpx-B1.3, along with three different Lpx-B1.1 alleles, Lpx-B1.1a, Lpx-B1.1b and the partially deleted Lpx-B1.1c. Screening of the germplasm collection showed that all of the genotypes have one of the three Lpx-B1.1 alleles, associated with either Lpx-B1.2 or Lpx-B1.3, thus showing that in this collection the two genes are alternatives. Therefore, based on Lpx-B1 distribution, three different haplotypes were distinguished: haplotype I, carrying Lpx-B1.3 and the Lpx-B1.1b allele; haplotype II carrying Lpx-B1.2 and the Lpx-B1.1a allele; and haplotype III carrying Lpx-B1.2 and the Lpx-B1.1c allele. Determination of Lpx-B1 transcript abundance and total LOX activity in mature grains revealed differences among these three haplotypes: haplotypes I, II and III showed high, intermediate and low levels, respectively, of functional Lpx-B1 transcripts and enzymatic activity. Conclusions In this germplasm collection, the Lpx-B1 gene family accounts for most of the total LOX activity in the mature grains. Information on these Lpx-B1 haplotypes provides significant improvement for

  18. Rateless feedback codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Hemming; Koike-Akino, Toshiaki; Orlik, Philip

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a concept called rateless feedback coding. We redesign the existing LT and Raptor codes, by introducing new degree distributions for the case when a few feedback opportunities are available. We show that incorporating feedback to LT codes can significantly decrease both...... the coding overhead and the encoding/decoding complexity. Moreover, we show that, at the price of a slight increase in the coding overhead, linear complexity is achieved with Raptor feedback coding....

  19. Coding for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Abraham, Nikhil

    2015-01-01

    Hands-on exercises help you learn to code like a pro No coding experience is required for Coding For Dummies,your one-stop guide to building a foundation of knowledge inwriting computer code for web, application, and softwaredevelopment. It doesn't matter if you've dabbled in coding or neverwritten a line of code, this book guides you through the basics.Using foundational web development languages like HTML, CSS, andJavaScript, it explains in plain English how coding works and whyit's needed. Online exercises developed by Codecademy, a leading online codetraining site, help hone coding skill

  20. Advanced video coding systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Wen

    2015-01-01

    This comprehensive and accessible text/reference presents an overview of the state of the art in video coding technology. Specifically, the book introduces the tools of the AVS2 standard, describing how AVS2 can help to achieve a significant improvement in coding efficiency for future video networks and applications by incorporating smarter coding tools such as scene video coding. Topics and features: introduces the basic concepts in video coding, and presents a short history of video coding technology and standards; reviews the coding framework, main coding tools, and syntax structure of AV

  1. Resequencing and association analysis of coding regions at twenty candidate genes suggest a role for rare risk variation at AKAP9 and protective variation at NRXN1 in schizophrenia susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Rama, José Javier; Arrojo, Manuel; Sobrino, Beatriz; Amigo, Jorge; Brenlla, Julio; Agra, Santiago; Paz, Eduardo; Brión, María; Carracedo, Ángel; Páramo, Mario; Costas, Javier

    2015-01-01

    A fraction of genetic risk to develop schizophrenia may be due to low-frequency variants. This multistep study attempted to find low-frequency variants of high effect at coding regions of eleven schizophrenia susceptibility genes supported by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and nine genes for the DISC1 interactome, a susceptibility gene-set. During the discovery step, a total of 125 kb per sample were resequenced in 153 schizophrenia patients and 153 controls from Galicia (NW Spain), and the cumulative role of low-frequency variants at a gene or at the DISC1 gene-set were analyzed by burden and variance-based tests. Relevant results were meta-analyzed when appropriate data were available. In addition, case-only putative damaging variants were genotyped in a further 419 cases and 398 controls. The discovery step revealed a protective effect of rare missense variants at NRXN1, a result supported by meta-analysis (OR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.47-0.94, P = 0.021, based on 3848 patients and 3896 controls from six studies). The follow-up step based on case-only putative damaging variants revealed a promising risk variant at AKAP9. This variant, K873R, reached nominal significance after inclusion of 240 additional Spanish controls from databases. The variant, located in an ADCY2 binding region, is absent from large public databases. Interestingly, GWAS revealed an association between common ADCY2 variants and bipolar disorder, a disorder with considerable genetic overlap with schizophrenia. These data suggest a role of rare missense variants at NRXN1 and AKAP9 in schizophrenia susceptibility, probably related to alteration of the excitatory/inhibitory synaptic balance, deserving further investigation.

  2. Paths of lateral gene transfer of lysyl-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases with a unique evolutionary transition stage of prokaryotes coding for class I and II varieties by the same organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nussinov Ruth

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the premise that lateral gene transfer (LGT is a dominant evolutionary force is still in considerable dispute, the case for widespread LGT in the family of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS is no longer contentious. aaRSs are ancient enzymes, guarding the fidelity of the genetic code. They are clustered in two structurally unrelated classes. Only lysine aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (LysRS is found both as a class 1 and a class 2 enzyme (LysRS1-2. Remarkably, in several extant prokaryotes both classes of the enzyme coexist, a unique phenomenon that has yet to receive its due attention. Results We applied a phylogenetic approach for determining the extent and origin of LGT in prokaryotic LysRS. Reconstructing species trees for Archaea and Bacteria, and inferring that their last common ancestors encoded LysRS1 and LysRS2, respectively, we studied the gains and losses of both classes. A complex pattern of LGT events emerged. In specific groups of organisms LysRS1 was replaced by LysRS2 (and vice versa. In one occasion, within the alpha proteobacteria, a LysRS2 to LysRS1 LGT was followed by reversal to LysRS2. After establishing the most likely LGT paths, we studied the possible origins of the laterally transferred genes. To this end, we reconstructed LysRS gene trees and evaluated the likely origins of the laterally transferred genes. While the sources of LysRS1 LGTs were readily identified, those for LysRS2 remain, for now, uncertain. The replacement of one LysRS by another apparently transits through a stage simultaneously coding for both synthetases, probably conferring a selective advantage to the affected organisms. Conclusion The family of LysRSs features complex LGT events. The currently available data were sufficient for identifying unambiguously the origins of LysRS1 but not of LysRS2 gene transfers. A selective advantage is suggested to organisms encoding simultaneously LysRS1-2.

  3. Genetic identification of cryptic genospecies of Haemophilus causing urogenital and neonatal infections by PCR using specific primers targeting genes coding for 16S rRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quentin, R; Ruimy, R; Rosenau, A; Musser, J M; Christen, R

    1996-06-01

    Previous genetic analysis of Haemophilus influenzae strains isolated from genital and neonatal infections identified a group of biotype IV that constitutes a cryptic genospecies only distantly related to H. influenzae and H. Haemolyticus. Small-subunit rRNA genes of two representative strains of this genital Haemophilus genospecies (strains 16N and 2406) were sequenced. The analysis indicated that these strains form a monophyletic unit with H. haemolyticus and H. influenzae biogroups Influenzae and Aegyptius and are more closely related to H. haemolyticus than to H. influenzae biogroups Influenzae and Aegyptius. 16S rRNA gene sequences were used to formulate primers for PCR-based identification of cryptic genital Haemophilus organisms. A 242-bp fragment was amplified from strains belonging to the genital Haemophilus genospecies but not from strains of 12 other Haemophilus species, including strains of H. influenzae biotype IV sensu stricto.

  4. The genes coding for the hsp70(dnaK) molecular chaperone machine occur in the moderate thermophilic archaeon Methanosarcina thermophila TM-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, H Jacob Peider; Lange, Marianne; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1999-01-01

    The hsp70 (dnaK) locus of the moderate thermophilic archaeon Methanosarcina thermophila TM-1 was cloned, sequenced, and tested in vitro to measure gene induction by heat and ammonia, i.e., stressors pertinent to the biotechnological ecosystem of this methanogen that plays a key role in anaerobic...... thermoautotrophicum Delta H, from another genus, in which trkA is not part of the locus. The proteins encoded in the TM-1 genes are very similar to the S-6 homologs, but considerably less similar to the Delta H proteins. The TM-1 Hsp70(DnaK) protein has the 23-amino acid deletion-by comparison with homologs from Gram...

  5. The single fgf receptor gene in the beetle Tribolium castaneum codes for two isoforms that integrate FGF8- and Branchless-dependent signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rahul; Beer, Katharina; Iwanov, Katharina; Schmöhl, Felix; Beckmann, Paula Indigo; Schröder, Reinhard

    2015-06-15

    The precise regulation of cell-cell communication by numerous signal-transduction pathways is fundamental for many different processes during embryonic development. One important signalling pathway is the evolutionary conserved fibroblast-growth-factor (FGF)-pathway that controls processes like cell migration, axis specification and mesoderm formation in vertebrate and invertebrate animals. In the model insect Drosophila, the FGF ligand / receptor combinations of FGF8 (Pyramus and Thisbe) / Heartless (Htl) and Branchless (Bnl) / Breathless (Btl) are required for the migration of mesodermal cells and for the formation of the tracheal network respectively with both the receptors functioning independently of each other. However, only a single fgf-receptor gene (Tc-fgfr) has been identified in the genome of the beetle Tribolium. We therefore asked whether both the ligands Fgf8 and Bnl could transduce their signal through a common FGF-receptor in Tribolium. Indeed, we found that the function of the single Tc-fgfr gene is essential for mesoderm differentiation as well as for the formation of the tracheal network during early development. Ligand specific RNAi for Tc-fgf8 and Tc-bnl resulted in two distinct non-overlapping phenotypes of impaired mesoderm differentiation and abnormal formation of the tracheal network in Tc-fgf8- and Tc-bnl(RNAi) embryos respectively. We further show that the single Tc-fgfr gene encodes at least two different receptor isoforms that are generated through alternative splicing. We in addition demonstrate through exon-specific RNAi their distinct tissue-specific functions. Finally, we discuss the structure of the fgf-receptor gene from an evolutionary perspective.

  6. Expression profile of genes coding for carotenoid biosynthetic pathway during ripening and their association with accumulation of lycopene in tomato fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smita, Shuchi; Rajwanshi, Ravi; Lenka, Sangram Keshari; Katiyar, Amit; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Bansal, Kailash Chander

    2013-12-01

    Fruit ripening process is associated with change in carotenoid profile and accumulation of lycopene in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.). In this study, we quantified the beta-carotene and lycopene content at green, breaker and red-ripe stages of fruit ripening in eight tomato genotypes by using high-performance liquid chromatography. Among the genotypes, lycopene content was found highest in Pusa Rohini and lowest in VRT-32-1. To gain further insight into the regulation of lycopene biosynthesis and accumulation during fruit ripening, expression analysis of nine carotenoid pathway-related genes was carried out in the fruits of high lycopene genotype-Pusa Rohini. We found that expression of phytoene synthase and beta-carotene hydroxylase-1 was four and thirty-fold higher, respectively, at breaker stage as compared to red-ripe stage of fruit ripening. Changes in the expression level of these genes were associated with a 40% increase in lycopene content at red-ripe stage as compared with breaker stage. Thus, the results from our study suggest the role of specific carotenoid pathway-related genes in accumulation of high lycopene during the fruit ripening processes.

  7. Expression profile of genes coding for carotenoid biosynthetic pathway during ripening and their association with accumulation of lycopene in tomato fruits

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shuchi Smita; Ravi Rajwanshi; Sangram Keshari Lenka; Amit Katiyar; Viswanathan Chinnusamy; Kailash Chander Bansal

    2013-12-01

    Fruit ripening process is associated with change in carotenoid profile and accumulation of lycopene in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.). In this study, we quantified the -carotene and lycopene content at green, breaker and red-ripe stages of fruit ripening in eight tomato genotypes by using high-performance liquid chromatography. Among the genotypes, lycopene content was found highest in Pusa Rohini and lowest in VRT-32-1. To gain further insight into the regulation of lycopene biosynthesis and accumulation during fruit ripening, expression analysis of nine carotenoid pathway-related genes was carried out in the fruits of high lycopene genotype—Pusa Rohini. We found that expression of phytoene synthase and -carotene hydroxylase-1 was four and thirty-fold higher, respectively, at breaker stage as compared to red-ripe stage of fruit ripening. Changes in the expression level of these genes were associated with a 40% increase in lycopene content at red-ripe stage as compared with breaker stage. Thus, the results from our study suggest the role of specific carotenoid pathway-related genes in accumulation of high lycopene during the fruit ripening processes.

  8. Characterization of a gene coding for a putative adenosine deaminase-related growth factor by RNA interference in the basidiomycete Flammulina velutipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiya, Shuichi; Yamada, Masato; Shibata, Kou; Okuhara, Toru; Yoshida, Masumi; Inatomi, Satoshi; Taguchi, Goro; Shimosaka, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    A full-length cDNA coding for a putative adenosine deaminase (Fv-ada) was isolated from the basidiomycete Flammulina velutipes. Fv-ada encodes a polypeptide consisting of 537 amino acid residues, which has a consensus sequence conserved among adenosine deaminase-related growth factors (ADGF) found in several metazoa, including chordates and insects. Fv-ada transcript was detected at all stages of growth in dikaryotic F. velutipes cells, with a peak at the primordial stage. Heterologous expression of Fv-ada in the yeast Pichia pastoris produced recombinant Fv-ADA that catalyzed the conversion of adenosine to inosine. Dikaryotic mycelia from F. velutipes were transformed with the binary plasmid pFungiway-Fv-ada, which was designed to suppress the expression of Fv-ada through RNA interference. The growth rates of the resulting transformants were retarded in response to the degree of suppression, indicating that Fv-ada plays an important role in the mycelial growth of F. velutipes. These results suggested that ADGF could function as growth factors in fungi, as is seen in other eukaryotes.

  9. Honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) mrjp gene family: computational analysis of putative promoters and genomic structure of mrjp1, the gene coding for the most abundant protein of larval food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malecová, Barbora; Ramser, Juliane; O'Brien, John K; Janitz, Michal; Júdová, Jana; Lehrach, Hans; Simúth, Jozef

    2003-01-16

    Mrjp1 gene belongs to the honeybee mrjp gene family encoding the major royal jelly proteins (MRJPs), secreted by nurse bees into the royal jelly. In this study, we have isolated the genomic clone containing the entire mrjp1 gene and determined its sequence. The mrjp1 gene sequence spans over 3038 bp and contains six exons separated by five introns. Seven mismatches between the mrjp1 gene sequence and two previously independently published cDNA sequences were found, but these differences do not lead to any change in the deduced amino acid sequence of MRJP1. With the aid of inverse polymerase chain reaction we obtained sequences flanking the 5' ends of other mrjp genes (mrjp2, mrjp3, mrjp4 and mrjp5). Putative promoters were predicted upstream of all mrjp genes (including mrjp1). The predicted promoters contain the TATA motif (TATATATT), highly conserved both in sequence and position. Ultraspiracle (USP) transcription factor (TF) binding sites in putative promoter regions and clusters of dead ringer TF binding sites upstream of these promoters were predicted computationally. We propose that USP, as a juvenile hormone (JH) binding TF, might possibly act as a mediator of mrjp expression in response to JH. Mrjp1's genomic locus is predicted to encode an antisense transcript, partially overlapping with five mrjp1 exons and entirely overlapping with the putative promoter and predicted transcriptional start point of mrjp1. This finding may shed light on the mechanisms of regulation of mrjps expression. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA revealed that all so far known members of mrjp gene family (mrjp1, mrjp2, mrjp3, mrjp4 and mrjp5) are present as single-copy genes per haploid honeybee genome. Although MRJPs and the yellow protein of Drosophila melanogaster share a certain degree of similarity in aa sequence and although it has been shown that they share a common evolutionary origin, neither structural similarities in the gene organization, nor significant similarities

  10. Immature transformed rat islet beta-cells differentially express C-peptides derived from the genes coding for insulin I and II as well as a transfected human insulin gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blume, N; Petersen, J S; Andersen, L C;

    1992-01-01

    Synthetic peptides representing unique sequences in rat proinsulin C-peptide I and II were used to generate highly specific antisera, which, when applied on sections of normal rat pancreas, confirm a homogeneous coexpression of the two C-peptides in all islet beta-cells. Insulin gene expression...... is induced in the transformed heterogeneous rat islet cell clone, NHI-6F, by transient in vivo passage. During this process a transfected human insulin gene is coactivated with the endogenous nonallelic rat insulin I and II genes. Newly established cultures from NHI-6F insulinomas having a high frequency...

  11. Analysis of coding-polymorphisms in NOTCH-related genes reveals NUMBL poly-glutamine repeat to be associated with schizophrenia in Brazilian and Danish subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Passos Gregorio, Sheila; Gattaz, Wagner F; Tavares, Hildeberto;

    2006-01-01

    Abnormality in neurodevelopment is one of the most robust hypotheses on the etiology of schizophrenia and has found substantial support from brain imaging and genetic studies. Neurodevelopmental processes involve several signaling pathways, including the Notch, but little is known at present...... regarding their possible involvement in schizophrenia. In the present study we investigated the link of non-synonymous variants of five genes of the Notch pathway (NOTCH2, NOTCH3, JAGGED2, ASCL1 and NUMBL) to schizophrenia in a group of 200 Brazilian patients and 200-paired controls. Also, we replicated...

  12. Role of microRNA 1207-5P and its host gene, the long non-coding RNA Pvt1, as mediators of extracellular matrix accumulation in the kidney: implications for diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, M Lucrecia; Khosroheidari, Mahdieh; Eddy, Elena; Kiefer, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of chronic kidney failure and end-stage renal disease in the Western World. One of the major characteristics of this disease is the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the kidney glomeruli. While both environmental and genetic determinants are recognized for their role in the development of diabetic nephropathy, epigenetic factors, such as DNA methylation, long non-coding RNAs, and microRNAs, have also recently been found to underlie some of the biological mechanisms, including ECM accumulation, leading to the disease. We previously found that a long non-coding RNA, the plasmacytoma variant translocation 1 (PVT1), increases plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) in mesangial cells, the two main contributors to ECM accumulation in the glomeruli under hyperglycemic conditions, as well as fibronectin 1 (FN1), a major ECM component. Here, we report that miR-1207-5p, a PVT1-derived microRNA, is abundantly expressed in kidney cells, and is upregulated by glucose and TGF-β1. We also found that like PVT1, miR-1207-5p increases expression of TGF-β1, PAI-1, and FN1 but in a manner that is independent of its host gene. In addition, regulation of miR-1207-5p expression by glucose and TGFβ1 is independent of PVT1. These results provide evidence supporting important roles for miR-1207-5p and its host gene in the complex pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy.

  13. Locally Orderless Registration Code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    This is code for the TPAMI paper "Locally Orderless Registration". The code requires intel threadding building blocks installed and is provided for 64 bit on mac, linux and windows.......This is code for the TPAMI paper "Locally Orderless Registration". The code requires intel threadding building blocks installed and is provided for 64 bit on mac, linux and windows....

  14. Locally orderless registration code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    This is code for the TPAMI paper "Locally Orderless Registration". The code requires intel threadding building blocks installed and is provided for 64 bit on mac, linux and windows.......This is code for the TPAMI paper "Locally Orderless Registration". The code requires intel threadding building blocks installed and is provided for 64 bit on mac, linux and windows....

  15. Site-directed RNA editing by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR1) for correction of the genetic code in gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, T A; Bhakta, S; Tsukahara, T

    2017-10-06

    Site-directed RNA editing is an important technique for correcting gene sequences and ultimately tuning protein function. In this study, we engineered the deaminase domain of adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR1) and the MS2 system to target specific adenosines, with the goal of correcting G-to-A mutations at the RNA level. For this purpose, the ADAR1 deaminase domain was fused downstream of the RNA-binding protein MS2, which has affinity for the MS2 RNA. To direct editing to specific targets, we designed guide RNAs complementary to target RNAs. The guide RNAs directed the ADAR1 deaminase to the desired editing site, where it converted adenosine to inosine. To provide proof of principle, we used an allele of EGFP bearing a mutation at the 58th amino acid (TGG), encoding Trp, into an amber (TAG) or ochre (TAA) stop codon. In HEK-293 cells, our system could convert stop codons to read-through codons, thereby turning on fluorescence. We confirmed the specificity of editing at the DNA level by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and sequencing, and at the protein level by western blotting. The editing efficiency of this enzyme system was ~5%. We believe that this system could be used to treat genetic diseases resulting from G-to-A point mutations.Gene Therapy accepted article preview online, 06 October 2017. doi:10.1038/gt.2017.90.

  16. PtrBAM1, a β-amylase-coding gene of Poncirus trifoliata, is a CBF regulon member with function in cold tolerance by modulating soluble sugar levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ting; Zhu, Xiaofang; Duan, Nian; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2014-12-01

    β-Amylase (BAM) catalyses starch breakdown to generate maltose, which can be incorporated into sugar metabolism. However, the role of BAM genes in cold tolerance is less characterized. In this study, we report the isolation and functional characterization of a chloroplast-localizing BAM-encoding gene PtrBAM1 from Poncirus trifoliata. PtrBAM1 was induced by cold, dehydration and salt, but repressed by maltose. Overexpression of PtrBAM1 in tobacco (Nicotiana nudicaulis) increased BAM activity, promoted starch degradation and enhanced the contents of maltose and soluble sugars, whereas opposite changes were observed when PtrBAM1 homolog in lemon (Citrus lemon) was knocked down. The tobacco overexpressing lines exhibited enhanced tolerance to cold at chilling or freezing temperatures. Under cold stress, higher BAM activity and greater accumulation of maltose and soluble sugars were observed in the overexpressing lines when compared with the wild-type or empty vector transformants. Bioinformatics analysis demonstrated that PtrBAM1 promoter contained a CBF-recognizing element. Yeast one-hybrid assay demonstrated that PtrCBF could interact with the promoter fragment containing the element. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PtrBAM1 is a member of CBF regulon and plays an important role in cold tolerance by modulating the levels of soluble sugars acting as osmolytes or antioxidants.

  17. QR Codes 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crompton, Helen; LaFrance, Jason; van 't Hooft, Mark

    2012-01-01

    A QR (quick-response) code is a two-dimensional scannable code, similar in function to a traditional bar code that one might find on a product at the supermarket. The main difference between the two is that, while a traditional bar code can hold a maximum of only 20 digits, a QR code can hold up to 7,089 characters, so it can contain much more…

  18. Constructing quantum codes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Quantum error correcting codes are indispensable for quantum information processing and quantum computation.In 1995 and 1996,Shor and Steane gave first several examples of quantum codes from classical error correcting codes.The construction of efficient quantum codes is now an active multi-discipline research field.In this paper we review the known several constructions of quantum codes and present some examples.

  19. Analysis of coding-polymorphisms in NOTCH-related genes reveals NUMBL poly-glutamine repeat to be associated with schizophrenia in Brazilian and Danish subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Passos Gregorio, Sheila; Gattaz, Wagner F; Tavares, Hildeberto;

    2006-01-01

    regarding their possible involvement in schizophrenia. In the present study we investigated the link of non-synonymous variants of five genes of the Notch pathway (NOTCH2, NOTCH3, JAGGED2, ASCL1 and NUMBL) to schizophrenia in a group of 200 Brazilian patients and 200-paired controls. Also, we replicated......Abnormality in neurodevelopment is one of the most robust hypotheses on the etiology of schizophrenia and has found substantial support from brain imaging and genetic studies. Neurodevelopmental processes involve several signaling pathways, including the Notch, but little is known at present...... genotype (p=0.002, x2=9.46, OR=1.46, 95% CI 1.15-1.87) to be associated with schizophrenia. The consistency of this finding in two independent and unrelated populations reinforces the veracity of this association....

  20. Temporal mapping of CEBPA and CEBPB binding during liver regeneration reveals dynamic occupancy and specific regulatory codes for homeostatic and cell cycle gene batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Janus Schou; Waage, Johannes; Rapin, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    quantified the genome-wide binding patterns of two key hepatocyte transcription factors, CEBPA and CEBPB (also known as C/EBPalpha and C/EBPbeta), at multiple time points during the highly dynamic process of liver regeneration elicited by partial hepatectomy in mouse. Combining these profiles with RNA...... polymerase II binding data, we find three temporal classes of transcription factor binding to be associated with distinct sets of regulated genes involved in the acute phase response, metabolic/homeostatic functions, or cell cycle progression. Moreover, we demonstrate a previously unrecognized early phase......-renewal of differentiated cells. Taken together, our work emphasizes the power of global temporal analyses of transcription factor occupancy to elucidate mechanisms regulating dynamic biological processes in complex higher organisms....

  1. Molecular cloning, identifi-cation and characteristics of NYD-SP9: Gene coding pro-tein kinase presumably in-volved in spermatogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Using cDNA microarray hybridization from a human testicular cDNA library, one gene exhibiting ten-fold difference at expression level between adult and embryo human testes was cloned and named NYD-SP9, which was believed to be involved in spermatogenesis. Southern blot hybridization results showed that NYD-SP9 expressed highly in testis but low in ovary. Protein motif analysis of this cDNA sequence revealed a cluster of phosphorylation sites, indicating its potential involvement in signal pathways during spermatogenesis. Furthermore, one transmembrane helix was predicted in N-terminal region, indicating that putative NYD-SP6 may be served as a transmembrane protein. The proximity of these potential phosphorylation sites to each other indicates that there may be interaction among these sites to regulate spermatogenesis. These findings suggested that protein kinase NYD-SP9 might play a role in male germ cell differentiation.

  2. Characterization of a salt-induced DhAHP, a gene coding for alkyl hydroperoxide reductase, from the extremely halophilic yeast Debaryomyces hansenii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ku Maurice SB

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Debaryomyces hansenii is one of the most salt tolerant species of yeast and has become a model organism for the study of tolerance mechanisms against salinity. The goal of this study was to identify key upregulated genes that are involved in its adaptation to high salinity. Results By using forward subtractive hybridization we have cloned and sequenced DhAHP from D. hansenii that is significantly upregulated during salinity stress. DhAHP is orthologous to the alkly hydroperoxide reductase of the peroxiredoxin gene family, which catalyzes the reduction of peroxides at the expense of thiol compounds. The full-lengthed cDNA of DhAHP has 674 bp of nucleotide and contains a 516 bp open reading frame (ORF encoding a deduced protein of 172 amino acid residues (18.3 kDa. D. hansenii Ahp is a cytosolic protein that belongs to the Ahp of the 1-Cys type peroxiredoxins. Phylogentically, the DhAhp and Candida albicans Ahp11 (Swiss-Prot: Q5AF44 share a common ancestry but show divergent evolution. Silence of its expression in D. hansenii by RNAi resulted in decreased tolerance to salt whereas overexpression of DhAHP in D. hansenii and the salt-sensitive yeasts Saccharomyces cereviasiae and Pichia methanolica conferred a higher tolerance with a reduced level of reactive oxygen species. Conclusion In conclusion, for the first time our study has identified alkly hydroperoxide reductase as a key protein involved in the salt tolerance of the extremely halophilic D. hansenii. Apparently, this enzyme plays a multi-functional role in the yeast's adaptation to salinity; it serves as a peroxidase in scavenging reactive oxygen species, as a molecular chaperone in protecting essential proteins from denaturation, and as a redox sensor in regulating H2O2-mediated cell defense signaling.

  3. Turbo Codes Extended with Outer BCH Code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jakob Dahl

    1996-01-01

    The "error floor" observed in several simulations with the turbo codes is verified by calculation of an upper bound to the bit error rate for the ensemble of all interleavers. Also an easy way to calculate the weight enumerator used in this bound is presented. An extended coding scheme is proposed...

  4. Investigation of coding genes of adhesion toxin and cytotoxins in Staphylococcus aureus isolated from infants%金黄色葡萄球菌婴幼儿分离株黏附毒素与细胞毒素编码基因研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谈华; 刘雪梅; 迟富丽; 徐飞; 曹波; 赵呈元; 常勇; 虞伟

    2015-01-01

    目的:调查金黄色葡萄球菌婴幼儿分离株的黏附毒素与细胞毒素编码基因携带状况。方法收集儿童医院2013年10-12月金黄色葡萄球菌婴幼儿分离株20株,采用聚合酶链反应(PCR)的方法分析9种黏附毒素编码基因、9种细胞毒素编码基因及2种荚膜抗原编码基因。结果20株金黄色葡萄球菌共检出7种黏附毒素编码基因,5种细胞毒素编码基因,荚膜抗原编码基因 cap5占15.0%、cap8占85.0%;黏附毒素、细胞毒素及荚膜抗原3类编码基因每一株均有阳性检出;阳性基因可分为7种模式,携带≥10种基因的菌株占大多数。结论黏附毒素和细胞毒素编码基因的高检出率是该组金黄色葡萄球菌在患儿皮肤软组织和病灶部定植和感染的重要原因,对金黄色葡萄球菌婴幼儿分离株进行9种黏附毒素编码基因、9种细胞毒素编码基因及2种荚膜抗原编码基因检测研究尚为国内外首次。%OBJECTIVE To investigate the distribution of coding genes of adhesions and cytotoxins in Staphylococ‐cus aureus isolated from infants .METHODS From Oct .to Dec .2013 ,20 strains of S .aureus isolated from infants were collected from Nanjing Children′s Hospital ,China .Nine kinds of coding genes of adhesions ,9 kinds of coding genes of cytotoxins ,and 2 kinds of coding genes of capsular antigens were analyzed by PCR .RESULTS Totally 7 kinds of coding genes of adhesions ,5 kinds of coding genes of cytotoxins and capsular antigens were positive in this group of 20 strains .And positive rate of cap5 was 15 .0% ,positive rate of cap8 was 85 .0% ;Furthermore ,3 classes of coding genes were all positive in strain .Moreover ,7 kinds of positive modes were divided ,and most strains carried over 10 kinds of genes .CONCLUSION High detection rates of coding genes of adhesions and cytotoxins in this group plays a key role in S . aureus colonizing and infecting infants′ skin ,soft

  5. The long non-coding HOTAIR is modulated by cyclic stretch and WNT/β-CATENIN in human aortic valve cells and is a novel repressor of calcification genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, Katrina; Dyo, Jeffrey; Patel, Vishal; Sasik, Roman; Mohamed, Salah A; Hardiman, Gary; Nigam, Vishal

    2014-01-01

    Aortic valve calcification is a significant and serious clinical problem for which there are no effective medical treatments. Individuals born with bicuspid aortic valves, 1-2% of the population, are at the highest risk of developing aortic valve calcification. Aortic valve calcification involves increased expression of calcification and inflammatory genes. Bicuspid aortic valve leaflets experience increased biomechanical strain as compared to normal tricuspid aortic valves. The molecular pathogenesis involved in the calcification of BAVs are not well understood, especially the molecular response to mechanical stretch. HOTAIR is a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) that has been implicated with cancer but has not been studied in cardiac disease. We have found that HOTAIR levels are decreased in BAVs and in human aortic interstitial cells (AVICs) exposed to cyclic stretch. Reducing HOTAIR levels via siRNA in AVICs results in increased expression of calcification genes. Our data suggest that β-catenin is a stretch responsive signaling pathway that represses HOTAIR. This is the first report demonstrating that HOTAIR is mechanoresponsive and repressed by WNT β-catenin signaling. These findings provide novel evidence that HOTAIR is involved in aortic valve calcification.

  6. Vorticella Linnaeus, 1767 (Ciliophora, Oligohymenophora, Peritrichia) is a grade not a clade: redefinition of Vorticella and the families Vorticellidae and Astylozoidae using molecular characters derived from the gene coding for small subunit ribosomal RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ping; Clamp, John; Xu, Dapeng; Kusuoka, Yasushi; Miao, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Recent phylogenetic analyses of the peritrich genus Vorticella have suggested that it might be paraphyletic, with one Vorticella species - Vorticella microstoma grouping with the swimming peritrichs Astylozoon and Opisthonecta in a distant clade. These results were based on very limited taxon sampling and thus could not be accepted as conclusive evidence for revising the generic classification. We tested paraphyly of the genus Vorticella by making a new analysis with a broad range of samples from three continents that yielded 52 new sequences of the gene coding for small subunit rRNA. Our results, together with the available sequences in Genbank, form a comprehensive set of data for the genus Vorticella. Analyses of these data showed that Vorticella microstoma morphotypes, Astylozoon, and Opisthonecta form a well-supported, monophyletic clade, that is distinct from and basal to the family Vorticellidae containing other species of Vorticella. Paraphyly of the genus Vorticella and family Vorticellidae was strongly confirmed by these results. Furthermore, the two clades of Vorticella identified by the SSU rRNA gene are so genetically diverse whereas the genetic distances within the one containing Vorticella microstoma morphotypes, Astylozoon, and Opisthonecta were so slight, which marked it as a separate family that must be defined by molecular characters in the absence of unifying morphological and morphogenetic characters. An emended characterization and status of the genus Vorticella, the families Vorticellidae and Astylozoidae are presented and discussed.

  7. Hybrid Noncoherent Network Coding

    CERN Document Server

    Skachek, Vitaly; Nedic, Angelia

    2011-01-01

    We describe a novel extension of subspace codes for noncoherent networks, suitable for use when the network is viewed as a communication system that introduces both dimension and symbol errors. We show that when symbol erasures occur in a significantly large number of different basis vectors transmitted through the network and when the min-cut of the networks is much smaller then the length of the transmitted codewords, the new family of codes outperforms their subspace code counterparts. For the proposed coding scheme, termed hybrid network coding, we derive two upper bounds on the size of the codes. These bounds represent a variation of the Singleton and of the sphere-packing bound. We show that a simple concatenated scheme that represents a combination of subspace codes and Reed-Solomon codes is asymptotically optimal with respect to the Singleton bound. Finally, we describe two efficient decoding algorithms for concatenated subspace codes that in certain cases have smaller complexity than subspace decoder...

  8. The analysis for the coding region of IRF6 gene of orofacial clefts in Guangdong Province%广东地区口面裂患者IRF6基因编码区序列特点分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邬文莉; 华亮; 王洪涛; 黎凡

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To reveal the sequence variations for the coding region of IRF6 gene of orofacial clefts in Guangdong Province. Methods; Genomic DNA from 47 orofacial cleft patients and 13 controls were extracted. Complete coding sequences of the IRF6 gene were amplified and sequenced directly. Results; Three mutations were found. 459G> T and 820G >A were detected both in controls and unaffected members in family. There were no differences in genetic frequency of 459G > T and. 820G>A between NSCL/P group and control group (P>0. 05 ). 1234C> T was detected in Van der Woude syndrome patients only, and the mutation has been reported in VWS patients previously. Conclusion; Among the three mutations, the 1234C>T mutation in exon 9 of IRF6 gene may be one of the risk factor of VWS patients in Guangdong Province.%目的 探讨广东地区口面裂患者干扰素调节因子6(Interferon regulatory factor 6,IRF6)基因编码区序列的特点.方法 收集广东籍口面裂患者及部分双亲血样共47例,包括1个Van der Woude综合征(van der Woude syndrome,VWS)患者核心家庭,NSCL/P患者40例,面横裂3例,正中裂3例;同时采取13例正常人血液样本做为对照,所有样本提取DNA后扩增IRF6基因的编码区,并进行序列测定和分析.结果 共检测到3个突变位点.其中459G>T和820G>A两种突变在正常对照及未患病双亲中均被检出,NSCL/P组与正常对照组之间无差异(P>0.05).1234C>T仅在VWS综合征患者中检出,与国际已报道的致病性突变一致.结论 广东地区口面裂患者IRF6基因编码区存在三个突变,其中IRF6基因外显子9的1234C>T突变可能是广东地区VWS患者的一个致病因素.

  9. The biological basis of anger: associations with the gene coding for DARPP-32 (PPP1R1B) and with amygdala volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Martin; Weber, Bernd; Fiebach, Christian J; Elger, Christian; Montag, Christian

    2009-09-14

    Recent findings have highlighted the importance of DARPP-32 (dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein, 32 kDa), a key regulatory molecule in the dopaminergic signalling pathway for dopamine related phenotypes like antisocial-behavior, drug addiction and schizophrenia. This is the first study investigating the role of the DARPP-32 gene for personality. In a sample of n=838 healthy German Caucasian subjects we found a significant association between rs907094 and ANGER. Carriers of the T-allele showed significantly higher ANGER scores than participants without a T-allele (F((1,837))=9.52, p=0.002). In a second step we validated self-report data of ANGER by investigating their relation to structural brain differences in anger-related brain regions using voxel-based morphometry. A negative association between ANGER scores and the volume of the left amygdala could be detected. The present findings yield genetic evidence for the importance of dopaminergic signal transduction for the personality trait of ANGER. In addition volumetric MRI data support the role of the amygdala for the processing of anger.

  10. Frequency of polymorphisms of genes coding for HIV-1 co-receptors CCR5 and CCR2 in a Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munerato Patrícia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Entry of human immunodeficiency type 1 virus (HIV-1 into target cells requires both CD4and one of the chemokine receptors. Viruses predominantly use one, or occasionally both, of the major co-receptors CCR5 and CXCR4, although other receptors, including CCR2B and CCR3, function as minor co-receptors. A 32-nucleotide deletion (delta32 within the beta-chemokine receptor 5 gene (CCR5 has been described in subjects who remain uninfected despite extensive exposition to HIV-1. The heterozygous genotype delays disease progression. This allele is common among Caucasians, but has not been found in people of African or Asian ancestry. A more common transition involving a valine to isoleucine switch in transmembrane domain I of CCR2B (64I, with unknown functional consequences, was found to delay disease progression but not to reduce infection risk. As the Brazilian population consists of a mixture of several ethnic groups, we decided to examine the genotype frequency of these polymorphisms in this country. There were 11.5% CCR5 heterozygotes among the HIV-1 infected population and 12.5% among uninfected individuals, similar to data from North America and Western Europe. The prevalence of CCR2-64I homozygotes and heterozygotes was 0.06 and 15.2%, respectively, also similar to what is known for North America and Western Europe.

  11. Efficacy Improvement of PCR Amplification of CAG Trinucleotide Repeats in the Coding Sequence of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type II Gene%提高SCA2编码区CAG三核苷酸重复的PCR扩增效率

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤熙翔; 夏家辉

    2000-01-01

    To improve the efficacy of PCR amplification of CAG trinucleotide repeats in the coding sequence of spinocerebellar ataxia type II gene(69.2% G+C), hot-start PCR, base-replacement PCR, and the addition of enhancers(1%~12.5% DMSO , 1%~25% glycerol ,1%~12.5% formamide) were performed and compared with normal PCR . The results showed that hot-start PCR, base-replacement PCR and the addition of enhancers(1%~10% DMSO , 5%~20% glycerol , 1%~10% formamide) improved the amplification efficacy of the GC rich region. Gene diagnosis in 70 SCA pedgrees and 60 spontaneous SCA patients were also conducted.%以遗传性脊髓小脑共济失调II型基因(spinocerebellar ataxia type II gene SCA2)编码区内的CAG三核苷酸重复为研究对象(G+C含量为69.2%),比较了热启动PCR、碱基替代PCR、添加增效剂(1%~12.5%二甲亚砜、1%~25%甘油、1%~12.5%甲酰胺)与常规PCR的扩增效率,发现热启动PCR、碱基替代PCR及添加增效剂(1%~10%二甲亚砜、5%~20%甘油、1%~10%甲酰胺)能提高该GC富集区的扩增效率,并对70个SCA家系及60个散发SCA患者进行了SCA2的基因诊断。

  12. Variations in/nearby genes coding for JAZF1, TSPAN8/LGR5 and HHEX-IDE and risk of type 2 diabetes in Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dai-zhan; Liu, Yun; Zhang, Di; Liu, Si-min; Yu, Lan; Yang, Yi-feng; Zhao, Teng; Chen, Zhuo; Kan, Meng-yuan; Zhang, Zuo-feng; Feng, Guo-yin; Xu, He; He, Lin

    2010-12-01

    Several genetic loci (JAZF1, CDC123/CAMK1D, TSPAN8/LGR5, ADAMTS9, VEGFA and HHEX-IDE) were identified to be significantly related to the risk of type 2 diabetes and quantitative metabolic traits in European populations. Here, we aimed to evaluate the impacts of these novel loci on type 2 diabetes risk in a population-based case-control study of Han Chinese (1912 cases and 2041 controls). We genotyped 13 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in/near these genes and examined the differences in allele/genotype frequency between cases and controls. We found that both IDE rs11187007 and HHEX rs1111875 were associated with type 2 diabetes risk (for both variants: odds ratio (OR)=1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-1.28, P=0.009). In a meta-analysis where we pooled our data with the three previous studies conducted in East Asians, we found that the variants of JAZF1 rs864745 (1.09 (1.03-1.16); P=3.49 × 10(-3)) and TSPAN8/LGR5 rs7961581 (1.11(1.05-1.17); P=1.89 × 10(-4)) were significantly associated with type 2 diabetes risk. In addition, the meta-analysis (7207 cases and 8260 controls) also showed that HHEX rs1111875 did have effects on type 2 diabetes in Chinese population (OR=1.15(1.10-1.21); P=1.93 × 10(-8)). This large population-based study and meta-analysis further confirmed the modest effects of the JAZF1, TSPAN8/LGR5 and HHEX-IDE loci on type 2 diabetes in Chinese and other East Asians.

  13. Network coding for computing: Linear codes

    CERN Document Server

    Appuswamy, Rathinakumar; Karamchandani, Nikhil; Zeger, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    In network coding it is known that linear codes are sufficient to achieve the coding capacity in multicast networks and that they are not sufficient in general to achieve the coding capacity in non-multicast networks. In network computing, Rai, Dey, and Shenvi have recently shown that linear codes are not sufficient in general for solvability of multi-receiver networks with scalar linear target functions. We study single receiver networks where the receiver node demands a target function of the source messages. We show that linear codes may provide a computing capacity advantage over routing only when the receiver demands a `linearly-reducible' target function. % Many known target functions including the arithmetic sum, minimum, and maximum are not linearly-reducible. Thus, the use of non-linear codes is essential in order to obtain a computing capacity advantage over routing if the receiver demands a target function that is not linearly-reducible. We also show that if a target function is linearly-reducible,...

  14. Practices in Code Discoverability

    CERN Document Server

    Teuben, Peter; Nemiroff, Robert J; Shamir, Lior

    2012-01-01

    Much of scientific progress now hinges on the reliability, falsifiability and reproducibility of computer source codes. Astrophysics in particular is a discipline that today leads other sciences in making useful scientific components freely available online, including data, abstracts, preprints, and fully published papers, yet even today many astrophysics source codes remain hidden from public view. We review the importance and history of source codes in astrophysics and previous efforts to develop ways in which information about astrophysics codes can be shared. We also discuss why some scientist coders resist sharing or publishing their codes, the reasons for and importance of overcoming this resistance, and alert the community to a reworking of one of the first attempts for sharing codes, the Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL). We discuss the implementation of the ASCL in an accompanying poster paper. We suggest that code could be given a similar level of referencing as data gets in repositories such ...

  15. Coding for optical channels

    CERN Document Server

    Djordjevic, Ivan; Vasic, Bane

    2010-01-01

    This unique book provides a coherent and comprehensive introduction to the fundamentals of optical communications, signal processing and coding for optical channels. It is the first to integrate the fundamentals of coding theory and optical communication.

  16. -449 C>G polymorphism of NFKB1 gene, coding nuclear factor-kappa-B, is associated with the susceptibility to ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ranji Hayashi; Tomomitsu Tahara; Tsukasa Yamaaki; Takashi Saito; Kazuhiro Matsunaga; Nobuhiko Hayashi; Atsushi Fukumura

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To clarify the association between a polymorphism-449 C>G (rs72696119) in 5'-UTR of NFKB1 with ulcerative colitis (UC).METHODS:The studied population comprised 639subjects,including patients with UC (UC cases,n =174) and subjects without UC (controls,n =465).We employed polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism to detect the gene polymorphism.RESULTS:The rs72696119 G allele frequencies in controls and UC cases were 33.4% and 38.5%,respectively (P =0.10).Genotype frequency of the GG homozygote in UC cases was significantly higher than that in controls (P =0.017),and the GG homozygote was significantly associated with susceptibility to UC [odds ratio (OR),1.88; 95%CI,1.13-3.14].In male subjects,the GG homozygote was associated with an increased risk for UC (OR,3.10; 95%CI,1.47-6.54; P =0.0053),whereas this association was not found in female subjects.In addition,the GG homozygote was significantly associated with the risk of non-continuous disease (OR,2.06; 95%CI,1.12-3.79; P =0.029),not having total colitis (OR,2.40; 95%CI,1.09-3.80,P =0.040),disease which developed before 20 years of age (OR,2.80; 95%CI,1.07-7.32,P =0.041),no hospitalization (OR,2.28; 95%CI,1.29-4.05; P =0.0090) and with a maximum of 8 or less on the UCDAI score (OR,2.45;95%CI,1.23-4.93; P =0.022).CONCLUSION:Our results provide evidence that NFKB1 polymorphism rs72696119 was significantly associated with the development of UC.This polymorphism influences the susceptibility to and pathophysiological features of UC.

  17. Enhancing QR Code Security

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Linfan; Zheng, Shuang

    2015-01-01

    Quick Response code opens possibility to convey data in a unique way yet insufficient prevention and protection might lead into QR code being exploited on behalf of attackers. This thesis starts by presenting a general introduction of background and stating two problems regarding QR code security, which followed by a comprehensive research on both QR code itself and related issues. From the research a solution taking advantages of cloud and cryptography together with an implementation come af...

  18. Refactoring test code

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van Deursen (Arie); L.M.F. Moonen (Leon); A. van den Bergh; G. Kok

    2001-01-01

    textabstractTwo key aspects of extreme programming (XP) are unit testing and merciless refactoring. Given the fact that the ideal test code / production code ratio approaches 1:1, it is not surprising that unit tests are being refactored. We found that refactoring test code is different from

  19. Informal Control code logic

    CERN Document Server

    Bergstra, Jan A

    2010-01-01

    General definitions as well as rules of reasoning regarding control code production, distribution, deployment, and usage are described. The role of testing, trust, confidence and risk analysis is considered. A rationale for control code testing is sought and found for the case of safety critical embedded control code.

  20. Gauge color codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bombin Palomo, Hector

    2015-01-01

    Color codes are topological stabilizer codes with unusual transversality properties. Here I show that their group of transversal gates is optimal and only depends on the spatial dimension, not the local geometry. I also introduce a generalized, subsystem version of color codes. In 3D they allow...

  1. Refactoring test code

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deursen, A. van; Moonen, L.M.F.; Bergh, A. van den; Kok, G.

    2001-01-01

    Two key aspects of extreme programming (XP) are unit testing and merciless refactoring. Given the fact that the ideal test code / production code ratio approaches 1:1, it is not surprising that unit tests are being refactored. We found that refactoring test code is different from refactoring product

  2. ARC Code TI: CODE Software Framework

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CODE is a software framework for control and observation in distributed environments. The basic functionality of the framework allows a user to observe a distributed...

  3. ARC Code TI: ROC Curve Code Augmentation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) curve Code Augmentation was written by Rodney Martin and John Stutz at NASA Ames Research Center and is a modification of ROC...

  4. Fountain Codes: LT And Raptor Codes Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Bazzi, Hiba Harb

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital fountain codes are a new class of random error correcting codes designed for efficient and reliable data delivery over erasure channels such as internet. These codes were developed to provide robustness against erasures in a way that resembles a fountain of water. A digital fountain is rateless in a way that sender can send limitless number of encoded packets. The receiver doesn’t care which packets are received or lost as long as the receiver gets enough packets to recover original data. In this paper, the design of the fountain codes is explored with its implementation of the encoding and decoding algorithm so that the performance in terms of encoding/decoding symbols, reception overhead, data length, and failure probability is studied.

  5. Universal Rateless Codes From Coupled LT Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Aref, Vahid

    2011-01-01

    It was recently shown that spatial coupling of individual low-density parity-check codes improves the belief-propagation threshold of the coupled ensemble essentially to the maximum a posteriori threshold of the underlying ensemble. We study the performance of spatially coupled low-density generator-matrix ensembles when used for transmission over binary-input memoryless output-symmetric channels. We show by means of density evolution that the threshold saturation phenomenon also takes place in this setting. Our motivation for studying low-density generator-matrix codes is that they can easily be converted into rateless codes. Although there are already several classes of excellent rateless codes known to date, rateless codes constructed via spatial coupling might offer some additional advantages. In particular, by the very nature of the threshold phenomenon one expects that codes constructed on this principle can be made to be universal, i.e., a single construction can uniformly approach capacity over the cl...

  6. Software Certification - Coding, Code, and Coders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havelund, Klaus; Holzmann, Gerard J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a certification approach for software development that has been adopted at our organization. JPL develops robotic spacecraft for the exploration of the solar system. The flight software that controls these spacecraft is considered to be mission critical. We argue that the goal of a software certification process cannot be the development of "perfect" software, i.e., software that can be formally proven to be correct under all imaginable and unimaginable circumstances. More realistically, the goal is to guarantee a software development process that is conducted by knowledgeable engineers, who follow generally accepted procedures to control known risks, while meeting agreed upon standards of workmanship. We target three specific issues that must be addressed in such a certification procedure: the coding process, the code that is developed, and the skills of the coders. The coding process is driven by standards (e.g., a coding standard) and tools. The code is mechanically checked against the standard with the help of state-of-the-art static source code analyzers. The coders, finally, are certified in on-site training courses that include formal exams.

  7. Coding for Electronic Mail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, R. F.; Lee, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Scheme for coding facsimile messages promises to reduce data transmission requirements to one-tenth current level. Coding scheme paves way for true electronic mail in which handwritten, typed, or printed messages or diagrams sent virtually instantaneously - between buildings or between continents. Scheme, called Universal System for Efficient Electronic Mail (USEEM), uses unsupervised character recognition and adaptive noiseless coding of text. Image quality of resulting delivered messages improved over messages transmitted by conventional coding. Coding scheme compatible with direct-entry electronic mail as well as facsimile reproduction. Text transmitted in this scheme automatically translated to word-processor form.

  8. The path to the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, Maciej; Barciszewski, Jan

    2017-11-01

    In December of 1966 the last nucleotide triplet in the genetic code has been assigned (Brenner et al., 1967 [1]) thus completing years of studies aimed at deciphering the nature of the relationship between the sequences of genes and proteins. The end product, the table of the genetic code, was a crowning achievement of the quest to unravel the basic mechanisms underlying functioning of all living organisms on the molecular level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Noisy Network Coding

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Sung Hoon; Gamal, Abbas El; Chung, Sae-Young

    2010-01-01

    A noisy network coding scheme for sending multiple sources over a general noisy network is presented. For multi-source multicast networks, the scheme naturally extends both network coding over noiseless networks by Ahlswede, Cai, Li, and Yeung, and compress-forward coding for the relay channel by Cover and El Gamal to general discrete memoryless and Gaussian networks. The scheme also recovers as special cases the results on coding for wireless relay networks and deterministic networks by Avestimehr, Diggavi, and Tse, and coding for wireless erasure networks by Dana, Gowaikar, Palanki, Hassibi, and Effros. The scheme involves message repetition coding, relay signal compression, and simultaneous decoding. Unlike previous compress--forward schemes, where independent messages are sent over multiple blocks, the same message is sent multiple times using independent codebooks as in the network coding scheme for cyclic networks. Furthermore, the relays do not use Wyner--Ziv binning as in previous compress-forward sch...

  10. Testing algebraic geometric codes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hao

    2009-01-01

    Property testing was initially studied from various motivations in 1990's.A code C (∩)GF(r)n is locally testable if there is a randomized algorithm which can distinguish with high possibility the codewords from a vector essentially far from the code by only accessing a very small (typically constant) number of the vector's coordinates.The problem of testing codes was firstly studied by Blum,Luby and Rubinfeld and closely related to probabilistically checkable proofs (PCPs).How to characterize locally testable codes is a complex and challenge problem.The local tests have been studied for Reed-Solomon (RS),Reed-Muller (RM),cyclic,dual of BCH and the trace subcode of algebraicgeometric codes.In this paper we give testers for algebraic geometric codes with linear parameters (as functions of dimensions).We also give a moderate condition under which the family of algebraic geometric codes cannot be locally testable.

  11. Chinese remainder codes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Aili; LIU Xiufeng

    2006-01-01

    Chinese remainder codes are constructed by applying weak block designs and the Chinese remainder theorem of ring theory.The new type of linear codes take the congruence class in the congruence class ring R/I1 ∩ I2 ∩…∩ In for the information bit,embed R/Ji into R/I1 ∩ I2 ∩…∩ In,and assign the cosets of R/Ji as the subring of R/I1 ∩ I2 ∩…∩ In and the cosets of R/Ji in R/I1 ∩ I2 ∩…∩ In as check lines.Many code classes exist in the Chinese remainder codes that have high code rates.Chinese remainder codes are the essential generalization of Sun Zi codes.

  12. Chinese Remainder Codes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张爱丽; 刘秀峰; 靳蕃

    2004-01-01

    Chinese Remainder Codes are constructed by applying weak block designs and Chinese Remainder Theorem of ring theory. The new type of linear codes take the congruence class in the congruence class ring R/I1∩I2∩…∩In for the information bit, embed R/Ji into R/I1∩I2∩…∩In, and asssign the cosets of R/Ji as the subring of R/I1∩I2∩…∩In and the cosets of R/Ji in R/I1∩I2∩…∩In as check lines. There exist many code classes in Chinese Remainder Codes, which have high code rates. Chinese Remainder Codes are the essential generalization of Sun Zi Codes.

  13. Code of Ethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adelstein, Jennifer; Clegg, Stewart

    2016-01-01

    Ethical codes have been hailed as an explicit vehicle for achieving more sustainable and defensible organizational practice. Nonetheless, when legal compliance and corporate governance codes are conflated, codes can be used to define organizational interests ostentatiously by stipulating norms...... for employee ethics. Such codes have a largely cosmetic and insurance function, acting subtly and strategically to control organizational risk management and protection. In this paper, we conduct a genealogical discourse analysis of a representative code of ethics from an international corporation...... to understand how management frames expectations of compliance. Our contribution is to articulate the problems inherent in codes of ethics, and we make some recommendations to address these to benefit both an organization and its employees. In this way, we show how a code of ethics can provide a foundation...

  14. Defeating the coding monsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colt, Ross

    2007-02-01

    Accuracy in coding is rapidly becoming a required skill for military health care providers. Clinic staffing, equipment purchase decisions, and even reimbursement will soon be based on the coding data that we provide. Learning the complicated myriad of rules to code accurately can seem overwhelming. However, the majority of clinic visits in a typical outpatient clinic generally fall into two major evaluation and management codes, 99213 and 99214. If health care providers can learn the rules required to code a 99214 visit, then this will provide a 90% solution that can enable them to accurately code the majority of their clinic visits. This article demonstrates a step-by-step method to code a 99214 visit, by viewing each of the three requirements as a monster to be defeated.

  15. Testing algebraic geometric codes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Property testing was initially studied from various motivations in 1990’s. A code C  GF (r)n is locally testable if there is a randomized algorithm which can distinguish with high possibility the codewords from a vector essentially far from the code by only accessing a very small (typically constant) number of the vector’s coordinates. The problem of testing codes was firstly studied by Blum, Luby and Rubinfeld and closely related to probabilistically checkable proofs (PCPs). How to characterize locally testable codes is a complex and challenge problem. The local tests have been studied for Reed-Solomon (RS), Reed-Muller (RM), cyclic, dual of BCH and the trace subcode of algebraicgeometric codes. In this paper we give testers for algebraic geometric codes with linear parameters (as functions of dimensions). We also give a moderate condition under which the family of algebraic geometric codes cannot be locally testable.

  16. Serially Concatenated IRA Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Taikun; Belzer, Benjamin J

    2007-01-01

    We address the error floor problem of low-density parity check (LDPC) codes on the binary-input additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channel, by constructing a serially concatenated code consisting of two systematic irregular repeat accumulate (IRA) component codes connected by an interleaver. The interleaver is designed to prevent stopping-set error events in one of the IRA codes from propagating into stopping set events of the other code. Simulations with two 128-bit rate 0.707 IRA component codes show that the proposed architecture achieves a much lower error floor at higher SNRs, compared to a 16384-bit rate 1/2 IRA code, but incurs an SNR penalty of about 2 dB at low to medium SNRs. Experiments indicate that the SNR penalty can be reduced at larger blocklengths.

  17. Overcoming Challenges in Engineering the Genetic Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajoie, M J; Söll, D; Church, G M

    2016-02-27

    Withstanding 3.5 billion years of genetic drift, the canonical genetic code remains such a fundamental foundation for the complexity of life that it is highly conserved across all three phylogenetic domains. Genome engineering technologies are now making it possible to rationally change the genetic code, offering resistance to viruses, genetic isolation from horizontal gene transfer, and prevention of environmental escape by genetically modified organisms. We discuss the biochemical, genetic, and technological challenges that must be overcome in order to engineer the genetic code.

  18. Detection of Multiple Budding Yeast Cells and a Partial Sequence of 43-kDa Glycoprotein Coding Gene of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis from a Case of Lacaziosis in a Female Pacific White-Sided Dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakawa, Tomoko; Ueda, Keiichi; Tanaka, Miyuu; Tanaka, Natsuki; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Izawa, Takeshi; Konno, Toshihiro; Yamate, Jyoji; Itano, Eiko Nakagawa; Sano, Ayako; Wada, Shinpei

    2016-08-01

    Lacaziosis, formerly called as lobomycosis, is a zoonotic mycosis, caused by Lacazia loboi, found in humans and dolphins, and is endemic in the countries on the Atlantic Ocean, Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean of Japanese coast. Susceptible Cetacean species include the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus), the Indian Ocean bottlenose dolphin (T. aduncus), and the estuarine dolphin (Sotalia guianensis); however, no cases have been recorded in other Cetacean species. We diagnosed a case of Lacaziosis in a Pacific white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens) nursing in an aquarium in Japan. The dolphin was a female estimated to be more than 14 years old at the end of June 2015 and was captured in a coast of Japan Sea in 2001. Multiple, lobose, and solid granulomatous lesions with or without ulcers appeared on her jaw, back, flipper and fluke skin, in July 2014. The granulomatous skin lesions from the present case were similar to those of our previous cases. Multiple budding and chains of round yeast cells were detected in the biopsied samples. The partial sequence of 43-kDa glycoprotein coding gene confirmed by a nested PCR and sequencing, which revealed a different genotype from both Amazonian and Japanese lacaziosis in bottlenose dolphins, and was 99 % identical to those derived from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis; a sister fungal species to L. loboi. This is the first case of lacaziosis in Pacific white-sided dolphin.

  19. Identifying personal microbiomes using metagenomic codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzosa, Eric A; Huang, Katherine; Meadow, James F; Gevers, Dirk; Lemon, Katherine P; Bohannan, Brendan J M; Huttenhower, Curtis

    2015-06-02

    Community composition within the human microbiome varies across individuals, but it remains unknown if this variation is sufficient to uniquely identify individuals within large populations or stable enough to identify them over time. We investigated this by developing a hitting set-based coding algorithm and applying it to the Human Microbiome Project population. Our approach defined body site-specific metagenomic codes: sets of microbial taxa or genes prioritized to uniquely and stably identify individuals. Codes capturing strain variation in clade-specific marker genes were able to distinguish among 100s of individuals at an initial sampling time point. In comparisons with follow-up samples collected 30-300 d later, ∼30% of individuals could still be uniquely pinpointed using metagenomic codes from a typical body site; coincidental (false positive) matches were rare. Codes based on the gut microbiome were exceptionally stable and pinpointed >80% of individuals. The failure of a code to match its owner at a later time point was largely explained by the loss of specific microbial strains (at current limits of detection) and was only weakly associated with the length of the sampling interval. In addition to highlighting patterns of temporal variation in the ecology of the human microbiome, this work demonstrates the feasibility of microbiome-based identifiability-a result with important ethical implications for microbiome study design. The datasets and code used in this work are available for download from huttenhower.sph.harvard.edu/idability.

  20. Rewriting the Genetic Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Takahito; Lajoie, Marc J; Englert, Markus; Söll, Dieter

    2017-09-08

    The genetic code-the language used by cells to translate their genomes into proteins that perform many cellular functions-is highly conserved throughout natural life. Rewriting the genetic code could lead to new biological functions such as expanding protein chemistries with noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) and genetically isolating synthetic organisms from natural organisms and viruses. It has long been possible to transiently produce proteins bearing ncAAs, but stabilizing an expanded genetic code for sustained function in vivo requires an integrated approach: creating recoded genomes and introducing new translation machinery that function together without compromising viability or clashing with endogenous pathways. In this review, we discuss design considerations and technologies for expanding the genetic code. The knowledge obtained by rewriting the genetic code will deepen our understanding of how genomes are designed and how the canonical genetic code evolved.

  1. On Polynomial Remainder Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Jiun-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Polynomial remainder codes are a large class of codes derived from the Chinese remainder theorem that includes Reed-Solomon codes as a special case. In this paper, we revisit these codes and study them more carefully than in previous work. We explicitly allow the code symbols to be polynomials of different degrees, which leads to two different notions of weight and distance. Algebraic decoding is studied in detail. If the moduli are not irreducible, the notion of an error locator polynomial is replaced by an error factor polynomial. We then obtain a collection of gcd-based decoding algorithms, some of which are not quite standard even when specialized to Reed-Solomon codes.

  2. Generating code adapted for interlinking legacy scalar code and extended vector code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwind, Michael K

    2013-06-04

    Mechanisms for intermixing code are provided. Source code is received for compilation using an extended Application Binary Interface (ABI) that extends a legacy ABI and uses a different register configuration than the legacy ABI. First compiled code is generated based on the source code, the first compiled code comprising code for accommodating the difference in register configurations used by the extended ABI and the legacy ABI. The first compiled code and second compiled code are intermixed to generate intermixed code, the second compiled code being compiled code that uses the legacy ABI. The intermixed code comprises at least one call instruction that is one of a call from the first compiled code to the second compiled code or a call from the second compiled code to the first compiled code. The code for accommodating the difference in register configurations is associated with the at least one call instruction.

  3. The aeroelastic code FLEXLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, B. [Stork Product Eng., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1996-09-01

    To support the discussion on aeroelastic codes, a description of the code FLEXLAST was given and experiences within benchmarks and measurement programmes were summarized. The code FLEXLAST has been developed since 1982 at Stork Product Engineering (SPE). Since 1992 FLEXLAST has been used by Dutch industries for wind turbine and rotor design. Based on the comparison with measurements, it can be concluded that the main shortcomings of wind turbine modelling lie in the field of aerodynamics, wind field and wake modelling. (au)

  4. Opening up codings?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensig, Jakob; Heinemann, Trine

    2015-01-01

    We welcome Tanya Stivers’s discussion (Stivers, 2015/this issue) of coding social interaction and find that her descriptions of the processes of coding open up important avenues for discussion, among other things of the precise ad hoc considerations that researchers need to bear in mind, both when....... Instead we propose that the promise of coding-based research lies in its ability to open up new qualitative questions....

  5. Industrial Computer Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Wilbur

    1996-01-01

    This is an overview of new and updated industrial codes for seal design and testing. GCYLT (gas cylindrical seals -- turbulent), SPIRALI (spiral-groove seals -- incompressible), KTK (knife to knife) Labyrinth Seal Code, and DYSEAL (dynamic seal analysis) are covered. CGYLT uses G-factors for Poiseuille and Couette turbulence coefficients. SPIRALI is updated to include turbulence and inertia, but maintains the narrow groove theory. KTK labyrinth seal code handles straight or stepped seals. And DYSEAL provides dynamics for the seal geometry.

  6. ARC Code TI: ACCEPT

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ACCEPT consists of an overall software infrastructure framework and two main software components. The software infrastructure framework consists of code written to...

  7. QR codes for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Waters, Joe

    2012-01-01

    Find out how to effectively create, use, and track QR codes QR (Quick Response) codes are popping up everywhere, and businesses are reaping the rewards. Get in on the action with the no-nonsense advice in this streamlined, portable guide. You'll find out how to get started, plan your strategy, and actually create the codes. Then you'll learn to link codes to mobile-friendly content, track your results, and develop ways to give your customers value that will keep them coming back. It's all presented in the straightforward style you've come to know and love, with a dash of humor thrown

  8. Tokamak Systems Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, R.L.; Barrett, R.J.; Brown, T.G.; Gorker, G.E.; Hooper, R.J.; Kalsi, S.S.; Metzler, D.H.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Roth, K.E.; Spampinato, P.T.

    1985-03-01

    The FEDC Tokamak Systems Code calculates tokamak performance, cost, and configuration as a function of plasma engineering parameters. This version of the code models experimental tokamaks. It does not currently consider tokamak configurations that generate electrical power or incorporate breeding blankets. The code has a modular (or subroutine) structure to allow independent modeling for each major tokamak component or system. A primary benefit of modularization is that a component module may be updated without disturbing the remainder of the systems code as long as the imput to or output from the module remains unchanged.

  9. MORSE Monte Carlo code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramer, S.N.

    1984-01-01

    The MORSE code is a large general-use multigroup Monte Carlo code system. Although no claims can be made regarding its superiority in either theoretical details or Monte Carlo techniques, MORSE has been, since its inception at ORNL in the late 1960s, the most widely used Monte Carlo radiation transport code. The principal reason for this popularity is that MORSE is relatively easy to use, independent of any installation or distribution center, and it can be easily customized to fit almost any specific need. Features of the MORSE code are described.

  10. Evolution of coding microsatellites in primate genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loire, Etienne; Higuet, Dominique; Netter, Pierre; Achaz, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellites (SSRs) are highly susceptible to expansions and contractions. When located in a coding sequence, the insertion or the deletion of a single unit for a mono-, di-, tetra-, or penta(nucleotide)-SSR creates a frameshift. As a consequence, one would expect to find only very few of these SSRs in coding sequences because of their strong deleterious potential. Unexpectedly, genomes contain many coding SSRs of all types. Here, we report on a study of their evolution in a phylogenetic context using the genomes of four primates: human, chimpanzee, orangutan, and macaque. In a set of 5,015 orthologous genes unambiguously aligned among the four species, we show that, except for tri- and hexa-SSRs, for which insertions and deletions are frequently observed, SSRs in coding regions evolve mainly by substitutions. We show that the rate of substitution in all types of coding SSRs is typically two times higher than in the rest of coding sequences. Additionally, we observe that although numerous coding SSRs are created and lost by substitutions in the lineages, their numbers remain constant. This last observation suggests that the coding SSRs have reached equilibrium. We hypothesize that this equilibrium involves a combination of mutation, drift, and selection. We thus estimated the fitness cost of mono-SSRs and show that it increases with the number of units. We finally show that the cost of coding mono-SSRs greatly varies from function to function, suggesting that the strength of the selection that acts against them can be correlated to gene functions.

  11. The neutral emergence of error minimized genetic codes superior to the standard genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Steven E

    2016-11-07

    The standard genetic code (SGC) assigns amino acids to codons in such a way that the impact of point mutations is reduced, this is termed 'error minimization' (EM). The occurrence of EM has been attributed to the direct action of selection, however it is difficult to explain how the searching of alternative codes for an error minimized code can occur via codon reassignments, given that these are likely to be disruptive to the proteome. An alternative scenario is that EM has arisen via the process of genetic code expansion, facilitated by the duplication of genes encoding charging enzymes and adaptor molecules. This is likely to have led to similar amino acids being assigned to similar codons. Strikingly, we show that if during code expansion the most similar amino acid to the parent amino acid, out of the set of unassigned amino acids, is assigned to codons related to those of the parent amino acid, then genetic codes with EM superior to the SGC easily arise. This scheme mimics code expansion via the gene duplication of charging enzymes and adaptors. The result is obtained for a variety of different schemes of genetic code expansion and provides a mechanistically realistic manner in which EM has arisen in the SGC. These observations might be taken as evidence for self-organization in the earliest stages of life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Research on universal combinatorial coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun; Zhang, Zhuo; Mo, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The conception of universal combinatorial coding is proposed. Relations exist more or less in many coding methods. It means that a kind of universal coding method is objectively existent. It can be a bridge connecting many coding methods. Universal combinatorial coding is lossless and it is based on the combinatorics theory. The combinational and exhaustive property make it closely related with the existing code methods. Universal combinatorial coding does not depend on the probability statistic characteristic of information source, and it has the characteristics across three coding branches. It has analyzed the relationship between the universal combinatorial coding and the variety of coding method and has researched many applications technologies of this coding method. In addition, the efficiency of universal combinatorial coding is analyzed theoretically. The multicharacteristic and multiapplication of universal combinatorial coding are unique in the existing coding methods. Universal combinatorial coding has theoretical research and practical application value.

  13. Safety Code A12

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Secretariat

    2005-01-01

    Please note that the Safety Code A12 (Code A12) entitled "THE SAFETY COMMISSION (SC)" is available on the web at the following url: https://edms.cern.ch/document/479423/LAST_RELEASED Paper copies can also be obtained from the SC Unit Secretariat, e-mail: sc.secretariat@cern.ch SC Secretariat

  14. Dress Codes for Teachers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million, June

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses an e-mail survey of principals from across the country regarding whether or not their school had a formal staff dress code. The results indicate that most did not have a formal dress code, but agreed that professional dress for teachers was not only necessary, but showed respect for the school and had a…

  15. Nuremberg code turns 60

    OpenAIRE

    Thieren, Michel; Mauron, Alex

    2007-01-01

    This month marks sixty years since the Nuremberg code – the basic text of modern medical ethics – was issued. The principles in this code were articulated in the context of the Nuremberg trials in 1947. We would like to use this anniversary to examine its ability to address the ethical challenges of our time.

  16. Pseudonoise code tracking loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laflame, D. T. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A delay-locked loop is presented for tracking a pseudonoise (PN) reference code in an incoming communication signal. The loop is less sensitive to gain imbalances, which can otherwise introduce timing errors in the PN reference code formed by the loop.

  17. Scrum Code Camps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pries-Heje, Jan; Pries-Heje, Lene; Dahlgaard, Bente

    2013-01-01

    is required. In this paper we present the design of such a new approach, the Scrum Code Camp, which can be used to assess agile team capability in a transparent and consistent way. A design science research approach is used to analyze properties of two instances of the Scrum Code Camp where seven agile teams...

  18. Scrum Code Camps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pries-Heje, Jan; Pries-Heje, Lene; Dahlgaard, Bente

    2013-01-01

    is required. In this paper we present the design of such a new approach, the Scrum Code Camp, which can be used to assess agile team capability in a transparent and consistent way. A design science research approach is used to analyze properties of two instances of the Scrum Code Camp where seven agile teams...

  19. READING A NEURAL CODE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BIALEK, W; RIEKE, F; VANSTEVENINCK, RRD; WARLAND, D

    1991-01-01

    Traditional approaches to neural coding characterize the encoding of known stimuli in average neural responses. Organisms face nearly the opposite task - extracting information about an unknown time-dependent stimulus from short segments of a spike train. Here the neural code was characterized from

  20. The materiality of Code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soon, Winnie

    2014-01-01

    , Twitter and Facebook). The focus is not to investigate the functionalities and efficiencies of the code, but to study and interpret the program level of code in order to trace the use of various technological methods such as third-party libraries and platforms’ interfaces. These are important...

  1. Transformation invariant sparse coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard

    2011-01-01

    Sparse coding is a well established principle for unsupervised learning. Traditionally, features are extracted in sparse coding in specific locations, however, often we would prefer invariant representation. This paper introduces a general transformation invariant sparse coding (TISC) model....... The model decomposes images into features invariant to location and general transformation by a set of specified operators as well as a sparse coding matrix indicating where and to what degree in the original image these features are present. The TISC model is in general overcomplete and we therefore invoke...... sparse coding to estimate its parameters. We demonstrate how the model can correctly identify components of non-trivial artificial as well as real image data. Thus, the model is capable of reducing feature redundancies in terms of pre-specified transformations improving the component identification....

  2. The SIFT Code Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    The specification of Software Implemented Fault Tolerance (SIFT) consists of two parts, the specifications of the SIFT models and the specifications of the SIFT PASCAL program which actually implements the SIFT system. The code specifications are the last of a hierarchy of models describing the operation of the SIFT system and are related to the SIFT models as well as the PASCAL program. These Specifications serve to link the SIFT models to the running program. The specifications are very large and detailed and closely follow the form and organization of the PASCAL code. In addition to describing each of the components of the SIFT code, the code specifications describe the assumptions of the upper SIFT models which are required to actually prove that the code will work as specified. These constraints are imposed primarily on the schedule tables.

  3. The Aesthetics of Coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Ulrik

    2007-01-01

    discusses code as the artist’s material and, further, formulates a critique of Cramer. The seductive magic in computer-generated art does not lie in the magical expression, but nor does it lie in the code/material/text itself. It lies in the nature of code to do something – as if it was magic......Computer art is often associated with computer-generated expressions (digitally manipulated audio/images in music, video, stage design, media facades, etc.). In recent computer art, however, the code-text itself – not the generated output – has become the artwork (Perl Poetry, ASCII Art, obfuscated...... avant-garde’. In line with Cramer, the artists Alex McLean and Adrian Ward (aka Slub) declare: “art-oriented programming needs to acknowledge the conditions of its own making – its poesis.” By analysing the Live Coding performances of Slub (where they program computer music live), the presentation...

  4. Combustion chamber analysis code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekwas, A. J.; Lai, Y. G.; Krishnan, A.; Avva, R. K.; Giridharan, M. G.

    1993-05-01

    A three-dimensional, time dependent, Favre averaged, finite volume Navier-Stokes code has been developed to model compressible and incompressible flows (with and without chemical reactions) in liquid rocket engines. The code has a non-staggered formulation with generalized body-fitted-coordinates (BFC) capability. Higher order differencing methodologies such as MUSCL and Osher-Chakravarthy schemes are available. Turbulent flows can be modeled using any of the five turbulent models present in the code. A two-phase, two-liquid, Lagrangian spray model has been incorporated into the code. Chemical equilibrium and finite rate reaction models are available to model chemically reacting flows. The discrete ordinate method is used to model effects of thermal radiation. The code has been validated extensively against benchmark experimental data and has been applied to model flows in several propulsion system components of the SSME and the STME.

  5. Astrophysics Source Code Library

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, Alice; Berriman, Bruce; Hanisch, Robert J; Mink, Jessica; Teuben, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL), founded in 1999, is a free on-line registry for source codes of interest to astronomers and astrophysicists. The library is housed on the discussion forum for Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD) and can be accessed at http://ascl.net. The ASCL has a comprehensive listing that covers a significant number of the astrophysics source codes used to generate results published in or submitted to refereed journals and continues to grow. The ASCL currently has entries for over 500 codes; its records are citable and are indexed by ADS. The editors of the ASCL and members of its Advisory Committee were on hand at a demonstration table in the ADASS poster room to present the ASCL, accept code submissions, show how the ASCL is starting to be used by the astrophysics community, and take questions on and suggestions for improving the resource.

  6. qRT-PCR检测结核分枝杆菌蛋白抗原编码基因表达水平%The coding gene's expression level of proteantigen in Mycobacterium tuberculosis by qRT-PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈伟; 王远志; 李永祥; 米利古; 张辉; 张娟; 魏克娜; 袁俐

    2011-01-01

    Objective Use quantitative realiin e polym erase chain reaction m eihod for detecting the coding gene' s expression ]evel of A g85B ,38kD a and M PT64 in M ycobacterium tuberculosis and expbre variability of their proteantigen in transcriptional level bete een the drug-resistant and the sensitive ,bete een the Beijng genotype and non-Beijng genotype and the value of use quantitative reartin e polym erase chain reaction diagnosing live M ycobacteiim tubercubsis .M ethods The specific prin ers of fbpB ,pstsl ,m pt64 and Siga were designed accoirding to GenBank database .The gene fragments were cbned to pMD18-T sin p]e vector respectively, and ream binant plaan idsweie purified and quantified spectophotm eteicalry .W e established theme1hod of detecting the expressbn of fbpB,pstsl,mpt64 by using SYBR Green I,and then selected 46 M ycobacterim tubercubsis strains and theN ontubercubsis m ycobacterk(2 ) to do study .qRT-PCR m eihod was used to detecthg 1he gene' s expressbn of fbpB ,ps1sl ,m pi64 in 46 M ycobacteriim tuber-cubsis,international standard strain H37Rv and 2 Nontubereubsismycobacterk. Results The amplification result h live M ycobacterim tibereubsis is S curve ,The deaih and Nontubereubsis m ycobacterk can' t detecting fluorescencal signal and the curve is linear.The gene's expressbn of m pt64 in diug-rssistant strains is downreguhted compare to sensitive strahs and H 37Rv,The result have statistical significance (t= 3 .093 (P<0 .01) ; t=2 .545 ( P<0 .05)) .The gene's expressbn of psisl in Beijing genoiype is downregulated compare to nornB eijng genoiype and H 37Rv,The result have statistical significance (t= 3 .093 (P<0 .01); t=2 .545 (Pgene' s expressbn level of fbpB ,pstsl ,m pi64 by real-tin e PCR have been estabished .This study fhd tie gene's expressbn of m pi64 in diug-rBsistant is downreguhted can pare to sensitive and H 37Rv .the gene' s expressbn of pstsl in Beijing genoiype is downreguhted

  7. Embedded foveation image coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z; Bovik, A C

    2001-01-01

    The human visual system (HVS) is highly space-variant in sampling, coding, processing, and understanding. The spatial resolution of the HVS is highest around the point of fixation (foveation point) and decreases rapidly with increasing eccentricity. By taking advantage of this fact, it is possible to remove considerable high-frequency information redundancy from the peripheral regions and still reconstruct a perceptually good quality image. Great success has been obtained previously by a class of embedded wavelet image coding algorithms, such as the embedded zerotree wavelet (EZW) and the set partitioning in hierarchical trees (SPIHT) algorithms. Embedded wavelet coding not only provides very good compression performance, but also has the property that the bitstream can be truncated at any point and still be decoded to recreate a reasonably good quality image. In this paper, we propose an embedded foveation image coding (EFIC) algorithm, which orders the encoded bitstream to optimize foveated visual quality at arbitrary bit-rates. A foveation-based image quality metric, namely, foveated wavelet image quality index (FWQI), plays an important role in the EFIC system. We also developed a modified SPIHT algorithm to improve the coding efficiency. Experiments show that EFIC integrates foveation filtering with foveated image coding and demonstrates very good coding performance and scalability in terms of foveated image quality measurement.

  8. Fulcrum Network Codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Fulcrum network codes, which are a network coding framework, achieve three objectives: (i) to reduce the overhead per coded packet to almost 1 bit per source packet; (ii) to operate the network using only low field size operations at intermediate nodes, dramatically reducing complexity in the net...... the number of dimensions seen by the network using a linear mapping. Receivers can tradeoff computational effort with network delay, decoding in the high field size, the low field size, or a combination thereof.......Fulcrum network codes, which are a network coding framework, achieve three objectives: (i) to reduce the overhead per coded packet to almost 1 bit per source packet; (ii) to operate the network using only low field size operations at intermediate nodes, dramatically reducing complexity...... in the network; and (iii) to deliver an end-to-end performance that is close to that of a high field size network coding system for high-end receivers while simultaneously catering to low-end ones that can only decode in a lower field size. Sources may encode using a high field size expansion to increase...

  9. Report number codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, R.N. (ed.)

    1985-05-01

    This publication lists all report number codes processed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. The report codes are substantially based on the American National Standards Institute, Standard Technical Report Number (STRN)-Format and Creation Z39.23-1983. The Standard Technical Report Number (STRN) provides one of the primary methods of identifying a specific technical report. The STRN consists of two parts: The report code and the sequential number. The report code identifies the issuing organization, a specific program, or a type of document. The sequential number, which is assigned in sequence by each report issuing entity, is not included in this publication. Part I of this compilation is alphabetized by report codes followed by issuing installations. Part II lists the issuing organization followed by the assigned report code(s). In both Parts I and II, the names of issuing organizations appear for the most part in the form used at the time the reports were issued. However, for some of the more prolific installations which have had name changes, all entries have been merged under the current name.

  10. Application of RS Codes in Decoding QR Code

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Suxia(朱素霞); Ji Zhenzhou; Cao Zhiyan

    2003-01-01

    The QR Code is a 2-dimensional matrix code with high error correction capability. It employs RS codes to generate error correction codewords in encoding and recover errors and damages in decoding. This paper presents several QR Code's virtues, analyzes RS decoding algorithm and gives a software flow chart of decoding the QR Code with RS decoding algorithm.

  11. Evaluation Codes from an Affine Veriety Code Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geil, Hans Olav

    2008-01-01

    Evaluation codes (also called order domain codes) are traditionally introduced as generalized one-point geometric Goppa codes. In the present paper we will give a new point of view on evaluation codes by introducing them instead as particular nice examples of affine variety codes. Our study...

  12. Study on the Cloning of Coding Sequence and Ontogenetic mRNA Expression of Ovine UCP4 Gene%绵羊UCP4基因编码序列的克隆和mRNA表达研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周沙沙; 刘宝凤; 魏琳琳; 王景霖; 刘建华; 梁琛; 乔利英; 刘文忠

    2013-01-01

    [Objective] This study aims to clone the coding sequence (CDS) of ovine UCP4 gene,to analyze the CDS and its coding protein structures,and to profile the ontogenetic mRNA expression so that to lay a theoretical foundation for future research on the structure and function of this gene.[Method] The CDS was amplified from ovine cerebrum tissue by reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Physicochemical features and structural characteristics of ovine UCP4 were analyzed by bioinformatics methods.Ninety-six animals from two sheep breeds with significant differences in tail types (Guangling Large Tailedand Small Tailed-Han Sheep) were used to study the ontogenetic mRNA expression by real-time quantitative PCR in eight tissues (cerebrum,cerebellum,hypothalamus,pituitary,and subcutaneous fat,perirenal fat,mesenteric fat and tail fat) from 2-to 12-month old age at two-month interval.[Result] The sequencing data showed that the length of complete CDS was 972 bp encoding a protein of 323 amino acids.The isoelectric point (pI) of the protein was 9.43,and the molecular weight was 35.73 kDa.The percentages of helix,strand and loop were 56.04%,7.12% and 36.84%,respectively,in the secondary structure.This transmembrane protein had no signal peptide but with two predicted glycosylation sites and 15 potential phosphorylation sites.The UCP4 mRNA expressed in all these tissues,but overexpressed in brain tissue other than in adipose tissue.Generally,breed,tissue and the months of age had significant influences on the UCP4 mRNA expression.[Conclusion] The obtained whole CDS of ovine UCP4 gene,expression profile and its limiting factors are of scientific significance to further studies on the relationship between the gene structure and energy metabolism.%[目的]克隆绵羊UCP4基因的编码序列(CDS),分析CDS及其编码蛋白结构特点,并探讨其mRNA的发育性表达规律,以期为该基因的结构和功能研究奠定理论基础.[方法]利用RT-PCR

  13. Distributed multiple description coding

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Huihui; Zhao, Yao

    2011-01-01

    This book examines distributed video coding (DVC) and multiple description coding (MDC), two novel techniques designed to address the problems of conventional image and video compression coding. Covering all fundamental concepts and core technologies, the chapters can also be read as independent and self-sufficient, describing each methodology in sufficient detail to enable readers to repeat the corresponding experiments easily. Topics and features: provides a broad overview of DVC and MDC, from the basic principles to the latest research; covers sub-sampling based MDC, quantization based MDC,

  14. Cryptography cracking codes

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    While cracking a code might seem like something few of us would encounter in our daily lives, it is actually far more prevalent than we may realize. Anyone who has had personal information taken because of a hacked email account can understand the need for cryptography and the importance of encryption-essentially the need to code information to keep it safe. This detailed volume examines the logic and science behind various ciphers, their real world uses, how codes can be broken, and the use of technology in this oft-overlooked field.

  15. Coded MapReduce

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Songze; Maddah-Ali, Mohammad Ali; Avestimehr, A. Salman

    2015-01-01

    MapReduce is a commonly used framework for executing data-intensive jobs on distributed server clusters. We introduce a variant implementation of MapReduce, namely "Coded MapReduce", to substantially reduce the inter-server communication load for the shuffling phase of MapReduce, and thus accelerating its execution. The proposed Coded MapReduce exploits the repetitive mapping of data blocks at different servers to create coding opportunities in the shuffling phase to exchange (key,value) pair...

  16. Classical Holographic Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Brehm, Enrico M

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we introduce classical holographic codes. These can be understood as concatenated probabilistic codes and can be represented as networks uniformly covering hyperbolic space. In particular, classical holographic codes can be interpreted as maps from bulk degrees of freedom to boundary degrees of freedom. Interestingly, they are shown to exhibit features similar to those expected from the AdS/CFT correspondence. Among these are a version of the Ryu-Takayanagi formula and intriguing properties regarding bulk reconstruction and boundary representations of bulk operations. We discuss the relation of our findings with expectations from AdS/CFT and, in particular, with recent results from quantum error correction.

  17. 不同群体中ATXN2基因编码区CAG重复的变异研究%Variation of CAG repeats in coding region of ATXN2 gene in different ethnic groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓晨; 杨昭庆; 褚嘉祐; 孙浩; 米冬青; 黄小琴; 林克勤; 易文; 于亮; 史磊; 史荔

    2011-01-01

    在中国6个生活环境差异较大的少数民族群体中进行ATXN2基因编码区CAG重复的变异研究,以衡量其是否受到正选择的作用以及寻找推动选择作用的因素.采集6个民族群体共291个健康无关个体,对其进行STR分型,直接计数其等位基因及等位基因型频率,计算其线性Fst值,构建针对该基因的系统进化树,并对各群体进行MDS分析.线性Fst值结果显示:回族和彝族群体间ATXN2基因STR位点进化的差异具有显著性,其他4个群体相互间无显著性差异.结合已报道的其他群体进一步分析,回族、哈尼族、云南蒙古族以及内蒙古自治区蒙古族每个人群都与日本人群有显著性差异;回族、内蒙古自治区蒙古族与汉族具有显著性差异.6个群体中ATXN2基因STR的等位基因频率有各自的分布特点,稀有等位基因频率变化产生的原因可能是选择作用的结果.%Toinvestigate CAG repeats variation of ATXN2 gene coding region in six ethnic groups that live in comparatively different environments, to evaluate whether these variations are under positive selection, and to find factors driving selection effects, 291 unrelated healthy individuals were collected from six ethnic groups and their STR geneotyping was performed.The frequencies of alleles and genotypes were counted and thereby Slatkin's linearized Fst values were calculated.The UPGMA tree against this gene was constructed.The MDS analysis among these groups was carried out as well.The results from the linearized Fst values indicated that there were significant evolutionary differences of the STR in A TXN2 gene between Hui and Yi groups, but not among the other 4 groups.Further analysis was performed by combining our data with published data obtained from other groups.These results indicated that there were significant differences between Japanese and other groups including Hui, Hani, Yunnan Mongolian, and Inner Mongolian.Both Hui and Mongolian from

  18. Sequencing of a 9.9 kb segment on the right arm of yeast chromosome VII reveals four open reading frames, including PFK1, the gene coding for succinyl-CoA synthetase (beta-chain) and two ORFs sharing homology with ORFs of the yeast chromosome VIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, P; Azevedo, D; Barreiros, T; Rodrigues-Pousada, C

    1997-03-15

    A 9.9 kb DNA fragment from the right arm of chromosome VII of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been sequenced and analysed. The sequence contains four open reading frames (ORFs) longer than 100 amino acids. One gene, PFK1, has already been cloned and sequenced and the other one is the probable yeast gene coding for the beta-subunit of the succinyl-CoA synthetase. The two remaining ORFs share homology with the deduced amino acid sequence (and their physical arrangement is similar to that) of the YHR161c and YHR162w ORFs from chromosome VIII.

  19. The fast code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, L.N.; Wilson, R.E. [Oregon State Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Corvallis, OR (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The FAST Code which is capable of determining structural loads on a flexible, teetering, horizontal axis wind turbine is described and comparisons of calculated loads with test data are given at two wind speeds for the ESI-80. The FAST Code models a two-bladed HAWT with degrees of freedom for blade bending, teeter, drive train flexibility, yaw, and windwise and crosswind tower motion. The code allows blade dimensions, stiffnesses, and weights to differ and models tower shadow, wind shear, and turbulence. Additionally, dynamic stall is included as are delta-3 and an underslung rotor. Load comparisons are made with ESI-80 test data in the form of power spectral density, rainflow counting, occurrence histograms, and azimuth averaged bin plots. It is concluded that agreement between the FAST Code and test results is good. (au)

  20. VT ZIP Code Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) A ZIP Code Tabulation Area (ZCTA) is a statistical geographic entity that approximates the delivery area for a U.S. Postal Service five-digit...

  1. Fulcrum Network Codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Fulcrum network codes, which are a network coding framework, achieve three objectives: (i) to reduce the overhead per coded packet to almost 1 bit per source packet; (ii) to operate the network using only low field size operations at intermediate nodes, dramatically reducing complexity...... in the network; and (iii) to deliver an end-to-end performance that is close to that of a high field size network coding system for high-end receivers while simultaneously catering to low-end ones that can only decode in a lower field size. Sources may encode using a high field size expansion to increase...... the number of dimensions seen by the network using a linear mapping. Receivers can tradeoff computational effort with network delay, decoding in the high field size, the low field size, or a combination thereof....

  2. GOOGLE SUMMER OF CODE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leslie Hawthorn

    2008-01-01

      This article examines the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) program, the world's first global initiative to introduce College and University students to free/libre open source software (F/LOSS) development...

  3. Importance of Building Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshmi Banerjee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A building code, or building control, is a set of rules that specify the minimum standards for constructed objects such as buildings and non building structures. The main purpose of building codes are to protect public health, safety and general welfare as they relate to the construction and occupancy of buildings and structures. The building code becomes law of a particular jurisdiction when formally enacted by the appropriate governmental or private authority. Building codes are generally intended to be applied by architects, engineers, constructors and regulators but are also used for various purposes by safety inspectors, environmental scientists, real estate developers, subcontractors, manufacturers of building products and materials, insurance companies, facility managers, tenants and others.

  4. Bandwidth efficient coding

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, John B

    2017-01-01

    Bandwidth Efficient Coding addresses the major challenge in communication engineering today: how to communicate more bits of information in the same radio spectrum. Energy and bandwidth are needed to transmit bits, and bandwidth affects capacity the most. Methods have been developed that are ten times as energy efficient at a given bandwidth consumption as simple methods. These employ signals with very complex patterns and are called "coding" solutions. The book begins with classical theory before introducing new techniques that combine older methods of error correction coding and radio transmission in order to create narrowband methods that are as efficient in both spectrum and energy as nature allows. Other topics covered include modulation techniques such as CPM, coded QAM and pulse design.

  5. Coded Random Access

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paolini, Enrico; Stefanovic, Cedomir; Liva, Gianluigi

    2015-01-01

    , in which the structure of the access protocol can be mapped to a structure of an erasure-correcting code defined on graph. This opens the possibility to use coding theory and tools for designing efficient random access protocols, offering markedly better performance than ALOHA. Several instances of coded......The rise of machine-to-machine communications has rekindled the interest in random access protocols as a support for a massive number of uncoordinatedly transmitting devices. The legacy ALOHA approach is developed under a collision model, where slots containing collided packets are considered...... as waste. However, if the common receiver (e.g., base station) is capable to store the collision slots and use them in a transmission recovery process based on successive interference cancellation, the design space for access protocols is radically expanded. We present the paradigm of coded random access...

  6. Code Disentanglement: Initial Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlbier, John Greaton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kelley, Timothy M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rockefeller, Gabriel M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Calef, Matthew Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-01-27

    The first step to making more ambitious changes in the EAP code base is to disentangle the code into a set of independent, levelized packages. We define a package as a collection of code, most often across a set of files, that provides a defined set of functionality; a package a) can be built and tested as an entity and b) fits within an overall levelization design. Each package contributes one or more libraries, or an application that uses the other libraries. A package set is levelized if the relationships between packages form a directed, acyclic graph and each package uses only packages at lower levels of the diagram (in Fortran this relationship is often describable by the use relationship between modules). Independent packages permit independent- and therefore parallel|development. The packages form separable units for the purposes of development and testing. This is a proven path for enabling finer-grained changes to a complex code.

  7. Annotated Raptor Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Mahdaviani, Kaveh; Tellambura, Chintha

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, an extension of raptor codes is introduced which keeps all the desirable properties of raptor codes, including the linear complexity of encoding and decoding per information bit, unchanged. The new design, however, improves the performance in terms of the reception rate. Our simulations show a 10% reduction in the needed overhead at the benchmark block length of 64,520 bits and with the same complexity per information bit.

  8. Robust Nonlinear Neural Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qianli; Pitkow, Xaq

    2015-03-01

    Most interesting natural sensory stimuli are encoded in the brain in a form that can only be decoded nonlinearly. But despite being a core function of the brain, nonlinear population codes are rarely studied and poorly understood. Interestingly, the few existing models of nonlinear codes are inconsistent with known architectural features of the brain. In particular, these codes have information content that scales with the size of the cortical population, even if that violates the data processing inequality by exceeding the amount of information entering the sensory system. Here we provide a valid theory of nonlinear population codes by generalizing recent work on information-limiting correlations in linear population codes. Although these generalized, nonlinear information-limiting correlations bound the performance of any decoder, they also make decoding more robust to suboptimal computation, allowing many suboptimal decoders to achieve nearly the same efficiency as an optimal decoder. Although these correlations are extremely difficult to measure directly, particularly for nonlinear codes, we provide a simple, practical test by which one can use choice-related activity in small populations of neurons to determine whether decoding is suboptimal or optimal and limited by correlated noise. We conclude by describing an example computation in the vestibular system where this theory applies. QY and XP was supported by a grant from the McNair foundation.

  9. Scalable motion vector coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarien, Joeri; Munteanu, Adrian; Verdicchio, Fabio; Andreopoulos, Yiannis; Cornelis, Jan P.; Schelkens, Peter

    2004-11-01

    Modern video coding applications require transmission of video data over variable-bandwidth channels to a variety of terminals with different screen resolutions and available computational power. Scalable video coding is needed to optimally support these applications. Recently proposed wavelet-based video codecs employing spatial domain motion compensated temporal filtering (SDMCTF) provide quality, resolution and frame-rate scalability while delivering compression performance comparable to that of the state-of-the-art non-scalable H.264-codec. These codecs require scalable coding of the motion vectors in order to support a large range of bit-rates with optimal compression efficiency. Scalable motion vector coding algorithms based on the integer wavelet transform followed by embedded coding of the wavelet coefficients were recently proposed. In this paper, a new and fundamentally different scalable motion vector codec (MVC) using median-based motion vector prediction is proposed. Extensive experimental results demonstrate that the proposed MVC systematically outperforms the wavelet-based state-of-the-art solutions. To be able to take advantage of the proposed scalable MVC, a rate allocation mechanism capable of optimally dividing the available rate among texture and motion information is required. Two rate allocation strategies are proposed and compared. The proposed MVC and rate allocation schemes are incorporated into an SDMCTF-based video codec and the benefits of scalable motion vector coding are experimentally demonstrated.

  10. On Expanded Cyclic Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yingquan

    2008-01-01

    The paper has a threefold purpose. The first purpose is to present an explicit description of expanded cyclic codes defined in $\\GF(q^m)$. The proposed explicit construction of expanded generator matrix and expanded parity check matrix maintains the symbol-wise algebraic structure and thus keeps many important original characteristics. The second purpose of this paper is to identify a class of constant-weight cyclic codes. Specifically, we show that a well-known class of $q$-ary BCH codes excluding the all-zero codeword are constant-weight cyclic codes. Moreover, we show this class of codes achieve the Plotkin bound. The last purpose of the paper is to characterize expanded cyclic codes utilizing the proposed expanded generator matrix and parity check matrix. We analyze the properties of component codewords of a codeword and particularly establish the precise conditions under which a codeword can be represented by a subbasis. With the new insights, we present an improved lower bound on the minimum distance of...

  11. Non-Binary Polar Codes using Reed-Solomon Codes and Algebraic Geometry Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Mori, Ryuhei

    2010-01-01

    Polar codes, introduced by Arikan, achieve symmetric capacity of any discrete memoryless channels under low encoding and decoding complexity. Recently, non-binary polar codes have been investigated. In this paper, we calculate error probability of non-binary polar codes constructed on the basis of Reed-Solomon matrices by numerical simulations. It is confirmed that 4-ary polar codes have significantly better performance than binary polar codes on binary-input AWGN channel. We also discuss an interpretation of polar codes in terms of algebraic geometry codes, and further show that polar codes using Hermitian codes have asymptotically good performance.

  12. Deciphering the genetic regulatory code using an inverse error control coding framework.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rintoul, Mark Daniel; May, Elebeoba Eni; Brown, William Michael; Johnston, Anna Marie; Watson, Jean-Paul

    2005-03-01

    We have found that developing a computational framework for reconstructing error control codes for engineered data and ultimately for deciphering genetic regulatory coding sequences is a challenging and uncharted area that will require advances in computational technology for exact solutions. Although exact solutions are desired, computational approaches that yield plausible solutions would be considered sufficient as a proof of concept to the feasibility of reverse engineering error control codes and the possibility of