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Sample records for generic antiepileptic drugs

  1. Risks and benefits of generic antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Alonso, Juan; Kanner, Andrés M; Herranz, José Luis; Molins, Albert; Gil-Nagel, Antonio

    2008-11-01

    In most therapeutic areas, prescribing generic drugs seems to lower costs without sacrificing efficacy. The use of generic drugs for treating epilepsy may, however, be more controversial. A systematic review of the literature on generic antiepileptic drugs has been carried out based primarily on a bibliographical search in the Medline database. Published studies are usually of a descriptive nature and are sometimes based on generic drugs that were approved in times when regulatory agency requirements were not as strict as they are now. Experts claim that a change in pharmaceutical formulations could cause seizure recurrence in cases that had been successfully controlled in the past, with severe effects on patients. Meanwhile, several health organizations have provided inconsistent recommendations on the use of generic antiepileptic drugs. In order to obtain scientific evidence on the potential risks and benefits of interchanging branded and generic antiepileptic drugs, high methodological comparative studies are necessary. These studies could bring consensus about the role of generic drugs for treating epilepsy.

  2. Pharmacy and generic substitution of antiepileptic drugs: missing in action?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Timothy E

    2007-06-01

    Generic substitution of antiepileptic drugs is an issue that is gathering a lot of attention in the neurology community but is not receiving much attention within pharmacy. Several proposals have been drafted that restrict a pharmacist's decision-making in generic substitution. These proposals highlight concerns about the pharmacy community related to generic substitution. Careful consideration needs to be given to these issues by pharmacists and pharmacy professional organizations. Unless pharmacy as a profession takes strong positions in support of a pharmacist's ability to make decisions about pharmacotherapy and addresses many of the pharmacy-related problems of generic substitution, policies that negatively impact pharmacy will be established.

  3. Interchangeability of generic anti-epileptic drugs: a quantitative analysis of topiramate and gabapentin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maliepaard, M.; Banishki, N.; Gispen-de Wied, C.C.; Teerenstra, S.; Elferink, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to determine whether the so-called "shift" or "drift" problem might occur when generic anti-epileptic drugs are interchanged, and thus to assess if generic anti-epileptic drugs are interchangeable and can be used in an efficacious and safe way on the basis of

  4. Generic substitution of antiepileptic drugs: a systematic review of prospective and retrospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Mikiko; Welty, Timothy E

    2011-11-01

    To systematically review the literature on generic antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), evaluate the efficacy and safety of generic AED substitution, and perform pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis using the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) scheme to classify evidence. PubMed and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature searches from January 1, 1980, to October 15, 2010, were performed using the search terms anticonvulsant, antiepileptic drug, carbamazepine, divalproex, ethosuximide, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, pheno-barbital, phenytoin, primidone, topiramate, valproate, valproic acid, and zonisamide; bioavailability, bioequivalence, bioequivalency, bioequivalent, and substitution; and generic. Retrospective and prospective controlled studies of generic substitution of AEDs were included in the review. Non-English-language articles and uncontrolled clinical studies were excluded. Published articles were categorized using the AAN criteria for systematic reviews. We identified 156 articles. Of these, 20 met our inclusion criteria; 7 were retrospective studies, 6 were prospective studies in patients with epilepsy, and 7 were prospective studies in healthy subjects. All articles were rated Class I to Class III, using AAN criteria. The retrospective studies were categorized as Class III and showed a significant relationship between generic substitution and increased use of health care resources because of seizures or AED toxicity. Prospective studies were categorized as Class I, II, and III. Prospective studies in patients showed no differences between brand and generic drugs in PK parameters of bioequivalence. Three prospective studies in healthy subjects reported significant differences in maximum drug concentrations. Comparison of brand and generic drugs revealed no significant difference in seizure frequency; however, some prospective studies showed significant differences in PK parameters, primarily those not used for bioequivalence

  5. Generic products of antiepileptic drugs: a perspective on bioequivalence and interchangeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialer, Meir; Midha, Kamal K

    2010-06-01

    Most antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are currently available as generic products, yet neurologists and patients are reluctant to switch to generics. Generic AEDs are regarded as bioequivalent to brand AEDs after meeting the average bioequivalence criteria; consequently, they are considered to be interchangeable with their respective brands without loss of efficacy and safety. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) the present bioequivalence requirements are already so rigorous and constrained that there is little possibility that generics that meet regulatory bioequivalence criteria could lead to therapeutic problems. So is there a scientific rationale for the concerns about switching patients with epilepsy to bioequivalent generics? Herein we discuss the assessment of bioequivalence and propose a scaled-average bioequivalence approach where scaling of bioequivalence is carried out based on brand lot-to-lot variance as an alternative to the conventional bioequivalence test as a means to determine whether switching patients to generic formulations, or vice versa, is a safe and effective therapeutic option. Meeting the proposed scaled-average bioequivalence requirements will ensure that when an individual patient is switched, he or she has fluctuations in plasma levels similar to those from lot-to-lot of the brand reference levels and thus should make these generic products safely switchable without change in efficacy and safety outcomes.

  6. THE PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH SWITCHING BRAND-NAME ANTIEPILEPTIC DRUGS TO GENERICS: A FOCUS ON TOPAMAX: A REVIEW OF LITERATURE AND A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Mukhin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the rather high efficiency of treatment for epilepsy (overall, 65–70 % of patients can achieve remission or show a considerable decrease in the frequency of seizures, there remains a challenge due to the need to use antiepileptic drugs long and regularly: therapy adherence, compliance, treatment tolerability, and impact of therapy on quality of patent’s life. One of the aspects of this problem is a very common tendency to switch brand-name antiepileptic drugs to their generics that are 1ess expensive, but also less predictably effective and tolerable. The authors review the literature on the interchangeability of brand-name and generic drugs and describe their case. 

  7. Switching to generic anti-epileptic medicines : A regulatory perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maliepaard, Marc; Hekster, Yechiel A.; Kappelle, Arnoud; Van Puijenbroek, Eugène P.; Elferink, André J.; Welink, Jan; Gispen-de Wied, Christine C.; Lekkerkerker, Frits J.F.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Currently, there is a lot of discussion about whether generic substitution of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) with the same active moiety but from different manufacturers can take place safely. Many AEDs are considered to have a narrow therapeutic index, and the consequences of an epilepti

  8. Antiepileptic drugs and intrauterine death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomson, Torbjörn; Battino, Dina; Bonizzoni, Erminio

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the risk of spontaneous abortions and stillbirth associated with maternal use of different antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). METHODS: The EURAP registry is an observational international cohort study primarily designed to determine the risk of major congenital malformations (MCMs...

  9. Teratogenicity of Antiepileptic Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güveli, Betül Tekin; Rosti, Rasim Özgür; Güzeltaş, Alper; Tuna, Elif Bahar; Ataklı, Dilek; Sencer, Serra; Yekeler, Ensar; Kayserili, Hülya; Dirican, Ahmet; Bebek, Nerses; Baykan, Betül; Gökyiğit, Ayşen; Gürses, Candan

    2017-01-01

    Objective Antiepileptic drugs (AED) have chronic teratogenic effects, the most common of which are congenital heart disease, cleft lip/palate, urogenital and neural tube defects. The aim of our study is to examine teratogenic effects of AED and the correlation between these malformations and AED in single or multiple pregnancies. Methods This is a retrospective study of malformations in children born to mothers currently followed up by our outpatient clinics who used or discontinued AED during their pregnancy. Their children were then investigated using echocardiography, urinary ultrasound, cranial magnetic resonance image, and examined by geneticists and pediatric dentists. Results One hundred and seventeen children were included in the study. Ninety one of these children were exposed to AED during pregnancy. The most commonly used AED were valproic acid and carbamazepine in monotherapy. The percentage of major anomaly was 6.8% in all children. Dysmorphic features and dental anomalies were observed more in children exposed especially to valproic acid. There were 26 mothers with two and four mothers with three pregnancies from the same fathers. No correlation was found between the distribution of malformations in recurring pregnancies and AED usage. Conclusion Our study has the highest number of dysmorphism examined in literature, found in all the children exposed to valproic acid, which may account for the higher rate of facial dysmorphism and dental anomalies. On lower doses of valproic acid, major malformations are not seen, although the risk increases with polytherapy. Our data also indicate possible effects of genetic and environmental factors on malformations. PMID:28138106

  10. [Endocrine effects of antiepileptic drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leśkiewicz, Monika; Budziszewska, Bogusława; Lasoń, Władysław

    2008-01-01

    Both seizures and antiepileptic drugs may induce disturbances in hormonal system. Regarding endocrine effects of anticonvulsants, an interaction of these drugs with gonadal, thyroid, and adrenal axis deserves attention. Since majority of antiepileptic drugs block voltage dependent sodium and calcium channels, enhance GABAergic transmission and/or antagonize glutamate receptors, one may expect that similar neurochemical mechanisms are engaged in the interaction of these drugs with synthesis of hypothalamic neurohormones such as gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH). Moreover some antiepileptic drugs may affect hormone metabolism via inhibiting or stimulating cytochrome P-450 iso-enzymes. An influence of antiepileptic drugs on hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis appears to be sex-dependent. In males, valproate decreased follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) but elevated dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) concentrations. Carbamazepine decreased testosterone/sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG) ratio, whereas its active metabolite--oxcarbazepine--had no effect on androgens. In females, valproate decreased FSH-stimulated estradiol release and enhanced testosterone level. On the other hand, carbamazepine decreased testosterone level but enhanced SHBG concentration. It has been reported that carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine or joined administration of carbamazepine and valproate decrease thyroxine (T4) level in patients with no effect on thyrotropin (TSH). While valproate itself has no effect on T4, phenytoin, phenobarbital and primidone, as metabolic enzyme inducers, can decrease the level of free and bound thyroxine. On the other hand, new antiepileptics such as levetiracetam, tiagabine, vigabatrine or lamotrigine had no effect on thyroid hormones. With respect to hormonal regulation of metabolic processes, valproate was

  11. Antiepileptic drugs and bone metabolism.

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    Valsamis, Helen A; Arora, Surender K; Labban, Barbara; McFarlane, Samy I

    2006-09-06

    Anti-epileptic medications encompass a wide range of drugs including anticonvulsants, benzodiazepines, enzyme inducers or inhibitors, with a variety effects, including induction of cytochrome P450 and other enzyme, which may lead to catabolism of vitamin D and hypocalcemia and other effects that may significantly effect the risk for low bone mass and fractures. With the current estimates of 50 million people worldwide with epilepsy together with the rapid increase in utilization of these medications for other indications, bone disease associated with the use of anti-epileptic medications is emerging as a serious health threat for millions of people. Nevertheless, it usually goes unrecognized and untreated. In this review we discuss the pathophysiologic mechanisms of bone disease associated with anti-epileptic use, including effect of anti-epileptic agents on bone turnover and fracture risk, highlighting various strategies for prevention of bone loss and associated fractures a rapidly increasing vulnerable population.

  12. Pharmacokinetic monitoring of antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldaz, A; Ferriols, R; Aumente, D; Calvo, M V; Farre, M R; García, B; Marqués, R; Mas, P; Porta, B; Outeda, M; Soy, D

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring plasma levels of antiepileptic drugs for the treatment and prophylaxis of epilepsy is one of the strategies enabling clinical results to improve by reducing adverse affects and increasing effectiveness. The objective of this article is to review the basic aspects in the monitoring of antiepileptic drugs using a consensus document prepared and endorsed by the pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenetics working group (PK.gen) of the Sociedad Española de Farmacia Hospitalaria (Spanish Society of Hospital Pharmacists). Copyright © 2010 SEFH. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparative effectiveness of generic versus brand-name antiepileptic medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, Joshua J; Kesselheim, Aaron S; Choudhry, Niteesh K; Polinski, Jennifer M; Hutchins, David; Matlin, Olga S; Brennan, Troyen A; Avorn, Jerry; Shrank, William H

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to compare treatment persistence and rates of seizure-related events in patients who initiate antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy with a generic versus a brand-name product. We used linked electronic medical and pharmacy claims data to identify Medicare beneficiaries who initiated one of five AEDs (clonazepam, gabapentin, oxcarbazepine, phenytoin, zonisamide). We matched initiators of generic versus brand-name versions of these drugs using a propensity score that accounted for demographic, clinical, and health service utilization variables. We used a Cox proportional hazards model to compare rates of seizure-related emergency room (ER) visit or hospitalization (primary outcome) and ER visit for bone fracture or head injury (secondary outcome) between the matched generic and brand-name initiators. We also compared treatment persistence, measured as time to first 14-day treatment gap, between generic and brand-name initiators. We identified 19,760 AED initiators who met study eligibility criteria; 18,306 (93%) initiated a generic AED. In the matched cohort, we observed 47 seizure-related hospitalizations and ER visits among brand-name initiators and 31 events among generic initiators, corresponding to a hazard ratio of 0.53 (95% confidence interval, 0.30 to 0.96). Similar results were observed for the secondary clinical endpoint and across sensitivity analyses. Mean time to first treatment gap was 124.2 days (standard deviation [sd], 125.8) for brand-name initiators and 137.9 (sd, 148.6) for generic initiators. Patients who initiated generic AEDs had fewer adverse seizure-related clinical outcomes and longer continuous treatment periods before experiencing a gap than those who initiated brand-name versions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Intravenous Antiepileptic Drugs in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Vlasov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Launching four intravenous antiepileptic drugs: valproate (Depakene and Convulex, lacosamide (Vimpat, and levetiracetam (Keppra – into the Russian market has significantly broadened the possibilities of rendering care to patients in seizure emergency situations. The chemi- cal structure, mechanisms of action, indications/contraindications, clinical effectiveness and tolerability, advantages/disadvantages, and adverse events of using these drugs in urgent and elective neurology are discussed. 

  15. Antiepileptic drugs and pregnancy outcomes.

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    Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J; Palacios, Ana M; George, Timothy M; Finnell, Richard H

    2012-08-01

    The treatment of epilepsy in women of reproductive age remains a clinical challenge. While most women with epilepsy (WWE) require anticonvulsant drugs for adequate control of their seizures, the teratogenicity associated with some antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is a risk that needs to be carefully addressed. Antiepileptic medications are also used to treat an ever broadening range of medical conditions such as bipolar disorder, migraine prophylaxis, cancer, and neuropathic pain. Despite the fact that the majority of pregnancies of WWE who are receiving pharmacological treatment are normal, studies have demonstrated that the risk of having a pregnancy complicated by a major congenital malformation is doubled when comparing the risk of untreated pregnancies. Furthermore, when AEDs are used in polytherapy regimens, the risk is tripled, especially when valproic acid (VPA) is included. However, it should be noted that the risks are specific for each anticonvulsant drug. Some investigations have suggested that the risk of teratogenicity is increased in a dose-dependent manner. More recent studies have reported that in utero exposure to AEDs can have detrimental effects on the cognitive functions and language skills in later stages of life. In fact, the FDA just issued a safety announcement on the impact of VPA on cognition (Safety Announcement 6-30-2011). The purpose of this document is to review the most commonly used compounds in the treatment of WWE, and to provide information on the latest experimental and human epidemiological studies of the effects of AEDs in the exposed embryos.

  16. Stiripentol. A novel antiepileptic drug.

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    Trojnar, Michał K; Wojtal, Katarzyna; Trojnar, Marcin P; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2005-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most widespread pathologies of human brain, affecting approximately 1% of world population. Despite the development of new methods of seizure control, chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) remains the treatment of choice. Nevertheless, pharmacotherapy is not always effective. In the case of single drug treatment, the number of non-responding patients is as high as 30%. Moreover, chronic medication with currently available AEDs may result in severe side-effects and undesired drug interactions. That is why in recent years intensive research has been carried out aiming at the development of new therapeutic strategies in epilepsy. The goal of this review is to assemble current literature data on stiripentol (STP), a novel anticonvulsant unrelated to any other AEDs. STP potentiates central gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transmission and is characterized by nonlinear pharmacokinetics and inhibition of liver microsomal enzymes. STP has proved its anticonvulsant potency in different types of animal seizures, as well as in clinical trials. The drug seems a good candidate for adjunctive therapy in intractable epilepsy.

  17. Antiepileptic drugs: newer targets and new drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vihang S. Chawan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder affecting 0.5-1% of the population in India. Majority of patients respond to currently available antiepileptic drugs (AEDs, but a small percentage of patients have shown poor and inadequate response to AEDs in addition to various side effects and drug interactions while on therapy. Thus there is a need to develop more effective AEDs in drug resistant epilepsy which have a better safety profile with minimal adverse effects. The United States food and drug administration (USFDA has approved eslicarbazepine acetate, ezogabine, perampanel and brivaracetam which have shown a promising future as better AEDs and drugs like ganaxolone, intranasal diazepam, ICA- 105665, valnoctamide, VX-765, naluzotan are in the pipeline. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(3.000: 587-592

  18. Papel de los fármacos antiepilépticos genéricos en el tratamiento de la epilepsia infantil Role of generic antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of childhood epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Campos-Castelló

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available La aparición de fármacos genéricos en el mercado, en sustitución de marcas registradas®, y las adecuadas regulaciones de las autoridades sanitarias en los distintos países ha condicionado hasta la actualidad una polémica sobre el riesgo costo/beneficio de tal sustitución en el paciente afecto de epilepsia. El binomio costo/beneficio debe dar por demostrado de manera clara que el paciente puede beneficiarse de tal sustitución sin correr riesgo alguno significativo. Por ello se valoran los distintos aportes en la literatura médica al respecto, que analizan estos riesgos y beneficios y en especial el hecho esencial de la bioequivalencia de ambas formulaciones, en especial en las situaciones de aquellos fármacos antiepilépticos de margen o índice terapéutico estrecho que hagan inviable la equivalencia de la biodisponibilidad del fármaco, la ausencia de repercusión clínica real en el paciente así como la evidencia que existe un beneficio económico claro al valorar el citado binomio riesgo/beneficio. La revisión efectuada señala la clara existencia de desventajas potenciales del cambio de un fármaco antiepiléptico (FAE original de marca a un genérico como: distinta biodisponibilidad, bioequivalencia no demostrada, riesgo de reaparición de crisis en pacientes controlados y variabilidad de la respuesta de los FAE en el paciente epiléptico, imposible de predecir. Por ello se aconseja valorar la importancia de un fracaso terapéutico tras un cambio a genérico, en especial en casos de margen terapéutico estrecho, la biodisponibilidad permisible con valoración de la variabilidad individual del paciente, situación médico-legal de tal cambio y la realidad de los ahorros y costos potenciales derivados.The use of generic instead of trade mark antiepileptic drugs raises the question of cost/benefit risks. The efficacy and side effects of the generic AED should be similar to the trade mark drugs. Otherwise, the substitution is not

  19. Interactions between hormonal contraception and antiepileptic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, Arne; Brodtkorb, Eylert; Sabers, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and hormonal contraceptives may affect each other's metabolism and clinical efficacy. Loss of seizure control and unplanned pregnancy may occur when these compounds are used concomitantly. Although a large number of available preparations yield a plethora of possible dr...

  20. Trends in Anti-Epileptic Drug Development

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    Lennart Gram

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Several avenues are being explored in the development of new anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs. For a number of years efforts have been directed towards compounds which may augment neuronal inhibition, and these efforts have resulted in the development of several valuable drugs. More recently, increased attention has been focused on the role which excitatory transmitters may play in epileptogenesis, and various substances which decrease excitation are currently being investigated at the preclinical level. Since considerable potential still resides in several of the drugs already on the market, resources have been spent on trying to modify/improve the chemical formula of some of these substances, and a number of new drugs has emerged as a result of this approach. The major accomplishments reviewed here in the development of new anti-epileptic drugs suggest that even more successful advances may be achieved in the near future.

  1. Bioequivalence of generic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2015-09-01

    Generic drugs are bioequivalent to the original brand; this is a prerequisite for marketing approval. It is theoretically possible that one generic drug may overestimate the pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of the original and another generic may underestimate these PK parameters; in consequence, these 2 generics may not be bioequivalent between themselves. The result could be loss of efficacy or development of drug-related adverse effects if these generics are interchanged in stable patients. In a recent study involving 292 indirect comparisons of generic formulations of 9 different drugs, mathematical modeling showed that in most cases (87.0% for maximum concentration, 90.1% for area under the curve, and 80.5% for both) generic drugs are bioequivalent to each other. These reassuring findings notwithstanding, prudence dictates that, in stable patients, generic drugs should be interchanged only if there is a good reason for it. This is because bioequivalent brands of drugs may differ in their excipient content, and this can result in variations in safety profiles.

  2. Adverse motor effects induced by antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccara, G; Cincotta, M; Borgheresi, A; Balestrieri, F

    2004-09-01

    Cognitive effects of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) have been already extensively reported. In contrast, motor disturbances, frequently induced by these drugs, have not received similar attention. We review subjective and objective adverse motor effects of traditional and new AEDs. We discuss the methodological issues caused by the heterogeneous sources of information on drug adverse effects (controlled clinical studies, open studies, and case reports). We describe specific disturbances (vestibulocerebellar, dyskinesias, parkinsonism, tics, myoclonus, and tremor) as the effects of different AEDs on distinct motor circuitries. Finally, we summarize the role of sophisticated technical studies which provide a valuable insight into the specific or subtle effects of AEDs on the central nervous system.

  3. Managing antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy and lactation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabers, Anne; Tomson, Torbjörn

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review discusses data on the pharmacokinetics of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in pregnancy and lactation, and the clinical consequences thereof, thus providing a basis for a rational management of AEDs during pregnancy and lactation. RECENT FINDINGS: Studies have confirmed...... of AEDs in pregnancy and during lactation is important to enable optimal treatment. Gestation induced alterations in pharmacokinetics vary with the AED but also between patients and are difficult to predict. Therapeutic drug monitoring is, therefore, advisable during pregnancy and the use...... of the individual patient's optimal prepregnancy drug level is recommended as reference. Breastfeeding is in general safe but needs appropriate observation of the nursing infant....

  4. Psychotic disorders induced by antiepileptic drugs in people with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ziyi; Lusicic, Ana; O'Brien, Terence J; Velakoulis, Dennis; Adams, Sophia J; Kwan, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Antiepileptic drug treatment can induce psychosis in some patients. However, there are no agreed definitions or diagnostic criteria for antiepileptic drug-induced psychotic disorder in the classification systems of either epileptology or psychiatry. In this study we investigated the clinical spectrum of antiepileptic drug-induced psychotic disorder in patients with epilepsy. The medical records of all patients with epilepsy who were diagnosed by a neuropsychiatrist as having a psychotic disorder at the Royal Melbourne Hospital from January 1993 to June 2015 were reviewed. Data were extracted regarding epilepsy and its treatment, psychotic symptoms profile and outcome. The diagnosis of epilepsy was established in accordance to the classification system of the International League Against Epilepsy while that of psychotic disorder was made according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition and the proposal on neuropsychiatric disorders in epilepsy. Patients with antiepileptic drug-induced psychotic disorder were compared to those with psychotic disorders unrelated to antiepileptic drugs assessed over the same period (non-antiepileptic drug induced psychotic disorder group). Univariate comparisons were performed and variables with a value of P psychosis after valproate withdrawal, 76.9% in the antiepileptic drug induced psychotic disorder group were female and the percentage of temporal lobe involvement was higher in the antiepileptic drug induced psychotic disorder group (69.2% versus 38.1%, P psychosis had antiepileptic drug-induced psychotic disorder. In these patients, female gender, temporal lobe involvement and current use of levetiracetam were significantly associated with antiepileptic drug induced psychotic disorder compared to other types of psychosis, while carbamazepine had a negative association. Disorganized behaviours and thinking were predominant in antiepileptic drug-induced psychotic disorder. Patients with

  5. Effects of antiepileptic drugs in electrophysiological tests.

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    Rump, S; Kowalczyk, M

    1987-01-01

    Methods of the study of antiepileptic drugs activity by means of analysis of their effects on bioelectrical ictal phenomena in the animal brain are described. The paper deals especially with EEG signal processing methods. Application of various nonparametric models (e.g. interval-amplitude scatter plots, power spectra analysis) as well as parametric models (e.g. autoregressive model, segmentation analysis) is discussed. A discriminative approach to some of these methods (especially to autoregressive model) is also presented. Special attention is stressed on the value of these methods for the study of anticonvulsant drugs activity.

  6. Are generic drugs really inferior medicines?

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    Moore, N; Berdaï, D; Bégaud, B

    2010-09-01

    In this issue Gagne et al. report an elegant case-crossover study of seizures in patients on antiepileptic drugs. They found that a dispensation episode approximately triples the risk of having a seizure within 21 days, but the risk is not statistically different whether the dispensation was of the same brand-name or generic drug as previously used or a switch from brand-name to a generic or from a generic to a brand name. The cause of the seizure might be a delay in taking medication or late redispensation, among others, but apparently the nature of the product dispensed is not relevant in this study; this may alleviate some of the concerns about generic drugs and epilepsy.

  7. Pharmacokinetic interactions between contraceptives and antiepileptic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabers, A.

    2008-01-01

    The occurrence of bi-directional drug interactions between antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and combined oral contraceptives (M) pose potential risks of unintended pregnancy and as well as seizure deterioration. It is well established that several of the older AEDs (carbamazepine, phenytoin...... AEDs, which undergoes glucuronidation processes, such as valproate and oxcarbazepine, may be affected by OCs. The magnitude of the drug-drug interactions show in general wide inter-individual variability and the change in the elimination rate is often unpredictable and can be influenced by a number...... of co-variants such as co-medication of other drugs, as well as genetic and environmental factors. It is therefore recommended that change in OC use is assisted by AED monitoring whenever possible. (C) 2007 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2008/3...

  8. Interactions between antiepileptic drugs and hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svalheim, Sigrid; Sveberg, Line; Mochol, Monika; Taubøll, Erik

    2015-05-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are known to have endocrine side effects in both men and women. These can affect fertility, sexuality, thyroid function, and bone health, all functions of major importance for well-being and quality of life. The liver enzyme inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs), like phenobarbital, phenytoin, and carbamazepine, and also valproate (VPA), a non-EIAED, are most likely to cause such side effects. AED treatment can alter the levels of different sex hormones. EIAEDs increase sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations in both men and women. Over time, this elevation can lead to lower levels of bioactive testosterone and estradiol, which may cause menstrual disturbances, sexual problems, and eventually reduced fertility. VPA can cause weight gain in both men and women. In women, VPA can also lead to androgenization with increased serum testosterone concentrations, menstrual disturbances, and polycystic ovaries. Lamotrigine has not been shown to result in endocrine side effects. The newer AEDs have not yet been thoroughly studied, but case reports indicate that some of these drugs could also be suspected to cause such effects if endocrine changes commence after treatment initiation. It is important to be aware of possible endocrine side effects of AEDs as they can have a major impact on quality of life, and are, at least partly, reversible after AED discontinuation.

  9. [New antiepileptic drugs: characteristics and clinical applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Yoko

    2014-05-01

    New antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) that have been used in many other countries for more than 10 years have only recently became available for use in Japan. Gabapentin, topiramate, lamotrigine and levetiracetam were licensed for use in Japan between 2006 and 2010. Stiripentol for Dravet syndrome and rufinamide for Lennox-Gastaut syndrome were also approved in 2012 and 2013 as orphan drugs. Clinical trials of other new AEDs such as oxcarbazepine, vigabatrin, lacosamide, and perampanel are in progress. In this review, the general characteristics of the new AEDs are discussed with regards to their effectiveness, tolerability, drug interaction, safety and mechanisms of action. The effectiveness, of the new AEDs compared with established AEDs is also discussed. Clinical applications of the new AEDs, focusing on gabapentin, topiramate, lamotrigine and levetiracetam are also discussed based on our domestic experience as well as overseas reports.

  10. Antiepileptic drug withdrawal in dogs with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Kaspar Gesell

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in dogs and is treated by chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs. In humans with epilepsy, it is common clinical practice to consider drug withdrawal after a patient has been in remission (seizure free for three or more years, but withdrawal is associated with the risk of relapse. In the present study, the consequences of AED withdrawal were studied in dogs with epilepsy. Therefore, 200 owners of dogs with idiopathic or presumed idiopathic epilepsy were contacted by telephone interview, 138 cases could be enrolled. In 11 cases the therapy had been stopped after the dogs had become seizure free for a median time of 1 year. Reasons for AED withdrawal were appearance or fear of adverse side effects, financial aspects and the idea that the medication could be unnecessary. Following AED withdrawal, 4 of these dogs remained seizure free, 7 dogs suffered from seizure recurrence, of which only 3 dogs could regain seizure freedom after resuming AED therapy. Due to the restricted case number, an exact percentage of dogs with seizure recurrence after AED withdrawal cannot be given. However, the present study gives a hint that similar numbers as in human patients are found, and the data can help owners of epileptic dogs and the responsible clinician to decide when and why to stop antiepileptic medication.

  11. Antiepileptic Drug Withdrawal in Dogs with Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesell, Felix Kaspar; Hoppe, Sonja; Löscher, Wolfgang; Tipold, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in dogs and is treated by chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In human beings with epilepsy, it is common clinical practice to consider drug withdrawal after a patient has been in remission (seizure free) for three or more years, but withdrawal is associated with the risk of relapse. In the present study, the consequences of AED withdrawal were studied in dogs with epilepsy. Therefore, 200 owners of dogs with idiopathic or presumed idiopathic epilepsy were contacted by telephone interview, 138 cases could be enrolled. In 11 cases, the therapy had been stopped after the dogs had become seizure free for a median time of 1 year. Reasons for AED withdrawal were appearance or fear of adverse side effects, financial aspects, and the idea that the medication could be unnecessary. Following AED withdrawal, four of these dogs remained seizure free, seven dogs suffered from seizure recurrence, of which only three dogs could regain seizure freedom after resuming AED therapy. Due to the restricted case number, an exact percentage of dogs with seizure recurrence after AED withdrawal cannot be given. However, the present study gives a hint that similar numbers as in human patients are found, and the data can help owners of epileptic dogs and the responsible clinician to decide when and why to stop antiepileptic medication.

  12. Rational use of generic psychotropic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, Maren; Correll, Christoph U

    2013-05-01

    For economic reasons, the generic substitution of branded medications is common and welcome. These replacements are based on the concept of bioequivalence, which is considered equal to therapeutic equivalence. Regulatory standards for bioequivalence require the 90 % confidence intervals of group averages of pharmacokinetic measures of a generic and the original drug to overlap within ±20 %. However, therapeutic equivalence has been challenged for several psychotropic agents by retrospective studies and case reports. To evaluate the degree of bioequivalence and therapeutic equivalence of branded and generic psychotropic drugs, we performed an electronic search (from database inception until 24 May 2012 and without language restrictions) in PubMed/MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science. Search terms were "(generic) AND (psychotropic OR psychoactive OR antipsychotic OR antiepileptic OR antidepressant OR stimulant OR benzodiazepine)" or the respective individual substances. We included clinical studies, regardless of design, comparing branded with generic psychotropic drug formulations, identifying 35 such studies. We also included case reports/series reporting on outcomes after a switch between brand and generic psychotropics, identifying 145 clinical cases. Bioequivalence studies in healthy controls or animals, in-vitro studies, and health economics studies without medical information were excluded. An overview of the few randomized controlled studies supports that US FDA regulations assure clinically adequate drug delivery in the majority of patients switched from brand to generic. However, with a growing number of competing generic products for one substance, and growing economic pressure to substitute with the currently cheapest generic, frequent generic-generic switches, often unbeknownst to prescribing clinicians, raise concerns, particularly for antiepileptics/mood stabilizers. Generic-generic switches may vary by more than ±20 % from each other in

  13. New antiepileptic drugs, cost-efficacy analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Vlasov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to optimize pharmacotherapy in patients with epilepsy and to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of its therapy with the new antiepileptic drugs (AED: levetiracetam, lamotrigine, topiramate, and oxcarbazepine.Patients and methods. The study enrolled 134 patients (women, 69.03%; men, 30.97% with different types of seizures, who had previously received antiepileptic therapy. The patients visited their physician at least twice; after correcting therapy by an epileptologist, the mono- or polytherapy regimen included new AEDs. The patients' mean age was 29.8±8.7 years; disease duration was 13.01±6.7 years; mean age at onset was 16.8±8.5 years. In the groups of working and nonworking patients with different types of seizures, the authors calculated the cost of epilepsy therapy, by taking into account the use of new AEDs and the pharmacoeconomic index "cost-benefit" before and after therapy optimization.Results. When the new AEDs were incorporated into the therapy, the low incidence rate of seizures following a year averaged 75 to 92%. The index cost-effectiveness was decreased by 2—3 times in all types of seizures when the new AEDs were used despite the increased direct cost of treatment. Also, there was a significant reduction in the cost of epilepsy treatment in practically all the groups under study. The findings suggest that the index cost-efficacy directly depends on the rational choice of an AED in an adequate dose. Rational therapy with the new AEDs makes it possible to reduce not only the total cost of epilepsy treatment, but also to lower the index cost-efficacy.

  14. New antiepileptic drugs: lacosamide, rufinamide, and vigabatrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Laura A; Koh, Susan; Frey, Lauren

    2010-07-01

    The treatment of epilepsy is complicated by the multiple seizure types and epilepsy syndromes needing therapy. In addition, seizures in up to 30% of epilepsy patients are resistant to available medications. The three newest antiepileptic medications (lacosamide, rufinamide, and vigabatrin) all putatively have novel mechanisms of action, which might increase the chance of treatment success in patients failing previous antiepilepsy drug trials and the chance of successful synergy with currently available medications. In our experience, all three drugs generally are well tolerated, although the risk for serious long-term complications with vigabatrin presents special challenges and precautions. Lacosamide is approved for the adjunctive therapy of complex partial seizures in adults and also is available in an intravenous formulation. Rufinamide is a new treatment option for seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, and although it is not FDA approved for partial seizures, it has shown efficacy for that indication as well. Vigabatrin has been approved in adults for drug-resistant complex partial seizures and in infants as a treatment option for infantile spasms.

  15. Pharmacogenetics of adverse reactions to antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke-Galindo, I; Jung-Cook, H; LLerena, A; López-López, M

    2015-05-11

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a major public health concern and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. In the case of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), ADRs constitute a barrier to successful treatment since they decrease treatment adherence and impact patients' quality of life of patients. Pharmacogenetics aims to identify genetic polymorphisms associated with drug safety. This article presents a review of genes coding for drug metabolising enzymes and drug transporters, and HLA system genes that have been linked to AED-induced ADRs. To date, several genetic variations associated with drug safety have been reported: CYP2C9*2 and *3 alleles, which code for enzymes with decreased activity, have been linked to phenytoin (PHT)-induced neurotoxicity; GSTM1 null alleles with hepatotoxicity induced by carbamazepine (CBZ) and valproic acid (VPA); EPHX1 polymorphisms with teratogenesis; ABCC2 genetic variations with CBZ- and VPA-induced neurological ADRs; and HLA alleles (e.g. HLA-B*15:02, -A*31:01, -B*15:11, -C*08:01) with cutaneous ADRs. Published findings show that there are ADRs with a pharmacogenetic basis and a high interethnic variability, which indicates a need for future studies in different populations to gather more useful results for larger number of patients. The search for biomarkers that would allow predicting ADRs to AEDs could improve pharmacotherapy for epilepsy. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Perioperative substitution of anti-epileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichards, Wilma S W; Schobben, Alfred F A M; Leijten, Frans S S

    2013-11-01

    A common problem in brain and abdominal surgery is the perioperative substitution of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) when patients are temporarily unable to take these drugs orally. We searched the literature for clinical trials with patients or healthy volunteers in whom non-oral formulations of AEDs as substitution were tested. Different search engines, handbooks, expert opinion and our own experience, were used. Pharmaceutical companies were approached for recommendations. This led to three categories of replacement: 1. commercial alternative (n = 10) for clonazepam, diazepam, lacosamide, levetiracetam, lorazepam, midazolam, nitrazepam, phenobarbital, phenytoin, and valproic acid; 2. alternatives that must be prepared (n = 6) for carbamazepine, clobazam, lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, primidone, topiramate; 3. no alternative (n = 7) for ethosuccimide, felbamate, retigabine, stiripentol, tiagabine, vigabatrin, zonisamide. Thus, for a substantial number of AEDs, unofficial perioperative treatment strategies need to be followed for lack of alternatives to oral administration. There is little clinical research addressing the equivalence of oral and parenteral formulas. Perioperative substitution of AEDs is an underestimated problem, and may increase the risk of postoperative seizures.

  17. Neurodevelopmental effects of fetal antiepileptic drug exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez-Ruiz, Naymee J; Meador, Kimford J

    2015-03-01

    Many studies investigating cognitive outcomes in children of women with epilepsy report an increased risk of mental impairment. Verbal scores on neuropsychometric measures may be selectively more involved. While a variety of factors contribute to the cognitive problems of children of women with epilepsy, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) appear to play a major role. The mechanisms by which AEDs affect neurodevelopmental outcomes remain poorly defined. Animal models suggest that AED-induced apoptosis, altered neurotransmitter environment, and impaired synaptogenesis are some of the mechanisms responsible for cognitive and behavioral teratogenesis. AEDs that are known to induce apoptosis, such as valproate, appear to affect children's neurodevelopment in a more severe fashion. Fetal valproate exposure has dose-dependent associations with reduced cognitive abilities across a range of domains, and these appear to persist at least until the age of 6. Some studies have shown neurodevelopmental deficiencies associated with the use of phenobarbital and possibly phenytoin. So far, most of the investigations available suggest that fetal exposures to lamotrigine or levetiracetam are safer with regard to cognition when compared with other AEDs. Studies on carbamazepine show contradictory results, but most information available suggests that major poor cognitive outcomes should not be attributed to this medication. Overall, children exposed to polytherapy prenatally appear to have worse cognitive and behavioral outcomes compared with children exposed to monotherapy, and with the unexposed. There is an increase risk of neurodevelopmental deficits when polytherapy involves the use of valproate versus other agents.

  18. Levels of Antiepileptic Drugs and the Ketogenic Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of the ketogenic diet did not change the plasma levels of antiepileptic drugs in an open study of 51 children (mean age 6.6 years with refractory epilepsy studied at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.

  19. Antiepileptic drug regimens and major congenital abnormalities in the offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samrén, E B; van Duijn, C M; Christiaens, G C; Hofman, A; Lindhout, D

    1999-11-01

    To assess the risk of major congenital abnormalities associated with specific antiepileptic drug regimens, a large retrospective cohort study was performed. The study comprised 1,411 children born between 1972 and 1992 in four provinces in The Netherlands who were born to mothers with epilepsy and using antiepileptic drugs during the first trimester of pregnancy, and 2,000 nonepileptic matched controls. We found significantly increased risks of major congenital abnormalities for carbamazepine and valproate monotherapy, with evidence for a significant dose-response relationship for valproate. The risk of major congenital abnormalities was nonsignificantly increased for phenobarbital monotherapy when caffeine comedication was excluded, but a significant increase in risk was found when caffeine was included. Phenytoin monotherapy was not associated with an increased risk of major congenital abnormalities. Regarding polytherapy regimens, increased risks were found for several antiepileptic drug combinations. Clonazepam, in combination with other antiepileptic drugs, showed a significantly increased relative risk. Furthermore, there were significantly increased relative risks for the combination of carbamazepine and valproate and the combination of phenobarbital and caffeine with other antiepileptic drugs. This study shows that most antiepileptic drug regimens were associated with an increased risk of major congenital abnormalities in the offspring, in particular valproate (dose-response relationship) and carbamazepine monotherapy, benzodiazepines in polytherapy, and caffeine comedication in combinations with phenobarbital.

  20. Aromatase inhibitors and antiepileptic drugs: a computational systems biology analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustata Gabriela

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study compares antiepileptic drugs and aromatase (CYP19 inhibitors for chemical and structural similarity. Human aromatase is well known as an important pharmacological target in anti-breast cancer therapy, but recent research demonstrates its role in epileptic seizures, as well. The current antiepileptic treatment methods cause severe side effects that endanger patient health and often preclude continued use. As a result, less toxic and more tolerable antiepileptic drugs (AEDs are needed, especially since every individual responds differently to given treatment options. Methods Through a pharmacophore search, this study shows that a model previously designed to search for new classes of aromatase inhibitors is able to identify antiepileptic drugs from the set of drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Chemical and structural similarity analyses were performed using five potent AIs, and these studies returned a set of AEDs that the model identifies as hits. Results The pharmacophore model returned 73% (19 out of 26 of the drugs used specifically to treat epilepsy and approximately 82% (51 out of 62 of the compounds with anticonvulsant properties. Therefore, this study supports the possibility of identifying AEDs with a pharmacophore model that had originally been designed to identify new classes of aromatase inhibitors. Potential candidates for anticonvulsant therapy identified in this manner are also reported. Additionally, the chemical and structural similarity between antiepileptic compounds and aromatase inhibitors is proved using similarity analyses. Conclusions This study demonstrates that a pharmacophore search using a model based on aromatase inhibition and the enzyme's structural features can be used to screen for new candidates for antiepileptic therapy. In fact, potent aromatase inhibitors and current antiepileptic compounds display significant - over 70% - chemical and structural similarity

  1. Effects of fetal antiepileptic drug exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, G.A.; Browning, N.; Cohen, M.J.; Bromley, R.L.; Clayton-Smith, J.; Kalayjian, L.A.; Kanner, A.; Liporace, J.D.; Pennell, P.B.; Privitera, M.; Loring, D.W.; Labiner, David; Moon, Jennifer; Sherman, Scott; Combs Cantrell, Deborah T.; Silver, Cheryl; Goyal, Monisha; Schoenberg, Mike R.; Pack, Alison; Palmese, Christina; Echo, Joyce; Meador, Kimford J.; Loring, David; Pennell, Page; Drane, Daniel; Moore, Eugene; Denham, Megan; Epstein, Charles; Gess, Jennifer; Helmers, Sandra; Henry, Thomas; Motamedi, Gholam; Flax, Erin; Bromfield, Edward; Boyer, Katrina; Dworetzky, Barbara; Cole, Andrew; Halperin, Lucila; Shavel-Jessop, Sara; Barkley, Gregory; Moir, Barbara; Harden, Cynthia; Tamny-Young, Tara; Lee, Gregory; Cohen, Morris; Penovich, Patricia; Minter, Donna; Moore, Layne; Murdock, Kathryn; Liporace, Joyce; Wilcox, Kathryn; Kanner, Andres; Nelson, Michael N.; Rosenfeld, William; Meyer, Michelle; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Mawer, George; Kini, Usha; Martin, Roy; Privitera, Michael; Bellman, Jennifer; Ficker, David; Baade, Lyle; Liow, Kore; Baker, Gus; Booth, Alison; Bromley, Rebecca; Casswell, Miranda; Barrie, Claire; Ramsay, Eugene; Arena, Patricia; Kalayjian, Laura; Heck, Christianne; Padilla, Sonia; Miller, John; Rosenbaum, Gail; Wilensky, Alan; Constantino, Tawnya; Smith, Julien; Adab, Naghme; Veling-Warnke, Gisela; Sam, Maria; O'Donovan, Cormac; Naylor, Cecile; Nobles, Shelli; Santos, Cesar; Holmes, Gregory L.; Druzin, Maurice; Morrell, Martha; Nelson, Lorene; Finnell, Richard; Yerby, Mark; Adeli, Khosrow; Wells, Peter; Browning, Nancy; Blalock, Temperance; Crawford, Todd; Hendrickson, Linda; Jolles, Bernadette; Kunchai, Meghan Kelly; Loblein, Hayley; Ogunsola, Yinka; Russell, Steve; Winestone, Jamie; Wolff, Mark; Zaia, Phyllis; Zajdowicz, Thad

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine outcomes at age 4.5 years and compare to earlier ages in children with fetal antiepileptic drug (AED) exposure. Methods: The NEAD Study is an ongoing prospective observational multicenter study, which enrolled pregnant women with epilepsy on AED monotherapy (1999–2004) to determine if differential long-term neurodevelopmental effects exist across 4 commonly used AEDs (carbamazepine, lamotrigine, phenytoin, or valproate). The primary outcome is IQ at 6 years of age. Planned analyses were conducted using Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID at age 2) and Differential Ability Scale (IQ at ages 3 and 4.5). Results: Multivariate intent-to-treat (n = 310) and completer (n = 209) analyses of age 4.5 IQ revealed significant effects for AED group. IQ for children exposed to valproate was lower than each other AED. Adjusted means (95% confidence intervals) were carbamazepine 106 (102–109), lamotrigine 106 (102–109), phenytoin 105 (102–109), valproate 96 (91–100). IQ was negatively associated with valproate dose, but not other AEDs. Maternal IQ correlated with child IQ for children exposed to the other AEDs, but not valproate. Age 4.5 IQ correlated with age 2 BSID and age 3 IQ. Frequency of marked intellectual impairment diminished with age except for valproate (10% with IQ <70 at 4.5 years). Verbal abilities were impaired for all 4 AED groups compared to nonverbal skills. Conclusions: Adverse cognitive effects of fetal valproate exposure persist to 4.5 years and are related to performances at earlier ages. Verbal abilities may be impaired by commonly used AEDs. Additional research is needed. PMID:22491865

  2. Epidemiological study of epilepsy by monitoring prescriptions of antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfi, R; Borselli, G; Marinai, C; Borgheresi, A; Cavalieri, A

    1995-07-28

    The aim of this study is to evaluate a simple and effective method of acquiring epidemiological information about epilepsy. Data on antiepileptic drug prescriptions was collected, the utilization pattern being based on defined daily doses (DDDs). Antiepileptic drugs are epidemiological tracers of epilepsy due to their chronic and highly specific usage. Consequently, a prevalence rate for the whole population may be obtained by using DDDs. Data on antiepileptic drug prescriptions for a period of 6 months in 1992 and 6 months in 1993 indicate a utilization of approximately 7 DDDs of antiepileptic drugs per 1,000 inhabitants. The prevalence of epilepsy was estimated by correcting the exposure calculated in DDDs by a factor of 0.68. In our sample, the prevalence of the disease was 5.2 per 1,000 inhabitants in 1992 and 4.9 per 1,000 in 1993. Physician prescriptions were concentrated on four compounds, namely phenobarbital, carbamazepine, valproic acid and phenytoin, which together represented 90% of total antiepileptic drug prescriptions.

  3. Antiepileptic drug poisoning: Three-year experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Kemal Günaydın

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: First generation antiepileptics are more toxic than SGAEs. In patients with serum carbamazepine level, particularly those over 30 mg/L, serious disorders of consciousness, cardiovascular toxicity, and metabolic disorders may occur. In VPA intoxication, there is a positive correlation between the serum VPA levels and ammonia levels. On account of this finding, one should be more careful about hyperammonemic hepatic encephalopathy as the serum VPA level rises.

  4. Functional roles of benzothiazole motif in antiepileptic drug research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Mohammad; Hassan, Mohd Zaheen

    2013-12-01

    Benzothiazoles are promising candidates for the design of novel antiepileptic drugs. The endocyclic sulphur and nitrogen functions present in this heterocyclic nucleus have been shown to be critical for the anticonvulsant activity. The present review outlines the rational design and anticonvulsant potential of promising benzothiazole lead molecules. Particular focus has been placed on the structure activity relationship of different benzothiazole derivatives giving selected examples of molecules with significant activity being that these molecules may serve as prototypes for the development of more active antiepileptic drugs.

  5. Antiepileptic Drug Nonadherence and Its Predictors among People with Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmamaw Getnet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Antiepileptic drugs are effective in the treatment of epilepsy to the extent that about 70% of people with epilepsy can be seizure-free, but poor adherence to medication is major problem to sustained remission and functional restoration. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and associated factors of antiepileptic drug nonadherence. Methods. Cross-sectional study was conducted on 450 individuals who were selected by systematic random sampling method. Antiepileptic drug nonadherence was measured by Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS and logistic regression was used to look for significant associations. Result. The prevalence of AEDs nonadherence was 37.8%. Being on treatment for 6 years and above [AOR = 3.47, 95% CI: 1.88, 6.40], payment for AEDs [AOR = 2.76, 95% CI: 1.73, 4.42], lack of health information [AOR = 2.20, 95% CI: 1.41,3.43], poor social support [AOR = 1.88, 95%, CI: 1.01, 3.50], perceived stigma [AOR = 2.27, 95% CI: 1.45, 3.56], and experience side effect [AOR = 1.70, 95% CI: 1.06, 2.72] were significantly associated with antiepileptic drug nonadherence. Conclusion. More than one-third of people with epilepsy were not compliant with their AEDs. Giving health information about epilepsy and its management and consequent reduction in stigma will help for medication adherence.

  6. Co-prescription of antiepileptic drugs and contraceptives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, H.; Bos, J.H.; de Jong-van den Berg, L.T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) reduce the efficacy of oral contraceptives. Little is known of contraceptive practice among reproductive-age women who receive AEDs. Study Design: We explored the use of contraceptive methods among Dutch women aged 15 to 49 years with prescripti

  7. Antiepileptic drugs and risk of suicide: a nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Hansen, Peter Riis; Erdal, Jesper;

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Patients with epilepsy or psychiatric diseases have increased risk of suicide, but whether the risk is influenced by antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment is unclear. Studies have suggested that AEDs in general increase the risk of suicidal behaviour shortly after initiation. This study inve...

  8. Co-prescription of antiepileptic drugs and contraceptives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, H.; Bos, J.H.; de Jong-van den Berg, L.T.

    Background: Enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) reduce the efficacy of oral contraceptives. Little is known of contraceptive practice among reproductive-age women who receive AEDs. Study Design: We explored the use of contraceptive methods among Dutch women aged 15 to 49 years with

  9. Co-prescription of antiepileptic drugs and contraceptives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, H.; Bos, J.H.; de Jong-van den Berg, L.T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) reduce the efficacy of oral contraceptives. Little is known of contraceptive practice among reproductive-age women who receive AEDs. Study Design: We explored the use of contraceptive methods among Dutch women aged 15 to 49 years with prescripti

  10. Severe early onset osteopenia and osteoporosis caused by antiepileptic drugs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerhorst, K.; Huvers, F.C.; Renier, W.O.

    2005-01-01

    We describe two adult patients with epilepsy who received long-term antiepileptic drug therapy, a woman aged 39 years and a man aged 38 years, in whom severe osteopenia and osteoporosis, respectively, were diagnosed. Both had had epilepsy since childhood, both were seizure free and off medication

  11. Access to antiepileptic drug therapy in children in Camagüey Province, Cuba

    OpenAIRE

    Bárzaga Arencibia, Zeina; López Leyva, Alberto; Mejías Peña, Yordanka; González Reyes, Alba Rosa; Acosta Nápolez, Maurilys; Carbonell Perdomo, Demetrio; Fernández Manzano, Edita; Choonara, Imti

    2012-01-01

    bjective  To describe access to antiepileptic drug therapy and estimate the prevalence of epilepsy in children in Camagüey Province, Cuba. Methods  All the community pharmacies in the province were visited and information collected about the number of children receiving antiepileptic drugs in 2009. Availability and cost of each antiepileptic drug were determined. The prevalence of epilepsy was estimated by determining the number of children receiving antiepileptic drugs. Results  Ther...

  12. Antiepileptic drugs in development pipeline: A recent update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harjeet Kaur

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder which significantly affects the quality of life and poses a health as well as economic burden on society. Epilepsy affects approximately 70 million people in the world. The present article reviews the scientific rationale, brief pathophysiology of epilepsy and newer antiepileptic drugs which are presently under clinical development. We have searched the investigational drugs using the key words ‘antiepileptic drugs,’ ‘epilepsy,’ ‘Phase I,’ ‘Phase II’ and ‘Phase III’ in American clinical trial registers (clinicaltrials.gov, the relevant published articles using National Library of Medicine's PubMed database, company websites and supplemented results with a manual search of cross-references and conference abstracts. This review provides a brief description about the antiepileptic drugs which are targeting different mechanisms and the clinical development status of these drugs. Besides the presence of old as well as new AEDs, still there is a need of new drugs or the modified version of old drugs in order to make affected people free of seizures. An optimistic approach should be used to translate the success of preclinical testing to clinical practice. There is an urgent need to improve animal models and to explore new targets with better understanding in order to develop the novel drugs with more efficacy and safety.

  13. Rufinamide: A Novel Broad-Spectrum Antiepileptic Drug

    OpenAIRE

    Wheless, James W.; Vazquez, Blanca

    2010-01-01

    The last 20 years have witnessed a tremendous explosion in the number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) as well as the introduction of AEDS developed for specific epilepsy syndromes. The study of the efficacy and side effect profile of AEDs for unique epilepsy syndromes has allowed neurologists to utilize evidence-based medicine when treating patients. In late 2008, the Food and Drug Administration approved rufinamide for adjunctive use in the treatment of seizures associated with Lennox–Gastaut ...

  14. Levetiracetam as an antiepileptic, neuroprotective, and hyperalgesic drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J L Cortes-Altamirano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this review was to expound upon the mechanism of action of Levetiracetam (LEV as an antiepileptic, neuroprotective, and hyperalgesic drug. LEV is a second-generation anti-epileptic drug (AED that is approved for clinical use as monotherapy and may also be used for adjunctive treatment of patients with seizures. Several researchers have recommended LEV as a treatment option in different diseases causing neuronal damage, and recently, LEV has been used as an antihyperalgesic drug. LEV exhibits favorable characteristics, including a low potential for interaction, a short elimination half-life, and has neither active metabolites nor major negative effects on cognition. This has generated many new research avenues for the utilization of this drug. However, the precise mechanism of action of LEV has not been fully elucidated. In this review, a search was conducted on PubMed, ProQuest, EBSCO, and the Science Citation index for studies evaluating the effects of LEV as an antiepileptic, neuroprotective, and hyperalgesic drug. A total of 32 studies related to the use of LEV suggested different mechanisms of action, such as binding to the synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2A (SV2A protein, inhibition of Ca2+ N-type channels, and its presence as a neuromodulator. These studies concluded that the pharmacodynamics of LEV should be viewed as a single pathway, and should not be based on specific molecular targets that depend on the physiological or pathological conditions prevalent at that time.

  15. Neuropathological sequelae of developmental exposure to antiepileptic and anesthetic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrysanthy eIkonomidou

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate (Glu and aminobutyric acid (GABA are major neurotransmitters in the mammalian brain which regulate brain development at molecular, cellular and systems level. Sedative, anesthetic and antiepileptic drugs interact with glutamate and GABA receptors to produce their desired effects. The question is posed whether such interference with glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission may exert undesired, and perhaps even detrimental effects on human brain development. Preclinical research in rodents and non-human primates has provided extensive evidence that sedative, anesthetic and antiepileptic drugs can trigger suicide of neurons and oligodendroglia, suppress neurogenesis, and inhibit normal synapse development and sculpting. Behavioral correlates in rodents and non-human primates consist of long-lasting cognitive impairment. Retrospective clinical studies in humans exposed to anesthetics or antiepileptic drugs in utero, during infancy or early childhood have delivered conflicting but concerning results in terms of a correlation between drug exposure and impaired neurodevelopmental outcomes. Prospective studies are currently ongoing. This review provides a short overview of the current state of knowledge on this topic.

  16. Antiepileptic drugs and risk of suicide: a nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, J.B.; Hansen, Peter Riis; Erdal, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Patients with epilepsy or psychiatric diseases have increased risk of suicide, but whether the risk is influenced by antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment is unclear. Studies have suggested that AEDs in general increase the risk of suicidal behaviour shortly after initiation. This study...... that clonazepam, valproate, lamotrigine and phenobarbital relatively shortly after treatment initiation may increase the risk of suicide. The increased risk of suicide associated with these AEDs appears to be a consistent finding. Copyright (C) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd...

  17. Current status of the New Antiepileptic drugs in chronic pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpreet Singh Sidhu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs are extensively used worldwide to treat a wide range of disorders other than epilepsy, such as neuropathic pain, migraine and bipolar disorder. Due to this situation more than 20 new third-generation AEDs have been introduced in the market recently. The future design of new AEDs must also have potential to help in the non-epileptic disorders. The wide acceptance of second generation AEDs for the management of various Non-epileptic disorders has caused the emergence of generics in the market. The wide use of approved AEDs outside epilepsy is based on both economic and scientific reasons. Bipolar disorders, migraine prophylaxis, fibromyalgia and neuropathic pain represent the most attractive indication expansion opportunities for anticonvulsant developers, providing blockbuster revenues. Strong growth in non-epilepsy conditions will see Pfizer’s Lyrica become the market leading brand by 2018. In this review we mainly focus on the current status of new AEDs in the treatment of chronic pain and migraine prophylaxis. AEDs have a strong analgesic potential and this is demonstrated by the wide use of carbamazepine in trigeminal neuralgia and sodium valproate in migraine prophylaxis. At present, data on the new AEDs for non-epileptic conditions are inconclusive. Not all AEDs are effective in the management of neuropathic pain and migraine. Only those AEDs whose mechanisms of action are match with pathophysiology of the disease, have potential to show efficacy in non-epileptic disorder. For this better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and mechanisms of action of new AEDs are essential requirement before initiating pre-clinical and clinical trials. Many new AEDs show good results in the animal model and open-label studies but fail to provide strong evidence at randomized, placebo-controlled trials. The final decision regarding the clinical efficacy of the particular AEDs in a specific non-epileptic disorder

  18. Efficacy and safety of innovator versus generic drugs in patients with epilepsy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talati, Ripple; Scholle, Jennifer M; Phung, Olivia P; Baker, Erika L; Baker, William L; Ashaye, Ajibade; Kluger, Jeffrey; Coleman, Craig I; White, C Michael

    2012-04-01

    Generic antiepileptic drugs achieve blood concentrations similar to those of innovator drugs in healthy volunteers, but their comparative effectiveness has not been well evaluated. Thus, we assessed the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of innovator versus generic antiepileptic drugs. We searched the MEDLINE database, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Web of Science for studies that evaluated innovator and generic antiepileptic drugs in patients with epilepsy and reported data on prespecified outcomes. We extracted data on study design, interventions, quality criteria, study population, baseline characteristics, and outcomes. Compared with initiation of innovator antiepileptic drugs, initiation of generic antiepileptic drugs did not significantly alter seizure occurrence (relative risk [RR] 0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.64-1.18; strength of evidence: low) or frequency (standardized mean difference 0.03, 95% CI -0.08-0.14; strength of evidence: low), withdrawals due to lack of efficacy (RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.41-2.54; strength of evidence: low) or adverse events (RR 0.79, 95% CI 0.28-2.20; strength of evidence: low), pharmacokinetic concentrations (maximum, minimum, or area under the curve [strength of evidence: low]), or a myriad of adverse events (strength of evidence: low or insufficient) in clinical trials. In qualitatively evaluated observational studies, switching between forms of antiepileptic drug (innovator to generic, generic to generic) may increase the risk of hospitalization (strength of evidence: low), hospital stay duration (strength of evidence: low), and a composite end point of medical service utilization (strength of evidence: insufficient) but may not increase outpatient service utilization (strength of evidence: low). Data are limited predominantly to carbamazepine, phenytoin, and valproic acid. Clinical trials are limited by small sample size, short-term nature, and lack of

  19. Pharmacokinetic aspects of the anti-epileptic drug substance vigabatrin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøhr, Martha Kampp; Frølund, Sidsel; Holm, René;

    2014-01-01

    Drug transporters in various tissues, such as intestine, kidney, liver and brain, are recognized as important mediators of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of drug substances. This review gives a current status on the transporter(s) mediating the absorption, distribution......, metabolism and excretion properties of the anti-epileptic drug substance vigabatrin. For orally administered drugs, like vigabatrin, the absorption from the intestine is a prerequisite for the bioavailability. Therefore, transporter(s) involved in the intestinal absorption of vigabatrin in vitro and in vivo...... are discussed in detail. Special focus is on the contribution of the proton-coupled amino acid transporter 1 (PAT1) for intestinal vigabatrin absorption. Furthermore, the review gives an overview of the pharmacokinetic parameters of vigabatrin across different species and drug-food and drug-drug interactions...

  20. Access to antiepileptic drug therapy in children in Camagüey Province, Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arencibia, Zeina Bárzaga; Leyva, Alberto López; Peña, Yordanka Mejías; Reyes, Alba Rosa González; Nápolez, Maurilys Acosta; Carbonell Perdomo, Demetrio; Manzano, Edita Fernández; Choonara, Imti

    2012-01-01

    Objective To describe access to antiepileptic drug therapy and estimate the prevalence of epilepsy in children in Camagüey Province, Cuba. Methods All the community pharmacies in the province were visited and information collected about the number of children receiving antiepileptic drugs in 2009. Availability and cost of each antiepileptic drug were determined. The prevalence of epilepsy was estimated by determining the number of children receiving antiepileptic drugs. Results There were 923 children who received a total of 977 antiepileptic drugs in Camagüey Province. The estimated prevalence of epilepsy was 5.18 per thousand children which is lower than previously reported rates in other low and lower-middle income countries. Most of the children (871, 94%) received a single antiepileptic drug. Carbamazepine and valproate were the two most frequently prescribed antiepileptic drugs. Antiepileptic drugs were available from the local pharmacy on 76% of occasions. If the antiepileptic drug was not available from the local pharmacy, the parent had to travel to another pharmacy to obtain the medicine. Conclusions The estimated prevalence of epilepsy in children in Cuba is lower than that estimated in other lower-middle income countries. Access to drug therapy in children with epilepsy can be achieved in lower-middle income countries. PMID:23134098

  1. Teratogenic Potential of Antiepileptic Drugs in the Zebrafish Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Hak Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The zebrafish model is an attractive candidate for screening of developmental toxicity during early drug development. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs arouse concern for the risk of teratogenicity, but the data are limited. In this study, we evaluated the teratogenic potential of seven AEDs (carbamazepine (CBZ, ethosuximide (ETX, valproic acid (VPN, lamotrigine (LMT, lacosamide (LCM, levetiracetam (LVT, and topiramate (TPM in the zebrafish model. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to AEDs from initiation of gastrula (5.25 hours post-fertilization (hpf to termination of hatching (72 hpf which mimic the mammalian teratogenic experimental design. The lethality and teratogenic index (TI of AEDs were determined and the TI values of each drug were compared with the US FDA human pregnancy categories. Zebrafish model was useful screening model for teratogenic potential of antiepilepsy drugs and was in concordance with in vivo mammalian data and human clinical data.

  2. Cost analysis of antiepileptic drugs available in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar Shukla

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: The average percentage price variation of different brands of the same oral antiepileptic drugs in Indian market is very wide. Treatment of epilepsy has a long course with compliance being a key factor for successful treatment. Improved adherence to the treatment can be ensured by decreasing the cost of therapy, by changes in the government policies and regulations and creating awareness among treating physicians for switching to cost effective therapy. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(4.000: 1636-1640

  3. Antiepileptic drugs targeting sodium channels: subunit and neuron-type specific interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qiao, X.

    2013-01-01

    Certain antiepileptic drugs (e.g. carbamazepine and lamotrigine) block sodium channels in an use-dependent manner and this mechanism contributes to the anti-convulsant properties of these drugs. There are, however, subtle differences in sodium current blocking properties of the antiepileptic drugs

  4. Antiepileptic drugs targeting sodium channels: subunit and neuron-type specific interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qiao, X.

    2013-01-01

    Certain antiepileptic drugs (e.g. carbamazepine and lamotrigine) block sodium channels in an use-dependent manner and this mechanism contributes to the anti-convulsant properties of these drugs. There are, however, subtle differences in sodium current blocking properties of the antiepileptic drugs w

  5. Generic drugs in dermatology: part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payette, Michael; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2012-03-01

    In part I, we discussed new drug development, reviewed the history of the generic drug industry, described how generic drugs are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, and defined the concepts of bioequivalence and therapeutic equivalence. Herein, we explore various factors impacting generic drug use across the different parties involved: the prescriber, the pharmacist, the patient, and the payer. We also include original cost analysis of dermatologic brand name and generic drugs and show the potential cost savings that can be achieved through generic substitution. We conclude with a review of the data addressing potential differences in the effectiveness of brand name versus generic drugs in dermatology. The cost of brand name and generic medications is highly variable by pharmacy, state, and payer. We used one source (www.drugstore.com) as an example and for consistency across all medications discussed herein. Prices included here may not reflect actual retail prices across the United States.

  6. Rufinamide: a novel broad-spectrum antiepileptic drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheless, James W; Vazquez, Blanca

    2010-01-01

    The last 20 years have witnessed a tremendous explosion in the number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) as well as the introduction of AEDS developed for specific epilepsy syndromes. The study of the efficacy and side effect profile of AEDs for unique epilepsy syndromes has allowed neurologists to utilize evidence-based medicine when treating patients. In late 2008, the Food and Drug Administration approved rufinamide for adjunctive use in the treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. This unique chemical compound is also the first new AED to reach the market in the United States having a pediatric indication prior to approval for adults. Rufinamide appears to have a broad spectrum of efficacy, is well tolerated, and may be rapidly initiated--properties that will likely extend its use outside of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

  7. Teratogenic effects of antiepileptic drugs : Use of an international database on malformations and drug exposure (MADRE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arpino, C; Brescianini, S; Robert, E; Castilla, EE; Cocchi, G; Cornel, MC; de Vigan, C; Lancaster, PAL; Merlob, P; Sumiyoshi, Y; Zampino, G; Renzi, C; Resano, A; Mastroiacovo, P

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The study goal was to assess teratogenic effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) through the use of a surveillance system (MADRE) of infants with malformations. Methods: Information on all malformed infants (1990-1996) with maternal first-trimester drug exposure was collected by the

  8. Neurological teratogenic effects of antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Qingmei; Su, Baohua; Wei, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the few neurologic disorders that requires a constant treatment during pregnancy. Epilepsy affects 0.3–0.8% of pregnant women. Prescription of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) to pregnant women with epilepsy requires monitoring and maintaining a balance between limiting seizures and decreasing fetal exposure to the potential teratogenic effects. AEDs are also commonly used for psychiatric disorders, pain disorders, and migraines. The types of malformations that can result in fetuses exposed to AEDs include minor anomalies, major congenital malformations, intrauterine growth retardation, cognitive dysfunction, low IQ, microcephaly, and infant mortality. In the present review, we analyzed and summarized the current understanding of neurological development in fetuses that are exposed to various AEDs administered to pregnant epileptic women. PMID:27698740

  9. Dose-dependent risk of malformations with antiepileptic drugs: an analysis of data from the EURAP epilepsy and pregnancy registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomson, Torbjörn; Battino, Dina; Bonizzoni, Erminio

    2011-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to antiepileptic drugs is associated with a greater risk of major congenital malformations, but there is inadequate information on the comparative teratogenicity of individual antiepileptic drugs and the association with dose. We aimed to establish the risks of major congenital...... malformations after monotherapy exposure to four major antiepileptic drugs at different doses....

  10. Prediction of antiepileptic drug treatment outcomes using machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colic, Sinisa; Wither, Robert G.; Lang, Min; Zhang, Liang; Eubanks, James H.; Bardakjian, Berj L.

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Antiepileptic drug (AED) treatments produce inconsistent outcomes, often necessitating patients to go through several drug trials until a successful treatment can be found. This study proposes the use of machine learning techniques to predict epilepsy treatment outcomes of commonly used AEDs. Approach. Machine learning algorithms were trained and evaluated using features obtained from intracranial electroencephalogram (iEEG) recordings of the epileptiform discharges observed in Mecp2-deficient mouse model of the Rett Syndrome. Previous work have linked the presence of cross-frequency coupling (I CFC) of the delta (2-5 Hz) rhythm with the fast ripple (400-600 Hz) rhythm in epileptiform discharges. Using the I CFC to label post-treatment outcomes we compared support vector machines (SVMs) and random forest (RF) machine learning classifiers for providing likelihood scores of successful treatment outcomes. Main results. (a) There was heterogeneity in AED treatment outcomes, (b) machine learning techniques could be used to rank the efficacy of AEDs by estimating likelihood scores for successful treatment outcome, (c) I CFC features yielded the most effective a priori identification of appropriate AED treatment, and (d) both classifiers performed comparably. Significance. Machine learning approaches yielded predictions of successful drug treatment outcomes which in turn could reduce the burdens of drug trials and lead to substantial improvements in patient quality of life.

  11. New antiepileptic drugs: focus on ezogabine, clobazam, and perampanel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudzinski, Leslie A; Vélez-Ruiz, Naymeé J; Gedzelman, Evan R; Mauricio, Elizabeth A; Shih, Jerry J; Karakis, Ioannis

    2016-08-01

    Ezogabine, clobazam, and perampanel are among the newest antiseizure drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration between 2011 and 2012. Ezogabine and perampanel are approved for adjunctive treatment of partial epilepsy. Perampanel is also approved for adjunctive treatment of primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Ezogabine and perampanel have novel mechanisms of action. Ezogabine binds to voltage-gated potassium channels and increases the M-current thereby causing membrane hyperpolarization. Perampanel is a selective, non-competitive 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid receptor antagonist, which reduces neuronal excitation. Clobazam has been used worldwide since the 1970s and is approved for adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Clobazam is the only 1,5-benzodiazepine currently in clinical use, which is less sedating than the commonly used 1,4-benzodiazepines. Phase III multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials demonstrated efficacy and good tolerability of these 3 new antiepileptic drugs. These drugs represent a welcome addition to the armamentarium of practitioners, but it remains to be seen how they will affect the landscape of pharmacoresistant epilepsy.

  12. Trigeminal neuralgia: successful antiepileptic drug combination therapy in three refractory cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prisco L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Lara Prisco1, Mario Ganau2, Federica Bigotto1, Francesca Zornada11Department of Anaesthesiology, Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine, University Hospital of Cattinara, 2Graduate School of Nanotechnology, University of Trieste, ItalyAbstract: Antiepileptic drug combination therapy remains an empirical second-line treatment approach in trigeminal neuralgia, after treatment with one antiepileptic drug or other nonantiepileptic drugs have failed. The results in three patients followed in our clinic are not sufficient to draw definitive conclusions, but suggest the possibility of developing this type of therapeutic approach further.Keywords: trigeminal neuralgia, antiepileptic drugs, combination therapy

  13. Pharmaceutical policy regarding generic drugs in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoens, Steven; De Bruyn, Kristien; Bogaert, Marc; Laekeman, Gert

    2005-01-01

    Pressure to control pharmaceutical expenditure and price competition among pharmaceutical companies are fuelling the development of generic drug markets in EU countries. However, in Belgium, the market for generic drugs is underdeveloped compared with other countries. To promote the use of generic drugs, the government introduced a reference pricing (RP) scheme in 2001. The aim of this paper is to discuss Belgian pharmaceutical policy regarding generic drugs and to analyse how the Belgian drug market has evolved following initiation of the RP scheme. The market share held by generic drugs increased following implementation of the RP scheme. Focusing on volume, average market share (by semester) for generic drugs amounted to 2.05% of the total pharmaceutical market from January 1998 to June 2001, compared with 6.11% from July 2001 to December 2003. As new generic drugs are introduced, their market share tends to increase in the first couple of months, after which it levels off. Faced with increasing generic competition, some manufacturers have launched new variants of their original drug, thereby effectively extending the period of patent protection. Strategies consisting of price reductions in return for the abolition of prescribing conditions and the launch of new dosages or formulations appear to have been successful in maintaining the market share of original drugs. Nevertheless, the introduction of the RP scheme was associated with savings amounting to 1.8% of pharmaceutical expenditure by the third-party payer in 2001 and 2.1% in 2002. The findings of this paper indicate that the RP scheme has stimulated the Belgian generic drug market. However, existing policy has largely failed to take into account the role that physicians and pharmacists can play in stimulating generic drug use. Therefore, further development of the Belgian generic drug market seems to hinge on the creation of appropriate incentives for physicians to prescribe, and for pharmacists to

  14. Propafenone enhances the anticonvulsant action of classical antiepileptic drugs in the mouse maximal electroshock model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banach, Monika; Piskorska, Barbara; Borowicz-Reutt, Kinga K

    2016-06-01

    Antiarrhythmic and antiepileptic drugs share some mechanisms of actions. Therefore, possibility of interactions between these in epileptic patients with cardiac arrhythmias is quite considerable. Herein, we attempted to assess interactions between propafenone and four conventional antiepileptic drugs: carbamazepine, valproate, phenytoin and phenobarbital. Effects of propafenone on seizures were determined in the electroconvulsive threshold test in mice. Interactions between propafenone and antiepileptic drugs were estimated in the model of maximal electroshock. Motor coordination was evaluated in the chimney test, while long-term memory in the passive-avoidance task. Brain concentrations of antiepileptics were determined by fluorescence polarization immunoassay. Propafenone up to 50mg/kg did not affect the electroconvulsive threshold, significantly enhancing this parameter at doses of 60-90mg/kg. Applied at its subthreshold doses, propafenone potentiated the antielectroshock action of all four tested classical antiepileptics: carbamazepine, valproate, phenytoin, and phenobarbital. Propafenone alone and in combinations with antiepileptics impaired neither motor performance nor long-term memory in mice. Propafenone did not change brain concentration of phenytoin and phenobarbital; however, it significantly decreased brain levels of carbamazepine and increased those of valproate. Propafenone exhibits its own anticonvulsant effect and enhances the action of classical antiepileptic drugs against electrically induced convulsions in mice. Further investigations are required to determine the effect of propafenone on antiepileptic therapy in humans. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  15. [Generic drugs: quality, efficacy, safety and interchangeability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschabitscher, Doris; Platzer, Peter; Baumgärtel, Christoph; Müllner, Marcus

    2008-01-01

    Since the introduction of generic drugs to the pharmaceutical market a sometimes emotional debate exists whether they are well-investigated and of high quality. There is some uncertainty about whether evidence of bioequivalence is enough to guarantee efficacy and safety of generic drugs. Some physicians ask the question if competent authorities are able to ascertain that the pharmaceutical quality of generics is acceptable. Doctors and patients sometimes are ill at ease about the interchangeability of innovator and generic products. This article describes how the European Union legislation ensures that a generic drug is only approved if its risk-benefit relationship is favourable and that it is essentially similar to the innovator product. In this context pharmacokinetic parameters are accepted as surrogates for clinical results because bioequivalence means therapeutic equivalence as well. For most drugs, current bioequivalence testing generally enables clinicians to routinely substitute generic for innovator products. Published findings, however, suggest that particular drugs may not be ideally suited for generic substitution when a patient is already on that drug. These are the so called critical dose medicinal products (drugs with a narrow therapeutic range). When starting a new therapy with any generic drug, however, its similarity to the innovator drug in terms of efficacy, safety and quality is guaranteed.

  16. Neurologist knowledge about interactions between antiepileptic drugs and contraceptive methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suto, Hilda S; Braga, Giordana C; Scarpellini, Giuliano R; Takeuchi, Leandro I; Martins, Ana P; Leite, João P; Vieira, Carolina S

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate neurologists' knowledge of contraceptive counseling for women receiving antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). An interview-based survey was conducted from February 2 to June 30, 2015, among neurologists working in Ribeirão Preto, Brazil. Direct interviews were conducted using a questionnaire that assessed knowledge of the pharmacological interactions between various contraceptive methods and six AEDs (carbamazepine, phenobarbital, topiramate, phenytoin, lamotrigine, and valproate) on the basis of WHO medical eligibility criteria for contraceptive use. Among 42 neurologists who participated, 32 (76%) stated that they treated women with epilepsy and provided them with counseling for family planning. Overall, 34 (81%) recommended the use of a copper intrauterine device irrespective of the AED used, and 26 (60%) stated that they co-prescribed AEDs and hormonal contraceptives. Although 39 (93%) neurologists had knowledge that AEDs might contraindicate the use of some contraceptives, their knowledge regarding the specific drug interactions was lacking. Furthermore, 34 (81%) had no knowledge of WHO medical eligibility criteria for contraceptive use. Although most neurologists interviewed had knowledge of interactions between AEDs and hormonal contraceptives, they did not know which specific AEDs interacted with these agents. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Modified Atkins diet may reduce serum concentrations of antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kverneland, M; Taubøll, E; Selmer, K K; Iversen, P O; Nakken, K O

    2015-03-01

    Modified Atkins diet is a treatment option for patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy that is not suitable for surgery. In the last few years, we have tried dietary treatment added to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in adult patients with severe epilepsy. To examine a possible pharmacokinetic interaction between the modified Atkins diet and AEDs. In four patients, AED serum concentrations were measured before onset and after 4 and 12 weeks on the diet. The patients used combinations of two or three AEDs, including carbamazepine, clobazam, lamotrigine, nitrazepam, oxcarbazepine, valproate, zonisamide, and topiramate. The patients did not change the type or dose of their AEDs during the diet period. After 12 weeks on the diet, the average serum concentrations of the respective AEDs were reduced by 35% (range 6-46%) compared to prediet values. Modified Atkins diet used as add-on therapy to AEDs in four patients with drug resistant seizures caused a considerable decrease in AED serum concentrations. In individual patients, this could be of clinical relevance, and we recommend that AED serum concentrations should be closely monitored when offering this diet to adults with epilepsy. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Generic drugs in dermatology: part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payette, Michael; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2012-03-01

    The cost of health care in the United States is increasing. In order to help control these rising costs, all parties involved in the delivery of health care, including dermatologists, need to be part of the solution of ethically reducing the cost of delivery of care. One potential means of meeting this goal is to increase the use of generic medications in daily practice. Generic medications can offer equally efficacious therapy at significantly lower prices, which can translate into large scale savings for the individual patient, the payer, and the overall health care system. Herein we provide an overview of new drug development, review the history of the generic drug industry, describe how generic drugs are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, and define the concepts of bioequivalence and therapeutic equivalence. In part II, we explore various factors impacting generic drug use, provide cost analyses of dermatologic brand name and generic drugs, and review data addressing potential differences in the effectiveness of brand name versus generic drugs in dermatology. The cost of brand name and generic medications is highly variable by pharmacy, state, and payer. We used one source (www.drugstore.com) as an example and for consistency across all medications discussed herein. Prices included here may not reflect actual retail prices across the United States.

  19. GENERIC DRUG USER FEE: AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darshit S. Patel*, Abhishek R. Patel and Narendra A. Patel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The globalization of generic drug manufacturing, supply and testing, and a growing workload that has far outpaced USFDA’s resources has created new challenges. USFDA & Industry propose generic drug user fee to address the need for globalization of the inspection process, and to speed the timely review of generic product applications. The Generic Drug User Fee (GDUF proposal is agreed by generic industry & USFDA and is focused on three key aims: safety, access, and transparency. Under the program, USFDA will receive nearly $1.5 billion over five years in supplemental funding through generic industry user fees in order to help the agency expedite access to generic drugs, enhance drug quality and safety and ensure inspection parity of both foreign and domestic manufacturing sites. GDUF also will help accelerate the market entry of additional manufacturers of drugs currently in short supply and improve quality, consistency, and availability within the supply chain, further helping to mitigate drug shortages. The GDUF new legislation is a milestone for the generic giants and a major win for American health care consumers.

  20. Selected pharmacokinetic issues of the use of antiepileptic drugs and parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd Arwa Y

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To conduct a systematic review for the evidence supporting or disproving the reality of parenteral nutrition- antiepileptic drugs interaction, especially with respect to the plasma protein-binding of the drug. Methods The articles related to the topic were identified through Medline and PubMed search (1968-Feburary 2010 for English language on the interaction between parenteral nutrition and antiepileptic drugs; the search terms used were anti-epileptic drugs, parenteral nutrition, and/or interaction, and/or in vitro. The search looked for prospective randomized and nonrandomized controlled studies; prospective nonrandomized uncontrolled studies; retrospective studies; case reports; and in vitro studies. Full text of the articles were then traced from the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM library subscribed databases, including Wiley-Blackwell Library, Cochrane Library, EBSCOHost, OVID, ScienceDirect, SAGE Premier, Scopus, SpringerLINK, and Wiley InterScience. The articles from journals not listed by USM library were traced through inter library loan. Results There were interactions between parenteral nutrition and drugs, including antiepileptics. Several guidelines were designed for the management of illnesses such as traumatic brain injuries or cancer patients, involving the use of parenteral nutrition and antiepileptics. Moreover, many studies demonstrated the in vitro and in vivo parenteral nutrition -drugs interactions, especially with antiepileptics. Conclusions There was no evidence supporting the existence of parenteral nutrition-antiepileptic drugs interaction. The issue has not been studied in formal researches, but several case reports and anecdotes demonstrate this drug-nutrition interaction. However, alteration in the drug-free fraction result from parenteral nutrition-drug (i.e. antiepileptics interactions may necessitate scrupulous reassessment of drug dosages in patients receiving these therapies. This

  1. Selected pharmacokinetic issues of the use of antiepileptic drugs and parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To conduct a systematic review for the evidence supporting or disproving the reality of parenteral nutrition- antiepileptic drugs interaction, especially with respect to the plasma protein-binding of the drug. Methods The articles related to the topic were identified through Medline and PubMed search (1968-Feburary 2010) for English language on the interaction between parenteral nutrition and antiepileptic drugs; the search terms used were anti-epileptic drugs, parenteral nutrition, and/or interaction, and/or in vitro. The search looked for prospective randomized and nonrandomized controlled studies; prospective nonrandomized uncontrolled studies; retrospective studies; case reports; and in vitro studies. Full text of the articles were then traced from the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) library subscribed databases, including Wiley-Blackwell Library, Cochrane Library, EBSCOHost, OVID, ScienceDirect, SAGE Premier, Scopus, SpringerLINK, and Wiley InterScience. The articles from journals not listed by USM library were traced through inter library loan. Results There were interactions between parenteral nutrition and drugs, including antiepileptics. Several guidelines were designed for the management of illnesses such as traumatic brain injuries or cancer patients, involving the use of parenteral nutrition and antiepileptics. Moreover, many studies demonstrated the in vitro and in vivo parenteral nutrition -drugs interactions, especially with antiepileptics. Conclusions There was no evidence supporting the existence of parenteral nutrition-antiepileptic drugs interaction. The issue has not been studied in formal researches, but several case reports and anecdotes demonstrate this drug-nutrition interaction. However, alteration in the drug-free fraction result from parenteral nutrition-drug (i.e. antiepileptics) interactions may necessitate scrupulous reassessment of drug dosages in patients receiving these therapies. This reassessment may be particularly

  2. Polycystic ovary syndrome in patients on antiepileptic drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Lakshminarayanapuram G.; Satishchandra, Parthasarathy; Bhimani, Bipin C.; Reddy, Janardhan YC; Rama Murthy, Batchu S.; Subbakrishna, Doddaballapura K.; Sinha, Sanjib

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to discuss the prevalence of polycystic ovary (PCO) and Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in women with epilepsy (WWE) on valproate (VPA), carbamazepine (CBZ), or phenobarbitone (PB), drug naive WWE and women with bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) on VPA. Materials and Methods: This prospective study included 190 women aged 18–45 years, who had epilepsy or BPAD (on VPA), and consented for study. Patients were grouped as Group 1 (n = 40): WWE on VPA, Group 2 (n = 50): WWE on CBZ, Group 3 (n = 50): WWE on PB, Group 4 (n = 30): drug naïve WWE, and Group 5 (n = 20): women with BPAD on VPA. All women were interviewed for medical, menstrual, drug and treatment history, nature of epilepsy, and seizure control. Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test were done to compare results between the groups. Results: Fifty-two women (52/190; 27.4%) had menstrual disturbances, in which oligomenorrhea was the most common (55.8%). There was a significant difference in the occurrence of PCOS in patients on VPA versus normal population (P = 0.05) and patients on other antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) (P = 0.02). There was, however, no significant difference in the occurrence of PCO between patients on VPA and the untreated epileptic women. VPA group (Epilepsy + BPAD) had a significantly higher occurrence of obesity than other treatment groups (P = 0.043, OR = 2.11). Conclusions: The study observed significantly higher occurrence of PCO in patients on VPA compared to other AEDs and the normal population. The importance of proper clinical evaluation before initiating VPA is highlighted. PMID:27570385

  3. Polycystic ovary syndrome in patients on antiepileptic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshminarayanapuram G Viswanathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aims to discuss the prevalence of polycystic ovary (PCO and Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS in women with epilepsy (WWE on valproate (VPA, carbamazepine (CBZ, or phenobarbitone (PB, drug naive WWE and women with bipolar affective disorder (BPAD on VPA. Materials and Methods: This prospective study included 190 women aged 18-45 years, who had epilepsy or BPAD (on VPA, and consented for study. Patients were grouped as Group 1 (n = 40: WWE on VPA, Group 2 (n = 50: WWE on CBZ, Group 3 (n = 50: WWE on PB, Group 4 (n = 30: drug naοve WWE, and Group 5 (n = 20: women with BPAD on VPA. All women were interviewed for medical, menstrual, drug and treatment history, nature of epilepsy, and seizure control. Chi-square test and Fisher′s exact test were done to compare results between the groups. Results: Fifty-two women (52/190; 27.4% had menstrual disturbances, in which oligomenorrhea was the most common (55.8%. There was a significant difference in the occurrence of PCOS in patients on VPA versus normal population (P = 0.05 and patients on other antiepileptic drugs (AEDs (P = 0.02. There was, however, no significant difference in the occurrence of PCO between patients on VPA and the untreated epileptic women. VPA group (Epilepsy + BPAD had a significantly higher occurrence of obesity than other treatment groups (P = 0.043, OR = 2.11. Conclusions: The study observed significantly higher occurrence of PCO in patients on VPA compared to other AEDs and the normal population. The importance of proper clinical evaluation before initiating VPA is highlighted.

  4. Short-term use of antiepileptic drugs is neurotoxic to the immature brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that the long-term use of antiepileptic drugs can cause nervous system damage. However, short-term antiepileptic drug treatment is frequently given to infants, especially neonates, to control seizure. Whether the short-term use of antiepileptic drugs is neurotoxic remains unclear. In the present study, immature rats, 3-21 days of age, were intraperitoneally injected with phenobarbital and/or topiramate for 3 consecutive days. Hematoxylin-eosin and immunohistochemical staining revealed that phenobarbital and topiramate, individually or in combination, were cytotoxic to hippocampal CA1 neurons and inhibited the expression of GluR1 and NR2B, excitatory glutamate receptor subunits. Furthermore, the combination of the two drugs caused greater damage than either drug alone. The results demonstrate that the short-term use of antiepileptic drugs damages neurons in the immature brain and that the combined use of antiepileptic drugs exacerbates damage. Our findings suggest that clinicians should consider the potential neurotoxic risk associated with the combined use of antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of seizure.

  5. Quantifying antiepileptic drug effects using intrinsic excitability measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel, Christian; Plenz, Dietmar; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Reichmann, Heinz

    2016-11-01

    Pathologic increases in excitability levels of cortical tissue commonly underlie the initiation and spread of seizure activity in patients with epilepsy. By reducing the excitability levels in neural tissue, antiepileptic drug (AED) pharmacotherapy aims to reduce seizure severity and frequency. However, AEDs may also bring about adverse effects, which have been reported to increase with higher AED load. Measures that monitor the dose-dependent effects of AEDs on cortical tissue and quantify its excitability level are therefore of prime importance for efficient clinical care and treatment but have been difficult to identify. Here, we systematically analyze continuous multiday electrocorticography (ECoG) data from 10 patients under different levels of AED load and derive the recently proposed intrinsic excitability measures (IEMs) from different brain regions and across different frequency bands. We find that IEMs are significantly negatively correlated with AED load (prescribed daily dose/defined daily dose). Furthermore, we demonstrate that IEMs derived from different brain regions can robustly capture global changes in the degree of excitability. These results provide a step toward the ultimate goal of developing a reliable quantitative measure of central physiologic effects of AEDs in patients with epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  6. Interactions between cannabidiol and commonly used antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Tyler E; Bebin, E Martina; Cutter, Gary R; Liu, Yuliang; Szaflarski, Jerzy P

    2017-09-01

    To identify potential pharmacokinetic interactions between the pharmaceutical formulation of cannabidiol (CBD; Epidiolex) and the commonly used antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) through an open-label safety study. Serum levels were monitored to identify interactions between CBD and AEDs. In 39 adults and 42 children, CBD dose was started at 5 mg/kg/day and increased every 2 weeks by 5 mg/kg/day up to a maximum of 50 mg/kg/day. Serum AED levels were obtained at baseline prior to CBD initiation and at most study visits. AED doses were adjusted if it was determined that a clinical symptom or laboratory result was related to a potential interaction. The Mixed Procedure was used to determine if there was a significant change in the serum level of each of the 19 AEDs with increasing CBD dose. AEDs with interactions seen in initial analysis were plotted for mean change in serum level over time. Subanalyses were performed to determine if the frequency of sedation in participants was related to the mean serum N-desmethylclobazam level, and if aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels were different in participants taking concomitant valproate. Increases in topiramate, rufinamide, and N-desmethylclobazam and decrease in clobazam (all p Epilepsy.

  7. Newer antiepileptic drug use and other factors decreasing hospital encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faught, Edward; Helmers, Sandra L; Begley, Charles E; Thurman, David J; Dilley, Cynthia; Clark, Chris; Fritz, Patty

    2015-04-01

    A retrospective analysis was conducted in one claims database and was confirmed in a second independent database (covering both commercial and government insurance plans between 11/2009 and 9/2011) for the understanding of factors influencing antiepileptic drug (AED) use and the role of AEDs and other health-care factors in hospital encounters. In both datasets, epilepsy cases were identified by AED use and epilepsy diagnosis coding. Variables analyzed for effect on hospitalization rates were as follows: (1) use of first-generation AEDs or second-generation AEDs, (2) treatment changes, and (3) factors that may affect AED choice. Lower rates of epilepsy-related hospital encounters (encounters with an epilepsy diagnosis code) were associated with use of second-generation AEDs, deliberate treatment changes, and treatment by a neurologist. Epilepsy-related hospital encounters were more frequent for patients not receiving an AED and for those with greater comorbidities. On average, patients taking ≥1 first-generation AED experienced epilepsy-related hospitalizations every 684days, while those taking ≥1second-generation AED were hospitalized every 1001days (relative risk reduction of 31%, pprivate insurance reimbursement policies, and education of patients and physicians. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The impact of side effects on long-term retention in three new antiepileptic drugs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bootsma, H.P.; Ricker, L.; Hekster, Y.A.; Hulsman, J.; Lambrechts, D.; Majoie, M.; Schellekens, A.; Krom, M. de; Aldenkamp, A.P.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine long-term retention, percentage of patients withdrawing because of adverse events, percentage of patients achieving seizure freedom, safety profile of the new anti-epileptic drugs lamotrigine, levetiracetam and topiramate. METHODS: All patients treated with lamotrigine,

  9. Influence of normal versus slow antiepileptic drugs withdrawal on seizure recurrence in patients with epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王凌玲

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the influence of normal and slow antiepileptic drugs(AEDs) withdrawal on recurrence of epilepsy. Methods Epileptic patients with seizure-free more than 2 years were recruited to the study. They were first divided into normal

  10. Antiepileptic drugs in pregnancy and hemorrhagic disease of the newborn: An update

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    QUESTION What is the current evidence regarding the association between hemorrhagic disease of the newborn and maternal use of hepatic enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (eg, carbamazepine, phenobarbitone, topiramate)?

  11. Effect of Antiepileptic Drugs for Acute and Chronic Seizures in Children with Encephalitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang-Lin Lin

    Full Text Available Encephalitis presents with seizures in the acute phase and increases the risk of late unprovoked seizures and epilepsy. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of antiepileptic drugs in pediatric patients with acute seizures due to encephalitis and epilepsy.Cases of acute pediatric encephalitis between January 2000 and December 2010 were reviewed. Clinical data, including onset at age, seizure type, seizure frequency, effects of antiepileptic drugs, and prognosis were analyzed.During the study period, 1038 patients (450 girls, 588 boys were enrolled. Among them, 44.6% (463 had seizures in the acute phase, 33% had status epilepticus, and 26% (251 developed postencephalitic epilepsy. At one year of follow-up, 205 of the 251 patients with postencephalitic epilepsy were receiving antiepileptic drugs while 18% were seizure free even after discontinuing the antiepileptic drugs. Among those with postencephalitic epilepsy, 67% had favorable outcomes and were using <2 anti-epileptic drugs while 15% had intractable seizures and were using ≥ 2 antiepileptic drugs. After benzodiazepines, intravenous phenobarbital was preferred over phenytoin as treatment of postencephalitic seizures in the acute phase. For refractory status epilepticus, high-dose topiramate combined with intravenous high-dose phenobarbital or high-dose lidocaine had less side effects.Children with encephalitis have a high rate of postencephalitic epilepsy. Phenobarbital and clonazepam are the most common drugs used, alone or in combination, for postencephalitic epilepsy.

  12. Effect of Antiepileptic Drugs for Acute and Chronic Seizures in Children with Encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kuang-Lin Lin; Jainn-Jim Lin; Shao-Hsuan Hsia; Min-Liang Chou; Po-Cheng Hung; Huei-Shyong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Background Encephalitis presents with seizures in the acute phase and increases the risk of late unprovoked seizures and epilepsy. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of antiepileptic drugs in pediatric patients with acute seizures due to encephalitis and epilepsy. Patients and Methods Cases of acute pediatric encephalitis between January 2000 and December 2010 were reviewed. Clinical data, including onset at age, seizure type, seizure frequency, effects of antiepileptic drugs, and progno...

  13. Stiripentol: an example of antiepileptic drug development in childhood epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabbout, Rima; Chiron, Catherine

    2012-09-01

    The efficacy of stiripentol (STP) in Dravet Syndrome (DS) was discovered first in an exploratory study in pediatric pharmacoresistant epilepsies. This efficacy signal, used as a proof of concept, led to - two independent multicenter randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in DS patients: STICLO-France and STICLO-Italy. In adjunction to valproate and clobazam, STP demonstrated marked efficacy and these trials became the basis for the registration of STP as an orphan drug for DS. Although STP had previously shown antiepileptic activity, since it inhibits cytochromes P450, the increased plasma levels of clobazam (CLB), norclobazam (NCLB), and NCLB/CLB ratio reported in STICLO studies brought into question the activity of STP per se. Recent pharmacological studies demonstrated that (i) STP is a direct allosteric modulator of the GABA receptors at a site distinct from benzodiazepines; (ii) STP and CLB/NCLB act independently at GABA(A) receptors; (iii) their combination increases the maximum response beyond that of either drug alone. All these effects are independent of considerations of changes in metabolism. Some responders in STICLO studies failed to display any increase of plasmatic concentrations of NCLB/CLB ratio as STP could not inhibit CYP2C19 because of its inhibition by progabide or due to an inactivating CYP polymorphism. The responder rate proved to be in the same range whether the NCLB/CLB ratio increased or not. These analyses confirmed that the effects of STP cannot result from a simple pharmacokinetic interaction. We propose that the success of STP should serve as a model for AED development in rare pediatric epileptic syndromes.

  14. Adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs in North Indian pediatric outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Dipika; Azad, Chandrika; Kaur, Manpreet; Rudroju, Neelima; Vepa, Pravallika; Guglani, Vishal

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the pattern and predictors of treatment-emergent adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in children diagnosed with epilepsy. We conducted prospective observational study in a tertiary care teaching hospital on 277 epileptic children. Antiepileptic drug (AED)-associated ADRs, demographic and clinical characteristics, AED regimen, and so on were recorded. Causality, severity, and preventability were performed by World Health Organization-Uppsala Monitoring Center scale, Hartwig's severity scale, and Schumock and Thornton questionnaire, respectively. Of the enrolled population, 53% children had symptomatic epilepsy, and 51% were in 5- to 10-year age group. More than two-thirds of children were on monotherapy, with phenytoin (n = 176, 63.5%) being the most common AED. Three hundred fifty-three AED-related ADRs were recorded in 175 children (63.2%). Poor scholastic performance (19%) was the most common ADR, followed by gum hypertrophy (13.3%), headache (10.2%), behavioral problems (5.7%), drowsiness (5.7%), and others. Two hundred sixteen ADRs were probable, and 126 ADRs were possible. Severe ADRs were noted in 6 children. Girls (odds ratio [OR], 1.93; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.07-3.45; P = 0.03), children with secondary epilepsy (OR, 3.31; 95% CI, 1.76-6.23; P ≤ 0.001), children older than 5 years (5-10 years; OR, 6.28; 95% CI, 2.79-14.12; P ≤ 0.001), and those older than 10 years (OR, 9.04; 95% CI, 3.69-22.17; P ≤ 0.001) were found to be at higher risk of experiencing ADRs. Monotherapy was the preferred treatment. Phenytoin was the most common ADR causative agent. Female sex, symptomatic epilepsy, and older age (> 5 years) were found to be associated with higher probability of ADR development.

  15. Generic substitution: issues for problematic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, J D; Esham, R H

    2001-01-01

    The methodology and criteria for bioequivalence testing have been firmly established by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). For certain drugs with a narrow therapeutic index (e.g., digoxin, levothyroxine, warfarin), generic substitution may not be advisable or even allowable, depending on the substitution laws of individual states. Digoxin and levothyroxine tablets are examples of drugs for which no New Drug Applications (NDAs) currently exist. However, commercially available generic products for both of these drugs have not been determined by the FDA to be therapeutically equivalent to the innovator products. Generic versions of warfarin have been approved by the FDA as being therapeutically equivalent to the innovator products, as have generic versions of the rescue inhaler albuterol. Yet, misinformation and myths persist regarding the adequacy and proven reliability of the FDA's determination of bioequivalence for these products.

  16. Determinants of generic drug substitution in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lufkin Thomas M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since generic drugs have the same therapeutic effect as the original formulation but at generally lower costs, their use should be more heavily promoted. However, a considerable number of barriers to their wider use have been observed in many countries. The present study examines the influence of patients, physicians and certain characteristics of the generics' market on generic substitution in Switzerland. Methods We used reimbursement claims' data submitted to a large health insurer by insured individuals living in one of Switzerland's three linguistic regions during 2003. All dispensed drugs studied here were substitutable. The outcome (use of a generic or not was modelled by logistic regression, adjusted for patients' characteristics (gender, age, treatment complexity, substitution groups and with several variables describing reimbursement incentives (deductible, co-payments and the generics' market (prices, packaging, co-branded original, number of available generics, etc.. Results The overall generics' substitution rate for 173,212 dispensed prescriptions was 31%, though this varied considerably across cantons. Poor health status (older patients, complex treatments was associated with lower generic use. Higher rates were associated with higher out-of-pocket costs, greater price differences between the original and the generic, and with the number of generics on the market, while reformulation and repackaging were associated with lower rates. The substitution rate was 13% lower among hospital physicians. The adoption of the prescribing practices of the canton with the highest substitution rate would increase substitution in other cantons to as much as 26%. Conclusions Patient health status explained a part of the reluctance to substitute an original formulation by a generic. Economic incentives were efficient, but with a moderate global effect. The huge interregional differences indicated that prescribing behaviours and

  17. [Antiepileptic drugs as mood stabilizers: what did we learn from the epileptology?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajna, Péter

    2008-09-30

    Author summarizes the practical aspects of psychiatric application of mood stabilizing antiepileptic drugs. He observes how to transfer experiences taken from the "epileptologic" practice into the psychiatric care of bipolar patients. He shortly demonstrates the relevant information on the mechanisms of action, controversies and possible clinical effects influenced by the seizure inhibiting effect of the concerning molecules. By the opinion of the author the clinical importance of pharmacokinetic parameters are underestimated in the psychiatric practice. Therefore--as an original approach in the literature--he summarizes the detailed clinical indications of serum level measurements of antiepileptic drugs applied in psychiatry as mood stabilizers. The therapeutic experiences in epilepsy added a lot of practices for the most effective dosing, building, tapering and exchange of the mood stabilizer antiepileptics. Drug interactions (appear among the psychotropic drugs or with the commonly used medicines). As in any chronic therapies the main condition of patient's compliance is the lacking or very mild presence of the applied therapy. The paper discusses the most frequently occurring and drug-specific side effects in table forms. Using the term of "relative therapeutic potential" the need of balance between the efficacy (influenced by the choice and dosing) and the tolerance are pointed. Rules of application can change significantly in special populations like in pregnancy, obesity, chronic diseases or in chronic comorbid states and in case of polytherapy. As for the special therapeutic effects, the experiences are not completed even in group of antiepileptics: we have larger and more favorable knowledge on the traditional drugs (carbamazepine and valproate) and on lamotrigine (from the newer generation) but promising but not enough information exists on the newest antiepileptic molecules. Further targeted studies are needed for the identification and positioning of

  18. Historical Origin And Antiepileptic Drug Development [história Do Surgimento E Desenvolvimento Das Drogas Antiepilépticas

    OpenAIRE

    Guerreiro C.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: New antiepileptic drugs are needed because many epileptic patients do not achieve complete control with current antiepileptic drugs. Methods: We reviewed the historical origin of antiepileptic drugs, the different phases of the medical treatment related to monotherapy or polytheraphy, and the experimental models applied to develop new medications nowadays. Results: Experimental models have been used for many years in order to detect some rational mechanisms of action. The result...

  19. 42 CFR 447.506 - Authorized generic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Authorized generic drugs. 447.506 Section 447.506... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS PAYMENTS FOR SERVICES Payment for Drugs § 447.506 Authorized generic drugs. (a) Authorized generic drug defined. For the purposes of this subpart, an authorized generic...

  20. The effects of antiepileptic drugs on the growth of glioblastoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Yi; Lai, Hung-Yi; Chiu, Angela; Chan, She-Hung; Hsiao, Ling-Ping; Lee, Shih-Tseng

    2016-05-01

    To determine the effects of antiepileptic drug compounds on glioblastoma cellular growth, we exposed glioblastoma cell lines to select antiepileptic drugs. The effects of selected antiepileptic drugs on glioblastoma cells were measured by MTT assay. For compounds showing significant inhibition, cell cycle analysis was performed. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS. The antiepileptic compounds selected for screening included carbamazepine, ethosuximide, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, magnesium sulfate, oxcarbazepine, phenytoin, primidone, tiagabine, topiramate, valproic acid, and vigabatrin. Dexamethasone and temozolomide were used as a negative and positive control respectively. Our results showed temozolomide and oxcarbazepine significantly inhibited glioblastoma cell growth and reached IC50 at therapeutic concentrations. The other antiepileptic drugs screened were unable to reach IC50 at therapeutic concentrations. The metabolites of oxcarbazepine were also unable to reach IC50. Dexamethasone, ethosuximide, levetiracetam, and vigabatrin showed some growth enhancement though they did not reach statistical significance. The growth enhancement effects of ethosuximide, levetiracetam, and vigabatrin found in the study may indicate that these compounds should not be used for prophylaxis or short term treatment of epilepsy in glioblastoma. While valproic acid and oxcarbazepine were effective, the required dose of valproic acid was far above that used for the treatment of epilepsy and the metabolites of oxcarbazepine failed to reach significant growth inhibition ruling out the use of oral oxcarbazepine or valproic acid as monotherapy in glioblastoma. The possibility of using these compounds as local treatment is a future area of study.

  1. The impact of different antiepileptic drugs on the sedation of children during magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isil Davarci

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives:The induction and inhibition of cytochrome P450 isoenzymes by antiepileptic drugs lead to changes in the clearance of anesthetic drugs eliminated via hepatic metabolism. We investigated the duration of the sedation and additional anesthetic needs during magnetic resonance imaging in epileptic children receiving antiepileptic drugs that cause either enzyme induction or inhibition.Methods:In American Society of Anesthesiology I–II, 120 children aged 3–10 years were included. Group 1: children using antiepileptic drugs that cause cytochrome P450 enzyme induction; Group 2: those using antiepileptic drugs that cause inhibition; and Group 3: those that did not use antiepileptic drugs. Sedation was induced with the use of 0.05 mg kg−1 midazolam and 1 mg kg−1 propofol. An additional 0.05 mg kg−1 of midazolam and rescue propofol (0.5 mg kg−1 were administered and repeated to maintain sedation. The duration of sedation and the additional sedation needed were compared.Results:The duration of the initial dose was significantly shorter in Group I compared with groups II and III (p = 0.001, p = 0.003, respectively. It was significantly longer in Group II compared with groups I and III (p = 0.001, p = 0.029, respectively. The additional midazolam needed for adequate sedation was increased in Group I when compared with groups II and III (p = 0.010, p = 0.001, respectively. In addition, the rescue propofol dose was significantly higher only in Group I when compared with Group III (p = 0.002.Conclusion:In epileptic children, the response variability to the initial sedative agents during the magnetic resonance imaging procedure resulting from the inhibition or induction of the cytochrome P450 isoenzymes by the antiepileptic drugs mandated the titration of anesthetic agents.

  2. [The patents game. Generic and biosimilar drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamañán, E; González, D; Armada, E; Ruano, M; Álvarez-Sala, R; Herrero, A

    2016-01-01

    The protection provided by patents on medicines has a limited duration. The expiry of patents expiration allows copies of the drugs to be released, competing with original. At first, they were identical to the original, known as generic drugs, but in recent years, due to the marketing of biological therapies and the expiry of many of their patents, biosimilar drugs have also emerged. These are not exact copies of the original, but, like generic drugs, biosimilar drugs have to demonstrate equivalence to the reference drugs in quality, safety and efficacy. Nevertheless, despite their importance and contribution to sustainability of health system, doctors are sometimes unaware of differences between them, and their impact in terms of clinical and economic effects. An attempt is made to review and clarify certain aspects often unknown by physicians, despite their involvement in their use. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Selection criteria for the clinical use of the newer antiepileptic drugs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deckers, C.L.P.; Knoester, P.D.; Haan, G.J. de; Keyser, A.J.M.; Renier, W.O.; Hekster, Y.A.

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, several new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have been licensed: felbamate, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin and zonisamide. These drugs have proven efficacy as add-on therapy in patients with difficult-to-treat partial epilepsy, as

  4. Rufinamide: a new antiepileptic drug treatment for Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrie, Colin D

    2010-06-01

    Lennox-Gastaut syndrome is a relatively rare epilepsy syndrome that usually begins in early-mid childhood and is characterized by multiple seizure types, particularly generalized seizures, which are often resistant to antiepileptic drug medication. Rufinamide is a new antiepileptic drug approved as adjunctive therapy to treat seizures in Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in those 4 years of age and older. In this article, the putative mechanism of action is described, along with data relating to its pharmacokinetics and metabolism. Key findings from clinical trials are presented and discussed. Adverse effects are summarized and compared with those encountered with competitor antiepileptic drugs. Finally, the role of rufinamide in the holistic management of subjects with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome is considered.

  5. FDA Critical Path Initiatives: Opportunities for Generic Drug Development

    OpenAIRE

    Lionberger, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    FDA’s critical path initiative documents have focused on the challenges involved in the development of new drugs. Some of the focus areas identified apply equally to the production of generic drugs. However, there are scientific challenges unique to the development of generic drugs as well. In May 2007, FDA released a document “Critical Path Opportunities for Generic Drugs” that identified some of the specific challenges in the development of generic drugs. The key steps in generic product de...

  6. [Generic and biosimilar drug substitution: a panacea?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, M J; Guignard, B; Nendaz, M

    2015-10-14

    Drugs are the third largest source of expenditure under Switzerland's compulsory basic health insurance. Generics, the price of which should be at least 30 per cent less than the cost of the original drugs, can potentially allow substantial savings. Their approval requires bioequivalence studies and their use is safe, although some factors may influence patients' and physicians' acceptance. The increased substitution of biosimilar drugs for more expensive biotech drugs should allow further cost savings. In an attempt to extend the monopoly granted by the original drug patent, some pharmaceutical companies implement "evergreening" strategies including small modifications of the original substance for which the clinical benefit is not always demonstrated.

  7. Generic drugs: myths, facts, and limitations

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Marzo; Elisabetta Porro; Anna Barassi

    2012-01-01

    Bioequivalence (BE) has always been an important pharmaceutical area, particularly (but not solely) in Mediterranean region, where the use of generic drugs is a relatively recent development. The lack of new therapeutic molecules has concentrated primary research in the hands of a few large pharmaceutical companies. For smaller companies, this has created opportunities for the development of new formulations of existing drugs (orodispersible tablets that dissolve in the mouth, extended-releas...

  8. 77 FR 60125 - Generic Drug Facilities, Sites and Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug Facilities, Sites and Organizations AGENCY... Administration (FDA) is notifying generic drug facilities, and certain sites and organizations identified in a generic drug submission, that they must provide identification information to FDA. This information...

  9. 78 FR 22553 - Generic Drug Facilities, Sites, and Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug Facilities, Sites, and Organizations AGENCY... announcing that the generic drug facility self-identification reporting period for fiscal year (FY) 2014 will begin on May 1, 2013, and close on June 1, 2013. Generic drug facilities, certain sites,...

  10. Generic Drugs: The Same Medicine for Less Money

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generic Drugs: The Same Medicine for Less Money What is a generic drug? A generic is a copy of a brand-name drug. A brand- name drug has a patent. When ... benefit to your health, and you will save money. 7KH IHGHUDO )RRG DQG 'UXJ $GPLQLVWUDWLRQ )'$ UHJXODWHV ERWK ...

  11. Exposure to antiepileptic drugs in utero and child development: a prospective population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiby, Gyri; Daltveit, Anne K; Schjølberg, Synnve; Stoltenberg, Camilla; Øyen, Anne-Siri; Vollset, Stein E; Engelsen, Bernt A; Gilhus, Nils E

    2013-08-01

    Antiepileptic drugs may cause congenital malformations. Less is known about the effect on development in infancy and childhood. The aim of this study was to examine whether exposure to antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy has an effect on early child development. From mid-1999 through December 2008, children of mothers recruited at 13-17 weeks of pregnancy were studied in the ongoing prospective Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Information on birth outcomes were obtained from the Medical Birth Registry (108,264 children), and mothers reported on their child's motor development, language, social skills, and autistic traits using items from standardized screening tools at 18 months (61,351 children) and 36 months (44,147 children) of age. The relative risk of adverse outcomes in children according to maternal or paternal epilepsy with and without prenatal exposure to antiepileptic drugs was estimated as odds ratios (ORs), using logistic regression with adjustment for maternal age, parity, education, smoking, depression/anxiety, folate supplementation, and child congenital malformation or low birth weight. A total of 333 children were exposed to antiepileptic drugs in utero. At 18 months, the exposed children had increased risk of abnormal scores for gross motor skills (7.1% vs. 2.9%; OR 2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-3.7) and autistic traits (3.5% vs. 0.9%; OR 2.7, CI 1.1-6.7) compared to children of parents without epilepsy. At 36 months, the exposed children had increased risk of abnormal score for gross motor skills (7.5% vs. 3.3%; OR 2.2, CI 1.1-4.2), sentence skills (11.2% vs. 4.8%; OR 2.1, CI 1.2-3.6), and autistic traits (6.0% vs. 1.5%; OR 3.4, CI 1.6-7.0). The drug-exposed children also had increased risk of congenital malformations (6.1% vs. 2.9%; OR 2.1, CI 1.4-3.4), but exclusion of congenital malformations did not affect the risk of adverse development. Children born to women with epilepsy who did not use antiepileptic drugs had no

  12. COST ANALYSIS OF LONG ESTABLISHED AND NEWER ORAL ANTIEPILEPTIC DRUGS AVAILABLE IN THE INDIAN MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phatak Abhishek M, Hotwani Jitendra H, Deshmukhkiran R, Panchal Sagar S, Naik Madhura S

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Large number of pharmaceutical companies manufactures antiepileptic drugs in India. The price variations among the marketed drugs are wide. Aims: The present study was aimed to find the cost of different oral antiepileptic drugs available in Indian market as monotherapy, combination therapy and number of manufacturing companies for each, to evaluate difference in cost of different brands of same dosage of same active drug by calculating percentage variation of cost. Methods and Materials: Cost of a drug being manufactured by different companies, in the same strength and dosage forms was obtained from “Indian Drug Review” Vol. XXI, Issue No.4, 2014 and “Current Index of Medical Specialties” July-October 2014. The difference in the maximum and minimum price of the same drug manufactured by different pharmaceutical companies and percentage variation in price was calculated. Results: The percentage price variation noted of long-established drugs was – Phenytoin (50mg: 140%, Carbamazepine (100mg: 1033%, Phenobarbital (30mg : 730%, Valproic acid (300mg : 420%. Newer drugs –Levetiracetam (250mg: 75%, Lamotrigine (25mg: 66%, Topiramate (50mg: 108%, Zonisamide (100mg: 19%. Combination drugs – Phenobarbital + Phenytoin (30+100 mg: 354.55%. Conclusion: The percentage price variation of different brands of the same commonly used long-established oral antiepileptic drug manufactured in India is very wide. The formulation or brand of Antiepileptic drugs (AED’s should preferably not be changed since variations in bioavailability or different pharmacokinetic profiles may increase the potential for reduced effect or excessive side effects. Hence, manufacturing companies should aim to decrease the price variation while maintaining the therapeutic efficacy.

  13. The Risk of Specific Congenital Anomalies in Relation to Newer Antiepileptic Drugs : A Literature Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Josta; Garne, Ester; Jong-van den Berg, de Lolkje; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: More information is needed about possible associations between the newer anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) in the first trimester of pregnancy and specific congenital anomalies of the fetus. OBJECTIVES: We performed a literature review to find signals for potential associations between newer A

  14. The Risk of Specific Congenital Anomalies in Relation to Newer Antiepileptic Drugs : A Literature Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Josta; Garne, Ester; Jong-van den Berg, de Lolkje; Wang, Hao

    BACKGROUND: More information is needed about possible associations between the newer anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) in the first trimester of pregnancy and specific congenital anomalies of the fetus. OBJECTIVES: We performed a literature review to find signals for potential associations between newer

  15. Long term course of childhood epilepsy following relapse after antiepileptic drug withdrawal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, OF

    Objective: To explore the course of epilepsy following relapse after antiepileptic drug (AED) withdrawal. Methods: Forty two patients were identified with onset of epilepsy in childhood in whom AEDs had been withdrawn after at least 2 years of seizure freedom, and in whom a relapse had occurred. Two

  16. The Australian Register of Antiepileptic Drugs in Pregnancy : The first 1002 pregnancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vajda, Frank J. E.; Hitchcock, Alison; Graham, Janet; O'Brien, Terence; Lander, Cecilie; Eadie, Mervyn

    2007-01-01

    Prospective studies are needed to assess the maternal and fetal hazards of antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy in pregnancy. To make the Australian Register of AEDs in Pregnancy better known to the Australian obstetric community by presenting results derived from it. Analysis of data collected by the

  17. The Australian Register of Antiepileptic Drugs in Pregnancy : The first 1002 pregnancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vajda, Frank J. E.; Hitchcock, Alison; Graham, Janet; O'Brien, Terence; Lander, Cecilie; Eadie, Mervyn

    2007-01-01

    Prospective studies are needed to assess the maternal and fetal hazards of antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy in pregnancy. To make the Australian Register of AEDs in Pregnancy better known to the Australian obstetric community by presenting results derived from it. Analysis of data collected by the R

  18. Bone mineral density in adult patients treated with various antiepileptic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, Simona Alexandra; Viken, Janina; Jensen, Lars Thorbjørn;

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable evidence suggesting, that older antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and some of the newer ones decrease bone mineral density (BMD). However, there is only limited and conflicting data concerning the effect of levetiracetam on BMD. In this cross-sectional study we analysed data from 1...

  19. Antiepileptic drug use in seven electronic health record databases in Europe: a methodological comparison.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, M.C.H. de; Schuerch, M.; Vries, F. de; Hesse, U.; Oliva, B.; Huerta Alvarez, C.; Gil, M.; Requena, G.; Abajo, F.; Afonso, A.; Souverein, P.C.; Alvarez, Y.; Slattery, J.; Rottenkolber, M.; Schmiedl, S.; Dijk, L. van; Schlienger, R.; Reynolds, R.; Klungel, O.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The annual prevalence of antiepileptic drug (AED) prescribing reported in the literature differs considerably among European countries; this may be due to differences in type of data sources, time periods, population distributions, and methodology. Objectives: To assess the prevalence of

  20. Antiepileptic drug use in seven electronic health record databases in europe: A methodological comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Groot, Mark C.H.; Schuerch, Markus; De Vries, Frank; Hesse, Ulrik; Oliva, Belén; Alvarez, Consuelo Huerta; Gil, Miguel; Requena, Gema; Abajo, Francisco; Afonso, Ana; Souverein, Patrick C.; Alvarez, Yolanda; Slattery, Jim; Rottenkolber, Marietta; Schmiedl, Sven; Van Dijk, Liset; Schlienger, Raymond G.; Reynolds, Robert; Klungel, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Background: The annual prevalence of antiepileptic drug (AED) prescribing reported in the literature differs considerably among European countries; this may be due to differences in type of data sources, time periods, population distributions, and methodology. Objectives: To assess the prevalence of

  1. Exposure to antiepileptic drugs and the risk of hip fracture: a case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsiropoulos, Ioannis; Andersen, Morten; Nymark, Tine

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) increases the risk of hip fracture. METHODS: We performed a case-control study using data from the Funen County (population 2004: 475,000) hip fracture register. Cases (n = 7,557) were all patients admitted to county hospitals ...

  2. Four-year outcome after early withdrawal of antiepileptic drugs in childhood epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts, AT; Niermeijer, JMF; Arts, WFM; Brouwer, OF; Stroink, H; Peeters, EAJ; van Donselaar, CA

    2005-01-01

    Four-year follow-up of children with epilepsy included in a randomized trial of early withdrawal of antiepileptic drugs showed that 51% achieved a terminal remission of at least 2 years without medication and 21% with medication; 15% had seizures during the fourth year. Early medication withdrawal i

  3. SPECTRUM OF NEURAL-TUBE DEFECTS IN 34 INFANTS PRENATALLY EXPOSED TO ANTIEPILEPTIC DRUGS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LINDHOUT, D; OMTZIGT, JGC; CORNEL, MC

    We analyzed the spectrum of neural-tube defects associated with maternal exposure to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and the possible contribution of familial and genetic factors to epilepsy or neural-tube defects. No specific association with maternal family history of neural-tube defects or epilepsy

  4. SPECTRUM OF NEURAL-TUBE DEFECTS IN 34 INFANTS PRENATALLY EXPOSED TO ANTIEPILEPTIC DRUGS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LINDHOUT, D; OMTZIGT, JGC; CORNEL, MC

    1992-01-01

    We analyzed the spectrum of neural-tube defects associated with maternal exposure to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and the possible contribution of familial and genetic factors to epilepsy or neural-tube defects. No specific association with maternal family history of neural-tube defects or epilepsy wa

  5. Trends in the use of anti-epileptic drugs during pregnancy in the netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Puijenbroek, Eugene; de Vries, Loes; Kant, Agnes

    2014-01-01

    Background: The use of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of birth defects. Since epilepsy itself is also associated with potential risks for mother and child, an optimal AED treatment is needed. Over the past years, the introduction of new AEDs and the

  6. Antiepileptic drug use in seven electronic health record databases in Europe: a methodological comparison.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, M.C.H. de; Schuerch, M.; Vries, F. de; Hesse, U.; Oliva, B.; Huerta Alvarez, C.; Gil, M.; Requena, G.; Abajo, F.; Afonso, A.; Souverein, P.C.; Alvarez, Y.; Slattery, J.; Rottenkolber, M.; Schmiedl, S.; Dijk, L. van; Schlienger, R.; Reynolds, R.; Klungel, O.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The annual prevalence of antiepileptic drug (AED) prescribing reported in the literature differs considerably among European countries; this may be due to differences in type of data sources, time periods, population distributions, and methodology. Objectives: To assess the prevalence of

  7. Antiepileptic drug use in seven electronic health record databases in europe: A methodological comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Groot, Mark C.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313936455; Schuerch, Markus; De Vries, Frank|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/303546670; Hesse, Ulrik; Oliva, Belén; Alvarez, Consuelo Huerta; Gil, Miguel; Requena, Gema; Abajo, Francisco; Afonso, Ana; Souverein, Patrick C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/243074948; Alvarez, Yolanda; Slattery, Jim; Rottenkolber, Marietta; Schmiedl, Sven; Van Dijk, Liset; Schlienger, Raymond G.; Reynolds, Robert; Klungel, Olaf|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/181447649

    2013-01-01

    Background: The annual prevalence of antiepileptic drug (AED) prescribing reported in the literature differs considerably among European countries; this may be due to differences in type of data sources, time periods, population distributions, and methodology. Objectives: To assess the prevalence of

  8. Changing Australian prescribing patterns for antiepileptic drugs in pregnancy and their possible consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vajda, F. J. E.; Lander, C. M.; Hitchcock, A.; Graham, J.; Solinas, C.; O'Brien, T.; Eadie, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    We report progress in the accumulation of data by the Australian Pregnancy Register over 64 months, confirming the rise in enrolment and the predominantly epileptic indication for taking antiepileptic drugs. Eighty percent of the enrolment was prospective. The focus of the current report is the obse

  9. [Social aspects of epilepsy: marriage, pregnancy, driving, antiepileptic drug withdrawal and against social stigma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2004-11-01

    Persons with epilepsy need adequate advice and effective counselling about issues such as marriage, pregnancy, risks of inheriting epilepsy, driving, employment and antiepileptic drug withdrawal, because these persons are not receiving important information and education about their condition and possible adverse effects of treatment. Furthermore, women with epilepsy have increased rates of pregnancy complications and poor fetal outcomes including congenital malformations and developmental delay related to both their epilepsy and antiepileptic drugs. However, approximately 90% of all women with epilepsy undergo normal pregnancy and give birth to children free of birth defects. Pregnancy is generally safe in women with epilepsy. The study of long-term prognosis of childhood-onset epilepsy in Japan shows that the majority of these patients have lower levels of educational background as well as employment and marital status compared with the general population (Wakamoto H. et al). Of patients with epilepsy, 60% to 70% achieve control with antiepileptic medication. However, several antiepileptic drug withdrawal studies show variable rates of success, with relapse rates ranging from 12% to 63% (Britton J.W.). Driving is listed as major problem in persons with epilepsy. However, the patients with seizure-free more than two years have been able to get the driver's license since June, 2002. Social attitudes towards epilepsy cause more distress to the patient than the disease itself. We should realize that persons with epilepsy are normal or near-normal. To ameliorate the social stigma against epilepsy, continuous and repetitive educational efforts would be needed.

  10. The role of reactive species in epileptogenesis and influence of antiepileptic drug therapy on oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinc, Boštjan; Grabnar, Iztok; Vovk, Tomaž

    2012-12-01

    Epilepsy is considered one of the most common neurological disorders. The focus of this review is the acquired form of epilepsy, with the development process consisting of three major phases, the acute injury phase, the latency epileptogenesis phase, and the phase of spontaneous recurrent seizures. Nowadays, an increasing attention is paid to the possible interrelationship between oxidative stress resulting in disturbance of physiological signalling roles of calcium and free radicals in neuronal cells and mitochondrial dysfunction, cell damage, and epilepsy. The positive stimulation of mitochondrial calcium signals by reactive oxygen species and increased reactive oxygen species generation resulting from increased mitochondrial calcium can lead to a positive feedback loop. We propose that calcium can pose both, physiological and pathological effects of mitochondrial function, which can lead in neuronal cell death and consequent epileptic seizures. Various antiepileptic drugs may impair the endogenous antioxidative ability to prevent oxidative stress. Therefore, some antiepileptic drugs, especially from the older generation, may trigger oxygen-dependent tissue injury. The prooxidative effects of these antiepileptic drugs might lead to enhancement of seizure activity, resulting in loss of their efficacy or apparent functional tolerance and undesired adverse effects. Additionally, various reactive metabolites of antiepileptic drugs are capable of covalent binding to macromolecules which may lead to deterioration of the epileptic seizures and systemic toxicity. Since neuronal loss seems to be one of the major neurobiological abnormalities in the epileptic brain, the ability of antioxidants to attenuate seizure generation and the accompanying changes in oxidative burden, further support an important role of antioxidants as having a putative antiepileptic potential.

  11. Generic legislation of new psychoactive drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Amsterdam, Jan; Nutt, David; van den Brink, Wim

    2013-03-01

    New psychoactive drugs (NPDs, new psychoactive substances) enter the market all the time. However, it takes several months to ban these NPDs and immediate action is generally not possible. Several European countries and drug enforcement officers insist on a faster procedure to ban NPDs. Introduction of generic legislation, in which clusters of psychotropic drugs are banned in advance, has been mentioned as a possible solution. Here we discuss the pros and cons of such an approach. First, generic legislation could unintentionally increase the expenditures of enforcement, black market practices, administrative burden and health risks for users. Second, it may have a negative impact on research and the development of new treatments. Third, due to the complexity of generic legislation, problems in the enforcement are anticipated due to lack of knowledge about the chemical nomenclature. Finally, various legal options are already available to ban the use, sale and trade of NPDs. We therefore conclude that the currently used scientific benefit-risk evaluation should be continued to limit the adverse health effects of NPDs. Only in emergency cases, where fatal incidents (may) occur, should this approach be overruled.

  12. Psychiatrists' decision making between branded and generic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Johannes; Mendel, Rosmarie; Kissling, Werner; Leucht, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    To study psychiatrists' decision making between generic and branded antipsychotics or antidepressants a hypothetical decision scenario involving decisions between branded and generic drugs was presented to a sample of German psychiatrists. Factors influencing this decision were identified using a regression analysis. n=410 Psychiatrists participated in the survey. Psychiatrists were more likely to choose branded drugs when imagining choosing the drug for themselves (vs. recommending a drug to a patient). In addition, psychiatrists were more likely to choose generic antidepressants than generic antipsychotics. Additional predictors for choosing a generic drug were a higher share of outpatients, less negative attitudes toward generics and higher uncertainty tolerance. In conclusion, psychiatrists' decision making in choosing between branded or generic antidepressants or antipsychotics is to a large extent influenced by vague attitudes towards properties of generics and branded drugs as well as by "non-evidence based" factors such as uncertainty tolerance.

  13. 76 FR 79198 - Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting; Correction AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; correction. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug... (76 FR 76738). The document announced a public meeting entitled ``Generic Drug User Fee.''...

  14. Generic drug names and social welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Félix; Feldman, Roger

    2013-06-01

    This article studies how well International Nonproprietary Names (INNs), the "generic" names for pharmaceuticals, address the problems of imperfect information. Left in private hands, the identification of medicines leads to confusion and errors. Developed in the 1950s by the World Health Organization, INNs are a common, global, scientific nomenclature designed to overcome this failure. Taking stock after sixty years, we argue that the contribution of INNs to social welfare is paramount. They enhance public health by reducing errors and improving patient safety. They also contribute to economic efficiency by creating transparency as the foundation of competitive generic drug markets, reducing transaction costs, and favoring trade. The law in most countries requires manufacturers to designate pharmaceuticals with INNs in labeling and advertising. Generic substitution is also permitted or mandatory in many countries. But not all the benefits of INNs are fully realized because prescribers may not use them. We advocate strong incentives or even legally binding provisions to extend the use of INNs by prescribing physicians and dispensing pharmacists, but we do not recommend replacing brand names entirely with INNs. Instead, we propose dual use of brand names and INNs in prescribing, as in drug labeling.

  15. Mexiletine and its Interactions with Classical Antiepileptic Drugs: An Isobolographic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowicz-Reutt, Kinga K; Banach, Monika; Piskorska, Barbara

    2016-05-01

    Using the mouse maximal electroshock test, the reference model of tonic-clonic seizures, the aim of the present study was to determine the type of interaction between mexiletine (a class IB antiarrhythmic drug) and classical antiepileptics: valproate, carbamazepine, phenytoin, and phenobarbital. Isobolographic analysis of obtained data indicated antagonistic interactions between mexiletine and valproate (for fixed ratio combinations of 1:1 and 3:1). Additivity was observed between mexiletine and valproate applied in proportion of 1:3 as well as between mexiletine and remaining antiepileptics for the fixed ratios of 1:3, 1:1, and 3:1. Neither motor performance nor long-term memory were impaired by mexiletine or antiepileptic drugs regardless of whether they were administered singly or in combination. Mexiletine did not significantly affected brain concentrations of carbamazepine, phenobarbital or phenytoin. In contrast, the antiarrhythmic drug decreased by 23 % the brain level of valproate. This could be, at least partially, the reason of antagonistic interaction between the two drugs. In conclusion, the observed additivity suggests that mexiletine can be safely applied in epileptic patients treated with carbamazepine, phenytoin or phenobarbital. Because of undesirable pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetic interactions with valproate, mexiletine should not be used in such combinations.

  16. Lacosamide: A novel antiepileptic and anti-nociceptive drug on the block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhminder Jit Singh Bajwa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With an increasing demand for newer anti-epileptic agents having a better pharmacological profile, many newer agents are being investigated. Lacosamide is a newer functional amino acid being developed as an adjunctive therapy for resistant partial-onset seizures owing to its activity of enhancing the slow inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels thereby reducing pathologic hyperactivity in neurons. It has also being investigated for its role as anti-nociceptive in variety of pain scenarios specifically in diabetic neuropathic pain. It is well-absorbed orally, metabolized in liver and excreted by the kidneys. It has a favorable pharmacologic profile in having minimal drug interactions. The adverse effects include mild dizziness, behavioral changes and dose dependent prolongation of PR interval. This review is directed toward the development of lacosamide and its potential usefulness as an anti-epileptic and an anti-nociceptive drug.

  17. Antiepileptic drug use in a nursing home setting: a retrospective study in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callegari, Camilla; Ielmini, M; Bianchi, L; Lucano, M; Bertù, L; Vender, Simone

    2016-05-13

    The authors set out to examine qualitatively the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in a population of older adults in a nursing home setting, evaluating aspects such as specialist prescriptions and changes in dosage. This retrospective prevalence study was carried out in a state-funded nursing home that provides care and rehabilitation for elderly people. The first objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of AED use in this population. The second objective was to monitor AED dosage modifications during the fifteen-month study period, focusing on the safety and the tolerability of AEDs. In the period of time considered, 129 of 402 monitored patients received at least one anti-epileptic therapy. The prevalence of AED use was therefore 32%. Gabapentin was found to be the most commonly prescribed drug, with a frequency of 29%, and it was used mainly for anxiety disorders, psychosis, neuropathic pain and mood disorders.

  18. Update on the Genetic Polymorphisms of Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes in Antiepileptic Drug Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Saruwatari

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Genetic polymorphisms in the genes that encode drug-metabolizing enzymes are implicated in the inter-individual variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmaco-dynamics of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs. However, the clinical impact of these polymorphisms on AED therapy still remains controversial. The defective alleles of cytochrome P450 (CYP 2C9 and/or CYP2C19 could affect not only the pharmacokinetics, but also the pharmacodynamics of phenytoin therapy. CYP2C19 deficient genotypes were associated with the higher serum concentration of an active metabolite of clobazam, N-desmethylclobazam, and with the higher clinical efficacy of clobazam therapy than the other CYP2C19 genotypes. The defective alleles of CYP2C9 and/or CYP2C19 were also found to have clinically significant effects on the inter-individual variabilities in the population pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital, valproic acid and zonisamide. EPHX1 polymorphisms may be associated with the pharmacokinetics of carbamazepine and the risk of phenytoin-induced congenital malformations. Similarly, the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B7 genotype may affect the pharmacokinetics of lamotrigine. Gluthatione S-transferase null genotypes are implicated in an increased risk of hepatotoxicity caused by carbamazepine and valproic acid. This article summarizes the state of research on the effects of mutations of drug-metabolizing enzymes on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of AED therapies. Future directions for the dose-adjustment of AED are discussed.

  19. Rufinamide: a novel broad-spectrum antiepileptic drug

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wheless, James W; Vazquez, Blanca

    2010-01-01

    ... has allowed neurologists to utilize evidence-based medicine when treating patients. In late 2008, the Food and Drug Administration approved rufinamide for adjunctive use in the treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome...

  20. Drug utilization pattern of anti-epileptic drugs: a pharmacoepidemiologic study in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanssens, Y; Deleu, D; Al Balushi, K; Al Hashar, A; Al-Zakwani, I

    2002-10-01

    To get an insight into the type and aetiology of epileptic seizures; to describe the drug utilization pattern of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) for the treatment of various forms of epileptic seizures in this tertiary referral centre in Oman; and to compare our drug utilization pattern with that from other countries. In addition, the tolerability of AEDs and the use of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) were evaluated. In a 6-month study, all epileptic patients aged 14 and above who were prescribed an AED were considered for analysis. Demographic data, type and aetiology of epileptic seizures, AED data, tests performed and adverse drug reaction (ADR) data were collected. A total of 1039 prescriptions originated from 488 epileptic patients. The age ranged from 14 to 77 years (median, 24 years). Generalized tonic-clonic seizures (51%) of idiopathic/cryptogenic origin (83%) were the most common type and aetiology of epileptic seizures, respectively. An average of 1.34 AEDs per patient was prescribed with 78% of patients being on monotherapy. Sodium valproate (49%) was the most frequently prescribed AED, followed by carbamazepine (44%), phenytoin (12%) and lamotrigine (11%). Ten patients suffered an ADR and phenobarbital followed by carbamazepine were most commonly the subject of TDM. Unlike the results in most other studies, generalized seizures represented the majority of epileptic seizures. The selection of the AEDs corresponded well with their known efficacy profiles for specific epileptic seizure types. Monotherapy was the type of therapy most frequently used, and sodium valproate and carbamazepine were the most commonly used AEDs.

  1. Inhibition of human aromatase complex (CYP19) by antiepileptic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Naja Wessel; Halling-Sørensen, Bent; Birkved, Franziska Maria A Kramer

    2008-01-01

    transfected insect cells using dibenzylfluorescein as substrate. The drugs inhibiting CYP19 were: lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, tiagabine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, ethosuximide, and valproate. The inhibitory effects (50% reduction in activity compared to enzymes without inhibitor present) were in the range...... with valproate and phenobarbital. When adding carbamazepine to a range of valproate concentrations no additional inhibition was seen. The data for some of the AEDs show that side effects on steroid synthesis in humans due to inhibition of aromatase should be considered....

  2. [Generic drugs in Brazil: historical overview and legislation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Lorena Ulhôa; Albuquerque, Kemile Toledo de; Kato, Kelly Cristina; Silveira, Gleiciely Santos; Maciel, Náira Rezende; Spósito, Pollyanna Álvaro; Barcellos, Neila Márcia Silva; Souza, Jacqueline de; Bueno, Márcia; Storpirtis, Sílvia

    2010-12-01

    The Brazilian generic drugs policy was implemented in 1999 with the aim of stimulating competition in the market, improve the quality of drugs and improve the access of the population to drug treatment. The process of implementing this policy allowed the introduction and discussion of concepts that had never before been used in the context of drug registration in Brazil: bioavailability, bioequivalence, pharmaceutical equivalence, generic drugs, biopharmaceutical classification system, biowaiver. The present article provides definitions for these concepts in the context of Brazilian legislation as well as a historical and chronological description of the implementation of the generic drugs policy in Brazil, including a list of current generic drug legislation. This article contributes to the understanding of the Brazilian generic drugs policy and facilitates the search for information concerning the legal requirements for registration of drugs in Brazil.

  3. [Strategies for pharmaceutical research and development. II. Generic drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchar, M

    1996-07-01

    When the patent protection is terminated, the original registered-mark preparation becomes a generic drug, which results in a decrease in its price as compared with the original pharmaceutical. The effects of changes in price relation are discussed from the viewpoint of the generic firms and the manufacturers of original preparations. The differences in the insurance system and legislative regulations of the registration of generic preparations can markedly the size influence of the share of generic drugs in the total consumption of drugs. The future development of generic drugs from a general viewpoint is discussed in relation to the contemporary extensive expiration of patent protection of drugs. The hitherto results are summed up and the topics for the present strategy of the development of generic drugs in the Research Institute for Pharmacy and Biochemistry, or in the Czech Republic, respectively are discussed.

  4. Differences in antiepileptic drug efficacy in hippocampally kindled normal and microcephalic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majkowski, J; Danneberg, P; Knappen, F; Sersen, E A

    1986-10-29

    The difference in antiepileptic drug efficacy was investigated in two groups of animals: 5 normal and 4 microcephalic rats. The latter were produced by a single i.p. injection of 30 mg/kg methylazoxymethanol acetate in the mother on the 15th day of gestation. Hippocampal kindling was performed to a seizure criterion in all animals followed by testing of the antiepileptic drugs vs placebo. Besides carbamazepine (CBZ), two new anticonvulsants were tested: (E)-2-[(alpha-amino)phenylmethylene]-benzo-[b]-thiophene-3(2H)-one (AF-CX 921) and its metabolite (E)-2-[alpha-amino)phenylmethylene]-benzo-[b]-thiophene-3(2H)-one- 1- oxide (AF-CX 1325). Frequency of occurrence and duration of afterdischarges and seizures were statistically examined. The duration of early afterdischarges (AD1) tended to be shorter in microcephalic than in normal animals in control and placebo periods. In contrast, during treatment with the antiepileptic drugs, AD1 durations were longer in microcephalic than in normal animals. This suggests that the drugs inhibited AD1 to a lesser extent in the microcephalics. Two other characteristics of EEG epileptic activity, focal spiking (FS) and late afterdischarges (AD2) also varied in the two groups. Both were significantly lower in occurrence in the microcephalic rats independent of treatment. Three types of behavioral manifestations were also examined: convulsive seizures (CS), epileptic behavior (EB) and quiet states (Q). The two groups of animals responded differently to the drugs with respect to Q and CS. In the microcephalics, AFCX 1325 and AFCX 921 were superior to CBZ, which in turn, was superior to placebo.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Drug interactions involving antiepileptic drugs: assessment of the consistency among three drug compendia and FDA-approved labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstein, Dana; Tirosh, Matanya; Eyal, Yonatan; Eyal, Sara

    2015-03-01

    Interactions of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) with other substances may lead to adverse effects and treatment failure. To avoid such interactions, clinicians often rely on drug interaction compendia. Our objective was to compare the concordance for twenty-two AEDs among three drug interaction compendia (Micromedex, Lexi-Interact, and Clinical Pharmacology) and the US Food and Drug Administration-approved product labels. For each AED, the overall concordance among data sources regarding existence of interactions and their classification was poor, with less than twenty percent of interactions listed in all four sources. Concordance among the three drug compendia decreased with the fraction of the drug excreted unchanged and was greater for established inducers of hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes than for the drugs that are not inducers (R-square=0.83, P<0.01). For interactions classified as contraindications, major, and severe, concordance among the four data sources was, in most cases, less than 30%. Prescribers should be aware of the differences between drug interaction sources of information for both older AEDs and newer AEDs, in particular for those AEDs which are not involved in hepatic enzyme-mediated interactions.

  6. Tall gastrodis tuber combined with antiepileptic drugs repairs abnormal perfusion foci in focal epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weimin Wang; Zhenyu Fan; Yongqin Zhang; Yuxia Yang; Yaqing Liu; Xiaoli Dang; Wenjun Song; Yinping Wu; Jiang Ye

    2013-01-01

    One hundred patients with focal epilepsy were recruited for the present study and their seizures controlled with antiepileptic drugs. The patients then orally received a capsule of tall gastrodis tuber powder, a traditional Chinese drug, and underwent single photon emission computed tomography, long-term electroencephalogram, and CT/MRI. Blood drug levels were monitored throughout the study. Before treatment with tall gastrodis tuber, 35 of the 100 cases had abnormal CT/MRI scans; 79 cases had abnormal single photon emission computed tomography images; 86 cases had abnormal electroencephalogram; and a total of 146 abnormal perfusion foci were observed across the 100 subjects. After treatment, the number of patients with normal single photon emission computed tomography images increased by 12; normal electroencephalogram was observed in an additional 27 cases and the number of patients with epileptiform discharge decreased by 29 (34% of 86); the total number of abnormal perfusion foci decreased by 52 (36%) and changes in abnormal foci were visible in 65 patients. These changes indicate that the administration of tall gastrodis tuber in combination with antiepileptic drugs repairs abnormal perfusion foci in patients with focal epilepsy. Our results demonstrate that traditional Chinese drugs can repair abnormal perfusion foci and, as such, are a promising new pathway in the treatment of focal epilepsy.

  7. Should Physicians be Encouraged to use Generic Names and to Prescribe Generic Drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Haris; Krasuski, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    While using the brand names seems like a trivial issue at the outset, using these names is inherently problematic. Cardiovascular drugs remain the most commonly prescribed drugs by the physicians. The junior doctors are likely to introject practices of their seniors and consequently to reciprocate from the experiences learnt from their preceptors. Using the generic names may be one way to facilitate prescription of the generic drugs who have a better cost profile and similar efficacy than the more expensive branded drugs. In this editorial, we have outlined several arguments to suggest the importance of using the generic names in academic discussions and clinical documentation.

  8. Targeting pharmacoresistant epilepsy and epileptogenesis with a dual-purpose antiepileptic drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doeser, Anna; Dickhof, Gesa; Reitze, Margit; Uebachs, Mischa; Schaub, Christina; Pires, Nuno Miguel; Bonifácio, Maria João; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício; Beck, Heinz

    2015-02-01

    In human epilepsy, pharmacoresistance to antiepileptic drug therapy is a major problem affecting a substantial fraction of patients. Many of the currently available antiepileptic drugs target voltage-gated sodium channels, leading to a rate-dependent suppression of neuronal discharge. A loss of use-dependent block has emerged as a potential cellular mechanism of pharmacoresistance for anticonvulsants acting on voltage-gated sodium channels. There is a need both for compounds that overcome this resistance mechanism and for novel drugs that inhibit the process of epileptogenesis. We show that eslicarbazepine acetate, a once-daily antiepileptic drug, may constitute a candidate compound that addresses both issues. Eslicarbazepine acetate is converted extensively to eslicarbazepine after oral administration. We have first tested using patch-clamp recording in human and rat hippocampal slices if eslicarbazepine, the major active metabolite of eslicarbazepine acetate, shows maintained activity in chronically epileptic tissue. We show that eslicarbazepine exhibits maintained use-dependent blocking effects both in human and experimental epilepsy with significant add-on effects to carbamazepine in human epilepsy. Second, we show that eslicarbazepine acetate also inhibits Cav3.2 T-type Ca(2+) channels, which have been shown to be key mediators of epileptogenesis. We then examined if transitory administration of eslicarbazepine acetate (once daily for 6 weeks, 150 mg/kg or 300 mg/kg) after induction of epilepsy in mice has an effect on the development of chronic seizures and neuropathological correlates of chronic epilepsy. We found that eslicarbazepine acetate exhibits strong antiepileptogenic effects in experimental epilepsy. EEG monitoring showed that transitory eslicarbazepine acetate treatment resulted in a significant decrease in seizure activity at the chronic state, 8 weeks after the end of treatment. Moreover, eslicarbazepine acetate treatment resulted in a

  9. Partial epilepsies: Choice of antiepileptic drugs in adults in the outpatient setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Vlasov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper depicts the author's view on how a neurologist/epileptologist chooses an antiepileptic drug in his practice under present-day conditions. It considers possible clinical situations and therapeutic tactics in relation to the efficiency of performed therapy, as well as methods for switching to other antiepileptic drugs if the previous/first monotherapy is ineffective. The author gives main international and Russian guidelines in terms of the type of epileptic seizure/form of epilepsy/epilepsy syndrome. Despite its almost semicentennial history of effective clinical application, valproate is shown to be now a first-line choice drug for the therapy of undifferentiated, cryptogenic, and symptomatic partial epilepsies in patients of different age groups. The properties of valproate, such as efficacy against different types of seizures and forms of epilepsy, good tolerability, minimal aggravation risk, high monotherapy retention rates, various dosage forms, including the brand-name extendedrelease drug Depakine chrono or Depakine chronosphere and its intravenous formulation, favorable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics profiles, make it indispensable at the present developmental stage of epileptology.

  10. Current understanding of the mechanism of action of the antiepileptic drug lacosamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogawski, Michael A; Tofighy, Azita; White, H Steve; Matagne, Alain; Wolff, Christian

    2015-02-01

    The antiepileptic drug lacosamide [(R)-2-acetamido-N-benzyl-3-methoxypropanamide], a chiral functionalized amino acid, was originally identified by virtue of activity in the mouse and rat maximal electroshock (MES) test. Attention was drawn to lacosamide because of its high oral potency and stereoselectivity. Lacosamide is also active in the 6 Hz seizure model but inactive against clonic seizures in rodents induced by subcutaneous pentylenetetrazol, bicuculline and picrotoxin. It is also ineffective in genetic models of absence epilepsy. At doses greater than those required to confer protection in the MES test, lacosamide inhibits behavioral and electrographic seizures in hippocampal kindled rats. It also effectively terminates seizures in the rat perforant path stimulation status epilepticus model when administered early after the onset of seizures. Lacosamide does not exhibit antiepileptogenic effects in kindling or post-status epilepticus models. The profile of lacosamide in animal seizure and epilepsy models is similar to that of sodium channel blocking antiepileptic drugs, such as phenytoin and carbamazepine. However, unlike these agents, lacosamide does not affect sustained repetitive firing (SRF) on a time scale of hundreds of milliseconds or affect fast inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels; however, it terminates SRF on a time scale of seconds by an apparent effect on sodium channel slow inactivation. Lacosamide shifts the slow inactivation curve to more hyperpolarized potentials and enhances the maximal fraction of channels that are in the slow inactivated state. Currently, lacosamide is the only known antiepileptic drug in clinical practice that exerts its anticonvulsant activity predominantly by selectively enhancing slow sodium channel inactivation.

  11. Isobolographic analysis of interactions among losigamone analog AO-620 and two conventional antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowicz, Kinga K; Jaszczyk, Bozena; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated pharmacodynamic interactions among AO-620, a losigamone analog, and two conventional antiepileptic drugs, valproate (VPA) and phenobarbital (PB). Experiments were conducted in the maximal electroshock test in mice. Isobolographic analysis of the obtained data revealed pure additive interactions between AO-620 and PB applied at three dose ratios of 1:1, 1:3 and 3:1. Antagonism was observed when AO-620 was co-administered with VPAat the ratio of 3:1, while additive interactions were seen in two remaining proportions (1:3 and 1:1). Surprisingly, the interaction pattern of AO-620 appeared quite different from that of losigamone.

  12. Generic drugs in Brazil: known by many, used by few.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoldi, Andréa D; Barros, Aluísio J D; Hallal, Pedro C

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated knowledge and use of generic drugs in a population-based sample of adults from a southern Brazilian city. The outcomes were: the proportion of generics in total medicines used; theoretical and practical knowledge about generics; and strategies used to buy medicines on medical prescriptions. The recall period for drug utilization was 15 days. The proportion of generics in total medicines was 3.9%. While 86.0% knew that generics cost less and 70.0% that the quality is similar to brand name medicines, only 57.0% knew any packaging characteristics that distinguish generics from other medicines. The highest proportion of generic drug utilization was in the antimicrobial pharmacological group. A brand name medicine (with a brand similar to the generic name) was mistakenly classified as a generic through photos by 48.0% of the interviewees. Among subjects who bought medicines in the 15-day period, 18.9% reported buying a generic, but this result should be interpreted with caution, because the population frequently fails to differentiate between generics and other medicines.

  13. New antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco CHIARELLI

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Lennox–Gastaut syndrome is a childhood epileptic encephalopathy characterised by polymorphic seizures and neuropsychological decline. The most characteristic seizures are tonic fits, atypical absences and atonic seizures, in that order. Treatment options for patients with LGS are limited because of the resistance of seizures to pharmacological treatment. Owing to the many seizure types, many drugs are used in combinations that are mostly guided by anecdotal evidence or personal experience. Opinions towards treatment are further complicated because an antiepileptic drug might be of some benefit for the control of one type of seizure while aggravating another type. Concomitantly, polytherapy increases the potential for adverse events. The ultimate goal of epilepsy treatment is to achieve seizure control in a safe manner. Seizure freedom appears to be unrealistic in some refractory epilepsies, especially LGS. In this Review, we discuss newer antiepileptic drugs (Felbamate, Lamotrigine, Levetiracetam, Topiramate, Rufinamide, Vigabatrin, Zonisamide in the treatment of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Investigation of the effects of newer medications might help to identify treatments that, when used in the early stages of the disorder, might have long-term beneficial effects on seizures and the associated comorbidities.

  14. Antiepileptic, behavioral, and antidepressant effects of adjuvant lamotrigine therapy in drug-resistant epilepsy

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    Martinović Žarko J.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the behavioral effects of lamotrigine as add-on therapy in treatment-resistant epilepsy. Methods. An open, prospective, long-term study of lamotrigine as adjuvant therapy was performed in 56 patients with drug-resistant epilepsy (female/male ratio 35/21, age range 16-51 years. All the patients kept seizure diaries, and electroencephalograms were recorded at baseline and during 24 months of the treatment. Quality of life questionnaire, Hamilton depression scale (HMD, Beck depression scale (BDI, and Hamilton anxiety scale (HMA were used before and during lamotrigine therapy. Comparative assessments were made in an age- and sex-matched control group treated with other antiepileptic drugs. Results. Overall, seizure control was improved in 55.3% of the patients, remained unchanged in 39.3%, and deteriorated in 5.4%. Improvement in some quality of life measures occurred in 50% of the patients. The HMD subscales and BDI scale showed significant improvement in lamotrigine treated patients compared to the control group (ANOVA, p < 0.01. Negative behavioral effects occurred in 10.7% of the patients. Conclusion. Lamotrigine demonstrated significant antiepileptic long-term efficacy, and its positive effects on the mood and quality of life, which surpassed the negative behavioral effects, and contributed highly to the favorable treatment outcome.

  15. Effect of Antiepileptic drugs on plasma lipoprotein (a) and other lipid levels in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aynaci, F M; Orhan, F; Orem, A; Yildirmis, S; Gedik, Y

    2001-05-01

    Antiepileptic drugs may alter plasma lipid status in epileptic patients. We conducted a study to assess the effect of phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and valproate on plasma levels of lipoprotein (a), total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein A, and apolipoprotein B in 22 epileptic children. The children were separated as group 1, seven children, mean age 1.6+/-0.2 years, treated with phenobarbital, 5 mg/kg/day, twice daily; group 2, seven children, mean age 9.8+/-1.2 years, treated with carbamazepine, 20 mg/kg/day, twice daily; and group 3, eight children, mean age 6.8+/-0.6 years, treated with valproate, 20 mg/kg/day, twice daily. Plasma lipoprotein (a) and other lipid levels were studied before (pretreatment) and at 3 and 6 months of treatment. Friedman two-way analysis of variance and Wilcoxon's signed-rank test were used for statistical analysis, and the results were expressed as the mean and standard error of the mean. The mean age of children in group 1 was significantly low, compared with groups 2 and, 3 (P < .001). The mean pretreatment lipid levels between the groups were not significant. The increase in lipoprotein (a) at 3 and 6 months and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol at 6 months was statistically significant in group 1 (P < .025). We suggest a careful monitoring of plasma levels of lipoprotein (a) and other lipids in epileptic children treated with antiepileptic drugs.

  16. Effect of antiepileptic drugs on plasma lipids, lipoprotein (a), and liver enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmez, Fatma Mujgan; Demir, Ercan; Orem, Asim; Yildirmis, Sermet; Orhan, Fazil; Aslan, Adnan; Topbas, Murat

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a study to assess the effect of phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and valproate on serum lipid profiles and lipoprotein (a) in 64 children with epilepsy (aged between 1 and 15 years) admitted to the child neurology outpatient clinic between July 2000 and July 2002. The children were separated as group 1 (18 children), treated with phenobarbital, 5 mg/kg/day; group 2 (22 children), treated with carbamazepine, 10 to 15 mg/kg/day; and group 3 (24 children), treated with sodium valproate, 20 mg/kg/day. Plasma lipoprotein (a), total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein A and apolipoprotein B levels, and liver enzymes alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and gamma-glutamyltransferase were determined before the initiation of the treatment and at 3, 6, and 12 months of the treatment period. The mean age of children in group 1 was significantly low compared with those in groups 2 and 3 (P 30 mg/dL) were observed only in carbamazepine-treated patients at 6 and 12 months. The percentage of children with lipoprotein (a) levels over 30 mg/dL was 44%, 63%, and 33% in the phenobarbital-, carbamazepine-, and valproate-treated children, respectively. Antiepileptic drugs significantly increase the level of lipoprotein (a), which is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis, and also have variable effects on other lipid parameters. Lipoprotein (a) levels should be closely followed in patients receiving antiepileptic drugs. (J Child Neurol 2006;21:70-74).

  17. Interactions between two enantiomers of losigamone and conventional antiepileptic drugs in the mouse maximal electroshock model--an isobolographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowicz, Kinga K; Jaszczyk, Bozena; Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2007-07-12

    The aim of this study was the isobolographic evaluation of interactions between two enantiomers of losigamone, AO-242 [(+)-5(R)-alpha(S)-5-(2-chlorophenylhydroxymethyl)-4-methoxy-2(5H)-furanone] and AO-294 [(-)-5(S)-alpha(R)-5-(2-chlorophenylhydroxymethyl)-4-methoxy-2(5H)-furanone], and valproate, carbamazepine, phenytoin, or phenobarbital in the maximal electroshock test in mice. Both enantiomers interacted additively with conventional antiepileptic drugs at all studied fixed dose ratios (1:3, 1:1, 3:1). Furthermore, AO-242, AO-294 and antiepileptics applied alone, as well as combinations of enantiomers and antiepileptics did not affect motor performance in the chimney test. Significant impairment of long-term memory (passive-avoidance task) was noted only in the case of valproate alone, given at the dose equal to its median effective dose (ED(50)) against maximal electroshock. All other antiepileptics and their combinations with AO-242 or AO-294 did not impair memory of mice. Enantiomers did not affect the brain concentrations of antiepileptic drugs, indicating a pharmacodynamic nature of the observed interactions. In conclusion, the present results suggest both AO-242 and AO-294 as promising candidate drugs in the add-on therapy of refractory epilepsy.

  18. The future of generic HIV drugs in Rhode Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jennifer Y; Reece, Rebecca; Montague, Brian; Rana, Aadia; Alexander-Scott, Nicole; Flanigan, Timothy

    2013-09-06

    The number of HIV-infected persons in the United States continues to increase and most patients with HIV will be on antiretroviral therapy (ART) for many decades. The introduction of generic antiretroviral medications has the potential for significant cost savings which may then be accompanied by improved access. State AIDS Drug Assistance Programs will be made more effective by the switch to generic ARTs. Cost savings and barriers to the introduction of generic ART are discussed.

  19. High-cost generic drugs--implications for patients and policymakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpern, Jonathan D; Stauffer, William M; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2014-11-13

    Some older generic drugs have become very expensive, owing to factors including drug shortages, supply disruptions, and consolidations in the generic-drug industry. But generics manufacturers that legally obtain a market monopoly can also unilaterally raise prices.

  20. Antiepileptic drugs patterns in elderly inpatients in a Brazilian tertiary center, Salvador, Brazil

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    Telma Rocha de Assis

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is very prevalent among elderly inpatients and treatment is far from ideal. Objective To analyze prescribing patterns of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs for hospitalized elderly with epilepsy, their relations with comorbidities and comedications. Method We assessed prescription regimen of elderly patients that were under AED use for treatment of epileptic seizures, during hospitalization. One hundred and nine patients were enrolled. AED regimen was categorized into two groups: Group 1 defined as appropriate (carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, valproic acid, gabapentin, clobazan and lamotrigine and Group 2 as inappropriate (phenytoin and phenobarbital. Results We found 73.4% of patients used inappropriate AEDs (p<0.001. Monotherapy was prescribed for 71.6% of patients. The most common comorbidity was hypertension. Potentially proconvulsant drugs as comedications were used for nearly half of patients. Conclusion Inappropriate AED therapy was commonly prescribed regimen for elderly inpatients. Some recommendations are discussed for a better care of elderly inpatients with epilepsy.

  1. Antiepileptic drugs: are women aware of interactions with oral contraceptives and potential teratogenicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, Alison M; Davis, Anne R; Kritzer, Jordana; Yoon, Ava; Camus, Adela

    2009-04-01

    Women with epilepsy (WWE)'s knowledge of the interaction between antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and oral contraceptives (OCs) and the potential teratogenicity of AEDs has received limited study. We conducted a cross-sectional questionnaire study (English or Spanish) among young WWE (18-44 years) to assess demographic characteristics, current AED use, and knowledge of AED interactions with OCs and teratogenicity. We used the Food and Drug Administration's classification system to categorize each AED's teratogenic potential. Participants (n=148) had a mean age of 32 years (SD 8); 32% spoke Spanish and described themselves as Hispanic. Among women prescribed a cytochrome p450-inducing AED, 65% were unaware of decreased OC efficacy. Forty percent of those prescribed Category D AEDs were unaware of potential teratogenic effects. WWE have limited knowledge of the potential interaction between AEDs and OCs and the teratogenic effects of AEDs. Educational efforts should highlight the reproductive health effects of AEDs in WWE.

  2. The Impact of Information on Doctors’ Attitudes Toward Generic Drugs

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    Aggeliki V. Tsaprantzi MD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to assess the impact of information on doctors’ attitudes and perceptions toward generics. A cross-sectional survey based on a specially designed 21-item questionnaire was conducted. The survey involved doctors of different specialties working in a public hospital in Greece. The analysis includes descriptive and inferential statistics, reliability and validity tests, as well as structural equation modeling to evaluate the causal model. Statistical analysis was accomplished by using SPSS 20 and Amos 20. A total of 134 questionnaires out of 162 were received, providing a response rate of 82.71%. A number of significant associations were found between information and perceptions about generic medicines with demographic characteristics. It seems that the provision of quality information on generic drugs influences doctors’ attitudes and prescription practices toward generic drugs. This is not a static process but a rather dynamic issue involving information provision policies for strengthening the proper doctors’ attitudes toward generic drugs.

  3. The Impact of Information on Doctors' Attitudes Toward Generic Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaprantzi, Aggeliki V; Kostagiolas, Petros; Platis, Charalampos; Aggelidis, Vassilios P; Niakas, Dimitris

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the impact of information on doctors' attitudes and perceptions toward generics. A cross-sectional survey based on a specially designed 21-item questionnaire was conducted. The survey involved doctors of different specialties working in a public hospital in Greece. The analysis includes descriptive and inferential statistics, reliability and validity tests, as well as structural equation modeling to evaluate the causal model. Statistical analysis was accomplished by using SPSS 20 and Amos 20. A total of 134 questionnaires out of 162 were received, providing a response rate of 82.71%. A number of significant associations were found between information and perceptions about generic medicines with demographic characteristics. It seems that the provision of quality information on generic drugs influences doctors' attitudes and prescription practices toward generic drugs. This is not a static process but a rather dynamic issue involving information provision policies for strengthening the proper doctors' attitudes toward generic drugs.

  4. Antiepileptic drugs prescription utilization behavior and direct costs of treatment in a national hospital of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahsan Haroon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The present study evaluated the direct costs of active epilepsy and looked at the pattern of drug prescription and utilization in epileptic patients visiting the neuroscience centre of a national hospital of India. Materials and Methods: A total of 134 epileptic patients were studied over a period of 4 months. Patients demography, commonly prescribed antiepileptic drugs (AEDs, socioeconomic status, direct costs, response ratio (RR for newer drugs, and quality of life (QOLIE-10 was evaluated. Results and Discussion: We found a higher percentage of male patients (67.9% as compared with females. Most of the patients were in the age group 11-30 years and majority of them (39.6% belonged to lower middle group. A higher percentage (68.7 of drugs was prescribed as polytherapy. Higher monthly cost was observed for some of the newer AEDs including the lamotrigine, levetiracetam, and lacosamide as compared with older drugs. Among the newer drugs, clobazam had the lowest cost. RR was calculated for 12 patients out of which 8 had a RR < −0.50. The QOL domains, following conventional or newer drugs, were not much affected. Conclusion: The study indicates an increasing trend toward clinical usage of newer AEDs, increasing trend of poly-therapy with significant escalations in the cost of therapy.

  5. Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Associated with Antiepileptic Drugs and Cranial Radiation Therapy

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    Shereen Elazzazy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Case reports on the development of toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN associated with concurrent administration of phenytoin with cranial radiation therapy (Ahmed (2004, Criton et al. (1997, and Rzany et al. (1996, but reports about erythema multiforme, which can develop in patients treated with levetiracetam and cranial irradiation, are very limited. This paper presents evidence that TEN may be induced by concurrent use of radiation with both phenytoin and levetiracetam. Our case is a 42-year-old male patient, a case of gliosarcoma who developed purpuric dermatitis associated with phenytoin when combined with cranial radiation therapy; although phenytoin was discontinued and switched to levetiracetam, the patient had more severe symptoms of toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN on levetiracetam; the patient improved with aggressive symptom management, discontinuation of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs, and holding radiotherapy. Although TEN is a rare toxicity, physicians should pay a special attention to the monitoring of brain tumor patients on antiepileptic prophylaxis during cranial irradiation; furthermore, patients should be counselled to notify their physicians if they develop any new or unusual symptoms.

  6. Outside the box: Medications worth considering when traditional antiepileptic drugs have failed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Adrian L; Perry, M Scott

    2017-08-01

    Review and discuss medications efficacious for seizure control, despite primary indications for other diseases, as treatment options in patients who have failed therapy with traditional antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Literature searches were conducted utilizing PubMed and MEDLINE databases employing combinations of search terms including, but not limited to, "epilepsy", "refractory", "seizure", and the following medications: acetazolamide, amantadine, bumetanide, imipramine, lidocaine, verapamil, and various stimulants. Data from relevant case studies, retrospective reviews, and available clinical trials were gathered, analyzed, and reported. Experience with acetazolamide, amantadine, bumetanide, imipramine, lidocaine, verapamil, and various stimulants show promise for cases of refractory epilepsy in both adults and children. Many medications lack large scale, randomized clinical trials, but the available data is informative when choosing treatment for patients that have failed traditional epilepsy therapies. All neurologists have encountered a patient that failed nearly every AED, diet, and surgical option. For these patients, we often seek fortuitous discoveries within small series and case reports, hoping to find a treatment that might help the patient. In the present review, we describe medications for which antiepileptic effect has been ascribed after they were introduced for other indications. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Fluoxetine enhances the anticonvulsant effects of conventional antiepileptic drugs in maximal electroshock seizures in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowicz, Kinga K; Stepień, Karolina; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2006-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of fluoxetine (FXT), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, on the effect of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in the maximal electroshock seizure (MES) model in mice. FXT at the doses of 25, 20 and 15 mg/kg significantly increased the electroconvulsive threshold. The antidepressant applied at the lower doses (10, 5 and 2.5 mg/kg) did not influence the threshold. Moreover, FXT (at the highest subprotective dose of 10 mg/kg) increased the anticonvulsive potential of carbamazepine (CBZ), diphenylhydantoin (DPH), valproate (VPA) and phenobarbital (PB), producing a dose-related decrease in their ED50 values against MES. Nevertheless, pharmacokinetic events may be involved in the interaction between FXT and PB or CBZ, since the antidepressant raised the total brain concentration of the two antiepileptics. FXT in combination with AEDs did not influence the motor performance in the chimney test and long-term memory. In conclusion, the data suggest that FXT modulates seizure processes in the brain and may be advantageous in the treatment of epilepsy in depressed patients, improving the seizure control in epilepsy.

  8. Prices of Generic Heart Failure Drugs Vary Widely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162035.html Prices of Generic Heart Failure Drugs Vary Widely Patients can spend from $12 to $ ... Nov. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Cash prices of generic medicines to treat heart failure vary so widely that ...

  9. Interactions between riluzole and conventional antiepileptic drugs -- a comparison of results obtained in the subthreshold method and isobolographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowicz, K K; Rwiader, M; Drelewska, E; Czuczwar, S J

    2004-12-01

    The exact types of pharmacodynamic interactions between riluzole and conventional antiepileptic drugs were evaluated in two available ways, the subthreshold and isobolographic analysis. Maximal electroshock test in mice was used as an animal model for generalized tonic-clonic convulsions. In the first method, riluzole (1.25-2.5 mg/kg) significantly raised the electroconvulsive threshold in mice. The drug administered at its subprotective dose of 0.3125 mg/kg enhanced the antiseizure activity of carbamazepine and phenobarbital, while, when applied at the higher dose of 0.625 mg/kg, it potentiated also the action of valproate and diphenylhydantoin. Riluzole (0.625) alone and in combinations with antiepileptic drugs did not produced any motor or log-term memory deficit. Results obtained from isobolographic analysis determined pure additive interaction between riluzole and all used conventional antiepileptic drugs. Since riluzole did not change plasma concentrations of co-administered antiepileptics, pharmacokinetic interactions, at least in terms of their free plasma levels, do not seem probable. The results of the present study confirm significant antiseizure properties of riluzole in the model of generalized tonic-clonic epileptic attacks. Moreover, comparison of effects obtained from both methods evaluating drug interactions strongly indicates a crucial role of the isobolographic analysis in verification and supplementation data achieved from the subthreshold method.

  10. Effects of Antiepileptic Drugs on Sexual Function and Reproductive Hormones of Male Epileptic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sonbolestan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diminished libido and sexual dysfunction are unusually common among male epileptic patients. The most important etiologic factor may be antiepileptic drugs (AEDs-induced androgen deficiency. We compared reproductive hormone levels among men with epilepsy taking various AEDs and normal controls. Methods: Subjects were 59 male epileptic patients who aged 24 ± 5 years. They had been receiving lamotrigine (LTG (n = 17, carbamazepine (CBZ (n = 18, and sodium valproate (VPA (n = 15 for at least 6 months. We also recruited 23 healthy controls. Testosterone, estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG, androstenedione (AND, luteinizing hormone (LH, and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH levels and gonadal efficiency (testosterone/LH were compared between the four groups. The patients and the control group were examined and evaluated for male reproduction by urology and endocrinology services. Results: Subjects receiving CBZ, VPA, and LTG had significantly lower mean testosterone levels than the control group (P < 0.01. In addition, patients receiving LTG had significantly higher mean testosterone levels than CBZ and VPA groups (P < 0.01 and controls (P < 0.05. There were not any significant differences between the groups in mean estradiol levels. The mean and level in VPA was higher than CBZ, LTG, and control groups (P < 0.01. Men receiving CBZ had significantly lower DHEAS levels than the other groups (P < 0.01. Testosterone/LH ratio in the control group was more than other groups (P < 0.01. On the other hand, this value in LTG group was higher than CBZ and VPA groups (P < 0.01. However, CBZ and VPA groups were not significantly different in terms of testosterone/LH ratio. Conclusion: Although the mean levels of reproductive hormones were lower in the LTG group compared to the controls, among traditional antiepileptic drugs, LTG had fewer side effects on reproductive hormones. Therefore, it is a good

  11. Importance of competing risks in the analysis of anti-epileptic drug failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Josemir W

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retention time (time to treatment failure is a commonly used outcome in antiepileptic drug (AED studies. Methods Two datasets are used to demonstrate the issues in a competing risks analysis of AEDs. First, data collection and follow-up considerations are discussed with reference to information from 15 monotherapy trials. Recommendations for improved data collection and cumulative incidence analysis are then illustrated using the SANAD trial dataset. The results are compared to the more common approach using standard survival analysis methods. Results A non-significant difference in overall treatment failure time between gabapentin and topiramate (logrank test statistic = 0.01, 1 degree of freedom, p-value = 0.91 masked highly significant differences in opposite directions with gabapentin resulting in fewer withdrawals due to side effects (Gray's test statistic = 11.60, 1 degree of freedom, p = 0.0007 but more due to poor seizure control (Gray's test statistic = 14.47, 1 degree of freedom, p-value = 0.0001. The significant difference in overall treatment failure time between lamotrigine and carbamazepine (logrank test statistic = 5.6, 1 degree of freedom, p-value = 0.018 was due entirely to a significant benefit of lamotrigine in terms of side effects (Gray's test statistic = 10.27, 1 degree of freedom, p = 0.001. Conclusion Treatment failure time can be measured reliably but care is needed to collect sufficient information on reasons for drug withdrawal to allow a competing risks analysis. Important differences between the profiles of AEDs may be missed unless appropriate statistical methods are used to fully investigate treatment failure time. Cumulative incidence analysis allows comparison of the probability of failure between two AEDs and is likely to be a more powerful approach than logrank analysis for most comparisons of standard and new anti-epileptic drugs.

  12. Strategies for improving adherence to antiepileptic drug treatment in people with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Aqeel, Sinaa; Gershuni, Olga; Al-Sabhan, Jawza; Hiligsmann, Mickael

    2017-02-03

    Poor adherence to antiepileptic medication is associated with increased mortality, morbidity and healthcare costs. In this review, we focus on interventions designed and tested in randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised controlled trials to assist people with adherence to antiepileptic medication. This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in the Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2010. To determine the effectiveness of interventions aimed at improving adherence to antiepileptic medication in adults and children with epilepsy. For the latest update, on 4 February 2016 we searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) via the Cochrane Register of Studies Online (CRSO), MEDLINE (Ovid 1946 to 4 February 2016), CINAHL Plus (EBSCOhost 1937 to 4 February 2016), PsycINFO (EBSCOhost 1887 to 4 February 2016), ClinicalTrials.gov, and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of adherence-enhancing interventions aimed at people with a clinical diagnosis of epilepsy (as defined in individual studies), of any age and treated with antiepileptic drugs in a primary care, outpatient or other community setting. All review authors independently assessed lists of potentially relevant citations and abstracts. At least two review authors independently extracted data and performed quality assessment of each study according to the Cochrane tool for assessing risk of bias. We graded the level of evidence for each outcome according to the GRADE working group scale.The studies differed widely according to the type of intervention and measures of adherence; therefore combining data was not appropriate. We included 12 studies reporting data on 1642 participants (intervention = 833, control = 809). Eight studies targeted adults with epilepsy, one study included participants

  13. Leveraging consumer's behaviour to promote generic drugs in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbini, Cristina; Luceri, Beatrice; Vergura, Donata Tania

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to fill the lack of knowledge regarding a more grounded exploration of the consumer's decision-making process in the context of generic drugs. In this perspective, a model, within the theoretical framework of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB), for studying the consumers' purchase intention of generic drugs was developed. An online survey on 2,222 Italian people who bought drugs in the past was conducted. The proposed model was tested through structural equation modelling (SEM). Almost all the constructs considered in the model, except the perceived behavioural control, contribute to explain the consumer's purchase intention of generic drugs, after controlling for demographic variables (age, income, education). Specifically, attitude, subjective norm, past behaviour, self-identity and trust in the pharmacist have a positive influence on the intention to buy generic drugs. On the contrary, perceived risk towards products and brand sensitivity act negatively. The results of the present study could be useful to public policy makers in developing effective policies and educational campaigns aimed at promoting generic drugs. Specifically, marketing efforts should be directed to inform consumers about the generic drugs' characteristics to mitigate the perceived risk towards these products and to raise awareness during their decision-making process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [Users sceptical about generic drugs: an anthropological approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarradon-Eck, A; Blanc, M-A; Faure, M

    2007-06-01

    Since the enactment of the 2002 legislative measures favoring the prescription of generic drugs, various quantitative studies have shown that approval by prescribers and users has risen in France. Nevertheless, scepticism remains as well as distrust towards these drugs focusing on their effectiveness compared with brand-name drugs, on potential dangers, and on the interruption they cause in prescription and consumption habits. Using a comprehensive approach, this article analyzes the social and cultural logic behind the negative image of generic drugs. The materials issued from an ethnographic study on the prescription of drugs for high blood pressure. Sixty-eight interviews were undertaken between April 2002 and October 2004 with people (39 women and 29 men, between the age of 40 and 95, 52 over the age of 60) treated for over a year for high blood pressure in rural areas in the Southeast of France. Thirteen people provided unsolicited opinions about generic drugs. Analysis of the information collected shows that users have various representations of generic drugs, including the idea of counterfeited and foreign drugs. These representations interfere with the adjustment process and the development of consumer loyalty. They are part of a set of social representations about drugs which form and express the user's reality. In these representations, the drug is an ambivalent object, carrier of both biological effectiveness and toxicity; it is also the metonymical extension of the prescriber, bestowing upon the prescription a symbolic value. By placing the generic drug in its network of symbolic and social meaning, this study highlights the coherence of the scepticism towards generic drugs by consumers (and prescribers) with a system of common opinion in which drugs are everyday things, personalized and compatible with users, symbolic exchange carriers in the physician-patient relationship, and in which confidence in the drug is also that given to the health care

  15. Lecture: profile of risks and benefits of new antiepileptic drugs in brain tumor-related epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschio, Marta; Dinapoli, L

    2011-11-01

    In patients with brain tumor, seizures are the onset symptom in 20-40% of the patients, while a further 20-45% of the patients will present them during the course of the disease. These data are important when considering the choice of antiepileptic drugs for this particular patient population, because brain tumor-related epilepsy (BTRE) is often drug resistant, has a strong impact on the quality of life and weighs heavily on public health expenditures. In brain tumor patients, the presence of epilepsy is considered as the most important risk factor for long-term disability. For this reason, the problem of the proper administration of medications and their potential side effects is of great importance, because good seizure control can significantly improve the patient's psychological and relational sphere. In these patients, new generation drugs such as gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, pregabalin, topiramate, and zonisamide are preferred, because they have fewer drug interactions and cause fewer side effects. Among the recently marketed drugs, lacosamide has demonstrated promising results and should be considered as a possible treatment option. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a customized treatment plan for each patient with BTRE, whose goals are complete seizure control, minimal or no side effects, and elimination of cognitive impairment and/or psychosocial problems.

  16. Development Enamel Defects in Children Prenatally Exposed to Anti-Epileptic Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Pernille Endrup; Henriksen, Tine Brink; Haubek, Dorte

    2013-01-01

    Objective Some anti-epileptic drugs (AED) have well-known teratogenic effects. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the effect of prenatal exposure to AED and the risk of enamel defects in the primary and permanent dentition. Methods A total of 38 exposed and 129 non-exposed children, 6......–10 years of age, were recruited from the Aarhus Birth Cohort and the Department of Neurology, Viborg Regional Hospital, Denmark. Medication during pregnancy was confirmed by the Danish Prescription Database. All children had their teeth examined and outcomes in terms of enamel opacities and enamel...... hypoplasia were recorded. Results Children prenatally exposed to AED have an increased prevalence of enamel hypoplasia (11% vs. 4%, odds ratio (OR) = 3.6 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.9 to 15.4]), diffuse opacities (18% vs. 7%, OR = 3.0; [95% CI: 1.0 to 8.7, p3) white opacities (18...

  17. Failure of antiepileptic drugs in controlling seizures in epilepsy: What do we do next?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahyan Galindo-Mendez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Medically intractable epilepsy is a clinical condition of concern that arises when a patient with epilepsy suffers seizures, despite a trial of two or more antiepileptic drugs (AEDs suitable for the type of epilepsy that are prescribed at maximum tolerated doses, does not achieve control of seizures. This diagnosis could be related to cortical dysplasias. We report the case of a 5-year-old girl with a previous normal neurological development and no family history of epilepsy who presented with focal-type seizures at age 4. She started treatment by taking different AEDs for seizure control. She continued having frequent seizures that sometimes progressed to generalized seizures and status epilepticus. After a focal cortical resection performed in the area where interictal spikes were detected, the pathology confirmed a type IIb cortical dysplasia as the cause of the epilepsy. This article discusses cortical dysplasias as a cause of pharmacoresistant epilepsy and its treatment.

  18. New anti-epileptic drugs--fifth Eilat conference. 25-29 June 2000, Eilat, Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perucca, E

    2000-10-01

    The fifth Eilat conference on new anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) was held at the Dan Hotel, Eilat, Israel, and was attended by 195 delegates from 19 countries. Delegates included basic scientists, clinical pharmacologists and neurologists working in clinical practice, in the pharmaceutical industry and in regulatory agencies. The conference provided a highly interactive forum for discussing the most recent data on new AEDs in various phases of clinical development, as well as an update on AEDs marketed in recent years. Methodological issues in AED evaluation were also discussed. Part of the conference was dedicated to a review of established and potential uses of AEDs in therapeutic areas outside epilepsy, with special reference to migraine, bipolar disorder, neuropathic pain and neuroprotection.

  19. The Impact of Anti-Epileptic Drugs on Growth and Bone Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Lee, Herng-Shen; Chang, Kai-Ping; Lee, Yi-Yen; Lai, Hsin-Chuan; Hung, Pi-Lien; Lee, Hsiu-Fen; Chi, Ching-Shiang

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder worldwide and anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) are always the first choice for treatment. However, more than 50% of patients with epilepsy who take AEDs have reported bone abnormalities. Cytochrome P450 (CYP450) isoenzymes are induced by AEDs, especially the classical AEDs, such as benzodiazepines (BZDs), carbamazepine (CBZ), phenytoin (PT), phenobarbital (PB), and valproic acid (VPA). The induction of CYP450 isoenzymes may cause vitamin D deficiency, hypocalcemia, increased fracture risks, and altered bone turnover, leading to impaired bone mineral density (BMD). Newer AEDs, such as levetiracetam (LEV), oxcarbazepine (OXC), lamotrigine (LTG), topiramate (TPM), gabapentin (GP), and vigabatrin (VB) have broader spectra, and are safer and better tolerated than the classical AEDs. The effects of AEDs on bone health are controversial. This review focuses on the impact of AEDs on growth and bone metabolism and emphasizes the need for caution and timely withdrawal of these medications to avoid serious disabilities. PMID:27490534

  20. The Impact of Anti-Epileptic Drugs on Growth and Bone Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Lee, Herng-Shen; Chang, Kai-Ping; Lee, Yi-Yen; Lai, Hsin-Chuan; Hung, Pi-Lien; Lee, Hsiu-Fen; Chi, Ching-Shiang

    2016-08-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder worldwide and anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) are always the first choice for treatment. However, more than 50% of patients with epilepsy who take AEDs have reported bone abnormalities. Cytochrome P450 (CYP450) isoenzymes are induced by AEDs, especially the classical AEDs, such as benzodiazepines (BZDs), carbamazepine (CBZ), phenytoin (PT), phenobarbital (PB), and valproic acid (VPA). The induction of CYP450 isoenzymes may cause vitamin D deficiency, hypocalcemia, increased fracture risks, and altered bone turnover, leading to impaired bone mineral density (BMD). Newer AEDs, such as levetiracetam (LEV), oxcarbazepine (OXC), lamotrigine (LTG), topiramate (TPM), gabapentin (GP), and vigabatrin (VB) have broader spectra, and are safer and better tolerated than the classical AEDs. The effects of AEDs on bone health are controversial. This review focuses on the impact of AEDs on growth and bone metabolism and emphasizes the need for caution and timely withdrawal of these medications to avoid serious disabilities.

  1. [Analysis of generic drug supply in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboulet, F; Haramburu, F; Latry, Ph

    2003-09-01

    The list of generic medicines (LGM), published since 1997 by the Agence Française de Sécurité Sanitaire des Produits de Santé (AFFSSaPS), the French Medicine Agency, concerns a special part of the medicines reimbursed by the National Health Insurance (Social Security). The objectives of the present study were: i) to describe the components of this list, based on pharmaceutical, economical and therapeutic characteristics, ii) to study differences between generic and reference products (formulations, excipients, prices, etc.), iii) to analyze information on excipients provided to health care professionals. The 21st version of the LGM (April 2001) was used. Therapeutic value was retrieved from the 2001 AFSSaPS report on the therapeutic value of 4490 reimbursed medicines. Information on excipients in the LGM and the Vidal dictionary (reference prescription book in France) was compared. The products included in the LGM represent 20% of all reimbursed medicines. The mean price differences between generics and their reference products vary between 30 and 50% for more than two thirds of the generic groups. The therapeutic value of the products of the LGM was judged important in 71% of cases (vs 63% for the 4409 assessed medicines) and insufficient in 13% of cases (vs 19%). Information on excipients is often missing and sometimes erroneous. Although the LGM is regularly revised and thus the generic market in perpetual change, the 2001 cross description of this pharmaceutical market provides much informations and raises some concern.

  2. The Portland Neurotoxicity Scale: Validation of a Brief Self-Report Measure of Antiepileptic-Drug-Related Neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinsky, Martin C.; Storzbach, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    The Portland Neurotoxicity Scale (PNS) is a brief patient-based survey of neurotoxicity complaints commonly encountered with the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). The authors present data on the validity of this scale, particularly when used in longitudinal studies. Participants included 55 healthy controls, 23 epilepsy patient controls, and 86…

  3. Malformation risks of antiepileptic drug monotherapies in pregnancy: updated results from the UK and Ireland Epilepsy and Pregnancy Registers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Campbell, E

    2014-09-01

    Antiepileptic drug (AED) exposure during pregnancy increases the risk of major congenital malformations (MCMs). The magnitude of this risk varies by AED exposure. Here we provide updated results from the UK Epilepsy and Pregnancy Register of the risk of MCMs after monotherapy exposure to valproate, carbamazepine and lamotrigine.

  4. Utilization of antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy: Comparative patterns in 38 countries based on data from the EURAP registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battino, D.; Bonizzoni, E.; Craig, J.

    2009-01-01

    We assessed the utilization of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), 1999-2005, in 4,798 prospective epilepsy pregnancies from 38 countries participating in EURAP, an international AED and pregnancy registry. Prominent differences in utilization patterns were observed across the various countries. Exposure...

  5. Glucuronidation of antiepileptic drugs in women with epilepsy : on the role of age, steroid hormones and oral contraceptives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegner, I.

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder with clinically important gender differences in both the expression and the impact of epilepsy. Understanding the complex interactions between sex hormones, epilepsy and antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) can greatly improve the care for women with epilepsy. This t

  6. Glucuronidation of antiepileptic drugs in women with epilepsy : on the role of age, steroid hormones and oral contraceptives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegner, I.

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder with clinically important gender differences in both the expression and the impact of epilepsy. Understanding the complex interactions between sex hormones, epilepsy and antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) can greatly improve the care for women with epilepsy. This

  7. Glucuronidation of antiepileptic drugs in women with epilepsy : on the role of age, steroid hormones and oral contraceptives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegner, I.

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder with clinically important gender differences in both the expression and the impact of epilepsy. Understanding the complex interactions between sex hormones, epilepsy and antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) can greatly improve the care for women with epilepsy. This t

  8. Influence of chemical structure on hypersensitivity reactions induced by antiepileptic drugs: the role of the aromatic ring.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Handoko, K.B.; Puijenbroek, E.P. van; Bijl, A.H.; Hermens, W.A.; Rijkom, JE Zwart-van; Hekster, Y.A.; Egberts, T.C.G.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) can cause various 'idiosyncratic' hypersensitivity reactions, i.e. the mechanism by which AEDs induce hypersensitivity is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess whether the presence of an aromatic ring as a commonality in chemical structures of AEDs can ex

  9. Influence of chemical structure on hypersensitivity reactions induced by antiepileptic drugs : the role of the aromatic ring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Handoko, Kim B; van Puijenbroek, Eugène P; Bijl, Annemarie H; Hermens, Walter A J J; Zwart-van Rijkom, Jeannette E F; Hekster, Yechiel A; Egberts, Toine C G

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) can cause various 'idiosyncratic' hypersensitivity reactions, i.e. the mechanism by which AEDs induce hypersensitivity is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess whether the presence of an aromatic ring as a commonality in chemical structures of AEDs can ex

  10. Intestinal absorption of the antiepileptic drug substance vigabatrin is altered by infant formula in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøhr, Martha Kampp; Thale, Zia I; Brodin, Birger;

    2014-01-01

    Vigabatrin is an antiepileptic drug substance mainly used in pediatric treatment of infantile spasms. The main source of nutrition for infants is breast milk and/or infant formula. Our hypothesis was that infant formula may affect the intestinal absorption of vigabatrin. The aim was therefore to ...

  11. Utilization of antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy: Comparative patterns in 38 countries based on data from the EURAP registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battino, D.; Bonizzoni, E.; Craig, J.

    2009-01-01

    We assessed the utilization of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), 1999-2005, in 4,798 prospective epilepsy pregnancies from 38 countries participating in EURAP, an international AED and pregnancy registry. Prominent differences in utilization patterns were observed across the various countries. Exposure...

  12. Transient Splenial Lesion of Corpus Callosum Associated with Antiepileptic Drug: Conventional and Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakyemez, B.; Erdogan, C.; Yildirim, N.; Gokalp, G.; Parlak, M. [Uludag Univ. Medical School, Bursa (Turkey). Dept. of Radiology

    2005-11-01

    Transient focal lesions of splenium of corpus callosum can be seen as a component of many central nervous system diseases, including antiepileptic drug toxicity. The conventional magnetic resonance (MR) findings of the disease are characteristic and include ovoid lesions with high signal intensity at T2-weighted MRI. Limited information exists about the diffusion-weighted MRI characteristics of these lesions vanishing completely after a period of time. We examined the conventional, FLAIR, and diffusion-weighted MR images of a patient complaining of depressive mood and anxiety disorder after 1 year receiving antiepileptic medication.

  13. Effect of clobazam as add-on antiepileptic drug in patients with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupa Joshi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The use of clobazam in epilepsy has increased since its introduction in 1975. However, it has not been audited for its overall usefulness in Indian set up. The present study was aimed to evaluate usage pattern, retention rate, effectiveness and tolerability of clobazam during routine practice in an outpatient epilepsy clinic of a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India. Methods: This study was performed on the patients prescribed antiepileptic medication who had clobazam as last added drug in their treatment regimen during October 2010 - March 2012. These patients were followed up for two OPD visits. The primary points evaluated were retention rate, percentage of seizure-free patients and reasons for discontinuing clobazam. Results: o0 f the 417 consecutive patients, 132 (31.7% were on clobazam treatment for more than four years (median 6 yr, range 4-15 yr. No seizure for previous 12 months was considered as seizure free and was observed in 151 (36.2% patients. There was no improvement in seizure control in 32 (7.7% patients. A decrease in seizure severity without any change in seizure frequency was observed in 76 (18.2% patients. Clobazam was discontinued by 15 (3.6% patients due to complaints like drowsiness (13, fatigue/tiredness (8, headache (6, poor memory (6, irritable behaviour (5, abdominal pain (3 and dizziness (3. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results provide valuable information about the clinical use of clobazam as add-on antiepileptic drug therapy in the management of patients with epilepsy.

  14. Antiepileptic drug prescribing patterns in Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Natalie N; Baca, Christine B; Van Cott, Anne C; Parko, Karen L; Amuan, Megan E; Pugh, Mary Jo

    2015-05-01

    We examined patterns of antiepileptic drug (AED) use in a cohort of Iraq/Afghanistan war veterans (IAVs) who were previously identified as having epilepsy. We hypothesized that clinicians would be more likely to prescribe newer AEDs and would select specific AEDs to treat seizures based on patient characteristics including gender and comorbidities. From the cohort of IAVs previously identified with epilepsy between fiscal years 2009 and 2010, we selected those who received AEDs from the Veterans Health Administration in FY2010. Regimens were classified as monotherapy or polytherapy, and specific AED use was examine overall and by gender. Multivariable logistic regression examined associations of age; gender; race/ethnicity; medical, psychiatric, and neurological comorbidities; and receipt of neurology specialty care associated with the six most commonly used AEDs. Among 256,284 IAVs, 2123 met inclusion criteria (mean age: 33years; 89% men). Seventy-two percent (n=1526) received monotherapy, most commonly valproate (N=425) and levetiracetam (n=347). Sixty-one percent of those on monotherapy received a newer AED (levetiracetam, topiramate, lamotrigine, zonisamide, oxcarbazepine). Although fewer women than men received valproate, nearly 90% (N=45) were of reproductive age (≤45years). Antiepileptic drug prescribing patterns were associated with posttraumatic stress disorder, bipolar disorder, cerebrovascular disease, dementia/cognitive impairment, headache, and receipt of neurological specialty care (all p<0.01). In this cohort of veterans with epilepsy, most received AED monotherapy and newer AEDs. Prescribing patterns were different for men and women. The patterns observed between AEDs and neurological/psychiatric comorbidities suggest that clinicians are practicing rational prescribing. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Cognitive effects of antiepileptic drugs Efectos cognitivos de los medicamentos antiepilépticos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Carrizosa Moog

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available

    Antiepileptic drugs have psychotropic and cognitive effects, either positive or negative, in some patients. The impact of these effects may be very important in epileptic subjects, especially during childhood and in the elderly. The diversity of methodological designs, of population samples, of doses and therapeutic levels makes it difficult to interpret these effects. In this article the effects of antiepileptic drugs, both traditional and novel, are reviewed on the basis of different studies in both animals and human beings.

    Los medicamentos antiepilépticos tienen efectos cognitivos y psicotrópicos, que en determinados pacientes pueden influir en el desempeño positivo o negativo. El impacto de estos efectos es muy importante en la población con epilepsia, fundamentalmente en edades de cuidado como la infancia y la ancianidad. La diversidad de diseños metodológicos, de muestras poblacionales, de dosificaciones y niveles terapéuticos hace que sea difícil la interpretación de estos efectos. Se revisan los efectos de los fármacos antiepilépticos corrientes y de los nuevos en diferentes estudios en animales y en seres humanos.

  16. Medicaid payment for generic drugs: achieving savings and access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Christie Provost

    2010-09-30

    Medicaid payment for generic prescription drugs has been a point of contention for the pharmacy industry over the past few years because of reimbursement formula changes contained in the Deficit Reduction Act (DRA) of 2005. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) includes provisions to resolve some of these issues. The DRA reduced the maximum amount the federal government would pay state Medicaid programs for generic drugs, and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid services (CMS) final regulation, to implement the DRA provisions was met with a lawsuit from the pharmacy industry. An injunction by the federal district court, followed by a congressional moratorium, kept CMS from implementing the regulation and kept the pre-DRA formula for the generic drug payment limit in place. PPACA provisions increase maximum federal reimbursement levels for Medicaid generic drugs, but the impact on the pharmacy industry depends on CMS implementation and state policies. This paper examines Medicaid payment for generic drugs, the DRA and PPACA changes to generic drug reimbursement, the concerns of the pharmacy industry, and the potential impact on access.

  17. 77 FR 51814 - Generic Drug User Fee Amendments of 2012; Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee Amendments of 2012; Public Meeting... discuss implementation of the Generic Drug User Fee Amendments of 2012 (GDUFA). GDUFA requires that generic drug manufacturers pay user fees to finance critical and measurable generic drug...

  18. 75 FR 47820 - Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting; Request for Comments... on the development of a generic drug user fee program. The number of human generic drug applications awaiting FDA action and the median review times for generic drug applications have increased in...

  19. Comparative study of antiepileptic drug use during pregnancy over a period of 12 years in Spain. Efficacy of the newer antiepileptic drugs lamotrigine, levetiracetam, and oxcarbazepine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Ferri, M; Peña Mayor, P; Perez López-Fraile, I; Escartin Siquier, A; Martin Moro, M; Forcadas Berdusan, M

    2016-07-21

    The prescription pattern of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) during pregnancy is changing but to what extent this is occurring in Spain remains unknown. The efficacy of newer drugs for controlling seizures is a key issue and may have changed over the years as doctors gained familiarity with these drugs during pregnancy. To assess these 2 topics, we report the results from the Spanish EURAP register gathered over a 12-year period. After signing informed consent forms, patients were included in the register and evaluated at onset of pregnancy, at the end of the second and third trimesters, after delivery, and one year after delivery. For the purposes of this study, we analysed AEDs, type of epilepsy, seizure frequency per trimester and throughout pregnancy, percentage of seizure-free pregnancies, and frequency of congenital malformations. We then compared data from 2 periods (June 2001-October 2007) and (January 2008-May 2015) RESULTS: We compared 304 monotherapies from the older period to 127 from the more recent one. There was a clear increase in the use of levetiracetam (LEV) with declining use of carbamazepine (CBZ), phenytoin, and phenobarbital; a slight decline in use of valproate (VPA), and a slight increase in the use of lamotrigine (LTG) and oxcarbazepine (OXC). Epilepsy types treated with CBZ and VPA remained unchanged, whereas fewer cases of generalised epilepsy were treated with LTG in the new period. This trend was not associated with significant changes in seizure frequency, but rather linked to better control over de novo seizures in the third trimester. LEV was similar to CBZ and VPA with regard to levels of seizure control, and more effective than LTG. Generalised epilepsy accounted for 64% of the cases treated with LEV. The prescription pattern of AEDs during pregnancy has changed in Spain, with diminishing use of CBZ, phenytoin, and phenobarbital. Changes also reflect the type of epilepsy, since there is less use of LTG for generalised epilepsy. LEV

  20. Recent progress in anticonvulsant drug research: strategies for anticonvulsant drug development and applications of antiepileptic drugs for non-epileptic central nervous system disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalkara, Sevim; Karakurt, Arzu

    2012-01-01

    Major advances in antiepileptic drug therapy have taken place since 1950s. In the first period, several antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) such as phenobarbital, diphenylhydantoin, ethosuximide, carbamazepine, benzodiazepines and valproic acid were introduced to epilepsy treatment. After 1990 many new generation drugs (lamotrigine, topiramate, gabapentine, pregabaline, felbamate, lacosamide, levetiracetam etc.) have been developed. These novel AEDs have offered some advantages such as fewer side effects, fewer drug-drug interactions, and better pharmacokinetic properties. But pharmacoresistance and therapeutic failure in 20-25% of the patients remain the main reasons to continue efforts to find safer and more efficacious drugs and ultimate a treatment for this devastating disease. Several AEDs especially novel compounds have been found to be effective also in the treatment of several other neurologic and psychiatric disorders. Chemical diversity of the newer antiepileptic drugs as well as those currently in clinical development is another point that encourages medicinal chemists to study this subject. This review summarizes recent studies on the development of potential anticonvulsant compounds in different chemical structures, their structure-activity relationships and also therapeutic usages of AEDs other than epilepsy.

  1. Differential impact of contraceptive methods on seizures varies by antiepileptic drug category: Findings of the Epilepsy Birth Control Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Andrew G; Mandle, Hannah B; Cahill, Kaitlyn E; Fowler, Kristen M; Hauser, W Allen

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether categories of contraception differ in their impact on seizures in women with epilepsy and whether the impact varies by antiepileptic drug category. Retrospective survey data came from 2712 contraceptive experiences reported by 1144 women with epilepsy. We compared risk ratios for reports of increase and decrease in seizure frequency on hormonal versus nonhormonal contraception, stratified by antiepileptic drug categories. More women with epilepsy reported a change in seizures on hormonal (28.2%) than on nonhormonal contraception (9.7%) (p<0.0001). The risk ratio for seizure increase on hormonal (18.7%) versus nonhormonal contraception (4.2%) was 4.47 (p<0.0001). The risk ratio for seizure decrease on hormonal (9.5%) versus nonhormonal contraception (5.5%) was 1.71, p<0.0001. On hormonal contraception, the risk ratio for seizure increase was greater than for decrease (1.98, p<0.0001). In comparison to combined pills, both hormonal patch and progestin-only pills had greater risk ratios for seizure increase. Depomedroxyprogesterone was the only hormonal method with a greater risk ratio for seizure decrease than combined pills. Seizure increase was greater for hormonal than nonhormonal contraception for each antiepileptic drug category (p<0.001). On hormonal contraception, relative to the non-enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drug category which had the lowest rate, each of the other categories had significantly greater risks for seizure increase, especially the enzyme-inhibiting (valproate) category (risk ratio=2.53, p=0.0002). The findings provide community-based, epidemiological survey evidence that contraceptive methods may differ in their impact on seizures and that this impact may vary by antiepileptic drug category. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Solid Dispersion Approach Improving Dissolution Rate of Stiripentol: a Novel Antiepileptic Drug.

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    Afifi, Samar

    2015-01-01

    Some drugs have low bioavailability due to their poor aqueous solubility and/or slow dissolution rate in biological fluids. Stiripentol (STP) is a novel anticonvulsant drug that is structurally unrelated to the currently available antiepileptics. It has poor aqueous solubility and its solubility has to be enhanced accordingly. Polyethyleneglycol 6000 (PEG-6000) is commonly utilized as a hydrophilic carrier for poorly water soluble drugs in order to improve their bioavailability. STP and PEG-6000 binary system was obtained by physical mixture, solvent evaporation, co-evaporation and melting methods using different weight ratios. The properties of the prepared binary systems were evaluated using dissolution rate, phase solubility, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies. The FTIR spectroscopic studies showed the stability of STP and absence of STP-PEG-6000 interaction. The DSC and SEM studies indicated the amorphous state of STP in its binary systems with PEG-6000. Dissolution profile of STP was significantly improved via complexation with PEG-6000 as compared with the pure drug. The binary system which was prepared using melting method showed the highest dissolution rate. The promising results of the prepared binary systems open the avenue for further oral formulation of STP.

  3. Generic drugs for hypertension: are they really equivalent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M; Elliott, William J

    2013-08-01

    Many antihypertensive drugs are now available in generic formulations at fractions of the cost of their branded counterparts. In the United States, marketing approval for generic medications is usually granted by the Food and Drug Administration on the basis of two simple studies involving dissolution rates and bioavailability in 24 - 36 healthy people, without data regarding antihypertensive efficacy, safety, or long-term outcomes. This process leaves many true disciples of "Evidence-Based Medicine" in a quandary: prescribe only brand-name medications that have been demonstrated in clinical trials to both lower blood pressure and prevent cardiovascular events, or instead recommend lower-priced generic agents that are usually supported by no such data. This review summarizes the current evidence that generic antihypertensive drugs are likely to be safe and effective, may increase the probability of medication availability and adherence for many patients, but, by law, must have a different physical appearance than the original product.

  4. Generic drugs: Review and experiences from South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Philip

    2015-01-01

    The cost of pharmaceuticals, as a percentage of total healthcare spending, has been rising worldwide. This has resulted in strained national budgets and a high proportion of people without access to essential medications. Though India has become a global hub of generic drug manufacturing, the expected benefits of cheaper drugs are not translating into savings for ordinary people. This is in part due to the rise of branded generics, which are marketed at a price point close to the innovator brands. Unbranded generic medicines are not finding their way into prescriptions due to issues of confidence and perception, though they are proven to be much cheaper and comparable in efficacy to branded medicines. The drug inventory of unbranded generic manufacturers fares reasonably when reviewed using the World Health Organization-Health Action International (WHO-HAI) tool for analysing drug availability. Also, unbranded generic medicines are much cheaper when compared to the most selling brands and they can bring down the treatment costs in primary care and family practice. We share our experience in running a community pharmacy for an urban health center in the Pathanamthitta district of Kerala State, which is run solely on generic medicines. The drug availability at the community pharmacy was 73.3% when analyzed using WHO-HAI tool and the savings for the final consumers were up to 93.1%, when compared with most-selling brand of the same formulation.

  5. Antiepileptic Drug-Related Adverse Reactions and Factors Influencing These Reactions

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    Parvaneh KARIMZADEH

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Karimzadeh P, Bakrani V. Antiepileptic Drug-Related Adverse Reactions And Factors Influencing These Reactions. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Summer; 7(3:23-27. ObjectiveAccording to the basic role of drug side effects in selection ofan appropriate drug, patient compliance and the quality of life inepileptic patients, and forasmuch as new dugs with unknown side effect have been produced and introduced, necessity of this research and similar studies is explained. This study was conducted to evaluate the incidence and clinical characteristics of anti epileptic drug (AED related adverse reactions in children treated with AEDs.Material & MethodsIn this descriptive study, children less than 14 years old with AEDside effects referred to the Children’s Medical Center and MofidChilderen’s Hospital (Tehran, Iran were evaluated during 2010-2012.The informations were: sex, age, incriminating drug, type of drug side effect, incubation period, history of drug usage, and patient and family allergy history. Exclusive criterions were age more than 14 years old and reactions due to reasons other than AEDs (Food, bite, non-AEDs, etc..ResultsA total of 70 patients with AED reaction were enrolled in thisstudy. They included 26 (37% females and 44 (63 % males. The maximum rate of incidence was seen at age less than 5 years old. All the patients had cutaneous eruptions that the most common cutaneous drug eruption was maculopapular rash. The incidence of systemic and laboratory adverse events was less than similar studies. The most common culprit was phenobarbital (70% and the least common was lamotrigine (1.4%.ConclusionIn this study, we found higher rates of drug rash in patients treated with aromatic AEDs and lower rates with non-aromatic AEDs. Various endogenous and environmental factors may influence the propensity to develop these reactions. Refrences1. Blume WT, Lu¨ders HO, Mizrahi E, et al. Glossary of descriptive terminology for

  6. Effects of Antiepileptic Drugs on Electroencephalographic Findings in Patients with Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy

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    Ali Akbar ASADI-POOYA

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveSeveral antiepileptic drugs (AEDs such as phenobarbital (Pb, carbamazepine (CBZ, and valproate (VPA may suppress interictal epileptiform activity. We investigated the effects of AEDs on electroencephalography (EEG data from patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE.Materials & MethodsIn this cross-sectional study, all patients electroclinically diagnosed with IGE were recruited in the outpatient epilepsy clinic at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences from September 2008 through August 2010. A routine EEG was requested at the time of referral for all patients. Statistical analyses were performed using Chi square and Fisher’s exact test.ResultsThis study comprised of 336 patients. For about 20.8% (70 patients of them, the initial EEG appeared normal. The first EEG was normal in 14.2% of the patients who had newly diagnosed IGE (19 patients. Normal EEG was also detected for 27.6% of the patients who received VPA monotherapy (16 patients, 31% of the patients who received CBZ monotherapy (9 patients, 29.4% of the patients who received Pb monotherapy (5 patients, and 11.1% of the patients who received lamotrigine (LTG (1 patient.ConclusionThis study shows that compared to LTG, VPA suppresses generalized interictal epileptiform activity in patients with IGE more effectively. Theoretically, if a drug can frequently induce normalization of EEG, then it may be a better drug for treating IGEs.

  7. Definition and Classification of Generic Drugs Across the World.

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    Alfonso-Cristancho, Rafael; Andia, Tatiana; Barbosa, Tatiana; Watanabe, Jonathan H

    2015-08-01

    Our aim was to systematically identify and compare how generic medications, as defined by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), World Health Organization (WHO), and European Medicines Agency (EMA), are classified and defined by regulatory agencies around the world. We focused on emerging markets and selected the most populated countries in each of the WHO regions: Africa, the Americas, Eastern Mediterranean, Europe, Southeast Asia, and Western Pacific. A structured review of published literature was performed through December 2013. Direct information from regulatory agencies and Ministries of Health for each country was extracted. Additionally, key informant interviews were performed for validation. Of the 21 countries selected, approximately half provided an official country-level definition for generic pharmaceuticals. The others did not have any definition or referred to the WHO. Only two-thirds of the countries had specific requirements for generic pharmaceuticals, often associated with clinical interchangeability. Most countries with requirements mention bioequivalence, but few required bioavailability studies explicitly. Over 30% of the countries had other terms associated with generics in their definitions and processes. In countries with generic drug policies, there is reference to patent and/or data protection during the drug registration process. Several countries do not mention good manufacturing practices as part of the evaluation process. Countries in Africa and Eastern Mediterranean regions appear to have a less developed regulatory framework. In summary, there is significant variability in the definition and classification of generic drugs in emerging markets. Standardization of the definitions is necessary to make international comparisons viable.

  8. 76 FR 58277 - Animal Generic Drug User Fee Act; Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Animal Generic Drug User Fee Act; Public Meeting; Request... comments. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public meeting on the Animal Generic Drug... on the Internet at...

  9. Innovation strategies for generic drug companies: moving into supergenerics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Malcolm S F

    2010-04-01

    Pharmaceutical companies that market generic products generally are not regarded as innovators, but rather as companies that produce copies of originator products to be launched at patent expiration. However, many generics companies have developed excellent scientific innovative skills in an effort to circumvent the defense patents of originator companies. More patents per product, in terms of both drug substances (process patents and polymorph patents) and formulations, are issued to generics companies than to companies that are traditionally considered to be 'innovators'. This quantity of issued patents highlights the technical knowledge and skill sets that are available in generics companies. In order to adopt a completely innovative model (ie, the development of NCEs), a generics company would require a completely new set of skills in several fields, including a sufficient knowledge base, project and risk management experience, and capability for clinical data evaluation. However, with relatively little investment, generics companies should be able to progress into the so-called 'supergeneric' drug space - an area of innovation that reflects the existing competencies of both innovative and generics companies.

  10. Generic medicines: solutions for a sustainable drug market?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dylst, Pieter; Vulto, Arnold; Godman, Brian; Simoens, Steven

    2013-10-01

    Generic medicines offer equally high-quality treatment as originator medicines do at much lower prices. As such, they represent a considerable opportunity for authorities to obtain substantial savings. At the moment, the pharmaceutical landscape is changing and many pharmaceutical companies have altered their development and commercial strategies, combining both originator and generic divisions. In spite of this, the generic medicines industry is currently facing a number of challenges: delayed market access; the limited price differential with originator medicines; the continuous downwards pressure on prices; and the negative perception regarding generic medicines held by some key stakeholder groups. This could jeopardize the long-term sustainability of the generic manufacturing industry. Therefore, governments must focus on demand-side policies, alongside policies to accelerate market access, as the generic medicines industry will only be able to deliver competitive and sustainable prices if they are ensured a high volume. In the future, the generic medicines industry will increasingly look to biosimilars and generic versions of orphan drugs to expand their business.

  11. Neuropsychological effects of antiepileptic drugs (carbamazepine versus valproate in adult males with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaydaa A Shehata

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Ghaydaa A Shehata,1 Abd El-aziz M Bateh,2 Sherifa A Hamed,1 Tarek A Rageh,1 Yaser B Elsorogy11Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Egypt; 2Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts, Banha University, EgyptPurpose: To evaluate the effect of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs on cognition and behavior in adult epileptic males controlled on treatment with conventional antiepileptic medications. Methods: Cognitive, mood, behavior and personality traits were assessed in 45 epileptic patients treated with carbamazepine and/or valproate and free of seizures for ≥1 year. Thirty-four newly diagnosed or untreated patients with epilepsy and 58 matched healthy subjects were also included for comparison. A battery of psychometric tests was utilized including Stanford-Binet (4th edition, Beck Inventory for Depression, Aggressive Scale and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire.Results: Compared to matched control subjects, treated and untreated epileptic patients had poor performance in different cognitive and behavioral functions testing. Treated patients had worse scores in memory for digits forward and backward, total short-term memory, extroversion and psychosis. The duration of AEDs intake was correlated with memory of objects (r = -0.323; P = 0.030, bead memory (r = -0.314; P = 0.036 and total nonverbal short-term memory (r = -0.346; P = 0.020. Treated and untreated epileptic patients had poor performance of similar extent in behavioral functions testing (depression, aggression and neurosis. The dose of AEDs was correlated with testing scores for neurosis (r = 0.307; P = 0.040, verbal aggression (r = 0.483; P = 0.001 and nonverbal aggression (r = 0.526; P = 0.000, and duration of drug intake was correlated with scores for depression (r = 0.384; P = 0.009, psychosis (r = 0.586; P = 0.0001 and nonverbal aggression (r = 0.300; P = 0.045.Conclusions: This study provides support for the notion that AEDs can impair performance

  12. Is switching from brand name to generic formulations of phenobarbital associated with loss of antiepileptic efficacy?: a pharmacokinetic study with two oral formulations (Luminal(®) vet, Phenoleptil(®)) in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankstahl, Marion; Bankstahl, Jens P; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2013-10-09

    In human medicine, adverse outcomes associated with switching between bioequivalent brand name and generic antiepileptic drug products is a subject of concern among clinicians. In veterinary medicine, epilepsy in dogs is usually treated with phenobarbital, either with the standard brand name formulation Luminal(®) or the veterinary products Luminal(®) vet and the generic formulation Phenoleptil(®). Luminal(®) and Luminal(®) vet are identical 100 mg tablet formulations, while Phenoleptil(®) is available in the form of 12.5 and 50 mg tablets. Following approval of Phenoleptil(®) for treatment of canine epilepsy, it was repeatedly reported by clinicians and dog owners that switching from Luminal(®) (human tablets) to Phenoleptil(®) in epileptic dogs, which were controlled by treatment with Luminal(®), induced recurrence of seizures. In the present study, we compared bioavailability of phenobarbital after single dose administration of Luminal(®) vet vs. Phenoleptil(®) with a crossover design in 8 healthy Beagle dogs. Both drugs were administered at a dose of 100 mg/dog, resulting in 8 mg/kg phenobarbital on average. Peak plasma concentrations (Cmax) following Luminal(®) vet vs. Phenoleptil(®) were about the same in most dogs (10.9 ± 0.92 vs. 10.5 ± 0.77 μg/ml), and only one dog showed noticeable lower concentrations after Phenoleptil(®) vs. Luminal(®) vet. Elimination half-life was about 50 h (50.3 ± 3.1 vs. 52.9 ± 2.8 h) without differences between the formulations. The relative bioavailability of the two products (Phenoleptil(®) vs. Luminal(®) vet.) was 0.98 ± 0.031, indicating that both formulations resulted in about the same bioavailability. Overall, the two formulations did not differ significantly with respect to pharmacokinetic parameters when mean group parameters were compared. Thus, the reasons for the anecdotal reports, if true, that switching from the brand to the generic formulation of phenobarbital may lead to recurrence of

  13. Is switching from brand name to generic formulations of phenobarbital associated with loss of antiepileptic efficacy?: a pharmacokinetic study with two oral formulations (Luminal® vet, Phenoleptil®) in dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In human medicine, adverse outcomes associated with switching between bioequivalent brand name and generic antiepileptic drug products is a subject of concern among clinicians. In veterinary medicine, epilepsy in dogs is usually treated with phenobarbital, either with the standard brand name formulation Luminal® or the veterinary products Luminal® vet and the generic formulation Phenoleptil®. Luminal® and Luminal® vet are identical 100 mg tablet formulations, while Phenoleptil® is available in the form of 12.5 and 50 mg tablets. Following approval of Phenoleptil® for treatment of canine epilepsy, it was repeatedly reported by clinicians and dog owners that switching from Luminal® (human tablets) to Phenoleptil® in epileptic dogs, which were controlled by treatment with Luminal®, induced recurrence of seizures. In the present study, we compared bioavailability of phenobarbital after single dose administration of Luminal® vet vs. Phenoleptil® with a crossover design in 8 healthy Beagle dogs. Both drugs were administered at a dose of 100 mg/dog, resulting in 8 mg/kg phenobarbital on average. Results Peak plasma concentrations (Cmax) following Luminal® vet vs. Phenoleptil® were about the same in most dogs (10.9 ± 0.92 vs. 10.5 ± 0.77 μg/ml), and only one dog showed noticeable lower concentrations after Phenoleptil® vs. Luminal® vet. Elimination half-life was about 50 h (50.3 ± 3.1 vs. 52.9 ± 2.8 h) without differences between the formulations. The relative bioavailability of the two products (Phenoleptil® vs. Luminal® vet.) was 0.98 ± 0.031, indicating that both formulations resulted in about the same bioavailability. Conclusions Overall, the two formulations did not differ significantly with respect to pharmacokinetic parameters when mean group parameters were compared. Thus, the reasons for the anecdotal reports, if true, that switching from the brand to the generic formulation of phenobarbital may lead to

  14. Antiepileptic Drug Removal by Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Sherif Hanafy

    2017-01-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is used for managing acute kidney injury in critically ill patients. Removal of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) by CRRT could be significant and may complicate patients' intensive care unit stay. The objective of the current review was to summarize the available evidence for AED removal by CRRT. An electronic literature search of PubMed (1946 to May 2016), Medline (1946 to May 2016), and Embase (1974 to May 2016) databases for studies discussing AED removal by CRRT was conducted. A total of 31 case reports discussing 32 patients were found. AEDs reported were levetiracetam (n = 3), valproic acid (n = 9), carbamazepine (n = 10), phenytoin (n = 3), phenobarbital (n = 4), lacosamide (n = 1), gabapentin (n = 1), and topiramate (n = 1). Two-thirds of the reports were about using CRRT in drug overdose and one-third was about AED removal by CRRT during therapy. Based on the current limited evidence and pharmacokinetic characteristics of AEDs, renally eliminated AEDs and/or AEDs with limited protein binding such as levetiracetam are more likely to be removed by CRRT than AEDs that are mainly metabolized and extensively protein bound such as carbamazepine. In conclusion, there is not enough evidence to provide robust dosing recommendations for AEDs in patients undergoing CRRT. Further studies are needed.

  15. [Generic drugs: we must cut pharmaceutical spending but undertaking drug quality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo Norte, Juan Antonio; Postigo Mota, Salvador

    2012-02-01

    The World Health Organization and all drug regulatory agencies (DRA) support the commercialization of generic medicines because they control costs and are irreplaceable therapeutic options in countries lacking the innovator product. Generic drugs are widely considered to be cost-efficient substitutes for brand-name medications. They make up about 20% of the total number of prescriptions in Spain, a figure that is still far from the use of generic drugs in USA and other European countries. Despite economical interest in this issue, in this article we review the interest of generic drugs from a pharmacological and clinical perspective that must undertake drug quality to ensure drug efficacy and safety of the patients. A generic drug (generic drugs, short: generics) is defined as "a drug product that is comparable to brand/reference listed drug product in dosage form, strength, route of administration, quality and performance characteristics, and intended use". Both the reference drug and the generic drug have to demonstrate previously they are therapeutically equivalent. With the exception of parenteral drugs, two products have demonstrated to be therapeutically equivalent if after administration in the same molar dose, their effects with respect to both efficacy and safety are essentially the same, as determined from bioequivalence studies in terms of comparison of appropriate pharmacokinetic parameters and bioavailability. Parenteral formulations, however, are not required to demonstrate therapeutic equivalence because it may be considered self-evident. Such assumptions have never been challenged, but there are reasons to do so for parenteral antimicrobials. It is interesting to highlight that although brand-name drugs and generic drugs are both approved by DRA and may be interchangeable with respect to their clinical effects, they can differ substantially in their appearance. Consumers of brand-name medications receive identical-appearing batches of pills with

  16. P-glycoprotein alters blood–brain barrier penetration of antiepileptic drugs in rats with medically intractable epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aimei Ma,1,* Cuicui Wang,2,3,* Yinghui Chen,2,3 Weien Yuan4 1Department of Neurology, The People's Hospital of Shanxi Province, Taiyuan, 2Department of Neurology, Jinshan Hospital, Fudan University, 3Department of Neurology, Shanghai Medical College, Shanghai, 4School of Pharmacy, Shanghai JiaoTong University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: P-glycoprotein is one of the earliest known multidrug transporters and plays an important role in resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs. In this study, we detected levels of P-glycoprotein and its mRNA expression in a rat brain model of medically intractable epilepsy established by amygdala kindling and drug selection. We investigated whether inhibition of P-glycoprotein affects the concentration of antiepileptic drugs in cortical extracellular fluid. We found that levels of P-glycoprotein and its mRNA expression were upregulated in epileptic cerebral tissue compared with cerebral tissue from normal rats. The concentrations of two antiepileptic drugs, carbamazepine and phenytoin, were very low in the cortical extracellular fluid of rats with medically intractable epilepsy, and were restored after blockade of P-glycoprotein by verapamil. These results show that increased P-glycoprotein levels alter the ability of carbamazepine and phenytoin to penetrate the blood–brain barrier and reduce the concentrations of these agents in extracellular cortical fluid. High P-glycoprotein levels may be involved in resistance to antiepileptic drugs in medically intractable epilepsy. Keywords: P-glycoprotein, medically intractable epilepsy, antiepileptic drugs, amygdala kindling, verapamil

  17. Medicine possession ratio as proxy for adherence to antiepileptic drugs: prevalence, associations, and cost implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobs K

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Karen Jacobs,1 Marlene Julyan,2 Martie S Lubbe,1 Johanita R Burger,1 Marike Cockeran1 1Medicine Usage in South Africa, Faculty of Health Sciences, 2Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, North-West University (Potchefstroom Campus, Potchefstroom, South Africa Objective: To determine the adherence status to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs among epilepsy patients; to observe the association between adherence status and age, sex, active ingredient prescribed, treatment period, and number of comorbidities; and to determine the effect of nonadherence on direct medicine treatment cost of AEDs. Methods: A retrospective study analyzing medicine claims data obtained from a South African pharmaceutical benefit management company was performed. Patients of all ages (N=19,168, who received more than one prescription for an AED, were observed from 2008 to 2013. The modified medicine possession ratio (MPRm was used as proxy to determine the adherence status to AED treatment. The MPRm was considered acceptable (adherent if the calculated value was ≥80%, but ≤110%, whereas an MPRm of <80% (unacceptably low or >110% (unacceptably high was considered nonadherent. Direct medicine treatment cost was calculated by summing the medical scheme contribution and patient co-payment associated with each AED prescription. Results: Only 55% of AEDs prescribed to 19,168 patients during the study period had an acceptable MPRm. MPRm categories depended on the treatment period (P>0.0001; Cramer’s V=0.208 but were independent of sex (P<0.182; Cramer’s V=0.009. Age group (P<0.0001; Cramer’s V=0.067, active ingredient (P<0.0001; Cramer’s V=0.071, and number of comorbidities (P<0.0001; Cramer’s V=0.050 were statistically but not practically significantly associated with MPRm categories. AEDs with an unacceptably high MPRm contributed to 3.74% (US$736,376.23 of the total direct cost of all AEDs included in the study, whereas those with an unacceptably low MPRm amounted to US

  18. Drug-induced QT-interval shortening following antiepileptic treatment with oral rufinamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimpf, Rainer; Veltmann, Christian; Papavassiliu, Theano; Rudic, Boris; Göksu, Turgay; Kuschyk, Jürgen; Wolpert, Christian; Antzelevitch, Charles; Ebner, Alois; Borggrefe, Martin; Brandt, Christian

    2012-05-01

    The arrhythmogenic potential of short QT intervals has recently been highlighted in patients with a short QT syndrome. Drug-induced QT-interval prolongation is a known risk factor for ventricular tachyarrhythmias. However, reports on drug-induced QT-interval shortening are rare and proarrhythmic effects remain unclear. Recently, rufinamide, a new antiepileptic drug for the add-on treatment of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, was approved in the European Union and the United States. Initial trials showed drug-induced QT-interval shortening. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of rufinamide on QT intervals in patients with difficult-to-treat epilepsies. Nineteen consecutive patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and other epilepsy syndromes were included (n = 12 men; mean age 41 ± 12 years). QRS, QT, and T(peak)-T(end) intervals were analyzed before and during rufinamide treatment. The mean QT interval shortened significantly following rufinamide administration (QT interval 349 ± 23 ms vs 327 ± 17 ms; corrected QT interval 402 ± 22 ms vs 382 ± 16 ms; P = .002). T(peak)-T(end) intervals were 79 ± 17 ms before and 70 ± 20 ms on treatment (P = .07). The mean reduction of the corrected QT interval was 20 ± 18 ms. During follow-up (3.04 ± 1.09 years), no adverse events including symptomatic cardiac arrhythmias or sudden cardiac deaths were observed. QTc-interval shortening following oral rufinamide administration in a small patient group was not associated with significant clinical adverse effects. These observations notwithstanding, the ability of rufinamide to significantly shorten the QT interval portends a potential arrhythmogenic risk that may best be guarded against by periodic electrocardiographic recordings. Copyright © 2012 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of topiramate versus other antiepileptic drugs on the cognitive function of patients with epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Xu; Qionghua Feng; Liang Yu; Jie Liu; Hongbin Sun

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Only very large dose of topiramate has neurotoxicity, indicating that topiramate has low neurotoxicity and high safety. The residual rate of topiramate is affected by many cognitive-related adverse effects. Patients who take topiramate often accompany with thought slowness, difficulty in finding words,dyscalculia, blunt reaction, attention decreasing, memory deterioration, etc.OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of topiramate with traditional anti-epileptic drugs (including carbamazepine and Valproic acid (VPA) on cognitive function of patients with epilepsy.DESIGN: Observational experiment, self-control and intergroup comparison.SETTING: Sichuan Academy of Medical Science.PARTICIPANTS: Eighty-seven inpatients and outpatients with newly diagnosed epilepsy who received preliminary diagnosis and follow-up in the Department of Neurology, Sichuan People's Hospital between January 2004 and June 2006 were involved in this survey. They were diagnosed according to disease history and electroencephalogram (EEG). The onset type was diagnosed following the definition of epilepsy and epileptic syndrome in 1989 International Anti-epileptic League. The involved patients and their relatives were informed of detection and therapeutic regimen. The patients were assigned into two groups according to table of random digit: traditional antiepileptic drugs group (AEDs group, n =44) and topiramate (TPM) group (n =43).partial seizures or partial secondarily generalized seizures, and VPA for 23 patients with generalized seizures.The initial dose of carbamazepine was 300 mg/d, and that of VPA was 500 mg/d. Patients in the TPM group took TPM with the initial dose of 25 mg/d, increased by 25 mg/d each week to target dose 150 mg/d within 8 months after administration by using Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale(WAIS) or Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC, Chinese edition), (Higher scores indicated better cognitive function), Stroop color word interference, test of memory

  20. Cross-National comparison of antiepileptic drug use: Catalonia, Denmark and Norway, 2007-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pili Ferrer-Argeles

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antiepileptic drug  (AEDconsumption has increased in recent years mainly from those AEDs marketed since 1990. The purpose is to describe and compare AED consumption in Catalonia, Denmark and Norway.Methods: Population-based descriptive study set in the outpatient healthcare sector. Data were retrieved from the Norwegian Prescription Register, Danish Register of Medicinal Product Statistics and DATAMART® in Catalonia, for 2007-2011.We calculated defined daily doses/1000 inhabitants/day (DID, by age and gender. AEDs were defined according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification (N03A. We reviewed the population covered by the databases, the drug data source and the definition of outpatient healthcare sector to compare the results across the three settings.Results: Total AED use steadily increased over the study period in the three settings. In 2011, consumption was highest in Catalonia (15.20 DID, followed by Denmark (15.06 DID and Norway (14.24 DID. The “other AEDs” (N03AX subgroup represented 60% of all AED use. The N03A pattern by gender did not differ across the three settings. Marked differences by age and gender appeared when studying lamotrigine, topiramate, gabapentin, pregabalin and levetiracetam.  Differences among the databases were mainly in the definition of outpatient healthcare setting.Conclusions: There was a rapid increase in “other AEDs” in all three settings. Although we did not have information on the indication for the use of AEDs, the drug data source, population coverage of the database and definition of the healthcare setting helped us interpret the results.

  1. The Teratogenic Effects of Antiepileptic Drug, Topiramate, on the Development of Chick Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jantima Roongruangchai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anti-epileptic drugs are known to be the risk of teratogenicity. Topiramate (TPM is a new kind of such drug, for which no research has confirmed the incidence of producing congenital abnormalities. Objective: This study was conducted to study the teratogenic effects of TPM by using chick embryos as an animal model and the results can be compared to the human embryo of the same stage. Methods: Fertilized Leghorn hen eggs were injected in ovo with two concentrations of TPM, which were 10mg, and 20mg, in NSS at a volume of 0.1 ml into the yolk sac at 21 hrs of incubation and repeated injections at 72 hrs at a volume of 0.05 ml. The chick embryos on day 3, 6 and 11 of incubation were sacrificed and all living embryos were processed for total mount and serial section. Results: The mortality rate increased corresponding to the concentrations of TPM, and the embryonic stage. The total mount of day 3 showed major abnormalities of the eye and heart, such as microphthalmia and looser of heart looping. The serial section of day 3 showed opening of the anterior neuropore, ectopia viscerae and multiple malformations of the eye and heart. Day 6 chick embryos showed ectopia cordis and ectopia viscerae. Moreover, there were retardation and abnormalities of several organs such as eye, heart, liver, mesonephros and gonads. Day 11 chick embryos showed ectopia viscerae and several growth retardations, retardation of ossification of both limb bones and skull bones. Conclusion: This study showed that TPM might cause embryonic death, growth retardation and abnormalities of the eye, heart, an opening of the anterior neuropore and ectopia viscerae. This might indicate abnormalities to the baby born from mother with gestational epilepsy who was taking this drug continuously, and it might lead to spontaneous abortion or congenital anomalies of the fetus.

  2. Chronic antiepileptic drug use and functional network efficiency: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veenendaal, Tamar M; IJff, Dominique M; Aldenkamp, Albert P; Lazeron, Richard H C; Hofman, Paul A M; de Louw, Anton J A; Backes, Walter H; Jansen, Jacobus F A

    2017-06-28

    To increase our insight in the neuronal mechanisms underlying cognitive side-effects of antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment. The relation between functional magnetic resonance-acquired brain network measures, AED use, and cognitive function was investigated. Three groups of patients with epilepsy with a different risk profile for developing cognitive side effects were included: A "low risk" category (lamotrigine or levetiracetam, n = 16), an "intermediate risk" category (carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, phenytoin, or valproate, n = 34) and a "high risk" category (topiramate, n = 5). Brain connectivity was assessed using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging and graph theoretical network analysis. The Computerized Visual Searching Task was used to measure central information processing speed, a common cognitive side effect of AED treatment. Central information processing speed was lower in patients taking AEDs from the intermediate and high risk categories, compared with patients from the low risk category. The effect of risk category on global efficiency was significant (P 0.2). Also no significant associations between information processing speed and global efficiency or the clustering coefficient (linear regression analysis, P > 0.15) were observed. Only the four patients taking topiramate show aberrant network measures, suggesting that alterations in functional brain network organization may be only subtle and measureable in patients with more severe cognitive side effects.

  3. Association of Interictal Epileptiform Discharges with Sleep and Anti-Epileptic Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Latika; Singh, Jayvardhan; Singh, Yogesh; Kathrotia, Rajesh; Goel, Arun

    2016-10-01

    The presence of interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) in electroencephalogram (EEG) is diagnostic of epilepsy. Latent IEDs are activated during sleep. Anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) improve sleep. AEDs, sleep, and IEDs may interact and affect epilepsy management. To explore the occurrence of IEDs and its association with sleep and AED status in suspected patients of epilepsy. EEG records were collected of suspected patients of epilepsy who reported to the electrophysiology laboratory of a tertiary care hospital during 1 year. The anthropometric details, clinical presentations, and AED status of the patients were recorded from the EEG records. Patients were divided into 2 categories based on whether AEDs had been started prior to the EEG evaluation (category-I) or not (category-II). The occurrences of IEDs in EEG recordings in both categories were analyzed. In 1 year, 138 patients were referred for diagnostic EEG evaluation. One-hundred-two patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria, of which 57 patients (53%) belonged to category-I and 45 patients (47%) belonged to category-II. Incidence of IEDs, suggestive of definite diagnosis of epilepsy in category-I was 88% and in category-II was 69%, and this difference was statistically significant (p = 0.02). The increased proportion of IEDs in category-I patients may be due to high clinical suspicion or compounding interaction of AEDs and sleep. More extensive studies are required to delineate the complex interaction of AEDs, sleep, and IEDs so that judicious yet prompt management of epilepsy can be carried out.

  4. A pilot randomized controlled clinical trial to improve antiepileptic drug adherence in young children with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Avani C; Guilfoyle, Shanna M; Mann, Krista A; Rausch, Joseph R

    2016-03-01

    The primary aim was to examine the preliminary efficacy of a family tailored problem-solving intervention to improve antiepileptic drug (AED) adherence in families of children with new-onset epilepsy. Secondary aims were to assess changes in targeted mechanisms and treatment feasibility and acceptability. Fifty families (M(age) = 7.6 ± 3.0; 80% Caucasian; 42% idiopathic localization related) completed baseline questionnaires and were given an electronic monitor to observe daily AED adherence. If adherence was ≤ 95% in the first 7 months of the study, families were randomized (Supporting Treatment Adherence Regimens (STAR): n = 11; Treatment as Usual (TAU): n = 12). Twenty-one families were not randomized due to adherence being ≥95%. The STAR intervention included four face-to-face and two telephone problem-solving sessions over 8 weeks. Significant group differences in adherence were found during active intervention (weeks 4-6; TAU = -12.0 vs. STAR = 18.1, p < 0.01; and weeks session 6-8: TAU = -9.7 vs. STAR = 15.3, p < 0.05). Children who received the STAR intervention exhibited improved adherence compared to children in the TAU group during active treatment. Significant changes in epilepsy knowledge and management were noted for the STAR group. Families expressed benefitting from the STAR intervention. Future studies should include a larger sample size and booster intervention sessions to maintain treatment effects over time.

  5. Lacosamide neurotoxicity associated with concomitant use of sodium channel-blocking antiepileptic drugs: a pharmacodynamic interaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novy, Jan; Patsalos, Philip N; Sander, Josemir W; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2011-01-01

    Lacosamide is a new antiepileptic drug (AED) apparently devoid of major pharmacokinetic interactions. Data from a small postmarketing assessment suggest people who had lacosamide co-prescribed with a voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC)-blocking AED seemed more likely to discontinue lacosamide because of tolerability problems. Among 39 people with refractory epilepsy who developed neurotoxicity (diplopia, dizziness, drowsiness) on lacosamide treatment given in combination with VGSC-blocking AEDs, we identified 7 (17.9%) without any changes in serum levels of other AEDs in whom the symptoms were ameliorated by dose reduction of the concomitant VGSC-blocking AED. Symptoms in these people seem to have arisen from a pharmacodynamic interaction between lacosamide and other VGSC-blocking AEDs. Slow-inactivated VGSCs targeted by lacosamide might be more sensitive to the effects of conventional VGSC-blocking AEDs. Advising people to reduce concomitantly the conventional VGSC-blocking AEDs during lacosamide uptitration in cases of neurotoxicity might improve the tolerability of combination treatment.

  6. Satisfaction with antiepileptic drugs in children and adolescents with newly diagnosed and chronic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghi, Ettore; Messina, Paolo; Pupillo, Elisabetta; Crichiutti, Giovanni; Baglietto, Maria Giuseppina; Veggiotti, Pierangelo; Zamponi, Nelia; Casellato, Susanna; Margari, Lucia; Cianchetti, Carlo

    2012-06-01

    To assess incidence, indicators and outcome of satisfaction with antiepileptic drugs in children. Multicenter, observational, open, prospective survey of children and adolescents with epilepsy with three-month follow-up. Included were patients aged 3-17 years with newly diagnosed ("new diagnosis") or chronic epilepsy ("old diagnosis") requiring treatment start or change. Satisfaction was assessed with the Hedonic Visual Scale or direct questions, depending on patient's age. Quality of life of adolescents (QOLIE-48) and of caregivers (SF-36) and predictors of (dis)satisfaction were also assessed. 293 patients completed the study. Most had generalized idiopathic epilepsy, and a disease lasting satisfaction were 70.6% at one month and 75.8% at three months. Compared to old diagnosis, new diagnosis carried a higher satisfaction rate and improved satisfaction at end of follow-up. Independent predictors of dissatisfaction were an old diagnosis, adverse events and SF-36 score. The latter remained the only independent predictor of persisting dissatisfaction when adjusting for the presence of and the interaction with adverse events. About one-fourth of children and adolescents with epilepsy are dissatisfied with treatment. Chronic epilepsy, adverse events, and parents/caregivers with poor quality of life predict dissatisfaction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Use of Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs for the Treatment of Pediatric Aggression and Mood Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Gonzalez-Heydrich

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive symptomatology presents across multiple psychiatric, developmental, neurological and behavioral disorders, complicating the diagnosis and treatment of the underlying pathology. Anti-Epileptic Drugs (AEDs have become an appealing alternative in the treatment of aggression, mood lability and impulsivity in adult and pediatric populations, although few controlled trials have explored their efficacy in treating pediatric populations. This review of the literature synthesizes the available data on ten AEDs – valproate, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, phenytoin, lamotrigine, topiramate, levetiracetam, zonisamide, gabapentin and tiagabine – in an attempt to assess evidence for the efficacy of AEDs in the treatment of aggression in pediatric populations. Our review revealed modest evidence that some of the AEDs produced improvement in pediatric aggression, but controlled trials in pediatric bipolar disorder have not been promising. Valproate is the best supported AED for aggression and should be considered as a first line of treatment. When monotherapy is insufficient, combining an AED with either lithium or an atypical anti-psychotic can result in better efficacy. Additionally, our review indicates that medications with predominately GABA-ergic mechanisms of action are not effective in treating aggression, and medications which decrease glutaminergic transmission tended to have more cognitive adverse effects. Agents with multiple mechanisms of action may be more effective.

  8. Adult-onset temporal lobe epilepsy, cognitive decline, multi-antiepileptic drug hypersensitivity, and Hashimoto's encephalopathy: Two case studies ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Sadan, Ofer; Seyman, Estelle; Ash, Elissa L.; Kipervasser, Svetlana; Neufeld, Miri Y.

    2013-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is defined by the coexistence of encephalopathy and antithyroid antibodies. We report two cases of adult-onset temporal lobe epilepsy with subacute cognitive decline, high titers of antithyroid antibodies, multi-antiepileptic drug hypersensitivity, and good response to immunomodulatory treatment. The relevance of multidrug hypersensitivity in the setting of adult-onset epilepsy and the importance of searching for autoimmune causes for epilepsy are discussed.

  9. Association between antiepileptic drugs and hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with epilepsy: a population‐based case–control study

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background This study explored whether antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) use increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods We conducted a case–control study using data from the National Health Insurance system of Taiwan. The case group comprised 1,454 epilepsy patients with newly diagnosed HCC, and the control group comprised 1,448 epilepsy patients without HCC. Both groups had similar distributions of sex and age, and follow‐up duration. Possible associations with the AEDs ...

  10. Development of the generic drug industry in the US after the Hatch-Waxman Act of 1984

    OpenAIRE

    Garth Boehm; Lixin Yao; Liang Han; Qiang Zheng

    2013-01-01

    The key events in the development of the US generic drug industry after the Hatch-Waxman Act of 1984 are systematically reviewed, including the process of approval for generic drugs, bioequivalence issues including “switchability”, bioequivalence for complicated dosage forms, patent extension, generic drug safety, generic substitution and low-cost generics. The backlog in generic review, generic drug user fees, and “quality by design” for generic drugs is also discussed. The evolution of the ...

  11. 77 FR 72359 - Animal Generic Drug User Fee Act; Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Animal Generic Drug User Fee Act; Public Meeting; Request... comments. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the following meeting: Animal Generic Drug... Animal Generic Drug User Fee Act (AGDUFA II). Date and Time: The meeting will be held on December...

  12. 75 FR 45636 - Animal Generic Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures for Fiscal Year 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Animal Generic Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures... generic new animal drug user fees. The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act), as amended by the Animal Generic Drug User Fee Act of 2008 (AGDUFA), authorizes FDA to collect user fees for...

  13. 77 FR 65199 - Generic Drug User Fee-Backlog Fee Rate for Fiscal Year 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee--Backlog Fee Rate for Fiscal Year 2013...) is announcing the ] rate for the backlog fee related to generic drug user fees for fiscal year (FY) 2013. The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act), as amended by the Generic Drug User...

  14. 78 FR 46958 - Animal Generic Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures for Fiscal Year 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Animal Generic Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures... generic new animal drug user fees. The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act), as amended by the Animal Generic Drug User Fee Amendments of 2013, which was signed by the President on June...

  15. Role of P-glycoprotein in refractoriness of seizures to antiepileptic drugs in Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Achal; Tripathi, Deepak; Paliwal, Vimal Kumar; Neyaz, Zafar; Agarwal, Vikas

    2015-02-01

    Mechanism of seizure refractoriness to antiepileptic drugs in children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome is not known. Efflux of antiepileptic drugs due to increased expression/function of P-glycoprotein, a multidrug efflux transporter protein on the cell surface is a proposed mechanism. The authors studied the expression/function of P-glycoprotein on peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 29 children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, 23 children with other epilepsies, and 19 healthy children. The authors found a higher P-glycoprotein expression/function in Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, a higher percent positive cells as compared to children with other epilepsy (P P = 0.012), higher P-glycoprotein expression as compared to healthy controls (P = 0.003), a higher total P-glycoprotein expression (relative florescence intensity × percent positive cells) as compared to children with other epilepsies (P P P-glycoprotein function as compared to children with other epilepsies (P = 0.001) and healthy controls (P = 0.002). These findings may explain seizure refractoriness to anti-epileptic drugs in Lennox-Gastaut syndome.

  16. Prevention of Fetal Congenital Malformations with Allowance for the Pharmacogenetic Features of the Metabolism of Antiepileptic Drugs and Hereditary Abnormalities in the Folate Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Dmitrenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetal congenital malformations are among the most dangerous complications of pregnancy in women with epilepsy taking antiepileptic drugs. Valproic acid and phenobarbital have the greatest risk of teratogenic effects. Insights into the current mechanisms of teratogenic effect of antiepileptic drugs, pharmacogenetic features of the metabolism of valproates and hereditary abnormalities in the folate cycle enables prevention of fetal congenital malformations. 

  17. Effects of antiepileptic drugs on associative LTP-like plasticity in human motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidegger, Tonio; Krakow, Karsten; Ziemann, Ulf

    2010-10-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are used extensively in clinical practice but relatively little is known on their specific effects at the systems level of human cortex. Here we tested, using a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled crossover design in healthy subjects, the effects of a single therapeutic oral dose of seven AEDs with different modes of action (tiagabine, diazepam, gabapentin, lamotrigine, topiramate, levetiracetam and piracetam) on long-term potentiation (LTP)-like motor cortical plasticity induced by paired associative transcranial magnetic stimulation (PAS). PAS-induced LTP-like plasticity was assessed from the increase in motor evoked potential amplitude in a hand muscle contralateral to the stimulated motor cortex. Levetiracetam significantly reduced LTP-like plasticity when compared to the placebo condition. Tiagabine, diazepam, lamotrigine and piracetam resulted in nonsignificant trends towards reduction of LTP-like plasticity while gabapentin and topiramate had no effect. The particularly depressant effect of levetiracetam is probably explained by its unique mode of action through binding at the vesicle membrane protein SV2A. Enhancement of gamma-amino butyric acid-dependent cortical inhibition by tiagabine, diazepam and possibly levetiracetam, and blockage of voltage-gated sodium channels by lamotrigine, may also depress PAS-induced LTP-like plasticity but these mechanisms appear to be less relevant. Findings may inform about AED-related adverse effects on important LTP-dependent central nervous systems processes such as learning or memory formation. The particular depressant effect of levetiracetam on LTP-like plasticity may also relate to the unique properties of this drug to inhibit epileptogenesis, a potentially LTP-associated process.

  18. Comparative study of lacosamide and classical sodium channel blocking antiepileptic drugs on sodium channel slow inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niespodziany, Isabelle; Leclère, Nathalie; Vandenplas, Catherine; Foerch, Patrik; Wolff, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Many antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) exert their therapeutic activity by modifying the inactivation properties of voltage-gated sodium (Na(v) ) channels. Lacosamide is unique among AEDs in that it selectively enhances the slow inactivation component. Although numerous studies have investigated the effects of AEDs on Na(v) channel inactivation, a direct comparison of results cannot be made because of varying experimental conditions. In this study, the effects of different AEDs on Na(v) channel steady-state slow inactivation were investigated under identical experimental conditions using whole-cell patch-clamp in N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells. All drugs were tested at 100 μM, and results were compared with those from time-matched control groups. Lacosamide significantly shifted the voltage dependence of Na(v) current (I(Na) ) slow inactivation toward more hyperpolarized potentials (by -33 ± 7 mV), whereas the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels and the curve slope did not differ significantly. Neither SPM6953 (lacosamide inactive enantiomer), nor carbamazepine, nor zonisamide affected the voltage dependence of I(Na) slow inactivation, the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels, or the curve slope. Phenytoin significantly increased the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels (by 28% ± 9%) in a voltage-independent manner but did not affect the curve slope. Lamotrigine slightly increased the fraction of inactivated currents (by 15% ± 4%) and widened the range of the slow inactivation voltage dependence. Lamotrigine and rufinamide induced weak, but significant, shifts of I(Na) slow inactivation toward more depolarized potentials. The effects of lacosamide on Na(v) channel slow inactivation corroborate previous observations that lacosamide has a unique mode of action among AEDs that act on Na(v) channels.

  19. Validation of the zebrafish pentylenetetrazol seizure model: locomotor versus electrographic responses to antiepileptic drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Afrikanova

    Full Text Available Zebrafish have recently emerged as an attractive in vivo model for epilepsy. Seven-day-old zebrafish larvae exposed to the GABA(A antagonist pentylenetetrazol (PTZ exhibit increased locomotor activity, seizure-like behavior, and epileptiform electrographic activity. A previous study showed that 12 out of 13 antiepileptic drugs (AEDs suppressed PTZ-mediated increases in larval movement, indicating the potential utility of zebrafish as a high-throughput in vivo model for AED discovery. However, a question remained as to whether an AED-induced decrease in locomotion is truly indicative of anticonvulsant activity, as some drugs may impair larval movement through other mechanisms such as general toxicity or sedation. We therefore carried out a study in PTZ-treated zebrafish larvae, to directly compare the ability of AEDs to inhibit seizure-like behavioral manifestations with their capacity to suppress epileptiform electrographic activity. We re-tested the 13 AEDs of which 12 were previously reported to inhibit convulsions in the larval movement tracking assay, administering concentrations that did not, on their own, impair locomotion. In parallel, we carried out open-field recordings on larval brains after treatment with each AED. For the majority of AEDs we obtained the same response in both the behavioral and electrographic assays. Overall our data correlate well with those reported in the literature for acute rodent PTZ tests, indicating that the larval zebrafish brain is more discriminatory than previously thought in its response to AEDs with different modes of action. Our results underscore the validity of using the zebrafish larval locomotor assay as a rapid first-pass screening tool in assessing the anticonvulsant and/or proconvulsant activity of compounds, but also highlight the importance of performing adequate validation when using in vivo models.

  20. Lamotrigine, an antiepileptic drug, inhibits 5-HT3 receptor currents in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Jung; Jeun, Seung Hyun; Sung, Ki-Wug

    2017-03-01

    Lamotrigine is an antiepileptic drug widely used to treat epileptic seizures. Using whole-cell voltage clamp recordings in combination with a fast drug application approach, we investigated the effects of lamotrigine on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)3 receptors in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells. Co-application of lamotrigine (1~300 µM) resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction in peak amplitude of currents induced by 3 µM of 5-HT for an IC50 value of 28.2±3.6 µM with a Hill coefficient of 1.2±0.1. These peak amplitude decreases were accompanied by the rise slope reduction. In addition, 5-HT3-mediated currents evoked by 1 mM dopamine, a partial 5-HT3 receptor agonist, were inhibited by lamotrigine co-application. The EC50 of 5-HT for 5-HT3 receptor currents were shifted to the right by co-application of lamotrigine without a significant change of maximal effect. Currents activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application in the presence of 1 min pretreatment of lamotrigine were similar to those activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application alone. Moreover, subsequent application of lamotrigine in the presence of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindole, known to attenuate 5-HT3 receptor desensitization, inhibited 5-HT3 receptor currents in a concentration-dependent manner. The deactivation of 5-HT3 receptor was delayed by washing with an external solution containing lamotrigine. Lamotrigine accelerated the desensitization process of 5-HT3 receptors. There was no voltage-dependency in the inhibitory effects of lamotrigine on the 5-HT3 receptor currents. These results indicate that lamotrigine inhibits 5-HT3-activated currents in a competitive manner by binding to the open state of the channels and blocking channel activation or accelerating receptor desensitization.

  1. Psychosocial factors associated with the prescription of generic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Calvillo, Javier A; Lana, Alberto; Cueto, Antonio; Markham, Wolfgang A; López, Maria Luisa

    2011-07-01

    To evaluate factors associated with "Generic drug prescription" (GDP) behaviour in Spain using the ASE (Attitude, Social Influence, Self-Efficacy) Model. General Practitioners were sent a validated and anonymous questionnaire measuring the ASE and Motivation variables for GDP and their generic drug prescription percentage. Most (n=486; 61.98%) responded to this cross-sectional survey. The mean scores and the 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. A binary logistic regression was used to identify the variables that best predict GDP behaviour. The main advantages and motivations for GDP were "saving money" and "protecting professional ethics". The greatest social influences were "doctors' personal preferences" and "authorities' pressure". GDP accounted for a scarce 15% of the total prescription. ASE and Motivation items were the best predictors: they explain 25% of being a 'high prescriber'. The highest prescribers were paediatricians (OR=5.07), workers in rural settings (OR=3.68) and professionals with high Motivation (OR=1.17) and Attitude (OR=1.11) scores. GDP percentage is very low compared with other countries. Interventions to modify the Attitudes of Primary Care doctors towards generic drugs should be implemented. Better informed patients, longer doctor appointment times and more varied dosage forms of generic drugs would also facilitate improvements in GDP. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Generic substitution of antihypertensive drugs : does it affect adherence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Wijk, Boris L G; Klungel, Olaf H; Heerdink, Eibert R; de Boer, Anthonius

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Generic substitution is an important opportunity to reduce the costs of pharmaceutical care. However, pharmacists and physicians often find that patients and brand-name manufacturers have doubt about the equivalence of the substituted drug. This may be reflected by decreased adherence to

  3. 76 FR 76738 - Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    ... $824 billion dollars in savings to the nation's health care system in the last decade alone. The additional resources called for under the agreement, an inflation-adjusted $299 million annually for each of... generic drug program in the amount of $299 million per year, adjusted for inflation, for 5 years....

  4. Lawsuits allege price fixing by generic drug makers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Two years after high generic drug prices became a public controversy, Reuters is reporting that 20 states filed a lawsuit Thursday against Mylan, Teva Pharmaceuticals and four other generic drug makers (1. The suit alleges the companies conspired to fix prices or allocated markets to prop up prices. The civil lawsuit, led by antitrust investigators in Connecticut, comes one day after the U.S. Department of Justice filed criminal charges against two former executives of the generic drug maker, Heritage. The states attorneys general asked the court to order the companies to disgorge ill-gotten gains, which were not defined, pay attorneys' fees and stop collusion. Of the states in the Southwest only Nevada is participating in the lawsuit. The cases are part of a broader generic drug pricing probe that remains under way at the state and federal level, as well as in the U.S. Congress. In 2014, media reports of …

  5. Do no harm - But first we need to know more: The case of adverse drug reactions with antiepileptic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagandeep Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An adverse drug reaction (ADR is defined by the World Health Organization as a noxious, unintended, and undesired drug effect, when used for therapeutic purposes in humans. ADRs to anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs significantly impact the quality of life of people with epilepsy and account for a little less than half of all recorded treatment failures with AEDs. Hence prevention and early recognition of ADRs constitute an important aspect of management of epilepsy. Recent developments have improved our ability to predict and hence potentially prevent the occurrence of some of the serious ADRs to AEDs. One example is the potential prediction of the risk of severe cutaneous hypersensitivity reactions including Stevens Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis by testing for expression of HLA BFNx011502 allele in people of Asian origin who are prescribed carbamazepine. The association between HLA BFNx011502 expression and carbamazepine skin reactions has been documented in India but the role of HLA testing in Indian populations needs to be clarified in larger studies across different ethnic groups within the country.

  6. 76 FR 14028 - Generic Drug User Fee; Notice of Public Meeting; Reopening of the Comment Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee; Notice of Public Meeting; Reopening... FR 47820), entitled ``Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting; Request for Comments.'' In that notice... the development of a generic drug user fee program. FDA is reopening the comment period for...

  7. 76 FR 4119 - Generic Drug User Fee; Notice of Public Meeting; Reopening of the Comment Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee; Notice of Public Meeting; Reopening... comment period for the notice of public meeting entitled Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting; Request... development of a generic drug user fee program. FDA is reopening the comment period to permit...

  8. 76 FR 24035 - Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting; Request for Comments... gather additional stakeholder input on the development of a generic drug user fee program. A user fee..., to facilitate the timely review of human generic drug applications by FDA, and FDA is currently...

  9. 76 FR 33307 - Generic Drug User Fee; Notice of Public Meeting; Extension of Comment Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee; Notice of Public Meeting; Extension... requested comments to gather stakeholder input on the development of a generic drug user fee program. The..., 75 FR 47820, FDA published a notice soliciting comment on development of a generic drug user...

  10. 76 FR 44014 - Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting; Request for Comments... gather additional stakeholder input on the development of a generic drug user fee program. A user fee..., to facilitate the timely review of human generic drug applications by FDA. FDA has been...

  11. 77 FR 43844 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Generic Drug User...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-26

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Generic Drug User Fee Cover Sheet; Form FDA 3794 AGENCY: Food and Drug... 3794 entitled ``Generic Drug User Fee Cover Sheet.'' DATES: Submit either electronic or written... appropriate, and other forms of information technology. Generic Drug User Fee Cover Sheet; Form FDA...

  12. [Beer-Fick criteria and generic drugs in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorzoni, Milton Luiz; Fabbri, Renato Moraes Alves; Pires, Sueli Luciano

    2008-01-01

    Determine, according to the Beer-Fick criteria, the prevalence of drugs potentially inappropriate for the elderly available as generic medication in Brazil. Analysis of the list of generic medications issued by " Diário Oficial da União" on July/12/2004 and of the page of the National Agency for Sanitary Surveillance (ANVISA) - www.anvisa.gov.br, using the Beers-Fick criteria. From the list of 299 products 20 (6.7% of the total) included in the Beers-Fick criteria were analyzed, mainly in the categories of anxiolytics, platelet antiaggregants, antiallergics, anti-angina and vasodilators, antiarrythmics, antidepressants, antispasmodics, anti-hypertensive's, non steroid antinflammatories, antiulceratives and cardiac glycosides. These criteria do not include drugs such as cough suppressants, cinnarizine, diltiazem, piracetam, quinolones, xanthines, creams, ointments and ophthalmic solutions which are also present in the list of generic medication. The Beers-Fick criteria may prevent use of drugs potentially inappropriate for the elderly, however, it should be stressed that these criteria are not complete for Brazilian generic medications.

  13. Correlation between prescribed daily dose, seizure freedom and defined daily dose in antiepileptic drug treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, László; Fekete, Klára; Márton, Sándor; Fekete, István

    2017-04-01

    Background Although defined daily doses (DDD) for antiepileptic drugs (AED) have been assigned only in combination therapy, based on the literature, most patients take them in monotherapy. Furthermore, discrepancies between DDD and prescribed daily dose (PDD) were observed. Objective First, to determine PDDs of AEDs and to reveal PDD/DDD ratio among seizure free versus not seizure free patients in everyday clinical practice. Second, to test the applicability of 75% cut-off of DDD to achieve seizure freedom. Furthermore, to find out what factors might influence PDD. Setting Outpatient data files at a Hungarian university hospital were studied. Methods A retrospective, 20-year cross-sectional database was compiled from 1282 epileptic outpatients' files. Main outcome measure Seizure freedom and PDD were used as outcome measures. Results The mean DDD% of all prescribed AEDs increased steadily from monotherapy, through bitherapy towards polytherapy (p seizure free patients took AEDs in doses in the range of ≤75% of DDDs in monotherapy and bitherapy. Older AEDs (carbamazepine and valproate) were given in a significantly higher mean dose in bitherapy in the seizure free group. Among the newer types, only levetiracetam and lamotrigine had a significantly higher DDD% in mono-, bi-, and polytherapy. Confirmed by logistic regression analysis, gender, age, type of epilepsy, and number of AEDs had a significant impact on the value of 75% DDD. Conclusion No significant unfavourable impact of the lower ratio of PDD/DDD on the outcome of achieving seizure freedom has been confirmed. As a measure of seizure freedom, 75% of DDD may be used, although individual therapy must be emphasised. Precisely quantified DDD would provide a more accurate calculation of other derived values.

  14. Early pediatric antiepileptic drug nonadherence is related to lower long-term seizure freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Avani C; Rausch, Joseph R; Glauser, Tracy A

    2014-02-25

    To examine the relationship between previously identified nonadherence trajectories during the first 6 months of antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy and long-term seizure-free rates (defined as ≥1 year of seizure freedom at the 4 years postdiagnosis milestone) in a cohort of children with newly diagnosed epilepsy. A prospective longitudinal observational study of AED adherence and seizure freedom in a consecutive cohort of 124 children (ages 2-12 years) with newly diagnosed epilepsy was conducted. The association between previously identified AED adherence trajectories (i.e., near-perfect adherence [e.g., average adherence = 96.8%] vs nonadherent) and seizure freedom for ≥1 year at the 4 years postdiagnosis milestone was determined. Children who exhibited nonadherence to AED therapy in the first 6 months of treatment were 3.24 times more likely not to have achieved ≥1 year of seizure freedom at the 4 years postdiagnosis milestone compared to children in the near-perfect adherence group (χ² = 5.13; p = 0.02). Specifically, at the 4 years postdiagnosis milestone, only 12% of children in the near-perfect adherence group were continuing to experience seizures compared to 31% of children in the nonadherent group. Children with epilepsy who achieved near-perfect adherence during the first 6 months of therapy experienced a higher rate of seizure freedom 4 years postdiagnosis compared with those children who demonstrated early nonadherence. This suggests that adherence intervention early in the course of treatment could play a role in improving long-term seizure freedom rates in children with epilepsy.

  15. Effects of antiepileptic drugs on the serum folate and vitamin B12 in various epileptic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hong-Li; Zhou, Hao; Wang, Nuan; Yu, Chun-Yu

    2016-10-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurodegenerative disease with an increasing morbidity. Clinical treatment of epilepsy includes symptomatic treatment, etiological treatment, surgery and prevention. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on serum folate and vitamin B12 in various epileptic patients, and to examine the correlation between these effects and secondary cerebrovascular events. A total of 68 epileptic patients, diagnosed between May 2012 and May 2014, were included in the present study. The study included 8 cases of autonomic seizures, 10 cases of absence seizures, 13 cases of complex partial seizures, 28 cases of generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and 9 cases of simple partial seizures. The patients received appropriate AED treatment according to the characteristics of epileptic seizure and the treatment guidance. The differences in the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in these patients, and the differences in the secondary cerebrovascular events in these patients after 1 year follow-up were analyzed. The difference in the AEDs used by various epileptic patients was statistically significant (PB12 in these patients following treatment were significantly lower than those prior to treatment (PB12 in these groups following treatment were not statistically significant (P>0.05). The difference in the incidence of cerebrovascular events in these groups at follow up was not statistically significant (P>0.05). The multifactorial logistic regression analysis revealed that the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 were the independent risk factors for epilepsy with secondary cerebrovascular events [folate: odds ratio (OR)=0.536, P=0.039; vitamin: OR=0.382, P=0.041]. In conclusion, various AEDs may decrease the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 and affect the secondary cerebrovascular events in various epileptic patients. Thus, regular supplementation of folate and vitamin B12 may be an option.

  16. Low potency and limited efficacy of antiepileptic drugs in the mouse 6 Hz corneal kindling model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, K; Matagne, A; Kaminski, R M

    2014-05-01

    Corneal kindling is a useful alternative to electrically induced amygdala or hippocampal kindling, which requires advanced surgical and EEG techniques that may not be easily available in many laboratories. Therefore the first aim of this study was to evaluate whether repeated 6 Hz corneal stimulation in mice would lead to an increased and persistent seizure response as described for higher frequency (50/60 Hz) corneal kindling. Male NMRI mice stimulated twice daily (except weekends) for 3 s with 6 Hz electrical current at 44 mA displayed robust kindling development, i.e., a progressive increase in seizure severity. The majority of the animals (about 90%) developed a fully kindled state, defined as at least 10 consecutive stage 3-5 seizures within 5 weeks of corneal stimulation. Afterwards, the fully kindled state was maintained for at least 8 weeks with only two days of stimulations per week. Next, the protective efficacy of four mechanistically different antiepileptic drugs (AEDs; clonazepam, valproate, carbamazepine and levetiracetam) was assessed and compared between 6 Hz and 50 Hz fully kindled mice. All tested AEDs showed a relatively lower potency in the 6 Hz kindling model and a limited efficacy against partial seizures was observed with carbamazepine and levetiracetam. We can conclude that 6 Hz kindling may be more advantageous than the previously described 50/60 Hz corneal kindling models due to its robustness and persistence of the fully kindled state. Furthermore, the observed low potency and limited efficacy of AEDs in 6 Hz fully kindled mice suggest that this model could be a useful tool in the discovery of novel AEDs targeting treatment resistant epilepsy.

  17. Antiepileptic drugs prescribed in pregnancy and prevalence of major congenital malformations: comparative prevalence studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Irene; Collings, Shuk-Li; McCrea, Rachel L; Nazareth, Irwin; Osborn, David P; Cowen, Phil J; Sammon, Cormac J

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of major congenital malformations associated with antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment in pregnancy. Patients and methods Using data from The Health Improvement Network, we identified women who have given live birth and their offspring. Four subgroups were selected based on the AED treatment in early pregnancy, valproate, carbamazepine, lamotrigine and women not receiving AED treatment. We compared the prevalence of major congenital malformations within children of these four groups and estimated prevalence ratios (PRs) using Poisson regression adjusted for maternal age, sex of child, quintiles of Townsend deprivation score and indication for treatment. Results In total, 240,071 women were included in the study. A total of 229 women were prescribed valproate in pregnancy, 357 were prescribed lamotrigine and 334 were prescribed carbamazepine and 239,151 women were not prescribed AEDs. Fifteen out of 229 (6.6%) women prescribed valproate gave birth to a child with a major congenital malformation. The figures for lamotrigine, carbamazepine and women not prescribed AEDs were 2.7%, 3.3% and 2.2%, respectively. The prevalence of major congenital malformation was similar for women prescribed lamotrigine or carbamazepine compared to women with no AED treatment in pregnancy. For women prescribed valproate in polytherapy, the prevalence was fourfold higher. After adjustments, the effect of estimates attenuated, but the prevalence remained two- to threefold higher in women prescribed valproate. Conclusion The results of our study suggest that lamotrigine and carbamazepine are safer treatment options than valproate in pregnancy and should be considered as alternative treatment options for women of childbearing potential and in pregnancy. PMID:28243149

  18. Relation between sexual dysfunctions and epilepsy, type of epilepsy, type of antiepileptic drugs: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavone, Carlo; Giacalone, Ninfa; Vella, Marco; Urso, Lidia; Zummo, Leila; Fierro, Brigida

    2017-04-28

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of sexual dysfunctions in males with epilepsy, the type of epilepsy, the frequency of seizures, the type of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), the serum hormonal profile and the presence of psychiatric comorbidity. Sixty-one patients focused on type of epilepsy, frequency of seizures, AEDs, hormonal profile and presence of mood disorders. We excluded all patients with severe neurologic and psychiatric impairment and patient who were not able to fill questionnaires. Mean age was 31.2 years (range 18-50 years); 31 patients (50.8%) had an idiopathic generalised epilepsy and 30 (49.2%) a focal epilepsy; among them, latter 18 (60%) had probably symptomatic type and 12 (40%) symptomatic type. Sexual functions were evaluated by "International Inventory of Erectile Function" questionnaire. Out of 61 enrolled patients, 22 (36.7%) showed sexual dysfunctions: erectile dysfunctions in 14 (23%), orgasmic dysfunctions in (11.5%) and sexual drive dysfunctions in 12 (19.7%). Out of 61 patients, 36 were subjected to blood measurement of sexual hormones and 21 (58.3%) showed hormonal modifications. Sexual dysfunction are present in 36.7% of enrolled males with epilepsy; there is any association between sexual dysfunctions and various AEDs in the treatment, except for carbamazepine (CBZ); there is not any association between sexual dysfunctions and frequency of seizures; hormonal changes are associated with sexual dysfunction in males with epilepsy treated with AEDs but not with the orgasmic dysfunction; there is not any association between hormonal changes and type of AEDs, except for CBZ; depression is associated with sexual dysfunctions.

  19. Use of antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy and lactation: Type of information provided by searching Google.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavi-Blau, Tal; Ekstein, Dana; Neufeld, Miri Y; Eyal, Sara

    2016-02-01

    Surveys among women with epilepsy (WWE) show that they receive their essential pregnancy-related information from many sources, including the internet. Our aim was to assess the types of websites provided by searching Google for the use of four antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) during pregnancy and lactation. The search was performed on 40 computers used by health-care professionals, on 40 computers used by nonhealth-care professionals, and on 5 computers used by WWE in Israel and on 8 computers used by nonhealth-care professionals in the U.S. On each computer, a Google search was conducted for term combinations that included one AED name ("carbamazepine","valproic acid", "lamotrigine", "levetiracetam", or "Keppra") and "Pregnancy", "Lactation", or "Breastfeeding". The top three and top ten websites retrieved in every search were mapped (a total of 45 and 150 websites, respectively, from each computer). Across all searches in English, on both U.S. and Israeli computers, the majority of websites listed among the first three and first ten results were those of independent health portals. The representation of the Epilepsy Foundation website was 10% or less, and only a few results were obtained from the NIH's general public-oriented MedlinePlus. In Hebrew, results included almost exclusively Israeli or Hebrew-translated websites. As in English, results from public-oriented, professionally-written websites in Hebrew accounted for less than 50% of entries. Overall, the availability of readable and high-quality information on AEDs used by pregnant and breastfeeding women is limited. Guiding patients towards accurate web resources can help them navigate among the huge amount of available online information.

  20. Antiepileptic drug teratogenesis: what are the risks for congenital malformations and adverse cognitive outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Cynthia L

    2008-01-01

    Antiepileptic drug (AED) exposure in utero has been associated with major congenital malformations (MCMs) and adverse cognitive outcomes in the offspring of women with epilepsy (WWE). However, determining the exact risk and the relative risks of AEDs for these outcomes has been challenging, and only in recent years has improved study designs enabled us to get a clearer picture of the risks. Still, there is a startling lack of information for many of the newer and widely used AEDs. At this point of time, studies clearly show that valproate (VPA) as a part of polytherapy or when used as a monotherapy is associated with an increased risk of MCMs, and that it poses about threefold the risk of carbamazepine (CBZ). It is unclear if any other AEDs studied pose an increased risk of MCM occurrence; in the best available large study the absolute rates of MCMs with other several other AEDs were not different from untreated WWE. The absolute risks have been reported as CBZ 2.2%, lamotrigine (LTG) 3.2%, phenytoin (PHT) 3.7%, untreated WWE 3.5%, with VPA as the outlier at 6.2%. In utero VPA exposure is also associated with a risk of lower verbal intelligence quotient (IQ) in children, at approximately 10 points lower than controls. CBZ appears to pose no risk to cognitive outcome, and there is some evidence that PHT and phenobarbital (PB) may be associated with risk of reduced cognitive outcome. Polytherapy is associated with greater risk than monotherapy for both MCMs and cognitive outcome. Although more information is needed and hopefully will be obtained from ongoing prospective studies, it is clear that WWE taking VPA and planning pregnancy should have a discussion with their physician about considering changing to another AED before pregnancy, if possible.

  1. Discontinuation of antiepileptic drugs after successful epilepsy surgery. a Canadian survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Téllez-Zenteno, José F; Ronquillo, Lizbeth Hernández; Jette, Nathalie; Burneo, Jorge G; Nguyen, Dang Khoa; Donner, Elizabeth J; Sadler, Mark; Javidan M, Mano; Gross, Donald W; Wiebe, Samuel

    2012-11-01

    To identify the perceived practice among Canadian epileptologists regarding discontinuation of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) following successful resective surgery for temporal and extratemporal surgery. We performed a survey of pediatric and adult epileptologists in Canada, using a 77-item questionnaire to explore attitudes, timing, rate of withdrawal, and factors contributing to the decision to withdraw AEDs after successful epilepsy surgery. Surveys were mailed with a postage-paid return envelope. Two subsequent surveys were mailed to non-respondents at 15 days intervals. All procedures received institutional review board approval. Surveys were sent to 82 epileptologists in all the Canadian provinces. Sixty-six physicians answered the survey (80.5%), representing all epilepsy centers across Canada. The minimum seizure free period required after epilepsy surgery before withdrawing AEDs, varied substantially among responders: 1 year in 50%, >2 years in 12%, >2 years in 3% after. The most important factors influencing the decision to withdraw AEDs a negative EEG before discontinuation (71%), patients' preferences (78%) and the presence of unilateral mesial temporal sclerosis (70%). The most important factors against reduction were the following: patients' wishes to resume driving (67%), focal (65%) or generalized (78%) epileptiform activity on EEG after surgery, persistent isolated auras (78%), any seizures after hospital discharge (81%), and presurgical multifocal/bilateral/diffuse findings (78%). Canadian epileptologists indicated that AED levels, EEG and MRI are typically done before discontinuing AEDs. Generally, a good candidate for stopping AEDs has focal pathology, is completely seizure free, had an anterior temporal lobe resection, complete resection of seizure focus, and has no epileptiform discharges on postoperative EEG. The data pertaining to self-reported practice styles, and actual practice may differ. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Associations between generic substitution and patient-related factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard Rathe, Jette

    Associations between generic substitution and patient-related factors Jette Østergaard Rathe1, Pia V. Larsen1, Morten Andersen2, Janus L. Thomsen3, Maja S. Paulsen1, Jens Søndergaard1 1. Research Unit of General Practice, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark 2. Centre...... substitutable drug. Data were linked with a prescription database. Results We found no associations between generic substitution and, respectively, gender, age, drug group and polypharmacy. Earlier switches of the index drug are statistically significant associated with acceptance of generic substitution...... generics in the antiepileptic and antidepressant groups (antiepileptics OR 0.37 and antidepressants OR 0.53). Conclusion We did not find any patient-related factors associated with generic substitution; however, patients who have once experienced a generic substitution with a specific drug are more likely...

  3. Analysis of pharmacists' opinions, attitudes and experiences with generic drugs and generic substitution in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, Josef; Dosedel, Martin; Kubena, Ales; Vlcek, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Generic substitution (GS) is an integral part of drug policy in many countries. Similarly to other countries its introduction in the Czech Republic gave rise to a vibrant discussion. The aim of the study was to map and analyze pharmacists' opinions of, attitudes towards and experiences with generic drugs and GS after the first year from its legislative embodiment in the Czech Republic. All 7,665 members of the Czech Chamber of Pharmacists were addressed to participate in a questionnaire survey between November 2008 and March 2009. The questionnaire consisted of 28 questions concerning the issue of generic drugs and GS and was divided into five sections. All collected data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and correlations were tested by selected parametric and non-parametric tests. A total of 615 completed questionnaire forms were returned (a questionnaire return rate of 8.0%). The demographic characteristics of the respondents were as follows: 470 (76.4%) females, mean age of 37.5 years (SD = 10.4) and 429 (69.6%) pharmacists with a practice specialization. Altogether 345 (56.1%) respondents became aware of the issue of brand name and generic drugs during their undergraduate studies. 378 (61.5%) respondents considered generic drugs as bioequivalent and 455 (74.0%) respondents as therapeutically equivalent to the respective brand name drugs. 99 (16.1%) pharmacists believed that generic products are of lower quality than branded drugs and 69 (11.2%) respondents expected generics to cause more adverse drug reactions. GS was perceived as a positive tool by 476 (77.4%) respondents. Only 71 (11.5%) respondents showed acquaintance with all the legal rules for GS. Legislation awareness and attitude towards GS was correlated with age (p generic drugs and GS. Approaching patients on an individual basis and pharmacists' awareness can minimize adverse drug events caused by generic drugs and at the same time enhance the professional status of pharmacists.

  4. The clinical pharmacology profile of the new antiepileptic drug perampanel: A novel noncompetitive AMPA receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsalos, Philip N

    2015-01-01

    The clinical pharmacology profile of a drug critically determines its therapeutics, and this review summarizes the characteristics associated with the antiepileptic drug (AED) perampanel. A PubMed literature search was performed for perampanel. Congress abstract data are included where necessary and Eisai Ltd provided access to unpublished data on file. After oral ingestion, perampanel is rapidly absorbed and peak plasma concentrations occur 0.5-2.5 h later; its bioavailability is ~100%. Although the rate of perampanel absorption is slowed by food co-ingestion, the extent absorbed remains unchanged; therefore, perampanel can be administered without regard to meal times. The pharmacokinetics of perampanel are linear and predictable over the clinically relevant dose range (2-12 mg); perampanel is 95% protein-bound to albumin and α1-acid glycoprotein. Perampanel is extensively metabolized (>90%) in the liver, primarily by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4, to various pharmacologically inactive metabolites. In healthy volunteers, the apparent terminal half-life is ~105 h, whereas the calculated effective half-life is 48 h. These half-life values allow for once-daily dosing, which will aid patient compliance and in the event of a missed dose, will have minimal impact on seizure control. In healthy volunteers prescribed carbamazepine, half-life decreases to 25 h. Clearance values are not significantly different in adolescents (~13.0 ml/min) and the elderly (~10.5 ml/min) compared with adults (10.9 ml/min). Perampanel has minimal propensity to cause pharmacokinetic interactions. However, it is the target of such interactions and CYP3A4-inducing AEDs enhance its clearance; this can be used to advantage because dose titration can be faster and thus optimum therapeutic outcome can be achieved sooner. Perampanel 12 mg, but not 4 or 8 mg, enhances the metabolism of the progesterone component of the oral contraceptive pill, necessitating the need for an additional reliable

  5. Antiepileptic drugs prescribed in pregnancy and prevalence of major congenital malformations: comparative prevalence studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petersen I

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Irene Petersen,1,2 Shuk-Li Collings,1,3 Rachel L McCrea,1 Irwin Nazareth,1 David P Osborn,4 Phil J Cowen,5 Cormac J Sammon1 1Department of Primary Care and Population Health, University College London, London, UK; 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus N, Denmark; 3OXON Epidemiology, London, UK; 4Division of Psychiatry, University College London, London, UK; 5University Department of Psychiatry, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of major congenital malformations associated with antiepileptic drug (AED treatment in pregnancy.Patients and methods: Using data from The Health Improvement Network, we identified women who have given live birth and their offspring. Four subgroups were selected based on the AED treatment in early pregnancy, valproate, carbamazepine, lamotrigine and women not receiving AED treatment. We compared the prevalence of major congenital malformations within children of these four groups and estimated prevalence ratios (PRs using Poisson regression adjusted for maternal age, sex of child, quintiles of Townsend deprivation score and indication for treatment.Results: In total, 240,071 women were included in the study. A total of 229 women were prescribed valproate in pregnancy, 357 were prescribed lamotrigine and 334 were prescribed carbamazepine and 239,151 women were not prescribed AEDs. Fifteen out of 229 (6.6% women prescribed valproate gave birth to a child with a major congenital malformation. The figures for lamotrigine, carbamazepine and women not prescribed AEDs were 2.7%, 3.3% and 2.2%, respectively. The prevalence of major congenital malformation was similar for women prescribed lamotrigine or carbamazepine compared to women with no AED treatment in pregnancy. For women prescribed valproate in polytherapy, the prevalence was fourfold higher. After adjustments, the effect of estimates attenuated, but the prevalence remained two- to

  6. Dissolution testing for generic drugs: an FDA perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Om; Yu, Lawrence X; Conner, Dale P; Davit, Barbara M

    2011-09-01

    In vitro dissolution testing is an important tool used for development and approval of generic dosage forms. The objective of this article is to summarize how dissolution testing is used for the approval of safe and effective generic drug products in the United States (US). Dissolution testing is routinely used for stability and quality control purposes for both oral and non-oral dosage forms. The dissolution method should be developed using an appropriate validated method depending on the dosage form. There are several ways in which dissolution testing plays a pivotal role in regulatory decision-making. It may be used to waive in vivo bioequivalence (BE) study requirements, as BE documentation for Scale Up and Post Approval Changes (SUPAC), and to predict the potential for a modified-release (MR) drug product to dose-dump if co-administered with alcoholic beverages. Thus, in vitro dissolution testing plays a major role in FDA's efforts to reduce the regulatory burden and unnecessary human studies in generic drug development without sacrificing the quality of the drug products.

  7. Pharmacological characterization of antiepileptic drugs and experimental analgesics on low magnesium-induced hyperexcitability in rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Robert L; Bowlby, Mark R

    2005-06-21

    Perfusion of acute hippocampal slices with stimulatory buffers has long been known to induce rhythmic, large amplitude, synchronized spontaneous neuronal bursting in areas CA1 and CA3. The characteristics of this model of neuronal hyperexcitability were investigated in this study, particularly with respect to the activity of antiepileptic drugs and compounds representing novel mechanisms of analgesic action. Toward that end, low Mg(2+)/high K(+)-induced spontaneous activity was quantified by a virtual instrument designed for the digitization and analysis of bursting activity. Uninterrupted streams of extracellular field potentials were digitized and analyzed in 10-s sweeps, yielding four quantified parameters of neuronal hyperexcitability. Following characterization of the temporal stability of low Mg(2+)/high K(+)-induced hyperexcitability, compounds representing a diversity of functional mechanisms were tested for their effectiveness in reversing this activity. Of the four antiepileptic drugs tested in this model, only phenytoin proved ineffective, while valproate, gabapentin and carbamazepine varied in their potencies, with only the latter drug proving to be completely efficacious. In addition, three investigational compounds having analgesic potential were examined: ZD-7288, a blocker of HCN channels; EAA-090, an NMDA antagonist; and WAY-132983, a muscarinic agonist. Each of these compounds showed strong efficacy by completely blocking spontaneous bursting activity, along with potency greater than that of the antiepileptic drugs. These data indicate that pharmacological agents with varying mechanisms of action are able to block low Mg(2+)/high K(+)-induced hyperexcitability, and thus this model may represent a useful tool for identifying novel agents and mechanisms involved in epilepsy and neuropathic pain.

  8. Effect of cholecalciferol on the anticonvulsant action of some second generation antiepileptic drugs in the mouse model of maximal electroshock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowicz, Kinga K; Morawska, Dorota; Morawska, Marta

    2015-10-01

    From a theoretical point of view, cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) as a precursor of calcitriol, a representative of secosteroids, may have neuroprotective properties and affect seizure phenomena. In the present study, interactions between cholecalciferol and three second generation antiepileptic drugs (oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine, and topiramate) were studied in the maximal electroshock test in mice. Effects of drugs on motor coordination, long-term memory and explorative behavior of animals were evaluated in the chimney test, passive-avoidance task and plus-maze test, respectively. Cholecalciferol applied ip at doses of 37.5-75μg/kg significantly raised the electroconvulsive threshold. Cholecalciferol, administered at the subthreshold dose of 18.75μg, potentiated the anticonvulsant activity of oxcarbazepine and lamotrigine, but did not change their brain concentrations, therefore the revealed interactions seem to be pharmacodynamic. Furthermore, the action of cholecalciferol was not dependent on its conversion to calcitriol. The anticonvulsant effect of topiramate was enhanced by cholecalciferol applied at the higher dose of 37.5μg/kg, at which it also increased the brain level of topiramate. As regards adverse effects, cholecalciferol, antiepileptic drugs, and their combinations did not significantly impair motor coordination or long-term memory in mice. Moreover, cholecalciferol did not show either anxiolytic or anxiogenic properties. Our findings show that cholecalciferol has not only its own anticonvulsant action but also enhances efficacy of certain antiepileptic drugs, at least in experimental conditions. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  9. Questionnaire on the awareness of generic drugs among outpatients and medical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, S; Kimura, H

    2008-06-01

    Generic drugs are not as widely used in Japan as they are in the West. The objective of this study was to survey the awareness of generic drugs among outpatients and medical staff and propose methods of promoting the use of generic drugs. Our survey showed that 86.7% of respondents were aware of generic drugs. This is a higher awareness rate than that in a survey of other groups conducted last year. One reason to explain this higher awareness is the recent increase in generic drug advertisements both in newspapers and on television. However, a point of note is that generic drug usage has not increased. Our survey also showed that generic drug awareness was differed widely among age groups, as younger respondents were much more aware of generic drugs than older respondents. Still, about 40% of respondents who were aware of generic drugs did not realize that they were less expensive than name-brand drugs ? including 30% of medical staff. In addition to continuing advertisement of generic drugs in the media, medical doctors and pharmacists should also be encouraged to endorse the use of generic drugs. Furthermore a new system allowing for substitution prescriptions started in April 2008 and consequently pharmacists can now play an important role in promoting the use of generic drugs.

  10. Regulation of Generic Drugs in Japan: the Current Situation and Future Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuribayashi, Ryosuke; Matsuhama, Maki; Mikami, Kenichi

    2015-09-01

    Generic drugs are interchangeable with original proprietary drugs, as they have the same active pharmaceutical ingredients, dosage forms, strength, quality, indications, effects, directions, and dosage. The cost of generic drugs is lower than original drugs, because the developmental cost is lower. The expansion of medical expenses is an important issue in many countries, including Japan, the USA, and Europe, and promotion of generic drugs has been demanded to solve this issue in Japan. Generic drug approval review in Japan is conducted by the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA), which reviews the equivalence of the original drugs from the viewpoint of quality, efficacy, and safety, based on documentation submitted by the generic drug applicants. However, the details of the generic drug review in Japan have not been reported. In this report, we introduce the application types, the number of applications and approvals, and the review timeline of generic drugs in Japan. In addition, we discuss recent consultations and future prospects.

  11. Generic Scrip Share and the Price of Brand-Name Drugs: The Role of the Consumer

    OpenAIRE

    John A Rizzo; Richard Zeckhauser

    2005-01-01

    Generic drug utilization has risen dramatically, from 19% of scrips in 1984 to 47% in 2001, thus bringing significant direct dollar savings. Generic drug use may also yield indirect savings if it lowers the average price of those brand-name drugs that are still purchased. Prior work indicates - and we confirm - that generic competition does not induce brand-name producers to lower prices. However, consumer choices between generic and brand-name drugs could affect the average price of those br...

  12. 75 FR 67984 - Generic Drug User Fee; Notice of Public Meeting; Reopening of the Comment Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-04

    ... No. FDA-2010-N-0381] Generic Drug User Fee; Notice of Public Meeting; Reopening of the Comment Period... notice of public meeting entitled Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting; Request for Comments, published... meeting on the development of a generic drug user fee program. In that notice, FDA posed several...

  13. Heterogeneous effects of antiepileptic drugs in an in vitro epilepsy model--a functional multineuron calcium imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Yoshie; Takasu, Keiko; Ikegaya, Yuji; Hasegawa, Minoru; Sakaguchi, Gaku; Ogawa, Koichi

    2015-07-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic brain disease characterised by recurrent seizures. Many studies of this disease have focused on local neuronal activity, such as local field potentials in the brain. In addition, several recent studies have elucidated the collective behavior of individual neurons in a neuronal network that emits epileptic activity. However, little is known about the effects of antiepileptic drugs on neuronal networks during seizure-like events (SLEs) at single-cell resolution. Using functional multineuron Ca(2+) imaging (fMCI), we monitored the activities of multiple neurons in the rat hippocampal CA1 region on treatment with the proconvulsant bicuculline under Mg(2+) -free conditions. Bicuculline induced recurrent synchronous Ca(2+) influx, and the events were correlated with SLEs. Other proconvulsants, such as 4-aminopyridine, pentetrazol, and pilocarpine, also induced synchronous Ca(2+) influx. We found that the antiepileptic drugs phenytoin, flupirtine, and ethosuximide, which have different mechanisms of action, exerted heterogeneous effects on bicuculline-induced synchronous Ca(2+) influx. Phenytoin and flupirtine significantly decreased the peak, the amount of Ca(2+) influx and the duration of synchronous events in parallel with the duration of SLEs, whereas they did not abolish the synchronous events themselves. Ethosuximide increased the duration of synchronous Ca(2+) influx and SLEs. Furthermore, the magnitude of the inhibitory effect of phenytoin on the peak synchronous Ca(2+) influx level differed according to the peak amplitude of the synchronous event in each individual cell. Evaluation of the collective behavior of individual neurons by fMCI seems to be a powerful tool for elucidating the profiles of antiepileptic drugs.

  14. Influence of Ivabradine on the Anticonvulsant Action of Four Classical Antiepileptic Drugs Against Maximal Electroshock-Induced Seizures in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicka, Katarzyna M; Wawryniuk, Agnieszka; Zwolak, Agnieszka; Daniluk, Jadwiga; Szpringer, Monika; Florek-Luszczki, Magdalena; Drop, Bartlomiej; Zolkowska, Dorota; Luszczki, Jarogniew J

    2017-04-01

    Although the role of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels in neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission is still unclear, it is postulated that the HCN channels may be involved in seizure activity. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of ivabradine (an HCN channel inhibitor) on the protective action of four classical antiepileptic drugs (carbamazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin and valproate) against maximal electroshock-induced seizures in mice. Tonic seizures (maximal electroconvulsions) were evoked in adult male albino Swiss mice by an electric current (sine-wave, 25 mA, 0.2 s stimulus duration) delivered via auricular electrodes. Acute adverse-effect profiles of the combinations of ivabradine with classical antiepileptic drugs were measured in mice along with total brain antiepileptic drug concentrations. Results indicate that ivabradine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly enhanced the anticonvulsant activity of valproate and considerably reduced that of phenytoin in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model. Ivabradine (10 mg/kg) had no impact on the anticonvulsant potency of carbamazepine and phenobarbital in the maximal electroshock-induced seizure test in mice. Ivabradine (10 mg/kg) significantly diminished total brain concentration of phenytoin and had no effect on total brain valproate concentration in mice. In conclusion, the enhanced anticonvulsant action of valproate by ivabradine in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model was pharmacodynamic in nature. A special attention is required when combining ivabradine with phenytoin due to a pharmacokinetic interaction and reduction of the anticonvulsant action of phenytoin in mice. The combinations of ivabradine with carbamazepine and phenobarbital were neutral from a preclinical viewpoint.

  15. Generic antiretroviral drugs and HIV care: An economic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanpanah, Y; Schwarzinger, M

    2016-03-01

    The cost of HIV care in European countries is high. Direct medical costs, in France, have been estimated at 500,000 Euros per patient's lifetime (20,000 Euros/year/patient). Overall, 73% of these costs are related to antiretroviral treatments. In the current financial crisis context, some European countries are beginning to make economic decisions on the drugs to be used. These approaches are likely to become more frequent. It is obviously essential to prescribe the most effective, appropriate, best tolerated, and easy-to-use antiretroviral treatments to patients. However, while taking the above into consideration, and if various treatment options or combinations are available, cost should also be considered in the treatment choice. One may thus reflect on the use of generic antiretroviral agents as they have just been launched in France. We aimed to review the cost and cost-effectiveness of generic antiretroviral drugs and to review treatment strategies other than generic drugs that could help reduce HIV-related costs. HIV clinicians should consider treatment costs to avoid any future coercive measures.

  16. Generic versus brand-name drugs used in cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoli, Lamberto; Flacco, Maria Elena; Boccia, Stefania; D'Andrea, Elvira; Panic, Nikola; Marzuillo, Carolina; Siliquini, Roberta; Ricciardi, Walter; Villari, Paolo; Ioannidis, John P A

    2016-04-01

    This meta-analysis aimed to compare the efficacy and adverse events, either serious or mild/moderate, of all generic versus brand-name cardiovascular medicines. We searched randomized trials in MEDLINE, Scopus, EMBASE, Cochrane Controlled Clinical Trial Register, and ClinicalTrials.gov (last update December 1, 2014). Attempts were made to contact the investigators of all potentially eligible trials. Two investigators independently extracted and analyzed soft (including systolic blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, and others) and hard efficacy outcomes (including major cardiovascular adverse events and death), minor/moderate and serious adverse events. We included 74 randomized trials; 53 reported ≥1 efficacy outcome (overall sample 3051), 32 measured mild/moderate adverse events (n = 2407), and 51 evaluated serious adverse events (n = 2892). We included trials assessing ACE inhibitors (n = 12), anticoagulants (n = 5), antiplatelet agents (n = 17), beta-blockers (n = 11), calcium channel blockers (n = 7); diuretics (n = 13); statins (n = 6); and others (n = 3). For both soft and hard efficacy outcomes, 100 % of the trials showed non-significant differences between generic and brand-name drugs. The aggregate effect size was 0.01 (95 % CI -0.05; 0.08) for soft outcomes; -0.06 (-0.71; 0.59) for hard outcomes. All but two trials showed non-significant differences in mild/moderate adverse events, and aggregate effect size was 0.07 (-0.06; 0.20). Comparable results were observed for each drug class and in each stratified meta-analysis. Overall, 8 serious possibly drug-related adverse events were reported: 5/2074 subjects on generics; 3/2076 subjects on brand-name drugs (OR 1.69; 95 % CI 0.40-7.20). This meta-analysis strengthens the evidence for clinical equivalence between brand-name and generic cardiovascular drugs. Physicians could be reassured about prescribing generic cardiovascular drugs, and health care organization about endorsing their wider

  17. Knowledge, perceptions and use of generic drugs: a cross sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lira, Claudio Andre Barbosa; Oliveira, Jéssica Nathalia Soares; Andrade, Marília dos Santos; Vancini-Campanharo, Cássia Regina; Vancini, Rodrigo Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the level of knowledge, perceptions and usage profile for generic drugs among laypersons. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with 278 volunteers (180 women and 98 men, aged 37.1±15.8 years). A questionnaire was drawn up with questions on their use, perceptions and knowledge of generic drugs. Results Most respondents (99.6%) knew that generic drugs exist, but only 48.6% were able to define them correctly, while 78.8% of the respondents had some information about generics. This information was obtained mainly through television (49.3%). In terms of generic drug characteristics, 79.1% stated that they were confident about their efficacy, 74.8% believed that generic drugs have the same effect as branded medications, 88.8% said that generics were priced lower than branded medications, and 80.2% stated that they bought generic drugs because of price. With regard to drugs prescribed by medical practitioners, 17.6% of the participants said that their doctors never prescribed generics and only 7.5% confirmed that their doctors always prescribed generics. Conclusion For the lay public, the sample in this study has sufficient knowledge of generic drugs in terms of definition, efficacy and cost. Consequently, the volunteers interviewed are very likely to use generics. Furthermore, the results of this study indicate that programs should be implemented in order to boost generic drug prescriptions by medical practitioners. PMID:25295444

  18. Isobolographic analysis of interactions between losigamone and conventional antiepileptic drugs in the mouse maximal electroshock model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowicz, Kinga K; Kimber-Trojnar, Zaneta; Ratnaraj, Neville; Patsalos, Philip N; Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2007-01-15

    The aim of this study was the isobolographic evaluation of interactions between losigamone (LSG), valproate (VPA), carbamazepine (CBZ), phenytoin (PHT), and phenobarbital (PB) in the maximal electroshock (MES) test in mice. Electroconvulsions were produced by means of an alternating current (ear-clip electrodes, 0.2-s stimulus duration, and tonic hindlimb extension taken as the endpoint). Adverse effects were evaluated in the chimney test (motor coordination) and the passive avoidance task (long-term memory). Brain concentrations of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) were measured by immunofluorescence or high-performance liquid chromatography. Isobolographic analysis indicated synergistic interactions between LSG and VPA. For example, in the proportion of 1:1 the theoretically calculated 50% effective dose for additivity (ED(50add)) was 138 mg/kg, while the experimentally derived ED(50) for the mixture (ED(50mix)) was 85.2 mg/kg. The difference was significant at p<0.001. LSG combined with CBZ or PHT showed additivity, whereas the combinations of LSG with PB were either additive, for the fixed ratios of 1:3 and 1:1, or antagonistic for the ratio of 3:1 (ED(50add)=18.4 mg/kg versus ED(50mix)=26.7 mg/kg, p<0.05). Impairment of long-term memory was noted only in the case of VPA given at its ED(50), however this AED did not affect motor performance. LSG, CBZ, PHT and PB (applied at their ED(50) values) and co-administration of LSG with conventional AEDs (including VPA) impaired neither motor performance nor long-term memory. LSG did not affect the brain concentration of VPA or PB, but significantly elevated the brain concentrations of CBZ and PHT. In contrast, VPA, CBZ and PHT significantly increased the brain concentration of LSG, indicating a pharmacokinetic contribution to the observed pharmacodynamic interactions. Although LSG exhibited some favorable pharmacodynamic interactions with various AEDs, these were complicated by pharmacokinetic interactions and emphasize the

  19. The absorptive flux of the anti-epileptic drug substance vigabatrin is carrier-mediated across Caco-2 cell monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøhr, Martha Kampp; Hansen, Steen Honoré; Brodin, Birger;

    2014-01-01

    Vigabatrin is an anti-epileptic drug substance. The oral bioavailability of vigabatrin is high (60-70%), however, little is known about the mechanism(s) mediating the intestinal absorption. The aim of the present study was to identify which solute carrier(s) are involved in the absorption...... of the human proton-coupled amino acid transporter (hPAT1) to the apical solution. The present study indicates that the transepithelial A-B flux of vigabatrin is mainly mediated by hPAT1 in Caco-2 cells at dose-relevant concentrations....

  20. Comparison of outcomes following a switch from a brand to an authorized vs. independent generic drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Richard A; Qian, Jingjing; Berg, Richard L; Linneman, James G; Seoane-Vazquez, Enrique; Dutcher, Sarah; Raofi, Saeid; Page, C David; Peissig, Peggy L

    2016-12-16

    Authorized generics are identical in formulation to brand drugs, manufactured by the brand company but marketed as a generic. Generics, marketed by generic manufacturers, are required to demonstrate pharmaceutical and bioequivalence to the brand drug, but repetition of clinical trials is not required. This retrospective cohort study compared outcomes for generics and authorized generics, which serves as a generic vs. brand proxy that minimizes bias against generics. For the seven drugs studied between 1999-2014, 5,234 unique patients were on brand drug prior to generic entry and 4,900 (93.6%) switched to a generic. During the 12-months following the brand-to-generic switch, patients using generics vs. authorized generics were similar in terms of outpatient visits, urgent care visits, hospitalizations, and medication discontinuation. The likelihood of emergency department visits was slightly higher for authorized generics compared with generics. These data suggest that generics were clinically no worse than their proxy brand comparator. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessment of oral side effects of Antiepileptic drugs and traumatic oro-facial injuries encountered in Epileptic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafoor, P A Fazal; Rafeeq, Mohammed; Dubey, Alok

    2014-04-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic disorder with unpredictably recurring seizure. Uncontrolled attacks can put patients at risk of suffering oro-facial trauma. Antiepileptic drugs (AED) provide satisfactory control of seizures in most of the patients with epilepsy. However use of AED has been found to cause many side effects inclusive of side effects in the oral cavity also. This study was conducted on 150 epileptic children, who were on anti epileptic medication for one year. Gingival over growth was seen as common side effect of the AED drugs. Lip and cheek biting were the most common soft tissue injury, while tooth fracture was the most common hard tissue dental injury. General physicians, physicians & dentists should be well aware of the potential side effects of AED. A Dentist should be well versed and trained to manage oro-facial injuries in the emergency department. How to cite the article: Ghafoor PA, Rafeeq M, Dubey A. Assessment of oral side effects of Antiepileptic drugs and traumaticoro-facial injuries encountered in Epileptic children. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(2):126-8.

  2. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 decreases the concentrations of antiepileptic drugs in cortical extracellular fluid in amygdale kindling rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-hui CHEN; Cui-cui WANG; Xia XIAO; Li WEI; Guoxiong XU

    2013-01-01

    Aim:To investigate whether multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) was responsible for drug resistence in refractory epilepsy in amygdale kindling rats.Methods:Rat amygdale kindling was used as a model of refractory epilepsy.The expression of MRP1 mRNA and protein in the brains was examined using RT-PCR and Western blot.MRP1-positive cells in the cortex and hippocampus were studied with immunohistochemical staining.The rats were intraperitoneally injected with phenytoin (50 mg/kg) or carbamazepine (20 mg/kg),and their concentrations in the cortical extracellular fluid were measured using microdialysis and HPLC.Probenecid,a MRP1 inhibitor (40 mmol/L,50 μL) was administered through an inflow tube into the cortex 30 min before injection of the antiepileptic drugs.Results:The expression of MRP1 mRNA and protein was significantly up-regulated in the cortex and hippocampus in amygdale kindling rats compared with the control group.Furthermore,the number of MRP1-positive cells in the cortex and hippocampus was also significantly increased in amygdale kindling rats.Microdialysis studies showed that the concentrations of phenytoin and carbamazepine in the cortical extracellular fluid were significantly decreased in amygdale kindling rats.Pre-administration of probenecid could restore the concentrations back to their control levels.Conclusion:Up-regulation of MRP1 is responsible for the resistance of brain cells to antiepileptic drugs in the amygdale kindling rats.

  3. Quality of Reporting of Bioequivalence Trials Comparing Generic to Brand Name Drugs: A Methodological Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Amélie van der Meersch; Agnès Dechartres; Philippe Ravaud

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Generic drugs are used by millions of patients for economic reasons, so their evaluation must be highly transparent. OBJECTIVE: To assess the quality of reporting of bioequivalence trials comparing generic to brand-name drugs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: PubMed was searched for reports of bioequivalence trials comparing generic to brand-name drugs between January 2005 and December 2008. Articles were included if the aim of the study was to assess the bioequivalency of generic ...

  4. Bioequivalence of generic drugs: a simple explanation for a US Food and Drug Administration requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2015-06-01

    There is a widespread misconception that for a generic drug to be deemed bioequivalent to a branded drug, it must contain 80%-125% of the active ingredient that is present in the branded version. More correctly, bioequivalence is studied in randomized crossover trials that compare the generic drug with the reference agent, and the relevant outcome measures are pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters such as peak drug concentration and area under the curve, which describe the rate and extent of absorption of the drug. The ratio of each PK characteristic of the generic drug to the reference drug is computed; the ideal value of this ratio is 1:1, or just 1.00 (indicating a perfect match, or perfect bioequivalence). Because this ideal is probably unattainable, the US Food and Drug Administration requires that the 90% confidence interval of the PK ratio should lie between 0.80 and 1.25. For the entire 90% confidence interval to meet this requirement, the mean PK value of the generic product should actually lie quite close to that of the reference standard. Therefore, the variation between the generic and the reference is actually small. These concepts are explained in this article with the help of simple, easy-to-understand examples.

  5. 药物基因组学与抗癫(癎)药物治疗%Pharmacogenomics and antiepileptic drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴晔

    2015-01-01

    药物基因组学是在整个基因组水平,通过探讨基因的DNA或RNA的变异与药物效应和不良反应之间的相关性,来研究基因的变异对于个体对药物反应的影响.药物基因组学研究的最终目的是实现个体化治疗.现就药物基因组学在抗癫(癎)药物治疗中的角色进行简述.%Pharmacogenomics is defined as the study of variation in DNA and RNA at the whole genome level,and its effects on drug response including effectiveness and adverse events.Pharmacogenomics is helpful for individualized drug therapy.The role of pharmacogenomics in antiepileptic drugs in therapy of epilepsy was briefly reviewed.

  6. Effect of hydrochlorothiazide on the anticonvulsant action of antiepileptic drugs against maximal electroshock-induced seizures in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łukawski, Krzysztof; Swiderska, Grażyna; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ), a thiazide-type diuretic and an antihypertensive drug, on the anticonvulsant activity of numerous antiepileptic drugs (AEDs: carbamazepine--CBZ, phenytoin--PHT, valproate--VPA, phenobarbital--PB, oxcarbazepine--OXC, lamotrigine--LTG and topiramate--TPM). The effects of HCTZ and AEDs on convulsions were examined in the maximal electroshock seizure (MES) test in mice. Additionally, adverse effects of combined treatment with HCTZ and the AEDs in the passive avoidance task and chimney test were assessed. All drugs were injected intraperitoneally (ip) at single doses. The data obtained indicate that HCTZ (100 mg ip) enhanced the anticonvulsant action of CBZ, decreasing its ED(50) value from 11.9 to 7.7 mg/kg (p anticonvulsant potency. Acute HCTZ may positively influence the anticonvulsant action of CBZ in epileptic patients.

  7. Effect of second-generation antiepileptic drugs on diplopia: a meta-analysis of placebo-controlled studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Haiyan; Qu, Wensheng; Kang, Huicong; Hu, Xiaoqing; Zhen, Guohua; Zhu, Suiqiang; Xue, Zheng

    2012-08-01

    Different antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) may cause similar adverse effects, one of which is diplopia. However, the AEDs causing diplopia and the dose-response effect of each drug remains uncertain. In this study, we compared several second-generation AEDs to find out whether they would contribute to the risk of diplopia and their effect-causing dose. A meta-analysis was performed on 19 studies in agreement with our inclusion criteria. The results showed that eight commonly used second-generation AEDs (gabapentin, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine, pregabalin, topiramate, vigabatrin and zonisamide) could cause diplopia. The reported odds ratios (ORs) ranged from 1.406 to 7.996. Ranking risks from the highest to the lowest ORs of the eight AEDs of any dose resulted in the following order: use of oxcarbazepine (7.996), levetiracetam (7.472), lamotrigine (5.258), vigabatrin (3.562), pregabalin (3.048), topiramate (2.660), gabapentin (1.966), zonisamide (1.406). Taking into account the ORs above, we can conclude that second-generation AEDs of any dose may cause diplopia. However, the levetiracetam-caused diplopia needs to be further studied according to the data (OR, 7.472; 95% confidence interval, 0.375-148.772). These findings ask for better concerns about patients' quality of life when giving antiepileptic treatments.

  8. Effect of magnesium oxide on the activity of standard anti-epileptic drugs against experimental seizures in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhande Priti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : To study the effect of oral magnesium oxide supplementation alone and on the activity of standard anti-epileptic drugs in the animal models of maximal electroshock seizures (MES and chemically (pentylenetetrazole [PTZ]-induced seizures. Methods : Healthy male albino rats were given magnesium oxide (MgO supplementation orally in various doses (500, 750 and 1000 mg/kg /day for 4 weeks (day 1 to day 28. On day 0 and day 29, response to MES (180 mA for 0.2 s was tested 1 h after pre-administration of phenytoin or carbamazepine orally. Similarly, in the other groups, the response to PTZ 40 mg/kg i.p. was tested 1 h after pre-administration of oral sodium valproate. Results : Oral administration of MgO in a low dose (500 mg/kg for 4 weeks in healthy rats appears to exert protective effect against MES. High oral doses of MgO (750 and 1000 mg/kg appear to enhance the activity of phenytoin and carbamazepine in the MES model. MgO supplementation was seen to decrease the latency of PTZ-induced seizures. Conclusion : The dose of oral MgO appears to have an inverse relation with the protective effect in MES-induced seizure model. High doses of MgO supplementation given orally appear to enhance the activity of standard anti-epileptic drugs in the MES-induced seizure model.

  9. Comparing Generic Drug Markets in Europe and the United States: Prices, Volumes, and Spending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Olivier J; Kanavos, Panos G; McKEE, Martin

    2017-09-01

    Policy Points: Our study indicates that there are opportunities for cost savings in generic drug markets in Europe and the United States. Regulators should make it easier for generic drugs to reach the market. Regulators and payers should apply measures to stimulate price competition among generic drugmakers and to increase generic drug use. To meaningfully evaluate policy options, it is important to analyze historical context and understand why similar initiatives failed previously. Rising drug prices are putting pressure on health care budgets. Policymakers are assessing how they can save money through generic drugs. We compared generic drug prices and market shares in 13 European countries, using data from 2013, to assess the amount of variation that exists between countries. To place these results in context, we reviewed evidence from recent studies on the prices and use of generics in Europe and the United States. We also surveyed peer-reviewed studies, gray literature, and books published since 2000 to (1) outline existing generic drug policies in European countries and the United States; (2) identify ways to increase generic drug use and to promote price competition among generic drug companies; and (3) explore barriers to implementing reform of generic drug policies, using a historical example from the United States as a case study. The prices and market shares of generics vary widely across Europe. For example, prices charged by manufacturers in Switzerland are, on average, more than 2.5 times those in Germany and more than 6 times those in the United Kingdom, based on the results of a commonly used price index. The proportion of prescriptions filled with generics ranges from 17% in Switzerland to 83% in the United Kingdom. By comparison, the United States has historically had low generic drug prices and high rates of generic drug use (84% in 2013), but has in recent years experienced sharp price increases for some off-patent products. There are policy

  10. Isobolographic analysis of interactions between loreclezole and conventional antiepileptic drugs in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Ratnaraj, Neville; Patsalos, Philip N; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2006-05-01

    This study examined the interaction characteristics between loreclezole (LCZ) and various conventional antiepileptic drugs (phenytoin--PHT, carbamazepine--CBZ, valproate--VPA and phenobarbital--PB) in the mouse maximal electroshock (MES)-induced seizure model using isobolographic analysis. Drug-related adverse effects were ascertained by use of the chimney test (motor impairment) and the step-through passive avoidance task (learning and retrieval). It was observed that the combination of LCZ with VPA or PB, at the fixed ratio of 1:1, was supra-additive (synergistic) and the combination of LCZ with CBZ, at all fixed ratios tested (1:3, 1:1 and 3:1), was supra-additive against electroconvulsions. The remaining combinations evaluated, i.e., LCZ with PB or VPA at fixed ratios of 1:3 and 3:1, as well as all fixed-ratio combinations between LCZ and PHT, were additive in the MES test in mice. Pharmacokinetic characterization revealed that LCZ significantly increased both free plasma and brain concentrations of CBZ and PHT, but was without effect on PB. Moreover, a bi-directional pharmacokinetic interaction between LCZ and VPA was observed in that while LCZ increased free plasma, but not total brain VPA concentrations, VPA increased the total brain, but not free plasma LCZ concentrations. Adverse-effect testing revealed that for all antiepileptic drug combinations neither motor performance nor long-term memory was altered. Of the drug combinations investigated, only that of LCZ and PB at the fixed ratio of 1:1 was not associated with any pharmacokinetic interactions, and thus it may be concluded that the supra-additive (synergistic) isobolographic interaction was pharmacodynamic in nature. Furthermore, the fact that LCZ and PB have similar mechanisms of action would suggest that drugs with similar mechanisms of action may provide rational polytherapy regimens.

  11. Certain secondary antiepileptic drugs can rescue hippocampal injury following a critical growth period despite poor anticonvulsant activity and cognitive deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbsgut, Lisa R; Fahim, Eiris; Kapoor, Karnika; Hong, Henry; Friedman, Linda K

    2013-12-01

    Clinical and experimental studies have shown that many common secondary antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are ineffective at blocking seizures in adulthood; however, some afford neuroprotection. In early development, certain AEDs cause apoptosis; however, it is unknown whether these drugs are neurotoxic to the juvenile brain following a developmentally regulated proapoptotic period and whether they alter the seizure threshold, seizure-induced neuronal vulnerability, and/or cognitive function. Lamotrigine (LTG), carbamazepine (CBZ), phenytoin (PHT), valproate (VPA), and topiramate (TPM) were systemically administered to rat pups for 7days beginning on postnatal (P) day 14 (P14), then half the animals were injected with kainate (KA) to trigger seizures, an age when the CA1 subregion becomes preferentially sensitive to status epilepticus. Histological outcome, seizure severity, and learning and memory were determined with an electroencephalograph (EEG), silver impregnation, and a water-maze swim task. None of the AEDs tested significantly attenuated behavioral or electrographic seizures. Phenytoin increased mortality, identifying a detrimental side effect of this drug. The other drugs (LTG, VPA, TPM, and CBZ) afforded different amounts of protection to the CA1 subregion but not to the CA3 subregion or extrahippocampal structures. With the exception of VPA, AED-treated animals lagged behind during swim task acquisition. All groups improved in the water-maze swim task over time, particularly on the last trials; however, the average escape latency was still impaired for TPM-treated animals and all AED+KA-treated groups. Thus, while certain AEDs demonstrated some neuroprotective effects, poor antiepileptic activity, memory impairment, and other deleterious side effects were observed with these drugs suggesting that the search for potentially more effective and tolerated agents is essential for improving clinical outcome in children and adolescents with epilepsy. © 2013.

  12. The generic drug market in Japan: will it finally take off?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Toshiaki; Kubo, Kensuke

    2011-07-01

    Historically, brand-name pharmaceuticals have enjoyed long periods of market exclusivity in Japan, given the limited use of generics after patent expiration. To improve the efficiency of the health-care system, however, the government has recently implemented various policies aimed at increasing generic substitution. Although this has created expectations that the Japanese generic drug market may finally take off, to date, generic usage has increased only modestly. After reviewing the incentives of key market participants to choose generics, we argue that previous government policies did not provide proper incentives for pharmacies to boost generic substitution. We offer some recommendations that may help to increase generic usage.

  13. Drug-related hospital admissions in a generic pharmaceutical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargarzadeh, A H; Emami, M H; Hosseini, F

    2007-01-01

    1. Generically based pharmaceutical systems exist in a few countries of the world, such as Iran. Most developed countries have free market pharmaceutical systems. Drug-related problems (DRP) have been reported mostly in the Western world but few data are available for generic systems. In this study, we tried to measure the prevalence of drug-related problems leading to hospital admissions in Isfahan, Iran. 2. One thousand consecutive hospital admissions in three major teaching hospitals were studied for a period of 6 months for the presence of DRP as a cause of hospital admissions. Two subcategories of DRP were considered: (i) drug therapy failure; and (ii) adverse drug reactions. Preventability and outcome measures were also assessed. Medications responsible for DRP were classified according to the Anatomic Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification of the World Health Organization. 3. Of the 1000 admissions studied, 115 (11.5%) were owing to DRP, 81% as a result of drug therapy failure and 19% as adverse drug reactions. A total of 106 out of the 115 DRP cases (92%) were either preventable or probably preventable, most of which had to do with either prescriber or patient error. An overview of DRP showed that 58.3% resulted in complete recovery, 33.9% in relative recovery and 7.8% in death. Close to 1% of hospital admissions resulted in DRP-related deaths. 4. The overall prevalence of hospital admissions caused by DRP is similar to that in free market pharmaceutical systems. The high preventability rate of these problems should alert clinicians and policy makers to design strategies to curtail this. Also, reasons for differences in subtypes of DRP between the results of this study and those of the literature from free market systems needs to be investigated further.

  14. Strategies that delay or prevent the timely availability of affordable generic drugs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gregory H; Carrier, Michael A; Silver, Richard T; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2016-03-17

    High cancer drug prices are influenced by the availability of generic cancer drugs in a timely manner. Several strategies have been used to delay the availability of affordable generic drugs into the United States and world markets. These include reverse payment or pay-for-delay patent settlements, authorized generics, product hopping, lobbying against cross-border drug importation, buying out the competition, and others. In this forum, we detail these strategies and how they can be prevented.

  15. [Perception, knowledge, and use of generic drugs in southern Brazil: what changed from 2002 to 2012?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttier, Marília Cruz; Silveira, Marysabel Pinto Telis; Luiza, Vera Lucia; Bertoldi, Andréa Dâmaso

    2016-08-01

    This study compared the perception, knowledge, and use of generic drugs by adults in Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, using two cross-sectional population-based studies from 2002 and 2012. Study outcomes were: (a) prevalence of use of generics; (b) generics as a proportion of all medication; (c) users' perceptions of prices and quality; (d) users' knowledge of generics; and (e) strategies for acquisition of medicines. Prevalence of generics use increased from 3.6% (95%CI: 3.0-4.3) to 26.1% (95%CI: 24.5-27.7) in the 10-year period. Perceptions of prices and quality of generics remained stable, identification of characteristics that distinguish generics from other drugs improved (p generics. Between 2002 and 2012 there was an increase in knowledge and use of generics, while perception of lower prices and equivalent quality remained high.

  16. A Review for the Analysis of Antidepressant, Antiepileptic and Quinolone Type Drugs in Pharmaceuticals and Environmental Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Susheela; Malik, Ashok Kumar; Kaur, Ramandeep; Kaur, Ripneel

    2016-09-02

    The analysis of drugs in various biological fluids is an important criterion for the determination of the physiological performance of a drug. After sampling of the biological fluid, the next step in the analytical process is sample preparation. Sample preparation is essential for isolation of desired components from complex biological matrices and greatly influences their reliable and accurate determination. The complexity of biological fluids adds to the challenge of direct determination of the drug by chromatographic analysis, therefore demanding a sample preparation step that is often time consuming, tedious and frequently overlooked. However, direct online injection methods offer the advantage of reducing sample preparation steps and enabling effective pre-concentration and clean-up of biological fluids. These procedures can be automated and therefore reduce the requirements for handling potentially infectious biomaterial, improve reproducibility, and minimize sample manipulations and potential contamination. This review is focused on the discovery and development of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography (GC) with different detectors. The drugs covered in this review are antiepileptics, antidepressant (AD), and quinolones. The application of these methods for determination of these drugs in biological, environmental and pharmaceutical samples has also been discussed.

  17. USE OF THE NEW ANTIEPILEPTIC DRUG PERAMPANEL (FYCOMPA IN THE TREATMENT OF EPILEPSY: A REVIEW OF FOREIGN LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Pylaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite a considerable advance made in epileptology, resistant epilepsies are about 30% among all epilepsy types particularly in patients with focal seizures. In these cases, there is hope for the success of neurosurgical treatment and the synthesis of new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs. The authors provide a review of the literature dealing the new AED perampanel (Fycompa and consider its mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, clinical and postmarketing trials of its efficacy, tolerability, and safety. Based on the data available in the literature, it may be concluded that parampanel is a promising highly effective and well tolerated AED to treat partial and secondary generalized seizures.

  18. Modulation of antioxidant enzymatic activities by certain antiepileptic drugs (valproic acid, oxcarbazepine, and topiramate): evidence in humans and experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Romero-Toledo, Arantxa; Sampieri, Aristides; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; Montesinos-Correa, Hortencia; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that at least 100 million people worldwide will suffer from epilepsy at some point in their lives. This neurological disorder induces brain death due to the excessive liberation of glutamate, which activates the postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, which in turn cause the reuptake of intracellular calcium (excitotoxicity). This excitotoxicity elicits a series of events leading to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activation and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Several studies in experimental models and in humans have demonstrated that certain antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) exhibit antioxidant effects by modulating the activity of various enzymes associated with this type of stress. Considering the above-mentioned data, we aimed to compile evidence elucidating how AEDs such as valproic acid (VPA), oxcarbazepine (OXC), and topiramate (TPM) modulate oxidative stress.

  19. Quantitative EEG and Current Source Density Analysis of Combined Antiepileptic Drugs and Dopaminergic Agents in Genetic Epilepsy: Two Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emory, Hamlin; Wells, Christopher; Mizrahi, Neptune

    2015-07-01

    Two adolescent females with absence epilepsy were classified, one as attention deficit and the other as bipolar disorder. Physical and cognitive exams identified hypotension, bradycardia, and cognitive dysfunction. Their initial electroencephalograms (EEGs) were considered slightly slow, but within normal limits. Quantitative EEG (QEEG) data included relative theta excess and low alpha mean frequencies. A combined treatment of antiepileptic drugs with a catecholamine agonist/reuptake inhibitor was sequentially used. Both patients' physical and cognitive functions improved and they have remained seizure free. The clinical outcomes were correlated with statistically significant changes in QEEG measures toward normal Z-scores in both anterior and posterior regions. In addition, low resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) Z-scored source correlation analyses of the initial and treated QEEG data showed normalized patterns, supporting a neuroanatomic resolution. This study presents preliminary evidence for a neurophysiologic approach to patients with absence epilepsy and comorbid disorders and may provide a method for further research.

  20. Modulation of Antioxidant Enzymatic Activities by Certain Antiepileptic Drugs (Valproic Acid, Oxcarbazepine, and Topiramate): Evidence in Humans and Experimental Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Romero-Toledo, Arantxa; Sampieri, Aristides III; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; Montesinos-Correa, Hortencia; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that at least 100 million people worldwide will suffer from epilepsy at some point in their lives. This neurological disorder induces brain death due to the excessive liberation of glutamate, which activates the postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, which in turn cause the reuptake of intracellular calcium (excitotoxicity). This excitotoxicity elicits a series of events leading to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activation and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Several studies in experimental models and in humans have demonstrated that certain antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) exhibit antioxidant effects by modulating the activity of various enzymes associated with this type of stress. Considering the above-mentioned data, we aimed to compile evidence elucidating how AEDs such as valproic acid (VPA), oxcarbazepine (OXC), and topiramate (TPM) modulate oxidative stress. PMID:24454986

  1. Modulation of Antioxidant Enzymatic Activities by Certain Antiepileptic Drugs (Valproic Acid, Oxcarbazepine, and Topiramate: Evidence in Humans and Experimental Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemí Cárdenas-Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that at least 100 million people worldwide will suffer from epilepsy at some point in their lives. This neurological disorder induces brain death due to the excessive liberation of glutamate, which activates the postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA receptors, which in turn cause the reuptake of intracellular calcium (excitotoxicity. This excitotoxicity elicits a series of events leading to nitric oxide synthase (NOS activation and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Several studies in experimental models and in humans have demonstrated that certain antiepileptic drugs (AEDs exhibit antioxidant effects by modulating the activity of various enzymes associated with this type of stress. Considering the above-mentioned data, we aimed to compile evidence elucidating how AEDs such as valproic acid (VPA, oxcarbazepine (OXC, and topiramate (TPM modulate oxidative stress.

  2. Pregnancy outcome in women exposed to antiepileptic drugs: teratogenic role of maternal epilepsy and its pharmacologic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassina, Matteo; Dilaghi, Arianna; Di Gianantonio, Elena; Cesari, Elena; De Santis, Marco; Mannaioni, Guido; Pistelli, Alessandra; Clementi, Maurizio

    2013-08-01

    Infants born to epileptic women treated with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have an increased risk of major congenital malformations (MCMs). In order to determine the role of maternal epilepsy we conducted a prospective cohort study on three cohorts of pregnant women: (i) 385 epileptic women treated with AEDs, (ii) 310 non-epileptic women treated with AEDs, (iii) 867 healthy women not exposed to AEDs (control group). The rate of MCMs in the epileptic group (7.7%) was not statistically higher than in the non-epileptic one (3.9%) (p=0.068). The rate in the first group was higher compared to the control group (p=0.001), while the rate in the second one was not (p=0.534). Our data confirm that AEDs therapy is the main cause of the increased risk of malformations in the offspring of epileptic women; however a teratogenic role of the maternal epilepsy itself cannot be excluded.

  3. Cognitive consequences of early versus late antiepileptic drug withdrawal after pediatric epilepsy surgery, the TimeToStop (TTS) trial : study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boshuisen, Kim; Lamberink, Herm J; van Schooneveld, Monique MJ; Cross, J Helen; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; van der Tweel, Ingeborg; Geleijns, Karin; Uiterwaal, Cuno Spm; Braun, Kees PJ

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The goals of intentional curative pediatric epilepsy surgery are to achieve seizure-freedom and antiepileptic drug (AED) freedom. Retrospective cohort studies have indicated that early postoperative AED withdrawal unmasks incomplete surgical success and AED dependency sooner, but not at

  4. Interactions between non-barbiturate injectable anesthetics and conventional antiepileptic drugs in the maximal electroshock test in mice--an isobolographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowicz, Kinga K; Łuszczki, Jarogniew; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was the isobolographic evaluation of interactions between three non-barbiturate intravenous anesthetics and conventional antiepileptic drugs in the maximal electroshock-induced seizures in mice. Electroconvulsions were produced by means of an alternating current (ear-clip electrodes, 0.2-s stimulus duration, tonic hindlimb extension taken as the endpoint). Adverse effects were evaluated in the chimney test (motor performance) and passive avoidance task (long-term memory). Plasma levels of antiepileptic drugs were measured by immunofluorescence. Obtained results indicate that ketamine acts synergistically with valproate and carbamazepine. Also the combinations of propofol and valproate or phenobarbital led to synergistic interactions. An antagonism was found between etomidate and carbamazepine or phenobarbital. On the other hand, interactions between diphenylhydantoin and injectable anesthetics proved to be additive. The only exception was the combination of diphenylhydantoin and propofol (1:3). Pharmacokinetic phenomena do not seem to interfere with the observed interactions, since none of anesthetics influenced the free plasma concentrations of antiepileptic drugs. Referring to undesired effects, only propofol impaired long-term memory. Although propofol did not disturbed motor coordination, it enhanced motor impairment caused by carbamazepine and diphenylhydantoin. Results of the present study suggest that etomidate needs to be avoided in epileptic patients due to a possibility of negative interactions with some antiepileptic drugs and seizure precipitation.

  5. Long-term neurological outcome of term-born children treated with two or more anti-epileptic drugs during the neonatal period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, Mariska J.; Roze, Elise; van der Veere, Christa N.; ter Horst, Hendrik J.; Brouwer, Oebele F.; Bos, Arend F.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Neonatal seizures may persist despite treatment with multiple anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). Objective: To determine in term-born infants with seizures that required two or more AEDs, whether treatment efficacy and/or the underlying disorder were related to neurological outcome. Design/met

  6. Influence of MPEP (a selective mGluR5 antagonist) on the anticonvulsant action of novel antiepileptic drugs against maximal electroshock-induced seizures in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolkowska, Dorota; Kondrat-Wrobel, Maria W; Florek-Luszczki, Magdalena; Luszczki, Jarogniew J

    2016-02-04

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP - a selective antagonist for the glutamate metabotropic receptor subtype mGluR5) on the protective action of some novel antiepileptic drugs (lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, pregabalin and topiramate) against maximal electroshock-induced seizures in mice. Brain concentrations of antiepileptic drugs were measured to determine whether MPEP altered pharmacokinetics of antiepileptic drugs. Intraperitoneal injection of 1.5 and 2mg/kg of MPEP significantly elevated the threshold for electroconvulsions in mice, whereas MPEP at a dose of 1mg/kg considerably enhanced the anticonvulsant activity of pregabalin and topiramate, but not that of lamotrigine or oxcarbazepine in the maximal electroshock-induced seizures in mice. Pharmacokinetic results revealed that MPEP (1mg/kg) did not alter total brain concentrations of pregabalin and topiramate, and the observed effect in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure model was pharmacodynamic in nature. Collectively, our preclinical data suggest that MPEP may be a safe and beneficial adjunct to the therapeutic effects of antiepileptic drugs in human patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Maternal use of antiepileptic drugs and the risk of major congenital malformations: a joint European prospective study of human teratogenesis associated with maternal epilepsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.B. Samren (Bettina); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); S. Koch; V.K. Hiilesma; H. Klepel; A.H. Bardy; B. Mannegetta; A.W. Deichl; E. Gaily; M.L. Granstrom; H. Meinardi; D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); D. Lindhout (Dick); A. Hofman (Albert)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: To quantify the risks of intrauterine antiepileptic drug (AED) exposure in monotherapy and polytherapy. METHODS: Data from five prospective European studies totaling 1,379 children were pooled and reanalyzed. Data were available for 1,221 children exposed to AED during pregnancy

  8. Long-term neurological outcome of term-born children treated with two or more anti-epileptic drugs during the neonatal period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, Mariska J.; Roze, Elise; van der Veere, Christa N.; ter Horst, Hendrik J.; Brouwer, Oebele F.; Bos, Arend F.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Neonatal seizures may persist despite treatment with multiple anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). Objective: To determine in term-born infants with seizures that required two or more AEDs, whether treatment efficacy and/or the underlying disorder were related to neurological outcome. Design/met

  9. Zebrafish embryotoxicity test for developmental (neuro)toxicity: Demo case of an integrated screening approach system using anti-epileptic drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beker van Woudenberg, A.; Snel, C.; Rijkmans, E.; Groot, D. de; Bouma, M.; Hermsen, S.; Piersma, A.; Menke, A.; Wolterbeek, A.

    2014-01-01

    To improve the predictability of the zebrafish embryotoxicity test (ZET) for developmental (neuro)toxicity screening, we used a multiple-endpoints strategy, including morphology, motor activity (MA), histopathology and kinetics. The model compounds used were antiepileptic drugs (AEDs): valproic acid

  10. Zebrafish embryotoxicity test for developmental (neuro)toxicity : Demo case of an integrated screening approach system using anti-epileptic drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beker van Woudenberg, Anna; Snel, Cor; Rijkmans, Eke; De Groot, Didima; Bouma, Marga; Hermsen, Sanne; Piersma, Aldert; Menke, Aswin; Wolterbeek, André

    2014-01-01

    To improve the predictability of the zebrafish embryotoxicity test (ZET) for developmental (neuro)toxicity screening, we used a multiple-endpoints strategy, including morphology, motor activity (MA), histopathology and kinetics. The model compounds used were antiepileptic drugs (AEDs): valproic acid

  11. Factors influencing the preference for purchasing generic drugs in a Southern Brazilian city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Cruz Guttier

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE The objective of this study is to identify factors associated with the preference for purchasing generic drugs in a medium-sized municipality in Southern Brazil. METHODS We have analyzed data from a population-based cross-sectional study conducted in 2012 with a sample of 2,856 adults (≥ 20 years old. The preference for purchasing generic drugs was the main outcome. The explanatory variables were the demographic and socioeconomic variables. Statistical analyses included Poisson regressions. RESULTS The preference for purchasing generic drugs was 63.2% (95%CI 61.4–64.9. The variables correlated with this preference in the fully adjusted models were: male (prevalence ratio [PR] = 1.08; 95%CI 1.03–1.14, age of 20–39 years (PR = 1.10; 95%CI 1.02–1.20, low socioeconomic status (PR = 1.15; 95%CI 1.03–1.28, and good knowledge about generic drugs (PR= 4.66; 95%CI 2.89–7.52. Among those who preferred to purchase generic drugs, 55.1% have reported accepting to replace the prescribed drug (if not a generic with the equivalent generic drug. Another correlate of the preference for purchasing generic drugs was because individuals consider their quality equivalent to reference medicines (PR = 2.15; 95%CI 1.93–2.41. CONCLUSIONS Knowledge about generic drugs was the main correlate of the preference for purchasing generic drugs. The greater the knowledge or positive perception about generic drugs, the greater is the preference to purchase them. Therefore, educational campaigns for healthcare professionals and consumers appear to be the best strategy for expanding the use of generic drugs in Brazil.

  12. An Australian nationwide survey on medicinal cannabis use for epilepsy: History of antiepileptic drug treatment predicts medicinal cannabis use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suraev, Anastasia S; Todd, Lisa; Bowen, Michael T; Allsop, David J; McGregor, Iain S; Ireland, Carol; Lintzeris, Nicholas

    2017-05-01

    Epilepsy Action Australia conducted an Australian nationwide online survey seeking opinions on and experiences with the use of cannabis-based products for the treatment of epilepsy. The survey was promoted via the Epilepsy Action Australia's main website, on their Facebook page, and by word of mouth. The survey consisted of 39 questions assessing demographics, clinical factors, including diagnosis and seizure types, and experiences with and opinions towards cannabis use in epilepsy. A total of 976 responses met the inclusion criteria. Results show that 15% of adults with epilepsy and 13% of parents/guardians of children with epilepsy were currently using, or had previously used, cannabis products to treat epilepsy. Of those with a history of cannabis product use, 90% of adults and 71% of parents reported success in reducing seizure frequency after commencing cannabis products. The main reasons for medicinal cannabis use were to manage treatment-resistant epilepsy and to obtain a more favorable side-effect profile compared to standard antiepileptic drugs. The number of past antiepileptic drugs tried was a significant predictor of medicinal cannabis use in both adults and children with epilepsy. Fifty-six percent of adults with epilepsy and 62% of parents/guardians of children with epilepsy expressed willingness to participate in clinical trials of cannabinoids. This survey provides insight into the use of cannabis products for epilepsy, in particular some of the likely factors influencing use, as well as novel insights into the experiences of and attitudes towards medicinal cannabis in people with epilepsy in the Australian community. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Cannabinoids and Epilepsy". Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Factors affecting the opinions of family physicians regarding generic drugs – a questionnaire based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Lewek

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A range of factors are believed to exert a negative influence on opinions of physicians about generic drugs.The aim of this study was to survey the opinions of primary care doctors on generics, and determine the factors which may affect them. A questionnaire comprising thirty eight questions was distributed among primary care doctors working in seventy out-patient clinics of the Lodzkie province, Poland, during the period of January 1, 2010 – December 31, 2010. A total of170 of 183 participants completed the survey (average age 48.5; 70.0% women: a 92.9%response rate. While 38.8% of physicians claimed that generics were worse than brand name drugs, 54.1% considered them to be better. However, 36.5% of the doctors did not choose generics for their own use. Two key opinions were identified among the responses concerning the effectiveness of generic drugs: use of generic drugs by the physician (p<0.001, and their opinion that pharmacists do inform patients about generic drugs (p<0.05. Although existing evidence confirms that generic and brand name drugs are equally effective, many physicians doubt this, which prevents them from being used as cost effective drug therapy. In order to increase healthcare savings through the use of generics, these factors should be addressed: for example, convincing a physician to adopt generics for personal use may be an efficient way to support more cost effective treatment of his patients.

  14. [What are patients' attitudes towards generic drugs? The example of metformin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allenet, Benoît; Golay, Alain

    2013-05-08

    The success of cost containment with generic drugs is based on consumer's willingness to accept substitution. This investigation reveals 3 major themes that can explain attitudes of patients towards generics: 1) personal beliefs and knowledge (coming from the media issues, family, friends) are fragmented and sometimes erroneous, with a background of suspicion on the quality of the generics; 2) relation with the prescriber (indirectly pharmacist) is central to build up patient's trust; suspicious professionals generate an anxious patient; 3) previous experience from the consumer with generics. Starting from patients' experiences and beliefs allows to anticipate their resistance to the generic and to adapt drug prescription choices.

  15. Development of the generic drug industry in the US after the Hatch-Waxman Act of 1984

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garth Boehm

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The key events in the development of the US generic drug industry after the Hatch-Waxman Act of 1984 are systematically reviewed, including the process of approval for generic drugs, bioequivalence issues including “switchability”, bioequivalence for complicated dosage forms, patent extension, generic drug safety, generic substitution and low-cost generics. The backlog in generic review, generic drug user fees, and “quality by design” for generic drugs is also discussed. The evolution of the US generic drug industry after the Hatch-Waxman Act in 1984 has afforded several lessons of great benefit to other countries wishing to establish or re-establish a domestic generic drug industry.

  16. Seizure type, antiepileptic drugs, and reproductive endocrine dysfunction in Indian women with epilepsy: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahota, Preeti; Prabhakar, Sudesh; Kharbanda, Parampreet S; Bhansali, Anil; Jain, Vanita; Das, Chandi Prasad; Modi, Manish

    2008-12-01

    There is paucity of data regarding occurrence of reproductive endocrine disorders in Asian women with epilepsy (WWE) on antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy. To determine the occurrence of reproductive endocrine disorders in Indian WWE, by seizure type and the AED use. Consecutive 427 reproductive age WWE receiving various AEDs were screened for the occurrence of menstrual abnormalities, weight change, and hirsutism. Of these, 53 WWE with menstrual disturbances and/or hirsutism were further evaluated for ovarian morphology and reproductive hormonal profile. Menstrual abnormalities and/or hirsutism were observed in 83 of 427 (19.4%) WWE irrespective of epileptic seizure type; of these, 50 (60.2%) received valproate, 21 (25.3%) received carbamazepine, 11 (13.3%) received phenytoin, and one (1.2%) received phenobarbitone as the primary AED. Almost half of valproate-treated women had significant weight gain and obesity. Among 53 of 83 women evaluated further, 23.5% and 63.6% of valproate-treated women, 25% and 58.3% of carbamazepine-treated women, and none and 20% of phenytoin-treated women had polycystic ovaries (PCO) and hyperandrogenemia (HA), respectively. Valproate-treated women had significantly higher frequency of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) (11.8% vs. 2.5%, p < 0.0001) and mean serum testrosterone levels (1.78 vs. 1.36 ng/ml, p = 0.03), compared with women treated with other AEDs. Limitations include small number of women in antiepileptic subgroups and a high drop out rate in women who underwent ultrasound and endocrinological investigations. Menstrual abnormalities, weight gain, obesity, and PCOS are frequent and significantly higher in WWE receiving valproate, independent of seizure type.

  17. Use of anti-epileptic drugs in a tertiary care hospital of Eastern India with emphasis on epilepsy due to neurocysticercosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita Sil

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Epilepsy is a chronic disease and neurocysticercosis is an important cause of secondary seizures. Its therapy is modified by a number of parameters and thus the pattern of anti-epileptic drugs used varies in different clinical settings. It was our objective to evaluate clinico-demographic and treatment profile of epilepsy patients attending neurology outpatient department, efficacy and side-effect profile of anti-epileptic drugs with special emphasis on epilepsy resulting from neurocysticercosis. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study of epilepsy patients over four months in neurology outpatient department. Clinico-biological data were obtained by interrogating patients and from recorded data using standard case-report form. Results: 79 patients were studied with 54.43% having primary etiology, 40.51% having seizures secondary to neurocysticercosis. 81% had generalized tonic-clonic seizure, 17.7% partial and 1.3% myoclonic seizures. Phenytoin (86.08%, valproate (30.38%, clobazam (26.58% and carbamazepine (10.13% were used either alone or in combination, with no use of anthelmintics even in cases of neurocysticercosis. Control of seizure was obtained in 79.7% with significant decrease in seizure frequency from 2.92 to 0.51 (P < 0.0001. Weight loss, nausea, decreased appetite, increased sleep, drowsiness, tremors were found to be significantly associated (P < 0.05 with phenytoin use. Conclusion: Phenytoin is the primary antiepileptic in spite of its side effects; though addition of other anti-epileptic drugs (valproate, clobazam was required for better seizure control. Cases of neurocysticercosis respond to anti-epileptic drugs without addition of anthelmintics. Side effects observed were mostly neurological in nature.

  18. HIV/AIDS drugs for Sub-Saharan Africa: how do brand and generic supply compare?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen V Chien

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Significant quantities of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs to treat HIV/AIDS have been procured for Sub-Saharan Africa for the first time in their 20-year history. This presents a novel opportunity to empirically study the roles of brand and generic suppliers in providing access to ARVs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An observational study of brand and generic supply based on a dataset of 2,162 orders of AIDS drugs for Sub-Saharan Africa reported to the Global Price Reporting Mechanism at the World Health Organization from January 2004-March 2006 was performed. Generic companies supplied 63% of the drugs studied, at prices that were on average about a third of the prices charged by brand companies. 96% of the procurement was of first line drugs, which were provided mostly by generic firms, while the remaining 4%, of second line drugs, was sourced primarily from brand companies. 85% of the generic drugs in the sample were manufactured in India, where the majority of the drugs procured were ineligible for patent protection. The remaining 15% was manufactured in South Africa, mostly under voluntary licenses provided by brand companies to a single generic company. In Sub-Saharan African countries, four first line drugs in the dataset were widely patented, however no general deterrent to generic purchasing based on a patent was detected. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Generic and brand companies have played distinct roles in increasing the availability of ARVs in Sub-Saharan Africa. Generic companies provided most of the drugs studied, at prices below those charged by brand companies, and until now, almost exclusively supplied several fixed-dose combination drugs. Brand companies have supplied almost all second line drugs, signed voluntary licenses with generic companies, and are not strictly enforcing patents in certain countries. Further investigation into how price reductions in second line drugs can be achieved and the cheapest drugs can

  19. Formulation and evaluation of an anti-epileptic drug-loaded microemulsion for nose to brain delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawtikwar P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to formulate an anti-epileptic drug-loaded microemulsion for nose-to-brain delivery. The oil system evaluated for the preparation of a stable microemulsion was iso-propyl myristate. A non-ionic surfactant like Tween 80 was used with polyethylene glycol 400 as a co-surfactant. A pseudoternary phase diagram for various proportions of S mix :oil was constructed by the water titration method. The effect of changing concentration of alcohol as a co-surfactant was also studied. The t-phase diagram shows that the water consumption capacity of the system was increased as the surfactant concentration was increased. It was also found that as the concentration of the alcohol was increased, the viscosity of the microemulsion decreased. After the identification of the microemulsion region, the composition of the microemulsion was fixed at oil 9-10%, S mix 35-40% and water 45-50%. The formulated microemulsion was evaluated for various parameters like pH, conductivity, zeta potential, viscosity and in vitro drug diffusion studies. All the evaluation parameters showed satisfactory results. Using this microemulsion, the solubility of valproic acid was increased from 1.29 to 36 mg/ml. Diffusion studies have shown a lag period of 45 min. Thirteen percent drug diffusion was achieved in 3 h. The prepared microemulsion was stable at 40°C and 75% relative humidity.

  20. Associations between generic substitution and patient-related factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard Rathe, Jette

    for Pharmacoepidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Medicine Solna, Stockholm, Sweden 3. Danish Quality Unit of General Practice, Odense, Denmark Background Generic substitution means that chemically equivalent but less expensive drugs are dispensed in place of a brand name product. Although generic medicines...... was made on beliefs about medicine, views on generic medicine and confidence in the health care system. The study comprised 2476 patients (736 users of antidepressants, 795 users of antiepileptics and 945 users of other substitutable drugs). For each patient we focused on one purchase of a generically...

  1. 78 FR 46977 - Generic Drug User Fee-Abbreviated New Drug Application, Prior Approval Supplement, Drug Master...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ..., Prior Approval Supplement, Drug Master File, Final Dosage Form Facility, and Active Pharmaceutical... active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), and finished dosage form (FDF) facilities user fees related to... one or more finished dosage forms of a human generic drug or an active pharmaceutical ingredient...

  2. Is there a role for generic antiretroviral drugs in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormser, Gary P; Lappas, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    The high cost of antiretroviral drugs has limited access to treatment for some HIV-infected patients in the United States and strained public resources. With the introduction of much cheaper generic versions of some of these agents, and with more to come in the next few years, the need increases to define the role of generic antiretroviral drugs in patient management.

  3. WHAT IS THERAPEUTIC EQUIVALENCE OF GENERIC DRUG AND HOW TO PROVE IT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Kutishenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of generic drugs use in clinical practice and confirmation of their therapeutic equivalence is discussed. The significance of studies on generic drugs bioequivalence, as well as details of international practice and regulations in this area is explained.

  4. The Effect of High and Low Antiepileptic Drug Dosage on Simulated Driving Performance in Person's with Seizures: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M. Crizzle

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prior studies examining driving performance have not examined the effects of antiepileptic drugs (AED’s or their dosages in persons with epilepsy. AED’s are the primary form of treatment to control seizures, but they are shown to affect cognition, attention, and vision, all which may impair driving. The purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics of high and low AED dosages on simulated driving performance in persons with seizures. Method: Patients (N = 11; mean age 42.1 ± 6.3; 55% female; 100% Caucasian were recruited from the Epilepsy Monitoring Unit and had their driving assessed on a simulator. Results: No differences emerged in total or specific types of driving errors between high and low AED dosages. However, high AED drug dosage was significantly associated with errors of lane maintenance (r = .67, p < .05 and gap acceptance (r = .66, p < .05. The findings suggest that higher AED dosages may adversely affect driving performance, irrespective of having a diagnosis of epilepsy, conversion disorder, or other medical conditions. Conclusion: Future studies with larger samples are required to examine whether AED dosage or seizure focus alone can impair driving performance in persons with and without seizures.

  5. Effects of long-term administration of the antiepileptic drug--sodium valproate upon the ultrastructure of hepatocytes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobaniec-Lotowska, M E

    1997-08-01

    Chronic intragastric application (1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months) of the antiepileptic drug--sodium valproate (VPA; Vupral "Polfa") to rats in the effective dose of 200 mg/kg b.w./day exerts hepatotoxic effect after 9 and 12 months of the experiment. The first ultrastructural changes in hepatocytes were observed after 3 months of the drug administration. These became more intense in the subsequent stages of the experiment, to be most pronounced after 12 months. The most striking changes were in the mitochondria (significant swelling, an increase in their number, degeneration of matrix and cristae, disruption of the outer mitochondrial membrane) and in peroxisomes (proliferation, enlargement and the presence of distinct nucleoids). Further alterations in hepatocytes manifested themselves in: microvesicular fatty change with cholesterolosis (cholesterol clefts), damage to the cellular membrane of the sinusoidal pole with dilation of the perisinusoidal space of Disse, presence of cystern-like cytoplasmic vacuoles in the sinusoidal region, filled with plasma-like material and focal cytoplasmic necrosis. The changes in hepatocytes coexisted with the swelling and activation of sinusoidal cells, endothelial cells and Kupffer cells. The author suggests that mitochondria and peroxisomes considerably contribute to the morphogenesis of hepatocyte damage by VPA in the chronic experimental model.

  6. Protection from phenytoin-induced congenital malformations by coadministration of the antiepileptic drug stiripentol in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnell, R H; Kerr, B M; van Waes, M; Steward, R L; Levy, R H

    1994-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that the cytochrome P-450-inhibiting antiepileptic drug (AED) stiripentol (STP) can reduce the incidence of phenytoin (PHT) induced congenital malformations, we chronically administered the AEDs to three inbred mouse strains. The frequency of congenital defects in PHT-treated animals was dosage dependent, ranging from 7 to 55%. When STP was coadministered orally with PHT, there was a significant reduction in fetal defects in SWV and C57BL/6J mouse strains. A replication of the experiment was conducted with addition of a seventh group of mice that received the high dosage of PHT together with STP. In the replicate, all three strains demonstrated a significant reduction in fetal defects in fetuses exposed to PHT (60 mg/kg) and STP (200 mg/kg) as compared with PHT (60 mg/kg) monotherapy. These results strongly suggest that oxidative metabolites activated by cytochrome P-450 are the primary teratogenic molecules involved in PHT-induced teratogenesis and that clinical management of pregnant epileptic patients may be improved through heightened awareness of these drug interactions.

  7. 78 FR 70953 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Generic Drug User Fee Amendments of 2012: Questions and Answers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Generic Drug User Fee... Industry on Generic Drug User Fee Amendments of 2012: Questions and Answers (Revision 1)'', published in... draft guidance entitled ``Draft Guidance for Industry on Generic Drug User Fee Amendments of...

  8. 77 FR 51814 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Generic Drug User Fee Amendments of 2012: Questions and Answers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Generic Drug User Fee... draft guidance for industry entitled ``Generic Drug User Fee Amendments of 2012: Questions and Answers... effective generic drugs to the public and reduce costs to industry. GDUFA enables FDA to assess user fees...

  9. 77 FR 51811 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Self-Identification of Generic Drug Facilities, Sites, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Self-Identification of... guidance for industry entitled ``Self- Identification of Generic Drug Facilities, Sites, and... generic drugs to the public and reduce costs to industry, requires that generic drug facilities,...

  10. 78 FR 55261 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Generic Drug User Fee Amendments of 2012: Questions and Answers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Generic Drug User Fee... a draft guidance for industry entitled ``Generic Drug User Fee Amendments of 2012: Questions and... delivery of safe and effective generic drugs to the public and reduce costs to industry. GDUFA enables...

  11. Has the increase in the availability of generic drugs lowered the price of cardiovascular drugs in South Africa?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Bangalee

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Increased generic competition is not a predictor of lower drug prices. The study also concludes that the current South African pharmaceutical policies have not yet achieved the lowest prices for drugs when compared internationally.

  12. Has the increase in the availability of generic drugs lowered the price of cardiovascular drugs in South Africa?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bangalee, Varsha; Suleman, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    .... Objective:To examine the relationship between originator drug prices and the number of generic brands within the cardiovascular class of drugs and to compare South African prices with international reference prices. Method...

  13. Has the increase in the availability of generic drugs lowered the price of cardiovascular drugs in South Africa?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Varsha Bangalee; Fatima Suleman

    2016-01-01

    ...: To examine the relationship between originator drug prices and the number of generic brands within the cardiovascular class of drugs and to compare South African prices with international reference prices. Method...

  14. Factors affecting the opinions of family physicians regarding generic drugs--a questionnaire based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewek, Pawel; Smigielski, Janusz; Kardas, Przemyslaw

    2014-12-17

    A range of factors are believed to exert a negative influence on opinions of physicians about generic drugs.The aim of this study was to survey the opinions of primary care doctors on generics, and determine the factors which may affect them. A questionnaire comprising thirty eight questions was distributed among primary care doctors working in seventy out-patient clinics of the Lodzkie province, Poland, during the period of January 1, 2010 - December 31, 2010. A total of 170 of 183 participants completed the survey (average age 48.5; 70.0% women): a 92.9% response rate. While 38.8% of physicians claimed that generics were worse than brand name drugs, 54.1% considered them to be better. However, 36.5% of the doctors did not choose generics for their own use. Two key opinions were identified among the responses concerning the effectiveness of generic drugs: use of generic drugs by the physician (pgeneric drugs (pgeneric and brand name drugs are equally effective, many physicians doubt this, which prevents them from being used as cost effective drug therapy. In order to increase healthcare savings through the use of generics, these factors should be addressed: for example, convincing a physician to adopt generics for personal use may be an efficient way to support more cost effective treatment of his patients.

  15. 78 FR 78366 - Draft Generic Drug User Fee Act Information Technology Plan; Availability for Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... shortages, drug supply chain, safety, security, and drug innovation. As generic drugs account for more than... approvals, drug supply chain, and other topics related to human pharmaceuticals. The draft GDUFA IT plan... the Division of Dockets Management (HFA-305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane,...

  16. Withdrawal of antiepileptic drugs in glioma patients after long-term seizure freedom: design of a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koekkoek, Johan A F; Kerkhof, Melissa; Dirven, Linda; Heimans, Jan J; Postma, Tjeerd J; Vos, Maaike J; Bromberg, Jacoline E C; van den Bent, Martin J; Reijneveld, Jaap C; Taphoorn, Martin J B

    2014-08-15

    Epilepsy is common in patients with a glioma. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are the mainstay of epilepsy treatment, but may cause side effects and may negatively impact neurocognitive functioning and quality of life. Besides antiepileptic drugs, anti-tumour treatment, which currently consists of surgery, radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, may contribute to seizure control as well. In glioma patients with seizure freedom after anti-tumour therapy the question emerges whether AEDs should be continued, particularly in the case where anti-tumour treatment has been successful. We propose to explore the possibility of AED withdrawal in glioma patients with long-term seizure freedom after anti-tumour therapy and without signs of tumour progression. We initiate a prospective, observational study exploring the decision-making process on the withdrawal or continuation of AEDs in low-grade and anaplastic glioma patients with stable disease and prolonged seizure freedom after anti-tumour treatment, and the effects of AED withdrawal or continuation on seizure freedom. We recruit participants through the outpatient clinics of three tertiary referral centers for brain tumour patients in The Netherlands. The patient and the treating physician make a shared decision to either withdraw or continue AED treatment. Over a one-year period, we aim to include 100 glioma patients. We expect approximately half of the participants to be willing to withdraw AEDs. The primary outcome measures are: 1) the outcome of the shared-decision making on AED withdrawal or continuation, and decision related arguments, and 2) seizure freedom at 12 months and 24 months of follow-up. We will also evaluate seizure type and frequency in case of seizure recurrence, as well as neurological symptoms, adverse effects related to AED treatment or withdrawal, other anti-tumour treatments and tumour progression. This study addresses two issues that are currently unexplored. First, it will explore the willingness to

  17. The novel antiepileptic drug levetiracetam (ucb L059) appears to act via a specific binding site in CNS membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyer, M; Gillard, M; Matagne, A; Hénichart, J P; Wülfert, E

    1995-11-14

    Levetiracetam ((S)-alpha-ethyl-2-oxo-pyrrolidine acetamide, ucb L059) is a novel potential antiepileptic agent presently in clinical development with unknown mechanism of action. The finding that its anticonvulsant activity is highly stereoselective (Gower et al., 1992) led us to investigate the presence of specific binding sites for [3H]levetiracetam in rat central nervous system (CNS). Binding assays, performed on crude membranes, revealed the existence of a reversible, saturable and stereoselective specific binding site. Results obtained in hippocampal membranes suggest that [3H]levetiracetam labels a single class of binding sites (nH = 0.92 +/- 0.06) with modest affinity (Kd = 780 +/- 115 nM) and with a high binding capacity (Bmax = 9.1 +/- 1.2 pmol/mg protein). Similar Kd and Bmax values were obtained in other brain regions (cortex, cerebellum and striatum). ucb L060, the (R) enantiomer of levetiracetam, displayed about 1000 times less affinity for these sites. The binding of [3H]levetiracetam is confined to the synaptic plasma membranes in the central nervous system since no specific binding was observed in a range of peripheral tissues including heart, kidneys, spleen, pancreas, adrenals, lungs and liver. The commonly used antiepileptic drugs carbamazepine, phenytoin, valproate, phenobarbital and clonazepam, as well as the convulsant agent t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS), picrotoxin and bicuculline did not displace [3H]levetiracetam binding. However, ethosuximide (pKi = 3.5 +/- 0.1), pentobarbital (pKi = 3.8 +/- 0.1), pentylenetetrazole (pKi = 4.1 +/- 0.1) and bemegride (pKi = 5.0 +/- 0.1) competed with [3H]levetiracetam with pKi values comparable to active drug concentrations observed in vivo. Structurally related compounds, including piracetam and aniracetam, also displaced [3H]levetiracetam binding. (S) Stereoisomer homologues of levetiracetam demonstrated a rank order of affinity for [3H]levetiracetam binding in correlation with their

  18. Bioequivalence studies: need for the reability of generic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Laosa, Olga; Centro de Farmacología Clínica, Departamento de Farmacología y Terapéutica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Madrid, España. Médico especialista en Farmacología Clínica.; Guerra, Pedro; Centro de Farmacología Clínica, Departamento de Farmacología y Terapéutica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Madrid, España. Médico especialista en Farmacología Clínica.; López-Durán, Jose Luis; Centro de Farmacología Clínica, Departamento de Farmacología y Terapéutica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Madrid, España. Médico especialista en Farmacología Clínica.; Mosquera, Beatriz; Centro de Farmacología Clínica, Departamento de Farmacología y Terapéutica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Madrid, España. Licenciada en Ciencias Químicas.; Frías, Jesús; Centro de Farmacología Clínica, Departamento de Farmacología y Terapéutica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Madrid, España. Servicio de Farmacología Clínica, Hospital Universitario la Paz. Madrid, España. Médico especialista en Farmacología Clínica.

    2009-01-01

    A generic medicine is a pharmaceutical product containing an active ingredient already known and previously developed and invented by others. The cost of these generic or multisource products should be less than their counterparts original. The clinical effects and the risk-benefit balance of a medicine do not depend exclusively on the activity of a pharmacologically active substance. Demonstration of bioequivalence of generic medicine is of great importance. In Europe and the United States g...

  19. Bioequivalence studies: need for the reability of generic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Laosa, Olga; Centro de Farmacología Clínica, Departamento de Farmacología y Terapéutica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Madrid, España. Médico especialista en Farmacología Clínica.; Guerra, Pedro; Centro de Farmacología Clínica, Departamento de Farmacología y Terapéutica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Madrid, España. Médico especialista en Farmacología Clínica.; López-Durán, Jose Luis; Centro de Farmacología Clínica, Departamento de Farmacología y Terapéutica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Madrid, España. Médico especialista en Farmacología Clínica.; Mosquera, Beatriz; Centro de Farmacología Clínica, Departamento de Farmacología y Terapéutica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Madrid, España. Licenciada en Ciencias Químicas.; Frías, Jesús; Centro de Farmacología Clínica, Departamento de Farmacología y Terapéutica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Madrid, España. Servicio de Farmacología Clínica, Hospital Universitario la Paz. Madrid, España. Médico especialista en Farmacología Clínica.

    2009-01-01

    A generic medicine is a pharmaceutical product containing an active ingredient already known and previously developed and invented by others. The cost of these generic or multisource products should be less than their counterparts original. The clinical effects and the risk-benefit balance of a medicine do not depend exclusively on the activity of a pharmacologically active substance. Demonstration of bioequivalence of generic medicine is of great importance. In Europe and the United States g...

  20. Critical review of current animal models of seizures and epilepsy used in the discovery and development of new antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löscher, Wolfgang

    2011-06-01

    Animal models for seizures and epilepsy have played a fundamental role in advancing our understanding of basic mechanisms underlying ictogenesis and epileptogenesis and have been instrumental in the discovery and preclinical development of novel antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). However, there is growing concern that the efficacy of drug treatment of epilepsy has not substantially improved with the introduction of new AEDs, which, at least in part, may be due to the fact that the same simple screening models, i.e., the maximal electroshock seizure (MES) and s.c. pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) seizure tests, have been used as gatekeepers in AED discovery for >6 decades. It has been argued that these old models may identify only drugs that share characteristics with existing drugs, and are unlikely to have an effect on refractory epilepsies. Indeed, accumulating evidence with several novel AEDs, including levetiracetan, has shown that the MES and PTZ models do not identify all potential AEDs but instead may fail to discover compounds that have great potential efficacy but work through mechanisms not tested by these models. Awareness of the limitations of acute seizure models comes at a critical crossroad. Clearly, preclinical strategies of AED discovery and development need a conceptual shift that is moving away from using models that identify therapies for the symptomatic treatment of epilepsy to those that may be useful for identifying therapies that are more effective in the refractory population and that may ultimately lead to an effective cure in susceptible individuals by interfering with the processes underlying epilepsy. To realize this goal, the molecular mechanisms of the next generation of therapies must necessarily evolve to include targets that contribute to epileptogenesis and pharmacoresistance in relevant epilepsy models.

  1. Effect of the Anti-depressant Sertraline, the Novel Anti-seizure Drug Vinpocetine and Several Conventional Antiepileptic Drugs on the Epileptiform EEG Activity Induced by 4-Aminopyridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitges, Maria; Aldana, Blanca Irene; Reed, Ronald Charles

    2016-06-01

    Seizures are accompanied by an exacerbated activation of cerebral ion channels. 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) is a pro-convulsive agent which mechanism of action involves activation of Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels, and several antiepileptic drugs control seizures by reducing these channels permeability. The antidepressant, sertraline, and the anti-seizure drug vinpocetine are effective inhibitors of cerebral presynaptic Na(+) channels. Here the effectiveness of these compounds to prevent the epileptiform EEG activity induced by 4-AP was compared with the effectiveness of seven conventional antiepileptic drugs. For this purpose, EEG recordings before and at three intervals within the next 30 min following 4-AP (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) were taken in anesthetized animals; and the EEG-highest peak amplitude values (HPAV) calculated. In control animals, the marked increase in the EEG-HPAV observed near 20 min following 4-AP reached its maximum at 30 min. Results show that this epileptiform EEG activity induced by 4-AP is prevented by sertraline and vinpocetine at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg, and by carbamazepine, phenytoin, lamotrigine and oxcarbazepine at a higher dose (25 mg/kg). In contrast, topiramate (25 mg/kg), valproate (100 mg/kg) and levetiracetam (100 mg/kg) failed to prevent the epileptiform EEG activity induced by 4-AP. It is concluded that 4-AP is a useful tool to elicit the mechanism of action of anti-seizure drugs at clinical meaningful doses. The particular efficacy of sertraline and vinpocetine to prevent seizures induced by 4-AP is explained by their high effectiveness to reduce brain presynaptic Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels permeability.

  2. Generic script share and the price of brand-name drugs: the role of consumer choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, John A; Zeckhauser, Richard

    2009-09-01

    Pharmaceutical expenditures have grown rapidly in recent decades, and now total nearly 10% of health care costs. Generic drug utilization has risen substantially alongside, from 19% of scripts in 1984 to 47% in 2001, thus tempering expenditure growth through significant direct dollar savings. However, generic drugs may lead to indirect savings as well if their use reduces the average price of those brand-name drugs that are still purchased. Prior work indicates that brand-name producers do not lower their prices in the face of generic competition, and our study confirms that finding. However, prior work is silent on how the mix of consumer choices between generic and brand-name drugs might affect the average price of those brand-name drugs that are purchased. We use a nationally representative panel of data on drug utilization and costs for the years 1996-2001 to examine how the share of an individual's prescriptions filled by generics (generic script share) affects his average out-of-pocket cost for brand-name drugs, and the net cost paid by the insurer. Our principal finding is that a higher generic script share lowers average brand-name prices to consumers, presumably because consumers are more likely to substitute generics when brand-name drugs would cost them more. This effect is substantial: a 10% increase in the consumer's generic script share is associated with a 15.6% decline in the average price paid for brand-name drugs by consumers. This implies that the potential cost savings to consumers from generic substitution are far greater than prior work suggests. In contrast, the percentage reduction in average brand costs to health plans is far smaller, and statistically insignificant.

  3. Strategic development on generic anti-cancer drugs Bevacizumab and Erlotinib Hydrochloride for Harbin Pharmaceutical Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheung Fat Ping

    2011-01-01

    @@ With improved economy, changing life styles, aging population and health care reform, China had a very potential anti-cancer drug market.The patents of popular anti-cancer drugs Avastin and Tarceva would expire in few years.Generic versions of Avastin and Tarceva were Bevacizumab and Erlotinib Hydrochloride respectively.Harbin Pharmaceutical Group was proposed to develop strategically both generic medicines to enter the high-end anti-cancer drug market for targeted cancer therapies.The vital to success of developing the generic drugs were discussed.

  4. Perception of the value of generic drugs in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elene Paltrinieri Nardi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of this study was to assess the perceptions of opinion-leaders, patients and their accompanying family members or carers about generic drugs. Three groups of participants were surveyed: (i 50 customers while they were visiting commercial pharmacies located in São Paulo city, Brazil, (ii 25 patients and 25 companions while they were waiting at the university outpatient clinic, and (iii 50 healthcare opinion-leaders from government, hospitals, health plans, academia, and pharmaceutical companies. The questions explored socio-demographic characteristics and perceptions regarding value attributes of generic drugs compared to brand name drugs. Respondents had an average age of 52 years and 53% were women. Respondents believed generic drugs to be cheaper than brand name drugs (97%, and 31% thought generic drugs to be less effective than brand name drugs. Also, generic drugs were perceived by 54% of respondents to be as safe as brand name drugs and 74% would prefer brand name drugs if there was no price difference. In conclusion, multiple factors may contribute to the decision to buy generic drugs; among these, perceived effectiveness, safety and price appear to be the most important factors.

  5. Perception of the value of generic drugs in São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Elene Paltrinieri; Ferraz, Marcos Bosi

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the perceptions of opinion-leaders, patients and their accompanying family members or carers about generic drugs. Three groups of participants were surveyed: (i) 50 customers while they were visiting commercial pharmacies located in São Paulo city, Brazil, (ii) 25 patients and 25 companions while they were waiting at the university outpatient clinic, and (iii) 50 healthcare opinion-leaders from government, hospitals, health plans, academia, and pharmaceutical companies. The questions explored socio-demographic characteristics and perceptions regarding value attributes of generic drugs compared to brand name drugs. Respondents had an average age of 52 years and 53% were women. Respondents believed generic drugs to be cheaper than brand name drugs (97%), and 31% thought generic drugs to be less effective than brand name drugs. Also, generic drugs were perceived by 54% of respondents to be as safe as brand name drugs and 74% would prefer brand name drugs if there was no price difference. In conclusion, multiple factors may contribute to the decision to buy generic drugs; among these, perceived effectiveness, safety and price appear to be the most important factors.

  6. Effect of acutely and chronically administered venlafaxine on the anticonvulsant action of classical antiepileptic drugs in the mouse maximal electroshock model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowicz, Kinga K; Gołyska, Dorota; Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2011-11-16

    The influence of acute and chronic treatments with intraperitoneal venlafaxine, a selective serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, on the anticonvulsant activity of selected antiepileptic drugs was studied in the maximal electroshock test in mice. Venlafaxine (12.5 and 25mg/kg), given either acutely or chronically, significantly increased the electroconvulsive threshold. Moreover, both acute and chronic venlafaxine, applied at the highest subprotective dose of 6.25mg/kg, enhanced the anticonvulsant effect of valproate, without affecting the protective action of carbamazepine, phenobarbital and phenytoin. The antidepressant did not affect brain concentration of valproate, indicating that the interaction between the two drugs seems pharmacodynamic in nature. Despite the lack of effect on the antielectroshock action of the remaining antiepileptics, acute venlafaxine increased the brain concentration of phenobarbital, while chronic venlafaxine reduced the brain level of phenytoin. In terms of adverse effects, acute/chronic venlafaxine and antiepileptic drugs alone, as well as their combinations, did not produce significant motor or long-term memory deficits in mice. Summing up, it seems that venlafaxine may be considered as a safe drug for the clinical use in patients with epilepsy and depressive disorders.

  7. The effects of antiepileptic drugs on estrogen-induced electrographic spike-wave discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, R M; Fowler, G W; Danielson, M G

    1975-05-01

    In locally anesthetized, paralyzed cats with bilateral conjugated estrogen (CE)-induced foci in sensory motor cortex, electrographic activity was characterized by 2 to 3 Hz spike and slow wave discharge. Commonly used anti-petit mal drugs (esthosuximide, trimethadione, acetazolamide and diazepam) all reduced CE-induced spike wave activity while diphenylhydantoin converted such activity into 9 to 12 Hz polyspike bursts separated by periods of interictal silence. Correlation appears to exist, therefore, between the ability of the drug to reduce CE-induced spike wave activity and its clinical utility in petit mal epilepsy. In addition to the above compounds, five drugs of less proven utility were evaluated. Of these, two benzodiazepine derivatives (clonazepam and clorazepate) were found to exert a potent and prolonged depressant action on CE-induced activity. The relation of CE to clinical petit mal epilepsy and the potential usefulness of CE as a laboratory model for the evaluation of anti-petit mal drugs are discussed.

  8. Does brain slices from pentylenetetrazole-kindled mice provide a more predictive screening model for antiepileptic drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Suzanne L; Sterjev, Zoran; Werngreen, Marie; Simonsen, Bodil J; Knudsen, Katrine E; Nielsen, Ane H; Pedersen, Mikael E; Badolo, Lassiana; Kristiansen, Uffe; Vestergaard, Henrik T

    2012-05-05

    The cortical wedge is a commonly applied model for in vitro screening of new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and has been extensively used in characterization of well-known AEDs. However, the predictive validity of this model as a screening model has been questioned as, e.g., carbamazepine has been reported to lack effect in this model. The neuroplastic changes induced in acute and chronic animal models of epilepsy are known to affect the pharmacological profile of AEDs in vivo. Hence, we investigated whether brain slices from pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindled animals could provide a more predictive screening model for AEDs. To this end, we compared the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological profile of several selected AEDs (phenobarbital, phenytoin, tiagabine, fosphenytoin, valproate, and carbamazepine) along with citalopram using the PTZ-kindled model and brain slices from naïve, saline-injected and PTZ-kindled mice. Our data suggest that the use of slices from PTZ-kindled mice in the cortical wedge does not increase the predictive validity of the model as an in vitro screening model for AEDs. Traditionally, the incidence of certain seizure types is widely used as a measure to characterize drug action in animal models of epilepsy. In our study, the anticonvulsant effect of the AEDs was investigated in vivo using several observational parameters (i.e., incidence and duration of convulsions, latency to clonic convulsions, and severity of convulsions). We found that including the observational parameter "severity" offered important additional information about the drug profile that would otherwise be lost if only a single parameter as "incidence" was used.

  9. A range of antiepileptic drugs do not affect the recovery of consciousness in vegetative and minimally conscious states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnato, Sergio; Boccagni, Cristina; Sant'angelo, Antonino; Galardi, Giuseppe

    2013-05-01

    Since most antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have cognitive effects, the aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of AED therapy on the recovery of consciousness in 103 consecutive patients in a vegetative or minimally conscious state (VS, MCS). The levels of cognitive functioning (LCF) score was retrospectively compared after a three-month period of rehabilitation between patients who were medicated (n=54) and patients who were not medicated (n=49) with AEDs. Mean LCF scores in AED-medicated and nonmedicated patients were 2.2±0.7 and 2.3±0.8 at admission and 3.8±2.2 and 3.7±2.1 after three months, respectively (p values>0.05). These results did not change when we compared patients with the same etiology separately, with the same disorder of consciousness only, or patients treated with only one or more than one AED. In conclusion, AEDs did not affect the recovery of consciousness in a large cohort of patients in a VS or MCS following an acute brain injury. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of antiepileptic drug monotherapy on one-carbon metabolism and DNA methylation in patients with epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanzhong Ni

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the serum levels of one-carbon metabolism (OCM nutrients (e.g., folate, homocysteine and vitamin B12 and peripheral blood DNA methylation in epileptic patients under treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs and in healthy controls.In this cross-sectional study, 60 patients with epilepsy who were receiving valproate (VPA (n = 30 or lamotrigine (LTG (n = 30 monotherapy were enrolled. Thirty age and sex matched healthy subjects served as the controls. Serum concentrations of OCM nutrients and peripheral blood DNA methylation status were measured.Compared to the control group, the VPA group had higher serum levels of homocysteine (p<0.05. No difference in homocysteine concentration was observed in the LTG group. Patients receiving VPA or LTG had significantly lower serum folate levels in comparison with controls (p<0.001. The level of methylation of long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1 in peripheral blood was not significantly different between the AED monotherapy group and healthy controls. A difference in the methylation levels of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR amplicon was observed between AED-treated patients with epilepsy and controls (p<0.01. A positive correlation between serum folate levels and peripheral blood MTHFR amplicon methylation status was also observed (r = 0.25, p = 0.023.Our findings suggest that the effects of AED monotherapy on OCM may induce specific regions of DNA hypomethylation.

  11. Influence of sildenafil on the anticonvulsant action of selected antiepileptic drugs against pentylenetetrazole-induced clonic seizures in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieoczym, Dorota; Socała, Katarzyna; Łuszczki, Jarogniew J; Czuczwar, Stanisław J; Wlaz, Piotr

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of sildenafil, a selective phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitor, on threshold for clonic seizures in mice. In addition, the effects of sildenafil on the anticonvulsant activity of selected antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), i.e., clonazepam (CZP), valproate (VPA), phenobarbital (PB), ethosuximide (ETS) and tiagabine (TGB), were also evaluated. The subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) test was used to determine the effects of sildenafil on convulsive susceptibility and the anticonvulsant activity of the studied AEDs in mice, while the acute side effects of sildenafil and its combinations with the studied AEDs were evaluated in the chimney test, step-through passive-avoidance task and grip-strength test in mice. Total brain concentrations of AEDs were also determined. Sildenafil (5–40 mg/kg) did not influence the threshold for PTZ-induced clonic seizures in mice, but increased the anticonvulsant activity of ETS in this test without any significant changes in the total brain concentration. The activity of the remaining AEDs was not significantly changed by sildenafil. Neither sildenafil alone nor its combinations with the studied AEDs produced any changes in the motor coordination, long-term memory and muscular strength in mice. Co-administration of sildenafil with ETS in male epileptic patients with co-existing erectile dysfunctions might lead to the pharmacodynamic interactions that may be beneficial for the patients. Combinations of sildenafil with CZP, VPA, PB and TGB appear to be neutral in terms of their influence on seizures.

  12. Is antiepileptic drug withdrawal status related to quality of life in seizure-free adult patients with epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xuemei; Hong, Zhen; Chen, Jiani; Zhou, Dong

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to determine factors that influence the quality of life (QOL) of seizure-free adult patients with epilepsy in western China and address whether these determinants vary by antiepileptic drug (AED) withdrawal. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the epilepsy outpatient clinic of West China Hospital, Sichuan University. Patients with epilepsy who were aged at least 18years and seizure-free for at least 12months were interviewed using the Quality of Life in Epilepsy Inventory-31 (QOLIE-31); the National Hospital Seizure Severity Scale (NHS3); the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile (LAEP); the Social Support Rating Scale (SSRS); the Family Adaptation, Partnership, Growth, Affection, and Resolve (APGAR) Questionnaire; and the Scale of Knowledge and Attitudes Toward Epilepsy. Eligible patients were divided into two groups: the nonwithdrawal group and the withdrawal group. The independent-samples t-test was used to compare the QOL between the groups, and linear regression analysis was used to explain the variance of their QOL. One hundred and eighty-seven (135 nonwithdrawal and 52 withdrawal) patients were included in the analysis. The QOLIE-31 overall score of the nonwithdrawal group was lower than that of the withdrawal group (pfree adult patients with epilepsy, those with AED withdrawal experienced better QOL than those continuing AED treatment. Furthermore, the determinants of QOL varied by AED withdrawal. Individual strategies to optimize QOL should be developed based on these differences. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Preclinical evaluation of 2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropanecarbonyl-urea, a novel, second generation to valproic acid, antiepileptic drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, Eyal; Yagen, Boris; Steve White, H; Wilcox, Karen S; Lamb, John G; Pappo, Orit; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J; Finnell, Richard H; Bialer, Meir

    2006-09-01

    2,2,3,3-Tetramethylcyclopropanecarbonylurea (TMCU) is an amide derivative of a tetramethylcyclopropyl analogue of valproic acid (VPA), one of the leading antiepileptic drugs. Structural considerations used in the design of TMCU aimed to enhance the anticonvulsant potency of VPA and to prevent its two life-threatening side effects; i.e., teratogenicity and hepatotoxicity. The anticonvulsant activity of TMCU was evaluated in the MES, scMet, 6-Hz, scBic and scPic tests, and also in the hippocampal kindling model of partial seizures and lamotrigine-resistant amygdala kindling model of therapy-resistant seizures. Minimal motor impairment was determined using the rotorod test in mice and the positional sense test, muscle tone test, and gait and stance test in rats. The antinociceptive effect of TMCU was evaluated in the mouse formalin model of acute-tonic pain. The molecular mechanisms of action of TMCU were investigated in electrophysiological studies using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Teratogenicity studies were performed in a SWV/Fnn-mouse model of VPA-induced teratogenicity. TMCU hepatotoxicity was evaluated following 1-week intraperitoneal and oral administration of 50, 250 and 500 mg/kg doses to rats. In the hepatotoxicity study the blood levels of TMCU were evaluated at day 1 and day 7 of the treatment. TMCU mutagenicity was evaluated in the Ames test.

  14. Novel antiepileptic drug lacosamide exerts neuroprotective effects by decreasing glial activation in the hippocampus of a gerbil model of ischemic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Ji Yun; Yan, Bing Chun; Park, Joon Ha; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; LEE, DAE HWAN; Kim, In Hye; Cho, Jeong-Hwi; Chen, Bai Hui; Lee, Jae-Chul; Cho, Young Shin; SHIN, MYOUNG CHUL; Cho, Jun Hwi; Hong, Seongkweon; Won, Moo-Ho; Kim, Sung Koo

    2015-01-01

    Lacosamide, which is a novel antiepileptic drug, has been reported to exert various additional therapeutic effects. The present study investigated the neuroprotective effects of lacosamide against transient cerebral ischemia-induced neuronal cell damage in the hippocampal cornu ammonis (CA)-1 region of a gerbil model. Neuronal Nuclei immunohistochemistry demonstrated that pre- and post-surgical treatment (5 min ischemia) with 25 mg/kg lacosamide protected CA1 pyramidal neurons in the lacosami...

  15. Impact of varying outcomes and definitions of suicidality on the associations of antiepileptic drugs and suicidality : Comparisons from UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) and Danish national registries (DNR)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuerch, Markus; Gasse, Christiane; Robinson, Noah Jamie; Alvarez, Yolanda; Walls, Robert; Mors, Ole; Christensen, Jakob; Hesse, Ulrik; de Groot, Mark; Schlienger, Raymond; Reynolds, Robert; Klungel, Olaf; de Vries, Frank

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to quantify the impact of the different outcomes and definitions of suicidality on the association between antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and suicidality. METHODS: Retrospective cohort studies of selected AEDs (carbamazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, phenytoin,

  16. Effect of xanthotoxin (8-methoxypsoralen) on the anticonvulsant activity of classical antiepileptic drugs against maximal electroshock-induced seizures in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagaja, Miroslaw; Pyrka, Daniel; Skalicka-Wozniak, Krystyna; Glowniak, Kazimierz; Florek-Luszczki, Magdalena; Glensk, Michał; Luszczki, Jarogniew J

    2015-09-01

    The effects of xanthotoxin (8-methoxypsoralen) on the anticonvulsant activity of four classical antiepileptic drugs (carbamazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin and valproate) were studied in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure model. Tonic hind limb extension (seizure activity) was evoked in adult male albino Swiss mice by a current (25 mA, 500 V, 50 Hz, 0.2 s stimulus duration) delivered via auricular electrodes. Total brain concentrations of antiepileptic drugs were measured by fluorescence polarization immunoassay to ascertain any pharmacokinetic contribution to the observed anticonvulsant effects. Results indicate that xanthotoxin (50 and 100 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly potentiated the anticonvulsant activity of carbamazepine against maximal electroshock-induced seizures (Panticonvulsant action of valproate in the maximal electroshock seizure test (Pdrugs. In conclusion, the combinations of xanthotoxin with carbamazepine and valproate, despite their beneficial effects in terms of seizure suppression in mice, were probably due to a pharmacokinetic increase in total brain concentrations of these antiepileptic drugs in experimental animals. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Correlation of the "EMIT" antiepileptic drug assay with a gas liquid chromatographic method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legaz, M; Raisys, V A

    1976-02-01

    Many methodologies have been developed for determining anticonvulsant drug levels in human serum. Unfortunately, most procedures are either time consuming or subject to a variety of interferring substances. The "Enzyme Multiplied Immunoassay Technique" (EMIT) system has been evaluated for its speed, sensitivity, accuracy, and precision. When compared with a gas-liquid chromatographic procedure, the EMIT assay appeared to yield results which were statistically comparable for the drugs diphenylhydantoin, phenobarbital, and primidone. The EMIT assay also demonstrated no significant interference when challenged with extraordinarily high levels of potentially cross reacting drugs. Results obtained with the EMIT assay correlated well with GLC data and rank it as an attractive alternative to many of the existing procedures now being used.

  18. 76 FR 79195 - Animal Generic Drug User Fee Act; Reopening of the Comment Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Animal Generic Drug User Fee Act; Reopening of the Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; reopening of the comment period. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or Agency) is extending to January 15, 2013, the...

  19. Acne keloidalis-like lesions on the scalp associated with antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunwald, M H; Ben-Dor, D; Livni, E; Halevy, S

    1990-10-01

    A man developed acne keloidalis-like lesions in the scalp during treatment with diphenylhydantoin and carbamazepine for epilepsy. These drugs were suspected to play a role in the pathogenesis of this skin disease in an unusual location, based on clinical evidence and on the in vitro test, mast cell degranulation (MCD).

  20. Recurrence rate of seizure following discontinuation of anti-epileptic drugs in patients with normal long term electroencephalography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Abdul Gafoor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The usefulness of electroencephalography (EEG in predicting seizure recurrence after antiepileptic drugs (AED tapering is a controversial subject. There have been no studies which tested the additional yield of long-term over routine EEG recordings in predicting seizure recurrence after AED withdrawal. Objective: The primary objective of our study is to determine the recurrence rate of seizure following AED withdrawal in patients with focal epilepsy, unknown cause who had normal long-term electroencephalography (LTEEG and secondary objective is to analyze the variables that would predict seizure recurrence. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective observational study. A total of 91 patients were included. 62 patients who had normal routine and LTEEG entered the final phase of the study were followed-up regularly for 1 year or until seizure recurrence whichever was earlier. Results: A total number of 91 patients were enrolled for the first phase of the study. Of these, 13 (14.29% patients had an abnormal routine EEG. Of the remaining patients, another 16 (17.58% had abnormal LTEEG. The remaining 62 patients with normal routine and long-term EEG entered the final phase of the study. Of these, 17 patients (27.41% had seizure recurrence during the follow-up while 45 (72.58% remained seizure free until the end of the 1 year follow-up. The significant variables associated with a higher risk of seizure relapse were a positive past history of seizure recurrence on prior drug withdrawal (relative risk: 2.19, confidence interval: 1.01-4.74, P < 0.05 and the duration of epilepsy until seizure control was achieved (P < 0.009. Conclusions: The recurrence rate of seizure in patients with a normal LTEEG is 27.41%. A positive past history of seizure recurrence and a longer time to achieve seizure freedom with AED increased the risk of seizure recurrence.

  1. Comparison of phenobarbital with bromide as a first-choice antiepileptic drug for treatment of epilepsy in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothe, Dawn Merton; Dewey, Curtis; Carpenter, David Mark

    2012-05-01

    To compare efficacy and safety of treatment with phenobarbital or bromide as the first-choice antiepileptic drug (AED) in dogs. Double-blinded, randomized, parallel, clinical trial. 46 AED-naïve dogs with naturally occurring epilepsy. Study inclusion was based on age, history, findings on physical and neurologic examinations, and clinicopathologic test results. For either phenobarbital treatment (21 dogs) or bromide treatment (25), a 7-day loading dose period was initiated along with a maintenance dose, which was adjusted on the basis of monthly monitoring. Efficacy and safety outcomes were compared between times (baseline and study end [generally 6 months]) and between drugs. Phenobarbital treatment resulted in eradication of seizures (17/20 [85%]) significantly more often than did bromide (12/23 [52%]); phenobarbital treatment also resulted in a greater percentage decrease in seizure duration (88 ± 34%), compared with bromide (49 ± 75%). Seizure activity worsened in 3 bromide-treated dogs only. In dogs with seizure eradication, mean ± SD serum phenobarbital concentration was 25 ± 6 μg/mL (phenobarbital dosage, 4.1 ± 1.1 mg/kg [1.9 ± 0.5 mg/lb], p.o., q 12 h) and mean serum bromide concentration was 1.8 ± 0.6 mg/mL (bromide dosage, 31 ± 11 mg/kg [14 ± 5 mg/lb], p.o., q 12 h). Ataxia, lethargy, and polydipsia were greater at 1 month for phenobarbital-treated dogs; vomiting was greater for bromide-treated dogs at 1 month and study end. Both phenobarbital and bromide were reasonable first-choice AEDs for dogs, but phenobarbital was more effective and better tolerated during the first 6 months of treatment.

  2. Suicide-related behaviors in older patients with new anti-epileptic drug use: data from the VA hospital system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dersh Jeffrey J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA recently linked antiepileptic drug (AED exposure to suicide-related behaviors based on meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials. We examined the relationship between suicide-related behaviors and different AEDs in older veterans receiving new AED monotherapy from the Veterans Health Administration (VA, controlling for potential confounders. Methods VA and Medicare databases were used to identify veterans 66 years and older, who received a care from the VA between 1999 and 2004, and b an incident AED (monotherapy prescription. Previously validated ICD-9-CM codes were used to identify suicidal ideation or behavior (suicide-related behaviors cases, epilepsy, and other conditions previously associated with suicide-related behaviors. Each case was matched to controls based on prior history of suicide-related behaviors, year of AED prescription, and epilepsy status. Results The strongest predictor of suicide-related behaviors (N = 64; Controls N = 768 based on conditional logistic regression analysis was affective disorder (depression, anxiety, or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD; Odds Ratio 4.42, 95% CI 2.30 to 8.49 diagnosed before AED treatment. Increased suicide-related behaviors were not associated with individual AEDs, including the most commonly prescribed AED in the US - phenytoin. Conclusion Our extensive diagnostic and treatment data demonstrated that the strongest predictor of suicide-related behaviors for older patients newly treated with AED monotherapy was a previous diagnosis of affective disorder. Additional, research using a larger sample is needed to clearly determine the risk of suicide-related behaviors among less commonly used AEDs.

  3. An evaluation of factors affecting adherence to antiepileptic drugs in patients with epilepsy: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurumurthy, Ranjana; Chanda, Kulkarni; Sarma, GRK

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Adherence to antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy is important for controlling seizures in patients with epilepsy (PWE). It is vital to identify the factors influencing adherence to AED therapy using validated tools. This study aimed to evaluate the pattern and extent of AED adherence among PWE and to identify the factors that influence adherence. METHODS This was a cross-sectional study involving PWE who had a confirmed diagnosis. Treatment adherence was assessed using the four-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. Univariate analysis with chi-square test was used to observe the association between different variables and AED adherence. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to identify the predictors of adherence. RESULTS 451 PWE (mean age 27.3 ± 8.1 years) were enrolled in the study; 251 (55.7%) were male and 198 (43.9%) were from the lower socioeconomic class. 326 (72.3%) patients had high adherence to AED therapy, while 125 (27.7%) had low adherence. AED adherence was significantly associated with socioeconomic status (p = 0.043) and type of epilepsy (p = 0.033). However, no significant difference was observed between adherence and age, gender, marital status, epilepsy duration, number and type of AEDs, and occurrence of adverse drug reactions. Patients with focal epilepsy and those from the middle/lower-middle socioeconomic classes were less likely to be nonadherent. The primary reason for nonadherence was forgetfulness. CONCLUSION This study found that a majority of PWE have optimal rates of AED adherence and that forgetfulness is the primary reason for nonadherence among PWE. PMID:26805666

  4. Multiple sclerosis. Generic glatiramer acetate--a step toward cheaper MS drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Per Soelberg

    2016-01-01

    A randomized, double-blind, phase III trial of generic glatiramer acetate has shown equivalent efficacy and safety compared with the approved formulation, Copaxone. The impact of approval of generic glatiramer acetate, however, will mainly depend on the pricing of the drug.

  5. Generic drugs for the treatment of ocular conditions: changing the treatment landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aref, Ahmad A

    2014-09-01

    As global spending on medicinal products continues to rise, the availability of lower-cost generic substitutes is increasingly driving health care decision-making. US FDA does not require strict demonstration of human bioequivalence and/or therapeutic studies for the approval of generic ophthalmic compounds. Bioequivalence between generic and innovator compounds is presumed on the basis of matching active and inactive ingredient profiles. Generic compounds may differ from innovator agents with regards to performance under environmental stress, relative acidity and bottle size/rigidity. Matching ingredient profiles may therefore not result in consistently comparable drug compositions and clinical effects.

  6. Patterns and predictors of generic narrow therapeutic index drug use among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, Joshua J; Polinski, Jennifer M; Kesselheim, Aaron S; Choudhry, Niteesh K; Hutchins, David; Matlin, Olga S; Tong, Angela; Shrank, William H

    2013-09-01

    To ascertain predictors of initiation of brand-name versus generic narrow therapeutic index (NTI) drugs. Retrospective cohort study. Data from CVS Caremark were linked to Medicare claims and to U.S. census data. Individuals aged 65 and older who initiated an NTI drug in 2006 and 2007 (N = 36,832). Demographic, health service utilization, and geographic predictors of whether participants initiated a generic or brand-name version of their NTI drug were identified using logistic regression. Overall, 30,014 (81.5%) participants started on a generic version of their NTI drug. The most commonly initiated NTI drugs were warfarin (n = 17,790; 48%), levothyroxine (n = 10,779; 29%), and digoxin (n = 6,414; 17%). Older age (odds ratio (OR) = 1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.02-1.22 comparing aged ≥ 85 with 65-74), higher burden of comorbidity (OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.04-1.07 for each 1-point increase in comorbidity score), and prior use of any generic drug (OR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.29-1.87) were positively associated with generic drug initiation. Independent of other predictors, residing in the census block group with the highest generic use was positively associated with greater odds of generic NTI drug initiation (OR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.14-1.35 compared with the lowest quintile). Demographic, health service utilization, and geographic characteristics are important determinants of whether individuals initiate treatment with a brand-name or generic NTI drug. These factors may contribute to disparities in care and highlight potential targets for educational campaigns. © 2013, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2013, The American Geriatrics Society.

  7. Generic Drugs - Decreasing Costs and Room for Increased Number of Kidney Transplantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasovski, Goce

    2015-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best treatment option in comparison to dialysis, although patients are obliged to receive life-long medical treatment with immunosuppressive drugs (ISDs) for prevention of the graft rejection. Such immunosuppressive treatment may be costly and associated with multiple adverse effects. Since costs are viewed as one of the major constraints for the increasing number of transplantation, the use of generic ISDs may decrease the overall cost of transplantation and raise the possibility for its further development. An ideal ISD should have the security margin between toxic and therapeutic dose, and prevent development of acute or chronic rejection of the transplanted kidney. This is particularly important for drugs with a "narrow therapeutical index" (NTI), where small differences in dose or concentration lead to dose and concentration-dependent, serious therapeutic failures and/or adverse drug reactions. The NTI generic drug is approved if within 90%-112% of the area under the curve of the original product the pharmacokinetics fulfills the strict criteria of pharmaceutical equivalence and bioequivalence. Every generic has to be proven to be bioequivalent to the innovator product, and not to other generic products because of the possible generic "drift". Thus, the generic ISDs may be economically attractive, but theoretically, they may pose a risk to transplant patients. Such risks may be reduced if a long-term clinical studies showing cost-effectiveness of generic ISDs in de novo and prevalent transplant patients for every new generic ISD are performed. In conclusion, the increased number of solid organ transplantation goes in line with the increased health care expenditure for ISDs. The generic immunosuppressants could be a possible solution if safely substituted for innovator products or other generic drug of choice. The substantial cost reduction needs to be redirected into organ donation initiatives so that more patients can benefit

  8. Effect of the new antiepileptic drug retigabine in a rodent model of mania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Ditte; Dias, Rebecca; Pedersen, Mette Lund;

    2008-01-01

    Bipolar spectrum disorders are severe chronic mood disorders that are characterized by episodes of mania or hypomania and depression. Because patients with manic symptoms often experience clinical benefit from treatment with anticonvulsant drugs, it was hypothesized that retigabine, a novel...... compound with anticonvulsant efficacy, may also possess antimanic activity. The amphetamine (AMPH)+chlordiazepoxide (CDP)-induced hyperactivity model has been proposed as a suitable model for studying antimanic-like activity of novel compounds in mice and rats. The aims of the present study in rats were...

  9. Status epilepticus induction has prolonged effects on the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs in the 6-Hz seizure model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Karine; Kaminski, Rafal M

    2015-08-01

    Several factors may influence the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in patients with epilepsy, and treatment resistance could be related to genetics, neuronal network alterations, and modification of drug transporters or targets. Consequently, preclinical models used for the identification of potential new, more efficacious AEDs should reflect at least a few of these factors. Previous studies indicate that induction of status epilepticus (SE) may alter drug efficacy and that this effect could be long-lasting. In this context, we wanted to assess the protective effects of mechanistically diverse AEDs in mice subjected to pilocarpine-induced SE in another seizure model. We first determined seizure thresholds in mice subjected to pilocarpine-induced SE in the 6-Hz model, 2 weeks and 8 weeks following SE. We then evaluated the protective effects of mechanistically diverse AEDs in post-SE and control animals. No major differences in 6-Hz seizure susceptibility were observed between control groups, while the seizure threshold of pilocarpine mice at 8 weeks after SE was higher than at 2 weeks and higher than in control groups. Treatment with AEDs revealed major differences in drug response depending on their mechanism of action. Diazepam produced a dose-dependent protection against 6-Hz seizures in control and pilocarpine mice, both at 2 weeks and 8 weeks after SE, but with a more pronounced increase in potency in post-SE animals at 2 weeks. Levetiracetam induced a potent and dose-dependent protection in pilocarpine mice, 2 weeks after SE, while its protective effects were observed only at much higher doses in control mice. Its potency decreased in post-SE mice at 8 weeks and was very limited (30% protection at the highest tested dose) in the control group. Carbamazepine induced a dose-dependent protection at 2 weeks in control mice but only limited effect (50% at the highest tested dose) in pilocarpine mice. Its efficacy deeply decreased in post-SE mice at 8 weeks

  10. Safety and efficacy of generic drugs with respect to brand formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallelli, Luca; Palleria, Caterina; De Vuono, Antonio; Mumoli, Laura; Vasapollo, Piero; Piro, Brunella; Russo, Emilio

    2013-12-01

    Generic drugs are equivalent to the brand formulation if they have the same active substance, the same pharmaceutical form and the same therapeutic indications and a similar bioequivalence respect to the reference medicinal product. The use of generic drugs is indicated from many countries in order to reduce medication price. However some points, such as bioequivalence and the role of excipients, may be clarified regarding the clinical efficacy and safety during the switch from brand to generic formulations. In conclusion, the use of generic drugs could be related with an increased days of disease (time to relapse) or might lead to a therapeutic failure; on the other hand, a higher drug concentration might expose patients to an increased risk of dose-dependent side-effects.

  11. Safety and efficacy of generic drugs with respect to brand formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Gallelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Generic drugs are equivalent to the brand formulation if they have the same active substance, the same pharmaceutical form and the same therapeutic indications and a similar bioequivalence respect to the reference medicinal product. The use of generic drugs is indicated from many countries in order to reduce medication price. However some points, such as bioequivalence and the role of excipients, may be clarified regarding the clinical efficacy and safety during the switch from brand to generic formulations. In conclusion, the use of generic drugs could be related with an increased days of disease (time to relapse or might lead to a therapeutic failure; on the other hand, a higher drug concentration might expose patients to an increased risk of dose-dependent side-effects.

  12. Effect of topiramate and traditional antiepileptic drugs on pituitary-sexual gland axis in adult males with epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Xu; Liang Yu; Jie Liu; Yongjie Luo; Hongbin Sun

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Some reports indicate that traditional antiepileptic drugs can cause a certain effect on reproductive endocrine system in epileptic patients. However, the effect of topiramate on reproductive endocrine system needs to be further studied.OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of topiramate and traditional valproic acid and carbamazepine on pituitary-sexual gland axis in adult males with epilepsy.DESIGN: Self-contrast and randomly parallel controlled study.SETTING: Sichuan Academy of Medical Sciences (Department of Neurology, Sichuan Provincial People's Hospital).PARTICIPANTS: A total of 54 male epileptic patients aged from 18 to 75 years were selected from Department of Neurology, Sichuan Provincial People's Hospital from January 2004 to June 2006. All patients were diagnosed as epilepsy based on illness history and electroencephalogram (EEG), and types of epilepsy were classified based on the theory of epilepsy and epilepsy syndrome established by International Anti-epilepsy League in 1989 and 2001. The accepted patients and their relatives provided the confirmed consent.METHODS: ① The accepted patients were randomly divided into traditional treatment group [n =26,mean age of (34 ±14) years] and topiramate group [n =28, mean age of (28 ±17) years]. In addition, based on various kinds of drugs, patients in the traditional treatment group were divided into two subgroups,including carbamazepine group (n =14) and valproic acid group (n =12). Patients in both subgroups were respectively treated with carbamazepine (100 mg/table, Shanghai Sanwei Pharmaceutical Factory, batch number: 060705) and valproic acid (200 mg/table, Hunan Xiangzhong Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., batch number: 061128). Patients in topiramate group were treated with topiramate (25 mg/table, Xi'an Yangsen Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., batch number: 060215836). Administration: The beginning dosage of topiramate was 25 mg/d, and then increased 25 mg/d per week. The final dosage was 150 mg/d. In

  13. Orientações ao pediatra sobre o manejo das drogas psicoativas e antiepilépticas Use of psychoactive and antiepileptic drugs: guidelines for pediatricians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibsi P. Rocha

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Revisar as indicações e o manejo clínico das drogas psicoativas e antiepilépticas na infância e adolescência. FONTES DE DADOS: Estudo baseado em revisão de literatura. Os autores organizam, de acordo com os quadros patológicos, uma rotina para o manejo dos psicofármacos e das drogas antiepilépticas na infância e na adolescência. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: Indicação clínica, dosagem terapêutica e efeitos colaterais dos psicofármacos e drogas antiepilépticas são descritos. O uso de psicofármacos na infância e adolescência está se tornando mais freqüente, com a disponibilidade de novos medicamentos e com o crescimento do conhecimento sobre diagnóstico de transtornos emocionais nessa faixa etária. CONCLUSÕES: O manejo dos psicofármacos e drogas antiepilépticas na faixa etária pediátrica requer amplo conhecimento da farmacocinética dos mesmos, assim como de seus efeitos colaterais deletérios. A escolha do fármaco adequado é determinante no sucesso terapêutico.OBJECTIVE: To review the guidelines for the use of psychoactive and antiepileptic drugs in childhood and adolescence. SOURCES OF DATA: Literature review. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: The clinical indications, dosage and side effects of psychoactive and antiepileptic drugs are presented. The use of psychoactive drugs is increasing due to the release of new drugs and to the better understanding of emotional disorders in children and adolescents. CONCLUSIONS: The use of antiepileptic and psychoactive drugs in childhood requires extensive knowledge concerning pharmacokinetics and deleterious side effects. An adequate choice of drugs is essential to ensure a successful treatment.

  14. [Switching to a generic drugA blessing or a curse?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbelaar, C F; Lammers, H A; Schobben, A F A M

    2016-01-01

    A patient suffering from Zollinger-Ellison was treated with Nexium, but after patent expiry only the costs of generic omeprazol were reimbursed. Generic tablets and capsules, pantoprazol and rabeprazol, were tried without success and finally the pharmacist dispensed Nexium at his own expense. Registered generic drugs have been shown to be bioequivalent with the originator drug within narrow margins. When two batches of the originator are compared, the same requirements are valid. Although the subject has received a lot of negative publicity, meta-analyses on outcome comparison support generic substitution; problems associated with switching can be partially explained by the loss of trust in the treatment, and differences in appearance also cause confusion. Generic prescribing should be encouraged to keep medical treatment affordable; however, in order to prevent the problems described it is desirable to keep to the same product as far as possible. Effective education and patient information are essential if switching is to be successful.

  15. The Influence of Solid Microneedles on the Transdermal Delivery of Selected Antiepileptic Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Julia; Ita, Kevin B.; Morra, Matthew J.; Popova, Inna E.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this project was to examine the effect of microneedle rollers on the percutaneous penetration of tiagabine hydrochloride and carbamazepine across porcine skin in vitro. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis was carried out using an Agilent 1200 Series HPLC system coupled to an Agilent G1969A TOF-MS system. Transdermal flux values of the drugs were determined from the steady-state portion of the cumulative amount versus time curves. Following twelve hours of microneedle roller application, there was a 6.74-fold increase in the percutaneous penetration of tiagabine hydrochloride (86.42 ± 25.66 µg/cm2/h) compared to passive delivery (12.83 ± 6.30 µg/cm2/h). For carbamazepine in 20% ethanol, passive transdermal flux of 7.85 ± 0.60 µg/cm2/h was observed compared to 10.85 ± 0.11 µg/cm2/h after microneedle treatment. Carbamazepine reconstituted in 30% ethanol resulted in only a 1.19-fold increase in drug permeation across porcine skin (36.73 ± 1.83 µg/cm2/h versus 30.74 ± 1.32 µg/cm2/h). Differences in flux values of untreated and microneedle-treated porcine skin using solid microneedles for the transdermal delivery of tiagabine were statistically significant. Although there were 1.38- and 1.19-fold increases in transdermal flux values of carbamazepine when applied as 20% and 30% ethanol solutions across microneedle-treated porcine skin, respectively, the increases were not statistically significant. PMID:27854292

  16. The Influence of Solid Microneedles on the Transdermal Delivery of Selected Antiepileptic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Nguyen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this project was to examine the effect of microneedle rollers on the percutaneous penetration of tiagabine hydrochloride and carbamazepine across porcine skin in vitro. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis was carried out using an Agilent 1200 Series HPLC system coupled to an Agilent G1969A TOF-MS system. Transdermal flux values of the drugs were determined from the steady-state portion of the cumulative amount versus time curves. Following twelve hours of microneedle roller application, there was a 6.74-fold increase in the percutaneous penetration of tiagabine hydrochloride (86.42 ± 25.66 µg/cm2/h compared to passive delivery (12.83 ± 6.30 µg/cm2/h. For carbamazepine in 20% ethanol, passive transdermal flux of 7.85 ± 0.60 µg/cm2/h was observed compared to 10.85 ± 0.11 µg/cm2/h after microneedle treatment. Carbamazepine reconstituted in 30% ethanol resulted in only a 1.19-fold increase in drug permeation across porcine skin (36.73 ± 1.83 µg/cm2/h versus 30.74 ± 1.32 µg/cm2/h. Differences in flux values of untreated and microneedle-treated porcine skin using solid microneedles for the transdermal delivery of tiagabine were statistically significant. Although there were 1.38- and 1.19-fold increases in transdermal flux values of carbamazepine when applied as 20% and 30% ethanol solutions across microneedle-treated porcine skin, respectively, the increases were not statistically significant.

  17. Long-term outcomes of surgical treatment for epilepsy in adults with regard to seizures, antiepileptic drug treatment and employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmgren, Kristina; Edelvik, Anna

    2017-01-01

    There is Class I evidence for short-term efficacy of epilepsy surgery from two randomized controlled studies of temporal lobe resection. Long-term outcome studies are observational. The aim of this narrative review was to summarise long-term outcomes taking the study methodology into account. A PubMed search was conducted identifying articles on long-term outcomes of epilepsy surgery in adults with regard to seizures, antiepileptic drug treatment and employment. Definitions of seizure freedom were examined in order to identify the proportions of patients with sustained seizure freedom. The quality of the long-term studies was assessed. In a number of high-quality studies 40-50% of patients had been continuously free from seizures with impairment of consciousness 10 years after resective surgery, with a higher proportion seizure-free at each annual follow-up. The proportion of seizure-free adults in whom AEDs have been withdrawn varied widely across studies, from 19-63% after around 5 years of seizure freedom. Few long-term vocational outcome studies were identified and results were inconsistent. Some investigators found no postoperative changes, others found decreased employment for patients with continuing seizures, but no change or increased employment for seizure-free patients. Having employment at baseline and postoperative seizure freedom were the strongest predictors of employment after surgery. Long-term studies of outcomes after epilepsy surgery are by necessity observational. There is a need for more prospective longitudinal studies of both seizure and non-seizure outcomes, considering individual patient trajectories in order to obtain valid outcome data needed for counselling patients about epilepsy surgery. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Associations between Fracture Incidence and Use of Depot Medroxyprogesterone Acetate and Anti-Epileptic Drugs in Women with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Martha J.; Cain, Kevin C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate any association between incidence of osteoporotic fractures and use of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and/or anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) among women and girls with developmental disabilities. Methods Cross-sectional population–based observational study of all non-institutionalized females with developmental disabilities age thirteen and older who received fee-for-service Medicaid in Washington State during 2002 (N=6773), using administrative data. Main Findings In a sample of 6,773 females, 140 women (2%) had an osteoporotic fracture during 2002. Among 340 users of DMPA, 13 (3.8%) had an osteoporotic fracture with an odds ratio of 2.4 (CI 95%, 1.3–4.4) for fracture compared to non-users. Among 1909 users of AEDs, 60 (3.1%) had an osteoporotic fracture with an odds ratio of 1.9 (CI 95%, 1.3–2.6) for fracture compared to non-users. We controlled for age and race (as Caucasian or non-Caucasian). Conclusions Use of either AEDs or DMPA by women with developmental disabilities is associated with significantly increased incidence of fracture. Women and girls who have developmental disabilities may be poor candidates for DMPA use due to increased risk of fractures. Further research is indicated (1) to determine the specific risks profile of DMPA for this population, (2) to explore alternative means of managing significant menstrual problems and contraceptive needs in this population and (3) to screen current and previous users of DMPA and chronic users of AEDs for osteoporosis risk, regardless of age. PMID:17188217

  19. Impact of early life exposure to antiepileptic drugs on neurobehavioral outcomes based on laboratory animal and clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bath, Kevin G; Scharfman, Helen E

    2013-03-01

    Epilepsy affects approximately 1% of children under the age of 15, making it a very common neurological disorder in the pediatric population (Russ et al., 2012). In addition, ~0.4-0.8% of all pregnant women have some form of epilepsy (Hauser et al., 1996a,b; Borthen et al., 2009; Krishnamurthy, 2012). Despite the potential deleterious effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on the developing brain, their use is still required for seizure control in pregnant women (Krishnamurthy, 2012), and they represent the standard approach for treating children with epilepsy (Chu-Shore and Thiele, 2010; Quach et al., 2010; Verrotti et al., 2011). Even when AEDs are effective, there are potential side effects, including cognitive and affective changes or altered sleep and appetite. The consequences of AED exposure in development have been studied extensively (Canger et al., 1999; Modi et al., 2011a,b; Oguni, 2011). Despite intensive study, there is still debate about the long-term consequences of early life AED exposure. Here, we consider the evidence to date that AED exposure, either prenatally or in early postnatal life, has significant adverse effects on the developing brain and incorporate studies of laboratory animals as well as those of patients. We also note the areas of research where greater clarity seems critical in order to make significant advances. A greater understanding of the impact of AEDs on somatic, cognitive and behavioral development has substantial value because it has the potential to inform clinical practice and guide studies aimed at understanding the genetic and molecular bases of comorbid pathologies associated with common treatment regimens. Understanding these effects has the potential to lead to AEDs with fewer side effects. Such advances would expand treatment options, diminish the risk associated with AED exposure in susceptible populations, and improve the quality of life and health outcomes of children with epilepsy and children born to women who

  20. Safety and efficacy of clobazam versus phenytoin-sodium in the antiepileptic drug treatment of solitary cysticercus granulomas

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    Kaushal Sandeep

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is now agreed that the prognosis of seizure disorder due to solitary cysticercus granuloma (SCG is generally good. However, the choice antiepileptic drugs (AEDs remain empirical, with no comparative trials of different AEDs being available. Aims: To determine the safety and efficacy (measured by the incidence of ′treatment failure′ of clobazam in comparison to standard treatment with phenytoin-sodium for prevention of seizures in persons with solitary cysticercus granulomas (SCGs. Settings and Design: This pilot study was conducted in a neurology department of a medical college hospital in the form of a prospective, randomized, open-labeled trial. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight patients with seizures due to SCG were randomized in an open-labeled trial to either, clobazam (1 mg/kg oral loading followed by 0.5 mg/kg/d (n=21 or phenytoin (15 mg/kg, oral loading in 3 divided doses over 24 h, followed by 5 mg/kg/d (n=27. They were followed over 6 months with the primary outcome measure being treatment failure (either discontinuation or modification of AEDs due to either adverse effects or breakthrough seizures. Results: Treatment failures were noted to be significantly less common ( P =0.03 in the clobazam-treated group (n=1; 4.7% than in phenytoin-treated group (n=9; 33.3%. These included one patient (4.7% in the clobazam-group who had breakthrough seizures and 3 (11.1% who had breakthrough seizures and 6 (22.2% in the phenytoin-treated group who had adverse effects requiring treatment discontinuation. Conclusions: Clobazam was well tolerated, safe and more effective than phenytoin in the AED treatment of patients with SCG.

  1. Low risk of development of substance dependence for barbiturates and clobazam prescribed as antiepileptic drugs: results from a questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlmann, Carmen; Fröscher, Walter

    2009-01-01

    There is no systematical research about the topic of dependence on antiepileptic drugs (AED) for patients with epilepsy, despite the fact that barbiturates and benzodiazepines comprise a potential risk of dependence. We hypothesize that there is no psychological substance dependence for patients with epilepsy, possibly because of their outcome expectations. The aim of the study was to examine these patients in terms of substance dependence. One hundred inpatients at the Lake Constance Epilepsy Center were asked about their experiences with AED in terms of dependence in a structured interview. We registered general statements about dependence of AED, markers for substance dependence, and outcome expectations. About 50% of the patients reported withdrawal symptoms and the development of tolerance, but less than 10% noticed loss of control and craving. Withdrawal symptoms and development of tolerance were significantly lower in a group of patients without barbiturates or clobazam versus patients with barbiturates or/and clobazam. There was no significant difference between these two groups in psychological criteria of dependence, that is, loss of control and craving. Outcome expectations of AED were clearly related to the efficacy against seizures, and only to a small amount to psychotropic effects. The study demonstrates that physiological variables of dependence are present more in patients with epilepsy with a permanent intake of barbiturates or clobazam, but psychological variables of dependence are rarely present in epileptic patients, with or without an intake of barbiturates and clobazam. These results confirm our hypothesis that substance dependence is not a major problem in benzodiazepines and barbiturates in patients with epilepsy. Outcome expectations seem to be related mainly to the anticonvulsant and not the psychotropic effect. This might be the reason for the absence of dependence.

  2. Pharmaceutical equivalence by design for generic drugs: modified-release products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raw, André Sirota; Lionberger, Robert; Yu, Lawrence X

    2011-07-01

    The Office of Generic Drugs has ensured the high quality of generic products based upon two requirements: pharmaceutical equivalence and bioequivalence to the reference listed drug (RLD). This paradigm has been used with success toward ensuring quality generic drug products that provide the same therapeutic benefit as the RLD. Drug products have increased in design complexity; as a result, approaches to ensure therapeutic equivalence must evolve to provide assurance of quality generic drug products. The Food and Drug Administration quality by design initiative (QbD) provides an enhanced evaluation approach by introducing the concept of a quality target product profile (QTPP). The QTPP introduces, within the context of the current regulatory framework, the quality concept of "pharmaceutical equivalence by design." This article illustrates through several examples how this QbD element in the evaluation of modified-release drug products enhances the current framework to ensure generic drug product equivalence. It achieves this by complementing the traditional paradigm, "equivalence by testing," where product equivalence is based upon inferences from a limited bioequivalence study, to one that also considers whether the drug product was developed to be an equivalent to the RLD, using appropriate quality surrogates that target "pharmaceutical equivalence by design."

  3. Clinical risk factors associated with anti-epileptic drug responsiveness in canine epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowena M A Packer

    Full Text Available The nature and occurrence of remission, and conversely, pharmacoresistance following epilepsy treatment is still not fully understood in human or veterinary medicine. As such, predicting which patients will have good or poor treatment outcomes is imprecise, impeding patient management. In the present study, we use a naturally occurring animal model of pharmacoresistant epilepsy to investigate clinical risk factors associated with treatment outcome. Dogs with idiopathic epilepsy, for which no underlying cause was identified, were treated at a canine epilepsy clinic and monitored following discharge from a small animal referral hospital. Clinical data was gained via standardised owner questionnaires and longitudinal follow up data was gained via telephone interview with the dogs' owners. At follow up, 14% of treated dogs were in seizure-free remission. Dogs that did not achieve remission were more likely to be male, and to have previously experienced cluster seizures. Seizure frequency or the total number of seizures prior to treatment were not significant predictors of pharmacoresistance, demonstrating that seizure density, that is, the temporal pattern of seizure activity, is a more influential predictor of pharmacoresistance. These results are in line with clinical studies of human epilepsy, and experimental rodent models of epilepsy, that patients experiencing episodes of high seizure density (cluster seizures, not just a high seizure frequency pre-treatment, are at an increased risk of drug-refractoriness. These data provide further evidence that the dog could be a useful naturally occurring epilepsy model in the study of pharmacoresistant epilepsy.

  4. Statistics on BCS Classification of Generic Drug Products Approved Between 2000 and 2011 in the USA

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, Anil K.; Anand, Om; Chun, Nam; Conner, Dale P.; Mehta, Mehul U.; Nhu, Duong T.; Polli, James E.; Yu, Lawrence X.; Davit, Barbara M.

    2012-01-01

    The Biopharmaceutics Classification system (BCS) classifies drug substances based on aqueous solubility and intestinal permeability. The objective of this study was to use the World Health Organization Model List of Essential Medicines to determine the distribution of BCS Class 1, 2, 3, and 4 drugs in Abbreviated New drug Applications (ANDA) submissions. To categorize solubility and intestinal permeability properties of generic drugs under development, we used a list of 61 drugs which were cl...

  5. Age-Related Inducibility of Carboxylesterases by the Antiepileptic Agent Phenobarbital and Implications in Drug Metabolism and Lipid Accumulation 1, 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Da; Chen, Yi-Tzai; Yang, Dongfang; Yan, Bingfang

    2014-01-01

    Carboxylesterases (CES) constitute a class of hydrolytic enzymes that play critical roles in drug metabolism and lipid mobilization. Previous studies with a large number of human liver samples have suggested that the inducibility of carboxylesterases is inversely related with age. To directly test this possibility, neonatal (10 days of age) and adult mice were treated with the antiepileptic agent phenobarbital. The expression and hydrolytic activity were determined on six major carboxylesterases including ces1d, the ortholog of human CES1. Without exception, all carboxylesterases tested were induced to a greater extent in neonatal than adult mice. The induction was detected at mRNA, protein and catalytic levels. Ces1d was greatly induced and found to rapidly hydrolyze the antiplatelet agent clopidogrel and support the accumulation of neutral lipids. Phenobarbital represents a large number of therapeutic agents that induce drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in a species-conserved manner. The higher inducibility of carboxylesterases in the developmental age likely represents a general phenomenon cross species including human. Consequently, individuals in the developmental age may experience greater drug-drug interactions. The greater induction of ces1d also provides a molecular explanation to the clinical observation that children on antiepileptic drugs increase plasma lipids. PMID:22513142

  6. Profilaxis con drogas antiepilépticas en enfermedades neurológicas Prophylactic treatment with antiepileptic drugs in neurological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano A. Sposato

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available El uso profiláctico de drogas antiepilépticas en enfermedades neurológicas como el accidente cerebrovascular isquémico y hemorrágico, la hemorragia subaracnoidea, el traumatismo de cráneo y los tumores cerebrales ha sido motivo de controversia durante muchos años. Estas drogas son indicadas con el fin de disminuir el daño neurológico secundario a las crisis epilépticas. Sin embargo, la escasa evidencia científica disponible para avalar esta hipótesis, las potenciales interacciones farmacológicas, los efectos adversos y algunos informes sobre neurotoxicidad generan dudas en cuanto a esta conducta terapéutica. En esta revisión, analizamos la evidencia acerca del uso profiláctico de drogas epilépticas en las enfermedades neurológicas arriba mencionadas.Prophylactic use of antiepileptic drugs in neurological conditions such as ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, head injury, and brain tumors has been matter of debate for many years. These drugs are used for reducing secondary neurological damage caused by epileptic seizures. However, the evidence supporting this indication is scarce. Potential drug interactions, side effects, and even neurotoxicity related to these drugs have raised concern about this therapeutic approach. In this review, we examine the evidence on the prophylactic use of antiepileptic drugs in the neurological disorders above mentioned.

  7. The Brain Activity in Brodmann Area 17: A Potential Bio-Marker to Predict Patient Responses to Antiepileptic Drugs.

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    Yida Hu

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to predict newly diagnosed patient responses to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging tools to explore changes in spontaneous brain activity. We recruited 21 newly diagnosed epileptic patients, 8 drug-resistant (DR patients, 11 well-healed (WH patients, and 13 healthy controls. After a 12-month follow-up, 11 newly diagnosed epileptic patients who showed a poor response to AEDs were placed into the seizures uncontrolled (SUC group, while 10 patients were enrolled in the seizure-controlled (SC group. By calculating the amplitude of fractional low-frequency fluctuations (fALFF of blood oxygen level-dependent signals to measure brain activity during rest, we found that the SUC patients showed increased activity in the bilateral occipital lobe, particularly in the cuneus and lingual gyrus compared with the SC group and healthy controls. Interestingly, DR patients also showed increased activity in the identical cuneus and lingual gyrus regions, which comprise Brodmann's area 17 (BA17, compared with the SUC patients; however, these abnormalities were not observed in SC and WH patients. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves indicated that the fALFF value of BA17 could differentiate SUC patients from SC patients and healthy controls with sufficient sensitivity and specificity prior to the administration of medication. Functional connectivity analysis was subsequently performed to evaluate the difference in connectivity between BA17 and other brain regions in the SUC, SC and control groups. Regions nearby the cuneus and lingual gyrus were found positive connectivity increased changes or positive connectivity changes with BA17 in the SUC patients, while remarkably negative connectivity increased changes or positive connectivity decreased changes were found in the SC patients. Additionally, default mode network (DMN regions showed negative connectivity increased changes or

  8. ACEA (a highly selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist) stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis in mice treated with antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres-Mach, Marta; Haratym-Maj, Agnieszka; Zagaja, Miroslaw; Rola, Radoslaw; Maj, Maciej; Chrościńska-Krawczyk, Magdalena; Luszczki, Jarogniew J

    2015-10-22

    Hippocampal neurogenesis plays a very important role in learning and memory functions. In a search for best neurological drugs that protect neuronal cells and stimulate neurogenesis with no side effects, cannabinoids proved to be a strong group of substances having many beneficial properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of ACEA (arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide--a highly selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist) combined with a classical antiepileptic drug sodium valproate (VPA) on neural precursor cells' proliferation and differentiation in the mouse brain. All experiments were performed on adolescent CB57/BL male mice injected i.p. with VPA (10mg/kg), ACEA (10mg/kg) and PMSF (30 mg/kg) (phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride--a substance protecting ACEA against degradation by the fatty-acid amidohydrolase) for 10 days. Next an acute response of proliferating neural precursor cells to ACEA and VPA administration was evaluated with Ki-67 staining (Time point 1). Next, in order to determine whether acute changes translated into long-term alterations in neurogenesis, proliferating cells were labeled with 5-bromo-2deoxyuridine (BrdU) followed by confocal microscopy used to determine the percentage of BrdU-labeled cells that showed mature cell phenotypes (Time point 2). Results indicate that ACEA with PMSF significantly increase the total number of Ki-67-positive cells when compared to the control group. Moreover, ACEA in combination with VPA increased the number of Ki-67-positive cells, whereas VPA administered alone had no impact on proliferating cells' population. Accordingly, neurogenesis study results indicate that the combination of ACEA+PMSF administered alone and in combination with VPA considerably increases the total number of BrdU-positive cells in comparison to the control group while ACEA+PMSF alone and in combination with VPA increased total numbers of BrdU-positive cells, newly born neurons and astrocytes as compared to VPA group but not to

  9. 77 FR 57094 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Self-Identification of Generic Drug Facilities, Sites, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Self-Identification of Generic Drug Facilities, Sites, and Organizations; Availability; Correction AGENCY: Food and Drug... announced a draft guidance for industry entitled ``Self-Identification of Generic Drug Facilities,...

  10. High Generic Drug Prices and Market Competition: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Chintan V; Kesselheim, Aaron S; Fox, Erin R; Qiu, Peihua; Hartzema, Abraham

    2017-08-01

    Prices for some generic drugs have increased in recent years, adversely affecting patients who rely on them. To determine the association between market competition levels and the change in generic drug prices in the United States. Retrospective cohort study. Prescription claims from commercial health plans between 2008 and 2013. The 5.5 years of data were divided into 11 study periods of 6 months each. The Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI)-calculated by summing the squares of individual manufacturers' market shares, with higher values indicating a less competitive market-and average drug prices were estimated for the generic drugs in each period. The HHI value estimated in the baseline period (first half of 2008) was modeled as a fixed covariate. Models estimated price changes over time by level of competition, adjusting for drug shortages, market size, and dosage forms. From 1.08 billion prescription claims, a cohort of 1120 generic drugs was identified. After adjustment, drugs with quadropoly (HHI value of 2500, indicating relatively high levels of competition), duopoly (HHI value of 5000), near-monopoly (HHI value of 8000), and monopoly (HHI value of 10 000) levels of baseline competition were associated with price changes of -31.7% (95% CI, -34.4% to -28.9%), -11.8% (CI, -18.6% to -4.4%), 20.1% (CI, 5.5% to 36.6%), and 47.4% (CI, 25.4% to 73.2%), respectively, over the study period. Study findings may not be generalizable to drugs that became generic after 2008. Market competition levels were associated with a change in generic drug prices. Such measurements may be helpful in identifying older prescription drugs at higher risk for price change in the future. None.

  11. Scaling-up the use of generic antiretrovirals in resource-limited countries: generic drugs for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Eduard J; Passarelli, Carlos; Lui, Iris; Guichard, Anne-Claire; Simao, Mariangela; De Lay, Paul; Loures, Luiz

    2014-01-01

    The number of people living with HIV (PLHIV) continues to increase around the world because of the increasing number on antiretroviral therapy (ART) and their associated increase of life expectancy, in addition to the number of people newly infected with HIV each year. Unless a 'cure' can be found for HIV infection, PLHIV can anticipate the need to take antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) for the rest of their lives. Because ARVs are now being used for HIV prevention, as well as for therapeutic purposes, the need for effective, affordable ARVs with few adverse effects will continue to rise. It is important to note that the dramatic growth in treatment coverage of PLHIV seen during the past decade has been primarily due to the increased use of generic ARVs. Thus, there will be a need to scale-up the research and development, production, distribution and access to generic ARVs and ART regimens. However, these processes must occur within national and international regulated free-market economic systems and must deal with increasingly multifaceted patent issues affecting the price while ensuring the quality of the ARVs. National and international regulatory mechanisms will have to evolve, which will affect broader national and international economic and trade issues. Because of the complexity of these issues, the Editors of this Supplement conceived of asking experts in their fields to describe the various steps from relevant research and development, to production of generic ARVs, their delivery to countries and subsequently to PLHIV in low- and middle-income countries. A main objective was to highlight how these steps are interrelated, how the production and delivery of these drugs to PLHIV in resource-limited countries can be made more effective and efficient, and what the lessons are for the production and delivery of a broader set of drugs to people in low- and middle-income countries.

  12. [GENERIC DRUGS: IS BIOEQUIVALENCE SUFFICIENT TO ENSURE QUALITY, EFFICACY AND SAFETY?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo Norte, Juan Antonio; Postigo Mota, Salvador

    2015-05-01

    This article is focusing on the current debate that prescription of generic drugs is producing among patients and healthcare professionals. Following European Medicine Agency (EMA) recommendations, a number of generic medicines have recently been withdrawn from the market in Spain. The authorization for these generic drugs was primarily based on clinical studies conducted at GVK Biosciences in Hyderabad, India. The EMA inspection of GVK revealed data manipulation of electrocardiograms during the development of some studies of generic medicines. These manipulations had taken place over a period of at least five years. The article is also dealing with the consideration that bioavailability and bioequivalence studies receive as a cornerstone to approve generic drugs, and the discrepancies between the national regulatory agencies of medicines to implement guidelines of approval. Likewise, in the last few years, the rapid expansion of clinical trial activity regarding generic medicines and other drugs in emerging markets, is often leading to doubt on the integrity of the way trials were performed and on the reliability of data obtained from these studies.

  13. From generic to biosimilar drugs: why take an innovative pace?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Barei

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The transition of the generic/biotechnology industry to innovation by investing in innovative R&D will enhance business expertise in biopharmaceutical development and manufacturing. The major impact of this evolution is on patient access to treatment and savings for the health care systems. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this paper is to investigate the innovative aspect of biosimilar and biobetter products, manufactured by some big generic companies. We will also try to explore the innovative business strategy, implementing this high risk product differentiation policy. METHODS: This qualitative research is conducted by a series of interviews with CEOs, physicians, and academics in different countries. The qualitative data obtained were analyzed by Nvivo9.2 software. A literature review has also contributed to our key findings. RESULTS: The results show that switching into biosimilars/biobetters is an innovative strategic choice, approved by some big generic pharmaceutical companies. The biosimilar/biobetter products can be considered innovative because of their value added quality. CONCLUSION: Expanding the product portfolio to biosimilars/biobetter can be considered as a long run strategy in the innovative business plans aiming to ensure the market access. Patients and their access to better treatments are major components of these innovative business models.

  14. Quality of reporting of bioequivalence trials comparing generic to brand name drugs: a methodological systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meersch, Amélie; Dechartres, Agnès; Ravaud, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Generic drugs are used by millions of patients for economic reasons, so their evaluation must be highly transparent. To assess the quality of reporting of bioequivalence trials comparing generic to brand-name drugs. PubMed was searched for reports of bioequivalence trials comparing generic to brand-name drugs between January 2005 and December 2008. Articles were included if the aim of the study was to assess the bioequivalency of generic and brand-name drugs. We excluded case studies, pharmaco-economic evaluations, and validation dosage assays of drugs. We evaluated whether important information about funding, methodology, location of trials, and participants were reported. We also assessed whether the criteria required by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicine Agency (EMA) to conclude bioequivalence were reported and that the conclusions were in agreement with the results. We identified 134 potentially relevant articles but eliminated 55 because the brand-name or generic drug status of the reference drug was unknown. Thus, we evaluated 79 articles. The funding source and location of the trial were reported in 41% and 56% of articles, respectively. The type of statistical analysis was reported in 94% of articles, but the methods to generate the randomization sequence and to conceal allocation were reported in only 15% and 5%, respectively. In total, 65 articles of single-dose trials (89%) concluded bioequivalence. Of these, 20 (31%) did not report the 3 criteria within the limits required by the FDA and 11 (17%) did not report the 2 criteria within the limits required by the EMA. Important information to judge the validity and relevance of results are frequently missing in published reports of trials assessing generic drugs. The quality of reporting of such trials is in need of improvement.

  15. Malformation risk of antiepileptic drug exposure during pregnancy in women with epilepsy: Results from a pregnancy registry in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sanjeev V; Jose, Manna; Divakaran, Srividya; Sankara Sarma, Prabhakaran

    2017-02-01

    Kerala Registry of Epilepsy and Pregnancy had been prospectively evaluating the reproductive issues of women with epilepsy since April 1998. This analysis aimed to estimate the relative risk of major congenital malformations (MCM) to the registrants. All pregnancies with known outcome in this register until December 2013 were included. Malformation status was evaluated by antenatal ultrasonography, physical examination at birth, echocardiography, and abdomen ultrasonography at 3 months of age and a final review at 1 year of age. There were 1,688 fetuses (singlets 1,643, twins 21, and triplet 1) resulting in 1,622 live births. All were born to women of Asian origin living in South India. The MCM rate for all live births was 6.84% (95% confidence interval [CI] 5.71-8.18) and for all pregnancy outcomes including fetal loss was 7.11% (95% CI 5.98-8.44). The MCM rates (mean with 95% CI) for exposed group were 6.4% (5.03-8.03) for monotherapy and 9.9% (7.37-13.13) for polytherapy; internal control group (women with epilepsy [WWE] not on antiepileptic drugs [AEDs] in first trimester) 5.6% (3.34-9.11), external control group (women without epilepsy or AED exposure in first trimester) 3.45% (1.94-6.07). Valproate monotherapy group had a dose-dependent relative risk for MCM of 2.6 (95% CI 1.30-5.20) compared to the external control group. The preliminary data on MCM rate for the nine total clobazam monotherapy (22.2%; 95% CI 6.2-54.7) signals increased risk that needs further validation on larger sample size. There was no association between MCM rate and maternal socioeconomic status, epilepsy syndrome, or use of folic acid in first trimester. This dataset from South India confirms the increased risk of MCM with exposure to AEDs, particularly polytherapy. A dose-dependent increased risk was observed with valproate. The increased risk associated with clobazam monotherapy is an important signal that needs to be confirmed in a larger sample. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017

  16. Influence of N-hydroxymethyl-p-isopropoxyphenylsuccinimide on the anticonvulsant action of different classical antiepileptic drugs in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Kominek, Mateusz; Florek-Luszczki, Magdalena; Tchaytchian, Dariusz A; Kocharov, Sergey L; Zolkowska, Dorota

    2012-06-01

    Experimental epileptology is mainly focused on searching for some active compounds suppressing seizures that could become efficacious antiepileptic drugs. Accumulating evidence indicates that succinimide derivatives would be good candidates for novel antiepileptic drugs. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effects of N-hydroxymethyl-p-isopropoxyphenyl-succinimide (HMIPPS) on the protective action of four classical antiepileptic drugs (carbamazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin and valproate) in the maximal electroshock-induced seizure test in mice. Tonic hind limb extension (seizure activity) was evoked in adult male albino Swiss mice by a current (sine-wave, 25 mA, 500 V, 50 Hz, 0.2s stimulus duration) delivered via auricular electrodes. Acute adverse-effect profiles with respect to motor performance, long-term memory and skeletal muscular strength were measured along with total brain antiepileptic drug concentrations. Results indicate that HMIPPS administered intraperitoneally at 100mg/kg significantly elevated the threshold for electroconvulsions in mice (Panticonvulsant activity of phenobarbital and valproate in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model by reducing their median effective doses (ED(50) values) from 23.25mg/kg to 16.82 mg/kg (Panticonvulsant action of valproate by reducing its ED(50) value from 259.3mg/kg to 210.6 mg/kg (P>0.05), but not that of phenobarbital, phenytoin and carbamazepine in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model. Pharmacokinetic experiments revealed that HMIPPS did not alter total brain concentrations of phenobarbital or valproate in mice. Moreover, none of the examined combinations of HMIPPS (50mg/kg) with carbamazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin and valproate (at their ED(50) values from the maximal electroshock-induced seizure test) affected motor coordination in the chimney test, long-term memory in the passive avoidance task, and muscular strength in the grip-strength test in mice

  17. Creating New Economic Incentives for Repurposing Generic Drugs for Unsolved Diseases Using Social Finance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Bruce E

    2015-12-01

    Repurposing research improves patient lives by taking drugs approved for one disease and clinically testing them to create a treatment for a different disease. Repurposing drugs that are generic, inexpensive, and widely available and that can be taken in their current dosage and formulation in the new indication provide a quick, affordable, and effective way to create "new" treatments. However, generic drug repurposing often provides no profit potential, and so there is no economic incentive for industry to pursue this, and philanthropy and government funds are often insufficient. One way to create new economic incentive for the repurposing of generic drugs is through social finance. This perspective describes how social finance can create a new economic incentive by using a social impact bond, or similar financial structure, to repay for-profit investors who fund the repurposing research from the proceeds of healthcare cost reductions generated when these affordable, effective, and widely available repurposed therapies improve healthcare outcomes.

  18. Effects of WIN 55,212-2 (a synthetic cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor agonist) on the anticonvulsant activity of various novel antiepileptic drugs against 6 Hz-induced psychomotor seizures in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florek-Luszczki, Magdalena; Wlaz, Aleksandra; Zagaja, Mirosław; Andres-Mach, Marta; Kondrat-Wrobel, Maria W; Luszczki, Jarogniew J

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of WIN 55,212-2 mesylate (WIN-a non-selective cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor agonist) on the anticonvulsant activity of various second- and third-generation antiepileptic drugs (i.e., gabapentin, lacosamide, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, pregabalin and tiagabine) in the mouse 6 Hz-induced psychomotor seizure model. Psychomotor seizures were evoked in albino Swiss mice by a current (32 mA, 6 Hz, 3s stimulus duration) delivered via ocular electrodes. Additionally, total brain antiepileptic drug concentrations were measured. Results indicate that WIN (5 mg/kg, administered i.p.) significantly potentiated the anticonvulsant action of gabapentin (P anticonvulsant activity of all tested antiepileptic drugs in the 6 Hz test in mice. Measurement of total brain antiepileptic drug concentrations revealed that WIN (5 mg/kg) had no impact on gabapentin or levetiracetam total brain concentrations, indicating the pharmacodynamic nature of interaction between these antiepileptic drugs in the mouse 6Hz model. In conclusion, WIN in combination with gabapentin and levetiracetam exerts beneficial anticonvulsant pharmacodynamic interactions in the mouse psychomotor seizure model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of xanthotoxin (8-methoxypsoralen) on the anticonvulsant activity of various novel antiepileptic drugs against maximal electroshock-induced seizures in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagaja, Mirosław; Andres-Mach, Marta; Patrzylas, Paweł; Pyrka, Daniel; Szpringer, Monika; Florek-Łuszczki, Magdalena; Żółkowska, Dorota; Skalicka-Woźniak, Krystyna; Łuszczki, Jarogniew J

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of xanthotoxin (8-methoxypsoralen) on the protective action of 5 various second- and third-generation antiepileptic drugs (i.e., lacosamide, lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, pregabalin and topiramate) in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model. Seizure activity was evoked in adult male albino Swiss mice by a current (25mA, 500V, 0.2s stimulus duration) delivered via auricular electrodes. Drug-related adverse effects were determined in the chimney, grip-strength and passive avoidance tests. Total brain antiepileptic drug concentrations were measured to confirm pharmacodynamic nature of observed interactions with xanthotoxin. Results indicate that xanthotoxin (100mg/kg, i.p.) significantly enhanced the anticonvulsant action of lacosamide (Panticonvulsant action of lacosamide (Pdrugs in mice. Furthermore, combinations of xanthotoxin with oxcarbazepine or topiramate produced no adverse effects. However, xanthotoxin in combination with lacosamide, lamotrigine or pregabalin significantly reduced muscular strength in mice in the grip-strength test. In the chimney test, only the combinations of xanthotoxin with pregabalin significantly impaired motor coordination in mice. In conclusion, the combinations of xanthotoxin with oxcarbazepine and topiramate produce beneficial anticonvulsant pharmacodynamic interactions in the maximal electroshock-induced seizure test. A special caution is advised when combining xanthotoxin with pregabalin due to appearance of acute adverse effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. 抗癫痫药基因多态性研究进展%Research on genetic polymorphism of antiepileptic drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高森

    2014-01-01

    Clinical agrees that drug's gene polymorphism has important meaning for individual differences of antiepileptic drugs, gene polymorphism leads individuals appear different pharmacological and toxicological effects. Pharmacogenetics is a genetics discipline, along with in-depth study of pharmacogenetics, personalized medicine has a new situation. This paper firstly analyzes the types and the effect of antiepileptic drugs, then discusse gene polymorphism on epilepsy medicine clinical research progress.%临床医学上一致认为药物的基因多态性对于抗癫痫药的个体差异有着重要的意义,基因多态性导致个体出现不同的药理和毒理作用。遗传药理学是一门遗传学学科,随着人们对遗传药理学的深入研究,个体化用药有了新的局面。本文首先分析了抗癫痫药的种类及其疗效,然后详细介绍了当前基因多态性对抗癫痫药疗效研究进展。

  1. Merger mania: mergers and acquisitions in the generic drug sector from 1995 to 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Marc-André; Volesky, Karena D

    2017-08-22

    Drug shortages and increasing generic drug prices are associated with low levels of competition. Mergers and acquisitions impact the level of competition. Record merger and acquisition activity was reported for the pharmaceutical sector in 2014/15, yet information on mergers and acquisitions in the generic drug sector are absent from the literature. This information is necessary to understand if and how such mergers and acquisitions can be a factor in drug shortages and increasing prices. Data on completed merger and acquisition deals that had a generic drug company being taken over (i.e. 'target') were extracted from Bloomberg Finance L.P. The number and announced value of deals are presented globally, for the United States, and globally excluding the United States annually from 1995 to 2016 in United States dollars. Generic drug companies comprised 9.3% of the value of all deals with pharmaceutical targets occurring from 1995 to 2016. Globally, in 1995 there were no deals, in 2014 there were 22 deals worth $1.86 billion, in 2015 there were 34 deals totalling $33.56 billion, and in 2016 there were 42 deals worth in excess of $44 billion. This substantial increase was partially attributed to Teva's 2016 acquisition of Allergan's generic drug business. The surge in mergers and acquisitions for 2015/16 was driven by deals in the United States, where they represented 89.7% of the dollar value of deals in those years. The recent blitz in mergers and acquisitions signals that the generic drug industry is undergoing a transformation, especially in the United States. This restructuring can negatively affect the level of competition that might impact prices and shortages for some products, emphasizing the importance of updating regulations and procurement policies.

  2. Perceptions and patterns of use of generic drugs among Italian family pediatricians: first round results of a web survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiano, Valentina; Mameli, Chiara; Cattaneo, Dario; Delle Fave, Antonella; Preziosa, Alessandra; Mele, Giuseppe; Clementi, Emilio; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo

    2012-03-01

    Prescription of generic medicines represents an efficacious healthcare cost containment strategy. In some European countries and in the US, generic medicines are largely prescribed. In Italy, generic drugs prescription rate is lower. General Practitioners and Family Pediatricians may be less confident in prescribing generic equivalents instead of "branded" medicines. There are currently no data about Italian Family Pediatricians' perceptions and patterns of use of generic drugs. This is a first nationwide web survey conducted with the aim to evaluate generic medicines knowledge and prescribing habits of Italian Family Pediatricians. 303 Family Pediatricians completed the online questionnaire. 37.2% and 32.6% of them declared to have a sufficient or fairly good knowledge of generic medicines, respectively, and the majority of them believed that efficacy of generic medicines was sufficient (33.6%) or good (45.2%). Nevertheless, Italian Family Pediatricians are still prone to prescribe trade medicines more frequently, since only 13.5% of them declared that more than a half of their patients were treated with generic medicines. Major issues related with generic medicines prescriptions by Italian Family Pediatricians seem to be represented by diffuse scepticism about reliability of bioequivalence tests and safety of switchability from branded to generic equivalents. More information about generic drugs and more research in the field of pediatric pharmacology are needed for increasing generic medicines prescription rate among Italian Family Pediatricians.

  3. (R)-[11C]PK11195 brain uptake as a biomarker of inflammation and antiepileptic drug resistance: evaluation in a rat epilepsy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanović, Renée Marie; Syvänen, Stina; Michler, Christina; Russmann, Vera; Eriksson, Jonas; Windhorst, Albert D; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; de Lange, Elisabeth C; Voskuyl, Rob A; Potschka, Heidrun

    2014-10-01

    Neuroinflammation has been suggested as a key determinant of the intrinsic severity of epilepsy. Glial cell activation and associated inflammatory signaling can influence seizure thresholds as well as the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of antiepileptic drugs. Based on these data, we hypothesized that molecular imaging of microglia activation might serve as a tool to predict drug refractoriness of epilepsy. Brain uptake of (R)-[11C]PK11195, a ligand of the translocator protein 18 kDa and molecular marker of microglia activation, was studied in a chronic model of temporal lobe epilepsy in rats with selection of phenobarbital responders and non-responders. In rats with drug-sensitive epilepsy, (R)-[11C]PK11195 brain uptake values were comparable to those in non-epileptic controls. Analysis in non-responders revealed enhanced brain uptake of up to 39% in different brain regions. The difference might be related to the fact that non-responders exhibited higher baseline seizure frequencies than responders indicating a more pronounced intrinsic disease severity. In hippocampal sections, ED1 immunostaining argued against a general difference in microglia activation between both groups. Our data suggest that TSPO PET imaging might serve as a biomarker for drug resistance in temporal lobe epilepsy. However, it needs to be considered that our findings indicate that the TSPO PET data might merely reflect seizure frequency. Future experimental and clinical studies should further evaluate the validity of TSPO PET data to predict the response to phenobarbital and other antiepileptic drugs in longitudinal studies with scanning before drug exposure and with a focus on the early phase following an epileptogenic brain insult.

  4. Paying Physicians to Prescribe Generic Drugs and Follow-On Biologics in the United States: e1001802

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ameet Sarpatwari; Niteesh K Choudhry; Jerry Avorn; Aaron S Kesselheim

    2015-01-01

    .... * Strategies to promote greater prescribing of generic drugs and follow-on biologics include traditional information-supplying programs such as formulary decision support and academic detailing...

  5. Isobolographic analysis of interactions between 1-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline and four conventional antiepileptic drugs in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Antkiewicz-Michaluk, Lucyna; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2009-01-14

    The anticonvulsant activity of 1-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (MeTHIQ--an endogenous parkinsonism-preventing substance) administered alone and in combination with four conventional antiepileptic drugs (carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital and valproate) was determined in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model. The types of interactions of MeTHIQ with the antiepileptic drugs were characterized using isobolographic analysis. The isobolographic analysis revealed that the combination of MeTHIQ with phenobarbital at the fixed-ratios of 1:3, 1:1 and 3:1 exerted supra-additive (synergistic) interaction in the maximal electroshock-induced seizure test. In contrast, the combinations of MeTHIQ with carbamazepine, phenytoin and valproate exerted additive interaction for all three fixed-ratios (1:3, 1:1 and 3:1) tested in the maximal electroshock-induced seizure test. In conclusion, MeTHIQ produces a clear-cut anticonvulsant effect in the maximal electroshock-induced seizure test in mice. The supra-additive interaction of MeTHIQ with phenobarbital against maximal electroshock-induced seizures makes their combination of pivotal importance from a clinical viewpoint.

  6. The novel antiepileptic drug imepitoin compares favourably to other GABA-mimetic drugs in a seizure threshold model in mice and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löscher, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Katrin; Twele, Friederike; Potschka, Heidrun; Töllner, Kathrin

    2013-11-01

    Recently, the imidazolinone derivative imepitoin has been approved for treatment of canine epilepsy. Imepitoin acts as a low-affinity partial agonist at the benzodiazepine (BZD) site of the GABAA receptor and is the first compound with such mechanism that has been developed as an antiepileptic drug (AED). This mechanism offers several advantages compared to full agonists, including less severe adverse effects and a lack of tolerance and dependence liability, which has been demonstrated in rodents, dogs, and nonhuman primates. In clinical trials in epileptic dogs, imepitoin was shown to be an effective and safe AED. Recently, seizures in dogs have been proposed as a translational platform for human therapeutic trials on new epilepsy treatments. In the present study, we compared the anticonvulsant efficacy of imepitoin, phenobarbital and the high-affinity partial BZD agonist abecarnil in the timed i.v. pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) seizure threshold test in dogs and, for comparison, in mice. Furthermore, adverse effects of treatments were compared in both species. All drugs dose-dependently increased the PTZ threshold in both species, but anticonvulsant efficacy was higher in dogs than mice. At the doses selected for this study, imepitoin was slightly less potent than phenobarbital in increasing seizure threshold, but markedly more tolerable in both species. Effective doses of imepitoin in the PTZ seizure model were in the same range as those suppressing spontaneous recurrent seizures in epileptic dogs. The study demonstrates that low-affinity partial agonists at the benzodiazepine site of the GABAA receptor, such as imepitoin, offer advantages as a new category of AEDs.

  7. Recognizing Severe Adverse Drug Reactions: Two Case Reports After Switching Therapies to the Same Generic Company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallelli, Luca; Gallelli, Giuseppe; Codamo, Giuseppe; Argentieri, Angela; Michniewicz, Andzelika; Siniscalchi, Antonio; Stefanelli, Roberta; Cione, Erika; Caroleo, Maria C; Longo, Paola; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2016-01-01

    Generic formulations represent a way to reduce the costs of brand compounds when their patent is expired. While, the bio-equivalence in generic drugs is guaranteed, some excipients as well as dyes could be different and this could reduce the drug safety. Herein, we report the development of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) in two patients after the switch from brand to generic formulations. We have tested cytochrome P450 enzymes expression as well as drug serum levels. None of these markers were altered. Checking deeply into both patient's medical history, they harbored poly-sensitivity or allergy to pollen and graminacea and used different active ingredients for different health problems coming from the same generic company Almus(®). This company used different dyes and excipients compared to the branded drugs made by distinguished companies. In conclusion, we strongly suggest to both pharmacists and physicians to be careful in giving the advice to change the drug, thinking to reduce health sanitary costs without considering the personal clinical history of each one. Paradoxically this behavior is causing other health issues, bringing to an increase of the overall costs for patients as well as for National Health System.

  8. Modeling HIV/AIDS drug price determinants in Brazil: is generic competition a myth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiners, Constance; Sagaon-Teyssier, Luis; Hasenclever, Lia; Moatti, Jean-Paul

    2011-01-01

    Brazil became the first developing country to guarantee free and universal access to HIV/AIDS treatment, with antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) being delivered to nearly 190,000 patients. The analysis of ARV price evolution and market dynamics in Brazil can help anticipate issues soon to afflict other developing countries, as the 2010 revision of the World Health Organization guidelines shifts demand towards more expensive treatments, and, at the same time, current evolution of international legislation and trade agreements on intellectual property rights may reduce availability of generic drugs for HIV care. Our analyses are based on effective prices paid for ARV procurement in Brazil between 1996 and 2009. Data panel structure was exploited to gather ex-ante and ex-post information and address various sources of statistical bias. In-difference estimation offered in-depth information on ARV market characteristics which significantly influence prices. Although overall ARV prices follow a declining trend, changing characteristics in the generic segment help explain recent increase in generic ARV prices. Our results show that generic suppliers are more likely to respond to factors influencing demand size and market competition, while originator suppliers tend to set prices strategically to offset compulsory licensing threats and generic competition. In order to guarantee the long term sustainability of access to antiretroviral treatment, our findings highlight the importance of preserving and stimulating generic market dynamics to sustain developing countries' bargaining power in price negotiations undertaken with originator companies.

  9. Modeling HIV/AIDS drug price determinants in Brazil: is generic competition a myth?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constance Meiners

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brazil became the first developing country to guarantee free and universal access to HIV/AIDS treatment, with antiretroviral drugs (ARVs being delivered to nearly 190,000 patients. The analysis of ARV price evolution and market dynamics in Brazil can help anticipate issues soon to afflict other developing countries, as the 2010 revision of the World Health Organization guidelines shifts demand towards more expensive treatments, and, at the same time, current evolution of international legislation and trade agreements on intellectual property rights may reduce availability of generic drugs for HIV care. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Our analyses are based on effective prices paid for ARV procurement in Brazil between 1996 and 2009. Data panel structure was exploited to gather ex-ante and ex-post information and address various sources of statistical bias. In-difference estimation offered in-depth information on ARV market characteristics which significantly influence prices. Although overall ARV prices follow a declining trend, changing characteristics in the generic segment help explain recent increase in generic ARV prices. Our results show that generic suppliers are more likely to respond to factors influencing demand size and market competition, while originator suppliers tend to set prices strategically to offset compulsory licensing threats and generic competition. SIGNIFICANCE: In order to guarantee the long term sustainability of access to antiretroviral treatment, our findings highlight the importance of preserving and stimulating generic market dynamics to sustain developing countries' bargaining power in price negotiations undertaken with originator companies.

  10. An Update of the Brazilian Regulatory Bioequivalence Recommendations for Approval of Generic Topical Dermatological Drug Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Kelen Carine Costa; Santos, Gustavo Mendes Lima; Gelfuso, Guilherme M; Gratieri, Tais

    2015-11-01

    This note aims to clarify the Brazilian regulatory bioequivalence recommendations for approval of generic topical dermatological drug products, since the legal framework of the "Brazilian Health Surveillance Agency" (ANVISA) is only available in Portuguese. According to Resolutions RE n. 1170 (December 19th 2006) and RDC n. 37 (August 3rd 2011) in Brazil, only in vitro studies are required for registration of generic topical dermatological drug products. Current Regulatory Agenda of ANVISA, which contains possible future resolutions to be revised over 2015-2016, includes a discussion on biowaiver requirements and on possible in vitro and in vivo comparability tests for these products.

  11. In vitro release of diclofenac diethylamine from gels: evaluation of generic semisolid drug products in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Goebel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In order for the pharmacological action of a topical dermal drug product to occur, the drug must first be released from the vehicle to be available to penetrate the skin layers and reach the site of action. Drug release is mainly dependent on the characteristics of the formulation. Currently, to register a generic or a similar drug product in Brazil performance testing of topical drug products for local action is not required. In this context, this aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro release of commercial diclofenac diethylamine gel products available on the Brazilian pharmaceutical market, using the vertical diffusion cell method. Factors which may influence the test, such as the type of membrane used, and the effect of the formulation characteristics on the diffusion rate were evaluated. Brazilian legislation currently allows generic drug products to contain excipients other than the reference drug, which may affect the drug release from the vehicle. Only one of the four generic drug products tested could be considered equivalent to the reference Cataflam Emulgel®. The cellulose acetate and polyethersulfone membranes tested were found to be interchangeable in the in vitro release studies carried out on this product.

  12. Bioequivalence study designs for generic solid oral anticancer drug products: scientific and regulatory considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Paramjeet; Chaurasia, Chandra S; Davit, Barbara M; Conner, Dale P

    2013-12-01

    The demonstration of bioequivalence (BE) between the test and reference products is an integral part of generic drug approval process. A sound BE study design is pivotal to the successful demonstration of BE of generic drugs to their corresponding reference listed drug product. Generally, BE of systemically acting oral dosage forms is demonstrated in a crossover, single-dose in vivo study in healthy subjects. The determination of BE of solid oral anticancer drug products is associated with its own unique challenges due to the serious safety risks involved. Unlike typical BE study in healthy subjects, the safety issues often necessitate conducting BE studies in cancer patients. Such BE studies of an anticancer drug should be conducted without disturbing the patients' therapeutic dosing regimen. Attributes such as drug permeability and solubility, pharmacokinetics, dosing regimen, and approved therapeutic indication(s) are considered in the BE study design of solid anticancer drug products. To streamline the drug approval process, the Division of Bioequivalence posts the Bioequivalence Recommendations for Specific Products guidances on the FDA public website. The objective of this article is to illustrate the scientific and regulatory considerations in the design of BE studies for generic solid oral anticancer drug products through examples.

  13. Glia and epilepsy: experimental investigation of antiepileptic drugs in an astroglia/microglia co-culture model of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambach, Hannes; Hinkerohe, Daniel; Prochnow, Nora; Stienen, Martin N; Moinfar, Zahra; Haase, Claus G; Hufnagel, Andreas; Faustmann, Pedro M

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of glial cells, mainly astrocytes and microglia, to the pathophysiology of epilepsy is increasingly appreciated. Glia play a pivotal role in the initiation and maintenance of the central nervous system (CNS) immune response and neuronal metabolic and trophic supply. Recent clinical and experimental evidence suggests a direct relationship between epileptic activity and CNS inflammation, which is characterized by accumulation, activation, and proliferation of microglia and astrocytes. Concomitant glia-mediated mechanisms of action of several antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have been proposed. However, their direct effects on glial cells have been rarely investigated. We aimed to investigate the effect of commonly used AEDs on glial viability, the gap junctional network, the microglial activation, and cytokine expression in an in vitro astroglia/microglia co-culture model. Primary astrocytic cultures were prepared from brains of postnatal (P0-P2) Wistar rats and co-cultured with a physiologic amount of 5%, as well as 30% microglia in order to mimic inflammatory conditions. Co-cultures were treated with valproic acid (VPA), carbamazepine (CBZ), phenytoin (PHE), and gabapentin (GBT). Viability and proliferation were measured using the tetrazolium (MTT) assay. The microglial activation state was determined by immunocytochemical labeling. The astroglial connexin 43 (Cx43) expression was measured by Western blot analysis. The transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) cytokine levels were measured by the quantitative sandwich enzyme immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Astrocytes, co-cultured with 5% microglia (M5 co-cultures), showed a dose-dependent, significant reduction in glial viability after incubation with PHE and CBZ. Furthermore, VPA led to highly significant microglial activation at all doses examined. The antiinflammatory cytokine TGF-β1 release was induced by high doses of GBT and PHE. Astrocytes co-cultured with 30

  14. [Equivalence studies of pravastatin original and generic drugs by dissolution test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakauchi, Takao; Takeuchi, Ena; Okamoto, Takuya; Teramoto, Katsuya; Nozaki, Aoi; Seko, Fuko; Yuminoki, Kayo; Katakawa, Junichi; Hashimoto, Naofumi

    2012-01-01

    There are various opinions regarding the different functions of original and generic drugs. We used the paddle method to perform dissolution tests on pravastatin sodium tablets (10 mg) to investigate the causes for these differences. We used water and buffer solutions adjusted to pH 1.2 (JP1) and pH 6.8 (JP2), which are described in the Japanese Pharmacopoeia. The pravastatin concentration was measured by UV spectroscopy and HPLC. There were significant differences in the percentages dissolved of original and generic drugs after 5 and 10 min. On the other hand, the dissolution behaviors using water and JP2 measured by HPLC were similar to the results obtained by UV spectroscopy. However, the percentage dissolved of pravastatin using JP1 decreased with time because pravastatin degraded in JP1. There were also significant differences in the pravastatin concentrations of the original and generic drugs at 5, 15, 30, and 45 min. Based on the above results, since the original drug has a slower dissolution rate than the generic drugs, it is necessary to be cautious about the degradation of pravastatin in the stomach and the bioavailability of pravastatin due to the different dissolution rates and the different residual amount of pravastatin in the stomach.

  15. [The effect of generic price competition on drug consumption and health insurance pharmaceutical expenditures in Hungary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Répásy, Balázs; Endrei, Dóra; Zemplényi, Antal; Agoston, István; Hornyák, Lajos; Nagy, Zsolt; Csákvári, Tímea; Vajda, Réka; Boncz Imre

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to analyze the Hungarian montelukast sodium drug market. We examined the effect of the appearance of generic drugs on the price and turnover of the brand-name drug, Singulair. Data derived from the nationwide pharmaceutical database of Hungarian National Health Insurance Fund Administration (2007-2014). We analized the turnover and price of the medicaments containing the active substance montelukast sodium. Accordingly our indicators were: consumer price, social insurance subsidy, patients' co-payment and days of treatment (DOT). First the generics started from a significantly lower price of 18 USD which was lower than the price of brand-name Singulair (32 USD). Then the prices of the generics started to diminish. While in 2007 the DOT was below 2 million, it increased over 10 million days by 2014. The increase of DOT was followed by the increase of health insurance subsidy until 2011. Then the amount of health insurance subsidy decreased from 10,5 million USD to 7 million USD in 2012. In 2013 and 2014 there was a further reduction, the amount of the health insurance subsidy decreased to 4,1 million USD in 2013, and in 2014 it was reduced to 2.2 million USD. Following the introduction of generic drugs, the price of the medicaments containing montelukast sodium was significantly reduced, while the days on treatment (DOT) increased. The patients' access to drugs containing montelukast sodium increased significantly. The annual health insurance subsidy was significantly reduced as well.

  16. Current Research on Antiepileptic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Xi Wei

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy affects about 1% of the world’s population. Due to the fact all antiepileptic drugs (AEDs have some undesirable side effects and about 30% of epileptic patients are not seizure-free with the existing AEDs, there is still an urgent need for the development of more effective and safer AEDs. Based on our research work on antiepileptic compounds and other references in recent years, this review covers the reported work on antiepileptic compounds which are classified according to their structures. This review summarized 244 significant anticonvulsant compounds which are classified by functional groups according to the animal model data, although there are some limitations in the data. This review highlights the properties of new compounds endowed with promising antiepileptic properties, which may be proven to be more effective and selective, and possibly free of unwanted side effects. The reviewed compounds represent an interesting possibility to overcome refractory seizures and to reduce the percentage of patients with a poor response to drug therapy.

  17. Treatment of cardiac arrhythmias in a mouse model of Rett syndrome with Na+-channel-blocking antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, José A; Ward, Christopher S; Pitcher, Meagan R; Percy, Alan K; Skinner, Steven; Kaufmann, Walter E; Glaze, Daniel G; Wehrens, Xander H T; Neul, Jeffrey L

    2015-04-01

    One quarter of deaths associated with Rett syndrome (RTT), an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder, are sudden and unexpected. RTT is associated with prolonged QTc interval (LQT), and LQT-associated cardiac arrhythmias are a potential cause of unexpected death. The standard of care for LQT in RTT is treatment with β-adrenergic antagonists; however, recent work indicates that acute treatment of mice with RTT with a β-antagonist, propranolol, does not prevent lethal arrhythmias. In contrast, acute treatment with the Na(+) channel blocker phenytoin prevented arrhythmias. Chronic dosing of propranolol may be required for efficacy; therefore, we tested the efficacy of chronic treatment with either propranolol or phenytoin on RTT mice. Phenytoin completely abolished arrhythmias, whereas propranolol showed no benefit. Surprisingly, phenytoin also normalized weight and activity, but worsened breathing patterns. To explore the role of Na(+) channel blockers on QT in people with RTT, we performed a retrospective analysis of QT status before and after Na(+) channel blocker antiepileptic therapies. Individuals with RTT and LQT significantly improved their QT interval status after being started on Na(+) channel blocker antiepileptic therapies. Thus, Na(+) channel blockers should be considered for the clinical management of LQT in individuals with RTT.

  18. 76 FR 45814 - Animal Generic Drug User Fee Rates and Payment Procedures for Fiscal Year 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Visit FDA's Web site at http://www.fda.gov/ForIndustry/UserFees/AnimalGenericDrugUserFee.... Background Section 741 of the FD&C Act (21 U.S.C. 379j-21) establishes three different kinds of user fees: (1.... Contact your bank or financial institution regarding the amount of the fees that need to be paid...

  19. The problem of choosing between the original and of generic drugs in patients with overweight and obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M L Maksimov

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This review article discusses the similarities and differences in the research, production and use in clinical practice, original and generic drugs. Reproduced drugs (generics present on the Russian pharmaceutical market that have the bioequivalence data are not always equal in therapeutic equivalence of the original drug. The article presents evidence base of efficacy and safety of the original drug Xenical in the complex treatment of patients with overweight and obesity.

  20. Individualised prediction model of seizure recurrence and long-term outcomes after withdrawal of antiepileptic drugs in seizure-free patients : a systematic review and individual participant data meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamberink, Herm J; Otte, Willem M; Geerts, Ada T; Pavlovic, Milen; Ramos-Lizana, Julio; Marson, Anthony G; Overweg, Jan; Sauma, Letícia; Specchio, Luigi M; Tennison, Michael; Cardoso, Tania M O; Shinnar, Shlomo; Schmidt, Dieter; Geleijns, Karin; Braun, Kees P J

    BACKGROUND: People with epilepsy who became seizure-free while taking antiepileptic drugs might consider discontinuing their medication, with the possibility of increased quality of life because of the elimination of adverse events. The risk with this action, however, is seizure recurrence. The

  1. The trials and tribulations of repurposing metformin and other generic drugs for tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Bruce E

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of generic drugs that might be useful in treating tuberculosis, but will they ever get to the patients who need them? They might, but not without a lot of help. There are intellectual property issues, endpoint issues, cost of research issues, economic incentive issues, preclinical validation issues, "who is in charge" issues and many more. It is clear that repurposed generic drugs have the potential to make a safe, effective, quick and affordable impact on a global disease of poverty such as tuberculosis. But without the economic incentives that are usually in place for drug development, can we muster the scientific, economic and governmental support to bring them to the patients?

  2. Phenobarbital or potassium bromide as an add-on antiepileptic drug for the management of canine idiopathic epilepsy refractory to imepitoin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royaux, E; Van Ham, L; Broeckx, B J G; Van Soens, I; Gielen, I; Deforce, D; Bhatti, S F M

    2017-02-01

    Imepitoin has recently been approved in Europe for the management of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Currently, there is no evidence-based information available on the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs used as additions to the therapeutic regimen in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy that are not well controlled with imepitoin. The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of phenobarbital or potassium bromide (KBr) as add-on antiepileptic drugs for controlling dogs refractory to a maximum dose of imepitoin (30 mg/kg twice daily). The study was performed as a prospective, randomised, controlled clinical trial. The efficacy of phenobarbital and KBr was evaluated by comparing monthly seizure frequency (MSF), monthly seizure day frequency (MSDF), the presence of cluster seizures during a retrospective 2-month period with a prospective follow-up of 6 months, and the overall responder rate. Twenty-seven dogs were included in the study, 14 dogs in the phenobarbital group and 13 dogs in the KBr group. Both median MSF and MSDF decreased in the phenobarbital group (both P = 0.001) and in the KBr group (P = 0.004 and P = 0.003, respectively). Overall, the number of dogs with cluster seizures decreased (P = 0.0005). The responder rate was 79% vs. 69% in the phenobarbital and KBr groups, respectively. We conclude that phenobarbital or KBr add-on treatment decreases median MSF and MSDF in epileptic dogs refractory to a maximum dose of imepitoin. Combination therapy was generally well tolerated and resulted in an improvement in seizure management in the majority of the dogs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. N-valproyl-L-phenylalanine as new potential antiepileptic drug: synthesis, characterization and in vitro studies on stability, toxicity and anticonvulsant efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Caro, Viviana; Scaturro, Anna Lisa; Sutera, Flavia Maria; Avellone, Giuseppe; Schiera, Gabriella; Ferrantelli, Evelina; Carafa, Maria; Rizzo, Valerio; Carletti, Fabio; Sardo, Pierangelo; Giannola, Libero Italo

    2014-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is considered first-line drug in treatment of generalized idiopathic seizures such as absence, generalized tonic-clonic and myoclonic seizures. Among major antiepileptic drugs, VPA is also considered effective in childhood epilepsies and infantile spasms. Due to its broad activity, VPA acts as a mood stabilizer in bipolar disorder and it is useful in migraine prophylaxis. Despite its long-standing usage, severe reactions to VPA, such as liver toxicity and teratogenicity, are reported. To circumvent side effects due to structural characteristics of VPA, we synthesized in good yield a new VPA-aminoacid conjugate, the N-valproyl-L-Phenylalanine, and characterized by FT-IR, MS, (13)C and (1)H- NMR analyses. The Log D(pH7.4) value (0.19) indicated that new molecule was potentially able to cross biological membranes. The resistance to chemical and enzymatic hydrolysis of N-valproyl-L-phenylalanine was also assessed. All trials suggested that the compound, at the pH conditions of the entire gastro-intestinal tract, remained unmodified. Furthermore, the new compound did not undergo enzymatic cleavage both in plasma and in cerebral medium up to 24 h. The toxicity assay on primary cultures of astrocytes indicated that the synthetized conjugate was less toxic than both free VPA and L-Phenylalanine. In this paper, the anticonvulsant activity of the new compound against epileptic burst discharges evoked in vitro in rat hippocampal slices was also evaluated. These preliminary results underline that N-valproyl-L-phenylalanine as new potential antiepileptic agent could represent a good candidate to further investigations.

  4. Brand-name drug, generic drug, orphan drug. Pharmacological therapy with biosimilar drugs - provision of due diligence in the treatment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajdel, Justyna; Zajdel, Radosław

    2013-01-01

    Due diligence in the process of provision of healthcare services refers, among other elements, to the application of pharmacological therapy at a time which offers the greatest chance for a successful outcome of treatment, i.e. for achieving the optimum expected effect understood as an improvement in the patient's health, reduction of health risks or elimination of the disease. However, due diligence may also refer to actions aimed at ensuring that neither the patient nor the healthcare payer is required to incur unreasonable costs in the process of treatment. The validity of that statement stems not only from normative acts but also from ethical standards laid down in the Medical Code of Ethics (Article 57 section 2). It often happens that the provision of optimal treatment calls for deviations from the formal provisions included in Summary Product Characteristics (SPCs), and the application of drugs that are bioequivalent to reference drugs, which translates into a significant reduction of costs. The present study addresses the problem of acceptability of a specific form of drug substitution consisting in the replacement of a reference drug with a generic drug. Also explored are legal aspects associated with the possibility of therapy based on "off-label use". The study reviews normative acts existing in the Polish and EU legislation. It also provides a clear definition of orphan drug, which has made it possible to make a distinction and investigate mutual relations between the concepts of brand-name (reference) drug, orphan drug and generic drug.

  5. Biopharmaceutics classification system-based biowaivers for generic oncology drug products: case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampal, Nilufer; Mandula, Haritha; Zhang, Hongling; Li, Bing V; Nguyen, Hoainhon; Conner, Dale P

    2015-02-01

    Establishing bioequivalence (BE) of drugs indicated to treat cancer poses special challenges. For ethical reasons, often, the studies need to be conducted in cancer patients rather than in healthy volunteers, especially when the drug is cytotoxic. The Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) introduced by Amidon (1) and adopted by the FDA, presents opportunities to avoid conducting the bioequivalence studies in humans. This paper analyzes the application of the BCS approach by the generic pharmaceutical industry and the FDA to oncology drug products. To date, the FDA has granted BCS-based biowaivers for several drug products involving at least four different drug substances, used to treat cancer. Compared to in vivo BE studies, development of data to justify BCS waivers is considered somewhat easier, faster, and more cost effective. However, the FDA experience shows that the approval times for applications containing in vitro studies to support the BCS-based biowaivers are often as long as the applications containing in vivo BE studies, primarily because of inadequate information in the submissions. This paper deliberates some common causes for the delays in the approval of applications requesting BCS-based biowaivers for oncology drug products. Scientific considerations of conducting a non-BCS-based in vivo BE study for generic oncology drug products are also discussed. It is hoped that the information provided in our study would help the applicants to improve the quality of ANDA submissions in the future.

  6. The European patient with Dravet syndrome: results from a parent-reported survey on antiepileptic drug use in the European population with Dravet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Luis Miguel; Isla, Julián; Mingorance-Le Meur, Ana

    2015-03-01

    Dravet syndrome is a rare form of epilepsy largely refractory to current antiepileptic medications. The only precedents of randomized placebo-controlled trials in Dravet syndrome are the two small trials that led to the approval of stiripentol. With the arrival of new clinical trials for Dravet syndrome, we sought to determine the characteristics of the patient population with Dravet syndrome in Europe today, which has possibly evolved subsequent to the approval of stiripentol and the ability to diagnose milder clinical cases via genetic testing. From May to June 2014, we conducted an online parent-reported survey to collect information about the demographics, disease-specific clinical characteristics, as well as current and past use of antiepileptic medications by European patients with Dravet syndrome. We present data from 274 patients with Dravet syndrome from 15 European countries. Most patients were between 4 and 8years of age, and 90% had known mutations in SCN1A. Their epilepsy was characterized by multiple seizure types, although only 45% had more than 4 tonic-clonic seizures per month on average. The most common drug combination was valproate, clobazam, and stiripentol, with 42% of the total population currently taking stiripentol. Over a third of patients with Dravet syndrome had taken sodium channel blockers in the past, and most had motor and behavioral comorbidities. Our study helps define the current typical European patient with Dravet syndrome. The results from this survey may have important implications for the design of future clinical trials that investigate new treatments for Dravet syndrome.

  7. Extent of Drug Coverage across Generic Drug Discount Programs offered by Community Pharmacies: A look at five Chronic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshali K. Patel, MS

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic conditions are expensive to treat because of the ongoing prescription cost burden. Generic drug discount programs (GDDPs that offer generics at discounted price may prove beneficial to reduce pharmacy costs for the same.Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the extent to which GDDPs provide drug coverage for five common chronic conditions.Methods: A content analyses of preexisting information was conducted. Extent of coverage based on top 200 generic drugs prescribed during 2008 for the treatment of chronic conditions such as hypertension, mental disorders, arthritis, pulmonary/respiratory conditions, and diabetes were identified. Commonly prescribed medications for these diseases were identified using published peer reviewed clinical guidelines. List of drugs covered under a GDDP for stores, Wal-Mart, Walgreens, CVS, Kroger, HEB, Target, and Randalls were obtained and compared to assess drug coverage by retail dollar sales and sales volume. Descriptive statistics and frequency/percentage of coverage were reported using SAS 9.2.Results: GDDPs covered the highest number of drugs for hypertension (21-27 across different GDDPs and the least (3-5 across different GDDPs for pulmonary/respiratory conditions. Arthritis (5-11, mental disorders (6-11 and diabetes (5-7 had similar coverage. When compared to the top 200 drugs by retail dollars spent during 2008, hypertension (68%-87% and diabetes (63%-88% had the highest coverage followed by respiratory conditions (30%-50%, arthritis (22%-48%, and mental disorders (21%-38%. Similar result was obtained when GDDP coverage was compared with the top 200 generic drugs by sales volume, where diabetes (63-88% and hypertension (57%-74% had the highest coverage and mental disorders remained the lowest (23%-37%.Conclusion/Implications: Drug coverage in GDDPs varied by pharmacies across the five common chronic conditions evaluated which may limit accessibility of these programs for

  8. Detection of 22 antiepileptic drugs by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry applicable to routine therapeutic drug monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Mai; Hashi, Sachiyo; Nakanishi, Haruka; Masuda, Satohiro; Katsura, Toshiya; Yano, Ikuko

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method of 22 antiepileptics for routine therapeutic monitoring. The antiepileptics used in the analyses were carbamazepine, carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide, clobazam, N-desmethylclobazam, clonazepam, diazepam, N-desmethyldiazepam, ethosuximide, felbamate, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, N-desmethylmesuximide, nitrazepam, phenobarbital, phenytoin, primidone, tiagabine, topiramate, valproic acid, vigabatrin and zonisamide. After protein precipitation of 50 μL plasma with methanol, the supernatant was diluted with water or was evaporated to dryness and reconstituted with mobile phase in the case of benzodiazepines. Separation was achieved on an Acquity UPLC BEH C₁₈ column with a gradient mobile phase of 10 mm ammonium acetate containing 0.1% formic acid and methanol at a flow rate of 0.4 mL/min. An Acquity TQD instrument in multiple reaction monitoring mode with ion mode switching was used for detection. All antiepileptics were detected and quantified within 10 min, with no endogenous interference. All the calibration curves showed good linearity in the therapeutic range (r²  < 0.99). The precision and accuracy values for intra- and inter-assays were within ±15% except for phenobarbital and tiagabine. A good correlation was observed between the concentration of clinical samples measured by the new method described here and the conventional methods. The values of carbamazepine and phenytoin by UPLC-MS/MS were lower than those detected by the immunoassays, which might be caused by the cross-reaction of antibodies with their metabolites. In conclusion, we developed a simple and selective UPLC-MS/MS method suitable for routine therapeutic monitoring of antiepileptics.

  9. Effects of levetiracetam, a novel antiepileptic drug, on convulsant activity in two genetic rat models of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, A J; Hirsch, E; Boehrer, A; Noyer, M; Marescaux, C

    1995-11-01

    The anticonvulsant effects of levetiracetam were assessed in two genetic rat models. In the audiogenic-seizure prone rat, levetiracetam, 5.4 to 96 mg/kg i.p. dose-dependently inhibited both wild running and tonic-clonic convulsions. In the GAERS model of petit mal epilepsy, levetiracetam markedly suppressed spontaneous spike-and-wave discharge (SWD) but left the underlying EEG trace normal. The effects were already marked at 5.4 mg/kg and did not increase significantly up to 170 mg/kg although more animals were completely protected. Levetiracetam produced no observable effects on behaviour apart from slight reversible sedation at 170 mg/kg. In contrast, piracetam, a structural analogue of levetiracetam, significantly and consistently suppressed SWD in GAERS rats only at the high dose of 1000 mg/kg with some slight effects at lower doses. The effect of piracetam appeared to be due to increased sleeping rather than to a direct antiepileptic effect. The results with levetiracetam argue for a clinical application in both petit mal, absence epilepsy and in treating generalised tonic-clonic and partial seizures.

  10. Protective effect of rutin on impairment of cognitive functions of due to antiepileptic drugs on zebrafish model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Shagun; Ganeshpurkar, Aditya; Bansal, Divya; Dubey, Nazneen

    2015-01-01

    The severity of adverse reactions due to antiepileptics is observed during initiation and early treatment in which impairment of cognitive effects are common. Since long time, herbal medicine is a natural remedy to treat neural symptoms. Phytochemicals have been proven to be potent neuro-protective agents. Rutin, a bioflavonoid is established to be nootropic in many studies. In this study, we aimed to determine the protective effect of rutin in zebrafish against the side effects produced by AEDs. Seizures were induced in zebrafish by phenylenetetrazole. Rutin pretreatment (50 mg/kg, single injection, i.p.) was done before commencement of the study. Behavioral studies were performed as: latency to move high in the tank, locomotion effects, color effect, shoal cohesion, light/dark test on Zebrafish. Treatment with rutin reverted the locomotor behavior to normal. Treatment with AEDs caused fishes to move in all regions while, in case of treatment with rutin, the response reverted to normal. Treatment with AEDs altered swimming behavior of zebrafish, however, rutin showed a positive effect over this behavior. Treatment with AEDs resulted in restricted movement of zebrafish to the dark zone. Treatment with rutin caused increased latency of zebrafish to move in the light compartment. Similarly, time spent in the light compartment by zebrafish treated with rutin was significantly (P < 0.01) higher as compared to zebrafish treated with AEDs. The results suggest a protective role of rutin on cognition impaired by AEDs.

  11. Implementation of a reference-scaled average bioequivalence approach for highly variable generic drug products by the US Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davit, Barbara M; Chen, Mei-Ling; Conner, Dale P; Haidar, Sam H; Kim, Stephanie; Lee, Christina H; Lionberger, Robert A; Makhlouf, Fairouz T; Nwakama, Patrick E; Patel, Devvrat T; Schuirmann, Donald J; Yu, Lawrence X

    2012-12-01

    Highly variable (HV) drugs are defined as those for which within-subject variability (%CV) in bioequivalence (BE) measures is 30% or greater. Because of this high variability, studies designed to show whether generic HV drugs are bioequivalent to their corresponding HV reference drugs may need to enroll large numbers of subjects even when the products have no significant mean differences. To avoid unnecessary human testing, the US Food and Drug Administration's Office of Generic Drugs developed a reference-scaled average bioequivalence (RSABE) approach, whereby the BE acceptance limits are scaled to the variability of the reference product. For an acceptable RSABE study, an HV generic drug product must meet the scaled BE limit and a point estimate constraint. The approach has been implemented successfully. To date, the RSABE approach has supported four full approvals and one tentative approval of HV generic drug products.

  12. Comparative evaluation of adverse drug reaction reporting forms for introduction of a spontaneous generic ADR form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshi Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite comprehensive and stringent phases of clinical trials and surveillance efforts, unexpected and serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs repeatedly occur after the drug is marketed. ADR reporting is an important aspect of an efficient and effective pharmacovigilance program. Although Medwatch, Yellow Card, CDSCO form, etc. are the protocol forms of ADR collection and reports, a number of countries design and use their respective ADR forms. This review compares similarities and dissimilarities of 13 ADR forms of countries representing their geographical location. This study extracted 73 data elements mentioned in 13 different ADR forms. Only 13 elements were common. An ADR form of Malaysia and Canada covers the highest number of data 43, while Brazil falls to the opposite end with a number of 17 data elements in lieu with the Generic ADR Form. The result of this review highlights 58 data elements of the proposed generic ADR form which ensures that requisite reporting information essential for correct causality assessment of ADRs are included. The proposed "Generic ADR form" could be adopted worldwide mandatorily for reporting any/all ADRs associated with marketed drugs.

  13. [Competition between branded and generic drugs in Austria: evidence from the market for ACE inhibitors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlich, J C; Stadler, I

    2012-01-01

    The market for pharmaceuticals in Austria is highly regulated and manufacturers cannot set prices freely after patent expiration of the pioneer drug. We wanted to examine the effect of price regulation on price competition between branded and generic drugs in Austria. We examined the Austrian market for ACE inhibitors and describe competitive dynamics by means of 6 indices. We compared our results with those of Grabowski and Vernon who studied the US market. According to our analysis the competition amongst the producers of generic drugs is not great and consequently, compared to the USA, over time the prices for generic products decrease less and their market share increases less. This is due to a market-oriented system in the USA which waives most regulatory provisions. Our conclusions are in line with the findings by Danzon und Chao (2000) who argue that in a price-regulated market competitive dynamics are less strongly developed. From a politico-economic view, the necessity of price regulations in the pharmaceutical market seems questionable, as price regulations generally also cause other negative effects, such as distorted economic incentives for research and development investments. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Generic solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for fast determination of drugs in biological fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellen, A.; Ooms, B.; Lagemaat, D. van de; Vreeken, R.; Dongen, W.D. van

    2003-01-01

    A generic method was developed for the fast determination of a wide range of drugs in serum or plasma. The methodology comprises generic solid-phase extraction, on-line coupled to gradient HPLC with tandem mass spectrometric detection (SPE-LC-MS/MS). The individual components of the SPE-LC-MS/MS sys

  15. Low-cost generic drugs under the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief drove down treatment cost; more are needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Kartik K; Mayer, Kenneth H; Carpenter, Charles C J

    2012-07-01

    The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) was originally authorized in 2003 with the goal of supporting HIV prevention, treatment, and care within fifteen focus countries in the developing world. By September 2011 nearly 13 million people around the world were receiving HIV/AIDS-related care through PEPFAR, and 3.9 million were receiving antiretroviral treatment. However, in the early years of the program, access to antiretroviral drugs was hampered by the lack of a licensing process that the US government recognized for generic versions of these medications. Ultimately, the obstacle to approval of generic antiretroviral drugs was removed, which led to PEPFAR's considerable success at making these treatments widely available. This article outlines PEPFAR's evolving use of generic antiretroviral drugs to treat HIV in the developing world, highlights ongoing initiatives to increase access to generic antiretrovirals, and points to the need for mechanisms that will speed up the approval of new generic drugs. The striking decline in antiretroviral treatment costs, from $1,100 per person annually in 2004 to $335 per person annually in 2012, is due to the availability of effective generic antiretrovirals. Given growing resistance to existing drugs and the planned expansion of treatment to millions more people, access to newer generations of generic antiretrovirals will have to be expedited.

  16. Modulation of Cytokine Production by Drugs with Antiepileptic or Mood Stabilizer Properties in Anti-CD3- and Anti-CD40-Stimulated Blood In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubertus Himmerich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased cytokine production possibly due to oxidative stress has repeatedly been shown to play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of epilepsy and bipolar disorder. Recent in vitro and animal studies of valproic acid (VPA report antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties, and suppression of interleukin (IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α. We tested the effect of drugs with antiepileptic or mood stabilizer properties, namely, primidone (PRM, carbamazepine (CBZ, levetiracetam (LEV, lamotrigine (LTG, VPA, oxcarbazepine (OXC, topiramate (TPM, phenobarbital (PB, and lithium on the production of the following cytokines in vitro: interleukin (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17, IL-22, and TNF-α. We performed a whole blood assay with stimulated blood of 14 healthy female subjects. Anti-human CD3 monoclonal antibody OKT3, combined with 5C3 antibody against CD40, was used as stimulant. We found a significant reduction of IL-1 and IL-2 levels with all tested drugs other than lithium in the CD3/5C3-stimulated blood; VPA led to a decrease in IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17, and TNF-α production, which substantiates and adds knowledge to current hypotheses on VPA’s anti-inflammatory properties.

  17. Modafinil and its metabolites enhance the anticonvulsant action of classical antiepileptic drugs in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolkowska, Dorota; Andres-Mach, Marta; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Baumann, Michael H; Luszczki, Jarogniew J

    2015-07-01

    Seizures occur when the excitability of brain circuits is not sufficiently restrained by inhibitory mechanisms. Although modafinil is reported to reduce GABA-activated currents and extracellular GABA levels in the brain, the drug exerts anticonvulsant effects in animal studies. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of modafinil and its metabolites (sulfone and carboxylic acid) on the anticonvulsant action of four classical antiepileptic drugs (AEDs)-carbamazepine (CBZ), phenobarbital (PB), phenytoin (PHT), and valproate (VPA). Anticonvulsant activity was assessed with the maximal electroshock seizure threshold (MEST) test and MES test in mice. Brain concentrations of AEDs were measured to ascertain any pharmacokinetic contribution to the observed anticonvulsant effects. Intraperitoneal injection of 75 mg kg(-1) of modafinil or its metabolites significantly elevated the threshold for electroconvulsions in mice, whereas 50 mg kg(-1) of each compound enhanced the anticonvulsant activity of CBZ, PHT, and VPA, but not that of PB. A 25-mg kg(-1) dose of modafinil or its sulfone metabolite enhanced anticonvulsant activity of VPA. Modafinil and its metabolites (50 mg kg(-1)) did not alter total brain concentrations of PB and VPA but did elevate CBZ and PHT. Enhancement of anticonvulsant actions of VPA by modafinil in the mouse MES model is a pharmacodynamic effect. Collectively, our data suggest that modafinil may be a safe and beneficial adjunct to the therapeutic effects of AEDs in human patients.

  18. Generic drug exclusivity system in United States%美国的仿制药独占制度研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨莉; 袁红梅; 连桂玉

    2011-01-01

    [Abstract] Generic drug exclusivity is a unique form of administrative protection for pharmaceutical products in United States. This paper introduced the generic drug exclusivity system in detail, analyzed its legal nature, and objectively evaluated the effectiveness of generic drug exclusivity since its implementation. We propose the necessity and suggestion of establishing the generic drug exclusivity system in China.%仿制药独占制度是美国特有的一种药品行政保护形式.文中详细地介绍了美国的仿制药独占制度,对其法律性质进行了分析,客观评价了仿制药独占制度实施以来发挥的效用,并提出我国建立仿制药独占制度的必要性及建议.

  19. Modified Regulatory Pathways to Approve Generic Drugs in the US and a Systematic Review of Their Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesselheim, Aaron S; Polinski, Jennifer M; Fulchino, Lisa A; Isaman, Danielle L; Gagne, Joshua J

    2015-04-01

    Generic drugs are approved on the basis of pharmaceutical equivalence and bioequivalence. Some drug products have unique structural or functional attributes, necessitating modified approaches to bioequivalence determinations. The aim of this systematic review was to identify studies that evaluated laboratory or clinical outcomes of six drugs approved via modified bioequivalence approaches. We conducted a systematic review of articles published through February 2014 in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts related to six recent drugs subject to modified regulatory approaches: venlafaxine extended release tablet (Effexor XR), acarbose (Precose), enoxaparin (Lovenox), vancomycin capsules (Vancocin), sodium ferric gluconate (Ferrlecit), and calcitonin salmon nasal spray (Miacalcin NS). We included all empirical evaluations (whether in vivo or in vitro) and excluded case studies, qualitative analyses, and pharmacoeconomic evaluations. Studies were summarized and evaluated on their methodological quality and assessed for bias using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Assessment Tool. Articles were divided into studies of US FDA-approved generics and non-FDA-approved generics available in non-US locations. We extracted drug(s) studied, study design, setting, sample size, population characteristics, study endpoints and results, and source of funding. After retrieving 1408 articles and searching through the full text of 106 articles, we found 26 articles that met our inclusion criteria-8 examining FDA-approved versions and 18 examining non-FDA-approved versions. Among FDA-approved generics, five studies of enoxaparin showed minor variations in biologic activities of unclear clinical importance, and no publications involved acarbose, venlafaxine ER, or vancomycin capsules. Among non-FDA-approved generics, nine studies of enoxaparin supported generic bioequivalence, despite three showing minor variations in drug activity. Four of six studies of venlafaxine ER

  20. Greek Physicians' Perceptions on Generic Drugs in the Era of Austerity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labiris, Georgios; Fanariotis, Michael; Kastanioti, Catherine; Alexias, Georgios; Protopapas, Adonis; Karampitsakos, Theodoros; Niakas, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the beliefs and preferences of Greek physicians, regarding generic drugs, in the years of financial crisis. Setting. Multicentered, nationwide survey. Material and Methods. A custom questionnaire based on former similar studies was developed and administered to Greek physicians. The variable "perception on generics" was constructed after an exploratory study and the instrument was validated by conventional and Rasch analysis methods. 22 items formed 5 subscales that constructed the variable in question. Results. 908 physicians successfully participated in the study (response rate: 80%). Mean total scores to the instrument were 60.63 ± 12.12 for men and significantly less (58.24 ± 11.73) for women (p = 0.04). Greek physicians were not persuaded on the potential economic gain (45.79 ± 10.53); moreover they identified that Greek authorities cannot address the increased pharmacovigilance mandates. Physicians working in Athens and those working in surgical units demonstrated significantly worse scores than their colleagues from the rest of Greece and those working in Internal Medicine wards (p = 0.03).  Conclusion. Our results suggest an overall poor acceptance of the national initiative on generic drugs by Greek physicians. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01855802.

  1. Taste acceptability of pulverized brand-name and generic drugs containing amlodipine or candesartan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uestuener, Peter; Ferrarini, Alessandra; Santi, Maristella; Mardegan, Chiara; Bianchetti, Mario G; Simonetti, Giacomo D; Milani, Gregorio P; Lava, Sebastiano A G

    2014-07-01

    Trials with pulverized brand-name antihypertensive drugs suggest that, from the perspective of taste acceptability, crushed candesartan, chlortalidon, hydrochlorothiazide, lercanidipine and lisinopril should be preferred to pulverized amlodipine, atenolol, bisoprolol, enalapril, irbesartan, losartan, ramipril, telmisartan and valsartan. Brand-name antihypertensive drugs and the corresponding generic medicines have never been compared with respect to their taste acceptability. We therefore investigated among healthy health care workers the taste acceptability of a pulverized 1 mg-test dose of the brand-name and two generics containing either the dihydropyridine calcium-channel blocker amlodipine (Norvasc(®), Amlodipin-Mepha(®) and Amlodipin Pfizer(®)) or the angiotensin receptor antagonist candesartan (Atacand(®), Cansartan-Mepha(®) and Pemzek(®)). For this purpose, a smiley-face scale depicting four degrees of pleasure was used. Between November and December 2013, the taste test was performed among 19 nurses (15 female and 4 male subjects) and 12 physicians (5 female and 7 male subjects) aged between 25 and 49 years. Pulverized brand-names and generics containing either amlodipine or candesartan did not differ with respect to their taste acceptability.

  2. International Guidelines for Bioequivalence of Systemically Available Orally Administered Generic Drug Products: A Survey of Similarities and Differences

    OpenAIRE

    Davit, Barbara; Braddy, April C.; Conner, Dale P.; Yu, Lawrence X.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this article is to discuss the similarities and differences among bioequivalence approaches used by international regulatory authorities when reviewing applications for marketing new generic drug products which are systemically active and intended for oral administration. We focused on the 13 jurisdictions and organizations participating in the International Generic Drug Regulators Pilot. These are Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Chinese Taipei, the European Medicines Assoc...

  3. SAFETY AND TOLERABILITY OF ANTIEPILEPTIC DRUGS AT WOMEN WITH EPILEPSY (DATA OF SVT. LUKA’S INSTITUTE OF CHILD NEUROLOGY AND EPILEPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Мukhin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Women with epilepsy are referred to the special risk group due to the development of side effects of antiepileptic drugs (АED. Women’s neuroendocrinal disorders can be caused by the disease itself-epilepsy, as well as by the undertaken therapy. We have carried out a retrospective research in order to assess the safety and the tolerance of different AED at young girls and women of reproductive age. Was analyzed the data base of patients of Svt. Luka’s Institute of Child Neurology and Epilepsy, comprising all patients, who have been monitored in the period between 2000 and 2014 inclusive at the age between 15–40 years (n = 301. The research included patients, with different diagnosed forms of focal or generalized epilepsy, who were taking AED both during mono and polytherapy. Were analyzed all cases of neuroendocrinal, especially reproductive disorders, including the considerable gain of weight, menstrual disorder, sterility at AED background. Also was analyzed the result of all registered pregnancies at women with epilepsy (at the background of the antiepileptic therapy, as well as without treatment during pregnancy. The retrospective data analysis has revealed 51 сase (17 % in the group under review of expressed neuroendocrinal, reproductive and cosmetic side effects (including the menstrual disorder: dysmenorrhea, opsomenorrhea, amenorrhea, anovulatory cycles, sterility, unfavorable pregnancy outcomes, as well as cosmetic endocrinal side effects: obesity, hirsutism, hair loss. Most patients have got such combined side effects. Our research results show, that in most cases the pregnancy at women with epilepsy ends by birth of a healthy child, the pregnancy outcome depends on many factors, it also differs according to applied AED. Valproic acid drugs show the highest teratogenic risk. Also at the back ground of the therapy with valproic acid have been registered most cases of neuroendocrinal reproductive diseases at women

  4. Cost of treatment as a placebo effect in psychopharmacology: importance in the context of generic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2015-04-01

    Nonspecific factors have long been known in both psychotherapy and psychopharmacology. In recent years, 2 studies showed that placebo benefits were lower when the treated subjects were told that the placebo, presented as an active treatment, cost less. One of these studies had assessed motor and other outcomes in Parkinson disease patients; the other had assessed analgesia in paid, healthy volunteers to whom electric shocks were administered. The implication of the finding that lower treatment cost may diminish treatment gains is that patients who receive generic medicines may have lower expectations and may consequently derive less placebo-related benefit. This could be of concern in psychiatric disorders that are characterized by a large placebo response. Although the 2 "placebo cost" studies cannot be easily generalized to clinical and especially psychiatric contexts, clinicans should consider offering reassurance to patients receiving generic drugs that cost, per se, has no bearing on treatment-related benefit.

  5. Association of polymorphisms of CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and ABCB1, and activity of P-glycoprotein with response to anti-epileptic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S R Taur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Epilepsy, the most common neurological disorder, has treatment failure rate of 20 to 25%. Inter-individual variability in drug response can be attributed to genetic polymorphism in genes encoding different drug metabolizing enzymes, drug transporters (P-gp, and enzymes involved in sodium channel biosynthesis. The present study attempted to evaluate association of polymorphisms of CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and ABCB1, and P-gp activity with treatment response in patients with epilepsy. Materials and Methods: Patients with epilepsy on phenytoin and/or phenobarbital and/or carbamazepine were categorized into responders and non-responders as per the International League Against Epilepsy. Plasma drug concentration was estimated by high-performance liquid chromatography. P-gp activity was measured by flow cytometry using rhodamine efflux. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR-RFLP was used to study polymorphisms of ABCB1 (C3435T, CYP2C9 (416 C > T, and 1061 A > T, and CYP2C19 (681 G > A and 636 G > A. Results: Of total 117 patients enrolled in this study, genotype data was available for 115 patients. P-gp activity was higher in non-responders (n = 68 compared to responders (n = 47 (P T and 1061 A > T in CYP2C9 or 681 G > A and 636 G > A in CYP2C19 was observed with response phenotype in genotypic analysis. Significant genotypic (odds ratio, OR = 4.5; 95% CI, 1.04 to 20.99 and allelic association (OR = 1.73; 95% CI, 1.02 to 2.95 was observed with ABCB1 C3435T and response phenotype. Conclusions: The response to antiepileptics seems to be modulated by C3435T in ABCB1 or P-gp activity. At present, role of other genetic factors in treatment responsiveness in epilepsy appears limited, warranting analysis in a larger cohort.

  6. 4城市2011-2013年抗癫痫类药物使用情况的分析与比较%The Analysis and Comparison of Four Cities Antiepileptic Drug Use in 2011-2013

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王佳庆; 王莉文; 赵志刚

    2014-01-01

    Objective:Analyzing the Antiepileptic drug use situation in four cities:Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, Chengdu in 2011-2013. Methods:Antiepileptic drug use from four cities in 2011-2013 was analyzed by using Microsoft office access 2007 software. Results:There are more men than women in these four cities for antiepileptic drug use in 2011-2013;the age distribution is quite different;and there is small defined daily dose and frequency difference. Conclusion:DDD and DDDs in four cities are basically the same, and drug use is fairly standard.%目的:研究北京、上海、广州、成都四个城市2011-2013年抗癫痫类药物用药情况。方法:利用Microsoft Office Access 2007软件对2011-2013年四个城市抗癫痫类药物用药进行统计分析。结果:四个城市2011-2013年抗癫痫类用药患者男性高于女性,年龄分布有较大差异,限定日剂量及用药频度差异较小。结论:四个城市用药限定日剂量及用药频度基本一致,药物使用比较规范。

  7. Aspectos farmacológicos relevantes de los antiepilépticos nuevos Relevant pharmacological aspects of the new antiepileptic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Zapata Martínez

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Dada la importancia de la epilepsia como enfermedad crónica no transmisible, se decidió realizar una revisión de los fármacos nuevos que en los últimos años han sido comercializados para su tratamiento en el mundo. Se enfatizó en la necesidad de establecer una correcta relación beneficio/riesgo/costo a partir del conocimiento de la eficacia, seguridad, conveniencia y costo de los fármacos empleados en el tratamiento de cualquier enfermedad, y por supuesto, de la epilepsia. Los nuevos medicamentos antiepilépticos todavía no han demostrado de forma convincente ser superiores a los ya conocidos, y de los cuales también se exponen sus principales características farmacológicas. Aunque en la mayoría de las ocasiones no son mejores, sí no hay dudas que son más caros e incrementan el precio de los tratamientos.Due to the importance of epilepsy as a non-communicable chronic disease, it was decided to make a review of the new drugs that in the last years have been commercialized for its treatement in the world. Emphasis was given to the need of establishing a correct benefit/risk/cost relation, starting from the knowledge of efficiency, safety, convenience and cost of the drugs used in the treatment of any disease and, of course, of epilepsy. The new antiepileptic drugs have not proved yet to be superior than the already known, whose main pharmacological characteristics are also exposed. Though in most of the ocassions they are not better, they are undoubtedly more expensive and increase the prices of the treatments.

  8. A retrospective study on the usage of antiepileptic drugs in Asian children from 2000 to 2009 in the largest pediatric hospital in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wei Wei; Kong, Sing Teang; Chan, Derrick W S; Ho, Paul C

    2012-10-01

    In light of the increasing usage of the newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in other countries, we reviewed the prescribing pattern of AEDs in Singapore over the last 10 years (2000-2009). A retrospective review of pharmacy dispensing records solicited from the only children's hospital in Singapore was performed to analyze the trend in AEDs prescribing in the last 10 years. We also examined the correlation between the serum concentrations of valproic acid (VPA), the most-prescribed AED, and seizure control. Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were then performed on the findings. A total of 41 671 prescriptions on AEDs were retrieved and analyzed. Despite the introduction of the second-generation AEDs, the first generation AEDs still dominate epilepsy treatment in Asian children, with VPA being the mostly prescribed AED (about 40% of the total AEDs usage). The majority of patients (62.8%) were on monotherapy. The mean VPA serum concentration in patients with good seizure control was 68.6 µg/ml (SD = 26.4 µg/ml; range = 12.2-138.0 µg/ml), which was statistically higher than the mean VPA concentration of 57.7 µg/ml (SD = 27.1 µg/ml; range = 11.1-149.0 µg/ml) in patients with poor seizure control (p monitoring is still of paramount importance. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. FT-Raman, FT-IR and UV-visible spectral investigations and ab initio computations of anti-epileptic drug: vigabatrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwin, Bismi; Joe, I Hubert

    2013-10-01

    Vibrational analysis of anti-epileptic drug vigabatrin, a structural GABA analog was carried out using NIR FT-Raman and FTIR spectroscopic techniques. The equilibrium geometry, various bonding features and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers were studied using density functional theory method. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out with the aid of VEDA.4 program. Vibrational spectra, natural bond orbital analysis and optimized molecular structure show clear evidence for the effect of electron charge transfer on the activity of the molecule. Predicted electronic absorption spectrum from TD-DFT calculation has been compared with the UV-vis spectrum. The Mulliken population analysis on atomic charges and the HOMO-LUMO energy were also calculated. Good consistency is found between the calculated results and experimental data for the electronic absorption as well as IR and Raman spectra. The blue-shifting of the C-C stretching wavenumber reveals that the vinyl group is actively involved in the conjugation path. The NBO analysis confirms the occurrence of intramolecular hyperconjugative interactions resulting in ICT causing stabilization of the system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of N-(m-bromoanilinomethyl-p-isopropoxyphenylsuccinimide on the anticonvulsant action of four classical antiepileptic drugs in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luszczki Jarogniew J.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of N-(m-bromoanilinomethyl- p-isopropoxyphenylsuccinimide (BAM-IPPS - a new succinimide derivative on the protective action of four classical antiepileptic drugs (AEDs: carbamazepine [CBZ], phenobarbital [PB], phenytoin [PHT] and valproate [VPA] in the mouse maximal electroshock (MES-induced tonic seizure model. Tonic hind limb extension (seizure activity was evoked in adult male albino Swiss mice by a current (sine-wave, 25 mA, 500 V, 50 Hz, 0.2 s stimulus duration delivered via ear-clip electrodes. BAM-IPPS administered (i.p. at a dose of 150 mg/kg significantly elevated the threshold for electroconvulsions in mice (P<0.05. Lower doses of BAM-IPPS (50 and 100 mg/kg had no significant impact on the threshold for electroconvulsions in mice. Moreover, BAM-IPPS (100 mg/kg did not significantly affect the anticonvulsant potency of CBZ, PB, PHT and VPA in the mouse MES model. BAM-IPPS elevated the threshold for electroconvulsions in mice in a dosedependent manner. However, BAM-IPPS (100 mg/kg did not affect the anticonvulsant action of various classical AEDs in the mouse MES model, making the combinations of BAM-IPPS with CBZ, PB, PHT and VPA neutral, from a preclinical point of view.

  11. Novel antiepileptic drug lacosamide exerts neuroprotective effects by decreasing glial activation in the hippocampus of a gerbil model of ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ji Yun; Yan, Bing Chun; Park, Joon Ha; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Dae Hwan; Kim, In Hye; Cho, Jeong-Hwi; Chen, Bai Hui; Lee, Jae-Chul; Cho, Young Shin; Shin, Myoung Chul; Cho, Jun Hwi; Hong, Seongkweon; Won, Moo-Ho; Kim, Sung Koo

    2015-12-01

    Lacosamide, which is a novel antiepileptic drug, has been reported to exert various additional therapeutic effects. The present study investigated the neuroprotective effects of lacosamide against transient cerebral ischemia-induced neuronal cell damage in the hippocampal cornu ammonis (CA)-1 region of a gerbil model. Neuronal Nuclei immunohistochemistry demonstrated that pre- and post-surgical treatment (5 min ischemia) with 25 mg/kg lacosamide protected CA1 pyramidal neurons in the lacosamide-treated-ischemia-operated group from ischemic injury 5 days post-ischemia, as compared with gerbils in the vehicle-treated-ischemia-operated group. Furthermore, treatment with 25 mg/kg lacosamide markedly attenuated the activation of astrocytes and microglia in the ischemic CA1 region at 5 days post-ischemia. The results of the present study suggested that pre- and post-surgical treatment of the gerbils with lacosamide was able to protect against transient cerebral ischemic injury-induced CA1 pyramidal neuronal cell death in the hippocampus. In addition, the neuroprotective effects of lacosamide may be associated with decreased activation of glial cells in the ischemic CA1 region.

  12. Differential impact of antiepileptic drugs on the effects of contraceptive methods on seizures: Interim findings of the epilepsy birth control registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Andrew G

    2015-05-01

    To present the interim findings of the Epilepsy Birth Control Registry (EBCR) regarding the impact of various contraceptive methods on seizures, stratified by antiepileptic drug (AED) type. This is an observational study that reports interim findings on the first 750 subjects. There are significantly greater relative risks (RR) for both seizure increase and decrease with hormonal contraception (HC) than with non-hormonal contraception (NHC). The rates of HC experiences associated with seizure increase (21.0%) are greater than with NHC (3.9%) (RR=5.39 [95% CI=3.77-7.73, poral contraceptive, perhaps related to the delivery of substantially higher concentrations of hormones, and a greater RR for seizure decrease with depomedroxyprogesterone, known to reduce seizure frequency when used in dosages which produce amenorrhea, support biological effects. All AED categories showed significantly higher frequencies of reports of seizure increase when combined with HC than with NHC. RR for seizure increase with HC was higher with valproate than with any other AED category. There were no significant differences among AEDs for seizure decrease with HC at this juncture of the study. Overall, NEIAEDs had the most favorable profile with regard to reports of seizure increase and decrease when used with HC. Interim EBCR findings suggest that contraception category and interactions between contraception category and AED category are predictive factors for changes in seizure frequency in WWE. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Are adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs different in symptomatic partial and idiopathic generalized epilepsies? The Portuguese-Brazilian validation of the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, H H; Alonso, N B; Vidal-Dourado, M; Carbonel, T D; de Araújo Filho, G M; Caboclo, L O; Yacubian, E M; Guilhoto, L M

    2011-11-01

    We report the results of administration of the Portuguese-Brazilian translation of the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile (LAEP) to 100 patients (mean age=34.5, SD=12.12; 56 females), 61 with symptomatic partial epilepsy (SPE) and 39 with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) (ILAE, 1989) who were on a stable antiepileptic drug (AED) regimen and being treated in a Brazilian tertiary epilepsy center. Carbamazepine was the most commonly used AED (43.0%), followed by valproic acid (32.0%). Two or more AEDs were used by 69.0% of patients. The mean LAEP score (19 questions) was 37.6 (SD=13.35). The most common adverse effects were sleepiness (35.0%), memory problems (35.0%), and difficulty in concentrating (25.0%). Higher LAEP scores were associated with polytherapy with three or more AEDs (P=0.005), female gender (P0.001) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (Depression: r=0.637, P<0.001; Anxiety: r=0.621, P<0.001) dimensions. LAEP overall scores were similar in people with SPE and IGE and were not helpful in differentiating adverse effects in these two groups. Clinical variables that influenced global LAEP were seizure frequency (P=0.050) and generalized tonic-clonic seizures in the last month (P=0.031) in the IGE group, and polytherapy with three or more AEDs (P=0.003 and P=0.003) in both IGE and SPE groups.

  14. Effects of antiepileptic drugs on mRNA levels of BDNF and NT-3 and cell neogenesis in the developing rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiu-Yu; Wang, Ji-Wen; Cui, Hong; Li, Bao-Min; Lei, Ge-Fei; Sun, Ruo-Peng

    2010-03-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder that occurs more frequently in childhood than in adulthood. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) which are used to treat seizures in pregnant women, infants, and young children may cause cognitive impairment or other uncertain injury. However, the exact mechanisms responsible for adverse effects of AEDs in the developing brain are still not clear. In the present study, we investigate the effects of AEDs on mRNA levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), cell neogenesis and mossy fiber sprouting (MFS) in the developing rat brain. Long-term treatment with Phenobarbital (40mg/kg), valproate (100mg/kg) and topiramate (40mg/kg) reduces BDNF and NT-3 mRNA expression in the developing brain, while lamotrigine reduces mRNA expression only at high dose level (80mg/kg). Cell neogenesis only increases in the rats treated with valproate and lamotrigine. And no differences are observed between the control group and the AEDs-treated groups in the Timm scores of the CA3 region and supragranular region. Our findings present some possible mechanisms to explain why different AEDs cause different cognitive impairment.

  15. Zebrafish embryotoxicity test for developmental (neuro)toxicity: Demo case of an integrated screening approach system using anti-epileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beker van Woudenberg, Anna; Snel, Cor; Rijkmans, Eke; de Groot, Didima; Bouma, Marga; Hermsen, Sanne; Piersma, Aldert; Menke, Aswin; Wolterbeek, André

    2014-11-01

    To improve the predictability of the zebrafish embryotoxicity test (ZET) for developmental (neuro)toxicity screening, we used a multiple-endpoints strategy, including morphology, motor activity (MA), histopathology and kinetics. The model compounds used were antiepileptic drugs (AEDs): valproic acid (VPA), carbamazepine (CBZ), ethosuximide (ETH) and levetiracetam (LEV). For VPA, histopathology was the most sensitive parameter, showing effects already at 60μM. For CBZ, morphology and MA were the most sensitive parameters, showing effects at 180μM. For ETH, all endpoints showed similar sensitivity (6.6mM), whereas MA was the most sensitive parameter for LEV (40mM). Inclusion of kinetics did not alter the absolute ranking of the compounds, but the relative potency was changed considerably. Taking all together, this demo-case study showed that inclusion of multiple-endpoints in ZET may increase the sensitivity of the assay, contribute to the elucidation of the mode of toxic action and to a better definition of the applicability domain of ZET.

  16. Pharmacological and clinical evaluation of the antiepileptic drug clobazam%癫痫治疗新药氯巴占的药理与临床评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高君伟; 孙搏; 李晓宇; 吴佳琪; 刘皋林

    2013-01-01

    氯巴占为1,5-苯二氮草类药物,具有抗癫痫作用,FDA于2011年10月21日批准其用于难治性癫痫——林-戈综合征(Lennox-Gastaut syndrome)的辅助治疗.本文通过Medline对氯巴占进行文献检索,并对其药理作用、药动学、药物相互作用、临床研究和安全性进行了综述.%Clobazam, a 1 ,5-benzodiazepine, possesses antiepileptic activity. It has been approved by the FDA for treatment of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, one of the refractory epilepsies, in October 21th, 2011. Literature search was conducted by searching MEDLINE with the key words clobazam. The pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, drug interactions, clinical trials and side effects of clobazam were reviewed in this paper.

  17. Evaluating the efficacy of memantine on improving cognitive functions in epileptic patients receiving anti-epileptic drugs: A double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial (Phase IIIb pilot study)

    OpenAIRE

    Priya Marimuthu; Sathyanarayanan Varadarajan; Muthuraj Krishnan; Sundar Shanmugam; Gireesh Kunjuraman; Jamuna Rani Ravinder; Balasubramanian Arumugam; Divya Alex; Porchelvan Swaminathan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: People with epilepsy have greater cognitive and behavioral dysfunction than the general population. There is no specific treatment available for cognitive impairment of these patients. We aimed to evaluate the effects of memantine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate-type glutamate receptor noncompetitive antagonist, on improving cognition and memory functions in epileptic patients with cognitive and memory impairment, who received anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). Methods: We did a randomized, do...

  18. VALUE OF THERAPEUTIC EQUIVALENCE IN SUBSTITUTION OF ORIGINAL DRUG WITH GENERIC BY EXAMPLE OF FOSINIPRIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Kutishenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the therapeutic equivalence of original and generic fosinopril in patients with arterial hypertension (HT of 1-2 degrees, and to evaluate the cost effectiveness of original drug substitution with generic. Material and methods. Patients (n=36 with HT of 1-2 degree aged 41-82 years and disease duration up 3 to 22 years included in an open, crossover , randomized trial. All patients had two courses of treatment: with generic (Fosicard and the original drug (Monopril; sequence of courses was determined by randomization. Wash-out period (10-14 days preceded each course. Treatment duration was 6 weeks; drugs were administered QD; initial dose - 10 mg/day. Blood pressure (BP and heart rate (HR were evaluated at the end of the wash-out period, and in 2, 4 and 6 weeks of therapy. In case of ineffective BP control (>140/90 mm Hg hydrochlorothiazide 12.5 mg was added initially and dose fosinopril was increased up to 20 mg/day next. Results. Patients in groups were comparable by basic clinical parameters. Both fosinopril based drugs have comparable antihypertensive effect. Differences between their effect on systolic and diastolic BP as well as HR at all steps of treatment were not significant. The individual analysis revealed a tendency to more pronounced Monopril antihypertensive effect compared with Fosicard, but the differences were not significant. An average dose of Monopril was 11.8±3.9 mg/day , and Fosicard — 13.2±4.7 mg/day (p=0.13; the rate of monotherapy with both drugs of fosinopril at dose of 10 mg/day was similar (in 41% and 44% of patients, respectively; the rate of combined therapies with various composition differed insignificantly. Reduction in BP <140/90 mmHg was recorded at the end of the study in 29 (85.3% patients treated with Monorpil and in 27 (79.4% — Fosicard (p=0.52. Both drugs showed a good safety profile. Conclusion. Fosicard or its combination with hydrochlorothiazide is therapeutically equivalent to

  19. Generic - equivalent drugs use in internal and general medicine patients: distrust, confusion, lack of certainties or knowledge? Part 1. Pharmacological issues

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Nardi; Marco Masina; Giorgio Cioni; Paolo Leandri; Paola Zuccheri

    2014-01-01

    Despite compelling evidence and guidelines, in Italy, generic/equivalent drugs are still underused. The failure to adopt existing generic drugs may result into a missed opportunity to further reduce healthcare costs. Equivalent drugs are approved based on data deriving from bioequivalence studies. In the first part of the article, the concepts of generic/equivalent drugs are defined, emphasizing the differences between pharmaceutical equivalence, therapeutic equivalence, bioequivalence and bi...

  20. Main Reasons for Registration Application Refusal of Generic and Similar Pharmaceutical Drug Products by the Brazilian Health Regulatory Agency (ANVISA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Carmo, Ana Cerúlia Moraes; Piras, Stefânia Schimaneski; Rocha, Nayrton Flávio Moura

    2017-01-01

    Objective. The marketing authorization of generic and similar pharmaceutical drug products involves the analysis of proposing company's administrative aspects as well as drug product technical description and scientific evaluations. This study evaluated the main reasons for registration refusal of generic and similar pharmaceutical drug products in Brazil. The aim is to help future applicants to better organize the proposal. Methods. A retrospective search of drug products registration processes was performed on the Brazilian Government Official Gazette from January 1, 2015, and December 31, 2015. Results. Drug product quality control, drug product stability study, deadline accomplishment, API quality control made by drug manufacturer, active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), and production report were the main reasons for marketing authorization application refusal of generic and similar pharmaceutical drug products in 2015. Conclusion. Disclosure of the reasons behind failed applications is a step forward on regulatory transparency. Sharing of experiences is essential to international regulatory authorities and organizations to improve legislation requirements for the marketing authorization of generic and similar pharmaceutical drug products. PMID:28280742

  1. Main Reasons for Registration Application Refusal of Generic and Similar Pharmaceutical Drug Products by the Brazilian Health Regulatory Agency (ANVISA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Carmo, Ana Cerúlia Moraes; Piras, Stefânia Schimaneski; Rocha, Nayrton Flávio Moura; Gratieri, Tais

    2017-01-01

    Objective. The marketing authorization of generic and similar pharmaceutical drug products involves the analysis of proposing company's administrative aspects as well as drug product technical description and scientific evaluations. This study evaluated the main reasons for registration refusal of generic and similar pharmaceutical drug products in Brazil. The aim is to help future applicants to better organize the proposal. Methods. A retrospective search of drug products registration processes was performed on the Brazilian Government Official Gazette from January 1, 2015, and December 31, 2015. Results. Drug product quality control, drug product stability study, deadline accomplishment, API quality control made by drug manufacturer, active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), and production report were the main reasons for marketing authorization application refusal of generic and similar pharmaceutical drug products in 2015. Conclusion. Disclosure of the reasons behind failed applications is a step forward on regulatory transparency. Sharing of experiences is essential to international regulatory authorities and organizations to improve legislation requirements for the marketing authorization of generic and similar pharmaceutical drug products.

  2. The lack of antiepileptic drugs and worsening of seizures among physically handicapped patients with epilepsy during the Great East Japan Earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Satoru; Endo, Wakaba; Inui, Takehiko; Wakusawa, Keisuke; Tanaka, Soichiro; Onuma, Akira; Haginoya, Kazuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Takuto Rehabilitation Center for Children is located in Sendai, the capital of the Miyagi prefecture, and faces the Pacific Ocean. The tsunami caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake resulted in tremendous damage to this region. Many physically handicapped patients with epilepsy who are treated at our hospital could not obtain medicine. We surveyed patients with epilepsy, using a questionnaire to identify the problems during the acute phase of the Great East Japan Earthquake. After the earthquake, we mailed questionnaires to physically handicapped patients with epilepsy who are treated and prescribed medications at our hospital, or to their parents. A total of 161 respondents completed the questionnaire. Overall, 68.4% of patients had seven days or less of stockpiled medication when the earthquake initially struck, and 28.6% of patients had no medication or almost no medication during the acute phase after the earthquake. Six patients were forced to stop taking their medication and nine patients experienced a worsening of seizures. Most (93.6%) patients stated they require a stockpile of medication for more than seven days: 20months after the earthquake, 76.9% patients a supply of drugs for more than seven days. We suggest that physically handicapped patients with epilepsy are recommended to prepare for natural disasters by stockpiling additional medication. Even if the stock of antiepileptic drugs is sufficient, stress could cause worsening of seizures. Specialized support is required after a disaster among physically handicapped patients with epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Fosinopril and zofenopril, two angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, potentiate the anticonvulsant activity of antiepileptic drugs against audiogenic seizures in DBA/2 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarro, Giovambattista De; Paola, Eugenio Donato Di; Gratteri, Santo; Gareri, Pietro; Rispoli, Vincenzo; Siniscalchi, Antonio; Tripepi, Giovanni; Gallelli, Luca; Citraro, Rita; Russo, Emilio

    2012-03-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) exists in the brain and it may be involved in pathogenesis of neurological and psychiatric disorders including seizures. The aim of the present research was to evaluate the effects of some angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi; captopril, enalapril, fosinopril and zofenopril), commonly used as antihypertensive agents, in the DBA/2 mice animal model of generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Furthermore, the co-administration of these compounds with some antiepileptic drugs (AEDs; carbamazepine, diazepam, felbamate, gabapentin, lamotrigine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, topiramate and valproate) was studied in order to identify possible positive interactions in the same model. All ACEi were able to decrease the severity of audiogenic seizures with the exception of enalapril up to the dose of 100mg/kg, the rank order of activity was as follows: fosinopril>zofenopril>captopril. The co-administration of ineffective doses of all ACE inhibitors with AEDs, generally increased the potency of the latter. Fosinopril was the most active in potentiating the activity of AEDs and the combination of ACEi with lamotrigine and valproate was the most favorable, whereas, the co-administrations with diazepam and phenobarbital seemed to be neutral. The increase in potency was generally associated with an enhancement of motor impairment, however, the therapeutic index of combined treatment of AEDs with ACEi was predominantly more favorable than control. ACEi administration did not influence plasma and brain concentrations of the AEDs studied excluding pharmacokinetic interactions and concluding that it is of pharmacodynamic nature. In conclusion, fosinopril, zofenopril, enalapril and captopril showed an additive anticonvulsant effect when co-administered with some AEDs, most notably carbamazepine, felbamate, lamotrigine, topiramate and valproate, implicating a possible therapeutic relevance of such drug combinations.

  4. Prescribing pattern of anti-epileptic drugs in an Italian setting of elderly outpatients: a population-based study during 2004–07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oteri, Alessandro; Trifirò, Gianluca; Gagliostro, Maria Silvia; Tari, Daniele Ugo; Moretti, Salvatore; Bramanti, Placido; Spina, Edoardo; Caputi, Achille Patrizio; Arcoraci, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    AIMS The aims of the study were to assess the trend of older and newer anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) in the elderly population and to analyze the effects of a health-policy intervention with regard to AED use in general practice in a setting in Southern Italy. METHODS Data were extracted from the ‘Caserta-1’ Local-Health-Unit Arianna database in the years 2004–07. Patients aged over 65 years, receiving at least one AED prescription and registered in the lists of 88 general practitioners, were selected. The use of older and newer AEDs was calculated as 1 year prevalence and incidence of use and defined daily dose (DDD) per 1000 inhabitants day−1. Sub-analyses by gender, age and indication of use were performed. RESULTS Most of AED users were treated because of neuropathic pain (64.8%). However, the main indication of use for older AEDs (57.8%) was epilepsy, whereas newer AEDs (79.5%) were used for neuropathic pain. Prevalence and incidence of newer AED use increased until 2006, followed by a reduction in 2007. Newer AEDs, particularly gabapentin and pregabalin, were used in the treatment of more patients than older AEDs. However phenobarbital, accounting for more than 50% of total AED volume, was the most prescribed medication during the entire study period. CONCLUSIONS An increasing use of AEDs has been observed during 2004–07, mostly due to the prescription of newer compounds for neuropathic pain. The fall in the use of newer AEDs during 2007 coincides with revised re-imbursement criteria for gabapentin and pregabalin. The large use of phenobarbital in the elderly should be considered in the light of a risk of adverse drug reactions. PMID:20840443

  5. 哺乳期女性抗癫痫药物的合理应用%The management of antiepileptic drugs in women during lactation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方敩; 禚志红; 田培超; 王怀立

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic diseases of the central nervous system,many epilepsy patients need lifelong medication.Epidemiological studies have shown that 3‰-5‰ neonates born by women suffering from epilepsy.Treatment become more challenging because not only the patients themselves but also the breastfed in fants should be taken into consideration.This paper reviewed how to choose lactation antiepileptic drug.In short,choosing drugs which transport less to milk and have less side effects to infants,using the lowest effective dose and avoiding combination if possible can ensure the safety of breastfeeding.%癫痫是最常见的慢性中枢神经系统疾病之一,许多癫痫患者需要终身服药.流行病学研究显示3‰~5‰婴儿的母亲患有癫痫,这些癫痫患者在哺乳期服用抗癫痫药物时,不但要考虑患者本人,还要考虑母乳喂养的婴儿.现对哺乳期女性如何选择抗癫痫药物进行了综述.总的来说,选择向母乳中转运少、不良反应小的药物,并尽量减少用药种类、应用最低有效剂量,可以保证母乳喂养的安全.

  6. Searches for Randomized Controlled Trials of Drugs in MEDLINE and EMBASE Using Only Generic Drug Names Compared with Searches Applied in Current Practice in Systematic Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waffenschmidt, Siw; Guddat, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is unclear which terms should be included in bibliographic searches for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of drugs, and identifying relevant drug terms can be extremely laborious. The aim of our analysis was to determine whether a bibliographic search using only the generic drug name produces sufficient results for the generation…

  7. Greek Physicians’ Perceptions on Generic Drugs in the Era of Austerity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Labiris

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess the beliefs and preferences of Greek physicians, regarding generic drugs, in the years of financial crisis. Setting. Multicentered, nationwide survey. Material and Methods. A custom questionnaire based on former similar studies was developed and administered to Greek physicians. The variable “perception on generics” was constructed after an exploratory study and the instrument was validated by conventional and Rasch analysis methods. 22 items formed 5 subscales that constructed the variable in question. Results. 908 physicians successfully participated in the study (response rate: 80%. Mean total scores to the instrument were 60.63 ± 12.12 for men and significantly less (58.24 ± 11.73 for women (p = 0.04. Greek physicians were not persuaded on the potential economic gain (45.79 ± 10.53; moreover they identified that Greek authorities cannot address the increased pharmacovigilance mandates. Physicians working in Athens and those working in surgical units demonstrated significantly worse scores than their colleagues from the rest of Greece and those working in Internal Medicine wards (p = 0.03.  Conclusion. Our results suggest an overall poor acceptance of the national initiative on generic drugs by Greek physicians. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01855802.

  8. Be sure to read the fine print: the agency for healthcare research and quality comparative effectiveness report on antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Timothy E; Faught, Edward; Schmidt, Dieter; McAuley, James W; Ryan, Melody

    2012-05-01

    For many questions related to the pharmacotherapy of epilepsy, there are few or no published data. This lack of data presents dilemmas to practitioners who must make informed, rational decisions about therapy on a daily basis and to policymakers dealing with drug formulary management and reimbursement. Reliance on randomized, clinical trial data is inefficient because of the extensive time and expense involved in conducting a study and the inability to answer every question encountered in practice. In addition, results from randomized, clinical studies are not fully applicable in the clinical setting because of short trial duration and the frequent use of surrogate controls that are rarely seen in routine practice.

  9. Be Sure to Read the Fine Print: The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Comparative Effectiveness Report on Antiepileptic Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Timothy E.; Faught, Edward; Schmidt, Dieter; McAuley, James W.; Ryan, Melody

    2012-01-01

    For many questions related to the pharmacotherapy of epilepsy, there are few or no published data. This lack of data presents dilemmas to practitioners who must make informed, rational decisions about therapy on a daily basis and to policymakers dealing with drug formulary management and reimbursement. Reliance on randomized, clinical trial data is inefficient because of the extensive time and expense involved in conducting a study and the inability to answer every question encountered in practice. In addition, results from randomized, clinical studies are not fully applicable in the clinical setting because of short trial duration and the frequent use of surrogate controls that are rarely seen in routine practice. PMID:22690134

  10. Isobolographic analysis of interactions between remacemide and conventional antiepileptic drugs in the mouse model of maximal electroshock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowicz, Kinga K; Malek, Robert; Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Ratnaraj, Neville; Patsalos, Philip N; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2007-08-01

    Using the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model, indicative of tonic-clonic seizures in humans, the present study was aimed at characterizing the interaction between remacemide and valproate, carbamazepine, phenytoin, and phenobarbital. Isobolographic analysis indicated additive interactions between remacemide and valproate, carbamazepine, and phenytoin (for all fixed ratios of tested drugs: 1:3, 1:1, and 3:1). Additivity was also observed between remacemide and phenobarbital applied in proportions of 1:1 and 3:1. In contrast, the combination of remacemide and phenobarbital at the fixed-ratio of 1:3 resulted in antagonism. Neither motor performance nor long-term memory was impaired by remacemide or by carbamazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, and valproate whether or not these drugs were administered singly or in combination. In combination with remacemide, brain concentrations of carbamazepine, phenobarbital, and phenytoin were increased by 71, 21, and 16%, respectively. Although brain valproate concentrations were unaffected by remacemide co-administration, brain concentrations of remacemide and its active metabolite, desglycinyl-remacemide, were increased by 68 and 162%, respectively. In contrast, phenobarbital co-administration was associated with decreases in brain remacemide (27%) and desglycinyl-remacemide (9%) concentrations, whereas only remacemide concentrations (increased by 131%) were affected by carbamazepine co-administration. In conclusion, significant and desirable pharmacodynamic interactions were observed between remacemide and valproate, carbamazepine, phenytoin, and phenobarbital. However, the concurrent pharmacokinetic interactions associated with remacemide complicate these observations and do not make remacemide a good candidate for adjunctive treatment of epilepsy.

  11. Interaction of an antiepileptic drug, lamotrigine with human serum albumin (HSA): Application of spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poureshghi, Fatemeh; Ghandforoushan, Parisa; Safarnejad, Azam; Soltani, Somaieh

    2017-01-01

    Lamotrigine (an epileptic drug) interaction with human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated by fluorescence, UV-Vis, FTIR, CD spectroscopic techniques, and molecular modeling methods. Binding constant (Kb) of 5.74×10(3) and number of binding site of 0.97 showed that there is a slight interaction between lamotrigine and HSA. Thermodynamic studies was constructed using the flourimetric titrations in three different temperatures and the resulted data used to calculate the parameters using Vant Hoff equation. Decreased Stern Volmer quenching constant by enhanced temperature revealed the static quenching mechanism. Negative standard enthalpy (ΔH) and standard entropy (ΔS) changes indicated that van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds were dominant forces which facilitate the binding of Lamotrigine to HSA, the results were confirmed by molecular docking studies which showed no hydrogen binding. The FRET studies showed that there is a possibility of energy transfer between Trp214 and lamotrigine. Also the binding of lamotrigine to HSA in the studied concentrations was not as much as many other drugs, but the secondary structure of the HSA was significantly changed following the interaction in a way that α-helix percentage was reduced from 67% to 57% after the addition of lamotrigine in the molar ratio of 4:1 to HSA. According to the docking studies, lamotrigine binds to IB site preferably.

  12. Generic switching and non-persistence among medicine users: a combined population-based questionnaire and register study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jette Rathe

    Full Text Available Generic substitution means that one medicinal product is replaced by another product containing the same active substance. It is strictly regulated with respect to its bioequivalence, and all products must have undergone appropriate studies. Although generic substitution is widely implemented, it still remains to be answered how generic switch influences persistence to long-term treatment, and if it is modified by patients' concerns about medicine and views on generic medicine. This study focuses on users of antidepressants and antiepileptics, and their experience of generic switching.The study was an observational cohort study. By use of a prescription database, we identified patients who had redeemed prescriptions on generically substitutable drugs, and a questionnaire was mailed to them. We analyzed predictors of discontinuation in relation to generic switch and patients' attitudes towards generic medicines and concerns about their medicine.Patients who experience their first-time switch of a specific drug were at higher risk of non-persistence, Hazard Ratio 2.98, 95% CI (1.81;4.89 versus those who have never switched, and 35.7% became non-persistent during the first year of follow-up. Generic switching did not influence persistence considerably in those having previous experience with generic switching of the specific drug. Stratified analyses on users of antidepressants and antiepileptics underpin the results, showing higher risk of non-persistence for first-time switchers for both drug categories.In conclusion, patients who are first-time switchers of a specific drug were at higher risk of non-persistence compared to never switchers and those having experienced previous generic switching.

  13. Potential to enhance the prescribing of generic drugs in patients with mental health problems in Austria; implications for the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian eGodman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Scrutiny over pharmaceutical expenditure is increasing leading to multiple reforms. This includes Austria with measures to lower generic prices and enhance their utilisation. However the situation for newer antidepressants and atypical antipsychotic drugs (AAPs is different to PPIs, statins and renin-angiotensin drugs with greater tailoring of therapy and no wish to switch products in stable patients. Authorities welcome generics though given high costs particularly of patented AAPs. Objective: Assess (a changes in utilisation of venlafaxine versus other newer anti-depressants before and after availability of generics, (b utilisation of generic versus originator venlafaxine, (c price reductions of venlafaxine over time and influence on total expenditure, (d utilisation of risperidone versus other AAPs, (e suggest potential additional reforms that could be introduced if pertinent. Methodology: A quasi-experimental study design with a segmented time series and an observational study. Utilisation measured in defined daily doses (DDDs and total expenditure per DDD and over time. Results: No appreciable changes in the utilization patterns of venlafaxine and risperidone after generics. The reduction in expenditure/ DDD for venlafaxine decreased overall expenditure on antidepressants by 5% by the end of the study versus just before generics despite a 37% increase in utilization. Expenditure will further decrease if there was reduced prescribing of duloxetine. Conclusion: Depression, schizophrenia and bipolar diseases are complex diseases. As a result, specific measures are needed to encourage prescribing of generic risperidone and venlafaxine when multiple choices are appropriate, and authorities cannot rely on a ´Hawthorne´ effect between classes to enhance use of generics first line. Measures may include prescribing restrictions for duloxetine. No specific measures planned for AAPs with more generics becoming available.

  14. Zebrafish larvae exposed to ginkgotoxin exhibit seizure-like behavior that is relieved by pyridoxal-5′-phosphate, GABA and anti-epileptic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang-Hui Lee

    2012-11-01

    The etiology of epilepsy is a very complicated, multifactorial process that is not completely understood. Therefore, the availability of epilepsy animal models induced by different mechanisms is crucial in advancing our knowledge and developing new therapeutic regimens for this disorder. Considering the advantages of zebrafish, we have developed a seizure model in zebrafish larvae using ginkgotoxin, a neurotoxin naturally occurring in Ginkgo biloba and hypothesized to inhibit the formation of the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA. We found that a 2-hour exposure to ginkgotoxin induced a seizure-like behavior in zebrafish larvae. This seizure-like swimming pattern was alleviated by the addition of either pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP or GABA and responded quickly to the anti-convulsing activity of gabapentin and phenytoin, two commonly prescribed anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs. Unexpectedly, the ginkgotoxin-induced PLP depletion in our experimental setting did not affect the homeostasis of folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism, another metabolic pathway playing a crucial role in neural function that also relies on the availability of PLP. This ginkgotoxin-induced seizure behavior was also relieved by primidone, which had been tested on a pentylenetetrazole-induced zebrafish seizure model but failed to rescue the seizure phenotype, highlighting the potential use and complementarity of this ginkgotoxin-induced seizure model for AED development. Structural and morphological characterization showed that a 2-hour ginkgotoxin exposure did not cause appreciable changes in larval morphology and tissues development. In conclusion, our data suggests that this ginkgotoxin-induced seizure in zebrafish larvae could serve as an in vivo model for epileptic seizure research and potential AED screening.

  15. Seizure freedom is not adversely affected by early discontinuation of concomitant anti-epileptic drugs in the EULEV cohort of levetiracetam users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droz-Perroteau, Cécile; Marchal, Cécile; Dureau-Pournin, Caroline; Lassalle, Régis; Jové, Jérémy; Robinson, Philip; Lavernhe, Gilles; Vespignani, Hervé; Moore, Nicholas; Fourrier-Réglat, Annie

    2012-11-01

    Fear of discontinuing concomitant anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) may lead to potentially unnecessary and perhaps unsafe polypharmacy. The effect of withdrawing concomitant AEDs on epilepsy control was therefore studied in long-term users of levetiracetam. The EULEV cohort followed patients initiating levetiracetam in France in 2005 or 2006 for one year. In those maintaining levetiracetam throughout the study period, the association of a reduction in the number of concomitant AEDs during the first six months with seizure-freedom during the last six months of follow-up was investigated using logistic regression. Of the 356 patients continuing levetiracetam for at least 1 year, 140 (39.3%) were seizure-free during the last six months of follow-up. Partial symptomatic or generalised idiopathic epilepsy were associated with greater seizure-freedom than partial cryptogenic disease. Factors associated with seizures were: longer disease duration, initial incapacity, increased number of seizures in the six months preceding levetiracetam initiation, and number of consultations for epilepsy in the six months preceding levetiracetam initiation. There was a trend for the association between the early reduction in the number of concomitant AEDs and seizure-free status later during follow-up, which however did not reach statistical significance in the final propensity score-adjusted multivariate model (OR = 1.8, 95%CI [0.8;4.0]). Taking into account the various risk factors for seizures, the early reduction of concomitant AEDs was not associated with worse seizure rates during follow-up in real-life users of levetiracetam. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Morphological features of encephalopathy after chronic administration of the antiepileptic drug valproate to rats. A transmission electron microscopic study of capillaries in the cerebellar cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobaniec-Lotowska, M E; Sobaniec, W

    1996-01-01

    Long-term intragastric application of the antiepileptic drug sodium valproate (Vupral "Polfa") at the effective dose of 200 mg/kg b. w. once daily to rats for 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months revealed neurological disorders indicating cerebellum damage ("valproate encephalopathy"). The first ultrastructural changes in structural elements of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) in the cerebellar cortex were detectable after 3 months of the experiment. They became more severe in the later months of the experiment, and were most severe after 12 months, located mainly in the molecular layer of the cerebellar cortex. Lesions of the capillary included necrosis of endothelial cells. Organelles of these cells, in particular the mitochondria (increased number and size, distinct degeneration of their matrix and cristae) and Golgi apparatus were altered. Reduced size of capillary lumen and occlusion were caused by swollen endothelial cells which had luminal protrusions and swollen microvilli. Pressure on the vessel wall was produced by enlarged perivascular astrocytic processes. Fragments of necrotic endothelial cells were in the vascular lumens and in these there was loosening and breaking of tight cellular junctions. Damage to the vascular basement lamina was also observed. Damage to the capillary was accompanied by marked damage to neuroglial cells, mainly to perivascular processes of astrocytes. The proliferation of astrocytes (Bergmann's in particular) and occasionally of oligodendrocytes was found. Alterations in the structural elements of the BBB coexisted with marked lesions of neurons of the cerebellum (Purkinje cells are earliest). In electron micrographs both luminal and antiluminal sides of the BBB of the cerebellar cortex had similar lesions. The possible influence of the hepatic damage, mainly hyperammonemia, upon the development of valproate encephalopathy is discussed.

  17. T-current related effects of antiepileptic drugs and a Ca2+ channel antagonist on thalamic relay and local circuit interneurons in a rat model of absence epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broicher, Tilman; Seidenbecher, Thomas; Meuth, Patrick; Munsch, Thomas; Meuth, Sven G; Kanyshkova, Tatyana; Pape, Hans-Christian; Budde, Thomas

    2007-09-01

    Channel blocking, anti-oscillatory, and anti-epileptic effects of clinically used anti-absence substances (ethosuximide, valproate) and the T-type Ca2+ current (IT) blocker mibefradil were tested by analyzing membrane currents in acutely isolated local circuit interneurons and thalamocortical relay (TC) neurons, slow intrathalamic oscillations in brain slices, and spike and wave discharges (SWDs) occurring in vivo in Wistar Albino Glaxo rats from Rijswijk (WAG/Rij). Substance effects in vitro were compared between WAG/Rij and a non-epileptic control strain, the ACI rats. Ethosuximide (ETX) and valproate were found to block IT in acutely isolated thalamic neurons. Block of IT by therapeutically relevant ETX concentrations (0.25-0.75 mM) was stronger in WAG/Rij, although the maximal effect at saturating concentrations (>or=10 mM) was stronger in ACI. Ethosuximide delayed the onset of the low threshold Ca2+ spike (LTS) of neurons recorded in slice preparations. Mibefradil (>or=2 microM) completely blocked IT and the LTS, dampened evoked thalamic oscillations, and attenuated SWDs in vivo. Computational modeling demonstrated that the complete effect of ETX can be replicated by a sole reduction of IT. However, the necessary degree of IT reduction was not induced by therapeutically relevant ETX concentrations. A combined reduction of IT, the persistent sodium current, and the Ca2+ activated K+ current resulted in an LTS alteration resembling the experimental observations. In summary, these results support the hypothesis of IT reduction as part of the mechanism of action of anti-absence drugs and demonstrate the ability of a specific IT antagonist to attenuate rhythmic burst firing and SWDs.

  18. Determination of a selection of anti-epileptic drugs and two active metabolites in whole blood by reversed phase UPLC-MS/MS and some examples of application of the method in forensic toxicology cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karinen, Ritva; Vindenes, Vigdis; Hasvold, Inger; Olsen, Kirsten Midtbøen; Christophersen, Asbjørg S; Øiestad, Elisabeth

    2015-07-01

    Quantitative determination of anti-epileptic drug concentrations is of great importance in forensic toxicology cases. Although the drugs are not usually abused, they are important post-mortem cases where the question of both lack of compliance and accidental or deliberate poisoning might be raised. In addition these drugs can be relevant for driving under the influence cases. A reversed phase ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method has been developed for the quantitative analysis of the anti-epileptic compounds carbamazepine, carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, 10-OH-carbazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, pregabalin, and topiramate in whole blood, using 0.1 mL sample volume with methaqualone as internal standard. Sample preparation was a simple protein precipitation with acetonitrile and methanol. The diluted supernatant was directly injected into the chromatographic system. Separation was performed on an Acquity UPLC® BEH Phenyl column with gradient elution and a mildly alkaline mobile phase. The mass spectrometric detection was performed in positive ion mode, except for phenobarbital, and multiple reaction monitoring was used for drug quantification. The limits of quantification for the different anti-epileptic drugs varied from 0.064 to 1.26 mg/L in blood, within-day and day-to-day relative standard deviations from 2.2 to 14.7% except for phenobarbital. Between-day variation for phenobarbital was 20.4% at the concentration level of 3.5 mg/L. The biases for all compounds were within ±17.5%. The recoveries ranged between 85 and 120%. The corrected matrix effects were 88-106% and 84-110% in ante-mortem and post-mortem whole blood samples, respectively.

  19. Quantification of new antiepileptic drugs by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and its application to cellular uptake experiment using human placental choriocarcinoma BeWo cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furugen, Ayako; Kobayashi, Masaki; Nishimura, Ayako; Takamura, Shigeo; Narumi, Katsuya; Yamada, Takehiro; Iseki, Ken

    2015-10-01

    A method for quantification of new antiepileptic drugs, including lamotrigine (LTG), levetiracetam (LEV), gabapentin (GBP), and topiramate (TPM), in cellular samples, using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry was developed to better understand the membrane transport mechanisms of these drugs. Cell lysate was deproteinized by methanol containing LEV-d3 as an internal standard (IS). Chromatographic separation was performed on a C18 column using gradient elution with methanol-water-formic acid (10:90:0.1, v/v/v) and methanol-formic acid (100:0.1, v/v). Analytes were detected in positive ion electrospray mode with selected reaction monitoring (SRM). This method was applicable for a linear range of 5 to 500pmol for LTG; 5 to 1000pmol for LEV; 10 to 10,000pmol for GBP; and 5 to 5000pmol for TPM. The intra-day precision, inter-day precision, and accuracy data were assessed and found to be acceptable. This developed and validated method was then successfully applied to the investigation of uptake of the new antiepileptic drugs in placental choriocarcinoma BeWo cells. The intracellular concentration of these drugs in BeWo cells, accumulating over 30min at 37°C was in the order of GBP>LTG>LEV≈TPM. Furthermore, the uptake of GBP at 4°C was much lower than that at 37°C. The uptake of GBP was saturated at high concentrations. The kinetic parameters calculated for GBP uptake in BeWo cells were determined as Km of 105.4±6.4μM and Vmax at 8153±348pmol/mg protein/min. The novel method described here should enable investigators to elucidate the transport mechanisms of these antiepileptic drugs in BeWo cells.

  20. Algunas consideraciones en relación con los medicamentos antiepilépticos de nueva generación en los niños Some considerations in relation to the new generation antiepileptic drugs in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desiderio Pozo Lauzán

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo es revisar las principales drogas antiepilépticas de segunda generación y su administración en los niños: vigabatrina, felbamato, lamotrigina, topiramato, tiagabina, oxcarbazepina, zonisamida, levetiracetam y stiripentol. Al inicio se recomendaron en pacientes adultos con epilepsias focales refractarias, sin embargo desde hace varios años, se ha demostrado su eficacia en diferentes tipos de crisis en los niños. La lamotrigina y el topiramato se consideran medicamentos de amplio espectro. Se enfatiza en el metabolismo, vías de eliminación, indicaciones, dosis en los niños, interacciones medicamentosas y efectos colaterales de los medicamentos antiepilépticos de segunda generación. Se mencionan algunos de los nuevos medicamentos que actualmente están en investigación como antiepilépticos y que constituyen una tercera generaciónThe objective of this paper is to review the main second generation antiepileptic drugs and their administration in children: vigatrine, felbamate, lamotrigine, topiramate, tiagabine, oxcarbazepine, zonisamide, leventiracetam and stiripentol. At the beginning, they were recommended in adult patients with focal refractory epilepsies; however, their efficacy in different types of seizures in children has been proved for some years. Lamotrigine and topiramate are considered drugs of wide spectrum. Emphasis is made on metabolism, routes of elimination, indications, doses in children, drug interactions and side effects of the second generation antiepileptic drugs. Some of the new drugs that are currently under study as antiepileptic and that constitute a third generation, are mentioned.

  1. Stability-indicating liquid chromatographic method for quantification of new anti-epileptic drug lacosamide in bulk and pharmaceutical formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chhalotiya Usmangani K.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An isocratic stability indicating reversed-phase liquid chromatographic determination was developed for the quantitative determination of lacosamide in the pharmaceutical dosage form. A Hypersil C-18, 4.5μm column with mobile phase containing acetonitrile-water (20:80, v/v was used. The flow rate was 1.0 mL min-1 and effluents were monitored at 258 nm. The retention time of lacosamide was 8.9 min. The method was found to be linear in the concentration range of 5-100 μg/ml and the recovery was found to be in the range of 99.15 - 100.09 %. The limit of detection and limit of quantification were found to be 2 μg/ml and 5 μg/ml, respectively. Lacosamide stock solutions were subjected to acid and alkali hydrolysis, chemical oxidation and dry heat degradation. The drug was found to be stable to the dry heat and acidic condition attempted. The proposed method was validated and successfully applied to the estimation of lacosamide in tablet dosage forms.

  2. Subchronic treatment with antiepileptic drugs modifies pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures in mice: Its correlation with benzodiazepine receptor binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Rocha

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Luisa RochaPharmacobiology Department, Center for Research and Advanced Studies, Calz, Tenorios, MéxicoAbstract: Experiments using male CD1 mice were carried out to investigate the effects of subchronic (daily administration for 8 days pretreatments with drugs enhancing GABAergic transmission (diazepam, 10 mg/kg, ip; gabapentin, 100 mg/kg, po; or vigabatrin, 500 mg/kg, po on pentylenetetrazol (PTZ-induced seizures, 24 h after the last injection. Subchronic administration of diazepam reduced latencies to clonus, tonic extension and death induced by PTZ. Subchronic vigabatrin produced enhanced latency to the first clonus but faster occurrence of tonic extension and death induced by PTZ. Subchronic gabapentin did not modify PTZ-induced seizures. Autoradiography experiments revealed reduced benzodiazepine receptor binding in several brain areas after subchronic treatment with diazepam or gabapentin, whereas subchronic vigabatrin did not induce significant receptor changes. The present results indicate differential effects induced by the subchronic administration of diazepam, vigabatrin, and gabapentin on the susceptibility to PTZ-induced seizures, benzodiazepine receptor binding, or both.Keywords: diazepam, gabapentin, vigabatrin, pentylenetetrazol, benzodiazepine receptors

  3. A Bioequivalence Approach for Generic Narrow Therapeutic Index Drugs: Evaluation of the Reference-Scaled Approach and Variability Comparison Criterion

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Wenlei; Makhlouf, Fairouz; Schuirmann, Donald J.; Zhang, Xinyuan; Zheng, Nan; Conner, Dale; Yu, Lawrence X.; Lionberger, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Various health communities have expressed concerns regarding whether average bioequivalence (BE) limits (80.00–125.00%) for the 90% confidence interval of the test-to-reference geometric mean ratio are sufficient to ensure therapeutic equivalence between a generic narrow therapeutic index (NTI) drug and its reference listed drug (RLD). Simulations were conducted to investigate the impact of different BE approaches for NTI drugs on study power, including (1) direct tightening of average BE lim...

  4. Clinical pharmacology of tyrosine kinase inhibitors becoming generic drugs: the regulatory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Niels; Röper, Lea; Haas, Bodo; Potthast, Henrike; Hermes, Ulrike; Unkrig, Christoph; Naumann-Winter, Frauke; Enzmann, Harald

    2014-02-07

    Over the last decades, billions have been spent and huge efforts have been taken in basic and clinical cancer research [CA Cancer J Clin63:11-30]. About a decade ago, the arms race between drugs and cancer cells reached a new level by introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) into pharmacological anti-cancer therapy. According to their molecular mechanism of action, TKI in contrast to so-called "classic" or "conventional" cytostatics belong to the group of targeted cancer medicines, characterized by accurately fitting with biological structures (i.e. active centers of kinases). Numerous (partly orphan) indications are covered by this new class of substances. Approximately ten years after the first substances of this class of medicines were authorized, patent protection will end within the next years. The following article covers clinical meaning and regulatory status of anti-cancer TKI and gives an outlook to what is expected from the introduction of generic anti-cancer TKI.

  5. Pharmacodynamic and/or pharmacokinetic characteristics of interactions between loreclezole and four conventional antiepileptic drugs in pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in mice: an isobolographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Ratnaraj, Neville; Patsalos, Philip N; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2005-12-01

    Isobolographic analysis was used to characterize the interactions between loreclezole (LCZ) and clonazepam (CZP), ethosuximide (ETS), phenobarbital (PB), and valproate (VPA) in suppressing pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures and in producing acute neurotoxic adverse effects in the chimney test in mice so as to identify optimum combinations. Moreover, protective indices (PIs) and benefit indices (BIs) were calculated so that a ranking in relation to advantageous combination could be established. Any pharmacokinetic contribution was ascertained by measurement of brain antiepileptic drug (AED) concentrations. All AED combinations comprising LCZ and CZP, ETS, PB, and VPA (at the fixed ratios of 1:3, 1:1, and 3:1) were additive in their seizure suppression. However, these interactions were complicated by changes in brain AED concentrations consequent to pharmacokinetic interactions. Thus, LCZ significantly increased total brain ETS concentrations (VPA, CZP, and PB concentrations were unaffected), and ETS decreased, and VPA increased, total brain LCZ concentrations. Only combinations of LCZ with CZP and PB were completely free of any pharmacokinetic interaction. Furthermore, in the chimney test, isobolographic analysis showed that the combination of LCZ and CZP, at the fixed ratio of 1:1, was supra-additive (synergistic, P<0.05), whereas LCZ and ETS at fixed ratios of 1:3 and 1:1 were subadditive (antagonistic, P<0.05). The remaining combinations of LCZ with CZP (1:3 and 3:1), ETS (3:1), PB (all fixed ratios of 1:3, 1:1, and 3:1), and VPA (at the fixed ratios of 1:3, 1:1, and 3:1) barely displayed additivity. In conclusion, BI, which is a measure of the margin of safety and tolerability of drugs in combination and comprises anticonvulsant and neurotoxic measures, was favorable for only one combination (LCZ and ETS at a fixed ratio of 1:3) with a value of 1.39. In contrast, LCZ and CZP constitute an unfavorable combination (BI=0.61-1.01). The combinations of LCZ

  6. Long-term Effectiveness of Antiepileptic Drug Monotherapy in Partial Epileptic Patients: A 7-year Study in an Epilepsy Center in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is important to choose an appropriate antiepileptic drug (AED to manage partial epilepsy. Traditional AEDs, such as carbamazepine (CBZ and valproate (VPA, have been proven to have good therapeutic effects. However, in recent years, a variety of new AEDs have increasingly been used as first-line treatments for partial epilepsy. As the studies regarding the effectiveness of new drugs and comparisons between new AEDs and traditional AEDs are few, it is determined that these are areas in need of further research. Accordingly, this study investigated the long-term effectiveness of six AEDs used as monotherapy in patients with partial epilepsy. Methods: This is a retrospective, long-term observational study. Patients with partial epilepsy who received monotherapy with one of six AEDs, namely, CBZ, VPA, topiramate (TPM, oxcarbazepine (OXC, lamotri