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Sample records for generation sequencing technology

  1. Nanopore-based Fourth-generation DNA Sequencing Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanxiao Feng; Yuechuan Zhang; Cuifeng Ying; Deqiang Wang; Chunlei Du

    2015-01-01

    Nanopore-based sequencers, as the fourth-generation DNA sequencing technology, have the potential to quickly and reliably sequence the entire human genome for less than $1000, and possibly for even less than$100. The single-molecule techniques used by this technology allow us to further study the interaction between DNA and protein, as well as between protein and protein. Nanopore analysis opens a new door to molecular biology investigation at the single-molecule scale. In this article, we have reviewed academic achievements in nanopore technology from the past as well as the latest advances, including both biological and solid-state nanopores, and discussed their recent and potential applications.

  2. Comparison of next generation sequencing technologies for transcriptome characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soltis Douglas E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have developed a simulation approach to help determine the optimal mixture of sequencing methods for most complete and cost effective transcriptome sequencing. We compared simulation results for traditional capillary sequencing with "Next Generation" (NG ultra high-throughput technologies. The simulation model was parameterized using mappings of 130,000 cDNA sequence reads to the Arabidopsis genome (NCBI Accession SRA008180.19. We also generated 454-GS20 sequences and de novo assemblies for the basal eudicot California poppy (Eschscholzia californica and the magnoliid avocado (Persea americana using a variety of methods for cDNA synthesis. Results The Arabidopsis reads tagged more than 15,000 genes, including new splice variants and extended UTR regions. Of the total 134,791 reads (13.8 MB, 119,518 (88.7% mapped exactly to known exons, while 1,117 (0.8% mapped to introns, 11,524 (8.6% spanned annotated intron/exon boundaries, and 3,066 (2.3% extended beyond the end of annotated UTRs. Sequence-based inference of relative gene expression levels correlated significantly with microarray data. As expected, NG sequencing of normalized libraries tagged more genes than non-normalized libraries, although non-normalized libraries yielded more full-length cDNA sequences. The Arabidopsis data were used to simulate additional rounds of NG and traditional EST sequencing, and various combinations of each. Our simulations suggest a combination of FLX and Solexa sequencing for optimal transcriptome coverage at modest cost. We have also developed ESTcalc http://fgp.huck.psu.edu/NG_Sims/ngsim.pl, an online webtool, which allows users to explore the results of this study by specifying individualized costs and sequencing characteristics. Conclusion NG sequencing technologies are a highly flexible set of platforms that can be scaled to suit different project goals. In terms of sequence coverage alone, the NG sequencing is a dramatic advance

  3. Exploring the switchgrass transcriptome using second-generation sequencing technology.

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    Yixing Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L. is a C4 perennial grass and widely popular as an important bioenergy crop. To accelerate the pace of developing high yielding switchgrass cultivars adapted to diverse environmental niches, the generation of genomic resources for this plant is necessary. The large genome size and polyploid nature of switchgrass makes whole genome sequencing a daunting task even with current technologies. Exploring the transcriptional landscape using next generation sequencing technologies provides a viable alternative to whole genome sequencing in switchgrass. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Switchgrass cDNA libraries from germinating seedlings, emerging tillers, flowers, and dormant seeds were sequenced using Roche 454 GS-FLX Titanium technology, generating 980,000 reads with an average read length of 367 bp. De novo assembly generated 243,600 contigs with an average length of 535 bp. Using the foxtail millet genome as a reference greatly improved the assembly and annotation of switchgrass ESTs. Comparative analysis of the 454-derived switchgrass EST reads with other sequenced monocots including Brachypodium, sorghum, rice and maize indicated a 70-80% overlap. RPKM analysis demonstrated unique transcriptional signatures of the four tissues analyzed in this study. More than 24,000 ESTs were identified in the dormant seed library. In silico analysis indicated that there are more than 2000 EST-SSRs in this collection. Expression of several orphan ESTs was confirmed by RT-PCR. SIGNIFICANCE: We estimate that about 90% of the switchgrass gene space has been covered in this analysis. This study nearly doubles the amount of EST information for switchgrass currently in the public domain. The celerity and economical nature of second-generation sequencing technologies provide an in-depth view of the gene space of complex genomes like switchgrass. Sequence analysis of closely related members of the NAD(+-malic enzyme type C4 grasses such as

  4. Application of next-generation sequencing technology in forensic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yaran; Xie, Bingbing; Yan, Jiangwei

    2014-10-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, with its high-throughput capacity and low cost, has developed rapidly in recent years and become an important analytical tool for many genomics researchers. New opportunities in the research domain of the forensic studies emerge by harnessing the power of NGS technology, which can be applied to simultaneously analyzing multiple loci of forensic interest in different genetic contexts, such as autosomes, mitochondrial and sex chromosomes. Furthermore, NGS technology can also have potential applications in many other aspects of research. These include DNA database construction, ancestry and phenotypic inference, monozygotic twin studies, body fluid and species identification, and forensic animal, plant and microbiological analyses. Here we review the application of NGS technology in the field of forensic science with the aim of providing a reference for future forensics studies and practice.

  5. Application of Next-generation Sequencing Technology in Forensic Science

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    Yaran Yang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS technology, with its high-throughput capacity and low cost, has developed rapidly in recent years and become an important analytical tool for many genomics researchers. New opportunities in the research domain of the forensic studies emerge by harnessing the power of NGS technology, which can be applied to simultaneously analyzing multiple loci of forensic interest in different genetic contexts, such as autosomes, mitochondrial and sex chromosomes. Furthermore, NGS technology can also have potential applications in many other aspects of research. These include DNA database construction, ancestry and phenotypic inference, monozygotic twin studies, body fluid and species identification, and forensic animal, plant and microbiological analyses. Here we review the application of NGS technology in the field of forensic science with the aim of providing a reference for future forensics studies and practice.

  6. Application of Next-generation Sequencing Technology in Forensic Science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaran Yang; Bingbing Xie; Jiangwei Yan

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, with its high-throughput capacity and low cost, has developed rapidly in recent years and become an important analytical tool for many genomics researchers. New opportunities in the research domain of the forensic studies emerge by harnessing the power of NGS technology, which can be applied to simultaneously analyzing multi-ple loci of forensic interest in different genetic contexts, such as autosomes, mitochondrial and sex chromosomes. Furthermore, NGS technology can also have potential applications in many other aspects of research. These include DNA database construction, ancestry and phenotypic inference, monozygotic twin studies, body fluid and species identification, and forensic animal, plant and microbiological analyses. Here we review the application of NGS technology in the field of forensic science with the aim of providing a reference for future forensics studies and practice.

  7. Next-generation sequencing technology in clinical virology.

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    Capobianchi, M R; Giombini, E; Rozera, G

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in nucleic acid sequencing technologies, referred to as 'next-generation' sequencing (NGS), have produced a true revolution and opened new perspectives for research and diagnostic applications, owing to the high speed and throughput of data generation. So far, NGS has been applied to metagenomics-based strategies for the discovery of novel viruses and the characterization of viral communities. Additional applications include whole viral genome sequencing, detection of viral genome variability, and the study of viral dynamics. These applications are particularly suitable for viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus, whose error-prone replication machinery, combined with the high replication rate, results, in each infected individual, in the formation of many genetically related viral variants referred to as quasi-species. The viral quasi-species, in turn, represents the substrate for the selective pressure exerted by the immune system or by antiviral drugs. With traditional approaches, it is difficult to detect and quantify minority genomes present in viral quasi-species that, in fact, may have biological and clinical relevance. NGS provides, for each patient, a dataset of clonal sequences that is some order of magnitude higher than those obtained with conventional approaches. Hence, NGS is an extremely powerful tool with which to investigate previously inaccessible aspects of viral dynamics, such as the contribution of different viral reservoirs to replicating virus in the course of the natural history of the infection, co-receptor usage in minority viral populations harboured by different cell lineages, the dynamics of development of drug resistance, and the re-emergence of hidden genomes after treatment interruptions. The diagnostic application of NGS is just around the corner. © 2012 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2012 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious

  8. Application of next-generation sequencing technologies in virology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, Alan D; Chapman, David; Dixon, Linda; Chantrey, Julian; Darby, Alistair C; Hall, Neil

    2012-09-01

    The progress of science is punctuated by the advent of revolutionary technologies that provide new ways and scales to formulate scientific questions and advance knowledge. Following on from electron microscopy, cell culture and PCR, next-generation sequencing is one of these methodologies that is now changing the way that we understand viruses, particularly in the areas of genome sequencing, evolution, ecology, discovery and transcriptomics. Possibilities for these methodologies are only limited by our scientific imagination and, to some extent, by their cost, which has restricted their use to relatively small numbers of samples. Challenges remain, including the storage and analysis of the large amounts of data generated. As the chemistries employed mature, costs will decrease. In addition, improved methods for analysis will become available, opening yet further applications in virology including routine diagnostic work on individuals, and new understanding of the interaction between viral and host transcriptomes. An exciting era of viral exploration has begun, and will set us new challenges to understand the role of newly discovered viral diversity in both disease and health.

  9. Discovery of posttranscriptional regulatory RNAs using next generation sequencing technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelderman, Grant; Contreras, Lydia M

    2013-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized the way by which we engineer metabolism by radically altering the path to genome-wide inquiries. This is due to the fact that NGS approaches offer several powerful advantages over traditional methods that include the ability to fully sequence hundreds to thousands of genes in a single experiment and simultaneously detect homozygous and heterozygous deletions, alterations in gene copy number, insertions, translocations, and exome-wide substitutions that include "hot-spot mutations." This chapter describes the use of these technologies as a sequencing technique for transcriptome analysis and discovery of regulatory RNA elements in the context of three main platforms: Illumina HiSeq, 454 pyrosequencing, and SOLiD sequencing. Specifically, this chapter focuses on the use of Illumina HiSeq, since it is the most widely used platform for RNA discovery and transcriptome analysis. Regulatory RNAs have now been found in all branches of life. In bacteria, noncoding small RNAs (sRNAs) are involved in highly sophisticated regulatory circuits that include quorum sensing, carbon metabolism, stress responses, and virulence (Gorke and Vogel, Gene Dev 22:2914-2925, 2008; Gottesman, Trends Genet 21:399-404, 2005; Romby et al., Curr Opin Microbiol 9:229-236, 2006). Further characterization of the underlying regulation of gene expression remains poorly understood given that it is estimated that over 60% of all predicted genes remain hypothetical and the 5' and 3' untranslated regions are unknown for more than 90% of the genes (Siegel et al., Trends Parasitol 27:434-441, 2011). Importantly, manipulation of the posttranscriptional regulation that occurs at the level of RNA stability and export, trans-splicing, polyadenylation, protein translation, and protein stability via untranslated regions (Clayton, EMBO J 21:1881-1888, 2002; Haile and Papadopoulou, Curr Opin Microbiol 10:569-577, 2007) could be highly beneficial to metabolic

  10. Next generation sequencing (NGS)technologies and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuyisich, Momchilo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-11

    NGS technology overview: (1) NGS library preparation - Nucleic acids extraction, Sample quality control, RNA conversion to cDNA, Addition of sequencing adapters, Quality control of library; (2) Sequencing - Clonal amplification of library fragments, (except PacBio), Sequencing by synthesis, Data output (reads and quality); and (3) Data analysis - Read mapping, Genome assembly, Gene expression, Operon structure, sRNA discovery, and Epigenetic analyses.

  11. Application of next generation sequencing technology in Mendelian movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yumin; Pan, Xuya; Xue, Dan; Li, Yuwei; Zhang, Xueying; Kuang, Biao; Zheng, Jiabo; Deng, Hao; Li, Xiaoling; Xiong, Wei; Zeng, Zhaoyang; Li, Guiyuan

    2016-02-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) has developed very rapidly in the last decade. Compared with Sanger sequencing, NGS has the advantages of high sensitivity and high throughput. Movement disorders are a common type of neurological disease. Although traditional linkage analysis has become a standard method to identify the pathogenic genes in diseases, it is getting difficult to find new pathogenic genes in rare Mendelian disorders, such as movement disorders, due to a lack of appropriate families with high penetrance or enough affected individuals. Thus, NGS is an ideal approach to identify the causal alleles for inherited disorders. NGS is used to identify genes in several diseases and new mutant sites in Mendelian movement disorders. This article reviewed the recent progress in NGS and the use of NGS in Mendelian movement disorders from genome sequencing and transcriptome sequencing. A perspective on how NGS could be employed in rare Mendelian disorders is also provided.

  12. Applications and Case Studies of the Next-Generation Sequencing Technologies in Food, Nutrition and Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Next-generation sequencing technologies are able to produce high-throughput short sequence reads in a cost-effective fashion. The emergence of these technologies has not only facilitated genome sequencing but also changed the landscape of life sciences. Here I survey their major applications ranging...

  13. Applications of Next-Generation Sequencing Technologies to Diagnostic Virology

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    Giorgio Palù

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Novel DNA sequencing techniques, referred to as “next-generation” sequencing (NGS, provide high speed and throughput that can produce an enormous volume of sequences with many possible applications in research and diagnostic settings. In this article, we provide an overview of the many applications of NGS in diagnostic virology. NGS techniques have been used for high-throughput whole viral genome sequencing, such as sequencing of new influenza viruses, for detection of viral genome variability and evolution within the host, such as investigation of human immunodeficiency virus and human hepatitis C virus quasispecies, and monitoring of low-abundance antiviral drug-resistance mutations. NGS techniques have been applied to metagenomics-based strategies for the detection of unexpected disease-associated viruses and for the discovery of novel human viruses, including cancer-related viruses. Finally, the human virome in healthy and disease conditions has been described by NGS-based metagenomics.

  14. Next-generation sequencing technology:A technology review and future perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    As one of the most powerful tools in biomedical research,DNA sequencing not only has been improving its productivity at an exponential growth rate but has also been evolving into a new layout of technological territories toward engineering and physical disciplines over the past three decades.In this technical review,we look into technical characteristics of the next-generation sequencers and provide insights into their future development and applications.We envisage that some of the emerging platforms are capable of supporting the USD1000 genome and USD100 genome goals if given a few years for technical maturation.We also suggest that scientists from China should play an active role in this campaign that will have a profound impact on both scientific research and societal healthcare systems.

  15. Perspectives of DNA microarray and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TENG XiaoKun; XIAO HuaSheng

    2009-01-01

    DNA microarray and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies are important tools for high-throughput genome research, in revealing both the structural and functional characteristics of genomes. In the past decade the DNA microarray technologies have been widely applied in the studies of functional genomics, systems biology and pharmacogenomics. The next-generation DNA sequenc-ing method was first introduced by the 454 Company in 2003, immediately followed by the establish-ment of the Solexa and Solid techniques by other biotech companies. Though it has not been long since the first emergence of this technology, with the fast and impressive improvement, the application of this technology has extended to almost all fields of genomics research, as a rival challenging the existing DNA microarray technology. This paper briefly reviews the working principles of these two technologies as well as their application and perspectives in genome research.

  16. Applications and case studies of the next-generation sequencing technologies in food, nutrition and agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, George E

    2009-01-01

    The next-generation sequencing technologies are able to produce millions of short sequence reads in a high-throughput, cost-effective fashion. The emergence of these technologies has not only facilitated genome sequencing but also started to change the landscape of life sciences. Here, I survey their major applications ranging from whole-genome sequencing and resequencing, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and structural variation discovery, to mRNA and noncoding RNA profiling and protein-nucleic acid interaction assay. These case studies in structural, functional and comparative genomics, metagenomics, and epigenomics are providing a more complete picture of the genome structures and functions. In the near future, we will witness broad impacts of these next-generation sequencing technologies for solving the complex biological problems in food, nutrition and agriculture. In this article, recent patents based information is also included.

  17. Perspectives of DNA microarray and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    DNA microarray and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies are important tools for high-throughput genome research,in revealing both the structural and functional characteristics of genomes.In the past decade the DNA microarray technologies have been widely applied in the studies of functional genomics,systems biology and pharmacogenomics.The next-generation DNA sequencing method was first introduced by the 454 Company in 2003,immediately followed by the establishment of the Solexa and Solid techniques by other biotech companies.Though it has not been long since the first emergence of this technology,with the fast and impressive improvement,the application of this technology has extended to almost all fields of genomics research,as a rival challenging the existing DNA microarray technology.This paper briefly reviews the working principles of these two technologies as well as their application and perspectives in genome research.

  18. Advanced Applications of Next-Generation Sequencing Technologies to Orchid Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chuan-Ming; Liu, Zhong-Jian; Tsai, Wen-Chieh

    2017-09-08

    Next-generation sequencing technologies are revolutionizing biology by permitting, transcriptome sequencing, whole-genome sequencing and resequencing, and genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism profiling. Orchid research has benefited from this breakthrough, and a few orchid genomes are now available; new biological questions can be approached and new breeding strategies can be designed. The first part of this review describes the unique features of orchid biology. The second part provides an overview of the current next-generation sequencing platforms, many of which are already used in plant laboratories. The third part summarizes the state of orchid transcriptome and genome sequencing and illustrates current achievements. The genetic sequences currently obtained will not only provide a broad scope for the study of orchid biology, but also serves as a starting point for uncovering the mystery of orchid evolution.

  19. Next-generation sequencing technology for genetics and genomics of sorghum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Hong; Mocoeur, Anne Raymonde Joelle; Jing, Hai-Chun

    2014-01-01

    NGS platforms, comparing their working theories and reveiwing their advantages and disavantages. We also discuss the future of NGS development and point out that single molecular sequencing would push the technology to the next level for biological sciences. Much of the chapter focuses on the use......The invention and application of Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies have revolutionized the study of genetics and genomics. Much research which would not even be considered are nowdays being excuted in many laboratories as routine. In this chapter, we introduce the currently available...... of NGS technologies in sorghum. Although the acquisition of the first whole-genome sequence in sorghum was carried out primarily using Sanger sequencing, the use of NGS for examining the genome-wide variation was almost synchronized with other work. Interesting genomic variation was found between sweet...

  20. DNA fingerprinting, DNA barcoding, and next generation sequencing technology in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucher, Nikolaus J; Hennell, James R; Carles, Maria C

    2012-01-01

    DNA fingerprinting of plants has become an invaluable tool in forensic, scientific, and industrial laboratories all over the world. PCR has become part of virtually every variation of the plethora of approaches used for DNA fingerprinting today. DNA sequencing is increasingly used either in combination with or as a replacement for traditional DNA fingerprinting techniques. A prime example is the use of short, standardized regions of the genome as taxon barcodes for biological identification of plants. Rapid advances in "next generation sequencing" (NGS) technology are driving down the cost of sequencing and bringing large-scale sequencing projects into the reach of individual investigators. We present an overview of recent publications that demonstrate the use of "NGS" technology for DNA fingerprinting and DNA barcoding applications.

  1. Next-generation sequencing technologies: breaking the sound barrier of human genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahassi, El Mustapha; Stambrook, Peter J

    2014-09-01

    Demand for new technologies that deliver fast, inexpensive and accurate genome information has never been greater. This challenge has catalysed the rapid development of advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS). The generation of large volumes of sequence data and the speed of data acquisition are the primary advantages over previous, more standard methods. In 2013, the Food and Drug Administration granted marketing authorisation for the first high-throughput NG sequencer, Illumina's MiSeqDx, which allowed the development and use of a large number of new genome-based tests. Here, we present a review of template preparation, nucleic acid sequencing and imaging, genome assembly and alignment approaches as well as recent advances in current and near-term commercially available NGS instruments. We also outline the broad range of applications for NGS technologies and provide guidelines for platform selection to best address biological questions of interest. DNA sequencing has revolutionised biological and medical research, and is poised to have a similar impact on the practice of medicine. This tool is but one of an increasing arsenal of developing tools that enhance our capabilities to identify, quantify and functionally characterise the components of biological networks that keep us healthy or make us sick. Despite advances in other 'omic' technologies, DNA sequencing and analysis, in many respects, have played the leading role to date. The new technologies provide a bridge between genotype and phenotype, both in man and model organisms, and have revolutionised how risk of developing a complex human disease may be assessed. The generation of large DNA sequence data sets is producing a wealth of medically relevant information on a large number of individuals and populations that will potentially form the basis of truly individualised medical care in the future.

  2. Transcriptome analysis of carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L. based on next-generation sequencing technology

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    Tanase Koji

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L., in the family Caryophyllaceae, can be found in a wide range of colors and is a model system for studies of flower senescence. In addition, it is one of the most important flowers in the global floriculture industry. However, few genomics resources, such as sequences and markers are available for carnation or other members of the Caryophyllaceae. To increase our understanding of the genetic control of important characters in carnation, we generated an expressed sequence tag (EST database for a carnation cultivar important in horticulture by high-throughput sequencing using 454 pyrosequencing technology. Results We constructed a normalized cDNA library and a 3’-UTR library of carnation, obtaining a total of 1,162,126 high-quality reads. These reads were assembled into 300,740 unigenes consisting of 37,844 contigs and 262,896 singlets. The contigs were searched against an Arabidopsis sequence database, and 61.8% (23,380 of them had at least one BLASTX hit. These contigs were also annotated with Gene Ontology (GO and were found to cover a broad range of GO categories. Furthermore, we identified 17,362 potential simple sequence repeats (SSRs in 14,291 of the unigenes. We focused on gene discovery in the areas of flower color and ethylene biosynthesis. Transcripts were identified for almost every gene involved in flower chlorophyll and carotenoid metabolism and in anthocyanin biosynthesis. Transcripts were also identified for every step in the ethylene biosynthesis pathway. Conclusions We present the first large-scale sequence data set for carnation, generated using next-generation sequencing technology. The large EST database generated from these sequences is an informative resource for identifying genes involved in various biological processes in carnation and provides an EST resource for understanding the genetic diversity of this plant.

  3. Analysis of plant microbe interactions in the era of next generation sequencing technologies

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    Claudia eKnief

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing (NGS technologies have impressively accelerated research in biological science during the last years by enabling the production of large volumes of sequence data to a drastically lower price per base, compared to traditional sequencing methods. The recent and ongoing developments in the field allow addressing research questions in plant-microbe biology that were not conceivable just a few years ago. The present review provides an overview of NGS technologies and their usefulness for the analysis of microorganisms that live in association with plants. Possible limitations of the different sequencing systems, in particular sources of errors and bias, are critically discussed and methods are disclosed that help to overcome these shortcomings. A focus will be on the application of NGS methods in metagenomic studies, including the analysis of microbial communities by amplicon sequencing, which can be considered as a targeted metagenomic approach. Different applications of NGS technologies are exemplified by selected research articles that address the biology of the pant associated microbiota to demonstrate the worth of the new methods.

  4. Stepwise threshold clustering: a new method for genotyping MHC loci using next-generation sequencing technology.

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    William E Stutz

    Full Text Available Genes of the vertebrate major histocompatibility complex (MHC are of great interest to biologists because of their important role in immunity and disease, and their extremely high levels of genetic diversity. Next generation sequencing (NGS technologies are quickly becoming the method of choice for high-throughput genotyping of multi-locus templates like MHC in non-model organisms. Previous approaches to genotyping MHC genes using NGS technologies suffer from two problems:1 a "gray zone" where low frequency alleles and high frequency artifacts can be difficult to disentangle and 2 a similar sequence problem, where very similar alleles can be difficult to distinguish as two distinct alleles. Here were present a new method for genotyping MHC loci--Stepwise Threshold Clustering (STC--that addresses these problems by taking full advantage of the increase in sequence data provided by NGS technologies. Unlike previous approaches for genotyping MHC with NGS data that attempt to classify individual sequences as alleles or artifacts, STC uses a quasi-Dirichlet clustering algorithm to cluster similar sequences at increasing levels of sequence similarity. By applying frequency and similarity based criteria to clusters rather than individual sequences, STC is able to successfully identify clusters of sequences that correspond to individual or similar alleles present in the genomes of individual samples. Furthermore, STC does not require duplicate runs of all samples, increasing the number of samples that can be genotyped in a given project. We show how the STC method works using a single sample library. We then apply STC to 295 threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus samples from four populations and show that neighboring populations differ significantly in MHC allele pools. We show that STC is a reliable, accurate, efficient, and flexible method for genotyping MHC that will be of use to biologists interested in a variety of downstream applications.

  5. Small RNA transcriptome investigation based on next-generation sequencing technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linglin Zhou; Xueying Li; Qi Liu; Fangqing Zhao; Jinyu Wu

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade,there has been a growing realization that studying the small RNA transcriptome is essential for understanding the complexity of transcriptional regulation.With an increased throughput and a reduced cost,next-generation sequencing technology has provided an unprecedented opportunity to measure the extent and complexity of small RNA transcriptome.Meanwhile,the large amount of obtained data and varied technology platforms have also posed multiple challenges for effective data analysis and mining.To provide some insight into the small RNA transcriptome investigation,this review describes the major small RNA classes,experimental methods to identify small RNAs,and available bioinformatics tools and databases.

  6. Next-generation sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieneck, Klaus; Bak, Mads; Jønson, Lars

    2013-01-01

    the feasibility of predicting the fetal KEL1 phenotype using next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: The KEL1/2 single-nucleotide polymorphism was polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified with one adjoining base, and the PCR product was sequenced using a genome analyzer (GAIIx......, Illumina); several millions of PCR sequences were analyzed. RESULTS: The results demonstrated the feasibility of diagnosing the fetal KEL1 or KEL2 blood group from cell-free DNA purified from maternal plasma. CONCLUSION: This method requires only one primer pair, and the large amount of sequence...

  7. The Application of Next Generation Sequencing Technology on Noninvasive Prenatal Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Hui

    of effective treatment. The rapid development of next generation sequencing technology boosts the discovery of new causative gene for these rare diseases, as well as the genetic diagnosis in clinic practice. Carrier screening, prenatal diagnosis and newborn screening are wildly used in the world to prevent...... an invasive process, which might lead to maternal anxiety, or even miscarriage. Therefore, developing an effective approach to perform noninvasive prenatal test (NIPT) for rare diseases is the key challenge to prevent birth defect in the future. The discovery of cell-­free fetal DNA, coupling with next......, and maternal plasma. In order to obtain accurate result, we combined the haplotype information from the parents with maternal plasma deep sequencing data to recover the fetal genotype. Our study demonstrated that the sequencing-based new approach could be used to detect rare diseases, including chromosomal...

  8. Coverage recommendation for genotyping analysis of highly heterologous species using next-generation sequencing technology

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    Song, Kai; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology is being applied to an increasing number of non-model species and has been used as the primary approach for accurate genotyping in genetic and evolutionary studies. However, inferring genotypes from sequencing data is challenging, particularly for organisms with a high degree of heterozygosity. This is because genotype calls from sequencing data are often inaccurate due to low sequencing coverage, and if this is not accounted for, genotype uncertainty can lead to serious bias in downstream analyses, such as quantitative trait locus mapping and genome-wide association studies. Here, we used high-coverage reference data sets from Crassostrea gigas to simulate sequencing data with different coverage, and we evaluate the influence of genotype calling rate and accuracy as a function of coverage. Having initially identified the appropriate parameter settings for filtering to ensure genotype accuracy, we used two different single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) calling pipelines, single-sample and multi-sample. We found that a coverage of 15× was suitable for obtaining sufficient numbers of SNPs with high accuracy. Our work provides guidelines for the selection of sequence coverage when using NGS to investigate species with a high degree of heterozygosity and rapid decay of linkage disequilibrium. PMID:27760996

  9. Read length and repeat resolution: Exploring prokaryote genomes using next-generation sequencing technologies

    KAUST Repository

    Cahill, Matt J.

    2010-07-12

    Background: There are a growing number of next-generation sequencing technologies. At present, the most cost-effective options also produce the shortest reads. However, even for prokaryotes, there is uncertainty concerning the utility of these technologies for the de novo assembly of complete genomes. This reflects an expectation that short reads will be unable to resolve small, but presumably abundant, repeats. Methodology/Principal Findings: Using a simple model of repeat assembly, we develop and test a technique that, for any read length, can estimate the occurrence of unresolvable repeats in a genome, and thus predict the number of gaps that would need to be closed to produce a complete sequence. We apply this technique to 818 prokaryote genome sequences. This provides a quantitative assessment of the relative performance of various lengths. Notably, unpaired reads of only 150nt can reconstruct approximately 50% of the analysed genomes with fewer than 96 repeat-induced gaps. Nonetheless, there is considerable variation amongst prokaryotes. Some genomes can be assembled to near contiguity using very short reads while others require much longer reads. Conclusions: Given the diversity of prokaryote genomes, a sequencing strategy should be tailored to the organism under study. Our results will provide researchers with a practical resource to guide the selection of the appropriate read length. 2010 Cahill et al.

  10. Read length and repeat resolution: exploring prokaryote genomes using next-generation sequencing technologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt J Cahill

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are a growing number of next-generation sequencing technologies. At present, the most cost-effective options also produce the shortest reads. However, even for prokaryotes, there is uncertainty concerning the utility of these technologies for the de novo assembly of complete genomes. This reflects an expectation that short reads will be unable to resolve small, but presumably abundant, repeats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a simple model of repeat assembly, we develop and test a technique that, for any read length, can estimate the occurrence of unresolvable repeats in a genome, and thus predict the number of gaps that would need to be closed to produce a complete sequence. We apply this technique to 818 prokaryote genome sequences. This provides a quantitative assessment of the relative performance of various lengths. Notably, unpaired reads of only 150nt can reconstruct approximately 50% of the analysed genomes with fewer than 96 repeat-induced gaps. Nonetheless, there is considerable variation amongst prokaryotes. Some genomes can be assembled to near contiguity using very short reads while others require much longer reads. CONCLUSIONS: Given the diversity of prokaryote genomes, a sequencing strategy should be tailored to the organism under study. Our results will provide researchers with a practical resource to guide the selection of the appropriate read length.

  11. Next Generation Sequencing and Health Technology Assessment in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Wendy J.

    2015-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) is a new genome-based technology showing great promise in delineating the genetic basis of autism thus facilitating diagnosis and in the future, the selection of treatment. NGS can have a targeted use as well as provide clinically important findings from medically actionable variants regarding the risk of other disorders. As more is learned about the genomic basis of autism, the clinical utility of the risk information will increase. But at what cost? As the medical management that ensues from primary and secondary (incidental) findings grows, there will be increased pressure on sub-specialists with a longer and more circuitous pathway to care. This will result in higher costs to health care systems and to families. Health technology assessment is needed to measure the additional costs associated with NGS compared to standard care and to weigh these costs against additional health benefits. Well-designed data collection systems should be implemented early in clinical translation of this technology to enable assessment of clinical utility and cost-effectiveness and to generate high quality evidence to inform clinical and budget allocation decision-making. PMID:26379724

  12. Next generation sequencing technology: a powerful tool for the genome characterization of sugarcane mosaic virus from Sorghum almum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technology was used to analyze the occurrence of viruses in Sorghum almum plants in Florida exhibiting mosaic symptoms. Total RNA was extracted from symptomatic leaves and used as a template for cDNA library preparation. The resulting library was sequenced on an Illu...

  13. Robust global microRNA expression profiling using next-generation sequencing technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Shirley; de Borja, Richard; Tsao, Ming-Sound; McPherson, John D

    2014-03-01

    miRNAs are a class of regulatory molecules involved in a wide range of cellular functions, including growth, development and apoptosis. Given their widespread roles in biological processes, understanding their patterns of expression in normal and diseased states will provide insights into the consequences of aberrant expression. As such, global miRNA expression profiling of human malignancies is gaining popularity in both basic and clinically driven research. However, to date, the majority of such analyses have used microarrays and quantitative real-time PCR. With the introduction of digital count technologies, such as next-generation sequencing (NGS) and the NanoString nCounter System, we have at our disposal many more options. To make effective use of these different platforms, the strengths and pitfalls of several miRNA profiling technologies were assessed, including a microarray platform, NGS technologies and the NanoString nCounter System. Overall, NGS had the greatest detection sensitivity, largest dynamic range of detection and highest accuracy in differential expression analysis when compared with gold-standard quantitative real-time PCR. Its technical reproducibility was high, with intrasample correlations of at least 0.95 in all cases. Furthermore, miRNA analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue was also evaluated. Expression profiles between paired frozen and FFPE samples were similar, with Spearman's ρ>0.93. These results show the superior sensitivity, accuracy and robustness of NGS for the comprehensive profiling of miRNAs in both frozen and FFPE tissues.

  14. Detecting novel genetic mutations in Chinese Usher syndrome families using next-generation sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ling-Hui; Jin, Xin; Xu, Hai-Wei; Li, Shi-Ying; Yin, Zheng-Qin

    2015-02-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is the most common cause of combined blindness and deafness inherited in an autosomal recessive mode. Molecular diagnosis is of great significance in revealing the molecular pathogenesis and aiding the clinical diagnosis of this disease. However, molecular diagnosis remains a challenge due to high phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity in USH. This study explored an approach for detecting disease-causing genetic mutations in candidate genes in five index cases from unrelated USH families based on targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology. Through systematic data analysis using an established bioinformatics pipeline and segregation analysis, 10 pathogenic mutations in the USH disease genes were identified in the five USH families. Six of these mutations were novel: c.4398G > A and EX38-49del in MYO7A, c.988_989delAT in USH1C, c.15104_15105delCA and c.6875_6876insG in USH2A. All novel variations segregated with the disease phenotypes in their respective families and were absent from ethnically matched control individuals. This study expanded the mutation spectrum of USH and revealed the genotype-phenotype relationships of the novel USH mutations in Chinese patients. Moreover, this study proved that targeted NGS is an accurate and effective method for detecting genetic mutations related to USH. The identification of pathogenic mutations is of great significance for elucidating the underlying pathophysiology of USH.

  15. Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Allele Determination Using Next-Generation Sequencing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bercelin Maniangou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The impact of natural killer (NK cell alloreactivity on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT outcome is still debated due to the complexity of graft parameters, HLA class I environment, the nature of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR/KIR ligand genetic combinations studied, and KIR+ NK cell repertoire size. KIR genes are known to be polymorphic in terms of gene content, copy number variation, and number of alleles. These allelic polymorphisms may impact both the phenotype and function of KIR+ NK cells. We, therefore, speculate that polymorphisms may alter donor KIR+ NK cell phenotype/function thus modulating post-HSCT KIR+ NK cell alloreactivity. To investigate KIR allele polymorphisms of all KIR genes, we developed a next-generation sequencing (NGS technology on a MiSeq platform. To ensure the reliability and specificity of our method, genomic DNA from well-characterized cell lines were used; high-resolution KIR typing results obtained were then compared to those previously reported. Two different bioinformatic pipelines were used allowing the attribution of sequencing reads to specific KIR genes and the assignment of KIR alleles for each KIR gene. Our results demonstrated successful long-range KIR gene amplifications of all reference samples using intergenic KIR primers. The alignment of reads to the human genome reference (hg19 using BiRD pipeline or visualization of data using Profiler software demonstrated that all KIR genes were completely sequenced with a sufficient read depth (mean 317× for all loci and a high percentage of mapping (mean 93% for all loci. Comparison of high-resolution KIR typing obtained to those published data using exome capture resulted in a reported concordance rate of 95% for centromeric and telomeric KIR genes. Overall, our results suggest that NGS can be used to investigate the broad KIR allelic polymorphism. Hence, these data improve our knowledge, not only on KIR+ NK cell alloreactivity in

  16. 第三代测序基本原理%The Mechanisms of the Third Generation Sequencing Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明爽; 赵敏

    2012-01-01

    In this review, I describe the mechanisms and features of the third generation sequencing technology which is a new generation of single molecule sequencing technology, introduce the True Single Molecule Sequencing (tSMS? of Helicos, the Single Molecule Real Time (SMRT? DNA Sequencing of the Pacific Bioseience, and the single-molecule nanopore DNA sequencing of the Oxford Nanopore Technologies. The advantages compared with the second generation sequencing, the problems and its future perspectives will be discussed here.%文章阐述了以单分子实时测序和纳米孔技术为标志第三代测序的基本原理,介绍了Helicos的Heliscope单分子测序仪、Pacific Bioscience的SMRT技术和Oxford Nanopore Technologies公司正在研究的纳米孔单分子测序技术.与其他测序技术进行了简单的对比以并提出一些单分子测序仍需面对的问题以及对未来单分子测序的展望.

  17. Development of a low bias method for characterizing viral populations using next generation sequencing technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M Willerth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With an estimated 38 million people worldwide currently infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, and an additional 4.1 million people becoming infected each year, it is important to understand how this virus mutates and develops resistance in order to design successful therapies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report a novel experimental method for amplifying full-length HIV genomes without the use of sequence-specific primers for high throughput DNA sequencing, followed by assembly of full length viral genome sequences from the resulting large dataset. Illumina was chosen for sequencing due to its ability to provide greater coverage of the HIV genome compared to prior methods, allowing for more comprehensive characterization of the heterogeneity present in the HIV samples analyzed. Our novel amplification method in combination with Illumina sequencing was used to analyze two HIV populations: a homogenous HIV population based on the canonical NL4-3 strain and a heterogeneous viral population obtained from a HIV patient's infected T cells. In addition, the resulting sequence was analyzed using a new computational approach to obtain a consensus sequence and several metrics of diversity. SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates how a lower bias amplification method in combination with next generation DNA sequencing provides in-depth, complete coverage of the HIV genome, enabling a stronger characterization of the quasispecies present in a clinically relevant HIV population as well as future study of how HIV mutates in response to a selective pressure.

  18. Scenario drafting for early technology assessment of next generation sequencing in clinical oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, S.E.P.; Retel, V.P.; Coupé, V.M.H.; Heuvel, van den M.M.; Harten, van W.H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) is expected to lift molecular diagnostics in clinical oncology to the next level. It enables simultaneous identification of mutations in a patient tumor, after which targeted therapy may be assigned. This approach could improve patient survival and/or assi

  19. H-TArget model: Early technology assessment for ext generation sequencing in oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Retel, Valesca P.; Joore, Manuela A.; Ramaekers, Bram; Heuvel, van den Michel M.; Heijden, van der Michiel Simon; Harten, van W.H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) promises to find mutations (targets) in individual cancer patients, to subsequently prescribe targeted therapy. Currently, NGS is in development, the effects on choice of therapy and prognosis are still unclear, and the costs for targeted therapies are hi

  20. Preparation of next-generation sequencing libraries using Nextera™ technology: simultaneous DNA fragmentation and adaptor tagging by in vitro transposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruccio, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    DNA library preparation is a common entry point and bottleneck for next-generation sequencing. Current methods generally consist of distinct steps that often involve significant sample loss and hands-on time: DNA fragmentation, end-polishing, and adaptor-ligation. In vitro transposition with Nextera™ Transposomes simultaneously fragments and covalently tags the target DNA, thereby combining these three distinct steps into a single reaction. Platform-specific sequencing adaptors can be added, and the sample can be enriched and bar-coded using limited-cycle PCR to prepare di-tagged DNA fragment libraries. Nextera technology offers a streamlined, efficient, and high-throughput method for generating bar-coded libraries compatible with multiple next-generation sequencing platforms.

  1. Next-generation sequencing technology for genetics and genomics of sorghum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Hong; Mocoeur, Anne Raymonde Joelle; Jing, Hai-Chun

    2014-01-01

    of NGS technologies in sorghum. Although the acquisition of the first whole-genome sequence in sorghum was carried out primarily using Sanger sequencing, the use of NGS for examining the genome-wide variation was almost synchronized with other work. Interesting genomic variation was found between sweet...... and grain sorghum. NGS has also been used to examine the transcriptomes of sorghum under various stress conditions. Besides identifying interesting transcriptonal adpatation to stress conditions, these study show that sugar could potentially act as an osmitic adjusting factor via transcriptional regulation....... Furthermore, miRNAs are found to be important adaptation to both biotic and abiotic stresses in sorghum. We discuss the use of NGS for further genetic improvement and breeding in sorghum....

  2. Identification of Genetic Alterations, as Causative Genetic Defects in Long QT Syndrome, Using Next Generation Sequencing Technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Campuzano

    Full Text Available Long QT Syndrome is an inherited channelopathy leading to sudden cardiac death due to ventricular arrhythmias. Despite that several genes have been associated with the disease, nearly 20% of cases remain without an identified genetic cause. Other genetic alterations such as copy number variations have been recently related to Long QT Syndrome. Our aim was to take advantage of current genetic technologies in a family affected by Long QT Syndrome in order to identify the cause of the disease.Complete clinical evaluation was performed in all family members. In the index case, a Next Generation Sequencing custom-built panel, including 55 sudden cardiac death-related genes, was used both for detection of sequence and copy number variants. Next Generation Sequencing variants were confirmed by Sanger method. Copy number variations variants were confirmed by Multiplex Ligation dependent Probe Amplification method and at the mRNA level. Confirmed variants and copy number variations identified in the index case were also analyzed in relatives.In the index case, Next Generation Sequencing revealed a novel variant in TTN and a large deletion in KCNQ1, involving exons 7 and 8. Both variants were confirmed by alternative techniques. The mother and the brother of the index case were also affected by Long QT Syndrome, and family cosegregation was observed for the KCNQ1 deletion, but not for the TTN variant.Next Generation Sequencing technology allows a comprehensive genetic analysis of arrhythmogenic diseases. We report a copy number variation identified using Next Generation Sequencing analysis in Long QT Syndrome. Clinical and familiar correlation is crucial to elucidate the role of genetic variants identified to distinguish the pathogenic ones from genetic noise.

  3. Allele Re-sequencing Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrne, Stephen; Farrell, Jacqueline Danielle; Asp, Torben

    2013-01-01

    The development of next-generation sequencing technologies has made sequencing an affordable approach for detection of genetic variations associated with various traits. However, the cost of whole genome re-sequencing still remains too high to be feasible for many plant species with large...... alternative to whole genome re-sequencing to identify causative genetic variations in plants. One challenge, however, will be efficient bioinformatics strategies for data handling and analysis from the increasing amount of sequence information....

  4. Comparison of Next-Generation Sequencing Technologies for Comprehensive Assessment of Full-Length Hepatitis C Viral Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Emma; Ip, Camilla L. C.; Badhan, Anjna; Christiansen, Mette T.; Adamson, Walt; Ansari, M. Azim; Breuer, Judith; Brown, Anthony; Bowden, Rory; Bonsall, David; Da Silva Filipe, Ana; Hinds, Chris; Hudson, Emma; Klenerman, Paul; Lythgow, Kieren; Mbisa, Jean L.; McLauchlan, John; Myers, Richard; Piazza, Paolo; Roy, Sunando; Trebes, Amy; Sreenu, Vattipally B.; Witteveldt, Jeroen; Simmonds, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Affordable next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies for hepatitis C virus (HCV) may potentially identify both viral genotype and resistance genetic motifs in the era of directly acting antiviral (DAA) therapies. This study compared the ability of high-throughput NGS methods to generate full-length, deep, HCV sequence data sets and evaluated their utility for diagnostics and clinical assessment. NGS methods using (i) unselected HCV RNA (metagenomics), (ii) preenrichment of HCV RNA by probe capture, and (iii) HCV preamplification by PCR implemented in four United Kingdom centers were compared. Metrics of sequence coverage and depth, quasispecies diversity, and detection of DAA resistance-associated variants (RAVs), mixed HCV genotypes, and other coinfections were compared using a panel of samples with different viral loads, genotypes, and mixed HCV genotypes/subtypes [geno(sub)types]. Each NGS method generated near-complete genome sequences from more than 90% of samples. Enrichment methods and PCR preamplification generated greater sequence depth and were more effective for samples with low viral loads. All NGS methodologies accurately identified mixed HCV genotype infections. Consensus sequences generated by different NGS methods were generally concordant, and majority RAVs were consistently detected. However, methods differed in their ability to detect minor populations of RAVs. Metagenomic methods identified human pegivirus coinfections. NGS provided a rapid, inexpensive method for generating whole HCV genomes to define infecting genotypes, RAVs, comprehensive viral strain analysis, and quasispecies diversity. Enrichment methods are particularly suited for high-throughput analysis while providing the genotype and information on potential DAA resistance. PMID:27385709

  5. A Review on the Applications of Next Generation Sequencing Technologies as Applied to Food-Related Microbiome Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Cao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of next generation sequencing (NGS techniques has enabled researchers to study and understand the world of microorganisms from broader and deeper perspectives. The contemporary advances in DNA sequencing technologies have not only enabled finer characterization of bacterial genomes but also provided deeper taxonomic identification of complex microbiomes which in its genomic essence is the combined genetic material of the microorganisms inhabiting an environment, whether the environment be a particular body econiche (e.g., human intestinal contents or a food manufacturing facility econiche (e.g., floor drain. To date, 16S rDNA sequencing, metagenomics and metatranscriptomics are the three basic sequencing strategies used in the taxonomic identification and characterization of food-related microbiomes. These sequencing strategies have used different NGS platforms for DNA and RNA sequence identification. Traditionally, 16S rDNA sequencing has played a key role in understanding the taxonomic composition of a food-related microbiome. Recently, metagenomic approaches have resulted in improved understanding of a microbiome by providing a species-level/strain-level characterization. Further, metatranscriptomic approaches have contributed to the functional characterization of the complex interactions between different microbial communities within a single microbiome. Many studies have highlighted the use of NGS techniques in investigating the microbiome of fermented foods. However, the utilization of NGS techniques in studying the microbiome of non-fermented foods are limited. This review provides a brief overview of the advances in DNA sequencing chemistries as the technology progressed from first, next and third generations and highlights how NGS provided a deeper understanding of food-related microbiomes with special focus on non-fermented foods.

  6. Transcriptome sequencing of lentil based on second-generation technology permits large-scale unigene assembly and SSR marker discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Materne Michael

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. is a cool-season grain legume which provides a rich source of protein for human consumption. In terms of genomic resources, lentil is relatively underdeveloped, in comparison to other Fabaceae species, with limited available data. There is hence a significant need to enhance such resources in order to identify novel genes and alleles for molecular breeding to increase crop productivity and quality. Results Tissue-specific cDNA samples from six distinct lentil genotypes were sequenced using Roche 454 GS-FLX Titanium technology, generating c. 1.38 × 106 expressed sequence tags (ESTs. De novo assembly generated a total of 15,354 contigs and 68,715 singletons. The complete unigene set was sequence-analysed against genome drafts of the model legume species Medicago truncatula and Arabidopsis thaliana to identify 12,639, and 7,476 unique matches, respectively. When compared to the genome of Glycine max, a total of 20,419 unique hits were observed corresponding to c. 31% of the known gene space. A total of 25,592 lentil unigenes were subsequently annoated from GenBank. Simple sequence repeat (SSR-containing ESTs were identified from consensus sequences and a total of 2,393 primer pairs were designed. A subset of 192 EST-SSR markers was screened for validation across a panel 12 cultivated lentil genotypes and one wild relative species. A total of 166 primer pairs obtained successful amplification, of which 47.5% detected genetic polymorphism. Conclusions A substantial collection of ESTs has been developed from sequence analysis of lentil genotypes using second-generation technology, permitting unigene definition across a broad range of functional categories. As well as providing resources for functional genomics studies, the unigene set has permitted significant enhancement of the number of publicly-available molecular genetic markers as tools for improvement of this species.

  7. SSR-Patchwork: An Optimized Protocol to Obtain a Rapid and Inexpensive SSR Library Using First-Generation Sequencing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonietta Di Maio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: We have optimized a version of a microsatellite loci isolation protocol for first-generation sequencing (FGS technologies. The protocol is optimized to reduce the cost and number of steps, and it combines some procedures from previous simple sequence repeat (SSR protocols with several key improvements that significantly affect the final yield of the SSR library. This protocol may be accessible for laboratories with a moderate budget or for which next-generation sequencing (NGS is not readily available. Methods and Results: We drew from classic protocols for library enrichment by digestion, ligation, amplification, hybridization, cloning, and sequencing. Three different systems were chosen: two with very different genome sizes (Galdieria sulphuraria, 10 Mbp; Pancratium maritimum, 30000 Mbp, and a third with an undetermined genome size (Kochia saxicola. Moreover, we also report the optimization of the sequencing reagents. A good frequency of the obtained microsatellite loci was achieved. Conclusions: The method presented here is very detailed; comparative tests with other SSR protocols are also reported. This optimized protocol is a promising tool for low-cost genetic studies and the rapid, simple construction of homemade SSR libraries for small and large genomes.

  8. SSR-patchwork: An optimized protocol to obtain a rapid and inexpensive SSR library using first-generation sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Maio, Antonietta; De Castro, Olga

    2013-01-01

    We have optimized a version of a microsatellite loci isolation protocol for first-generation sequencing (FGS) technologies. The protocol is optimized to reduce the cost and number of steps, and it combines some procedures from previous simple sequence repeat (SSR) protocols with several key improvements that significantly affect the final yield of the SSR library. This protocol may be accessible for laboratories with a moderate budget or for which next-generation sequencing (NGS) is not readily available. • We drew from classic protocols for library enrichment by digestion, ligation, amplification, hybridization, cloning, and sequencing. Three different systems were chosen: two with very different genome sizes (Galdieria sulphuraria, 10 Mbp; Pancratium maritimum, 30 000 Mbp), and a third with an undetermined genome size (Kochia saxicola). Moreover, we also report the optimization of the sequencing reagents. A good frequency of the obtained microsatellite loci was achieved. • The method presented here is very detailed; comparative tests with other SSR protocols are also reported. This optimized protocol is a promising tool for low-cost genetic studies and the rapid, simple construction of homemade SSR libraries for small and large genomes.

  9. The next generation of target capture technologies - large DNA fragment enrichment and sequencing determines regional genomic variation of high complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapprich, Johannes; Ferriola, Deborah; Mackiewicz, Kate; Clark, Peter M; Rappaport, Eric; D'Arcy, Monica; Sasson, Ariella; Gai, Xiaowu; Schug, Jonathan; Kaestner, Klaus H; Monos, Dimitri

    2016-07-09

    The ability to capture and sequence large contiguous DNA fragments represents a significant advancement towards the comprehensive characterization of complex genomic regions. While emerging sequencing platforms are capable of producing several kilobases-long reads, the fragment sizes generated by current DNA target enrichment technologies remain a limiting factor, producing DNA fragments generally shorter than 1 kbp. The DNA enrichment methodology described herein, Region-Specific Extraction (RSE), produces DNA segments in excess of 20 kbp in length. Coupling this enrichment method to appropriate sequencing platforms will significantly enhance the ability to generate complete and accurate sequence characterization of any genomic region without the need for reference-based assembly. RSE is a long-range DNA target capture methodology that relies on the specific hybridization of short (20-25 base) oligonucleotide primers to selected sequence motifs within the DNA target region. These capture primers are then enzymatically extended on the 3'-end, incorporating biotinylated nucleotides into the DNA. Streptavidin-coated beads are subsequently used to pull-down the original, long DNA template molecules via the newly synthesized, biotinylated DNA that is bound to them. We demonstrate the accuracy, simplicity and utility of the RSE method by capturing and sequencing a 4 Mbp stretch of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Our results show an average depth of coverage of 164X for the entire MHC. This depth of coverage contributes significantly to a 99.94 % total coverage of the targeted region and to an accuracy that is over 99.99 %. RSE represents a cost-effective target enrichment method capable of producing sequencing templates in excess of 20 kbp in length. The utility of our method has been proven to generate superior coverage across the MHC as compared to other commercially available methodologies, with the added advantage of producing longer sequencing

  10. Characterization of microflora in Latin-style cheeses by next-generation sequencing technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lusk Tina S

    2012-11-01

    have been influenced by the enrichment process. This study is the first to define Latin-style cheese microflora using Next-Generation Sequencing. These valuable preliminary data will direct selective tailoring of agar formulations to improve culture-based detection of pathogens in Latin-style cheese.

  11. Comparative analysis of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 transcriptomes using DNA microarray and next generation sequencing technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leimena, M.M.; Wels, M.; Bongers, R.; Smid, E.J.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2012-01-01

    RNA sequencing is starting to compete with the use of DNA microarrays for transcription analysis in eukaryotes as well as in prokaryotes. Application of RNA sequencing in prokaryotes requires additional steps in the RNA preparation procedure to increase the relative abundance of mRNA and cannot

  12. BRCA1-2 diagnostic workflow from next-generation sequencing technologies to variant identification and final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilato, Brunella; Pinto, Rosamaria; De Summa, Simona; Petriella, Daniela; Lacalamita, Rosanna; Danza, Katia; Paradiso, Angelo; Tommasi, Stefania

    2016-10-01

    The BRCA1-BRCA2 genes predispose to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, and the germline and mutational status of these genes defines a target population that can benefit from PARP inhibitor treatments. To respond to the increasing number of BRCA1-BRCA2 tests, it is necessary to shift to high-throughput technologies that are reliable and less time consuming. Different methodological platforms are dedicated to this purpose with different approaches and algorithms for analysis. Our aim was to set up a cost-effective and low time-consuming BRCA1-BRCA2 mutation detection workflow using the Ion Torrent PGM technology. A retrospective cohort of 40 patients with familial breast/ovarian cancer previously tested by Sanger sequencing and a prospective cohort of 72 patients (validation set) were analyzed. The validation set included 64 patients affected by familial breast/ovarian cancer and eight sporadic ovarian cancer cases, who are potential candidates for PARPi treatments. A complete and standardized workflow easily usable and suitable in a certified laboratory has been proved and validated. This includes all steps from library preparation to the final report. The use of next-generation sequencing will be of benefit for patients enrolled in the genetic counseling process and, moreover, will enhance the process of selecting patients eligible for personalized treatments. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A more complete picture of metal hyperaccumulation through next-generation sequencing technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie eVerbruggen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The mechanistic understanding of metal hyperaccumulation has benefitted immensely from the use of molecular genetics tools developed for Arabidopsis thaliana. The revolution in DNA sequencing will enable even greater strides in the near future, this time not restricted to the family Brassicaceae. Reference genomes are within reach for many ecologically interesting species including heterozygous outbreeders. They will allow deep RNA-seq transcriptome studies and the re-sequencing of contrasting individuals to unravel the genetic basis of phenotypic variation. Cell-type specific transcriptome analyses, which will be essential for the dissection of metal translocation pathways in hyperaccumulators, can be achieved through the combination of RNA-seq and translatome approaches. Affordable high-resolution genotyping of many individuals enables the elucidation of quantitative trait loci in intra- and interspecific crosses as well as through genome-wide association mapping across large panels of accessions. Furthermore, genome-wide scans have the power to detect loci under recent selection. Together these approaches will lead to a detailed understanding of the evolutionary path towards the emergence of hyperaccumulation traits.

  14. A more complete picture of metal hyperaccumulation through next-generation sequencing technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbruggen, Nathalie; Hanikenne, Marc; Clemens, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The mechanistic understanding of metal hyperaccumulation has benefitted immensely from the use of molecular genetics tools developed for Arabidopsis thaliana. The revolution in DNA sequencing will enable even greater strides in the near future, this time not restricted to the family Brassicaceae. Reference genomes are within reach for many ecologically interesting species including heterozygous outbreeders. They will allow deep RNA-seq transcriptome studies and the re-sequencing of contrasting individuals to unravel the genetic basis of phenotypic variation. Cell-type specific transcriptome analyses, which will be essential for the dissection of metal translocation pathways in hyperaccumulators, can be achieved through the combination of RNA-seq and translatome approaches. Affordable high-resolution genotyping of many individuals enables the elucidation of quantitative trait loci in intra- and interspecific crosses as well as through genome-wide association mapping across large panels of accessions. Furthermore, genome-wide scans have the power to detect loci under recent selection. Together these approaches will lead to a detailed understanding of the evolutionary path towards the emergence of hyperaccumulation traits. PMID:24098304

  15. Sporadic hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies: Advances in the diagnosis using next generation sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallerini, Chiara; Carignani, Giulia; Capoccitti, Giorgio; Federico, Antonio; Rufa, Alessandra; Pinto, Anna Maria; Rizzo, Caterina Lo; Rossi, Alessandro; Mari, Francesca; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Giannini, Fabio; Renieri, Alessandra

    2015-12-15

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies (HMSN) are genetically heterogeneous disorders affecting peripheral motor and sensory functions. Many different pathogenic variants in several genes involved in the demyelinating, the axonal and the intermediate HMSN forms have been identified, for which all inheritance patterns have been described. The mutation screening currently available is based on Sanger sequencing and is time-consuming and relatively expensive due to the high number of genes involved and to the absence of mutational hot spots. To overcome these limitations, we have designed a custom panel for simultaneous sequencing of 28 HMSN-related genes. We have applied this panel to three representative patients with variable HMSN phenotype and uncertain diagnostic classifications. Using our NGS platform we rapidly identified three already described pathogenic heterozygous variants in MFN2, MPZ and DNM2 genes. Here we show that our pre-custom platform allows a fast, specific and low-cost diagnosis in sporadic HMSN cases. This prompt diagnosis is useful for providing a well-timed treatment, establishing a recurrence risk and preventing further investigations poorly tolerated by patients and expensive for the health system. Importantly, our study illustrates the utility and successful application of NGS to mutation screening of a Mendelian disorder with extreme locus heterogeneity.

  16. Rapid development of polymorphic microsatellite markers for the Amur sturgeon (Acipenser schrenckii) using next-generation sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L M; Wei, L; Jiang, H Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, X J; Yuan, L H; Chen, J P

    2015-07-14

    Anthropogenic activities have seriously impacted wild resources of the Amur sturgeon, Acipenser schrenckii, and more information on local and regional population genetic structure is required to aid the conservation of this species. In this study, we report the development of 12 novel polymorphic microsatellite loci using next-generation sequencing technology, and the genotyping of 24 individuals collected from a sturgeon farm. The results show that the mean number of ob-served alleles per locus is 6.6 (ranging from 2 to 17). Observed and expected heterozygosity values ranged from 0 to 0.958 and from 0.508 to 0.940, respectively. Not a single locus showed significant departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and no linkage disequilibrium was observed among any pairwise loci. These highly informative microsatellite markers will be useful for genetic diversity and population structure analyses of A. schrenckii and other species of this genus.

  17. The Application of Next Generation Sequencing Technology on Noninvasive Prenatal Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Hui

    and diagnosis of rare diseases. Among them, genetic test for pregnant women is the most powerful and cost-­effective tool to identify and prevent rare diseases related birth defect. However, most of the current routine prenatal genetic testing for rare diseases requires of collecting fetal samples through...... an invasive process, which might lead to maternal anxiety, or even miscarriage. Therefore, developing an effective approach to perform noninvasive prenatal test (NIPT) for rare diseases is the key challenge to prevent birth defect in the future. The discovery of cell-­free fetal DNA, coupling with next...... a sensitivity and specificity of over 99%, which can provide accurate and reliable results and thus avoid most of invasive process compared to standard prenatal test. Moreover,we also designed probes for genes related to Monogenetic disorders and conducted target region sequencing for parents, proband...

  18. Sequence based polymorphic (SBP marker technology for targeted genomic regions: its application in generating a molecular map of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahu Binod B

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular markers facilitate both genotype identification, essential for modern animal and plant breeding, and the isolation of genes based on their map positions. Advancements in sequencing technology have made possible the identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs for any genomic regions. Here a sequence based polymorphic (SBP marker technology for generating molecular markers for targeted genomic regions in Arabidopsis is described. Results A ~3X genome coverage sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype, Niederzenz (Nd-0 was obtained by applying Illumina's sequencing by synthesis (Solexa technology. Comparison of the Nd-0 genome sequence with the assembled Columbia-0 (Col-0 genome sequence identified putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs throughout the entire genome. Multiple 75 base pair Nd-0 sequence reads containing SNPs and originating from individual genomic DNA molecules were the basis for developing co-dominant SBP markers. SNPs containing Col-0 sequences, supported by transcript sequences or sequences from multiple BAC clones, were compared to the respective Nd-0 sequences to identify possible restriction endonuclease enzyme site variations. Small amplicons, PCR amplified from both ecotypes, were digested with suitable restriction enzymes and resolved on a gel to reveal the sequence based polymorphisms. By applying this technology, 21 SBP markers for the marker poor regions of the Arabidopsis map representing polymorphisms between Col-0 and Nd-0 ecotypes were generated. Conclusions The SBP marker technology described here allowed the development of molecular markers for targeted genomic regions of Arabidopsis. It should facilitate isolation of co-dominant molecular markers for targeted genomic regions of any animal or plant species, whose genomic sequences have been assembled. This technology will particularly facilitate the development of high density molecular marker maps, essential for

  19. Large scale single nucleotide polymorphism discovery in unsequenced genomes using second generation high throughput sequencing technology: applied to turkey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerstens, H.H.D.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Veenendaal, A.; Dibbits, B.W.; Chin-A-Woeng, T.F.C.; Dunnen, den J.T.; Groenen, M.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background - The development of second generation sequencing methods has enabled large scale DNA variation studies at moderate cost. For the high throughput discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in species lacking a sequenced reference genome, we set-up an analysis pipeline based on a

  20. High-throughput next-generation sequencing technologies foster new cutting-edge computing techniques in bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mary Qu; Athey, Brian D; Arabnia, Hamid R; Sung, Andrew H; Liu, Qingzhong; Yang, Jack Y; Mao, Jinghe; Deng, Youping

    2009-07-07

    The advent of high-throughput next generation sequencing technologies have fostered enormous potential applications of supercomputing techniques in genome sequencing, epi-genetics, metagenomics, personalized medicine, discovery of non-coding RNAs and protein-binding sites. To this end, the 2008 International Conference on Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (Biocomp) - 2008 World Congress on Computer Science, Computer Engineering and Applied Computing (Worldcomp) was designed to promote synergistic inter/multidisciplinary research and education in response to the current research trends and advances. The conference attracted more than two thousand scientists, medical doctors, engineers, professors and students gathered at Las Vegas, Nevada, USA during July 14-17 and received great success. Supported by International Society of Intelligent Biological Medicine (ISIBM), International Journal of Computational Biology and Drug Design (IJCBDD), International Journal of Functional Informatics and Personalized Medicine (IJFIPM) and the leading research laboratories from Harvard, M.I.T., Purdue, UIUC, UCLA, Georgia Tech, UT Austin, U. of Minnesota, U. of Iowa etc, the conference received thousands of research papers. Each submitted paper was reviewed by at least three reviewers and accepted papers were required to satisfy reviewers' comments. Finally, the review board and the committee decided to select only 19 high-quality research papers for inclusion in this supplement to BMC Genomics based on the peer reviews only. The conference committee was very grateful for the Plenary Keynote Lectures given by: Dr. Brian D. Athey (University of Michigan Medical School), Dr. Vladimir N. Uversky (Indiana University School of Medicine), Dr. David A. Patterson (Member of United States National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Engineering, University of California at Berkeley) and Anousheh Ansari (Prodea Systems, Space Ambassador). The theme of the conference to promote

  1. Sequencing technologies for animal cell culture research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremkow, Benjamin G; Lee, Kelvin H

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, 2nd and 3rd generation sequencing technologies have made the use of genomic sequencing within the animal cell culture community increasingly commonplace. Each technology's defining characteristics are unique, including the cost, time, sequence read length, daily throughput, and occurrence of sequence errors. Given each sequencing technology's intrinsic advantages and disadvantages, the optimal technology for a given experiment depends on the particular experiment's objective. This review discusses the current characteristics of six next-generation sequencing technologies, compares the differences between them, and characterizes their relevance to the animal cell culture community. These technologies are continually improving, as evidenced by the recent achievement of the field's benchmark goal: sequencing a human genome for less than $1,000.

  2. Large scale single nucleotide polymorphism discovery in unsequenced genomes using second generation high throughput sequencing technology: applied to turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    den Dunnen Johan T

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of second generation sequencing methods has enabled large scale DNA variation studies at moderate cost. For the high throughput discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in species lacking a sequenced reference genome, we set-up an analysis pipeline based on a short read de novo sequence assembler and a program designed to identify variation within short reads. To illustrate the potential of this technique, we present the results obtained with a randomly sheared, enzymatically generated, 2-3 kbp genome fraction of six pooled Meleagris gallopavo (turkey individuals. Results A total of 100 million 36 bp reads were generated, representing approximately 5-6% (~62 Mbp of the turkey genome, with an estimated sequence depth of 58. Reads consisting of bases called with less than 1% error probability were selected and assembled into contigs. Subsequently, high throughput discovery of nucleotide variation was performed using sequences with more than 90% reliability by using the assembled contigs that were 50 bp or longer as the reference sequence. We identified more than 7,500 SNPs with a high probability of representing true nucleotide variation in turkeys. Increasing the reference genome by adding publicly available turkey BAC-end sequences increased the number of SNPs to over 11,000. A comparison with the sequenced chicken genome indicated that the assembled turkey contigs were distributed uniformly across the turkey genome. Genotyping of a representative sample of 340 SNPs resulted in a SNP conversion rate of 95%. The correlation of the minor allele count (MAC and observed minor allele frequency (MAF for the validated SNPs was 0.69. Conclusion We provide an efficient and cost-effective approach for the identification of thousands of high quality SNPs in species currently lacking a sequenced genome and applied this to turkey. The methodology addresses a random fraction of the genome, resulting in an even

  3. Next-generation sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieneck, Klaus; Bak, Mads; Jønson, Lars

    2013-01-01

    information obtained allows well for statistical analysis of the data. This general approach can be integrated into current laboratory practice and has numerous applications. Besides DNA-based predictions of blood group phenotypes, platelet phenotypes, or sickle cell anemia, and the determination of zygosity......, Illumina); several millions of PCR sequences were analyzed. RESULTS: The results demonstrated the feasibility of diagnosing the fetal KEL1 or KEL2 blood group from cell-free DNA purified from maternal plasma. CONCLUSION: This method requires only one primer pair, and the large amount of sequence...

  4. Next-Generation Sequencing Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardis, Elaine R.

    2013-06-01

    Automated DNA sequencing instruments embody an elegant interplay among chemistry, engineering, software, and molecular biology and have built upon Sanger's founding discovery of dideoxynucleotide sequencing to perform once-unfathomable tasks. Combined with innovative physical mapping approaches that helped to establish long-range relationships between cloned stretches of genomic DNA, fluorescent DNA sequencers produced reference genome sequences for model organisms and for the reference human genome. New types of sequencing instruments that permit amazing acceleration of data-collection rates for DNA sequencing have been developed. The ability to generate genome-scale data sets is now transforming the nature of biological inquiry. Here, I provide an historical perspective of the field, focusing on the fundamental developments that predated the advent of next-generation sequencing instruments and providing information about how these instruments work, their application to biological research, and the newest types of sequencers that can extract data from single DNA molecules.

  5. Identification and complete genome sequencing of paramyxoviruses in mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos using random access amplification and next generation sequencing technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Berg Thierry

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During a wildlife screening program for avian influenza A viruses (AIV and avian paramyxoviruses (APMV in Belgium, we isolated two hemagglutinating agents from pools of cloacal swabs of wild mallards (Anas platyrhynchos caught in a single sampling site at two different times. AIV and APMV1 were excluded using hemagglutination inhibition (HI testing and specific real-time RT-PCR tests. Methods To refine the virological identification of APMV2-10 realized by HI subtyping tests and in lack of validated molecular tests for APMV2-10, random access amplification was used in combination with next generation sequencing for the sequence independent identification of the viruses and the determination of their genomes. Results Three different APMVs were identified. From one pooled sample, the complete genome sequence (15054 nucleotides of an APMV4 was assembled from the random sequences. From the second pooled sample, the nearly complete genome sequence of an APMV6 (genome size of 16236 nucleotides was determined, as well as a partial sequence for an APMV4. This APMV4 was closely related but not identical to the APMV4 isolated from the first sample. Although a cross-reactivity with other APMV subtypes did not allow formal identification, the HI subtyping revealed APMV4 and APMV6 in the respective pooled samples but failed to identify the co-infecting APMV4 in the APMV6 infected pool. Conclusions These data further contribute to the knowledge about the genetic diversity within the serotypes APMV4 and 6, and confirm the limited sensitivity of the HI subtyping test. Moreover, this study demonstrates the value of a random access nucleic acid amplification method in combination with massive parallel sequencing. Using only a moderate and economical sequencing effort, the characterization and full genome sequencing of APMVs can be obtained, including the identification of viruses in mixed infections.

  6. Evaluation of GS Junior and MiSeq next-generation sequencing technologies as an alternative to Trugene population sequencing in the clinical HIV laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Daniela; Leshkowitz, Dena; Gonzalez, Dimitri; Forer, Relly; Levy, Itzchak; Chowers, Michal; Lorber, Margalit; Hindiyeh, Musa; Mendelson, Ella; Mor, Orna

    2015-02-01

    Population HIV-1 sequencing is currently the method of choice for the identification and follow-up of HIV-1 antiretroviral drug resistance. It has limited sensitivity and results in a consensus sequence showing the most prevalent nucleotide per position. Moreover concomitant sequencing and interpretation of the results for several samples together is laborious and time consuming. In this study, the practical use of GS Junior and MiSeq bench-top next generation sequencing (NGS) platforms as an alternative to Trugene Sanger-based population sequencing in the clinical HIV laboratory was assessed. DeepChek(®)-HIV TherapyEdge software was used for processing all the protease and reverse transcriptase sequences and for resistance interpretation. Plasma samples from nine HIV-1 carriers, representing the major HIV-1 subtypes in Israel, were compared. The total number of amino acid substitutions identified in the nine samples by GS Junior (232 substitutions) and MiSeq (243 substitutions) was similar and higher than Trugene (181 substitutions), emphasizing the advantage of deep sequencing on population sequencing. More than 80% of the identified substitutions were identical between the GS Junior and MiSeq platforms, most of which (184 of 199) at similar frequency. Low abundance substitutions accounted for 20.9% of the MiSeq and 21.9% of the GS Junior output, the majority of which were not detected by Trugene. More drug resistance mutations were identified by both the NGS platforms, primarily, but not only, at low abundance. In conclusion, in combination with DeepChek, both GS Junior and MiSeq were found to be more sensitive than Trugene and adequate for HIV-1 resistance analysis in the clinical HIV laboratory.

  7. Comparison of next-generation sequencing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Li, Yinhu; Li, Siliang; Hu, Ni; He, Yimin; Pong, Ray; Lin, Danni; Lu, Lihua; Law, Maggie

    2012-01-01

    With fast development and wide applications of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, genomic sequence information is within reach to aid the achievement of goals to decode life mysteries, make better crops, detect pathogens, and improve life qualities. NGS systems are typically represented by SOLiD/Ion Torrent PGM from Life Sciences, Genome Analyzer/HiSeq 2000/MiSeq from Illumina, and GS FLX Titanium/GS Junior from Roche. Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI), which possesses the world's biggest sequencing capacity, has multiple NGS systems including 137 HiSeq 2000, 27 SOLiD, one Ion Torrent PGM, one MiSeq, and one 454 sequencer. We have accumulated extensive experience in sample handling, sequencing, and bioinformatics analysis. In this paper, technologies of these systems are reviewed, and first-hand data from extensive experience is summarized and analyzed to discuss the advantages and specifics associated with each sequencing system. At last, applications of NGS are summarized.

  8. Power generation technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Breeze, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The new edition of Power Generation Technologies is a concise and readable guide that provides an introduction to the full spectrum of currently available power generation options, from traditional fossil fuels and the better established alternatives such as wind and solar power, to emerging renewables such as biomass and geothermal energy. Technology solutions such as combined heat and power and distributed generation are also explored. However, this book is more than just an account of the technologies - for each method the author explores the economic and environmental costs and risk factor

  9. Development of novel, cross-species microsatellite markers for Acropora corals using next-generation sequencing technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuya eShinzato

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The genus Acropora (Scleractinia, Acroporidae is one of the most widespread coral genera, comprising the largest number of extant species among scleractinian (reef-building corals. Molecular phylogenetic studies have suggested that A. tenuis belongs to the most basal clade (clade I while A. digitifera belongs to a derived clade (clade IV. In order to develop microsatellite markers that would be useful for most Acropora species, we sequenced the genomic DNA of A. tenuis, using a next generation sequencer (Illumina MiSeq, and designed primer sets that amplify microsatellite loci. Afterward we selected primer pairs with perfectly matched nucleotide sequences from which at least one primer was uniquely mapped to the A. digitifera genome. Fourteen microsatellite markers showed non-significant departure from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium (HWE in both A. tenuis and A. digitifera. Thus these markers could be used for wide range of species and may provide powerful tools for population genetics studies and conservation of Acropora corals.

  10. SSR-patchwork: An optimized protocol to obtain a rapid and inexpensive SSR library using first-generation sequencing technology1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Maio, Antonietta; De Castro, Olga

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: We have optimized a version of a microsatellite loci isolation protocol for first-generation sequencing (FGS) technologies. The protocol is optimized to reduce the cost and number of steps, and it combines some procedures from previous simple sequence repeat (SSR) protocols with several key improvements that significantly affect the final yield of the SSR library. This protocol may be accessible for laboratories with a moderate budget or for which next-generation sequencing (NGS) is not readily available. • Methods and Results: We drew from classic protocols for library enrichment by digestion, ligation, amplification, hybridization, cloning, and sequencing. Three different systems were chosen: two with very different genome sizes (Galdieria sulphuraria, 10 Mbp; Pancratium maritimum, 30 000 Mbp), and a third with an undetermined genome size (Kochia saxicola). Moreover, we also report the optimization of the sequencing reagents. A good frequency of the obtained microsatellite loci was achieved. • Conclusions: The method presented here is very detailed; comparative tests with other SSR protocols are also reported. This optimized protocol is a promising tool for low-cost genetic studies and the rapid, simple construction of homemade SSR libraries for small and large genomes. PMID:25202476

  11. 下一代测序技术在分子诊断中的应用%Application of next-generation sequencing technologies in molecular diagnostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏军; 赵志军

    2013-01-01

    DNA sequencing is a powerful approach for decoding human diseases, including cancers. The rapid development of next-generation sequencing (NGS) greatly reduce the cost of sequencing and realize the high-throughput, which allows us to obtain the whole genome sequence, and entire genome information about those patients who are clinically diagnosed. However, the benefits offered by NGS technologies come with a number of challenges, which is how to make this technology become a conventional means in the clinical diagnosis. This article reviews the principle of a few technology platform, potential applications and the challenges of NGS in the clinical diagnosis.%  DNA测序是破译人类疾病的一种强大技术,尤其在癌症方面。飞速发展的下一代测序(next-generation sequencing,NGS)极大降低了测序成本,并且实现了高通量,这使我们可以获得整个基因组的序列,以及那些临床上确诊病人的全部基因组信息。然而下一代测序技术带来诸多益处的同时也带来了挑战,那就是怎样使这个技术在临床诊断中成为常规手段。本文就目前NGS的几大技术平台原理,在临床诊断中的应用,以及目前面临的挑战等进行综述。

  12. First study on gene expression of cement proteins and potential adhesion-related genes of a membranous-based barnacle as revealed from Next-Generation Sequencing technology

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Hsiu Chin

    2013-12-12

    This is the first study applying Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology to survey the kinds, expression location, and pattern of adhesion-related genes in a membranous-based barnacle. A total of 77,528,326 and 59,244,468 raw sequence reads of total RNA were generated from the prosoma and the basis of Tetraclita japonica formosana, respectively. In addition, 55,441 and 67,774 genes were further assembled and analyzed. The combined sequence data from both body parts generates a total of 79,833 genes of which 47.7% were shared. Homologues of barnacle cement proteins - CP-19K, -52K, and -100K - were found and all were dominantly expressed at the basis where the cement gland complex is located. This is the main area where transcripts of cement proteins and other potential adhesion-related genes were detected. The absence of another common barnacle cement protein, CP-20K, in the adult transcriptome suggested a possible life-stage restricted gene function and/or a different mechanism in adhesion between membranous-based and calcareous-based barnacles. © 2013 © 2013 Taylor & Francis.

  13. Application of next-generation sequencing for comparative transcriptome analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Heesun

    2010-01-01

    I have used novel whole transcriptome sequence data generated from massively parallel high-throughput next generation sequencing technologies, namely 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina sequencing, to perform comparative transcriptome analyses of C. elegans populations in specific biological conditions and developmental stages. Firstly, I have conducted transcriptome profiling of C. elegans in its first larval (L1) stage using data generated from the Roche 454 sequencing platform. I have used thi...

  14. Design of a high density SNP genotyping assay in the pig using SNPs identified and characterized by next generation sequencing technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio M Ramos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The dissection of complex traits of economic importance to the pig industry requires the availability of a significant number of genetic markers, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. This study was conducted to discover several hundreds of thousands of porcine SNPs using next generation sequencing technologies and use these SNPs, as well as others from different public sources, to design a high-density SNP genotyping assay. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 19 reduced representation libraries derived from four swine breeds (Duroc, Landrace, Large White, Pietrain and a Wild Boar population and three restriction enzymes (AluI, HaeIII and MspI were sequenced using Illumina's Genome Analyzer (GA. The SNP discovery effort resulted in the de novo identification of over 372K SNPs. More than 549K SNPs were used to design the Illumina Porcine 60K+SNP iSelect Beadchip, now commercially available as the PorcineSNP60. A total of 64,232 SNPs were included on the Beadchip. Results from genotyping the 158 individuals used for sequencing showed a high overall SNP call rate (97.5%. Of the 62,621 loci that could be reliably scored, 58,994 were polymorphic yielding a SNP conversion success rate of 94%. The average minor allele frequency (MAF for all scorable SNPs was 0.274. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Overall, the results of this study indicate the utility of using next generation sequencing technologies to identify large numbers of reliable SNPs. In addition, the validation of the PorcineSNP60 Beadchip demonstrated that the assay is an excellent tool that will likely be used in a variety of future studies in pigs.

  15. Comparative analysis of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 transcriptomes by using DNA microarray and next-generation sequencing technologies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leimena, M.M.; Wels, M.W.; Bongers, R.S.; Smid, E.J.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2012-01-01

    RNA sequencing is starting to compete with the use of DNA microarrays for transcription analysis in eukaryotes as well as in prokaryotes. The application of RNA sequencing in prokaryotes requires additional steps in the RNA preparation procedure to increase the relative abundance of mRNA and cannot

  16. ANGSD: Analysis of Next Generation Sequencing Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand; Albrechtsen, Anders; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2014-11-25

    High-throughput DNA sequencing technologies are generating vast amounts of data. Fast, flexible and memory efficient implementations are needed in order to facilitate analyses of thousands of samples simultaneously. We present a multithreaded program suite called ANGSD. This program can calculate various summary statistics, and perform association mapping and population genetic analyses utilizing the full information in next generation sequencing data by working directly on the raw sequencing data or by using genotype likelihoods. The open source c/c++ program ANGSD is available at http://www.popgen.dk/angsd . The program is tested and validated on GNU/Linux systems. The program facilitates multiple input formats including BAM and imputed beagle genotype probability files. The program allow the user to choose between combinations of existing methods and can perform analysis that is not implemented elsewhere.

  17. Next-generation sequencing in veterinary medicine: how can the massive amount of information arising from high-throughput technologies improve diagnosis, control, and management of infectious diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Borm, Steven; Belák, Sándor; Freimanis, Graham; Fusaro, Alice; Granberg, Fredrik; Höper, Dirk; King, Donald P; Monne, Isabella; Orton, Richard; Rosseel, Toon

    2015-01-01

    The development of high-throughput molecular technologies and associated bioinformatics has dramatically changed the capacities of scientists to produce, handle, and analyze large amounts of genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic data. A clear example of this step-change is represented by the amount of DNA sequence data that can be now produced using next-generation sequencing (NGS) platforms. Similarly, recent improvements in protein and peptide separation efficiencies and highly accurate mass spectrometry have promoted the identification and quantification of proteins in a given sample. These advancements in biotechnology have increasingly been applied to the study of animal infectious diseases and are beginning to revolutionize the way that biological and evolutionary processes can be studied at the molecular level. Studies have demonstrated the value of NGS technologies for molecular characterization, ranging from metagenomic characterization of unknown pathogens or microbial communities to molecular epidemiology and evolution of viral quasispecies. Moreover, high-throughput technologies now allow detailed studies of host-pathogen interactions at the level of their genomes (genomics), transcriptomes (transcriptomics), or proteomes (proteomics). Ultimately, the interaction between pathogen and host biological networks can be questioned by analytically integrating these levels (integrative OMICS and systems biology). The application of high-throughput biotechnology platforms in these fields and their typical low-cost per information content has revolutionized the resolution with which these processes can now be studied. The aim of this chapter is to provide a current and prospective view on the opportunities and challenges associated with the application of massive parallel sequencing technologies to veterinary medicine, with particular focus on applications that have a potential impact on disease control and management.

  18. Generations of Wireless Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagan Preet Kaur

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Wireless communication is the transfer of information over adistance without the use of enhanced electrical conductors or"wires”. The distances involved may be short (a few meters as intelevision remote control or long (thousands or millions ofkilometres for radio communications. When the context is clear,the term is often shortened to "wireless". It encompasses varioustypes of fixed, mobile, and portable two-way radios, cellulartelephones, Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs, and wirelessnetworking. In this paper we will throw light on the evolution anddevelopment of various generations of mobile wireless technologyalong with their significance and advantages of one over theother. In the past few decades, the mobile wireless technologies haveexperience of various generations of technology revolution &evolution, namely from 0G to 4G. An advance implementation of 5Gtechnology which are being made on the development of World WideWireless Web (WWW

  19. Preparation of SELEX Samples for Next-Generation Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle, Fabian; Mayer, Günter

    2016-01-01

    Fuelled by massive whole genome sequencing projects such as the human genome project, enormous technological advancements and therefore tremendous price drops could be achieved, rendering next-generation sequencing very attractive for deep sequencing of SELEX libraries. Herein we describe the preparation of SELEX samples for Illumina sequencing, based on the already established whole genome sequencing workflow. We describe the addition of barcode sequences for multiplexing and the adapter ligation, avoiding associated pitfalls.

  20. Transcriptome response to pollutants and insecticides in the dengue vector Aedes aegypti using next-generation sequencing technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riaz Muhammad

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The control of mosquitoes transmitting infectious diseases relies mainly on the use of chemical insecticides. However, mosquito control programs are now threatened by the emergence of insecticide resistance. Hitherto, most research efforts have been focused on elucidating the molecular basis of inherited resistance. Less attention has been paid to the short-term response of mosquitoes to insecticides and pollutants which could have a significant impact on insecticide efficacy. Here, a combination of LongSAGE and Solexa sequencing was used to perform a deep transcriptome analysis of larvae of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti exposed for 48 h to sub-lethal doses of three chemical insecticides and three anthropogenic pollutants. Results Thirty millions 20 bp cDNA tags were sequenced, mapped to the mosquito genome and clustered, representing 6850 known genes and 4868 additional clusters not located within predicted genes. Mosquitoes exposed to insecticides or anthropogenic pollutants showed considerable modifications of their transcriptome. Genes encoding cuticular proteins, transporters, and enzymes involved in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and detoxification processes were particularly affected. Genes and molecular mechanisms potentially involved in xenobiotic response and insecticide tolerance were identified. Conclusions The method used in the present study appears as a powerful approach for investigating fine transcriptome variations in genome-sequenced organisms and can provide useful informations for the detection of novel transcripts. At the biological level, despite low concentrations and no apparent phenotypic effects, the significant impact of these xenobiotics on mosquito transcriptomes raise important questions about the 'hidden impact' of anthropogenic pollutants on ecosystems and consequences on vector control.

  1. Clinical Application of Picodroplet Digital PCR Technology for Rapid Detection of EGFR T790M in Next-Generation Sequencing Libraries and DNA from Limited Tumor Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsu, Laetitia; Intrieri, Julie; Thampi, Linta; Yu, Helena; Riely, Gregory; Nafa, Khedoudja; Chandramohan, Raghu; Ladanyi, Marc; Arcila, Maria E

    2016-11-01

    Although next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a robust technology for comprehensive assessment of EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinomas with acquired resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, it may not provide sufficiently rapid and sensitive detection of the EGFR T790M mutation, the most clinically relevant resistance biomarker. Here, we describe a digital PCR (dPCR) assay for rapid T790M detection on aliquots of NGS libraries prepared for comprehensive profiling, fully maximizing broad genomic analysis on limited samples. Tumor DNAs from patients with EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinomas and acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors were prepared for Memorial Sloan-Kettering-Integrated Mutation Profiling of Actionable Cancer Targets sequencing, a hybrid capture-based assay interrogating 410 cancer-related genes. Precapture library aliquots were used for rapid EGFR T790M testing by dPCR, and results were compared with NGS and locked nucleic acid-PCR Sanger sequencing (reference high sensitivity method). Seventy resistance samples showed 99% concordance with the reference high sensitivity method in accuracy studies. Input as low as 2.5 ng provided a sensitivity of 1% and improved further with increasing DNA input. dPCR on libraries required less DNA and showed better performance than direct genomic DNA. dPCR on NGS libraries is a robust and rapid approach to EGFR T790M testing, allowing most economical utilization of limited material for comprehensive assessment. The same assay can also be performed directly on any limited DNA source and cell-free DNA.

  2. Statistical analysis of next generation sequencing data

    CERN Document Server

    Nettleton, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) is the latest high throughput technology to revolutionize genomic research. NGS generates massive genomic datasets that play a key role in the big data phenomenon that surrounds us today. To extract signals from high-dimensional NGS data and make valid statistical inferences and predictions, novel data analytic and statistical techniques are needed. This book contains 20 chapters written by prominent statisticians working with NGS data. The topics range from basic preprocessing and analysis with NGS data to more complex genomic applications such as copy number variation and isoform expression detection. Research statisticians who want to learn about this growing and exciting area will find this book useful. In addition, many chapters from this book could be included in graduate-level classes in statistical bioinformatics for training future biostatisticians who will be expected to deal with genomic data in basic biomedical research, genomic clinical trials and personalized med...

  3. Generation of physical map contig-specific sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanliang eJiang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rapid advances of the next-generation sequencing technologies have allowed whole genome sequencing of many species. However, with the current sequencing technologies, the whole genome sequence assemblies often fall in short in one of the four quality measurements: accuracy, contiguity, connectivity, and completeness. In particular, small-sized contigs and scaffolds limit the applicability of whole genome sequences for genetic analysis. To enhance the quality of whole genome sequence assemblies, particularly the scaffolding capabilities, additional genomic resources are required. Among these, sequences derived from known physical locations offer great powers for scaffolding. In this mini-review, we will describe the principles, procedures and applications of physical-map-derived sequences, with the focus on physical map contig-specific sequences.

  4. Multiple nuclear ortholog next generation sequencing phylogeny of Daucus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Next generation sequencing is helping to solve the data insufficiency problem hindering well-resolved dominant gene phylogenies. We used Roche 454 technology to obtain DNA sequences from 93 nuclear orthologs, dispersed throughout all linkage groups of Daucus. Of these 93 orthologs, ten were designed...

  5. Concept For Generation Of Long Pseudorandom Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    Conceptual very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) digital circuit performs exponentiation in finite field. Algorithm that generates unusually long sequences of pseudorandom numbers executed by digital processor that includes such circuits. Concepts particularly advantageous for such applications as spread-spectrum communications, cryptography, and generation of ranging codes, synthetic noise, and test data, where usually desirable to make pseudorandom sequences as long as possible.

  6. Quantifying population genetic differentiation from next-generation sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fumagalli, Matteo; Garrett Vieira, Filipe Jorge; Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few years, new high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have dramatically increased speed and reduced sequencing costs. However, the use of these sequencing technologies is often challenged by errors and biases associated with the bioinformatical methods used for analyzing the data...... method for quantifying population genetic differentiation from next-generation sequencing data. In addition, we present a strategy to investigate population structure via Principal Components Analysis. Through extensive simulations, we compare the new method herein proposed to approaches based...... individuals, suggesting that employing this new method is useful for investigating the genetic relationships of populations sampled at low coverage....

  7. Comparison of sequence reads obtained from three next-generation sequencing platforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Suzuki

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing technologies enable the rapid cost-effective production of sequence data. To evaluate the performance of these sequencing technologies, investigation of the quality of sequence reads obtained from these methods is important. In this study, we analyzed the quality of sequence reads and SNP detection performance using three commercially available next-generation sequencers, i.e., Roche Genome Sequencer FLX System (FLX, Illumina Genome Analyzer (GA, and Applied Biosystems SOLiD system (SOLiD. A common genomic DNA sample obtained from Escherichia coli strain DH1 was applied to these sequencers. The obtained sequence reads were aligned to the complete genome sequence of E. coli DH1, to evaluate the accuracy and sequence bias of these sequence methods. We found that the fraction of "junk" data, which could not be aligned to the reference genome, was largest in the data set of SOLiD, in which about half of reads could not be aligned. Among data sets after alignment to the reference, sequence accuracy was poorest in GA data sets, suggesting relatively low fidelity of the elongation reaction in the GA method. Furthermore, by aligning the sequence reads to the E. coli strain W3110, we screened sequence differences between two E. coli strains using data sets of three different next-generation platforms. The results revealed that the detected sequence differences were similar among these three methods, while the sequence coverage required for the detection was significantly small in the FLX data set. These results provided valuable information on the quality of short sequence reads and the performance of SNP detection in three next-generation sequencing platforms.

  8. The contribution of next generation sequencing to epilepsy genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S.; Dahl, Hans A.; Helbig, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    to as epileptic encephalopathies. The increased knowledge about causative genetic variants has had a major impact on diagnosis of genetic epilepsies and has already been translated into treatment recommendations for a few genes. This article provides an overview of how next generation sequencing has advanced our......During the last decade, next generation sequencing technologies such as targeted gene panels, whole exome sequencing and whole genome sequencing have led to an explosion of gene identifications in monogenic epilepsies including both familial epilepsies and severe epilepsies, often referred...... understanding of epilepsy genetics and discusses some of the recently discovered genes in monogenic epilepsies....

  9. Clinical Next Generation Sequencing for Precision Medicine in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Ling; Wang, Wanheng; Li, Alvin; Kansal, Rina; Chen, Yuhan; Hong CHEN; Li, Xinmin

    2015-01-01

    Rapid adoption of next generation sequencing (NGS) in genomic medicine has been driven by low cost, high throughput sequencing and rapid advances in our understanding of the genetic bases of human diseases. Today, the NGS method has dominated sequencing space in genomic research, and quickly entered clinical practice. Because unique features of NGS perfectly meet the clinical reality (need to do more with less), the NGS technology is becoming a driving force to realize the dream of precision ...

  10. [Automatic analysis pipeline of next-generation sequencing data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenke, Li; Fengyu, Li; Siyao, Zhang; Bin, Cai; Na, Zheng; Yu, Nie; Dao, Zhou; Qian, Zhao

    2014-06-01

    The development of next-generation sequencing has generated high demand for data processing and analysis. Although there are a lot of software for analyzing next-generation sequencing data, most of them are designed for one specific function (e.g., alignment, variant calling or annotation). Therefore, it is necessary to combine them together for data analysis and to generate interpretable results for biologists. This study designed a pipeline to process Illumina sequencing data based on Perl programming language and SGE system. The pipeline takes original sequence data (fastq format) as input, calls the standard data processing software (e.g., BWA, Samtools, GATK, and Annovar), and finally outputs a list of annotated variants that researchers can further analyze. The pipeline simplifies the manual operation and improves the efficiency by automatization and parallel computation. Users can easily run the pipeline by editing the configuration file or clicking the graphical interface. Our work will facilitate the research projects using the sequencing technology.

  11. Third Generation Sequencing Techniques and Applications to Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozsolak, Fatih

    2012-01-01

    Introduction There is an immediate need for functional and molecular studies to decipher differences between disease and “normal” settings to identify large quantities of validated targets with the highest therapeutic utilities. Furthermore, drug mechanism of action and biomarkers to predict drug efficacy and safety need to be identified for effective design of clinical trials, decreasing attrition rates, regulatory agency approval process and drug repositioning. By expanding the power of genetics and pharmacogenetics studies, next generation nucleic acid sequencing technologies have started to play an important role in all stages of drug discovery. Areas covered This article reviews the first and second generation sequencing technologies (SGSTs) and challenges they pose to biomedicine. The article then focuses on the emerging third generation sequencing technologies (TGSTs), their technological foundations and potential contributions to drug discovery. Expert Opinion Despite the scientific and commercial success of SGSTs, the goal of rapid, comprehensive and unbiased sequencing of nucleic acids has not been achieved. TGSTs promise to increase sequencing throughput and read lengths, decrease costs, run times and error rates, eliminate biases inherent in SGSTs, and offer capabilities beyond nucleic acid sequencing. Such changes will have positive impact in all sequencing applications to drug discovery. PMID:22468954

  12. Next-Generation Sequencing: From Understanding Biology to Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Meder

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Within just a few years, the new methods for high-throughput next-generation sequencing have generated completely novel insights into the heritability and pathophysiology of human disease. In this review, we wish to highlight the benefits of the current state-of-the-art sequencing technologies for genetic and epigenetic research. We illustrate how these technologies help to constantly improve our understanding of genetic mechanisms in biological systems and summarize the progress made so far. This can be exemplified by the case of heritable heart muscle diseases, so-called cardiomyopathies. Here, next-generation sequencing is able to identify novel disease genes, and first clinical applications demonstrate the successful translation of this technology into personalized patient care.

  13. Next generation DNA led technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Jyothsna, G; Kashyap, Amita

    2016-01-01

    This brief highlights advances in DNA technologies and their wider applications. DNA is the source of life and has been studied since a generation, but very little is known as yet. Several sophisticated technologies of the current era have laid their foundations on the principle of DNA based mechanisms. DNA based technologies are bringing a new revolution of Advanced Science and Technology. Forensic Investigation, Medical Diagnosis, Paternity Disputes, Individual Identity, Health insurance, Motor Insurance have incorporated the DNA testing and profiling technologies for settling the issues.

  14. Design of Digital Hybrid Chaotic Sequence Generator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAO Nini; ZENG Dong

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of the hybrid chaotic sequences as the spreading codes in code divided multiple access(CDMA) system is analyzed.The design and realization of the digital hybrid chaotic sequence generator by very high speed integrated circuit hardware description language(VHDL) are described.A valid hazard canceledl method is presented.Computer simulations show that the stable digital sequence waveforms can be produced.The correlations of the digital hybrid chaotic sequences are compared with those of m-sequences.The results show that the correlations of the digital hybrid chaotic sequences are almost as good as those of m-sequences.The works in this paper explored a road for the practical applications of chaos.

  15. Historical Perspective, Development and Applications of Next-Generation Sequencing in Plant Virology

    OpenAIRE

    Marina Barba; Henryk Czosnek; Ahmed Hadidi

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation high throughput sequencing technologies became available at the onset of the 21st century. They provide a highly efficient, rapid, and low cost DNA sequencing platform beyond the reach of the standard and traditional DNA sequencing technologies developed in the late 1970s. They are continually improved to become faster, more efficient and cheaper. They have been used in many fields of biology since 2004. In 2009, next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies began to be appli...

  16. Next-generation sequencing strategies for characterizing the turkey genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalloul, Rami A; Zimin, Aleksey V; Settlage, Robert E; Kim, Sungwon; Reed, Kent M

    2014-02-01

    The turkey genome sequencing project was initiated in 2008 and has relied primarily on next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. Our first efforts used a synergistic combination of 2 NGS platforms (Roche/454 and Illumina GAII), detailed bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) maps, and unique assembly tools to sequence and assemble the genome of the domesticated turkey, Meleagris gallopavo. Since the first release in 2010, efforts to improve the genome assembly, gene annotation, and genomic analyses continue. The initial assembly build (2.01) represented about 89% of the genome sequence with 17X coverage depth (931 Mb). Sequence contigs were assigned to 30 of the 40 chromosomes with approximately 10% of the assembled sequence corresponding to unassigned chromosomes (ChrUn). The sequence has been refined through both genome-wide and area-focused sequencing, including shotgun and paired-end sequencing, and targeted sequencing of chromosomal regions with low or incomplete coverage. These additional efforts have improved the sequence assembly resulting in 2 subsequent genome builds of higher genome coverage (25X/Build3.0 and 30X/Build4.0) with a current sequence totaling 1,010 Mb. Further, BAC with end sequences assigned to the Z/W and MG18 (MHC) chromosomes, ChrUn, or not placed in the previous build were isolated, deeply sequenced (Hi-Seq), and incorporated into the latest build (5.0). To aid in the annotation and to generate a gene expression atlas of major tissues, a comprehensive set of RNA samples was collected at various developmental stages of female and male turkeys. Transcriptome sequencing data (using Illumina Hi-Seq) will provide information to enhance the final assembly and ultimately improve sequence annotation. The most current sequence covers more than 95% of the turkey genome and should yield a much improved gene level of annotation, making it a valuable resource for studying genetic variations underlying economically important traits in poultry.

  17. Quantifying population genetic differentiation from next-generation sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fumagalli, Matteo; Vieira, Filipe G.; Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand;

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few years, new high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have dramatically increased speed and reduced sequencing costs. However, the use of these sequencing technologies is often challenged by errors and biases associated with the bioinformatical methods used for analyzing the da...... individuals, suggesting that employing this new method is useful for investigating the genetic relationships of populations sampled at low coverage....... method for quantifying population genetic differentiation from next-generation sequencing data. In addition, we present a strategy to investigate population structure via Principal Components Analysis. Through extensive simulations, we compare the new method herein proposed to approaches based...... on genotype calling and demonstrate a marked improvement in estimation accuracy for a wide range of conditions. We apply the method to a large-scale genomic data set of domesticated and wild silkworms sequenced at low coverage. We find that we can infer the fine-scale genetic structure of the sampled...

  18. Next-generation sequencing approaches to understanding the oral microbiome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaura, E.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, the focus in dental research has been on studying a small fraction of the oral microbiome—so-called opportunistic pathogens. With the advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, researchers now have the tools that allow for profiling of the microbiomes and metagenomes at

  19. Next-generation sequencing approaches to understanding the oral microbiome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaura, E.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, the focus in dental research has been on studying a small fraction of the oral microbiome—so-called opportunistic pathogens. With the advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, researchers now have the tools that allow for profiling of the microbiomes and metagenomes at

  20. De novo Transcriptome Generation and Annotation for Two Korean Endemic Land Snails, Aegista chejuensis and Aegista quelpartensis, Using Illumina Paired-End Sequencing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se Won Kang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aegista chejuensis and Aegista quelpartensis (Family-Bradybaenidae are endemic to Korea, and are considered vulnerable due to declines in their population. The limited genetic resources for these species restricts the ability to prioritize conservation efforts. We sequenced the transcriptomes of these species using Illumina paired-end technology. Approximately 257 and 240 million reads were obtained and assembled into 198,531 and 230,497 unigenes for A. chejuensis and A. quelpartensis, respectively. The average and N50 unigene lengths were 735.4 and 1073 bp, respectively, for A. chejuensis, and 705.6 and 1001 bp, respectively, for A. quelpartensis. In total, 68,484 (34.5% and 77,745 (33.73% unigenes for A. chejuensis and A. quelpartensis, respectively, were annotated to databases. Gene Ontology terms were assigned to 23,778 (11.98% and 26,396 (11.45 unigenes, for A. chejuensis and A. quelpartensis, respectively, while 5050 and 5838 unigenes were mapped to 117 and 124 pathways in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database. In addition, we identified and annotated 9542 and 10,395 putative simple sequence repeats (SSRs in unigenes from A. chejuensis and A. quelpartensis, respectively. We designed a list of PCR primers flanking the putative SSR regions. These microsatellites may be utilized for future phylogenetics and conservation initiatives.

  1. Next-generation sequencing technologies and the application in microbiology-A review%高通量测序技术及其在微生物学研究中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦楠; 栗东芳; 杨瑞馥

    2011-01-01

    20世纪70年代发明的核酸测序技术为基因组学及其相关学科的发展做出了巨大贡献,本世纪初发展的以Illumina公司的HiSeq 2000,ABI公司的SOLID,和Roche公司的454技术为代表的高通量测序技术又为基因组学的发展注入了新活力.本文在阐述这些技术的基础上,着重讨论了新一代测序技术在微生物领域中的应用.%Since its invention in 1970s, nucleic acid sequencing technology has contributed tremendously to the genomics advances.The next-generation sequencing technologies, represented by HiSeq 2000 from Illumina, SOLiD from Applied Biosystems and 454 from Roche, re-energized the application of genomics.In this review, we first introduced the next-generation sequencing technologies, then, described their potential applications in the field of microbiology.

  2. Next generation sequencing (NGS): a golden tool in forensic toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, S M; Sabri, D M

    2015-01-01

    The DNA analysis is a cornerstone in contemporary forensic sciences. DNA sequencing technologies are powerful tools that enrich molecular sciences in the past based on Sanger sequencing and continue to glowing these sciences based on Next generation sequencing (NGS). Next generation sequencing has excellent potential to flourish and increase the molecular applications in forensic sciences by jumping over the pitfalls of the conventional method of sequencing. The main advantages of NGS compared to conventional method that it utilizes simultaneously a large number of genetic markers with high-resolution of genetic data. These advantages will help in solving several challenges such as mixture analysis and dealing with minute degraded samples. Based on these new technologies, many markers could be examined to get important biological data such as age, geographical origins, tissue type determination, external visible traits and monozygotic twins identification. It also could get data related to microbes, insects, plants and soil which are of great medico-legal importance. Despite the dozens of forensic research involving NGS, there are requirements before using this technology routinely in forensic cases. Thus, there is a great need to more studies that address robustness of these techniques. Therefore, this work highlights the applications of forensic sciences in the era of massively parallel sequencing.

  3. Cost-effective, species-specific microsatellite development for the endangered Dwarf Bulrush (Typha minima) using next-generation sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csencsics, Daniela; Brodbeck, Sabine; Holderegger, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    The dwarf bulrush (Typha minima Funck ex Hoppe) is an endangered pioneer plant species of riparian flood plains. In Switzerland, only 3 natural populations remain, but reintroductions are planned. To identify suitable source populations for reintroductions, we developed 17 polymorphic microsatellite markers with perfect repeats using the 454 pyrosequencing technique and tested them on 20 individuals with low-cost M13 labeling. We detected 2 to 7 alleles per locus and found expected and observed heterozygosities of 0.05-0.76 and 0.07-1, respectively. The whole process was finished in less than 6 weeks and cost approximately USD 5000. Due to low costs and reduced expenditure of time, the use of next-generation sequencing techniques for microsatellite development represent a powerful tool for population genetic studies in nonmodel species, as we show in this first application of the approach to a plant species of conservation importance.

  4. Galaxy LIMS for next-generation sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtalbers, J.; Rossler, J.; Sorn, P.; Graaf, J. de; Boisguerin, V.; Castle, J.; Sahin, U.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY: We have developed a laboratory information management system (LIMS) for a next-generation sequencing (NGS) laboratory within the existing Galaxy platform. The system provides lab technicians standard and customizable sample information forms, barcoded submission forms, tracking of input sam

  5. Fetal Kidney Anomalies: Next Generation Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Maria; Sunde, Lone; Nielsen, Marlene Louise

    Aim and Introduction Identification of abnormal kidneys in the fetus may lead to termination of the pregnancy and raises questions about the underlying cause and recurrence risk in future pregnancies. In this study, we investigate the effectiveness of targeted next generation sequencing in fetuses...

  6. Advances in genetics and molecular breeding of three legume crops of semi-arid tropics using next-generation sequencing and high-throughput genotyping technologies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajeev K Varshney; Himabindu Kudapa; Manish Roorkiwal; Mahendar Thudi; Manish K Pandey; Rachit K Saxena; Siva K Chamarthi; Murali Mohan S; Nalini Mallikarjuna; Hari Upadhyaya; Pooran M Gaur; L Krishnamurthy; K B Saxena; Shyam N Nigam; Suresh Pande

    2012-11-01

    Molecular markers are the most powerful genomic tools to increase the efficiency and precision of breeding practices for crop improvement. Progress in the development of genomic resources in the leading legume crops of the semi-arid tropics (SAT), namely, chickpea (Cicer arietinum), pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) and groundnut (Arachis hypogaea), as compared to other crop species like cereals, has been very slow. With the advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) and high-throughput (HTP) genotyping methods, there is a shift in development of genomic resources including molecular markers in these crops. For instance, 2,000 to 3,000 novel simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers have been developed each for chickpea, pigeonpea and groundnut. Based on Sanger, 454/FLX and Illumina transcript reads, transcriptome assemblies have been developed for chickpea (44,845 transcript assembly contigs, or TACs) and pigeonpea (21,434 TACs). Illumina sequencing of some parental genotypes of mapping populations has resulted in the development of 120 million reads for chickpea and 128.9 million reads for pigeonpea. Alignment of these Illumina reads with respective transcriptome assemblies have provided > 10,000 SNPs each in chickpea and pigeonpea. A variety of SNP genotyping platforms including GoldenGate, VeraCode and Competitive Allele Specific PCR (KASPar) assays have been developed in chickpea and pigeonpea. By using above resources, the first-generation or comprehensive genetic maps have been developed in the three legume speciesmentioned above. Analysis of phenotyping data together with genotyping data has provided candidate markers for drought-tolerance-related root traits in chickpea, resistance to foliar diseases in groundnut and sterility mosaic disease (SMD) and fertility restoration in pigeonpea. Together with these trait-associated markers along with those already available, molecular breeding programmes have been initiated for enhancing drought tolerance, resistance to

  7. Advances in genetics and molecular breeding of three legume crops of semi-arid tropics using next-generation sequencing and high-throughput genotyping technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Rajeev K; Kudapa, Himabindu; Roorkiwal, Manish; Thudi, Mahendar; Pandey, Manish K; Saxena, Rachit K; Chamarthi, Siva K; Mohan, S Murali; Mallikarjuna, Nalini; Upadhyaya, Hari; Gaur, Pooran M; Krishnamurthy, L; Saxena, K B; Nigam, Shyam N; Pande, Suresh

    2012-11-01

    Molecular markers are the most powerful genomic tools to increase the efficiency and precision of breeding practices for crop improvement. Progress in the development of genomic resources in the leading legume crops of the semi-arid tropics (SAT), namely, chickpea (Cicer arietinum), pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) and groundnut (Arachis hypogaea), as compared to other crop species like cereals, has been very slow. With the advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) and high-throughput (HTP) genotyping methods, there is a shift in development of genomic resources including molecular markers in these crops. For instance, 2,000 to 3,000 novel simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers have been developed each for chickpea, pigeonpea and groundnut. Based on Sanger, 454/FLX and Illumina transcript reads, transcriptome assemblies have been developed for chickpea (44,845 transcript assembly contigs, or TACs) and pigeonpea (21,434 TACs). Illumina sequencing of some parental genotypes of mapping populations has resulted in the development of 120 million reads for chickpea and 128.9 million reads for pigeonpea. Alignment of these Illumina reads with respective transcriptome assemblies have provided more than 10,000 SNPs each in chickpea and pigeonpea. A variety of SNP genotyping platforms including GoldenGate, VeraCode and Competitive Allele Specific PCR (KASPar) assays have been developed in chickpea and pigeonpea. By using above resources, the first-generation or comprehensive genetic maps have been developed in the three legume speciesmentioned above. Analysis of phenotyping data together with genotyping data has provided candidate markers for drought-tolerance-related root traits in chickpea, resistance to foliar diseases in groundnut and sterility mosaic disease (SMD) and fertility restoration in pigeonpea. Together with these traitassociated markers along with those already available, molecular breeding programmes have been initiated for enhancing drought tolerance, resistance

  8. Estimating individual admixture proportions from next generation sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skotte, Line; Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand; Albrechtsen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Inference of population structure and individual ancestry is important both for population genetics and for association studies. With next generation sequencing technologies it is possible to obtain genetic data for all accessible genetic variations in the genome. Existing methods for admixture...... analysis rely on known genotypes. However, individual genotypes cannot be inferred from low-depth sequencing data without introducing errors. This article presents a new method for inferring an individual's ancestry that takes the uncertainty introduced in next generation sequencing data into account....... This is achieved by working directly with genotype likelihoods that contain all relevant information of the unobserved genotypes. Using simulations as well as publicly available sequencing data, we demonstrate that the presented method has great accuracy even for very low-depth data. At the same time, we...

  9. Development of the Third Generation Sequencing Technologies and Related Bioinformatics%第三代DNA测序及其相关生物信息学技术发展概况

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨悦; 杜欣军; 梁彬; 郭季冬; 程晓真; 王硕

    2015-01-01

    本文介绍了第三代DNA测序的技术原理及应用现状,并对相关的生物信息学技术进行了综述。第三代测序技术以单分子测序为主要特点,目前已广泛应用于食品科学及生命科学研究的各个领域,其代表有 Heliscope BioScience公司的SMS技术、Pacific BioSciences公司的SMRT技术等。本文同时归纳总结了基因组学相关的生物信息学发展状况及常用的数据库。%In the present study, the principles and applications of the third generation of DNA sequencing technology were summerized, as well as the progresses of bioinformatics involved genome sequencing. The third generation DNA sequencing technology was characterized by single DNA molecular and had been used in many fields of food science and life science research, for instance, SMS from Heliscope BioScience and SMRT from Pacific BioSciences. Meanwhile, the developement of bioinformatics and the main bioinformatics databases were summarized in the paper.

  10. Next-generation sequencing technology and non-invasive prenatal diagnosis%第二代测序技术与无创产前诊断

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵馨; 何天文; 尹爱华

    2014-01-01

    孕妇外周血中胎儿游离DNA(cell free fetal DNA,cffDNA)的发现开辟了无创产前诊断的新篇章,借助各种分子诊断技术针对cffDNA进行胎儿染色体疾病、遗传性疾病以妊娠相关疾病的研究迅速成为热点.以高通量、自动化为显著特征的第二代测序(next-generation sequencing,NGS)技术诞生,极大加速了cffDNA的实验室研究进展.目前基于NGS平台,建立的胎儿21/18/13三体综合征的产前基因诊断技术已应用于临床,其他如性染色体非整倍体、双胎妊娠染色体非整倍体、胎儿染色体结构异常疾病以及孟德尔单基因遗传病的研究也因NGS的出现获得了显著的进步.本文就NGS的基本原理、cffDNA的生理特性及NGS在无创产前诊断研究中的进展进行综述.

  11. Tablet—next generation sequence assembly visualization

    OpenAIRE

    Milne, Iain; Bayer, Micha; Cardle, Linda; Shaw, Paul; Stephen, Gordon; Wright, Frank; Marshall, David

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Tablet is a lightweight, high-performance graphical viewer for next-generation sequence assemblies and alignments. Supporting a range of input assembly formats, Tablet provides high-quality visualizations showing data in packed or stacked views, allowing instant access and navigation to any region of interest, and whole contig overviews and data summaries. Tablet is both multi-core aware and memory efficient, allowing it to handle assemblies containing millions of reads, even on a 32...

  12. Combining two technologies for full genome sequencing of human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skryabin, K G; Prokhortchouk, E B; Mazur, A M; Boulygina, E S; Tsygankova, S V; Nedoluzhko, A V; Rastorguev, S M; Matveev, V B; Chekanov, N N; D A, Goranskaya; Teslyuk, A B; Gruzdeva, N M; Velikhov, V E; Zaridze, D G; Kovalchuk, M V

    2009-10-01

    At present, the new technologies of DNA sequencing are rapidly developing allowing quick and efficient characterisation of organisms at the level of the genome structure. In this study, the whole genome sequencing of a human (Russian man) was performed using two technologies currently present on the market - Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection (SOLiD™) (Applied Biosystems) and sequencing technologies of molecular clusters using fluorescently labeled precursors (Illumina). The total number of generated data resulted in 108.3 billion base pairs (60.2 billion from Illumina technology and 48.1 billion from SOLiD technology). Statistics performed on reads generated by GAII and SOLiD showed that they covered 75% and 96% of the genome respectively. Short polymorphic regions were detected with comparable accuracy however, the absolute amount of them revealed by SOLiD was several times less than by GAII. Optimal algorithm for using the latest methods of sequencing was established for the analysis of individual human genomes. The study is the first Russian effort towards whole human genome sequencing.

  13. Applications for next-generation sequencing in fish ecotoxicogenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvine C Mehinto

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The new technologies for next-generation sequencing and global gene expression analyses that are widely used in molecular medicine are increasingly applied to the field of fish biology. This has facilitated new directions to address research areas that could not be previously considered due to the lack of molecular information for ecologically relevant species. Over the past decade, the cost of next-generation sequencing (NGS has decreased significantly, making it possible to use non-model fish species to investigate emerging environmental issues. NGS technologies have permitted researchers to obtain large amounts of raw data in short periods of time. There have also been significant improvements in bioinformatics to assemble the sequences and annotate the genes, thus facilitating the management of these large datasets. The combination of DNA sequencing and bioinformatics has improved our abilities to design custom microarrays and study the genome and transcriptome of a wide variety of organisms. Despite the promising results obtained using these techniques in fish studies, NGS technologies are currently underused in ecotoxicogenomics and few studies have employed these methods. These issues should be addressed in order to exploit the full potential of NGS in ecotoxicological studies and expand our understanding of the biology of non-model organisms.

  14. Advantages of genome sequencing by long-read sequencer using SMRT technology in medical area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Kazuma; Shiroma, Akino; Shimoji, Makiko; Tamotsu, Hinako; Ashimine, Noriko; Ohki, Shun; Shinzato, Misuzu; Minami, Maiko; Nakanishi, Tetsuhiro; Teruya, Kuniko; Satou, Kazuhito; Hirano, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    PacBio RS II is the first commercialized third-generation DNA sequencer able to sequence a single molecule DNA in real-time without amplification. PacBio RS II's sequencing technology is novel and unique, enabling the direct observation of DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase. PacBio RS II confers four major advantages compared to other sequencing technologies: long read lengths, high consensus accuracy, a low degree of bias, and simultaneous capability of epigenetic characterization. These advantages surmount the obstacle of sequencing genomic regions such as high/low G+C, tandem repeat, and interspersed repeat regions. Moreover, PacBio RS II is ideal for whole genome sequencing, targeted sequencing, complex population analysis, RNA sequencing, and epigenetics characterization. With PacBio RS II, we have sequenced and analyzed the genomes of many species, from viruses to humans. Herein, we summarize and review some of our key genome sequencing projects, including full-length viral sequencing, complete bacterial genome and almost-complete plant genome assemblies, and long amplicon sequencing of a disease-associated gene region. We believe that PacBio RS II is not only an effective tool for use in the basic biological sciences but also in the medical/clinical setting.

  15. [DNA sequencing technology and automatization of it].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraev, A S

    1991-01-01

    Precise manipulations with genetic material, typical for modern experiments in molecular biology and in new biotechnology, require a capability to determine DNA base sequence. This capability enables today to exploit specific genetic knowledge for the dissection of complex cell processes and for modulation of cell metabolism in transgenic organisms. The review focuses on such DNA sequencing technologies that are widespread in general laboratory practice. They can safely be called, with the availability of commercial reagents, industrial techniques. Modern DNA sequencing requires recurrent breakdown of large genomic DNA into smaller pieces, that are then amplified, sequenced and the initial long stretch reconstructed via overlap of small pieces. The DNA sequencing process has several steps: a DNA fragment is obtained in sufficient quantity and purity, it is converted to a form suitable for a particular sequencing method, a sequencing reaction is performed and its products fractionated; and finally the resultant data are interpreted (i.e. an autoradiograph is read into a computer memory) and a long sequence in reconstructed via overlap of short stretches. These steps are considered in separate parts; an accent is made on sequencing strategies with respect to their biological task. In the last part, possibilities for automation of sequencing experiment are considered, followed by a discussion of domestic problems in DNA sequencing.

  16. Generating matrix and sums of Fibonacci and Pell sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C. K.; Woon, H. S.; Chong, Chin-Yoon

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we study the Fibonacci sequence and Pell sequence and developed generating matrices for them. First we proved two results on the even sum of the Fibonacci sequence and the Pell sequence, using the generating matrix approach. We then deduce the odd sums, some identities and recursive formulas for these two sequences.

  17. Current applications of next-generation sequencing technology in Mycobacterium tuberculosis research%二代测序技术在结核分枝杆菌研究中的应用进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐鹏; 甘明宇; 高谦

    2015-01-01

    结核病是由结核分枝杆菌引起的全球第二大传染病。二代测序技术为从基因组水平研究结核分枝杆菌提供了重要的研究方法。本文从结核病流行病学、结核分枝杆菌耐药和进化及相关生物信息学等方面,介绍二代测序技术在结核分枝杆菌研究中的应用进展。%Tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M . tuberculosis) is the second important infectious disease in the world , and next-generation sequencing technology provides an effective research method to study the genome of M . tuberculosis . The current applications of next-generation sequencing technology in the study of M . tuberculosis from the aspects of epidemiology ,drug resistance ,evolution and related bioinformatics are reviewed .

  18. Temporally consistent virtual camera generation from stereo image sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Simon R.; Flack, Julien; Shao, Juliang; Harman, Phil

    2004-05-01

    The recent emergence of auto-stereoscopic 3D viewing technologies has increased demand for the creation of 3D video content. A range of glasses-free multi-viewer screens have been developed that require as many as 9 views generated for each frame of video. This presents difficulties in both view generation and transmission bandwidth. This paper examines the use of stereo video capture as a means to generate multiple scene views via disparity analysis. A machine learning approach is applied to learn relationships between disparity generated depth information and source footage, and to generate depth information in a temporally smooth manner for both left and right eye image sequences. A view morphing approach to multiple view rendering is described which provides an excellent 3D effect on a range of glasses-free displays, while providing robustness to inaccurate stereo disparity calculations.

  19. Sequencing of BAC pools by different next generation sequencing platforms and strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholz Uwe

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Next generation sequencing of BACs is a viable option for deciphering the sequence of even large and highly repetitive genomes. In order to optimize this strategy, we examined the influence of read length on the quality of Roche/454 sequence assemblies, to what extent Illumina/Solexa mate pairs (MPs improve the assemblies by scaffolding and whether barcoding of BACs is dispensable. Results Sequencing four BACs with both FLX and Titanium technologies revealed similar sequencing accuracy, but showed that the longer Titanium reads produce considerably less misassemblies and gaps. The 454 assemblies of 96 barcoded BACs were improved by scaffolding 79% of the total contig length with MPs from a non-barcoded library. Assembly of the unmasked 454 sequences without separation by barcodes revealed chimeric contig formation to be a major problem, encompassing 47% of the total contig length. Masking the sequences reduced this fraction to 24%. Conclusion Optimal BAC pool sequencing should be based on the longest available reads, with barcoding essential for a comprehensive assessment of both repetitive and non-repetitive sequence information. When interest is restricted to non-repetitive regions and repeats are masked prior to assembly, barcoding is non-essential. In any case, the assemblies can be improved considerably by scaffolding with non-barcoded BAC pool MPs.

  20. Generation of Physical Map Contig-Specific Sequences Useful for Whole Genome Sequence Scaffolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanliang; Ninwichian, Parichart; Liu, Shikai; Zhang, Jiaren; Kucuktas, Huseyin; Sun, Fanyue; Kaltenboeck, Ludmilla; Sun, Luyang; Bao, Lisui; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2013-01-01

    Along with the rapid advances of the nextgen sequencing technologies, more and more species are added to the list of organisms whose whole genomes are sequenced. However, the assembled draft genome of many organisms consists of numerous small contigs, due to the short length of the reads generated by nextgen sequencing platforms. In order to improve the assembly and bring the genome contigs together, more genome resources are needed. In this study, we developed a strategy to generate a valuable genome resource, physical map contig-specific sequences, which are randomly distributed genome sequences in each physical contig. Two-dimensional tagging method was used to create specific tags for 1,824 physical contigs, in which the cost was dramatically reduced. A total of 94,111,841 100-bp reads and 315,277 assembled contigs are identified containing physical map contig-specific tags. The physical map contig-specific sequences along with the currently available BAC end sequences were then used to anchor the catfish draft genome contigs. A total of 156,457 genome contigs (~79% of whole genome sequencing assembly) were anchored and grouped into 1,824 pools, in which 16,680 unique genes were annotated. The physical map contig-specific sequences are valuable resources to link physical map, genetic linkage map and draft whole genome sequences, consequently have the capability to improve the whole genome sequences assembly and scaffolding, and improve the genome-wide comparative analysis as well. The strategy developed in this study could also be adopted in other species whose whole genome assembly is still facing a challenge. PMID:24205335

  1. Generation of physical map contig-specific sequences useful for whole genome sequence scaffolding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanliang Jiang

    Full Text Available Along with the rapid advances of the nextgen sequencing technologies, more and more species are added to the list of organisms whose whole genomes are sequenced. However, the assembled draft genome of many organisms consists of numerous small contigs, due to the short length of the reads generated by nextgen sequencing platforms. In order to improve the assembly and bring the genome contigs together, more genome resources are needed. In this study, we developed a strategy to generate a valuable genome resource, physical map contig-specific sequences, which are randomly distributed genome sequences in each physical contig. Two-dimensional tagging method was used to create specific tags for 1,824 physical contigs, in which the cost was dramatically reduced. A total of 94,111,841 100-bp reads and 315,277 assembled contigs are identified containing physical map contig-specific tags. The physical map contig-specific sequences along with the currently available BAC end sequences were then used to anchor the catfish draft genome contigs. A total of 156,457 genome contigs (~79% of whole genome sequencing assembly were anchored and grouped into 1,824 pools, in which 16,680 unique genes were annotated. The physical map contig-specific sequences are valuable resources to link physical map, genetic linkage map and draft whole genome sequences, consequently have the capability to improve the whole genome sequences assembly and scaffolding, and improve the genome-wide comparative analysis as well. The strategy developed in this study could also be adopted in other species whose whole genome assembly is still facing a challenge.

  2. The impact of next-generation sequencing on genomics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Zhang; Rod Chiodini; Ahmed Badr; Genfa Zhang

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews basic concepts,general applications,and the potential impact of next-generation sequencing(NGS)technologies on genomics,with particular reference to currently available and possible future platforms and bioinformatics.NGS technologies have demonstrated the capacity to sequence DNA at unprecedented speed,thereby enabling previously unimaginable scientific achievements and novel biological applications.But,the massive data produced by NGS also presents a significant challenge for data storage,analyses,and management solutions.Advanced bioinformatic tools are essential for the successful application of NGS technology.As evidenced throughout this review,NGS technologies will have a striking impact on genomic research and the entire biological field.With its ability to tackle the unsolved challenges unconquered by previous genomic technologies,NGS is likely to unravel the complexity of the human genome in terms of genetic variations,some of which may be confined to susceptible loci for some common human conditions.The impact of NGS technologies on genomics will be far reaching and likely change the field for years to come.

  3. Next-generation sequencing: big data meets high performance computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Bertil; Hildebrandt, Andreas

    2017-02-02

    The progress of next-generation sequencing has a major impact on medical and genomic research. This high-throughput technology can now produce billions of short DNA or RNA fragments in excess of a few terabytes of data in a single run. This leads to massive datasets used by a wide range of applications including personalized cancer treatment and precision medicine. In addition to the hugely increased throughput, the cost of using high-throughput technologies has been dramatically decreasing. A low sequencing cost of around US$1000 per genome has now rendered large population-scale projects feasible. However, to make effective use of the produced data, the design of big data algorithms and their efficient implementation on modern high performance computing systems is required.

  4. Understanding Cancer Genome and Its Evolution by Next Generation Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Yong

    Cancer will cause 13 million deaths by the year of 2030, ranking the second leading cause of death worldwide. Previous studies indicate that most of the cancers originate from cells that acquired somatic mutations and evolved as Darwin Theory. Ten biological insights of cancer have been summarized...... recently. Cutting-age technologies like next generation sequencing (NGS) enable exploring cancer genome and evolution much more efficiently. However, integrated cancer genome sequencing studies showed great inter-/intra-tumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and complex evolution patterns beyond the cancer biological...... evolution by NGS, we first developed high throughput single cell sequencing (SCS) pipeline on whole exome and trascriptome and updated the pipeline after systematically reviewed the existed single cell whole genome amplification (WGA) and whole transcriptome amplification methods. Using SCS pipeline we...

  5. Next generation sequencing reveals the hidden diversity of zooplankton assemblages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope K Lindeque

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Zooplankton play an important role in our oceans, in biogeochemical cycling and providing a food source for commercially important fish larvae. However, difficulties in correctly identifying zooplankton hinder our understanding of their roles in marine ecosystem functioning, and can prevent detection of long term changes in their community structure. The advent of massively parallel next generation sequencing technology allows DNA sequence data to be recovered directly from whole community samples. Here we assess the ability of such sequencing to quantify richness and diversity of a mixed zooplankton assemblage from a productive time series site in the Western English Channel. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Plankton net hauls (200 µm were taken at the Western Channel Observatory station L4 in September 2010 and January 2011. These samples were analysed by microscopy and metagenetic analysis of the 18S nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene using the 454 pyrosequencing platform. Following quality control a total of 419,041 sequences were obtained for all samples. The sequences clustered into 205 operational taxonomic units using a 97% similarity cut-off. Allocation of taxonomy by comparison with the National Centre for Biotechnology Information database identified 135 OTUs to species level, 11 to genus level and 1 to order, <2.5% of sequences were classified as unknowns. By comparison a skilled microscopic analyst was able to routinely enumerate only 58 taxonomic groups. CONCLUSIONS: Metagenetics reveals a previously hidden taxonomic richness, especially for Copepoda and hard-to-identify meroplankton such as Bivalvia, Gastropoda and Polychaeta. It also reveals rare species and parasites. We conclude that Next Generation Sequencing of 18S amplicons is a powerful tool for elucidating the true diversity and species richness of zooplankton communities. While this approach allows for broad diversity assessments of plankton it may

  6. Next generation sequencing in sporadic retinoblastoma patients reveals somatic mosaicism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitrano, Sara; Marozza, Annabella; Somma, Serena; Imperatore, Valentina; Hadjistilianou, Theodora; De Francesco, Sonia; Toti, Paolo; Galimberti, Daniela; Meloni, Ilaria; Cetta, Francesco; Piu, Pietro; Di Marco, Chiara; Dosa, Laura; Lo Rizzo, Caterina; Carignani, Giulia; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Mari, Francesca; Renieri, Alessandra; Ariani, Francesca

    2015-11-01

    In about 50% of sporadic cases of retinoblastoma, no constitutive RB1 mutations are detected by conventional methods. However, recent research suggests that, at least in some of these cases, there is somatic mosaicism with respect to RB1 normal and mutant alleles. The increased availability of next generation sequencing improves our ability to detect the exact percentage of patients with mosaicism. Using this technology, we re-tested a series of 40 patients with sporadic retinoblastoma: 10 of them had been previously classified as constitutional heterozygotes, whereas in 30 no RB1 mutations had been found in lymphocytes. In 3 of these 30 patients, we have now identified low-level mosaic variants, varying in frequency between 8 and 24%. In 7 out of the 10 cases previously classified as heterozygous from testing blood cells, we were able to test additional tissues (ocular tissues, urine and/or oral mucosa): in three of them, next generation sequencing has revealed mosaicism. Present results thus confirm that a significant fraction (6/40; 15%) of sporadic retinoblastoma cases are due to postzygotic events and that deep sequencing is an efficient method to unambiguously distinguish mosaics. Re-testing of retinoblastoma patients through next generation sequencing can thus provide new information that may have important implications with respect to genetic counseling and family care.

  7. Impact of Next Generation Sequencing Techniques in Food Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Baltasar; Rachid, Caio T. C. C; Alegría, Ángel; Leite, Analy M. O; Peixoto, Raquel S; Delgado, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the Maxam-Gilbert and Sanger sequencing as the first generation, in recent years there has been an explosion of newly-developed sequencing strategies, which are usually referred to as next generation sequencing (NGS) techniques. NGS techniques have high-throughputs and produce thousands or even millions of sequences at the same time. These sequences allow for the accurate identification of microbial taxa, including uncultivable organisms and those present in small numbers. In specific applications, NGS provides a complete inventory of all microbial operons and genes present or being expressed under different study conditions. NGS techniques are revolutionizing the field of microbial ecology and have recently been used to examine several food ecosystems. After a short introduction to the most common NGS systems and platforms, this review addresses how NGS techniques have been employed in the study of food microbiota and food fermentations, and discusses their limits and perspectives. The most important findings are reviewed, including those made in the study of the microbiota of milk, fermented dairy products, and plant-, meat- and fish-derived fermented foods. The knowledge that can be gained on microbial diversity, population structure and population dynamics via the use of these technologies could be vital in improving the monitoring and manipulation of foods and fermented food products. They should also improve their safety. PMID:25132799

  8. Transcriptome sequencing of the Microarray Quality Control (MAQC RNA reference samples using next generation sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry-Mieg Danielle

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcriptome sequencing using next-generation sequencing platforms will soon be competing with DNA microarray technologies for global gene expression analysis. As a preliminary evaluation of these promising technologies, we performed deep sequencing of cDNA synthesized from the Microarray Quality Control (MAQC reference RNA samples using Roche's 454 Genome Sequencer FLX. Results We generated more that 3.6 million sequence reads of average length 250 bp for the MAQC A and B samples and introduced a data analysis pipeline for translating cDNA read counts into gene expression levels. Using BLAST, 90% of the reads mapped to the human genome and 64% of the reads mapped to the RefSeq database of well annotated genes with e-values ≤ 10-20. We measured gene expression levels in the A and B samples by counting the numbers of reads that mapped to individual RefSeq genes in multiple sequencing runs to evaluate the MAQC quality metrics for reproducibility, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy and compared the results with DNA microarrays and Quantitative RT-PCR (QRTPCR from the MAQC studies. In addition, 88% of the reads were successfully aligned directly to the human genome using the AceView alignment programs with an average 90% sequence similarity to identify 137,899 unique exon junctions, including 22,193 new exon junctions not yet contained in the RefSeq database. Conclusion Using the MAQC metrics for evaluating the performance of gene expression platforms, the ExpressSeq results for gene expression levels showed excellent reproducibility, sensitivity, and specificity that improved systematically with increasing shotgun sequencing depth, and quantitative accuracy that was comparable to DNA microarrays and QRTPCR. In addition, a careful mapping of the reads to the genome using the AceView alignment programs shed new light on the complexity of the human transcriptome including the discovery of thousands of new splice variants.

  9. Targeted sequencing of cancer-related genes in colorectal cancer using next-generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sae-Won Han

    Full Text Available Recent advance in sequencing technology has enabled comprehensive profiling of genetic alterations in cancer. We have established a targeted sequencing platform using next-generation sequencing (NGS technology for clinical use, which can provide mutation and copy number variation data. NGS was performed with paired-end library enriched with exons of 183 cancer-related genes. Normal and tumor tissue pairs of 60 colorectal adenocarcinomas were used to test feasibility. Somatic mutation and copy number alteration were analyzed. A total of 526 somatic non-synonymous sequence variations were found in 113 genes. Among these, 278 single nucleotide variations were 232 different somatic point mutations. 216 SNV were 79 known single nucleotide polymorphisms in the dbSNP. 32 indels were 28 different indel mutations. Median number of mutated gene per tumor was 4 (range 0-23. Copy number gain (>X2 fold was found in 65 genes in 40 patients, whereas copy number loss (sequencing platform using NGS technology is feasible for clinical use and provides comprehensive genetic alteration data.

  10. Period of the d-Sequence Based Random Number Generator

    OpenAIRE

    Thippireddy, Suresh; Chalasani, Sandeep

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an expression to compute the exact period of a recursive random number generator based on d-sequences. Using the multi-recursive version of this generator we can produce large number of pseudorandom sequences.

  11. Exploring genetic polymorphism in innate immune genes in Indian cattle (Bos indicus) and buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) using next generation sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shreya M; Koringa, Prakash G; Nathani, Neelam M; Patel, Namrata V; Shah, Tejash M; Joshi, Chaitanya G

    2015-02-01

    Activation of innate immunity initiates various cascades of reactions that largely contribute to defense against physical, microbial or chemical damage, prompt for damage repair and removal of causative organisms as well as restoration of tissue homeostasis. Genetic polymorphism in innate immune genes plays prominent role in disease resistance capabilities in various breeds of cattle and buffalo. Here we studied single nucleotide variations (SNP/SNV) and haplotype structure in innate immune genes viz CHGA, CHGB, CHGC, NRAMP1, NRAMP2, DEFB1, BNBD4, BNBD5, TAP and LAP in Gir cattle and Murrah buffalo. Targeted sequencing of exonic regions of these genes was performed by Ion Torrent PGM sequencing platform. The sequence reads obtained corresponding to coding regions of these genes were mapped to reference genome of cattle BosTau7 by BWA program using genome analysis tool kit (GATK). Further variant analysis by Unified Genotyper revealed 54 and 224 SNPs in Gir and Murrah respectively and also 32 SNVs was identified. Among these SNPs 43, 36, 11,32,81,21 and 22 variations were in CHGA, CHGB, CHGC, NRAMP1, NRAMP2, DEFB1 and TAP genes respectively. Among these identified 278 SNPs, 24 were found to be reported in the dbSNP database. Variant analysis was followed by structure formation of haplotypes based on multiple SNPs using SAS software revealed a large number of haplotypes. The SNP discovery in innate immune genes in cattle and buffalo breeds of India would advance our understanding of role of these genes in determining the disease resistance/susceptibility in Indian breeds. The identified SNPs and haplotype data would also provide a wealth of sequence information for conservation studies, selective breeding and designing future strategies for identifying disease associations involving samples from distinct populations.

  12. Exploring genetic polymorphism in innate immune genes in Indian cattle (Bos indicus and buffalo (Bubalus bubalis using next generation sequencing technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreya M. Patel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Activation of innate immunity initiates various cascades of reactions that largely contribute to defense against physical, microbial or chemical damage, prompt for damage repair and removal of causative organisms as well as restoration of tissue homeostasis. Genetic polymorphism in innate immune genes plays prominent role in disease resistance capabilities in various breeds of cattle and buffalo. Here we studied single nucleotide variations (SNP/SNV and haplotype structure in innate immune genes viz CHGA, CHGB, CHGC, NRAMP1, NRAMP2, DEFB1, BNBD4, BNBD5, TAP and LAP in Gir cattle and Murrah buffalo. Targeted sequencing of exonic regions of these genes was performed by Ion Torrent PGM sequencing platform. The sequence reads obtained corresponding to coding regions of these genes were mapped to reference genome of cattle BosTau7 by BWA program using genome analysis tool kit (GATK. Further variant analysis by Unified Genotyper revealed 54 and 224 SNPs in Gir and Murrah respectively and also 32 SNVs was identified. Among these SNPs 43, 36, 11,32,81,21 and 22 variations were in CHGA, CHGB, CHGC, NRAMP1, NRAMP2, DEFB1 and TAP genes respectively. Among these identified 278 SNPs, 24 were found to be reported in the dbSNP database. Variant analysis was followed by structure formation of haplotypes based on multiple SNPs using SAS software revealed a large number of haplotypes. The SNP discovery in innate immune genes in cattle and buffalo breeds of India would advance our understanding of role of these genes in determining the disease resistance/susceptibility in Indian breeds. The identified SNPs and haplotype data would also provide a wealth of sequence information for conservation studies, selective breeding and designing future strategies for identifying disease associations involving samples from distinct populations.

  13. GRASS: a generic algorithm for scaffolding next-generation sequencing assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gritsenko, A.A.; Nijkamp, J.F.; Reinders, M.J.T.; De Ridder, D.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: The increasing availability of second-generation highthroughput sequencing (HTS) technologies has sparked a growing interest in de novo genome sequencing. This in turn has fueled the need for reliable means of obtaining high-quality draft genomes from short-read sequencing data. The mill

  14. Sequencing of chloroplast genome using whole cellular DNA and Solexa sequencing technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian eWu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Sequencing of the chloroplast genome using traditional sequencing methods has been difficult because of its size (>120 kb and the complicated procedures required to prepare templates. To explore the feasibility of sequencing the chloroplast genome using DNA extracted from whole cells and Solexa sequencing technology, we sequenced whole cellular DNA isolated from leaves of three Brassica rapa accessions with one lane per accession. In total, 246 Mb, 362Mb, 361 Mb sequence data were generated for the three accessions Chiifu-401-42, Z16 and FT, respectively. Microreads were assembled by reference-guided assembly using the cpDNA sequences of B. rapa, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Nicotiana tabacum. We achieved coverage of more than 99.96% of the cp genome in the three tested accessions using the B. rapa sequence as the reference. When A. thaliana or N. tabacum sequences were used as references, 99.7–99.8% or 95.5–99.7% of the B. rapa chloroplast genome was covered, respectively. These results demonstrated that sequencing of whole cellular DNA isolated from young leaves using the Illumina Genome Analyzer is an efficient method for high-throughput sequencing of chloroplast genome.

  15. Next generation sequencing and its applications in forensic genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Børsting, Claus; Morling, Niels

    2015-09-01

    It has been almost a decade since the first next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies emerged and quickly changed the way genetic research is conducted. Today, full genomes are mapped and published almost weekly and with ever increasing speed and decreasing costs. NGS methods and platforms have matured during the last 10 years, and the quality of the sequences has reached a level where NGS is used in clinical diagnostics of humans. Forensic genetic laboratories have also explored NGS technologies and especially in the last year, there has been a small explosion in the number of scientific articles and presentations at conferences with forensic aspects of NGS. These contributions have demonstrated that NGS offers new possibilities for forensic genetic case work. More information may be obtained from unique samples in a single experiment by analyzing combinations of markers (STRs, SNPs, insertion/deletions, mRNA) that cannot be analyzed simultaneously with the standard PCR-CE methods used today. The true variation in core forensic STR loci has been uncovered, and previously unknown STR alleles have been discovered. The detailed sequence information may aid mixture interpretation and will increase the statistical weight of the evidence. In this review, we will give an introduction to NGS and single-molecule sequencing, and we will discuss the possible applications of NGS in forensic genetics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Next-Generation Sequencing for Binary Protein-Protein Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard eSuter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The yeast two-hybrid (Y2H system exploits host cell genetics in order to display binary protein-protein interactions (PPIs via defined and selectable phenotypes. Numerous improvements have been made to this method, adapting the screening principle for diverse applications, including drug discovery and the scale-up for proteome wide interaction screens in human and other organisms. Here we discuss a systematic workflow and analysis scheme for screening data generated by Y2H and related assays that includes high-throughput selection procedures, readout of comprehensive results via next-generation sequencing (NGS, and the interpretation of interaction data via quantitative statistics. The novel assays and tools will serve the broader scientific community to harness the power of NGS technology to address PPI networks in health and disease. We discuss examples of how this next-generation platform can be applied to address specific questions in diverse fields of biology and medicine.

  17. Generating Local Needs through Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    á Rogvi, Sofie; Juul, Annegrete; Langstrup, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    The rhetoric of need is commonplace in discourses of technology and innovation, as well as in global health. Users are said to have a need for innovative technology, and citizens in resource-poor regions to have a need for improved healthcare. In this article we follow a global health technology......—more specifically, a piece of software for monitoring diabetes quality—from Denmark, where it was developed, to Jakarta, Indonesia, where it was introduced in 2012–13. Using ethnographic material, we show how the need for a specific technology is constituted through the very process of moving a technology from one...

  18. Probabilistic model based error correction in a set of various mutant sequences analyzed by next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aita, Takuyo; Ichihashi, Norikazu; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2013-12-01

    To analyze the evolutionary dynamics of a mutant population in an evolutionary experiment, it is necessary to sequence a vast number of mutants by high-throughput (next-generation) sequencing technologies, which enable rapid and parallel analysis of multikilobase sequences. However, the observed sequences include many errors of base call. Therefore, if next-generation sequencing is applied to analysis of a heterogeneous population of various mutant sequences, it is necessary to discriminate between true bases as point mutations and errors of base call in the observed sequences, and to subject the sequences to error-correction processes. To address this issue, we have developed a novel method of error correction based on the Potts model and a maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) estimate of its parameters corresponding to the "true sequences". Our method of error correction utilizes (1) the "quality scores" which are assigned to individual bases in the observed sequences and (2) the neighborhood relationship among the observed sequences mapped in sequence space. The computer experiments of error correction of artificially generated sequences supported the effectiveness of our method, showing that 50-90% of errors were removed. Interestingly, this method is analogous to a probabilistic model based method of image restoration developed in the field of information engineering.

  19. Second generation sequencing of the mesothelioma tumor genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Bueno

    Full Text Available The current paradigm for elucidating the molecular etiology of cancers relies on the interrogation of small numbers of genes, which limits the scope of investigation. Emerging second-generation massively parallel DNA sequencing technologies have enabled more precise definition of the cancer genome on a global scale. We examined the genome of a human primary malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM tumor and matched normal tissue by using a combination of sequencing-by-synthesis and pyrosequencing methodologies to a 9.6X depth of coverage. Read density analysis uncovered significant aneuploidy and numerous rearrangements. Method-dependent informatics rules, which combined the results of different sequencing platforms, were developed to identify and validate candidate mutations of multiple types. Many more tumor-specific rearrangements than point mutations were uncovered at this depth of sequencing, resulting in novel, large-scale, inter- and intra-chromosomal deletions, inversions, and translocations. Nearly all candidate point mutations appeared to be previously unknown SNPs. Thirty tumor-specific fusions/translocations were independently validated with PCR and Sanger sequencing. Of these, 15 represented disrupted gene-encoding regions, including kinases, transcription factors, and growth factors. One large deletion in DPP10 resulted in altered transcription and expression of DPP10 transcripts in a set of 53 additional MPM tumors correlated with survival. Additionally, three point mutations were observed in the coding regions of NKX6-2, a transcription regulator, and NFRKB, a DNA-binding protein involved in modulating NFKB1. Several regions containing genes such as PCBD2 and DHFR, which are involved in growth factor signaling and nucleotide synthesis, respectively, were selectively amplified in the tumor. Second-generation sequencing uncovered all types of mutations in this MPM tumor, with DNA rearrangements representing the dominant type.

  20. Advanced sequencing technologies and their wider impact in microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Neil

    2007-05-01

    In the past 10 years, microbiology has undergone a revolution that has been driven by access to cheap high-throughput DNA sequencing. It was not long ago that the cloning and sequencing of a target gene could take months or years, whereas now this entire process has been replaced by a 10 min Internet search of a public genome database. There has been no single innovation that has initiated this rapid technological change; in fact, the core chemistry of DNA sequencing is the same as it was 30 years ago. Instead, progress has been driven by large sequencing centers that have incrementally industrialized the Sanger sequencing method. A side effect of this industrialization is that large-scale sequencing has moved out of small research labs, and the vast majority of sequence data is now generated by large genome centers. Recently, there have been advances in technology that will enable high-throughput genome sequencing to be established in research labs using bench-top instrumentation. These new technologies are already being used to explore the vast microbial diversity in the natural environment and the untapped genetic variation that can occur in bacterial species. It is expected that these powerful new methods will open up new questions to genomic investigation and will also allow high-throughput sequencing to be more than just a discovery exercise but also a routine assay for hypothesis testing. While this review will concentrate on microorganisms, many of the important arguments about the need to measure and understand variation at the species, population and ecosystem level will hold true for many other biological systems.

  1. Perspectives of Integrative Cancer Genomics in Next Generation Sequencing Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Mee Kwon

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The explosive development of genomics technologies including microarrays and next generation sequencing (NGS has provided comprehensive maps of cancer genomes, including the expression of mRNAs and microRNAs, DNA copy numbers, sequence variations, and epigenetic changes. These genome-wide profiles of the genetic aberrations could reveal the candidates for diagnostic and/or prognostic biomarkers as well as mechanistic insights into tumor development and progression. Recent efforts to establish the huge cancer genome compendium and integrative omics analyses, so-called "integromics", have extended our understanding on the cancer genome, showing its daunting complexity and heterogeneity. However, the challenges of the structured integration, sharing, and interpretation of the big omics data still remain to be resolved. Here, we review several issues raised in cancer omics data analysis, including NGS, focusing particularly on the study design and analysis strategies. This might be helpful to understand the current trends and strategies of the rapidly evolving cancer genomics research.

  2. Sequence assembly using next generation sequencing data--challenges and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Francis Y L; Leung, Henry C M; Yiu, S M

    2014-11-01

    Sequence assembling is an important step for bioinformatics study. With the help of next generation sequencing (NGS) technology, high throughput DNA fragment (reads) can be randomly sampled from DNA or RNA molecular sequence. However, as the positions of reads being sampled are unknown, assembling process is required for combining overlapped reads to reconstruct the original DNA or RNA sequence. Compared with traditional Sanger sequencing methods, although the throughput of NGS reads increases, the read length is shorter and the error rate is higher. It introduces several problems in assembling. Moreover, paired-end reads instead of single-end reads can be sampled which contain more information. The existing assemblers cannot fully utilize this information and fails to assemble longer contigs. In this article, we will revisit the major problems of assembling NGS reads on genomic, transcriptomic, metagenomic and metatranscriptomic data. We will also describe our IDBA package for solving these problems. IDBA package has adopted several novel ideas in assembling, including using multiple k, local assembling and progressive depth removal. Compared with existence assemblers, IDBA has better performance on many simulated and real sequencing datasets.

  3. Sequencing of Ebola Virus Genomes Using Nanopore Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Sequencing of virus genomes during disease outbreaks can provide valuable information for diagnostics, epidemiology, and evaluation of potential countermeasures. However, particularly in remote areas logistical and technical challenges can be significant. Nanopore sequencing provides an alternative to classical Sanger and next-generation sequencing methods, and was successfully used under outbreak conditions (Hoenen et al., 2016; Quick et al., 2016). Here we describe a protocol used for sequencing of Ebola virus under outbreak conditions using Nanopore technology, which we successfully implemented at the CDC/NIH diagnostic laboratory (de Wit et al., 2016) located at the ELWA-3 Ebola virus Treatment Unit in Monrovia, Liberia, during the recent Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa.

  4. Advanced technologies on steam generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakata, Kaoru; Nakamura, Yuuki [Mitsubishi Heavy Industry Co., Takasago (Japan); Nakamori, Nobuo; Mizutani, Toshiyuki; Uwagawa, Seiichi; Saito, Itaru [Mitsubishi Heavy Industry Co., Kobe (Japan); Matsuoka, Tsuyoshi [Mitsubishi Heavy Industry Co., Yokohama (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    The thermal-hydraulic tests for a horizontal steam generator of a next-generation PWR (New PWR-21) were performed. The purpose of these tests is to understand the thermal-hydraulic behavior in the secondary side of horizontal steam generator during the plant normal operation. A test was carried out with cross section slice model simulated the straight tube region. In this paper, the results of the test is reported, and the effect of the horizontal steam generator internals on the thermalhydraulic behavior of the secondary side and the circulation characteristics of the secondary side are discussed. (orig.). 3 refs.

  5. Next-Generation Sequencing and Genome Editing in Plant Virology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Hadidi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS has been applied to plant virology since 2009. NGS provides highly efficient, rapid, low cost DNA or RNA high-throughput sequencing of the genomes of plant viruses and viroids and of the specific small RNAs generated during the infection process. These small RNAs, which cover frequently the whole genome of the infectious agent, are 21-24 nt long and are known as vsRNAs for viruses and vd-sRNAs for viroids. NGS has been used in a number of studies in plant virology including, but not limited to, discovery of novel viruses and viroids as well as detection and identification of those pathogens already known, analysis of genome diversity and evolution, and study of pathogen epidemiology. The genome engineering editing method, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-Cas9 system has been successfully used recently to engineer resistance to DNA geminiviruses (family, Geminiviridae by targeting different viral genome sequences in infected Nicotiana benthamiana or Arabidopsis plants. The DNA viruses targeted include tomato yellow leaf curl virus and merremia mosaic virus (begomovirus; beet curly top virus and beet severe curly top virus (curtovirus; and bean yellow dwarf virus (mastrevirus. The technique has also been used against the RNA viruses zucchini yellow mosaic virus, papaya ringspot virus and turnip mosaic virus (potyvirus and cucumber vein yellowing virus (ipomovirus, family, Potyviridae by targeting the translation initiation genes eIF4E in cucumber or Arabidopsis plants. From these recent advances of major importance, it is expected that NGS and CRISPR-Cas technologies will play a significant role in the very near future in advancing the field of plant virology and connecting it with other related fields of biology.Keywords: Next-generation sequencing, NGS, plant virology, plant viruses, viroids, resistance to plant viruses by CRISPR-Cas9

  6. Applications of next-generation sequencing to phylogeography and phylogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, John E; Hird, Sarah M; Zellmer, Amanda J; Carstens, Bryan C; Brumfield, Robb T

    2013-02-01

    This is a time of unprecedented transition in DNA sequencing technologies. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) clearly holds promise for fast and cost-effective generation of multilocus sequence data for phylogeography and phylogenetics. However, the focus on non-model organisms, in addition to uncertainty about which sample preparation methods and analyses are appropriate for different research questions and evolutionary timescales, have contributed to a lag in the application of NGS to these fields. Here, we outline some of the major obstacles specific to the application of NGS to phylogeography and phylogenetics, including the focus on non-model organisms, the necessity of obtaining orthologous loci in a cost-effective manner, and the predominate use of gene trees in these fields. We describe the most promising methods of sample preparation that address these challenges. Methods that reduce the genome by restriction digest and manual size selection are most appropriate for studies at the intraspecific level, whereas methods that target specific genomic regions (i.e., target enrichment or sequence capture) have wider applicability from the population level to deep-level phylogenomics. Additionally, we give an overview of how to analyze NGS data to arrive at data sets applicable to the standard toolkit of phylogeography and phylogenetics, including initial data processing to alignment and genotype calling (both SNPs and loci involving many SNPs). Even though whole-genome sequencing is likely to become affordable rather soon, because phylogeography and phylogenetics rely on analysis of hundreds of individuals in many cases, methods that reduce the genome to a subset of loci should remain more cost-effective for some time to come.

  7. Generating Functions for the Powers of Fibonacci Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrana, D.; Chen, H.

    2007-01-01

    In this note, based on the Binet formulas and the power-reducing techniques, closed forms of generating functions for the powers of Fibonacci sequences are presented. The corresponding results are extended to some other famous sequences as well.

  8. Next-generation sequencing offers new insights into DNA degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overballe-Petersen, Søren; Orlando, Ludovic Antoine Alexandre; Willerslev, Eske

    2012-01-01

    The processes underlying DNA degradation are central to various disciplines, including cancer research, forensics and archaeology. The sequencing of ancient DNA molecules on next-generation sequencing platforms provides direct measurements of cytosine deamination, depurination and fragmentation r...

  9. Historical perspective, development and applications of next-generation sequencing in plant virology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, Marina; Czosnek, Henryk; Hadidi, Ahmed

    2014-01-06

    Next-generation high throughput sequencing technologies became available at the onset of the 21st century. They provide a highly efficient, rapid, and low cost DNA sequencing platform beyond the reach of the standard and traditional DNA sequencing technologies developed in the late 1970s. They are continually improved to become faster, more efficient and cheaper. They have been used in many fields of biology since 2004. In 2009, next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies began to be applied to several areas of plant virology including virus/viroid genome sequencing, discovery and detection, ecology and epidemiology, replication and transcription. Identification and characterization of known and unknown viruses and/or viroids in infected plants are currently among the most successful applications of these technologies. It is expected that NGS will play very significant roles in many research and non-research areas of plant virology.

  10. Historical Perspective, Development and Applications of Next-Generation Sequencing in Plant Virology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Barba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation high throughput sequencing technologies became available at the onset of the 21st century. They provide a highly efficient, rapid, and low cost DNA sequencing platform beyond the reach of the standard and traditional DNA sequencing technologies developed in the late 1970s. They are continually improved to become faster, more efficient and cheaper. They have been used in many fields of biology since 2004. In 2009, next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies began to be applied to several areas of plant virology including virus/viroid genome sequencing, discovery and detection, ecology and epidemiology, replication and transcription. Identification and characterization of known and unknown viruses and/or viroids in infected plants are currently among the most successful applications of these technologies. It is expected that NGS will play very significant roles in many research and non-research areas of plant virology.

  11. Generating barcoded libraries for multiplex high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Michael; Stiller, Mathias; Meyer, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Molecular barcoding is an essential tool to use the high throughput of next generation sequencing platforms optimally in studies involving more than one sample. Various barcoding strategies allow for the incorporation of short recognition sequences (barcodes) into sequencing libraries, either by ligation or polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Here, we present two approaches optimized for generating barcoded sequencing libraries from low copy number extracts and amplification products typical of ancient DNA studies.

  12. Metagenomics using next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Lauren; Tyson, Gene W

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, microbial genome sequencing has been restricted to the small number of species that can be grown in pure culture. The progressive development of culture-independent methods over the last 15 years now allows researchers to sequence microbial communities directly from environmental samples. This approach is commonly referred to as "metagenomics" or "community genomics". However, the term metagenomics is applied liberally in the literature to describe any culture-independent analysis of microbial communities. Here, we define metagenomics as shotgun ("random") sequencing of the genomic DNA of a sample taken directly from the environment. The metagenome can be thought of as a sampling of the collective genome of the microbial community. We outline the considerations and analyses that should be undertaken to ensure the success of a metagenomic sequencing project, including the choice of sequencing platform and methods for assembly, binning, annotation, and comparative analysis.

  13. Photonic Arbitrary Waveform Generation Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    radar/ lidar , optical communications, and signal processing. Our key achievements are as follows: • Frequency domain based architecture using...and combining the result onto a photodetector . The derivative of the time varying voltage applied to the phase modulator determines the addition... photodetectors would also be warranted. 28 References [1] K. Nosu, “Advanced coherent lightwave technologies,” IEEE Commun. Magn,, vol. 26

  14. Next-generation DNA barcoding: using next-generation sequencing to enhance and accelerate DNA barcode capture from single specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokralla, Shadi; Gibson, Joel F; Nikbakht, Hamid; Janzen, Daniel H; Hallwachs, Winnie; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad

    2014-09-01

    DNA barcoding is an efficient method to identify specimens and to detect undescribed/cryptic species. Sanger sequencing of individual specimens is the standard approach in generating large-scale DNA barcode libraries and identifying unknowns. However, the Sanger sequencing technology is, in some respects, inferior to next-generation sequencers, which are capable of producing millions of sequence reads simultaneously. Additionally, direct Sanger sequencing of DNA barcode amplicons, as practiced in most DNA barcoding procedures, is hampered by the need for relatively high-target amplicon yield, coamplification of nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes, confusion with sequences from intracellular endosymbiotic bacteria (e.g. Wolbachia) and instances of intraindividual variability (i.e. heteroplasmy). Any of these situations can lead to failed Sanger sequencing attempts or ambiguity of the generated DNA barcodes. Here, we demonstrate the potential application of next-generation sequencing platforms for parallel acquisition of DNA barcode sequences from hundreds of specimens simultaneously. To facilitate retrieval of sequences obtained from individual specimens, we tag individual specimens during PCR amplification using unique 10-mer oligonucleotides attached to DNA barcoding PCR primers. We employ 454 pyrosequencing to recover full-length DNA barcodes of 190 specimens using 12.5% capacity of a 454 sequencing run (i.e. two lanes of a 16 lane run). We obtained an average of 143 sequence reads for each individual specimen. The sequences produced are full-length DNA barcodes for all but one of the included specimens. In a subset of samples, we also detected Wolbachia, nontarget species, and heteroplasmic sequences. Next-generation sequencing is of great value because of its protocol simplicity, greatly reduced cost per barcode read, faster throughout and added information content.

  15. Genomic relationships computed from either next- generation sequence or array SNP data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez Enciso, M.

    2014-01-01

    The use of sequence data in genomic prediction models is a topic of high interest, given the decreasing prices of current next'-generation sequencing technologies (NGS) and the theoretical possibility of directly interrogating the genomes for all causal mutations. Here, we compare by simulation how

  16. Exploring the potential of next-generation sequencing in detection of respiratory Viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Prachayangprecha (Slinporn); C.M.E. Schapendonk (Claudia); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); A. Schürch (Anita); S.D. Pas (Suzan); A.A. Eijck (Annemiek); Y. Poovorawan (Yong); B.L. Haagmans (Bart); S.L. Smits (Saskia)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractEfficient detection of human respiratory viral pathogens is crucial in the management of patients with acute respiratory tract infection. Sequence-independent amplification of nucleic acids combined with next-generation sequencing technology and bioinformatics analyses is a promising str

  17. Chaotic block iterating method for pseudo-random sequence generator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shuai; ZHONG Xian-xin

    2007-01-01

    A pseudo-random sequence generator is a basic tool for cryptography. To realize a pseudo-random sequence generator, a new block iterating method using shifter, multiplier,and adder operations has been introduced. By increasing the iteration of the counter and by performing calculations based on the initial value, an approximate pseudo-random sequence was obtained after exchanging bits. The algorithm and the complexity of the generator were introduced. The result obtained from the calculation shows that the self-correlation of the "m" block sequence is two-valued; the block field value is [0,2m - 1 ], and the block period is 2m+8 - 1.

  18. Pseudo-Random Sequences Generator Based on Discrete Hyperchaotic Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李昌刚; 韩正之

    2003-01-01

    We first design a discrete hyperchaotic system via piecewise linear state feedback. The states of the closed loop system are locally expanding in two directions but absolutely bounded on the whole, which implies hyperchaos. Then, we use three suchlike hyperchaotie systems with different feedback gain matrices to design a pseudo-random sequence generator (PRSG). Through a threshold function, three sub-sequences generated from the output of piecewise linear functions are changed into 0-1 sequences. Then, followed by XOR operation, an unpredictable pseudo-random sequence (PRS) is ultimately obtained. The analysis and simulation results indicate that the PRS, generated with hyperchaotic systems, has desirable statistical features.

  19. Image encryption using random sequence generated from generalized information domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia-Yan, Zhang; Guo-Ji, Zhang; Xuan, Li; Ya-Zhou, Ren; Jie-Hua, Wu

    2016-05-01

    A novel image encryption method based on the random sequence generated from the generalized information domain and permutation-diffusion architecture is proposed. The random sequence is generated by reconstruction from the generalized information file and discrete trajectory extraction from the data stream. The trajectory address sequence is used to generate a P-box to shuffle the plain image while random sequences are treated as keystreams. A new factor called drift factor is employed to accelerate and enhance the performance of the random sequence generator. An initial value is introduced to make the encryption method an approximately one-time pad. Experimental results show that the random sequences pass the NIST statistical test with a high ratio and extensive analysis demonstrates that the new encryption scheme has superior security.

  20. Automated Testing with Targeted Event Sequence Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Casper Svenning; Prasad, Mukul R.; Møller, Anders

    2013-01-01

    of the individual event handlers of the application. The second phase builds event sequences backward from the target, using the summaries together with a UI model of the application. Our experiments on a collection of open source Android applications show that this technique can successfully produce event...

  1. Automated Testing with Targeted Event Sequence Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Casper Svenning; Prasad, Mukul R.; Møller, Anders

    2013-01-01

    of the individual event handlers of the application. The second phase builds event sequences backward from the target, using the summaries together with a UI model of the application. Our experiments on a collection of open source Android applications show that this technique can successfully produce event...

  2. Spot-Based Generations for Meta-Fibonacci Sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Dalton, Barnaby; Tanny, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    For many meta-Fibonacci sequences it is possible to identify a partition of the sequence into successive intervals (sometimes called blocks) with the property that the sequence behaves "similarly" in each block. This partition provides insights into the sequence properties. To date, for any given sequence, only ad hoc methods have been available to identify this partition. We apply a new concept - the spot-based generation sequence - to derive a general methodology for identifying this partition for a large class of meta-Fibonacci sequences. This class includes the Conolly and Conway sequences and many of their well-behaved variants, and even some highly chaotic sequences, such as Hofstadter's famous Q-sequence.

  3. Multi-platform next-generation sequencing of the domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) genome assembly and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Next-generation sequencing technologies were used to rapidly and efficiently sequence the genome of the domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo). The current genome assembly (~1.1 Gb) includes 917 Mb of sequence assigned to chromosomes. Innate heterozygosity of the sequenced bird allowed discovery of...

  4. Unrevealed mosaicism in the next-generation sequencing era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajecka, Marzena

    2016-04-01

    Mosaicism refers to the presence in an individual of normal and abnormal cells that are genotypically distinct and are derived from a single zygote. The incidence of mosaicism events in the human body is underestimated as the genotypes in the mosaic ratio, especially in the low-grade mosaicism, stay unrevealed. This review summarizes various research outcomes and diagnostic questions in relation to different types of mosaicism. The impact of both tested biological material and applied method on the mosaicism detection rate is especially highlighted. As next-generation sequencing technologies constitute a promising methodological solution in mosaicism detection in the coming years, revisions in current diagnostic protocols are necessary to increase the detection rate of the unrevealed mosaicism events. Since mosaicism identification is a complex process, numerous examples of multistep mosaicism investigations are presented and discussed.

  5. Applications of Next-generation Sequencing in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyangzi Ma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Systemic autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous disorders caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Although numerous causal genes have been identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS, these susceptibility genes are correlated to a relatively low disease risk, indicating that environmental factors also play an important role in the pathogenesis of disease. The intestinal microbiome, as the main symbiotic ecosystem between the host and host-associated microorganisms, has been demonstrated to regulate the development of the body’s immune system and is likely related to genetic mutations in systemic autoimmune diseases. Next-generation sequencing (NGS technology, with high-throughput capacity and accuracy, provides a powerful tool to discover genomic mutations, abnormal transcription and intestinal microbiome identification for autoimmune diseases. In this review, we briefly outlined the applications of NGS in systemic autoimmune diseases. This review may provide a reference for future studies in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases.

  6. Applications of Next-generation Sequencing in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yiyangzi Ma; Na Shi; Mengtao Li; Fei Chen; Haitao Niu

    2015-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous disorders caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Although numerous causal genes have been identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS), these susceptibility genes are correlated to a relatively low disease risk, indicating that environmental factors also play an important role in the pathogen-esis of disease. The intestinal microbiome, as the main symbiotic ecosystem between the host and host-associated microorganisms, has been demonstrated to regulate the development of the body’s immune system and is likely related to genetic mutations in systemic autoimmune diseases. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, with high-throughput capacity and accuracy, provides a powerful tool to discover genomic mutations, abnormal transcription and intestinal microbiome identification for autoimmune diseases. In this review, we briefly outlined the applications of NGS in systemic autoimmune diseases. This review may provide a reference for future studies in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases.

  7. Reconciling proteomics with next generation sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Low, Teck Yew; Heck, Albert Jr

    2015-01-01

    Both genomics and proteomics technologies have matured in the last decade to a level where they are able to deliver system-wide data on the qualitative and quantitative abundance of their respective molecular entities, that is DNA/RNA and proteins. A next logical step is the collective use of these

  8. Next-Generation Sequencing and Genome Editing in Plant Virology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadidi, Ahmed; Flores, Ricardo; Candresse, Thierry; Barba, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has been applied to plant virology since 2009. NGS provides highly efficient, rapid, low cost DNA, or RNA high-throughput sequencing of the genomes of plant viruses and viroids and of the specific small RNAs generated during the infection process. These small RNAs, which cover frequently the whole genome of the infectious agent, are 21-24 nt long and are known as vsRNAs for viruses and vd-sRNAs for viroids. NGS has been used in a number of studies in plant virology including, but not limited to, discovery of novel viruses and viroids as well as detection and identification of those pathogens already known, analysis of genome diversity and evolution, and study of pathogen epidemiology. The genome engineering editing method, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 system has been successfully used recently to engineer resistance to DNA geminiviruses (family, Geminiviridae) by targeting different viral genome sequences in infected Nicotiana benthamiana or Arabidopsis plants. The DNA viruses targeted include tomato yellow leaf curl virus and merremia mosaic virus (begomovirus); beet curly top virus and beet severe curly top virus (curtovirus); and bean yellow dwarf virus (mastrevirus). The technique has also been used against the RNA viruses zucchini yellow mosaic virus, papaya ringspot virus and turnip mosaic virus (potyvirus) and cucumber vein yellowing virus (ipomovirus, family, Potyviridae) by targeting the translation initiation genes eIF4E in cucumber or Arabidopsis plants. From these recent advances of major importance, it is expected that NGS and CRISPR-Cas technologies will play a significant role in the very near future in advancing the field of plant virology and connecting it with other related fields of biology.

  9. Next-Generation Sequencing and Genome Editing in Plant Virology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadidi, Ahmed; Flores, Ricardo; Candresse, Thierry; Barba, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has been applied to plant virology since 2009. NGS provides highly efficient, rapid, low cost DNA, or RNA high-throughput sequencing of the genomes of plant viruses and viroids and of the specific small RNAs generated during the infection process. These small RNAs, which cover frequently the whole genome of the infectious agent, are 21–24 nt long and are known as vsRNAs for viruses and vd-sRNAs for viroids. NGS has been used in a number of studies in plant virology including, but not limited to, discovery of novel viruses and viroids as well as detection and identification of those pathogens already known, analysis of genome diversity and evolution, and study of pathogen epidemiology. The genome engineering editing method, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 system has been successfully used recently to engineer resistance to DNA geminiviruses (family, Geminiviridae) by targeting different viral genome sequences in infected Nicotiana benthamiana or Arabidopsis plants. The DNA viruses targeted include tomato yellow leaf curl virus and merremia mosaic virus (begomovirus); beet curly top virus and beet severe curly top virus (curtovirus); and bean yellow dwarf virus (mastrevirus). The technique has also been used against the RNA viruses zucchini yellow mosaic virus, papaya ringspot virus and turnip mosaic virus (potyvirus) and cucumber vein yellowing virus (ipomovirus, family, Potyviridae) by targeting the translation initiation genes eIF4E in cucumber or Arabidopsis plants. From these recent advances of major importance, it is expected that NGS and CRISPR-Cas technologies will play a significant role in the very near future in advancing the field of plant virology and connecting it with other related fields of biology. PMID:27617007

  10. NGS Catalog: A Database of Next Generation Sequencing Studies in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, Junfeng; Wang, Qingguo; Jia, Peilin; Wang, Bing; Pao, William; Zhao, Zhongming

    2012-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have been rapidly applied in biomedical and biological research since its advent only a few years ago, and they are expected to advance at an unprecedented pace in the following years. To provide the research community with a comprehensive NGS resource, we have developed the database Next Generation Sequencing Catalog (NGS Catalog, http://bioinfo.mc.vanderbilt.edu/NGS/index.html), a continually updated database that collects, curates and manages a...

  11. Solar power generation technology, new concepts & policy

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, P Jayarama

    2012-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the current state of affairs in the field of solar power engineering from a global perspective. In four parts, this well-researched volume informs about (1) established solar PV (photovoltaic) technologies; (2) third-generation PV technologies based on new materials with potential for low-cost large-scale production; (3) solar cell technology based on new (third-generation) concepts such as quantum dot solar cells and nano wire solar cells using silicon and compound semiconductors; and (4) economic implications and effects, as well as policies and incentives i

  12. De Novo Assembly of Human Herpes Virus Type 1 (HHV-1) Genome, Mining of Non-Canonical Structures and Detection of Novel Drug-Resistance Mutations Using Short- and Long-Read Next Generation Sequencing Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamitros, Timokratis; Harrison, Ian; Piorkowska, Renata; Katzourakis, Aris; Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Mbisa, Jean Lutamyo

    2016-01-01

    Human herpesvirus type 1 (HHV-1) has a large double-stranded DNA genome of approximately 152 kbp that is structurally complex and GC-rich. This makes the assembly of HHV-1 whole genomes from short-read sequencing data technically challenging. To improve the assembly of HHV-1 genomes we have employed a hybrid genome assembly protocol using data from two sequencing technologies: the short-read Roche 454 and the long-read Oxford Nanopore MinION sequencers. We sequenced 18 HHV-1 cell culture-isolated clinical specimens collected from immunocompromised patients undergoing antiviral therapy. The susceptibility of the samples to several antivirals was determined by plaque reduction assay. Hybrid genome assembly resulted in a decrease in the number of contigs in 6 out of 7 samples and an increase in N(G)50 and N(G)75 of all 7 samples sequenced by both technologies. The approach also enhanced the detection of non-canonical contigs including a rearrangement between the unique (UL) and repeat (T/IRL) sequence regions of one sample that was not detectable by assembly of 454 reads alone. We detected several known and novel resistance-associated mutations in UL23 and UL30 genes. Genome-wide genetic variability ranged from assembly of accurate, full-length HHV-1 genomes will be useful in determining genetic determinants of drug resistance, virulence, pathogenesis and viral evolution. The numerous, complex repeat regions of the HHV-1 genome currently remain a barrier towards this goal.

  13. Efficient coroutine generation of constrained Gray sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Knuth, Donald E

    2009-01-01

    We study an interesting family of cooperating coroutines, which is able to generate all patterns of bits that satisfy certain fairly general ordering constraints, changing only one bit at a time. (More precisely, the directed graph of constraints is required to be cycle-free when it is regarded as an undirected graph.) If the coroutines are implemented carefully, they yield an algorithm that needs only a bounded amount of computation per bit change, thereby solving an open problem in the field of combinatorial pattern generation.

  14. A viable technology to generate third-generation biofuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Anoop; Olsen, Stig Irving; Nigam, Poonam Singh

    2011-01-01

    First generation biofuels are commercialized at large as the production technologies are well developed. However, to grow the raw materials, there is a great need to compromise with food security, which made first generation biofuels not so much promising. The second generation of biofuels does...... not have direct competition with food but requires several energy intensive processes to produce them and also increase the land use change, which reduces its environmental and economical feasibility. The third generation biofuels production avoids issues with first and second generation biofuels, viz...... of organic waste and carbon dioxide in flue gases for the production of biomass further increases the sustainability of third generation biofuels, as it does minimize greenhouse gases emission and disposal problems....

  15. Generation of hierarchically correlated multivariate symbolic sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Tumminello, Mi; Mantegna, R N

    2008-01-01

    We introduce an algorithm to generate multivariate series of symbols from a finite alphabet with a given hierarchical structure of similarities. The target hierarchical structure of similarities is arbitrary, for instance the one obtained by some hierarchical clustering procedure as applied to an empirical matrix of Hamming distances. The algorithm can be interpreted as the finite alphabet equivalent of the recently introduced hierarchically nested factor model (M. Tumminello et al. EPL 78 (3) 30006 (2007)). The algorithm is based on a generating mechanism that is different from the one used in the mutation rate approach. We apply the proposed methodology for investigating the relationship between the bootstrap value associated with a node of a phylogeny and the probability of finding that node in the true phylogeny.

  16. Visual programming for next-generation sequencing data analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milicchio, Franco; Rose, Rebecca; Bian, Jiang; Min, Jae; Prosperi, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput or next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have become an established and affordable experimental framework in biological and medical sciences for all basic and translational research. Processing and analyzing NGS data is challenging. NGS data are big, heterogeneous, sparse, and error prone. Although a plethora of tools for NGS data analysis has emerged in the past decade, (i) software development is still lagging behind data generation capabilities, and (ii) there is a 'cultural' gap between the end user and the developer. Generic software template libraries specifically developed for NGS can help in dealing with the former problem, whilst coupling template libraries with visual programming may help with the latter. Here we scrutinize the state-of-the-art low-level software libraries implemented specifically for NGS and graphical tools for NGS analytics. An ideal developing environment for NGS should be modular (with a native library interface), scalable in computational methods (i.e. serial, multithread, distributed), transparent (platform-independent), interoperable (with external software interface), and usable (via an intuitive graphical user interface). These characteristics should facilitate both the run of standardized NGS pipelines and the development of new workflows based on technological advancements or users' needs. We discuss in detail the potential of a computational framework blending generic template programming and visual programming that addresses all of the current limitations. In the long term, a proper, well-developed (although not necessarily unique) software framework will bridge the current gap between data generation and hypothesis testing. This will eventually facilitate the development of novel diagnostic tools embedded in routine healthcare.

  17. Short barcodes for next generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Mir

    Full Text Available We consider the design and evaluation of short barcodes, with a length between six and eight nucleotides, used for parallel sequencing on platforms where substitution errors dominate. Such codes should have not only good error correction properties but also the code words should fulfil certain biological constraints (experimental parameters. We compare published barcodes with codes obtained by two new constructions methods, one based on the currently best known linear codes and a simple randomized construction method. The evaluation done is with respect to the error correction capabilities, barcode size and their experimental parameters and fundamental bounds on the code size and their distance properties. We provide a list of codes for lengths between six and eight nucleotides, where for length eight, two substitution errors can be corrected. In fact, no code with larger minimum distance can exist.

  18. Short barcodes for next generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Katharina; Neuhaus, Klaus; Bossert, Martin; Schober, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    We consider the design and evaluation of short barcodes, with a length between six and eight nucleotides, used for parallel sequencing on platforms where substitution errors dominate. Such codes should have not only good error correction properties but also the code words should fulfil certain biological constraints (experimental parameters). We compare published barcodes with codes obtained by two new constructions methods, one based on the currently best known linear codes and a simple randomized construction method. The evaluation done is with respect to the error correction capabilities, barcode size and their experimental parameters and fundamental bounds on the code size and their distance properties. We provide a list of codes for lengths between six and eight nucleotides, where for length eight, two substitution errors can be corrected. In fact, no code with larger minimum distance can exist.

  19. From Conventional to Next Generation Sequencing of Epstein-Barr Virus Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Hin; Chiang, Alan Kwok Shing

    2016-02-24

    Genomic sequences of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) have been of interest because the virus is associated with cancers, such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and conditions such as infectious mononucleosis. The progress of whole-genome EBV sequencing has been limited by the inefficiency and cost of the first-generation sequencing technology. With the advancement of next-generation sequencing (NGS) and target enrichment strategies, increasing number of EBV genomes has been published. These genomes were sequenced using different approaches, either with or without EBV DNA enrichment. This review provides an overview of the EBV genomes published to date, and a description of the sequencing technology and bioinformatic analyses employed in generating these sequences. We further explored ways through which the quality of sequencing data can be improved, such as using DNA oligos for capture hybridization, and longer insert size and read length in the sequencing runs. These advances will enable large-scale genomic sequencing of EBV which will facilitate a better understanding of the genetic variations of EBV in different geographic regions and discovery of potentially pathogenic variants in specific diseases.

  20. Next generation sequencing in clinical medicine: Challenges and lessons for pathology and biomedical informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rama R Gullapalli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Human Genome Project (HGP provided the initial draft of mankind′s DNA sequence in 2001. The HGP was produced by 23 collaborating laboratories using Sanger sequencing of mapped regions as well as shotgun sequencing techniques in a process that occupied 13 years at a cost of ~$3 billion. Today, Next Generation Sequencing (NGS techniques represent the next phase in the evolution of DNA sequencing technology at dramatically reduced cost compared to traditional Sanger sequencing. A single laboratory today can sequence the entire human genome in a few days for a few thousand dollars in reagents and staff time. Routine whole exome or even whole genome sequencing of clinical patients is well within the realm of affordability for many academic institutions across the country. This paper reviews current sequencing technology methods and upcoming advancements in sequencing technology as well as challenges associated with data generation, data manipulation and data storage. Implementation of routine NGS data in cancer genomics is discussed along with potential pitfalls in the interpretation of the NGS data. The overarching importance of bioinformatics in the clinical implementation of NGS is emphasized. [7] We also review the issue of physician education which also is an important consideration for the successful implementation of NGS in the clinical workplace. NGS technologies represent a golden opportunity for the next generation of pathologists to be at the leading edge of the personalized medicine approaches coming our way. Often under-emphasized issues of data access and control as well as potential ethical implications of whole genome NGS sequencing are also discussed. Despite some challenges, it′s hard not to be optimistic about the future of personalized genome sequencing and its potential impact on patient care and the advancement of knowledge of human biology and disease in the near future.

  1. Genomic and Functional Characteristics of Human Cytomegalovirus Revealed by Next-Generation Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Sijmons

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The complete genome of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV was elucidated almost 25 years ago using a traditional cloning and Sanger sequencing approach. Analysis of the genetic content of additional laboratory and clinical isolates has lead to a better, albeit still incomplete, definition of the coding potential and diversity of wild-type HCMV strains. The introduction of a new generation of massively parallel sequencing technologies, collectively called next-generation sequencing, has profoundly increased the throughput and resolution of the genomics field. These increased possibilities are already leading to a better understanding of the circulating diversity of HCMV clinical isolates. The higher resolution of next-generation sequencing provides new opportunities in the study of intrahost viral population structures. Furthermore, deep sequencing enables novel diagnostic applications for sensitive drug resistance mutation detection. RNA-seq applications have changed the picture of the HCMV transcriptome, which resulted in proof of a vast amount of splicing events and alternative transcripts. This review discusses the application of next-generation sequencing technologies, which has provided a clearer picture of the intricate nature of the HCMV genome. The continuing development and application of novel sequencing technologies will further augment our understanding of this ubiquitous, but elusive, herpesvirus.

  2. Next Generation Sequencing of Ancient DNA: Requirements, Strategies and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Knapp

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The invention of next-generation-sequencing has revolutionized almost all fields of genetics, but few have profited from it as much as the field of ancient DNA research. From its beginnings as an interesting but rather marginal discipline, ancient DNA research is now on its way into the centre of evolutionary biology. In less than a year from its invention next-generation-sequencing had increased the amount of DNA sequence data available from extinct organisms by several orders of magnitude. Ancient DNA  research is now not only adding a temporal aspect to evolutionary studies and allowing for the observation of evolution in real time, it also provides important data to help understand the origins of our own species. Here we review progress that has been made in next-generation-sequencing of ancient DNA over the past five years and evaluate sequencing strategies and future directions.

  3. Generating Exome Enriched Sequencing Libraries from Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissue DNA for Next-Generation Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marosy, Beth A; Craig, Brian D; Hetrick, Kurt N; Witmer, P Dane; Ling, Hua; Griffith, Sean M; Myers, Benjamin; Ostrander, Elaine A; Stanford, Janet L; Brody, Lawrence C; Doheny, Kimberly F

    2017-01-11

    This unit describes a technique for generating exome-enriched sequencing libraries using DNA extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. Utilizing commercially available kits, we present a low-input FFPE workflow starting with 50 ng of DNA. This procedure includes a repair step to address damage caused by FFPE preservation that improves sequence quality. Subsequently, libraries undergo an in-solution-targeted selection for exons, followed by sequencing using the Illumina next-generation short-read sequencing platform. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. Next-generation sequencing and large genome assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    Henson, Joseph; Tischler, German; Ning, Zemin

    2012-01-01

    The next-generation sequencing (NGS) revolution has drastically reduced time and cost requirements for sequencing of large genomes, and also qualitatively changed the problem of assembly. This article reviews the state of the art in de novo genome assembly, paying particular attention to mammalian-sized genomes. The strengths and weaknesses of the main sequencing platforms are highlighted, leading to a discussion of assembly and the new challenges associated with NGS data. Current approaches ...

  5. ATRF Houses the Latest DNA Sequencing Technologies | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer By the end of October, the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF) will be one of the few facilities in the world to house all of the latest DNA sequencing technologies.

  6. Generating Multiple Base-Resolution DNA Methylomes Using Reduced Representation Bisulfite Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Aniruddha; Rodger, Euan J; Stockwell, Peter A; Le Mée, Gwenn; Morison, Ian M

    2017-01-01

    Reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) is an effective technique for profiling genome-wide DNA methylation patterns in eukaryotes. RRBS couples size selection, bisulfite conversion, and second-generation sequencing to enrich for CpG-dense regions of the genome. The progressive improvement of second-generation sequencing technologies and reduction in cost provided an opportunity to examine the DNA methylation patterns of multiple genomes. Here, we describe a protocol for sequencing multiple RRBS libraries in a single sequencing reaction to generate base-resolution methylomes. Furthermore, we provide a brief guideline for base-calling and data analysis of multiplexed RRBS libraries. These strategies will be useful to perform large-scale, genome-wide DNA methylation analysis.

  7. The Fast Changing Landscape of Sequencing Technologies and Their Impact on Microbial Genome Assemblies and Annotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Quest, Daniel J [ORNL; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Clum, Alicia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Cottingham, Robert W [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2012-01-01

    Background: The emergence of next generation sequencing (NGS) has provided the means for rapid and high throughput sequencing and data generation at low cost, while concomitantly creating a new set of challenges. The number of available assembled microbial genomes continues to grow rapidly and their quality reflects the quality of the sequencing technology used, but also of the analysis software employed for assembly and annotation. Methodology/Principal Findings: In this work, we have explored the quality of the microbial draft genomes across various sequencing technologies. We have compared the draft and finished assemblies of 133 microbial genomes sequenced at the Department of Energy-Joint Genome Institute and finished at the Los Alamos National Laboratory using a variety of combinations of sequencing technologies, reflecting the transition of the institute from Sanger-based sequencing platforms to NGS platforms. The quality of the public assemblies and of the associated gene annotations was evaluated using various metrics. Results obtained with the different sequencing technologies, as well as their effects on downstream processes, were analyzed. Our results demonstrate that the Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing system, the primary sequencing technology currently used for de novo genome sequencing and assembly at JGI, has various advantages in terms of total sequence throughput and cost, but it also introduces challenges for the downstream analyses. In all cases assembly results although on average are of high quality, need to be viewed critically and consider sources of errors in them prior to analysis. Conclusion: These data follow the evolution of microbial sequencing and downstream processing at the JGI from draft genome sequences with large gaps corresponding to missing genes of significant biological role to assemblies with multiple small gaps (Illumina) and finally to assemblies that generate almost complete genomes (Illumina+PacBio).

  8. 高通量测序技术在鉴定木本植物双生病毒中的应用%Application of next-generation sequencing technology in identification of geminiviruses from woody plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马宇欣; 李世访

    2016-01-01

    高通量测序技术(next-generation sequencing,NGS)平台提供了一种高效、快速、低成本、深度测序 DNA 的解决方案,2009年该技术开始被应用于植物病毒学领域,包括新病毒的发现,病害病原的鉴定,病毒基因组多样性及进化的研究,显著加快了植物病毒学的发展进程。迄今,应用高通量测序技术已经成功鉴定了上百种新的植物病毒和类病毒。双生病毒是一类对多种作物造成毁灭性危害的 DNA 病毒,多发生于草本作物。然而利用高通量测序技术,从柑橘、葡萄、苹果和桑树等多种多年生木本植物中检测到了新的双生病毒,显示出了高通量测序技术所独有的、传统检测技术所不具备的优势。本文围绕高通量测度技术在植物病毒学领域的应用进行概述,重点阐述NGS 用于检测木本植物双生病毒的几个实例。%Next-generation sequencing (NGS)platforms provide highly efficient,rapid,low-cost high-throughput DNA sequencing.Since 2009,NGS has been applied to plant virology,including discovery of novel viruses,iden-tification of pathogens and analysis of genome diversity and evolution,which speeds up the process of plant virolo-gy research.Over one hundred novel plant viruses and/or viroids have been successfully identified by NGS so far. Geminiviruses (Family Geminiviridae )with circular,single-stranded DNA genome have caused devastating effect on many crops.To our knowledge,most of them generally infect herbaceous plants.However,many new gemini-viruses,recently identified by NGS,were detected from perennial woody plants like citrus,grapevine,apple and mulberry.These studies have shown the superiority of NGS technology over conventional detection protocols. This paper reviews the application of NGS in plant virology and mainly demonstrates its application in detection of geminiviruses from perennial woody fruit trees.

  9. Novel Frequency Hopping Sequences Generator Based on AES Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李振荣; 庄奕琪; 张博; 张超

    2010-01-01

    A novel frequency hopping(FH) sequences generator based on advanced encryption standard(AES) iterated block cipher is proposed for FH communication systems.The analysis shows that the FH sequences based on AES algorithm have good performance in uniformity, correlation, complexity and security.A high-speed, low-power and low-cost ASIC of FH sequences generator is implemented by optimizing the structure of S-Box and MixColumns of AES algorithm, proposing a hierarchical power management strategy, and applying ...

  10. Entropy Generation Analysis of Desalination Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H. Lienhard V

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing global demand for fresh water is driving the development and implementation of a wide variety of seawater desalination technologies. Entropy generation analysis, and specifically, Second Law efficiency, is an important tool for illustrating the influence of irreversibilities within a system on the required energy input. When defining Second Law efficiency, the useful exergy output of the system must be properly defined. For desalination systems, this is the minimum least work of separation required to extract a unit of water from a feed stream of a given salinity. In order to evaluate the Second Law efficiency, entropy generation mechanisms present in a wide range of desalination processes are analyzed. In particular, entropy generated in the run down to equilibrium of discharge streams must be considered. Physical models are applied to estimate the magnitude of entropy generation by component and individual processes. These formulations are applied to calculate the total entropy generation in several desalination systems including multiple effect distillation, multistage flash, membrane distillation, mechanical vapor compression, reverse osmosis, and humidification-dehumidification. Within each technology, the relative importance of each source of entropy generation is discussed in order to determine which should be the target of entropy generation minimization. As given here, the correct application of Second Law efficiency shows which systems operate closest to the reversible limit and helps to indicate which systems have the greatest potential for improvement.

  11. A tale of three next generation sequencing platforms: comparison of Ion Torrent, Pacific Biosciences and Illumina MiSeq sequencers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quail Michael A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Next generation sequencing (NGS technology has revolutionized genomic and genetic research. The pace of change in this area is rapid with three major new sequencing platforms having been released in 2011: Ion Torrent’s PGM, Pacific Biosciences’ RS and the Illumina MiSeq. Here we compare the results obtained with those platforms to the performance of the Illumina HiSeq, the current market leader. In order to compare these platforms, and get sufficient coverage depth to allow meaningful analysis, we have sequenced a set of 4 microbial genomes with mean GC content ranging from 19.3 to 67.7%. Together, these represent a comprehensive range of genome content. Here we report our analysis of that sequence data in terms of coverage distribution, bias, GC distribution, variant detection and accuracy. Results Sequence generated by Ion Torrent, MiSeq and Pacific Biosciences technologies displays near perfect coverage behaviour on GC-rich, neutral and moderately AT-rich genomes, but a profound bias was observed upon sequencing the extremely AT-rich genome of Plasmodium falciparum on the PGM, resulting in no coverage for approximately 30% of the genome. We analysed the ability to call variants from each platform and found that we could call slightly more variants from Ion Torrent data compared to MiSeq data, but at the expense of a higher false positive rate. Variant calling from Pacific Biosciences data was possible but higher coverage depth was required. Context specific errors were observed in both PGM and MiSeq data, but not in that from the Pacific Biosciences platform. Conclusions All three fast turnaround sequencers evaluated here were able to generate usable sequence. However there are key differences between the quality of that data and the applications it will support.

  12. Applications for Solid Propellant Cool Gas Generator Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der List, M.; van Vliet, L. D.; Sanders, H. M.; Put, P. A. G.; Elst, J. W. E. C.

    2004-10-01

    In 2002 and 2003, Bradford Engineering B.V. conducted, in corporation with the Dutch research institute TNO Prins Maurits Laboratory (PML) a SME study for ESA-ESTEC for the identification of spaceflight applications and on-ground demonstration of Solid Propellant Cool Gas Generator (SPCGG) technology. This innovative technology has been developed by TNO-PML while Bradford Engineering also brought in its experience in spaceflight hardware development and manufacturing. The Solid Propellant Cool Gas Generator (SPCGG) technology allows for pure gas generation at ambient temperatures, as opposed to conventional solid propellant gas generators. This makes the SPCGG technology interesting for a wide range of terrestrial spaceflight applications. During the first part of the study, a variety of potential applications have been identified and three applications were selected for a more detailed quantitative study. In the third phase a ground demonstration was performed successfully for a cold gas propulsion system application. During the actual demonstration test, 10 cool gas generators were mounted and all operated successfully in sequence, demonstrating good repeatability of the produced amount of gas and pressure.

  13. Next-generation sequencing of human mitochondrial reference genomes uncovers high heteroplasmy frequency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ximena Sosa

    Full Text Available We describe methods for rapid sequencing of the entire human mitochondrial genome (mtgenome, which involve long-range PCR for specific amplification of the mtgenome, pyrosequencing, quantitative mapping of sequence reads to identify sequence variants and heteroplasmy, as well as de novo sequence assembly. These methods have been used to study 40 publicly available HapMap samples of European (CEU and African (YRI ancestry to demonstrate a sequencing error rate <5.63×10(-4, nucleotide diversity of 1.6×10(-3 for CEU and 3.7×10(-3 for YRI, patterns of sequence variation consistent with earlier studies, but a higher rate of heteroplasmy varying between 10% and 50%. These results demonstrate that next-generation sequencing technologies allow interrogation of the mitochondrial genome in greater depth than previously possible which may be of value in biology and medicine.

  14. Minimal-Length Interoperability Test Sequences Generation via Genetic Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Ning; KUANG Jing-ming; HE Zun-wen

    2008-01-01

    A novel interoperability test sequences optimization scheme is proposed in which the genetic algo-rithm(GA)is used to obtain the minimal-length interoperability test sequences.During our work,the basicin teroperability test sequences are generated based on the minimal-complete-coverage criterion,which removes the redundancy from conformance test sequences.Then interoperability sequences minimization problem can be considered as an instance of the set covering problem,and the GA is applied to remove redundancy in interoperability transitions.The results show that compared to conventional algorithm,the proposed algorithm is more practical to avoid the state space explosion problem,for it can reduce the length of the test sequences and maintain the same transition coverage.

  15. Simulation-Based Evaluation of Learning Sequences for Instructional Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEneaney, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Instructional technologies critically depend on systematic design, and learning hierarchies are a commonly advocated tool for designing instructional sequences. But hierarchies routinely allow numerous sequences and choosing an optimal sequence remains an unsolved problem. This study explores a simulation-based approach to modeling learning…

  16. Low Diversity in the Mitogenome of Sperm Whales Revealed by Next-Generation Sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander, Alana; Steel, Debbie; Slikas, Beth; Hoekzema, Kendra; Carraher, Colm; Parks, Matthew; Cronn, Richard; Baker, C. Scott

    2012-01-01

    Large population sizes and global distributions generally associate with high mitochondrial DNA control region (CR) diversity. The sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) is an exception, showing low CR diversity relative to other cetaceans; however, diversity levels throughout the remainder of the sperm whale mitogenome are unknown. We sequenced 20 mitogenomes from 17 sperm whales representative of worldwide diversity using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies (Illumina GAIIx, Roche 45...

  17. A non-hyponormal operator generating Stieltjes moment sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Jablonski, Z J; Stochel, J

    2011-01-01

    A linear operator $S$ in a complex Hilbert space $\\hh$ for which the set $\\dzn{S}$ of its $C^\\infty$-vectors is dense in $\\hh$ and $\\{\\|S^n f\\|^2\\}_{n=0}^\\infty$ is a Stieltjes moment sequence for every $f \\in \\dzn{S}$ is said to generate Stieltjes moment sequences. It is shown that there exists a closed non-hyponormal operator $S$ which generates Stieltjes moment sequences. What is more, $\\dzn{S}$ is a core of any power $S^n$ of $S$. This is established with the help of a weighted shift on a directed tree with one branching vertex. The main tool in the construction comes from the theory of indeterminate Stieltjes moment sequences. As a consequence, it is shown that there exists a non-hyponormal composition operator in an $L^2$-space (over a $\\sigma$-finite measure space) which is injective, paranormal and which generates Stieltjes moment sequences. In contrast to the case of abstract Hilbert space operators, composition operators which are formally normal and which generate Stieltjes moment sequences are alw...

  18. Next-Generation Sequencing in Oncology: Genetic Diagnosis, Risk Prediction and Cancer Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick Kamps

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS technology has expanded in the last decades with significant improvements in the reliability, sequencing chemistry, pipeline analyses, data interpretation and costs. Such advances make the use of NGS feasible in clinical practice today. This review describes the recent technological developments in NGS applied to the field of oncology. A number of clinical applications are reviewed, i.e., mutation detection in inherited cancer syndromes based on DNA-sequencing, detection of spliceogenic variants based on RNA-sequencing, DNA-sequencing to identify risk modifiers and application for pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, cancer somatic mutation analysis, pharmacogenetics and liquid biopsy. Conclusive remarks, clinical limitations, implications and ethical considerations that relate to the different applications are provided.

  19. Peptide Synthesis on a Next-Generation DNA Sequencing Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensen, Nina; Peersen, Olve B; Jaffrey, Samie R

    2016-09-01

    Methods for displaying large numbers of peptides on solid surfaces are essential for high-throughput characterization of peptide function and binding properties. Here we describe a method for converting the >10(7) flow cell-bound clusters of identical DNA strands generated by the Illumina DNA sequencing technology into clusters of complementary RNA, and subsequently peptide clusters. We modified the flow-cell-bound primers with ribonucleotides thus enabling them to be used by poliovirus polymerase 3D(pol) . The primers hybridize to the clustered DNA thus leading to RNA clusters. The RNAs fold into functional protein- or small molecule-binding aptamers. We used the mRNA-display approach to synthesize flow-cell-tethered peptides from these RNA clusters. The peptides showed selective binding to cognate antibodies. The methods described here provide an approach for using DNA clusters to template peptide synthesis on an Illumina flow cell, thus providing new opportunities for massively parallel peptide-based assays.

  20. Deep homology in the age of next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschopp, Patrick; Tabin, Clifford J

    2017-02-05

    The principle of homology is central to conceptualizing the comparative aspects of morphological evolution. The distinctions between homologous or non-homologous structures have become blurred, however, as modern evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo) has shown that novel features often result from modification of pre-existing developmental modules, rather than arising completely de novo. With this realization in mind, the term 'deep homology' was coined, in recognition of the remarkably conserved gene expression during the development of certain animal structures that would not be considered homologous by previous strict definitions. At its core, it can help to formulate an understanding of deeper layers of ontogenetic conservation for anatomical features that lack any clear phylogenetic continuity. Here, we review deep homology and related concepts in the context of a gene expression-based homology discussion. We then focus on how these conceptual frameworks have profited from the recent rise of high-throughput next-generation sequencing. These techniques have greatly expanded the range of organisms amenable to such studies. Moreover, they helped to elevate the traditional gene-by-gene comparison to a transcriptome-wide level. We will end with an outlook on the next challenges in the field and how technological advances might provide exciting new strategies to tackle these questions.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evo-devo in the genomics era, and the origins of morphological diversity'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  1. Identification of Nucleotide Variation in Genomes Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Megens, H.J.W.C.; Groenen, M.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Discovery of genome-wide variation has taken a huge leap forward with the introduction of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology. Variant discovery requires sampling of a number of haplotypes. This can be either the two haplotypes of a diploid organism or multiple haplotypes in a population. Va

  2. Efficient application of next-generation sequencing for the diagnosis of rare genetic syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madrigal, I.; Alvarez-Mora, M.I.; Karlberg, O.; Rodriguez-Revenga, L.; Martinez Elurbe, D.; Rabionet, R.; Mur, A.; Pie, J.; Ballesta, F.; Sauer, S.; Syvanen, A.C.; Mila, M.

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: The causes of intellectual disability, which affects 1%-3% of the general population, are highly heterogeneous and the genetic defect remains unknown in around 40% of patients. The application of next-generation sequencing is changing the nature of biomedical diagnosis. This technology has qui

  3. Bringing Next-Generation Sequencing into the Classroom through a Comparison of Molecular Biology Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, Bethany; Zimmer, Erin; Pyatt, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Although the development of next-generation (NextGen) sequencing technologies has revolutionized genomic research and medicine, the incorporation of these topics into the classroom is challenging, given an implied high degree of technical complexity. We developed an easy-to-implement, interactive classroom activity investigating the similarities…

  4. Efficient application of next-generation sequencing for the diagnosis of rare genetic syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madrigal, I.; Alvarez-Mora, M.I.; Karlberg, O.; Rodriguez-Revenga, L.; Martinez Elurbe, D.; Rabionet, R.; Mur, A.; Pie, J.; Ballesta, F.; Sauer, S.; Syvanen, A.C.; Mila, M.

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: The causes of intellectual disability, which affects 1%-3% of the general population, are highly heterogeneous and the genetic defect remains unknown in around 40% of patients. The application of next-generation sequencing is changing the nature of biomedical diagnosis. This technology has qui

  5. Using next generation sequencing for multiplexed trait-linked markers in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the advent of next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have become the major type of marker for genotyping in many crops. However, the availability of SNP markers for important traits of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) that can be effectively used...

  6. Palindromic sequence artifacts generated during next generation sequencing library preparation from historic and ancient DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastiaan Star

    Full Text Available Degradation-specific processes and variation in laboratory protocols can bias the DNA sequence composition from samples of ancient or historic origin. Here, we identify a novel artifact in sequences from historic samples of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua, which forms interrupted palindromes consisting of reverse complementary sequence at the 5' and 3'-ends of sequencing reads. The palindromic sequences themselves have specific properties - the bases at the 5'-end align well to the reference genome, whereas extensive misalignments exists among the bases at the terminal 3'-end. The terminal 3' bases are artificial extensions likely caused by the occurrence of hairpin loops in single stranded DNA (ssDNA, which can be ligated and amplified in particular library creation protocols. We propose that such hairpin loops allow the inclusion of erroneous nucleotides, specifically at the 3'-end of DNA strands, with the 5'-end of the same strand providing the template. We also find these palindromes in previously published ancient DNA (aDNA datasets, albeit at varying and substantially lower frequencies. This artifact can negatively affect the yield of endogenous DNA in these types of samples and introduces sequence bias.

  7. Targeted next generation sequencing reveals a novel intragenic deletion of the TPO gene in a family with intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iqbal, Z.; Neveling, K.; Razzaq, A.; Shahzad, M.; Zahoor, M.Y.; Qasim, M.; Gilissen, C.; Wieskamp, N.; Kwint, M.P.; Gijsen, S.; Brouwer, A.P. de; Veltman, J.A.; Riazuddin, S.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUNDS AND AIMS: Next generation sequencing (NGS) approaches have revolutionized the identification of mutations underlying genetic disorders. This technology is particularly useful for the identification of mutations in known and new genes for conditions with extensive genetic heterogeneity. I

  8. A survey of sequence alignment algorithms for next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Heng; Homer, Nils

    2010-09-01

    Rapidly evolving sequencing technologies produce data on an unparalleled scale. A central challenge to the analysis of this data is sequence alignment, whereby sequence reads must be compared to a reference. A wide variety of alignment algorithms and software have been subsequently developed over the past two years. In this article, we will systematically review the current development of these algorithms and introduce their practical applications on different types of experimental data. We come to the conclusion that short-read alignment is no longer the bottleneck of data analyses. We also consider future development of alignment algorithms with respect to emerging long sequence reads and the prospect of cloud computing.

  9. Identification of optimum sequencing depth especially for de novo genome assembly of small genomes using next generation sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Aarti; Marwah, Veer Singh; Yadav, Akshay; Jha, Vineet; Dhaygude, Kishor; Bangar, Ujwala; Kulkarni, Vivek; Jere, Abhay

    2013-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) is a disruptive technology that has found widespread acceptance in the life sciences research community. The high throughput and low cost of sequencing has encouraged researchers to undertake ambitious genomic projects, especially in de novo genome sequencing. Currently, NGS systems generate sequence data as short reads and de novo genome assembly using these short reads is computationally very intensive. Due to lower cost of sequencing and higher throughput, NGS systems now provide the ability to sequence genomes at high depth. However, currently no report is available highlighting the impact of high sequence depth on genome assembly using real data sets and multiple assembly algorithms. Recently, some studies have evaluated the impact of sequence coverage, error rate and average read length on genome assembly using multiple assembly algorithms, however, these evaluations were performed using simulated datasets. One limitation of using simulated datasets is that variables such as error rates, read length and coverage which are known to impact genome assembly are carefully controlled. Hence, this study was undertaken to identify the minimum depth of sequencing required for de novo assembly for different sized genomes using graph based assembly algorithms and real datasets. Illumina reads for E.coli (4.6 MB) S.kudriavzevii (11.18 MB) and C.elegans (100 MB) were assembled using SOAPdenovo, Velvet, ABySS, Meraculous and IDBA-UD. Our analysis shows that 50X is the optimum read depth for assembling these genomes using all assemblers except Meraculous which requires 100X read depth. Moreover, our analysis shows that de novo assembly from 50X read data requires only 6-40 GB RAM depending on the genome size and assembly algorithm used. We believe that this information can be extremely valuable for researchers in designing experiments and multiplexing which will enable optimum utilization of sequencing as well as analysis resources.

  10. Maturing Technologies for Stirling Space Power Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Nowlin, Brentley C.; Dobbs, Michael W.; Schmitz, Paul C.; Huth, James

    2016-01-01

    Stirling Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) are being developed as an option to provide power on future space science missions where robotic spacecraft will orbit, flyby, land or rove. A Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) could offer space missions a more efficient power system that uses one fourth of the nuclear fuel and decreases the thermal footprint of the current state of the art. The RPS Program Office, working in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), manages projects to develop thermoelectric and dynamic power systems, including Stirling Radioisotope Generators (SRGs). The Stirling Cycle Technology Development (SCTD) Project, located at Glenn Research Center (GRC), is developing Stirling-based subsystems, including convertors and controllers. The SCTD Project also performs research that focuses on a wide variety of objectives, including increasing convertor temperature capability to enable new environments, improving system reliability or fault tolerance, reducing mass or size, and developing advanced concepts that are mission enabling. Research activity includes maturing subsystems, assemblies, and components to prepare them for infusion into future convertor and generator designs. The status of several technology development efforts are described here. As part of the maturation process, technologies are assessed for readiness in higher-level subsystems. To assess the readiness level of the Dual Convertor Controller (DCC), a Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) was performed and the process and results are shown. Stirling technology research is being performed by the SCTD Project for NASA's RPS Program Office, where tasks focus on maturation of Stirling-based systems and subsystems for future space science missions.

  11. Implementation of Targeted Next Generation Sequencing in Clinical Diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Jakob; Burton, Mark; Thomassen, Mads;

    Accurate mutation detection is essential in clinical genetic diagnostics of monogenic hereditary diseases. Targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) provides a promising and cost-effective alternative to Sanger sequencing and MLPA analysis currently used in most diagnostic laboratories. One...... advantage of targeted NGS is that multiple disease-specific genes can easily be sequenced simultaneously, which is favorable in genetic heterogeneous diseases. Prior to implementation in our diagnostic setting, we aimed to assess the sensitivity and specificity of targeted NGS by sequencing a collection......, respectively. For diagnostics, the sequencing coverage is essential, wherefore a minimum coverage of 30x per nucleotide in the coding regions was used as our primary quality criterion. For the majority of the included genes, we obtained adequate gene coverage, in which we were able to detect 100% of the known...

  12. Model-based quality assessment and base-calling for second-generation sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Héctor Corrada; Irizarry, Rafael A

    2010-09-01

    Second-generation sequencing (sec-gen) technology can sequence millions of short fragments of DNA in parallel, making it capable of assembling complex genomes for a small fraction of the price and time of previous technologies. In fact, a recently formed international consortium, the 1000 Genomes Project, plans to fully sequence the genomes of approximately 1200 people. The prospect of comparative analysis at the sequence level of a large number of samples across multiple populations may be achieved within the next five years. These data present unprecedented challenges in statistical analysis. For instance, analysis operates on millions of short nucleotide sequences, or reads-strings of A,C,G, or T's, between 30 and 100 characters long-which are the result of complex processing of noisy continuous fluorescence intensity measurements known as base-calling. The complexity of the base-calling discretization process results in reads of widely varying quality within and across sequence samples. This variation in processing quality results in infrequent but systematic errors that we have found to mislead downstream analysis of the discretized sequence read data. For instance, a central goal of the 1000 Genomes Project is to quantify across-sample variation at the single nucleotide level. At this resolution, small error rates in sequencing prove significant, especially for rare variants. Sec-gen sequencing is a relatively new technology for which potential biases and sources of obscuring variation are not yet fully understood. Therefore, modeling and quantifying the uncertainty inherent in the generation of sequence reads is of utmost importance. In this article, we present a simple model to capture uncertainty arising in the base-calling procedure of the Illumina/Solexa GA platform. Model parameters have a straightforward interpretation in terms of the chemistry of base-calling allowing for informative and easily interpretable metrics that capture the variability in

  13. Next-Generation Sequencing and Genome Editing in Plant Virology

    OpenAIRE

    Hadidi, Ahmed; Flores, Ricardo; Candresse, Thierry; Barba, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has been applied to plant virology since 2009. NGS provides highly efficient, rapid, low cost DNA, or RNA high-throughput sequencing of the genomes of plant viruses and viroids and of the specific small RNAs generated during the infection process. These small RNAs, which cover frequently the whole genome of the infectious agent, are 21–24 nt long and are known as vsRNAs for viruses and vd-sRNAs for viroids. NGS has been used in a number of studies in plant vir...

  14. Next generation sequencing data of a defined microbial mock community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Esther; Andreopoulos, Bill; Bowers, Robert M.; Lee, Janey; Deshpande, Shweta; Chiniquy, Jennifer; Ciobanu, Doina; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Zane, Matthew; Daum, Christopher; Clum, Alicia; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Copeland, Alex; Woyke, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Generating sequence data of a defined community composed of organisms with complete reference genomes is indispensable for the benchmarking of new genome sequence analysis methods, including assembly and binning tools. Moreover the validation of new sequencing library protocols and platforms to assess critical components such as sequencing errors and biases relies on such datasets. We here report the next generation metagenomic sequence data of a defined mock community (Mock Bacteria ARchaea Community; MBARC-26), composed of 23 bacterial and 3 archaeal strains with finished genomes. These strains span 10 phyla and 14 classes, a range of GC contents, genome sizes, repeat content and encompass a diverse abundance profile. Short read Illumina and long-read PacBio SMRT sequences of this mock community are described. These data represent a valuable resource for the scientific community, enabling extensive benchmarking and comparative evaluation of bioinformatics tools without the need to simulate data. As such, these data can aid in improving our current sequence data analysis toolkit and spur interest in the development of new tools. PMID:27673566

  15. DNA Polymerases Drive DNA Sequencing-by-Synthesis Technologies: Both Past and Present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yao eChen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies have revolutionized modern biological and biomedical research. The engines responsible for this innovation are DNA polymerases; they catalyze the biochemical reaction for deriving template sequence information. In fact, DNA polymerase has been a cornerstone of DNA sequencing from the very beginning. E. coli DNA polymerase I proteolytic (Klenow fragment was originally utilized in Sanger's dideoxy chain terminating DNA sequencing chemistry. From these humble beginnings followed an explosion of organism-specific, genome sequence information accessible via public database. Family A/B DNA polymerases from mesophilic/thermophilic bacteria/archaea were modified and tested in today's standard capillary electrophoresis (CE and NGS sequencing platforms. These enzymes were selected for their efficient incorporation of bulky dye-terminator and reversible dye-terminator nucleotides respectively. Third generation, real-time single molecule sequencing platform requires slightly different enzyme properties. Enterobacterial phage ⱷ29 DNA polymerase copies long stretches of DNA and possesses a unique capability to efficiently incorporate terminal phosphate-labeled nucleoside polyphosphates. Furthermore, ⱷ29 enzyme has also been utilized in emerging DNA sequencing technologies including nanopore-, and protein-transistor-based sequencing. DNA polymerase is, and will continue to be, a crucial component of sequencing technologies.

  16. AMPLISAS: a web server for multilocus genotyping using next-generation amplicon sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Alvaro; Herdegen, Magdalena; Migalska, Magdalena; Radwan, Jacek

    2016-03-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are revolutionizing the fields of biology and medicine as powerful tools for amplicon sequencing (AS). Using combinations of primers and barcodes, it is possible to sequence targeted genomic regions with deep coverage for hundreds, even thousands, of individuals in a single experiment. This is extremely valuable for the genotyping of gene families in which locus-specific primers are often difficult to design, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The utility of AS is, however, limited by the high intrinsic sequencing error rates of NGS technologies and other sources of error such as polymerase amplification or chimera formation. Correcting these errors requires extensive bioinformatic post-processing of NGS data. Amplicon Sequence Assignment (AMPLISAS) is a tool that performs analysis of AS results in a simple and efficient way, while offering customization options for advanced users. AMPLISAS is designed as a three-step pipeline consisting of (i) read demultiplexing, (ii) unique sequence clustering and (iii) erroneous sequence filtering. Allele sequences and frequencies are retrieved in excel spreadsheet format, making them easy to interpret. AMPLISAS performance has been successfully benchmarked against previously published genotyped MHC data sets obtained with various NGS technologies.

  17. Application of next generation sequencing to human gene fusion detection: computational tools, features and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingguo; Xia, Junfeng; Jia, Peilin; Pao, William; Zhao, Zhongming

    2013-07-01

    Gene fusions are important genomic events in human cancer because their fusion gene products can drive the development of cancer and thus are potential prognostic tools or therapeutic targets in anti-cancer treatment. Major advancements have been made in computational approaches for fusion gene discovery over the past 3 years due to improvements and widespread applications of high-throughput next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. To identify fusions from NGS data, existing methods typically leverage the strengths of both sequencing technologies and computational strategies. In this article, we review the NGS and computational features of existing methods for fusion gene detection and suggest directions for future development.

  18. Calculation of Tajima's D and other neutrality test statistics from low depth next-generation sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand; Moltke, Ida; Albrechtsen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    A number of different statistics are used for detecting natural selection using DNA sequencing data, including statistics that are summaries of the frequency spectrum, such as Tajima's D. These statistics are now often being applied in the analysis of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) data. However......, estimates of frequency spectra from NGS data are strongly affected by low sequencing coverage; the inherent technology dependent variation in sequencing depth causes systematic differences in the value of the statistic among genomic regions....

  19. Quantitative miRNA expression analysis: comparing microarrays with next-generation sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willenbrock, Hanni; Salomon, Jesper; Søkilde, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    Recently, next-generation sequencing has been introduced as a promising, new platform for assessing the copy number of transcripts, while the existing microarray technology is considered less reliable for absolute, quantitative expression measurements. Nonetheless, so far, results from the two...... technologies have only been compared based on biological data, leading to the conclusion that, although they are somewhat correlated, expression values differ significantly. Here, we use synthetic RNA samples, resembling human microRNA samples, to find that microarray expression measures actually correlate...... better with sample RNA content than expression measures obtained from sequencing data. In addition, microarrays appear highly sensitive and perform equivalently to next-generation sequencing in terms of reproducibility and relative ratio quantification....

  20. Exploring the potential of next-generation sequencing in detection of respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prachayangprecha, Slinporn; Schapendonk, Claudia M E; Koopmans, Marion P; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Schürch, Anita C; Pas, Suzan D; van der Eijk, Annemiek A; Poovorawan, Yong; Haagmans, Bart L; Smits, Saskia L

    2014-10-01

    Efficient detection of human respiratory viral pathogens is crucial in the management of patients with acute respiratory tract infection. Sequence-independent amplification of nucleic acids combined with next-generation sequencing technology and bioinformatics analyses is a promising strategy for identifying pathogens in clinical and public health settings. It allows the characterization of hundreds of different known pathogens simultaneously and of novel pathogens that elude conventional testing. However, major hurdles for its routine use exist, including cost, turnaround time, and especially sensitivity of the assay, as the detection limit is dependent on viral load, host genetic material, and sequencing depth. To obtain insights into these aspects, we analyzed nasopharyngeal aspirates from a cohort of 81 Thai children with respiratory disease for the presence of respiratory viruses using a sequence-independent next-generation sequencing approach and routinely used diagnostic real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (real-time RT-PCR) assays. With respect to the detection of rhinovirus and human metapneumovirus, the next-generation sequencing approach was at least as sensitive as diagnostic real-time RT-PCR in this small cohort, whereas for bocavirus and enterovirus, next-generation sequencing was less sensitive than real-time RT-PCR. The advantage of the sequencing approach over real-time RT-PCR was the immediate availability of virus-typing information. Considering the development of platforms capable of generating more output data at declining costs, next-generation sequencing remains of interest for future virus diagnosis in clinical and public health settings and certainly as an additional tool when screening results from real-time RT-PCR are negative.

  1. Integrated, Automated Distributed Generation Technologies Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Kevin

    2014-09-30

    The purpose of the NETL Project was to develop a diverse combination of distributed renewable generation technologies and controls and demonstrate how the renewable generation could help manage substation peak demand at the ATK Promontory plant site. The Promontory plant site is located in the northwestern Utah desert approximately 25 miles west of Brigham City, Utah. The plant encompasses 20,000 acres and has over 500 buildings. The ATK Promontory plant primarily manufactures solid propellant rocket motors for both commercial and government launch systems. The original project objectives focused on distributed generation; a 100 kW (kilowatt) wind turbine, a 100 kW new technology waste heat generation unit, a 500 kW energy storage system, and an intelligent system-wide automation system to monitor and control the renewable energy devices then release the stored energy during the peak demand time. The original goal was to reduce peak demand from the electrical utility company, Rocky Mountain Power (RMP), by 3.4%. For a period of time we also sought to integrate our energy storage requirements with a flywheel storage system (500 kW) proposed for the Promontory/RMP Substation. Ultimately the flywheel storage system could not meet our project timetable, so the storage requirement was switched to a battery storage system (300 kW.) A secondary objective was to design/install a bi-directional customer/utility gateway application for real-time visibility and communications between RMP, and ATK. This objective was not achieved because of technical issues with RMP, ATK Information Technology Department’s stringent requirements based on being a rocket motor manufacturing facility, and budget constraints. Of the original objectives, the following were achieved: • Installation of a 100 kW wind turbine. • Installation of a 300 kW battery storage system. • Integrated control system installed to offset electrical demand by releasing stored energy from renewable sources

  2. Integrated, Automated Distributed Generation Technologies Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Kevin [Atk Launch Systems Inc., Brigham City, UT (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the NETL Project was to develop a diverse combination of distributed renewable generation technologies and controls and demonstrate how the renewable generation could help manage substation peak demand at the ATK Promontory plant site. The Promontory plant site is located in the northwestern Utah desert approximately 25 miles west of Brigham City, Utah. The plant encompasses 20,000 acres and has over 500 buildings. The ATK Promontory plant primarily manufactures solid propellant rocket motors for both commercial and government launch systems. The original project objectives focused on distributed generation; a 100 kW (kilowatt) wind turbine, a 100 kW new technology waste heat generation unit, a 500 kW energy storage system, and an intelligent system-wide automation system to monitor and control the renewable energy devices then release the stored energy during the peak demand time. The original goal was to reduce peak demand from the electrical utility company, Rocky Mountain Power (RMP), by 3.4%. For a period of time we also sought to integrate our energy storage requirements with a flywheel storage system (500 kW) proposed for the Promontory/RMP Substation. Ultimately the flywheel storage system could not meet our project timetable, so the storage requirement was switched to a battery storage system (300 kW.) A secondary objective was to design/install a bi-directional customer/utility gateway application for real-time visibility and communications between RMP, and ATK. This objective was not achieved because of technical issues with RMP, ATK Information Technology Department’s stringent requirements based on being a rocket motor manufacturing facility, and budget constraints. Of the original objectives, the following were achieved: • Installation of a 100 kW wind turbine. • Installation of a 300 kW battery storage system. • Integrated control system installed to offset electrical demand by releasing stored energy from renewable sources

  3. The bioinformatics of next generation sequencing: a meeting report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ravi Shankar

    2011-01-01

    @@ The Studio of Computational Biology & Bioinformatics (SCBB), IHBT, CSIR,Palampur, India organized one of the very first national workshop funded by DBT,Govt.of India, on the Bioinformatics issues associated with next generation sequencing approaches.The course structure was designed by SCBB, IHBT.The workshop took place in the IHBT premise on 17 and 18 June 2010.

  4. Targeted enrichment of genomic DNA regions for next generation sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, F.; El-Sharawy, A.; Sauer, S.; Van Helvoort, J.; Van der Zaag, P.J.; Franke, A.; Nilsson, M.; Lehrach. H.; Brookes, A.

    2011-01-01

    In this review we discuss the latest targeted enrichment methods, and aspects of their utilization along with second generation sequencing for complex genome analysis. In doing so we provide an overview of issues involved in detecting genetic variation, for which targeted enrichment has become a pow

  5. Comparing Apples and Oranges?: Next Generation Sequencing and Its Impact on Microbiome Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam G Clooney

    Full Text Available Rapid advancements in sequencing technologies along with falling costs present widespread opportunities for microbiome studies across a vast and diverse array of environments. These impressive technological developments have been accompanied by a considerable growth in the number of methodological variables, including sampling, storage, DNA extraction, primer pairs, sequencing technology, chemistry version, read length, insert size, and analysis pipelines, amongst others. This increase in variability threatens to compromise both the reproducibility and the comparability of studies conducted. Here we perform the first reported study comparing both amplicon and shotgun sequencing for the three leading next-generation sequencing technologies. These were applied to six human stool samples using Illumina HiSeq, MiSeq and Ion PGM shotgun sequencing, as well as amplicon sequencing across two variable 16S rRNA gene regions. Notably, we found that the factor responsible for the greatest variance in microbiota composition was the chosen methodology rather than the natural inter-individual variance, which is commonly one of the most significant drivers in microbiome studies. Amplicon sequencing suffered from this to a large extent, and this issue was particularly apparent when the 16S rRNA V1-V2 region amplicons were sequenced with MiSeq. Somewhat surprisingly, the choice of taxonomic binning software for shotgun sequences proved to be of crucial importance with even greater discriminatory power than sequencing technology and choice of amplicon. Optimal N50 assembly values for the HiSeq was obtained for 10 million reads per sample, whereas the applied MiSeq and PGM sequencing depths proved less sufficient for shotgun sequencing of stool samples. The latter technologies, on the other hand, provide a better basis for functional gene categorisation, possibly due to their longer read lengths. Hence, in addition to highlighting methodological biases, this study

  6. Comparing Apples and Oranges?: Next Generation Sequencing and Its Impact on Microbiome Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clooney, Adam G; Fouhy, Fiona; Sleator, Roy D; O' Driscoll, Aisling; Stanton, Catherine; Cotter, Paul D; Claesson, Marcus J

    2016-01-01

    Rapid advancements in sequencing technologies along with falling costs present widespread opportunities for microbiome studies across a vast and diverse array of environments. These impressive technological developments have been accompanied by a considerable growth in the number of methodological variables, including sampling, storage, DNA extraction, primer pairs, sequencing technology, chemistry version, read length, insert size, and analysis pipelines, amongst others. This increase in variability threatens to compromise both the reproducibility and the comparability of studies conducted. Here we perform the first reported study comparing both amplicon and shotgun sequencing for the three leading next-generation sequencing technologies. These were applied to six human stool samples using Illumina HiSeq, MiSeq and Ion PGM shotgun sequencing, as well as amplicon sequencing across two variable 16S rRNA gene regions. Notably, we found that the factor responsible for the greatest variance in microbiota composition was the chosen methodology rather than the natural inter-individual variance, which is commonly one of the most significant drivers in microbiome studies. Amplicon sequencing suffered from this to a large extent, and this issue was particularly apparent when the 16S rRNA V1-V2 region amplicons were sequenced with MiSeq. Somewhat surprisingly, the choice of taxonomic binning software for shotgun sequences proved to be of crucial importance with even greater discriminatory power than sequencing technology and choice of amplicon. Optimal N50 assembly values for the HiSeq was obtained for 10 million reads per sample, whereas the applied MiSeq and PGM sequencing depths proved less sufficient for shotgun sequencing of stool samples. The latter technologies, on the other hand, provide a better basis for functional gene categorisation, possibly due to their longer read lengths. Hence, in addition to highlighting methodological biases, this study demonstrates the

  7. Considerations for clinical read alignment and mutational profiling using next-generation sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin R Oliver

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing technologies are increasingly being applied in clinical settings, however the data are characterized by a range of platform-specific artifacts making downstream analysis problematic and error prone. One major application of NGS is in the profiling of clinically relevant mutations whereby sequences are aligned to a reference genome and potential mutations assessed and scored. Accurate sequence alignment is pivotal in reliable assessment of potential mutations however selection of appropriate alignment tools is a non-trivial task complicated by the availability of multiple solutions each with its own performance characteristics. Using BRCA1 as an example, we have simulated and mutated a test dataset based on Illumina sequencing technology. Our findings reveal key differences in the performances of a range of common commercial and open source tools and will be of importance to anyone using NGS to profile mutations in clinical or basic research.

  8. Next-generation sequencing and large genome assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Joseph; Tischler, German; Ning, Zemin

    2012-06-01

    The next-generation sequencing (NGS) revolution has drastically reduced time and cost requirements for sequencing of large genomes, and also qualitatively changed the problem of assembly. This article reviews the state of the art in de novo genome assembly, paying particular attention to mammalian-sized genomes. The strengths and weaknesses of the main sequencing platforms are highlighted, leading to a discussion of assembly and the new challenges associated with NGS data. Current approaches to assembly are outlined and the various software packages available are introduced and compared. The question of whether quality assemblies can be produced using short-read NGS data alone, or whether it must be combined with more expensive sequencing techniques, is considered. Prospects for future assemblers and tests of assembly performance are also discussed.

  9. Using chaos to generate variations on movement sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Elizabeth; Stuart, Joshua

    1998-12-01

    We describe a method for introducing variations into predefined motion sequences using a chaotic symbol-sequence reordering technique. A progression of symbols representing the body positions in a dance piece, martial arts form, or other motion sequence is mapped onto a chaotic trajectory, establishing a symbolic dynamics that links the movement sequence and the attractor structure. A variation on the original piece is created by generating a trajectory with slightly different initial conditions, inverting the mapping, and using special corpus-based graph-theoretic interpolation schemes to smooth any abrupt transitions. Sensitive dependence guarantees that the variation is different from the original; the attractor structure and the symbolic dynamics guarantee that the two resemble one another in both aesthetic and mathematical senses.

  10. Coupled high-throughput functional screening and next generation sequencing for identification of plant polymer decomposing enzymes in metagenomic libraries

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in sequencing technologies generate new predictions and hypotheses about the functional roles of environmental microorganisms. Yet, until we can test these predictions at a scale that matches our ability to generate them, most of them will remain as hypotheses. Function-based mining of metagenomic libraries can provide direct linkages between genes, metabolic traits and microbial taxa and thus bridge this gap between sequence data generation and functional predictions. Here we...

  11. CAPRG: sequence assembling pipeline for next generation sequencing of non-model organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Rawat

    Full Text Available Our goal is to introduce and describe the utility of a new pipeline "Contigs Assembly Pipeline using Reference Genome" (CAPRG, which has been developed to assemble "long sequence reads" for non-model organisms by leveraging a reference genome of a closely related phylogenetic relative. To facilitate this effort, we utilized two avian transcriptomic datasets generated using ROCHE/454 technology as test cases for CAPRG assembly. We compared the results of CAPRG assembly using a reference genome with the results of existing methods that utilize de novo strategies such as VELVET, PAVE, and MIRA by employing parameter space comparisons (intra-assembling comparison. CAPRG performed as well or better than the existing assembly methods based on various benchmarks for "gene-hunting." Further, CAPRG completed the assemblies in a fraction of the time required by the existing assembly algorithms. Additional advantages of CAPRG included reduced contig inflation resulting in lower computational resources for annotation, and functional identification for contigs that may be categorized as "unknowns" by de novo methods. In addition to providing evaluation of CAPRG performance, we observed that the different assembly (inter-assembly results could be integrated to enhance the putative gene coverage for any transcriptomics study.

  12. CAPRG: sequence assembling pipeline for next generation sequencing of non-model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Arun; Elasri, Mohamed O; Gust, Kurt A; George, Glover; Pham, Don; Scanlan, Leona D; Vulpe, Chris; Perkins, Edward J

    2012-01-01

    Our goal is to introduce and describe the utility of a new pipeline "Contigs Assembly Pipeline using Reference Genome" (CAPRG), which has been developed to assemble "long sequence reads" for non-model organisms by leveraging a reference genome of a closely related phylogenetic relative. To facilitate this effort, we utilized two avian transcriptomic datasets generated using ROCHE/454 technology as test cases for CAPRG assembly. We compared the results of CAPRG assembly using a reference genome with the results of existing methods that utilize de novo strategies such as VELVET, PAVE, and MIRA by employing parameter space comparisons (intra-assembling comparison). CAPRG performed as well or better than the existing assembly methods based on various benchmarks for "gene-hunting." Further, CAPRG completed the assemblies in a fraction of the time required by the existing assembly algorithms. Additional advantages of CAPRG included reduced contig inflation resulting in lower computational resources for annotation, and functional identification for contigs that may be categorized as "unknowns" by de novo methods. In addition to providing evaluation of CAPRG performance, we observed that the different assembly (inter-assembly) results could be integrated to enhance the putative gene coverage for any transcriptomics study.

  13. Next Generation Sequencing of Pooled Samples: Guideline for Variants’ Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Santosh; Mangano, Eleonora; Barizzone, Nadia; Bordoni, Roberta; Sorosina, Melissa; Clarelli, Ferdinando; Corrado, Lucia; Martinelli Boneschi, Filippo; D’Alfonso, Sandra; De Bellis, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing large number of individuals, which is often needed for population genetics studies, is still economically challenging despite falling costs of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS). Pool-seq is an alternative cost- and time-effective option in which DNA from several individuals is pooled for sequencing. However, pooling of DNA creates new problems and challenges for accurate variant call and allele frequency (AF) estimation. In particular, sequencing errors confound with the alleles present at low frequency in the pools possibly giving rise to false positive variants. We sequenced 996 individuals in 83 pools (12 individuals/pool) in a targeted re-sequencing experiment. We show that Pool-seq AFs are robust and reliable by comparing them with public variant databases and in-house SNP-genotyping data of individual subjects of pools. Furthermore, we propose a simple filtering guideline for the removal of spurious variants based on the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistical test. We experimentally validated our filters by comparing Pool-seq to individual sequencing data showing that the filters remove most of the false variants while retaining majority of true variants. The proposed guideline is fairly generic in nature and could be easily applied in other Pool-seq experiments. PMID:27670852

  14. Modelling Nonlinear Sequence Generators in terms of Linear Cellular Automata

    CERN Document Server

    Fúster-Sabater, Amparo; 10.1016/j.apm.2005.08.013

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a wide family of LFSR-based sequence generators, the so-called Clock-Controlled Shrinking Generators (CCSGs), has been analyzed and identified with a subset of linear Cellular Automata (CA). In fact, a pair of linear models describing the behavior of the CCSGs can be derived. The algorithm that converts a given CCSG into a CA-based linear model is very simple and can be applied to CCSGs in a range of practical interest. The linearity of these cellular models can be advantageously used in two different ways: (a) for the analysis and/or cryptanalysis of the CCSGs and (b) for the reconstruction of the output sequence obtained from this kind of generators.

  15. The standardization of the next generation sequencing technologies in clinical application: in reference to the ACMG clinical laboratory standards for next-generation sequencing%下一代测序技术的临床应用规范化问题——参考美国医学遗传学与基因组学会行业标准

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜烈君; 陆晓旭; 黄华艺

    2016-01-01

    下一代测序(next generation sequencing,NGS)技术已经在临床实验室中得到应用.该技术的发展以及检测规模和应用范围的扩大,使基因检测成本大大降低.NGS技术在临床上的应用在不断地扩大,如疾病靶向基因组套检测、个体外显子组或全基因组分析等.同时,NGS技术也进一步改善了治疗决策和对某疾病高危人群的预测.然而,NGS技术的发展也充满了挑战性,包括测序平台和技术更新带来的选择困惑、测序结果的临床验证的不一致性问题等.为了帮助临床实验室更好地了解NGS技术、解决临床验证和正确选择NGS测序平台和方法,以及持续监控NGS并保证高质量的测序结果及其临床解释,本文结合美国医学遗传学和基因组学会(American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics,ACMG)关于NGS技术在临床上的应用的专业标准和指南进行归纳和讨论,供我国分子诊断工作者制定国内行业标准时参考.

  16. An overview of second generation biofuel technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Ralph E H; Mabee, Warren; Saddler, Jack N; Taylor, Michael

    2010-03-01

    The recently identified limitations of 1st-generation biofuels produced from food crops (with perhaps the exception of sugarcane ethanol) have caused greater emphasis to be placed on 2nd-generation biofuels produced from ligno-cellulosic feedstocks. Although significant progress continues to be made to overcome the technical and economic challenges, 2nd-generation biofuels production will continue to face major constraints to full commercial deployment. The logistics of providing a competitive, all-year-round, supply of biomass feedstock to a commercial-scale plant is challenging, as is improving the performance of the conversion process to reduce costs. The biochemical route, being less mature, probably has a greater cost reduction potential than the thermo-chemical route, but here a wider range of synthetic fuels can be produced to better suit heavy truck, aviation and marine applications. Continued investment in research and demonstration by both public and private sectors, coupled with appropriate policy support mechanisms, are essential if full commercialisation is to be achieved within the next decade. After that, the biofuel industry will grow only at a steady rate and encompass both 1st- and 2nd-generation technologies that meet agreed environmental, sustainability and economic policy goals.

  17. 二代测序技术检测早期自然流产胚胎染色体异常%Detection of chromosome abnormality by next-generation sequencing technology of miscarried embryo in the first-trimester

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丽; 徐凤琴; 邸建永; 刘清华; 李毅

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical values of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology in diagnosis of miscarried chorionic villi genetic disorders. Methods Patients who underwent miscarriage (n=87) were enrolled in this study. Among all patients, 32 cases were of recurrent miscarrage and 55 cases were of sporadic miscarriage. In all collected patients, 35 women were 35 years or older while other 52 women were less than 35 years old. Positive detection rate and the abnormal detection rate were compared between these two methods. Chromosomes abnormal rates were also compared among different types of miscarrage and different ages. All aborted villi tissue were analyzed by NGS of whole genome and G-band⁃ing karyotype. Results The successful detection rate of chorionic villi by NGS (100.00%) was higher than that of G-band⁃ing karyotype (74.71%), and the detection rate of abnormal chorionic villi by NGS (58.62%) was also higher than that of G-banding karyotype (50.77%). Three cases of chromosome structure anomaly were found in those 51 chromosome anomalies (5.88%). Other 48 cases of chromosome anomalies were aneuploidy anomalies (94.12%) include 39 cases of trisomy, 2 cases of double trisomy and 1 case of triple trisomy and 6 cases of monomer. On the other hand, 32 cases of chromosome aneuploi⁃dy anomalies were found in 33 chromosome anomalies by G-banding karyotype, which include 24 cases of trisomy, 2 cases of double trisomy, 1 case of triple trisomy, 5 cases of monomer and 1 case of chromosome structure anomaly. Most NGS re⁃sults (n=64) were in agreement with G-banding karyotype but with 1 case of discrepancy. Chromosomal abnormality rate de⁃tected by NGS in sporadic miscarrage group and recurrent spontaneous miscarrage group were 60.00%and 56.25%respective⁃ly. There was no significant difference (P>0.05). Chromosomal abnormality rate picked by NGS in women aged≥35 years old (71.43%) was higher than that in women<35 years old (50.00%) with

  18. Quantifying Next Generation Sequencing Sample Pre-Processing Bias in HIV-1 Complete Genome Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrancken, Bram; Trovão, Nídia Sequeira; Baele, Guy; van Wijngaerden, Eric; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; van Laethem, Kristel; Lemey, Philippe

    2016-01-07

    Genetic analyses play a central role in infectious disease research. Massively parallelized "mechanical cloning" and sequencing technologies were quickly adopted by HIV researchers in order to broaden the understanding of the clinical importance of minor drug-resistant variants. These efforts have, however, remained largely limited to small genomic regions. The growing need to monitor multiple genome regions for drug resistance testing, as well as the obvious benefit for studying evolutionary and epidemic processes makes complete genome sequencing an important goal in viral research. In addition, a major drawback for NGS applications to RNA viruses is the need for large quantities of input DNA. Here, we use a generic overlapping amplicon-based near full-genome amplification protocol to compare low-input enzymatic fragmentation (Nextera™) with conventional mechanical shearing for Roche 454 sequencing. We find that the fragmentation method has only a modest impact on the characterization of the population composition and that for reliable results, the variation introduced at all steps of the procedure--from nucleic acid extraction to sequencing--should be taken into account, a finding that is also relevant for NGS technologies that are now more commonly used. Furthermore, by applying our protocol to deep sequence a number of pre-therapy plasma and PBMC samples, we illustrate the potential benefits of a near complete genome sequencing approach in routine genotyping.

  19. 适用于第2代测序技术的宏基因组DNA提取方法%Extraction method of metagenomic DNA used for the next generation sequencing technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李昂; 崔迪; 王继华; 张斯; 杨基先; 马放

    2012-01-01

    Extraction of metagenomic DNA from environmental sample was the main restrictive factor for the metagenomic sequencing.Three different extraction methods were used and compared in this study.The results indicated that the metagenomic DNA obtained from the activated sludge by Liquid Nitrogen Grinding + DNA Extraction Kit was the best sample due to the largest information and best quality,and D(260 /280 nm) was between 1.69-1.72.During the sample preparation for the next generation sequencing,D(260 /280 nm) of the metagenomic DNA reached to 1.83 after purification,which met the requirement of library construction.After the sequencing by Solexa Genome Analyzer System,the results showed that the forward sequencing of these two samples was successful,and the high quality data was about 90.8%,which could be used for assemble.%为快速、高效、大量地获得城市污水处理厂活性污泥中的宏基因组DNA,将3种不同的基因组DNA提取方式进行对比.结果显示,采用液氮研磨+基因组提取试剂盒相结合的方法获得的宏基因组DNA信息量最大,质量好,D(260/280 nm)在1.69~1.72.在进行高通量测序前的样品制备过程中,样品经过初步处理后宏基因组D(260/280 nm)达1.83,满足文库构建要求.利用Solexa Genome Analyzer System测序结果显示,两个样品正向测序结果良好,可用于序列拼接的高质量数据条数占90.8%.

  20. Application of Next Generation Sequencing on Genetic Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jian

    The discovery of genetic factors behind increasing number of human diseases and the growth of education of genetic knowledge to the public make demands for genetic testing increase rapidly. However, traditional genetic testing methods cannot meet all kinds of the requirements. Next generation...... sequencing (NGS) featured with high throughput and low cost of sequencing capacity develops fast, especially with the improvement of its read length, read accuracy and the immergence of small-sized machines, making it a powerful genetic testing tool. In this study, we applied NGS to develop novel genetic...... developed a targeted sequencing based preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) method for monogenic diseases and tested it in a family suffering from β-thalassaemia major undergoing PGD. Moreover, we developed a method which can achieve detection of point mutation and copy number variation simultaneously...

  1. Application of Next Generation Sequencing on Genetic Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jian

    The discovery of genetic factors behind increasing number of human diseases and the growth of education of genetic knowledge to the public make demands for genetic testing increase rapidly. However, traditional genetic testing methods cannot meet all kinds of the requirements. Next generation...... sequencing (NGS) featured with high throughput and low cost of sequencing capacity develops fast, especially with the improvement of its read length, read accuracy and the immergence of small-sized machines, making it a powerful genetic testing tool. In this study, we applied NGS to develop novel genetic...... developed a targeted sequencing based preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) method for monogenic diseases and tested it in a family suffering from β-thalassaemia major undergoing PGD. Moreover, we developed a method which can achieve detection of point mutation and copy number variation simultaneously...

  2. Next-generation sequencing for endocrine cancers: Recent advances and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Padmanaban S; Venkatesh, Thejaswini; Tsutsumi, Rie; Shetty, Abhishek

    2017-05-01

    Contemporary molecular biology research tools have enriched numerous areas of biomedical research that address challenging diseases, including endocrine cancers (pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid, adrenal, testicular, ovarian, and neuroendocrine cancers). These tools have placed several intriguing clues before the scientific community. Endocrine cancers pose a major challenge in health care and research despite considerable attempts by researchers to understand their etiology. Microarray analyses have provided gene signatures from many cells, tissues, and organs that can differentiate healthy states from diseased ones, and even show patterns that correlate with stages of a disease. Microarray data can also elucidate the responses of endocrine tumors to therapeutic treatments. The rapid progress in next-generation sequencing methods has overcome many of the initial challenges of these technologies, and their advantages over microarray techniques have enabled them to emerge as valuable aids for clinical research applications (prognosis, identification of drug targets, etc.). A comprehensive review describing the recent advances in next-generation sequencing methods and their application in the evaluation of endocrine and endocrine-related cancers is lacking. The main purpose of this review is to illustrate the concepts that collectively constitute our current view of the possibilities offered by next-generation sequencing technological platforms, challenges to relevant applications, and perspectives on the future of clinical genetic testing of patients with endocrine tumors. We focus on recent discoveries in the use of next-generation sequencing methods for clinical diagnosis of endocrine tumors in patients and conclude with a discussion on persisting challenges and future objectives.

  3. MPD: multiplex primer design for next-generation targeted sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingo, Thomas S; Kotlar, Alex; Cutler, David J

    2017-01-05

    Targeted resequencing offers a cost-effective alternative to whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing when investigating regions known to be associated with a trait or disease. There are a number of approaches to targeted resequencing, including microfluidic PCR amplification, which may be enhanced by multiplex PCR. Currently, there is no open-source software that can design next-generation multiplex PCR experiments that ensures primers are unique at a genome-level and efficiently pools compatible primers. We present MPD, a software package that automates the design of multiplex PCR primers for next-generation sequencing. The core of MPD is implemented in C for speed and uses a hashed genome to ensure primer uniqueness, avoids placing primers over sites of known variation, and efficiently pools compatible primers. A JavaScript web application ( http://multiplexprimer.io ) utilizing the MPD Perl package provides a convenient platform for users to make designs. Using a realistic set of genes identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS), we achieve 90% coverage of all exonic regions using stringent design criteria. Using the first 47 primer pools for wet-lab validation, we sequenced ~25Kb at 99.7% completeness with a mean coverage of 300X among 313 samples simultaneously and identified 224 variants. The number and nature of variants we observe are consistent with high quality sequencing. MPD can successfully design multiplex PCR experiments suitable for next-generation sequencing, and simplifies retooling targeted resequencing pipelines to focus on new targets as new genetic evidence emerges.

  4. All-optical pseudorandom bit sequences generator based on TOADs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhenchao; Wang, Zhi; Wu, Chongqing; Wang, Fu; Li, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    A scheme for all-optical pseudorandom bit sequences (PRBS) generator is demonstrated with optical logic gate 'XNOR' and all-optical wavelength converter based on cascaded Tera-Hertz Optical Asymmetric Demultiplexer (TOADs). Its feasibility is verified by generation of return-to-zero on-off keying (RZ-OOK) 263-1 PRBS at the speed of 1 Gb/s with 10% duty radio. The high randomness of ultra-long cycle PRBS is validated by successfully passing the standard benchmark test.

  5. Genotyping 1000 yeast strains by next-generation sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilkening Stefan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The throughput of next-generation sequencing machines has increased dramatically over the last few years; yet the cost and time for library preparation have not changed proportionally, thus representing the main bottleneck for sequencing large numbers of samples. Here we present an economical, high-throughput library preparation method for the Illumina platform, comprising a 96-well based method for DNA isolation for yeast cells, a low-cost DNA shearing alternative, and adapter ligation using heat inactivation of enzymes instead of bead cleanups. Results Up to 384 whole-genome libraries can be prepared from yeast cells in one week using this method, for less than 15 euros per sample. We demonstrate the robustness of this protocol by sequencing over 1000 yeast genomes at ~30x coverage. The sequence information from 768 yeast segregants derived from two divergent S. cerevisiae strains was used to generate a meiotic recombination map at unprecedented resolution. Comparisons to other datasets indicate a high conservation of recombination at a chromosome-wide scale, but differences at the local scale. Additionally, we detected a high degree of aneuploidy (3.6% by examining the sequencing coverage in these segregants. Differences in allele frequency allowed us to attribute instances of aneuploidy to gains of chromosomes during meiosis or mitosis, both of which showed a strong tendency to missegregate specific chromosomes. Conclusions Here we present a high throughput workflow to sequence genomes of large number of yeast strains at a low price. We have used this workflow to obtain recombination and aneuploidy data from hundreds of segregants, which can serve as a foundation for future studies of linkage, recombination, and chromosomal aberrations in yeast and higher eukaryotes.

  6. Probing the SELEX process with next-generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Schütze

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: SELEX is an iterative process in which highly diverse synthetic nucleic acid libraries are selected over many rounds to finally identify aptamers with desired properties. However, little is understood as how binders are enriched during the selection course. Next-generation sequencing offers the opportunity to open the black box and observe a large part of the population dynamics during the selection process. METHODOLOGY: We have performed a semi-automated SELEX procedure on the model target streptavidin starting with a synthetic DNA oligonucleotide library and compared results obtained by the conventional analysis via cloning and Sanger sequencing with next-generation sequencing. In order to follow the population dynamics during the selection, pools from all selection rounds were barcoded and sequenced in parallel. CONCLUSIONS: High affinity aptamers can be readily identified simply by copy number enrichment in the first selection rounds. Based on our results, we suggest a new selection scheme that avoids a high number of iterative selection rounds while reducing time, PCR bias, and artifacts.

  7. Authentication of Herbal Supplements Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanova, Natalia V.; Kuzmina, Maria L.; Thomas W A Braukmann; Borisenko, Alex V.; Zakharov, Evgeny V.

    2016-01-01

    Background DNA-based testing has been gaining acceptance as a tool for authentication of a wide range of food products; however, its applicability for testing of herbal supplements remains contentious. Methods We utilized Sanger and Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) for taxonomic authentication of fifteen herbal supplements representing three different producers from five medicinal plants: Echinacea purpurea, Valeriana officinalis, Ginkgo biloba, Hypericum perforatum and Trigonella foenum-grae...

  8. Genotype and SNP calling from next-generation sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Paul, Joshua S.; Albrechtsen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Meaningful analysis of next-generation sequencing (NGS) data, which are produced extensively by genetics and genomics studies, relies crucially on the accurate calling of SNPs and genotypes. Recently developed statistical methods both improve and quantify the considerable uncertainty associated w...... with genotype calling, and will especially benefit the growing number of studies using low- to medium-coverage data. We review these methods and provide a guide for their use in NGS studies....

  9. SMALL TURBOGENERATOR TECHNOLOGY FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Sy; Moritz, Bob

    2001-09-01

    potential users who see an application in grid support. The machine is consistent with 21st century power generation objectives. It will be more efficient than a microturbine and also more cost effective because it does not require an expensive recuperator. It will produce ultra-low emissions because it has a low combustor delivery temperature. It will also avoid producing hazardous waste because it requires no lube system. These qualities are obtained by combining, and in some instances extending, the best of available technologies rather than breaking wholly new ground. Limited ''barrier technology'' rig tests of bearing systems and alternator configuration are proposed to support the extension of technology. Low combustion temperature also has merit in handling alternative fuels with minimum emissions and minimum materials degradation. Program continuation is proposed that will simultaneously provide technology support to a SECA fuel cell hybrid system and a distributed generation turbogenerator. This technology program will be led by a Rolls-Royce team based in Indianapolis with access to extensive small turbogenerator experience gathered in DOE (and other) programs by Allison Mobile Power Systems. It is intended that subsequent production will be in the U.S., but the products may have substantial export potential.

  10. Quantifying Next Generation Sequencing Sample Pre-Processing Bias in HIV-1 Complete Genome Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bram Vrancken

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic analyses play a central role in infectious disease research. Massively parallelized “mechanical cloning” and sequencing technologies were quickly adopted by HIV researchers in order to broaden the understanding of the clinical importance of minor drug-resistant variants. These efforts have, however, remained largely limited to small genomic regions. The growing need to monitor multiple genome regions for drug resistance testing, as well as the obvious benefit for studying evolutionary and epidemic processes makes complete genome sequencing an important goal in viral research. In addition, a major drawback for NGS applications to RNA viruses is the need for large quantities of input DNA. Here, we use a generic overlapping amplicon-based near full-genome amplification protocol to compare low-input enzymatic fragmentation (Nextera™ with conventional mechanical shearing for Roche 454 sequencing. We find that the fragmentation method has only a modest impact on the characterization of the population composition and that for reliable results, the variation introduced at all steps of the procedure—from nucleic acid extraction to sequencing—should be taken into account, a finding that is also relevant for NGS technologies that are now more commonly used. Furthermore, by applying our protocol to deep sequence a number of pre-therapy plasma and PBMC samples, we illustrate the potential benefits of a near complete genome sequencing approach in routine genotyping.

  11. Analysis of quality raw data of second generation sequencers with Quality Assessment Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Maria PC

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Second generation technologies have advantages over Sanger; however, they have resulted in new challenges for the genome construction process, especially because of the small size of the reads, despite the high degree of coverage. Independent of the program chosen for the construction process, DNA sequences are superimposed, based on identity, to extend the reads, generating contigs; mismatches indicate a lack of homology and are not included. This process improves our confidence in the sequences that are generated. Findings We developed Quality Assessment Software, with which one can review graphs showing the distribution of quality values from the sequencing reads. This software allow us to adopt more stringent quality standards for sequence data, based on quality-graph analysis and estimated coverage after applying the quality filter, providing acceptable sequence coverage for genome construction from short reads. Conclusions Quality filtering is a fundamental step in the process of constructing genomes, as it reduces the frequency of incorrect alignments that are caused by measuring errors, which can occur during the construction process due to the size of the reads, provoking misassemblies. Application of quality filters to sequence data, using the software Quality Assessment, along with graphing analyses, provided greater precision in the definition of cutoff parameters, which increased the accuracy of genome construction.

  12. Achieving high throughput sequencing of a cDNA library utilizing an alternative protocol for the bench top next-generation sequencing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Minxi; Faruq, Junaid; Rosenberg, Julian N; Xia, Jinlan; Oyler, George A; Betenbaugh, Michael J

    2013-02-15

    The development of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies has provided novel tools for genome analysis and expression profiling. A high throughput cDNA sequencing method using a bench top next-generation sequencing system, GS Junior, is now available. Here, we used an alternative protocol to the standard method for generating the cDNA library. This protocol can decrease the number of processing steps to manipulate RNA when constructing a cDNA library from an RNA sample, and does not require mRNA isolation from total RNA. Thus it can decrease the risk of RNA degradation and the cost for preparing a cDNA library. Also, the efficiency of sequencing data obtained with this approach is comparable to the standard method as verified by sequencing characteristics and expression levels of the reference gene glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH).

  13. DNA immunoprecipitation semiconductor sequencing (DIP-SC-seq) as a rapid method to generate genome wide epigenetic signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, John P; Fawkes, Angie; Ottaviano, Raffaele; Hunter, Jennifer M; Shukla, Ruchi; Mjoseng, Heidi K; Clark, Richard; Coutts, Audrey; Murphy, Lee; Meehan, Richard R

    2015-05-14

    Modification of DNA resulting in 5-methylcytosine (5 mC) or 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) has been shown to influence the local chromatin environment and affect transcription. Although recent advances in next generation sequencing technology allow researchers to map epigenetic modifications across the genome, such experiments are often time-consuming and cost prohibitive. Here we present a rapid and cost effective method of generating genome wide DNA modification maps utilising commercially available semiconductor based technology (DNA immunoprecipitation semiconductor sequencing; "DIP-SC-seq") on the Ion Proton sequencer. Focussing on the 5hmC mark we demonstrate, by directly comparing with alternative sequencing strategies, that this platform can successfully generate genome wide 5hmC patterns from as little as 500 ng of genomic DNA in less than 4 days. Such a method can therefore facilitate the rapid generation of multiple genome wide epigenetic datasets.

  14. Advanced IGCC technology for competitive power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, H.-R.; Ullrich, N.; Haupt, G.; Zimmermann, G.; Pruschek, R.; Oeljeklaus, G. [Krupp Uhde GmbH (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The paper reports interim results of a comprehensive ongoing study of potential for development funded by the European Commission. First, the status of the advanced IGCC technology is described. This IGCC 98 concept, including what has been achieved in 1998, results in net station efficiencies around 52% according to the site conditions prevailing in Denmark, where one of the world`s most modern pulverised-coal-fired power plants (design efficiency 47%) is currently under construction. The advanced IGCC station will be equipped with PRENFLO gasification developed by Krupp and a Siemens Model V94.3A gas turbine-generator. The second section depicts the results of a detailed cost estimate based on Western European conditions and aimed at clearly lower specific capital investment for an IGCC power plant. This cost estimate is based mainly on bidding information from competent manufacturers and suggests that the target purchase price of 1,100 US dollars per kW installed capacity is likely to be verified in the near future. One main factor contributing to achievement of this figure is the tremendous increase in net power output to about 450 MW with nearly the same absolute capital investment as for IGCC plants designed previously. Consequently, this permits IGCC generating costs surely lower than those of a comparable pulverised-coal-fired (PCF) steam power plant, so that the advanced IGCC stations described in this paper can be regarded as truly competitive. 2 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Next-Generation Sequencing Workflow for NSCLC Critical Samples Using a Targeted Sequencing Approach by Ion Torrent PGM™ Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Vanni

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS is a cost-effective technology capable of screening several genes simultaneously; however, its application in a clinical context requires an established workflow to acquire reliable sequencing results. Here, we report an optimized NGS workflow analyzing 22 lung cancer-related genes to sequence critical samples such as DNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE blocks and circulating free DNA (cfDNA. Snap frozen and matched FFPE gDNA from 12 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients, whose gDNA fragmentation status was previously evaluated using a multiplex PCR-based quality control, were successfully sequenced with Ion Torrent PGM™. The robust bioinformatic pipeline allowed us to correctly call both Single Nucleotide Variants (SNVs and indels with a detection limit of 5%, achieving 100% specificity and 96% sensitivity. This workflow was also validated in 13 FFPE NSCLC biopsies. Furthermore, a specific protocol for low input gDNA capable of producing good sequencing data with high coverage, high uniformity, and a low error rate was also optimized. In conclusion, we demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining gDNA from FFPE samples suitable for NGS by performing appropriate quality controls. The optimized workflow, capable of screening low input gDNA, highlights NGS as a potential tool in the detection, disease monitoring, and treatment of NSCLC.

  16. IQSeq: integrated isoform quantification analysis based on next-generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Du

    Full Text Available With the recent advances in high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq, biologists are able to measure transcription with unprecedented precision. One problem that can now be tackled is that of isoform quantification: here one tries to reconstruct the abundances of isoforms of a gene. We have developed a statistical solution for this problem, based on analyzing a set of RNA-Seq reads, and a practical implementation, available from archive.gersteinlab.org/proj/rnaseq/IQSeq, in a tool we call IQSeq (Isoform Quantification in next-generation Sequencing. Here, we present theoretical results which IQSeq is based on, and then use both simulated and real datasets to illustrate various applications of the tool. In order to measure the accuracy of an isoform-quantification result, one would try to estimate the average variance of the estimated isoform abundances for each gene (based on resampling the RNA-seq reads, and IQSeq has a particularly fast algorithm (based on the Fisher Information Matrix for calculating this, achieving a speedup of ~ 500 times compared to brute-force resampling. IQSeq also calculates an information theoretic measure of overall transcriptome complexity to describe isoform abundance for a whole experiment. IQSeq has many features that are particularly useful in RNA-Seq experimental design, allowing one to optimally model the integration of different sequencing technologies in a cost-effective way. In particular, the IQSeq formalism integrates the analysis of different sample (i.e. read sets generated from different technologies within the same statistical framework. It also supports a generalized statistical partial-sample-generation function to model the sequencing process. This allows one to have a modular, "plugin-able" read-generation function to support the particularities of the many evolving sequencing technologies.

  17. Next-generation sequencing reveals phylogeographic structure and a species tree for recent bird divergences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCormack, John E.; Maley, James M.; Hird, Sarah M.

    2012-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are revolutionizing many biological disciplines but have been slow to take root in phylogeography. This is partly due to the difficulty of using NGS to sequence orthologous DNA fragments for many individuals at low cost. We explore cases of recent...... divergence in four phylogenetically diverse avian systems using a method for quick and cost-effective generation of primary DNA sequence data using pyrosequencing. NGS data were processed using an analytical pipeline that reduces many reads into two called alleles per locus per individual. Using single...... nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) mined from the loci, we detected population differentiation in each of the four bird systems, including: a case of ecological speciation in rails (Rallus); a rapid postglacial radiation in the genus Junco; recent in situ speciation among hummingbirds (Trochilus) in Jamaica...

  18. Humans cannot consciously generate random numbers sequences: Polemic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figurska, Małgorzata; Stańczyk, Maciej; Kulesza, Kamil

    2008-01-01

    It is widely believed, that randomness exists in Nature. In fact such an assumption underlies many scientific theories and is embedded in the foundations of quantum mechanics. Assuming that this hypothesis is valid one can use natural phenomena, like radioactive decay, to generate random numbers. Today, computers are capable of generating the so-called pseudorandom numbers. Such series of numbers are only seemingly random (bias in the randomness quality can be observed). Question whether people can produce random numbers, has been investigated by many scientists in the recent years. The paper "Humans can consciously generate random numbers sequences..." published recently in Medical Hypotheses made claims that were in many ways contrary to state of art; it also stated far-reaching hypotheses. So, we decided to repeat the experiments reported, with special care being taken of proper laboratory procedures. Here, we present the results and discuss possible implications in computer and other sciences.

  19. Current practices and guidelines for clinical next-generation sequencing oncology testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samuel P. Strom

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has been rapidly integrated into molecular pathology, dramatically increasing the breadth genomic of information available to oncologists and their patients. This review will explore the ways in which this new technology is currently applied to bolster care for patients with solid tumors and hematological malignancies, focusing on practices and guidelines for assessing the technical validity and clinical utility of DNA variants identified during clinical NGS oncology testing.

  20. Using ultra-sensitive next generation sequencing to dissect DNA damage-induced mutagenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kaile Wang; Xiaolu Ma; Xue Zhang; Dafei Wu; Chenyi Sun; Yazhou Sun; Xuemei Lu; Chung-I Wu; Caixia Guo; Jue Ruan

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have dramatically improved studies in biology and biomedical science. However, no optimal NGS approach is available to conveniently analyze low frequency mutations caused by DNA damage treatments. Here, by developing an exquisite ultra-sensitive NGS (USNGS) platform “EasyMF” and incorporating it with a widely used supF shuttle vector-based mutagenesis system, we can conveniently dissect roles of lesion bypass polymerases in damage-induced mutagene...

  1. New development and validation of 50 SSR markers in breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis, Moraceae) by next-generation sequencing 1

    OpenAIRE

    De Bellis, Fabien; Malapa, Roger; Kagy, Valérie; Lebegin, Stéphane; Billot, Claire; Labouisse, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Using next-generation sequencing technology, new microsatellite loci were characterized in Artocarpus altilis (Moraceae) and two congeners to increase the number of available markers for genotyping breadfruit cultivars. Methods and Results: A total of 47,607 simple sequence repeat loci were obtained by sequencing a library of breadfruit genomic DNA with an Illumina MiSeq system. Among them, 50 single-locus markers were selected and assessed using 41 samples (39 A. altili...

  2. Next generation sequencing and its applications in forensic genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsting, Claus; Morling, Niels

    2015-01-01

    matured during the last 10 years, and the quality of the sequences has reached a level where NGS is used in clinical diagnostics of humans. Forensic genetic laboratories have also explored NGS technologies and especially in the last year, there has been a small explosion in the number of scientific...... articles and presentations at conferences with forensic aspects of NGS. These contributions have demonstrated that NGS offers new possibilities for forensic genetic case work. More information may be obtained from unique samples in a single experiment by analyzing combinations of markers (STRs, SNPs...... and will increase the statistical weight of the evidence. In this review, we will give an introduction to NGS and single-molecule sequencing, and we will discuss the possible applications of NGS in forensic genetics....

  3. A Primer for Disease Gene Prioritization Using Next-Generation Sequencing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuoguo Wang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput next-generation sequencing (NGS technology produces a tremendous amount of raw sequence data. The challenges for researchers are to process the raw data, to map the sequences to genome, to discover variants that are different from the reference genome, and to prioritize/rank the variants for the question of interest. The recent development of many computational algorithms and programs has vastly improved the ability to translate sequence data into valuable information for disease gene identification. However, the NGS data analysis is complex and could be overwhelming for researchers who are not familiar with the process. Here, we outline the analysis pipeline and describe some of the most commonly used principles and tools for analyzing NGS data for disease gene identification.

  4. NGS catalog: A database of next generation sequencing studies in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Junfeng; Wang, Qingguo; Jia, Peilin; Wang, Bing; Pao, William; Zhao, Zhongming

    2012-06-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have been rapidly applied in biomedical and biological research since its advent only a few years ago, and they are expected to advance at an unprecedented pace in the following years. To provide the research community with a comprehensive NGS resource, we have developed the database Next Generation Sequencing Catalog (NGS Catalog, http://bioinfo.mc.vanderbilt.edu/NGS/index.html), a continually updated database that collects, curates and manages available human NGS data obtained from published literature. NGS Catalog deposits publication information of NGS studies and their mutation characteristics (SNVs, small insertions/deletions, copy number variations, and structural variants), as well as mutated genes and gene fusions detected by NGS. Other functions include user data upload, NGS general analysis pipelines, and NGS software. NGS Catalog is particularly useful for investigators who are new to NGS but would like to take advantage of these powerful technologies for their own research. Finally, based on the data deposited in NGS Catalog, we summarized features and findings from whole exome sequencing, whole genome sequencing, and transcriptome sequencing studies for human diseases or traits.

  5. Preparation of next-generation sequencing libraries from damaged DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Adrian W; Heyn, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized ancient DNA research, especially when combined with high-throughput target enrichment methods. However, attaining high sequencing depth and accuracy from samples often remains problematic due to the damaged state of ancient DNA, in particular the extremely low copy number of ancient DNA and the abundance of uracil residues derived from cytosine deamination that lead to miscoding errors. It is therefore critical to use a highly efficient procedure for conversion of a raw DNA extract into an adaptor-ligated sequencing library, and equally important to reduce errors from uracil residues. We present a protocol for NGS library preparation that allows highly efficient conversion of DNA fragments into an adaptor-ligated form. The protocol incorporates an option to remove the vast majority of uracil miscoding lesions as part of the library preparation process. The procedure requires only two spin column purification steps and no gel purification or bead handling. Starting from an aliquot of DNA extract, a finished, highly amplified library can be generated in 5 h, or under 3 h if uracil removal is not required.

  6. BG7: A New Approach for Bacterial Genome Annotation Designed for Next Generation Sequencing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja-Tobes, Pablo; Manrique, Marina; Pareja-Tobes, Eduardo; Pareja, Eduardo; Tobes, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    BG7 is a new system for de novo bacterial, archaeal and viral genome annotation based on a new approach specifically designed for annotating genomes sequenced with next generation sequencing technologies. The system is versatile and able to annotate genes even in the step of preliminary assembly of the genome. It is especially efficient detecting unexpected genes horizontally acquired from bacterial or archaeal distant genomes, phages, plasmids, and mobile elements. From the initial phases of the gene annotation process, BG7 exploits the massive availability of annotated protein sequences in databases. BG7 predicts ORFs and infers their function based on protein similarity with a wide set of reference proteins, integrating ORF prediction and functional annotation phases in just one step. BG7 is especially tolerant to sequencing errors in start and stop codons, to frameshifts, and to assembly or scaffolding errors. The system is also tolerant to the high level of gene fragmentation which is frequently found in not fully assembled genomes. BG7 current version – which is developed in Java, takes advantage of Amazon Web Services (AWS) cloud computing features, but it can also be run locally in any operating system. BG7 is a fast, automated and scalable system that can cope with the challenge of analyzing the huge amount of genomes that are being sequenced with NGS technologies. Its capabilities and efficiency were demonstrated in the 2011 EHEC Germany outbreak in which BG7 was used to get the first annotations right the next day after the first entero-hemorrhagic E. coli genome sequences were made publicly available. The suitability of BG7 for genome annotation has been proved for Illumina, 454, Ion Torrent, and PacBio sequencing technologies. Besides, thanks to its plasticity, our system could be very easily adapted to work with new technologies in the future. PMID:23185310

  7. Next Generation Sequencing of Actinobacteria for the Discovery of Novel Natural Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Gomez-Escribano

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Like many fields of the biosciences, actinomycete natural products research has been revolutionised by next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS. Hundreds of new genome sequences from actinobacteria are made public every year, many of them as a result of projects aimed at identifying new natural products and their biosynthetic pathways through genome mining. Advances in these technologies in the last five years have meant not only a reduction in the cost of whole genome sequencing, but also a substantial increase in the quality of the data, having moved from obtaining a draft genome sequence comprised of several hundred short contigs, sometimes of doubtful reliability, to the possibility of obtaining an almost complete and accurate chromosome sequence in a single contig, allowing a detailed study of gene clusters and the design of strategies for refactoring and full gene cluster synthesis. The impact that these technologies are having in the discovery and study of natural products from actinobacteria, including those from the marine environment, is only starting to be realised. In this review we provide a historical perspective of the field, analyse the strengths and limitations of the most relevant technologies, and share the insights acquired during our genome mining projects.

  8. Next Generation Sequencing of Actinobacteria for the Discovery of Novel Natural Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Escribano, Juan Pablo; Alt, Silke; Bibb, Mervyn J

    2016-04-13

    Like many fields of the biosciences, actinomycete natural products research has been revolutionised by next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS). Hundreds of new genome sequences from actinobacteria are made public every year, many of them as a result of projects aimed at identifying new natural products and their biosynthetic pathways through genome mining. Advances in these technologies in the last five years have meant not only a reduction in the cost of whole genome sequencing, but also a substantial increase in the quality of the data, having moved from obtaining a draft genome sequence comprised of several hundred short contigs, sometimes of doubtful reliability, to the possibility of obtaining an almost complete and accurate chromosome sequence in a single contig, allowing a detailed study of gene clusters and the design of strategies for refactoring and full gene cluster synthesis. The impact that these technologies are having in the discovery and study of natural products from actinobacteria, including those from the marine environment, is only starting to be realised. In this review we provide a historical perspective of the field, analyse the strengths and limitations of the most relevant technologies, and share the insights acquired during our genome mining projects.

  9. Performance evaluation of the next-generation sequencing approach for molecular diagnosis of hereditary hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumaran, Theru A; Husami, Ammar; Kissell, Diane; Zhang, Wenying; Keddache, Mehdi; Black, Angela P; Tinkle, Brad T; Greinwald, John H; Zhang, Kejian

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the performance of a next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based targeted resequencing genetic test, OtoSeq, to identify the sequence variants in the genes causing sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Retrospective study. Tertiary children's hospital. A total of 8 individuals presenting with prelingual hearing loss were used in this study. The coding and flanking intronic regions of 24 well-studied SNHL genes were enriched using microdroplet polymerase chain reaction and sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencer. The filtered high-quality sequence reads were mapped to reference sequence, and variants were detected using NextGENe software. A total of 1148 sequence variants were detected in 8 samples in 24 genes. Using in-house developed NGS data analysis criteria, we classified 810 (~71%) of these variants as potential true variants that include previously detected pathogenic mutations in 5 patients. To validate our strategy, we Sanger sequenced the target regions of 5 of the 24 genes, accounting for about 29.2% of all target sequence. Our results showed >99.99% concordance between NGS and Sanger sequencing in these 5 genes, resulting in an analytical sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 99.997%, respectively. We were able to successfully detect single base substitutions, small deletions, and insertions of up to 22 nucleotides. This study demonstrated that our NGS-based mutation screening strategy is highly sensitive and specific in detecting sequence variants in the SNHL genes. Therefore, we propose that this NGS-based targeted sequencing method would be an alternative to current technologies for identifying the multiple genetic causes of SNHL.

  10. Maximum length sequence and Bessel diffusers using active technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Trevor J.; Avis, Mark R.; Xiao, Lejun

    2006-02-01

    Active technologies can enable room acoustic diffusers to operate over a wider bandwidth than passive devices, by extending the bass response. Active impedance control can be used to generate surface impedance distributions which cause wavefront dispersion, as opposed to the more normal absorptive or pressure-cancelling target functions. This paper details the development of two new types of active diffusers which are difficult, if not impossible, to make as passive wide-band structures. The first type is a maximum length sequence diffuser where the well depths are designed to be frequency dependent to avoid the critical frequencies present in the passive device, and so achieve performance over a finite-bandwidth. The second is a Bessel diffuser, which exploits concepts developed for transducer arrays to form a hybrid absorber-diffuser. Details of the designs are given, and measurements of scattering and impedance used to show that the active diffusers are operating correctly over a bandwidth of about 100 Hz to 1.1 kHz. Boundary element method simulation is used to show how more application-realistic arrays of these devices would behave.

  11. Using next generation transcriptome sequencing to predict an ectomycorrhizal metablome.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, P. E.; Sreedasyam, A.; Trivedi, G; Podila, G. K.; Cseke, L. J.; Collart, F. R. (Biosciences Division); (On Assignment, Scientific Staffing); (Univ. of Alabama at Huntsville)

    2011-05-13

    Mycorrhizae, symbiotic interactions between soil fungi and tree roots, are ubiquitous in terrestrial ecosystems. The fungi contribute phosphorous, nitrogen and mobilized nutrients from organic matter in the soil and in return the fungus receives photosynthetically-derived carbohydrates. This union of plant and fungal metabolisms is the mycorrhizal metabolome. Understanding this symbiotic relationship at a molecular level provides important contributions to the understanding of forest ecosystems and global carbon cycling. We generated next generation short-read transcriptomic sequencing data from fully-formed ectomycorrhizae between Laccaria bicolor and aspen (Populus tremuloides) roots. The transcriptomic data was used to identify statistically significantly expressed gene models using a bootstrap-style approach, and these expressed genes were mapped to specific metabolic pathways. Integration of expressed genes that code for metabolic enzymes and the set of expressed membrane transporters generates a predictive model of the ectomycorrhizal metabolome. The generated model of mycorrhizal metabolome predicts that the specific compounds glycine, glutamate, and allantoin are synthesized by L. bicolor and that these compounds or their metabolites may be used for the benefit of aspen in exchange for the photosynthetically-derived sugars fructose and glucose. The analysis illustrates an approach to generate testable biological hypotheses to investigate the complex molecular interactions that drive ectomycorrhizal symbiosis. These models are consistent with experimental environmental data and provide insight into the molecular exchange processes for organisms in this complex ecosystem. The method used here for predicting metabolomic models of mycorrhizal systems from deep RNA sequencing data can be generalized and is broadly applicable to transcriptomic data derived from complex systems.

  12. Using next generation transcriptome sequencing to predict an ectomycorrhizal metabolome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cseke Leland J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycorrhizae, symbiotic interactions between soil fungi and tree roots, are ubiquitous in terrestrial ecosystems. The fungi contribute phosphorous, nitrogen and mobilized nutrients from organic matter in the soil and in return the fungus receives photosynthetically-derived carbohydrates. This union of plant and fungal metabolisms is the mycorrhizal metabolome. Understanding this symbiotic relationship at a molecular level provides important contributions to the understanding of forest ecosystems and global carbon cycling. Results We generated next generation short-read transcriptomic sequencing data from fully-formed ectomycorrhizae between Laccaria bicolor and aspen (Populus tremuloides roots. The transcriptomic data was used to identify statistically significantly expressed gene models using a bootstrap-style approach, and these expressed genes were mapped to specific metabolic pathways. Integration of expressed genes that code for metabolic enzymes and the set of expressed membrane transporters generates a predictive model of the ectomycorrhizal metabolome. The generated model of mycorrhizal metabolome predicts that the specific compounds glycine, glutamate, and allantoin are synthesized by L. bicolor and that these compounds or their metabolites may be used for the benefit of aspen in exchange for the photosynthetically-derived sugars fructose and glucose. Conclusions The analysis illustrates an approach to generate testable biological hypotheses to investigate the complex molecular interactions that drive ectomycorrhizal symbiosis. These models are consistent with experimental environmental data and provide insight into the molecular exchange processes for organisms in this complex ecosystem. The method used here for predicting metabolomic models of mycorrhizal systems from deep RNA sequencing data can be generalized and is broadly applicable to transcriptomic data derived from complex systems.

  13. Solving the molecular diagnostic testing conundrum for Mendelian disorders in the era of next-generation sequencing: single-gene, gene panel, or exome/genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yuan; Ankala, Arunkanth; Wilcox, William R; Hegde, Madhuri R

    2015-06-01

    Next-generation sequencing is changing the paradigm of clinical genetic testing. Today there are numerous molecular tests available, including single-gene tests, gene panels, and exome sequencing or genome sequencing. As a result, ordering physicians face the conundrum of selecting the best diagnostic tool for their patients with genetic conditions. Single-gene testing is often most appropriate for conditions with distinctive clinical features and minimal locus heterogeneity. Next-generation sequencing-based gene panel testing, which can be complemented with array comparative genomic hybridization and other ancillary methods, provides a comprehensive and feasible approach for heterogeneous disorders. Exome sequencing and genome sequencing have the advantage of being unbiased regarding what set of genes is analyzed, enabling parallel interrogation of most of the genes in the human genome. However, current limitations of next-generation sequencing technology and our variant interpretation capabilities caution us against offering exome sequencing or genome sequencing as either stand-alone or first-choice diagnostic approaches. A growing interest in personalized medicine calls for the application of genome sequencing in clinical diagnostics, but major challenges must be addressed before its full potential can be realized. Here, we propose a testing algorithm to help clinicians opt for the most appropriate molecular diagnostic tool for each scenario.

  14. ZERO EMISSION POWER GENERATION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald Bischoff; Stephen Doyle

    2005-01-20

    Clean Energy Systems (CES) was previously funded by DOE's ''Vision 21'' program. This program provided a proof-of-concept demonstration that CES' novel gas generator (combustor) enabled production of electrical power from fossil fuels without pollution. CES has used current DOE funding for additional design study exercises which established the utility of the CES-cycle for retrofitting existing power plants for zero-emission operations and for incorporation in zero-emission, ''green field'' power plant concepts. DOE funding also helped define the suitability of existing steam turbine designs for use in the CES-cycle and explored the use of aero-derivative turbines for advanced power plant designs. This work is of interest to the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum & Energy. California's air quality districts have significant non-attainment areas in which CES technology can help. CEC is currently funding a CES-cycle technology demonstration near Bakersfield, CA. The Norwegian government is supporting conceptual studies for a proposed 40 MW zero-emission power plant in Stavager, Norway which would use the CES-cycle. The latter project is called Zero-Emission Norwegian Gas (ZENG). In summary, current engineering studies: (1) supported engineering design of plant subsystems applicable for use with CES-cycle zero-emission power plants, and (2) documented the suitability and availability of steam turbines for use in CES-cycle power plants, with particular relevance to the Norwegian ZENG Project.

  15. Ultrasensitive single-genome sequencing: accurate, targeted, next generation sequencing of HIV-1 RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltz, Valerie F; Rausch, Jason; Shao, Wei; Hattori, Junko; Luke, Brian; Maldarelli, Frank; Mellors, John W; Kearney, Mary F; Coffin, John M

    2016-12-20

    Although next generation sequencing (NGS) offers the potential for studying virus populations in unprecedented depth, PCR error, amplification bias and recombination during library construction have limited its use to population sequencing and measurements of unlinked allele frequencies. Here we report a method, termed ultrasensitive Single-Genome Sequencing (uSGS), for NGS library construction and analysis that eliminates PCR errors and recombinants, and generates single-genome sequences of the same quality as the "gold-standard" of HIV-1 single-genome sequencing assay but with more than 100-fold greater depth. Primer ID tagged cDNA was synthesized from mixtures of cloned BH10 wild-type and mutant HIV-1 transcripts containing ten drug resistance mutations. First, the resultant cDNA was divided and NGS libraries were generated in parallel using two methods: uSGS and a method applying long PCR primers to attach the NGS adaptors (LP-PCR-1). Second, cDNA was divided and NGS libraries were generated in parallel comparing 3 methods: uSGS and 2 methods adapted from more recent reports using variations of the long PCR primers to attach the adaptors (LP-PCR-2 and LP-PCR-3). Consistently, the uSGS method amplified a greater proportion of cDNAs, averaging 30% compared to 13% for LP-PCR-1, 21% for LP-PCR-2 and 14% for LP-PCR-3. Most importantly, when the uSGS sequences were binned according to their primer IDs, 94% of the bins did not contain PCR recombinant sequences versus only 55, 75 and 65% for LP-PCR-1, 2 and 3, respectively. Finally, when uSGS was applied to plasma samples from HIV-1 infected donors, both frequent and rare variants were detected in each sample and neighbor-joining trees revealed clusters of genomes driven by the linkage of these mutations, showing the lack of PCR recombinants in the datasets. The uSGS assay can be used for accurate detection of rare variants and for identifying linkage of rare alleles associated with HIV-1 drug resistance. In addition

  16. Challenges and opportunities in estimating viral genetic diversity from next-generation sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niko eBeerenwinkel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Many viruses, including the clinically relevant RNA viruses HIV and HCV, exist in large populations and display high genetic heterogeneity within and between infected hosts. Assessing intra-patient viral genetic diversity is essential for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of viruses, for designing effective vaccines, and for the success of antiviral therapy. Next-generation sequencing technologies allow the rapid and cost-effective acquisition of thousands to millions of short DNA sequences from a single sample. However, this approach entails several challenges in experimental design and computational data analysis. Here, we review the entire process of inferring viral diversity from sample collection to computing measures of genetic diversity. We discuss sample preparation, including reverse transcription and amplification, and the effect of experimental conditions on diversity estimates due to in vitro base substitutions, insertions, deletions, and recombination. The use of different next-generation sequencing platforms and their sequencing error profiles are compared in the context of various applications of diversity estimation, ranging from the detection of single nucleotide variants to the reconstruction of whole-genome haplotypes. We describe the statistical and computational challenges arising from these technical artifacts, and we review existing approaches, including available software, for their solution. Finally, we discuss open problems, and highlight successful biomedical applications and potential future clinical use of next-generation sequencing to estimate viral diversity.

  17. Use of next-generation sequencing in oral cavity cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabaeifar, Siavosh; Kruse, Torben A; Thomassen, Mads

    Background: Oral cavity cancer is a subgroup of head and neck cancer which is the world’s 6th most common cancer form. Oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) constitute almost all oral cavity cancers, and OSCC are primarily attributed by excessive alcohol consumption and tobacco exposure...... of tumour cells exists. Conclusions: Use of next generation sequencing in oral cavity cancer can give valuable insight into the biology of the disease. By investigating intra tumour heterogeneity we see that the different tumour specimens in each patient are quite homogenous, but evidence of heterogeneous...

  18. Next-Generation Sequencing-Based Molecular Diagnosis of Choroideremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayo Shimizu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We screened patients with choroideremia using next-generation sequencing (NGS and identified a novel mutation and a known mutation in the CHM gene. One patient presented an atypical fundus appearance for choroideremia. Another patient presented macular hole retinal detachment in the left eye. The present case series shows the utility of NGS-based screening in patients with choroideremia. In addition, the presence of macular hole in 1 of the 2 patients, together with a previous report, indicated the susceptibility of patients with choroideremia to macular hole.

  19. Mapping sensorimotor sequences to word sequences: a connectionist model of language acquisition and sentence generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takac, Martin; Benuskova, Lubica; Knott, Alistair

    2012-11-01

    In this article we present a neural network model of sentence generation. The network has both technical and conceptual innovations. Its main technical novelty is in its semantic representations: the messages which form the input to the network are structured as sequences, so that message elements are delivered to the network one at a time. Rather than learning to linearise a static semantic representation as a sequence of words, our network rehearses a sequence of semantic signals, and learns to generate words from selected signals. Conceptually, the network's use of rehearsed sequences of semantic signals is motivated by work in embodied cognition, which posits that the structure of semantic representations has its origin in the serial structure of sensorimotor processing. The rich sequential structure of the network's semantic inputs also allows it to incorporate certain Chomskyan ideas about innate syntactic knowledge and parameter-setting, as well as a more empiricist account of the acquisition of idiomatic syntactic constructions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Next-generation sequencing as a powerful motor for advances in the biological and environmental sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Denis; Joly, Dominique

    2015-04-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) provides unprecedented insight into (meta)genomes, (meta)transcriptomes (cDNA) and (meta)barcodes of individuals, populations and communities of Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya, as well as viruses. This special issue combines reviews and original papers reporting technical and scientific advances in genomics and transcriptomics of non-model species, as well as quantification and functional analyses of biodiversity using NGS technologies of the second and third generations. In addition, certain papers also exemplify the transition from Sanger to NGS barcodes in molecular taxonomy.

  1. Digital technologies to generate health awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Adriaan van Wietmarschen

    2015-10-01

    A third use case for improving health awareness is the launch of a HealthCafé. The aim is to inspire people to measure their own health and measure the effects of interventions on their health, using all sorts of do-it-your-self technologies. The current version of the HealthCafé offers first of all a physical location where people can interact. It also offers devices such as activity trackers, glucose and cholesterol measurement devices, questionnaires, and a personal internet portal to store and analyse the data. The goal is to empower people and give people more control over their own health. Conclusions: Complexity science offers new opportunities to create health awareness. We have shown how a systems dynamics software tool can be used in group model building sessions to generate a shared understanding of a health problem among stakeholders. The resulted in a successful integrative overweight treatment program at a rehabilitation centre in the Netherlands. The HealthCafé was launched as a living lab which can be used by people to explore their own health and conduct studies on themselves. These activities are aiming for a transition in health care towards more awareness as the personal level, empowerment and thereby increasing the chances for successful life-style changes towards more health and happiness.

  2. Solid-State Nanopore-Based DNA Sequencing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zewen Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The solid-state nanopore-based DNA sequencing technology is becoming more and more attractive for its brand new future in gene detection field. The challenges that need to be addressed are diverse: the effective methods to detect base-specific signatures, the control of the nanopore’s size and surface properties, and the modulation of translocation velocity and behavior of the DNA molecules. Among these challenges, the realization of the high-quality nanopores with the help of modern micro/nanofabrication technologies is a crucial one. In this paper, typical technologies applied in the field of solid-state nanopore-based DNA sequencing have been reviewed.

  3. Personal microbiomes and next-generation sequencing for laboratory-based education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Mark R; Harrington, Kristin T; Etson, Candice M; Fierman, Matthew B; Slonim, Donna K; Walt, David R

    2016-12-01

    Sequencing and bioinformatics technologies have advanced rapidly in recent years, driven largely by developments in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology. Given the increasing importance of these advances, there is a growing need to incorporate concepts and practices relating to NGS into undergraduate and high school science curricula. We believe that direct access to sequencing and bioinformatics will improve the ability of students to understand the information obtained through these increasingly ubiquitous research tools. In this commentary, we discuss approaches and challenges for bringing NGS into the classroom based on our experiences in developing and running a microbiome project in high school and undergraduate courses. We describe strategies for maximizing student engagement through establishing personal relevance and utilizing an inquiry-based structure. Additionally, we address the practical issues of incorporating cutting edge technologies into an established curriculum. Looking forward, we anticipate that NGS educational experiments will become more commonplace as sequencing costs continue to decrease and the workflow becomes more user friendly. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The Sequencing Bead Array (SBA, a next-generation digital suspension array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Akhras

    Full Text Available Here we describe the novel Sequencing Bead Array (SBA, a complete assay for molecular diagnostics and typing applications. SBA is a digital suspension array using Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS, to replace conventional optical readout platforms. The technology allows for reducing the number of instruments required in a laboratory setting, where the same NGS instrument could be employed from whole-genome and targeted sequencing to SBA broad-range biomarker detection and genotyping. As proof-of-concept, a model assay was designed that could distinguish ten Human Papillomavirus (HPV genotypes associated with cervical cancer progression. SBA was used to genotype 20 cervical tumor samples and, when compared with amplicon pyrosequencing, was able to detect two additional co-infections due to increased sensitivity. We also introduce in-house software Sphix, enabling easy accessibility and interpretation of results. The technology offers a multi-parallel, rapid, robust, and scalable system that is readily adaptable for a multitude of microarray diagnostic and typing applications, e.g. genetic signatures, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, structural variations, and immunoassays. SBA has the potential to dramatically change the way we perform probe-based applications, and allow for a smooth transition towards the technology offered by genomic sequencing.

  5. The Sequencing Bead Array (SBA), a next-generation digital suspension array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhras, Michael S; Pettersson, Erik; Diamond, Lisa; Unemo, Magnus; Okamoto, Jennifer; Davis, Ronald W; Pourmand, Nader

    2013-01-01

    Here we describe the novel Sequencing Bead Array (SBA), a complete assay for molecular diagnostics and typing applications. SBA is a digital suspension array using Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS), to replace conventional optical readout platforms. The technology allows for reducing the number of instruments required in a laboratory setting, where the same NGS instrument could be employed from whole-genome and targeted sequencing to SBA broad-range biomarker detection and genotyping. As proof-of-concept, a model assay was designed that could distinguish ten Human Papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes associated with cervical cancer progression. SBA was used to genotype 20 cervical tumor samples and, when compared with amplicon pyrosequencing, was able to detect two additional co-infections due to increased sensitivity. We also introduce in-house software Sphix, enabling easy accessibility and interpretation of results. The technology offers a multi-parallel, rapid, robust, and scalable system that is readily adaptable for a multitude of microarray diagnostic and typing applications, e.g. genetic signatures, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), structural variations, and immunoassays. SBA has the potential to dramatically change the way we perform probe-based applications, and allow for a smooth transition towards the technology offered by genomic sequencing.

  6. QTrim : a novel tool for the quality trimming of sequence reads generated using the Roche/454 sequencing platform

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, Ram; Lubinsky, Baruch; Bansode, Vijay B; Moinz, Mónica B. J.; McCormack, Grace P.; Travers, Simon A

    2014-01-01

    Background\\ud Many high throughput sequencing (HTS) approaches, such as the Roche/454 platform, produce sequences in which the quality of the sequence (as measured by a Phred-like quality scores) decreases linearly across a sequence read. Undertaking quality trimming of this data is essential to enable confidence in the results of subsequent downstream analysis. Here, we have developed a novel, highly sensitive and accurate approach (QTrim) for the quality trimming of sequence reads generated...

  7. Deciphering next-generation pharmacogenomics: an information technology perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potamias, George; Lakiotaki, Kleanthi; Katsila, Theodora; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; Topouzis, Stavros; Cooper, David N; Patrinos, George P

    2014-07-01

    In the post-genomic era, the rapid evolution of high-throughput genotyping technologies and the increased pace of production of genetic research data are continually prompting the development of appropriate informatics tools, systems and databases as we attempt to cope with the flood of incoming genetic information. Alongside new technologies that serve to enhance data connectivity, emerging information systems should contribute to the creation of a powerful knowledge environment for genotype-to-phenotype information in the context of translational medicine. In the area of pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine, it has become evident that database applications providing important information on the occurrence and consequences of gene variants involved in pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, drug efficacy and drug toxicity will become an integral tool for researchers and medical practitioners alike. At the same time, two fundamental issues are inextricably linked to current developments, namely data sharing and data protection. Here, we discuss high-throughput and next-generation sequencing technology and its impact on pharmacogenomics research. In addition, we present advances and challenges in the field of pharmacogenomics information systems which have in turn triggered the development of an integrated electronic 'pharmacogenomics assistant'. The system is designed to provide personalized drug recommendations based on linked genotype-to-phenotype pharmacogenomics data, as well as to support biomedical researchers in the identification of pharmacogenomics-related gene variants. The provisioned services are tuned in the framework of a single-access pharmacogenomics portal.

  8. Generation of artificial FASTQ files to evaluate the performance of next-generation sequencing pipelines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Frampton

    Full Text Available Pipelines for the analysis of Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS data are generally composed of a set of different publicly available software, configured together in order to map short reads of a genome and call variants. The fidelity of pipelines is variable. We have developed ArtificialFastqGenerator, which takes a reference genome sequence as input and outputs artificial paired-end FASTQ files containing Phred quality scores. Since these artificial FASTQs are derived from the reference genome, it provides a gold-standard for read-alignment and variant-calling, thereby enabling the performance of any NGS pipeline to be evaluated. The user can customise DNA template/read length, the modelling of coverage based on GC content, whether to use real Phred base quality scores taken from existing FASTQ files, and whether to simulate sequencing errors. Detailed coverage and error summary statistics are outputted. Here we describe ArtificialFastqGenerator and illustrate its implementation in evaluating a typical bespoke NGS analysis pipeline under different experimental conditions. ArtificialFastqGenerator was released in January 2012. Source code, example files and binaries are freely available under the terms of the GNU General Public License v3.0. from https://sourceforge.net/projects/artfastqgen/.

  9. Performance Characteristics and Validation of Next-Generation Sequencing for Human Leucocyte Antigen Typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimer, Eric T; Montgomery, Maureen; Petraroia, Rosanne; Crawford, John; Schmitz, John L

    2016-09-01

    High-resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matching reduces graft-versus-host disease and improves overall patient survival after hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Sanger sequencing has been the gold standard for HLA typing since 1996. However, given the increasing number of new HLA alleles identified and the complexity of the HLA genes, clinical HLA typing by Sanger sequencing requires several rounds of additional testing to provide allele-level resolution. Although next-generation sequencing (NGS) is routinely used in molecular genetics, few clinical HLA laboratories use the technology. The performance characteristics of NGS HLA typing using TruSight HLA were determined using Sanger sequencing as the reference method. In total, 211 samples were analyzed with an overall accuracy of 99.8% (2954/2961) and 46 samples were analyzed for precision with 100% (368/368) reproducibility. Most discordant alleles were because of technical error rather than assay performance. More important, the ambiguity rate was 3.5% (103/2961). Seventy-four percentage of the ambiguities were within the DRB1 and DRB4 loci. HLA typing by NGS saves approximately $6000 per run when compared to Sanger sequencing. Thus, TruSight HLA assay enables high-throughput HLA typing with an accuracy, precision, ambiguity rate, and cost savings that should facilitate adoption of NGS technology in clinical HLA laboratories.

  10. Next-Generation Sequencing in Clinical Molecular Diagnostics of Cancer: Advantages and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajyalakshmi Luthra

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The application of next-generation sequencing (NGS to characterize cancer genomes has resulted in the discovery of numerous genetic markers. Consequently, the number of markers that warrant routine screening in molecular diagnostic laboratories, often from limited tumor material, has increased. This increased demand has been difficult to manage by traditional low- and/or medium-throughput sequencing platforms. Massively parallel sequencing capabilities of NGS provide a much-needed alternative for mutation screening in multiple genes with a single low investment of DNA. However, implementation of NGS technologies, most of which are for research use only (RUO, in a diagnostic laboratory, needs extensive validation in order to establish Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA and College of American Pathologists (CAP-compliant performance characteristics. Here, we have reviewed approaches for validation of NGS technology for routine screening of tumors. We discuss the criteria for selecting gene markers to include in the NGS panel and the deciding factors for selecting target capture approaches and sequencing platforms. We also discuss challenges in result reporting, storage and retrieval of the voluminous sequencing data and the future potential of clinical NGS.

  11. A next generation semiconductor based sequencing approach for the identification of meat species in DNA mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, Francesca; Ghionda, Marco Ciro; D'Alessandro, Enrico; Geraci, Claudia; Chiofalo, Vincenzo; Fontanesi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the species of origin of meat and meat products is an important issue to prevent and detect frauds that might have economic, ethical and health implications. In this paper we evaluated the potential of the next generation semiconductor based sequencing technology (Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine) for the identification of DNA from meat species (pig, horse, cattle, sheep, rabbit, chicken, turkey, pheasant, duck, goose and pigeon) as well as from human and rat in DNA mixtures through the sequencing of PCR products obtained from different couples of universal primers that amplify 12S and 16S rRNA mitochondrial DNA genes. Six libraries were produced including PCR products obtained separately from 13 species or from DNA mixtures containing DNA from all species or only avian or only mammalian species at equimolar concentration or at 1:10 or 1:50 ratios for pig and horse DNA. Sequencing obtained a total of 33,294,511 called nucleotides of which 29,109,688 with Q20 (87.43%) in a total of 215,944 reads. Different alignment algorithms were used to assign the species based on sequence data. Error rate calculated after confirmation of the obtained sequences by Sanger sequencing ranged from 0.0003 to 0.02 for the different species. Correlation about the number of reads per species between different libraries was high for mammalian species (0.97) and lower for avian species (0.70). PCR competition limited the efficiency of amplification and sequencing for avian species for some primer pairs. Detection of low level of pig and horse DNA was possible with reads obtained from different primer pairs. The sequencing of the products obtained from different universal PCR primers could be a useful strategy to overcome potential problems of amplification. Based on these results, the Ion Torrent technology can be applied for the identification of meat species in DNA mixtures.

  12. A next generation semiconductor based sequencing approach for the identification of meat species in DNA mixtures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Bertolini

    Full Text Available The identification of the species of origin of meat and meat products is an important issue to prevent and detect frauds that might have economic, ethical and health implications. In this paper we evaluated the potential of the next generation semiconductor based sequencing technology (Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine for the identification of DNA from meat species (pig, horse, cattle, sheep, rabbit, chicken, turkey, pheasant, duck, goose and pigeon as well as from human and rat in DNA mixtures through the sequencing of PCR products obtained from different couples of universal primers that amplify 12S and 16S rRNA mitochondrial DNA genes. Six libraries were produced including PCR products obtained separately from 13 species or from DNA mixtures containing DNA from all species or only avian or only mammalian species at equimolar concentration or at 1:10 or 1:50 ratios for pig and horse DNA. Sequencing obtained a total of 33,294,511 called nucleotides of which 29,109,688 with Q20 (87.43% in a total of 215,944 reads. Different alignment algorithms were used to assign the species based on sequence data. Error rate calculated after confirmation of the obtained sequences by Sanger sequencing ranged from 0.0003 to 0.02 for the different species. Correlation about the number of reads per species between different libraries was high for mammalian species (0.97 and lower for avian species (0.70. PCR competition limited the efficiency of amplification and sequencing for avian species for some primer pairs. Detection of low level of pig and horse DNA was possible with reads obtained from different primer pairs. The sequencing of the products obtained from different universal PCR primers could be a useful strategy to overcome potential problems of amplification. Based on these results, the Ion Torrent technology can be applied for the identification of meat species in DNA mixtures.

  13. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) in the microbiological world: How to make the most of your money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Antony T; Derome, Nicolas; Boyle, Brian; Culley, Alexander I; Charette, Steve J

    2017-07-01

    The Sanger sequencing method produces relatively long DNA sequences of unmatched quality and has been considered for long time as the gold standard for sequencing DNA. Many improvements of the Sanger method that culminated with fluorescent dyes coupled with automated capillary electrophoresis enabled the sequencing of the first genomes. Nevertheless, using this technology to sequence whole genomes was costly, laborious and time consuming even for genomes that are relatively small in size. A major technological advance was the introduction of next-generation sequencing (NGS) pioneered by 454 Life Sciences in the early part of the 21th century. NGS allowed scientists to sequence thousands to millions of DNA molecules in a single machine run. Since then, new NGS technologies have emerged and existing NGS platforms have been improved, enabling the production of genome sequences at an unprecedented rate as well as broadening the spectrum of NGS applications. The current affordability of generating genomic information, especially with microbial samples, has resulted in a false sense of simplicity that belies the fact that many researchers still consider these technologies a black box. In this review, our objective is to identify and discuss four steps that we consider crucial to the success of any NGS-related project. These steps are: (1) the definition of the research objectives beyond sequencing and appropriate experimental planning, (2) library preparation, (3) sequencing and (4) data analysis. The goal of this review is to give an overview of the process, from sample to analysis, and discuss how to optimize your resources to achieve the most from your NGS-based research. Regardless of the evolution and improvement of the sequencing technologies, these four steps will remain relevant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. PAFFT: A new homology search algorithm for third-generation sequencers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, Kazuharu; Ootsuki, Ryo

    2015-11-01

    DNA sequencers that can conduct real-time sequencing from a single polymerase molecule are known as third-generation sequencers. Third-generation sequencers enable sequencing of reads that are several kilobases long. However, the raw data generated from third-generation sequencers are known to be error-prone. Because of sequencing errors, it is difficult to identify which genes are homologous to the reads obtained using third-generation sequencers. In this study, a new method for homology search algorithm, PAFFT, is developed. This method is the extension of the MAFFT algorithm which was used for multiple alignments. PAFFT detects global homology rather than local homology so that homologous regions can be detected even when the error rate of sequencing is high. PAFFT will boost application of third-generation sequencers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cracking the Code of Human Diseases Using Next-Generation Sequencing: Applications, Challenges, and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenza Precone

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies have greatly impacted on every field of molecular research mainly because they reduce costs and increase throughput of DNA sequencing. These features, together with the technology’s flexibility, have opened the way to a variety of applications including the study of the molecular basis of human diseases. Several analytical approaches have been developed to selectively enrich regions of interest from the whole genome in order to identify germinal and/or somatic sequence variants and to study DNA methylation. These approaches are now widely used in research, and they are already being used in routine molecular diagnostics. However, some issues are still controversial, namely, standardization of methods, data analysis and storage, and ethical aspects. Besides providing an overview of the NGS-based approaches most frequently used to study the molecular basis of human diseases at DNA level, we discuss the principal challenges and applications of NGS in the field of human genomics.

  16. Next-generation sequencing and genetic diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Verma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over 70 different Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT–associated genes have now been discovered and their number is growing. Conventional genetic testing for all CMT genes is cumbersome, expensive, and impractical in an individual patient. Next-generation sequencing (NGS technology allows cost-effective sequencing of large scale DNA, even entire exome (coding sequences or whole genome and thus, NGS platform can be employed to effectively target a large number or all CMT-related genes for accurate diagnosis. This overview discusses how NGS can be strategically used for genetic diagnosis in patients with CMT or unexplained neuropathy. A comment is made to combine simple clinical and electrophysiological algorithm to assign patients to major CMT subtypes and then employ NGS to screen for all known mutations in the subtype-specific CMT gene panel.

  17. Characterization of sequence-specific errors in various next-generation sequencing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sunguk; Park, Joonhong

    2016-03-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a popular method for assessing the molecular diversity of microbial communities without cultivation, for identifying polymorphisms in populations, and for comparing genomes and transcriptomes. However, sequence-specific errors (SSEs) by NGS systems can result in genome mis-assembly, overestimation of diversity in microbial community analyses, and false polymorphism discovery. SSEs can be particularly problematic due to rich microbial biodiversity and genomes containing frequent repeats. In this study, SSEs in public data from all popular NGS systems were discovered using a Markov chain model and hotspots for sequence errors were identified. Deletion errors were frequently preceded by homopolymers in non-Illumina NGS systems, such as GS FLX+. Substitution errors were often related to high GC contents and long G/C homopolymers in Illumina sequencing systems such as HiSeq. After removal of long G/C homopolymers in HiSeq, the average lengths of contigs and average SNP quality increased. SSEs were selectively removed from our mock community data by quality filtering, and a bias against specific microbes was identified. Our findings provide a scientific basis for filtering poor-quality reads, correcting deletion errors, preventing genome mis-assembly, and accurately assessing microbial community compositions and polymorphisms.

  18. High-throughput novel microsatellite marker of faba bean via next generation sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Tao

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Faba bean (Vicia faba L. is an important food legume crop, grown for human consumption globally including in China, Turkey, Egypt and Ethiopia. Although genetic gain has been made through conventional selection and breeding efforts, this could be substantially improved through the application of molecular methods. For this, a set of reliable molecular markers representative of the entire genome is required. Results A library with 125,559 putative SSR sequences was constructed and characterized for repeat type and length from a mixed genome of 247 spring and winter sown faba bean genotypes using 454 sequencing. A suit of 28,503 primer pair sequences were designed and 150 were randomly selected for validation. Of these, 94 produced reproducible amplicons that were polymorphic among 32 faba bean genotypes selected from diverse geographical locations. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 8, the expected heterozygocities ranged from 0.0000 to 1.0000, and the observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.0908 to 0.8410. The validation by UPGMA cluster analysis of 32 genotypes based on Nei's genetic distance, showed high quality and effectiveness of those novel SSR markers developed via next generation sequencing technology. Conclusions Large scale SSR marker development was successfully achieved using next generation sequencing of the V. faba genome. These novel markers are valuable for constructing genetic linkage maps, future QTL mapping, and marker-assisted trait selection in faba bean breeding efforts.

  19. Suppression Subtractive Hybridization Versus Next-Generation Sequencing in Plant Genetic Engineering: Challenges and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahebi, Mahbod; Hanafi, Mohamed M; Azizi, Parisa; Hakim, Abdul; Ashkani, Sadegh; Abiri, Rambod

    2015-10-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) is an effective method to identify different genes with different expression levels involved in a variety of biological processes. This method has often been used to study molecular mechanisms of plants in complex relationships with different pathogens and a variety of biotic stresses. Compared to other techniques used in gene expression profiling, SSH needs relatively smaller amounts of the initial materials, with lower costs, and fewer false positives present within the results. Extraction of total RNA from plant species rich in phenolic compounds, carbohydrates, and polysaccharides that easily bind to nucleic acids through cellular mechanisms is difficult and needs to be considered. Remarkable advancement has been achieved in the next-generation sequencing (NGS) field. As a result of progress within fields related to molecular chemistry and biology as well as specialized engineering, parallelization in the sequencing reaction has exceptionally enhanced the overall read number of generated sequences per run. Currently available sequencing platforms support an earlier unparalleled view directly into complex mixes associated with RNA in addition to DNA samples. NGS technology has demonstrated the ability to sequence DNA with remarkable swiftness, therefore allowing previously unthinkable scientific accomplishments along with novel biological purposes. However, the massive amounts of data generated by NGS impose a substantial challenge with regard to data safe-keeping and analysis. This review examines some simple but vital points involved in preparing the initial material for SSH and introduces this method as well as its associated applications to detect different novel genes from different plant species. This review evaluates general concepts, basic applications, plus the probable results of NGS technology in genomics, with unique mention of feasible potential tools as well as bioinformatics.

  20. Summary of New Generation Technologies and Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1993-01-08

    This compendium includes a PG&E R&D program perspective on the Advanced Energy Systems Technology Information Module (TIM) project, a glossary, a summary of each TIM, updated information on the status and trends of each technology, and a bibliography. The objectives of the TIMs are to enhance and document the PG&E R&D Program's understanding of the technology status, resource potential, deployment hurdles, commercial timing, PG&E applications and impacts, and R&D issues of advanced technologies for electric utility applications in Northern California. [DJE-2005

  1. RAMBO-K: Rapid and Sensitive Removal of Background Sequences from Next Generation Sequencing Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon H Tausch

    Full Text Available The assembly of viral or endosymbiont genomes from Next Generation Sequencing (NGS data is often hampered by the predominant abundance of reads originating from the host organism. These reads increase the memory and CPU time usage of the assembler and can lead to misassemblies.We developed RAMBO-K (Read Assignment Method Based On K-mers, a tool which allows rapid and sensitive removal of unwanted host sequences from NGS datasets. Reaching a speed of 10 Megabases/s on 4 CPU cores and a standard hard drive, RAMBO-K is faster than any tool we tested, while showing a consistently high sensitivity and specificity across different datasets.RAMBO-K rapidly and reliably separates reads from different species without data preprocessing. It is suitable as a straightforward standard solution for workflows dealing with mixed datasets. Binaries and source code (java and python are available from http://sourceforge.net/projects/rambok/.

  2. Next generation sequencing for characterizing biodiversity: promises and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompanon, François; Samadi, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    DNA barcoding approaches are used to describe biodiversity by analysing specimens or environmental samples in taxonomic, phylogenetic and ecological studies. While sharing data among these disciplines would be highly valuable, this remains difficult because of contradictory requirements. The properties making a DNA barcode efficient for specimen identification or species delimitation are hardly reconcilable with those required for a powerful analysis of degraded DNA from environmental samples. The use of next generation sequencing methods open up the way towards the development of new markers (e.g., multilocus barcodes) that would overcome such limitations. However, several challenges should be taken up for coordinating actions at the interface between taxonomy, ecology, molecular biology and bioinformatics in order to develop methods and protocols compatible with both taxonomic and ecological studies.

  3. Field guide to next-generation DNA sequencers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Travis C

    2011-09-01

    The diversity of available 2(nd) and 3(rd) generation DNA sequencing platforms is increasing rapidly. Costs for these systems range from $10/Mb for 454 and some Ion Torrent chips). In terms of cost per nonmultiplexed sample and instrument run time, the Pacific Biosciences and Ion Torrent platforms excel, with the 454 GS Junior and Illumina MiSeq also notable in this regard. All platforms allow multiplexing of samples, but details of library preparation, experimental design and data analysis can constrain the options. The wide range of characteristics among available platforms provides opportunities both to conduct groundbreaking studies and to waste money on scales that were previously infeasible. Thus, careful thought about the desired characteristics of these systems is warranted before purchasing or using any of them. Updated information from this guide will be maintained at: http://dna.uga.edu/ and http://tomato.biol.trinity.edu/blog/. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Experimental study on ceramic membrane technology for onboard oxygen generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Dongsheng; Bu Xueqin; Sun Bing; Lin Guiping; Zhao Hongtao; Cai Yan; Fang Ling

    2016-01-01

    The ceramic membrane oxygen generation technology has advantages of high concentra-tion of produced oxygen and potential nuclear and biochemical protection capability. The present paper studies the ceramic membrane technology for onboard oxygen generation. Comparisons are made to have knowledge of the effects of two kinds of ceramic membrane separation technologies on oxygen generation, namely electricity driven ceramic membrane separation oxygen generation technology (EDCMSOGT) and pressure driven ceramic membrane separation oxygen generation technology (PDCMSOGT). Experiments were conducted under different temperatures, pressures of feed air and produced oxygen flow rates. On the basis of these experiments, the flow rate of feed air, electric power provided, oxygen recovery rate and concentration of produced oxygen are compared under each working condition. It is concluded that the EDCMSOGT is the oxygen generation means more suitable for onboard conditions.

  5. Experimental study on ceramic membrane technology for onboard oxygen generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Dongsheng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The ceramic membrane oxygen generation technology has advantages of high concentration of produced oxygen and potential nuclear and biochemical protection capability. The present paper studies the ceramic membrane technology for onboard oxygen generation. Comparisons are made to have knowledge of the effects of two kinds of ceramic membrane separation technologies on oxygen generation, namely electricity driven ceramic membrane separation oxygen generation technology (EDCMSOGT and pressure driven ceramic membrane separation oxygen generation technology (PDCMSOGT. Experiments were conducted under different temperatures, pressures of feed air and produced oxygen flow rates. On the basis of these experiments, the flow rate of feed air, electric power provided, oxygen recovery rate and concentration of produced oxygen are compared under each working condition. It is concluded that the EDCMSOGT is the oxygen generation means more suitable for onboard conditions.

  6. Anomalous statistics of aftershock sequences generated by supershear ruptures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathikrit Bhattacharya

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Most earthquake ruptures propagate with speeds smaller than the Rayleigh wave velocity of the medium. These are called sub- Rayleigh ruptures. However, under suitable conditions, segments of otherwise sub- Rayleigh seismogenic ruptures can occasionally accelerate to speeds higher than the local shear wave velocity, giving rise to so-called supershear ruptures. The occurrence of supershear ruptures is usually associated with a locally higher value of pre-stress on the fault segment compared to the sub-Rayleigh segments of the same fault. Additionally, shear stress changes generated by the supershear rupture are radiated out unattenuated to distances comparable to the depth of rupture instead of rapidly decaying at much smaller distances from the rupture. This leads to aftershocks being distributed away from the fault on the supershear segment. This study attempts to verify whether these pre- and postseismic stress conditions and the resultant spatial aftershock distributions lead to discernible features in the statistical properties of the aftershock sequences of the earthquakes known to be associated with supershear ruptures. We analyze the Gutenberg-Richter scaling, the modified Omori law and Båth’s law for the aftershock sequences of two supershear mainshocks: the 1979 MW 6.5 Imperial Valley (California and 2002 MW 7.9 Denali (Alaska earthquakes. We observe that the b-value is always higher in the supershear zone than the rest of the sequence. We also observe that there is no systematic trend in the exponent of the modified Omori law when comparing the aftershocks in the supershear zone with the rest of the aftershocks. We argue that the b-value anomaly can be explained in terms of the off-fault distribution of aftershocks around the supershear segment of the rupture.

  7. Genome survey sequencing and genetic background characterization of Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis (Rhodophyta based on next-generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhou

    Full Text Available Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis has a high economic value and is one of the most important aquaculture species in China. Despite it is economic importance, it has remained largely unstudied at the genomic level. In this study, we conducted a genome survey of Gp. lemaneiformis using next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies. In total, 18.70 Gb of high-quality sequence data with an estimated genome size of 97 Mb were obtained by HiSeq 2000 sequencing for Gp. lemaneiformis. These reads were assembled into 160,390 contigs with a N50 length of 3.64 kb, which were further assembled into 125,685 scaffolds with a total length of 81.17 Mb. Genome analysis predicted 3490 genes and a GC% content of 48%. The identified genes have an average transcript length of 1,429 bp, an average coding sequence size of 1,369 bp, 1.36 exons per gene, exon length of 1,008 bp, and intron length of 191 bp. From the initial assembled scaffold, transposable elements constituted 54.64% (44.35 Mb of the genome, and 7737 simple sequence repeats (SSRs were identified. Among these SSRs, the trinucleotide repeat type was the most abundant (up to 73.20% of total SSRs, followed by the di- (17.41%, tetra- (5.49%, hexa- (2.90%, and penta- (1.00% nucleotide repeat type. These characteristics suggest that Gp. lemaneiformis is a model organism for genetic study. This is the first report of genome-wide characterization within this taxon.

  8. Characterization of mutations and sequence variants in the D21S11 locus by next generation sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rockenbauer, Eszter; Hansen, Stine; Mikkelsen, Martin;

    2014-01-01

    We sequenced the D21S11 locus in 77 individuals from Danish paternity cases using 454 FLX next generation sequencing (NGS) technology. All samples were also typed with the AmpFlSTR(®) Profiler Plus(®) or the AmpFlSTR(®) Identifiler(®) PCR Amplification kits as part of paternity investigations....... In 18 of the confirmed trios, a genetic inconsistency was observed between one of the parents and the child at the D21S11 locus. NGS of the D21S11 locus revealed which allele had mutated from which parent to the child in 13 of these trios. All characterized mutations could be explained by single......-step mutations in the longest sub-repeat of D21S11. A total of 53 of the 77 sequenced samples originated from unrelated individuals. Twenty different D21S11 alleles were detected by NGS in these individuals whereas only 13 different alleles were observed with fragment analysis. Several alleles had the same...

  9. NGS-QC Generator: A Quality Control System for ChIP-Seq and Related Deep Sequencing-Generated Datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Parra, Marco Antonio; Saleem, Mohamed-Ashick M; Blum, Matthias; Cholley, Pierre-Etienne; Gronemeyer, Hinrich

    2016-01-01

    The combination of massive parallel sequencing with a variety of modern DNA/RNA enrichment technologies provides means for interrogating functional protein-genome interactions (ChIP-seq), genome-wide transcriptional activity (RNA-seq; GRO-seq), chromatin accessibility (DNase-seq, FAIRE-seq, MNase-seq), and more recently the three-dimensional organization of chromatin (Hi-C, ChIA-PET). In systems biology-based approaches several of these readouts are generally cumulated with the aim of describing living systems through a reconstitution of the genome-regulatory functions. However, an issue that is often underestimated is that conclusions drawn from such multidimensional analyses of NGS-derived datasets critically depend on the quality of the compared datasets. To address this problem, we have developed the NGS-QC Generator, a quality control system that infers quality descriptors for any kind of ChIP-sequencing and related datasets. In this chapter we provide a detailed protocol for (1) assessing quality descriptors with the NGS-QC Generator; (2) to interpret the generated reports; and (3) to explore the database of QC indicators (www.ngs-qc.org) for >21,000 publicly available datasets.

  10. Human identification by lice: A Next Generation Sequencing challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilli, Elena; Agostino, Alessandro; Vergani, Debora; Salata, Elena; Ciuna, Ignazio; Berti, Andrea; Caramelli, David; Lambiase, Simonetta

    2016-09-01

    Rapid and progressive advances in molecular biology techniques and the advent of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) have opened new possibilities for analyses also in the identification of entomological matrixes. Insects and other arthropods are widespread in nature and those found at a crime scene can provide a useful contribution to forensic investigations. Entomological evidence is used by experts to define the postmortem interval (PMI), which is essentially based on morphological recognition of the insect and an estimation of its insect life cycle stage. However, molecular genotyping methods can also provide an important support for forensic entomological investigations when the identification of species or human genetic material is required. This case study concerns a collection of insects found in the house of a woman who died from unknown causes. Initially the insects were identified morphologically as belonging to the Pediculidae family, and then, human DNA was extracted and analyzed from their gastrointestinal tract. The application of the latest generation forensic DNA assays, such as the Quantifiler(®) Trio DNA Quantification Kit and the HID-Ion AmpliSeq™ Identity Panel (Applied Biosystems(®)), individuated the presence of human DNA in the samples and determined the genetic profile.

  11. QColors: an algorithm for conservative viral quasispecies reconstruction from short and non-contiguous next generation sequencing reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Austin; Kantor, Rami; DeLong, Allison; Schreier, Leeann; Istrail, Sorin

    Next generation sequencing technologies have recently been applied to characterize mutational spectra of the heterogeneous population of viral genotypes (known as a quasispecies) within HIV-infected patients. Such information is clinically relevant because minority genetic subpopulations of HIV within patients enable viral escape from selection pressures such as the immune response and antiretroviral therapy. However, methods for quasispecies sequence reconstruction from next generation sequencing reads are not yet widely used and remains an emerging area of research. Furthermore, the majority of research methodology in HIV has focused on 454 sequencing, while many next-generation sequencing platforms used in practice are limited to shorter read lengths relative to 454 sequencing. Little work has been done in determining how best to address the read length limitations of other platforms. The approach described here incorporates graph representations of both read differences and read overlap to conservatively determine the regions of the sequence with sufficient variability to separate quasispecies sequences. Within these tractable regions of quasispecies inference, we use constraint programming to solve for an optimal quasispecies subsequence determination via vertex coloring of the conflict graph, a representation which also lends itself to data with non-contiguous reads such as paired-end sequencing. We demonstrate the utility of the method by applying it to simulations based on actual intra-patient clonal HIV-1 sequencing data.

  12. Assessment of technology generating institutions in biotechnology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-18

    May 18, 2009 ... biotechnology innovation system of South-Eastern. Nigeria. E. N. Ajani, M. C. ... Agricultural biotechnology provides new technological tools and aims to ..... constraints include poor fringe benefit to researchers ( x. = 2.90) ...

  13. The first insight into the tissue specific taxus transcriptome via Illumina second generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Cheng Hao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Illumina second generation sequencing is now an efficient route for generating enormous sequence collections that represent expressed genes and quantitate expression level. Taxus is a world-wide endangered gymnosperm genus and forms an important anti-cancer medicinal resource, but the large and complex genomes of Taxus have hindered the development of genomic resources. The research of its tissue-specific transcriptome is absent. There is also no study concerning the association between the plant transcriptome and metabolome with respect to the plant tissue type. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed the de novo assembly of Taxus mairei transcriptome using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology. In a single run, we produced 13,737,528 sequencing reads corresponding to 2.03 Gb total nucleotides. These reads were assembled into 36,493 unique sequences. Based on similarity search with known proteins, 23,515 Unigenes were identified to have the Blast hit with a cut-off E-value above 10⁻⁵. Furthermore, we investigated the transcriptome difference of three Taxus tissues using a tag-based digital gene expression system. We obtained a sequencing depth of over 3.15 million tags per sample and identified a large number of genes associated with tissue specific functions and taxane biosynthetic pathway. The expression of the taxane biosynthetic genes is significantly higher in the root than in the leaf and the stem, while high activity of taxane-producing pathway in the root was also revealed via metabolomic analyses. Moreover, many antisense transcripts and novel transcripts were found; clusters with similar differential expression patterns, enriched GO terms and enriched metabolic pathways with regard to the differentially expressed genes were revealed for the first time. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data provides the most comprehensive sequence resource available for Taxus study and will help define mechanisms of tissue

  14. Study on Technology Solutions of CEFR Steam Generator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU; Zhi-guang; YU; Hua-jin; LIAO; Zi-yu; ZHANG; Zhen-xing

    2012-01-01

    <正>The technology solutions of CFR1000 steam generator were researched which were compared and analyze with foreign fast reactor steam generator technology solutions. The comparative analysis included the integral/modular structure, the number of modules per loop, structure types, the

  15. Research on Comparisons of New Clean Power Generation Technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    On the basis of introducing clean power generation technologies, the author calculated and analyzed the investment, economy and environmental protection of these technologies, posed his views of giving the priorities to the development of supercritical and ultra-supercritical pressure coal-fired power generation technologies and taking vigorous action to nuclear power generation technology within the following 5-10 years, exploiting wind power within the following 10-15 years, and suggested that the installed capacity of nuclear power reach 80-100 GW and that of wind power reach 50-80 GW by 2020.

  16. Food Safety in the Age of Next Generation Sequencing, Bioinformatics, and Open Data Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada, Eduardo N; Graham, Morag R; Carriço, João A; Van Domselaar, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Public health labs and food regulatory agencies globally are embracing whole genome sequencing (WGS) as a revolutionary new method that is positioned to replace numerous existing diagnostic and microbial typing technologies with a single new target: the microbial draft genome. The ability to cheaply generate large amounts of microbial genome sequence data, combined with emerging policies of food regulatory and public health institutions making their microbial sequences increasingly available and public, has served to open up the field to the general scientific community. This open data access policy shift has resulted in a proliferation of data being deposited into sequence repositories and of novel bioinformatics software designed to analyze these vast datasets. There also has been a more recent drive for improved data sharing to achieve more effective global surveillance, public health and food safety. Such developments have heightened the need for enhanced analytical systems in order to process and interpret this new type of data in a timely fashion. In this review we outline the emergence of genomics, bioinformatics and open data in the context of food safety. We also survey major efforts to translate genomics and bioinformatics technologies out of the research lab and into routine use in modern food safety labs. We conclude by discussing the challenges and opportunities that remain, including those expected to play a major role in the future of food safety science.

  17. Food Safety in the Age of Next Generation Sequencing, Bioinformatics, and Open Data Access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo N. Taboada

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Public health labs and food regulatory agencies globally are embracing whole genome sequencing (WGS as a revolutionary new method that is positioned to replace numerous existing diagnostic and microbial typing technologies with a single new target: the microbial draft genome. The ability to cheaply generate large amounts of microbial genome sequence data, combined with emerging policies of food regulatory and public health institutions making their microbial sequences increasingly available and public, has served to open up the field to the general scientific community. This open data access policy shift has resulted in a proliferation of data being deposited into sequence repositories and of novel bioinformatics software designed to analyze these vast datasets. There also has been a more recent drive for improved data sharing to achieve more effective global surveillance, public health and food safety. Such developments have heightened the need for enhanced analytical systems in order to process and interpret this new type of data in a timely fashion. In this review we outline the emergence of genomics, bioinformatics and open data in the context of food safety. We also survey major efforts to translate genomics and bioinformatics technologies out of the research lab and into routine use in modern food safety labs. We conclude by discussing the challenges and opportunities that remain, including those expected to play a major role in the future of food safety science.

  18. Next generation sequencing of DNA-launched Chikungunya vaccine virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidajat, Rachmat; Nickols, Brian [Medigen, Inc., 8420 Gas House Pike, Suite S, Frederick, MD 21701 (United States); Forrester, Naomi [Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, Sealy Center for Vaccine Development and Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, GNL, 301 University Blvd., Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Tretyakova, Irina [Medigen, Inc., 8420 Gas House Pike, Suite S, Frederick, MD 21701 (United States); Weaver, Scott [Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, Sealy Center for Vaccine Development and Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, GNL, 301 University Blvd., Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Pushko, Peter, E-mail: ppushko@medigen-usa.com [Medigen, Inc., 8420 Gas House Pike, Suite S, Frederick, MD 21701 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) represents a pandemic threat with no approved vaccine available. Recently, we described a novel vaccination strategy based on iDNA® infectious clone designed to launch a live-attenuated CHIKV vaccine from plasmid DNA in vitro or in vivo. As a proof of concept, we prepared iDNA plasmid pCHIKV-7 encoding the full-length cDNA of the 181/25 vaccine. The DNA-launched CHIKV-7 virus was prepared and compared to the 181/25 virus. Illumina HiSeq2000 sequencing revealed that with the exception of the 3′ untranslated region, CHIKV-7 viral RNA consistently showed a lower frequency of single-nucleotide polymorphisms than the 181/25 RNA including at the E2-12 and E2-82 residues previously identified as attenuating mutations. In the CHIKV-7, frequencies of reversions at E2-12 and E2-82 were 0.064% and 0.086%, while in the 181/25, frequencies were 0.179% and 0.133%, respectively. We conclude that the DNA-launched virus has a reduced probability of reversion mutations, thereby enhancing vaccine safety. - Highlights: • Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an emerging pandemic threat. • In vivo DNA-launched attenuated CHIKV is a novel vaccine technology. • DNA-launched virus was sequenced using HiSeq2000 and compared to the 181/25 virus. • DNA-launched virus has lower frequency of SNPs at E2-12 and E2-82 attenuation loci.

  19. Next-generation wireless technologies 4G and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Chilamkurti, Naveen; Chaouchi, Hakima

    2013-01-01

    This comprehensive text/reference examines the various challenges to secure, efficient and cost-effective next-generation wireless networking. Topics and features: presents the latest advances, standards and technical challenges in a broad range of emerging wireless technologies; discusses cooperative and mesh networks, delay tolerant networks, and other next-generation networks such as LTE; examines real-world applications of vehicular communications, broadband wireless technologies, RFID technology, and energy-efficient wireless communications; introduces developments towards the 'Internet o

  20. A program for generating randomized simple and context-sensitive sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remillard, Gilbert

    2008-05-01

    This article introduces Sequence Generation 2008 (SeqGen2008), a Windows-based sequence generator. SeqGen2008 can generate simple sequences satisfying user-defined event probabilities or frequencies. The program can also generate context-sensitive sequences satisfying user-defined transition matrices that specify the probabilities or frequencies with which distinct events are to follow specific contexts. An analysis of the properties and behavior of the algorithms employed by SeqGen2008 reveals that the algorithms are unbiased in their generation of sequences.

  1. Assessment of technology generating institutions in biotechnology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... generating institutions in biotechnology innovation system of South-Eastern Nigeria. ... data from a sample of forty-three heads of departments from research institutes and ... for development and safe application of biotechnology innovations.

  2. Carrier molecules and extraction of circulating tumor DNA for next generation sequencing in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beránek, Martin; Sirák, Igor; Vošmik, Milan; Petera, Jiří; Drastíková, Monika; Palička, Vladimír

    The aims of the study were: i) to compare circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) yields obtained by different manual extraction procedures, ii) to evaluate the addition of various carrier molecules into the plasma to improve ctDNA extraction recovery, and iii) to use next generation sequencing (NGS) technology to analyze KRAS, BRAF, and NRAS somatic mutations in ctDNA from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Venous blood was obtained from patients who suffered from metastatic colorectal carcinoma. For plasma ctDNA extraction, the following carriers were tested: carrier RNA, polyadenylic acid, glycogen, linear acrylamide, yeast tRNA, salmon sperm DNA, and herring sperm DNA. Each extract was characterized by quantitative real-time PCR and next generation sequencing. The addition of polyadenylic acid had a significant positive effect on the amount of ctDNA eluted. The sequencing data revealed five cases of ctDNA mutated in KRAS and one patient with a BRAF mutation. An agreement of 86% was found between tumor tissues and ctDNA. Testing somatic mutations in ctDNA seems to be a promising tool to monitor dynamically changing genotypes of tumor cells circulating in the body. The optimized process of ctDNA extraction should help to obtain more reliable sequencing data in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

  3. Characterization of the oral microbiota of healthy cats using next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, A; Pinder, S L; Costa, M C; Weese, J S

    2014-08-01

    The healthy feline oral cavity harbours a rich assemblage of microorganisms, which have not previously been well characterized using modern sequencing technology. The goal of this study was to accurately describe the oral microbiota of 11 healthy cats using next-generation sequencing. Sequencing generated a total of 10,177 operational taxonomic units, representing 273 genera from 18 bacterial phyla. Eight bacterial phyla made up 97.6% of sequences: Proteobacteria (75.2%), Bacteroidetes (9.3%), Firmicutes (6.7%), SR1 (2.7%), Spirochaetes (1.8%), Fusobacteria (1.3%), and Actinobacteria (0.6%). The most prevalent genus-level phylotypes were: an unclassified Pasteurellaceae (18.7%), Moraxella (10.9%), Thermomonas (6.9%), an unclassified Comamonadaceae (5.6%), Neisseria (4.9%), an unclassified Moraxellaceae (4.4%), and Pasteurella (4.3%). Results suggest that the feline oral microbiota are largely conserved between cats at the phylum level, and that the population is highly diverse, rich and even. A strong core microbiome was evident among all cats, yet significant differences in oral bacterial populations were observed across cats in each household.

  4. Authentication of Herbal Supplements Using Next-Generation Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia V Ivanova

    Full Text Available DNA-based testing has been gaining acceptance as a tool for authentication of a wide range of food products; however, its applicability for testing of herbal supplements remains contentious.We utilized Sanger and Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS for taxonomic authentication of fifteen herbal supplements representing three different producers from five medicinal plants: Echinacea purpurea, Valeriana officinalis, Ginkgo biloba, Hypericum perforatum and Trigonella foenum-graecum. Experimental design included three modifications of DNA extraction, two lysate dilutions, Internal Amplification Control, and multiple negative controls to exclude background contamination. Ginkgo supplements were also analyzed using HPLC-MS for the presence of active medicinal components.All supplements yielded DNA from multiple species, rendering Sanger sequencing results for rbcL and ITS2 regions either uninterpretable or non-reproducible between the experimental replicates. Overall, DNA from the manufacturer-listed medicinal plants was successfully detected in seven out of eight dry herb form supplements; however, low or poor DNA recovery due to degradation was observed in most plant extracts (none detected by Sanger; three out of seven-by NGS. NGS also revealed a diverse community of fungi, known to be associated with live plant material and/or the fermentation process used in the production of plant extracts. HPLC-MS testing demonstrated that Ginkgo supplements with degraded DNA contained ten key medicinal components.Quality control of herbal supplements should utilize a synergetic approach targeting both DNA and bioactive components, especially for standardized extracts with degraded DNA. The NGS workflow developed in this study enables reliable detection of plant and fungal DNA and can be utilized by manufacturers for quality assurance of raw plant materials, contamination control during the production process, and the final product. Interpretation of results should

  5. Autocorrelation of Sequences Generated by Single Cycle T-Functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yan; Hu Yupu; Li Shunbo; Yang Yang

    2011-01-01

    Cryptographic properties of the single cycle T-function's output sequences are investigated.Bounds of autocorrelation functions of the kth coordinate sequence and bounds of state output sequence are calculated respectively.The Maximum Sidelobe Ratio (MSR) of the kth coordinate sequence and the MSR of state output sequence are given respectively.The bounds of autocorrelation functions show that the values of autocorrelation functions are large when shifts are small.Comparisons of the autocorrelations between the state output sequence and coordinate output sequence are illustrated.The autocorrelation properties demonstrate that T-functions have cryptographic weaknesses and the illustration result shows coordinate output sequences have better autocorrelation than that of state output sequences.

  6. Next Generation Public Safety and Emergency Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Camilla; Tadayoni, Reza; Skouby, Knud Erik

    2014-01-01

    The paper researches the existing European standards for Public Safety and Emergency (PSE) services (also called Public Protection Disaster Relief “PPDR”), and identifies based on user studies in Denmark conflicts between the current deployments of the standards and the user requirements. The aim...... is further to identify the potentials of new technologies for PSE. The paper deals with policy and technology frameworks, regulatory issues and in particular the spectrum issues in the current PPDR deployments in the EU countries. The paper draws on the results and concepts developed in two EU...

  7. Next generation sequencing reveals the antibiotic resistant variants in the genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Babu; Jindal, Hassan Mahmood; Le, Cheng Foh; Gudimella, Ranganath; Anwar, Arif; Razali, Rozaimi; Poole-Johnson, Johan; Manikam, Rishya; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2017-01-01

    Rapid progress in next generation sequencing and allied computational tools have aided in identification of single nucleotide variants in genomes of several organisms. In the present study, we have investigated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in ten multi-antibiotic resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates. All the draft genomes were submitted to Rapid Annotations using Subsystems Technology (RAST) web server and the predicted protein sequences were used for comparison. Non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (nsSNP) found in the clinical isolates compared to the reference genome (PAO1), and the comparison of nsSNPs between antibiotic resistant and susceptible clinical isolates revealed insights into the genome variation. These nsSNPs identified in the multi-drug resistant clinical isolates were found to be altering a single amino acid in several antibiotic resistant genes. We found mutations in genes encoding efflux pump systems, cell wall, DNA replication and genes involved in repair mechanism. In addition, nucleotide deletions in the genome and mutations leading to generation of stop codons were also observed in the antibiotic resistant clinical isolates. Next generation sequencing is a powerful tool to compare the whole genomes and analyse the single base pair variations found within the antibiotic resistant genes. We identified specific mutations within antibiotic resistant genes compared to the susceptible strain of the same bacterial species and these findings may provide insights to understand the role of single nucleotide variants in antibiotic resistance.

  8. Next-generation sequencing-based genome diagnostics across clinical genetics centers : implementation choices and their effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrijenhoek, Terry; Kraaijeveld, Ken; Elferink, Martin; de Ligt, Joep; Kranendonk, Elcke; Santen, Gijs; Nijman, Isaac J.; Butler, Derek; Claes, Godelieve; Costessi, Adalberto; Dorlijn, Wim; van Eyndhoven, Winfried; Halley, Dicky J. J.; van den Hout, Mirjam C. G. N.; van Hove, Steven; Johansson, Lennart F.; Jongbloed, Jan D. H.; Kamps, Rick; Kockx, Christel E. M.; de Koning, Bart; Kriek, Marjolein; Deprez, Ronald Lekanne Dit; Lunstroo, Hans; Mannens, Marcel; Mook, Olaf R.; Nelen, Marcel; Ploem, Corrette; Rijnen, Marco; Saris, Jasper J.; Sinke, Richard; Sistermans, Erik; van Slegtenhorst, Marjon; Sleutels, Frank; van der Stoep, Nienke; van Tienhoven, Marianne; Vermaat, Martijn; Vogel, Maartje; Waisfisz, Quinten; Weiss, Janneke Marjan; van den Wijngaard, Arthur; van Workum, Wilbert; Ijntema, Helger; van der Zwaag, Bert; van IJcken, Wilfred F. J.; den Dunnen, Johan T.; Veltman, Joris A.; Hennekam, Raoul; Cuppen, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Implementation of next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) technology into routine diagnostic genome care requires strategic choices. Instead of theoretical discussions on the consequences of such choices, we compared NGS-based diagnostic practices in eight clinical genetic centers in the Netherlands, b

  9. Next generation sequencing yields the complete mitochondrial genome of the scarce blue-tailed damselfly, Ischnura pumilio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Carballa, M Olalla; Thompson, David J; Cordero-Rivera, Adolfo; Watts, Phillip C

    2014-08-01

    We report the entire mitochondrial genome of the scarce blue-tailed damselfly, Ischnura pumilio (Odonata, Coenagrionidae), using next-generation sequencing on genomic DNA. A de novo assembly provided a single contiguous sequence of 15,250 bp that contained the A + T-rich region and all standard coding regions; gene configuration is similar to other odonates and comprises 13 protein-coding genes, two rRNA genes (12 S and 16 S rRNA) and 22 tRNA genes. We found a unique intergenic spacer in I. pumilio and confirm that the intergenic spacer s5 likely represents a synapomorphy between Anisoptera and Zygoptera. This is the first mitogenome sequence obtained for a member of the Coenagrionidae and demonstrates how next-generation sequencing technology can obtain mtDNA genome sequences without prior sample processing or primer design.

  10. DNA qualification workflow for next generation sequencing of histopathological samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Simbolo

    Full Text Available Histopathological samples are a treasure-trove of DNA for clinical research. However, the quality of DNA can vary depending on the source or extraction method applied. Thus a standardized and cost-effective workflow for the qualification of DNA preparations is essential to guarantee interlaboratory reproducible results. The qualification process consists of the quantification of double strand DNA (dsDNA and the assessment of its suitability for downstream applications, such as high-throughput next-generation sequencing. We tested the two most frequently used instrumentations to define their role in this process: NanoDrop, based on UV spectroscopy, and Qubit 2.0, which uses fluorochromes specifically binding dsDNA. Quantitative PCR (qPCR was used as the reference technique as it simultaneously assesses DNA concentration and suitability for PCR amplification. We used 17 genomic DNAs from 6 fresh-frozen (FF tissues, 6 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissues, 3 cell lines, and 2 commercial preparations. Intra- and inter-operator variability was negligible, and intra-methodology variability was minimal, while consistent inter-methodology divergences were observed. In fact, NanoDrop measured DNA concentrations higher than Qubit and its consistency with dsDNA quantification by qPCR was limited to high molecular weight DNA from FF samples and cell lines, where total DNA and dsDNA quantity virtually coincide. In partially degraded DNA from FFPE samples, only Qubit proved highly reproducible and consistent with qPCR measurements. Multiplex PCR amplifying 191 regions of 46 cancer-related genes was designated the downstream application, using 40 ng dsDNA from FFPE samples calculated by Qubit. All but one sample produced amplicon libraries suitable for next-generation sequencing. NanoDrop UV-spectrum verified contamination of the unsuccessful sample. In conclusion, as qPCR has high costs and is labor intensive, an alternative effective standard

  11. DNA qualification workflow for next generation sequencing of histopathological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simbolo, Michele; Gottardi, Marisa; Corbo, Vincenzo; Fassan, Matteo; Mafficini, Andrea; Malpeli, Giorgio; Lawlor, Rita T; Scarpa, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Histopathological samples are a treasure-trove of DNA for clinical research. However, the quality of DNA can vary depending on the source or extraction method applied. Thus a standardized and cost-effective workflow for the qualification of DNA preparations is essential to guarantee interlaboratory reproducible results. The qualification process consists of the quantification of double strand DNA (dsDNA) and the assessment of its suitability for downstream applications, such as high-throughput next-generation sequencing. We tested the two most frequently used instrumentations to define their role in this process: NanoDrop, based on UV spectroscopy, and Qubit 2.0, which uses fluorochromes specifically binding dsDNA. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used as the reference technique as it simultaneously assesses DNA concentration and suitability for PCR amplification. We used 17 genomic DNAs from 6 fresh-frozen (FF) tissues, 6 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, 3 cell lines, and 2 commercial preparations. Intra- and inter-operator variability was negligible, and intra-methodology variability was minimal, while consistent inter-methodology divergences were observed. In fact, NanoDrop measured DNA concentrations higher than Qubit and its consistency with dsDNA quantification by qPCR was limited to high molecular weight DNA from FF samples and cell lines, where total DNA and dsDNA quantity virtually coincide. In partially degraded DNA from FFPE samples, only Qubit proved highly reproducible and consistent with qPCR measurements. Multiplex PCR amplifying 191 regions of 46 cancer-related genes was designated the downstream application, using 40 ng dsDNA from FFPE samples calculated by Qubit. All but one sample produced amplicon libraries suitable for next-generation sequencing. NanoDrop UV-spectrum verified contamination of the unsuccessful sample. In conclusion, as qPCR has high costs and is labor intensive, an alternative effective standard workflow for

  12. ngs_backbone: a pipeline for read cleaning, mapping and SNP calling using Next Generation Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cañizares Joaquin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The possibilities offered by next generation sequencing (NGS platforms are revolutionizing biotechnological laboratories. Moreover, the combination of NGS sequencing and affordable high-throughput genotyping technologies is facilitating the rapid discovery and use of SNPs in non-model species. However, this abundance of sequences and polymorphisms creates new software needs. To fulfill these needs, we have developed a powerful, yet easy-to-use application. Results The ngs_backbone software is a parallel pipeline capable of analyzing Sanger, 454, Illumina and SOLiD (Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection sequence reads. Its main supported analyses are: read cleaning, transcriptome assembly and annotation, read mapping and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP calling and selection. In order to build a truly useful tool, the software development was paired with a laboratory experiment. All public tomato Sanger EST reads plus 14.2 million Illumina reads were employed to test the tool and predict polymorphism in tomato. The cleaned reads were mapped to the SGN tomato transcriptome obtaining a coverage of 4.2 for Sanger and 8.5 for Illumina. 23,360 single nucleotide variations (SNVs were predicted. A total of 76 SNVs were experimentally validated, and 85% were found to be real. Conclusions ngs_backbone is a new software package capable of analyzing sequences produced by NGS technologies and predicting SNVs with great accuracy. In our tomato example, we created a highly polymorphic collection of SNVs that will be a useful resource for tomato researchers and breeders. The software developed along with its documentation is freely available under the AGPL license and can be downloaded from http://bioinf.comav.upv.es/ngs_backbone/ or http://github.com/JoseBlanca/franklin.

  13. DNA sequencing technology, walking with modular primers. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulanovsky, L.

    1996-12-31

    The success of the Human Genome Project depends on the development of adequate technology for rapid and inexpensive DNA sequencing, which will also benefit biomedical research in general. The authors are working on DNA technologies that eliminate primer synthesis, the main bottleneck in sequencing by primer walking. They have developed modular primers that are assembled from three 5-mer, 6-mer or 7-mer modules selected from a presynthesized library of as few as 1,000 oligonucleotides ({double_bond}4, {double_bond}5, {double_bond}7). The three modules anneal contiguously at the selected template site and prime there uniquely, even though each is not unique for the most part when used alone. This technique is expected to speed up primer walking 30 to 50 fold, and reduce the sequencing cost by a factor of 5 to 15. Time and expensive will be saved on primer synthesis itself and even more so due to closed-loop automation of primer walking, made possible by the instant availability of primers. Apart from saving time and cost, closed-loop automation would also minimize the errors and complications associated with human intervention between the walks. The author has also developed two additional approaches to primer-library based sequencing. One involves a branched structure of modular primers which has a distinctly different mechanism of achieving priming specificity. The other introduces the concept of ``Differential Extension with Nucleotide Subsets`` as an approach increasing priming specificity, priming strength and allowing cycle sequencing. These approaches are expected to be more robust than the original version of the modular primer technique.

  14. Targeted recovery of novel phylogenetic diversity from next-generation sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Michael D J; Bartram, Andrea K; Neufeld, Josh D

    2012-11-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have led to recognition of a so-called 'rare biosphere'. These microbial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) are defined by low relative abundance and may be specifically adapted to maintaining low population sizes. We hypothesized that mining of low-abundance next-generation 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene data would lead to the discovery of novel phylogenetic diversity, reflecting microorganisms not yet discovered by previous sampling efforts. Here, we test this hypothesis by combining molecular and bioinformatic approaches for targeted retrieval of phylogenetic novelty within rare biosphere OTUs. We combined BLASTN network analysis, phylogenetics and targeted primer design to amplify 16S rRNA gene sequences from unique potential bacterial lineages, comprising part of the rare biosphere from a multi-million sequence data set from an Arctic tundra soil sample. Demonstrating the feasibility of the protocol developed here, three of seven recovered phylogenetic lineages represented extremely divergent taxonomic entities. These divergent target sequences correspond to (a) a previously unknown lineage within the BRC1 candidate phylum, (b) a sister group to the early diverging and currently recognized monospecific Cyanobacteria Gloeobacter, a genus containing multiple plesiomorphic traits and (c) a highly divergent lineage phylogenetically resolved within mitochondria. A comparison to twelve next-generation data sets from additional soils suggested persistent low-abundance distributions of these novel 16S rRNA genes. The results demonstrate this sequence analysis and retrieval pipeline as applicable for exploring underrepresented phylogenetic novelty and recovering taxa that may represent significant steps in bacterial evolution.

  15. Second-generation dental laser technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Michael

    1993-07-01

    The first generation of dental lasers proved limited to soft tissue applications. Due to the thermal properties of these lasers, drilling of enamel and dentin is harmful to the underlying nerve tissue. As a solution to this problem, more sophisticated solidstate lasers are under commercial development for hard tissue applications. The first of these second generation lasers to emerge is the erbium:YAG now marketed in Europe by KaVo. This system relies on a cumbersome articulated arm delivery device. Other manufacturers have overcome this delivery problem with the introduction of flexible delivery methods. Another hard tissue laser that has been introduced is the short-pulsed Nd:YAG. This laser uses shaped pulses to drill teeth without thermal damage. An overview of these and other second generation dental lasers is presented.

  16. Generation and analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) for marker development in yam (Dioscorea alata L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narina, Satya S; Buyyarapu, Ramesh; Kottapalli, Kameswara Rao; Sartie, Alieu M; Ali, Mohamed I; Robert, Asiedu; Hodeba, Mignouna J D; Sayre, Brian L; Scheffler, Brian E

    2011-02-09

    Anthracnose (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides) is a major limiting factor in the production of yam (Dioscorea spp.) worldwide. Availability of high quality sequence information is necessary for designing molecular markers associated with resistance. However, very limited sequence information pertaining to yam is available at public genome databases. Therefore, this collaborative project was developed for genetic improvement and germplasm characterization of yams using molecular markers. The current investigation is focused on studying gene expression, by large scale generation of ESTs, from one susceptible (TDa 95-0310) and two resistant yam genotypes (TDa 87-01091, TDa 95-0328) challenged with the fungus. Total RNA was isolated from young leaves of resistant and susceptible genotypes and cDNA libraries were sequenced using Roche 454 technology. A total of 44,757 EST sequences were generated from the cDNA libraries of the resistant and susceptible genotypes. Greater than 56% of ESTs were annotated using MapMan Mercator tool and Blast2GO search tools. Gene annotations were used to characterize the transcriptome in yam and also perform a differential gene expression analysis between the resistant and susceptible EST datasets. Mining for SSRs in the ESTs revealed 1702 unique sequences containing SSRs and 1705 SSR markers were designed using those sequences. We have developed a comprehensive annotated transcriptome data set in yam to enrich the EST information in public databases. cDNA libraries were constructed from anthracnose fungus challenged leaf tissues for transcriptome characterization, and differential gene expression analysis. Thus, it helped in identifying unique transcripts in each library for disease resistance. These EST resources provide the basis for future microarray development, marker validation, genetic linkage mapping and QTL analysis in Dioscorea species.

  17. Generation and analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs for marker development in yam (Dioscorea alata L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Asiedu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anthracnose (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides is a major limiting factor in the production of yam (Dioscorea spp. worldwide. Availability of high quality sequence information is necessary for designing molecular markers associated with resistance. However, very limited sequence information pertaining to yam is available at public genome databases. Therefore, this collaborative project was developed for genetic improvement and germplasm characterization of yams using molecular markers. The current investigation is focused on studying gene expression, by large scale generation of ESTs, from one susceptible (TDa 95-0310 and two resistant yam genotypes (TDa 87-01091, TDa 95-0328 challenged with the fungus. Total RNA was isolated from young leaves of resistant and susceptible genotypes and cDNA libraries were sequenced using Roche 454 technology. Results A total of 44,757 EST sequences were generated from the cDNA libraries of the resistant and susceptible genotypes. Greater than 56% of ESTs were annotated using MapMan Mercator tool and Blast2GO search tools. Gene annotations were used to characterize the transcriptome in yam and also perform a differential gene expression analysis between the resistant and susceptible EST datasets. Mining for SSRs in the ESTs revealed 1702 unique sequences containing SSRs and 1705 SSR markers were designed using those sequences. Conclusion We have developed a comprehensive annotated transcriptome data set in yam to enrich the EST information in public databases. cDNA libraries were constructed from anthracnose fungus challenged leaf tissues for transcriptome characterization, and differential gene expression analysis. Thus, it helped in identifying unique transcripts in each library for disease resistance. These EST resources provide the basis for future microarray development, marker validation, genetic linkage mapping and QTL analysis in Dioscorea species.

  18. DISCUSSION ON AVERAGE GENERATION OF TWODIMENSIONAL DATA SEQUENCE IN GREY SYSTEM THEORY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PINGXue-liang; ZHOURu-rong; LIUSheng-lan

    2004-01-01

    An unequal time interval sequence or a sequence with blanks is usually completed with average generation in grey system theory. This paper discovers that there exists obvious errors when using average generation to generate internal points of non-consecutive neighbours. The average generation and the preference generation of the sequence are discussed, the concave and convex properties show the status of local sequence and propose a new idea for using the status to build up the criteria of choosing generation coefficient. Compared with the general average method of the one-dimensional data sequence, the two-dimensional data sequence is defined and its average generation is discussed, and the coefficient decision method for the preference generation is presented.

  19. The rolling circle amplification and next generation sequencing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Titus

    2016-09-14

    Sep 14, 2016 ... sequencing approaches reveal genome wide diversity of Kenyan cassava mosaic ..... Kenya for providing the funds for this project. Our special ... (2008). Accurate whole human genome sequencing using reversible terminator ...

  20. Characterisation of the transcriptome of a wild great tit Parus major population by next generation sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheldon Ben C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent development of next generation sequencing technologies has made it possible to generate very large amounts of sequence data in species with little or no genome information. Combined with the large phenotypic databases available for wild and non-model species, these data will provide an unprecedented opportunity to "genomicise" ecological model organisms and establish the genetic basis of quantitative traits in natural populations. Results This paper describes the sequencing, de novo assembly and analysis from the transcriptome of eight tissues of ten wild great tits. Approximately 4.6 million sequences and 1.4 billion bases of DNA were generated and assembled into 95,979 contigs, one third of which aligned with known Taeniopygia guttata (zebra finch and Gallus gallus (chicken transcripts. The majority (78% of the remaining contigs aligned within or very close to regions of the zebra finch genome containing known genes, suggesting that they represented precursor mRNA rather than untranscribed genomic DNA. More than 35,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms and 10,000 microsatellite repeats were identified. Eleven percent of contigs were expressed in every tissue, while twenty one percent of contigs were expressed in only one tissue. The function of those contigs with strong evidence for tissue specific expression and contigs expressed in every tissue was inferred from the gene ontology (GO terms associated with these contigs; heart and pancreas had the highest number of highly tissue specific GO terms (21.4% and 28.5% respectively. Conclusions In summary, the transcriptomic data generated in this study will contribute towards efforts to assemble and annotate the great tit genome, as well as providing the markers required to perform gene mapping studies in wild populations.

  1. Accelerating next generation sequencing data analysis with system level optimizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiresan, Nagarajan; Temanni, Ramzi; Almabrazi, Hakeem; Syed, Najeeb; Jithesh, Puthen V; Al-Ali, Rashid

    2017-08-22

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) data analysis is highly compute intensive. In-memory computing, vectorization, bulk data transfer, CPU frequency scaling are some of the hardware features in the modern computing architectures. To get the best execution time and utilize these hardware features, it is necessary to tune the system level parameters before running the application. We studied the GATK-HaplotypeCaller which is part of common NGS workflows, that consume more than 43% of the total execution time. Multiple GATK 3.x versions were benchmarked and the execution time of HaplotypeCaller was optimized by various system level parameters which included: (i) tuning the parallel garbage collection and kernel shared memory to simulate in-memory computing, (ii) architecture-specific tuning in the PairHMM library for vectorization, (iii) including Java 1.8 features through GATK source code compilation and building a runtime environment for parallel sorting and bulk data transfer (iv) the default 'on-demand' mode of CPU frequency is over-clocked by using 'performance-mode' to accelerate the Java multi-threads. As a result, the HaplotypeCaller execution time was reduced by 82.66% in GATK 3.3 and 42.61% in GATK 3.7. Overall, the execution time of NGS pipeline was reduced to 70.60% and 34.14% for GATK 3.3 and GATK 3.7 respectively.

  2. Detection of Listeria monocytogenes in CSF from Three Patients with Meningoencephalitis by Next-Generation Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ming; Zhou, Jiali; Zhu, Yicheng; Zhang, Yinxin; Lv, Xia; Sun, Ruixue; Shen, Ao; Ren, Haitao; Cui, Liying

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Encephalitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) is rare but sometimes fatal. Early diagnosis is difficult using routine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tests, while next-generation sequencing (NGS) is increasingly being used for the detection and characterization of pathogens. Methods This study set up and applied unbiased NGS to detect L. monocytogenes in CSF collected from three cases of clinically suspected listeria meningoencephalitis. Results Three cases of patients with acute/subacute meningoencephalitis are reported. Magnetic resonance imaging and blood cultures led to a suspected diagnosis of L. monocytogenes, while the CSF cultures were negative. Unbiased NGS of CSF identified and sequenced reads corresponding to L. monocytogenes in all three cases. Conclusions This is the first report highlighting the feasibility of applying NGS of CSF as a diagnostic method for central nervous system (CNS) L. monocytogenes infection. Routine application of this technology in clinical microbiology will significantly improve diagnostic methods for CNS infectious diseases.

  3. Next-generation sequence assembly: four stages of data processing and computational challenges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara El-Metwally

    Full Text Available Decoding DNA symbols using next-generation sequencers was a major breakthrough in genomic research. Despite the many advantages of next-generation sequencers, e.g., the high-throughput sequencing rate and relatively low cost of sequencing, the assembly of the reads produced by these sequencers still remains a major challenge. In this review, we address the basic framework of next-generation genome sequence assemblers, which comprises four basic stages: preprocessing filtering, a graph construction process, a graph simplification process, and postprocessing filtering. Here we discuss them as a framework of four stages for data analysis and processing and survey variety of techniques, algorithms, and software tools used during each stage. We also discuss the challenges that face current assemblers in the next-generation environment to determine the current state-of-the-art. We recommend a layered architecture approach for constructing a general assembler that can handle the sequences generated by different sequencing platforms.

  4. Next-generation sequence assembly: four stages of data processing and computational challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Metwally, Sara; Hamza, Taher; Zakaria, Magdi; Helmy, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Decoding DNA symbols using next-generation sequencers was a major breakthrough in genomic research. Despite the many advantages of next-generation sequencers, e.g., the high-throughput sequencing rate and relatively low cost of sequencing, the assembly of the reads produced by these sequencers still remains a major challenge. In this review, we address the basic framework of next-generation genome sequence assemblers, which comprises four basic stages: preprocessing filtering, a graph construction process, a graph simplification process, and postprocessing filtering. Here we discuss them as a framework of four stages for data analysis and processing and survey variety of techniques, algorithms, and software tools used during each stage. We also discuss the challenges that face current assemblers in the next-generation environment to determine the current state-of-the-art. We recommend a layered architecture approach for constructing a general assembler that can handle the sequences generated by different sequencing platforms.

  5. Novel technologies applied to the nucleotide sequencing and comparative sequence analysis of the genomes of infectious agents in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granberg, F; Bálint, Á; Belák, S

    2016-04-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS), also referred to as deep, high-throughput or massively parallel sequencing, is a powerful new tool that can be used for the complex diagnosis and intensive monitoring of infectious disease in veterinary medicine. NGS technologies are also being increasingly used to study the aetiology, genomics, evolution and epidemiology of infectious disease, as well as host-pathogen interactions and other aspects of infection biology. This review briefly summarises recent progress and achievements in this field by first introducing a range of novel techniques and then presenting examples of NGS applications in veterinary infection biology. Various work steps and processes for sampling and sample preparation, sequence analysis and comparative genomics, and improving the accuracy of genomic prediction are discussed, as are bioinformatics requirements. Examples of sequencing-based applications and comparative genomics in veterinary medicine are then provided. This review is based on novel references selected from the literature and on experiences of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Collaborating Centre for the Biotechnology-based Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases in Veterinary Medicine, Uppsala, Sweden.

  6. Pseudo-random sequence generator based on the generalized Henon map

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Fan; TIAN Xiao-jian; SONG Jing-yi; LI Xue-yan

    2008-01-01

    By analysis and comparison of several chaotic systems that are applied to generate pseudo-random sequence, the generalized Henon map is proposed as a pseudo-random sequence generator. A new algorithm is created to solve the problem of non-uniform distribution of the sequence generated by the generalized Henon map. First, move the decimal point of elements in the sequence to the right; then, cut off the integer; and finally, quantify it into a binary sequence. Statistical test, security analysis, and the application of image encryption have strongly supported the good random statistical characteristics, high linear complexity, large key space, and great sensitivity of the binary sequence.

  7. A biologist's guide to de novo genome assembly using next-generation sequence data: A test with fungal genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridas, Sajeet; Breuill, Colette; Bohlmann, Joerg; Hsiang, Tom

    2011-09-01

    We offer a guide to de novo genome assembly using sequence data generated by the Illumina platform for biologists working with fungi or other organisms whose genomes are less than 100Mb in size. The guide requires no familiarity with sequencing assembly technology or associated computer programs. It defines commonly used terms in genome sequencing and assembly; provides examples of assembling short-read genome sequence data for four strains of the fungus Grosmannia clavigera using four assembly programs; gives examples of protocols and software; and presents a commented flowchart that extends from DNA preparation for submission to a sequencing center, through to processing and assembly of the raw sequence reads using freely available operating systems and software.

  8. Exome sequencing generates high quality data in non-target regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Yan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exome sequencing using next-generation sequencing technologies is a cost efficient approach to selectively sequencing coding regions of human genome for detection of disease variants. A significant amount of DNA fragments from the capture process fall outside target regions, and sequence data for positions outside target regions have been mostly ignored after alignment. Result We performed whole exome sequencing on 22 subjects using Agilent SureSelect capture reagent and 6 subjects using Illumina TrueSeq capture reagent. We also downloaded sequencing data for 6 subjects from the 1000 Genomes Project Pilot 3 study. Using these data, we examined the quality of SNPs detected outside target regions by computing consistency rate with genotypes obtained from SNP chips or the Hapmap database, transition-transversion (Ti/Tv ratio, and percentage of SNPs inside dbSNP. For all three platforms, we obtained high-quality SNPs outside target regions, and some far from target regions. In our Agilent SureSelect data, we obtained 84,049 high-quality SNPs outside target regions compared to 65,231 SNPs inside target regions (a 129% increase. For our Illumina TrueSeq data, we obtained 222,171 high-quality SNPs outside target regions compared to 95,818 SNPs inside target regions (a 232% increase. For the data from the 1000 Genomes Project, we obtained 7,139 high-quality SNPs outside target regions compared to 1,548 SNPs inside target regions (a 461% increase. Conclusions These results demonstrate that a significant amount of high quality genotypes outside target regions can be obtained from exome sequencing data. These data should not be ignored in genetic epidemiology studies.

  9. Fuel cycle comparison of distributed power generation technologies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elgowainy, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Energy Systems

    2008-12-08

    The fuel-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the application of fuel cells to distributed power generation were evaluated and compared with the combustion technologies of microturbines and internal combustion engines, as well as the various technologies associated with grid-electricity generation in the United States and California. The results were primarily impacted by the net electrical efficiency of the power generation technologies and the type of employed fuels. The energy use and GHG emissions associated with the electric power generation represented the majority of the total energy use of the fuel cycle and emissions for all generation pathways. Fuel cell technologies exhibited lower GHG emissions than those associated with the U.S. grid electricity and other combustion technologies. The higher-efficiency fuel cells, such as the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), exhibited lower energy requirements than those for combustion generators. The dependence of all natural-gas-based technologies on petroleum oil was lower than that of internal combustion engines using petroleum fuels. Most fuel cell technologies approaching or exceeding the DOE target efficiency of 40% offered significant reduction in energy use and GHG emissions.

  10. Application of Next Generation Sequencing for personalized medicine for sudden cardiac death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morini, Elena; Sangiuolo, Federica; Caporossi, Daniela; Novelli, Giuseppe; Amati, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a serious public health problem. In the United States, more than 300,000 people are affected by SCD every year. Significantly, sudden deaths represent 20% of the total mortality and 50% of cardiovascular mortality in Western countries. In addition, SCD constitutes one of the most important unsolved challenges in the practice of forensic pathology because of the failure to determine the exact cause of sudden death. In young individuals, SCD is frequently caused by cardiomyopathies and channelopathies, that have generally an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. The impact of genetics and genetic testing on the clinical management of these diseases is unquestioned. In particular, genetic tests are an important tool for identifying pre-symptomatic individuals carrying genetic variant that predisposes them to SCD. High-throughput sequencing technologies offer novel opportunities to deeper investigate the genetic background underlying these fatal diseases and to early identify individuals at risk for SCD. In this review, we provide an overview of the development of Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies and of guidelines useful to design an efficient sequencing protocol and to perform an accurate data analysis. We suggest a flow chart to follow for the set up of a genetic screening protocol for the prevention of cardiac pathologies, in particular SCD events, in young athletes.

  11. Next-Generation Sequencing and Epigenomics Research: A Hammer in Search of Nails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrutii Sarda

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available After the initial enthusiasm of the human genome project, it became clear that without additional data pertaining to the epigenome, i.e., how the genome is marked at specific developmental periods, in different tissues, as well as across individuals and species-the promise of the genome sequencing project in understanding biology cannot be fulfilled. This realization prompted several large-scale efforts to map the epigenome, most notably the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE project. While there is essentially a single genome in an individual, there are hundreds of epigenomes, corresponding to various types of epigenomic marks at different developmental times and in multiple tissue types. Unprecedented advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies, by virtue of low cost and high speeds that continue to improve at a rate beyond what is anticipated by Moore's law for computer hardware technologies, have revolutionized molecular biology and genetics research, and have in turn prompted innovative ways to reduce the problem of measuring cellular events involving DNA or RNA into a sequencing problem. In this article, we provide a brief overview of the epigenome, the various types of epigenomic data afforded by NGS, and some of the novel discoveries yielded by the epigenomics projects. We also provide ample references for the reader to get in-depth information on these topics.

  12. Impact of next-generation sequencing on molecular diagnosis of inherited non-syndromic hearing loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Gao; Pu Dai

    2014-01-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most common birth defects, with inherited genetic defects play an important role, contributing to about 60% of deafness occurring in infants. However, hearing impairment is genetically heterogeneous, with both common and rare forms occurring due to mutations in estimated 500 genes. Due to the large number and presumably low mutation frequencies of those genes, it would be highly expensive and time-consuming to address this issue by conventional gene-by-gene Sanger sequencing. Next-generation sequencing is a revo-lutionary technology that allows the simultaneous screening of mutations in a large number of genes. It is cost effective compared to classical strategies of linkage analysis and direct sequencing when the number or size of genes is large, and thus has become a highly efficient strategy for identifying novel causative genes and mutations involved in heritable disease. In this review, we describe major NGS methodologies currently used for genetic disorders and highlight applications of these technologies in studies of molecular diagnosis and the discovery of genes implicated in non-syndromic hearing loss.

  13. Application of Next Generation Sequencing for personalized medicine for Sudden Cardiac Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eMorini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractSudden cardiac death (SCD is a serious public health problem. In the United States, more than 300,000 people are affected by SCD every year. Significantly, sudden deaths represent 20% of the total mortality and 50% of cardiovascular mortality in Western countries. In addition, SCD constitutes one of the most important unsolved challenges in the practice of forensic pathology because of the failure to determine the exact cause of sudden death. In young individuals, SCD is frequently caused by cardiomyopathies and channelopathies, that have generally an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. The impact of genetics and genetic testing on the clinical management of these diseases is unquestioned. In particular, genetic tests are an important tool for identifying pre-symptomatic individuals carrying genetic variant that predisposes them to sudden cardiac death. High-throughput sequencing technologies offer novel opportunities to deeper investigate the genetic background underlying these fatal diseases and to early identify individuals at risk for SCD.In this review, we provide an overview of the development of Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS technologies and of guidelines useful to design an efficient sequencing protocol and to perform an accurate data analysis. We suggest a flow chart to follow for the set up of a genetic screening protocol for the prevention of cardiac pathologies, in particular SCD events, in young athletes.

  14. MuffinInfo: HTML5-Based Statistics Extractor from Next-Generation Sequencing Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alic, Andy S; Blanquer, Ignacio

    2016-09-01

    Usually, the information known a priori about a newly sequenced organism is limited. Even resequencing the same organism can generate unpredictable output. We introduce MuffinInfo, a FastQ/Fasta/SAM information extractor implemented in HTML5 capable of offering insights into next-generation sequencing (NGS) data. Our new tool can run on any software or hardware environment, in command line or graphically, and in browser or standalone. It presents information such as average length, base distribution, quality scores distribution, k-mer histogram, and homopolymers analysis. MuffinInfo improves upon the existing extractors by adding the ability to save and then reload the results obtained after a run as a navigable file (also supporting saving pictures of the charts), by supporting custom statistics implemented by the user, and by offering user-adjustable parameters involved in the processing, all in one software. At the moment, the extractor works with all base space technologies such as Illumina, Roche, Ion Torrent, Pacific Biosciences, and Oxford Nanopore. Owing to HTML5, our software demonstrates the readiness of web technologies for mild intensive tasks encountered in bioinformatics.

  15. Using Layer Recurrent Neural Network to Generate Pseudo Random Number Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena Desai

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudo Random Numbers (PRNs are required for many cryptographic applications. This paper proposes a new method for generating PRNs using Layer Recurrent Neural Network (LRNN. The proposed technique generates PRNs from the weight matrix obtained from the layer weights of the LRNN. The LRNN random number generator (RNG uses a short keyword as a seed and generates a long sequence as a pseudo PRN sequence. The number of bits generated in the PRN sequence depends on the number of neurons in the input layer of the LRNN. The generated PRN sequence changes, with a change in the training function of the LRNN .The sequences generated are a function of the keyword, initial state of network and the training function. In our implementation the PRN sequences have been generated using 3 training functions: 1Scaled Gradient Descent 2Levenberg-Marquartz (TRAINLM and 3 TRAINBGF. The generated sequences are tested for randomness using ENT and NIST test suites. The ENT test can be applied for sequences of small size. NIST has 16 tests to test random numbers. The LRNN generated PRNs pass in 11 tests, show no observations for 4 tests, and fail in 1 test when subjected to NIST .This paper presents the test results for random number sequence ranging from 25 bits to 1000 bits, generated using LRNN.

  16. Technology development for gene discovery and full-length sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcelo Bento Soares

    2004-07-19

    In previous years, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, we developed methods for construction of normalized and subtracted cDNA libraries, and constructed hundreds of high-quality libraries for production of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs). Our clones were made widely available to the scientific community through the IMAGE Consortium, and millions of ESTs were produced from our libraries either by collaborators or by our own sequencing laboratory at the University of Iowa. During this grant period, we focused on (1) the development of a method for preferential cloning of tissue-specific and/or rare transcripts, (2) its utilization to expedite EST-based gene discovery for the NIH Mouse Brain Molecular Anatomy Project, (3) further development and optimization of a method for construction of full-length-enriched cDNA libraries, and (4) modification of a plasmid vector to maximize efficiency of full-length cDNA sequencing by the transposon-mediated approach. It is noteworthy that the technology developed for preferential cloning of rare mRNAs enabled identification of over 2,000 mouse transcripts differentially expressed in the hippocampus. In addition, the method that we optimized for construction of full-length-enriched cDNA libraries was successfully utilized for the production of approximately fifty libraries from the developing mouse nervous system, from which over 2,500 full-ORF-containing cDNAs have been identified and accurately sequenced in their entirety either by our group or by the NIH-Mammalian Gene Collection Program Sequencing Team.

  17. Next generation sequencing and omics in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) breeding directed research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawełkowicz, Magdalena; Zieliński, Konrad; Zielińska, Dorota; Pląder, Wojciech; Yagi, Kouhei; Wojcieszek, Michał; Siedlecka, Ewa; Bartoszewski, Grzegorz; Skarzyńska, Agnieszka; Przybecki, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    In the post-genomic era the availability of genomic tools and resources is leading us to novel generation methods in plant breeding, as they facilitate the study of the genotype and its relationship with the phenotype, in particular for complex traits. In this study we have mainly concentrated on the Cucumis sativus and (but much less) Cucurbitaceae family several important vegetable crops. There are many reports on research conducted in Cucurbitaceae plant breeding programs on the ripening process, phloem transport, disease resistance, cold tolerance and fruit quality traits. This paper presents the role played by new omic technologies in the creation of knowledge on the mechanisms of the formation of the breeding features. The analysis of NGS (NGS-next generation sequencing) data allows the discovery of new genes and regulatory sequences, their positions, and makes available large collections of molecular markers. Genome-wide expression studies provide breeders with an understanding of the molecular basis of complex traits. Firstly a high density map should be created for the reference genome, then each re-sequencing data could be mapped and new markers brought out into breeding populations. The paper also presents methods that could be used in the future for the creation of variability and genomic modification of the species in question. It has been shown also the state and usefulness in breeding the chloroplastomic and mitochondriomic study.

  18. Pseudorandom Bit Sequence Generator for Stream Cipher Based on Elliptic Curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jilna Payingat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a pseudorandom sequence generator for stream ciphers based on elliptic curves (EC. A detailed analysis of various EC based random number generators available in the literature is done and a new method is proposed such that it addresses the drawbacks of these schemes. Statistical analysis of the proposed method is carried out using the NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology test suite and it is seen that the sequence exhibits good randomness properties. The linear complexity analysis shows that the system has a linear complexity equal to the period of the sequence which is highly desirable. The statistical complexity and security against known plain text attack are also analysed. A comparison of the proposed method with other EC based schemes is done in terms of throughput, periodicity, and security, and the proposed method outperforms the methods in the literature. For resource constrained applications where a highly secure key exchange is essential, the proposed method provides a good option for encryption by time sharing the point multiplication unit for EC based key exchange. The algorithm and architecture for implementation are developed in such a way that the hardware consumed in addition to point multiplication unit is much less.

  19. Unveiling Chloroplast RNA Editing Events Using Next Generation Small RNA Sequencing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nureyev F. Rodrigues

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Organellar RNA editing involves the modification of nucleotide sequences to maintain conserved protein functions, mainly by reverting non-neutral codon mutations. The loss of plastid editing events, resulting from mutations in RNA editing factors or through stress interference, leads to developmental, physiological and photosynthetic alterations. Recently, next generation sequencing technology has generated the massive discovery of sRNA sequences and expanded the number of sRNA data. Here, we present a method to screen chloroplast RNA editing using public sRNA libraries from Arabidopsis, soybean and rice. We mapped the sRNAs against the nuclear, mitochondrial and plastid genomes to confirm predicted cytosine to uracil (C-to-U editing events and identify new editing sites in plastids. Among the predicted editing sites, 40.57, 34.78, and 25.31% were confirmed using sRNAs from Arabidopsis, soybean and rice, respectively. SNP analysis revealed 58.2, 43.9, and 37.5% new C-to-U changes in the respective species and identified known and new putative adenosine to inosine (A-to-I RNA editing in tRNAs. The present method and data reveal the potential of sRNA as a reliable source to identify new and confirm known editing sites.

  20. Repair technology for steam generator tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Ho; Jung, Hyun Kyu; Jung, Seung Ho; Kim, Chang Hoi; Jung, Young Moo; Seo, Yong Chil; Kim, Jung Su; Seo, Moo Hong

    2001-02-01

    The most commonly used sleeving materials are thermally treated Alloy 600 and thermally treated Alloy 690 Alloy. Currently, thermally treated Alloy 690 and Alloy 800 are being offered although Alloy 800 has not been licensed in the US. To install sleeve, joint strength, leak tightness, PWSCC resistance, evaluation on process parameter range and the effect of equipments and procedures on repair plan and radiation damage have to be investigated before sleeving. ABB CE provides three type of leak tight Alloy 690 TIG welded and PLUSS sleeve. Currently, Direct Tube Repair technique using Nd:YAG laser has been developed by ABB CE and Westinghouse. FTI has brazed and kinetic sleeve designs for recirculating steam generator and hydraulic and rolled sleeve designs for one-through steam generators. Westinghouse provides HEJ, brazed and laser welded sleeve design. When sleeve is installed in order to repair the damaged S/G tubes, it is certain that defects can be occurred due to the plastic induced stress and thermal stress. Therefore it is important to minimize the residual stress. FTI provides the electrosleeve technique as a future repair candidate using electroplating.

  1. Analyzing the next-generation catalog a library technology report

    CERN Document Server

    Nagy, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    his issue of ""Library Technology Reports"" analyzes five different academic libraries to better understand their investments, detailing the outcome thus far and drawing conclusions about the next-generation catalog.

  2. Recent Advances in Autism Spectrum Disorders: Applications of Whole Exome Sequencing Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Elif Funda; Canatan, Halit; Ozkul, Yusuf

    2016-05-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is characterized by three core symptoms with impaired reciprocal social interaction and communication, a pattern of repetitive behavior and/or restricted interests in early childhood. The prevalence is higher in male children than in female children. As a complex neurodevelopmental disorder, the phenotype and severity of autism are extremely heterogeneous with differences from one patient to another. Genetics has a key role in the etiology of autism. Environmental factors are also interacting with the genetic profile and cause abnormal changes in neuronal development, brain growth, and functional connectivity. The term of exome represents less than 1% of the human genome, but contains 85% of known disease-causing variants. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) is an application of the next generation sequencing technology to determine the variations of all coding regions, or exons of known genes. For this reason, WES has been extensively used for clinical studies in the recent years. WES has achieved great success in the past years for identifying Mendelian disease genes. This review evaluates the potential of current findings in ASD for application in next generation sequencing technology, particularly WES. WES and whole-genome sequencing (WGS) approaches may lead to the discovery of underlying genetic factors for ASD and may thereby identify novel therapeutic targets for this disorder.

  3. 应用第二代DNA测序技术于遗传性疾病的研究%Applying next-generation DNA sequencing technology for genetic disease study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王山鸣

    2011-01-01

    1 Genetic disease Genetic disease is one of the top classes of human diseases.Several thousand types of human genetic diseases have been identified.Most of the family may contain genetic disorders,and at least 10 percent of all adults contain genetic defects (http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/228874/human-geneticdisease) [1].In China,over 1 million new born babies have genetic birth deficiency annually (http://www.dcmst.org.cn/bencandy.php? fid =14&id =273 ).While the individuals with genetic diseases passed away before reaching the reproduction age will eliminate the diseases from the human population,the individuals reaching the reproduction age will transmit the diseases to the new generation,therefore,the diseases will remain in the human population.China has the largest human population in the world and Shandong is one of the most populated provinces in China.In the foreseeable future,most of the genetic diseases will not be curable.

  4. Coverage bias and sensitivity of variant calling for four whole-genome sequencing technologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Rieber

    Full Text Available The emergence of high-throughput, next-generation sequencing technologies has dramatically altered the way we assess genomes in population genetics and in cancer genomics. Currently, there are four commonly used whole-genome sequencing platforms on the market: Illumina's HiSeq2000, Life Technologies' SOLiD 4 and its completely redesigned 5500xl SOLiD, and Complete Genomics' technology. A number of earlier studies have compared a subset of those sequencing platforms or compared those platforms with Sanger sequencing, which is prohibitively expensive for whole genome studies. Here we present a detailed comparison of the performance of all currently available whole genome sequencing platforms, especially regarding their ability to call SNVs and to evenly cover the genome and specific genomic regions. Unlike earlier studies, we base our comparison on four different samples, allowing us to assess the between-sample variation of the platforms. We find a pronounced GC bias in GC-rich regions for Life Technologies' platforms, with Complete Genomics performing best here, while we see the least bias in GC-poor regions for HiSeq2000 and 5500xl. HiSeq2000 gives the most uniform coverage and displays the least sample-to-sample variation. In contrast, Complete Genomics exhibits by far the smallest fraction of bases not covered, while the SOLiD platforms reveal remarkable shortcomings, especially in covering CpG islands. When comparing the performance of the four platforms for calling SNPs, HiSeq2000 and Complete Genomics achieve the highest sensitivity, while the SOLiD platforms show the lowest false positive rate. Finally, we find that integrating sequencing data from different platforms offers the potential to combine the strengths of different technologies. In summary, our results detail the strengths and weaknesses of all four whole-genome sequencing platforms. It indicates application areas that call for a specific sequencing platform and disallow other

  5. Application of next-generation sequencing in clinical oncology to advance personalized treatment of cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Fang Guan; Gai-Rui Li; Rong-Jiao Wang; Yu-Ting Yi; Ling Yang; Dan Jiang; Xiao-Ping Zhang; Yin Peng

    2012-01-01

    With the development and improvement of new sequencing technology,next-generation sequencing (NGS) has been applied increasingly in cancer genomics research over the past decade.More recently,NGS has been adopted in clinical oncology to advance personalized treatment of cancer.NGS is used to identify novel and rare cancer mutations,detect familial cancer mutation carriers,and provide molecular rationale for appropriate targeted therapy.Compared to traditional sequencing,NGS holds many advantages,such as the ability to fully sequence all types of mutations for a large number of genes (hundreds to thousands) in a single test at a relatively low cost.However,significant challenges,particularly with respect to the requirement for simpler assays,more flexible throughput,shorter turnaround time,and most importantly,easier data analysis and interpretation,will have to be overcome to translate NGS to the bedside of cancer patients.Overall,continuous dedication to apply NGS in clinical oncology practice will enable us to be one step closer to personalized medicine.

  6. Next-Generation Sequencing of Aquatic Oligochaetes: Comparison of Experimental Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivien, Régis; Lejzerowicz, Franck; Pawlowski, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Aquatic oligochaetes are a common group of freshwater benthic invertebrates known to be very sensitive to environmental changes and currently used as bioindicators in some countries. However, more extensive application of oligochaetes for assessing the ecological quality of sediments in watercourses and lakes would require overcoming the difficulties related to morphology-based identification of oligochaetes species. This study tested the Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) of a standard cytochrome c oxydase I (COI) barcode as a tool for the rapid assessment of oligochaete diversity in environmental samples, based on mixed specimen samples. To know the composition of each sample we Sanger sequenced every specimen present in these samples. Our study showed that a large majority of OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Unit) could be detected by NGS analyses. We also observed congruence between the NGS and specimen abundance data for several but not all OTUs. Because the differences in sequence abundance data were consistent across samples, we exploited these variations to empirically design correction factors. We showed that such factors increased the congruence between the values of oligochaetes-based indices inferred from the NGS and the Sanger-sequenced specimen data. The validation of these correction factors by further experimental studies will be needed for the adaptation and use of NGS technology in biomonitoring studies based on oligochaete communities. PMID:26866802

  7. Next-Generation Sequencing of Aquatic Oligochaetes: Comparison of Experimental Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivien, Régis; Lejzerowicz, Franck; Pawlowski, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Aquatic oligochaetes are a common group of freshwater benthic invertebrates known to be very sensitive to environmental changes and currently used as bioindicators in some countries. However, more extensive application of oligochaetes for assessing the ecological quality of sediments in watercourses and lakes would require overcoming the difficulties related to morphology-based identification of oligochaetes species. This study tested the Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) of a standard cytochrome c oxydase I (COI) barcode as a tool for the rapid assessment of oligochaete diversity in environmental samples, based on mixed specimen samples. To know the composition of each sample we Sanger sequenced every specimen present in these samples. Our study showed that a large majority of OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Unit) could be detected by NGS analyses. We also observed congruence between the NGS and specimen abundance data for several but not all OTUs. Because the differences in sequence abundance data were consistent across samples, we exploited these variations to empirically design correction factors. We showed that such factors increased the congruence between the values of oligochaetes-based indices inferred from the NGS and the Sanger-sequenced specimen data. The validation of these correction factors by further experimental studies will be needed for the adaptation and use of NGS technology in biomonitoring studies based on oligochaete communities.

  8. Next-Generation Sequencing of Aquatic Oligochaetes: Comparison of Experimental Communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Régis Vivien

    Full Text Available Aquatic oligochaetes are a common group of freshwater benthic invertebrates known to be very sensitive to environmental changes and currently used as bioindicators in some countries. However, more extensive application of oligochaetes for assessing the ecological quality of sediments in watercourses and lakes would require overcoming the difficulties related to morphology-based identification of oligochaetes species. This study tested the Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS of a standard cytochrome c oxydase I (COI barcode as a tool for the rapid assessment of oligochaete diversity in environmental samples, based on mixed specimen samples. To know the composition of each sample we Sanger sequenced every specimen present in these samples. Our study showed that a large majority of OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Unit could be detected by NGS analyses. We also observed congruence between the NGS and specimen abundance data for several but not all OTUs. Because the differences in sequence abundance data were consistent across samples, we exploited these variations to empirically design correction factors. We showed that such factors increased the congruence between the values of oligochaetes-based indices inferred from the NGS and the Sanger-sequenced specimen data. The validation of these correction factors by further experimental studies will be needed for the adaptation and use of NGS technology in biomonitoring studies based on oligochaete communities.

  9. Coval: Improving Alignment Quality and Variant Calling Accuracy for Next-Generation Sequencing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosugi, Shunichi; Natsume, Satoshi; Yoshida, Kentaro; MacLean, Daniel; Cano, Liliana; Kamoun, Sophien; Terauchi, Ryohei

    2013-01-01

    Accurate identification of DNA polymorphisms using next-generation sequencing technology is challenging because of a high rate of sequencing error and incorrect mapping of reads to reference genomes. Currently available short read aligners and DNA variant callers suffer from these problems. We developed the Coval software to improve the quality of short read alignments. Coval is designed to minimize the incidence of spurious alignment of short reads, by filtering mismatched reads that remained in alignments after local realignment and error correction of mismatched reads. The error correction is executed based on the base quality and allele frequency at the non-reference positions for an individual or pooled sample. We demonstrated the utility of Coval by applying it to simulated genomes and experimentally obtained short-read data of rice, nematode, and mouse. Moreover, we found an unexpectedly large number of incorrectly mapped reads in ‘targeted’ alignments, where the whole genome sequencing reads had been aligned to a local genomic segment, and showed that Coval effectively eliminated such spurious alignments. We conclude that Coval significantly improves the quality of short-read sequence alignments, thereby increasing the calling accuracy of currently available tools for SNP and indel identification. Coval is available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/coval105/. PMID:24116042

  10. Coval: improving alignment quality and variant calling accuracy for next-generation sequencing data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunichi Kosugi

    Full Text Available Accurate identification of DNA polymorphisms using next-generation sequencing technology is challenging because of a high rate of sequencing error and incorrect mapping of reads to reference genomes. Currently available short read aligners and DNA variant callers suffer from these problems. We developed the Coval software to improve the quality of short read alignments. Coval is designed to minimize the incidence of spurious alignment of short reads, by filtering mismatched reads that remained in alignments after local realignment and error correction of mismatched reads. The error correction is executed based on the base quality and allele frequency at the non-reference positions for an individual or pooled sample. We demonstrated the utility of Coval by applying it to simulated genomes and experimentally obtained short-read data of rice, nematode, and mouse. Moreover, we found an unexpectedly large number of incorrectly mapped reads in 'targeted' alignments, where the whole genome sequencing reads had been aligned to a local genomic segment, and showed that Coval effectively eliminated such spurious alignments. We conclude that Coval significantly improves the quality of short-read sequence alignments, thereby increasing the calling accuracy of currently available tools for SNP and indel identification. Coval is available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/coval105/.

  11. Analysis of metagenomics next generation sequence data for fungal ITS barcoding: Do you need advance bioinformatics experience?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalla Osman Abdalla Ahmed

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available During the last few decades, most of microbiology laboratories have become familiar in analyzing Sanger sequence data for ITS barcoding. However, with the availability of next-generation sequencing platforms in many centers, it has become important for medical mycologists to know how to make sense of the massive sequence data generated by these new sequencing technologies. In many reference laboratories, the analysis of such data is not a big deal, since suitable IT infrastructure and well-trained bioinformatics scientists are always available. However, in small research laboratories and clinical microbiology laboratories the availability of such resources are always lacking. In this report, simple and user-friendly bioinformatics work-flow is suggested for fast and reproducible ITS barcoding of fungi.

  12. The Impact of Generational Status on Instructors' Reported Technology Usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, Susan Troncoso; Zientek, Linda Reichwein; Saxon, D. Patrick; Edmonson, Stacey L.

    2014-01-01

    Although the majority of colleges and universities are equipped with the latest instructional technologies, an appreciable integration of technology has not been observed in instructional practices (Flavin, 2013; Garrison & Akyol, 2009; Salinas, 2008). The purpose of this research is to understand the impact that generational differences can…

  13. Next Generation Sequence Analysis and Computational Genomics Using Graphical Pipeline Workflows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marquis P. Vawter

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Whole-genome and exome sequencing have already proven to be essential and powerful methods to identify genes responsible for simple Mendelian inherited disorders. These methods can be applied to complex disorders as well, and have been adopted as one of the current mainstream approaches in population genetics. These achievements have been made possible by next generation sequencing (NGS technologies, which require substantial bioinformatics resources to analyze the dense and complex sequence data. The huge analytical burden of data from genome sequencing might be seen as a bottleneck slowing the publication of NGS papers at this time, especially in psychiatric genetics. We review the existing methods for processing NGS data, to place into context the rationale for the design of a computational resource. We describe our method, the Graphical Pipeline for Computational Genomics (GPCG, to perform the computational steps required to analyze NGS data. The GPCG implements flexible workflows for basic sequence alignment, sequence data quality control, single nucleotide polymorphism analysis, copy number variant identification, annotation, and visualization of results. These workflows cover all the analytical steps required for NGS data, from processing the raw reads to variant calling and annotation. The current version of the pipeline is freely available at http://pipeline.loni.ucla.edu. These applications of NGS analysis may gain clinical utility in the near future (e.g., identifying miRNA signatures in diseases when the bioinformatics approach is made feasible. Taken together, the annotation tools and strategies that have been developed to retrieve information and test hypotheses about the functional role of variants present in the human genome will help to pinpoint the genetic risk factors for psychiatric disorders.

  14. Use of four next-generation sequencing platforms to determine HIV-1 coreceptor tropism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, John; Weber, Jan; Henry, Kenneth; Winner, Dane; Gibson, Richard; Lee, Lawrence; Paxinos, Ellen; Arts, Eric J; Robertson, David L; Mimms, Larry; Quiñones-Mateu, Miguel E

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 coreceptor tropism assays are required to rule out the presence of CXCR4-tropic (non-R5) viruses prior treatment with CCR5 antagonists. Phenotypic (e.g., Trofile™, Monogram Biosciences) and genotypic (e.g., population sequencing linked to bioinformatic algorithms) assays are the most widely used. Although several next-generation sequencing (NGS) platforms are available, to date all published deep sequencing HIV-1 tropism studies have used the 454™ Life Sciences/Roche platform. In this study, HIV-1 co-receptor usage was predicted for twelve patients scheduled to start a maraviroc-based antiretroviral regimen. The V3 region of the HIV-1 env gene was sequenced using four NGS platforms: 454™, PacBio® RS (Pacific Biosciences), Illumina®, and Ion Torrent™ (Life Technologies). Cross-platform variation was evaluated, including number of reads, read length and error rates. HIV-1 tropism was inferred using Geno2Pheno, Web PSSM, and the 11/24/25 rule and compared with Trofile™ and virologic response to antiretroviral therapy. Error rates related to insertions/deletions (indels) and nucleotide substitutions introduced by the four NGS platforms were low compared to the actual HIV-1 sequence variation. Each platform detected all major virus variants within the HIV-1 population with similar frequencies. Identification of non-R5 viruses was comparable among the four platforms, with minor differences attributable to the algorithms used to infer HIV-1 tropism. All NGS platforms showed similar concordance with virologic response to the maraviroc-based regimen (75% to 80% range depending on the algorithm used), compared to Trofile (80%) and population sequencing (70%). In conclusion, all four NGS platforms were able to detect minority non-R5 variants at comparable levels suggesting that any NGS-based method can be used to predict HIV-1 coreceptor usage.

  15. Next generation sequence analysis and computational genomics using graphical pipeline workflows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torri, Federica; Dinov, Ivo D; Zamanyan, Alen; Hobel, Sam; Genco, Alex; Petrosyan, Petros; Clark, Andrew P; Liu, Zhizhong; Eggert, Paul; Pierce, Jonathan; Knowles, James A; Ames, Joseph; Kesselman, Carl; Toga, Arthur W; Potkin, Steven G; Vawter, Marquis P; Macciardi, Fabio

    2012-08-30

    Whole-genome and exome sequencing have already proven to be essential and powerful methods to identify genes responsible for simple Mendelian inherited disorders. These methods can be applied to complex disorders as well, and have been adopted as one of the current mainstream approaches in population genetics. These achievements have been made possible by next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, which require substantial bioinformatics resources to analyze the dense and complex sequence data. The huge analytical burden of data from genome sequencing might be seen as a bottleneck slowing the publication of NGS papers at this time, especially in psychiatric genetics. We review the existing methods for processing NGS data, to place into context the rationale for the design of a computational resource. We describe our method, the Graphical Pipeline for Computational Genomics (GPCG), to perform the computational steps required to analyze NGS data. The GPCG implements flexible workflows for basic sequence alignment, sequence data quality control, single nucleotide polymorphism analysis, copy number variant identification, annotation, and visualization of results. These workflows cover all the analytical steps required for NGS data, from processing the raw reads to variant calling and annotation. The current version of the pipeline is freely available at http://pipeline.loni.ucla.edu. These applications of NGS analysis may gain clinical utility in the near future (e.g., identifying miRNA signatures in diseases) when the bioinformatics approach is made feasible. Taken together, the annotation tools and strategies that have been developed to retrieve information and test hypotheses about the functional role of variants present in the human genome will help to pinpoint the genetic risk factors for psychiatric disorders.

  16. Next-generation sequencing for rodent barcoding: species identification from fresh, degraded and environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galan, Maxime; Pagès, Marie; Cosson, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    Rodentia is the most diverse order among mammals, with more than 2,000 species currently described. Most of the time, species assignation is so difficult based on morphological data solely that identifying rodents at the specific level corresponds to a real challenge. In this study, we compared the applicability of 100 bp mini-barcodes from cytochrome b and cytochrome c oxidase 1 genes to enable rodent species identification. Based on GenBank sequence datasets of 115 rodent species, a 136 bp fragment of cytochrome b was selected as the most discriminatory mini-barcode, and rodent universal primers surrounding this fragment were designed. The efficacy of this new molecular tool was assessed on 946 samples including rodent tissues, feces, museum samples and feces/pellets from predators known to ingest rodents. Utilizing next-generation sequencing technologies able to sequence mixes of DNA, 1,140 amplicons were tagged, multiplexed and sequenced together in one single 454 GS-FLX run. Our method was initially validated on a reference sample set including 265 clearly identified rodent tissues, corresponding to 103 different species. Following validation, 85.6% of 555 rodent samples from Europe, Asia and Africa whose species identity was unknown were able to be identified using the BLASTN program and GenBank reference sequences. In addition, our method proved effective even on degraded rodent DNA samples: 91.8% and 75.9% of samples from feces and museum specimens respectively were correctly identified. Finally, we succeeded in determining the diet of 66.7% of the investigated carnivores from their feces and 81.8% of owls from their pellets. Non-rodent species were also identified, suggesting that our method is sensitive enough to investigate complete predator diets. This study demonstrates how this molecular identification method combined with high-throughput sequencing can open new realms of possibilities in achieving fast, accurate and inexpensive species identification.

  17. Use of four next-generation sequencing platforms to determine HIV-1 coreceptor tropism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Archer

    Full Text Available HIV-1 coreceptor tropism assays are required to rule out the presence of CXCR4-tropic (non-R5 viruses prior treatment with CCR5 antagonists. Phenotypic (e.g., Trofile™, Monogram Biosciences and genotypic (e.g., population sequencing linked to bioinformatic algorithms assays are the most widely used. Although several next-generation sequencing (NGS platforms are available, to date all published deep sequencing HIV-1 tropism studies have used the 454™ Life Sciences/Roche platform. In this study, HIV-1 co-receptor usage was predicted for twelve patients scheduled to start a maraviroc-based antiretroviral regimen. The V3 region of the HIV-1 env gene was sequenced using four NGS platforms: 454™, PacBio® RS (Pacific Biosciences, Illumina®, and Ion Torrent™ (Life Technologies. Cross-platform variation was evaluated, including number of reads, read length and error rates. HIV-1 tropism was inferred using Geno2Pheno, Web PSSM, and the 11/24/25 rule and compared with Trofile™ and virologic response to antiretroviral therapy. Error rates related to insertions/deletions (indels and nucleotide substitutions introduced by the four NGS platforms were low compared to the actual HIV-1 sequence variation. Each platform detected all major virus variants within the HIV-1 population with similar frequencies. Identification of non-R5 viruses was comparable among the four platforms, with minor differences attributable to the algorithms used to infer HIV-1 tropism. All NGS platforms showed similar concordance with virologic response to the maraviroc-based regimen (75% to 80% range depending on the algorithm used, compared to Trofile (80% and population sequencing (70%. In conclusion, all four NGS platforms were able to detect minority non-R5 variants at comparable levels suggesting that any NGS-based method can be used to predict HIV-1 coreceptor usage.

  18. Current Advanced Power Generation Technologies and Options for China (1)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ In China,electricity consumption keeps growing at a high speed and installed capacity will be doubled in the next fifteen years.As the world second CO2 producer and also a member of Kyoto Protocol,how to balance energy needs and environmental protection responsibility in the future is a serious problem for China.As such,there are a number of technology choices for today's electric power generation.After discussing the current advanced power generation technologies based on Chinese energy structure and current conditions of power industry,this paper gives a reference to the technology options for China in the future.

  19. 测序技术的研究进展%Research Progress on the Sequencing Technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝甜甜; 李强飞; 李国治; 陈禹翰; 邓卫东

    2014-01-01

    基因组测序技术是一种分子生物学及其相关学科研究中最常用的技术。从20世纪70年代中期第一代测序技术出现以来,基因组测序技术已取得了重大进展,并改变了生命科学诸多领域的研究面貌。测序成本的急剧下降,测序通量呈指数提高,使得测序速度大大提升。DNA和RNA是生命体的2个基本遗传物质,其组成和序列变化创造了形形色色的生命世界。快速、准确地获取生物体的遗传信息对于生命科学的研究具有重要意义,测序技术能够真正地反映基因组、遗传信息转录,全面地揭示基因组的复杂性和多样性,在生命科学研究中起着重要的作用。综述了各代测序技术的发展成果、测序原理、测序优缺点、国内研究现状,并对测序技术未来的发展方向进行了展望。%Genome sequencing technology is the most commonly used technique in molecular biology and its related discipline studies. Genome sequencing technology has made great progresses and changed the status of life science research in many fields since the first-generation of sequencing technology appeared in the 1970s. The sharp decline of sequencing cost and exponential increase of sequencing throughout greatly improved the sequencing speed. The two basic genetic materials of organism are DNA and RNA, whose composition and sequence changes create all sorts of lives in the world. It is of important significance to get the genetic information of organisms fast and accurately for life science research. Sequencing technology can reflect genome and transcription of genetic information truly and reveal the complexity and diversity of genome, which plays a very important role in life science research. The development achievements, sequencing principle, the advantages and disadvantages of sequencing, domestic research status of each generation of sequencing technology were reviewed. And the future development

  20. Targeted next-generation sequencing can replace Sanger sequencing in clinical diagnostics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikkema-Raddatz, B.; Johansson, L.F.; de Boer, E.N.; Almomani, R.; Boven, L.G.; van den Berg, M.P.; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, K.Y.; van Tintelen, J.P.; Sijmons, R.H.; Jongbloed, J.D.H.; Sinke, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    Mutation detection through exome sequencing allows simultaneous analysis of all coding sequences of genes. However, it cannot yet replace Sanger sequencing (SS) in diagnostics because of incomplete representation and coverage of exons leading to missing clinically relevant mutations. Targeted next-g

  1. Recurrent Network Models of Sequence Generation and Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Kanaka; Harvey, Christopher D; Tank, David W

    2016-04-01

    Sequential activation of neurons is a common feature of network activity during a variety of behaviors, including working memory and decision making. Previous network models for sequences and memory emphasized specialized architectures in which a principled mechanism is pre-wired into their connectivity. Here we demonstrate that, starting from random connectivity and modifying a small fraction of connections, a largely disordered recurrent network can produce sequences and implement working memory efficiently. We use this process, called Partial In-Network Training (PINning), to model and match cellular resolution imaging data from the posterior parietal cortex during a virtual memory-guided two-alternative forced-choice task. Analysis of the connectivity reveals that sequences propagate by the cooperation between recurrent synaptic interactions and external inputs, rather than through feedforward or asymmetric connections. Together our results suggest that neural sequences may emerge through learning from largely unstructured network architectures.

  2. Interpretation of custom designed Illumina genotype cluster plots for targeted association studies and next-generation sequence validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tindall Elizabeth A

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput custom designed genotyping arrays are a valuable resource for biologically focused research studies and increasingly for validation of variation predicted by next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies. We investigate the Illumina GoldenGate chemistry using custom designed VeraCode and sentrix array matrix (SAM assays for each of these applications, respectively. We highlight applications for interpretation of Illumina generated genotype cluster plots to maximise data inclusion and reduce genotyping errors. Findings We illustrate the dramatic effect of outliers in genotype calling and data interpretation, as well as suggest simple means to avoid genotyping errors. Furthermore we present this platform as a successful method for two-cluster rare or non-autosomal variant calling. The success of high-throughput technologies to accurately call rare variants will become an essential feature for future association studies. Finally, we highlight additional advantages of the Illumina GoldenGate chemistry in generating unusually segregated cluster plots that identify potential NGS generated sequencing error resulting from minimal coverage. Conclusions We demonstrate the importance of visually inspecting genotype cluster plots generated by the Illumina software and issue warnings regarding commonly accepted quality control parameters. In addition to suggesting applications to minimise data exclusion, we propose that the Illumina cluster plots may be helpful in identifying potential in-put sequence errors, particularly important for studies to validate NGS generated variation.

  3. Physico-chemical foundations underpinning microarray and next-generation sequencing experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Andrew; Binder, Hans; Buhot, Arnaud; Burden, Conrad J.; Carlon, Enrico; Gibas, Cynthia; Gamble, Lara J.; Halperin, Avraham; Hooyberghs, Jef; Kreil, David P.; Levicky, Rastislav; Noble, Peter A.; Ott, Albrecht; Pettitt, B. Montgomery; Tautz, Diethard; Pozhitkov, Alexander E.

    2013-01-01

    Hybridization of nucleic acids on solid surfaces is a key process involved in high-throughput technologies such as microarrays and, in some cases, next-generation sequencing (NGS). A physical understanding of the hybridization process helps to determine the accuracy of these technologies. The goal of a widespread research program is to develop reliable transformations between the raw signals reported by the technologies and individual molecular concentrations from an ensemble of nucleic acids. This research has inputs from many areas, from bioinformatics and biostatistics, to theoretical and experimental biochemistry and biophysics, to computer simulations. A group of leading researchers met in Ploen Germany in 2011 to discuss present knowledge and limitations of our physico-chemical understanding of high-throughput nucleic acid technologies. This meeting inspired us to write this summary, which provides an overview of the state-of-the-art approaches based on physico-chemical foundation to modeling of the nucleic acids hybridization process on solid surfaces. In addition, practical application of current knowledge is emphasized. PMID:23307556

  4. Biological characterization and next-generation genome sequencing of the unclassified Cotia virus SPAn232 (Poxviridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Priscila P; Silva, Patrícia M; Schnellrath, Laila C; Jesus, Desyreé M; Hu, Jianhong; Yang, Yajie; Renne, Rolf; Attias, Marcia; Condit, Richard C; Moussatché, Nissin; Damaso, Clarissa R

    2012-05-01

    Cotia virus (COTV) SPAn232 was isolated in 1961 from sentinel mice at Cotia field station, São Paulo, Brazil. Attempts to classify COTV within a recognized genus of the Poxviridae have generated contradictory findings. Studies by different researchers suggested some similarity to myxoma virus and swinepox virus, whereas another investigation characterized COTV SPAn232 as a vaccinia virus strain. Because of the lack of consensus, we have conducted an independent biological and molecular characterization of COTV. Virus growth curves reached maximum yields at approximately 24 to 48 h and were accompanied by virus DNA replication and a characteristic early/late pattern of viral protein synthesis. Interestingly, COTV did not induce detectable cytopathic effects in BSC-40 cells until 4 days postinfection and generated viral plaques only after 8 days. We determined the complete genomic sequence of COTV by using a combination of the next-generation DNA sequencing technologies 454 and Illumina. A unique contiguous sequence of 185,139 bp containing 185 genes, including the 90 genes conserved in all chordopoxviruses, was obtained. COTV has an interesting panel of open reading frames (ORFs) related to the evasion of host defense, including two novel genes encoding C-C chemokine-like proteins, each present in duplicate copies. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the highest amino acid identity scores with Cervidpoxvirus, Capripoxvirus, Suipoxvirus, Leporipoxvirus, and Yatapoxvirus. However, COTV grouped as an independent branch within this clade, which clearly excluded its classification as an Orthopoxvirus. Therefore, our data suggest that COTV could represent a new poxvirus genus.

  5. Detection and removal of biases in the analysis of next-generation sequencing reads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schraga Schwartz

    Full Text Available Since the emergence of next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies, great effort has been put into the development of tools for analysis of the short reads. In parallel, knowledge is increasing regarding biases inherent in these technologies. Here we discuss four different biases we encountered while analyzing various Illumina datasets. These biases are due to both biological and statistical effects that in particular affect comparisons between different genomic regions. Specifically, we encountered biases pertaining to the distributions of nucleotides across sequencing cycles, to mappability, to contamination of pre-mRNA with mRNA, and to non-uniform hydrolysis of RNA. Most of these biases are not specific to one analyzed dataset, but are present across a variety of datasets and within a variety of genomic contexts. Importantly, some of these biases correlated in a highly significant manner with biological features, including transcript length, gene expression levels, conservation levels, and exon-intron architecture, misleadingly increasing the credibility of results due to them. We also demonstrate the relevance of these biases in the context of analyzing an NGS dataset mapping transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerase II (RNAPII in the context of exon-intron architecture, and show that elimination of these biases is crucial for avoiding erroneous interpretation of the data. Collectively, our results highlight several important pitfalls, challenges and approaches in the analysis of NGS reads.

  6. Performance comparison of next-generation sequencing platforms for determining HIV-1 coreceptor use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Stéphanie; Nicot, Florence; Jeanne, Nicolas; Delfour, Olivier; Carcenac, Romain; Lefebvre, Caroline; Cazabat, Michelle; Sauné, Karine; Delobel, Pierre; Izopet, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    The coreceptor used by HIV-1 must be determined before a CCR5 antagonist, part of the arsenal of antiretroviral drugs, is prescribed because viruses that enter cells using the CXCR4 coreceptor are responsible for treatment failure. HIV-1 tropism is also correlated with disease progression and so must be determined for virological studies. Tropism can be determined by next-generation sequencing (NGS), but not all of these new technologies have been fully validated for use in clinical practice. The Illumina NGS technology is used in many laboratories but its ability to predict HIV-1 tropism has not been evaluated while the 454 GS-Junior (Roche) is used for routine diagnosis. The genotypic prediction of HIV-1 tropism is based on sequencing the V3 region and interpreting the results with an appropriate algorithm. We compared the performances of the MiSeq (Illumina) and 454 GS-Junior (Roche) systems with a reference phenotypic assay. We used clinical samples for the NGS tropism predictions and assessed their ability to quantify CXCR4-using variants. The data show that the Illumina platform can be used to detect minor CXCR4-using variants in clinical practice but technical optimization are needed to improve quantification. PMID:28186189

  7. Efficient generation of k-directional assembly sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, P.K. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Berg, M. de [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands); Halperin, D. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Sharir, M. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)

    1996-12-31

    Let S be a collection of n rigid bodies in 3-space, and let D be a set of k directions in 3-space, where k is a small constant. A k-directional assembly sequence for S, with respect to D, is a linear ordering (s{sub 1},...., s{sub n}) of the bodies in S, such that each si can be moved to infinity by translating it in one of the directions of D and without intersecting any s{sub j}, for j > i. We present an algorithm that computes a k-directional assembly sequence, or decides that no such sequence exists, for a set of polyhedra. The algorithm runs in O(km{sup 4/3+{epsilon}}) time, where m is the total number of vertices of the polyhedra. We also give an algorithm for {open_quote}k-directional{close_quote} rotational motions.

  8. Generating long sequences of high-intensity femtosecond pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Bitter, Martin

    2015-01-01

    We present an approach to create pulse sequences extending beyond 150~picoseconds in duration, comprised of $100~\\mu$J femtosecond pulses. A quarter of the pulse train is produced by a high-resolution pulse shaper, which allows full controllability over the timing of each pulse. Two nested Michelson interferometers follow to quadruple the pulse number and the sequence duration. To boost the pulse energy, the long train is sent through a multi-pass Ti:Sapphire amplifier, followed by an external compressor. A periodic sequence of 84~pulses of 120~fs width and an average pulse energy of 107~$\\mu$J, separated by 2~ps, is demonstrated as a proof of principle.

  9. Diagnostic value of next-generation sequencing in an unusual sphenoid tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, Farzad; Pleasance, Erin; Li, Yvonne; Shen, Yaoqing; Kasaian, Katayoon; Corbett, Richard; Eirew, Peter; Lum, Amy; Pandoh, Pawan; Zhao, Yongjun; Schein, Jacqueline E; Moore, Richard A; Rassekh, Rod; Huntsman, David G; Knowling, Meg; Lim, Howard; Renouf, Daniel J; Jones, Steven J M; Marra, Marco A; Nielsen, Torsten O; Laskin, Janessa; Yip, Stephen

    2014-06-01

    Extraordinary advancements in sequencing technology have made what was once a decade-long multi-institutional endeavor into a methodology with the potential for practical use in a clinical setting. We therefore set out to examine the clinical value of next-generation sequencing by enrolling patients with incurable or ambiguous tumors into the Personalized OncoGenomics initiative at the British Columbia Cancer Agency whereby whole genome and transcriptome analyses of tumor/normal tissue pairs are completed with the ultimate goal of directing therapeutics. First, we established that the sequencing, analysis, and communication with oncologists could be completed in less than 5 weeks. Second, we found that cancer diagnostics is an area that can greatly benefit from the comprehensiveness of a whole genome analysis. Here, we present a scenario in which a metastasized sphenoid mass, which was initially thought of as an undifferentiated squamous cell carcinoma, was rediagnosed as an SMARCB1-negative rhabdoid tumor based on the newly acquired finding of homozygous SMARCB1 deletion. The new diagnosis led to a change in chemotherapy and a complete nodal response in the patient. This study also provides additional insight into the mutational landscape of an adult SMARCB1-negative tumor that has not been explored at a whole genome and transcriptome level.

  10. Measuring the diversity of the human microbiota with targeted next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finotello, Francesca; Mastrorilli, Eleonora; Di Camillo, Barbara

    2016-12-26

    The human microbiota is a complex ecological community of commensal, symbiotic and pathogenic microorganisms harboured by the human body. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, in particular targeted amplicon sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S-seq), are enabling the identification and quantification of human-resident microorganisms at unprecedented resolution, providing novel insights into the role of the microbiota in health and disease. Once microbial abundances are quantified through NGS data analysis, diversity indices provide valuable mathematical tools to describe the ecological complexity of a single sample or to detect species differences between samples. However, diversity is not a determined physical quantity for which a consensus definition and unit of measure have been established, and several diversity indices are currently available. Furthermore, they were originally developed for macroecology and their robustness to the possible bias introduced by sequencing has not been characterized so far. To assist the reader with the selection and interpretation of diversity measures, we review a panel of broadly used indices, describing their mathematical formulations, purposes and properties, and characterize their behaviour and criticalities in dependence of the data features using simulated data as ground truth. In addition, we make available an R package, DiversitySeq, which implements in a unified framework the full panel of diversity indices and a simulator of 16S-seq data, and thus represents a valuable resource for the analysis of diversity from NGS count data and for the benchmarking of computational methods for 16S-seq.

  11. Inherited platelet disorders: Insight from platelet genomics using next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclachlan, Annabel; Watson, Steve P; Morgan, Neil V

    2017-01-01

    Inherited platelet disorders (IPDs) are a heterogeneous group of disorders associated with normal or reduced platelet counts and bleeding diatheses of varying severities. The identification of the underlying cause of IPDs is clinically challenging due to the absence of a gold-standard platelet test, and is often based on a clinical presentation and normal values in other hematology assays. As a consequence, a DNA-based approach has a potentially important role in the investigation of these patients. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are allowing the rapid analysis of genes that have been previously implicated in IPDs or that are known to have a key role in platelet regulation, as well as novel genes that have not been previously implicated in platelet dysfunction. The potential limitations of NGS arise with the interpretation of the sheer volume of genetic information obtained from whole exome sequencing (WES) or whole genome sequencing (WGS) in order to identify function-disrupting variants. Following on from bioinformatic analysis, a number of candidate genetic variants usually remain, therefore adding to the difficulty of phenotype-genotype segregation verification. Linking genetic changes to an underlying bleeding disorder is an ongoing challenge and may not always be feasible due to the multifactorial nature of IPDs. Nevertheless, NGS will play a key role in our understanding of the mechanisms of platelet function and the genetics involved.

  12. Next-generation sequencing identifies novel CACNA1A gene mutations in episodic ataxia type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksemous, Neven; Roy, Bishakha; Smith, Robert A; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2016-03-01

    Episodic Ataxia type 2 (EA2) is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited neurological disorder characterized by recurrent disabling imbalance, vertigo, and episodes of ataxia lasting minutes to hours. EA2 is caused most often by loss of function mutations of the calcium channel gene CACNA1A. In addition to EA2, mutations in CACNA1A are responsible for two other allelic disorders: familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1) and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). Herein, we have utilized next-generation sequencing (NGS) to screen the coding sequence, exon-intron boundaries, and Untranslated Regions (UTRs) of five genes where mutation is known to produce symptoms related to EA2, including CACNA1A. We performed this screening in a group of 31 unrelated patients with EA2 symptoms. Both novel and known mutations were detected through NGS technology, and confirmed through Sanger sequencing. Genetic testing showed in total 15 mutation bearing patients (48%), of which nine were novel mutations (6 missense and 3 small frameshift deletion mutations) and six known mutations (4 missense and 2 nonsense).These results demonstrate the efficiency of our NGS-panel for detecting known and novel mutations for EA2 in the CACNA1A gene, also identifying a novel missense mutation in ATP1A2 which is not a normal target for EA2 screening.

  13. Assembly of Repeat Content Using Next Generation Sequencing Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    labutti, Kurt; Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor; Copeland, Alex

    2014-03-17

    Repetitive organisms pose a challenge for short read assembly, and typically only unique regions and repeat regions shorter than the read length, can be accurately assembled. Recently, we have been investigating the use of Pacific Biosciences reads for de novo fungal assembly. We will present an assessment of the quality and degree of repeat reconstruction possible in a fungal genome using long read technology. We will also compare differences in assembly of repeat content using short read and long read technology.

  14. Application of next generation sequencing in clinical microbiology and infection prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deurenberg, Ruud H; Bathoorn, Erik; Chlebowicz, Monika A; Couto, Natacha; Ferdous, Mithila; García-Cobos, Silvia; Kooistra-Smid, Anna M D; Raangs, Erwin C; Rosema, Sigrid; Veloo, Alida C M; Zhou, Kai; Friedrich, Alexander W; Rossen, John W A

    2016-01-01

    Current molecular diagnostics of human pathogens provide limited information that is often not sufficient for outbreak and transmission investigation. Next generation sequencing (NGS) determines the DNA sequence of a complete bacterial genome in a single sequence run, and from these data, informatio

  15. A video annotation methodology for interactive video sequence generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindley, C.A.; Earnshaw, R.A.; Vince, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    The FRAMES project within the RDN CRC (Cooperative Research Centre for Research Data Networks) has developed an experimental environment for dynamic virtual video sequence synthesis from databases of video data. A major issue for the development of dynamic interactive video applications of this type

  16. Generating technology assessment. Phase I work plan, Task 1 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-15

    A plan of work outlining information to assess electric generating technologies is presented. Projections are made of realistic and understandable engineering and cost assessments of nonnuclear electrical generating technologies. A computer-based method of producing such engineering and cost estimates for use by EIA's Coal and Electric Power Analysis Division is to be developed and implemented. Technologies and processes to be assessed are: all nonnuclear conventional and nonconventional (coal gasification, advanced combustion turbines, atmospheric fluidized bed combustion, fuel cells, geothermal, solar thermal and photovoltaics, biomass conversion to electricity, ocean thermal, wind, and MHD). Engineering specifications recommended for determination are listed. Compatibility of the technologies are to be assessed with EIA models: MEFS, LEAP, and NCM.

  17. Exome sequencing in the knockin mice generated using the CRISPR/Cas system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Kazuo; Kazuno, An-a; Kelsoe, John; Nakanishi, Moe; Takumi, Toru; Kato, Tadafumi

    2016-01-01

    Knockin (KI) mouse carrying a point mutation has been an invaluable tool for disease modeling and analysis. Genome editing technologies using the CRISPR/Cas system has emerged as an alternative way to create KI mice. However, if the mice carry nucleotide insertions and/or deletions (InDels) in other genes, which could have unintentionally occurred during the establishment of the KI mouse line and potentially have larger impact than a point mutation, it would confound phenotyping of the KI mice. In this study, we performed whole exome sequencing of multiple lines of F1 heterozygous Ntrk1 KI mice generated using the CRISPR/Cas system in comparison to that of a wild-type mouse used as a control. We found three InDels in four KI mice but not in a control mouse. In vitro digestion assay suggested that each InDel occurred as a de novo mutation, was carried-over from the parental mice, or was incorporated through the Cas9 nuclease mediated off-target cleavage. These results suggest that frequency of InDels found in KI mice generated by the CRISPR/Cas technology is not high, but cannot be neglected and careful assessment of these mutations is warranted. PMID:27698470

  18. Next-Generation Sequencing: Application in Liver Cancer—Past, Present and Future?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper B. Andersen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC is the third most deadly malignancy worldwide characterized by phenotypic and molecular heterogeneity. In the past two decades, advances in genomic analyses have formed a comprehensive understanding of different underlying pathobiological layers resulting in hepatocarcinogenesis. More recently, improvements of sophisticated next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies have enabled complete and cost-efficient analyses of cancer genomes at a single nucleotide resolution and advanced into valuable tools in translational medicine. Although the use of NGS in human liver cancer is still in its infancy, great promise rests in the systematic integration of different molecular analyses obtained by these methodologies, i.e., genomics, transcriptomics and epigenomics. This strategy is likely to be helpful in identifying relevant and recurrent pathophysiological hallmarks thereby elucidating our limited understanding of liver cancer. Beside tumor heterogeneity, progress in translational oncology is challenged by the amount of biological information and considerable “noise” in the data obtained from different NGS platforms. Nevertheless, the following review aims to provide an overview of the current status of next-generation approaches in liver cancer, and outline the prospects of these technologies in diagnosis, patient classification, and prediction of outcome. Further, the potential of NGS to identify novel applications for concept clinical trials and to accelerate the development of new cancer therapies will be summarized.

  19. Amish revisited: next-generation sequencing studies of psychiatric disorders among the Plain people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Liping; Faraci, Gloria; Chen, David T W; Kassem, Layla; Schulze, Thomas G; Shugart, Yin Yao; McMahon, Francis J

    2013-07-01

    The rapid development of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has led to renewed interest in the potential contribution of rarer forms of genetic variation to complex non-mendelian phenotypes such as psychiatric illnesses. Although challenging, family-based studies offer some advantages, especially in communities with large families and a limited number of founders. Here we revisit family-based studies of mental illnesses in traditional Amish and Mennonite communities--known collectively as the Plain people. We discuss the new opportunities for NGS in these populations, with particular emphasis on investigating psychiatric disorders. We also address some of the challenges facing NGS-based studies of complex phenotypes in founder populations. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Amish Revisited: Next Generation Sequencing Studies of Psychiatric Disorders Among the Plain People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Liping; Faraci, Gloria; Chen, David T.W.; Kassem, Layla; Schulze, Thomas G.; Shugart, Yin Yao; McMahon, Francis J.

    2014-01-01

    The rapid development of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has led to renewed interest in the potential contribution of rarer forms of genetic variation to complex, non-Mendelian phenotypes, such as psychiatric illnesses. Although challenging, family-based studies offer some advantages, especially in communities with large families and a limited number of founders. Here we revisit family-based studies of mental illnesses in traditional Amish and Mennonite communities -- known collectively as the Plain people. We discuss the new opportunities for NGS in these populations, with a particular emphasis on investigating psychiatric disorders. We also address some of the challenges facing NGS-based studies of complex phenotypes in founder populations. PMID:23422049

  1. Generating Relational Competitive Advantage from Strategic Technological Partnership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yimei; Zhang, Si; Li, Jizhen

    2012-01-01

    Collaborating with external partners on strategic technological partnerships (STPs) have been popular phenomena for long, which leads new development in existing theories on competitive advantage. Under the relational view, the competitive advantage is jointly generated by alliance firms. Though ...... appropriation. In order to avoid opportunism and learning races, the success of an STP requires an integration and interaction among three ways of governance: economic investments or hostage, legal contract and trustful social relationships.......Collaborating with external partners on strategic technological partnerships (STPs) have been popular phenomena for long, which leads new development in existing theories on competitive advantage. Under the relational view, the competitive advantage is jointly generated by alliance firms. Though...

  2. Probabilistic Inference on Multiple Normalized Signal Profiles from Next Generation Sequencing: Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2015-04-20

    With the prevalence of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with sequencing (ChIP-Seq) technology, massive ChIP-Seq data has been accumulated. The ChIP-Seq technology measures the genome-wide occupancy of DNA-binding proteins in vivo. It is well-known that different DNA-binding protein occupancies may result in a gene being regulated in different conditions (e.g. different cell types). To fully understand a gene\\'s function, it is essential to develop probabilistic models on multiple ChIP-Seq profiles for deciphering the gene transcription causalities. In this work, we propose and describe two probabilistic models. Assuming the conditional independence of different DNA-binding proteins\\' occupancies, the first method (SignalRanker) is developed as an intuitive method for ChIP-Seq genome-wide signal profile inference. Unfortunately, such an assumption may not always hold in some gene regulation cases. Thus, we propose and describe another method (FullSignalRanker) which does not make the conditional independence assumption. The proposed methods are compared with other existing methods on ENCODE ChIP-Seq datasets, demonstrating its regression and classification ability. The results suggest that FullSignalRanker is the best-performing method for recovering the signal ranks on the promoter and enhancer regions. In addition, FullSignalRanker is also the best-performing method for peak sequence classification. We envision that SignalRanker and FullSignalRanker will become important in the era of next generation sequencing. FullSignalRanker program is available on the following website: http://www.cs.toronto.edu/∼wkc/FullSignalRanker/ © 2015 IEEE.

  3. Harnessing Next-Generation Sequencing Capabilities for Microbial Forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-15

    a sophisticated analysis identified the source, many countries acted proactively to remove cucumbers and tomatoes from store shelves, Russia issued...Eisenstein, M. (2012). Oxford Nanopore announcement sets sequencing sector abuzz. Nature Biotechnology , 30(4), 295–6. doi:10.1038/nbt0412-295... Biotechnology , 29(7). Grad, Y. H., Lipsitch, M., Feldgarden, M., Arachchi, H. M., Cerqueira, G. C., Fitzgerald, M., .. . Hanage, W. P. (2012). Genomic

  4. Greener power generation technologies. Solutions for carbon capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimuth, Oliver; Kremer, Hermann; Vortmeyer, Nicolas [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Fossil-based power generation will continue to account for a dominant share of over 50 % in the future energy mix. In order to meet the requirements of climate protection, a combination of highly-efficient, flexible combined cycle power plants and the use of CCS in coal-based power generation will be necessary. In addition to funding of the first demonstration projects comprehensive statutory framework and public acceptance are necessary for launching CCS technology. (orig.)

  5. The long tail and rare disease research: the impact of next-generation sequencing for rare Mendelian disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tony; Lee, Ariel; Shen, Carol; Lin, C Jimmy

    2015-09-14

    There are an estimated 6000-8000 rare Mendelian diseases that collectively affect 30 million individuals in the United States. The low incidence and prevalence of these diseases present significant challenges to improving diagnostics and treatments. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have revolutionized research of rare diseases. This article will first comment on the effectiveness of NGS through the lens of long-tailed economics. We then provide an overview of recent developments and challenges of NGS-based research on rare diseases. As the quality of NGS studies improve and the cost of sequencing decreases, NGS will continue to make a significant impact on the study of rare diseases moving forward.

  6. Next generation digital microfluidic technology: Electrophoresis of charged droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Do Jin [Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Contact charging of a conducting droplet in a dielectric medium is introduced as a novel and useful digital microfluidic technology as well as an interesting scientific phenomenon. The history of this phenomenon, starting from original observations to its interpretations and applications, is presented. The basic principle of the droplet contact charging is also presented. Several fundamental aspects of the droplet contact charging from view points of electrochemistry, surface science, electrocoalescence, and electrohydrodynamics are mentioned. Some promising results for future applications and potential features as a next generation digital microfluidic technology are discussed, especially for 3D organ printing. Finally, implications and significance of the proposed technology for chemical engineering community are discussed.

  7. Optical coherent technologies in next generation access networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwatsuki, Katsumi; Tsukamoto, Katsutoshi

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews optical coherent technologies in next generation access networks with the use of radio over fiber (RoF), which offer key enabling technologies of wired and wireless integrated and/or converged broadband access networks to accommodate rapidly widespread cloud computing services. We describe technical issues on conventional RoF based on subcarrier modulation (SCM) and their countermeasures. Two examples of RoF access networks with optical coherent technologies to solve the technical issues are introduced; a video distribution system with FM conversion and wired and wireless integrated wide-area access network with photonic up- and down-conversion.

  8. QC-Chain: fast and holistic quality control method for next-generation sequencing data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhou

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies have been widely used in life sciences. However, several kinds of sequencing artifacts, including low-quality reads and contaminating reads, were found to be quite common in raw sequencing data, which compromise downstream analysis. Therefore, quality control (QC is essential for raw NGS data. However, although a few NGS data quality control tools are publicly available, there are two limitations: First, the processing speed could not cope with the rapid increase of large data volume. Second, with respect to removing the contaminating reads, none of them could identify contaminating sources de novo, and they rely heavily on prior information of the contaminating species, which is usually not available in advance. Here we report QC-Chain, a fast, accurate and holistic NGS data quality-control method. The tool synergeticly comprised of user-friendly tools for (1 quality assessment and trimming of raw reads using Parallel-QC, a fast read processing tool; (2 identification, quantification and filtration of unknown contamination to get high-quality clean reads. It was optimized based on parallel computation, so the processing speed is significantly higher than other QC methods. Experiments on simulated and real NGS data have shown that reads with low sequencing quality could be identified and filtered. Possible contaminating sources could be identified and quantified de novo, accurately and quickly. Comparison between raw reads and processed reads also showed that subsequent analyses (genome assembly, gene prediction, gene annotation, etc. results based on processed reads improved significantly in completeness and accuracy. As regard to processing speed, QC-Chain achieves 7-8 time speed-up based on parallel computation as compared to traditional methods. Therefore, QC-Chain is a fast and useful quality control tool for read quality process and de novo contamination filtration of NGS reads, which could

  9. Biomolecule Sequencer: Nanopore Sequencing Technology for In-Situ Environmental Monitoring and Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, K. K.; Botkin, D. J.; Burton, A. S.; Castro-Wallace, S. L.; Chaput, J. D.; Dworkin, J. P.; Lupisella, M. L.; Mason, C. E.; Rubins, K. H.; Smith, D. J.; Stahl, S.; Switzer, C.

    2016-10-01

    Biomolecule Sequencer will demonstrate, for the first time, that DNA sequencing is feasible as a tool for in-situ environmental monitoring and astrobiology. A space-based sequencer could identify microbes, diseases, and help detect DNA-based life.

  10. Challenges and opportunities for next-generation sequencing in companion diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Erick; Chien, Jeremy; Ong, Frank S; Fan, Jian-Bing

    2015-02-01

    The rapid decline in sequencing costs has allowed next-generation sequencing (NGS) assays, previously ubiquitous only in research laboratories, to begin making inroads into molecular diagnostics. Genotypic assays - DNA sequencing - include whole genome sequencing, whole exome sequencing, focused assays that target only a handful of genes. Phenotypic assays comprise a broader spectrum of options and can query a variety of epigenetic modifications of DNA (such as ChIP-seq, bisulfite sequencing, DNase-I hypersensitivity site-sequencing, Formaldehyde-Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements-sequencing, etc.) that regulate gene expression-related processes or gene expression (RNA-sequencing) itself. To date, the US FDA has only cleared 12 DNA-based companion diagnostic tests, all in cancer. Although challenges exist for NGS in companion diagnostics, the wide-ranging capabilities of NGS offer extraordinary opportunities for the development and implementation of NGS-based companion diagnostics to probe oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and cancer-enabling genes.

  11. Development of molecular markers tightly linked to Pvr4 gene in pepper using next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devran, Zübeyir; Kahveci, Erdem; Özkaynak, Ercan; Studholme, David J; Tör, Mahmut

    It is imperative to identify highly polymorphic and tightly linked markers of a known trait for molecular marker-assisted selection. Potyvirus resistance 4 (Pvr4) locus in pepper confers resistance to three pathotypes of potato virus Y and to pepper mottle virus. We describe the use of next-generation sequencing technology to generate molecular markers tightly linked to Pvr4. Initially, comparative genomics was carried out, and a syntenic region of tomato on chromosome ten was used to generate PCR-based markers and map Pvr4. Subsequently, the genomic sequence of pepper was used, and more than 5000 single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) were identified within the interval. In addition, we identified nucleotide binding site-leucine-rich repeat-type disease resistance genes within the interval. Several of these SNVs were converted to molecular markers desirable for large-scale molecular breeding programmes.

  12. The power of single molecule real-time sequencing technology in the de novo assembly of a eukaryotic genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Hiroaki; Naito, Ken; Ogiso-Tanaka, Eri; Takahashi, Yu; Iseki, Kohtaro; Muto, Chiaki; Satou, Kazuhito; Teruya, Kuniko; Shiroma, Akino; Shimoji, Makiko; Hirano, Takashi; Itoh, Takeshi; Kaga, Akito; Tomooka, Norihiko

    2015-11-30

    Second-generation sequencers (SGS) have been game-changing, achieving cost-effective whole genome sequencing in many non-model organisms. However, a large portion of the genomes still remains unassembled. We reconstructed azuki bean (Vigna angularis) genome using single molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing technology and achieved the best contiguity and coverage among currently assembled legume crops. The SMRT-based assembly produced 100 times longer contigs with 100 times smaller amount of gaps compared to the SGS-based assemblies. A detailed comparison between the assemblies revealed that the SMRT-based assembly enabled a more comprehensive gene annotation than the SGS-based assemblies where thousands of genes were missing or fragmented. A chromosome-scale assembly was generated based on the high-density genetic map, covering 86% of the azuki bean genome. We demonstrated that SMRT technology, though still needed support of SGS data, achieved a near-complete assembly of a eukaryotic genome.

  13. Making the Leap from Research Laboratory to Clinic: Challenges and Opportunities for Next-Generation Sequencing in Infectious Disease Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Brittany; Sichtig, Heike; Geyer, Chelsie; Ledeboer, Nathan; Weinstock, George M

    2015-12-08

    Next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) has progressed enormously over the past decade, transforming genomic analysis and opening up many new opportunities for applications in clinical microbiology laboratories. The impact of NGS on microbiology has been revolutionary, with new microbial genomic sequences being generated daily, leading to the development of large databases of genomes and gene sequences. The ability to analyze microbial communities without culturing organisms has created the ever-growing field of metagenomics and microbiome analysis and has generated significant new insights into the relation between host and microbe. The medical literature contains many examples of how this new technology can be used for infectious disease diagnostics and pathogen analysis. The implementation of NGS in medical practice has been a slow process due to various challenges such as clinical trials, lack of applicable regulatory guidelines, and the adaptation of the technology to the clinical environment. In April 2015, the American Academy of Microbiology (AAM) convened a colloquium to begin to define these issues, and in this document, we present some of the concepts that were generated from these discussions.

  14. Next-generation sequencing facilitates quantitative analysis of wild-type and Nrl(-/-) retinal transcriptomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Matthew J; Rajasimha, Harsha K; Roger, Jerome E; Swaroop, Anand

    2011-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized systems-based analysis of cellular pathways. The goals of this study are to compare NGS-derived retinal transcriptome profiling (RNA-seq) to microarray and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) methods and to evaluate protocols for optimal high-throughput data analysis. Retinal mRNA profiles of 21-day-old wild-type (WT) and neural retina leucine zipper knockout (Nrl(-/-)) mice were generated by deep sequencing, in triplicate, using Illumina GAIIx. The sequence reads that passed quality filters were analyzed at the transcript isoform level with two methods: Burrows-Wheeler Aligner (BWA) followed by ANOVA (ANOVA) and TopHat followed by Cufflinks. qRT-PCR validation was performed using TaqMan and SYBR Green assays. Using an optimized data analysis workflow, we mapped about 30 million sequence reads per sample to the mouse genome (build mm9) and identified 16,014 transcripts in the retinas of WT and Nrl(-/-) mice with BWA workflow and 34,115 transcripts with TopHat workflow. RNA-seq data confirmed stable expression of 25 known housekeeping genes, and 12 of these were validated with qRT-PCR. RNA-seq data had a linear relationship with qRT-PCR for more than four orders of magnitude and a goodness of fit (R(2)) of 0.8798. Approximately 10% of the transcripts showed differential expression between the WT and Nrl(-/-) retina, with a fold change ≥1.5 and p value <0.05. Altered expression of 25 genes was confirmed with qRT-PCR, demonstrating the high degree of sensitivity of the RNA-seq method. Hierarchical clustering of differentially expressed genes uncovered several as yet uncharacterized genes that may contribute to retinal function. Data analysis with BWA and TopHat workflows revealed a significant overlap yet provided complementary insights in transcriptome profiling. Our study represents the first detailed analysis of retinal transcriptomes, with biologic replicates, generated by RNA

  15. Current Advanced Power Generation Technologies and Options for China (2)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Nubo; Mohsen Assadi; Yang Cheng

    2008-01-01

    @@ In China,electricity consumption keeps growing at a high speed and installed capacity will be doubled in the next fifteen years.As the world second CO2 producer and also a member of Kyoto Protocol,how to balance energy needs arid environmental protection responsibility in the future is a serious problem for China.As such,there are a number of technology choices for today's electric power generation.After discussing the current advanced power generation technologies based on Chinese energy structure and current conditions of power industry,this paper gives a reference to the technology options for China in the future.Here published is the second part of the paper.

  16. Structural materials for the next generation of technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Van de Voorde, Marcel Hubert

    1996-01-01

    1. Overview of advanced technologies; i.e. aerospace-aeronautics; automobile; energy technology; accelerator engineering etc. and the need for new structural materials. 2. Familiarisation with polymers, metals and alloys, structural ceramics, composites and surface engineering. The study of modern materials processing, generation of a materials data base, engineering properties includind NDE, radiation damage etc. 3. Development of new materials for the next generation of technologies; including the spin-off of materials developed for space and military purposes to industrial applications. 4. Materials selection for modern accelerator engineering. 5. Materials research in Europe, USA and Japan. Material R & D programmes sponsored by the European Union and the collaboration of CERN in EU sponsored programmes.

  17. NASA Fixed Wing Project: Green Technologies for Future Aircraft Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelRosario, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Fixed Wing (FW) Project addresses the comprehensive challenge of enabling revolutionary energy efficiency improvements in subsonic transport aircraft combined with dramatic reductions in harmful emissions and perceived noise to facilitate sustained growth of the air transportation system. Advances in multidisciplinary technologies and the development of unconventional aircraft systems offer the potential to achieve these improvements. The presentation will highlight the FW Project vision of revolutionary systems and technologies needed to achieve the challenging goals of aviation. Specifically, the primary focus of the FW Project is on the N+3 generation that is, vehicles that are three generations beyond the current state of the art, requiring mature technology solutions in the 2025-30 timeframe.

  18. Next-generation sequencing for high-throughput molecular ecology: a step-by-step protocol for targeted multilocus genotyping by pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puritz, Jonathan B; Toonen, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technology can now provide population biologists and phylogeographers with information at the genomic scale; however, many pertinent questions in population genetics and phylogeography can be answered effectively with modest levels of genomic information. For the past two decades, most population-level studies have lacked nuclear DNA (nDNA) sequence data due to the complications and cost of amplifying and sequencing diploid loci. However, pyrosequencing of emulsion PCR reactions, amplifying from only one molecule at a time, can generate megabases of clonally amplified loci at high coverage, thereby greatly simplifying allelic sequence determination. Here, we present a step-by-step methodology for utilizing the 454 GS FLX Titanium pyrosequencing platform to simultaneously sequence 16 populations (at 20 individuals per population) at 10 different nDNA loci (3,200 loci in total) in one plate of sequencing for less than the cost of traditional Sanger sequencing.

  19. Large scale renewable power generation advances in technologies for generation, transmission and storage

    CERN Document Server

    Hossain, Jahangir

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on the issues of integrating large-scale renewable power generation into existing grids. The issues covered in this book include different types of renewable power generation along with their transmission and distribution, storage and protection. It also contains the development of medium voltage converters for step-up-transformer-less direct grid integration of renewable generation units, grid codes and resiliency analysis for large-scale renewable power generation, active power and frequency control and HVDC transmission. The emerging SMES technology for controlling and int

  20. Targeted 'Next-Generation' sequencing in anophthalmia and microphthalmia patients confirms SOX2, OTX2 and FOXE3 mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez Jimenez Nelson

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anophthalmia/microphthalmia (A/M is caused by mutations in several different transcription factors, but mutations in each causative gene are relatively rare, emphasizing the need for a testing approach that screens multiple genes simultaneously. We used next-generation sequencing to screen 15 A/M patients for mutations in 9 pathogenic genes to evaluate this technology for screening in A/M. Methods We used a pooled sequencing design, together with custom single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP calling software. We verified predicted sequence alterations using Sanger sequencing. Results We verified three mutations - c.542delC in SOX2, resulting in p.Pro181Argfs*22, p.Glu105X in OTX2 and p.Cys240X in FOXE3. We found several novel sequence alterations and SNPs that were likely to be non-pathogenic - p.Glu42Lys in CRYBA4, p.Val201Met in FOXE3 and p.Asp291Asn in VSX2. Our analysis methodology gave one false positive result comprising a mutation in PAX6 (c.1268A > T, predicting p.X423LeuextX*15 that was not verified by Sanger sequencing. We also failed to detect one 20 base pair (bp deletion and one 3 bp duplication in SOX2. Conclusions Our results demonstrated the power of next-generation sequencing with pooled sample groups for the rapid screening of candidate genes for A/M as we were correctly able to identify disease-causing mutations. However, next-generation sequencing was less useful for small, intragenic deletions and duplications. We did not find mutations in 10/15 patients and conclude that there is a need for further gene discovery in A/M.

  1. An efficient quantitation method of next-generation sequencing libraries by using MiSeq sequencer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuoka, Fumiki; Yokozawa, Junji; Tsuda, Kaoru; Ito, Shin; Pan, Xiaoqing; Nagasaki, Masao; Yasuda, Jun; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2014-12-01

    Library quantitation is a critical step to obtain high data output in Illumina HiSeq sequencers. Here, we introduce a library quantitation method that uses the Illumina MiSeq sequencer designated as quantitative MiSeq (qMiSeq). In this procedure, 96 dual-index libraries, including control samples, are denatured, pooled in equal volume, and sequenced by MiSeq. We found that relative concentration of each library can be determined based on the observed index ratio and can be used to determine HiSeq run condition for each library. Thus, qMiSeq provides an efficient way to quantitate a large number of libraries at a time.

  2. A Web-based High-Throughput Tool for Next-Generation Sequence Annotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    annotation of a newly sequenced complete genome, can help devise new strategies in diagnostics and forensics . Moreover, these annotations, coupled...References 1. Hall, N., “Advanced sequencing technologies and their wider impact in microbiology ”, The Journal of Experimental Biology, 210(9), pp. 1518–1525

  3. Next-generation genebanking: plant genetic resources management and utilization in the sequencing era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treuren, van R.; Hintum, van T.J.L.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in sequencing technologies have made it possible to analyse large amounts of germplasm against low production costs, which has opened the door to screen genebank collections more efficiently for DNA sequence variation. The present study explores how these developments may affect the

  4. Using Next-Generation Sequencing to Explore Genetics and Race in the High School Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinmiao; Hartman, Mark R.; Harrington, Kristin T.; Etson, Candice M.; Fierman, Matthew B.; Slonim, Donna K.; Walt, David R.

    2017-01-01

    With the development of new sequencing and bioinformatics technologies, concepts relating to personal genomics play an increasingly important role in our society. To promote interest and understanding of sequencing and bioinformatics in the high school classroom, we developed and implemented a laboratory-based teaching module called "The…

  5. Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tidball, Rick [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States); Bluestein, Joel [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States); Rodriguez, Nick [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States); Knoke, Stu [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States)

    2010-11-01

    The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

  6. Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tidball, R.; Bluestein, J.; Rodriguez, N.; Knoke, S.

    2010-11-01

    The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

  7. Next-generation sequencing of common osteogenesis imperfecta-related genes in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Árvai, Kristóf; Horváth, Péter; Balla, Bernadett; Tobiás, Bálint; Kató, Karina; Kirschner, Gyöngyi; Klujber, Valéria; Lakatos, Péter; Kósa, János P.

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) is a rapidly developing area in genetics. Utilizing this technology in the management of disorders with complex genetic background and not recurrent mutation hot spots can be extremely useful. In this study, we applied NGS, namely semiconductor sequencing to determine the most significant osteogenesis imperfecta-related genetic variants in the clinical practice. We selected genes coding collagen type I alpha-1 and-2 (COL1A1, COL1A2) which are responsible for more than 90% of all cases. CRTAP and LEPRE1/P3H1 genes involved in the background of the recessive forms with relatively high frequency (type VII and VIII) represent less than 10% of the disease. In our six patients (1–41 years), we identified 23 different variants. We found a total of 14 single nucleotide variants (SNV) in COL1A1 and COL1A2, 5 in CRTAP and 4 in LEPRE1. Two novel and two already well-established pathogenic SNVs have been identified. Among the newly recognized mutations, one results in an amino acid change and one of them is a stop codon. We have shown that a new full-scale cost-effective NGS method can be developed and utilized to supplement diagnostic process of osteogenesis imperfecta with molecular genetic data in clinical practice. PMID:27335225

  8. Next-generation sequencing of common osteogenesis imperfecta-related genes in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Árvai, Kristóf; Horváth, Péter; Balla, Bernadett; Tobiás, Bálint; Kató, Karina; Kirschner, Gyöngyi; Klujber, Valéria; Lakatos, Péter; Kósa, János P

    2016-06-23

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) is a rapidly developing area in genetics. Utilizing this technology in the management of disorders with complex genetic background and not recurrent mutation hot spots can be extremely useful. In this study, we applied NGS, namely semiconductor sequencing to determine the most significant osteogenesis imperfecta-related genetic variants in the clinical practice. We selected genes coding collagen type I alpha-1 and-2 (COL1A1, COL1A2) which are responsible for more than 90% of all cases. CRTAP and LEPRE1/P3H1 genes involved in the background of the recessive forms with relatively high frequency (type VII and VIII) represent less than 10% of the disease. In our six patients (1-41 years), we identified 23 different variants. We found a total of 14 single nucleotide variants (SNV) in COL1A1 and COL1A2, 5 in CRTAP and 4 in LEPRE1. Two novel and two already well-established pathogenic SNVs have been identified. Among the newly recognized mutations, one results in an amino acid change and one of them is a stop codon. We have shown that a new full-scale cost-effective NGS method can be developed and utilized to supplement diagnostic process of osteogenesis imperfecta with molecular genetic data in clinical practice.

  9. BRCA somatic and germline mutation detection in paraffin embedded ovarian cancers by next-generation sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafficini, Andrea; Simbolo, Michele; Parisi, Alice; Rusev, Borislav; Luchini, Claudio; Cataldo, Ivana; Piazzola, Elena; Sperandio, Nicola; Turri, Giona; Franchi, Massimo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Bovo, Chiara; Lawlor, Rita T.; Scarpa, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    BRCA mutated ovarian cancers respond better to platinum-based therapy and to the recently approved PARP-inhibitors. There is the need for efficient and timely methods to detect both somatic and germline mutations using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues and commercially available technology. We used a commercial kit exploring all exons and 50bp exon-intron junctions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, and semiconductor next-generation sequencing (NGS) on DNA from 47 FFPE samples of high-grade serous ovarian cancers. Pathogenic mutations were found in 13/47 (28%) cancers: eight in BRCA1 and five in BRCA2. All BRCA1 and two BRCA2 mutations were germline; three BRCA2 mutations were somatic. All mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. To evaluate the performance of the NGS panel, we assessed its capability to detect the 6,953 variants described for BRCA1 and BRCA2 in ClinVar and COSMIC databases using callability analysis. 6,059 (87.1%) variants were identified automatically by the software; 829 (12.0%) required visual verification. The remaining 65 (0.9%) variants were uncallable, and would require 15 Sanger reactions to be resolved. Thus, the sensitivity of the NGS-panel was 99.1%. In conclusion, NGS performed with a commercial kit is highly efficient for detection of germline and somatic mutations in BRCA genes using routine FFPE tissue. PMID:26745875

  10. Review of alignment and SNP calling algorithms for next-generation sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielczarek, M; Szyda, J

    2016-02-01

    Application of the massive parallel sequencing technology has become one of the most important issues in life sciences. Therefore, it was crucial to develop bioinformatics tools for next-generation sequencing (NGS) data processing. Currently, two of the most significant tasks include alignment to a reference genome and detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In many types of genomic analyses, great numbers of reads need to be mapped to the reference genome; therefore, selection of the aligner is an essential step in NGS pipelines. Two main algorithms-suffix tries and hash tables-have been introduced for this purpose. Suffix array-based aligners are memory-efficient and work faster than hash-based aligners, but they are less accurate. In contrast, hash table algorithms tend to be slower, but more sensitive. SNP and genotype callers may also be divided into two main different approaches: heuristic and probabilistic methods. A variety of software has been subsequently developed over the past several years. In this paper, we briefly review the current development of NGS data processing algorithms and present the available software.

  11. QuickNGS elevates Next-Generation Sequencing data analysis to a new level of automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagle, Prerana; Nikolić, Miloš; Frommolt, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) has emerged as a widely used tool in molecular biology. While time and cost for the sequencing itself are decreasing, the analysis of the massive amounts of data remains challenging. Since multiple algorithmic approaches for the basic data analysis have been developed, there is now an increasing need to efficiently use these tools to obtain results in reasonable time. We have developed QuickNGS, a new workflow system for laboratories with the need to analyze data from multiple NGS projects at a time. QuickNGS takes advantage of parallel computing resources, a comprehensive back-end database, and a careful selection of previously published algorithmic approaches to build fully automated data analysis workflows. We demonstrate the efficiency of our new software by a comprehensive analysis of 10 RNA-Seq samples which we can finish in only a few minutes of hands-on time. The approach we have taken is suitable to process even much larger numbers of samples and multiple projects at a time. Our approach considerably reduces the barriers that still limit the usability of the powerful NGS technology and finally decreases the time to be spent before proceeding to further downstream analysis and interpretation of the data.

  12. BRCA somatic and germline mutation detection in paraffin embedded ovarian cancers by next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafficini, Andrea; Simbolo, Michele; Parisi, Alice; Rusev, Borislav; Luchini, Claudio; Cataldo, Ivana; Piazzola, Elena; Sperandio, Nicola; Turri, Giona; Franchi, Massimo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Bovo, Chiara; Lawlor, Rita T; Scarpa, Aldo

    2016-01-12

    BRCA mutated ovarian cancers respond better to platinum-based therapy and to the recently approved PARP-inhibitors. There is the need for efficient and timely methods to detect both somatic and germline mutations using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues and commercially available technology. We used a commercial kit exploring all exons and 50bp exon-intron junctions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, and semiconductor next-generation sequencing (NGS) on DNA from 47 FFPE samples of high-grade serous ovarian cancers. Pathogenic mutations were found in 13/47 (28%) cancers: eight in BRCA1 and five in BRCA2. All BRCA1 and two BRCA2 mutations were germline; three BRCA2 mutations were somatic. All mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. To evaluate the performance of the NGS panel, we assessed its capability to detect the 6,953 variants described for BRCA1 and BRCA2 in ClinVar and COSMIC databases using callability analysis. 6,059 (87.1%) variants were identified automatically by the software; 829 (12.0%) required visual verification. The remaining 65 (0.9%) variants were uncallable, and would require 15 Sanger reactions to be resolved. Thus, the sensitivity of the NGS-panel was 99.1%. In conclusion, NGS performed with a commercial kit is highly efficient for detection of germline and somatic mutations in BRCA genes using routine FFPE tissue.

  13. Generation of mast cells from mouse fetus: analysis of differentiation and functionality, and transcriptome profiling using next generation sequencer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Fukuishi

    Full Text Available While gene knockout technology can reveal the roles of proteins in cellular functions, including in mast cells, fetal death due to gene manipulation frequently interrupts experimental analysis. We generated mast cells from mouse fetal liver (FLMC, and compared the fundamental functions of FLMC with those of bone marrow-derived mouse mast cells (BMMC. Under electron microscopy, numerous small and electron-dense granules were observed in FLMC. In FLMC, the expression levels of a subunit of the FcεRI receptor and degranulation by IgE cross-linking were comparable with BMMC. By flow cytometry we observed surface expression of c-Kit prior to that of FcεRI on FLMC, although on BMMC the expression of c-Kit came after FcεRI. The surface expression levels of Sca-1 and c-Kit, a marker of putative mast cell precursors, were slightly different between bone marrow cells and fetal liver cells, suggesting that differentiation stage or cell type are not necessarily equivalent between both lineages. Moreover, this indicates that phenotypically similar mast cells may not have undergone an identical process of differentiation. By comprehensive analysis using the next generation sequencer, the same frequency of gene expression was observed for 98.6% of all transcripts in both cell types. These results indicate that FLMC could represent a new and useful tool for exploring mast cell differentiation, and may help to elucidate the roles of individual proteins in the function of mast cells where gene manipulation can induce embryonic lethality in the mid to late stages of pregnancy.

  14. Analysis of Pre-Analytic Factors Affecting the Success of Clinical Next-Generation Sequencing of Solid Organ Malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hui [Department of Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Luthra, Rajyalakshmi, E-mail: rluthra@mdanderson.org; Goswami, Rashmi S.; Singh, Rajesh R. [Department of Hematopathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita [Department of Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology to routine clinical practice has enabled characterization of personalized cancer genomes to identify patients likely to have a response to targeted therapy. The proper selection of tumor sample for downstream NGS based mutational analysis is critical to generate accurate results and to guide therapeutic intervention. However, multiple pre-analytic factors come into play in determining the success of NGS testing. In this review, we discuss pre-analytic requirements for AmpliSeq PCR-based sequencing using Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM) (Life Technologies), a NGS sequencing platform that is often used by clinical laboratories for sequencing solid tumors because of its low input DNA requirement from formalin fixed and paraffin embedded tissue. The success of NGS mutational analysis is affected not only by the input DNA quantity but also by several other factors, including the specimen type, the DNA quality, and the tumor cellularity. Here, we review tissue requirements for solid tumor NGS based mutational analysis, including procedure types, tissue types, tumor volume and fraction, decalcification, and treatment effects.

  15. Analysis of Pre-Analytic Factors Affecting the Success of Clinical Next-Generation Sequencing of Solid Organ Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Chen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Application of next-generation sequencing (NGS technology to routine clinical practice has enabled characterization of personalized cancer genomes to identify patients likely to have a response to targeted therapy. The proper selection of tumor sample for downstream NGS based mutational analysis is critical to generate accurate results and to guide therapeutic intervention. However, multiple pre-analytic factors come into play in determining the success of NGS testing. In this review, we discuss pre-analytic requirements for AmpliSeq PCR-based sequencing using Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM (Life Technologies, a NGS sequencing platform that is often used by clinical laboratories for sequencing solid tumors because of its low input DNA requirement from formalin fixed and paraffin embedded tissue. The success of NGS mutational analysis is affected not only by the input DNA quantity but also by several other factors, including the specimen type, the DNA quality, and the tumor cellularity. Here, we review tissue requirements for solid tumor NGS based mutational analysis, including procedure types, tissue types, tumor volume and fraction, decalcification, and treatment effects.

  16. The Role of Next-Generation Sequencing in the Diagnosis of Lysosomal Storage Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Komlosi MD, PhD

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS panels are used widely in clinical diagnostics to identify genetic causes of various monogenic disease groups including neurometabolic disorders and, more recently, lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs. Many new challenges have been introduced through these new technologies, both at the laboratory level and at the bioinformatics level, with consequences including new requirements for interpretation of results, and for genetic counseling. We review some recent examples of the application of NGS technologies, with purely diagnostic and with both diagnostic and research aims, for establishing a rapid genetic diagnosis in LSDs. Given that NGS can be applied in a way that takes into account the many issues raised by international consensus guidelines, it can have a significant role even early in the course of the diagnostic process, in combination with biochemical and clinical data. Besides decreasing the delay in diagnosis for many patients, a precise molecular diagnosis is extremely important as new therapies are becoming available within the LSD spectrum for patients who share specific types of mutations. A genetic diagnosis is also the prerequisite for genetic counseling, family planning, and the individual choice of reproductive options in affected families.

  17. The Role of Next-Generation Sequencing in the Diagnosis of Lysosomal Storage Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Komlosi MD, PhD

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS panels are used widely in clinical diagnostics to identify genetic causes of various monogenic disease groups including neurometabolic disorders and, more recently, lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs. Many new challenges have been introduced through these new technologies, both at the laboratory level and at the bioinformatics level, with consequences including new requirements for interpretation of results, and for genetic counseling. We review some recent examples of the application of NGS technologies, with purely diagnostic and with both diagnostic and research aims, for establishing a rapid genetic diagnosis in LSDs. Given that NGS can be applied in a way that takes into account the many issues raised by international consensus guidelines, it can have a significant role even early in the course of the diagnostic process, in combination with biochemical and clinical data. Besides decreasing the delay in diagnosis for many patients, a precise molecular diagnosis is extremely important as new therapies are becoming available within the LSD spectrum for patients who share specific types of mutations. A genetic diagnosis is also the prerequisite for genetic counseling, family planning, and the individual choice of reproductive options in affected families.

  18. Research of laser cleaning technology for steam generator tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Suixa; Luo, Jijun; Xu, Jun; Yuan, Bo

    2010-10-01

    Surface cleaning based on the laser-induced breakdown of gas and subsequent shock wave generation can remove small particles from solid surfaces. Accordingly, several studies in steam generator tubes of nuclear power plants were performed to expand the cleaning capability of the process. In this work, experimental apparatus of laser cleaning was designed in order to clean heat tubes in steam generator. The laser cleaning process is monitored by analyzing acoustic emission signal experimentally. Experiments demonstrate that laser cleaning can remove smaller particles from the surface of steam generator tubes better than other cleaning process. It has advantages in saving on much manpower and material resource, and it is a good cleaning method for heat tubes, which can be real-time monitoring in laser cleaning process of heat tubes by AE signal. As a green cleaning process, laser cleaning technology in equipment maintenance will be a good prospect.

  19. Non-invasive detection of somatic mutations using next-generation sequencing in primary central nervous system lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanilles, Maxime; Marguet, Florent; Bohers, Élodie; Viailly, Pierre-Julien; Dubois, Sydney; Bertrand, Philippe; Camus, Vincent; Mareschal, Sylvain; Ruminy, Philippe; Maingonnat, Catherine; Lepretre, Stéphane; Veresezan, Elena-Liana; Derrey, Stéphane; Tilly, Hervé; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Laquerrière, Annie; Jardin, Fabrice

    2017-07-18

    Primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSL) have recurrent genomic alterations. The main objective of our study was to demonstrate that targeted sequencing of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) released by PCNSL at the time of diagnosis could identify somatic mutations by next-generation sequencing (NGS). PlasmacfDNA and matched tumor DNA (tDNA) from 25 PCNSL patients were sequenced using an Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (Life Technologies®). First, patient-specific targeted sequencing of identified somatic mutations in tDNA was performed. Then, a second sequencing targeting MYD88 c.T778C was performed and compared to plasma samples from 25 age-matched control patients suffering from other types of cancer. According to the patient-specific targeted sequencing, eight patients (32% [95% CI 15-54%]) had detectable somatic mutations in cfDNA. Considering MYD88 sequencing, six patients had the specific c.T778C alteration detected in plasma. Using a control group, the sensitivity was 24% [9-45%] and the specificity was 100%. Tumor volume or deep brain structure involvement did not influence the detection of somatic mutations in plasma. This pilot study provided evidence that somatic mutations can be detected by NGS in the cfDNA of a subset of patients suffering from PCNSL.

  20. Next-generation phylogeography: a targeted approach for multilocus sequencing of non-model organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan B Puritz

    Full Text Available The field of phylogeography has long since realized the need and utility of incorporating nuclear DNA (nDNA sequences into analyses. However, the use of nDNA sequence data, at the population level, has been hindered by technical laboratory difficulty, sequencing costs, and problematic analytical methods dealing with genotypic sequence data, especially in non-model organisms. Here, we present a method utilizing the 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing platform with the capacity to simultaneously sequence two species of sea star (Meridiastra calcar and Parvulastra exigua at five different nDNA loci across 16 different populations of 20 individuals each per species. We compare results from 3 populations with traditional Sanger sequencing based methods, and demonstrate that this next-generation sequencing platform is more time and cost effective and more sensitive to rare variants than Sanger based sequencing. A crucial advantage is that the high coverage of clonally amplified sequences simplifies haplotype determination, even in highly polymorphic species. This targeted next-generation approach can greatly increase the use of nDNA sequence loci in phylogeographic and population genetic studies by mitigating many of the time, cost, and analytical issues associated with highly polymorphic, diploid sequence markers.

  1. Next-Generation Phylogeography: A Targeted Approach for Multilocus Sequencing of Non-Model Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puritz, Jonathan B.; Addison, Jason A.; Toonen, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    The field of phylogeography has long since realized the need and utility of incorporating nuclear DNA (nDNA) sequences into analyses. However, the use of nDNA sequence data, at the population level, has been hindered by technical laboratory difficulty, sequencing costs, and problematic analytical methods dealing with genotypic sequence data, especially in non-model organisms. Here, we present a method utilizing the 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing platform with the capacity to simultaneously sequence two species of sea star (Meridiastra calcar and Parvulastra exigua) at five different nDNA loci across 16 different populations of 20 individuals each per species. We compare results from 3 populations with traditional Sanger sequencing based methods, and demonstrate that this next-generation sequencing platform is more time and cost effective and more sensitive to rare variants than Sanger based sequencing. A crucial advantage is that the high coverage of clonally amplified sequences simplifies haplotype determination, even in highly polymorphic species. This targeted next-generation approach can greatly increase the use of nDNA sequence loci in phylogeographic and population genetic studies by mitigating many of the time, cost, and analytical issues associated with highly polymorphic, diploid sequence markers. PMID:22470543

  2. Steam generator asset management: integrating technology and asset management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoemaker, P.; Cislo, D. [AREVA NP Inc., Lynchburg, Virginia (United States)]. E-mail: paul.shoemaker@areva.com

    2006-07-01

    Asset Management is an established but often misunderstood discipline that is gaining momentum within the nuclear generation industry. The global impetus behind the movement toward asset management is sustainability. The discipline of asset management is based upon three fundamental aspects; key performance indicators (KPI), activity-based cost accounting, and cost benefits/risk analysis. The technology associated with these three aspects is fairly well-developed, in all but the most critical area; cost benefits/risk analysis. There are software programs that calculate, trend, and display key-performance indicators to ensure high-level visibility. Activity-based costing is a little more difficult; requiring a consensus on the definition of what comprises an activity and then adjusting cost accounting systems to track. In the United States, the Nuclear Energy Institute's Standard Nuclear Process Model (SNPM) serves as the basis for activity-based costing. As a result, the software industry has quickly adapted to develop tracking systems that include the SNPM structure. Both the KPI's and the activity-based cost accounting feed the cost benefits/risk analysis to allow for continuous improvement and task optimization; the goal of asset management. In the case where the benefits and risks are clearly understood and defined, there has been much progress in applying technology for continuous improvement. Within the nuclear generation industry, more specialized and unique software systems have been developed for active components, such as pumps and motors. Active components lend themselves well to the application of asset management techniques because failure rates can be established, which serves as the basis to quantify risk in the cost-benefits/risk analysis. A key issue with respect to asset management technologies is only now being understood and addressed, that is how to manage passive components. Passive components, such as nuclear steam generators

  3. Forensic Loci Allele Database (FLAD): Automatically generated, permanent identifiers for sequenced forensic alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Neste, Christophe; Van Criekinge, Wim; Deforce, Dieter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to predict if and when massively parallel sequencing of forensic STR loci will replace capillary electrophoresis as the new standard technology in forensic genetics. The main benefits of sequencing are increased multiplexing scales and SNP detection. There is not yet a consensus on how sequenced profiles should be reported. We present the Forensic Loci Allele Database (FLAD) service, made freely available on http://forensic.ugent.be/FLAD/. It offers permanent identifiers for sequenced forensic alleles (STR or SNP) and their microvariants for use in forensic allele nomenclature. Analogous to Genbank, its aim is to provide permanent identifiers for forensically relevant allele sequences. Researchers that are developing forensic sequencing kits or are performing population studies, can register on http://forensic.ugent.be/FLAD/ and add loci and allele sequences with a short and simple application interface (API).

  4. Influence of sequence mismatches on the specificity of recombinase polymerase amplification technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, Rana K; Stewart, Gale; Boissinot, Maurice; Boudreau, Dominique K; Bergeron, Michel G

    2015-04-01

    Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) technology relies on three major proteins, recombinase proteins, single-strand binding proteins, and polymerases, to specifically amplify nucleic acid sequences in an isothermal format. The performance of RPA with respect to sequence mismatches of closely-related non-target molecules is not well documented and the influence of the number and distribution of mismatches in DNA sequences on RPA amplification reaction is not well understood. We investigated the specificity of RPA by testing closely-related species bearing naturally occurring mismatches for the tuf gene sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and/or Mycobacterium tuberculosis and for the cfb gene sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae. In addition, the impact of the number and distribution of mismatches on RPA efficiency was assessed by synthetically generating 14 types of mismatched forward primers for detecting five bacterial species of high diagnostic relevance such as Clostridium difficile, Staphylococcus aureus, S. agalactiae, P. aeruginosa, and M. tuberculosis as well as Bacillus atropheus subsp. globigii for which we use the spores as internal control in diagnostic assays. A total of 87 mismatched primers were tested in this study. We observed that target specific RPA primers with mismatches (n > 1) at their 3'extrimity hampered RPA reaction. In addition, 3 mismatches covering both extremities and the center of the primer sequence negatively affected RPA yield. We demonstrated that the specificity of RPA was multifactorial. Therefore its application in clinical settings must be selected and validated a priori. We recommend that the selection of a target gene must consider the presence of closely-related non-target genes. It is advisable to choose target regions with a high number of mismatches (≥36%, relative to the size of amplicon) with respect to closely-related species and the best case scenario would be by choosing a unique target gene.

  5. Highly sensitive, non-invasive detection of colorectal cancer mutations using single molecule, third generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Giancarlo; Patrignani, Andrea; Poveda, Lucy; Hoehn, Frederic; Scholtka, Bettina; Schlapbach, Ralph; Garvin, Alex M

    2015-12-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) represents one of the most prevalent and lethal malignant neoplasms and every individual of age 50 and above should undergo regular CRC screening. Currently, the most effective preventive screening procedure to detect adenomatous polyps, the precursors to CRC, is colonoscopy. Since every colorectal cancer starts as a polyp, detecting all polyps and removing them is crucial. By exactly doing that, colonoscopy reduces CRC incidence by 80%, however it is an invasive procedure that might have unpleasant and, in rare occasions, dangerous side effects. Despite numerous efforts over the past two decades, a non-invasive screening method for the general population with detection rates for adenomas and CRC similar to that of colonoscopy has not yet been established. Recent advances in next generation sequencing technologies have yet to be successfully applied to this problem, because the detection of rare mutations has been hindered by the systematic biases due to sequencing context and the base calling quality of NGS. We present the first study that applies the high read accuracy and depth of single molecule, real time, circular consensus sequencing (SMRT-CCS) to the detection of mutations in stool DNA in order to provide a non-invasive, sensitive and accurate test for CRC. In stool DNA isolated from patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma, we are able to detect mutations at frequencies below 0.5% with no false positives. This approach establishes a foundation for a non-invasive, highly sensitive assay to screen the population for CRC and the early stage adenomas that lead to CRC.

  6. A pilot study using next-generation sequencing in advanced cancers: feasibility and challenges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen J Weiss

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: New anticancer agents that target a single cell surface receptor, up-regulated or amplified gene product, or mutated gene, have met with some success in treating advanced cancers. However, patients' tumors still eventually progress on these therapies. If it were possible to identify a larger number of targetable vulnerabilities in an individual's tumor, multiple targets could be exploited with the use of specific therapeutic agents, thus possibly giving the patient viable therapeutic alternatives. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: In this exploratory study, we used next-generation sequencing technologies (NGS including whole genome sequencing (WGS, and where feasible, whole transcriptome sequencing (WTS to identify genomic events and associated expression changes in advanced cancer patients. RESULTS: WGS on paired tumor and normal samples from nine advanced cancer patients and WTS on six of these patients' tumors was completed. One patient's treatment was based on targets and pathways identified by NGS and the patient had a short-lived PET/CT response with a significant reduction in his tumor-related pain. To design treatment plans based on information garnered from NGS, several challenges were encountered: NGS reporting delays, communication of results to out-of-state participants and their treating oncologists, and chain of custody handling for fresh biopsy samples for Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA target validation. CONCLUSION: While the initial effort was a slower process than anticipated due to a variety of issues, we demonstrate the feasibility of using NGS in advanced cancer patients so that treatments for patients with progressing tumors may be improved.

  7. Low diversity in the mitogenome of sperm whales revealed by next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Alana; Steel, Debbie; Slikas, Beth; Hoekzema, Kendra; Carraher, Colm; Parks, Matthew; Cronn, Richard; Baker, C Scott

    2013-01-01

    Large population sizes and global distributions generally associate with high mitochondrial DNA control region (CR) diversity. The sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) is an exception, showing low CR diversity relative to other cetaceans; however, diversity levels throughout the remainder of the sperm whale mitogenome are unknown. We sequenced 20 mitogenomes from 17 sperm whales representative of worldwide diversity using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies (Illumina GAIIx, Roche 454 GS Junior). Resequencing of three individuals with both NGS platforms and partial Sanger sequencing showed low discrepancy rates (454-Illumina: 0.0071%; Sanger-Illumina: 0.0034%; and Sanger-454: 0.0023%) confirming suitability of both NGS platforms for investigating low mitogenomic diversity. Using the 17 sperm whale mitogenomes in a phylogenetic reconstruction with 41 other species, including 11 new dolphin mitogenomes, we tested two hypotheses for the low CR diversity. First, the hypothesis that CR-specific constraints have reduced diversity solely in the CR was rejected as diversity was low throughout the mitogenome, not just in the CR (overall diversity π = 0.096%; protein-coding 3rd codon = 0.22%; CR = 0.35%), and CR phylogenetic signal was congruent with protein-coding regions. Second, the hypothesis that slow substitution rates reduced diversity throughout the sperm whale mitogenome was rejected as sperm whales had significantly higher rates of CR evolution and no evidence of slow coding region evolution relative to other cetaceans. The estimated time to most recent common ancestor for sperm whale mitogenomes was 72,800 to 137,400 years ago (95% highest probability density interval), consistent with previous hypotheses of a bottleneck or selective sweep as likely causes of low mitogenome diversity.

  8. Structural variation discovery in the cancer genome using next generation sequencing: Computational solutions and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Biao; Conroy, Jeffrey M.; Morrison, Carl D.; Odunsi, Adekunle O.; Qin, Maochun; Wei, Lei; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.; Liu, Song; Wang, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Somatic Structural Variations (SVs) are a complex collection of chromosomal mutations that could directly contribute to carcinogenesis. Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology has emerged as the primary means of interrogating the SVs of the cancer genome in recent investigations. Sophisticated computational methods are required to accurately identify the SV events and delineate their breakpoints from the massive amounts of reads generated by a NGS experiment. In this review, we provide an overview of current analytic tools used for SV detection in NGS-based cancer studies. We summarize the features of common SV groups and the primary types of NGS signatures that can be used in SV detection methods. We discuss the principles and key similarities and differences of existing computational programs and comment on unresolved issues related to this research field. The aim of this article is to provide a practical guide of relevant concepts, computational methods, software tools and important factors for analyzing and interpreting NGS data for the detection of SVs in the cancer genome. PMID:25849937

  9. Next generation sequencing on patients with LGMD and nonspecific myopathies: findings associated with ANO5 mutations

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    We studied 786 undiagnosed patients with LGMD or nonspecific myopathic features to investigate the role of ANO5 mutations in limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) and in nonspecific myopathies using the next generation sequencing (NGS) approach. In 160 LGMD patients, we first sequenced hotspot exons 5 and 20 and then sequenced the remaining part of the coding region. Another 626 patients, recruited using broader inclusion criteria, were directly analyzed by targeted NGS. By combining NGS a...

  10. Now and next-generation sequencing techniques: future of sequence analysis using cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Radhe Shyam; Bandopadhyay, Rajib; Chaudhary, Bratati; Chatterjee, Sourav

    2012-01-01

    Advances in the field of sequencing techniques have resulted in the greatly accelerated production of huge sequence datasets. This presents immediate challenges in database maintenance at datacenters. It provides additional computational challenges in data mining and sequence analysis. Together these represent a significant overburden on traditional stand-alone computer resources, and to reach effective conclusions quickly and efficiently, the virtualization of the resources and computation on a pay-as-you-go concept (together termed "cloud computing") has recently appeared. The collective resources of the datacenter, including both hardware and software, can be available publicly, being then termed a public cloud, the resources being provided in a virtual mode to the clients who pay according to the resources they employ. Examples of public companies providing these resources include Amazon, Google, and Joyent. The computational workload is shifted to the provider, which also implements required hardware and software upgrades over time. A virtual environment is created in the cloud corresponding to the computational and data storage needs of the user via the internet. The task is then performed, the results transmitted to the user, and the environment finally deleted after all tasks are completed. In this discussion, we focus on the basics of cloud computing, and go on to analyze the prerequisites and overall working of clouds. Finally, the applications of cloud computing in biological systems, particularly in comparative genomics, genome informatics, and SNP detection are discussed with reference to traditional workflows.

  11. Now And Next Generation Sequencing Techniques: Future of Sequence Analysis using Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhe Shyam Thakur

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Advancements in the field of sequencing techniques resulted in the huge sequenced data to be produced at a very faster rate. It is going cumbersome for the datacenter to maintain the databases. Data mining and sequence analysis approaches needs to analyze the databases several times to reach any efficient conclusion. To cope with such overburden on computer resources and to reach efficient and effective conclusions quickly, the virtualization of the resources and computation on pay as you go concept was introduced and termed as cloud computing. The datacenter’s hardware and software is collectively known as cloud which when available publicly is termed as public cloud. The datacenter’s resources are provided in a virtual mode to the clients via a service provider like Amazon, Google and Joyent which charges on pay as you go manner. The workload is shifted to the provider which is maintained by the required hardware and software upgradation. The service provider manages it by upgrading the requirements in the virtual mode. Basically a virtual environment is created according to the need of the user by taking permission from datacenter via internet, the task is performed and the environment is deleted after the task is over. In this discussion, we are focusing on the basics of cloud computing, the prerequisites and overall working of clouds. Furthermore, briefly the applications of cloud computing in biological systems, especially in comparative genomics, genome informatics and SNP detection with reference to traditional workflow are discussed.

  12. ISO 17025 validation of a next-generation sequencing assay for relationship testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchard, Anders; Kampmann, Marie-Louise; Poulsen, Lena

    2016-01-01

    The HID-Ion AmpliSeq™ Identity Panel is a next-generation sequencing assay with 90 autosomal and 34 Y-chromosome SNPs that are amplified in one PCR step and subsequently sequenced using the Ion Personal Genome Machine (Ion PGM™) System. This assay was validated for relationship testing in our ISO...

  13. Comparison of techniques for quantification of next-generation sequencing libraries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussing, Christian; Kampmann, Marie-Louise; Mogensen, Helle Smidt;

    2015-01-01

    To ensure efficient sequencing, the DNA of next-generation sequencing (NGS) libraries must be quantified correctly. Therefore, an accurate, sensitive and stable method for DNA quantification is crucial. In this study, seven different methods for DNA quantification were compared to each other by q...

  14. From FASTQ to Function: In Silico Methods for Processing Next-Generation Sequencing Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Mark D; Stabler, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents a method to process C. difficile whole-genome next-generation sequencing data straight from the sequencer. Quality control processing and de novo assembly of these data enable downstream analyses such as gene annotation and in silico multi-locus strain-type identification.

  15. Molecular diagnostics of aleutian mink disease virus: applied use of next generation sequencing and phylogenetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagberg, Emma Elisabeth

    such as next generation sequencing cheaper and more easily available. Whole genome sequencing and advanced phylogenetic analyses have successfully been applied to describe the molecular evolution and transmission patterns for viruses such as Foot and Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV), Ebola, and avian influenza virus...

  16. Stochastic modeling and generation of synthetic sequences of hourly global solar irradiation at Quetta, Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamal, Lalarukh [Balochistan Univ., Dept. of Mathematics, Quetta (Pakistan); Jafri, Yasmin Zahra [Balochistan Univ., Dept. of Statistics, Quetta (Pakistan)

    1999-07-01

    Using hourly global radiation data at Quetta, Pakistan for 10 yr, an Autoregressive Moving Average (ARMA) process is fitted. Markov Transition Matrices have also been developed. These models are used for generating synthetic sequences for hourly radiations in MJ/m{sup 2} and that the generated sequences are compared with the observed data. We found the MTM approach relatively better as a simulator compared to ARMA modeling. (Author)

  17. Large-scale Gene Ontology analysis of plant transcriptome-derived sequences retrieved by AFLP technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramina Angelo

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After 10-year-use of AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism technology for DNA fingerprinting and mRNA profiling, large repertories of genome- and transcriptome-derived sequences are available in public databases for model, crop and tree species. AFLP marker systems have been and are being extensively exploited for genome scanning and gene mapping, as well as cDNA-AFLP for transcriptome profiling and differentially expressed gene cloning. The evaluation, annotation and classification of genomic markers and expressed transcripts would be of great utility for both functional genomics and systems biology research in plants. This may be achieved by means of the Gene Ontology (GO, consisting in three structured vocabularies (i.e. ontologies describing genes, transcripts and proteins of any organism in terms of their associated cellular component, biological process and molecular function in a species-independent manner. In this paper, the functional annotation of about 8,000 AFLP-derived ESTs retrieved in the NCBI databases was carried out by using GO terminology. Results Descriptive statistics on the type, size and nature of gene sequences obtained by means of AFLP technology were calculated. The gene products associated with mRNA transcripts were then classified according to the three main GO vocabularies. A comparison of the functional content of cDNA-AFLP records was also performed by splitting the sequence dataset into monocots and dicots and by comparing them to all annotated ESTs of Arabidopsis and rice, respectively. On the whole, the statistical parameters adopted for the in silico AFLP-derived transcriptome-anchored sequence analysis proved to be critical for obtaining reliable GO results. Such an exhaustive annotation may offer a suitable platform for functional genomics, particularly useful in non-model species. Conclusion Reliable GO annotations of AFLP-derived sequences can be gathered through the optimization

  18. Smart Home Technologies: Insights into Generation-Specific Acceptance Motives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaul, Sylvia; Ziefle, Martina

    In this research we examine the generation specific acceptance motives of eHealth technologies in order to assess the likelihood of success for these new technologies. 280 participants (14 - 92 years of age) volunteered to participate in a survey, in which using motives and barriers toward smart home technologies were explored. The scenario envisaged was the use of a medical stent implemented into the body, which monitors automatically the health status and which is able to remotely communicate with the doctor. Participants were asked to evaluate the pros and cons of the usage of this technology, their acceptance motives and potential utilization barriers. In order to understand the complex nature of acceptance, personal variables (age, technical expertise, health status), individual's cognitive concepts toward ageing as well as perceived usefulness were related. Outcomes show that trust, believe in the reliability of technology, privacy and security as well as intimacy facets are essential for acceptance and should be considered in order to proactively design a successful rollout of smart home technologies.

  19. Key factors affecting the deployment of electricity generation technologies in energy technology scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruoss, F.; Turton, H.; Hirschberg, S.

    2009-12-15

    This report presents the findings of a survey of key factors affecting the deployment of electricity generation technologies in selected energy scenarios. The assumptions and results of scenarios, and the different models used in their construction, are compared. Particular attention is given to technology assumptions, such as investment cost or capacity factors, and their impact on technology deployment. We conclude that the deployment of available technologies, i.e. their market shares, can only be explained from a holistic perspective, and that there are strong interactions between driving forces and competing technology options within a certain scenario. Already the design of a scenario analysis has important impacts on the deployment of technologies: the choice of the set of available technologies, the modeling approach and the definition of the storylines determine the outcome. Furthermore, the quantification of these storylines into input parameters and cost assumptions drives technology deployment, even though differences across the scenarios in cost assumptions are not observed to account for many of the observed differences in electricity technology deployment. The deployment can only be understood after a consideration of the interplay of technology options and the scale of technology deployment, which is determined by economic growth, end-use efficiency, and electrification. Some input parameters are of particular importance for certain technologies: CO{sub 2} prices, fuel prices and the availability of carbon capture and storage appear to be crucial for the deployment of fossil-fueled power plants; maximum construction rates and safety concerns determine the market share of nuclear power; the availability of suitable sites represents the most important factor for electricity generation from hydro and wind power plants; and technology breakthroughs are needed for solar photovoltaics to become cost-competitive. Finally, this analysis concludes with a

  20. New development and validation of 50 SSR markers in breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis, Moraceae) by next-generation sequencing1

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bellis, Fabien; Malapa, Roger; Kagy, Valérie; Lebegin, Stéphane; Billot, Claire; Labouisse, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Using next-generation sequencing technology, new microsatellite loci were characterized in Artocarpus altilis (Moraceae) and two congeners to increase the number of available markers for genotyping breadfruit cultivars. Methods and Results: A total of 47,607 simple sequence repeat loci were obtained by sequencing a library of breadfruit genomic DNA with an Illumina MiSeq system. Among them, 50 single-locus markers were selected and assessed using 41 samples (39 A. altilis, one A. camansi, and one A. heterophyllus). All loci were polymorphic in A. altilis, 44 in A. camansi, and 21 in A. heterophyllus. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 19. Conclusions: The new markers will be useful for assessing the identity and genetic diversity of breadfruit cultivars on a small geographical scale, gaining a better understanding of farmer management practices, and will help to optimize breadfruit genebank management. PMID:27610273

  1. New development and validation of 50 SSR markers in breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis, Moraceae) by next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bellis, Fabien; Malapa, Roger; Kagy, Valérie; Lebegin, Stéphane; Billot, Claire; Labouisse, Jean-Pierre

    2016-08-01

    Using next-generation sequencing technology, new microsatellite loci were characterized in Artocarpus altilis (Moraceae) and two congeners to increase the number of available markers for genotyping breadfruit cultivars. A total of 47,607 simple sequence repeat loci were obtained by sequencing a library of breadfruit genomic DNA with an Illumina MiSeq system. Among them, 50 single-locus markers were selected and assessed using 41 samples (39 A. altilis, one A. camansi, and one A. heterophyllus). All loci were polymorphic in A. altilis, 44 in A. camansi, and 21 in A. heterophyllus. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 19. The new markers will be useful for assessing the identity and genetic diversity of breadfruit cultivars on a small geographical scale, gaining a better understanding of farmer management practices, and will help to optimize breadfruit genebank management.

  2. Climate regulation enhances the value of second generation biofuel technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertel, T. W.; Steinbuks, J.; Tyner, W.

    2014-12-01

    Commercial scale implementation of second generation (2G) biofuels has long been 'just over the horizon - perhaps a decade away'. However, with recent innovations, and higher oil prices, we appear to be on the verge of finally seeing commercial scale implementations of cellulosic to liquid fuel conversion technologies. Interest in this technology derives from many quarters. Environmentalists see this as a way of reducing our carbon footprint, however, absent a global market for carbon emissions, private firms will not factor this into their investment decisions. Those interested in poverty and nutrition see this as a channel for lessening the biofuels' impact on food prices. But what is 2G technology worth to society? How valuable are prospective improvements in this technology? And how are these valuations affected by future uncertainties, including climate regulation, climate change impacts, and energy prices? This paper addresses all of these questions. We employ FABLE, a dynamic optimization model for the world's land resources which characterizes the optimal long run path for protected natural lands, managed forests, crop and livestock land use, energy extraction and biofuels over the period 2005-2105. By running this model twice for each future state of the world - once with 2G biofuels technology available and once without - we measure the contribution of the technology to global welfare. Given the uncertainty in how these technologies are likely to evolve, we consider a range cost estimates - from optimistic to pessimistic. In addition to technological uncertainty, there is great uncertainty in the conditions characterizing our baseline for the 21st century. For each of the 2G technology scenarios, we therefore also consider a range of outcomes for key drivers of global land use, including: population, income, oil prices, climate change impacts and climate regulation. We find that the social valuation of 2G technologies depends critically on climate change

  3. Generating Relational Competitive Advantage from Strategic Technological Partnership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yimei; Zhang, Si; Li, Jizhen

    2012-01-01

    Collaborating with external partners on strategic technological partnerships (STPs) have been popular phenomena for long, which leads new development in existing theories on competitive advantage. Under the relational view, the competitive advantage is jointly generated by alliance firms. Though...... appropriation. In order to avoid opportunism and learning races, the success of an STP requires an integration and interaction among three ways of governance: economic investments or hostage, legal contract and trustful social relationships....

  4. Diffusion of multi-generational high-technology products

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Xiaohui; Fernandes, Kiran,; Chumnumpan, Pattarin

    2014-01-01

    Previous multi-generational product diffusion (MGPD) models were developed based on the diffusion patterns at that time, but may not be adopted in today’s cases. By incorporating the effect of customers’ forward-looking behaviour, this paper offers a parsimonious and original model that captures the dynamics of MGPD in current high-technology markets. We empirically examine the feasibility of using previous MGPD models and our suggested model to explain the market growth of new products from ...

  5. PileLineGUI: a desktop environment for handling genome position files in next-generation sequencing studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Fernández, Hugo; Glez-Peña, Daniel; Reboiro-Jato, Miguel; Gómez-López, Gonzalo; Pisano, David G; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino

    2011-07-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are making sequence data available on an unprecedented scale. In this context, new catalogs of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism and mutations generated by resequencing studies are usually stored in genome position files (e.g. Variant Call Format, SAMTools pileup, BED, GFF) comprising of large lists of genomic positions, which are difficult to handle by researchers. Here, we present PileLineGUI, a novel desktop application primarily designed for manipulating, browsing and analysing genome position files (GPF), with specific support to somatic mutation finding studies. The developed tool also integrates a new genome browser module specially designed for inspecting GPFs. PileLineGUI is free, multiplatform and designed to be intuitively used by biomedical researchers. PileLineGUI is available at: http://sing.ei.uvigo.es/pileline/pilelinegui.html.

  6. Identification and Characterization of Microsatellite Loci in Maqui (Aristotelia chilensis [Molina] Stunz) Using Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastías, Adriana; Correa, Francisco; Rojas, Pamela; Almada, Rubén; Muñoz, Carlos; Sagredo, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Maqui (Aristotelia chilensis [Molina] Stunz) is a small dioecious tree native to South America with edible fruit characterized by very high antioxidant capacity and anthocyanin content. To preserve maqui as a genetic resource it is essential to study its genetic diversity. However, the complete genome is unknown and only a few gene sequences are available in databases. Simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers, which are neutral, co-dominant, reproducible and highly variable, are desirable to support genetic studies in maqui populations. By means of identification and characterization of microsatellite loci from a maqui genotype, using 454 sequencing technology, we develop a set of SSR for this species. Obtaining a total of 165,043 shotgun genome sequences, with an average read length of 387 bases, we covered 64 Mb of the maqui genome. Reads were assembled into 4,832 contigs, while 98,546 reads remained as singletons, generating a total of 103,378 consensus genomic sequences. A total of 24,494 SSR maqui markers were identified. Of them, 15,950 SSR maqui markers were classified as perfects. The most common SSR motifs were dinucleotide (31%), followed by tetranucleotide (26%) and trinucleotide motifs (24%). The motif AG/CT (28.4%) was the most abundant, while the motif AC (89 bp) was the largest. Eleven polymorphic SSRs were selected and used to analyze a population of 40 maqui genotypes. Polymorphism information content (PIC) ranged from 0.117 to 0.82, with an average of 0.58. Non-significant groups were observed in the maqui population, showing a panmictic genetic structure. In addition, we also predicted 11150 putative genes and 3 microRNAs (miRNAs) in maqui sequences. This results, including partial sequences of genes, some miRNAs and SSR markers from high throughput next generation sequencing (NGS) of maqui genomic DNA, constitute the first platform to undertake genetic and molecular studies of this important species. PMID:27459734

  7. Identification and Characterization of Microsatellite Loci in Maqui (Aristotelia chilensis [Molina] Stunz Using Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Bastías

    Full Text Available Maqui (Aristotelia chilensis [Molina] Stunz is a small dioecious tree native to South America with edible fruit characterized by very high antioxidant capacity and anthocyanin content. To preserve maqui as a genetic resource it is essential to study its genetic diversity. However, the complete genome is unknown and only a few gene sequences are available in databases. Simple sequence repeats (SSR markers, which are neutral, co-dominant, reproducible and highly variable, are desirable to support genetic studies in maqui populations. By means of identification and characterization of microsatellite loci from a maqui genotype, using 454 sequencing technology, we develop a set of SSR for this species. Obtaining a total of 165,043 shotgun genome sequences, with an average read length of 387 bases, we covered 64 Mb of the maqui genome. Reads were assembled into 4,832 contigs, while 98,546 reads remained as singletons, generating a total of 103,378 consensus genomic sequences. A total of 24,494 SSR maqui markers were identified. Of them, 15,950 SSR maqui markers were classified as perfects. The most common SSR motifs were dinucleotide (31%, followed by tetranucleotide (26% and trinucleotide motifs (24%. The motif AG/CT (28.4% was the most abundant, while the motif AC (89 bp was the largest. Eleven polymorphic SSRs were selected and used to analyze a population of 40 maqui genotypes. Polymorphism information content (PIC ranged from 0.117 to 0.82, with an average of 0.58. Non-significant groups were observed in the maqui population, showing a panmictic genetic structure. In addition, we also predicted 11150 putative genes and 3 microRNAs (miRNAs in maqui sequences. This results, including partial sequences of genes, some miRNAs and SSR markers from high throughput next generation sequencing (NGS of maqui genomic DNA, constitute the first platform to undertake genetic and molecular studies of this important species.

  8. Transcriptome analysis based on next-generation sequencing of non-model plants producing specialized metabolites of biotechnological interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Mei; Zhang, Ye; Chen, Xue; Lee, Eun-Jeong; Barber, Carla J S; Chakrabarty, Romit; Desgagné-Penix, Isabel; Haslam, Tegan M; Kim, Yeon-Bok; Liu, Enwu; MacNevin, Gillian; Masada-Atsumi, Sayaka; Reed, Darwin W; Stout, Jake M; Zerbe, Philipp; Zhang, Yansheng; Bohlmann, Joerg; Covello, Patrick S; De Luca, Vincenzo; Page, Jonathan E; Ro, Dae-Kyun; Martin, Vincent J J; Facchini, Peter J; Sensen, Christoph W

    2013-07-10

    Plants produce a vast array of specialized metabolites, many of which are used as pharmaceuticals, flavors, fragrances, and other high-value fine chemicals. However, most of these compounds occur in non-model plants for which genomic sequence information is not yet available. The production of a large amount of nucleotide sequence data using next-generation technologies is now relatively fast and cost-effective, especially when using the latest Roche-454 and Illumina sequencers with enhanced base-calling accuracy. To investigate specialized metabolite biosynthesis in non-model plants we have established a data-mining framework, employing next-generation sequencing and computational algorithms, to construct and analyze the transcriptomes of 75 non-model plants that produce compounds of interest for biotechnological applications. After sequence assembly an extensive annotation approach was applied to assign functional information to over 800,000 putative transcripts. The annotation is based on direct searches against public databases, including RefSeq and InterPro. Gene Ontology (GO), Enzyme Commission (EC) annotations and associated Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway maps are also collected. As a proof-of-concept, the selection of biosynthetic gene candidates associated with six specialized metabolic pathways is described. A web-based BLAST server has been established to allow public access to assembled transcriptome databases for all 75 plant species of the PhytoMetaSyn Project (www.phytometasyn.ca). Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Automated Gel Size Selection to Improve the Quality of Next-generation Sequencing Libraries Prepared from Environmental Water Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyaguari-Diaz, Miguel I; Slobodan, Jared R; Nesbitt, Matthew J; Croxen, Matthew A; Isaac-Renton, Judith; Prystajecky, Natalie A; Tang, Patrick

    2015-04-17

    Next-generation sequencing of environmental samples can be challenging because of the variable DNA quantity and quality in these samples. High quality DNA libraries are needed for optimal results from next-generation sequencing. Environmental samples such as water may have low quality and quantities of DNA as well as contaminants that co-precipitate with DNA. The mechanical and enzymatic processes involved in extraction and library preparation may further damage the DNA. Gel size selection enables purification and recovery of DNA fragments of a defined size for sequencing applications. Nevertheless, this task is one of the most time-consuming steps in the DNA library preparation workflow. The protocol described here enables complete automation of agarose gel loading, electrophoretic analysis, and recovery of targeted DNA fragments. In this study, we describe a high-throughput approach to prepare high quality DNA libraries from freshwater samples that can be applied also to other environmental samples. We used an indirect approach to concentrate bacterial cells from environmental freshwater samples; DNA was extracted using a commercially available DNA extraction kit, and DNA libraries were prepared using a commercial transposon-based protocol. DNA fragments of 500 to 800 bp were gel size selected using Ranger Technology, an automated electrophoresis workstation. Sequencing of the size-selected DNA libraries demonstrated significant improvements to read length and quality of the sequencing reads.

  10. Knowledge Generation in Technology-Enhanced Health Exhibitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke; Kharlamov, Nikita; Zachariasssen, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents results from eye-tracking studies of audience interaction and knowledge generation in the technology-enhanced health promotion exhibition PULSE at a science centre in Copenhagen, Denmark. The main purpose of the study was to understand what types of knowledge audiences build...... in health promotion exhibitions designed to include direct physical interaction. The current study is part of the larger PULSE project, which aims to develop innovative health promotion activities that include a science museum exhibition as a key setting. The primary target group is families with children...... age 6–12. Health promotion technologies are defined here, as technologies designed specifically for the purpose of health promotion, be they educational or focused on physical activities. The study was conducted in late 2015 and comprised eight families with children in 2nd-6th grade visiting...

  11. Engineering the next generation of clinical deep brain stimulation technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Cameron C; Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; Shamir, Reuben R; Lempka, Scott F

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has evolved into a powerful clinical therapy for a range of neurological disorders, but even with impressive clinical growth, DBS technology has been relatively stagnant over its history. However, enhanced collaborations between neural engineers, neuroscientists, physicists, neurologists, and neurosurgeons are beginning to address some of the limitations of current DBS technology. These interactions have helped to develop novel ideas for the next generation of clinical DBS systems. This review attempts collate some of that progress with two goals in mind. First, provide a general description of current clinical DBS practices, geared toward educating biomedical engineers and computer scientists on a field that needs their expertise and attention. Second, describe some of the technological developments that are currently underway in surgical targeting, stimulation parameter selection, stimulation protocols, and stimulation hardware that are being directly evaluated for near term clinical application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Technology commercialization: From generating ideas to creating economic value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayeb Dehghani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Frequent changes in competitors' status, technology, and customer interests make it unwise and impossible for companies to rely on their products. Customers always seek to find new products. Consequently, companies should continuously produce and offer superior products to meet customer needs, tastes, and expectations. In fact, every company needs a development plan for its new products. Research has demonstrated that one of the major reasons for rapid development of technology in industrial countries is commercialization of research results. The basis of such commercialization is research-industry collaboration in converting research output into innovation. Today, technology commercialization and its outcomes can provide financial resources required for organizational longevity. The main objective of this article is to propose a model for commercializing research findings from idea generation to initial market entry. We believe that this article can, hopefully, contribute to commercialization literature by acting as a guide to local authorities involved in commercialization cycle.

  13. Five simple guidelines for establishing basic authenticity and reliability of newly generated fungal ITS sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Henrik Nilsson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Molecular data form an important research tool in most branches of mycology. A non-trivial proportion of the public fungal DNA sequences are, however, compromised in terms of quality and reliability, contributing noise and bias to sequence-borne inferences such as phylogenetic analysis, diversity assessment, and barcoding. In this paper we discuss various aspects and pitfalls of sequence quality assessment. Based on our observations, we provide a set of guidelines to assist in manual quality management of newly generated, near-full-length (Sanger-derived fungal ITS sequences and to some extent also sequences of shorter read lengths, other genes or markers, and groups of organisms. The guidelines are intentionally non-technical and do not require substantial bioinformatics skills or significant computational power. Despite their simple nature, we feel they would have caught the vast majority of the severely compromised ITS sequences in the public corpus. Our guidelines are nevertheless not infallible, and common sense and intuition remain important elements in the pursuit of compromised sequence data. The guidelines focus on basic sequence authenticity and reliability of the newly generated sequences, and the user may want to consider additional resources and steps to accomplish the best possible quality control. A discussion on the technical resources for further sequence quality management is therefore provided in the supplementary material.

  14. Sequence Alignment with Dynamic Divisor Generation for Keystroke Dynamics Based User Authentication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiacang Ho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Keystroke dynamics based authentication is one of the prevention mechanisms used to protect one’s account from criminals’ illegal access. In this authentication mechanism, keystroke dynamics are used to capture patterns in a user typing behavior. Sequence alignment is shown to be one of effective algorithms for keystroke dynamics based authentication, by comparing the sequences of keystroke data to detect imposter’s anomalous sequences. In previous research, static divisor has been used for sequence generation from the keystroke data, which is a number used to divide a time difference of keystroke data into an equal-length subinterval. After the division, the subintervals are mapped to alphabet letters to form sequences. One major drawback of this static divisor is that the amount of data for this subinterval generation is often insufficient, which leads to premature termination of subinterval generation and consequently causes inaccurate sequence alignment. To alleviate this problem, we introduce sequence alignment of dynamic divisor (SADD in this paper. In SADD, we use mean of Horner’s rule technique to generate dynamic divisors and apply them to produce the subintervals with different length. The comparative experimental results with SADD and other existing algorithms indicate that SADD is usually comparable to and often outperforms other existing algorithms.

  15. Technology spin-offs generation – a multicase study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Mendes Constante

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to understand how small businesses can innovate through the generation of technological spin-offs, identifying motivations, influences and barriers to achieving this phenomenon. Through a qualitative and exploratory study, we analyzed four cases of technological spin-offs in Santa Catarina State. We collected data through field observations, historical data and semi-structured interviews. The main reasons found for spin-offs creation were: diversification and to complement the value chain of the parent company and to ensure greater focus for a specific technology. The main barrier was lack of capital. Government initiatives to support the creation of new businesses, coupled with the organizational culture open to entrepreneurship and investment in R&D, contributed to the development of spin-offs analyzed. This work contributes to the understanding that small and medium-sized technology-based companies are a source of technological spin-offs and can benefit from the occurrence of this process.

  16. Towards a Next-Generation Sequencing Diagnostic Service for Tumour Genotyping: A Comparison of Panels and Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George J. Burghel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Detection of clinically actionable mutations in diagnostic tumour specimens aids in the selection of targeted therapeutics. With an ever increasing number of clinically significant mutations identified, tumour genetic diagnostics is moving from single to multigene analysis. As it is still not feasible for routine diagnostic laboratories to perform sequencing of the entire cancer genome, our approach was to undertake targeted mutation detection. To optimise our diagnostic workflow, we evaluated three target enrichment strategies using two next-generation sequencing (NGS platforms (Illumina MiSeq and Ion PGM. The target enrichment strategies were Fluidigm Access Array custom amplicon panel including 13 genes (MiSeq sequencing, the Oxford Gene Technologies (OGT SureSeq Solid Tumour hybridisation panel including 60 genes (MiSeq sequencing, and an Ion AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel including 50 genes (Ion PGM sequencing. DNA extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE blocks of eight previously characterised cancer cell lines was tested using the three panels. Matching genomic DNA from fresh cultures of these cell lines was also tested using the custom Fluidigm panel and the OGT SureSeq Solid Tumour panel. Each panel allowed mutation detection of core cancer genes including KRAS, BRAF, and EGFR. Our results indicate that the panels enable accurate variant detection despite sequencing from FFPE DNA.

  17. Genetic diagnosis of Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy using next-generation sequencing: validation analysis of DMD mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Mariko; Minami, Narihiro; Goto, Kanako; Goto, Yuichi; Noguchi, Satoru; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Nishino, Ichizo

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD/BMD) are the most common inherited neuromuscular disease. The genetic diagnosis is not easily made because of the large size of the dystrophin gene, complex mutational spectrum and high number of tests patients undergo for diagnosis. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) has been used as the initial diagnostic test of choice. Although MLPA can diagnose 70% of DMD/BMD patients having deletions/duplications, the remaining 30% of patients with small mutations require further analysis, such as Sanger sequencing. We applied a high-throughput method using Ion Torrent next-generation sequencing technology and diagnosed 92% of patients with DMD/BMD in a single analysis. We designed a multiplex primer pool for DMD and sequenced 67 cases having different mutations: 37 with deletions/duplications and 30 with small mutations or short insertions/deletions in DMD, using an Ion PGM sequencer. The results were compared with those from MLPA or Sanger sequencing. All deletions were detected. In contrast, 50% of duplications were correctly identified compared with the MLPA method. Small insertions in consecutive bases could not be detected. We estimated that Ion Torrent sequencing could diagnose ~92% of DMD/BMD patients according to the mutational spectrum of our cohort. Our results clearly indicate that this method is suitable for routine clinical practice providing novel insights into comprehensive genetic information for future molecular therapy. PMID:26911353

  18. Evaluation ofA Single-reaction Method for Whole Genome Sequencing of Influenza A Virus using Next Generation Sequencing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Xiao Hui; CHEN Wen Bing; ZHAO Xiang; ZHU Wen Fei; YANG Lei; WANG Da Yan; SHU Yue Long

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveTo evaluate a single-reaction genome amplification method, the multisegment reverse transcription-PCR (M-RTPCR), for its sensitivity to full genome sequencing of influenza A virus, and the ability to differentiate mix-subtype virus, using the next generation sequencing (NGS) platform. MethodsVirus genome copy was quantified and serially diluted to different titers, followed by amplification with the M-RTPCR method and sequencing on the NGS platform. Furthermore, we manually mixed two subtype viruses to different titer rate and amplified the mixed virus with the M-RTPCR protocol, followed by whole genome sequencing on the NGS platform. We also used clinical samples to test the method performance. ResultsThe M-RTPCR method obtained complete genome of testing virus at 125 copies/reaction and determined the virus subtype at titer of 25 copies/reaction. Moreover, the two subtypes in the mixed virus could be discriminated, even though these two virus copies differed by 200-fold using this amplification protocol. The sensitivity of this protocol we detected using virus RNA was also confirmed with clinical samples containing low-titer virus. ConclusionThe M-RTPCR is a robust and sensitive amplification method for whole genome sequencing of influenza A virus using NGS platform.

  19. Construction of a high-density genetic map for grape using next generation restriction-site associated DNA sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Nian

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic mapping and QTL detection are powerful methodologies in plant improvement and breeding. Construction of a high-density and high-quality genetic map would be of great benefit in the production of superior grapes to meet human demand. High throughput and low cost of the recently developed next generation sequencing (NGS technology have resulted in its wide application in genome research. Sequencing restriction-site associated DNA (RAD might be an efficient strategy to simplify genotyping. Combining NGS with RAD has proven to be powerful for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP marker development. Results An F1 population of 100 individual plants was developed. In-silico digestion-site prediction was used to select an appropriate restriction enzyme for construction of a RAD sequencing library. Next generation RAD sequencing was applied to genotype the F1 population and its parents. Applying a cluster strategy for SNP modulation, a total of 1,814 high-quality SNP markers were developed: 1,121 of these were mapped to the female genetic map, 759 to the male map, and 1,646 to the integrated map. A comparison of the genetic maps to the published Vitis vinifera genome revealed both conservation and variations. Conclusions The applicability of next generation RAD sequencing for genotyping a grape F1 population was demonstrated, leading to the successful development of a genetic map with high density and quality using our designed SNP markers. Detailed analysis revealed that this newly developed genetic map can be used for a variety of genome investigations, such as QTL detection, sequence assembly and genome comparison.

  20. High resolution clustering of Salmonella enterica serovar Montevideo strains using a next-generation sequencing approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allard Marc W

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS is increasingly being used as a molecular epidemiologic tool for discerning ancestry and traceback of the most complicated, difficult to resolve bacterial pathogens. Making a linkage between possible food sources and clinical isolates requires distinguishing the suspected pathogen from an environmental background and placing the variation observed into the wider context of variation occurring within a serovar and among other closely related foodborne pathogens. Equally important is the need to validate these high resolution molecular tools for use in molecular epidemiologic traceback. Such efforts include the examination of strain cluster stability as well as the cumulative genetic effects of sub-culturing on these clusters. Numerous isolates of S. Montevideo were shot-gun sequenced including diverse lineage representatives as well as numerous replicate clones to determine how much variability is due to bias, sequencing error, and or the culturing of isolates. All new draft genomes were compared to 34 S. Montevideo isolates previously published during an NGS-based molecular epidemiological case study. Results Intraserovar lineages of S. Montevideo differ by thousands of SNPs, that are only slightly less than the number of SNPs observed between S. Montevideo and other distinct serovars. Much less variability was discovered within an individual S. Montevideo clade implicated in a recent foodborne outbreak as well as among individual NGS replicates. These findings were similar to previous reports documenting homopolymeric and deletion error rates with the Roche 454 GS Titanium technology. In no case, however, did variability associated with sequencing methods or sample preparations create inconsistencies with our current phylogenetic results or the subsequent molecular epidemiological evidence gleaned from these data. Conclusions Implementation of a validated pipeline for NGS data acquisition and

  1. Next-Generation Sequencing of the HLA locus: Methods and impacts on HLA typing, population genetics and disease association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carapito, Raphael; Radosavljevic, Mirjana; Bahram, Seiamak

    2016-11-01

    The human Major Histocompatibility Complex, known as the "Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)", could be defined as a "super locus" (historically called "supergene") governing the adaptive immune system in vertebrates. It also harbors genes involved in innate immunity. HLA is the most gene-dense, polymorphic and disease-associated region of the human genome. It is of critical medical relevance given its involvement in the fate of the transplanted organs/tissues and its association with more than 100 diseases. However, despite these important roles, comprehensive sequence analysis of the 4 megabase HLA locus has been limited due to technological challenges. Thanks to recent improvements in Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies however, one is now able to handle the peculiarities of the MHC notably the tight linkage disequilibrium between genes as well as their high degree of polymorphism (and hence heterozygosity). Increased read lengths, throughput, accuracy, as well as development of new bioinformatics tools now enable to efficiently generate complete and accurate full-length HLA haplotypes without phase ambiguities. The present report reviews current NGS approaches to capture, sequence and analyze HLA genes and loci. The impact of these new methodologies on various applications including HLA typing, population genetics and disease association studies are discussed. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. NASA Fixed Wing Project: Green Technologies for Future Aircraft Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rosario, Ruben; Koudelka, John M.; Wahls, Rich; Madavan, Nateri

    2014-01-01

    Commercial aviation relies almost entirely on subsonic fixed wing aircraft to constantly move people and goods from one place to another across the globe. While air travel is an effective means of transportation providing an unmatched combination of speed and range, future subsonic aircraft must improve substantially to meet efficiency and environmental targets.The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Fixed Wing (FW) Project addresses the comprehensive challenge of enabling revolutionary energy efficiency improvements in subsonic transport aircraft combined with dramatic reductions in harmful emissions and perceived noise to facilitate sustained growth of the air transportation system. Advanced technologies and the development of unconventional aircraft systems offer the potential to achieve these improvements. Multidisciplinary advances are required in aerodynamic efficiency to reduce drag, structural efficiency to reduce aircraft empty weight, and propulsive and thermal efficiency to reduce thrust-specific energy consumption (TSEC) for overall system benefit. Additionally, advances are required to reduce perceived noise without adversely affecting drag, weight, or TSEC, and to reduce harmful emissions without adversely affecting energy efficiency or noise.The paper will highlight the Fixed Wing project vision of revolutionary systems and technologies needed to achieve these challenging goals. Specifically, the primary focus of the FW Project is on the N+3 generation; that is, vehicles that are three generations beyond the current state of the art, requiring mature technology solutions in the 2025-30 timeframe

  3. Introduction and comparison of next-generation mobile wireless technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Syed R.; Hussain, Shahab; Ali, M. A.; Sana, Ajaz; Saddawi, Samir; Carranza, Aparicio

    2010-01-01

    Mobile networks and services have gone further than voice-only communication services and are rapidly developing towards data-centric services. Emerging mobile data services are expected to see the same explosive growth in demand that Internet and wireless voice services have seen in recent years. To support such a rapid increase in traffic, active users, and advanced multimedia services implied by this growth rate along with the diverse quality of service (QoS) and rate requirements set by these services, mobile operator need to rapidly transition to a simple and cost-effective, flat, all IP-network. This has accelerated the development and deployment of new wireless broadband access technologies including fourth-generation (4G) mobile WiMAX and cellular Long-Term Evolution (LTE). Mobile WiMAX and LTE are two different (but not necessarily competing) technologies that will eventually be used to achieve data speeds of up to 100 Mbps. Speeds that are fast enough to potentially replace wired broadband connections with wireless. This paper introduces both of these next generation technologies and then compares them in the end.

  4. Maize transformation technology development for commercial event generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiudeng eQue

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Maize is an important food and feed crop in many countries. It is also one of the most important target crops for the application of biotechnology. Currently, there are more biotech traits available on the market in maize than in any other crop. Generation of transgenic events is a crucial step in the development of biotech traits. For commercial applications, a high throughput transformation system producing a large number of high quality events in an elite genetic background is highly desirable. There has been tremendous progress in Agrobacterium-mediated maize transformation since the publication of the Ishida et al. (1996 paper and the technology has been widely adopted for transgenic event production by many labs around the world. We will review general efforts in establishing efficient maize transformation technologies useful for transgenic event production in trait research and development. The review will also discuss transformation systems used for generating commercial maize trait events currently on the market. As the number of traits is increasing steadily and two or more modes of action are used to control key pests, new tools are needed to efficiently transform vectors containing multiple trait genes. We will review general guidelines for assembling binary vectors for commercial transformation. Approaches to increase transformation efficiency and gene expression of large gene stack vectors will be discussed. Finally, recent studies of targeted genome modification and transgene insertion using different site-directed nuclease technologies will be reviewed.

  5. Process Technology Development of Ni Electroplating in Steam Generator Tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joung Soo; Kim, H. P.; Lim, Y. S.; Kim, S. S.; Hwang, S. S.; Yi, Y. S.; Kim, D. J.; Jeong, M. K.

    2009-11-15

    Operating nuclear power steam generator tubing material, Alloy 600, having superior resistance to corrosion has many experiences of damage by various corrosion mechanisms during long term operation period. In this research project, a new Ni electroplating technology to be applied to repair the damaged steam generator tubes has been developed. In this technology development, the optimum conditions for variables affecting the Ni electroplating process, optimum process conditions for maximum adhesion forces at interface between were established. The various mechanical properties (RT and HT tensile, fatigue, creep, burst, etc.) and corrosion properties (general corrosion, pitting, crevice corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, boric acid corrosion, doped steam) of the Ni plated layers made at the established optimum conditions have been evaluated and confirmed to satisfy the specifications. In addition, a new ECT probe developed at KAERI enable to detect defects from magnetic materials was confirmed to be used for Ni electroplated Alloy 600 tubes at the field. For the application of this developed technology to operating plants, a mock-up electroplating system has been designed and manufactured, and set up at Doosan Heavy Industry Co. and also its performance test has been done. At same time, the anode probe has been modified and improved to be used with the established mock-up system without any problem

  6. Cost efficient SAGD heave monitoring: new generation radar technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granda, Johanna; Arnaud, Alain; Payas, Blanca; Katsuris, Dimitra; Cooksley, Geraint [Altamira Information (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Oil sands operations are subject to various regulations, one of them being the obligation to monitor heave monuments or other surfaces. Besides meeting the Energy Resources Conservation Board (ERCB) requirements, heave monitoring is efficient in steam chamber monitoring and guaranteeing the safety of SAGD operations. Several techniques exist for heave monitoring, such as GPS-measurement and Interferometry for synthetic aperture readar (InSAR). This paper aimed at presenting the InSAR technology and the advances made with the new generation X-band satellite technology. Two studies were conducted: one in an SAGD steam injection area in Alberta, Canada, and the other in a CO2 storage site in In Salah, Algeria. The new generation X-band radar satellites showed some advantages over traditional techniques, with: redundancy of satellites, frequency of images, measurement precision, a higher resolution and a smaller size of corner reflectors. The InSAR technology presented herein is a cost efficient technique allowing heavy oil operators to comply with ERCB requirements.

  7. Audio watermarking technologies for automatic cue sheet generation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccia, Giuseppe; Lancini, Rosa C.; Pascarella, Annalisa; Tubaro, Stefano; Vicario, Elena

    2001-08-01

    Usually watermark is used as a way for hiding information on digital media. The watermarked information may be used to allow copyright protection or user and media identification. In this paper we propose a watermarking scheme for digital audio signals that allow automatic identification of musical pieces transmitted in TV broadcasting programs. In our application the watermark must be, obviously, imperceptible to the users, should be robust to standard TV and radio editing and have a very low complexity. This last item is essential to allow a software real-time implementation of the insertion and detection of watermarks using only a minimum amount of the computation power of a modern PC. In the proposed method the input audio sequence is subdivided in frames. For each frame a watermark spread spectrum sequence is added to the original data. A two steps filtering procedure is used to generate the watermark from a Pseudo-Noise (PN) sequence. The filters approximate respectively the threshold and the frequency masking of the Human Auditory System (HAS). In the paper we discuss first the watermark embedding system then the detection approach. The results of a large set of subjective tests are also presented to demonstrate the quality and robustness of the proposed approach.

  8. Recent Progress Using High-throughput Sequencing Technologies in Plant Molecular Breeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Gao; Guidong Yue; Wenqi Li; Junyi Wang; Jiaohui Xu; Ye Yin

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing is a revolutionary technological innovation in DNA sequencing.This technology has an ultra-low cost per base of sequencing and an overwhelmingly high data output.High-throughput sequencing has brought novel research methods and solutions to the research fields of genomics and post-genomics.Furthermore,this technology is leading to a new molecular breeding revolution that has landmark significance for scientific research and enables us to launch multi-level,multifaceted,and multi-extent studies in the fields of crop genetics,genomics,and crop breeding.In this paper,we review progress in the application of high-throughput sequencing technologies to plant molecular breeding studies.

  9. GRC Supporting Technology for NASA's Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Thieme, Lanny G.

    2008-01-01

    From 1999 to 2006, the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) supported a NASA project to develop a high-efficiency, nominal 110-We Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110) for potential use on NASA missions. Lockheed Martin was selected as the System Integration Contractor for the SRG110, under contract to the Department of Energy (DOE). The potential applications included deep space missions, and Mars rovers. The project was redirected in 2006 to make use of the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) that was being developed by Sunpower, Inc. under contract to GRC, which would reduce the mass of the generator and increase the power output. This change would approximately double the specific power and result in the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG). The SRG110 supporting technology effort at GRC was replanned to support the integration of the Sunpower convertor and the ASRG. This paper describes the ASRG supporting technology effort at GRC and provides details of the contributions in some of the key areas. The GRC tasks include convertor extended-operation testing in air and in thermal vacuum environments, heater head life assessment, materials studies, permanent magnet characterization and aging tests, structural dynamics testing, electromagnetic interference and electromagnetic compatibility characterization, evaluation of organic materials, reliability studies, and analysis to support controller development.

  10. Identification and characterization of Highlands J virus from a Mississippi sandhill crane using unbiased next-generation sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Hon S.; Wiley, Michael R.; Long, Renee; Gustavo, Palacios; Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie; Whitehouse, Chris A.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in massively parallel DNA