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Sample records for generation free electron

  1. Second harmonic generation in Te crystal using free electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Yamauchi, T; Minehara, E J

    2002-01-01

    The second harmonic generation signal converted from the fundamental wavelength of 22 mu m of a free electron laser was observed for the first time using a birefringent Te crystal. The experimental conversion efficiency of Te crystal for second harmonic generation is 0.53%, which is equivalent to the theoretical value within a factor of 2. The Te crystal has been incorporated into an autocorrelator system to measure the micro-pulse width of infrared free electron laser successfully. (author)

  2. Harmonic operation of high gain harmonic generation free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Haixiao; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Dai Zhimin

    2008-01-01

    In high gain harmonic generation (HGHG) free electron laser (FEL), with the right choice of parameters of the modulator undulator, the dispersive section and the seed laser, one may make the spatial bunching of the electron beam density distribution correspond to one of the harmonic frequencies of the radiator radiation, instead of the fundamental frequency of the radiator radiation in conventional HGHG, thus the radiator undulator is in harmonic operation (HO) mode. In this paper, we investigate HO of HGHG FEL. Theoretical analyses with universal method are derived and numerical simulations in ultraviolet and deep ultraviolet spectral regions are given. It shows that the power of the 3rd harmonic radiation in the HO of HGHG may be as high as 18.5% of the fundamental power level. Thus HO of HGHG FEL may obtain short wavelength by using lower beam energy. (authors)

  3. Optical klystron and harmonic generation free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qika Jia

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The optical field evolution of an optical klystron free electron laser is analytically described for both low gain and high gain cases. The harmonic optical klystron (HOK in which the second undulator is resonant on the higher harmonic of the first undulator is analyzed as a harmonic amplifier. The optical field evolution equation of the HOK is derived analytically for both the CHG mode (coherent harmonic generation, the quadratic gain regime and the HGHG mode (high gain harmonic generation, the exponential gain regime, the effects of energy spread, energy modulation, and dispersion in the whole process are taken into account. The linear theory is given and discussed for the HGHG mode. The analytical formula is given for the CHG mode.

  4. First microwave generation in the FOM free-electron maser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhoeven, A.G.A.; Bongers, W.A.; Geer, C.A.J. van der; Manintveld, P.; Poelman, A.J.; Pluygers, J.; Smeets, P.H.M.; Sterk, A.B.; Urbanus, W.H.; Bratman, V.L.; Denisov, G.G.; Shmelyov, M.Yu.; Caplan, M.

    1998-01-01

    A free-electron maser (FEM) has been built as a pilot experiment for a millimetre-wave source for applications on future fusion research devices such as ITER, the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor. A unique feature of the Dutch fusion FEM is the possibility to tune the frequency over the entire range from 130 to 260 GHz at an output power exceeding 1 MW. In the first phase of the project, the so-called inverse set-up is used. The electron gun is mounted inside the high-voltage terminal. The entire beam line was tested successfully with extremely low loss current, lower than 0.05%. The first generation of millimetre waves was achieved in October 1997. The highest peak power measured so far is 700 kW at 200 GHz. This was achieved with a beam current of 8 A and an acceleration voltage of 1.77 MV. The output power, start-up time and frequency correspond well with the simulation results. The parameter scans for the longitudinal undulator gap, acceleration voltage and reflection coefficient have given a wide range of interesting data of which a few highlights are given. (author)

  5. Studies of harmonic generation in free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldammer, K.

    2007-01-01

    Nonlinear harmonic generation is one of the most interesting aspects of Free Electron Lasers under study today. It provides for coherent, high intensity radiation at higher harmonics of the FEL resonant frequency. The sources, numerical simulation and applications of harmonic radiation in cascaded High Gain Harmonic Generation FELs were the subject of this thesis. Harmonic emission in FELs originates from harmonic microbunching of the particles and the particular electron trajectory during FEL interaction. Numerical FEL simulation codes model these analytical equations and predict the performance of Free Electron Lasers with good accuracy. This thesis has relied heavily upon the FEL simulation code Genesis 1.3 which has been upgraded in the framework of this thesis to compute harmonic generation in a self-consistent manner. Tests against analytical predictions suggest that the harmonic power levels as well as harmonic gain lengths are simulated correctly. A benchmark with the FEL simulation code GINGER yields excellent agreement of the harmonic saturation length and saturation power. The new version of the simulation code Genesis was also tested against measurements from the VUV-FEL FLASH at DESY. The spectral power distributions of fundamental and third harmonic radiation were recorded at 25.9 nm and 8.6 nm, respectively. The relative bandwidths (FWHM) were in the range of 2 % for both the fundamental as well as the third harmonic, which was accurately reproduced by time-dependent simulations with Genesis. The new code was also used to propose and evaluate a new design for the BESSY Soft X-Ray FEL, a cascaded High Gain Harmonic Generation FEL proposed by BESSY in Berlin. The original design for the BESSY High Energy FEL line requires four HGHG stages to convert the initial seed laser wavelength of 297.5 nm down to 1.24 nm. A new scheme is proposed that makes use of fifth harmonic radiation from the first stage and reduces the number of HGHG stages to three. It

  6. Studies of harmonic generation in free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldammer, K.

    2007-11-12

    Nonlinear harmonic generation is one of the most interesting aspects of Free Electron Lasers under study today. It provides for coherent, high intensity radiation at higher harmonics of the FEL resonant frequency. The sources, numerical simulation and applications of harmonic radiation in cascaded High Gain Harmonic Generation FELs were the subject of this thesis. Harmonic emission in FELs originates from harmonic microbunching of the particles and the particular electron trajectory during FEL interaction. Numerical FEL simulation codes model these analytical equations and predict the performance of Free Electron Lasers with good accuracy. This thesis has relied heavily upon the FEL simulation code Genesis 1.3 which has been upgraded in the framework of this thesis to compute harmonic generation in a self-consistent manner. Tests against analytical predictions suggest that the harmonic power levels as well as harmonic gain lengths are simulated correctly. A benchmark with the FEL simulation code GINGER yields excellent agreement of the harmonic saturation length and saturation power. The new version of the simulation code Genesis was also tested against measurements from the VUV-FEL FLASH at DESY. The spectral power distributions of fundamental and third harmonic radiation were recorded at 25.9 nm and 8.6 nm, respectively. The relative bandwidths (FWHM) were in the range of 2 % for both the fundamental as well as the third harmonic, which was accurately reproduced by time-dependent simulations with Genesis. The new code was also used to propose and evaluate a new design for the BESSY Soft X-Ray FEL, a cascaded High Gain Harmonic Generation FEL proposed by BESSY in Berlin. The original design for the BESSY High Energy FEL line requires four HGHG stages to convert the initial seed laser wavelength of 297.5 nm down to 1.24 nm. A new scheme is proposed that makes use of fifth harmonic radiation from the first stage and reduces the number of HGHG stages to three. It

  7. First microwave generation in the FOM free-electron maser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, A. G. A.; Bongers, W. A.; Bratman, V. L.; Caplan, M.; Denisov, G. G.; van der Geer, C. A. J.; Manintveld, P.; Poelman, A. J.; Pluygers, J.; Shmelyov, M. Y.; Smeets, P. H. M.; Sterk, A. B.; Urbanus, W. H.

    1998-01-01

    A free-electron maser (FEM) has been built as a pilot experiment for a millimetre-wave source for applications on future fusion research devices such as ITER, the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor. A unique feature of the Dutch fusion FEM is the possibility to tune the frequency over the

  8. Effects of Energy Chirp on Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation Free-Electron Lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Z.

    2009-01-01

    We study effects of energy chirp on echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG). Analytical expressions are compared with numerical simulations for both harmonic and bunching factors. We also discuss the EEHG free-electron laser bandwidth increase due to an energy-modulated beam and its pulse length dependence on the electron energy chirp

  9. Studies of Interfacial Regions by Sum-Frequency Generation with a Free-Electron Laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eliel, E. R.; van der Ham, E. W. M.; Vrehen, Q. H. F.; Thooft, G. W.; Barmentlo, M.; Auerhammer, J. M.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1995-01-01

    The use of a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) allows the study of (non)linear optical properties of materials over unsurpassed large spectral intervals. As an example, we report on the use of a FEL as the infrared source in spectroscopic infrared-visible Sum-Frequency Generation (SFG). Employing the

  10. Ponderomotive Generation and Detection of Attosecond Free-Electron Pulse Trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozák, M.; Schönenberger, N.; Hommelhoff, P.

    2018-03-01

    Atomic motion dynamics during structural changes or chemical reactions have been visualized by pico- and femtosecond pulsed electron beams via ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy. Imaging the even faster dynamics of electrons in atoms, molecules, and solids requires electron pulses with subfemtosecond durations. We demonstrate here the all-optical generation of trains of attosecond free-electron pulses. The concept is based on the periodic energy modulation of a pulsed electron beam via an inelastic interaction, with the ponderomotive potential of an optical traveling wave generated by two femtosecond laser pulses at different frequencies in vacuum. The subsequent dispersive propagation leads to a compression of the electrons and the formation of ultrashort pulses. The longitudinal phase space evolution of the electrons after compression is mapped by a second phase-locked interaction. The comparison of measured and calculated spectrograms reveals the attosecond temporal structure of the compressed electron pulse trains with individual pulse durations of less than 300 as. This technique can be utilized for tailoring and initial characterization of suboptical-cycle free-electron pulses at high repetition rates for stroboscopic time-resolved experiments with subfemtosecond time resolution.

  11. Extreme UV harmonic production by free-electron generators of coherent radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The bunching phenomenon is the basic process occurring in a free-electron generator of coherent generation such as the Klystron in the mm-wave-length range or the free-electron laser (FEL) in the optical region. During interaction with the incident electromagnetic wave the electrons are progressively gathered into small packets separated by a length equal to its wavelength λ/sub L/. Once the electrons are bunched there is a given phase relationship between them and the field of any wave which wavelength is an harmonic of λ/sub L/. This is the source of the gain (electrons decelerated by the field) or of the absorption (electrons accelerated by the laser) mechanisms. In the FEL case the electrons are passing through an undulator (spatially varying periodic magnetic field). Since one uses high-energy electrons (E≅100-1000 MeV) they emit synchrotron radiation called in this case undulator radiation or spontaneous emission. This radiation coexists with the stimulated emission giving rise to the gain mechanism and to the FEL oscillation. When the electrons are bunched the spontaneous emission becomes coherent at the wavelength harmonic of λ/sub L/, and there is an increase in the emission intensity which ideally would be N/sub e/. (Number of electrons is typically ≅10/sup 10/.) Thus bursts of photons are emitted at frequencies harmonic of an incident wave which may be an external laser or the FEL itself. This is likely to extend the spectral range of the free-electron generation of coherent radiation toward the extreme UV λ<1000A). The advantages and limitations of the various solutions (linear or circular accelerator, FEL, or external laser) are discussed. The authors summarize the various experimental results obtained to date and the prospects for the synchrotron radiation dedicated ring super-ACO presently under construction at LURE at Orsay

  12. Theory of nonlinear harmonic generation in free-electron lasers with helical wigglers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geloni, G.; Saldin, E.; Schneidmiller, E.; Yurkov, M.

    2007-05-01

    CoherentHarmonicGeneration (CHG), and in particularNonlinearHarmonicGeneration (NHG), is of importance for both short wavelength Free-Electron Lasers (FELs), in relation with the achievement of shorter wavelengths with a fixed electron-beam energy, and high-average power FEL resonators, in relation with destructive effects of higher harmonics radiation on mirrors. In this paper we present a treatment of NHG from helical wigglers with particular emphasis on the second harmonic. Our study is based on an exact analytical solution of Maxwell's equations, derived with the help of a Green's function method. In particular, we demonstrate that nonlinear harmonic generation (NHG) fromhelicalwigglers vanishes on axis. Our conclusion is in open contrast with results in literature, that include a kinematical mistake in the description of the electron motion. (orig.)

  13. High gain harmonic generation free electron lasers enhanced by pseudoenergy bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Tanaka

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new scheme for high gain harmonic generation free electron lasers (HGHG FELs, which is seeded by a pair of intersecting laser beams to interact with an electron beam in a modulator undulator located in a dispersive section. The interference of the laser beams gives rise to a two-dimensional modulation in the energy-time phase space because of a strong correlation between the electron energy and the position in the direction of dispersion. This eventually forms pseudoenergy bands in the electron beam, which result in efficient harmonic generation in HGHG FELs in a similar manner to the well-known scheme using the echo effects. The advantage of the proposed scheme is that the beam quality is less deteriorated than in other existing schemes.

  14. Generation of high harmonic free electron laser with phase-merging effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Heting, E-mail: liheting@ustc.edu.cn; Jia, Qika; Zhao, Zhouyu

    2017-03-01

    An easy-to-implement scheme is proposed to produce the longitudinal electron bunch density modulation with phase-merging phenomenon. In this scheme an electron bunch is firstly transversely dispersed in a modified dogleg to generate the exact dependence of electron energy on the transverse position, then it is modulated in a normal modulator. After travelling through a modified chicane with specially designed transfer matrix elements, the density modulation with phase-merging effect is generated which contains high harmonic components of the seed laser. We present theoretical analysis and numerical simulations for seeded soft x-ray free-electron laser. The results demonstrate that this technique can significantly enhance the frequency up-conversion efficiency and allow a seeded FEL operating at very high harmonics.

  15. Synchrotron radiation and free-electron lasers principles of coherent X-ray generation

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kwang-Je; Lindberg, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    Learn about the latest advances in high-brightness X-ray physics and technology with this authoritative text. Drawing upon the most recent theoretical developments, pre-eminent leaders in the field guide readers through the fundamental principles and techniques of high-brightness X-ray generation from both synchrotron and free-electron laser sources. A wide range of topics is covered, including high-brightness synchrotron radiation from undulators, self-amplified spontaneous emission, seeded high-gain amplifiers with harmonic generation, ultra-short pulses, tapering for higher power, free-electron laser oscillators, and X-ray oscillator and amplifier configuration. Novel mathematical approaches and numerous figures accompanied by intuitive explanations enable easy understanding of key concepts, whilst practical considerations of performance-improving techniques and discussion of recent experimental results provide the tools and knowledge needed to address current research problems in the field. This is a comp...

  16. Free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, J.M.; Billardon, M.

    1986-01-01

    Operation principle of a laser and an oscillator are recalled together with the klystron one. In the free electron laser, electrons go through an undulator or an optical klystron. Principles of the last one are given. The two distinct ways of producing coherent radiation with an undulator and an optical klystron are presented. The first one is the use of the free electron laser, the second is to make use of the spontaneous emission generation (harmonics generation). The different current types of free electron lasers are presented (Stanford, Los Alamos, Aco at Orsay). Prospects and applications are given in conclusion [fr

  17. Free electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadeau, J.-B.

    2003-01-01

    Hydro-Quebec, Canada's leading exporter of electricity, generates 96 per cent of its electricity from hydropower. In 2002, the utility exported only 8 per cent of its annual output, but import-export and brokerage activities brought in $3.5 billion, representing more than 25 per cent of the total sales of $13 billion. Performance is improving, profitability is up and net exports are down. It was noted that on average, Hydro-Quebec pays $42.00 for each megawatt-hour and sells at $64. That is double the $27.90 paid by Quebec consumers. The traffic in energy blocks is controlled by hourly, daily and seasonal fluctuations. Power demand depends on the season, weather and consumption. It also depends on the power plants on stream in New England, available transmission lines and reservoir levels. Demand for electricity in Quebec is generally at its lowest in late June, at which time consumers in Ontario and New England states use their air conditioners creating a demand that peaks higher than in winter. Power producers are constantly monitoring weather patterns to determine which generating stations to fire up. Economic and demographic profiles in the New England states also affect demand. It is estimated that electricity demand in Ontario and New England markets will grow about 1.5 per cent. Other demand factors include grid commissioning and operating schedules which identify which facilities will be taken off stream temporarily for maintenance purposes. Information about water levels in reservoirs is kept confidential by all power producers. A hydropower plant can be put on stream or off stream on a few moments notice without added cost. The turbined water is free and it can also be stored. On the other hand, thermal generating stations such as oil-, coal- or nuclear-fired stations, can take days to power up or down. This renders adjustments in power production very costly. Open electricity markets mean that power system operators can stock smaller reserves because

  18. First lasing of a high-gain harmonic generation free-electron laser experiment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Biedron, S. G.; DiMauro, L. F.; Douryan, A.; Galayda, J. N.; Gluskin, E.; Graves, W.; Jagger, J.; Johnson, E.; Krinsky, S.; Malone, R.; Pogorelsky, I.; Rakowsky, G.; Sajaev, V.; Skaritka, J.; Solomon, L.; Vasserman, I.; Wang, X. L.; Woodle, M.; Yakimenko, V.; Yu, L.-H.

    1999-09-11

    We report on the first lasing of a high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG) free-electron laser (FEL). The experiment was conducted at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). This is a BNL experiment in collaboration with the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. A preliminary measurement gives a high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG) pulse energy that is 2 x 10{sup 7} times larger than the spontaneous radiation, In a purely self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mode of operation, the signal was measured as 10 times larger than the spontaneous radiation in the same distance ({approximately}2 m) through the same wiggler. This means the HGHG signal is 2 x 10{sup 6} times larger than the SASE signal. To obtain the same saturated output power by the SASE process, the radiator would have to be 3 times longer (6 m).

  19. Electronically rotated and translated field-free line generation for open bore magnetic particle imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Top, Can Barış; Ilbey, Serhat; Güven, Hüseyin Emre

    2017-12-01

    We propose a coil arrangement for open bore field-free line (FFL) magnetic particle imaging (MPI) system, which is suitable for accessing the subject from the sides. The purpose of this study is twofold, to show that the FFL can be rotated and translated electronically in a volume of interest with this arrangement and to analyze the current, voltage and power requirements for a 1 T/m gradient human sized scanner for a 200 mm diameter × 200 mm height cylindrical field of view (FOV). We used split coils side by side with alternating current directions to generate a field-free line. Employing two of these coil groups, one of which is rotated 90 degrees with respect to the other, a rotating FFL was generated. We conducted numerical simulations to show the feasibility of this arrangement for three-dimensional (3D) electronical scan of the FFL. Using simulations, we obtained images of a two-dimensional (2D) in silico dot phantom for a human size scanner with system matrix-based reconstruction. Simulations showed that the FFL can be generated and rotated in one plane and can be translated in two axes, allowing for 3D imaging of a large subject with the proposed arrangement. Human sized scanner required 63-215 kW power for the selection field coils to scan the focus inside the FOV. The proposed setup is suitable for FFL MPI imaging with an open bore configuration without the need for mechanical rotation, which is preferable for clinical usage in terms of imaging time and patient access. Further studies are necessary to determine the limitations imposed by peripheral nerve stimulation, and to optimize the system parameters and the sequence design. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  20. A free-electron laser fourth-generation X-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncton, D. E.

    1999-01-01

    The field of synchrotrons radiation research has grown rapidly over the last 25 years due to both the push of the accelerator and magnet technology that produces the x-ray beams and the pull of the extraordinary scientific research those beams make possible. Three successive generations of synchrotrons radiation facilities have resulted in beam brilliances 11 to 12 orders of magnitude greater than the standard laboratory x-ray tube. However, greater advances can be easily imagined given the fact that x-ray beams from present-day facilities do not exhibit the coherence or time structure so familiar with the.optical laser. Theoretical work over the last ten years or so has pointed to the possibility of generating hard x-ray beams with laser-like characteristics. The concept is based on self-amplified spontaneous emission in free electron lasers. The use of a superconducting linac could produce a major, cost-effective facility that spans wavelengths from the ultraviolet to the hard x-ray regime, simultaneously servicing large numbers experimenters from a wide range of disciplines. As with each past generation of synchrotron facilities, immense new scientific opportunities from fourth-generation sources

  1. Analysis of coherence properties of 3-rd generation synchrotron sources and free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vartanyants, I.A.; Singer, A.

    2009-07-01

    A general theoretical approach based on the results of statistical optics is used for the analysis of the transverse coherence properties of 3-rd generation synchrotron sources and X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL). Correlation properties of the wave elds are calculated at different distances from an equivalent Gaussian Schell-model source. This model is used to describe coherence properties of the five meter undulator source at the synchrotron storage ring PETRA III. In the case of XFEL sources the decomposition of the statistical fields into a sum of independently propagating transverse modes is used for the analysis of the coherence properties of these new sources. A detailed calculation is performed for the parameters of the SASE1 undulator at the European XFEL. It is demonstrated that only a few modes contribute significantly to the total radiation field of that source. (orig.)

  2. Analysis of coherence properties of 3-rd generation synchrotron sources and free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vartanyants, I.A.; Singer, A. [HASYLAB at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    A general theoretical approach based on the results of statistical optics is used for the analysis of the transverse coherence properties of 3-rd generation synchrotron sources and X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL). Correlation properties of the wave elds are calculated at different distances from an equivalent Gaussian Schell-model source. This model is used to describe coherence properties of the five meter undulator source at the synchrotron storage ring PETRA III. In the case of XFEL sources the decomposition of the statistical fields into a sum of independently propagating transverse modes is used for the analysis of the coherence properties of these new sources. A detailed calculation is performed for the parameters of the SASE1 undulator at the European XFEL. It is demonstrated that only a few modes contribute significantly to the total radiation field of that source. (orig.)

  3. Generation of strong electromagnetic power at 35 GHz from the interaction of a resonant cavity with a relativistic electron beam generated by a free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefevre, Thibaut

    2000-01-01

    The next generation of electron-positron linear colliders must reach the TeV energy range. For this, one requires an adequate RF power source to feed the accelerating cavities of the collider. One way to generate this source is to use the Two Beam Accelerator concept in which the RF power is produced in resonant cavities driven by an intense bunched beam. In this thesis, I present the experimental results obtained at the CEA/CESTA using an electron beam generated by an induction linac. First, some studies were performed with the LELIA induction linac (2.2 MeV, 1 kA, 80 ns) using a Free Electron Laser (FEL) as a buncher at 35 GHz. A second part relates the experiment made with the PIVAIR induction linac (7 MeV, 1 kA, 80 ns) in order to measure the RF power extracted from a resonant cavity at 35 GHz, which is driven by the bunches produced in the FEL. One can also find a simple theoretical modeling of the beam-cavity interaction, and the numerical results dealing with the design of the cavity we tested. (author) [fr

  4. First mm-wave generation in the FOM free electron maser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, A. G. A.; Bongers, W. A.; Bratman, V. L.; Caplan, M.; Denisov, G. G.; van der Geer, C. A. J.; Manintveld, P.; Poelman, A. J.; Plomp, J.; Savilov, A. V.; Smeets, P. H. M.; Sterk, A. B.; Urbanus, W. H.

    1999-01-01

    A free electron maser (FEM) has been built as a pilot mm-wave source for applications on future fusion research devices such as international tokamak experimental reactor (ITER), A unique feature of the Dutch FEM is the possibility to tune the frequency over the entire range from 130 to 260 GHz at

  5. Generation of ultrahigh harmonics with a two-stage free electron laser and a seed laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goloviznin, V. V.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1997-01-01

    We consider the possibility to premodulate an ultrarelativistic electron beam on the nanometer length scale, so that it can produce coherent spontaneous radiation in the x-ray range. The scheme that uses the same basic elements as the high gain harmonic generation (HGHG) scheme, two wigglers and a

  6. Generation of coherent soft x-rays using a single-pass free-electron laser amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, T.F.; Goldstein, J.C.; Newnam, B.E.; McVey, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    We consider a single-pass free-electron laser (FEL) amplifier, driven by an rf-linac followed by a damping ring for reduced emittance, for use in generating coherent light in the soft x-ray region. The dependence of the optical gain on electron-beam quality, studied with the three-dimensional FEL simulation code FELEX, is given and related to the expected power of self-amplified spontaneous emission. We discuss issues for the damping ring designed to achieve the required electron beam quality. The idea of a multipass regenerative amplifier is also presented

  7. Experimental investigation of the generation of harmonic photons from the interaction of free electrons with intense laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Englert, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the generation of second harmonic photons through the interaction of free electrons with an intense laser beam has been performed. Second harmonic photons with a wavelength of 530nm generated from the interaction of free electrons with 1060nm photons from a neodymium-glass laser are implied by observing Doppler shifted photons with wavelengths of 490nm and 507nm. The observed photon wavelengths results from a Doppler shift of the laser photon wavelengths as viewed in the rest frame of the electrons combined with a Doppler shift of the second harmonic photons emitted from 1600eV and 500eV electrons. Comparison of experimental results with those predicted by cross sections, derived using classical and quantum electrodynamics, shows reasonable agreement with both theories. Although second harmonic photons are created, the dynamics of second harmonic photon generation (accelerated electron motion due to the electromagnetic field or actual two-photon interaction with the electron) cannot be resolved without further experiment

  8. New results of the high-gain harmonic generation free-electron laser experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyuran, A.; Babzien, M.; Shaftan, T.; Biedron, S.G.; Yu, L.H.; Ben-Zvi, I.; DiMauro, L.F.; Graves, W.; Johnson, E.; Krinsky, S.; Malone, R.; Pogorelsky, I.; Skaritka, J.; Rakowsky, G.; Wang, X.J.; Woodle, M.; Yakimenko, V.; Jagger, J.; Sajaev, V.; Vasserman, I.

    2001-01-01

    We report on the experimental investigation of high-gain harmonic generation carried out at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A seed CO 2 laser at a wavelength of 10.6 μm was used to generate FEL output at a 5.3-μm wavelength. The duration of the output pulse was measured using a second-harmonic intensity autocorrelator, and the coherence length was measured using an interferometer. We also measured the energy distribution of the electron beam after it exited the second undulator, observing behavior consistent with that is expected at saturation. The intensity of the harmonic components of the output at 2.65 and 1.77 μm was determined relative to that of the 5.3-μm fundamental. Finally, using a corrector magnet upstream of the radiator, steering effects on the trajectories of the electron and light beams were studied

  9. Mechanism of free radical generation in platelets and primary hepatocytes: A novel electron spin resonance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chiun-Lang; Yang, Po-Sheng; Tsao, Jeng-Ting; Jayakumar, Thanasekaran; Wang, Meng-Jiy; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Chou, Duen-Suey

    2018-01-01

    Oxygen free radicals have been implicated in the pathogenesis of toxic liver injury and are thought to be involved in cardiac dysfunction in the cirrhotic heart. Therefore, direct evidence for the electron spin resonance (ESR) detection of how D‑galactosamine (GalN), an established experimental hepatotoxic substance, induced free radicals formation in platelets and primary hepatocytes is presented in the present study. ESR results demonstrated that GalN induced hydroxyl radicals (OH•) in a resting human platelet suspension; however, radicals were not produced in a cell free Fenton reaction system. The GalN‑induced OH• formation was significantly inhibited by the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor indomethasin, though it was not affected by the lipoxygenase (LOX) or cytochrome P450 inhibitors, AA861 and 1‑aminobenzotriazole (ABT), in platelets. In addition, the present study demonstrated that baicalein induced semiquinone free radicals in platelets, which were significantly reduced by the COX inhibitor without affecting the formed OH•. In the mouse primary hepatocytes, the formation of arachidonic acid (AA) induced carbon‑centered radicals that were concentration dependently enhanced by GalN. These radicals were inhibited by AA861, though not affected by indomethasin or ABT. In addition, GalN did not induce platelet aggregation prior to or following collagen pretreatment in human platelets. The results of the present study indicated that GalN and baicalein may induce OH• by COX and LOX in human platelets. GalN also potentiated AA induced carbon‑centered radicals in hepatocytes via cytochrome P450. The present study presented the role of free radicals in the pathophysiological association between platelets and hepatocytes.

  10. Injection of harmonics generated in gas in a free-electron laser providing intense and coherent extreme-ultraviolet light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, G; Garzella, D; Labat, M; Carre, B; Bougeard, M; Salieres, P; Merdji, H; Gobert, O [CEA Saclay, DSM, DRECAM, Serv. Photons Atomes Mol., F-91191 Gif sur Yvette, (France); Lambert, G; Hara, T; Tanikawa, T; Kitamura, H; Shintake, T; Tanaka, Y; Tahara, K [RIKEN SPring Centre, Harima Inst., Hyogo 679-5148, (Japan); Lambert, G; Labat, M; Chubar, O; Couprie, M E [Groupe Magnetisme et Insertion, Synchrotron Soleil, F-91192 Gif sur Yvette, (France); Hara, T; Kitamura, H; Shintake, T; Inoue, S; Tanaka, Y [XFEL Project Head Office, RIKEN, Hyogo 679-5148, (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Conventional synchrotron radiation sources enable the structure of matter to be studied at near-atomic spatial resolution and picosecond temporal resolution. Free-electron lasers promise to extend this down to femtosecond timescales. The process by which free-electron lasers amplify synchrotron light-known as self-amplified spontaneous emission - is only partially temporally coherent, but this can be improved by seeding it with an external laser. Here we explore the use of seed light produced by high-order harmonic generation in a gas, covering wavelengths from the ultraviolet to soft X-rays. Using the SPring-8 Compact SASE Source test accelerator, we demonstrate an increase of three orders of magnitude in the intensity of the fundamental radiation at 160 nm, halving of the free-electron laser saturation length, and the generation of nonlinear harmonics at 54 nm and 32 nm. The low seed level used in this demonstration suggests that nonlinear harmonic schemes should enable the generation of fully coherent soft X-rays at wavelengths down to the so-called 'water window', vital for the study of biological samples. (authors)

  11. Half-period optical pulse generation using a free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaroszynski, D.A.; Chaix, P.; Piovella, N.

    1995-01-01

    Recently there has been growth, in interest in non-equilibrium interaction of half-period long optical pulses with matter. To date the optical pulses have been produced by chopping out a half-period long segment from a longer pulse using a semiconductor switch driven by a femtosecond laser. In this paper we present new methods for producing tunable ultra-short optical pulses as short as half an optical period using a free-electron laser driven by electron bunches with a duration a fraction of an optical period. Two different methods relying on the production of coherent spontaneous emission will be described. In the first method we show that when a train of ultra-short optical pulses as short as one half period. We present calculations which show that the small signal gain is unimportant in the early stages of radiation build up in the cavity when the startup process is dominated by coherent spontaneous emission. To support our proposed method we present encouraging experimental results from the FELIX experiment in the Netherlands which show that interference effects between the coherent spontaneous optical pulses at start-up are very important. The second proposed method relies on the fact that coherent spontaneous emission mimics the undulations of electrons as they pass through the undulator. We show that ultra-short optical pulses are produced by coherent spontaneous emission when ultra-short electron bunches pass through an ultra-short undulator. We discuss the interesting case of such undulator radiation in the presence of an optical cavity and show that the optical pulse can be open-quotes tayloredclose quotes by simply adjusting the optical cavity desynchronism. The proposed methods may be realisable using existing rf driven FELs in the far-infrared

  12. Three-dimensional analysis of harmonic generation in high-gain free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Zhirong; Kim, Kwang-Je

    2000-01-01

    In a high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) employing a planar undulator, strong bunching at the fundamental wavelength can drive substantial bunching and power levels at the harmonic frequencies. In this paper we investigate the three-dimensional evolution of harmonic radiation based on the coupled Maxwell-Klimontovich equations that take into account nonlinear harmonic interactions. Each harmonic field is a sum of a linear amplification term and a term driven by nonlinear harmonic interactions. After a certain stage of exponential growth, the dominant nonlinear term is determined by interactions of the lower nonlinear harmonics and the fundamental radiation. As a result, the gain length, transverse profile, and temporal structure of the first few harmonics are eventually governed by those of the fundamental. Transversely coherent third-harmonic radiation power is found to approach 1% of the fundamental power level for current high-gain FEL projects

  13. Generating femtosecond X-ray pulses using an emittance-spoiling foil in free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Y., E-mail: ding@slac.stanford.edu; Coffee, R.; Decker, F.-J.; Emma, P.; Field, C.; Huang, Z.; Krejcik, P.; Krzywinski, J.; Loos, H.; Lutman, A.; Marinelli, A.; Maxwell, T. J.; Turner, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Behrens, C. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Helml, W. [Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-11-09

    Generation of femtosecond to sub-femtosecond pulses is attracting much attention in X-ray free-electron laser user community. One method is to use a slotted, emittance-spoiling foil which was proposed before (P. Emma et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 074801 (2004)) and has been widely used at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Direct experimental characterization of the slotted-foil performance was previously unfeasible due to a lack of appropriate diagnostics. With a recently installed X-band radio-frequency transverse deflector, we are able to characterize the electron bunch spoiling effect and X-ray pulse when using the slotted foil. We show that few-femtosecond X-ray pulses are generated with flexible control of the single-pulse duration or double-pulse separation with comparison to the theoretical model.

  14. Analytic model of bunched beams for harmonic generation in the low-gain free electron laser regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Penn

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available One scheme for harmonic generation employs free electron lasers (FELs with two undulators: the first uses a seed laser to modulate the energy of the electron beam; following a dispersive element which acts to bunch the beam, the second undulator radiates at a higher harmonic. These processes are currently evaluated using extensive calculations or simulation codes which can be slow to evaluate and difficult to set up. We describe a simple algorithm to predict the output of a harmonic generation beam line in the low-gain FEL regime, based on trial functions for the output radiation. Full three-dimensional effects are included. This method has been implemented as a Mathematica® package, named CAMPANILE, which runs rapidly and can be generalized to include effects such as asymmetric beams and misalignments. This method is compared with simulation results using the FEL code GENESIS, both for single stages of harmonic generation and for the LUX project, a design concept for an ultrafast x-ray facility, where multiple stages upshift the input laser frequency by factors of up to 200.

  15. Electron slicing for the generation of tunable femtosecond soft x-ray pulses from a free electron laser and slice diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Di Mitri

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the experimental results of femtosecond slicing an ultrarelativistic, high brightness electron beam with a collimator. In contrast to some qualitative considerations reported in Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 074801 (2004PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.92.074801, we first demonstrate that the collimation process preserves the slice beam quality, in agreement with our theoretical expectations, and that the collimation is compatible with the operation of a linear accelerator in terms of beam transport, radiation dose, and collimator heating. Accordingly, the collimated beam can be used for the generation of stable femtosecond soft x-ray pulses of tunable duration, from either a self-amplified spontaneous emission or an externally seeded free electron laser. The proposed method also turns out to be a more compact and cheaper solution for electron slice diagnostics than the commonly used radio frequency deflecting cavities and has minimal impact on the machine design.

  16. Generation of surface electromagnetic waves in terahertz spectral range by free-electron laser radiation and their refractive index determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogomolov, G.D.; Jeong, Uk Young; Zhizhin, G.N.; Nikitin, A.K.; Zavyalov, V.V.; Kazakevich, G.M.; Lee, Byung Cheol

    2005-01-01

    First experiments for observation of surface electromagnetic waves (SEW) in the terahertz spectral range generated on dense aluminum films covering the optical quality glass plates are presented in this paper. Coherent radiation of the new free-electron laser covering the frequency range from 30 to 100cm -1 was used. The interference technique employing SEW propagation in the part of one shoulder of the asymmetric interferometer was applied. From the interference pattern the real part of SEW's effective refractive index ae ' was determined for the two laser emission wavelengths: at λ=150μm-ae ' =1+5x10 -5 , at λ=110μm-ae ' =1+8x10 -4 . High sensitivity of the interference patterns to overlayers made of Ge and Si with thickness of 100nm was demonstrated as well

  17. Second harmonic generation spectroscopy in the Reststrahl band of SiC using an infrared free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paarmann, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.paarmann@fhi-berlin.mpg.de; Razdolski, Ilya; Melnikov, Alexey; Gewinner, Sandy; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Wolf, Martin [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-08-24

    The Reststrahl spectral region of silicon carbide has recently attracted much attention owing to its potential for mid-infrared nanophotonic applications based on surface phonon polaritons (SPhPs). Studies of optical phonon resonances responsible for surface polariton formation, however, have so far been limited to linear optics. In this Letter, we report the first nonlinear optical investigation of the Reststrahl region of SiC, employing an infrared free-electron laser to perform second harmonic generation (SHG) spectroscopy. We observe two distinct resonance features in the SHG spectra, one attributed to resonant enhancement of the nonlinear susceptibility χ{sup (2)} and the other due to a resonance in the Fresnel transmission. Our work clearly demonstrates high sensitivity of mid-infrared SHG to phonon-driven phenomena and opens a route to studying nonlinear effects in nanophotonic structures based on SPhPs.

  18. Introduction. From a first-generation synchrotron radiation to an x-ray free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuki, Jun'ichiro

    2013-01-01

    The fruitful and remarkable research results in materials science during the past more than ten years have been continuously obtained by the advent of synchrotron radiation (SR) sources, especially the third-generation SR source. This is easily understood by considering that the SR beams provide not only five to ten orders of magnitude brilliance more in the continuum vacuum ultraviolet and X-ray regions of the electromagnetic spectrum than conventional sources, but also natural collimation, high polarization, pulsed time structure and high stability. In this paper we present a brief history of SR sources, especially in Japan to know how the SR sources developed, and a view of the future research direction regarding the use of SR beams. (author)

  19. Sum-frequency generation from molecular monolayers using 14 μm radiation from the FELIX free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Ham, E.W.M.; Vrehen, Q.H.F.; Eliel, E.R.

    1995-01-01

    Sum-frequency generation (SFG) has developed into a widely applied tool for study of surfaces and interfaces where molecules are present. It combines the surface specificity of a second-order nonlinear optical technique with the power of a spectroscopic method, and it can be used under widely varying experimental conditions ranging from UHV to electrochemical cells. The important characteristic of SFG is that it allows one to study the average spatial orientation of a molecular bond in a monolayer of molecules at an interface. Until recently SFG measurements were confined to the frequency interval Y μ > 1700 cm -1 because of a lack of suitable laser sources at wave-lengths λ > 6 μm. So for most molecules only a few vibrational modes and thus intramolecular bonds can be studied. We have developed a universal sum-frequency spectrometer around the FELIX free-electron law that covers the complete molecular fingerprint since we can generate any IR wavelength between 2.75 and 110 fμ at the FELIX facility. We have used this setup for a series of exploratory SFG experiments in a frequency range that was hitherto unexplored in the study of molecular monolayers. We have studied thiol monolayers chemisorbed on a variety of noble metals (Au, Ag, Pt) where we focussed on the C-S stretch vibration at ν = 702 cm -1 (λ = 14.3 μm). We have found spectroscopic features revealing the presence of both the trane and gauche conformers of the adsorbed molecules. The present measurements open a whole new wavelength range for nonlinear optical studies of interfaces

  20. Development of high current electron beam generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byeong Cheol; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Sun Kook [and others

    1997-05-01

    A high-current electron beam generator has been developed. The energy and the average current of the electron beam are 2 MeV and 50 mA, respectively. The electron beam generator is composed of an electron gun, RF acceleration cavities, a 260-kW RF generator, electron beam optics components, and control system, etc. The electron beam generator will be used for the development of a millimeter-wave free-electron laser and a high average power infrared free-electron laser. The machine will also be used as a user facility in nuclear industry, environment industry, semiconductor industry, chemical industry, etc. (author). 15 tabs., 85 figs.

  1. Development of high current electron beam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byeong Cheol; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Sun Kook

    1997-05-01

    A high-current electron beam generator has been developed. The energy and the average current of the electron beam are 2 MeV and 50 mA, respectively. The electron beam generator is composed of an electron gun, RF acceleration cavities, a 260-kW RF generator, electron beam optics components, and control system, etc. The electron beam generator will be used for the development of a millimeter-wave free-electron laser and a high average power infrared free-electron laser. The machine will also be used as a user facility in nuclear industry, environment industry, semiconductor industry, chemical industry, etc. (author). 15 tabs., 85 figs

  2. Free Electron Laser in Poland

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2009-01-01

    The idea of building a new IVth generation of light sources of high luminosity, which use accelerators, arose in the 80ties of XXth century. Now, in a numerable synchrotron and laser laboratories in Europe, there is carried out, since a couple of years, intense applied research on free electron lasers (FEL) [17,18]. Similarly, in this country, free electron laser in Poland – POLFEL [9] is, in a design, a coherent light source of the IVth generation, characterized by very short pulses in the range of 10-100fs, of big power 0,2GW and UV wavelength of 27nm, of average power 1W, with effective high power third harmonic of 9nm. The laser consists of a linear superconducting accelerator 100m in length, undulator and experimental lines. It generates a monochromatic and coherent radiation and can be tuned from THz range via IR, visible to UV, and potentially to X-rays. The linac works in quasi-CW or real-CW mode. It is planned by IPJ [9,10] and XFEL-Poland Consortium [16] as a part of the ESFRI [1] priority EuroFEL...

  3. Harmonics generation of a terahertz wakefield free-electron laser from a dielectric loaded waveguide excited by a direct current electron beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiwei; Lu, Yalin; He, Zhigang; Jia, Qika; Wang, Lin

    2016-06-01

    We propose to generate high-power terahertz (THz) radiation from a cylindrical dielectric loaded waveguide (DLW) excited by a direct-current electron beam with the harmonics generation method. The DLW supports a discrete set of modes that can be excited by an electron beam passing through the structure. The interaction of these modes with the co-propagating electron beam results in micro-bunching and the coherent enhancement of the wakefield radiation, which is dominated by the fundamental mode. By properly choosing the parameters of DLW and beam energy, the high order modes can be the harmonics of the fundamental one; thus, high frequency radiation corresponding to the high order modes will benefit from the dominating bunching process at the fundamental eigenfrequency and can also be coherently excited. With the proposed method, high power THz radiation can be obtained with an easily achievable electron beam and a large DLW structure.

  4. Generating high-brightness and coherent soft x-ray pulses in the water window with a seeded free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaishang Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new scheme to generate high-brightness and temporal coherent soft x-ray radiation in a seeded free-electron laser. The proposed scheme is based on the coherent harmonic generation (CHG and superradiant principles. A CHG scheme is first used to generate a coherent signal at ultrahigh harmonics of the seed. This coherent signal is then amplified by a series of chicane-undulator modules via the fresh bunch and superradiant processes in the following radiator. Using a representative of a realistic set of parameters, three-dimensional simulations have been carried out and the simulations results demonstrated that 10 GW-level ultrashort (∼20  fs coherent radiation pulses in the water window can be achieved by using a 1.6 GeV electron beam based on the proposed technique.

  5. Generation of electron Airy beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloch-Bloch, Noa; Lereah, Yossi; Lilach, Yigal; Gover, Avraham; Arie, Ady

    2013-02-21

    Within the framework of quantum mechanics, a unique particle wave packet exists in the form of the Airy function. Its counterintuitive properties are revealed as it propagates in time or space: the quantum probability wave packet preserves its shape despite dispersion or diffraction and propagates along a parabolic caustic trajectory, even though no force is applied. This does not contradict Newton's laws of motion, because the wave packet centroid propagates along a straight line. Nearly 30 years later, this wave packet, known as an accelerating Airy beam, was realized in the optical domain; later it was generalized to an orthogonal and complete family of beams that propagate along parabolic trajectories, as well as to beams that propagate along arbitrary convex trajectories. Here we report the experimental generation and observation of the Airy beams of free electrons. These electron Airy beams were generated by diffraction of electrons through a nanoscale hologram, which imprinted on the electrons' wavefunction a cubic phase modulation in the transverse plane. The highest-intensity lobes of the generated beams indeed followed parabolic trajectories. We directly observed a non-spreading electron wavefunction that self-heals, restoring its original shape after passing an obstacle. This holographic generation of electron Airy beams opens up new avenues for steering electronic wave packets like their photonic counterparts, because the wave packets can be imprinted with arbitrary shapes or trajectories.

  6. Free-electron laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehara, Eisuke

    2003-01-01

    The principle and history of free-electron laser (FEL), first evidenced in 1977, the relationship between FEL wavelength and output power, the high-power FEL driven by the superconducting linac, the X-ray FEL by the linac, and the medical use are described. FEL is the vacuum oscillator tube and essentially composed from the high-energy linac, undulator and light-resonator. It utilizes free electrons in the vacuum to generate the beam with wavelength ranging from microwave to gamma ray. The first high-power FEL developed in Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is based on the development of superconducting linac for oscillating the highest power beam. In the medical field, applications to excise brain tumors (in US) and to reconstruct experimentally blood vessels in the pig heart (in Gunma University) by lasing and laser coagulator are in progress with examinations to remove intra-vascular cholesterol mass by irradiation of 5.7μm FEL beam. Cancer cells are considered diagnosed by FEL beam of far-infrared-THz range. The FEL beam CT is expected to have a wide variety of application without the radiation exposure and its resolution is equal or superior to that of usual imaging techniques. (N.I.)

  7. Photonic Free-Electron Lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Slot, Petrus J.M.; Denis, T.; Lee, J.H.H.; van Dijk, M.W.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2012-01-01

    A photonic free-electron laser (pFEL) produces coherent Cerenkov radiation from a set of parallel electron beams streaming through a photonic crystal. The function of the crystal is to slow down the phase velocity of a copropagating electromagnetic wave, such that also mildly relativistic electrons

  8. Characterization of electron bunches from field emitter array cathodes for use in next-generation x-ray free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leemann, S. C.

    2007-01-01

    PSI is interested in developing an x-ray free electron laser (X-FEL) as a companion radiation source to the existing Swiss Light Source. In order to achieve radiation wavelengths as low as 1 Α, the X-FEL requires excellent electron beam quality and high beam energy. The energy requirements and thus the size and cost of the project can be reduced considerably if an ultra-low emittance electron source is developed. Therefore PSI has started the Low Emittance Gun Project with the aim to design a novel type of electron source that will deliver an electron beam with unprecedented emittance at high peak currents to the linear accelerator of the proposed X-FEL. A source candidate for such a gun is field emission from cold cathodes. In order to gain first experience with field emission guns, investigate the dynamics of space charge dominated electron beams and to develop diagnostics capable of resolving ultra-low emittances, it was decided to build a 100 keV DC gun test stand. In the scope of this thesis, the test stand has been designed, assembled and commissioned. For the first time, transverse phase space measurements of bunches emitted by field emitter arrays in pulsed DC accelerating fields have been performed. (author)

  9. Development of a Nomarski-type multi-frame interferometer as a time and space resolving diagnostics for the free electron density of laser-generated plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerner, M.; Frank, A.; Pelka, A.; Schaumann, G.; Schoekel, A.; Schumacher, D.; Roth, M.; Fils, J.; Blazevic, A.; Hessling, T.; Basko, M. M.; Maruhn, J.; Tauschwitz, An.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on the development and set-up of a Nomarski-type multi-frame interferometer as a time and space resolving diagnostics of the free electron density in laser-generated plasma. The interferometer allows the recording of a series of 4 images within 6 ns of a single laser-plasma interaction. For the setup presented here, the minimal accessible free electron density is 5 x 10 18 cm -3 , the maximal one is 2 x 10 20 cm -3 . Furthermore, it provides a resolution of the electron density in space of 50 μm and in time of 0.5 ns for one image with a customizable magnification in space for each of the 4 images. The electron density was evaluated from the interferograms using an Abel inversion algorithm. The functionality of the system was proven during first experiments and the experimental results are presented and discussed. A ray tracing procedure was realized to verify the interferometry pictures taken. In particular, the experimental results are compared to simulations and show excellent agreement, providing a conclusive picture of the evolution of the electron density distribution.

  10. Free-electron laser results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, W.E.; Brau, C.A.; Newnam, B.E.; Warren, R.W.; Winston, J.; Young, L.M.

    1981-01-01

    The Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL) amplifier experiment was designed to demonstrate high efficiency for transfer of energy from an electron beam to a light beam in the magnetic field of a tapered wiggler. Initial results indicate an energy transfer consistent with theory. Distinct groups of decelerated electrons as well as accelerated electrons are clearly present in the energy spectrum of electrons emerging from the wiggler when the laser light is present. The observed energy decrease for the electrons captured in the decelerating bucket is approx. 6% and the average decrease of the entire energy distribution is approx. 2% for the conditions of these initial measurements

  11. X-Ray Production by Cascading Stages of a High-Gain Harmonic Generation Free-Electron Laser I: Basic Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, J

    2004-07-02

    We study a new approach to produce x-ray by cascading several stages of a High-Gain Harmonic Generation (HGHG) Free-Electron Laser (FEL). Besides the merits of a Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) scheme, an HGHG scheme could also provide much better stability of the radiation power, controllable short pulse length, more stable central wavelength, and radiation with better longitudinal coherence. Detailed design and optimization scheme, simulation results and analytical estimate formulae are presented. To lay results on a realistic basis, the electron bunch parameters used in this paper are restricted to be those of DESY TTF and SLAC LCLS projects; however, such sets of parameters are not necessary to be optimized for an HGHG FEL.

  12. X-ray comb generation from nuclear-resonance-stabilized x-ray free-electron laser oscillator for fundamental physics and precision metrology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. W. Adams

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An x-ray free-electron laser oscillator (XFELO is a next-generation x-ray source, similar to free-electron laser oscillators at VUV and longer wavelengths but using crystals as high-reflectivity x-ray mirrors. Each output pulse from an XFELO is fully coherent with high spectral purity. The temporal coherence length can further be increased drastically, from picoseconds to microseconds or even longer, by phase-locking successive XFELO output pulses, using the narrow nuclear resonance lines of nuclei such as ^{57}Fe as a reference. We show that the phase fluctuation due to the seismic activities is controllable and that due to spontaneous emission is small. The fluctuation of electron-bunch spacing contributes mainly to the envelope fluctuation but not to the phase fluctuation. By counting the number of standing-wave maxima formed by the output of the nuclear-resonance-stabilized (NRS XFELO over an optically known length, the wavelength of the nuclear resonance can be accurately measured, possibly leading to a new length or frequency standard at x-ray wavelengths. A NRS-XFELO will be an ideal source for experimental x-ray quantum optics as well as other fundamental physics. The technique can be refined for other, narrower resonances such as ^{181}Ta or ^{45}Sc.

  13. X-ray Production by Cascading Stages of a High-Gain Harmonic Generation Free-Electron Laser II: Special Topics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, J

    2004-09-01

    In this paper, we study the tolerance of a new approach to produce coherent x-ray by cascading several stages of a High-Gain Harmonic Generation (HGHG) Free-Electron Laser (FEL). Being a harmonic generation process, a small noise in the initial fundamental signal will lead to a significant noise-to-signal (NTS) ratio in the final harmonic, so the noise issue is studied in this paper. We study two sources of noise: the incoherent undulator radiation, which is a noise with respect to the seed laser; and the noise of the seed laser itself. In reality, the electron beam longitudinal current profile is not uniform. Since the electron beam is the amplification medium for the FEL, this non- uniformity will induce phase error in the FEL. Therefore, this effect is studied. Phase error due to the wakefield and electron beam self-field is also studied. Synchrotronization of the electron beam and the seed laser is an important issue determining the success of the HGHG. We study the timing jitter induced frequency jitter in this paper. We also show that an HGHG FEL poses a less stringent requirement on the emittance than a SASE FEL does, due to a Natural Emittance Effect Reduction (NEER) mechanism. This NEER mechanism suggests a new operation mode, i.e., the HGHG FEL could adopt a high current, though unavoidable, a high emittance electron beam. Study in this paper shows that, production of hard x-rays with good longitudinal coherence by cascading stages of a HGHG FEL is promising. However, technical improvement is demanded.

  14. Free-electron lasers 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petroff, Y.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents papers on free-electron laser technology. The authors cover technological developments on existing FELs, new FEL research, and the use of FELs in experimental investigations. Among the studies reported are lasing in the visible and UV on the Novosibirsk VEPP-3 storage ring, description of Japanese FEL research, and Mark III FEL, and the Paladin results

  15. Free Electron Lasers in 2005

    CERN Document Server

    Colson, W B; Voughs, T

    2005-01-01

    Twenty-eight years after the first operation of the short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) at Stanford University, there continue to be many important experiments, proposed experiments, and user facilities around the world. Properties of FELs in the infrared, visible, UV, and x-ray wavelength regimes are listed and discussed.

  16. Free Electron Lasers in 2004

    CERN Document Server

    Colson, William B

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-seven years after the first operation of the short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) at Stanford University, there continue to be many important experiments, proposed experiments, and user facilities around the world. Properties of FELs operating in the infrared, visible, UV, and x-ray wavelength regimes are listed and discussed.

  17. Quantum aspects of the free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaiba, R.

    2007-03-15

    We study the role of Quantum Mechanics in the physics of Free Electron Lasers. While the Free Electron Laser (FEL) is usually treated as a classical device, we review the advantages of a quantum formulation of the FEL. We then show the existence of a regime of operation of the FEL that can only be described using Quantum Mechanics: if the dimensionless quantum parameter anti {rho} is smaller than 1, then in the 1-dimensional approximation the Hamiltonian that describes the FEL becomes equivalent to the Hamiltonian of a two-level system coupled to a radiation field. We give analytical and numerical solutions for the photon statistics of a Free Electron Laser operating in the quantum regime under various approximations. Since in the quantum regime the momentum of the electrons is discrete, we give a description of the electrons in phase space by introducing the Discrete Wigner Function. We then drop the assumption of a mono-energetic electron beam and describe the general case of a initial electron energy spread G({gamma}). Numerical analysis shows that the FEL quantum regime is observed only when the width of the initial momentum distribution is smaller than the momentum of the emitted photons. Both the analytical results in the linear approximation and the numerical simulations show that only the electrons close to a certain resonant energy start to emit photons. This generates the so-called Hole-burning effect in the electrons energy distribution, as it can be seen in the simulations we provide. Finally, we present a brief discussion about a fundamental uncertainty relation that ties the electron energy spread and the electron bunching. (orig.)

  18. Progress toward the Wisconsin Free Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisognano, Joseph; Bosch, R.A.; Eisert, D.; Fisher, M.V.; Green, M.A.; Jacobs, K.; Kleman, K.J.; Kulpin, J.; Rogers, G.C.; Lawler, J.E.; Yavuz, D.; Legg, R.

    2011-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison/Synchrotron Radiation Center is advancing its design for a seeded VUV/soft X-ray Free Electron Laser facility called WiFEL. To support this vision of an ultimate light source, we are pursuing a program of strategic R and D addressing several crucial elements. This includes development of a high repetition rate, VHF superconducting RF electron gun, R and D on photocathode materials by ARPES studies, and evaluation of FEL facility architectures (e.g., recirculation, compressor scenarios, CSR dechirping, undulator technologies) with the specific goal of cost containment. Studies of high harmonic generation for laser seeding are also planned.

  19. Electron Inelastic-Mean-Free-Path Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 71 NIST Electron Inelastic-Mean-Free-Path Database (PC database, no charge)   This database provides values of electron inelastic mean free paths (IMFPs) for use in quantitative surface analyses by AES and XPS.

  20. Free-electron laser theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, G.; Torre, A.

    1989-01-01

    The essential features of the theory of the free electron laser (FEL) are given in some detail. Beginning with an explanation of the basic gain mechanism, the lectures continue with a discussion of the problems associated with single-passage and recirculated (storage-ring) operation. Pulse propagation effects and the so-called 'lethargic' behaviour are analysed more completely. Finally, elements of FEL quantum theory are reported, in order to clarify the laser process from the microscopic point of view. Appendices give a fuller treatment of optical cavities and undulator magnets. (orig.)

  1. On the electrolytic generation of hydrated electron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh Mazumdar, A.S.; Guha, S.N.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations on the electrolytic generation of hydrated electron in oxygenated as well as oxygen-free solutions at different pH were undertaken. Since sup(-e)aq is known to react rapidly with O 2 yielding the transient O 2 - ion, the latter was looked for through its interaction with phosphite ions resulting in their oxidation near the cathode. It appears from the results that in electrolytic processes, the primary electron (esup(-)sub(cathode)) probably reacts directly with reactive solutes like oxygen, bypassing the hydration step. Data obtained in oxygen-free solutions, however, support the possible formation of hydrated electron at least in alkaline solutions. (author)

  2. Synchrotron topographic evaluation of strain around craters generated by irradiation with X-ray pulses from free electron laser with different intensities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wierzchowski, W.; Wieteska, K.; Sobierajski, R.; Klinger, D.; Pelka, J.; Zymierska, D.; Paulmann, C.; Hau-Riege, S.P.; London, R.A.; Graf, A.; Burian, Tomáš; Chalupský, Jaromír; Gaudin, J.; Krzywinski, J.; Moeller, S.; Messerschmidt, M.; Bozek, J.; Bostedt, C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 364, Dec (2015), s. 20-26 ISSN 0168-583X Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : x-ray free electron laser * soft x-ray lasers * irradiation with femtosecond pulses * silicon Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 1.389, year: 2015

  3. Simulations of free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, T.; Godfrey, B.B.

    1979-01-01

    The generation of coherent electromagnetic radiation by the interaction of a relativistic electron beam with a static helical magnetic field is investigated using one- and two-dimensional relativistic electromagnetic plasma simulation codes. In the one-dimensional simulations, we observed the coupling between the negative energy beam mode and the positive energy electromagnetic wave. Substantial growth rate (omega 1 approx. 0.1 omega/sub pe/) of the unstable electromagnetic wave has been observed and efficiency of radiation production is found to be between 25 to 30% depending on various parameters. In the two-dimensional simulations, we observed a decrease in the growth rate, but increased efficiency due to the decrease in the phase velocity of the unstable electrostatic wave. In addition, we also observed waves propagating at an angle with respect to the electron beam. Consequently, the beam is bunched in the radial as well as the axial directions. These waves are believed to be generated by another instability which saturates at relatively low level

  4. Inverse Free Electron Laser accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; van Steenbergen, A.; Sandweiss, J.

    1992-09-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e - beam and the 10 11 Watt CO 2 laser beam of BNL's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP) and a wiggler. The latter element is designed as a fast excitation unit making use of alternating stacks of Vanadium Permendur (VaP) ferromagnetic laminations, periodically interspersed with conductive, nonmagnetic laminations, which act as eddy current induced field reflectors. Wiggler parameters and field distribution data will be presented for a prototype wiggler in a constant period and in a ∼ 1.5 %/cm tapered period configuration. The CO 2 laser beam will be transported through the IFEL interaction region by means of a low loss, dielectric coated, rectangular waveguide. Short waveguide test sections have been constructed and have been tested using a low power cw CO 2 laser. Preliminary results of guide attenuation and mode selectivity will be given, together with a discussion of the optical issues for the IFEL accelerator. The IFEL design is supported by the development and use of 1D and 3D simulation programs. The results of simulation computations, including also wiggler errors, for a single module accelerator and for a multi-module accelerator will be presented

  5. Fate of free radicals generated during one-electron reductions of 4-alkyl-1,4-peroxyquinols by cytochrome P-450

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yumibe, N.P.; Thompson, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    Free radicals resulting from the one-electron reduction and subsequent homolytic cleavage of oxygen-oxygen bonds by heme proteins are likely to be responsible for some aspects of the toxicity of organic hydroperoxides. In the present work, effects of the 4-alkyl substituent of 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-alkyl-4-hydroperoxycytohexa-2,5-dienones on radical production were investigated with microsomal cytochrome P-450 from rat liver. Quinoxy radicals from homolysis of the peroxyquinols underwent β-scission to produce a quinone and an alkyl radical, and this process occurred with increasing frequency as the stability of the alkyl radical increased. The fate of benzyl and 2-phenylethyl radicals generated from the appropriately substituted peroxyquinols was investigated also. The former was converted to benzyl alcohol, benzaldehyde, and toluene and the latter to 2-phenylethanol, phenylacetaldehyde, ethylbenzene, styrene, and benzaldehyde. Oxygen-18 labeling studies demonstrate that 80-85% of the benzyl alcohol incorporated oxygen from the hydroperoxide and the balance from molecular oxygen. This indicates that the predominant reaction pathway involved recombination between the benzyl radical and the iron-bound hydroxyl radical of the P-450 intermediate complex. By contrast, about 50% of 2-phenylethanol from the 2-phenylethyl radical incorporated oxygen from water and the balance from O 2 . Two alternative mechanisms are proposed to explain the formation of 2-phenylethanol that contained oxygen from water and the concurrent formation of styrene: (a) oxygen exchange of the P-450 intermediate with water, followed by hydrogen abstraction and radical recombination reactions with the P-450 complex, or (b) oxidation of the radical to the 2-phenylethyl cation followed by proton elimination and hydration

  6. Generative electronic background music system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazurowski, Lukasz [Faculty of Computer Science, West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, Zolnierska Street 49, Szczecin, PL (Poland)

    2015-03-10

    In this short paper-extended abstract the new approach to generation of electronic background music has been presented. The Generative Electronic Background Music System (GEBMS) has been located between other related approaches within the musical algorithm positioning framework proposed by Woller et al. The music composition process is performed by a number of mini-models parameterized by further described properties. The mini-models generate fragments of musical patterns used in output composition. Musical pattern and output generation are controlled by container for the mini-models - a host-model. General mechanism has been presented including the example of the synthesized output compositions.

  7. Generative electronic background music system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazurowski, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    In this short paper-extended abstract the new approach to generation of electronic background music has been presented. The Generative Electronic Background Music System (GEBMS) has been located between other related approaches within the musical algorithm positioning framework proposed by Woller et al. The music composition process is performed by a number of mini-models parameterized by further described properties. The mini-models generate fragments of musical patterns used in output composition. Musical pattern and output generation are controlled by container for the mini-models - a host-model. General mechanism has been presented including the example of the synthesized output compositions

  8. Free electron laser and superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Iwata, A

    2003-01-01

    The lasing of the first free-electron laser (FEL) in the world was successfully carried out in 1977, so the history of FELs as a light source is not so long. But FELs are now utilized for research in many scientific and engineering fields owing to such characteristics as tunability of the wavelength, and short pulse and high peak power, which is difficult utilizing a common light source. Research for industrial applications has also been carried out in some fields, such as life sciences, semiconductors, nano-scale measurement, and others. The task for the industrial use of FEL is the realization of high energy efficiency and high optical power. As a means of promoting realization, the combining of an FEL and superconducting linac is now under development in order to overcome the thermal limitations of normal-conducting linacs. Further, since tuning the wavelength is carried out by changing the magnetic density of the undulator, which is now induced by moving part of the stack of permanent magnets, there is un...

  9. Free-electron lasers considered for CEBAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Spinoff development of industrial free-electron lasers is in prospect for an industry-universitylaboratory consortium centred at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility in Newport News, Virginia, site of the CEBAF 4 GeV superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) accelerator, now being commissioned (see page 42). Together with several US corporations and universities, the Laboratory is now also addressing the potential of smaller SRF electron accelerators for ''driving'' free-electron lasers (FELs)

  10. Two-stage free electron laser research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, S. B.

    1984-10-01

    KMS Fusion, Inc. began studying the feasibility of two-stage free electron lasers for the Office of Naval Research in June, 1980. At that time, the two-stage FEL was only a concept that had been proposed by Luis Elias. The range of parameters over which such a laser could be successfully operated, attainable power output, and constraints on laser operation were not known. The primary reason for supporting this research at that time was that it had the potential for producing short-wavelength radiation using a relatively low voltage electron beam. One advantage of a low-voltage two-stage FEL would be that shielding requirements would be greatly reduced compared with single-stage short-wavelength FEL's. If the electron energy were kept below about 10 MeV, X-rays, generated by electrons striking the beam line wall, would not excite neutron resonance in atomic nuclei. These resonances cause the emission of neutrons with subsequent induced radioactivity. Therefore, above about 10 MeV, a meter or more of concrete shielding is required for the system, whereas below 10 MeV, a few millimeters of lead would be adequate.

  11. High frequency free-electron laser results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, K.; Brau, C.A.; Newman, B.E.; Stein, W.E.; Warren, R.W.; Winston, J.G.; Young, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    By looking at the free-electron laser as a particle accelerator working backwards, Morton realized that the techniques used to accelerate particles could be used to improve the performance of free-electron lasers. In particular, he predicted the capture of electrons in ''stable-phase'' regions, or ''buckets'' in the electron phase space, and proposed that by decelerating the buckets, the trapped electrons could be decelerated to extract significant amounts of their energy as optical radiation. In fact, since electrons not trapped in the stable regions are forever excluded from them--at least in the adiabatic approximation--displacement techniques could also be used to accelerate or decelerate electrons in a free-electron laser. This paper explains the principle behind ''phase-displacement'' acceleration and details an experiment carried out with a 20-MeV electron beam to test these predictions. Results obtained with a tapered-wiggler free-electron laser demonstrate the concepts proposed by Morton for enhanced efficiency. They show deceleration of electrons by as much as 7% and extraction of more than 3% of the total electron-beam energy as laser energy when the laser is operated as an amplifier. The experiment is presently being reconfigured to examine its performance as a laser oscillator

  12. Laser Assisted Free-Free Transition in Electron - Atom Collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    Free-free transition is studied for electron-Hydrogen atom system in ground state at very low incident energies in presence of an external homogeneous, monochromatic and linearly polarized laser field. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser in a non perturbative manner by choosing the Volkov solutions in both the channels. The space part of the scattering wave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of electron exchange, short range as well as of the long range interactions. Laser assisted differential as well as elastic total cross sections are calculated for single photon absorption/emission in the soft photon limit, the laser intensity being much less than the atomic field intensity. A strong suppression is noted in the laser assisted cross sections as compared to the field free situations. Significant difference is noted in the singlet and the triplet cross sections.

  13. Magnet Free Generators - 3rd Generation Wind Turbine Generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bogi Bech; Mijatovic, Nenad; Henriksen, Matthew Lee

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an introduction to superconducting wind turbine generators, which are often referred to as 3rd generation wind turbine generators. Advantages and challenges of superconducting generators are presented with particular focus on possible weight and efficiency improvements. A comp...

  14. Free electron laser as a fusion driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosnitz, D.; Schlitt, L.

    1981-01-01

    The Free Electron Laser (FEL) is shown to be a potentially attractive solution to the problem of finding a suitable short wavelength fusion driver. The design of a 3 MJ, 250 nm FEL fusion driver is discussed

  15. Integrated Free-Piston Generators: An Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arshad, Waqas M.; Thelin, Peter; Sadarangani, Chandur [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Electrical Machines and Power Electronics; Baeckstroem, Thomas [ABB Group Services-Corporate Research, Vaesteraas (Sweden)

    2002-08-01

    The free-piston generator is an energy conversion device that integrates a combustion engine and an electrical generator into a single unit. Thereby the intermediary crankshaft stage present in conventional hybrid topologies is eliminated. This has benefits in efficiency, weight reduction, robustness, variable compression operation and multi-fuel possibilities. This paper presents the free-piston generator concepts, along with the expected benefits and drawbacks. A literature survey is provided. Results from a simplified combustion modeling process are presented in terms of piston motion profiles. These have implications upon the dimensioning and selection of an appropriate electrical machine. Specifications for the electrical machine are outlined. Some distinct electrical machine solutions are presented and discussed. An application of the free-piston generator in a series hybrid vehicle is also proposed.

  16. Hex Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    The overall objective of the Hex Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics project is to evaluate and test pretreatment coating systems not containing hexavalent chrome in avionics and electronics housing applications. This objective will be accomplished by testing strong performing coating systems from prior NASA and DoD testing or new coating systems as determined by the stakeholders.

  17. Control system for JAERI Free Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Masayoshi

    1992-01-01

    A control system comprising of the personal computers network and the CAMAC stations for the JAERI Free Electron Laser is designed and is in the development stage. It controls the equipment and analyzes the electron and optical beam experiments. The concept and the prototype of the control system are described. (author)

  18. Long range coherence in free electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, W. B.

    1984-01-01

    The simple free electron laser (FEL) design uses a static, periodic, transverse magnetic field to undulate relativistic electrons traveling along its axis. This allows coupling to a co-propagating optical wave and results in bunching to produce coherent radiation. The advantages of the FEL are continuous tunability, operation at wavelengths ranging from centimeters to angstroms, and high efficiency resulting from the fact that the interaction region only contains light, relativistic electrons, and a magnetic field. Theoretical concepts and operational principles are discussed.

  19. Linac technology for free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, R.K.; Morton, P.L.; Wilson, P.B.; Keefe, D.; Faltens, A.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to concentrate on the properties of high-energy electron linear accelerators for use in free-electron lasers operating principally in the Compton regime. To fix our focus somewhat, we shall consider electron energies in the 20- to 200-MeV range and consider requirements for high-power free-electron lasers operating in the 0.5- to 10-μm range. Preliminary remarks are made on high-power free-electron laser amplifiers and oscillators and some desirable characteristics of the linacs that deliver electron beams for these devices. Both the high peak-current requirements of the amplifier and the high pulse-repetition frequency requirements of the oscillator can be met by present-day linac technology, although not necessarily by the same machine. In this papers second and third section, the technology of two rather different types of linear accelerators, the rf linac and the induction linac, is reviewed. In conclusion, applications to the Free Electron Lasers are stated

  20. Polarization in free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadichev, V.A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    Polarization of electromagnetic radiation is required very often in numerous scientific and industrial applications: studying of crystals, molecules and intermolecular interaction high-temperature superconductivity, semiconductors and their transitions, polymers and liquid crystals. Using polarized radiation allows to obtain important data (otherwise inaccessible) in astrophysics, meteorology and oceanology. It is promising in chemistry and biology for selective influence on definite parts of molecules in chain synthesis reactions, precise control of various processes at cell and subcell levels, genetic engineering etc. Though polarization methods are well elaborated in optics, they can fail in far-infrared, vacuum-ultraviolet and X-ray regions because of lack of suitable non-absorbing materials and damaging of optical elements at high specific power levels. Therefore, it is of some interest to analyse polarization of untreated FEL radiation obtained with various types of undulators, with and without axial magnetic field. The polarization is studied using solutions for electron orbits in various cases: plane or helical undulator with or without axial magnetic field, two plane undulators, a combination of right- and left-handed helical undulators with equal periods, but different field amplitudes. Some examples of how a desired polarization (elliptical circular or linear) can be obtained or changed quickly, which is necessary in many experiments, are given.

  1. Delocalization Drives Free Charge Generation in Conjugated Polymer Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rumbles, Garry [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Reid, Obadiah G [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pace, Natalie A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-02-19

    We demonstrate that the product of photoinduced electron transfer between a conjugated polymer host and a dilute molecular sensitizer is controlled by the structural state of the polymer. Ordered semicrystalline solids exhibit free charge generation, while disordered polymers in the melt phase do not. We use photoluminescence (PL) and time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) measurements to sweep through polymer melt transitions in situ. Free charge generation measured by TRMC turns off upon melting, whereas PL quenching of the molecular sensitizers remains constant, implying unchanged electron transfer efficiency. The key difference is the intermolecular order of the polymer host in the solid state compared to the melt. We propose that this order-disorder transition modulates the localization length of the initial charge-transfer state, which controls the probability of free charge formation.

  2. Electron Beam Generation in Tevatron Electron Lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Solyak, N.; Tiunov, M.

    2006-01-01

    New type of high perveance electron guns with convex cathode has been developed. Three guns described in this article are built to provide transverse electron current density distributions needed for Electron Lenses for beam-beam compensation in the Tevatron collider. The current distribution can be controlled either by the gun geometry or by voltage on a special control electrode located near cathode. We present the designs of the guns and report results of beam measurements on the test bench. Because of their high current density and low transverse temperature of electrons, electron guns of this type can be used in electron cooling and beam-beam compensation devices

  3. Electron beam generation in Tevatron electron lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Solyak, N.; Tiunov, M.

    2006-01-01

    New type of high perveance electron guns with convex cathode has been developed. Three guns described in this article are built to provide transverse electron current density distributions needed for Electron Lenses for beam-beam compensation in the Tevatron collider. The current distribution can be controlled either by the gun geometry or by voltage on a special control electrode located near cathode. We present the designs of the guns and report results of beam measurements on the test bench. Because of their high current density and low transverse temperature of electrons, electron guns of this type can be used in electron cooling and beam-beam compensation devices

  4. Rippled beam free electron laser amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1999-01-01

    A free electron laser amplifier provides a scalloping annular electron beam that interacts with the axial electric field of a TM.sub.0n mode. A waveguide defines an axial centerline and, a solenoid arranged about the waveguide produces an axial constant magnetic field within the waveguide. An electron beam source outputs a annular electron beam that interacts with the axial magnetic field to have an equilibrium radius and a ripple radius component having a variable radius with a ripple period along the axial centerline. An rf source outputs an axial electric field that propagates within the waveguide coaxial with the electron beam and has a radial mode that interacts at the electron beam at the equilibrium radius component of the electron beam.

  5. An inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wernick, I.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    A free electron laser was configured as an autoaccelerator to test the principle of accelerating electrons by stimulated absorption of radiation (λ = 1.65mm) by an electron beam (750kV) traversing an undulator. Radiation is produced in the first section of a constant period undulator (1 w1 = 1.43cm) and then absorbed (∼ 40%) in a second undulator, having a tapered period (1 w2 = 1.8 - 2.25cm), which results in the acceleration of a subgroup (∼ 9%) of electrons to ∼ 1MeV

  6. An Electrostatic Free-Electron Maser for Fusion - Design Considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Amersfoort, P. W.; Urbanus, W. H.; Verhoeven, A. G. A.; Verheul, A.; Sterk, A. B.; Vaningen, A. M.; van der Wiel, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    For the next generation of large tokamaks, efficient mm-wave sources at frequencies of up to 300 GHz and unit size of 1 MW cw will be required. The design of a free electron maser for this application, based on a dc electrostatic accelerator, is discussed.

  7. Commissioning of the JAERI free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehara, E.J.; Nagai, R.; Sawamura, M.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed, and constructed a prototype for a quasi-cw, and high-average power free electron laser driven by a 15MeV superconducting rf linac at Tokai, JAERI. In designing a high power FEL, there are many available design options to generate the required power output. By applying the superconducting rf linac driver, some of the options relating to the FEL itself may be relaxed by transferring design difficulties to the driver. Because wall losses become minimal in the superconducting accelerator cavity, very long pulse or quasi-cw, and resultant high average power may be readily attained at the JAERI superconducting rf linac FEL. In 1992 Japanese fiscal year, we have successfully demonstrated better cryogenic (stand-by loss<3.5W at 4.5K) and accelerating fields' performances (Eacc=7-9.4MV/m and Q=1-2x10+9) of four JAERI superconducting accelerator modules, and installed them in the FEL accelerator vault. In 1993, Optical resonators and beam transport systems, which have been already assembled, are now under commissioning. A description and the latest results of the JAERI super-conducting rf linac FEL will be discussed in comparison with a normal-conducting one, and reported in the symposium. (author)

  8. Nonlinear optics with coherent free electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencivenga, F.; Capotondi, F.; Mincigrucci, R.; Cucini, R.; Manfredda, M.; Pedersoli, E.; Principi, E.; Simoncig, A.; Masciovecchio, C.

    2016-12-01

    We interpreted the recent construction of free electron laser (FELs) facilities worldwide as an unprecedented opportunity to bring concepts and methods from the scientific community working with optical lasers into the domain of x-ray science. This motivated our efforts towards the realization of FEL-based wave-mixing applications. In this article we present new extreme ultraviolet transient grating (X-TG) data from vitreous SiO2, collected using two crossed FEL pulses (photon frequency 38 eV) to generate the X-TG and a phase matched optical probing pulse (photon frequency 3.1 eV). This experiment extends our previous investigation, which was carried out on a nominally identical sample using a different FEL photon frequency (45 eV) to excite the X-TG. The present data are featured by a peak intensity of the X-TG signal substantially larger than that previously reported and by slower modulations of the X-TG signal at positive delays. These differences could be ascribed to the different FEL photon energy used in the two experiments or to differences in the sample properties. A systematic X-TG study on the same sample as a function of the FEL wavelength is needed to draw a consistent conclusion. We also discuss how the advances in the performance of the FELs, in terms of generation of fully coherent photon pulses and multi-color FEL emission, may push the development of original experimental strategies to study matter at the femtosecond-nanometer time-length scales, with the unique option of element and chemical state specificity. This would allow the development of advanced experimental tools based on wave-mixing processes, which may have a tremendous impact in the study of a large array of phenomena, ranging from nano-dynamics in complex materials to charge and energy transfer processes.

  9. Applications for Energy Recovering Free Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Neil

    2007-08-01

    The availability of high-power, high-brilliance sources of tunable photons from energy-recovered Free Electron Lasers is opening up whole new fields of application of accelerators in industry. This talk will review some of the ideas that are already being put into production, and some of the newer ideas that are still under development.

  10. Undulators and free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Luchini, P

    1990-01-01

    This book is a reference text for all those working in free-electron laser research as well as being a learning aid for physicists and graduate students who wish an introduction to this field. Only a basic understanding of relativistic mechanics and electromagnetism is presupposed. After an overview of early developments and general principles of operation, the different models that can be used to describe free-electron lasers are presented, organized according to their range of applicability. The relevent conceptual and mathematical constructs are built up from first principles with attention to obtaining the practically important results in a simple but rigorous way. Interaction of the undulator with the driving electron accelerator and the laser cavity and design of undulator magnets are treated and an overview is given of some typical experiments.

  11. Smith-Purcell free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, K.J.; Walsh, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    The term Smith-Purcell free electron laser can be employed generally to describe any coherent radiation source in which a diffraction grating is used to couple an electron beam with the electromagnetic field. To date, most practical developments of this concept have focused on devices which operate in the millimeter spectral regime. In this paper construction of a Smith-Purcell free-electron laser operating in the far-infrared (FIR) region using a novel resonator cavity design and the electron beam from a low energy (0.5-5 MeV) radio-frequency accelerator will be discussed. A tunable source in this region would have many applications and since the beam energy is low, the small size and low overall cost of such a device would make it a laboratory instrument. Current projects which are progressing towards developing a FIR source are the programs at Stanford and CREOL. Both of these projects are using permanent magnet undulators to couple the electron beam with the electromagnetic field. An alternative approach is to use an electron beam passing over a diffraction grating as the radiating mechanism. This phenomenon is known as Smith-Purcell radiation and was first demonstrated for incoherent emission at visible wavelengths. The addition of feedback enhances the stimulated component of the emission which leads to the growth of coherence. Recent calculations for spontaneous emission have shown that the wiggler parameter and the grating efficiency are analogous. This result has important implications for the development of a Smith-Purcell FEL because a grating based free-electron laser would offer a greater range of tunability at a lower cost than its wiggler based counterpart

  12. Free-electron laser system with Raman amplifier outcoupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linford, G.J.

    1988-05-03

    A free-electron laser system is described comprising: a free-electron laser pump beam generator producing a high-power optical output beam in a vacuum environement; a Raman amplifier cell located in the path of the output beam from the pump beam generator; means for generating and introducing a Stokes seed beam into the Raman amplifier cell, a pair of gaseous windows through which the output beam enters and leaves the Raman amplifier cell, each window having a stream of gas moving continuously in a direction generally perpendicular to the beam; and a mirror positioned in the path of the output beam from the Raman amplifier, the mirror functioning to reflect and further direct the output beam, but not the unwanted spectral components.

  13. Electron beam generation in high voltage glow discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocca, J.J.; Szapiro, B.; Murray, C.

    1989-01-01

    The generation of intense CW and pulsed electron beams in glow discharges in reviewed. Glow discharge electron guns operate at a pressure of the order of 1 Torr and often have an advantage in applications that require a broad area electron beam in a gaseous atmosphere, such as laser excitation and some aspects of materials processing. Aspects of electron gun design are covered. Diagnostics of the high voltage glow discharges including the electric field distribution mapped by Doppler free laser spectroscopy, and plasma density and electron temperature measurements of the electron yield of different cathode materials under glow discharge conditions are presented

  14. Automatic tuning of free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agapov, Ilya; Zagorodnov, Igor [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL, Schenefeld (Germany); Tomin, Sergey [European XFEL, Schenefeld (Germany); NRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-07

    Existing FEL facilities often suffer from stability issues: so electron orbit, transverse electron optics, electron bunch compression and other parameters have to be readjusted often to account for drifts in performance of various components. The tuning procedures typically employed in operation are often manual and lengthy. We have been developing a combination of model-free and model-based automatic tuning methods to meet the needs of present and upcoming XFEL facilities. Our approach has been implemented at FLASH to achieve automatic SASE tuning using empirical control of orbit, electron optics and bunch compression. In this paper we describe our approach to empirical tuning, the software which implements it, and the results of using it at FLASH.We also discuss the potential of using machine learning and model-based techniques in tuning methods.

  15. Automatic tuning of free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agapov, Ilya; Zagorodnov, Igor; Geloni, Gianluca; Tomin, Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Existing FEL facilities often suffer from stability issues: so electron orbit, transverse electron optics, electron bunch compression and other parameters have to be readjusted often to account for drifts in performance of various components. The tuning procedures typically employed in operation are often manual and lengthy. We have been developing a combination of model-free and model-based automatic tuning methods to meet the needs of present and upcoming XFEL facilities. Our approach has been implemented at FLASH to achieve automatic SASE tuning using empirical control of orbit, electron optics and bunch compression. In this paper we describe our approach to empirical tuning, the software which implements it, and the results of using it at FLASH.We also discuss the potential of using machine learning and model-based techniques in tuning methods.

  16. Lead-Free Electronics: Impact for Space Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Pb is used as a constituent in solder alloys used to connect and attach electronic parts to printed wiring boards (PWBs). Similar Pbbearing alloys are electroplated or hot dipped onto the terminations of electronic parts to protect the terminations and make them solderable. Changing to Pb-free solders and termination finishes has introduced significant technical challenges into the supply chain. Tin/lead (Sn/Pb) alloys have been the solders of choice for electronics for more than 50 years. Pb-free solder alloys are available but there is not a plug-in replacement for 60/40 or 63/37 (Sn/Pb) alloys, which have been the industry workhorses.

  17. Elsa: an infrared free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimbal, P.; Chaix, P.

    1998-01-01

    Since the first experiments, twenty years ago, free-electron lasers (FEL) have known a strong development because of their promise: broadband tunability from X-rays to microwaves and high (peak or average) power, limited only by technological issues. ELSA has been designed as a research tool to investigate the physics of high-power FELs. After a brief introduction of the FEL field of research, we point out the unique characteristics of ELSA and why it is a valuable tool for the study of FEL interaction in the strong electron-photon coupling. The main experimental results are reviewed. We conclude on the concept of Two-Frequency-Wiggler. (author)

  18. The waveguide Free-Electron Laser. 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    The general characteristics of free-electron lasers (FELs) which employ a waveguiding structure to confine electromagnetic fields and to couple them to the electron beam is discussed. The mode structure of the basic parallel plate waveguide and its adaptation via quasi-optical techniques to FEL resonator design are considered in detail. A summary of the theory of FEL systems which depend intrinsically on a guide structure (micro-undulator, Cerenkov and metal-grating FELs) and a review of progress on waveguide FEL experiments are also presented. (author). 44 refs.; 16 figs

  19. Secondary electron ion source neutron generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, John P.; McCollister, Daryl R.

    1998-01-01

    A neutron generator employing an electron emitter, an ion source bombarded by the electrons from the electron emitter, a plasma containment zone, and a target situated between the plasma containment zone and the electron emitter. The target contains occluded deuterium, tritium, or a mixture thereof

  20. Zolpidem, a clinical hypnotic that affects electronic transfer, alters synaptic activity through potential GABA receptors in the nervous system without significant free radical generation

    OpenAIRE

    Kovacic, Peter; Somanathan, Ratnasamy

    2009-01-01

    Zolpidem (trade name Ambien) has attracted much interest as a sleep-inducing agent and also in research. Attention has been centered mainly on receptor binding and electrochemistry in the central nervous system which are briefly addressed herein. A novel integrated approach to mode of action is presented. The pathways to be discussed involve basicity, reduction potential, electrostatics, cell signaling, GABA receptor binding, electron transfer (ET), pharmacodynamics, structure activity relati...

  1. Los Alamos advanced free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K. C. D.; Kraus, R. H.; Ledford, J.; Meier, K. L.; Meyer, R. E.; Nguyen, D.; Sheffield, R. L.; Sigler, F. L.; Young, L. M.; Wang, T. S.; Wilson, W. L.; Wood, R. L.

    1992-07-01

    Los Alamos researchers are building a free-electron laser (FEL) for industrial, medical, and research applications. This FEL, which will incorporate many of the new technologies developed over the last decade, will be compact, robust, and user-friendly. Electrons produced by a photocathode will be accelerated to 20 MeV by a high-brightness accelerator and transported by permanent-magnet quadrupoles and dipoles. The resulting electron beam will have an excellent instantaneous beam quality of 10πmm mrad in transverse emittance and 0.3% in energy spread at a peak current up to 300 A. Including operation at higher harmonics, the laser wavelength extends from 3.7 μm to 0.4 μm.

  2. High gain free electron laser at ETA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orzechowski, T.J.; Prosnitz, D.; Halbach, K.

    1983-01-01

    A single pass, tapered electron wiggler and associated beam transport has been constructed at the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The system is designed to transport 1 kA of 4.5 MeV electrons with an emittance of 30 millirad-cm. The planar wiggler is provided by a pulsed electromagnet. The interaction region is an oversized rectangular waveguide. Quadrupole fields stabilize the beam in the plane parallel to the wiggler field. The 3 meter long wiggler has a 9.8 cm period. The Free Electron Laser (FEL) will serve as an amplifier for input frequencies of 35 GHz and 140 GHz. The facility is designed to produce better than 500 Megawatts peak power

  3. Microwave free-electron laser applications for electron cyclotron heating of plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, K.

    1990-01-01

    Millimeter wave power may be the ideal source of heat for the plasma, but advances in technology are needed to meet requirements of next generation fusion devices. Free electron lasers (FEL) are one candidate for such sources, and this paper reviews the progress, issues of physics and technology, and potential benefits for fusion from these devices

  4. Microwave free-electron laser applications for electron cyclotron heating of plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1990-01-01

    Millimeter wave power may be the ideal source of heat for a plasma, but advances in technology are needed to meet requirements of next generation fusion devices. Free electron lasers (FEL) are one candidate for such sources, and this paper reviews the progress, issues of physics and technology, and potential benefits for fusion from these devices. 15 refs., 13 figs

  5. Zolpidem, A Clinical Hypnotic that Affects Electronic Transfer, Alters Synaptic Activity Through Potential Gaba Receptors in the Nervous System Without Significant Free Radical Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kovacic

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Zolpidem (trade name Ambien has attracted much interest as a sleep-inducing agent and also in research. Attention has been centered mainly on receptor binding and electrochemistry in the central nervous system which are briefly addressed herein. A novel integrated approach to mode of action is presented. The pathways to be discussed involve basicity, reduction potential, electrostatics, cell signaling, GABA receptor binding, electron transfer (ET, pharmacodynamics, structure activity relationships (SAR and side effects. The highly conjugated pyridinium salt formed by protonation of the amidine moiety is proposed to be the active form acting as an ET agent. Extrapolation of reduction potentials for related compounds supports the premise that zolpidem may act as an ET species in vivo. From recent literature reports, electrostatics is believed to play a significant role in drug action.

  6. X-ray Free-electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldhaus, J.; /DESY; Arthur, J.; Hastings, J.B.; /SLAC

    2007-02-23

    In a free-electron laser (FEL) the lasing medium is a high-energy beam of electrons flying with relativistic speed through a periodic magnetic field. The interaction between the synchrotron radiation that is produced and the electrons in the beam induces a periodic bunching of the electrons, greatly increasing the intensity of radiation produced at a particular wavelength. Depending only on a phase match between the electron energy and the magnetic period, the wavelength of the FEL radiation can be continuously tuned within a wide spectral range. The FEL concept can be adapted to produce radiation wavelengths from millimeters to Angstroms, and can in principle produce hard x-ray beams with unprecedented peak brightness, exceeding that of the brightest synchrotron source by ten orders of magnitude or more. This paper focuses on short-wavelength FELs. It reviews the physics and characteristic properties of single-pass FELs, as well as current technical developments aiming for fully coherent x-ray radiation pulses with pulse durations in the 100 fs to 100 as range. First experimental results at wavelengths around 100 nm and examples of scientific applications planned on the new, emerging x-ray FEL facilities are presented.

  7. Multiple purpose research complex on the basis of electron accelerators and terahertz free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulipanov, G.N.

    2009-01-01

    In this report the basic positioning parameters of multiple purpose research complex are presented, the list of potential experiments and technological uses on the example of results received in the multiuser center of G.I. Budker Institut of nuclear physics Siberian department of the Russian Academy of Sciences is discussed. This research complex is directed on work in the big universities and nano technology centers. Electron accelerators is intended for development of electron-beam technologies different material modification, for production of nano powder, nano materials and solution of ecological tasks. In this work the project of multiple purpose research complex on the basis of new generation electron accelerator Il-14 and workable terahertz free electron laser is suggested. Terahertz free electron laser will be used for researches in the sphere of physics and chemistry, biology and medicine, nanotechnology engineering and different methods of nanodiagnostics.

  8. The LLNL/UCLA high gradient inverse free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, J. T.; Musumeci, P.; Anderson, G.; Anderson, S.; Betts, S.; Fisher, S.; Gibson, D.; Tremaine, A.; Wu, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles California, 90095 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States)

    2012-12-21

    We describe the Inverse Free Electron Accelerator currently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Lab. Upon completion of this accelerator, high brightness electrons generated in the photoinjector blowout regime and accelerated to 50 MeV by S-band accelerating sections will interact with > 4 TW peak power Ti:Sapphire laser in a highly tapered 50 cm undulator and experience an acceleration gradient of > 200 MeV/m. We present the final design of the accelerator as well as the results of start-to-end simulations investigating preservation of beam quality and tolerances involved with this accelerator.

  9. Kinetic theory of free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafizi, B. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Roberson, C.W. [Office of Naval Research, Arlington, VA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    We have developed a relativistic kinetic theory of free electron lasers (FELs). The growth rate, efficiency, filling factor and radius of curvature of the radiation wave fronts are determined. We have used the theory to examine the effects of beam compression on growth rate. The theory has been extended to include self field effects on FEL operation. These effects are particularly important in compact, low voltage FELs. The surprising result is that the self field contribution to the beam quality is opposite to the emittance contribution. Hence self fields can improve beam quality, particularly in compact, low voltage FELs.

  10. Free electron lasers on superconducting linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapierrre, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Analysing the results of several Free Electron Laser experiments, we show that the best accelerator should be a superconducting linear accelerator: it can provide a c.w. high quality beam (energy spread and emittance). The technology of RF superconductivity provide the opportunity to build such an accelerator. In this paper, we present the foreseen results one can expect from a FEL based on such a machine: - Average power > 1 Kw, - Total efficiency > 2.5%, - Tunability between 0.6 and 5 μm [fr

  11. The free electron laser: conceptual history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madey, John; Scully, Marlan O; Sprangle, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    The free electron laser (FEL) has lived up to its promise as given in (Madey 1971 J. Appl. Phys. 42 1906) to wit: ‘As shall be seen, finite gain is available …from the far-infrared through the visible region …with the further possibility of partially coherent radiation sources in the x-ray region’. In the present paper we review the history of the FEL drawing liberally (and where possible literally) from the original sources. Coauthors, Madey, Scully and Sprangle were involved in the early days of the subject and give a first hand account of the subject with an eye to the future. (invited comment)

  12. Short Rayleigh Length Free Electron Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Crooker, P P; Armstead, R L; Blau, J

    2004-01-01

    Conventional free electron laser (FEL) oscillators minimize the optical mode volume around the electron beam in the undulator by making the resonator Rayleigh length about one third of the undulator length. This maximizes gain and beam-mode coupling. In compact configurations of high-power infrared FELs or moderate power UV FELs, the resulting optical intensity can damage the resonator mirrors. To increase the spot size and thereby reduce the optical intensity at the mirrors below the damage threshold, a shorter Rayleigh length can be used, but the FEL interaction is significantly altered. A new FEL interaction is described and analyzed with a Rayleigh length that is only one tenth the undulator length, or less. The effect of mirror vibration and positioning are more critical in the short Rayleigh length design, but we find that they are still within normal design tolerances.

  13. Free electron laser variable bridge coupler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalek, G.; Billen, J.H.; Garcia, J.A.; McMurry, D.E.; Harnsborough, L.D.; Giles, P.M.; Stevens, S.B.

    1985-01-01

    The Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL) is being modified to test a scheme for recovering most of the power in the residual 20-MeV electron beam by decelerating the microbunches in a linear standing-wave accelerator and using the recovered energy to accelerate new beam. A variable-coupler low-power model that resonantly couples the accelerator and decelerator structures has been built and tested. By mixing the TE 101 and TE 102 modes, this device permits continuous variation of the decelerator fields relative to the accelerator fields through a range of 1:1 to 1:2.5. Phase differences between the two structures are kept below 1 0 and are independent of power-flow direction. The rf power is also fed to the two structures through this coupling device. Measurements were also made on a three-post-loaded variable coupler that is a promising candidate for the same task

  14. Inverse free-electron laser accelerator development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Steenbergen, A. van; Sandweiss, J.; Fang, J.M.

    1994-06-01

    The study of the Inverse Free-Electron Laser, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, has been pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory for a number of years. More recent studies focused on the development of a low energy (few GeV), high gradient, multistage linear accelerator. The authors are presently designing a short accelerator module which will make use of the 50 MeV linac beam and high power (2 x 10 11 W) CO 2 laser beam of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at the Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP), Brookhaven National Laboratory. These elements will be used in conjunction with a fast excitation (300 μsec pulse duration) variable period wiggler, to carry out an accelerator demonstration stage experiment

  15. Zolpidem, a clinical hypnotic that affects electronic transfer, alters synaptic activity through potential GABA receptors in the nervous system without significant free radical generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacic, Peter; Somanathan, Ratnasamy

    2009-01-01

    Zolpidem (trade name Ambien) has attracted much interest as a sleep-inducing agent and also in research. Attention has been centered mainly on receptor binding and electrochemistry in the central nervous system which are briefly addressed herein. A novel integrated approach to mode of action is presented. The pathways to be discussed involve basicity, reduction potential, electrostatics, cell signaling, GABA receptor binding, electron transfer (ET), pharmacodynamics, structure activity relationships (SAR) and side effects. The highly conjugated pyridinium salt formed by protonation of the amidine moiety is proposed to be the active form acting as an ET agent. Extrapolation of reduction potentials for related compounds supports the premise that zolpidem may act as an ET species in vivo. From recent literature reports, electrostatics is believed to play a significant role in drug action. The pyridinium cation displays molecular electrostatic potential which may well play a role energetically or as a bridging mechanism. An SAR analysis points to analogy with other physiologically active xenobiotics, namely benzodiazepines and paraquat in the conjugated iminium category. Inactivity of metabolites indicates that the parent is the active form of zolpidem. Absence of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress is in line with minor side effects. In contrast, generally, the prior literature contains essentially no discussion of these fundamental biochemical relationships. Pharmacodynamics may play an important role. Concerning behavior at the blood-brain barrier, useful insight can be gained from investigations of the related cationic anesthetics that are structurally related to acetyl choline. Evidently, the neutral form of the drug penetrates the neuronal membrane, with the salt form operating at the receptor. The pathways of zolpidem have several clinical implications since the agent affects sedation, electroencephalographic activity, oxidative metabolites and

  16. Short Rayleigh length free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. B. Colson

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional free electron laser (FEL oscillators minimize the optical mode volume around the electron beam in the undulator by making the resonator Rayleigh length about one third to one half of the undulator length. This maximizes gain and beam-mode coupling. In compact configurations of high-power infrared FELs or moderate power UV FELs, the resulting optical intensity can damage the resonator mirrors. To increase the spot size and thereby reduce the optical intensity at the mirrors below the damage threshold, a shorter Rayleigh length can be used, but the FEL interaction is significantly altered. We model this interaction using a coordinate system that expands with the rapidly diffracting optical mode from the ends of the undulator to the mirrors. Simulations show that the interaction of the strongly focused optical mode with a narrow electron beam inside the undulator distorts the optical wave front so it is no longer in the fundamental Gaussian mode. The simulations are used to study how mode distortion affects the single-pass gain in weak fields, and the steady-state extraction in strong fields.

  17. A high power, tunable free electron maser for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbanus, W.H.; Bratman, V.L.; Bongers, W.A.; Caplan, M.; Denisov, G.G.; Geer, C.A.J. van der; Manintveld, P.; Militsyn, B.; Oomens, A.A.M.; Poelman, A.J.; Plomp, J.; Pluygers, J.; Savilov, A.V.; Smeets, P.H.M.; Sterk, A.B.; Verhoeven, A.G.A

    2001-01-01

    The Fusion-FEM experiment, a high-power, electrostatic free-electron maser being built at the FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics 'Rijnhuizen', is operated at various frequencies. So far, experiments were done without a depressed collector, and the pulse length was limited to 12 {mu}s. Nevertheless, many aspects of generation of mm-wave power have been explored, such as the dependency on the electron beam energy and beam current, and cavity settings such as the feedback coefficient. An output power of 730 kW at 206 GHz is generated with a 7.2 A, 1.77 MeV electron beam, and 360 kW at 167 GHz is generated with a 7.4 A, 1.61 MeV electron beam. It is shown experimentally and by simulations that, depending on the electron beam energy, the FEM can operate in single-frequency regime. The next step of the FEM experiment is to reach a pulse length of 100 ms. The major part of the beam line, the high voltage systems, and the collector have been completed. The undulator and mm-wave cavity are now at high voltage (2 MV). The new mm-wave transmission line, which transports the mm-wave output power from the high-voltage terminal to ground and outside the pressure tank, has been tested at low power.

  18. Nanosecond electron beams compact generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konkin, D V; Nagovitsin, A Yu; Pavlov, S S; Popkov, N F [All-Russian Scientific Research Inst. of Experimental Physics, Sarov (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    A small-scale accelerator providing a storage energy of 40 J, electron energy of 200 keV, beam current released into air of 1 kA, and current pulse duration of 30-40 ns at the half-height is described. The multi-channel commutation is implemented in the accelerator capacitive energy storage, ensuring an output current pulse front of 10 ns, while the inductiveness is 120 nH. The gross weight of the device is approximately 100 kg. (author). 4 figs., 6 refs.

  19. Nanosecond electron beams compact generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konkin, D.V.; Nagovitsin, A.Yu.; Pavlov, S.S.; Popkov, N.F.

    1996-01-01

    A small-scale accelerator providing a storage energy of 40 J, electron energy of 200 keV, beam current released into air of 1 kA, and current pulse duration of 30-40 ns at the half-height is described. The multi-channel commutation is implemented in the accelerator capacitive energy storage, ensuring an output current pulse front of 10 ns, while the inductiveness is 120 nH. The gross weight of the device is approximately 100 kg. (author). 4 figs., 6 refs

  20. Ultrafast magnetodynamics with free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvestuto, Marco; Ciprian, Roberta; Caretta, Antonio; Casarin, Barbara; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2018-02-01

    The study of ultrafast magnetodynamics has entered a new era thanks to the groundbreaking technological advances in free-electron laser (FEL) light sources. The advent of these light sources has made possible unprecedented experimental schemes for time-resolved x-ray magneto-optic spectroscopies, which are now paving the road for exploring the ultimate limits of out-of-equilibrium magnetic phenomena. In particular, these studies will provide insights into elementary mechanisms governing spin and orbital dynamics, therefore contributing to the development of ultrafast devices for relevant magnetic technologies. This topical review focuses on recent advancement in the study of non-equilibrium magnetic phenomena from the perspective of time-resolved extreme ultra violet (EUV) and soft x-ray spectroscopies at FELs with highlights of some important experimental results.

  1. Free-electron lasers in ultraviolet photobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coohill, T.P.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    The potential uses for a free-electron laser (FEL), tunable in wavelength from 10 to 400 nm, for photobiological experiments is discussed. Inherent problems of cell and molecular absorption, especially in certain regions of the ultraviolet (UV), are addressed. Absorption values for living cells and viruses at selected wavelengths in the UV are tabulated, and a calculation of the flux needed to inactivate mammalian cells is included. A comparison is made of the UV output of a proposed rf-linac FEL with those of a monochromator, a tunable dye laser, and a synchrotron. The advantages of a UV FEL are apparent, especially in the wavelength regions where the cross section for absorption by biological molecules is low, i.e., 300 to 400 nm and 10 to 200 nm. It is apparent that a UV FEL would be an ideal source for a variety of biological studies that use both intact organisms and isolated cells and viruses

  2. Free electron laser and fundamental physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattoli, Giuseppe; Nguyen, Federico

    2018-03-01

    This review paper is devoted to the understanding of free-electron lasers (FEL) as devices for fundamental physics (FP) studies. After clarifying what FP stands for, we select some aspects of the FEL physics which can be viewed as fundamental. Furthermore, we discuss the perspective uses of the FEL in FP experiments. Regarding the FP aspects of the FEL, we analyze the quantum electrodynamics (QED) nature of the underlying laser mechanism. We look for the truly quantum signature in a process whose phenomenology is dominated by classical effects. As to the use of FEL as a tool for FP experiments we discuss the realization of a device dedicated to the study of non-linear effects in QED such as photon-photon scattering and shining-through-the-wall experiments planned to search for dark matter candidates like axions.

  3. A compact x-ray free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, W.; Attac, M.; Cline, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    We present a design concept and simulation of the performance of a compact x-ray, free electron laser driven by ultra-high gradient rf-linacs. The accelerator design is based on recent advances in high gradient technology by a LLNL/SLAC/LBL collaboration and on the development of bright, high current electron sources by BNL and LANL. The GeV electron beams generated with such accelerators can be concerted to soft x-rays in the range from 2--10 nm by passage through short period, high fields strength wigglers as are being designed at Rocketdyne. Linear light sources of this type can produce trains of picosecond (or shorter) pulses of extremely high spectral brilliance suitable for flash holography of biological specimens in vivo and for studies of fast chemical reactions. 12 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs

  4. Electron attenuation in free, neutral ethane clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, M; Myrseth, V; Harnes, J; Børve, K J

    2014-10-28

    The electron effective attenuation length (EAL) in free, neutral ethane clusters has been determined at 40 eV kinetic energy by combining carbon 1s x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical lineshape modeling. More specifically, theory is employed to form model spectra on a grid in cluster size (N) and EAL (λ), allowing N and λ to be determined by optimizing the goodness-of-fit χ(2)(N, λ) between model and observed spectra. Experimentally, the clusters were produced in an adiabatic-expansion setup using helium as the driving gas, spanning a range of 100-600 molecules in mean cluster size. The effective attenuation length was determined to be 8.4 ± 1.9 Å, in good agreement with an independent estimate of 10 Å formed on the basis of molecular electron-scattering data and Monte Carlo simulations. The aggregation state of the clusters as well as the cluster temperature and its importance to the derived EAL value are discussed in some depth.

  5. An Inverse Free-Electron-Laser accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, A.S.; Gallardo, J.C.; van Steenbergen, A.; Ulc, S.; Woodle, M.; Sandweiss, J.; Fang, Jyan-Min

    1993-01-01

    Recent work at BNL on electron acceleration using the Inverse Free-Electron Laser (IFEL) has considered a low-energy, high-gradient, multi-stage linear accelerator. Experiments are planned at BNL's Accelerator Test Facility using its 50-MeV linac and 100-GW CO 2 laser. We have built and tested a fast-excitation wiggler magnet with constant field, tapered period, and overall length of 47 cm. Vanadium-Permendur ferromagnetic laminations are stacked in alternation with copper, eddy-current-induced, field reflectors to achieve a 1.4-T peak field with a 4-mm gap and a typical period of 3 cm. The laser beam will pass through the wiggler in a low-loss, dielectric-coated stainless-steel, rectangular waveguide. The attenuation and transverse mode has been measured in waveguide sections of various lengths, with and without the dielectric. Results of 1-D and 3-D IFEL simulations, including wiggler errors, will be presented for several cases: the initial, single-module experiment with ΔE = 39 MeV, a four-module design giving ΔE = 100 MeV in a total length of 2 m, and an eight-module IFEL with ΔE = 210 MeV

  6. Development of a high power free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Sun Kook; Jung, Yung Wook; Cho, Sung Oh [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-01-01

    A millimeter-wave free electron laser (FEL) driven by a recirculating electrostatic accelerator has been developed. The wavelength of the FEL is tunable in the range of 3 - 12 mm by tuning the energy of the electron beam. The output power is estimated to be 1 kW. The electrostatic accelerator is composed of high-current electron gun, acceleration tube, high-voltage generator, high-voltage terminal, deceleration tube, electron collator, and vacuum pumps. Two types of LaB{sub 6}-based thermionic electron guns (triode gun and diode gun) and their power supplies have been developed. The voltage of the guns is 30 kV and the output current is - 2 A. A beam-focusing planar undulator and a permanent-magnet helical undulator have been developed and 3D trajectories of electron beam in the undulators have been calculated to find optimal input condition of electron beam. 135 figs, 15 pix, 17 tabs, 98 refs. (Author).

  7. Development of a high power free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Sun Kook; Jung, Yung Wook; Cho, Sung Oh

    1995-01-01

    A millimeter-wave free electron laser (FEL) driven by a recirculating electrostatic accelerator has been developed. The wavelength of the FEL is tunable in the range of 3 - 12 mm by tuning the energy of the electron beam. The output power is estimated to be 1 kW. The electrostatic accelerator is composed of high-current electron gun, acceleration tube, high-voltage generator, high-voltage terminal, deceleration tube, electron collator, and vacuum pumps. Two types of LaB 6 -based thermionic electron guns (triode gun and diode gun) and their power supplies have been developed. The voltage of the guns is 30 kV and the output current is - 2 A. A beam-focusing planar undulator and a permanent-magnet helical undulator have been developed and 3D trajectories of electron beam in the undulators have been calculated to find optimal input condition of electron beam. 135 figs, 15 pix, 17 tabs, 98 refs. (Author)

  8. Acceleration of electrons using an inverse free electron laser auto- accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wernick, I.K.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-07-01

    We present data from our study of a device known as the inverse free electron laser. First, numerical simulations were performed to optimize the design parameters for an experiment that accelerates electrons in the presence of an undulator by stimulated absorption of radiation. The Columbia free electron laser (FEL) was configured as an auto-accelerator (IFELA) system; high power (MW's) FEL radiation at ∼1.65 mm is developed along the first section of an undulator inside a quasi-optical resonator. The electron beam then traverses a second section of undulator where a fraction of the electrons is accelerated by stimulated absorption of the 1.65 mm wavelength power developed in the first undulator section. The second undulator section has very low gain and does not generate power on its own. We have found that as much as 60% of the power generated in the first section can be absorbed in the second section, providing that the initial electron energy is chosen correctly with respect to the parameters chosen for the first and second undulators. An electron momentum spectrometer is used to monitor the distribution of electron energies as the electrons exit the IFELA. We have found; using our experimental parameters, that roughly 10% of the electrons are accelerated to energies as high as 1100 keV, in accordance with predictions from the numerical model. The appearance of high energy electrons is correlated with the abrupt absorption of millimeter power. The autoaccelerator configuration is used because there is no intense source of coherent power at the 1.65 mm design wavelength other than the FEL

  9. Linear Gain and Gain Saturation in a Photonic Free-Electron Laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denis, T.; Boller, Klaus J.; Lee, J.H.H.; van der Slot, P.J.M.; van Dijk, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Photonic crystals are used to manipulate the generation of light, for example, stimulated emission can be enhanced. A photonic free-electron laser (pFEL) applies this enhancement to generate widely tunable coherent Cerenkov radiation from low energy electrons (keV) streaming through the photonic

  10. Deep saturated Free Electron Laser oscillators and frozen spikes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ottaviani, P.L. [ENEA - Centro Ricerche Bologna, via Martiri di Monte Sole, 4, IT 40129, Bologna (Italy); Pagnutti, S., E-mail: simonetta.pagnutti@enea.it [ENEA - Centro Ricerche Bologna, via Martiri di Monte Sole, 4, IT 40129, Bologna (Italy); Dattoli, G., E-mail: giuseppe.dattoli@enea.it [ENEA - Centro Ricerche Frascati, via E. Fermi, 45, IT 00044, Frascati, Roma (Italy); Sabia, E., E-mail: elio.sabia@enea.it [ENEA - Centro Ricerche Frascati, via E. Fermi, 45, IT 00044, Frascati, Roma (Italy); Petrillo, V., E-mail: vittoria.petrillo@mi.infn.it [Universita' degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, IT 20133, Milano (Italy); INFN - Mi, via Celoria 16, IT 20133, Milano (Italy); Slot, P.J.M. van der, E-mail: p.j.m.vanderslot@utwente.nl [Mesa+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O.Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede (Netherlands); Biedron, S., E-mail: sandra.biedron@colostate.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Colorado State University (United States); Milton, S., E-mail: milton@engr.colostate.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Colorado State University (United States)

    2016-10-21

    We analyze the behavior of Free Electron Laser (FEL) oscillators operating in the deep saturated regime and point out the formation of sub-peaks of the optical pulse. These are very stable configurations and the sub-peaks are found to have a duration corresponding to the coherence length. We speculate on the physical mechanisms underlying their growth and attempt an identification with natural mode-locked structures in FEL oscillators. Their impact on the intra-cavity nonlinear harmonic generation is also discussed along with the possibility of exploiting them as cavity out-coupler.

  11. Interactions of free electrons with an electromagnetic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zel' dovich, Ya B [AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Prikladnoj Matematiki

    1975-02-01

    The interaction of a chaotic field of electromagnetic radiation with free electrons in plasma is considered as applied to astrophysical problems, in particular, to the theory of establishing thermodynamic equilibrium of radiation in the hot universe. The kinetic equation describes a change in the spectrum; particular attention is paid to the induced scattering and to the classical interpretation of the induced transfer of energy and momentum. In spectra of radiosources with a high brightness temperature the induced scattering may lead to the Bose condensation of photons, shock wave and appearance of solutions. The scattering of strong low-frequency waves is considered as applied to pulsars and laboratory coherent generators.

  12. Multiple electron generation in a sea of electronic states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzel, Wayne; Shabaev, Andrew; Efros, Alexander; Hellberg, Carl; Verne, Jacobs

    2009-03-01

    In traditional bulk semiconductor photovoltaics (PVs), each photon may excite a single electron-hole, wasting excess energy beyond the band-gap as heat. In nanocrystals, multiple excitons can be generated from a single photon, enhancing the PV current. Multiple electron generation (MEG) may result from Coulombic interactions of the confined electrons. Previous investigations have been based on incomplete or over-simplified electronic-state representations. We present results of quantum simulations that include hundreds of thousands of configuration states and show how the complex dynamics, even in a closed electronic system, yields a saturated MEG effect on a femtosecond timescale. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Theory and Simulation of an Inverse Free Electron Laser Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, S. K.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Fang, J. M.; Marshall, T. C.

    1996-11-01

    An experimental demonstration of the acceleration of electrons using a high power CO2 laser in an inverse free electron laser (IFEL) is underway at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. This experiment has generated data, which we are attempting to simulate. Included in our studies are such effects as: a low-loss metallic waveguide with a dielectric coating on the walls; multi-mode coupling due to self-consistent interaction between the electrons and the optical wave; space charge (which is significant at lower laser power); energy-spread of the electrons; arbitrary wiggler field profile; and slippage. Two types of wiggler profile have been considered: a linear taper of the period, and a step-taper of the period (the period is ~ 3cm, the field is ~ 1T, and the wiggler length is 47cm). The energy increment of the electrons ( ~ 1-2%) is analyzed in detail as a function of laser power, wiggler parameters, and the initial beam energy (40MeV). For laser power ~ 0.5GW, the predictions of the simulations are in good accord with experimental results. A matter currently under study is the discrepancy between theory and observations for the electron energy distribution observed at the end of the IFEL. This work is supported by the Department of Energy.

  14. Workshop on scientific and industrial applications of free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Difilippo, F.C.; Perez, R.B.

    1990-05-01

    A Workshop on Scientific and Industrial Applications of Free Electron Lasers was organized to address potential uses of a Free Electron Laser in the infrared wavelength region. A total of 13 speakers from national laboratories, universities, and the industry gave seminars to an average audience of 30 persons during June 12 and 13, 1989. The areas covered were: Free Electron Laser Technology, Chemistry and Surface Science, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Condensed Matter, and Biomedical Applications, Optical Damage, and Optoelectronics

  15. Quantum entanglement in electron optics generation, characterization, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chandra, Naresh

    2013-01-01

    This monograph forms an interdisciplinary study in atomic, molecular, and quantum information (QI) science. Here a reader will find that applications of the tools developed in QI provide new physical insights into electron optics as well as properties of atoms & molecules which, in turn, are useful in studying QI both at fundamental and applied levels. In particular, this book investigates entanglement properties of flying electronic qubits generated in some of the well known processes capable of taking place in an atom or a molecule following the absorption of a photon. Here, one can generate Coulombic or fine-structure entanglement of electronic qubits. The properties of these entanglements differ not only from each other, but also from those when spin of an inner-shell photoelectron is entangled with the polarization of the subsequent fluorescence. Spins of an outer-shell electron and of a residual photoion can have free or bound entanglement in a laboratory.

  16. Free form CMOS electronics: Physically flexible and stretchable

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa; Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto; Sevilla, Galo T.; Hussain, Aftab M.; Ghoneim, Mohamed T.; Hanna, Amir; Kutbee, Arwa T.; Nassar, Joanna M.; Cruz, Melvin

    2015-01-01

    Free form (physically flexible and stretchable) electronics can be used for applications which are unexplored today due to the rigid and brittle nature of the state-of-the-art electronics. Therefore, we show integration strategy to rationally design

  17. The Two-Beam Free Electron Laser Oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Neil R

    2004-01-01

    A one-dimensional model of a free-electron laser operating simultaneously with two electron beams of different energies [1] is extended to an oscillator configuration. The electron beam energies are chosen so that an harmonic of the lower energy beam is at the fundamental radiation wavelength of the higher energy beam. Potential benefits over a single-beam free-electron laser oscillator are discussed.

  18. Influence of an imperfect energy profile on a seeded free electron laser performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botao Jia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A single-pass high-gain x-ray free electron laser (FEL calls for a high quality electron bunch. In particular, for a seeded FEL amplifier and for a harmonic generation FEL, the electron bunch initial energy profile uniformity is crucial for generating an FEL with a narrow bandwidth. After the acceleration, compression, and transportation, the electron bunch energy profile entering the undulator can acquire temporal nonuniformity. We study the influence of the electron bunch initial energy profile nonuniformity on the FEL performance. Intrinsically, for a harmonic generation FEL, the harmonic generation FEL in the final radiator starts with an electron bunch having energy modulation acquired in the previous stages, due to the FEL interaction at those FEL wavelengths and their harmonics. The influence of this electron bunch energy nonuniformity on the harmonic generation FEL in the final radiator is then studied.

  19. Nonlinear theory of the free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chian, A.C.-L.; Padua Brito Serbeto, A. de.

    1984-01-01

    A theory of Raman free-electron laser using a circularly polarized electromagnetic pump is investigated. Coupled wave equations that describe both linear and nonlinear evolution of stimulated Raman scattering are derived. The dispersion relation and the growth rate for the parametric instability are obtained. Nonlinear processes that may lead to saturation of the free-electron laser are discussed. (Author) [pt

  20. Wave function of free electron in a strong laser plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shitong; Shen Wenda; Guo Qizhi

    1993-01-01

    The wave function of free electron in a strong laser plasma is obtained by solving exactly the Dirac equation in a curved space-time with optical metric for the laser plasma. When the laser field is diminished to zero, the wave function is naturally reduced to relativistic wave function of free electron. The possible application of the wave function is discussed

  1. Runaway electron generation in tokamak disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helander, P.; Andersson, F.; Fueloep, T.; Smith, H.; Anderson, D.; Lisak, M.; Eriksson, L.-G.

    2005-01-01

    The time evolution of the plasma current during a tokamak disruption is calculated by solving the equations for runaway electron production simultaneously with the induction equation for the toroidal electric field. The resistive diffusion time in a post-disruption plasma is typically comparable to the runaway avalanche growth time. Accordingly, the toroidal electric field induced after the thermal quench of a disruption diffuses radially through the plasma at the same time as it accelerates runaway electrons, which in turn back-react on the electric field. When these processes are accounted for in a self-consistent way, it is found that (1) the efficiency and time scale of runaway generation agrees with JET experiments; (2) the runaway current profile typically becomes more peaked than the pre-disruption current profile; and (3) can easily become radially filamented. It is also shown that higher runaway electron generation is expected if the thermal quench is sufficiently fast. (author)

  2. Energy of auroral electrons and Z mode generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss-Varban, D.; Wong, H. K.

    1990-01-01

    The present consideration of Z-mode radiation generation, in light of observational results indicating that the O mode and second-harmonic X-mode emissions can prevail over the X-mode fundamental radiation when suprathermal electron energy is low, gives attention to whether the thermal effect on the Z-mode dispersion can be equally important, and whether the Z-mode can compete for the available free-energy source. It is found that, under suitable circumstances, the growth rate of the Z-mode can be substantial even for low suprathermal auroral electron energies. Growth is generally maximized for propagation perpendicular to the magnetic field.

  3. NASA-DoD Lead-Free Electronics Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the current state of the lead-free electronics project. It characterizes the test articles, which were built with lead-free solder and lead-free component finishes. The tests performed and reported on are: thermal cycling, combine environments testing, mechanical shock testing, vibration testing and drop testing.

  4. A model for disruption generated runaway electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, A.J.; Campbell, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    One of the possible consequences of disruptions in tokamaks is the generation of runaway electrons which can impact plasma facing components and cause damage, owing to high local energy deposition. This problem becomes more serious as the machine size and plasma current increase. Since large size and high currents are characteristics of proposed future machines, control of runaway generation is an important design consideration. A lumped circuit model for disruption runaway electron generation indicates that impurity concentration and type, as well as plasma motion, can strongly influence runaway behaviour. A comparison of disruption data from several runs on JET and DIII-D with model results demonstrate the effects of impurities, and plasma motion, on runaway number density and energy. The model is also applied to the calculation of runaway currents for ITER. (author). 16 refs, 13 figs

  5. Electron energy and electron trajectories in an inverse free-electron laser accelerator based on a novel electrostatic wiggler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikrah, M.; Jafari, S.

    2016-06-01

    We expand here a theory of a high-gradient laser-excited electron accelerator based on an inverse free-electron laser (inverse-FEL), but with innovations in the structure and design. The electrostatic wiggler used in our scheme, namely termed the Paul wiggler, is generated by segmented cylindrical electrodes with applied oscillatory voltages {{V}\\text{osc}}(t) over {{90}\\circ} segments. The inverse-FEL interaction can be described by the equations that govern the electron motion in the combined fields of both the laser pulse and Paul wiggler field. A numerical study of electron energy and electron trajectories has been made using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The results indicate that the electron attains a considerable energy at short distances in this device. It is found that if the electron has got sufficient suitable wiggler amplitude intensities, it can not only gain higher energy in longer distances, but also can retain it even after the passing of the laser pulse. In addition, the results reveal that the electron energy gains different peaks for different initial axial velocities, so that a suitable small initial axial velocity of e-beam produces substantially high energy gain. With regard to the transverse confinement of the electron beam in a Paul wiggler, there is no applied axial guide magnetic field in this device.

  6. Electron Bunch Timing with Femtosecond Precision in a Superconducting Free-Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhl, F.; Arsov, V.; Felber, M.; Hacker, K.; Jalmuzna, W.; Lorbeer, B.; Ludwig, F.; Matthiesen, K.-H.; Schlarb, H.; Schmidt, B.; Schmüser, P.; Schulz, S.; Szewinski, J.; Winter, A.; Zemella, J.

    2010-04-01

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating femtosecond x-ray pulses with peak brilliances many orders of magnitude higher than at other existing x-ray sources. In order to fully exploit the opportunities offered by these femtosecond light pulses in time-resolved experiments, an unprecedented synchronization accuracy is required. In this Letter, we distributed the pulse train of a mode-locked fiber laser with femtosecond stability to different locations in the linear accelerator of the soft x-ray FEL FLASH. A novel electro-optic detection scheme was applied to measure the electron bunch arrival time with an as yet unrivaled precision of 6 fs (rms). With two beam-based feedback systems we succeeded in stabilizing both the arrival time and the electron bunch compression process within two magnetic chicanes, yielding a significant reduction of the FEL pulse energy jitter.

  7. Electron Bunch Timing with Femtosecond Precision in a Superconducting Free-Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loehl, F.; Arsov, V.; Felber, M.; Hacker, K.; Lorbeer, B.; Ludwig, F.; Matthiesen, K.-H.; Schlarb, H.; Schmidt, B.; Winter, A.; Jalmuzna, W.; Schmueser, P.; Schulz, S.; Zemella, J.; Szewinski, J.

    2010-01-01

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating femtosecond x-ray pulses with peak brilliances many orders of magnitude higher than at other existing x-ray sources. In order to fully exploit the opportunities offered by these femtosecond light pulses in time-resolved experiments, an unprecedented synchronization accuracy is required. In this Letter, we distributed the pulse train of a mode-locked fiber laser with femtosecond stability to different locations in the linear accelerator of the soft x-ray FEL FLASH. A novel electro-optic detection scheme was applied to measure the electron bunch arrival time with an as yet unrivaled precision of 6 fs (rms). With two beam-based feedback systems we succeeded in stabilizing both the arrival time and the electron bunch compression process within two magnetic chicanes, yielding a significant reduction of the FEL pulse energy jitter.

  8. Beam generated electrostatic electron waves in the magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hultqvist, B.

    1986-03-01

    The generation of growing electrostatic electron waves by electron beams in the ionosphere and magnetosphere is investigated. The auroral F-region, the high latitude exosphere, the auroral acceleration region around 1 Rsub(e), the outer plasmasphere and the plasmasheet are treated. It is found that auroral electron beams can amplify electrostatic waves in all these regions but in different k-ranges. The growth rate, in terms of ωsub(i)/ω, generally increases outward. The propagation direction range of the waves discussed varies from a narrow cone around the magnetic field lines to all directions except close to perpendicularity. Strong cyclotron resonance effects at propagation angles close to 90 degrees are not dealt with. The method used can easily be applied to any plasma system where free energy is available in the form of an electron beam, including laboratory plasma. (author)

  9. Free piston linear generator for low grid power generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalla Izzeldin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Generating power is of great importance nowadays across the world. However, recently, the world became aware of the climatic changes due to the greenhouse effect caused by CO2 emissions and began seeking solutions to reduce the negative impact on the environment. Besides, the exhaustion of fossil fuels and their environmental impact, make it is crucial to develop clean energy sources, and efforts are focused on developing and improving the efficiency of all energy consuming systems. The tubular permanent magnet linear generators (TPMLGs are the best candidate for energy converters. Despite being suffering problem of attraction force between permanent magnets and stator teeth, to eliminate such attraction force, ironless-stator could be considered. Thus, they could waive the presence of any magnetic attraction between the moving and stator part. This paper presents the design and analysis of ironless -cored TPMLG for low grid power generation. The main advantages of this generator are the low cogging force and high efficiency. Therefore, the magnetic field computation of the proposed generator has been performed by applying a magnetic vector potential and utilizing a 2-D finite element analysis (FEA. Moreover, the experimental results for the current profile, pressure profile and velocity profile have been presented.

  10. Direct longitudinal laser acceleration of electrons in free space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Carbajo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Compact laser-driven accelerators are pursued heavily worldwide because they make novel methods and tools invented at national laboratories widely accessible in science, health, security, and technology [V. Malka et al., Principles and applications of compact laser-plasma accelerators, Nat. Phys. 4, 447 (2008]. Current leading laser-based accelerator technologies [S. P. D. Mangles et al., Monoenergetic beams of relativistic electrons from intense laser-plasma interactions, Nature (London 431, 535 (2004; T. Toncian et al., Ultrafast laser-driven microlens to focus and energy-select mega-electron volt protons, Science 312, 410 (2006; S. Tokita et al. Single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction with a laser-accelerated sub-MeV electron pulse, Appl. Phys. Lett. 95, 111911 (2009] rely on a medium to assist the light to particle energy transfer. The medium imposes material limitations or may introduce inhomogeneous fields [J. R. Dwyer et al., Femtosecond electron diffraction: “Making the molecular movie,”, Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A 364, 741 (2006]. The advent of few cycle ultraintense radially polarized lasers [S. Carbajo et al., Efficient generation of ultraintense few-cycle radially polarized laser pulses, Opt. Lett. 39, 2487 (2014] has ushered in a novel accelerator concept [L. J. Wong and F. X. Kärtner, Direct acceleration of an electron in infinite vacuum by a pulsed radially polarized laser beam, Opt. Express 18, 25035 (2010; F. Pierre-Louis et al. Direct-field electron acceleration with ultrafast radially polarized laser beams: Scaling laws and optimization, J. Phys. B 43, 025401 (2010; Y. I. Salamin, Electron acceleration from rest in vacuum by an axicon Gaussian laser beam, Phys. Rev. A 73, 043402 (2006; C. Varin and M. Piché, Relativistic attosecond electron pulses from a free-space laser-acceleration scheme, Phys. Rev. E 74, 045602 (2006; A. Sell and F. X. Kärtner, Attosecond electron bunches accelerated and

  11. Extreme-Ultraviolet Vortices from a Free-Electron Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Primož Rebernik Ribič

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Extreme-ultraviolet vortices may be exploited to steer the magnetic properties of nanoparticles, increase the resolution in microscopy, and gain insight into local symmetry and chirality of a material; they might even be used to increase the bandwidth in long-distance space communications. However, in contrast to the generation of vortex beams in the infrared and visible spectral regions, production of intense, extreme-ultraviolet and x-ray optical vortices still remains a challenge. Here, we present an in-situ and an ex-situ technique for generating intense, femtosecond, coherent optical vortices at a free-electron laser in the extreme ultraviolet. The first method takes advantage of nonlinear harmonic generation in a helical undulator, producing vortex beams at the second harmonic without the need for additional optical elements, while the latter one relies on the use of a spiral zone plate to generate a focused, micron-size optical vortex with a peak intensity approaching 10^{14}  W/cm^{2}, paving the way to nonlinear optical experiments with vortex beams at short wavelengths.

  12. Generation of Nondiffracting Electron Bessel Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Grillo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Almost 30 years ago, Durnin discovered that an optical beam with a transverse intensity profile in the form of a Bessel function of the first order is immune to the effects of diffraction. Unlike most laser beams, which spread upon propagation, the transverse distribution of these Bessel beams remains constant. Electrons also obey a wave equation (the Schrödinger equation, and therefore Bessel beams also exist for electron waves. We generate an electron Bessel beam by diffracting electrons from a nanoscale phase hologram. The hologram imposes a conical phase structure on the electron wave-packet spectrum, thus transforming it into a conical superposition of infinite plane waves, that is, a Bessel beam. We verify experimentally that these beams can propagate for 0.6 m without measurable spreading and can also reconstruct their intensity distributions after being partially obstructed by an obstacle. Finally, we show by numerical calculations that the performance of an electron microscope can be increased dramatically through use of these beams.

  13. Biological applications of ultraviolet free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, J.C.

    1997-10-01

    This review examines the possibilities for biological research using the three ultraviolet free-electron lasers that are nearing operational status in the US. The projected operating characteristics of major interest in biological research of the free-electron lasers at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, and Duke University are presented. Experimental applications in the areas of far- and vacuum ultraviolet photophysics and photochemistry, structural biology, environmental photobiology, and medical research are discussed and the prospects for advances in these areas, based upon the characteristics of the new ultraviolet free-electron lasers, are evaluated

  14. Efficiency enhancement of a harmonic lasing free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehi, E.; Maraghechi, B.; Mirian, N. S.

    2015-01-01

    The harmonic lasing free-electron laser amplifier, in which two wigglers is employed in order for the fundamental resonance of the second wiggler to coincide with the third harmonic of the first wiggler to generate ultraviolet radiation, is studied. A set of coupled nonlinear first-order differential equations describing the nonlinear evolution of the system, for a long electron bunch, is solved numerically by CYRUS code. Solutions for the non-averaged and averaged equations are compared. Remarkable agreement is found between the averaged and non-averaged simulations for the evolution of the third harmonic. Thermal effects in the form of longitudinal velocity spread are also investigated. For efficiency enhancement, the second wiggler field is set to decrease linearly and nonlinearly at the point where the radiation of the third harmonic saturates. The optimum starting point and the slope of the tapering of the amplitude of the wiggler are found by a successive run of the code. It is found that tapering can increase the saturated power of the third harmonic considerably. In order to reduce the length of the wiggler, the prebunched electron beam is considered

  15. Efficiency enhancement of a harmonic lasing free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, E.; Maraghechi, B.; Mirian, N. S.

    2015-03-01

    The harmonic lasing free-electron laser amplifier, in which two wigglers is employed in order for the fundamental resonance of the second wiggler to coincide with the third harmonic of the first wiggler to generate ultraviolet radiation, is studied. A set of coupled nonlinear first-order differential equations describing the nonlinear evolution of the system, for a long electron bunch, is solved numerically by CYRUS code. Solutions for the non-averaged and averaged equations are compared. Remarkable agreement is found between the averaged and non-averaged simulations for the evolution of the third harmonic. Thermal effects in the form of longitudinal velocity spread are also investigated. For efficiency enhancement, the second wiggler field is set to decrease linearly and nonlinearly at the point where the radiation of the third harmonic saturates. The optimum starting point and the slope of the tapering of the amplitude of the wiggler are found by a successive run of the code. It is found that tapering can increase the saturated power of the third harmonic considerably. In order to reduce the length of the wiggler, the prebunched electron beam is considered.

  16. Efficiency enhancement of a harmonic lasing free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salehi, E.; Maraghechi, B., E-mail: behrouz@aut.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, 15875-4413 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirian, N. S. [School of Particle and Accelerator Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), 19395-5531 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    The harmonic lasing free-electron laser amplifier, in which two wigglers is employed in order for the fundamental resonance of the second wiggler to coincide with the third harmonic of the first wiggler to generate ultraviolet radiation, is studied. A set of coupled nonlinear first-order differential equations describing the nonlinear evolution of the system, for a long electron bunch, is solved numerically by CYRUS code. Solutions for the non-averaged and averaged equations are compared. Remarkable agreement is found between the averaged and non-averaged simulations for the evolution of the third harmonic. Thermal effects in the form of longitudinal velocity spread are also investigated. For efficiency enhancement, the second wiggler field is set to decrease linearly and nonlinearly at the point where the radiation of the third harmonic saturates. The optimum starting point and the slope of the tapering of the amplitude of the wiggler are found by a successive run of the code. It is found that tapering can increase the saturated power of the third harmonic considerably. In order to reduce the length of the wiggler, the prebunched electron beam is considered.

  17. NASA-DoD Lead-Free Electronics Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs). depots. and support contractors have to be prepared to deal with an electronics supply chain thaI increasingly provides parts with lead-free finishes. some labeled no differently and intenningled with their SnPb counterparts. Allowance oflead-free components presents one of the greatest risks to the reliability of military and aerospace electronics. The introduction of components with lead-free lenninations, tennination finishes, or circuit boards presents a host of concerns to customers. suppliers, and maintainers of aerospace and military electronic systems such as: 1. Electrical shorting due to tin whiskers; 2. Incompatibility oflead-free processes and parameters (including higher melting points of lead-free alloys) with other materials in the system; and 3. Unknown material properties and incompatibilities that could reduce solder joint re liability.

  18. A control system for a free electron laser experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giove, D.

    1992-01-01

    The general layout of a control and data acquisition system for a Free Electron Laser experiment will be discussed. Some general considerations about the requirements and the architecture of the whole system will be developed. (author)

  19. The theoretical study of the optical klystron free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhenhua

    2001-01-01

    The work of the theoretical study and numerical simulation of optical klystron free electron laser is supported by National 863 Research Development Program and National Science Foundation of China. The object of studying UV band free electron laser (FEL) is to understand the physical law of optical klystron FEL and to gain experience for design. A three-dimensional code OPFEL are made and it is approved that the code is correct completely. The magnetic field of the optical klystron, the energy modulation of the electron beam, the density modulation of the electron beam, spontaneous emission of the electron beam in optical klystron, the harmonic super-radiation of the electron beam, and the effects of the undulator magnetic field error on modulation of the electron beam energy are simulated. These results are useful for the future experiments

  20. Generation of Femtosecond Electron and Photon Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Thongbai, Chitrlada; Kangrang, Nopadol; Kusoljariyakul, Keerati; Rhodes, Michael W; Rimjaem, Sakhorn; Saisut, Jatuporn; Vilaithong, Thiraphat; Wichaisirimongkol, Pathom; Wiedemann, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Femtosecond electron and photon pulses become a tool of interesting important to study dynamics at molecular or atomic levels. Such short pulses can be generated from a system consisting of an RF-gun with a thermionic cathode, an alpha magnet as a magnetic bunch compressor, and a linear accelerator. The femtosecond electron pulses can be used directly or used as sources to produce electromagnetic radiation of equally short pulses by choosing certain kind of radiation pruduction processes. At the Fast Neutron Research Facility (Thailand), we are especially interested in production of radiation in Far-infrared and X-ray regime. In the far-infrared wavelengths which are longer than the femtosecond pulse length, the radiation is emitted coherently producing intense radiation. In the X-ray regime, development of femtosecond X-ray source is crucial for application in ultrafast science.

  1. Beam conditioner for free electron lasers and synchrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.; Neil, G.R.

    1998-01-01

    A focused optical has been used to introduce an optical pulse, or electromagnetic wave, collinear with the electron beam in a free electron laser or synchrotron thereby adding an axial field component that accelerates the electrons on the radial outside of the distribution of electrons in the electron beam. This invention consists of using the axial electrical component of a TEM 10 mode Gaussian beam in vacuum to condition the electron beam and speed up the outer electrons in the beam. The conditioning beam should possess about the same diameter as the electron beam. The beam waist of the conditioning wave must be located around the entrance of the undulator longitudinally to have a net energy exchange between the electrons in the outer part of the distribution and the conditioning wave owing to the natural divergence of a Gaussian beam. By accelerating the outer electrons, the outer and core electrons are caused to stay in phase. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron. 4 figs

  2. Formation of presheath and current-free double layer in a two-electron-temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kunihiro; Miyawaki, Fujio

    1992-02-01

    Development of the steady-state potential in a two-temperature-electron plasma in contact with the wall is investigated analytically. It is shown that if the hot- to cold electron temperature ratio is greater than ten, the potential drop in the presheath, which is allowed to have either a small value characterized by the cold electrons or a large value by the hot electrons, discontinuously changes at a critical value for the hot- to total electron density ratio. It is also found that the monotonically decreasing potential structure which consists of the first presheath, a current-free double layer, the second presheath, and the sheath can be steadily formed in a lower range of the hot- to total electron density ratio around the critical value. The current-free double layer is set up due to existence of the two electron species and cold ions generated by ionization so as to connect two presheath potentials at different levels. (author)

  3. Voltage-pulse generator for electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenev, S.A.; Enchevich, I.B.; Mikhov, M.K.

    1987-01-01

    A voltage-pulse generator with combined capacitive and inductive storage devices of an electron gun is described. The current interrupter is a hydrogen thyratron (TGI1-100/8, TGI1-500/16, or TGI1-1000/25) installed in a short magnetic lens. The current interruption time of the thyratrons is 100-300 nsec. When the capacitive storage device is charged to 1 kV, a voltage pulse with an amplitude of 25 kV is obtained at the load

  4. Generation and study of relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyyengar, S.K.; Ron, P.H.; Mittal, K.C.; Goel, A.K.; Ramaswamy, V.; Rohatgi, V.K.

    1977-01-01

    Pulsed Electron Beam (REB) technology has progressed rapidly in recent years because of applications in various fields like radiation sources, high power laser development, plasma heating and fusion research. The REB development programme at the Plasma Physics Section of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, has been described. The design features of the 375 KV, 3500 A, 75 Joule REB generator are discussed. The diagnostic equipment developed for the studies is described. The present experimental studies and some preliminary results on beam characterisation are presented. (author)

  5. High-efficiency free-electron-laser experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, K.; Brau, C.A.; Goldstein, J.C.; Hohla, K.L.; Newnam, B.E.; Stein, W.E.; Warren, R.W.; Winston, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments with a tapered-wiggler free-electron laser have demonstrated extraction of about 3% of the energy from the electron beam and measured the corresponding optical emission. These results are in excellent agreement with theory and represent an order-of-magnitude improvement over all previous results

  6. Coherent Startup of an Infrared Free-Electron Laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaroszynski, D. A.; Bakker, R. J.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Oepts, D.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1993-01-01

    Coherent enhancement of the spontaneous undulator radiation by several orders of magnitude has been observed in a free-electron laser at wavelengths from 40 to 100 mum. The coherent emission can be explained by details of the electron-beam micropulse structure. Furthermore, it has been found that

  7. Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics Applications: Joint Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothgeb, Matt; Kessel, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    The overall objective of the Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics Applications project is to evaluate and test pretreatments not containing hexavalent chrome in avionics and electronics housing applications. This objective will be accomplished by testing strong performing coating systems from prior NASA and DoD testing or new coating systems as determined by the stakeholders.

  8. Linac-driven XUV free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newnam, B.E.; Goldstein, J.C.; Fraser, J.S.; Cooper, R.K.

    1983-01-01

    Use of an rf linear accelerator as the electron source for a free-electron laser operating in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength range from 100 nm to at least as low as 50 nm appears feasible. Peak and average power outputs of greater than 100 kW and 50W, respectively, are predicted

  9. Free electron laser amplifier driven by an induction linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neil, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of a free-electron laser amplifier as a means of converting the kinetic energy of an electron beam into coherent radiation. In particular, the use of an induction linear accelerator is discussed. The motion of the elections in the tapered and untapered wiggler magnets is discussed as well as the beam emittance, and the radiation fields involved

  10. XUV/VUV free-electron laser oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, J.C.; Newnam, B.E.; Cooper, R.K.; Comly, J.C. Jr.

    1984-04-01

    It is shown, from computations based on a detailed theoretical model, that modest improvements in electron beam and optical mirror technologies will enable a free-electron laser, driven by an rf linear accelerator, to operate in the 50 to 200-nm range of optical wavelengths. 10 references

  11. Two-dimensional optimization of free-electron-laser designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosnitz, D.; Haas, R.A.

    1982-05-04

    Off-axis, two-dimensional designs for free electron lasers are described that maintain correspondence of a light beam with a synchronous electron at an optimal transverse radius r > 0 to achieve increased beam trapping efficiency and enhanced laser beam wavefront control so as to decrease optical beam diffraction and other deleterious effects.

  12. Free electron laser experiments using a long pulse induction linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasour, J.A.; Lucey, R.

    1983-01-01

    The NRL Long Pulse Induction Linac is being employed in a Free Electron Laser (FEL) experiment. The authors present results of beam transport and focusing experiments as well as measurements of the output radiation generated by various magnetic wigglers. The electron gun of the accelerator presently has a 17-cmdiam. cold cathode which is located in a nearly zero magnetic field (B /SUB z/ less than or equal to 5 G). The gun voltage is flat to within approx. = + or - 5% for 1.5 μsec with this graphite brush cathode. The beam is focused by a series of solenoidal coils as it propagates through the 4-m-long accelerator. 2 A solenoidal field which can be varied from 1-10 kG confines the beam in the FEL interaction region. Previous experiments were limited by poor beam transport, focusing, and matching into the relatively large solenoidal field in the FEL region. By smoothing the axial magnetic field profile in the accelerator and making a more adiabatic transition from the low field in the accelerator to the high field in the FEL, beam transport into the wiggler has been substantially improved. Currently, a 700 kV beam with I > 500 A and r /SUB b/ < 0.75 cm is transported through the FEL region. Beam transport is in qualitative agreement with envelope code calculations

  13. Compact two-beam push-pull free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Andrew [Yorktown, VA

    2009-03-03

    An ultra-compact free electron laser comprising a pair of opposed superconducting cavities that produce identical electron beams moving in opposite directions such that each set of superconducting cavities accelerates one electron beam and decelerates the other electron beam. Such an arrangement, allows the energy used to accelerate one beam to be recovered and used again to accelerate the second beam, thus, each electron beam is decelerated by a different structure than that which accelerated it so that energy exchange rather than recovery is achieved resulting in a more compact and highly efficient apparatus.

  14. High-efficiency free-electron laser results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, K.; Baru, C.A.; Newnam, B.E.; Stein, W.E.; Warren, R.W.; Winston, J.G.; Young, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    Results obtained with a tapered-wiggler free-electron laser demonstrate the concepts proposed by Morton for enhanced efficiency and show deceleration of electrons by as much as 7%, and extraction of more than 3% of the total electron-beam energy as laser energy when the laser is operated as an amplifier. The experiment is presently being reconfigured to examine its performance as a laser oscillator

  15. Harmonic lasing in x-ray free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Schneidmiller

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Harmonic lasing in a free electron laser with a planar undulator (under the condition that the fundamental frequency is suppressed might be a cheap and efficient way of extension of wavelength ranges of existing and planned x-ray free electron laser (FEL facilities. Contrary to nonlinear harmonic generation, harmonic lasing can provide much more intense, stable, and narrow-band FEL beam which is easier to handle due to the suppressed fundamental frequency. In this paper we perform a parametrization of the solution of the eigenvalue equation for lasing at odd harmonics, and present an explicit expression for FEL gain length, taking into account all essential effects. We propose and discuss methods for suppression of the fundamental harmonic. We also suggest a combined use of harmonic lasing and lasing at the retuned fundamental wavelength in order to reduce bandwidth and to increase brilliance of x-ray beam at saturation. Considering 3rd harmonic lasing as a practical example, we come to the conclusion that it is much more robust than usually thought, and can be widely used in the existing or planned x-ray FEL (XFEL facilities. In particular, Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS after a minor modification can lase to saturation at the 3rd harmonic up to the photon energy of 25–30 keV providing multigigawatt power level and narrow bandwidth. As for the European XFEL, harmonic lasing would allow one to extend operating range (ultimately up to 100 keV, to reduce FEL bandwidth and to increase brilliance, to enable two-color operation for pump-probe experiments, and to provide more flexible operation at different electron energies. Similar improvements can be realized in other x-ray FEL facilities with gap-tunable undulators like FLASH II, SACLA, LCLS II, etc. Harmonic lasing can be an attractive option for compact x-ray FELs (driven by electron beams with a relatively low energy, allowing the use of the standard undulator technology instead of

  16. Mean free path of electrons in rare gas solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwentner, N.

    1976-07-01

    The energy distribution of photoelectrons of solid Ar, Kr and Xe films with thickness between 10 A and 300 A have been measured in the photon energy range 10 eV to 30 eV using the synchrotron radiation of DESY. By varying the photon energy and the film thickness the dependence of the electron-electron scattering length on the electron kinetic energy has been determined. The mean free path for inelastic electron-electron scattering decreases monotonically from values of the order of 1.000 A at the scattering threshold to values between 1 A and 5 A for electron energies 10 eV above threshold. The observed energy dependence can be understood by a simplified bandstructure and a scattering probability described by a product of density of states. The threshold energy for electron-electron scattering lies between twice the energy of the n = 1 excitons and the sum of bandgap and exciton energy. (HK) [de

  17. Feasibility of free piston generation unit for electrical power provision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, R.; Roskilly, A.; Shaw, R.; French, C. [Newcastle Univ. (United Kingdom)

    2000-07-01

    Free piston linear engines offer the capability of providing power without the need to convert reciprocating motion into rotary motion. This allows for the utilisation of higher peak pressures during the combustion process and thus improves efficiency. The objective of this paper is to outline the potential benefits of a Free Piston Generator (FPG) and discuss the feasibility of this technology as a potential platform for electrical power provision. (authors)

  18. Carbonyl Compounds Generated from Electronic Cigarettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanae Bekki

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes are advertised as being safer than tobacco cigarettes products as the chemical compounds inhaled from e-cigarettes are believed to be fewer and less toxic than those from tobacco cigarettes. Therefore, continuous careful monitoring and risk management of e-cigarettes should be implemented, with the aim of protecting and promoting public health worldwide. Moreover, basic scientific data are required for the regulation of e-cigarette. To date, there have been reports of many hazardous chemical compounds generated from e-cigarettes, particularly carbonyl compounds such as formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, and glyoxal, which are often found in e-cigarette aerosols. These carbonyl compounds are incidentally generated by the oxidation of e-liquid (liquid in e-cigarette; glycerol and glycols when the liquid comes in contact with the heated nichrome wire. The compositions and concentrations of these compounds vary depending on the type of e-liquid and the battery voltage. In some cases, extremely high concentrations of these carbonyl compounds are generated, and may contribute to various health effects. Suppliers, risk management organizations, and users of e-cigarettes should be aware of this phenomenon.

  19. Theory of coherent transition radiation generated by ellipsoidal electron bunches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Root, op 't W.P.E.M.; Smorenburg, P.W.; Oudheusden, van T.; Wiel, van der M.J.; Luiten, O.J.

    2007-01-01

    We present the theory of coherent transition radiation (CTR) generated by ellipsoidal electron bunches. We calculate analytical expressions for the electric field spectrum, the power spectrum, and the temporal electric field of CTR, generated by cylindrically symmetric ellipsoidal electron bunches

  20. Seeded free-electron and inverse free-electron laser techniques for radiation amplification and electron microbunching in the terahertz range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Sung

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive analysis is presented that describes amplification of a seed THz pulse in a single-pass free-electron laser (FEL driven by a photoinjector. The dynamics of the radiation pulse and the modulated electron beam are modeled using the time-dependent FEL code, GENESIS 1.3. A 10-ps (FWHM electron beam with a peak current of 50–100 A allows amplification of a ∼1  kW seed pulse in the frequency range 0.5–3 THz up to 10–100 MW power in a relatively compact 2-m long planar undulator. The electron beam driving the FEL is strongly modulated, with some inhomogeneity due to the slippage effect. It is shown that THz microbunching of the electron beam is homogeneous over the entire electron pulse when saturated FEL amplification is utilized at the very entrance of an undulator. This requires seeding of a 30-cm long undulator buncher with a 1–3 MW of pump power with radiation at the resonant frequency. A narrow-band seed pulse in the THz range needed for these experiments can be generated by frequency mixing of CO_{2} laser lines in a GaAs nonlinear crystal. Two schemes for producing MW power pulses in seeded FELs are considered in some detail for the beam parameters achievable at the Neptune Laboratory at UCLA: the first uses a waveguide to transport radiation in the 0.5–3 THz range through a 2-m long FEL amplifier and the second employs high-gain third harmonic generation using the FEL process at 3–9 THz.

  1. Chaotic behaviour and controlling chaos in free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wenjie; Chen Shigang; Du Xiangwan; Wang Guangrui

    1995-01-01

    Chaos in free electron lasers (FEL) is reviewed. Special attention has been paid to the chaotic behaviour of the electrons and the laser field. The problem of controlling and utilizing chaotic motion of the electrons and the laser field has also been discussed. In order to find out the rules of instability and chaos in FEL, some typical methods of the chaotic theory are used. These methods include making the Poincare surface of section, drawing the phase space diagrams of the electron orbits, calculating the Liapunov exponents, and computing the power spectrum, etc. Finally, some problems in FEL research are discussed (103 refs., 54 figs.)

  2. Free-electron lasers with magnetized ion-wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehdian, H.; Jafari, S.; Hasanbeigi, A.; Ebrahimi, F.

    2009-01-01

    Significant progress has been made using laser ionized channels to guide electron beams in the ion focus regime in a free-electron laser. Propagation of an electron beam in the ion focusing regime (IFR) allows the beam to propagate without expanding from space-charge repulsion. The ninth-degree polynomial dispersion relation for electromagnetic and space-charge waves is derived analytically by solving the electron momentum transfer and wave equations. The variation of resonant frequencies and peak growth rates with axial magnetic field strength has been demonstrated. Substantial enhancement in peak growth rate is obtained as the axial field frequency approaches the gyroresonance frequency.

  3. Free form CMOS electronics: Physically flexible and stretchable

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2015-12-07

    Free form (physically flexible and stretchable) electronics can be used for applications which are unexplored today due to the rigid and brittle nature of the state-of-the-art electronics. Therefore, we show integration strategy to rationally design materials, processes and devices to transform advanced complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics into flexible and stretchable one while retaining their high performance, energy efficiency, ultra-large-scale-integration (ULSI) density, reliability and performance over cost benefit to expand its applications for wearable, implantable and Internet-of-Everything electronics.

  4. A spectral unaveraged algorithm for free electron laser simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andriyash, I.A.; Lehe, R.; Malka, V.

    2015-01-01

    We propose and discuss a numerical method to model electromagnetic emission from the oscillating relativistic charged particles and its coherent amplification. The developed technique is well suited for free electron laser simulations, but it may also be useful for a wider range of physical problems involving resonant field–particles interactions. The algorithm integrates the unaveraged coupled equations for the particles and the electromagnetic fields in a discrete spectral domain. Using this algorithm, it is possible to perform full three-dimensional or axisymmetric simulations of short-wavelength amplification. In this paper we describe the method, its implementation, and we present examples of free electron laser simulations comparing the results with the ones provided by commonly known free electron laser codes

  5. Ensuring Steady Operation of Free-Piston Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Nemecek

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes Free-Piston Generator (FPG model and its control for achieving steady operation. A FPG is a special type of combustion engine representing a new approach concerning the conversion of the chemical energy of hydrocarbon fuel into electrical energy. Unlike conventional engines, this type of engine does not use a crankshaft, and generates electric energy directly by a linear movement of pistons.

  6. Free piston variable-stroke linear-alternator generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaland, Carsten M.

    1998-01-01

    A free-piston variable stroke linear-alternator AC power generator for a combustion engine. An alternator mechanism and oscillator system generates AC current. The oscillation system includes two oscillation devices each having a combustion cylinder and a flying turnbuckle. The flying turnbuckle moves in accordance with the oscillation device. The alternator system is a linear alternator coupled between the two oscillation devices by a slotted connecting rod.

  7. Ensuring Steady Operation of Free-Piston Generator

    OpenAIRE

    Pavel Nemecek

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes Free-Piston Generator (FPG) model and its control for achieving steady operation. A FPG is a special type of combustion engine representing a new approach concerning the conversion of the chemical energy of hydrocarbon fuel into electrical energy. Unlike conventional engines, this type of engine does not use a crankshaft, and generates electric energy directly by a linear movement of pistons.

  8. Construction of double discharge pulsed electron beam generator and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goektas, H.

    2001-12-01

    Generation of fast pulsed electron beam by superposing DC and pulsed hollow cathode discharge is studied. The electrical characteristics and measurements of the electron beam generator are done dc glow discharge and for the pulsed one. The electron beam current, its density and magnetic field effect, pinch effect, have been studied. The dependence of the electron beam parameters with respect to pressure and magnetic field have been studied. The pulsing effect of the beam is reviewed. By using the generator, micron holes drilling and carbon deposition was done at the laboratory. As a target source for carbon deposition methane gas is used and for Hydrogen-free carbon deposition was graphite

  9. Compact free-electron laser at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, K.C.D.; Meier, K.L.; Nguyen, D.; Sheffield, R.L.; Wang, Tai-Sen F.; Warren, R.W.; Wilson, W.L.; Young, L.M.

    1991-01-01

    The design and construction of second-generation free-electron laser (FEL) system at Los Alamos will be described. comprising state-of-the art components, this FEL system will be sufficiently compact, robust and user-friendly for application in industry, medicine, and research. 11 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Atomic and free electrons in a strong light field

    CERN Document Server

    Fedorov, Mikhail V

    1997-01-01

    This book presents and describes a series of unusual and striking strong-field phenomena concerning atoms and free electrons. Some of these phenomena are: multiphoton stimulated bremsstrahlung, free-electron lasers, wave-packet physics, above-threshold ionization, and strong-field stabilization in Rydberg atoms. The theoretical foundations and causes of the phenomena are described in detail, with all the approximations and derivations discussed. All the known and relevant experiments are described too, and their results are compared with those of the existing theoretical models.An extensive ge

  11. Short wavelength optics for future free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attwood, D.T.

    1984-04-01

    Although much free-electron laser work is directed toward achieving sufficient single-pass gain to be useful for research purposes, the availability of mirrors of high reflectance for the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray regime would make resonant cavities a possibility. In addition, as in ordinary synchrotron radiation work, mirrors are required for the construction of realistic experiments and for beam manipulation purposes such as folding and extraction. The Working Group discussed a number of approaches to reflecting optics for free electron lasers, which are summarized here, and described in some detail. 16 references, 2 figures

  12. Electron-phonon coupling in quasi free-standing graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christian Johannsen, Jens; Ulstrup, Søren; Bianchi, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Quasi free-standing monolayer graphene can be produced by intercalating species like oxygen or hydrogen between epitaxial graphene and the substrate crystal. If the graphene is indeed decoupled from the substrate, one would expect the observation of a similar electronic dispersion and many......-body effects, irrespective of the substrate and the material used to achieve the decoupling. Here we investigate the electron-phonon coupling in two different types of quasi free-standing monolayer graphene: decoupled from SiC via hydrogen intercalation and decoupled from Ir via oxygen intercalation. Both...

  13. Beamline for X-ray Free Electron Laser of SACLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tono, K; Togashi, T; Ohashi, H; Kimura, H; Takahashi, S; Takeshita, K; Tomizawa, H; Goto, S; Inubushi, Y; Sato, T; Yabashi, M

    2013-01-01

    A beamline for X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) has been developed at SACLA, SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free electron LAser. The beamline delivers and diagnoses an XFEL beam without degrading the beam quality. The transport optics are applicable in the range of 4–30 keV with a double-crystal monochromator or 4–15 keV with either of two double-mirror systems. A photon diagnostic system of the beamline monitors intensity, photon energy, center-of-mass position, and spatial profile in shot-by-shot and non-destructive manners.

  14. Material Processing Opportunites Utilizing a Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Alan

    1996-11-01

    Many properties of photocathode-driven Free Electron Lasers (FEL) are extremely attractive for material processing applications. These include: 1) broad-band tunability across the IR and UV spectra which permits wavelength optimization, depth deposition control and utilization of resonance phenomena; 2) picosecond pulse structure with continuous nanosecond spacing for optimum deposition efficiency and minimal collateral damage; 3) high peak and average radiated power for economic processing in quantity; and 4) high brightness for spatially defined energy deposition and intense energy density in small spots. We discuss five areas: polymer, metal and electronic material processing, micromachining and defense applications; where IR or UV material processing will find application if the economics is favorable. Specific examples in the IR and UV, such as surface texturing of polymers for improved look and feel, and anti-microbial food packaging films, which have been demonstrated using UV excimer lamps and lasers, will be given. Unfortunately, although the process utility is readily proven, the power levels and costs of lamps and lasers do not scale to production margins. However, from these examples, application specific cost targets ranging from 0.1=A2/kJ to 10=A2/kJ of delivered radiation at power levels from 10 kW to 500 kW, have been developed and are used to define strawman FEL processing systems. Since =46EL radiation energy extraction from the generating electron beam is typically a few percent, at these high average power levels, economic considerations dictate the use of a superconducting RF accelerator with energy recovery to minimize cavity and beam dump power loss. Such a 1 kW IR FEL, funded by the US Navy, is presently under construction at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. This dual-use device, scheduled to generate first light in late 1997, will test both the viability of high-power FELs for shipboard self-defense against cruise

  15. Rate constant of free electrons and holes recombination in thin films CdSe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radychev, N.A.; Novikov, G.F.

    2006-01-01

    Destruction kinetics of electrons generated in thin films CdSe by laser impulse (wave length is 337 nm, period of impulse - 8 nc) is studied by the method of microwave photoconductivity (36 GHz) at 295 K. Model of the process was suggested using the analysis of kinetics of photo-responses decay, and it allowed determination of rate constant of recombination of free electrons and holes in cadmium selenide - (4-6)x10 -11 cm 3 s -1 [ru

  16. Femtosecond and Subfemtosecond X-Ray Pulses from a SASE Based Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emma, P

    2004-03-10

    We propose a novel method to generate femtosecond and sub-femtosecond photon pulses in a free electron laser by selectively spoiling the transverse emittance of the electron beam. Its merits are simplicity and ease of implementation. When the system is applied to the Linac Coherent Light Source, it can provide x-ray pulses the order of 1 femtosecond in duration containing about 1010 transversely coherent photons.

  17. Maxwell-Like Equations for Free Dirac Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, S. A.

    2018-03-01

    In this article, we show that the wave equation for a free Dirac electron can be represented in a form that is analogous to Maxwell's electrodynamics. The electron bispinor wavefunction is explicitly expressed in terms of its real and imaginary components. This leads us to incorporate into it appropriate scalar and pseudo-scalar fields in advance, so that a full symmetry may be accomplished. The Dirac equation then takes on a form similar to that of a set of inhomogeneous Maxwell's equations involving a particular self-source. We relate plane wave solutions of these equations to waves corresponding to free Dirac electrons, identifying the longitudinal component of the electron motion, together with the corresponding Zitterbewegung ("trembling motion").

  18. Inhomogeneous effects in the quantum free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piovella, N.; Bonifacio, R.

    2006-01-01

    We include inhomogeneous effects in the quantum model of a free electron laser taking into account the initial energy spread of the electron beam. From a linear analysis, we obtain a generalized dispersion relation, from which the exponential gain can be explicitly calculated. We determine the maximum allowed initial energy spread in the quantum exponential regime and we discuss the limit of large energy spread

  19. Vibrational analysis of a shipboard free electron laser beam path

    OpenAIRE

    Gallant, Bryan M.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis explores the deployment of a free electron laser (FEL) weapon system in a shipboard vibration environment. A concept solid model of a shipboard FEL is developed and used as a basis for a finite element model which is subjected to vibration simulation in MATLAB. Vibration input is obtained from ship shock trials data and wave excited motion data from ship motion simulation software. Emphasis is placed on the motion of electron beam path components of the FEL and the feasibility of ...

  20. A review of electronic engineering design free software tools

    OpenAIRE

    Medrano Sánchez, Carlos; Plaza García, Inmaculada; Castro Gil, Manuel Alonso; García Sevilla, Francisco; Martínez Calero, J.D.; Pou Félix, Josep; Corbalán Fuertes, Montserrat

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we review electronic design free software tools. We have searched open source programs that help with several tasks of the electronic design flow: analog and digital simulation, schematic capture, printed circuit board design and hardware description language compilation and simulation. Using some rapid criteria for verifying their availability, we have selected some of them which are worth working with. This work intends to perform a deeper analysis of fre...

  1. Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser Facility preliminary design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi, I. (ed.)

    1993-02-01

    This document, the Preliminary Design Report (PDR) for the Brookhaven Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL) facility, describes all the elements of a facility proposed to meet the needs of a research community which requires ultraviolet sources not currently available as laboratory based lasers. Further, for these experiments, the requisite properties are not extant in either the existing second or upcoming third generation synchrotron light sources. This document is the result of our effort at BNL to identify potential users, determine the requirements of their experiments, and to design a facility which can not only satisfy the existing need, but have adequate flexibility for possible future extensions as need dictates and as evolving technology allows. The PDR is comprised of three volumes. In this, the first volume, background for the development of the proposal is given, including descriptions of the UV FEL facility, and representative examples of the science it was designed to perform. Discussion of the limitations and potential directions for growth are also included. A detailed description of the facility design is then provided, which addresses the accelerator, optical, and experimental systems. Information regarding the conventional construction for the facility is contained in an addendum to volume one (IA).

  2. Cartilage ablation studies using mid-IR free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Jong-In; Peavy, George M.; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2005-04-01

    The ablation rate of articular cartilage and fibrocartilage (meniscus), were quantified to examine wavelength and tissue-composition dependence of ablation efficiency for selected mid-infrared wavelengths. The wavelengths tested were 2.9 um (water dominant absorption), 6.1 (protein and water absorption) and 6.45 um (protein dominant absorption) generated by the Free Electron Laser (FEL) at Vanderbilt University. The measurement of tissue mass removal using a microbalance during laser ablation was conducted to determine the ablation rates of cartilage. The technique can be accurate over methods such as profilometer and histology sectioning where tissue surface and the crater morphology may be affected by tissue processing. The ablation efficiency was found to be dependent upon the wavelength. Both articular cartilage and meniscus (fibrocartilage) ablations at 6.1 um were more efficient than those at the other wavelengths evaluated. We observed the lowest ablation efficiency of both types of cartilage with the 6.45 um wavelength, possibly due to the reduction in water absorption at this wavelength in comparison to the other wavelengths that were evaluated.

  3. Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser Facility preliminary design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.

    1993-02-01

    This document, the Preliminary Design Report (PDR) for the Brookhaven Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL) facility, describes all the elements of a facility proposed to meet the needs of a research community which requires ultraviolet sources not currently available as laboratory based lasers. Further, for these experiments, the requisite properties are not extant in either the existing second or upcoming third generation synchrotron light sources. This document is the result of our effort at BNL to identify potential users, determine the requirements of their experiments, and to design a facility which can not only satisfy the existing need, but have adequate flexibility for possible future extensions as need dictates and as evolving technology allows. The PDR is comprised of three volumes. In this, the first volume, background for the development of the proposal is given, including descriptions of the UV FEL facility, and representative examples of the science it was designed to perform. Discussion of the limitations and potential directions for growth are also included. A detailed description of the facility design is then provided, which addresses the accelerator, optical, and experimental systems. Information regarding the conventional construction for the facility is contained in an addendum to volume one (IA)

  4. Radiation safety aspects of new X-ray free electron laser facility, SACLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    In the safety point of view, X-ray free electron laser facilities have some characteristics in comparison with 3 rd generation synchrotron radiation facilities. One is that the high energy electrons are always injected into the beam dump and the beamlines must be constructed in the direction of the movements of electrons, and another is that the total number of accelerated electrons of X-ray free electron laser facilities is much larger than that of synchrotron radiation facilities. In addition to the importance of safety interlock systems, therefore, it is important that high energy electrons never invade into X-ray free electron laser beamlines and the amount of accelerated electron beam losses must be reduced as much as possible. At SACLA, a safety permanent magnet was installed into the X-ray light beam axis, and a beam halo monitor and beam loss monitors were installed within and around the electron transport pipes, respectively. In comparison with the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility, shielding design of SACLA, outline of the radiation safety systems including the monitors will be presented

  5. A new far infrared free-electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, J E; Swartz, J C; Urata, J; Kimmitt, M F

    1999-01-01

    The operation of a new ultra compact diffraction grating coupled free-electron laser (FEL) has been demonstrated. The basic elements of the device which is termed a grating coupled oscillator (GCO) are the beam in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a diffraction grating which is mounted in the e-beam focal region of the SEM. The e-beam is controlled by the SEM's electron optical system and distributed feed back is provided by the grating itself. Recent experimental results are presented and techniques for extending the wavelength and power coverage are discussed.

  6. A new far infrared free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, J.E.; Brownell, J.H.; Swartz, J.C.; Urata, J.; Kimmitt, M.F.

    1999-01-01

    The operation of a new ultra compact diffraction grating coupled free-electron laser (FEL) has been demonstrated. The basic elements of the device which is termed a grating coupled oscillator (GCO) are the beam in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a diffraction grating which is mounted in the e-beam focal region of the SEM. The e-beam is controlled by the SEM's electron optical system and distributed feed back is provided by the grating itself. Recent experimental results are presented and techniques for extending the wavelength and power coverage are discussed

  7. A new far infrared free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, J.E.; Brownell, J.H.; Swartz, J.C.; Urata, J.; Kimmitt, M.F

    1999-06-01

    The operation of a new ultra compact diffraction grating coupled free-electron laser (FEL) has been demonstrated. The basic elements of the device which is termed a grating coupled oscillator (GCO) are the beam in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a diffraction grating which is mounted in the e-beam focal region of the SEM. The e-beam is controlled by the SEM's electron optical system and distributed feed back is provided by the grating itself. Recent experimental results are presented and techniques for extending the wavelength and power coverage are discussed.

  8. Transient analysis of a bunched beam free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.M.; Yu, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of the bunched beam operation of a free electron laser was studied. Assuming the electron beam to be initially monoenergetic, the Maxwell-Vlasov equations describing the system reduce to a third order partial differential equation for the envelope of the emitted light. The Green's function corresponding to an arbitrary shape of the electron bunch, which describes the transient behavior of the system, is obtained. The Green's function was used to discuss the start up problem as well as the power output and the power specrum of a self-amplified spontaneous emission

  9. High-energy inverse free-electron laser accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courant, E.D.; Pellegrini, C.; Zakowicz, W.

    1985-01-01

    We study the inverse free electron laser (IFEL) accelerator and show that it can accelerate electrons to the few hundred GeV region with average acceleration rates of the order of 200 meV/m. Several possible accelerating structures are analyzed, and the effect of synchrotron radiation losses is studied. The longitudinal phase stability of accelerated particles is also analyzed. A Hamiltonian description, which takes into account the dissipative features of the IFEL accelerator, is introduced to study perturbations from the resonant acceleration. Adiabatic invariants are obtained and used to estimate the change of the electron phase space density during the acceleration process

  10. Synchrotron radiation and free electron laser activities in Novosibirsk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korchuganov, V.N.; Kulipanov, G.N.; Mezentsev, N.A.; Oreshkov, A.D.; Panchenko, V.E.; Pindyurin, V.F.; Skrinskij, A.N.; Sheromov, M.A.; Vinokurov, N.A.; Zolotarev, K.V.

    1994-01-01

    The results of studies realized in the Siberian synchrotron radiation centre within the frameworks of wide program of synchrotron radiation and free electron laser research are summarized. The technical information on the VEPP-2M, VEPP-3 and VEPP-4M storage rings used as synchrotron radiation sources is given. 10 refs.; 8 figs.; 12 tabs

  11. The quantum mechanical analysis of the free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, G.; Renieri, A.

    1985-01-01

    A quantum analysis of the Free Electron Laser is presented. The theory is developed both in single and longitudinal multimode regimes. Finally a self-consistent procedure to study the growth of the laser signal from the vacuum to the macroscopic level is presented

  12. Three-dimensional simulations of free-electron laser physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVey, B.D.

    1985-09-01

    A computer code has been developed to simulate three-dimensional free-electron laser physics. A mathematical formulation of the FEL equations is presented, and the numerical solution of the problem is described. Sample results from the computer code are discussed. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Modeling paraxial wave propagation in free-electron laser oscillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karssenberg, J.G.; van der Slot, Petrus J.M.; Volokhine, I.; Verschuur, Jeroen W.J.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators requires calculation of both the light-beam interaction within the undulator and the light propagation outside the undulator. We have developed a paraxial optical propagation code that can be combined with various existing models of gain media, for

  14. Mechanisms for the production of harmonics in free electron lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elgin, J.N.; Penman, C.

    1991-01-01

    Harmonics in the radiation of a free electron laser are useful for extending the range of tuning, may originate in spontaneous or parametric processes, and can take part in stimulated emission or amplification. These mechanisms exhibit interesting analogies with those of nonlinear optics. Apart from

  15. Electron beam generation in z-pinch discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikhrev, V.V.; Baronova, E.O. [Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation). Russian Research Center

    1997-12-31

    Numerical modelling of the process of electron beam generation in z-pinch discharges are presented. The proposed model represents the electron beam generation under turbulent plasma conditions. Strong current distribution inhomogeneity in the plasma column and the zigzag drift current motion through the plasma have accounted for the adequate generation process investigation. Electron beam is generated near the maximum of compression and it is not related with the current break effect. (author)

  16. Electron gun for the positron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, S.; Ogawa, Y.; Saito, Y.

    1986-01-01

    A triode electron gun has been installed on the Positron Generator at KEK, and brought into test operation. It involves a grid-cathode assembly currently used in a planner triode. The cathode has a diameter of 10 mm and is coated with Ba-Sr-Ca oxide. Because of the short grid-cathode distance (0.18 mm), the relatively low grid pulse voltages makes it possible to draw a high current. The assembly has a small vacuum flange which allows its easy replacement. Emission current from the oxide cathode is sensitive to residual gases, therefore, the vacuum system is carefully made and the pressure is kept in the range of 10 -9 Torr even when the accelerator is on. The grid pulser is a line type pulser using multi-stage avalanche transistors as a switch. The pulse width of 10 nsec has been used for the test to investigate the gun characteristics. The performance of the gun has been tested with this pulser and the emission current of 9.7 A was achieved at an injection voltage of 110 kV. The characteristics of the gun are described together with the beam trace

  17. Drift velocity of free electrons in liquid argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walkowiak, W.

    2000-01-01

    A measurement of the drift velocity of free electrons in liquid argon has been performed. Free electrons have been produced by photoelectric effect using laser light in a so-called 'laser chamber'. The results on the drift velocity v d are given as a function of the electric field strength in the range 0.5 kV/cm≤|E|≤12.6 kV/cm and the temperature in the range 87 K≤T≤94 K. A global parametrization of v d (|E|,T) has been fitted to the data. A temperature dependence of the electron drift velocity is observed, with a mean value of Δv d /(ΔT v d )=(-1.72±0.08)%/K in the range of 87-94 K

  18. Free-Free Transitions in the Presence of Laser Fields at Very Low Incident Electron Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Sinha, Chandana

    2010-01-01

    We study the free-free transition in electron-hydrogenic systems in ground state in presence of an external laser field at very loud incident energies. The laser field is treated classically while the collision dynamics is treated quantum mechanically. The laser field is chosen to be monochromatic, linearly polarized and homogeneous. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser in a nonperturbative manner by choosing a Volkov wave function for it. The scattering weave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of the electron exchange, short-range as well as of the long-range interactions to get the S and P wave phase shifts while for the higher angular momentum phase shifts the exchange approximation has only been considered. We calculate the laser assisted differential cross sections (LADCS) for the aforesaid free-free transition process for single photon absorption/emission. The laser intensity is chosen to be much less than the atomic field intensity. A strong suppression is noted in the LADCS as compared to the field free (FF) cross sections. Unlike the FF ones, the LADCS exhibit some oscillations having a distinct maximum at a low value of the scattering angle depending on the laser parameters as well as on the incident energies.

  19. Modified two beam accelerator driven by a D.C. pelletron free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, D.

    1985-01-01

    Assembling the next generation of linear particle accelerators requires progress in three areas. (1) Sources must be developed to provide the coherent electromagnetic radiation used to power the device. (2) Physical structures must be designed which efficiently transfer the power to the high energy beam. (3) Cooling techniques must be developed in order to enhance beam transport and to provide sufficient luminosity. This paper will describe a method of obtaining a highly efficient coherent radiation source by using a continuous wave Free Electron Laser (FEL). Several possibilities exist for an accelerating structure which could use this radiation as a power source. These include scaling down the size of traditional RF cavities, inverse free electron lasers, and surface grating schemes. Inverse free electron lasers have the possibility of intrinsic cooling of the high energy beam

  20. Direct measurement of the pulse duration and frequency chirp of seeded XUV free electron laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azima, Armin; Bödewadt, Jörn; Becker, Oliver; Düsterer, Stefan; Ekanayake, Nagitha; Ivanov, Rosen; Kazemi, Mehdi M.; Lamberto Lazzarino, Leslie; Lechner, Christoph; Maltezopoulos, Theophilos; Manschwetus, Bastian; Miltchev, Velizar; Müller, Jost; Plath, Tim; Przystawik, Andreas; Wieland, Marek; Assmann, Ralph; Hartl, Ingmar; Laarmann, Tim; Rossbach, Jörg; Wurth, Wilfried; Drescher, Markus

    2018-01-01

    We report on a direct time-domain measurement of the temporal properties of a seeded free-electron laser pulse in the extreme ultraviolet spectral range. Utilizing the oscillating electromagnetic field of terahertz radiation, a single-shot THz streak-camera was applied for measuring the duration as well as spectral phase of the generated intense XUV pulses. The experiment was conducted at FLASH, the free electron laser user facility at DESY in Hamburg, Germany. In contrast to indirect methods, this approach directly resolves and visualizes the frequency chirp of a seeded free-electron laser (FEL) pulse. The reported diagnostic capability is a prerequisite to tailor amplitude, phase and frequency distributions of FEL beams on demand. In particular, it opens up a new window of opportunities for advanced coherent spectroscopic studies making use of the high degree of temporal coherence expected from a seeded FEL pulse.

  1. Free electron lasers and short wavelengths: state of the art and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couprie, M.E.

    2003-01-01

    Free electron lasers generate coherent and adjustable radiation that is based on the interaction of a light wave with a relativistic electron beam circulating in a periodic and permanent magnetic field produced by an ondulator. The light wave comes from either - synchrotron radiation emitted by the electron packet at each round in the case of SASE (self amplified spontaneous emission) operating more, or - synchrotron radiation stored in an optic cavity in the case of oscillator operating mode, or - an external laser wave in the case of harmonic generation operating mode. Under particular conditions the light wave is amplified to the detriment of the kinetic energy of the electrons which leads to the laser effect. 5 free electron lasers are operating in the world: Super-Aco in France, Elettra in Italy, NIJI-4 and Uvsor in Japan, and Duke in Usa. The state of the art of free electron lasers in the UV, VUV range is presented and the different configurations associated to storage rings, linac and ERL (energy recovery linacs) are described. (A.C.)

  2. Generating hierarchial scale-free graphs from fractals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komjathy, Julia, E-mail: komyju@math.bme.hu [Department of Stochastics, Institute of Mathematics, Technical University of Budapest, H-1529 P.O. Box 91 (Hungary); Simon, Karoly, E-mail: simonk@math.bme.hu [Department of Stochastics, Institute of Mathematics, Technical University of Budapest, H-1529 P.O. Box 91 (Hungary)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > We generate deterministic scale-free networks using graph-directed self similar IFS. > Our model exhibits similar clustering, power law decay properties to real networks. > The average length of shortest path and the diameter of the graph are determined. > Using this model, we generate random graphs with prescribed power law exponent. - Abstract: Motivated by the hierarchial network model of E. Ravasz, A.-L. Barabasi, and T. Vicsek, we introduce deterministic scale-free networks derived from a graph directed self-similar fractal {Lambda}. With rigorous mathematical results we verify that our model captures some of the most important features of many real networks: the scale-free and the high clustering properties. We also prove that the diameter is the logarithm of the size of the system. We point out a connection between the power law exponent of the degree distribution and some intrinsic geometric measure theoretical properties of the underlying fractal. Using our (deterministic) fractal {Lambda} we generate random graph sequence sharing similar properties.

  3. Electron beam requirements for soft x-ray/XUV free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    A discussion of the electron beam quality (peak current, energy spread, and transverse emittance) required to drive short wavelength free-electron lasers in the XUV (10-100 nm) and soft x-ray (<10 nm) optical wavelength ranges is presented

  4. Effect of flavoring chemicals on free radical formation in electronic cigarette aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitzer, Zachary T; Goel, Reema; Reilly, Samantha M; Elias, Ryan J; Silakov, Alexey; Foulds, Jonathan; Muscat, Joshua; Richie, John P

    2018-05-20

    Flavoring chemicals, or flavorants, have been used in electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) since their inception; however, little is known about their toxicological effects. Free radicals present in e-cigarette aerosols have been shown to induce oxidative stress resulting in damage to proliferation, survival, and inflammation pathways in the cell. Aerosols generated from e-liquid solvents alone contain high levels of free radicals but few studies have looked at how these toxins are modulated by flavorants. We investigated the effects of different flavorants on free radical production in e-cigarette aerosols. Free radicals generated from 49 commercially available e-liquid flavors were captured and analyzed using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The flavorant composition of each e-liquid was analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectroscopy (GCMS). Radical production was correlated with flavorant abundance. Ten compounds were identified and analyzed for their impact on free radical generation. Nearly half of the flavors modulated free radical generation. Flavorants with strong correlations included β-damascone, δ-tetradecalactone, γ-decalactone, citral, dipentene, ethyl maltol, ethyl vanillin, ethyl vanillin PG acetal, linalool, and piperonal. Dipentene, ethyl maltol, citral, linalool, and piperonal promoted radical formation in a concentration-dependent manner. Ethyl vanillin inhibited the radical formation in a concentration dependent manner. Free radical production was closely linked with the capacity to oxidize biologically-relevant lipids. Our results suggest that flavoring agents play an important role in either enhancing or inhibiting the production of free radicals in flavored e-cigarette aerosols. This information is important for developing regulatory strategies aimed at reducing potential harm from e-cigarettes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Low-energy electron inelastic mean free path in materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen-Truong, Hieu T., E-mail: nguyentruongthanhhieu@tdt.edu.vn [Theoretical Physics Research Group & Faculty of Applied Sciences, Ton Duc Thang University, Ho Chi Minh City 756636 (Viet Nam)

    2016-04-25

    We show that the dielectric approach can determine electron inelastic mean free paths in materials with an accuracy equivalent to those from first-principle calculations in the GW approximation of many-body theory. The present approach is an alternative for calculating the hot-electron lifetime, which is an important quantity in ultrafast electron dynamics. This approach, applied here to solid copper for electron energies below 100 eV, yields results in agreement with experimental data from time-resolved two-photon photoemission, angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption fine structure measurements in the energy ranges 2–3.5, 10–15, and 60–100 eV, respectively.

  6. Development of superconducting acceleration cavity technology for free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Byung Cheol; Kim, Sun Kook; Jeong, Young Uk; Cho, Sung Oh

    2000-10-01

    As a result of the cooperative research between the KAERI and Peking University, the key technologies of superconducting acceleration cavity and photoelectron gun have been developed for the application to high power free electron lasers. A 1.5-GHz, 1-cell superconducting RF cavity has been designed and fabricated by using pure Nb sheets. The unloaded Q values of the fabricated superconducting cavity has been measured to be 2x10 9 at 2.5K, and 8x10 9 at 1.8K. The maximum acceleration gradient achieved was 12 MeV/m at 2.5K, and 20MV/m at 1.8 K. A cryostat for the 1-cell superconducting cavity has been designed. As a source of electron beam, a DC photocathode electron gun has been designed and fabricated, which is composed of a photocathode evaporation chamber and a 100-keV acceleration chamber. The efficiency of the Cs2Te photocathode is 3% nominally at room temperature, 10% at 290 deg C. The superconducting photoelectron gun system developed has been estimated to be a good source of high-brightness electron beam for high-power free electron lasers

  7. Development of superconducting acceleration cavity technology for free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Byung Cheol; Kim, Sun Kook; Jeong, Young Uk; Cho, Sung Oh

    2000-10-01

    As a result of the cooperative research between the KAERI and Peking University, the key technologies of superconducting acceleration cavity and photoelectron gun have been developed for the application to high power free electron lasers. A 1.5-GHz, 1-cell superconducting RF cavity has been designed and fabricated by using pure Nb sheets. The unloaded Q values of the fabricated superconducting cavity has been measured to be 2x10{sup 9} at 2.5K, and 8x10{sup 9} at 1.8K. The maximum acceleration gradient achieved was 12 MeV/m at 2.5K, and 20MV/m at 1.8 K. A cryostat for the 1-cell superconducting cavity has been designed. As a source of electron beam, a DC photocathode electron gun has been designed and fabricated, which is composed of a photocathode evaporation chamber and a 100-keV acceleration chamber. The efficiency of the Cs2Te photocathode is 3% nominally at room temperature, 10% at 290 deg C. The superconducting photoelectron gun system developed has been estimated to be a good source of high-brightness electron beam for high-power free electron lasers.

  8. The Livermore Free-Electron Laser Program Magnet Test Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, M.J.; Kulke, B.; Deis, G.A.; Frye, R.W.; Kallman, J.S.; Ollis, C.W.; Tyler, G.C.; Van Maren, R.D.; Weiss, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Free-Electron Laser Program Magnet Test Laboratory supports the ongoing development of the Induction Linac Free Electron Laser (IFEL) and uses magnetic field measurement systems that are useful in the testing of long periodic magnetic structures, electron-beam transport magnets, and spectrometer magnets. The major systems described include two computer-controlled, three-axis Hall probe-and-search coil transports with computer-controlled data acquisition; a unique, automated-search coil system used to detect very small inaccuracies in wiggler fields; a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based Hall probe-calibration facility; and a high-current DC ion source using heavy ions of variable momentum to model the transport of high-energy electrons. Additionally, a high-precision electron-beam-position monitor for use within long wigglers that has a positional resolution of less than 100 μm is under development in the laboratory and will be discussed briefly. Data transfer to LLNL's central computing facility and on-line graphics enable us to analyze large data sets quickly. 3 refs

  9. Free electron laser on the ACO storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elleaume, P.

    1984-06-01

    This dissertation presents the design and characteristics of a Free Electron Laser built on the electron storage ring ACO at Orsay. The weak optical gain available (approximately 0.1% per pass) necessitated the use of an optical klystron instead of an undulator and the use of mirror with extremely high reflectivity. The laser characteristics: spectra, micro and macro-temporal structures, transverse structure and power are presented. They are in very good agreement with a classical theory based on the Lorentz force and Maxwell equations [fr

  10. Investigation of metal coatings for the free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, M.L.; Arendt, P.N.; Springer, R.W.; Cordi, R.C.; McCreary, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    We are investigating the deposition and characteristics of metal coatings for use in environments such as the Free Electron Laser where the radiation resistance of metal coatings could prove to be of great benefit. We have concentrated our initial efforts on silver laminate coatings due to the high reflectance of silver at 1 micron wavelength. Our initial laminate coatings have utilized thin layers of titanium oxide to break up the columnar structure of the silver during electron-beam deposition on fused silica substrates. Our initial results on equal coating thickness samples indicate an improvement in damage threshold that ranges from 1.07 to 1.71 at 351 nm

  11. ETL linac facility and free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, T.; Noguchi, T.; Mikado, T.; Sugiyama, S.; Yamada, K.; Chiwaki, M.; Ohgaki, H.; Suzuki, R.; Sei, N.

    1993-01-01

    An outline is presented of the recent development on the ETL (Electro-technical Laboratory) electron-linac facility and storage-ring FELs (free-electron lasers). Some modifications including the injection system have been made to the linac. Four storage rings are working very well. The TERAS FEL system has been shut down after the successful oscillation around 590 nm. The new NIJI-IV FEL system has been proven to work well, and the current tunable wavelength range is over 100 nm (488-595 nm). Preparatory experiments on the FEL at shorter wavelength are underway. (author)

  12. Atomic and Free Electrons in a Strong Light Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, Mikhail V.

    1998-02-01

    This book presents and describes a series of unusual and striking strong-field phenomena concerning atoms and free electrons. Some of these phenomena are: multiphoton stimulated Bremsstrahlung, free-electron lasers, ave-packet physics, above-threshold ionization, and strong-field stabilization in Rydberg atoms. The theoretical foundations and causes of the phenomena are described in detail, with all the approximations and derivations discussed. All the known and relevant experiments are described oo, and their results are compared with those of the existing theoretical models. An extensive general theoretical introduction gives a good basis for subsequent parts of the book and is an independent and self-sufficient description of the most efficient theoretical methods of the strong-field and multiphoton physics. This book can serve as a textbook for graduate students

  13. Applications of Free Electron Lasers in Biology and Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelka, J.B.; Tybor, K.R.; Nietubyc, R.; Wrochna, G.

    2010-01-01

    The advent of free electron lasers opens up new opportunities to probe the dynamics of ultrafast processes and the structure of matter with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. New methods inaccessible with other known types of radiation sources can be developed, resulting in a breakthrough in deep understanding the fundamentals of life as well as in numerous medical and biological applications. In the present work the properties of free electron laser radiation that make the sources excellent for probing biological matter at an arbitrary wavelength, in a wide range of intensities and pulse durations are briefly discussed. A number of biophysical and biomedical applications of the new sources, currently considered among the most promising in the field, are presented. (author)

  14. Charged beam dynamics, particle accelerators and free electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Dattoli, Giuseppe; Sabia, Elio; Artioli, Marcello

    2017-01-01

    Charged Beam Dynamics, Particle Accelerators and Free Electron Lasers summarises different topics in the field of accelerators and of Free Electron Laser (FEL) devices. It is intended as a reference manual for the different aspects of FEL devices, explaining how to design both a FEL device and the accelerator providing the driving beam. It covers both theoretical and experimental aspects, allowing researchers to attempt a first design of a FEL device in different operating conditions. It provides an analysis of what is already available, what is needed, and what the challenges are to determine new progress in this field. All chapters contain complements and exercises that are designed in such a way that the reader will gradually acquire self-confidence with the matter treated in the book.

  15. Inverse free electron laser accelerator for advanced light sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Duris

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the inverse free electron laser (IFEL scheme as a compact high gradient accelerator solution for driving advanced light sources such as a soft x-ray free electron laser amplifier or an inverse Compton scattering based gamma-ray source. In particular, we present a series of new developments aimed at improving the design of future IFEL accelerators. These include a new procedure to optimize the choice of the undulator tapering, a new concept for prebunching which greatly improves the fraction of trapped particles and the final energy spread, and a self-consistent study of beam loading effects which leads to an energy-efficient high laser-to-beam power conversion.

  16. Crystallographic data processing for free-electron laser sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Thomas A.; Barty, Anton; Stellato, Francesco; Holton, James M.; Kirian, Richard A.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Chapman, Henry N.

    2013-01-01

    A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A detailed analysis of the nature and impact of indexing ambiguities is presented. Simulations of the Monte Carlo integration scheme, which accounts for the partially recorded nature of the diffraction intensities, are presented and show that the integration of partial reflections could be made to converge more quickly if the bandwidth of the X-rays were to be increased by a small amount or if a slight convergence angle were introduced into the incident beam

  17. Crystallographic data processing for free-electron laser sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Thomas A., E-mail: taw@physics.org; Barty, Anton; Stellato, Francesco [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Holton, James M. [University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kirian, Richard A. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Zatsepin, Nadia A. [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Chapman, Henry N. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A detailed analysis of the nature and impact of indexing ambiguities is presented. Simulations of the Monte Carlo integration scheme, which accounts for the partially recorded nature of the diffraction intensities, are presented and show that the integration of partial reflections could be made to converge more quickly if the bandwidth of the X-rays were to be increased by a small amount or if a slight convergence angle were introduced into the incident beam.

  18. Oil-Free Turbomachinery Technologies for Long-Life, Maintenance-Free Power Generation Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacorte, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Turbines have long been used to convert thermal energy to shaft work for power generation. Conventional turbines rely upon oil-lubricated rotor supports (bearings, seals, etc.) to achieve low wear, high efficiency and reliability. Emerging Oil-Free technologies such as gas foil bearings and magnetic bearings offer a path for reduced weight and complexity and truly maintenance free systems. Oil-Free gas turbines, using gaseous and liquid fuels are commercially available in power outputs to at least 250kWe and are gaining acceptance for remote power generation where maintenance is a challenge. Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) turbines are an approach to power generation that is well suited for long life space missions. In these systems, a recirculating gas is heated by nuclear, solar or other heat energy source then fed into a high-speed turbine that drives an electrical generator. For closed cycle systems such as these, the working fluid also passes through the bearing compartments thus serving as a lubricant and bearing coolant. Compliant surface foil gas bearings are well suited for the rotor support systems of these advanced turbines. Foil bearings develop a thin hydrodynamic gas film that separates the rotating shaft from the bearing preventing wear. During start-up and shut down when speeds are low, rubbing occurs. Solid lubricants are used to reduce starting torque and minimize wear. Other emerging technologies such as magnetic bearings can also contribute to robust and reliable Oil-Free turbomachinery. In this presentation, Oil-Free technologies for advanced rotor support systems will be reviewed as will the integration and development processes recommended for implementation.

  19. Help system for control of JAERI FEL (Free Electron laser)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Masayoshi

    1993-01-01

    The control system of JAERI FEL (Free Electron Laser) has a help system to provide the information necessary to operate the machine and to develop the new user interface. As the control software is constructed on the MS-Windows 3.x, the hyper-text feature of the Windows help system can be accessed. It consists of three major parts: (1) on-line help, (2) full document, and (3) tutorial system. (author)

  20. Storage ring free electron lasers and saw-tooth instability

    CERN Document Server

    Dattoli, Giuseppe; Migliorati, M; Palumbo, L; Renieri, A

    1999-01-01

    We show that Free Electron Lasers (FEL) operating with storage rings may counteract beam instabilities of the Saw Tooth (STI) type. We use a model based on a set of equations that couple those describing the FEL evolution to those accounting for the STI dynamics. The analysis provides a clear picture of the FEL-STI mutual feedback and clarifies the mechanisms of the instability inhibition. The reliability of the results is supported by a comparison with fully numerical codes.

  1. Pulse propagation in tapered wiggler free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, J.C.; Colson, W.B.

    1981-01-01

    The one-dimensional theory of short pulse propagation in free electron lasers is extended to tapered wiggler devices and is used to study the behavior of an oscillator with parameter values close to those expected in forthcoming experiments. It is found that stable laser output is possible only over a small range of optical cavity lengths. Optical pulse characteristcs are presented and are found to change considerably over this range

  2. Research on high performance mirrors for free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitatani, Fumito

    1996-01-01

    For the stable functioning of free electron laser, high performance optical elements are required because of its characteristics. In particular in short wavelength free electron laser, since its gain is low, the optical elements having very high reflectivity are required. Also in free electron laser, since high energy noise light exists, the optical elements must have high optical breaking strength. At present in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, the research for heightening the performance of dielectric multi-layer film elements for short wavelength is carried out. For manufacturing such high performance elements, it is necessary to develop the new materials for vapor deposition, new vapor deposition process, and the techniques of accurate substrate polishing and inspection. As the material that satisfies the requirements, there is diamond-like carbon (DLC) film, of which the properties are explained. As for the manufacture of the DLC films for short wavelength optics, the test equipment for forming the DLC films, the test of forming the DLC films, the change of the film quality due to gas conditions, discharge conditions and substrate materials, and the measurement of the optical breaking strength are reported. (K.I.)

  3. From Storage Rings to Free Electron Lasers for Hard X-Rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuhn, H

    2004-01-01

    The intensity of X-ray sources has increased at a rapid rate since the late 1960s by 10 orders of magnitude and more through the use of synchrotron radiation produced by bending magnets, wigglers and undulators. Three generations of radiation sources have been identified depending on amplitude and quality of the radiation provided. While user facilities of the third generation were being constructed a new concept of radiation generating devices was being developed that offers an even larger increase in peak and average brightness than had been achieved till then. The new concept of the X-ray Free Electron Laser based on the principle of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission will be the basis of fourth generation X-ray source user facilities of this century. The paper will start with a brief history of the development of x-ray sources, discuss some of the differences between storage ring and free electron laser based approaches, and close with an update of the present development of x-ray free electron laser user facilities

  4. From Storage Rings to Free Electron Lasers for Hard X-Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuhn, H

    2004-01-09

    The intensity of X-ray sources has increased at a rapid rate since the late 1960s by 10 orders of magnitude and more through the use of synchrotron radiation produced by bending magnets, wigglers and undulators. Three generations of radiation sources have been identified depending on amplitude and quality of the radiation provided. While user facilities of the third generation were being constructed a new concept of radiation generating devices was being developed that offers an even larger increase in peak and average brightness than had been achieved till then. The new concept of the X-ray Free Electron Laser based on the principle of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission will be the basis of fourth generation X-ray source user facilities of this century. The paper will start with a brief history of the development of x-ray sources, discuss some of the differences between storage ring and free electron laser based approaches, and close with an update of the present development of x-ray free electron laser user facilities.

  5. From storage rings to free electron lasers for hard x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter

    2004-01-01

    The intensity of x-ray sources has increased at a rapid rate since the late 1960s by ten orders of magnitude and more through the use of synchrotron radiation produced by bending magnets, wigglers and undulators. Three generations of radiation sources have been identified depending on amplitude and quality of the radiation provided. While user facilities of the third generation were being constructed, a new concept of radiation generating devices was being developed that offers an even larger increase in peak and average brightness than had been achieved till then. The new concept of the x-ray free electron laser based on the principle of self-amplified spontaneous emission will be the basis of fourth generation x-ray source user facilities of this century. The paper will start with a brief history of the development of x-ray sources, it will then discuss some of the differences between storage ring and free electron laser based approaches, and will close with an update of the present development of x-ray free electron laser user facilities

  6. A ferroelectric electron gun in a free-electron maser experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Einat, M; Rosenman, G

    2002-01-01

    An electron-gun based on a ferroelectric cathode is studied in a free-electron maser (FEM) experiment. In this gun, the electrons are separated from the cathode surface plasma, and are accelerated in two stages. The electron energy-spread is reduced sufficiently for an FEM operation in the microwave regime. A 14 keV, 1-2 A e-beam is obtained in a 0.1-2.1 mu s pulse width. The pulse repetition frequency attains 3.1 MHz in approx 50% duty-cycle. This gun is implemented in an FEM oscillator experiment operating around 3 GHz. The paper presents experimental results and discusses the applicability of ferroelectric guns in free-electron laser devices.

  7. A ferroelectric electron gun in a free-electron maser experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einat, M.; Jerby, E.; Rosenman, G.

    2002-01-01

    An electron-gun based on a ferroelectric cathode is studied in a free-electron maser (FEM) experiment. In this gun, the electrons are separated from the cathode surface plasma, and are accelerated in two stages. The electron energy-spread is reduced sufficiently for an FEM operation in the microwave regime. A 14 keV, 1-2 A e-beam is obtained in a 0.1-2.1 μs pulse width. The pulse repetition frequency attains 3.1 MHz in ∼50% duty-cycle. This gun is implemented in an FEM oscillator experiment operating around 3 GHz. The paper presents experimental results and discusses the applicability of ferroelectric guns in free-electron laser devices

  8. Performance of the Fitch generator in a nanosecond electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernyj, V.V.

    1976-01-01

    The operation of the Fitch generator in the nanosecond electron accelerator is discussed. The operating principle of the generator is based on the inversion of the voltage at the storage capacitances. Only one discharger is employed in the discharge circuit of the generator which provides for decreasing the generator impedance to 24 Ohms. The maximum accelerating voltage equals 0.6 MV

  9. Electron beam generation form a superemissive cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, T.-Y.; Liou, R.-L.; Kirkman-Amemiya, G.; Gundersen, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental study of electron beams produced by a superemissive cathode in the Back-Lighted Thyratron (BLT) and the pseudospark is presented. This work is motivated by experiments demonstrating very high current densities (≥10 kA/cm 2 over an area of 1 cm 2 ) from the pseudospark and BLT cathode. This high-density current is produced by field-enhanced thermionic emission from the ion beam-heated surface of a molybdenum cathode. This work reports the use of this cathode as a beam source, and is to be distinguished from previous work reporting hollow cathode-produced electron beams. An electron beam of more than 260 A Peak current has been produced with 15 kV applied voltage. An efficiency of ∼10% is estimated. These experimental results encourage further investigation of the super-emissive cathode as an intense electron beam source for applications including accelerator technology

  10. New generation of free-piston shock tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, W. R. B.; Stalker, R. J.; Duffin, J.

    1990-01-01

    Consideration is given to three free-piston driven hypersonic tunnels under construction that will greatly enhance existing test capabilities. The tunnel being built at Caltech will feature energy capabilities about 40 percent higher than those of the world's largest operational free-piston tunnel to date. The second tunnel under construction will allow full-size engine hardware at near-orbital speeds. The third facility is a high-performance expansion tube that will be capable of generating high enthalpy flows at speeds of up to 9 km/sec. It will provide flows with dissociation levels much lower than are attainable with a reflected shock tunnel, approaching actual flight conditions. A table shows the tunnels' characteristics.

  11. Conceptual design of industrial free electron laser using superconducting accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Ulyanov, Yu.N. [Automatic Systems Corporation, Samara (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Paper presents conceptual design of free electron laser (FEL) complex for industrial applications. The FEL complex consists of three. FEL oscillators with the optical output spanning the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) wave-lengths ({lambda} = 0.3...20 {mu}m) and with the average output power 10 - 20 kW. The driving beam for the FELs is produced by a superconducting accelerator. The electron beam is transported to the FELs via three beam lines (125 MeV and 2 x 250 MeV). Peculiar feature of the proposed complex is a high efficiency of the. FEL oscillators, up to 20 %. This becomes possible due to the use of quasi-continuous electron beam and the use of the time-dependent undulator tapering.

  12. Gain of a Smith-Purcell free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. L. Andrews

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available A formula is derived for the small-signal gain of a Smith-Purcell free-electron laser. The theory describes the electron beam as a moving plasma dielectric, and assumes that the electron beam interacts with an evanescent mode traveling along the surface of a periodic waveguide with a rectangular profile. The phase velocity of the evanescent wave is synchronous with the electron velocity, but the group velocity is actually negative. The electron beam amplifies the evanescent wave, which does not itself radiate. According to this picture, the radiation observed emanating from the grating is Smith-Purcell radiation enhanced by the bunching of the electrons due to the interaction with the evanescent mode. There will also be radiation from the part of the evanescent mode that is outcoupled from the ends of the grating. This radiation appears at a lower frequency than the Smith-Purcell radiation. The new results explain both the gain and the radiation observed in the experiments of Urata and Walsh, and the cube-root current dependence of the gain inferred by Bakhtyari, Walsh, and Brownell.

  13. Ginzburg's invention of undulators and their role in modern synchrotron radiation sources and free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulipanov, Gennadii N

    2007-01-01

    Undulators - periodic magnetic structures that were originally introduced by Vitalii Ginzburg in 1947 for electromagnetic radiation generation using relativistic electrons - are among the key elements of modern synchrotron radiation sources and free electron lasers (FELs). In this talk, the history of three generations of storage ring-based synchrotron X-ray sources using wigglers and undulators is briefly traced. Prospects for two types of next-generation space-coherent X-ray sources are discussed, which use long undulators and energy recovery accelerators or, alternatively, employ linear accelerator-based FELs. The recently developed Novosibirsk terahertz FEL facility, currently the world' s most powerful terahertz source, is described. It was the generation of electromagnetic radiation in this range that Ginzburg discussed in his 1947 work. (oral issue of the journal 'uspekhi fizicheskikh nauk')

  14. Obtaining attosecond x-ray pulses using a self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Zholents

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe a technique for the generation of a solitary attosecond x-ray pulse in a free-electron laser (FEL, via a process of self-amplified spontaneous emission. In this method, electrons experience an energy modulation upon interacting with laser pulses having a duration of a few cycles within single-period wiggler magnets. Two consecutive modulation sections, followed by compression in a dispersive section, are used to obtain a single, subfemtosecond spike in the electron peak current. This region of the electron beam experiences an enhanced growth rate for FEL amplification. After propagation through a long undulator, this current spike emits a ∼250   attosecond x-ray pulse whose intensity dominates the x-ray emission from the rest of the electron bunch.

  15. Fiber optic probe of free electron evanescent fields in the optical frequency range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Jin-Kyu, E-mail: js1m10@orc.soton.ac.uk; MacDonald, Kevin F. [Optoelectronics Research Centre and Centre for Photonic Metamaterials, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Zheludev, Nikolay I. [Optoelectronics Research Centre and Centre for Photonic Metamaterials, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Centre for Disruptive Photonic Technologies, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

    2014-05-19

    We introduce an optical fiber platform which can be used to interrogate proximity interactions between free-electron evanescent fields and photonic nanostructures at optical frequencies in a manner similar to that in which optical evanescent fields are sampled using nanoscale aperture probes in scanning near-field microscopy. Conically profiled optical fiber tips functionalized with nano-gratings are employed to couple electron evanescent fields to light via the Smith-Purcell effect. We demonstrate the interrogation of medium energy (30–50 keV) electron fields with a lateral resolution of a few micrometers via the generation and detection of visible/UV radiation in the 700–300 nm (free-space) wavelength range.

  16. Attosecond time-energy structure of X-ray free-electron laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, N.; Hartmann, G.; Heider, R.; Wagner, M. S.; Ilchen, M.; Buck, J.; Lindahl, A. O.; Benko, C.; Grünert, J.; Krzywinski, J.; Liu, J.; Lutman, A. A.; Marinelli, A.; Maxwell, T.; Miahnahri, A. A.; Moeller, S. P.; Planas, M.; Robinson, J.; Kazansky, A. K.; Kabachnik, N. M.; Viefhaus, J.; Feurer, T.; Kienberger, R.; Coffee, R. N.; Helml, W.

    2018-04-01

    The time-energy information of ultrashort X-ray free-electron laser pulses generated by the Linac Coherent Light Source is measured with attosecond resolution via angular streaking of neon 1s photoelectrons. The X-ray pulses promote electrons from the neon core level into an ionization continuum, where they are dressed with the electric field of a circularly polarized infrared laser. This induces characteristic modulations of the resulting photoelectron energy and angular distribution. From these modulations we recover the single-shot attosecond intensity structure and chirp of arbitrary X-ray pulses based on self-amplified spontaneous emission, which have eluded direct measurement so far. We characterize individual attosecond pulses, including their instantaneous frequency, and identify double pulses with well-defined delays and spectral properties, thus paving the way for X-ray pump/X-ray probe attosecond free-electron laser science.

  17. Conceptual survey of Generators and Power Electronics for Wind Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, L.H.; Helle, L.; Blaabjerg, F.; Ritchie, E.; Munk-Nielsen, S.; Bindner, H.; Soerensen, P.; Bak-Jensen, B.

    2001-12-01

    This report presents a survey on generator concepts and power electronic concepts for wind turbines. The report is aimed as a tool for decision-makers and development people with respect to wind turbine manufactures, utilities, and independent system operators as well as manufactures of generators and power electronics. The survey is focused on the electric development of wind turbines and it yields an overview on: State of the art on generators and power electronics; future concepts and technologies within generators and power electronics; market needs in the shape of requirements to the grid connection, and; consistent system solutions, plus an evaluation of these seen in the prospect of market needs. This survey on of generator and power electronic concepts was carried out in co-operation between Aalborg University and Risoe National Laboratory in the scope of the research programme Electric Design and Control. (au)

  18. Experimental Investigation of Runaway Electron Generation in Textor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Jaspers,; Finken, K.H.; Mank, G.; Hoenen, F.; Boedo, J. A.; Cardozo, N. J. L.; Schüller, F. C.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental study of the generation of runaway electrons in TEXTOR has been performed. From the infrared synchrotron radiation emitted by relativistic electrons, the number of runaway electrons can be obtained as a function of time. In low density discharges (n(e)BAR < 1 X 10(19) m-3)

  19. Simulation study on avoiding runaway electron generation by magnetic perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuda, S.; Yoshino, R.; Matsumoto, T.; Hudson, S.R.; Kawano, Y.; Takizuka, T.

    2001-01-01

    Simulations have demonstrated that magnetic islands having the widths expected on the major disruption cause the collisionless loss of the relativistic electrons, and that the resultant loss rate is high enough to avoid or to suppress the runaway generation. It is because, for the magnetic fluctuations in the disruption, the loss of the electron confinement due to the breakdown of the toroidal momentum conservation overwhelms the runaway electron confinement due to the phase-averaging effect of relativistic electrons. Simulation results agree closely with recent experiments on fast plasma shutdown, showing that it is possible to prevent the generation of runaway electrons. (author)

  20. Brightness and coherence of radiation from undulators and high-gain free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kwang-Je.

    1987-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the radiation characteristics of undulators and high-gain free electron lasers (FELs). The topics covered are: a phase-space method in wave optics and synchrotron radiation, coherence from the phase-space point of view, discussions of undulator performances in next-generation synchrotron radiation facility and the characteristics of the high-gain FELs and their performances

  1. An inverse free electron laser accelerator: Experiment and theoretical interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Jyan-Min.

    1997-01-01

    Experimental and numerical studies of the Inverse Free Electron Laser using a GW-level 10.6 μm CO 2 laser have been carried out at Brookhaven's Accelerator Test Facility. An energy gain of 2.5 % (ΔE/E) on a 40 MeV electron beam has been observed E which compares well with theory. The effects on IFEL acceleration with respect to the variation of the laser electric field, the input electron beam energy, and the wiggler magnetic field strength were studied, and show the importance of matching the resonance condition in the IFEL. The numerical simulations were performed under various conditions and the importance of the electron bunching in the IFEL is shown. The numerical interpretation of our IFEL experimental results was examined. Although good numerical agreement with the experimental results was obtained, there is a discrepancy between the level of the laser power measured in the experiment and used in the simulation, possibly due to the non-Gaussian profile of the input high power laser beam. The electron energy distribution was studied numerically and a smoothing of the energy spectrum by the space charge effect at the location of the spectrometer was found, compared with the spectrum at the exit of the wiggler. The electron bunching by the IFEL and the possibility of using the IFEL as an electron prebuncher for another laser-driven accelerator were studied numerically. We found that bunching of the electrons at 1 meter downstream from the wiggler can be achieved using the existing facility. The simulation shows that there is a fundamental difference between the operating conditions for using the IFEL as a high gradient accelerator, and as a prebuncher for another accelerator

  2. The second generation of electronic blasting systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammelmann, F.; Petzold, J. [Dynamit Nobel GmbH (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    8 years after the market introduction of the first commercial electronic detonator - DYNATRONIC - the paper describes a new area of electronic blasting systems Made in Germany: i-kon. The results of a joint development between Dynamit Nobel and Orica is a unique universal electronic detonator, which is as simple to use as a standard non-electric detonator. The delay time or delay interval is not factory preprogrammed and the system is not based on a numbered system like conventional detonators. The miner or Blaster decides on site which delay timing he likes to use and is programming the whole blast on site. The new i-kon system allows delay times between 0 and 8000 ms by increments of 1 ms. With the control equipment it is possible to blast up to 1600 detonators in a single blast. The paper describes the construction and functionality of this new electronic blasting system - manufactured and developed by Precision Blasting Systems, a joint venture between Orica and Dynamic Nobel. (orig.)

  3. Preliminary experiments on a planar electron beam for an intense free electron maser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Katsumasa; Iwata, Kazuma; Kitamura, Taro; Yamada, Naohisa; Soga, Yukihiro; Kamada, Keiichi; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Ginzburg, Naum S.

    2013-01-01

    A planar wiggler magnetic field was used to increase the output power of an intense free electron maser. As a preliminary experiment, a cylindrical electron beam was injected into a planar wiggler field with an axial magnetic field. Without the axial magnetic field, the cylindrical beam could not propagate through the wiggler field with length of 1 m. The microwave with frequency of 40 GHz was observed only when the beam propagates through the wiggler field. The frequency was nearly equal to the expected frequency of the free electron maser interaction. Though a sheet electron beam with nearly the same energy propagated through the planar wiggler field with deformation of its cross section, the microwave with frequency of 40 GHz was not observed. (author)

  4. Tuning the Electron Gas at an Oxide Heterointerface via Free Surface Charges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, Christopher

    2011-08-11

    Oxide heterointerfaces are emerging as one of the most exciting materials systems in condensed matter science. One remarkable example is the LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} (LAO/STO) interface, a model system in which a highly mobile electron gas forms between two band insulators, exhibiting two dimensional superconductivity and unusual magnetotransport properties. An ideal tool to tune such an electron gas is the electrostatic field effect. In principle, the electrostatic field can be generated by bound charges due to polarization (as in the normal and ferroelectric field effects) or by adding excess free charge. In previous studies, a large modulation of the carrier density and mobility of the LAO/STO interface has been achieved using the normal field effect. However, little attention has been paid to the field effect generated by free charges. This issue is scarcely addressed, even in conventional semiconductor devices, since the free charges are typically not stable. Here, we demonstrate an unambiguous tuning of the LAO/STO interface conductivity via free surface charges written using conducting atomic force microscopy (AFM). The modulation of the carrier density was found to be reversible, nonvolatile and surprisingly large, {approx}3 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}, comparable to the maximum modulation by the normal field effect. Our finding reveal the efficiency of free charges in controlling the conductivity of this oxide interface, and suggest that this technique may be extended more generally to other oxide systems.

  5. Free electron lifetime achievements in Liquid Argon Imaging TPC

    CERN Document Server

    Baibussinov, B; Calligarich, E; Centro, S; Cieslik, K; Farnese, C; Fava, A; Gibin, D; Guglielmi, A; Meng, G; Pietropaolo, F; Rubbia, C; Varanini, F; Ventura, S

    2010-01-01

    A key feature for the success of the Liquid Argon TPC technology is the industrial purification against electro-negative impurities, especially Oxygen and Nitrogen remnants, which have to be initially and continuously kept at an exceptional purity. New purification techniques have been applied to a 120 litres LAr-TPC test facility in the INFN-LNL laboratory. Through-going muon tracks have been used to monitor the LAr purity. The short path length used (30 cm) is compensated by the high accuracy in the observation of the specific ionization of cosmic rays muons at sea level. A free electron lifetime of (21.4+7.3-4.3) ms, namely > 15.8 ms at 90 % C.L. has been observed under stable conditions over several weeks, corresponding to about 15 ppt (part per trillion) of Oxygen equivalent. At 500 V/cm, where the electron speed is approximately of 1.5 mm/us, the free electron lifetime >15 ms corresponds to an attenuation <15 % for a drift path of 5 m, opening the way to reliable operation of LAr TPC for exceptionall...

  6. An XUV/VUV free-electron laser oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, J. C.; Newnam, B. E.; Cooper, R. K.; Comly, J. C., Jr.

    Problems regarding the extension of free-electron laser technology from the visible and near infrared region, where such devices are currently operating, to the ultraviolet have recently been extensively discussed. It was found that significant technical problems must be overcome before free-electron lasers (FELs) can be operated in the VUV (100-200 nm) and the XUV (50-100). However, the present lack of other intense and tunable sources of coherent radiation at these wavelengths together with the intrinsic properties of FELs make the development of such devices potentially very rewarding. The properties of FELs include continuous tunability in wavelength and output in the form of a train of picosecond pulses. An investigation is conducted regarding the feasibility of an operation of a FEL in the XUV/VUV regions, taking into account a theoretical model. It is found that modest improvements in electron beam and optical mirror technologies will make the design of a FEL for operation in the 50-200-nm range of optical wavelength possible.

  7. Disruption generated secondary runaway electrons in present day tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankratov, I.M.; Jaspers, R.

    2000-01-01

    An analysis of the runaway electron secondary generation during disruptions in present day tokamaks (JET, JT-60U, TEXTOR) was made. It was shown that even for tokamaks with the plasma current I approx 100 kA the secondary generation may dominate the runaway production during disruptions. In the same time in tokamaks with I approx 1 MA the runaway electron secondary generation during disruptions may be suppressed

  8. Generate the scale-free brain music from BOLD signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Guo, Sijia; Chen, Mingming; Wang, Weixia; Yang, Hua; Guo, Daqing; Yao, Dezhong

    2018-01-01

    Many methods have been developed to translate a human electroencephalogram (EEG) into music. In addition to EEG, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another method used to study the brain and can reflect physiological processes. In 2012, we established a method to use simultaneously recorded fMRI and EEG signals to produce EEG-fMRI music, which represents a step toward scale-free brain music. In this study, we used a neural mass model, the Jansen-Rit model, to simulate activity in several cortical brain regions. The interactions between different brain regions were represented by the average normalized diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) structural connectivity with a coupling coefficient that modulated the coupling strength. Seventy-eight brain regions were adopted from the Automated Anatomical Labeling (AAL) template. Furthermore, we used the Balloon-Windkessel hemodynamic model to transform neural activity into a blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal. Because the fMRI BOLD signal changes slowly, we used a sampling rate of 250 Hz to produce the temporal series for music generation. Then, the BOLD music was generated for each region using these simulated BOLD signals. Because the BOLD signal is scale free, these music pieces were also scale free, which is similar to classic music. Here, to simulate the case of an epileptic patient, we changed the parameter that determined the amplitude of the excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) in the neural mass model. Finally, we obtained BOLD music for healthy and epileptic patients. The differences in levels of arousal between the 2 pieces of music may provide a potential tool for discriminating the different populations if the differences can be confirmed by more real data. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Intense relativistic electron beam: generation and propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, K.C.; Mondal, J.

    2010-01-01

    A general review of relativistic electron beam extracted from explosive field emission diode has been presented here. The beam current in the diode gap taking into account cathode and anode plasma expansion velocity and excluding the self magnetic field effect is directly proportional to gap voltage V 3/2 and inversely proportional to the square of the effective diode gap (d-vt). In the limit of high current, self magnetic field focusing effect comes into play and results in a critical current at which pinching will take place. When the diode current exceeds the critical current, the electron flow is in the para-potential regime. Different diode geometries such as planner, coaxial, rod-pinched, reflex triode are discussed qualitatively. When the beam is injected into a vacuum drift tube the propagation of the beam is only possible in presence of a strong axial magnetic field which prevents the beam expansion in the radial direction. If the beam is injected in the drift tube filled with dense plasma, then the redistribution of the plasma electrons effectively neutralizes the beam space charge, resulting subsequent propagation of the beam along the drift tube. The beam propagation through neutral gas is similar to the plasma filled drift tube. In this case both the neutral gas pressure and the beam current regulate the transmission of the REB. (author)

  10. Development of a free-electron laser user facility for the extreme ultraviolet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newnam, B.E.

    1987-01-01

    A free-electron laser user facility for scientific experimentation in the extreme ultraviolet is being developed at Los Alamos. A series of laser oscillators and amplifiers, driven by a single, rf linear accelerator, will generate broadly tunable, picosecond-pulse, coherent radiation from 1 nm to 400 nm. The design and output parameters of this facility are described, comparison with synchrotron radiation sources is made, and recent progress in developing the three primary components (electron beam, undulator, and resonator mirrors) is reviewed, and various categories of scientific applications are indicated

  11. Free electron laser for the 2 x 1 TeV photon collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarantsev, V.P.; Yurkov, M.V.; Saldin, E.L.; Shnejdmiller, E.A.

    1993-01-01

    The two-cascade scheme of a free electron laser (FEL) of the 2 x 1 TeV photon collider is suggested. The FEL-generator having peak power of ∼ 10 MW which is amplified up to 5 x 10 11 W in the FEL-amplifier with variable parameters is used as a driving laser. Requirements for parameters of electron beam and the FEL-amplifier magnetic system are formulated on the base of calculations. 19 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs

  12. Competition of electron-cyclotron maser and free-electron laser modes with combined solenoidal and longitudinal wiggler fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, A.T.; Lin, C.

    1986-01-01

    A relativistic electron beam with a finite transverse dc momentum (β/sub perpendicular/ = 1/γ 0 ) passing through a region of combined uniform solenoidal and longitudinal wiggler magnetic fields is observed to convert 25% of its kinetic energy into coherent radiation at frequency ω = γ 2 0 (k/sub w/V 0 +Ω/sub c//γ 0 ) if the phase velocity of the generated wave is slightly above the speed of light. In this situation, the bunchings of the slow electron-cyclotron mode and free-electron laser modes with combined solenoidal and longitudinal wiggler fields (lowbitron) are observed to compensate each other, which gives rise to a finite threshold for lowbitron operation. In order to attain high efficiency, the wiggler strength of a lowbitron must substantially exceed the threshold

  13. Conceptual survey of generators and power electronics for wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L.H.; Helle, L.; Blaabjerg, F.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents a survey on generator concepts and power electronic concepts for wind turbines. The report is aimed as a tool for decision-makers and development people with respect to wind turbine manufactures, utilities, and independent systemoperators as well as manufactures of generators...... and power electronics. The survey is focused on the electric development of wind turbines and it yields an overview on: - State of the art on generators and power electronics. - future concepts andtechnologies within generators and power electronics. - market needs in the shape of requirements to the grid...... connection, and - consistent system solutions, plus an evaluation of these seen in the prospect of market needs. This survey on of generatorand power electronic concepts was carried out in co-operation between Aalborg University and Risø National Laboratory in the scope of the research programme Electric...

  14. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, C.B.; Fawley, W.M.; Gruner, F.; Bakeman, M.; Nakamura, K.; Robinson, K.E.; Toth, Cs.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2008-01-01

    A design of a compact free-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-peak flux, XUV pulses is presented. The FEL is driven by ahigh-current, 0.5 GeV electron beam from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator, whose active acceleration length is only a few centimeters. The proposed ultra-fast source (∼10 fs) would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science. Owing to the high current (>10 kA) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially greater than 10 13 photons/pulse. Devices based both on self-amplified spontaneous emission and high-harmonic generated input seeds, to reduce undulator length and fluctuations, are considered.

  15. Design of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma-accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, C.B.; Fawley, W.M.; Montgomery, A.L.; Robinson, K.E.; Gruner, F.; Bakeman, M.; Leemans, W.P.

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the design and current status of a compact free-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-peak flux, VUV pulses driven by a high-current, GeV electron beam from the existing Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator, whose active acceleration length is only a few cm. The proposed ultra-fast source would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science with pulse lengths of tens of fs. Owing to the high current ( and 10 kA) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially greater than 1013 photons/pulse. Devices based both on SASE and high-harmonic generated input seeds, to reduce undulator length and fluctuations, are considered

  16. Simultaneous operation of a free-electron laser on two harmonically related wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, A.T.; Ride, S.K.

    1992-01-01

    The interaction of light waves at the fundamental and the third harmonic frequencies in a free-electron laser (FEL) oscillator is explored using the 1-D finite pulse mode-code BFELP. The code, which assumes that only the TEM 00 transverse mode is present at both harmonic frequencies, tracks the temporally-finite pulse electric field amplitudes of the fundamental and the third harmonic which interact with an rf-linac-generated electron micropulse inside a wiggler. The evolution of the pulse profiles, with possibly different mirror reflectivities at each frequency, after many passes through the wiggler and the optical resonator, has been generated for various initial conditions. Results include pulse-dependent third-harmonic coherent-spontaneous emission (CSE) with, and without, multiple-pass interference effects; the effects of sidebands at the fundamental on third-harmonic CSE; and, lasing competition between the fundamental and third harmonic in overlapping spatial regions of the electron micropulse

  17. Inverse free electron laser beat-wave accelerator research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, T.C.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    1993-09-01

    A calculation on the stabilization of the sideband instability in the free electron laser (FEL) and inverse FEL (IFEL) was completed. The issue arises in connection with the use of a tapered (''variable-parameter'') undulator of extended length, such as might be used in an ''enhanced efficiency'' traveling-wave FEL or an IFEL accelerator. In addition, the FEL facility at Columbia was configured as a traveling wave amplifier for a 10-kW signal from a 24-GHz magnetron. The space charge field in the bunches of the FEL was measured. Completed work has been published

  18. Free-Electron Lasers Push Into New Frontiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, Stephen V.

    2003-01-01

    From the early days of the development of free-electron lasers (FELs) the promise of high power and short wavelengths has tantalized physicists and other scientists. Recent developments in accelerator technologies and some new discoveries about the physics of FELs have allowed researchers to push the performance of FELs into new frontiers of high power, short wavelength, and ultra-short pulses. Spin-offs from the FELs have also opened up new radiation sources in the THz, X-ray and gamma ray wavelength ranges

  19. Free-electron laser experiments in the microwave tokamak experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, S.L.; Brown, M.D.; Byers, J.A.; Casper, T.A.; Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Cummings, J.C.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Foote, J.H.; Hooper, E.B.; Jong, R.A.; Langdon, A.B.; Lasinski, B.F.; Lasnier, C.J.; Matsuda, Y.; Meyer, W.H.; Moller, J.M.; Nexsen, W.E.; Rice, B.W.; Rognlien, T.D.; Smith, G.R.; Stallard, B.W.; Thomassen, K.I.; Throop, A.L.; Turner, W.C.; Wood, R.D.; Cook, D.R.; Makowski, M.A.; Oasa, K.; Ogawa, T.

    1990-08-01

    Microwave pulses have been injected from a free electron-laser (FEL) into the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) at up to 0.2 GW at 140 GHz in short pulses (10-ns duration) with O-mode polarization. The power transmitted through the plasma was measured in a first experimental study of high power pulse propagation in the plasma; no nonlinear effects were found at this power level. Calculations indicate that nonlinear effects may be found at the higher power densities expected in future experiments. 9 refs., 2 figs

  20. A novel property of gold nanoparticles: Free radical generation under microwave irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paudel, Nava Raj; Shvydka, Diana; Parsai, E. Ishmael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are known to be effective mediators in microwave hyperthermia. Interaction with an electromagnetic field, large surface to volume ratio, and size quantization of nanoparticles (NPs) can lead to increased cell killing beyond pure heating effects. The purpose of this study is to explore the possibility of free radical generation by GNPs in aqueous media when they are exposed to a microwave field. Methods: A number of samples with 500 mM 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) in 20 ppm GNP colloidal suspensions were scanned with an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)/electron spin resonance spectrometer to generate and detect free radicals. A fixed (9.68 GHz) frequency microwave from the spectrometer has served for both generation and detection of radicals. EPR spectra obtained as first derivatives of intensity with the spectrometer were double integrated to get the free radical signal intensities. Power dependence of radical intensity was studied by applying various levels of microwave power (12.5, 49.7, and 125 mW) while keeping all other scan parameters the same. Free radical signal intensities from initial and final scans, acquired at the same power levels, were compared. Results: Hydroxyl radical (OH⋅) signal was found to be generated due to the exposure of GNP–DMPO colloidal samples to a microwave field. Intensity of OH⋅ signal thus generated at 12.5 mW microwave power for 2.8 min was close to the intensity of OH⋅ signal obtained from a water–DMPO sample exposed to 1.5 Gy ionizing radiation dose. For repeated scans, higher OH⋅ intensities were observed in the final scan for higher power levels applied between the initial and the final scans. Final intensities were higher also for a shorter time interval between the initial and the final scans. Conclusions: Our results observed for the first time demonstrate that GNPs generate OH⋅ radicals in aqueous media when they are exposed to a microwave field. If OH

  1. A novel property of gold nanoparticles: Free radical generation under microwave irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Nava Raj; Shvydka, Diana; Parsai, E Ishmael

    2016-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are known to be effective mediators in microwave hyperthermia. Interaction with an electromagnetic field, large surface to volume ratio, and size quantization of nanoparticles (NPs) can lead to increased cell killing beyond pure heating effects. The purpose of this study is to explore the possibility of free radical generation by GNPs in aqueous media when they are exposed to a microwave field. A number of samples with 500 mM 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) in 20 ppm GNP colloidal suspensions were scanned with an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)/electron spin resonance spectrometer to generate and detect free radicals. A fixed (9.68 GHz) frequency microwave from the spectrometer has served for both generation and detection of radicals. EPR spectra obtained as first derivatives of intensity with the spectrometer were double integrated to get the free radical signal intensities. Power dependence of radical intensity was studied by applying various levels of microwave power (12.5, 49.7, and 125 mW) while keeping all other scan parameters the same. Free radical signal intensities from initial and final scans, acquired at the same power levels, were compared. Hydroxyl radical (OH⋅) signal was found to be generated due to the exposure of GNP-DMPO colloidal samples to a microwave field. Intensity of OH⋅ signal thus generated at 12.5 mW microwave power for 2.8 min was close to the intensity of OH⋅ signal obtained from a water-DMPO sample exposed to 1.5 Gy ionizing radiation dose. For repeated scans, higher OH⋅ intensities were observed in the final scan for higher power levels applied between the initial and the final scans. Final intensities were higher also for a shorter time interval between the initial and the final scans. Our results observed for the first time demonstrate that GNPs generate OH⋅ radicals in aqueous media when they are exposed to a microwave field. If OH⋅ radicals can be generated close to

  2. A novel property of gold nanoparticles: Free radical generation under microwave irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paudel, Nava Raj, E-mail: nrpaudel@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, Ohio 43614 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas 72205 (United States); Shvydka, Diana; Parsai, E. Ishmael [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, Ohio 43614 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are known to be effective mediators in microwave hyperthermia. Interaction with an electromagnetic field, large surface to volume ratio, and size quantization of nanoparticles (NPs) can lead to increased cell killing beyond pure heating effects. The purpose of this study is to explore the possibility of free radical generation by GNPs in aqueous media when they are exposed to a microwave field. Methods: A number of samples with 500 mM 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) in 20 ppm GNP colloidal suspensions were scanned with an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)/electron spin resonance spectrometer to generate and detect free radicals. A fixed (9.68 GHz) frequency microwave from the spectrometer has served for both generation and detection of radicals. EPR spectra obtained as first derivatives of intensity with the spectrometer were double integrated to get the free radical signal intensities. Power dependence of radical intensity was studied by applying various levels of microwave power (12.5, 49.7, and 125 mW) while keeping all other scan parameters the same. Free radical signal intensities from initial and final scans, acquired at the same power levels, were compared. Results: Hydroxyl radical (OH⋅) signal was found to be generated due to the exposure of GNP–DMPO colloidal samples to a microwave field. Intensity of OH⋅ signal thus generated at 12.5 mW microwave power for 2.8 min was close to the intensity of OH⋅ signal obtained from a water–DMPO sample exposed to 1.5 Gy ionizing radiation dose. For repeated scans, higher OH⋅ intensities were observed in the final scan for higher power levels applied between the initial and the final scans. Final intensities were higher also for a shorter time interval between the initial and the final scans. Conclusions: Our results observed for the first time demonstrate that GNPs generate OH⋅ radicals in aqueous media when they are exposed to a microwave field. If OH

  3. Achromatic and isochronous electron beam transport for tunable free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, J.; Kim, K.J.

    1991-09-01

    We have continued the study of a suitable electron beam transport line, which is both isochronous and achromatic, for the free electron laser being designed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. A refined version of the beam transport optics is discussed that accommodates two different modes of FEL wavelength tuning. For the fine tuning involving a small change of the electron beam energy, sextupoles are added to cancel the leading nonlinear dispersion. For the main tuning involving the change of the undulator gap, a practical solution of maintaining the beam matching condition is presented. Calculation of the higher order aberrations is facilitated by a newly developed code. 11 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  4. XUV free-electron laser-based projection lithography systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newnam, B.E.

    1990-01-01

    Free-electron laser sources, driven by rf-linear accelerators, have the potential to operate in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range with more than sufficient average power for high-volume projection lithography. For XUV wavelengths from 100 nm to 4 nm, such sources will enable the resolution limit of optical projection lithography to be extended from 0.25 {mu}m to 0.05{mu}m and with an adequate total depth of focus (1 to 2 {mu}m). Recent developments of a photoinjector of very bright electron beams, high-precision magnetic undulators, and ring-resonator cavities raise our confidence that FEL operation below 100 nm is ready for prototype demonstration. We address the motivation for an XUV FEL source for commercial microcircuit production and its integration into a lithographic system, include reflecting reduction masks, reflecting XUV projection optics and alignment systems, and surface-imaging photoresists. 52 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Palm Power Free-Piston Stirling Engine Control Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiter, Douglas E.; Holliday, Ezekiel

    2007-01-01

    A prototype 35We, JP-8 fueled, soldier-wearable power system for the DARPA Palm Power program has been developed and tested by Sunpower. A hermetically-sealed 42We Sunpower Free-Piston Stirling Engine (FPSE) with integral linear alternator is the prime mover for this system. To maximize system efficiency over a broad range of output power, a non-dissipative, highly efficient electronic control system which modulates engine output power by varying piston stroke and converts the AC output voltage of the FPSE into 28Vdc for the Palm Power end user, has been designed and demonstrated as an integral component of the Palm Power system. This paper reviews the current status and progress made in developing the control electronics for the Palm Power system, in addition to describing the operation and demonstrated performance of the engine controller in the context of the current JP-8 fueled Palm Power system.

  6. Introduction to the theory of free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krinsky, S.

    1985-01-01

    We present an introduction to some fundamental aspects of the theory of free electron lasers. Spontaneous radiation emitted by electrons traversing a wiggler magnet is briefly reviewed, and stimulated emission in the low-gain regime is discussed using Colson's pendulum equations and Madey's theorems. The high-gain regime is treated by an extention of the work of Bonifacio, Pellegrini, and Narducci. We introduce dynamical variables to describe the radiation field, and a Hamiltonian formulation of Maxwell's equations is employed. A canonical transformation to the interaction representation factors out the fast time variation of the radiation field, and the slow time dependence is determined by linearized equations for the appropriate collective variables. As an application of this technique we consider self-amplified spontaneous radiation, and we comment upon the relationship between our approach and the use of coupled Vlasov-Maxwell equations

  7. Introduction to free electron lasers (1/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    The Free-electron laser (FEL) is a source of coherent electromagnetic radiation based on a relativistic electron beam. First operated 25 years ago, the FEL has now reached a stage of maturity for operation in the infra-red region of the spectrum and several facilities provide intense FEL radiation beams for research covering a wide range of disciplines. Several projects both underway and proposed aim at pushing the minimum wavelength from its present limit around 100 nm progressively down to the 1 Angstrom region where the X-ray FEL would open up many new and exciting research possibilities. Other developments aim at increasing power levels to the 10's of kW level. In this series of lectures we give an introduction to the basic principles of FELs and their different modes of operation, and summarise their applications and current state of development.

  8. Introduction to free electron lasers (3/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    The Free-electron laser (FEL) is a source of coherent electromagnetic radiation based on a relativistic electron beam. First operated 25 years ago, the FEL has now reached a stage of maturity for operation in the infra-red region of the spectrum and several facilities provide intense FEL radiation beams for research covering a wide range of disciplines. Several projects both underway and proposed aim at pushing the minimum wavelength from its present limit around 100 nm progressively down to the 1 Angstrom region where the X-ray FEL would open up many new and exciting research possibilities. Other developments aim at increasing power levels to the 10's of kW level. In this series of lectures we give an introduction to the basic principles of FELs and their different modes of operation, and summarise their applications and current state of development.

  9. Introduction to free electron lasers (2/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    The Free-electron laser (FEL) is a source of coherent electromagnetic radiation based on a relativistic electron beam. First operated 25 years ago, the FEL has now reached a stage of maturity for operation in the infra-red region of the spectrum and several facilities provide intense FEL radiation beams for research covering a wide range of disciplines. Several projects both underway and proposed aim at pushing the minimum wavelength from its present limit around 100 nm progressively down to the 1 Angstrom region where the X-ray FEL would open up many new and exciting research possibilities. Other developments aim at increasing power levels to the 10's of kW level. In this series of lectures we give an introduction to the basic principles of FELs and their different modes of operation, and summarise their applications and current state of development.

  10. The stability of free-electron lasers against filamentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnard, J.J.; Scharlemann, E.T.; Yu, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    In inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, the high electromagnetic fields propagating through a relatively dense plasma can result in a transverse instability, causing the matter and light to form filaments oriented parallel to the light beam. We examine whether a similar instability exists in the electron beam of a free-electron laser, where such an instability could interfere with the transfer of beam kinetic energy into optical wave energy. We heuristically examine the instability in a relativistic beam through which an intense laser beam is propagating. We ignore the FEL effects. We estimate how the altered index of refraction in an FEL affects the dispersion relation. Finally, we estimate the effect that the instability could have on the phase coherence of a particle as it transits an FEL. 10 refs., 2 tabs

  11. Design and Analysis of an Electron Gun/Booster and Free Electron Laser Optical Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    105 65. Stanford DC gun equipotentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 66. Energy plots for various electrode ratios...222 121. Graphical Cross-correlation Demonstration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 122. 2D cross-correlation surface ...them enough energy to escape the metal’s surface . Once free of the metal, the electric field accelerates the electrons toward an anode. If the anode is

  12. Free electron lasers for transmission of energy in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, S. B.; Hiddleston, H. R.; Catella, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    A one-dimensional resonant-particle model of a free electron laser (FEL) is used to calculate laser gain and conversion efficiency of electron energy to photon energy. The optical beam profile for a resonant optical cavity is included in the model as an axial variation of laser intensity. The electron beam profile is matched to the optical beam profile and modeled as an axial variation of current density. Effective energy spread due to beam emittance is included. Accelerators appropriate for a space-based FEL oscillator are reviewed. Constraints on the concentric optical resonator and on systems required for space operation are described. An example is given of a space-based FEL that would produce 1.7 MW of average output power at 0.5 micrometer wavelength with over 50% conversion efficiency of electrical energy to laser energy. It would utilize a 10 m-long amplifier centered in a 200 m-long optical cavity. A 3-amp, 65 meV electrostatic accelerator would provide the electron beam and recover the beam after it passes through the amplifier. Three to five shuttle flights would be needed to place the laser in orbit.

  13. Modeling and multidimensional optimization of a tapered free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Jiao

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Energy extraction efficiency of a free electron laser (FEL can be greatly increased using a tapered undulator and self-seeding. However, the extraction rate is limited by various effects that eventually lead to saturation of the peak intensity and power. To better understand these effects, we develop a model extending the Kroll-Morton-Rosenbluth, one-dimensional theory to include the physics of diffraction, optical guiding, and radially resolved particle trapping. The predictions of the model agree well with that of the GENESIS single-frequency numerical simulations. In particular, we discuss the evolution of the electron-radiation interaction along the tapered undulator and show that the decreasing of refractive guiding is the major cause of the efficiency reduction, particle detrapping, and then saturation of the radiation power. With this understanding, we develop a multidimensional optimization scheme based on GENESIS simulations to increase the energy extraction efficiency via an improved taper profile and variation in electron beam radius. We present optimization results for hard x-ray tapered FELs, and the dependence of the maximum extractable radiation power on various parameters of the initial electron beam, radiation field, and the undulator system. We also study the effect of the sideband growth in a tapered FEL. Such growth induces increased particle detrapping and thus decreased refractive guiding that together strongly limit the overall energy extraction efficiency.

  14. Field Emitter Arrays for a Free Electron Laser Application

    CERN Document Server

    Shing-Bruce-Li, Kevin; Ganter, Romain; Gobrecht, Jens; Raguin, Jean Yves; Rivkin, Leonid; Wrulich, Albin F

    2004-01-01

    The development of a new electron gun with the lowest possible emittance would help reducing the total length and cost of a free electron laser. Field emitter arrays (FEAs) are an attractive technology for electron sources of ultra high brightness. Indeed, several thousands of microscopic tips can be deposited on a 1 mm diameter area. Electrons are then extracted by applying voltage to a first grid layer close to the tip apexes, the so called gate layer, and focused by a second grid layer one micrometer above the tips. The typical aperture diameter of the gate and the focusing layer is in the range of one micrometer. One challenge for such cathodes is to produce peak currents in the ampere range since the usual applications of FEAs require less than milliampere. Encouraging peak current performances have been obtained by applying voltage pulses at low frequency between gate and tips. In this paper we report on different tip materials available on the market: diamond FEAs from Extreme Devices Inc., ZrC single ...

  15. Optical guiding and beam bending in free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharlemann, E.T.

    1987-01-01

    The electron beam in a free-electron laser (FEL) can act as an optical fiber, guiding or bending the optical beam. The refractive and gain effects of the bunched electron beam can compensate for diffraction, making possible wigglers that are many Rayleigh ranges (i.e., characteristic diffraction lengths) long. The origin of optical guiding can be understood by examining gain and refractive guiding in a fiber with a complex index of refraction, providing a mathematical description applicable also to the FEL, with some extensions. In the exponential gain regime of the FEL, the electron equations of motion must be included, but a self-consistent description of exponential gain with diffraction fully included becomes possible. The origin of the effective index of refraction of an FEL is illustrated with a simple example of bunched, radiating dipoles. Some of the properties of the index of refraction are described. The limited experimental evidence for optical beam bending is summarized. The evidence does not yet provide conclusive proof of the existence of optical guiding, but supports the idea. Finally, the importance of refractive guiding for the performance of a high-gain tapered-wiggler FEL amplifier is illustrated with numerical simulations

  16. High-voltage pulse generator for electron gun power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenev, S.A.; Enchevich, I.B.; Mikhov, M.K.

    1987-01-01

    High-voltage pulse generator with combined capacitive and inductive energy storages for electron gun power supply is described. Hydrogen thyratron set in a short magnetic lense is a current breaker. Times of current interruption in thyratrons are in the range from 100 to 300 ns. With 1 kV charging voltage of capacitive energy storage 25 kV voltage pulse is obtained in the load. The given high-voltage pulse generator was used for supply of an electron gun generating 10-30 keV low-energy electron beam

  17. Electron beam properties and impedance characterization for storage rings used for free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, G.; Mezi, L.; Renieri, A.; Migliorati, M.; Walker, R.

    2000-01-01

    Good electron beam qualities and stability are the crucial features of Storage Rings dedicated to synchrotron radiation sources or to Free Electron Laser. Most of these characteristics depends on the coupling of the e-beam with the machine environment, which can be in turn modelled in terms of a characteristic impedance, whose absolute value and structure can be used to specify both the stability (longitudinal and transverse) of the beam and its qualities (energy spread, bunch length, peak current ...). In this paper are considered two specific examples of Storage Rings used for FEL operation and analyze their performances by means of semi analytical and numerical methods. The analysis is aimed at clarifying the dependence of beam energy spread and bunch length on beam current and at providing a set of parameters useful for the optimization of Free Electron Laser or synchrotron radiation sources [it

  18. PROCEEDING OF THE SEEDED X-RAY FREE ELECTRON LASER WORKSHOP.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WANG,X.J.; MURPHY,J.B.; YU,L.H.; FAATZ,B.; HUANG,Z.; REICHE,S.; ZOLOTOREV,M.

    2002-12-13

    The underlying theory of a high gain free electron laser (FEL) has existed for two decades [1-2], but it is only in the last few years that these novel radiation sources have been realized experimentally. Several high gain FELs have successfully reached saturation in the infrared, visible and the VUV portion of the spectrum: the High Gain Harmonic Generation (HGHG) free electron lasers [3] at BNL and the Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) FELs at LEUTL, VISA and TTF [4-6]. The outstanding challenges for future FELs are to extend high gain FELs to the X-ray regime, improve the longitudinal coherence of the radiation using seeded FEL schemes and generate ultrashort pulses (<100 fs). The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) sponsored a Seeded X-ray Free Electron Laser Workshop on December 13-14, 2002 to explore these challenging issues. Representatives from BNL, DESY, LBNL, SLAC and UCLA made presentations on the novel schemes under consideration at their laboratories. Workshop participants had a lively discussion on the feasibility, performance and R&D issues associated with the seeded XFEL schemes. An improvement of the electron beam quality will certainly be necessary to drive the XFEL. Self-seeding SASE, cascaded HGHG, and SASE pulse compression FELs show the most promise for producing short pulse X-rays. Of these, only the self-seeded and HGHG schemes generate longitudinally coherent radiation. While the pulse length in the self-seeded scheme is determined by the electron bunch length ({approx}100 fs), the pulse length in the HGHG scheme is determined by the short pulse seed laser, and so can be much shorter ({approx} 20 fs).

  19. Photovoltaic power generation system free of bypass diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentine, Anthony L.; Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2015-07-28

    A photovoltaic power generation system that includes a solar panel that is free of bypass diodes is described herein. The solar panel includes a plurality of photovoltaic sub-modules, wherein at least two of photovoltaic sub-modules in the plurality of photovoltaic sub-modules are electrically connected in parallel. A photovoltaic sub-module includes a plurality of groups of electrically connected photovoltaic cells, wherein at least two of the groups are electrically connected in series. A photovoltaic group includes a plurality of strings of photovoltaic cells, wherein a string of photovoltaic cells comprises a plurality of photovoltaic cells electrically connected in series. The strings of photovoltaic cells are electrically connected in parallel, and the photovoltaic cells are microsystem-enabled photovoltaic cells.

  20. Research on heightening of performance of optical system for free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yoshiyuki; Toyada, Koichi

    1996-01-01

    Free electron laser will become in future the center of industrial laser technology as a high efficiency, high power output laser. For the development of free electron laser, the development of the elementary technologies such as accelerator, wiggler, optical system and so on must be carried out. For the stable functioning of free electron laser for long hours, the innovative technical development of the optical technology has been strongly desired. In this research, the development of the method of manufacturing a new high performance, multilayer film reflection mirror and the research on compound optical damage by new high energy photon generation process were advanced. The research on the formation of aluminum oxide thin films by using surface reaction, the development of the technology for forming high accuracy, multi-layer thin films and the evaluation of the optical performance of multi-layer films are reported. The constitution of compound optical damage evaluation system, the calculation of the luminance of high energy photons and the experiment on the generation of photons by a carbon dioxide gas laser are described regarding the compound optical damage research. (K.I.)

  1. Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy for Studying the Generation and Scavenging of Reactive Oxygen Species by Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun-Jie; Zhao, Baozhong; Xia, Qingsu; Fu, Peter P.

    2013-09-01

    One fundamental mechanism widely described for nanotoxicity involves oxidative damage due to generation of free radicals and other reactive oxygen species. Indeed, the ability of nanoscale materials to facilitate the transfer of electrons, and thereby promote oxidative damage or in some instances provide antioxidant protection, may be a fundamental property of these materials. Any assessment of a nanoscale material's safety must therefore consider the potential for toxicity arising from oxidative damage. Therefore, rapid and predictive methods are needed to assess oxidative damage elicited by nanoscale materials. The use of electron spin resonance (ESR) to study free radical related bioactivity of nanomaterials has several advantages for free radical determination and identification. Specifically it can directly assess antioxidant quenching or prooxidant generation of relevant free radicals and reactive oxygen species. In this chapter, we have reported some nonclassical behaviors of the electron spin relaxation properties of unpaired electrons in different fullerenes and the investigation of anti/prooxidant activity by various types of nanomaterials using ESR. In addition, we have reviewed the mechanisms of free radical formation photosensitized by different nanomaterials. This chapter also included the use of spin labels, spin traps and ESR oximetry to systematically examine the enzymatic mimetic activities of nanomaterials.

  2. Electron beam generation in the fore-vacuum pressure range

    CERN Document Server

    Burachevskij, Y A; Kuzemchenko, M N; Mytnikov, A V; Oks, E M

    2001-01-01

    One presents the results of investigations to generate electron beams within 0.01-0.1 Torr gas pressure range. To generate a beam one used a plasma source based on a hollow cathode discharge in combination with a plane accelerating gap. Peculiar features of electron emission and acceleration within the mentioned pressure range are associated with high probability of gas ionization in an accelerating gap and with generation of ion flow meeting electron beam. It results in reduction of discharge combustion intensification, as well as, in plasma concentration range. The developed design of an electron source enables to generate cylindrical beams with up to 1 A current and with up to 10 keV energy

  3. Infrared spectroscopy of gas-phase clusters using a free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heijnsbergen, D. van; Helden, G. von; Meijer, G.

    2002-01-01

    Most clusters produced in the gas phase, especially those containing metals, remain largely uncharaterized, among these are transition metal - carbide, -oxide and -nitride clusters. A method for recording IR spectra of strongly bound gas-phase clusters is presented. It is based on a free-electron laser called Felix, characterized by wide wavelength tuning range, covering almost the full 'molecular finger print' region, high power and fluence which make it suited to excite gas-phase species i.e. gas -phase clusters. Neutral clusters were generated by laser vaporization technique, ions that were created after the interaction with the free-electron laser were analyzed in a flight mass spectrometer. Experiments were run with titanium carbide clusters and their IR spectra given. It was shown that this method is suited to strongly bound clusters with low ionization energies, a condition met for many pure metal clusters and metal compound clusters. (nevyjel)

  4. Use of electronic cigarettes in smoke-free environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yuyan; Cummins, Sharon E; Zhu, Shu-Hong

    2017-03-01

    Although most US states prohibit cigarette smoking in public places and worksites, fewer jurisdictions regulate indoor use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes). Given the dramatic increase in e-cigarette use and concern about its impact on non-users, there is a need to examine the use of e-cigarettes in smoke-free environments and related attitudes and perceptions. Recruited from a nationally representative adult panel (GfK's KnowledgePanel), 952 current users of e-cigarettes completed a cross-sectional online survey in 2014. Multivariate logistic regressions were conducted to examine the factors associated with ever using e-cigarettes in smoke-free environments. Overall, 59.5% of e-cigarette users had vaped where cigarette smoking was not allowed. Young adults (18-29 years) were most likely to do so, 74.2%. The places of first-time use most often mentioned were service venues (bar, restaurant, lounge and club), 30.7%, followed by worksites, 23.5%. Daily e-cigarette users were more likely to have vaped in smoke-free environments than non-daily users (OR=2.08, p=0.012). Only 2.5% of those who used e-cigarettes in smoke-free environments reported negative reactions from other people. Most e-cigarette users did not think e-cigarettes are harmful to themselves or to by-standers, and thus should not be banned where smoking is; those who had used e-cigarettes where smoking is banned were even more likely to hold these views. E-cigarette use in smoke-free environments was common, suggesting that most e-cigarette users do not consider smoke-free laws to apply to e-cigarettes. Explicit laws should be considered if jurisdictions want to prohibit e-cigarette use in public places. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Millimeter wave free electron laser amplifiers: Experiments and designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidwell, S.W.; Zhang, Z.X.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Bensen, D.M.; Destler, W.W.; Granatstein, V.L.; Lantham, P.E.; Levush, B.; Rodgers, J.

    1991-01-01

    Free electron laser amplifies are investigated as sources of high- average-power (1 MW) millimeter to submillimeter wave radiation (200 GHz - 600 GHz) for application to electron cyclotron resonance heating of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. As a stepping-stone to higher frequencies and cw operation a pulsed amplifier (τ pulse ≅ 80 ns) at 98 GHz is being developed. Status is reported on this experiment which investigates linear gain amplification with use of sheet electron beam (transverse cross section = 0.1 cm x 2.0 cm, V beam = 440 keV, I beam ≅ 10 A) and short-period wiggler (ell w = 0.96 cm) and with expected output of 140 W. Predictions of gain and efficiency from a 1-D universal formulation are presented. Beam propagation results, with wiggler focusing as a means of sheet beam confinement in both transverse dimensions, through the 54 cm (56 period) pulsed electromagnet wiggler are discussed. Peak wiggler fields of 5.1 kG on-axis have been achieved

  6. Electron-beam generated plasmas for processing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meger, Robert; Leonhardt, Darrin; Murphy, Donald; Walton, Scott; Blackwell, David; Fernsler, Richard; Lampe, Martin; Manheimer, Wallace

    2001-10-01

    NRL's Large Area Plasma Processing System (LAPPS) utilizes a 5-10 mA/cm^2, 2-4 kV, 1 cm x 30-60 cm cross section beam of electrons guided by a magnetic field to ionize a low density (10-100 mTorr) gas.[1] Beam ionization allows large area, high density, low temperature plasmas to be generated in an arbitrary gas mixture at a well defined location. Energy and composition of particle fluxes to surfaces on both sides of the plasma can be controlled by gas mixture, location, rf bias, and other factors. Experiments have been performed using both pulsed and cw beams. Extensive diagnostics (Langmuir probes, mass and ion energy analyzers, optical emissions, microwave interferometry, etc.) have been fielded to measure the plasma properties and neutral particle fluxes (ions, neutrals, free radicals) with and without rf bias on nearby surfaces both with the beam on and off. Uniform, cold (Te < 1eV), dense (ne 10^13 cm-3) plasmas in molecular and atomic gases and mixtures thereof have been produced in agreement with theoretical expectations. Initial tests of LAPPS application such as ashing, etching, sputtering, and diamond growth have been performed. Program status will be presented. [1]R.A. Meger, et al, Phys. of Plasmas 8(5), p. 2558 (2001)

  7. Generation of electronic waste in India: Current scenario, dilemmas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper tries to quantify the amount of E-waste generated in India with the related stakeholder involvement. Electronic waste (E-waste) or waste electrical and electronic equipments (WEEE), which is relatively a recent addition to the hazardous waste stream, is drawing rapid attention across the globe as the quantity ...

  8. Highly efficient electron vortex beams generated by nanofabricated phase holograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grillo, Vincenzo, E-mail: vincenzo.grillo@nano.cnr.it [CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Centro S3, Via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); CNR-IMEM Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, I-43124 Parma (Italy); Carlo Gazzadi, Gian [CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Centro S3, Via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Karimi, Ebrahim [CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Centro S3, Via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); Mafakheri, Erfan [Dipartimento di Fisica Informatica e Matematica, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Boyd, Robert W. [Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); Frabboni, Stefano [CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Centro S3, Via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica Informatica e Matematica, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy)

    2014-01-27

    We propose an improved type of holographic-plate suitable for the shaping of electron beams. The plate is fabricated by a focused ion beam on a silicon nitride membrane and introduces a controllable phase shift to the electron wavefunction. We adopted the optimal blazed-profile design for the phase hologram, which results in the generation of highly efficient (25%) electron vortex beams. This approach paves the route towards applications in nano-scale imaging and materials science.

  9. Highly efficient electron vortex beams generated by nanofabricated phase holograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grillo, Vincenzo; Carlo Gazzadi, Gian; Karimi, Ebrahim; Mafakheri, Erfan; Boyd, Robert W.; Frabboni, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    We propose an improved type of holographic-plate suitable for the shaping of electron beams. The plate is fabricated by a focused ion beam on a silicon nitride membrane and introduces a controllable phase shift to the electron wavefunction. We adopted the optimal blazed-profile design for the phase hologram, which results in the generation of highly efficient (25%) electron vortex beams. This approach paves the route towards applications in nano-scale imaging and materials science

  10. A multi-frequency approach to free electron lasers driven by short electron bunches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piovella, Nicola

    1997-01-01

    A multi-frequency model for free electron lasers (FELs), based on the Fourier decomposition of the radiation field coupled with the beam electrons, is discussed. We show that the multi-frequency approach allows for an accurate description of the evolution of the radiation spectrum, also when the FEL is driven by short electron bunches, of arbitrary longitudinal profile. We derive from the multi-frequency model, by averaging over one radiation period, the usual FEL equations modelling the slippage between radiation and particles and describing the super-radiant regime in high-gain FELs. As an example of application of the multi-frequency model, we discuss the coherent spontaneous emission (CSE) from short electron bunches

  11. Trapped electrons as a free energy source for the auroral kilometric radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louarn, P.; Roux, A.; de Feraudy, H.; Le Queau, D.; Andre, M.; Matson, L.

    1990-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of electromagnetic fields and particle distributions, measured during the crossing by the Swedish spacecraft Viking of an auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) source, are presented. It is shown that AKR is generated within an acceleration region characterized by an upward directed parallel electric field, as evidenced by its signature on the proton and electron distributions. From particle observations inside the AKR source it is clear that the potential drop below the spacecraft produces upward moving field-aligned ion beams and a depletion in the density of low energy electrons. The potential drop above the spacecraft produces downward accelerated electrons. A large fraction of these electrons have small parallel velocities; they mirror above the ionosphere. These trapped electrons lie in a region of velocity space which should be empty in a simple adiabatic theory. The authors suggest that these electrons get trapped when they experience a time-varying (or space-varying) parallel electric field. This conclusion is supported by the comparison between the observed electron distribution function and a model distribution function built by applying Liouville theorem. Since trapped electrons can cause positive gradients (∂f e /∂V perpendicular > 0) over a broad range of parallel velocities, around v parallel ∼ 0, it is suggested that they are the free energy source for the AKR. This conclusion is substantiated by an evaluation of the convective growth rate, where the various input parameters have been determined by fitting particle data

  12. Free radicals generated by radiolysis of aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, H.A.

    1981-01-01

    The free radicals produced in the radiolysis of aqueous solutions span the range of redox potentials from -2.9 to +2.65 volts. The identity and nature of these radicals were discussed. Most of the discussion was results obtained with low LET radiation sources ( 60 Co gamma radiation or electron accelerators). Water radiolysis provides the synthesis of many radicals and radical ions in aqueous solution. The primary radicals, e/sub aq/ - H, OH, are well characterized. The radical population can be made to be 90% pure OH (or O - ) if N 2 O solutions are irradiated, the remaining 10% being H atoms. 55% of the radicals can be converted to H atoms in acid solution or in neutral phosphate solutions(e/sub aq/ - reacts with H 2 PO 4- to produce H). The remaining 45% (OH radicals) are difficult to convert to H by reaction with H 2 , due to the slow rate of the reaction. About 100 atmospheres of H 2 are required to do the conversion in less than 10 - 6 sec. 3 figures, 3 tables. (DP)

  13. User issues at the Stanford picosecond free electron laser center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T.I.

    1995-01-01

    Assembling a productive user facility around a Free Electron Laser (FEL) is a complex task. Reliable operation of the FEL is a necessary, but by no means sufficient, condition to ensure that the center will be able to attract and keep the interest of first rate researchers. Some other issues which are important include: center wavelength stability and ease of tuning, bandwidth control, amplitude and position stability, ability to select arbitrary sequences of micropulses, and real time availability of information of the FEL's important parameters (spectral width, center wavelength, micropulse length and energy, etc.). In addition, at the Stanford Center we have found that providing additional systems (conventional picosecond lasers synchronized to the FEL, an FTIR spectrometer, a confocal microscopy, ...) has been important. (author)

  14. Free Electron Laser as Energy Driver for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saldin, E.L.; Shnejdmiller, E.A.; Ul'yanov, Yu.N.; Sarantsev, V.P.; Yurkov, M.V.

    1994-01-01

    A FEL based energy driver for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is proposed. The key element of the scheme is free electron laser system. Novel technical solutions reveal a possibility to construct the FEL system operating at radiation wavelength λ = 0.5 μm and providing flash energy E = 1 MJ and brightness 4 x 10 22 W cm -2 sr -1 within steering pulse duration 0.1-2 ns. Total energy efficiency of the proposed ICF energy driver is about of 11% and repetition rate is 40 Hz. Dimensions of such an ICF driver are comparable with those of heavy-ion ICF driver, while the problem of technical realization seems to be more realistic. It is shown that the FEL based ICF energy driver may be constructed at the present level of accelerator technique R and D. 27 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Free Space Optics for Next Generation Cellular Backhaul

    KAUST Repository

    Zedini, Emna

    2016-11-01

    The exponential increase in the number of mobile users, coupled with the strong demand for high-speed data services results in a significant growth in the required cellular backhaul capacity. Optimizing the cost efficiency while increasing the capacity is becoming a key challenge to the cellular backhaul. It refers to connections between base stations and mobile switching nodes over a variety of transport technologies such as copper, optical fibers, and radio links. These traditional transmission technologies are either expensive, or cannot provide high data rates. This work is focused on the opportunities of free-space-optical (FSO) technology in next generation cellular back- haul. FSO is a cost effective and wide bandwidth solution as compared with the traditional radio-frequency (RF) transmission. Moreover, due to its ease of deployment, license-free operation, high transmission security, and insensitivity to interference, FSO links are becoming an attractive solution for next generation cellular networks. However, the widespread deployment of FSO links is hampered by the atmospheric turbulence-induced fading, weather conditions, and pointing errors. Increasing the reliability of FSO systems, while still exploiting their high data rate communications, is a key requirement in the deployment of an FSO-based backhaul. Therefore, the aim of this work is to provide different approaches to address these technical challenges. In this context, investigation of hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) protocols from an information-theoretic perspective is undertaken. Moreover, performance analysis of asymmetric RF/FSO dual-hop systems is studied. In such system models, multiple RF users can be multiplexed and sent over the FSO link. More specifically, the end-to-end performance metrics are presented in closed-form. This also has increased the interest to study the performance of dual-hop mixed FSO/RF systems, where the FSO link is used as a multicast channel that serves

  16. Characterization and control of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, Christopher

    2012-11-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) open up new frontiers in photon science, and in order to take full advantage of these unique accelerator-based light sources, the characterization and control of the femtosecond electron and X-ray beams is essential. Within this cumulative thesis, recent results achieved within the active research field of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at FELs are reported.The basic principles of X-ray FELs are described, and concepts of longitudinal electron beam diagnostics with femtosecond accuracy are covered. Experimental results obtained with a transverse deflecting structure (TDS) and spectroscopy of coherent terahertz radiation are presented, and the suppression of coherent optical radiation effects, required for diagnostics utilizing a TDS, is demonstrated. Control of the longitudinal phase space by using multiple radio frequencies for longitudinal electron beam tailoring is presented, and a new technique of reversible electron beam heating with two TDSs is described. For the characterization of femtosecond X-ray pulses, a novel method based on dedicated longitudinal phase space diagnostics for electron beams is introduced, and recent measurements with a streaking technique using external terahertz fields are presented.

  17. Characterization and control of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, Christopher

    2012-11-15

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) open up new frontiers in photon science, and in order to take full advantage of these unique accelerator-based light sources, the characterization and control of the femtosecond electron and X-ray beams is essential. Within this cumulative thesis, recent results achieved within the active research field of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at FELs are reported.The basic principles of X-ray FELs are described, and concepts of longitudinal electron beam diagnostics with femtosecond accuracy are covered. Experimental results obtained with a transverse deflecting structure (TDS) and spectroscopy of coherent terahertz radiation are presented, and the suppression of coherent optical radiation effects, required for diagnostics utilizing a TDS, is demonstrated. Control of the longitudinal phase space by using multiple radio frequencies for longitudinal electron beam tailoring is presented, and a new technique of reversible electron beam heating with two TDSs is described. For the characterization of femtosecond X-ray pulses, a novel method based on dedicated longitudinal phase space diagnostics for electron beams is introduced, and recent measurements with a streaking technique using external terahertz fields are presented.

  18. Free radical generation from an aniline derivative in HepG2 cells: a possible captodative effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horinouchi, Yuya; Summers, Fiona A; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Mason, Ronald P

    2015-01-01

    Xenobiotic metabolism can induce the generation of protein radicals, which are believed to play an important role in the toxicity of chemicals and drugs. It is therefore important to identify chemical structures capable of inducing macromolecular free radical formation in living cells. In this study, we evaluated the ability of four structurally related environmental chemicals, aniline, nitrosobenzene, N,N-dimethylaniline, and N,N-dimethyl-4-nitrosoaniline (DMNA), to induce free radicals and cellular damage in the hepatoma cell line HepG2. Cytotoxicity was assessed using lactate dehydrogenase assays, and morphological changes were observed using phase contrast microscopy. Protein free radicals were detected by immuno-spin trapping using in-cell western experiments and confocal microscopy to determine the subcellular locale of free radical generation. DMNA induced free radical generation, lactate dehydrogenase release, and morphological changes in HepG2 cells, whereas aniline, nitrosobenzene, N,N-dimethylaniline did not. Confocal microscopy showed that DMNA induced free radical generation mainly in the cytosol. Preincubation of HepG2 cells with N-acetylcysteine and 2,2'-dipyridyl significantly prevented free radical generation on subsequent incubation with DMNA, whereas preincubation with apocynin and dimethyl sulfoxide had no effect. These results suggest that DMNA is metabolized to reactive free radicals capable of generating protein radicals which may play a critical role in DMNA toxicity. We propose that the captodative effect, the combined action of the electron-releasing dimethylamine substituent, and the electron-withdrawing nitroso substituent, leads to a thermodynamically stabilized radical, facilitating enhanced protein radical formation by DMNA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 'Diffraction-free' optical beams in inverse free electron laser accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, S.Y.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Marshall, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    'Diffraction-free' optical beams correspond to exact solutions of the wave equation in free space with the remarkable property that they propagate with negligible transverse spreading for distances much larger than the Rayleigh range. The requirement for this to occur is a large aperture. Using a 2D computer code, we find that these optical beams will also propagate with negligible diffraction even when perturbed by the electron beam in an IFEL; indeed they match well the FEL requirement for the accelerator. The numerical simulations are performed for the proposed facility at Brookhaven in which λ s =10 μm, B=1.5 T (linearly tapered l w =1.31-6.28 cm) and the optical beam power is either 8x10 11 W or 2.3x10 10 W. Approximately 70% of the electrons constituting a beam of current 5 mA or 15 A, radius 0.14 mm and initial energy of 50 MeV is accelerated at 50 MeV/m. (orig.)

  20. The influence of plasma motion on disruption generated runaway electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    One of the possible consequences of disruptions is the generation of runaway electrons which can impact plasma facing components and cause damage due to high local energy deposition. This problem becomes more serious as the machine size and plasma current increases. Since large size and high currents are characteristics of proposed future machines, control of runaway generation is an important design consideration. A lumped circuit model for disruption runaway electron generation indicates that control circuitry on strongly influence runaway behavior. A comparison of disruption data from several shots on JET and D3-D with model results, demonstrate the effects of plasma motion on runaway number density and energy. 6 refs., 12 figs

  1. Shack-Hartmann Electron Densitometer (SHED): An Optical System for Diagnosing Free Electron Density in Laser-Produced Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Free Electron Density in Laser-Produced Plasmas by Anthony R Valenzuela Approved for public release; distribution is...AND SUBTITLE Shack-Hartmann Electron Densitometer (SHED): An Optical System for Diagnosing Free Electron Density in Laser-Produced Plasmas 5a...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The Shack-Hartmann Electron Densitometer is a novel method to diagnose ultrashort pulse laser–produced plasmas

  2. Free-Free Transitions in the Presence of Laser Fields and Debye Potential at Very Low Incident Electron Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Anand

    2012-01-01

    We study the free-free transition in electron-helium ion in the ground state and embedded in a Debye potential in the presence of an external laser field at very low incident electron energies. The laser field is treated classically while the collision dynamics is treated quantum mechanically. The laser field is chosen as monochromatic, linearly polarized and homogeneous. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser field in a nonperturbative manner by choosing Volkov wave function for it. The scattering wave function for the incident electron on the target embedded in a Debye potential is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of electron exchange. We calculate the laser-assisted differential and total cross sections for free-free transition for absorption/emission of a single photon or no photon exchange. The results will be presented at the conference.

  3. Quantum theory for 1D X-ray free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, Petr M.

    2018-06-01

    Classical 1D X-ray Free Electron Laser (X-ray FEL) theory has stood the test of time by guiding FEL design and development prior to any full-scale analysis. Future X-ray FELs and inverse-Compton sources, where photon recoil approaches an electron energy spread value, push the classical theory to its limits of applicability. After substantial efforts by the community to find what those limits are, there is no universally agreed upon quantum approach to design and development of future X-ray sources. We offer a new approach to formulate the quantum theory for 1D X-ray FELs that has an obvious connection to the classical theory, which allows for immediate transfer of knowledge between the two regimes. We exploit this connection in order to draw quantum mechanical conclusions about the quantum nature of electrons and generated radiation in terms of FEL variables.

  4. Free-electron laser and related quantum beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehara, Eisuke J.

    2003-01-01

    Past, present and future development programs of the JAERI super-conducting rf linac-based FELs and light sources with and without energy recovery have been discussed and introduced briefly. The JAERI FEL group has successfully discovered, and realized the brand-new FEL lasing mode of 255 fs ultra fast pulse, 6-9% high-efficiency, one GW high peak power, a few kW average power, and wide tunability of medium and far infrared wavelength regions at the same time. Using the new lasing, we could realize a powerful and efficient free-electron laser (FEL) for industrial uses near future. In order to realize such a tunable, ultra-short-pulse, high averaged-power FEL, we have needed the efficient and powerful CW FEL driver of the JAERI compact, stand-alone and zero-boil-off super-conducting rf linac with an energy-recovery geometry. The JAERI energy-recovery and/or super-conducting rf linac driver has been developed to use as an industrial electron irradiator, and millimeter-wave, far-infrared, mid-infrared, near-infrared and shorter wavelength quantum beam sources. (author)

  5. Free-electron laser and related quantum beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minehara, Eisuke J [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-07-01

    Past, present and future development programs of the JAERI super-conducting rf linac-based FELs and light sources with and without energy recovery have been discussed and introduced briefly. The JAERI FEL group has successfully discovered, and realized the brand-new FEL lasing mode of 255 fs ultra fast pulse, 6-9% high-efficiency, one GW high peak power, a few kW average power, and wide tunability of medium and far infrared wavelength regions at the same time. Using the new lasing, we could realize a powerful and efficient free-electron laser (FEL) for industrial uses near future. In order to realize such a tunable, ultra-short-pulse, high averaged-power FEL, we have needed the efficient and powerful CW FEL driver of the JAERI compact, stand-alone and zero-boil-off super-conducting rf linac with an energy-recovery geometry. The JAERI energy-recovery and/or super-conducting rf linac driver has been developed to use as an industrial electron irradiator, and millimeter-wave, far-infrared, mid-infrared, near-infrared and shorter wavelength quantum beam sources. (author)

  6. Structural enzymology using X-ray free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Kupitz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mix-and-inject serial crystallography (MISC is a technique designed to image enzyme catalyzed reactions in which small protein crystals are mixed with a substrate just prior to being probed by an X-ray pulse. This approach offers several advantages over flow cell studies. It provides (i room temperature structures at near atomic resolution, (ii time resolution ranging from microseconds to seconds, and (iii convenient reaction initiation. It outruns radiation damage by using femtosecond X-ray pulses allowing damage and chemistry to be separated. Here, we demonstrate that MISC is feasible at an X-ray free electron laser by studying the reaction of M. tuberculosis ß-lactamase microcrystals with ceftriaxone antibiotic solution. Electron density maps of the apo-ß-lactamase and of the ceftriaxone bound form were obtained at 2.8 Å and 2.4 Å resolution, respectively. These results pave the way to study cyclic and non-cyclic reactions and represent a new field of time-resolved structural dynamics for numerous substrate-triggered biological reactions.

  7. Numerical Simulations of X-Ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL)

    KAUST Repository

    Antonelli, Paolo

    2014-11-04

    We study a nonlinear Schrödinger equation which arises as an effective single particle model in X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL). This equation appears as a first principles model for the beam-matter interactions that would take place in an XFEL molecular imaging experiment in [A. Fratalocchi and G. Ruocco, Phys. Rev. Lett., 106 (2011), 105504]. Since XFEL are more powerful by several orders of magnitude than more conventional lasers, the systematic investigation of many of the standard assumptions and approximations has attracted increased attention. In this model the electrons move under a rapidly oscillating electromagnetic field, and the convergence of the problem to an effective time-averaged one is examined. We use an operator splitting pseudospectral method to investigate numerically the behavior of the model versus that of its time-averaged version in complex situations, namely the energy subcritical/mass supercritical case and in the presence of a periodic lattice. We find the time-averaged model to be an effective approximation, even close to blowup, for fast enough oscillations of the external field. This work extends previous analytical results for simpler cases [P. Antonelli, A. Athanassoulis, H. Hajaiej, and P. Markowich, Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal., 211 (2014), pp. 711--732].

  8. Maximum Work of Free-Piston Stirling Engine Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Shinji

    2017-04-01

    Using the method of adjoint equations described in Ref. [1], we have calculated the maximum thermal efficiencies that are theoretically attainable by free-piston Stirling and Carnot engine generators by considering the work loss due to friction and Joule heat. The net work done by the Carnot cycle is negative even when the duration of heat addition is optimized to give the maximum amount of heat addition, which is the same situation for the Brayton cycle described in our previous paper. For the Stirling cycle, the net work done is positive, and the thermal efficiency is greater than that of the Otto cycle described in our previous paper by a factor of about 2.7-1.4 for compression ratios of 5-30. The Stirling cycle is much better than the Otto, Brayton, and Carnot cycles. We have found that the optimized piston trajectories of the isothermal, isobaric, and adiabatic processes are the same when the compression ratio and the maximum volume of the same working fluid of the three processes are the same, which has facilitated the present analysis because the optimized piston trajectories of the Carnot and Stirling cycles are the same as those of the Brayton and Otto cycles, respectively.

  9. High efficiency, multiterawatt x-ray free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Emma

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present undulator magnet tapering methods for obtaining high efficiency and multiterawatt peak powers in x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs, a key requirement for enabling 3D atomic resolution single molecule imaging and nonlinear x-ray science. The peak power and efficiency of tapered XFELs is sensitive to time dependent effects, like synchrotron sideband growth. To analyze this dependence in detail we perform a comparative numerical optimization for the undulator magnetic field tapering profile including and intentionally disabling these effects. We show that the solution for the magnetic field taper profile obtained from time independent optimization does not yield the highest extraction efficiency when time dependent effects are included. Our comparative optimization is performed for a novel undulator designed specifically to obtain TW power x-ray pulses in the shortest distance: superconducting, helical, with short period and built-in strong focusing. This design reduces the length of the breaks between modules, decreasing diffraction effects, and allows using a stronger transverse electron focusing. Both effects reduce the gain length and the overall undulator length. We determine that after a fully time dependent optimization of a 100 m long Linac coherent light source-like XFEL we can obtain a maximum efficiency of 7%, corresponding to 3.7 TW peak radiation power. Possible methods to suppress the synchrotron sidebands, and further enhance the FEL peak power, up to about 6 TW by increasing the seed power and reducing the electron beam energy spread, are also discussed.

  10. The electron accelerator for FELIX [Free Electron Laser for Infrared eXperiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amersfoort, P.W. van; Geer, C.A.J. van der; Meer, A.F.G. van der; Bruinsma, P.J.T.; Hoekstra, R.; Kroes, F.B.; Luyckx, G.; Noomen, J.G.; Poole, M.W.; Saxon, G.

    1989-01-01

    The authors discuss the design of the electron accelerator for the Free Electron Laser for Infrared eXperiments (FELIX), which is meant to provide the Dutch science community with a rapidly tunable source of infrared radiation. The first stage of the project will (at least) cover the wavelength range between 8 and 80 μm. The accelerator consists of a triode with a grid modulated at 1 GHz, a 3.8-MeV buncher, and two travelling-wave S-band linac structures, with which 70-A, 3-ps bunches are accelerated to an energy between 15 and 4-5 MeV. The system has been designed to minimize the energy spread in the electron beam. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  11. Two electron response to an intense x-ray free electron laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, L R; Parker, J S; Meharg, K J; Armstrong, G S J; Taylor, K T

    2009-01-01

    New x-ray free electron lasers (FELs) promise an ultra-fast ultra-intense regime in which new physical phenomena, such as double core hole formation in at atom, should become directly observable. Ahead of x-ray FEL experiments, an initial key task is to theoretically explore such fundamental laser-atom interactions and processes. To study the response of a two-electron positive ion to an intense x-ray FEL pulse, our theoretical approach is a direct numerical integration, incorporating non-dipole Hamiltonian terms, of the full six-dimensional time-dependent Schroedinger equation. We present probabilities of double K-shell ionization in the two-electron positive ions Ne 8+ and Ar 16+ exposed to x-ray FEL pulses with frequencies in the range 50 au to 300 au and intensities in the range 10 17 to 10 22 W/cm 2 .

  12. Two electron response to an intense x-ray free electron laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, L R; Parker, J S; Meharg, K J; Armstrong, G S J; Taylor, K T, E-mail: l.moore@qub.ac.u [DAMTP, David Bates Building, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-01

    New x-ray free electron lasers (FELs) promise an ultra-fast ultra-intense regime in which new physical phenomena, such as double core hole formation in at atom, should become directly observable. Ahead of x-ray FEL experiments, an initial key task is to theoretically explore such fundamental laser-atom interactions and processes. To study the response of a two-electron positive ion to an intense x-ray FEL pulse, our theoretical approach is a direct numerical integration, incorporating non-dipole Hamiltonian terms, of the full six-dimensional time-dependent Schroedinger equation. We present probabilities of double K-shell ionization in the two-electron positive ions Ne{sup 8+} and Ar{sup 16+} exposed to x-ray FEL pulses with frequencies in the range 50 au to 300 au and intensities in the range 10{sup 17} to 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}.

  13. Electron beam halo monitor for a compact x-ray free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Aoyagi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available An electron beam halo monitor using diamond-based detectors, which are operated in the ionization mode, has been developed for the SPring-8 Angstrom compact free-electron laser (SACLA to protect its undulator magnets from radiation damage. Diamond-based detectors are inserted in a beam duct to measure the intensity of the beam halo directly. To suppress the degradation of the electron beam due to the installation of the beam halo monitor, rf fingers with aluminum windows are newly employed. We evaluated the effect of radiation from the Al windows on the output signal both experimentally and by simulation. The operational results of the beam halo monitor employed in SACLA are presented.

  14. Experimental study on generation of large area uniform electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Ying; Yi Aiping; Liu Jingru; Qian Hang; Huang Xin; Yu Li; Su Jiancang; Ding Zhenjie; Ding Yongzhong; Yu Jianguo

    2007-01-01

    In the experiment of gas laser pumped by electron beam, large area uniform electron beam is important to generate high efficiency laser output. The experimental study on generation of large area uniform electron beam with SPG-200 pulsed power generator is introduced. SPG-200 is an all-solid-state components pulsed power generator based on SOS, and its open voltage is more than 350 kV. The cathode have the area of 24 mm x 294 mm, and the anode-cathode(A-C)gap spacing is adjustable from 0 to 49 mm. The electron beam of cathode emission is transported to the laser chamber through the diode pressure foil, which sepa-rates the vacuum chamber from the laser chamber. Velvet and graphite cathodes are studied, each generates large area electron beam. The diode parameters are presented, and the uniformity of e-beam is diagnosed. The experimental results show that the diode voltage of the graphite cathode is 240-280 kV, and the diode current is 0.7-1.8 kA. The diode voltage of the velvet cathode is 200-250 kV, and the diode current is 1.5-1.7 kA. The uniformity of the velvet cathode emission is better than that of the graphite cathode. (authors)

  15. Beam energy distribution influences on density modulation efficiency in seeded free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanglei Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The beam energy spread at the entrance of an undulator system is of paramount importance for efficient density modulation in high-gain seeded free-electron lasers (FELs. In this paper, the dependences of high harmonic bunching efficiency in high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG, echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG and phase-merging enhanced harmonic generation (PEHG schemes on the electron beam energy spread distribution are studied. Theoretical investigations and multidimensional numerical simulations are applied to the cases of uniform and saddle beam energy distributions and compared to a traditional Gaussian distribution. It shows that the uniform and saddle electron energy distributions significantly enhance the bunching performance of HGHG FELs, while they almost have no influence on EEHG and PEHG schemes. A further start-to-end simulation example demonstrated that, with the saddle distribution of sliced beam energy spread controlled by a laser heater, the 30th harmonic can be directly generated by a single-stage HGHG scheme for a soft x-ray FEL facility.

  16. Megawatt-class free electron laser concept for shipboard self-defense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, Alan M.M.; Colson, William B.; Neil, George

    1997-01-01

    An efficient MW-class free electron laser (FEL) directed energy weapon (DEW) system holds promise for satisfying shipboard self-defense (SSD) requirements on future generations of Navy vessels because of the potential for high-power operation and the accessibility to all IR wavelengths. In order to meet shipboard packaging and prime power constraints, the power efficiency and high real-estate gradient achievable in an FEL driven by a superconducting RF accelerator is attractive. Configuration options and the key development issues for such a system are described

  17. New light for science: European X-ray Free Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobierajski, R.; Lawniczak-Jablonska, K.

    2006-01-01

    The execution of the X-Ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) project begins January 2007. The unique combination of the radiation wavelength, pulse duration and peak brightness provided by XFEL will enable to study processes which occur in both atomic scales - time and space. It will create new scientific opportunities in physics, chemistry, biology and material sciences. In the paper the principles of the XFEL radiation generation, technical design and main radiation parameters are described. They are followed by short description of the project organization. (author) [pl

  18. A Low-Energy-Spread Rf Accelerator for a Far-Infrared Free-Electron Laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geer, C. A. J.; Bakker, R. J.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; van Amersfoort, P. W.; Gillespie, W. A.; Saxon, G.; Poole, M. W.

    1993-01-01

    A high electron current and a small energy spread are essential for the operation of a free electron laser (FEL). In this paper we discuss the design and performance of the accelerator for FELIX, the free electron laser for infrared experiments. The system consists of a thermionic gun, a prebuncher,

  19. Optical synchronization of a free-electron laser with femtosecond precision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehl, F.

    2009-09-15

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating sub-10 fs long light pulses. In order to take full advantage of these extremely short light pulses in time-resolved experiments, synchronization with a so far unprecedented timing accuracy is required. Within this thesis, an optical synchronization system providing sub-10 fs stability has been developed and was implemented at the ultra-violet and soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH at DESY, Hamburg. The system uses a mode-locked laser as a timing reference. The laser pulses are distributed via length stabilized optical fiber-links to the remote locations. A key feature of the system is a bunch arrival-time monitor detecting the electron bunch arrival-time with an unrivaled resolution of 6 fs. A feedback system based on the arrival-time monitor was established, improving the arrival-time fluctuations from 200 fs in the unstabilized case to 25 fs with active feedback. In order to achieve the high peak current of several thousand amperes required for the FEL process, the electron bunches are longitudinally compressed in two magnetic chicanes. A second feedback system was developed stabilizing the bunch compression process based on measurements of diffraction radiation. The combination of both feedback systems improves the stability of the FEL radiation significantly. (orig.)

  20. Optical synchronization of a free-electron laser with femtosecond precision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loehl, F.

    2009-09-01

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating sub-10 fs long light pulses. In order to take full advantage of these extremely short light pulses in time-resolved experiments, synchronization with a so far unprecedented timing accuracy is required. Within this thesis, an optical synchronization system providing sub-10 fs stability has been developed and was implemented at the ultra-violet and soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH at DESY, Hamburg. The system uses a mode-locked laser as a timing reference. The laser pulses are distributed via length stabilized optical fiber-links to the remote locations. A key feature of the system is a bunch arrival-time monitor detecting the electron bunch arrival-time with an unrivaled resolution of 6 fs. A feedback system based on the arrival-time monitor was established, improving the arrival-time fluctuations from 200 fs in the unstabilized case to 25 fs with active feedback. In order to achieve the high peak current of several thousand amperes required for the FEL process, the electron bunches are longitudinally compressed in two magnetic chicanes. A second feedback system was developed stabilizing the bunch compression process based on measurements of diffraction radiation. The combination of both feedback systems improves the stability of the FEL radiation significantly. (orig.)

  1. Generation and application of bessel beams in electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grillo, Vincenzo, E-mail: vincenzo.grillo@cnr.it [CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Centro S3, Via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); CNR-IMEM, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, I-43124 Parma (Italy); Harris, Jérémie [Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 25 Templeton St., Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1N 6N5 (Canada); Gazzadi, Gian Carlo [CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Centro S3, Via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Balboni, Roberto [CNR-IMM Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Mafakheri, Erfan [Dipartimento di Fisica Informatica e Matematica, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Dennis, Mark R. [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Frabboni, Stefano [CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Centro S3, Via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica Informatica e Matematica, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Boyd, Robert W.; Karimi, Ebrahim [Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 25 Templeton St., Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2016-07-15

    We report a systematic treatment of the holographic generation of electron Bessel beams, with a view to applications in electron microscopy. We describe in detail the theory underlying hologram patterning, as well as the actual electron-optical configuration used experimentally. We show that by optimizing our nanofabrication recipe, electron Bessel beams can be generated with relative efficiencies reaching 37±3%. We also demonstrate by tuning various hologram parameters that electron Bessel beams can be produced with many visible rings, making them ideal for interferometric applications, or in more highly localized forms with fewer rings, more suitable for imaging. We describe the settings required to tune beam localization in this way, and explore beam and hologram configurations that allow the convergences and topological charges of electron Bessel beams to be controlled. We also characterize the phase structure of the Bessel beams generated with our technique, using a simulation procedure that accounts for imperfections in the hologram manufacturing process. - Highlights: • Bessel beams with different convergence, topological charge, visible fringes are demonstrated. • The relation between the Fresnel hologram and the probe shape is explained by detailed calculations and experiments. • Among the holograms here presented the highest relative efficiency is 37%, the best result ever reached for blazed holograms.

  2. Generation and application of bessel beams in electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grillo, Vincenzo; Harris, Jérémie; Gazzadi, Gian Carlo; Balboni, Roberto; Mafakheri, Erfan; Dennis, Mark R.; Frabboni, Stefano; Boyd, Robert W.; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    We report a systematic treatment of the holographic generation of electron Bessel beams, with a view to applications in electron microscopy. We describe in detail the theory underlying hologram patterning, as well as the actual electron-optical configuration used experimentally. We show that by optimizing our nanofabrication recipe, electron Bessel beams can be generated with relative efficiencies reaching 37±3%. We also demonstrate by tuning various hologram parameters that electron Bessel beams can be produced with many visible rings, making them ideal for interferometric applications, or in more highly localized forms with fewer rings, more suitable for imaging. We describe the settings required to tune beam localization in this way, and explore beam and hologram configurations that allow the convergences and topological charges of electron Bessel beams to be controlled. We also characterize the phase structure of the Bessel beams generated with our technique, using a simulation procedure that accounts for imperfections in the hologram manufacturing process. - Highlights: • Bessel beams with different convergence, topological charge, visible fringes are demonstrated. • The relation between the Fresnel hologram and the probe shape is explained by detailed calculations and experiments. • Among the holograms here presented the highest relative efficiency is 37%, the best result ever reached for blazed holograms.

  3. Field-free molecular alignment probed by the free electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsson, P; Rouzee, A; Siu, W; Huismans, Y; Vrakking, M J J [FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics (AMOLF), Science Park 113, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lepine, F [Universite Lyon 1, CNRS, LASIM, UMR 5579, 43 bvd. du 11 novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Marchenko, T [Laboratoire d' Optique Applique, ENSTA/Ecole Polytechnique, Chemin de la Huniere, 91761 Palaiseau (France); Duesterer, S; Tavella, F; Stojanovic, N; Azima, A; Treusch, R [Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor (HASYLAB) at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Kling, M F [Max-Planck Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: per.johnsson@fysik.lth.se

    2009-07-14

    High flux extreme ultraviolet (XUV) sources like the free electron laser (FEL) in Hamburg (FLASH) offer the possibility of diffractive imaging of small objects. Irrespective of whether the diffraction is based on the detection of photons or photoelectrons, it is required that the measurement is done in the reference frame of the molecule meaning that, for a sample of several molecules, it is necessary to pre-align the molecules in the sample. As a step towards performing molecular frame diffraction experiments, we report experiments on field-free molecular alignment performed at FLASH. The impulsive alignment induced by a 100 fs near-infrared laser pulse in a rotationally cold CO{sub 2} sample is characterized by ionizing and dissociating the molecules with a time-delayed XUV-FEL pulse. The time-dependent angular distributions of ionic fragments measured by a velocity map imaging spectrometer exhibit rapid changes associated with the induced rotational dynamics. The experimental results show hints of a dissociation process that depends nonlinearly on the XUV intensity.

  4. Label-free all-electronic biosensing in microfluidic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Michael A.

    Label-free, all-electronic detection techniques offer great promise for advancements in medical and biological analysis. Electrical sensing can be used to measure both interfacial and bulk impedance changes in conducting solutions. Electronic sensors produced using standard microfabrication processes are easily integrated into microfluidic systems. Combined with the sensitivity of radiofrequency electrical measurements, this approach offers significant advantages over competing biological sensing methods. Scalable fabrication methods also provide a means of bypassing the prohibitive costs and infrastructure associated with current technologies. We describe the design, development and use of a radiofrequency reflectometer integrated into a microfluidic system towards the specific detection of biologically relevant materials. We developed a detection protocol based on impedimetric changes caused by the binding of antibody/antigen pairs to the sensing region. Here we report the surface chemistry that forms the necessary capture mechanism. Gold-thiol binding was utilized to create an ordered alkane monolayer on the sensor surface. Exposed functional groups target the N-terminus, affixing a protein to the monolayer. The general applicability of this method lends itself to a wide variety of proteins. To demonstrate specificity, commercially available mouse anti- Streptococcus Pneumoniae monoclonal antibody was used to target the full-length recombinant pneumococcal surface protein A, type 2 strain D39 expressed by Streptococcus Pneumoniae. We demonstrate the RF response of the sensor to both the presence of the surface decoration and bound SPn cells in a 1x phosphate buffered saline solution. The combined microfluidic sensor represents a powerful platform for the analysis and detection of cells and biomolecules.

  5. Pulsed electron beam generation with fast repetitive double pulse system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Surender Kumar; Deb, Pankaj; Shyam, Anurag, E-mail: surender80@gmail.com [Energetics and Electromagnetics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Visakhapatnam (India); Sharma, Archana [Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2014-07-01

    Longer duration high voltage pulse (∼ 100 kV, 260 ns) is generated and reported using helical pulse forming line in compact geometry. The transmission line characteristics of the helical pulse forming line are also used to develop fast repetition double pulse system with very short inter pulse interval. It overcomes the limitations caused due to circuit parameters, power supplies and load characteristics for fast repetitive high voltage pulse generation. The high voltage double pulse of 100 kV, 100 ns with an inter pulse repetition interval of 30 ns is applied across the vacuum field emission diode for pulsed electron beam generation. The electron beam is generated from cathode material by application of negative high voltage (> 100 kV) across the diode by explosive electron emission process. The vacuum field emission diode is made of 40 mm diameter graphite cathode and SS mesh anode. The anode cathode gap was 6 mm and the drift tube diameter was 10 cm. The initial experimental results of pulsed electron beam generation with fast repetitive double pulse system are reported and discussed. (author)

  6. Free-piston linear generator and the development of a solid lubrication system

    OpenAIRE

    Virsik, Roman; Rinderknecht, Frank; Friedrich, Horst E.

    2017-01-01

    The free piston linear generator is a new electromechanical generator. It converts chemical energy into electrical energy by means of a combustion process, a linear generator and a gas spring. The free piston linear generator doesn´t use any crankshaft, which is responsible for a lot of losses. Thereby the technology aims to have better properties than other electromechanical generators: higher efficiency over wide range of operating points, better noise-vibration-harshness, package … This pu...

  7. Generation of broadband electrostatic noise by electron acoustic solitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubouloz, N.; Pottelette, R.; Malingre, M.; Treumann, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    Broadband electrostatic noise (BEN) bursts whose amplitude sometimes reaches about 100 mV m -1 have been observed by the Viking satellite in the dayside auroral zone. These emissions have been shown to be greatly influenced by nonlinear effects and to occur simultaneously with the observation of particle distributions favouring the destabilization of the electron acoustic mode. It is shown that electron acoustic solitons passing by the satellite would generate spectra that can explain the high-frequency part of BEN, above the electron plasma frequency

  8. Optical plasma torch electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wittig

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel, flexible method of witness electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators is described. A quasistationary plasma region is ignited by a focused laser pulse prior to the arrival of the plasma wave. This localized, shapeable optical plasma torch causes a strong distortion of the plasma blowout during passage of the electron driver bunch, leading to collective alteration of plasma electron trajectories and to controlled injection. This optically steered injection is more flexible and faster when compared to hydrodynamically controlled gas density transition injection methods.

  9. Generation of valley-polarized electron beam in bilayer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Changsoo

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method to produce valley-polarized electron beams using a bilayer graphene npn junction. By analyzing the transmission properties of electrons through the junction with zigzag interface in the presence of trigonal warping, we observe that there exist a range of incident energies and barrier heights in which transmitted electrons are well polarized and collimated. From this observation and by performing numerical simulations, it is demonstrated that valley-dependent electronic currents with nearly perfect polarization can be generated. We also show that the peak-to-peak separation angle between the polarized currents is tunable either by incident energy or by barrier height each of which is controlled by using top and back gate voltages. The results can be used for constructing an electron beam splitter to produce valley-polarized currents

  10. Generation of valley-polarized electron beam in bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Changsoo

    2015-12-01

    We propose a method to produce valley-polarized electron beams using a bilayer graphene npn junction. By analyzing the transmission properties of electrons through the junction with zigzag interface in the presence of trigonal warping, we observe that there exist a range of incident energies and barrier heights in which transmitted electrons are well polarized and collimated. From this observation and by performing numerical simulations, it is demonstrated that valley-dependent electronic currents with nearly perfect polarization can be generated. We also show that the peak-to-peak separation angle between the polarized currents is tunable either by incident energy or by barrier height each of which is controlled by using top and back gate voltages. The results can be used for constructing an electron beam splitter to produce valley-polarized currents.

  11. Marangoni Convection during Free Electron Laser Nitriding of Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höche, Daniel; Müller, Sven; Rapin, Gerd; Shinn, Michelle; Remdt, Elvira; Gubisch, Maik; Schaaf, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Pure titanium was treated by free electron laser (FEL) radiation in a nitrogen atmosphere. As a result, nitrogen diffusion occurs and a TiN coating was synthesized. Local gradients of interfacial tension due to the local heating lead to a Marangoni convection, which determines the track properties. Because of the experimental inaccessibility of time-dependent occurrences, finite element calculations were performed, to determine the physical processes such as heat transfer, melt flow, and mass transport. In order to calculate the surface deformation of the gas-liquid interface, the level set approach was used. The equations were modified and coupled with heat-transfer and diffusion equations. The process was characterized by dimensionless numbers such as the Reynolds, Peclet, and capillary numbers, to obtain more information about the acting forces and the coating development. Moreover, the nitrogen distribution was calculated using the corresponding transport equation. The simulations were compared with cross-sectional micrographs of the treated titanium sheets and checked for their validity. Finally, the process presented is discussed and compared with similar laser treatments.

  12. A microwave FEL [free electron laser] code using waveguide modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byers, J.A.; Cohen, R.H.

    1987-08-01

    A free electron laser code, GFEL, is being developed for application to the LLNL tokamak current drive experiment, MTX. This single frequency code solves for the slowly varying complex field amplitude using the usual wiggler-averaged equations of existing codes, in particular FRED, except that it describes the fields by a 2D expansion in the rectangular waveguide modes, using coupling coefficients similar to those developed by Wurtele, which include effects of spatial variations in the fields seen by the wiggler motion of the particles. Our coefficients differ from those of Wurtele in two respects. First, we have found a missing √2γ/a/sub w/ factor in his C/sub z/; when corrected this increases the effect of the E/sub z/ field component and this in turn reduces the amplitude of the TM mode. Second, we have consistently retained all terms of second order in the wiggle amplitude. Both corrections are necessary for accurate computation. GFEL has the capability of following the TE/sub 0n/ and TE(M)/sub m1/ modes simultaneously. GFEL produces results nearly identical to those from FRED if the coupling coefficients are adjusted to equal those implied by the algorithm in FRED. Normally, the two codes produce results that are similar but different in detail due to the different treatment of modes higher than TE/sub 01/. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  13. Free electron laser and coherent radiation. Working group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gover, A.; Csonka, P.; Deacon, D.

    1984-01-01

    The planned development of a new storage ring at SSRL gives hope for the exciting possibility that an x-ray laser may become available in a users facility. Such a device would certainly be a unique and revolutionary tool for scientific research and industrial applications, which may take advantage of the spatial and temporal coherence, high power and high brightness of this device in a wavelength regime where no alternative coherent radiation sources exist. The feasibility of implementing such a device in the new ring should be examined carefully by the ring designers. If conclusions are positive, the ring design should take into account the special requirements which are set by the x-ray laser design parameters. Our working group made the first step in this examination process. Most of the emphasis was put on the consideration of an X-Ray Free Electron Laser (XR FEL). FEL technology has developed in the last few years and was recently demonstrated to operate successfully in the visible wavelength regime in the ACO storage ring in Orsay

  14. Reflection of attosecond x-ray free electron laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Chapman, Henry N.

    2007-01-01

    In order to utilize hard x-ray free electron lasers (XFEL's) when they are extended to attosecond pulse lengths, it is necessary to choose optical elements with minimal response time. Specular grazing-incidence optics made of low-Z materials are popular candidates for reflectors since they are likely to withstand x-ray damage and provide sufficiently large reflectivities. Using linear-optics reflection theory, we calculated the transient reflectivity of a delta-function electric pulse from a homogenous semi-infinite medium as a function of angle of incidence for s- and p-polarized light. We specifically considered the pulse response of beryllium, diamond, silicon carbide, and silicon, all of which are of relevance to the XFEL's that are currently being built. We found that the media emit energy in a damped oscillatory way, and that the impulse-response times are shorter than 0.3 fs for normal incidence. For grazing incidence, the impulse-response time is substantially shorter, making grazing-incidence mirrors a good choice for deep subfemtosecond reflective optics

  15. Achieving few-femtosecond time-sorting at hard X-ray free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmand, M.; Coffee, R.; Bionta, M. R.; Chollet, M.; French, D.; Zhu, D.; Fritz, D. M.; Lemke, H. T.; Medvedev, N.; Ziaja, B.; Toleikis, S.; Cammarata, M.

    2013-03-01

    Recently, few-femtosecond pulses have become available at hard X-ray free-electron lasers. Coupled with the available sub-10 fs optical pulses, investigations into few-femtosecond dynamics are not far off. However, achieving sufficient synchronization between optical lasers and X-ray pulses continues to be challenging. We report a `measure-and-sort' approach, which achieves sub-10 fs root-mean-squared (r.m.s.) error measurement at hard X-ray FELs, far beyond the 100-200 fs r.m.s. jitter limitations. This timing diagnostic, now routinely available at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), is based on ultrafast free-carrier generation in optically transparent materials. Correlation between two independent measurements enables unambiguous demonstration of ~6 fs r.m.s. error in reporting the optical/X-ray delay, with single shot error suggesting the possibility of reaching few-femtosecond resolution.

  16. Free radical scavenging activities of yellow gentian (Gentiana lutea L.) measured by electron spin resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusar, A; Zupancic, A; Sentjurc, M; Baricevic, D

    2006-10-01

    Yellow gentian (Gentiana lutea L.) is a herbal species with a long-term use in traditional medicine due to its digestive and stomachic properties. This paper presents an investigation of the free radical scavenging activity of methanolic extracts of yellow gentian leaves and roots in two different systems using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry. Assays were based on the stable free radical 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and the superoxide radicals (O2*-) generated by the xanthine/xanthine oxidase (X/XO) system. The results of gentian methanolic extracts were compared with the antioxidant capacity of synthetic antioxidant butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA). This study proves that yellow gentian leaves and roots exhibit considerable antioxidant properties, expressed either by their capability to scavenge DPPH or superoxide radicals.

  17. Three-dimensional simulation of thermal harmonic lasing free electron laser with detuning of the fundamental

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, E.; Maraghechi, B.; Mirian, N. S.

    2016-03-01

    Detuning of the fundamental is a way to enhance harmonic generation. By this method, the wiggler is composed of two segments in such a way that the fundamental resonance of the second segment to coincide with the third harmonic of the first segment of the wiggler to generate extreme ultraviolet radiation and x-ray emission. A set of coupled, nonlinear, and first-order differential equations in three dimensions describing the evolution of the electron trajectories and the radiation field with warm beam is solved numerically by CYRUS 3D code in the steady-state for two models (1) seeded free electron laser (FEL) and (2) shot noise on the electron beam (self-amplified spontaneous emission FEL). Thermal effects in the form of longitudinal velocity spread are considered. Three-dimensional simulation describes self-consistently the longitudinal spatial dependence of radiation waists, curvatures, and amplitudes together with the evaluation of the electron beam. The evolutions of the transverse modes are investigated for the fundamental resonance and the third harmonic. Also, the effective modes of the third harmonic are studied. In this paper, we found that detuning of the fundamental with shot noise gives more optimistic result than the seeded FEL.

  18. Three-dimensional simulation of thermal harmonic lasing free electron laser with detuning of the fundamental

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehi, E.; Maraghechi, B.; Mirian, N. S.

    2016-01-01

    Detuning of the fundamental is a way to enhance harmonic generation. By this method, the wiggler is composed of two segments in such a way that the fundamental resonance of the second segment to coincide with the third harmonic of the first segment of the wiggler to generate extreme ultraviolet radiation and x-ray emission. A set of coupled, nonlinear, and first-order differential equations in three dimensions describing the evolution of the electron trajectories and the radiation field with warm beam is solved numerically by CYRUS 3D code in the steady-state for two models (1) seeded free electron laser (FEL) and (2) shot noise on the electron beam (self-amplified spontaneous emission FEL). Thermal effects in the form of longitudinal velocity spread are considered. Three-dimensional simulation describes self-consistently the longitudinal spatial dependence of radiation waists, curvatures, and amplitudes together with the evaluation of the electron beam. The evolutions of the transverse modes are investigated for the fundamental resonance and the third harmonic. Also, the effective modes of the third harmonic are studied. In this paper, we found that detuning of the fundamental with shot noise gives more optimistic result than the seeded FEL.

  19. Three-dimensional simulation of thermal harmonic lasing free electron laser with detuning of the fundamental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salehi, E. [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, 15875-4413 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Maraghechi, B., E-mail: behrouz@aut.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, 15875-4413 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Particle and Accelerator Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), 19395-5531 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirian, N. S. [School of Particle and Accelerator Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), 19395-5531 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); UVSOR Facility (UVSOR), Institute for Molecular Science, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    Detuning of the fundamental is a way to enhance harmonic generation. By this method, the wiggler is composed of two segments in such a way that the fundamental resonance of the second segment to coincide with the third harmonic of the first segment of the wiggler to generate extreme ultraviolet radiation and x-ray emission. A set of coupled, nonlinear, and first-order differential equations in three dimensions describing the evolution of the electron trajectories and the radiation field with warm beam is solved numerically by CYRUS 3D code in the steady-state for two models (1) seeded free electron laser (FEL) and (2) shot noise on the electron beam (self-amplified spontaneous emission FEL). Thermal effects in the form of longitudinal velocity spread are considered. Three-dimensional simulation describes self-consistently the longitudinal spatial dependence of radiation waists, curvatures, and amplitudes together with the evaluation of the electron beam. The evolutions of the transverse modes are investigated for the fundamental resonance and the third harmonic. Also, the effective modes of the third harmonic are studied. In this paper, we found that detuning of the fundamental with shot noise gives more optimistic result than the seeded FEL.

  20. Self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser devices and nonideal electron beam transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Lazzarino

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We have developed, at the SPARC test facility, a procedure for a real time self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser (FEL device performance control. We describe an actual FEL, including electron and optical beam transport, through a set of analytical formulas, allowing a fast and reliable on-line “simulation” of the experiment. The system is designed in such a way that the characteristics of the transport elements and the laser intensity are measured and adjusted, via a real time computation, during the experimental run, to obtain an on-line feedback of the laser performances. The detail of the procedure and the relevant experimental results are discussed.

  1. Basic design considerations for free-electron lasers driven by electron beams from RF accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gover, A.; Freund, H.; Granatstein, V. L.; McAdoo, J. H.; Tang, C.-M.

    A design procedure and design criteria are derived for free-electron lasers driven by electron beams from RF accelerators. The procedure and criteria permit an estimate of the oscillation-buildup time and the laser output power of various FEL schemes: with waveguide resonator or open resonator, with initial seed-radiation injection or with spontaneous-emission radiation source, with a linear wiggler or with a helical wiggler. Expressions are derived for computing the various FEL parameters, allowing for the design and optimization of the FEL operational characteristics under ideal conditions or with nonideal design parameters that may be limited by technological or practical constraints. The design procedure enables one to derive engineering curves and scaling laws for the FEL operating parameters. This can be done most conveniently with a computer program based on flowcharts given in the appendices.

  2. Generation of attosecond electron packets via conical surface plasmon electron acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, S. R.; Elezzabi, A. Y.

    2016-01-01

    We present a method for the generation of high kinetic energy attosecond electron packets via magnetostatic and aperture filtering of conical surface plasmon (SP) accelerated electrons. The conical SP waves are excited by coupling an ultrafast radially polarized laser beam to a conical silica lens coated with an Ag film. Electromagnetic and particle tracking models are employed to characterize the ultrafast electron packets. PMID:26764129

  3. Study of runaway electron generation during major disruptions in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plyusnin, V.V.; Riccardo, V.; Jaspers, R.; Alper, B.; Kiptily, V.G.; Mlynar, J.; Popovichev, S.; Luna, E. de La; Andersson, F.

    2006-01-01

    Extensive analysis of disruptions in JET has helped advance the understanding of trends of disruption-generated runaway electrons. Tomographic reconstruction of the soft x-ray emission has made possible a detailed observation of the magnetic flux geometry evolution during disruptions. With the aid of soft and hard x-ray diagnostics runaway electrons have been detected at the very beginning of disruptions. A study of runaway electron parameters has shown that an approximate upper bound for the conversion efficiency of pre-disruptive plasma currents into runaways is about 60% over a wide range of plasma currents in JET. Runaway generation has been simulated with a test particle model in order to verify the results of experimental data analysis and to obtain the background for extrapolation of the existing results onto larger devices such as ITER. It was found that close agreement between the modelling results and experimental data could be achieved if in the calculations the post-disruption plasma electron temperature was assumed equal to 10 eV and if the plasma column geometry evolution is taken into account in calculations. The experimental trends and numerical simulations show that runaway electrons are a critical issue for ITER and, therefore, the development of mitigation methods, which suppress runaway generation, is an essential task

  4. The effects of nuclear power generators upon electronic instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C. G.; Truscello, V. C.

    1970-01-01

    Radiation sensitivity of electronic instruments susceptible to neutron and gamma radiation is evaluated by means of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator /RTG/. The gamma field of the RTG affects instrument operation and requires shielding, the neutron field does not affect operation via secondary capture-gamma production.

  5. Power Electronics for the Next Generation Wind Turbine System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke

    This book presents recent studies on the power electronics used for the next generation wind turbine system. Some criteria and tools for evaluating and improving the critical performances of the wind power converters have been proposed and established. The book addresses some emerging problems...

  6. Intense relativistic electron beam generation from KALI-5000 pulse accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, A.; Mondal, J.; Mitra, S.; Durga Praveen Kumar, D.; Sharma, Archana; Nagesh, K.V.; Chakravarthy, D.P.

    2006-01-01

    Intense Relativistic Electron Beam (IREB) with parameters 420 keV, 22 kA, 100 ns has been generated from indigenously developed pulse power system KALI- 5000. High current electron beam is generated from explosive field emission graphite cathodes. Studies have been conducted by changing the diameter of graphite cathode and also the anode cathode gap. In order to avoid prepulse effect it was concluded that anode cathode (AK) gap should be kept larger than estimated by the Child Langmuir relation. Beam voltage has been measured by a copper sulphate voltage divider, beam current by a self integrating Rogowski coil and B-dot probe. Electron beam diode Impedance and Perveance were obtained from the experimentally measured beam voltage and current. (author)

  7. Alignment of Duke free electron laser storage ring and optical beam delivery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emamian, M.; Hower, N.

    1999-01-01

    Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory (DFELL) hosts a 1.1 GeV electron beam storage ring facility which is capable of generating beams in the range of nearly monochromatic gamma rays to high peak power infra red (IR) laser. In this report specifications and procedures for alignment of OK-4 /Duke storage ring FEL wiggler and optical cavity mirrors will be discussed. The OK-4 FEL lasing has demonstrated a series of world record in the last few years. In August of this year the OK-4 FEL successfully commissioned to laser at 193.7 nm. Also in this article, alignment of the γ-ray and UV optical beam delivery system that is currently in progress will be described. (authors)

  8. Generation of static magnetic fields by a test charge in a plasma with anisotropic electron temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliev, Yu.M.; Bychenkov, V.Yu.; Frolov, A.A. (AN SSSR, Moscow. Fizicheskij Inst.)

    Structure of electomagnetic field generated with a charge in a plasma with anisotropic electron temperature has been studied. Unlike a hydrodynamical approach to study on the magnetic field qeneration with a test charge a kinetic theory describing spatial distribution of both magnetic and electrostatic components of charge field was constructed. Such theory results permit to investigate the charge field structure both at distances larger than length of free electron path and not exceeding it. The developed theory can serve as the basis for development of new methods for anisotropic plasma diagnostics.

  9. Three-dimensional simulations of an XUV free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, J.C.; McVey, B.D.; Newnam, B.E.

    1985-01-01

    Operation of free-electron lasers (FEL) at long optical wavelengths (greater than or equal to 600 nm) has now been successfully demonstrated at several laboratories. To operate an FEL at shorter wavelengths imposes constraints on the brightness of the electron beam which are difficult to achieve. Until recently, it was perceived that only an electron storage ring could satisfy these beam requirements. However, our previous 1-D theoretical calculations revealed that modest improvements in the emittance available from rf-linear accelerators would be sufficient to allow operation of an FEL in the XUV spectral range (greater than or equal to 50 nm). We shall present new theoretical results for the design of a linac-driven XUV FEL derived from an improved simulation model. The model is fully three-dimensional in its treatment of the undulator magnetic field, the optical radiation field, and the motion of electrons in a finite-emittance beam. Furthermore, the model computes self-consistently the motion of the electrons and the amplification, diffraction, and the refraction of the light within the undulator magnet. Propagation of the optical beam and reflection at the mirrors of the optical resonator are incorporated in the model so that a complete laser oscillator solution can be generated. The computed performance parameters of a particular XUV FEL oscillator design will be compared with the output of synchrotron radiation sources. 26 refs., 8 figs

  10. Multicascade X-Ray Free-Electron Laser with Harmonic Multiplier and Two-Frequency Undulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukovsky, K. V.

    2018-06-01

    The feasibility of generation of powerful x-ray radiation by a cascade free-electron laser (FEL) with amplification of higher harmonics using a two-frequency undulator is studied. To analyze the FEL operation, a complex phenomenological single-pass FEL model is developed and used. It describes linear and nonlinear generation of harmonics in the FEL with seed laser that takes into account initial electron beam noise and describes all main losses of each harmonic in each FEL cascade. The model is also calibrated against and approved by the experimental FEL data and available results of three-dimensional numerical simulation. The electron beam in the undulator is assumed to be matched and focused, and the dynamics of power in the singlepass FEL with cascade harmonic multipliers is investigated to obtain x-ray laser radiation in the FEL having the shortest length, beam energy, and frequency of the seed laser as low as possible. In this context, the advantages of the two-frequency undulator used for generation of harmonics are demonstrated. The evolution of harmonics in a multicascade FEL with multiplication of harmonics is investigated. The operation of the cascade FEL at the wavelength λ = 1.14 nm, generating 30 MW already on 38 m with the seed laser operating at a wavelength of 11.43 nm corresponding to the maximal reflectivity of the multilayered mirror MoRu/Be coating is investigated. In addition, the operation of the multicascade FEL with accessible seed UVlaser operating at a wavelength of 157 nm (F2 excimer UV-laser) and electron beam with energy of 0.5 GeV is investigated. X-ray radiation simulated in it at the wavelength λ 3.9 nm reaches power of 50 MW already at 27 m, which is by two orders of magnitude shorter than 3.4 km of the x-ray FEL recently put into operation in Europe.

  11. Power Electronics for the Next Generation Wind Turbine System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke

    generation unit, are becoming crucial in the wind turbine system. The objective of this project is to study the power electronics technology used for the next generation wind turbines. Some emerging challenges as well as potentials like the cost of energy and reliability are going to be addressed. First...... conversion is pushed to multi-MW level with high power density requirement. It has also been revealed that thermal stress in the power semiconductors is closely related to many determining factors in the wind power application like the reliability, cost, power density, etc. therefore it is an important......The wind power generation has been steadily growing both for the total installed capacity and for the individual turbine size. Due to much more significant impacts to the power grid, the power electronics, which can change the behavior of wind turbines from an unregulated power source to an active...

  12. Impact of electron-electron Coulomb interaction on the high harmonic generation process in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avetissian, H. K.; Mkrtchian, G. F.

    2018-03-01

    Generation of high harmonics in a monolayer graphene initiated by a strong coherent radiation field, taking into account electron-electron Coulomb interaction, is investigated. A microscopic theory describing the nonlinear optical response of graphene is developed. The Coulomb interaction of electrons is treated in the scope of dynamic Hartree-Fock approximation. The closed set of integrodifferential equations for the single-particle density matrix of a graphene quantum structure is solved numerically. The obtained solutions show the significance of many-body Coulomb interaction on the high harmonic generation process in graphene.

  13. Theory and simulation of an inverse free-electron laser experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, S. K.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Fang, J.-M.; Marshall, T. C.

    1997-03-01

    An experimental demonstration of the acceleration of electrons using a high-power CO2 laser interacting with a relativistic electron beam moving along a wiggler has been carried out at the Accelerator Test Facility of the Brookhaven National Laboratory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 2690 (1996)]. The data generated by this inverse free-electron-laser (IFEL) experiment are studied by means of theory and simulation. Included in the simulations are such effects as: a low-loss metallic waveguide with a dielectric coating on the walls; multi-mode coupling due to self-consistent interaction between the electrons and the optical wave; space charge; energy spread of the electrons; and arbitrary wiggler-field profile. Two types of wiggler profile are considered: a linear taper of the period, and a step-taper of the period. (The period of the wiggler is ˜3 cm, its magnetic field is ˜1 T, and the wiggler length is 0.47 m.) The energy increment of the electrons (˜1-2%) is analyzed in detail as a function of laser power, wiggler parameters, and the initial beam energy (˜40 MeV). At a laser power level ˜0.5 Gw, the simulation results on energy gain are in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. Preliminary results on the electron energy distribution at the end of the IFEL are presented. Whereas the experiment produces a near-monotone distribution of electron energies with the peak shifted to higher energy, the simulation shows a more structured and non-monotonic distribution at the end of the wiggler. Effects that may help reconcile these differences are considered.

  14. FELIX: A proposal for a free electron laser experiment at Daresbury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Although the Stanford Group has clearly demonstrated the feasibility of the free electron laser (of the type working in the low current density regime), and a great deal of theoretical work has been done before and since that time, there is still very little experimental data on such devices and very little practical experience. One of the reasons for this is the cost of suitable electron beam sources. At Daresbury the NINA injector linac is in store and could be recommissioned at much less than the cost of a new machine. It is believed that there is a scientific case for infra-red sources of the FEL type, because of their high power and tunability and that they would complement a synchrotron radiation source which provides intense VUV and X-ray beams. FELIX is a free electron laser experiment using the NINA linac with an output tunable over the range 57-150 μm, proposed as a project to produce experimental data on FEL characteristics and provide practical experience which could lead to a new generation of infra-red sources. The paper will describe a design study which has been carried out and is presently under consideration by the Science Research Council. (orig.)

  15. Electron-positron plasma generation in a pulsar magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurevich, A.V.; Istomin, Ya.N.

    1985-01-01

    The generation of an electron-positron plasma in vacuum (vacuum ''breakdown'') in the presence of an inhomogeneous electric field and strong curvilinear magnetic field is considered. A situation of this type may occur in the magnetosphere of a rotating neutron star. A general set of kinetic equations for electrons, positrons and γ quanta in a curvilinear magnetic field is derived by taking into account electron-positron pair production and emission of curvicur and synchrotron photons. The conditions for appearance of ''breakdown'' are determined and the threshold value of the elec tric field discontinuity at the surface of the star is found. Multiplication of particles in the magnetosphere is investigated and the electron, positron and γ quantum distribution functions are found. The extinction limit of pulsars is determined. The theory is shown to be in accordance with the observation results

  16. Modelling hot electron generation in short pulse target heating experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sircombe N.J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Target heating experiments planned for the Orion laser facility, and electron beam driven fast ignition schemes, rely on the interaction of a short pulse high intensity laser with dense material to generate a flux of energetic electrons. It is essential that the characteristics of this electron source are well known in order to inform transport models in radiation hydrodynamics codes and allow effective evaluation of experimental results and forward modelling of future campaigns. We present results obtained with the particle in cell (PIC code EPOCH for realistic target and laser parameters, including first and second harmonic light. The hot electron distributions are characterised and their implications for onward transport and target heating are considered with the aid of the Monte-Carlo transport code THOR.

  17. Generation of runaway electron beams in high-pressure nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Burachenko, A. G.; Baksht, E. Kh

    2017-07-01

    In this paper the results of experimental studies of the amplitude-temporal characteristics of a runaway electron beam, as well as breakdown voltage in nitrogen are presented. The voltage pulses with the amplitude in incident wave ≈120 kV and the rise time of ≈0.3 ns was used. The supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) was detected by a collector behind the flat anode. The amplitude-time characteristics of the voltage and SAEB current were studied with subnanosecond time resolution. The maximum pressure at which a SAEB is detectable by collector was ∼1 MPa. This pressure increases with decreasing the voltage rise time. The waveforms of the discharge and runaway electron beam currents was synchronized with the voltage pulses. The mechanism of the runaway electron generation in atmospheric-pressure gases is analyzed on the basis of the obtained experimental data.

  18. Improvement of the quality of laser-wakefield accelerators: towards a compact free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehe, R.

    2014-01-01

    When an intense and short laser pulse propagates through an underdense gas, it can accelerate a fraction of the electrons of the gas, and thereby generate an electron bunch with an energy of a few hundreds of MeV. This phenomenon, which is referred to as laser-wakefield acceleration, has many potential applications, including the design of ultra-bright X-ray sources known as free electron lasers (FEL). However, these applications require the electron bunch to have an excellent quality (low divergence, emittance and energy spread). In this thesis, different solutions to improve the quality of the electron bunch are developed, both analytically and through the use of Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations. It is first shown however that PIC simulations tend to erroneously overestimate the emittance of the bunch, due to the numerical Cherenkov effect. Thus, in order to correctly estimate the emittance, a modified PIC algorithm is proposed, which is not subject to this unphysical Cherenkov effect. Using this algorithm, we have observed and studied a new mechanism to generate the electron bunch: optical transverse injection. This mechanism can produce bunches with a high charge, a low emittance and a low energy spread. In addition, we also proposed an experimental setup - the laser-plasma lens - which can strongly reduce the final divergence of the bunch. Finally, these results are put into context by discussing the properties required for the design of a compact FEL. It is shown in particular that laser-wakefield accelerator could be advantageously combined with innovative laser-plasma undulators, in order to produce bright X-rays sources. (author)

  19. An optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier for seeding high repetition rate free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Höppner, H; Hage, A; Tanikawa, T; Schulz, M; Faatz, B; Riedel, R; Prandolini, M J; Teubner, U; Tavella, F

    2015-01-01

    High repetition rate free-electron lasers (FEL), producing highly intense extreme ultraviolet and x-ray pulses, require new high power tunable femtosecond lasers for FEL seeding and FEL pump-probe experiments. A tunable, 112 W (burst mode) optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier (OPCPA) is demonstrated with center frequencies ranging from 720–900 nm, pulse energies up to 1.12 mJ and a pulse duration of 30 fs at a repetition rate of 100 kHz. Since the power scalability of this OPCPA is limited by the OPCPA-pump amplifier, we also demonstrate a 6.7–13.7 kW (burst mode) thin-disk OPCPA-pump amplifier, increasing the possible OPCPA output power to many hundreds of watts. Furthermore, third and fourth harmonic generation experiments are performed and the results are used to simulate a seeded FEL with high-gain harmonic generation. (paper)

  20. Three-dimensional analysis of free-electron laser performance using brightness scaled variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gullans

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional analysis of radiation generation in a free-electron laser (FEL is performed in the small signal regime. The analysis includes beam conditioning, harmonic generation, flat beams, and a new scaling of the FEL equations using the six-dimensional beam brightness. The six-dimensional beam brightness is an invariant under Liouvillian flow; therefore, any nondissipative manipulation of the phase space, performed, for example, in order to optimize FEL performance, must conserve this brightness. This scaling is more natural than the commonly used scaling with the one-dimensional growth rate. The brightness-scaled equations allow for the succinct characterization of the optimal FEL performance under various additional constraints. The analysis allows for the simple evaluation of gain enhancement schemes based on beam phase space manipulations such as emittance exchange and conditioning. An example comparing the gain in the first and third harmonics of round or flat and conditioned or unconditioned beams is presented.

  1. User-Generated Free-Form Gestures for Authentication: Security and Memorability

    OpenAIRE

    Sherman, Michael; Clark, Gradeigh; Yang, Yulong; Sugrim, Shridatt; Modig, Arttu; Lindqvist, Janne; Oulasvirta, Antti; Roos, Teemu

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies the security and memorability of free-form multitouch gestures for mobile authentication. Towards this end, we collected a dataset with a generate-test-retest paradigm where participants (N=63) generated free-form gestures, repeated them, and were later retested for memory. Half of the participants decided to generate one-finger gestures, and the other half generated multi-finger gestures. Although there has been recent work on template-based gestures, there are yet no metr...

  2. Study of beam transverse properties of a thermionic electron gun for application to a compact THz free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Tongning; Qin, Bin; Tan, Ping; Chen, Qushan; Yang, Lei; Pei, Yuanji; Li, Ji

    2014-01-01

    A novel thermionic electron gun adopted for use in a high power THz free electron laser (FEL) is proposed in this paper. By optimization of the structural and radiofrequency (RF) parameters, the physical design of the gun is performed using dynamic calculations. Velocity bunching is used to minimize the bunch's energy spread, and the dynamic calculation results indicate that high quality beams can be provided. The transverse properties of the beams generated by the gun are also analyzed. The novel RF focusing effects of the resonance cavity are investigated precisely and are used to establish emittance compensation, which enables the injector length to be reduced. In addition, the causes of the extrema of the beam radius and the normalized transverse emittance are analyzed and interpreted, respectively, and slice simulations are performed to illustrate how the RF focusing varies along the bunch length and to determine the effects of that variation on the emittance compensation. Finally, by observation of the variations of the beam properties in the drift tube behind the electron gun, prospective assembly scenarios for the complete THz-FEL injector are discussed, and a joint-debugging process for the injector is implemented

  3. Indoor Fast Neutron Generator for Biophysical and Electronic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannuli, A.; Caccamo, M. T.; Marchese, N.; Tomarchio, E. A.; Pace, C.; Magazù, S.

    2018-05-01

    This study focuses the attention on an indoor fast neutron generator for biophysical and electronic applications. More specifically, the findings obtained by several simulations with the MCNP Monte Carlo code, necessary for the realization of a shield for indoor measurements, are presented. Furthermore, an evaluation of the neutron spectrum modification caused by the shielding is reported. Fast neutron generators are a valid and interesting available source of neutrons, increasingly employed in a wide range of research fields, such as science and engineering. The employed portable pulsed neutron source is a MP320 Thermo Scientific neutron generator, able to generate 2.5 MeV neutrons with a neutron yield of 2.0 x 106 n/s, a pulse rate of 250 Hz to 20 KHz and a duty factor varying from 5% to 100%. The neutron generator, based on Deuterium-Deuterium nuclear fusion reactions, is employed in conjunction with a solid-state photon detector, made of n-type high-purity germanium (PINS-GMX by ORTEC) and it is mainly addressed to biophysical and electronic studies. The present study showed a proposal for the realization of a shield necessary for indoor applications for MP320 neutron generator, with a particular analysis of the transport of neutrons simulated with Monte Carlo code and described the two main lines of research in which the source will be used.

  4. Generation of subnanosecond electron beams in air at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyrya, I. D.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Rybka, D. V.

    2009-11-01

    Optimum conditions for the generation of runaway electron beams with maximum current amplitudes and densities in nanosecond pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure are determined. A supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) with a current amplitude of ˜30 A, a current density of ˜20 A/cm2, and a pulse full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ˜100 ps has been observed behind the output foil of an air-filled diode. It is shown that the position of the SAEB current maximum relative to the voltage pulse front exhibits a time shift that varies when the small-size collector is moved over the foil surface.

  5. Magnetic Field Generation and Electron Acceleration in Relativistic Laser Channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostyukov, I.Yu.; Shvets, G.; Fisch, N.J.; Rax, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    The interaction between energetic electrons and a circularly polarized laser pulse inside an ion channel is studied. Laser radiation can be resonantly absorbed by electrons executing betatron oscillations in the ion channel and absorbing angular momentum from the laser. The absorbed angular momentum manifests itself as a strong axial magnetic field (inverse Faraday effect). The magnitude of this magnetic field is calculated and related to the amount of the absorbed energy. Absorbed energy and generated magnetic field are estimated for the small and large energy gain regimes. Qualitative comparisons with recent experiments are also made

  6. Generating hierarchical scale free-graphs from fractals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komjáthy, J.; Simon, K.

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the hierarchial network model of E. Ravasz, A.-L. Barabási, and T. Vicsek, we introduce deterministic scale-free networks derived from a graph directed self-similar fractal ¿. With rigorous mathematical results we verify that our model captures some of the most important features of

  7. On the applicability of nearly free electron model for resistivity calculations in liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorecki, J.; Popielawski, J.

    1982-09-01

    The calculations of resistivity based on the nearly free electron model are presented for many noble and transition liquid metals. The triple ion correlation is included in resistivity formula according to SCQCA approximation. Two different methods for describing the conduction band are used. The problem of applicability of the nearly free electron model for different metals is discussed. (author)

  8. Operational Radiation Protection in Synchrotron Light and Free Electron Laser Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, James C.; Rokni, Sayed H.; /SLAC; Vylet, Vaclav; /Jefferson Lab

    2009-12-11

    The 3rd generation synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities are storage ring based facilities with many insertion devices and photon beamlines, and have low injection beam power (< few tens of watts), but extremely high stored beam power ({approx} 1 GW). The 4th generation x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facilities are based on an electron Linac with a long undulator and have high injection beam power (a few kW). Due to its electron and photon beam characteristics and modes of operation, storage ring and photon beamlines have unique safety aspects, which are the main subjects of this paper. The shielding design limits, operational modes, and beam losses are first reviewed. Shielding analysis (source terms and methodologies) and interlocked safety systems for storage ring and photon beamlines (including SR and gas bremsstrahlung) are described. Specific safety issues for storage ring top-off injection operation and FEL facilities are discussed. The operational safety program, e.g., operation authorization, commissioning, training, and radiation measurements, for SR facilities is also presented.

  9. Operational Radiation Protection in Synchrotron Light and Free Electron Laser Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, James C.; Rokni, Sayed H.; Vylet, Vaclav

    2009-01-01

    The 3rd generation synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities are storage ring based facilities with many insertion devices and photon beamlines, and have low injection beam power (< few tens of watts), but extremely high stored beam power (∼ 1 GW). The 4th generation x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facilities are based on an electron Linac with a long undulator and have high injection beam power (a few kW). Due to its electron and photon beam characteristics and modes of operation, storage ring and photon beamlines have unique safety aspects, which are the main subjects of this paper. The shielding design limits, operational modes, and beam losses are first reviewed. Shielding analysis (source terms and methodologies) and interlocked safety systems for storage ring and photon beamlines (including SR and gas bremsstrahlung) are described. Specific safety issues for storage ring top-off injection operation and FEL facilities are discussed. The operational safety program, e.g., operation authorization, commissioning, training, and radiation measurements, for SR facilities is also presented.

  10. Design, development and characterization of tetrode type electron gun system for generation of low energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deore, A.V.; Bhoraskar, V.N.; Dhole, S.D.

    2011-01-01

    A tetrode type electron gun system for the generation of low energy electrons was designed, developed and characterized. An electron gun having four electrodes namely cathode, focusing electrode, control electrode and anode has been designed for the irradiation experiments. This electron gun is capable to provide electrons of energy over the range of 1 keV to 20 keV, with current maximum upto 100 μA. The electron gun and a faraday cup are mounted in the evacuated cylindrical chamber. The samples are fixed on the faraday cup and irradiated with low energy electrons at a pressure around 10 -6 mbar. In this electron gun system, at any electron energy over the entire range, the electron beam diameter can be varied from 5 to 120 mm on the Faraday cup mounted at a distance of 200 mm from the anode in the chamber. Also, the circular shape of the beam spot was maintained, even though the beam current and beam diameter are varied. The uniformity of the electron beam over the entire beam area was measured with a multi electrode assembly and found to be well within 15%. This system is being used for the synthesis and diffusion of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles in polymeric materials. (author)

  11. Fast electron generation and transport in a turbulent, magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoneking, W.R.

    1994-05-01

    The nature of fast electron generation and transport in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed field pinch (RFP) is investigated using two electron energy analyzer (EEA) probes and a thermocouple calorimeter. The parallel velocity distribution of the fast electron population is well fit by a drifted Maxwellian distribution with temperature of about 100 eV and drift velocity of about 2 x 10 6 m/s. Cross-calibration of the EEA with the calorimeter provides a measurement of the fast electron perpendicular temperature of 30 eV, much lower than the parallel temperature, and is evidence that the kinetic dynamo mechanism (KDT) is not operative in MST. The fast electron current is found to match to the parallel current at the edge, and the fast electron density is about 4 x 10 11 cm -3 independent of the ratio of the applied toroidal electric field to the critical electric field for runaways. First time measurements of magnetic fluctuation induced particle transport are reported. By correlating electron current fluctuations with radial magnetic fluctuations the transported flux of electrons is found to be negligible outside r/a∼0.9, but rises the level of the expected total particle losses inside r/a∼0.85. A comparison of the measured diffusion coefficient is made with the ausilinear stochastic diffusion coefficient. Evidence exists that the reduction of the transport is due to the presence of a radial ambipolar electric field of magnitude 500 V/m, that acts to equilibrate the ion and electron transport rates. The convective energy transport associated with the measured particle transport is large enough to account for the observed magnetic fluctuation induced energy transport in MST

  12. Fast pulse beam generation systems for electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, R.F.

    1977-01-01

    The fast pulse beam generation system to supply the SLAC storage ring, SPEAR, by the two one nanosecond bunch electron beam pulses is described. Generation of these pulses is accomplished with a combination of a fast pulsed grided gun and a synchronized transverse beam chopper. Fast gun based on spherical cathode-grid assembly has output current up to 2As. Fast pulse amplifier system can handle trains of short pulses with repetition rates up to 40 MHz during the 1.6 μs normal accelerating time. Chopping deflector system consists of a resonant coaxial line with the deflecting plates. The resonator frequency is 39.667 MHz. A schematic diagram of the resonant system is shown. The fast beam pickup system has a one hundred picosecond rise time overrall. Fast beam generation and chopper systems permit to generate almost any short or single bunch beam profile needed for experiments

  13. Generation of Low-Energy High-Current Electron Beams in Plasma-Anode Electron Guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozur, G. E.; Proskurovsky, D. I.

    2018-01-01

    This paper is a review of studies on the generation of low-energy high-current electron beams in electron guns with a plasma anode and an explosive-emission cathode. The problems related to the initiation of explosive electron emission under plasma and the formation and transport of high-current electron beams in plasma-filled systems are discussed consecutively. Considerable attention is given to the nonstationary effects that occur in the space charge layers of plasma. Emphasis is also placed on the problem of providing a uniform energy density distribution over the beam cross section, which is of critical importance in using electron beams of this type for surface treatment of materials. Examples of facilities based on low-energy high-current electron beam sources are presented and their applications in materials science and practice are discussed.

  14. Generation of hydrogen free radicals from water for fuels by electric field induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nong, Guangzai; Chen, Yiyi; Li, Ming; Zhou, Zongwen

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Hydrogen free radicals are generated from water splitting. • Hydrogen fuel is generated from water by electric field induction. • Hydrocarbon fuel is generated from CO_2 and water by electric field induction. - Abstract: Water is the most abundant resource for generating hydrogen fuel. In addition to dissociating H"+ and "−OH ions, certain water molecules dissociate to radicals under an electric field are considered. Therefore, an electric field inducing reactor is constructed and operated to generate hydrogen free radicals in this paper. Hydrogen free radicals begin to be generated under a 1.0 V electric field, and increasing the voltage and temperature increases the number of hydrogen free radicals. The production rate of hydrogen free radicals is 0.245 mmol/(L h) at 5.0 V and room temperature. The generated hydrogen free radicals are converted to polymer fuel and hydrogen fuel at production rates of 0.0093 mmol/(L h) and 0.0038 mmol/(L h) respectively, under 5.0 V and 0.25 mA. The results provide a way to generate hydrogen free radicals, which might be used to generate hydrocarbon fuel in industrial manufacture.

  15. Linear Generator for a Free Piston Stirling Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OROS (POP Teodora Susana

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present some aspects about the design of a Stirling engine driven linear generator. There are summarised the main steps of the magnetic and electric calculations with application to a particular case of a cogeneration plant bassed on Stirling engine. The designed linear generator is of fixed coil and moving magnets type. There are presented and a finite element method (FEM simulation of magnetic field. The linear generator design starts with the characteristics of the rare earth permanent magnets existing on the market.

  16. Application of FPGA's in Flexible Analogue Electronic Image Generator Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kulla

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on usage of the FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Arrays Xilinx as a part of our more complex workdedicated to design of flexible analogue electronic images generator for application in TV measurement technique or/and TV servicetechnique or/and education process. The FPGAs performs here the role of component colour R, G, B, synchronization and blanking signals source. These signals are next processed and amplified in other parts of the generator as NTSC/PAL source encoder and RF modulator. The main aim of this paper is to show the possibilities how with suitable development software use a FPGAs in analog TV technology.

  17. Hemostatic properties of the free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cram, G.P. Jr.; Copeland, M.L. [Department of Neurosurgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)

    1998-09-02

    We have investigated the hemostatic properties of the free-electron laser (FEL) and compared these properties to the most commonly used commercial lasers in neurosurgery, CO{sub 2} and Nd:YAG, using an acute canine model. Arterial and venous vessels, of varying diameters from 0.1 to 1.0 mm, were divided with all three lasers. Analysis of five wavelengths of the FEL (3.0, 4.5, 6.1, 6.45, and 7.7 microns) resulted in bleeding without evidence of significant coagulation, regardless of whether the vessel was an artery or vein. Hemorrhage from vessels less than 0.4 mm diameter was subsequently easily controlled with Gelfoam registered (topical hemostatic agent) alone, whereas larger vessels required bipolar electrocautery. No significant charring, or contraction of the surrounding parenchyma was noted with any of the wavelengths chosen from FEL source. The CO{sub 2} laser, in continuous mode, easily coagulated vessels with diameters of 4 mm and less, while larger vessels displayed significant bleeding requiring bipolar electrocautery for control. Tissue charring was noted with application of the CO{sub 2} laser. In super pulse mode, the CO{sub 2} laser exhibited similar properties, including significant charring of the surrounding parenchyma. The Nd:YAG coagulated all vessels tested up to 1.4 mm, which was the largest diameter cortical artery found, however this laser displayed significant and extensive contraction and retraction of the surrounding parenchyma. In conclusion, the FEL appears to be a poor hemostatic agent. Our results did not show any benefit of the FEL over current conventional means of achieving hemostasis. However, control of hemorrhage was easily achieved with currently used methods of hemostasis, namely Gelfoam registered or bipolar electrocuatery. Although only cortical vessels in dogs were tested, we feel this data can be applied to all animals, including humans, and the peripheral, as well as central, vasculature, as our data on the CO{sub 2} and

  18. Hemostatic properties of the free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cram, G.P. Jr.; Copeland, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the hemostatic properties of the free-electron laser (FEL) and compared these properties to the most commonly used commercial lasers in neurosurgery, CO 2 and Nd:YAG, using an acute canine model. Arterial and venous vessels, of varying diameters from 0.1 to 1.0 mm, were divided with all three lasers. Analysis of five wavelengths of the FEL (3.0, 4.5, 6.1, 6.45, and 7.7 microns) resulted in bleeding without evidence of significant coagulation, regardless of whether the vessel was an artery or vein. Hemorrhage from vessels less than 0.4 mm diameter was subsequently easily controlled with Gelfoam registered (topical hemostatic agent) alone, whereas larger vessels required bipolar electrocautery. No significant charring, or contraction of the surrounding parenchyma was noted with any of the wavelengths chosen from FEL source. The CO 2 laser, in continuous mode, easily coagulated vessels with diameters of 4 mm and less, while larger vessels displayed significant bleeding requiring bipolar electrocautery for control. Tissue charring was noted with application of the CO 2 laser. In super pulse mode, the CO 2 laser exhibited similar properties, including significant charring of the surrounding parenchyma. The Nd:YAG coagulated all vessels tested up to 1.4 mm, which was the largest diameter cortical artery found, however this laser displayed significant and extensive contraction and retraction of the surrounding parenchyma. In conclusion, the FEL appears to be a poor hemostatic agent. Our results did not show any benefit of the FEL over current conventional means of achieving hemostasis. However, control of hemorrhage was easily achieved with currently used methods of hemostasis, namely Gelfoam registered or bipolar electrocuatery. Although only cortical vessels in dogs were tested, we feel this data can be applied to all animals, including humans, and the peripheral, as well as central, vasculature, as our data on the CO 2 and Nd:YAG appear to closely

  19. Static and fatigue investigation of second generation steel free bridge decks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klowak, C.; Memon, Amjad H.; Mufti, Aftab A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper outlines the static and fatigue behavior of two different cast-in-place second generation steel-free bridge decks, which are: hybrid carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP); and glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) and steel strap design. Although cast monolithically, the first deck slab was divided into three segments with different reinforcement configurations. All three segments were tested under a 222kN cyclic loading to investigate fatigue behavior. The second bridge deck comprised an internal panel and two cantilevers and was equipped with a civionics system. The internal panel static test that this paper deals with is useful in the development of fatigue theory derived from fatigue testing of the first bridge deck. Test results form the cyclic loading of the first bridge deck indicated that the cross-sectional area of the reinforcement used in the test bridge deck can be reduced by 40% based on the reinforcement provided in the deck under service loads. The hybrid system also reduced the development of longitudinal crack widths to approximately 0.4 mm under service conditions, compared to the cracks that occurred approximately halfway between adjacent bridge girders that were determined to be roughly 1 mm in several first generation steel-free bridge decks constructed in Canada. Civionics, also discussed in the paper, is a new term coined from Civil-Electronics, which is the application of electronics to civil structures. The Civionics Specifications (2004) developed by ISIS Canada researchers are a helpful design tool for engineers and contractors to develop civionics and structural health monitoring systems for civil infrastructure that will last the lifetime of a structure. The use of civionics for the second test bridge deck ensured the survival of 100% of the 63 internal sensors throughout the rigors of the construction and casting of the deck. (author)

  20. Dephasing of optically generated electron spins in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idrish Miah, M.

    2010-01-01

    Dephasing of optically generated electron spins in the presence of the external magnetic field and electric bias in semiconductor nano-structures has been studied by time- and polarization-resolved spectrometry. The obtained experimental data are presented in dependence of the strength of the magnetic field. The optically generated electron-spin precession frequency and dephasing time and rate are estimated. It is found that both the spin precession frequency and dephasing rate increase linearly with the external magnetic field up to about 9 T. However, the spin dephasing time is within sub-μs and is found to decrease exponentially with the strength of the external magnetic field. The results are discussed by exploring possible mechanisms of spin dephasing in low-dimensional semiconductor structures, where the quantum-confinement persists within the nano-range.

  1. Dephasing of optically generated electron spins in semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idrish Miah, M., E-mail: m.miah@griffith.edu.a [Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong, Chittagong - 4331 (Bangladesh)

    2010-09-13

    Dephasing of optically generated electron spins in the presence of the external magnetic field and electric bias in semiconductor nano-structures has been studied by time- and polarization-resolved spectrometry. The obtained experimental data are presented in dependence of the strength of the magnetic field. The optically generated electron-spin precession frequency and dephasing time and rate are estimated. It is found that both the spin precession frequency and dephasing rate increase linearly with the external magnetic field up to about 9 T. However, the spin dephasing time is within sub-{mu}s and is found to decrease exponentially with the strength of the external magnetic field. The results are discussed by exploring possible mechanisms of spin dephasing in low-dimensional semiconductor structures, where the quantum-confinement persists within the nano-range.

  2. Quantum random number generation for loophole-free Bell tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Morgan; Abellan, Carlos; Amaya, Waldimar

    2015-05-01

    We describe the generation of quantum random numbers at multi-Gbps rates, combined with real-time randomness extraction, to give very high purity random numbers based on quantum events at most tens of ns in the past. The system satisfies the stringent requirements of quantum non-locality tests that aim to close the timing loophole. We describe the generation mechanism using spontaneous-emission-driven phase diffusion in a semiconductor laser, digitization, and extraction by parity calculation using multi-GHz logic chips. We pay special attention to experimental proof of the quality of the random numbers and analysis of the randomness extraction. In contrast to widely-used models of randomness generators in the computer science literature, we argue that randomness generation by spontaneous emission can be extracted from a single source.

  3. Self-field effects on electron dynamics in free-electron lasers with axial magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzanejhad, S.; Maraghechi, B.; Mohsenpour, T.

    2004-01-01

    A self-consistent method for the analysis of self-magnetic field for a free-electron laser with a one-dimensional helical wiggler and an axial guide magnetic field is presented. The equilibrium orbits and their stability, under the influence of self-electric and self-magnetic fields, are analyzed. New unstable orbits, in the first part of the Group I orbits and in the resonance region of the Group II orbits, are found. It is shown that an increase in the defocusing effect of self-fields will widen the unstable orbits. An anomalous self-field regime is found where an increase in the defocusing effect of self-fields can have stabilizing effect on the resonance region

  4. Zonal flow generation in collisionless trapped electron mode turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J; Nordman, H; Singh, R; Weiland, J

    2006-01-01

    In the present work the generation of zonal flows in collisionless trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence is studied analytically. A reduced model for TEM turbulence is utilized based on an advanced fluid model for reactive drift waves. An analytical expression for the zonal flow growth rate is derived and compared with the linear TEM growth, and its scaling with plasma parameters is examined for typical tokamak parameter values

  5. MODEL OF AN ELECTRONIC EDUCATIONAL RESOURCE OF NEW GENERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoliy V. Loban

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical structure of the modular architecture of an electronic educational resource (EER of new generation, which allows to decompose the process of studying the subjects of the course at a hierarchically ordered set of data (knowledge and procedures for manipulating them, to determine the roles of participants of process of training of and technology the development and use of EOR in the study procrate.

  6. Free-piston engine linear generator for hybrid vehicles modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, T. J.; Ingram, S. K.

    1995-05-01

    Development of a free piston engine linear generator was investigated for use as an auxiliary power unit for a hybrid electric vehicle. The main focus of the program was to develop an efficient linear generator concept to convert the piston motion directly into electrical power. Computer modeling techniques were used to evaluate five different designs for linear generators. These designs included permanent magnet generators, reluctance generators, linear DC generators, and two and three-coil induction generators. The efficiency of the linear generator was highly dependent on the design concept. The two-coil induction generator was determined to be the best design, with an efficiency of approximately 90 percent.

  7. Ion beam neutralization with ferroelectrically generated electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herleb, U; Riege, H [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). LHC Division

    1997-12-31

    A technique for ion beam space-charge neutralization with pulsed electron beams is described. The intensity of multiply-charged ions produced with a laser ion source can be enhanced or decreased separately with electron beam trains of MHz repetition rate. These are generated with ferroelectric cathodes, which are pulsed in synchronization with the laser ion source. The pulsed electron beams guide the ion beam in a similar way to the alternating gradient focusing of charged particle beams in circular accelerators such as synchrotrons. This new neutralization technology overcomes the Langmuir-Child space-charge limit and may in future allow ion beam currents to be transported with intensities by orders of magnitude higher than those which can be accelerated today in a single vacuum tube. (author). 6 figs., 10 refs.

  8. Electron thermalization distances and free-ion yields in dielectric fluids: Effect of electron scavengers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gee, N.; Freeman, G.R.

    1985-01-01

    Free-ion yields were measured in isobutane and in solutions containing sulfur hexafluoride, at densities from the liquid at 295 K to the supercritical fluid. A modified Onsager model was used to estimate the most probable thermalization distances b/sub GP/ (GP denotes a Gaussian power-law distribution). The density-normalized distance b/sub GP/d in isobutane increased from 6.3 x 10 -6 kg/m 2 at 295 K to a maximum of 10.5 x 10 -6 kg/m 2 at 395 K, and then decreased to 5.6 x 10 -6 kg/m 2 at 408 K (T/sub c/). The maximum, which is evidence of conduction-band enhancement of b/sub GP/, was suppressed in solutions containing small amounts of SF 6 . The SF 6 captured the electrons while they were still at epithermal energies, and terminated their flight away from their sibling ions. The values of b/sub GP/ and the free-ion yields were thereby decreased

  9. CIF2Cell: Generating geometries for electronic structure programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkman, Torbjörn

    2011-05-01

    The CIF2Cell program generates the geometrical setup for a number of electronic structure programs based on the crystallographic information in a Crystallographic Information Framework (CIF) file. The program will retrieve the space group number, Wyckoff positions and crystallographic parameters, make a sensible choice for Bravais lattice vectors (primitive or principal cell) and generate all atomic positions. Supercells can be generated and alloys are handled gracefully. The code currently has output interfaces to the electronic structure programs ABINIT, CASTEP, CPMD, Crystal, Elk, Exciting, EMTO, Fleur, RSPt, Siesta and VASP. Program summaryProgram title: CIF2Cell Catalogue identifier: AEIM_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEIM_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU GPL version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 12 691 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 74 933 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python (versions 2.4-2.7) Computer: Any computer that can run Python (versions 2.4-2.7) Operating system: Any operating system that can run Python (versions 2.4-2.7) Classification: 7.3, 7.8, 8 External routines: PyCIFRW [1] Nature of problem: Generate the geometrical setup of a crystallographic cell for a variety of electronic structure programs from data contained in a CIF file. Solution method: The CIF file is parsed using routines contained in the library PyCIFRW [1], and crystallographic as well as bibliographic information is extracted. The program then generates the principal cell from symmetry information, crystal parameters, space group number and Wyckoff sites. Reduction to a primitive cell is then performed, and the resulting cell is output to suitably named files along with documentation of the information source generated from any bibliographic information contained in the CIF

  10. Free piston linear generator in comparison to other range-extender technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Virsik, Roman; Heron, Alex

    2013-01-01

    The free piston linear generator is a new range-extender technology. It converts chemical energy into electrical energy by means of a combustion process and linear generator. Thereby the technology aims to have better properties than other range extenders. Therefore this publication deals with the explanation of the concept and the characteristics of a free piston linear generator and a comparison to other technologies. In order to compare the range extender systems, fuel cells, micro gas tur...

  11. Free-electron laser with a plasma wave wiggler propagating through a magnetized plasma channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafari, S; Jafarinia, F; Mehdian, H

    2013-01-01

    A plasma eigenmode has been employed as a wiggler in a magnetized plasma channel for the generation of laser radiation in a free-electron laser. The short wavelength of the plasma wave allows a higher radiation frequency to be obtained than from conventional wiggler free-electron lasers. The plasma can significantly slow down the radiation mode, thereby relaxing the beam energy requirement considerably. In addition, it allows a beam current in excess of the vacuum current limit via charge neutralization. This configuration has a higher tunability by controlling the plasma density in addition to the γ-tunability of the standard FEL. The laser gain has been calculated and numerical computations of the electron trajectories and gain are presented. Four groups (I–IV) of electron orbits have been found. It has been shown that by increasing the cyclotron frequency, the gain for orbits of group I and group III increases, while a decrease in gain has been obtained for orbits of group II and group IV. Similarly, the effect of plasma density on gain has been exhibited. The results indicate that with increasing plasma density, the orbits of all groups shift to higher cyclotron frequencies. The effects of beam self-fields on gain have also been demonstrated. It has been found that in the presence of beam self-fields the sensitivity of the gain increases substantially in the vicinity of gyroresonance. Here, the gain enhancement and reduction are due to the paramagnetic and diamagnetic effects of the self-magnetic field, respectively. (paper)

  12. Monitoring the electron beam position at the TESLA test facility free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamps, T

    2000-06-14

    The operation of a free electron laser working in the Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission mode (SASE FEL) requires the electron trajectory to be aligned with very high precision in overlap with the photon beam. In order to ensure this overlap, one module of the SASE FEL undulator at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) is equipped with a new type of waveguide beam position monitor (BPM). Four waveguides are arranged symmetrically around the beam pipe, each channel couples through a small slot to the electromagnetic beam field. The induced signal depends on the beam intensity and on the transverse beam position in terms of beam-to-slot distance. With four slot--waveguide combinations a linear position sensitive signal can be achieved, which is independent of the beam intensity. The signals transduced by the slots are transferred by ridged waveguides through an impedance matching stage into a narrowband receiver tuned to 12 GHz. The present thesis describes design, tests, and implementation of this new type of BPM. (orig.)

  13. Development of novel low-voltage free-electron lasers in the 5-500GHz region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Xiehe

    2002-01-01

    The electromagnetic spectrum from 5GHz to 500GHz is important for many industrial, commercial, and scientific applications. In particular for the 100 - 500GHz region, free electron lasers (FELs) are usually the only viable radiation sources with sizeable output power and as such are an attractive enabling technology for many applications. One major issue for widespread application of free electron lasers is to reduce their cost and size. This is particularly challenging because of the expensive electron accelerator system they employ. To make it significantly more attractive economically for many important applications, the electron energy has to be reduced to below 300keV. In this thesis two novel electron-energy-reduction techniques are investigated for FEL systems operated in the spectrum from 5GHz to 500GHz with the development of a suite of suitable FEL codes. In the microwave to millimetre-wave region, a novel energy reduction technique based on second harmonic waveguide FELs is studied. It is shown that the required electron voltage is approximately half of what is normally required for comparable conventional waveguide FELs. Effect of electron energy spread is studied for second harmonic waveguide FELs both in microwave and millimetre-wave regions. It is shown that strong wiggler field enhances electron hunching thereby increasing the small-signal gain as well as the insusceptibility to electron voltage spread. Saturation behaviour of second harmonic waveguide FELs is also studied because it is important for evaluation of output power. For FEL generation above 300GHz, it is found that second harmonic waveguide FELs need to increase electron energy above 300keV. To this end, a second energy reduction technique is considered based on a novel quasiperiodic wiggler. It is established that by changing the initial phase angle between the two component wigglers, strong radiation can be generated near 1THz with electron energy below 300keV. (author)

  14. Batch crystallization of rhodopsin for structural dynamics using an X-ray free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wenting; Nogly, Przemyslaw; Rheinberger, Jan; Kick, Leonhard M.; Gati, Cornelius; Nelson, Garrett; Deupi, Xavier; Standfuss, Jörg; Schertler, Gebhard; Panneels, Valérie, E-mail: valerie.panneels@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute, OFLC/103, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland)

    2015-06-27

    A new batch preparation method is presented for high-density micrometre-sized crystals of the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin for use in time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography at an X-ray free-electron laser using a liquid jet. Rhodopsin is a membrane protein from the G protein-coupled receptor family. Together with its ligand retinal, it forms the visual pigment responsible for night vision. In order to perform ultrafast dynamics studies, a time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography method is required owing to the nonreversible activation of rhodopsin. In such an approach, microcrystals in suspension are delivered into the X-ray pulses of an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) after a precise photoactivation delay. Here, a millilitre batch production of high-density microcrystals was developed by four methodical conversion steps starting from known vapour-diffusion crystallization protocols: (i) screening the low-salt crystallization conditions preferred for serial crystallography by vapour diffusion, (ii) optimization of batch crystallization, (iii) testing the crystal size and quality using second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging and X-ray powder diffraction and (iv) production of millilitres of rhodopsin crystal suspension in batches for serial crystallography tests; these crystals diffracted at an XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source using a liquid-jet setup.

  15. A linear current injection generator for the generation of electrons in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, Moutushi; Thakur, Satish Kumar; Agiwal, Mamta; Sholapurwala, Zarir H.

    2011-01-01

    While, operating a nuclear reactor it is absolutely necessary for generating a chain reaction or fission. A chain reaction can be initiated by bombardment of a heavy nucleus with fast moving particles. One of the common methods used for generating a fast moving particle is injecting a very high voltage into a particle accelerator and accelerating high energy particle beams using machine like cyclotron, synchrotron, linear accelerators i.e. linac and similar equipment. These equipment generated and run by several high voltage applications like simple high voltage DC systems and supplies or pulsed electron systems. (author)

  16. Investigating free radical generation in HepG2 cells using immuno-spin trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horinouchi, Yuya; Summers, Fiona A; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Kawazoe, Kazuyoshi; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Tamaki, Toshiaki; Mason, Ronald P

    2014-10-01

    Oxidative stress can induce the generation of free radicals, which are believed to play an important role in both physiological and pathological processes and a number of diseases such as cancer. Therefore, it is important to identify chemicals which are capable of inducing oxidative stress. In this study, we evaluated the ability of four environmental chemicals, aniline, nitrosobenzene (NB), N,N-dimethylaniline (DMA) and N,N-dimethyl-4-nitrosoaniline (DMNA), to induce free radicals and cellular damage in the hepatoma cell line HepG2. Cytotoxicity was assessed using lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays and morphological changes were observed using phase contrast microscopy. Free radicals were detected by immuno-spin trapping (IST) in in-cell western experiments or in confocal microscopy experiments to determine the subcellular localization of free radical generation. DMNA induced free radical generation, LDH release and morphological changes in HepG2 cells whereas aniline, NB and DMA did not. Confocal microscopy showed that DMNA induced free radical generation mainly in the cytosol. Preincubation of HepG2 cells with N-acetylcysteine and 2,2'-dipyridyl significantly prevented free radical generation upon subsequent incubation with DMNA, whereas preincubation with apocynin and dimethyl sulfoxide did not. These results suggest that DMNA induces oxidative stress and that reactive oxygen species, metals and free radical generation play a critical role in DMNA-induced cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Generation of mega-electron-volt electron beams by an ultrafast intense laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaofang; Saleh, Ned; Krishnan, Mohan; Wang Haiwen; Backus, Sterling; Murnane, Margaret; Kapteyn, Henry; Umstadter, Donald; Wang Quandong; Shen Baifei

    2003-01-01

    Mega-electron-volt (MeV) electron emission from the interaction of an ultrafast (τ∼29 fs), intense (>10 18 W/cm 2 ) laser pulse with underdense plasmas has been studied. A beam of MeV electrons with a divergence angle as small as 1 deg. is observed in the forward direction, which is correlated with relativistic filamentation of the laser pulse in plasmas. A novel net-energy-gain mechanism is proposed for electron acceleration resulting from the relativistic filamentation and beam breakup. These results suggest an approach for generating a beam of femtosecond, MeV electrons at a kilohertz repetition rate with a compact ultrafast intense laser system

  18. Temperature dependence of electron mean free path in molybdenum from ultrasonic measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almond, D P; Detwiler, D A; Rayne, J A [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. (USA)

    1975-09-08

    The temperature dependence of the electronic mean free path in molybdenum has been obtained from ultrasonic attenuation measurements.For temperature up to 30 K a T/sup -2/ law is followed suggesting the importance of electron-electron scattering in the attenuation mechanism.

  19. Improvement of the intrinsic time resolving power of the Cologne iron-free orange type electron spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regis, J.-M.; Materna, Th.; Pascovici, G.; Christen, S.; Dewald, A.; Fransen, C.; Jolie, J.; Petkov, P.; Zell, K. O. [Institut fuer Kernphysik (IKP), Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Koeln (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    Conversion electron spectroscopy represents an important tool for nuclear structure analysis of medium and heavy nuclei. Two iron-free magnetic electron spectrometers of the orange type have been installed at the Institute for Nuclear Physics of the University of Cologne. The very large transmission of 15% and the very good energy resolution of 1% makes the iron-free orange spectrometer a powerful instrument. By means of fast timing techniques, lifetimes of nuclear excited states can be measured with an accuracy better than 20 ps. For the first time, the energy dependent centroid position of prompt events yielding the time-walk characteristics (the prompt curve) of the orange spectrometer fast timing setup has been measured using prompt secondary {delta}-electrons generated in a pulsed beam experiment. The prompt curve calibrated as a function of energy allows precise lifetime determination down to a few tens of picoseconds by the use of the centroid shift method.

  20. Inducing Strong Density Modulation with Small Energy Dispersion in Particle Beams and the Harmonic Amplifier Free Electron Laser

    CERN Document Server

    McNeil, Brian W J; Robb, Gordon

    2005-01-01

    We present a possible method of inducing a periodic density modulation in a particle beam with little increase in the energy dispersion of the particles. The flow of particles in phase space does not obey Liouville's Theorem. The method relies upon the Kuramoto-like model of collective synchronism found in free electron generators of radiation, such as Cyclotron Resonance Masers and the Free Electron Laser. For the case of an FEL interaction, electrons initially begin to bunch and emit radiation energy with a correlated energy dispersion which is periodic with the FEL ponderomotive potential. The relative phase between potential and particles is then changed by approximately 180 degrees. The particles continue to bunch, however, there is now a correlated re-absorption of energy from the field. We show that, by repeating this relative phase change many times, a significant density modulation of the particles may be achieved with only relatively small energy dispersion. A similar method of repeated relative ele...

  1. Generation of components for software renovation factories from context-free grammars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, van den M.G.J.; Sellink, M.P.A.; Verhoef, C.

    2000-01-01

    We present an approach for the generation of components for a software renovation factory. These components are generated from a contex-free grammar definition that recognizes the code that has to be renovated. We generate analysis and transformation components that can be instantiated with a

  2. Suppression of beam-break-up in a standing wave free electron laser two-beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H.; Kim, J.S.

    1994-03-01

    Various schemes are examined in this study on the suppression of beam break-up (BBU) in a standing wave free electron laser two-beam accelerator (SWFEL/TBA). Two schemes are found to be not only able to effectively suppress the BBU but at the same time have minimum effect on the microwave generation process inside the SWFEL cavities. One is making the cavity-iris junction sufficiently gradual and the other is stagger-tuning the cavities

  3. WavePropaGator: interactive framework for X-ray free-electron laser optics design and simulations1

    OpenAIRE

    Samoylova, Liubov; Buzmakov, Alexey; Chubar, Oleg; Sinn, Harald

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the WavePropaGator (WPG) package, a new interactive software framework for coherent and partially coherent X-ray wavefront propagation simulations. The package has been developed at European XFEL for users at the existing and emerging free-electron laser (FEL) facilities, as well as at the third-generation synchrotron sources and future diffraction-limited storage rings. The WPG addresses the needs of beamline scientists and user groups to facilitate the design, optimiz...

  4. Study of airborne particle generated by free falling powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquelin, M.

    2007-10-01

    This study comes within the general framework of industrial facilities' safety research. Indeed, industrial processes, notably in the nuclear field, handle hazardous materials in powder form and can produce large quantities of fugitive dust. The study of the particles resuspension from powders is of interest of first order in order to estimate the consequences of this source term of contamination on the operator, the neighbouring installations and, if necessary, the environment. Up to now, there are very few reliable data in the scientific literature on the particulate emission in case of a scenario with an accidental free fall spill of powder. The powder dustiness evaluation is carried out using coefficients obtained in experiments, or using empirical correlations. The objective of the present work is to study the influence of some parameters involved in the airborne particles production by a free fall of powder. For that purpose, experiments are carried out in order to study the influence of parameters such as the type of discharge, the powder nature, the type of surface on which occurs the powder impaction, the system diameter used for discharge, and the falling mass. The results of mass fractions and number concentrations obtained highlighted the dominating parameters according to the type of discharge employed. Thereafter, the comparisons between our results and the empirical correlations available in the literature showed that those led to an undervaluation of the powder dustiness. This thus led us to develop, starting from the whole of experimental data, empirical correlations taking into account the various parameters studied as well as the interactions. (author)

  5. Generation of Z mode radiation by diffuse auroral electron precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusenbery, P. B.; Lyons, L. R.

    1985-01-01

    The generation of Z mode waves by diffuse auroral electron precipitation is investigated assuming that a loss cone exists in the upgoing portion of the distribution due to electron interactions with the atmosphere. The waves are generated at frequencies above, but very near, the local electron cyclotron frequency omega(e) and at wave normal angles larger than 90 deg. In agreement with Hewitt et al. (1983), the group velocity is directed downward in regions where the ratio of the upper hybrid frequency omega(pe) to Omega(e) is less than 0.5, so that Z mode waves excited above a satellite propagate toward it and away from the upper hybrid resonance. Z mode waves are excited in a frequency band between Omega(e) and about 1.02 Omega(e), and with maximum growth rates of about 0.001 Omega(e). The amplification length is about 100 km, which allows Z mode waves to grow to the intensities observed by high-altitude satellites.

  6. Numerical Simulations of X-Ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL)

    KAUST Repository

    Antonelli, Paolo; Athanassoulis, Agissilaos; Huang, Zhongyi; Markowich, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    and approximations has attracted increased attention. In this model the electrons move under a rapidly oscillating electromagnetic field, and the convergence of the problem to an effective time-averaged one is examined. We use an operator splitting pseudospectral

  7. Applications of free electron lasers and synchrotrons in industry and research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barletta, William A. [Dept. of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge MA (United States)

    2013-04-19

    Synchrotron radiation sources have had a profound effect on both science and technology from their beginnings decades ago as parasitic operations on accelerators for high energy physics. Now the general area of photon science has opened up new experimental techniques which have become the mainstay tools of materials science, surface physics, protein crystallography, and nanotechnology. With the promise of ultra-bright beams from the latest generation of storage rings and free electron lasers with full coherence, the tools of photon science promise to open a new area of mesoscale science and technology as well as prove to be a disruptive wildcard in the search for sustainable energy technologies. This review will survey a range of applications and explore in greater depth the potential applications to EUV lithography and to technologies for solar energy.

  8. Free-electron laser multiplex driven by a superconducting linear accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plath, Tim; Amstutz, Philipp; Bödewadt, Jörn; Brenner, Günter; Ekanayake, Nagitha; Faatz, Bart; Hacker, Kirsten; Honkavaara, Katja; Lazzarino, Leslie Lamberto; Lechner, Christoph; Maltezopoulos, Theophilos; Scholz, Matthias; Schreiber, Siegfried; Vogt, Mathias; Zemella, Johann; Laarmann, Tim

    2016-09-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) generate femtosecond XUV and X-ray pulses at peak powers in the gigawatt range. The FEL user facility FLASH at DESY (Hamburg, Germany) is driven by a superconducting linear accelerator with up to 8000 pulses per second. Since 2014, two parallel undulator beamlines, FLASH1 and FLASH2, have been in operation. In addition to the main undulator, the FLASH1 beamline is equipped with an undulator section, sFLASH, dedicated to research and development of fully coherent extreme ultraviolet photon pulses using external seed lasers. In this contribution, the first simultaneous lasing of the three FELs at 13.4 nm, 20 nm and 38.8 nm is presented.

  9. FreeDam - A webtool for free-electron laser-induced damage in femtosecond X-ray crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, H. Olof; Östlin, Christofer; Scott, Howard A.; Chapman, Henry N.; Aplin, Steve J.; Tîmneanu, Nicuşor; Caleman, Carl

    2018-03-01

    Over the last decade X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources have been made available to the scientific community. One of the most successful uses of these new machines has been protein crystallography. When samples are exposed to the intense short X-ray pulses provided by the XFELs, the sample quickly becomes highly ionized and the atomic structure is affected. Here we present a webtool dubbed FreeDam based on non-thermal plasma simulations, for estimation of radiation damage in free-electron laser experiments in terms of ionization, temperatures and atomic displacements. The aim is to make this tool easily accessible to scientists who are planning and performing experiments at XFELs.

  10. Analog electronic model of the lobster pyloric central pattern generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkovskii, A [Institute for Nonlinear Science, University of California San Diego, CA (United States); Brugioni, S [Institute for Nonlinear Science, University of California San Diego, CA (United States); Istituto Nazionale di Ottica Applicata Largo E. Fermi 6 50125 Florence (Italy); Levi, R [Institute for Nonlinear Science, University of California San Diego, CA (United States); Rabinovich, M [Institute for Nonlinear Science, University of California San Diego, CA (United States); Selverston, A [Institute for Nonlinear Science, University of California San Diego, CA (United States); Abarbane, H D I [Institute for Nonlinear Science, University of California San Diego, CA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    An electronic circuit intended to simulate the nonlinear dynamics of a simplified 3-cell model of the pyloric central pattern generator in California spiny lobster stomato gastric ganglion is presented. The model employs the synaptic phase locked loop (SPLL) concept where the frequency of oscillations of a postsynaptic cell is mainly controlled by the synaptic current which depends on the phase shift between the oscillations. The theoretical study showed that the system has a stable steady state with correct phase shifts between the oscillations and that this regime is stable when the frequency of the pacemaker cell is varied over a wide range. The main bifurcations in the system were studied analytically, in computer simulations, and in experiments with the electronic circuit. The experimental measurements are in good agreement with the expectations of the theoretical model.

  11. Electron diode oscillators for high-power RF generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, S.

    1989-01-01

    Feedback oscillators have been used since the invention of the vacuum tube. This paper describes the extension of these familiar circuits to the regime of relativistic electron beam diodes. Such devices have potential application for the generation of high power RF radiation in the range 50-250 MHz, 1-10 GW with 20-60% conversion efficiency. This paper reviews the theory of the oscillator and the results of a design study. Calculations for the four-electrode diode with EGUN and EBQ show that good modulations of 30 kA electron beam at 600 kV can be achieved with moderate field stress on the electrodes. Conditions for oscillation have been studied with an in-house transmission line code. A design for a 7.5 GW oscillator at 200 MHz with 25% conversion efficiency is presented

  12. Resonant third-harmonic generation of a short-pulse laser from electron-hole plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kant, Niti [Department of Physics, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara, Punjab 144 402 (India); Nandan Gupta, Devki [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007 (India); Suk, Hyyong [Advanced Photonics Research Institute (APRI) and Graduate Program of Photonics and Applied Physics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500 712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    In semiconductors, free carriers are created in pairs in inter-band transitions and consist of an electron and its corresponding hole. At very high carrier densities, carrier-carrier collisions dominate over carrier-lattice collisions and carriers begin to behave collectively to form plasma. Here, we apply a short-pulse laser to generate third-harmonic radiation from a semiconductor plasma (electron-hole plasma) in the presence of a transverse wiggler magnetic-field. The process of third-harmonic generation of an intense short-pulse laser is resonantly enhanced by the magnetic wiggler, i.e., wiggler magnetic field provides the necessary momentum to third-harmonic photons. In addition, a high-power laser radiation, propagating through a semiconductor imparts an oscillatory velocity to the electrons and exerts a ponderomotive force on electrons at the third-harmonic frequency of the laser. This oscillatory velocity produces a third-harmonic longitudinal current. And due to the beating of the longitudinal electron velocity and the wiggler magnetic field, a transverse third-harmonic current is produced that drives third-harmonic electromagnetic radiation. It is finally observed that for a specific wiggler wave number value, the phase-matching conditions for the process are satisfied, leading to resonant enhancement in the energy conversion efficiency.

  13. Resonant third-harmonic generation of a short-pulse laser from electron-hole plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kant, Niti; Nandan Gupta, Devki; Suk, Hyyong

    2012-01-01

    In semiconductors, free carriers are created in pairs in inter-band transitions and consist of an electron and its corresponding hole. At very high carrier densities, carrier-carrier collisions dominate over carrier-lattice collisions and carriers begin to behave collectively to form plasma. Here, we apply a short-pulse laser to generate third-harmonic radiation from a semiconductor plasma (electron-hole plasma) in the presence of a transverse wiggler magnetic-field. The process of third-harmonic generation of an intense short-pulse laser is resonantly enhanced by the magnetic wiggler, i.e., wiggler magnetic field provides the necessary momentum to third-harmonic photons. In addition, a high-power laser radiation, propagating through a semiconductor imparts an oscillatory velocity to the electrons and exerts a ponderomotive force on electrons at the third-harmonic frequency of the laser. This oscillatory velocity produces a third-harmonic longitudinal current. And due to the beating of the longitudinal electron velocity and the wiggler magnetic field, a transverse third-harmonic current is produced that drives third-harmonic electromagnetic radiation. It is finally observed that for a specific wiggler wave number value, the phase-matching conditions for the process are satisfied, leading to resonant enhancement in the energy conversion efficiency.

  14. Research on heightening quality of free electron laser using superconducting linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehara, Eisuke

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, the superconducting high frequency linear accelerator technology using low temperature superconductor is introduced, and its application to the heightening of quality of free electron laser is discussed. The high frequency application of superconductivity is a relatively new technology, and the first superconducting high frequency linear accelerator was made at the middle of 1960s. The invention of free electron laser and the development so far are described. In free electron laser, the variation of wavelength, high efficiency and high power output are possible as compared with conventional type lasers. The price and the size are two demerits of free electron laser that remain to the last. In Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the adjustment experiment is carried out for the prototype free electron laser. About this prototype, injection system, superconducting accelerator, helium refrigerator, whole solid element high frequency power source, control system, electron beam transport system, undulator system and optical resonator are described. The application of high mean power output free electron laser and its future are discussed. (K.I.)

  15. About the free electron model in electric conduction of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, C.

    1991-01-01

    In the model proposed by Drude to describe, among others, the electric conduction in metals, it is supposed that electrons move freely in the material with a time interval between encounters T and a probability distribution g(t). The name, 'electron pause time', will be assigned to the time T with that probability distribution. The calculations made by Drude turned out to be erroneous. The error can be corrected observing that the random variable 'pause time' appearing in this intuitive idea is not the previously defined random variable T, 'electron pause time', but another random variable S, which will be called 'observed pause time' whose probability density is Csg(s), where C is a normalization constant. With this distribution, the characteristics of the distribution, q(u), of the wait time can be obtained. (Author) [es

  16. Calculation technique of free and impurity ion electronic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulagin, N.A.; Sviridov, D.T.

    1986-01-01

    The monograph deals with calculation technique of free and impurity ion spectra with completed nl N -shell. The principles of the theory of irreducible tensor operators, genealogical coefficients, calculation technique of angular and radial parts of matrix elements operators are stated. The correlation accounting methods in free ions are considered in detail. The principles of the theory of crystal field and ligand field, the method of self-consistent field for impurity ions are reported. The technique efficiency based on example of lanthanum and actinium group ions is shown. Experimental data by nf N -ion spectra are given. The tables of angular coefficients, energy values of X-ray lines of rare earth ions and genealogical coefficients are given in the appendix

  17. Pulse duration of seeded free-electron lasers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Finetti, P.; Höppner, H.; Allaria, E.; Callegari, C.; Capotondi, F.; Cinquegrana, P.; Coreno, M.; Cucini, R.; Danailov, M.B.; Demidovich, A.; De Ninno, G.; Di Fraia, M.; Feifel, R.; Ferrari, E.; Fröhlich, L.; Gauthier, D.; Golz, T.; Grazioli, C.; Kai, Y.; Kurdi, G.; Mahne, N.; Manfredda, M.; Medvedev, Nikita; Nikolov, I.P.; Pedersoli, E.; Penco, G.; Plekan, O.; Prandolini, M.J.; Prince, K. C.; Raimondi, L.; Rebernik, P.; Riedel, R.; Roussel, E.; Sigalotti, P.; Squibb, R.; Stojanovic, N.; Stranges, S.; Svetina, C.; Tanikawa, T.; Teubner, U.; Tkachenko, V.; Toleikis, S.; Zangrando, M.; Ziaja, B.; Tavella, F.; Giannessi, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 2 (2017), s. 1-19, č. článku 021043. ISSN 2160-3308 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ray free -eletron * amplified spontaneous-emission * spectral-phase interferometry * order harmonic radiation * extreme-ultraviolet * cross-correlation Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 12.789, year: 2016

  18. Electron emission in the Auger neutralization of a spin-polarized He+ ion embedded in a free electron gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juaristi, J.I.; Alducin, M.; Diez Muino, R.; Roesler, M.

    2005-01-01

    Results are presented for the energy distribution and spin polarization of the electrons excited during the Auger neutralization of a spin polarized He + ion embedded in a paramagnetic free electron gas. The screening of the He + ion is calculated using density functional theory within the local spin density approximation. The Auger rates, the energy distribution and the spin polarization of the excited electrons are obtained using the Fermi golden rule. The transport of the electrons is calculated within the Boltzmann transport equation formalism. The spin-polarization of the initially excited electrons is very high (>70%) and parallel to that of the electron bound to the He + ion. Nevertheless, the emitted electrons show a much lower degree of polarization, mainly in the low energy range, due to the creation of the unpolarized cascade of secondaries in the transport process

  19. Brightness and coherence of synchrotron radiation and high-gain free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.J.

    1986-10-01

    The characteristics of synchrotron radiation are reviewed with particular attention to its phase-space properties and coherence. The transition of the simple undulator radiation to more intense, more coherent high-gain free electron lasers, is discussed

  20. Proceedings of the workshop prospects for a 1 angstrom free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, J.C. (ed.)

    1990-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics free-electron laser theory, scaling relations and simulations; micro-wigglers; photocathode and switched power gun; applications; and summary of working groups.

  1. Proceedings of the workshop prospects for a 1 angstrom free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallardo, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics free-electron laser theory, scaling relations and simulations; micro-wigglers; photocathode and switched power gun; applications; and summary of working groups

  2. Criterion of transverse coherence of self-amplified spontaneous emission in high gain free electron laser amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, M.; Kim, K.J.

    1995-01-01

    In a high gain free electron laser amplifier based on Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) the spontaneous radiation generated by an electron beam near the undulator entrance is amplified many orders of magnitude along the undulator. The transverse coherence properties of the amplified radiation depends on both the amplification process and the coherence of the seed radiation (the undulator radiation generated in the first gain length or so). The evolution of the transverse coherence in the amplification process is studied based on the solution of the coupled Maxwell-Vlasov equations including higher order transverse modes. The coherence of the seed radiation is determined by the number of coherent modes in the phase space area of the undulator radiation. We discuss the criterion of transverse coherence and identify governing parameters over a broad range of parameters. In particular we re-examine the well known emittance criterion for the undulator radiation, which states that full transverse coherence is guaranteed if the rms emittance is smaller than the wavelength divided by 4π. It is found that this criterion is modified for SASE because of the different optimization conditions required for the electron beam. Our analysis is a generalization of the previous study by Yu and Krinsky for the case of vanishing emittance with parallel electron beam. Understanding the transverse coherence of SASE is important for the X-ray free electron laser projects now under consideration at SLAC and DESY

  3. Free electron lasers for the XUV spectral region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, J.B.; Pellegrini, C.

    1984-01-01

    Using the system described, an electron storage ring with an undulator in a special bypass section, we can obtain high intensity coherent radiation by sending the beam through the undulator and using the FEL collective instability to produce radiation. Compared to other systems, such as an FEL oscillator or a transverse optical klystron, this system has the advantage that it does not

  4. Multi-GeV electron-positron beam generation from laser-electron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranic, Marija; Klimo, Ondrej; Korn, Georg; Weber, Stefan

    2018-03-16

    The new generation of laser facilities is expected to deliver short (10 fs-100 fs) laser pulses with 10-100 PW of peak power. This opens an opportunity to study matter at extreme intensities in the laboratory and provides access to new physics. Here we propose to scatter GeV-class electron beams from laser-plasma accelerators with a multi-PW laser at normal incidence. In this configuration, one can both create and accelerate electron-positron pairs. The new particles are generated in the laser focus and gain relativistic momentum in the direction of laser propagation. Short focal length is an advantage, as it allows the particles to be ejected from the focal region with a net energy gain in vacuum. Electron-positron beams obtained in this setup have a low divergence, are quasi-neutral and spatially separated from the initial electron beam. The pairs attain multi-GeV energies which are not limited by the maximum energy of the initial electron beam. We present an analytical model for the expected energy cutoff, supported by 2D and 3D particle-in-cell simulations. The experimental implications, such as the sensitivity to temporal synchronisation and laser duration is assessed to provide guidance for the future experiments.

  5. Characterization of lead-free solders for electronic packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongtao

    The characterization of lead-free solders, especially after isothermal aging, is very important in order to accurately predict the reliability of solder joints. However, due to lack of experimental testing standards and the high homologous temperature of solder alloys (Th > 0.5T m even at room temperature), there are very large discrepancies in both the tensile and creep properties provided in current databases for both lead-free and Sn-Pb solder alloys. In this research, mechanical measurements of isothermal aging effects and the resulting changes in the materials behavior of lead-free solders were performed. A novel specimen preparation procedure was developed where the solder uniaxial test specimens are formed in high precision rectangular cross-section glass tubes using a vacuum suction process. Using specimens fabricated with the developed procedure, isothermal aging effects and viscoplastic material behavior evolution have been characterized for 95.5Sn-4.0Ag-0.5Cu (SAC405) and 96.5Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu (SAC305) lead-free solders, which are commonly used as the solder ball alloy in lead-free BGAs and other components. Analogous tests were performed with 63Sn-37Pb eutectic solder samples for comparison purposes. Up to 40% reduction in tensile strength was observed for water quenched specimens after two months of aging at room temperature. Creep deformation also increased dramatically with increasing aging durations. Microstructural changes during room temperature aging were also observed and recorded for the solder alloys and correlated with the observed mechanical behavior changes. Aging effects at elevated temperatures for up to 6 months were also investigated. Thermal aging caused significant tensile strength loss and deterioration of creep deformation. The thermal aging results also showed that after an initial tensile strength drop, the Sn-Pb eutectic solder reached a relatively stable stage after 200 hours of aging. However, for SAC alloy, both the tensile and

  6. UV-generated free radicals (FR) in skin: Their prevention by sunscreens and their induction by self-tanning agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, K.; Seifert, M.; Herrling, Th.; Fuchs, J.

    2008-05-01

    In the past few years, the cellular effects of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induced in skin have become increasingly recognized. Indeed, it is now well known that UV irradiation induces structural and cellular changes in all the compartments of skin tissue. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is the first and immediate consequence of UV exposure and therefore the quantitative determination of free radical reactions in the skin during UV radiation is of primary importance for the understanding of dermatological photodamage. The RSF method (radical sun protection factor) herein presented, based on electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR), enables the measurement of free radical reactions in skin biopsies directly during UV radiation. The amount of free radicals varies with UV doses and can be standardized by varying UV irradiance or exposure time. The RSF method allows the determination of the protective effect of UV filters and sunscreens as well as the radical induction capacity of self-tanning agents as dihydroxyacetone (DHA). The reaction of the reducing sugars used in self-tanning products and amino acids in the skin layer (Maillard reaction) leads to the formation of Amadori products that generate free radicals during UV irradiation. Using the RSF method three different self-tanning agents were analyzed and it was found, that in DHA-treated skin more than 180% additional radicals were generated during sun exposure with respect to untreated skin. For this reason the exposure duration in the sun must be shortened when self-tanners are used and photoaging processes are accelerated.

  7. Generation and transport of double-bunch electron beams in the FLASH beamline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Entrena Utrilla, Carlos Manuel

    2014-10-01

    The Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) is part of the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) research center. Its linear accelerator produces high-quality electron bunches of up to about 1.2 GeV that are used in its undulator to generate short, intense, high-brilliance soft-X ray pulses with a wavelength from 4.2 nm to 45 nm with the SASE process. This characteristics make FLASH a leading facility worldwide in photon science and linear accelerator technologies, along with the Linac Coherent Light Source (in SLAC, Standford, USA), the FERMI rate at Elettra in Trieste (Italy) and SACLA (Japan). For several reasons, there is a substantial interest to accelerate two electron bunches with a final temporal distance of several hundreds of femtoseconds. These two bunches are generated on the photocathode within picoseconds from each other and accelerated within the same RF bucket (the same period of the RF (radio-frequency) accelerating fields). These experiments are of interest for two-color FEL for pump-probe experiments, and for the external injection of electrons in the future particle-driven plasma wakefield accelerator experiment, called FLASHForward, which will start in early 2016. This work analyzes the longitudinal dynamics of said double-bunches, from generation on the photocathode to the transport and compression through the linac. It is shown how a working point for a desired compression scenario (shape and final current of the bunches, and final distance between them) can be found with different numerical tracking procedures, and how the electrons can be experimentally generated and transported through the accelerator in the current layout, which was confirmed in a proof-of-concept experiment in late May 2014.

  8. Generation of the auroral electron velocity distribution by electrostatic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, D.A.; Cook, A.C.; Wang, Z.-S.; Angelis, U. de; Perry, C.H.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown from first principles that the characteristic peak in the auroral electron velocity distribution can be generated stochastically through resonant interactions with lower-hybrid electrostatic turbulence. The peak itself is shown to be the inevitable consequence of restrictions imposed on random walk in velocity space by the limitation in wave group velocity. A Monte-Carlo model of the process demonstrates how the various properties of the acceleration region are reflected in the resultant electron distribution. It is shown, in particular, that the width of the peak is governed by the amplitude of the turbulence, while the amplitude of the peak reflects the column density of wave energy. Electron distributions encountered within three auroral arcs are interpreted to yield order of magnitude estimates of the amplitude and rms electric field of lower-hybrid wave packets. The velocities and frequencies of the resonant waves, the net electric field, the column density of wave energy and the electric field energy density are also estimated. The results are found to be not inconsistent with available electric-field measurements. (author)

  9. Simple method for generating adjustable trains of picosecond electron bunches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Muggli

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A simple, passive method for producing an adjustable train of picosecond electron bunches is demonstrated. The key component of this method is an electron beam mask consisting of an array of parallel wires that selectively spoils the beam emittance. This mask is positioned in a high magnetic dispersion, low beta-function region of the beam line. The incoming electron beam striking the mask has a time/energy correlation that corresponds to a time/position correlation at the mask location. The mask pattern is transformed into a time pattern or train of bunches when the dispersion is brought back to zero downstream of the mask. Results are presented of a proof-of-principle experiment demonstrating this novel technique that was performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility. This technique allows for easy tailoring of the bunch train for a particular application, including varying the bunch width and spacing, and enabling the generation of a trailing witness bunch.

  10. Microwave generation and frequency conversion using intense relativistic electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzzi, J.M.; Doucet, H.J.; Etlicher, B.

    1977-01-01

    Some aspects of the microwave generation and frequency conversion by relativistic electron beams are studied. Using an electron synchrotron maser, the excitation of microwaves by an annular relativistic electron beam propagating through a circular wave guide immersed in a longitudinal magnetic field is analyzed. This theoretical model is somewhat more realistic than the previous one because the guiding centers are not on the wave guide axis. Microwave reflection is observed on a R.E.B. front propagating into a gas filled waveguide. The frequency conversion from the incident X-band e.m. waves and the reflected Ka band observed signal is consistent with the Doppler model for β = 0.7. This value agrees with the average beam front velocity as measured from time-of-flight using two B/sub theta/ probes. The reflection is found to occur during the current rise time. With a low impedance device (2 Ω, 400 keV) a GW X-band emission has been observed using thin anodes and a gas filled waveguide. This emission is probably due to the self-fields of the beam and could be used as a diagnostic

  11. Electrical and Electronical Waste Generation in Turkey: Bursa Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güray SALİHOĞLU

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Electrical and electronical equipment that gradually take more place in our daily life, spend their service life in short times and become an e-waste problem to be solved.  Because of the hazardous components they contain, e-waste can cause environmental and human health threats if they are not properly managed. If they are managed properly, they can be a valuable raw material source, since they contain valuable metals such as copper, silver, gold, palladium and recyclable components such as plastics and metals. According to a research conducted in 2014, the global e-waste amount accounts to a source worth 52 billion $; however, only 16% of this source has been properly recycled. It is important to know the potential e-waste amount and the behaviors of people in the production of e-waste to realize a proper e-waste management in our country. The amount and property of electrical and electronic equipment and e-waste generation potential per person in Bursa was investigated in this study. A questionnaire was prepared and applied to a group of people including 31 families (100 person. The questions were to investigate the behaviors in the use, replacement, and management of electrical and electronical equipment. The findings showed that usage of lamps (fluorescent and others were higher than the other equipment, and usage of mobile phones were found to be highest in terms of devices. It was also found that when the mobiles become e-waste since the owners do not want to use them, they are not just thrown away and kept at homes instead. E-waste generation potential of a person from the families investigated was estimated to be 8.14 kg/year.

  12. Electronic Control Of Small Hydro-Generators Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz B, Pedro; Torres M, Carlos A.

    1994-01-01

    The present project arises for the Colombian population's necessity to overcome the underdevelopment, the poverty, the education and the level of life in rural areas of difficult access, for an economic rural electrification. The UIS, by means of the advisory committee of investigations of the ability of Physical-mechanical Sciences and the ability of Electricity and Electronic, it begins the process of developing in 1991 a study of economic and reliable control for the handling of small micro-centrals. Providing from electric power to the rural sector is a world problem, and have more than enough this some countries (China, Nepal, Peru, The islands of Papua, New Guinea), they have made investigations, outlining and building central micro controlled by microprocessor. The present study is developed with the objective of carrying out a load control that acts reliable and quickly. Traditionally they have been come using mechanical governors, which are those in charge of making the load control by means of valves that regulate the flow of water in the turbines, involving this way big retards characteristic of any mechanical control. In summary, the electronic governor of load presents on the mechanical governor, the advantage of acting to more speed and consequently to maintain stable the frequency of the system. To continue with the study, the objective that this project must develop, is an electronic control of load which presents to a small hydro generator, a relatively constant and independent electric load that the demanded consumption for the user varies from none to full load, given as initial parameters a constant flow in the turbine and a control in the line tension. This way it seeks to improve the energy quality given by isolated generators

  13. Designed azurins show lower reorganization free energies for intraprotein electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Marshall, Nicholas M; Wherland, Scot

    2013-01-01

    Low reorganization free energies are necessary for fast electron transfer (ET) reactions. Hence, rational design of redox proteins with lower reorganization free energies has been a long-standing challenge, promising to yield a deeper understanding of the underlying principles of ET reactivity...

  14. Electronic Control Of Small Hydro-Generators Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez G, Alvaro; Romero A, Carlos E.

    1993-01-01

    This work is the beginning of several applied itineraries, to the government of micro-centrals, mainly directed to the control of electric variables of the generator with the desire of obtaining a system of electric generation to drop it climbs, economic, reliable and with great sense of use of the hydraulic resources guided to poor communities, isolated of the system of national interconnection. In all hydroelectric power station without caring their capacity is fundamental to govern the speed of the system turbine generator, to guarantee a constant frequency of 60 Hz, the stability of this parameter is a measure of the quality of the energy given to the user. The used regulation method is the mechanical governor, its action it is to control the flow of water that it enters to the turbine. For small generation power stations (smaller to 200 Kw), the mechanical governor's cost is comparable to the total cost of the plant, then it is economic to use an electronic load control. The project develops the load control whose function is to add external electric load to the generator to maintain the constant nominal active power and similar to the power nominal mechanics surrendered by the turbine. The microprocessor 8088 dedicated to the control of the system by the complexity of the process, the quantity of variables and the precision in the answer of the system is used. To carry out the investigation project a simulation program it was designed in computer that allows to know the answer of the load control ahead of time for different conditions of the user's operation. These results were answered with the obtained experimental values of the final tests of the team, throwing very near values to those calculated

  15. First lasing of the Darmstadt cw free electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Brunken, M; Eichhorn, R; Genz, H; Gräf, H D; Loos, H; Richter, A; Schweizer, B; Stascheck, A; Wesp, T

    1999-01-01

    The Darmstadt CW FEL designed for wavelengths between 3 and 10 mu m driven by the superconducting electron accelerator S-DALINAC first lased on December 1st, 1996 and has operated thereafter successfully in the wavelength region between 6.6 and 7.8 mu m. The pulsed electron beam employed had a micro pulse length of about 2ps, with a repetition rate of 10 MHz and a peak current of 2.7 A while its energy was varied between 29.6 and 31.5 MeV. A wedged pole hybrid undulator, with 80 periods each of 0.032 m length and a magnetic field strength of 0.15-0.4T, was located in between a 15.01 m long optical cavity equipped with two high reflectivity (99.8) mirrors of 0.05 m diameter. Due to the low beam current special care with respect to the electron and optical beam properties was necessary to meet the stringent conditions in order to reach a minute small signal gain of at least a few percent resulting in amplification. Saturation was obtained after about 2000 repetitions of the photon pulse inside the cavity. The D...

  16. Imaging the ultrafast Kerr effect, free carrier generation, relaxation and ablation dynamics of Lithium Niobate irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Lechuga, Mario, E-mail: mario@io.cfmac.csic.es; Siegel, Jan, E-mail: j.siegel@io.cfmac.csic.es; Hernandez-Rueda, Javier; Solis, Javier [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-21

    The interaction of high-power single 130 femtosecond (fs) laser pulses with the surface of Lithium Niobate is experimentally investigated in this work. The use of fs-resolution time-resolved microscopy allows us to separately observe the instantaneous optical Kerr effect induced by the pulse and the generation of a free electron plasma. The maximum electron density is reached 550 fs after the peak of the Kerr effect, confirming the presence of a delayed carrier generation mechanism. We have also observed the appearance of transient Newton rings during the ablation process, related to optical interference of the probe beam reflected at the front and back surface of the ablating layer. Finally, we have analyzed the dynamics of the photorefractive effect on a much longer time scale by measuring the evolution of the transmittance of the irradiated area for different fluences below the ablation threshold.

  17. Imaging the ultrafast Kerr effect, free carrier generation, relaxation and ablation dynamics of Lithium Niobate irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Lechuga, Mario; Siegel, Jan; Hernandez-Rueda, Javier; Solis, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of high-power single 130 femtosecond (fs) laser pulses with the surface of Lithium Niobate is experimentally investigated in this work. The use of fs-resolution time-resolved microscopy allows us to separately observe the instantaneous optical Kerr effect induced by the pulse and the generation of a free electron plasma. The maximum electron density is reached 550 fs after the peak of the Kerr effect, confirming the presence of a delayed carrier generation mechanism. We have also observed the appearance of transient Newton rings during the ablation process, related to optical interference of the probe beam reflected at the front and back surface of the ablating layer. Finally, we have analyzed the dynamics of the photorefractive effect on a much longer time scale by measuring the evolution of the transmittance of the irradiated area for different fluences below the ablation threshold.

  18. Free radical generation induced by ultrasound in red wine and model wine: An EPR spin-trapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-An; Shen, Yuan; Fan, Xue-Hui; Martín, Juan Francisco García; Wang, Xi; Song, Yun

    2015-11-01

    Direct evidence for the formation of 1-hydroxylethyl radicals by ultrasound in red wine and air-saturated model wine is presented in this paper. Free radicals are thought to be the key intermediates in the ultrasound processing of wine, but their nature has not been established yet. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping with 5,5-dimethyl-l-pyrrolin N-oxide (DMPO) was used for the detection of hydroxyl free radicals and 1-hydroxylethyl free radicals. Spin adducts of hydroxyl free radicals were detected in DMPO aqueous solution after sonication while 1-hydroxylethyl free radical adducts were observed in ultrasound-processed red wine and model wine. The latter radical arose from ethanol oxidation via the hydroxyl radical generated by ultrasound in water, thus providing the first direct evidence of the formation of 1-hydroxylethyl free radical in red wine exposed to ultrasound. Finally, the effects of ultrasound frequency, ultrasound power, temperature and ultrasound exposure time were assessed on the intensity of 1-hydroxylethyl radical spin adducts in model wine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Runaway electron generation during plasma shutdown by killer pellet injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal, K; Feher, T; Smith, H; Fueloep, T; Helander, P

    2008-01-01

    Tokamak discharges are sometimes terminated by disruptions that may cause large mechanical and thermal loads on the vessel. To mitigate disruption-induced problems it has been proposed that 'killer' pellets could be injected into the plasma in order to safely terminate the discharge. Killer pellets enhance radiative energy loss and thereby lead to rapid cooling and shutdown of the discharge. But pellets may also cause runaway electron generation, as has been observed in experiments in several tokamaks. In this work, runaway dynamics in connection with deuterium or carbon pellet-induced fast plasma shutdown is considered. A pellet code, which calculates the material deposition and initial cooling caused by the pellet is coupled to a runaway code, which determines the subsequent temperature evolution and runaway generation. In this way, a tool has been created to test the suitability of different pellet injection scenarios for disruption mitigation. If runaway generation is avoided, the resulting current quench times are too long to safely avoid large forces on the vessel due to halo currents

  20. Direct electron transfer of glucose oxidase promoted by carbon nanotubes is without value in certain mediator-free applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.; Yao, Y.

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the direct electron transfer (DET) promoted by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on an electrode containing immobilized glucose oxidase (GOx) with the aim to develop a third-generation glucose biosensor and a mediator-free glucose biofuel cell anode. GOx was immobilized via chitosan (CS) on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Cyclic voltammetric revealed that the GOx on the surface of such an electrode is unable to simultaneously demonstrate DET with the electrode and to retain its catalytic activity towards glucose, although the MWCNTs alone can promote electron transfer between GOx and electrode. This is interpreted in terms of two types of GOx on the surface, the distribution and properties of which are quite different. The first type exhibits DET capability that results from the collaboration of MWCNTs and metal impurities, but is unable to catalyze the oxidation of glucose. The second type maintains its glucose-specific catalytic capability in the presence of a mediator, which can be enhanced by MWCNTs, but cannot undergo DET with the electrode. As a result, the MWCNTs are capable of promoting the electron transfer, but this is without value in some mediator-free applications such as in third-generation glucose biosensors and in mediator-free anodes for glucose biofuel cells. (author)

  1. Performance simulation of a spark ignited free-piston engine generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikalsen, R.; Roskilly, A.P. [Sir Joseph Swan Institute for Energy Research, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-15

    Free-piston engines are under investigation by a number of research groups worldwide due to potential fuel efficiency and engine emissions advantages. The free-piston engine generator, in which a linear electric generator is fixed to the mover to produce electric power, has been proposed as an alternative prime mover for hybrid-electric vehicles. This paper investigates the performance of a spark ignited free-piston engine generator and compares it to a conventional engine using a computational fluid dynamics simulation model. The particular operating characteristics of the free-piston engine were not found to give noticeable performance advantages, and it is concluded that the main potential of this technology lies in the simplicity and flexibility of the concept. (author)

  2. On generator systems for non-torsion Abelian groups of infinite free rank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedenko, V.M.

    1977-01-01

    The paper is further advance in solution of the Dlab problem related to the systems of generators of Abelian groups. Some existence criteria for hereditarily strongly reducible systems of generators of Abelian groups are presented. On this basis the distribution of non-torsion groups of infinite free rank on Dlab's classes is obtained

  3. Next generation of electron-positron colliding beam machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1979-03-01

    The contribution of electron-positron colliding beam experiments to high-energy physics in the 1970's has been prodigious. From the research done with the two highest-energy e + e - machines of the present generation of these devices, have come such things as the discovery and illumination of the properties of the psi family, charmed particles, a new heavy lepton, non-ambigious evidence for hadronic jets, etc. The rapid pace of new developments in physics from such machines comes about for two reasons. First, the electron-positron annihilation process at present energies is particularly simple and well understood, making the problem of determining the quantum numbers and properties of new particles particularly simple. Second, in electron-positron annihilation all final states are on a relatively equal footing, and small production cross sections are compensated for by a lack of confusing background. For example, the rate of production of charmed particles at the SPEAR storage ring at SLAC and the DORIS storage ring at DESY is 3 or 4 orders of magnitude less than the rate of production at FNAL and the SPS. Yet these particles were first found at the storage rings where the background cross sections are comparable to the signal cross section, and have not yet been observed directly by their hadronic decays at the proton machines where the background cross sections are 4 orders of magnitude larger than the signal cross sections. The machines PEP at SLAC and PETRA at DESY will soon be operating at 35 to 40 GeV cm to explore new regions of energy. Studies of electron-positron annihilation at much higher energies than presently planned have a great deal to teach, not only about particle structure and dynamics, but also about the nature of the weak interaction. Some of the physics which can be done with such machines is discussed with a view toward getting an idea of the minimum required energy for the new generation of colliding beam devices

  4. Gyrokinetic electron acceleration in the force-free corona with anomalous resistivity

    OpenAIRE

    Arzner, Kaspar; Vlahos, Loukas

    2006-01-01

    We numerically explore electron acceleration and coronal heating by dissipative electric fields. Electrons are traced in linear force-free magnetic fields extrapolated from SOHO/MDI magnetograms, endowed with anomalous resistivity ($\\eta$) in localized dissipation regions where the magnetic twist $\

  5. Nonlinear effects and conversion efficiency of free electron laser in compton regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Toshihiro; Mima, Kunioki; Mochizuki, Takayasu

    1980-01-01

    Nonlinear evolutions of free electron laser are analyzed by using quasi-linear theory. By the analysis, the energy conversion rates and the spectral width of the emitted radiations are calculated self-consistently. Moreover, it is found that the energy conversion rate is remarkably improved, when a RF field is applied to reaccelerate electron beam. (author)

  6. The general particle tracer code applied to the fusion free-electron maser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Loos, M. J.; van der Geer, S. B.; van der Geer, C. A. J.; Verhoeven, A. G. A.; Urbanus, W. H.

    1998-01-01

    The fusion Free-Electron Maser (FEM) is the prototype of a high power, electrostatic mm-wave source, tunable in the range 130-260 GHz. In order to achieve a high overall efficiency, the charge and energy of the spent electron beam, i.e. the beam which leaves the undulator after interaction with the

  7. Rigorous bounds on the free energy of electron-phonon models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, Hans De; Michielsen, Kristel

    1997-01-01

    We present a collection of rigorous upper and lower bounds to the free energy of electron-phonon models with linear electron-phonon interaction. These bounds are used to compare different variational approaches. It is shown rigorously that the ground states corresponding to the sharpest bounds do

  8. State-of-the-art of high power gyro-devices and free electron masers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thumm, M.

    1993-10-01

    At present, gyrotron oscillators are mainly used as high power millimeter wave sources for electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and diagnostics of magnetically confined plasmas for generation of energy by controlled thermonuclear fusion. 140 GHz gyrotrons with output power P out = 0.58 MW, pulse length τ = 2.0 s and efficiency η = 34% are commercially available. Diagnostic gyrotrons deliver P out = 40 kW with τ = 40 μs at frequencies up to 650 GHz (η ≥ 4%). Recently, gyrotron oscillators have also been successfully used in material processing and plasma chemistry. Such technological applications require gyrotrons with the following parameters: f ≥ 28 GHz, P out = 10-30 kW, CW, η ≥ 30%. This paper reports on achievements and problems related to the development of very high power mm-wave gyrotrons for long pulse or CW operation and describes the microwave technological pecularities of the different development steps. In addition, this work gives a short overview of the present development of gyrotrons for technological applications, quasi-optical gyrotrons, cyclotron autoresonance masers (CARMs), gyro-klystrons, gyro-TWT amplifiers, gyro-BWO's and free electron masers (FEMs). The most impressive FEM output parameters are: P out = 2 GW, τ = 20 ns, η = 13% at 140 GHz (LLNL) and P out = 15 kW, τ = 20 μs, η = 5% in the range from 120 to 900 GHz (UCSB). (orig.) [de

  9. Recirculating accelerator driver for a high-power free-electron laser: A design overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohn, C.L.

    1997-01-01

    Jefferson Lab is building a free-electron laser (FEL) to produce continuous-wave (cw), kW-level light at 3-6 μm wavelength. A superconducting linac will drive the laser, generating a 5 mA average current, 42 MeV energy electron beam. A transport lattice will recirculate the beam back to the linac for deceleration and conversion of about 75% of its power into rf power. Bunch charge will range up to 135 pC, and bunch lengths will range down to 1 ps in parts of the transport lattice. Accordingly, space charge in the injector and coherent synchrotron radiation in magnetic bends come into play. The machine will thus enable studying these phenomena as a precursor to designing compact accelerators of high-brightness beams. The FEL is scheduled to be installed in its own facility by 1 October 1997. Given the short schedule, the machine design is conservative, based on modifications of the CEBAF cryomodule and MIT-Bates transport lattice. This paper surveys the machine design

  10. Comments on advanced, time-resolved imaging techniques for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1992-01-01

    An extensive set of time-resolved imaging experiments has been performed on rf-linac driven free-electron lasers (FELs) over the past few years. These experiments have addressed both micropulse and macropulse timescales on both the charged-particle beam and the wiggler/undulator outputs (spontaneous emission and lasing). A brief review of first measurements on photoinjecter micropulse elongation, submacropulse phase slew in drive lasers, submacropulse wavelength shifts in lasers, etc. is presented. This is followed by discussions of new measurements of 35-MeV electron beam micropulse bunch length (<10 ps) using optical transition radiation, some of the first single bend synchrotron radiation beam profile measurements at gamma <80, and comments on the low-jitter synchroscan streak camera tuner. These techniques will be further developed on the 200-650 MeV linac test stand at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in the next few years. Such techniques should be adaptable to many of the present FEL designs and to some aspects of the next generation of light sources.

  11. Comments on advanced, time-resolved imaging techniques for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1992-11-01

    An extensive set of time-resolved imaging experiments has been performed on rf-linac driven free-electron lasers (FELs) over the past few years. These experiments have addressed both micropulse and macropulse timescales on both the charged-particle beam and the wiggler/undulator outputs (spontaneous emission and lasing). A brief review of first measurements on photoinjecter micropulse elongation, submacropulse phase slew in drive lasers, submacropulse wavelength shifts in lasers, etc. is presented. This is followed by discussions of new measurements of 35-MeV electron beam micropulse bunch length (<10 ps) using optical transition radiation, some of the first single bend synchrotron radiation beam profile measurements at gamma <80, and comments on the low-jitter synchroscan streak camera tuner. These techniques will be further developed on the 200-650 MeV linac test stand at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in the next few years. Such techniques should be adaptable to many of the present FEL designs and to some aspects of the next generation of light sources.

  12. High-power free-electron lasers-technology and future applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socol, Yehoshua

    2013-03-01

    Free-electron laser (FEL) is an all-electric, high-power, high beam-quality source of coherent radiation, tunable - unlike other laser sources - at any wavelength within wide spectral region from hard X-rays to far-IR and beyond. After the initial push in the framework of the “Star Wars” program, the FEL technology benefited from decades of R&D and scientific applications. Currently, there are clear signs that the FEL technology reached maturity, enabling real-world applications. E.g., successful and unexpectedly smooth commissioning of the world-first X-ray FEL in 2010 increased in one blow by more than an order of magnitude (40×) wavelength region available by FEL technology and thus demonstrated that the theoretical predictions just keep true in real machines. Experience of ordering turn-key electron beamlines from commercial companies is a further demonstration of the FEL technology maturity. Moreover, successful commissioning of the world-first multi-turn energy-recovery linac demonstrated feasibility of reducing FEL size, cost and power consumption by probably an order of magnitude in respect to previous configurations, opening way to applications, previously considered as non-feasible. This review takes engineer-oriented approach to discuss the FEL technology issues, keeping in mind applications in the fields of military and aerospace, next generation semiconductor lithography, photo-chemistry and isotope separation.

  13. Collimation system for the VUV free-electron laser at the TESLA test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlarb, H.

    2001-11-01

    To perform a proof-of-principle experiment for a Free Electron Laser operating at VUV wavelengths an undulator has been installed in the TESLA Test Facility linac phase I. To meet the requirements on the magnetic field quality in the undulator, a hybrid type structure with NdFeB permanent magnets has been chosen. The permanent magnets are sensitive to radiation by high energy particles. In order to perform the various experiments planned at the TESLA Test Facility linac, a collimator section has been installed to protect the undulator from radiation. In this thesis the design, performance and required steps for commissioning the collimator system are presented. To identify potential difficulties for the linac operation, the beam halo and the dark current transport through the entire linac is discussed. Losses of primary electrons caused by technical failures, component misalignments, and operation errors are investigated by tracking simulations, in order to derive a complete understanding of the absorbed dose in the permanent magnets of the undulator. Various topics related to a collimator system such as the removal of secondary particles produced at the collimators, generation and shielding of neutrons, excitation of wake fields, and beam based alignment concepts are important subjects of this thesis. (orig.)

  14. Higher-order harmonics coupling in different free-electron laser codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannessi, L.; Freund, H. P.; Musumeci, P.; Reiche, S.

    2008-08-01

    The capability for simulation of the dynamics of a free-electron laser including the higher-order harmonics in linear undulators exists in several existing codes as MEDUSA [H.P. Freund, S.G. Biedron, and S.V. Milton, IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 27 (2000) 243; H.P. Freund, Phys. Rev. ST-AB 8 (2005) 110701] and PERSEO [L. Giannessi, Overview of Perseo, a system for simulating FEL dynamics in Mathcad, , in: Proceedings of FEL 2006 Conference, BESSY, Berlin, Germany, 2006, p. 91], and has been recently implemented in GENESIS 1.3 [See ]. MEDUSA and GENESIS also include the dynamics of even harmonics induced by the coupling through the betatron motion. In addition MEDUSA, which is based on a non-wiggler averaged model, is capable of simulating the generation of even harmonics in the transversally cold beam regime, i.e. when the even harmonic coupling arises from non-linear effects associated with longitudinal particle dynamics and not to a finite beam emittance. In this paper a comparison between the predictions of the codes in different conditions is given.

  15. Recirculating accelerator driver for a high-power free-electron laser: A design overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohn, C.L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    1997-06-01

    Jefferson Lab is building a free-electron laser (FEL) to produce continuous-wave (cw), kW-level light at 3-6 {mu}m wavelength. A superconducting linac will drive the laser, generating a 5 mA average current, 42 MeV energy electron beam. A transport lattice will recirculate the beam back to the linac for deceleration and conversion of about 75% of its power into rf power. Bunch charge will range up to 135 pC, and bunch lengths will range down to 1 ps in parts of the transport lattice. Accordingly, space charge in the injector and coherent synchrotron radiation in magnetic bends come into play. The machine will thus enable studying these phenomena as a precursor to designing compact accelerators of high-brightness beams. The FEL is scheduled to be installed in its own facility by 1 October 1997. Given the short schedule, the machine design is conservative, based on modifications of the CEBAF cryomodule and MIT-Bates transport lattice. This paper surveys the machine design.

  16. Dispersion relation and growth rate in a Cherenkov free electron laser: Finite axial magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kheiri, Golshad; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi

    2013-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented for dispersion relation and growth rate in a Cherenkov free electron laser with finite axial magnetic field. It is shown that the growth rate and the resonance frequency of Cherenkov free electron laser increase with increasing axial magnetic field for low axial magnetic fields, while for high axial magnetic fields, they go to a saturation value. The growth rate and resonance frequency saturation values are exactly the same as those for infinite axial magnetic field approximation. The effects of electron beam self-fields on growth rate are investigated, and it is shown that the growth rate decreases in the presence of self-fields. It is found that there is an optimum value for electron beam density and Lorentz relativistic factor at which the maximum growth rate can take place. Also, the effects of velocity spread of electron beam are studied and it is found that the growth rate decreases due to the electron velocity spread

  17. Collision free path generation in 3D with turning and pitch radius constraints for aerial vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schøler, F.; La Cour-Harbo, A.; Bisgaard, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of trajectory generation in 3D for uninhabited aerial systems (UAS). The proposed algorithm for trajectory generation allows us to find a feasible collision-free 3D trajectory through a number of waypoints in an environment containing obstacles. Our approach...... assumes that most of the aircraft structural and dynamic limitations can be formulated as a turn radius constraint, and that any two consecutive waypoints have line-of-sight. The generated trajectories are collision free and also satisfy a constraint on the minimum admissible turning radius, while...

  18. Electron mean free path from angle-dependent photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldmann, Maximilian; Miguel-Sánchez, Javier; West, Adam H. C.; Yoder, Bruce L.; Signorell, Ruth, E-mail: rsignorell@ethz.ch [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zürich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-06-14

    We propose angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol particles as an alternative way to determine the electron mean free path of low energy electrons in solid and liquid materials. The mean free path is obtained from fits of simulated photoemission images to experimental ones over a broad range of different aerosol particle sizes. The principal advantage of the aerosol approach is twofold. First, aerosol photoemission studies can be performed for many different materials, including liquids. Second, the size-dependent anisotropy of the photoelectrons can be exploited in addition to size-dependent changes in their kinetic energy. These finite size effects depend in different ways on the mean free path and thus provide more information on the mean free path than corresponding liquid jet, thin film, or bulk data. The present contribution is a proof of principle employing a simple model for the photoemission of electrons and preliminary experimental data for potassium chloride aerosol particles.

  19. Electron Production and Collective Field Generation in Intense Particle Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A W; Vay, J; Cohen, R; Friedman, A; Lee, E; Verboncoeur, J; Covo, M K

    2006-01-01

    Electron cloud effects (ECEs) are increasingly recognized as important, but incompletely understood, dynamical phenomena, which can severely limit the performance of present electron colliders, the next generation of high-intensity rings, such as PEP-II upgrade, LHC, and the SNS, the SIS 100/200, or future high-intensity heavy ion accelerators such as envisioned in Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion (HIF). Deleterious effects include ion-electron instabilities, emittance growth, particle loss, increase in vacuum pressure, added heat load at the vacuum chamber walls, and interference with certain beam diagnostics. Extrapolation of present experience to significantly higher beam intensities is uncertain given the present level of understanding. With coordinated LDRD projects at LLNL and LBNL, we undertook a comprehensive R and D program including experiments, theory and simulations to better understand the phenomena, establish the essential parameters, and develop mitigating mechanisms. This LDRD project laid the essential groundwork for such a program. We developed insights into the essential processes, modeled the relevant physics, and implemented these models in computational production tools that can be used for self-consistent study of the effect on ion beams. We validated the models and tools through comparison with experimental data, including data from new diagnostics that we developed as part of this work and validated on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL. We applied these models to High-Energy Physics (HEP) and other advanced accelerators. This project was highly successful, as evidenced by the two paragraphs above, and six paragraphs following that are taken from our 2003 proposal with minor editing that mostly consisted of changing the tense. Further benchmarks of outstanding performance are: we had 13 publications with 8 of them in refereed journals, our work was recognized by the accelerator and plasma physics communities by 8 invited papers and we have

  20. Influence of the electron density on the characteristics of terahertz waves generated under laser–cluster interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frolov, A. A., E-mail: frolov@ihed.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    A theory of generation of terahertz radiation under laser–cluster interaction, developed earlier for an overdense cluster plasma [A. A. Frolov, Plasma Phys. Rep. 42. 637 (2016)], is generalized for the case of arbitrary electron density. The spectral composition of radiation is shown to substantially depend on the density of free electrons in the cluster. For an underdense cluster plasma, there is a sharp peak in the terahertz spectrum at the frequency of the quadrupole mode of a plasma sphere. As the electron density increases to supercritical values, this spectral line vanishes and a broad maximum at the frequency comparable with the reciprocal of the laser pulse duration appears in the spectrum. The dependence of the total energy of terahertz radiation on the density of free electrons is analyzed. The radiation yield is shown to increase significantly under resonance conditions, when the laser frequency is close to the eigenfrequency of the dipole or quadrupole mode of a plasma sphere.

  1. Hot Electron Generation and Transport Using Kα Emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akli, K.U.; Stephens, R.B.; Key, M.H.; Bartal, T.; Beg, F.N.; Chawla, S.; Chen, C.D.; Fedosejevs, R.; Freeman, R.R.; Friesen, H.; Giraldez, E.; Green, J.S.; Hey, D.S.; Higginson, D.P.; Hund, J.; Jarrott, L.C.; Kemp, G.E.; King, J.A.; Kryger, A.; Lancaster, K.; LePape, S.; Link, A.; Ma, T.; Mackinnon, A.J.; MacPhee, A.G.; McLean, H.S.; Murphy, C.; Norreys, P.A.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Patel, P.K.; Ping, Y.; Sawada, H.; Schumacher, D.; Theobald, W.; Tsui, Y.Y.; Van Woerkom, L.D.; Wei, M.S.; Westover, B.; Yabuuchi, T.

    2010-01-01

    We have conducted experiments on both the Vulcan and Titan laser facilities to study hot electron generation and transport in the context of fast ignition. Cu wires attached to Al cones were used to investigate the effect on coupling efficiency of plasma surround and the pre-formed plasma inside the cone. We found that with thin cones 15% of laser energy is coupled to the 40(micro)m diameter wire emulating a 40(micro)m fast ignition spot. Thick cone walls, simulating plasma in fast ignition, reduce coupling by x4. An increase of prepulse level inside the cone by a factor of 50 reduces coupling by a factor of 3.

  2. Higher harmonics generation in relativistic electron beam with virtual cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurkin, S. A., E-mail: KurkinSA@gmail.com; Badarin, A. A.; Koronovskii, A. A.; Hramov, A. E. [Saratov State Technical University, Politechnicheskaja 77, Saratov 410028, Russia and Saratov State University, Astrakhanskaja 83, Saratov 410012 (Russian Federation)

    2014-09-15

    The study of the microwave generation regimes with intense higher harmonics taking place in a high-power vircator consisting of a relativistic electron beam with a virtual cathode has been made. The characteristics of these regimes, in particular, the typical spectra and their variations with the change of the system parameters (beam current, the induction of external magnetic field) as well as physical processes occurring in the system have been analyzed by means of 3D electromagnetic simulation. It has been shown that the system under study demonstrates the tendency to the sufficient growth of the amplitudes of higher harmonics in the spectrum of current oscillations in the VC region with the increase of beam current. The obtained results allow us to consider virtual cathode oscillators as promising high power mmw-to-THz sources.

  3. The chirped-pulse free-electron laser: Final technical report, September 1987--October 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, G.T.

    1989-01-01

    This is the final report of a theoretical and numerical investigation into the operation of pulsed free-electron lasers in which the electron energy depends on the time of injection into the wiggler. Such energy ''chirping'' over each of a train of electron micropulses injected into an FEL oscillator is expected to give rise to a laser pulse inside the optical resonator with a chirped carrier frequency ω/sub s/(/tau/). 8 refs., 7 figs

  4. Properties of the transfer matrices of deflecting magnet systems for free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takao, Masaru

    1993-01-01

    The oscillation of the free electron laser (FEL) requires the high current and low emittance electron beam. The beam transport system should be achromatic and isochronous to preserve the brightness and the emittance of the electron beam. In this paper we clarify the algebraic properties of the transfer matrices of the magnetic deflection system, which is a key component in the beam transport line. (author)

  5. Conceptual design of a laser-plasma accelerator driven free-electron laser demonstration experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seggebrock, Thorben

    2015-01-01

    Up to now, short-wavelength free-electron lasers (FEL) have been systems on the scale of hundreds of meters up to multiple kilometers. Due to the advancements in laser-plasma acceleration in the recent years, these accelerators have become a promising candidate for driving a fifth-generation synchrotron light source - a lab-scale free-electron laser. So far, demonstration experiments have been hindered by the broad energy spread typical for this type of accelerator. This thesis addresses the most important challenges of the conceptual design for a first lab-scale FEL demonstration experiment using analytical considerations as well as simulations. The broad energy spread reduces the FEL performance directly by weakening the microbunching and indirectly via chromatic emittance growth, caused by the focusing system. Both issues can be mitigated by decompressing the electron bunch in a magnetic chicane, resulting in a sorting by energies. This reduces the local energy spread as well as the local chromatic emittance growth and also lowers performance degradations caused by the short bunch length. Moreover, the energy dependent focus position leads to a focus motion within the bunch, which can be synchronized with the radiation pulse, maximizing the current density in the interaction region. This concept is termed chromatic focus matching. A comparison shows the advantages of the longitudinal decompression concept compared to the alternative approach of transverse dispersion. When using typical laser-plasma based electron bunches, coherent synchrotron radiation and space-charge contribute in equal measure to the emittance growth during decompression. It is shown that a chicane for this purpose must not be as weak and long as affordable to reduce coherent synchrotron radiation, but that an intermediate length is required. Furthermore, the interplay of the individual concepts and components is assessed in a start-to-end simulation, confirming the feasibility of the

  6. Conceptual design of a laser-plasma accelerator driven free-electron laser demonstration experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seggebrock, Thorben

    2015-07-08

    Up to now, short-wavelength free-electron lasers (FEL) have been systems on the scale of hundreds of meters up to multiple kilometers. Due to the advancements in laser-plasma acceleration in the recent years, these accelerators have become a promising candidate for driving a fifth-generation synchrotron light source - a lab-scale free-electron laser. So far, demonstration experiments have been hindered by the broad energy spread typical for this type of accelerator. This thesis addresses the most important challenges of the conceptual design for a first lab-scale FEL demonstration experiment using analytical considerations as well as simulations. The broad energy spread reduces the FEL performance directly by weakening the microbunching and indirectly via chromatic emittance growth, caused by the focusing system. Both issues can be mitigated by decompressing the electron bunch in a magnetic chicane, resulting in a sorting by energies. This reduces the local energy spread as well as the local chromatic emittance growth and also lowers performance degradations caused by the short bunch length. Moreover, the energy dependent focus position leads to a focus motion within the bunch, which can be synchronized with the radiation pulse, maximizing the current density in the interaction region. This concept is termed chromatic focus matching. A comparison shows the advantages of the longitudinal decompression concept compared to the alternative approach of transverse dispersion. When using typical laser-plasma based electron bunches, coherent synchrotron radiation and space-charge contribute in equal measure to the emittance growth during decompression. It is shown that a chicane for this purpose must not be as weak and long as affordable to reduce coherent synchrotron radiation, but that an intermediate length is required. Furthermore, the interplay of the individual concepts and components is assessed in a start-to-end simulation, confirming the feasibility of the

  7. Electron emission and plasma generation in a modulator electron gun using ferroelectric cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shutao; Zheng Shuxin; Zhu Ziqiu; Dong Xianlin; Tang Chuanxiang

    2006-01-01

    Strong electron emission and dense plasma generation have been observed in a modulator electron gun with a Ba 0.67 Sr 0.33 TiO 3 ferroelectric cathode. Parameter of the modulator electron gun and lifetime of the ferroelectric cathode were investigated. It was shown that electron emission from Ba 0.67 Sr 0.33 TiO 3 cathode with a positive triggering pulse is a sort of plasma emission. Electrons were emitted by the co-effect of surface plasma and non-compensated negative polarization charges at the surface of the ferroelectric. The element analyses of the graphite collector after emission process was performed to show the ingredient of the plasma consist of Ba, Ti and Cu heavy cations of the ceramic compound and electrode. It was demonstrated the validity of the Child-Langmuir law by introducing the decrease of vacuum gap and increase of emission area caused by the expansion of the surface plasma

  8. The Generation Mechanism of Airy—Bessel Wave Packets in Free Space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Zhi-Jun; Ying Chao-Fu; Fan Chang-Jiang; Wu Qiong

    2012-01-01

    Localized optical Airy—Bessel configuration wave packets were first generated on the basis of a grating-telescope combination [Nat. Photon. 4(2010) 103]. By studying the spatially induced group velocity dispersion effect of ultrashort pulsed Bessel beams during propagation, we find the universal physical foundation of generating Airy—Bessel wave packets (ABWs) in free space. The research results are expected to open up more common channels for generating stable linear localized ABWs

  9. Free radicals produced by the oxidation of gallic acid: An electron paramagnetic resonance study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Brett A

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid is found in a wide variety of plants; it is extensively used in tanning, ink dyes, as well as in the manufacturing of paper. The gallate moiety is a key component of many functional phytochemicals. In this work electron paramagnetic spectroscopy (EPR was used to detect the free radicals generated by the air-oxidation of gallic acid. Results We found that gallic acid produces two different radicals as a function of pH. In the pH range between 7-10, the spectrum of the gallate free radical is a doublet of triplets (aH = 1.00 G, aH = 0.23 G, aH = 0.28 G. This is consistent with three hydrogens providing hyperfine splitting. However, in a more alkaline environment, pH >10, the hyperfine splitting pattern transforms into a 1:2:1 pattern (aH (2 = 1.07 G. Using D2O as a solvent, we demonstrate that the third hydrogen (i.e. aH = 0.28 G at lower pH is a slowly exchanging hydron, participating in hydrogen bonding with two oxygens in ortho position on the gallate ring. The pKa of this proton has been determined to be 10. Conclusions This simple and novel approach permitted the understanding of the prototropic equilibrium of the semiquinone radicals generated by gallic acid, a ubiquitous compound, allowing new insights into its oxidation and subsequent reactions.

  10. Experimental development of a millimeter wave free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radack, D.J.; Bidwell, S.W.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Carmel, Y.; Destler, W.W.; Granatstein, V.L.; Latham, P.E.; Levush, B.; Mayergoyz, I.D.; Rodgers, J.; Zhang, Z.X.

    1990-01-01

    A 1 MW (cw), millimeter wave FEL (λ 3 ∼ 0.5 mm)is currently under development with an application for heating fusion plasmas. Two salient features of the FEL are the use of a short-period wiggler ell w ≤ 10 mm electromagnet and a mildly relativistic (E beam ≤ 1 MeV) sheet electron beam. The FEL has been designed to operate in the high-gain regime and uses a tapered wiggler. The wiggler provides beam focusing as well as the magnetostatic pump wave. The effectiveness of wiggler focusing is being investigated. Planned experiments will address the critical issues of beam interception and stable single-mode operation. 12 refs., 1 tab

  11. Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL) rf system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallerico, P.J.; Lynch, M.T.

    1985-01-01

    The FEL rf system was designed for 3.6-MW rf pulses from two klystrons to drive two linacs and one deflection cavity at 1300 MHz. Two 108.33-MHz subharmonic buncher cavities and one fundamental buncher were also built, each powered by a 5-kW amplifier. A single phase-coherent source drives the various amplifiers as well as the grid of the electron gun, which is pulsed at 21.67 MHz. The initial buncher system did not work as well as expected, and the first linac tank required more rf power than anticipated. The light output was extremely sensitive to amplitude and phase errors. More powerful klystrons were developed and installed, and a method was discovered for operating a single subharmonic buncher and allowing the first linac to complete the bunching process. This paper shows the actual configuration used to operate the laser and discusses future improvements

  12. Generation of the auroral electron velocity distribution by stochastic acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, D.A.; Cook, A.C.; Wang, Z.-S.; Angelis, U. de.

    1990-07-01

    In a further development of the wave theory of the aurora, it is demonstrated, using a Monte-Carlo numerical model, that the characteristic peak in the auroral electron velocity distribution can be generated stochastically through resonant interactions between an initially monotonic distribution and lower-hybrid electrostatic turbulence. The principal requirement is that the velocity spectrum of resonant waves has a sharp cut-off at high velocity. It is then shown that a cut-off is expected as a natural consequence of the difference between the phase and group velocities of lower-hybrid waves. The possibility is considered that a second peak, sometimes observed at lower velocities, is due to the same statistical mechanism, arising from the damping of waves of low phase velocity. An enhancement of wave intensity is found at higher velocities, where momentum flows preferentially from electrons to waves. The relation between the wave theory and the currently prevailing potential-difference theory emerges clearly from the analysis. (author)

  13. Velocity shear generated Alfven waves in electron-positron plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogava, A.D.; Berezhiani, V.I.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    Linear MHD modes in cold, nonrelativistic electron-positron plasma shear flow are considered. The general set of differential equations, describing the evolution of perturbations in the framework of the nonmodal approach is derived. It is found, that under certain circumstances, the compressional and shear Alfven perturbations may exhibit large transient growth fuelled by the mean kinetic energy of the shear flow. The velocity shear also induces mode coupling allowing the exchange of energy as well as the possibility of a strong mutual transformation of these modes into each other. The compressional Alfven mode may extract the energy of the mean flow and transfer it to the shear Alfven mode via this coupling. The relevance of these new physical effects to provide a better understanding of the laboratory e + e - plasma is emphasized. It is speculated that the shear-induced effects in the electron-positron plasmas could also help solve some astrophysical puzzles (e.g., the generation of pulsar radio emission). Since most astrophysical plasma are relativistic, it is shown that the major results of the study remain valid for weakly sheared relativistic plasmas. (author). 21 refs, 4 figs

  14. Investigation of the free electron laser with a guide magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, T.; Dawson, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    The free electron laser with a static guide magnetic field has been investigated theoretically and by computer simulation using a fully relativistic electromagnetic particle code which has one spatial and three velocity dimensions. By passing a relativistic electron beam through a helical magnetic field, high frequency electromagnetic radiation is generated by its coupling to the negative energy electrostatic beam modes through the helical magnetic field. In the regime of strong guide field where Ω/sub c/e/γ>>k 0 v/sub 0z/, the dispersion relation is obtained by using a fluid model for the electron beam and the growth rates are solved for numerically. Reasonable agreement between the theory and the simulations has been obtained. It was found that the growth rate increases linearly with magnetic ripple strength but decreases with the strength of the guide field. In addition, the growth rates also increase slightly with the beam energy. For a reasonably strong guide field (e.g., Ω/sub c/e=6.0ω/sub p/e), the growth rate can be on the order of 0.1ω/sub p/e and the efficiency of radiation production has been found to be as high as 16%. However, the efficiency decreases with the strength of the guide field. A theory for the saturation level is developed which relates the efficiency to the continued growth of the electromagnetic wave after the onset of trapping by the electrostatic field. It is found that the growth continues for about one bounce time and the observed saturation levels are reasonably well explained

  15. SATURNUS: the UCLA infrared free-electron laser project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, J.W.; Hartman, S.C.; Park, S.; Pellegrini, C.; Rosenzweig, J.B.; Smolin, J.A.; Hairapetian, G.; Kolonko, J.; Barletta, W.A.; Cline, D.B.; Favis, J.G.; Joshi, C.J.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Ivanchenkov, S.N.; Khlebnikov, A.S.; Lachin, Y.Y.; Varfolomeev, A.A.

    1991-01-01

    A compact 20 MeV linac with an RF laser-driven electron gun will be used to drive a high-gain (10cm gain length), 10.6 μm wavelength FEL amplifier, operating in the SASE mode. Saturnus will mainly study FEL physics in the high-gain regime, including start-up from noise, optical guiding, sidebands, saturation, and superradiance, with emphasis on the effects important for future short wavelength operation of FEL's. The hybrid undulator was designed and built at the Kurchatov Inst. of Atomic Energy in the USSR. The primary magnetic flux is provided by C-shaped iron yokes, where between the poles thin blocks of neodymium-iron-boron magnets are placed to provide additional magnetic flux along the undulator axis. The field strength is adjusted by moving the thin Nd-Fe-B blocks on a set screw mount. The initial assembly will have forty periods, each 1.5 cm long. The gap distance between the yoke pole-pieces is fixed at 5 mm. The undulator field has been measured, yielding on an axis peak value of 6.6kGauss, which closely matches computer simulations

  16. Design and Optimization of Tube Type Interior Permanent Magnets Generator for Free Piston Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdal ARSLAN

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study a design and optimization of a generator to be used in free piston applications was made. In order to supply required initial force, an IPM (interior permanent magnets cavity tube type linear generator was selected. By using analytical equations’ basic dimensioning of generator was made. By using Ansys-Maxwell dimensioning, analysis and optimization of the generator was realized. Also, the effects of design basic variables (pole step ratio, cavity step ratio, inner diameter - outer diameter ratio, primary final length, air interval on pinking force were examined by using parametric analyses. Among these variables, cavity step ratio, inner diameter - outer diameter ratio, primary final length were optimally determined by algorithm and sequential nonlinear programming. The two methods were compared in terms of pinking force calculation problem. Preliminary application of the linear generator was performed for free piston application.

  17. Tracking the ultrafast XUV optical properties of x-ray free-electron-laser heated matter with high-order harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gareth O.; Künzel, S.; Daboussi, S.; Iwan, B.; Gonzalez, A. I.; Boutu, W.; Hilbert, V.; Zastrau, U.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Granados, E.; Galtier, E.; Heimann, P.; Barbrel, B.; Dovillaire, G.; Lee, R. W.; Dunn, J.; Recoules, V.; Blancard, C.; Renaudin, P.; de la Varga, A. G.; Velarde, P.; Audebert, P.; Merdji, H.; Zeitoun, Ph.; Fajardo, M.

    2018-02-01

    We present measurements of photon absorption by free electrons as a solid is transformed to plasma. A femtosecond x-ray free-electron laser is used to heat a solid, which separates the electron and ion heating time scales. The changes in absorption are measured with an independent probe pulse created through high-order-harmonic generation. We find an increase in electron temperature to have a relatively small impact on absorption, contrary to several predictions, whereas ion heating increases absorption. We compare the data to current theoretical and numerical approaches and find that a smoother electronic structure yields a better fit to the data, suggestive of a temperature-dependent electronic structure in warm dense matter.

  18. Free electron laser amplifier experiments on SG-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hui Zhongxi; Zhou Chuanming; Wu Ruian

    1994-01-01

    The SG-1 FEL facility is composed of a linear induction accelerator (LIA), an electron beam transport system, a wiggler, a microwave source and a diagnostic system. SG-1 LIA provides a 2 kA, 3.0 MeV beam with a normalized emittance of 0.4∼0.6 (π rad·cm), an energy spread (FWHM) of 4%, resulting in a beam brightness of nearly 10 8 A/πm·rad) 2[1] . The beam current through the wiggler is about 600 A. The first ASE experiments began in September 1991. A 2.6-m long wiggler with a peak magnetic field of 0.3 T was used. At 35.8∼36.5 GHz an ASE output of 0.5 W was obtained for a beam current of nearly 50 A. After a shutdown of about 8 months, the second series of ASE experiments began in October 1992. The second series of ASE experiments were performed with a wiggler magnetic field between 0.25∼0.27 T. The maximum output power is about 100 kw for B w = 0.24 T, I = 600 A, At ν = 35.2 GHz. Based on the ASE experiments the amplifier experiments was carried out on SG-1. Using an 300 W input signal (TE 01 ), a beam current of about 600 A and wiggler magnetic fields of 0.24∼0.28 T, the authors measured the FEL output power as a function of the wiggler magnetic field. The resonant magnetic field was about 0.25 T. Meanwhile, in order to study the amplifier gain, the authors measured the FEL output power as a function of the wiggler length at a peak wiggler magnetic field of 0.26 T. The exponential gain is approximately 19 dB/m and the maximum output power is about 10 MW

  19. Femtosecond electron diffraction. Next generation electron sources for atomically resolved dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirscht, Julian

    2015-08-01

    Three instruments for femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) experiments were erected, partially commissioned and used for first diffraction experiments. The Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) was completed by beamline elements including supports, a specimen chamber and dark current or electron beam collimating elements such that the commissioning process, including first diffraction experiments in this context, could be started. The temporal resolution of this machine is simulated to be 25 fs (fwhm) short, while a transverse coherence length of 30 nm (fwhm) is feasible to resolve proteins on this scale. Whether this machine is capable of meeting these predictions or whether the dynamics of the electron beam will stay limited by accelerator components, is not finally determined by the end of this work, because commissioning and improvement of accelerator components is ongoing. Simultaneously, a compact DC electron diffraction apparatus, the E-Gun 300, designed for solid and liquid specimens and a target electron energy of 300 keV, was built. Fundamental design issues of the high potential carrying and beam generating components occurred and are limiting the maximum potential and electron energy to 120 keV. Furthermore, this is limiting the range of possible applications and consequently the design and construction of a brand new instrument began. The Femtosecond Electron Diffraction CAmera for Molecular Movies (FED-CAMM) bridges the performance problems of very high electric potentials and provides optimal operational conditions for all applied electron energies up to 300 keV. The variability of gap spacings and optimized manufacturing of the high voltage electrodes lead to the best possible electron pulse durations obtainable with a compact DC setup, that does not comprise of rf-structures. This third apparatus possesses pulse durations just a few tenth femtoseconds apart from the design limit of the highly relativistic REGAE and combines the

  20. Femtosecond electron diffraction. Next generation electron sources for atomically resolved dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirscht, Julian

    2015-08-15

    Three instruments for femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) experiments were erected, partially commissioned and used for first diffraction experiments. The Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) was completed by beamline elements including supports, a specimen chamber and dark current or electron beam collimating elements such that the commissioning process, including first diffraction experiments in this context, could be started. The temporal resolution of this machine is simulated to be 25 fs (fwhm) short, while a transverse coherence length of 30 nm (fwhm) is feasible to resolve proteins on this scale. Whether this machine is capable of meeting these predictions or whether the dynamics of the electron beam will stay limited by accelerator components, is not finally determined by the end of this work, because commissioning and improvement of accelerator components is ongoing. Simultaneously, a compact DC electron diffraction apparatus, the E-Gun 300, designed for solid and liquid specimens and a target electron energy of 300 keV, was built. Fundamental design issues of the high potential carrying and beam generating components occurred and are limiting the maximum potential and electron energy to 120 keV. Furthermore, this is limiting the range of possible applications and consequently the design and construction of a brand new instrument began. The Femtosecond Electron Diffraction CAmera for Molecular Movies (FED-CAMM) bridges the performance problems of very high electric potentials and provides optimal operational conditions for all applied electron energies up to 300 keV. The variability of gap spacings and optimized manufacturing of the high voltage electrodes lead to the best possible electron pulse durations obtainable with a compact DC setup, that does not comprise of rf-structures. This third apparatus possesses pulse durations just a few tenth femtoseconds apart from the design limit of the highly relativistic REGAE and combines the