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Sample records for generating q-expansion coefficients

  1. Modified loss coefficients in the determination of optimum generation scheduling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazarika, D.; Bordoloi, P.K. (Assam Engineering Coll. (IN))

    1991-03-01

    A modified method has been evolved to form the loss coefficients of an electrical power system network by decoupling load and generation and thereby creating additional fictitious load buses. The system losses are then calculated and co-ordinated to arrive at an optimum scheduling of generation using the standard co-ordination equation. The method presented is superior to the ones currently available, in that it is applicable to a multimachine system with random variation of load and it accounts for limits in plant generations and line losses. The precise nature of results and the economy in the cost of energy production obtained by this method is quantified and presented. (author).

  2. Generation of leading coefficients of orthogonal polynomials with an application to anisotropic scattering of neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ofek, R.

    1984-01-01

    A simple method to generate leading coefficients for high-order sets of orthogonal polynomials, by derivation of recurrence expression for these coefficients, is developed. The method is applied to Legendre, Hermite, Chebyshev and Laguerre polynomials. The method may be used in calculations of high anisotropic neutron-scattering transfer cross-sections, where the angular distribution of the scattered neutrons is given in the ENDF/B files for most materials as coefficients of an expansion into Legendre polynomials. (author)

  3. Development of life cycle water-demand coefficients for coal-based power generation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Babkir; Kumar, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We develop water consumption and withdrawals coefficients for coal power generation. • We develop life cycle water footprints for 36 coal-based electricity generation pathways. • Different coal power generation technologies were assessed. • Sensitivity analysis of plant performance and coal transportation on water demand. - Abstract: This paper aims to develop benchmark coefficients for water consumption and water withdrawals over the full life cycle of coal-based power generation. This study considered not only all of the unit operations involved in the full electricity generation life cycle but also compared different coal-based power generating technologies. Overall this study develops the life cycle water footprint for 36 different coal-based electricity generation pathways. Power generation pathways involving new technologies of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or ultra supercritical technology with coal transportation by conventional means and using dry cooling systems have the least complete life cycle water-demand coefficients of about 1 L/kW h. Sensitivity analysis is conducted to study the impact of power plant performance and coal transportation on the water demand coefficients. The consumption coefficient over life cycle of ultra supercritical or IGCC power plants are 0.12 L/kW h higher when conventional transportation of coal is replaced by coal-log pipeline. Similarly, if the conventional transportation of coal is replaced by its transportation in the form of a slurry through a pipeline, the consumption coefficient of a subcritical power plant increases by 0.52 L/kW h

  4. Combination of PVA with Graphene to Improve the Seebeck Coefficient for Thermoelectric Generator Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, L.; Abdul Samad, Y.; Alhawari, M.; Mohammad, B.; Liao, K.; Ismail, M.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasensitive thermoelectric (TE) materials are essential for the next generation of self-powered electronic devices. In this work, a graphene-based TE generator was fabricated. For 50 to 1000 graphene layers the average Seebeck coefficient was 90 μV/K. We also report improvement of the Seebeck coefficient by use of a hybrid material containing 10% poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and 90% graphene oxide prepared and tested under the same conditions. The results show that the Seebeck coefficient is improved by an average of 30% compared with graphene alone. Because the fabrication process is facile, scalable, and cost effective, it could also be applicable to other fields of science and engineering.

  5. Development of water demand coefficients for power generation from renewable energy technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Babkir; Kumar, Amit

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Water consumption and withdrawals coefficients for renewable power generation were developed. • Six renewable energy sources (biomass, nuclear, solar, wind, hydroelectricity, and geothermal) were studied. • Life cycle water footprints for 60 electricity generation pathways were considered. • Impact of cooling systems for some power generation pathways was assessed. - Abstract: Renewable energy technology-based power generation is considered to be environmentally friendly and to have a low life cycle greenhouse gas emissions footprint. However, the life cycle water footprint of renewable energy technology-based power generation needs to be assessed. The objective of this study is to develop life cycle water footprints for renewable energy technology-based power generation pathways. Water demand is evaluated through consumption and withdrawals coefficients developed in this study. Sixty renewable energy technology-based power generation pathways were developed for a comprehensive comparative assessment of water footprints. The pathways were based on the use of biomass, nuclear, solar, wind, hydroelectricity, and geothermal as the source of energy. During the complete life cycle, power generation from bio-oil extracted from wood chips, a biomass source, was found to have the highest water demand footprint and wind power the lowest. During the complete life cycle, the water demand coefficients for biomass-based power generation pathways range from 260 to 1289 l of water per kilowatt hour and for nuclear energy pathways from 0.48 to 179 l of water per kilowatt hour. The water demand for power generation from solar energy-based pathways ranges from 0.02 to 4.39 l of water per kilowatt hour, for geothermal pathways from 0.04 to 1.94 l of water per kilowatt hour, and for wind from 0.005 to 0.104 l of water per kilowatt hour. A sensitivity analysis was conducted with varying conversion efficiencies to evaluate the impact of power plant performance on

  6. Condition monitoring of steam generator by estimating the overall heat transfer coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furusawa, Hiroaki; Gofuku, Akio

    2013-01-01

    This study develops a technique for monitoring in on-line the state of the steam generator of the fast-breeder reactor (FBR) “Monju”. Because the FBR uses liquid sodium as coolant, it is necessary to handle liquid sodium with caution due to its chemical characteristics. The steam generator generates steam by the heat of secondary sodium coolant. The sodium-water reaction may happen if a pinhole or crack occurs at the thin metal tube wall that separates the secondary sodium coolant and water/steam. Therefore, it is very important to detect an anomaly of the wall of heat transfer tubes at an early stage. This study aims at developing an on-line condition monitoring technique of the steam generator by estimating overall heat transfer coefficient from process signals. This paper describes simplified mathematical models of superheater and evaporator to estimate the overall heat transfer coefficient and a technique to diagnose the state of the steam generator. The applicability of the technique is confirmed by several estimations using simulated process signals with artificial noises. The results of the estimations show that the developed technique can detect the occurrence of an anomaly. (author)

  7. A concept of heat dissipation coefficient for thermal cloak based on entropy generation approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang Xu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we design a 3D spherical thermal cloak with eight material layers based on transformation thermodynamics and it worked at steady state before approaching ‘static limit’. Different from the present research, we introduce local entropy generation to present the randomness in the cloaking system and propose the concept of a heat dissipation coefficient which is used to describe the capacity of heat diffusion in the ‘cloaking’ and ‘protected’ region to characterize the cloaking performance on the basis of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. We indicate the ability of heat dissipation for the thermal cloak responds to changes in anisotropy (caused by the change in the number of layers and differential temperatures. In addition, we obtain a comparison of results of different cloaks and believe that the concept of a heat dissipation coefficient can be an evaluation criterion for the thermal cloak.

  8. Finite element model for beef chilling using CFD-generated heat transfer coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Q.T. [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Trujillo, F.J. [Food Science Australia, 11 Julius Avenue, North Ryde, NSW 2113 (Australia); McPhail, N. [Food Science Australia, P.O. Box 3312, Tingalpa DC, Brisbane, QLD 4173 (Australia)

    2009-01-15

    A combined model of the beef chilling process is presented, in which computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to estimate the local heat and mass transfer coefficients, assuming uniform surface temperatures, and a set of 2-D finite element grids was used to solve the heat transfer equation in the product, which has an elongated shape. Another set of 1-D grids was used to solve the water transport equation near the surface of the meat. The surface transfer coefficients were calculated for various combinations of air orientations and speeds, and summarised in a set of regression equations. The model was verified by existing and new data on heat load, temperatures, weight loss and surface water activity. (author)

  9. Approximate effective nonlinear coefficient of second-harmonic generation in KTiOPO(4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaumi, K

    1993-10-20

    A simplified approximate expression for the effective nonlinear coefficient of type-II second-harmonicgeneration in KTiOPO(4) was obtained by observing that the difference between the refractive indices n(x) and n(y) is 1 order of magnitude smaller than the difference between n(z) and n(y) (or n(x)). The agreement of this approximate equation with the true definition is good, with a maximum discrepancy of 4%.

  10. Basic data generation and pressure loss coefficient evaluation for HANARO core thermal-hydraulic analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Hee Taek; Lee, Kye Hong

    1999-06-01

    MATRA-h, a HANARO subchannel analysis computer code, is used to evaluate thermal margin of the HANARO fuel. It's capability includes the assessments of CHF, ONB margin, and fuel temperature. In this report, basic input data and core design parameters required to perform the subchannel analysis with MATRA-h code are collected. These data include the subchannel geometric data, thermal-hydraulic correlations, empirical constants and material properties. The friction and form loss coefficients of the fuel assemblies were determined based on the results of the pressure drop test. At the same time, different form loss coefficients at the end plates and spacers are evaluated for various subchannels. The adequate correlations are applied to the evaluation of the form loss coefficients for various subchannels, which are corrected by measured values in order to have a same pressure drop at each flow channel. These basic input data and design parameters described in this report will be applied usefully to evaluate the thermal margin of the HANARO fuel. (author). 11 refs., 13 tabs., 11 figs

  11. Regular approach for generating van der Waals Cs coefficients to arbitrary orders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovsiannikov, Vitali D; Mitroy, J

    2006-01-01

    A completely general formalism is developed to describe the energy E disp = Σ s C s /R s of dispersion interaction between two atoms in spherically symmetric states. Explicit expressions are given up to the tenth order of perturbation theory for the dispersion energy E disp and dispersion coefficients C s . The method could, in principle, be used to derive the expressions for any s while including all contributing orders of perturbation theory for asymptotic interaction between two atoms. The theory is applied to the calculation of the complete series up to s = 30 for two hydrogen atoms in their ground state. A pseudo-state series expansion of the two-atom Green function gives rapid convergence of the series for radial matrix elements. The numerical values of C s are computed up to C 30 to a relative accuracy of 10 -7 or better. The dispersion coefficients for the hydrogen-antihydrogen interaction are obtained from the H-H coefficients by simply taking the absolute magnitude of C s

  12. Implications of next generation attenuation ground motion prediction equations for site coefficients used in earthquake resistant design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherdt, Roger D.

    2014-01-01

    Proposals are developed to update Tables 11.4-1 and 11.4-2 of Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures published as American Society of Civil Engineers Structural Engineering Institute standard 7-10 (ASCE/SEI 7–10). The updates are mean next generation attenuation (NGA) site coefficients inferred directly from the four NGA ground motion prediction equations used to derive the maximum considered earthquake response maps adopted in ASCE/SEI 7–10. Proposals include the recommendation to use straight-line interpolation to infer site coefficients at intermediate values of (average shear velocity to 30-m depth). The NGA coefficients are shown to agree well with adopted site coefficients at low levels of input motion (0.1 g) and those observed from the Loma Prieta earthquake. For higher levels of input motion, the majority of the adopted values are within the 95% epistemic-uncertainty limits implied by the NGA estimates with the exceptions being the mid-period site coefficient, Fv, for site class D and the short-period coefficient, Fa, for site class C, both of which are slightly less than the corresponding 95% limit. The NGA data base shows that the median value  of 913 m/s for site class B is more typical than 760 m/s as a value to characterize firm to hard rock sites as the uniform ground condition for future maximum considered earthquake response ground motion estimates. Future updates of NGA ground motion prediction equations can be incorporated easily into future adjustments of adopted site coefficients using procedures presented herein. 

  13. Internal transmission coefficient in charges carrier generation layer of graphene/Si based solar cell device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosikhin, Ahmad; Winata, Toto

    2016-04-01

    Internal transmission profile in charges carrier generation layer of graphene/Si based solar cell has been explored theoretically. Photovoltaic device was constructed from graphene/Si heterojunction forming a multilayer stuck with Si as generation layer. The graphene/Si sheet was layered on ITO/glass wafer then coated by Al forming Ohmic contact with Si. Photon incident propagate from glass substrate to metal electrode and assumed that there is no transmission in Al layer. The wavelength range spectra used in this calculation was 200 - 1000 nm. It found that transmission intensity in the generation layer show non-linear behavior and partitioned by few areas which related with excitation process. According to this information, it may to optimize the photons absorption to create more excitation process by inserting appropriate material to enhance optical properties in certain wavelength spectra because of the exciton generation is strongly influenced by photon absorption.

  14. Internal friction between fluid particles of MHD tangent hyperbolic fluid with heat generation: Using coefficients improved by Cash and Karp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salahuddin, T.; Khan, Imad; Malik, M. Y.; Khan, Mair; Hussain, Arif; Awais, Muhammad

    2017-05-01

    The present work examines the internal resistance between fluid particles of tangent hyperbolic fluid flow due to a non-linear stretching sheet with heat generation. Using similarity transformations, the governing system of partial differential equations is transformed into a coupled non-linear ordinary differential system with variable coefficients. Unlike the current analytical works on the flow problems in the literature, the main concern here is to numerically work out and find the solution by using Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg coefficients improved by Cash and Karp (Naseer et al., Alexandria Eng. J. 53, 747 (2014)). To determine the relevant physical features of numerous mechanisms acting on the deliberated problem, it is sufficient to have the velocity profile and temperature field and also the drag force and heat transfer rate all as given in the current paper.

  15. Comparison of Absolute Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) Values in ADC Maps Generated Across Different Postprocessing Software: Reproducibility in Endometrial Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Adarsh; Singh, Tulika; Singla, Veenu; Bagga, Rashmi; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2017-12-01

    Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps are usually generated by builtin software provided by the MRI scanner vendors; however, various open-source postprocessing software packages are available for image manipulation and parametric map generation. The purpose of this study is to establish the reproducibility of absolute ADC values obtained using different postprocessing software programs. DW images with three b values were obtained with a 1.5-T MRI scanner, and the trace images were obtained. ADC maps were automatically generated by the in-line software provided by the vendor during image generation and were also separately generated on postprocessing software. These ADC maps were compared on the basis of ROIs using paired t test, Bland-Altman plot, mountain plot, and Passing-Bablok regression plot. There was a statistically significant difference in the mean ADC values obtained from the different postprocessing software programs when the same baseline trace DW images were used for the ADC map generation. For using ADC values as a quantitative cutoff for histologic characterization of tissues, standardization of the postprocessing algorithm is essential across processing software packages, especially in view of the implementation of vendor-neutral archiving.

  16. Generation IV sodium fast reactor. Feedback reactivity coefficients to optimise safe natural core behaviour during accident transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaetta, Alain; Bernardin, Bruno; Vanier, Marc; Tommasi, Jean; Varaine, Frederic

    2009-01-01

    One of the key research goals for Generation IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) is to improve their safety levels, particularly by ensuring robust core behaviour during accident conditions. A dedicated approach called COCONS has been developed to reach these objectives. This paper discusses this approach which focuses on the design of naturally safe core. It can be broken down into three stages: The first stage involves defining the role of feedback reactivity coefficients applicable during accident transients, such as unprotected reactivity insertion transients (UTOP) or unprotected loss-of-cooling-flow transients (ULOF). The parametric study has revealed the impact of the Doppler effect on UTOP and sodium temperature coefficient which is directly related to the sodium void effect for ULOF. The second stage is to define optimised ranges for these reactivity coefficients to avoid any core damage by fuel meltdown or sodium boiling. Conclusions differ greatly depending on the fuel type, e.g. oxide, metal or carbide. Fuel temperature margins before fuel meltdown and average fuel temperatures play a very important role. The third stage involves recommending several core concepts that are capable of achieving these idealistic ranges. Several new oxide fuel subassembly designs are suggested in view of reducing the maximum fuel temperature and increasing margins to fuel meltdown. Ceramic carbide fuel seems to be a very promising choice from a reactor physics viewpoint. Combined with moderator material in the core or used with the new fuel 'plate' subassembly concept, ceramic carbide fuel seems capable of achieving safe natural behaviour during either a UTOP or ULOF transient. The COCONS approach appears to be a useful tool in terms of recommending new SFR core options and comparing overall performance levels with reactor safety levels. Final optimization will require more general comparisons, taking into account all the main Generation IV goals i.e. economic

  17. The development from kinetic coefficients of a predictive model for the growth of Eichhomia crassipes in the field. I. Generating kinetic coefficients for the model in greenhouse culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. Musil

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of N- and P- limited growth of Eichhornia crassipes (Mart . Solms were investigated in greenhouse culture with the object of developing a model for predicting population sizes, yields, growth rates and frequencies and amounts of harvest, under varying conditions of nutrient loading and climate, to control both nutrient inputs and excessive growth in eutrophied aquatic systems. The kinetic coefficients, maximum specific growth rate (Umax, half saturation coefficient (Ks and yield coefficient (Yc were measured under N and P limitation in replicated batch culture experiments. Umax values and Ks concentrations derived under N limitation ranged from 5,37 to 8,86% d + and from 400 to 1 506 µg  N ℓ1respectively. Those derived under P limitation ranged from 4,51 to 10,89% d 1 and from 41 to 162 fig P ℓ1 respectively. Yc values (fresh mass basis determined ranged from 1 660 to 1 981 (87 to 98 dry mass basis for N and from 16 431 to 18 671 (867 to 980 dry mass basis for P. The reciprocals of Yc values (dry mass basis, expressed as percentages, adequately estimated the minimum limiting concentrations of N and P {% dry mass in the plant tissues. Kinetic coefficients determined are compared with those reported for algae. The experimental method used and results obtained are critically assessed.

  18. Absolute non-linear optical coefficients measurements of CsLiB 6O 10 single crystals by second harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifi, A.; Klein, R. S.; Maillard, A.; Kugel, G. E.; Péter, A.; Polgár, K.

    2003-10-01

    We present absolute measurements of the effective non-linear optical coefficients deff of cesium lithium borate crystals (CsLiB 6O 10, CLBO) by second harmonic generation using a continuous Nd-YAG laser source. The experiments were carried out at room temperature, on crystals cut perpendicular to type I or type II phase matching directions, with two different crystal lengths along the propagation direction. The d36 and d14 non-linear coefficients involved in deff developments are deduced and are shown to be equal as it is predicted by the Kleinman symmetry. Two different compositions prepared by the Czochralski technique from melt with compositions of 1:1:6 and 1:1:5.5 molar ratios of Cs 2O, Li 2O and B 2O 3 are comparatively studied.

  19. Friction pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient of two-phase flow in helically coiled tube once-through steam generator for integrated type marine water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nariai, Hideki; Kobayashi, Michiyuki; Matsuoka, Takeshi.

    1982-01-01

    Two-phase friction pressure drop and heat transfer coefficients in a once-through steam generator with helically coiled tubes were investigated with the model test rig of an integrated type marine water reactor. As the dimensions of the heat transfer tubes and the thermal-fluid conditions are almost the same as those of real reactors, the data applicable directly to the real reactor design were obtained. As to the friction pressure drop, modified Kozeki's prediction which is based on the experimental data by Kozeki for coiled tubes, agreed the best with the experimental data. Modified Martinelli-Nelson's prediction which is based on Martinelli-Nelson's multiplier using Ito's equation for single-phase flow in coiled tube, agreed within 30%. The effect of coiled tube on the average heat transfer coefficients at boiling region were small, and the predictions for straight tube could also be applied to coiled tube. Schrock-Grossman's correlation agreed well with the experimental data at the pressures of lower than 3.5 MPa. It was suggested that dryout should be occurred at the quality of greater than 90% within the conditions of this report. (author)

  20. A varying coefficient model to measure the effectiveness of mass media anti-smoking campaigns in generating calls to a Quitline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Quang M; Huggins, Richard M; Hwang, Wen-Han; White, Victoria; Erbas, Bircan

    2010-01-01

    Anti-smoking advertisements are an effective population-based smoking reduction strategy. The Quitline telephone service provides a first point of contact for adults considering quitting. Because of data complexity, the relationship between anti-smoking advertising placement, intensity, and time trends in total call volume is poorly understood. In this study we use a recently developed semi-varying coefficient model to elucidate this relationship. Semi-varying coefficient models comprise parametric and nonparametric components. The model is fitted to the daily number of calls to Quitline in Victoria, Australia to estimate a nonparametric long-term trend and parametric terms for day-of-the-week effects and to clarify the relationship with target audience rating points (TARPs) for the Quit and nicotine replacement advertising campaigns. The number of calls to Quitline increased with the TARP value of both the Quit and other smoking cessation advertisement; the TARP values associated with the Quit program were almost twice as effective. The varying coefficient term was statistically significant for peak periods with little or no advertising. Semi-varying coefficient models are useful for modeling public health data when there is little or no information on other factors related to the at-risk population. These models are well suited to modeling call volume to Quitline, because the varying coefficient allowed the underlying time trend to depend on fixed covariates that also vary with time, thereby explaining more of the variation in the call model.

  1. Heat generation and solar radiation effects on Carreau nanofluid over a stretching sheet with variable thickness: Using coefficients improved by Cash and Carp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mair Khan

    Full Text Available Present work examines the effects of chemical reactive species and solar radiation on Carreau nanofluid induced by a stretching sheet with variable thickness. Heat generation effects are taken for exothermic reaction. In the boundary layer region, nanoparticles provides enhancement in the heat transfer phenomena. In the literature, most of the researchers used Runge Kutta Fehlberg method, but our main concentration here is to find the solution by improved form of Fehlberg method (Cash and Carp. The velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are plotted for different governing parameter, namely, wall thickness parameter, magnetic parameter, thermal conductivity parameter, chemical reaction parameter, Schmidt number and Prandtl number. It is found that the velocity profile increases by increasing Weissenberg numberWe, Hartmann number M and wall thickness parameter n. Moreover, temperature profile enhances by increasing heat generation parameter γ and radiative heat flux parameter R. The accuracy of the present method is checked with previously published work and excellent agreement is noticed. Keywords: Carreau nanofluid, Heat generation, Solar radiation, Chemical reaction, Stretching sheet with flexible thickness, Shooting method (Cash and Carp

  2. Absolute and relative nonlinear optical coefficients of KDP, KD(asterisk)P, BaB2O4, LiIO3, MgO:LiNbO3, and KTP measured by phase-matched second-harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckardt, Robert C.; Byer, Robert L.; Masuda, Hisashi; Fan, Yuan Xuan

    1990-01-01

    Both absolute and relative nonlinear optical coefficients of six nonlinear materials measured by second-harmonic generation are discussed. A single-mode, injection-seeded, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with spatially filtered output was used to generate the 1.064-micron fundamental radiation. The following results were obtained: d36(KDP) = 0.38 pm/V, d36(KD/asterisk/P) = 0.37 pm/V, (parallel)d22(BaB2O4)(parallel) = 2.2 pm/V, d31(LiIO3) = -4.1 pm/V, d31(5 percentMgO:MgO LiNbO3) = -4.7 pm/V, and d(eff)(KTP) = 3.2 pm/V. The accuracy of these measurements is estimated to be better than 10 percent.

  3. LORAN Warpage Coefficients Generation Program (WARP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-23

    technical report has been reviewed and is cipproved for publicationl. LEE D. McINTOSH Program Manager FOR THE COMMANDER DAVID H. AMOS, Cdr, USCG Chief Tac...ither of these two s;pheroi is *ohen the 4ar lo co I ic i iot s have i)eon ~jenera te1 ust ig a di ff erent one. Th ere i s alIsoI a K’ .’r’ a noia L i.a

  4. Transport Coefficients of Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Eu, Byung Chan

    2006-01-01

    Until recently the formal statistical mechanical approach offered no practicable method for computing the transport coefficients of liquids, and so most practitioners had to resort to empirical fitting formulas. This has now changed, as demonstrated in this innovative monograph. The author presents and applies new methods based on statistical mechanics for calculating the transport coefficients of simple and complex liquids over wide ranges of density and temperature. These molecular theories enable the transport coefficients to be calculated in terms of equilibrium thermodynamic properties, and the results are shown to account satisfactorily for experimental observations, including even the non-Newtonian behavior of fluids far from equilibrium.

  5. Implications of NGA for NEHRP site coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherdt, Roger D.

    2012-01-01

    Three proposals are provided to update tables 11.4-1 and 11.4-2 of Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures (7-10), by the American Society of Civil Engineers (2010) (ASCE/SEI 7-10), with site coefficients implied directly by NGA (Next Generation Attenuation) ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs). Proposals include a recommendation to use straight-line interpolation to infer site coefficients at intermediate values of ̅vs (average shear velocity). Site coefficients are recommended to ensure consistency with ASCE/SEI 7-10 MCER (Maximum Considered Earthquake) seismic-design maps and simplified site-specific design spectra procedures requiring site classes with associated tabulated site coefficients and a reference site class with unity site coefficients. Recommended site coefficients are confirmed by independent observations of average site amplification coefficients inferred with respect to an average ground condition consistent with that used for the MCER maps. The NGA coefficients recommended for consideration are implied directly by the NGA GMPEs and do not require introduction of additional models.

  6. Prestarlike functions with negative coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Silverman

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available The extreme points for prestarlike functions having negative coefficients are determined. Coefficient, distortion and radii of univalence, starlikeness, and convexity theorems are also obtained.

  7. Transport Coefficients from Large Deviation Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloe Ya Gao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe a method for computing transport coefficients from the direct evaluation of large deviation functions. This method is general, relying on only equilibrium fluctuations, and is statistically efficient, employing trajectory based importance sampling. Equilibrium fluctuations of molecular currents are characterized by their large deviation functions, which are scaled cumulant generating functions analogous to the free energies. A diffusion Monte Carlo algorithm is used to evaluate the large deviation functions, from which arbitrary transport coefficients are derivable. We find significant statistical improvement over traditional Green–Kubo based calculations. The systematic and statistical errors of this method are analyzed in the context of specific transport coefficient calculations, including the shear viscosity, interfacial friction coefficient, and thermal conductivity.

  8. Form coefficient of helical toroidal solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amelin, V.Z.; Kunchenko, V.B.

    1982-01-01

    For toroidal solenoids with continuous spiral coil, winded according to the laws of equiinclined and simple cylindrical spirals with homogeneous, linearly increasing to the coil periphery and ''Bitter'' distribution of current density, the analytical expressions for the dependence between capacity consumed and generated magnetic field, expressions for coefficients of form similar to Fabry coefficient for cylindrical solenoids are obtained and dependence of the form coefficient and relative volume of solenoid conductor on the number of revolutions of screw line per one circumvention over the large torus radius is also investigated. Analytical expressions of form coefficients and graphical material permit to select the optimum geometry as to capacity consumed both for spiral (including ''force-free'') and conventional toroidal solenoids of magnetic systems in thermonulear installations

  9. Coefficient estimates of negative powers and inverse coefficients for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    λ. Using this we shall determine the ... Univalent; starlike; meromorphic functions; subordination; coefficient bounds; inverse ...... [6] FitzGerald C H, Quadratic inequalities and coefficient estimates for Schlicht functions, Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal.

  10. Variation in aerodynamic coefficients with altitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiza Shahid

    Full Text Available Precise aerodynamics performance prediction plays key role for a flying vehicle to get its mission completed within desired accuracy. Aerodynamic coefficients for same Mach number can be different at different altitude due to difference in Reynolds number. Prediction of these aerodynamics coefficients can be made through experiments, analytical solution or Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD. Advancements in computational power have generated the concept of using CFD as a virtual Wind Tunnel (WT, hence aerodynamic performance prediction in present study is based upon CFD (numerical test rig. Simulations at different altitudes for a range of Mach numbers with zero angle of attack are performed to predict axial force coefficient behavior with altitude (Reynolds number. Similar simulations for a fixed Mach number ‘3’ and a range of angle of attacks are also carried out to envisage the variation in normal force and pitching moment coefficients with altitude (Reynolds number. Results clearly depict that the axial force coefficient is a function of altitude (Reynolds number and increase as altitude increases, especially for subsonic region. Variation in axial force coefficient with altitude (Reynolds number slightly increases for larger values of angle of attacks. Normal force and pitching moment coefficients do not depend on altitude (Reynolds number at smaller values of angle of attacks but show slight decrease as altitude increases. Present study suggests that variation of normal force and pitching moment coefficients with altitude can be neglected but the variation of axial force coefficient with altitude should be considered for vehicle fly in dense atmosphere. It is recommended to continue this study to more complex configurations for various Mach numbers with side slip and real gas effects. Keywords: Mach number, Reynolds number, Blunt body, Altitude effect, Angle of attacks

  11. Variation in aerodynamic coefficients with altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Faiza; Hussain, Mukkarum; Baig, Mirza Mehmood; Haq, Ihtram ul

    Precise aerodynamics performance prediction plays key role for a flying vehicle to get its mission completed within desired accuracy. Aerodynamic coefficients for same Mach number can be different at different altitude due to difference in Reynolds number. Prediction of these aerodynamics coefficients can be made through experiments, analytical solution or Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Advancements in computational power have generated the concept of using CFD as a virtual Wind Tunnel (WT), hence aerodynamic performance prediction in present study is based upon CFD (numerical test rig). Simulations at different altitudes for a range of Mach numbers with zero angle of attack are performed to predict axial force coefficient behavior with altitude (Reynolds number). Similar simulations for a fixed Mach number '3' and a range of angle of attacks are also carried out to envisage the variation in normal force and pitching moment coefficients with altitude (Reynolds number). Results clearly depict that the axial force coefficient is a function of altitude (Reynolds number) and increase as altitude increases, especially for subsonic region. Variation in axial force coefficient with altitude (Reynolds number) slightly increases for larger values of angle of attacks. Normal force and pitching moment coefficients do not depend on altitude (Reynolds number) at smaller values of angle of attacks but show slight decrease as altitude increases. Present study suggests that variation of normal force and pitching moment coefficients with altitude can be neglected but the variation of axial force coefficient with altitude should be considered for vehicle fly in dense atmosphere. It is recommended to continue this study to more complex configurations for various Mach numbers with side slip and real gas effects.

  12. Lattice cell diffusion coefficients. Definitions and comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    Definitions of equivalent diffusion coefficients for regular lattices of heterogeneous cells have been given by several authors. The paper begins by reviewing these different definitions and the unification of their derivation. This unification makes clear how accurately each definition (together with appropriate cross-section definitions to preserve the eigenvalue) represents the individual reaction rates within the cell. The approach can be extended to include asymmetric cells and whereas before, the buckling describing the macroscopic flux shape was real, here it is found to be complex. A neutron ''drift'' coefficient as well as a diffusion coefficient is necessary to produce the macroscopic flux shape. The numerical calculation of the various different diffusion coefficients requires the solutions of equations similar to the ordinary transport equation for an infinite lattice. Traditional reactor physics codes are not sufficiently flexible to solve these equations in general. However, calculations in certain simple cases are presented and the theoretical results quantified. In difficult geometries, Monte Carlo techniques can be used to calculate an effective diffusion coefficient. These methods relate to those already described provided that correlation effects between different generations of neutrons are included. Again, these effects are quantified in certain simple cases. (author)

  13. Experimental methodology for obtaining sound absorption coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Macía M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the authors propose a new methodology for estimating sound absorption coefficients using genetic algorithms. Methodology: sound waves are generated and conducted along a rectangular silencer. The waves are then attenuated by the absorbing material covering the silencer’s walls. The attenuated sound pressure level is used in a genetic algorithm-based search to find the parameters of the proposed attenuation expressions that include geometric factors, the wavelength and the absorption coefficient. Results: a variety of adjusted mathematical models were found that make it possible to estimate the absorption coefficients based on the characteristics of a rectangular silencer used for measuring the attenuation of the noise that passes through it. Conclusions: this methodology makes it possible to obtain the absorption coefficients of new materials in a cheap and simple manner. Although these coefficients might be slightly different from those obtained through other methodologies, they provide solutions within the engineering accuracy ranges that are used for designing noise control systems.

  14. Quadrature formulas for Fourier coefficients

    KAUST Repository

    Bojanov, Borislav

    2009-09-01

    We consider quadrature formulas of high degree of precision for the computation of the Fourier coefficients in expansions of functions with respect to a system of orthogonal polynomials. In particular, we show the uniqueness of a multiple node formula for the Fourier-Tchebycheff coefficients given by Micchelli and Sharma and construct new Gaussian formulas for the Fourier coefficients of a function, based on the values of the function and its derivatives. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Measuring of heat transfer coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul; Lindegren, Maria

    Subtask 3.4 Measuring of heat transfer coefficient Subtask 3.4.1 Design and setting up of tests to measure heat transfer coefficient Objective: Complementary testing methods together with the relevant experimental equipment are to be designed by the two partners involved in order to measure...... the heat transfer coefficient for a wide range of interface conditions in hot and warm forging processes. Subtask 3.4.2 Measurement of heat transfer coefficient The objective of subtask 3.4.2 is to determine heat transfer values for different interface conditions reflecting those typically operating in hot...

  16. On some properties of SU(3 fusion coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Coquereaux

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Three aspects of the SU(3 fusion coefficients are revisited: the generating polynomials of fusion coefficients are written explicitly; some curious identities generalizing the classical Freudenthal–de Vries formula are derived; and the properties of the fusion coefficients under conjugation of one of the factors, previously analyzed in the classical case, are extended to the affine algebra suˆ(3 at finite level.

  17. Head-wave coefficients in anisotropic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Chris

    2018-03-01

    Reflections and transmissions from interfaces can generate head waves. Although the kinematic properties of head waves are modelled simply using ray concepts, the dynamic properties require an extension of ray theory or the use of wave theory. Head waves are important in exploration and crustal seismology as they indicate the existence of an interface and the velocity of the generating wave. Head waves have been described in the literature for isotropic media but the extension to anisotropic media seems to be lacking. The expressions for the head-wave coefficients using ray concepts or wave theory differ, and their equality is not obvious. This paper extends the theory for head-wave coefficients to anisotropic media using both ray theory and wave theory, and generalizes the proof of equality of the two methods. Simple numerical examples confirm this equality and indicate how the head-wave results can be calculated in anisotropic media and included in a ray-tracing algorithm.

  18. Sabine absorption coefficients to random incidence absorption coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2014-01-01

    into random incidence absorption coefficients for porous absorbers are investigated. Two optimization-based conversion methods are suggested: the surface impedance estimation for locally reacting absorbers and the flow resistivity estimation for extendedly reacting absorbers. The suggested conversion methods...

  19. Identification of aerodynamic coefficients using computational neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linse, Dennis J.; Stengel, Robert F.

    1992-01-01

    Precise, smooth aerodynamic models are required for implementing adaptive, nonlinear control strategies. Accurate representations of aerodynamic coefficients can be generated for the complete flight envelope by combining computational neural network models with an Estimation-Before-Modeling paradigm for on-line training information. A novel method of incorporating first-partial-derivative information is employed to estimate the weights in individual feedforward neural networks for each aerodynamic coefficient. The method is demonstrated by generating a model of the normal force coefficient of a twin-jet transport aircraft from simulated flight data, and promising results are obtained.

  20. Kuznetsov equation with variable coefficients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    like solutions of the PDE in (2+1) dimension with variable coefficients. ... Shivamoggi [12] gives only four polynomial conservation laws of the ZK equation ..... [3] P J Olver, Application of Lie group to differential equation (Springer, New York,.

  1. Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewe, W.E.

    2001-07-31

    A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

  2. Clustering Coefficients for Correlation Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Masuda

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Graph theory is a useful tool for deciphering structural and functional networks of the brain on various spatial and temporal scales. The clustering coefficient quantifies the abundance of connected triangles in a network and is a major descriptive statistics of networks. For example, it finds an application in the assessment of small-worldness of brain networks, which is affected by attentional and cognitive conditions, age, psychiatric disorders and so forth. However, it remains unclear how the clustering coefficient should be measured in a correlation-based network, which is among major representations of brain networks. In the present article, we propose clustering coefficients tailored to correlation matrices. The key idea is to use three-way partial correlation or partial mutual information to measure the strength of the association between the two neighboring nodes of a focal node relative to the amount of pseudo-correlation expected from indirect paths between the nodes. Our method avoids the difficulties of previous applications of clustering coefficient (and other measures in defining correlational networks, i.e., thresholding on the correlation value, discarding of negative correlation values, the pseudo-correlation problem and full partial correlation matrices whose estimation is computationally difficult. For proof of concept, we apply the proposed clustering coefficient measures to functional magnetic resonance imaging data obtained from healthy participants of various ages and compare them with conventional clustering coefficients. We show that the clustering coefficients decline with the age. The proposed clustering coefficients are more strongly correlated with age than the conventional ones are. We also show that the local variants of the proposed clustering coefficients (i.e., abundance of triangles around a focal node are useful in characterizing individual nodes. In contrast, the conventional local clustering coefficients

  3. Non-constant retardation coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiming; Gu Zhijie; Yang Yue'e; Li Shushen

    2004-12-01

    Retardation coefficient is one of the important parameters used in transport models describing radionuclide migration in geological media and usually regarded as a constant in the models. The objectives of the work are to understand: (1) Whether the retardation coefficient, R d , is a constant? (2) How much effect is R d on calculated consequence if R d is not constant? (3) Is the retardation coefficient derived from distribution coefficient, k d , according to conventional equation suitable for safety assessment? The objectives are achieved through test and analysis of the test results on radionuclide migration in unsaturated loess. It can be seen from the results that retardation coefficient, R d , of 85 Sr is not constant and increases with water content, θ, under unsaturated condition. R d , of 85 Sr derived from k d according to conventional equation can not be used for safety assessment. R d , used for safety assessment should be directly measured, rather than derived from k d . It is shown from calculation that the effect of R d on calculated consequence is very considerable. (authors)

  4. Coefficient estimates of negative powers and inverse coefficients for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1 an(−λ, f )zn for z ∈ D. (1.4). One of the well-known extremal problems in the theory of univalent functions is to esti- mate the modulus of the Taylor coefficients an(−λ, f ) given by (1.4). This problem has been extensively studied in the literature ...

  5. Harmonic functions with varying coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Dziok

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Complex-valued harmonic functions that are univalent and sense preserving in the open unit disk can be written in the form f = h + g ‾ $f=h+\\overline{g}$ , where h and g are analytic. In this paper we investigate some classes of univalent harmonic functions with varying coefficients related to Janowski functions. By using the extreme points theory we obtain necessary and sufficient convolution conditions, coefficients estimates, distortion theorems, and integral mean inequalities for these classes of functions. The radii of starlikeness and convexity for these classes are also determined.

  6. Integer Solutions of Binomial Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbertson, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    A good formula is like a good story, rich in description, powerful in communication, and eye-opening to readers. The formula presented in this article for determining the coefficients of the binomial expansion of (x + y)n is one such "good read." The beauty of this formula is in its simplicity--both describing a quantitative situation…

  7. Effective Viscosity Coefficient of Nanosuspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudyak, V. Ya.; Belkin, A. A.; Egorov, V. V.

    2008-12-01

    Systematic calculations of the effective viscosity coefficient of nanosuspensions have been performed using the molecular dynamics method. It is established that the viscosity of a nanosuspension depends not only on the volume concentration of the nanoparticles but also on their mass and diameter. Differences from Einstein's relation are found even for nanosuspensions with a low particle concentration.

  8. Irrational "Coefficients" in Renaissance Algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oaks, Jeffrey A

    2017-06-01

    Argument From the time of al-Khwārizmī in the ninth century to the beginning of the sixteenth century algebraists did not allow irrational numbers to serve as coefficients. To multiply by x, for instance, the result was expressed as the rhetorical equivalent of . The reason for this practice has to do with the premodern concept of a monomial. The coefficient, or "number," of a term was thought of as how many of that term are present, and not as the scalar multiple that we work with today. Then, in sixteenth-century Europe, a few algebraists began to allow for irrational coefficients in their notation. Christoff Rudolff (1525) was the first to admit them in special cases, and subsequently they appear more liberally in Cardano (1539), Scheubel (1550), Bombelli (1572), and others, though most algebraists continued to ban them. We survey this development by examining the texts that show irrational coefficients and those that argue against them. We show that the debate took place entirely in the conceptual context of premodern, "cossic" algebra, and persisted in the sixteenth century independent of the development of the new algebra of Viète, Decartes, and Fermat. This was a formal innovation violating prevailing concepts that we propose could only be introduced because of the growing autonomy of notation from rhetorical text.

  9. Extinction Coefficient of Gold Nanostars

    OpenAIRE

    de Puig, Helena; Tam, Justina O.; Yen, Chun-Wan; Gehrke, Lee; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanostars (NStars) are highly attractive for biological applications due to their surface chemistry, facile synthesis and optical properties. Here, we synthesize NStars in HEPES buffer at different HEPES/Au ratios, producing NStars of different sizes and shapes, and therefore varying optical properties. We measure the extinction coefficient of the synthesized NStars at their maximum surface plasmon resonances (SPR), which range from 5.7 × 108 to 26.8 × 108 M−1cm−1. Measured values correl...

  10. Study of transport coefficients of nanodiamond nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryazhnikov, M. I.; Minakov, A. V.; Guzei, D. V.

    2017-09-01

    Experimental data on the thermal conductivity coefficient and viscosity coefficient of nanodiamond nanofluids are presented. Distilled water and ethylene glycol were used as the base fluid. Dependences of transport coefficients on concentration are obtained. It was shown that the thermal conductivity coefficient increases with increasing nanodiamonds concentration. It was shown that base fluids properties and nanodiamonds concentration affect on the rheology of nanofluids.

  11. Coefficient adaptive triangulation for strongly anisotropic problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Azevedo, E.F.; Romine, C.H.; Donato, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Second order elliptic partial differential equations arise in many important applications, including flow through porous media, heat conduction, the distribution of electrical or magnetic potential. The prototype is the Laplace problem, which in discrete form produces a coefficient matrix that is relatively easy to solve in a regular domain. However, the presence of anisotropy produces a matrix whose condition number is increased, making the resulting linear system more difficult to solve. In this work, we take the anisotropy into account in the discretization by mapping each anisotropic region into a ``stretched`` coordinate space in which the anisotropy is removed. The region is then uniformly triangulated, and the resulting triangulation mapped back to the original space. The effect is to generate long slender triangles that are oriented in the direction of ``preferred flow.`` Slender triangles are generally regarded as numerically undesirable since they tend to cause poor conditioning; however, our triangulation has the effect of producing effective isotropy, thus improving the condition number of the resulting coefficient matrix.

  12. Measurements of thermal accommodation coefficients.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rader, Daniel John; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Torczynski, John Robert; Grasser, Thomas W.; Trott, Wayne Merle

    2005-10-01

    A previously-developed experimental facility has been used to determine gas-surface thermal accommodation coefficients from the pressure dependence of the heat flux between parallel plates of similar material but different surface finish. Heat flux between the plates is inferred from measurements of temperature drop between the plate surface and an adjacent temperature-controlled water bath. Thermal accommodation measurements were determined from the pressure dependence of the heat flux for a fixed plate separation. Measurements of argon and nitrogen in contact with standard machined (lathed) or polished 304 stainless steel plates are indistinguishable within experimental uncertainty. Thus, the accommodation coefficient of 304 stainless steel with nitrogen and argon is estimated to be 0.80 {+-} 0.02 and 0.87 {+-} 0.02, respectively, independent of the surface roughness within the range likely to be encountered in engineering practice. Measurements of the accommodation of helium showed a slight variation with 304 stainless steel surface roughness: 0.36 {+-} 0.02 for a standard machine finish and 0.40 {+-} 0.02 for a polished finish. Planned tests with carbon-nanotube-coated plates will be performed when 304 stainless-steel blanks have been successfully coated.

  13. Sorption Coefficients for Iodine, Silver, and Cesium on Dust Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stempniewicz, M.M.; Goede, P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the work performed to find relevant experimental data and find the sorption coefficients that represent well the available data for cesium, iodine, and silver on dust particles. The purpose of this work is to generate a set of coefficients that may be recommended for the computer code users. The work was performed using the computer code SPECTRA. Calculations were performed for the following data: • I-131 on AVR dust; • Ag-110m on AVR dust; • Cs-13 and Cs-137 on AVR dust. Available data was matched using the SPECTRA Sorption Model. S = A(T) · C V -B(T) · C d . The results are summarized as follows: • The available data can be correlated. The data scatter is about 4 orders of magnitude. Therefore the coefficients of the Langmuir isotherms vary by 4 orders of magnitude. • Sorption rates are higher at low temperatures and lower at high temperatures. This tendency has been observed in the data compiled at Oak Ridge. It is therefore surmised that the highest value of the sorption coefficients are appropriate for the low temperatures and the lowest value of the sorption coefficients are appropriate for the high temperatures. The recommended sorption coefficients are presented in this paper. • The present set of coefficients is very rough and should be a subject for future verification against experimental data. (author)

  14. Effective Electrocardiogram Steganography Based on Coefficient Alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ching-Yu; Wang, Wen-Fong

    2016-03-01

    This study presents two types of data hiding methods based on coefficient alignment for electrocardiogram (ECG) signals, namely, lossy and reversible ECG steganographys. The lossy method is divided into high-quality and high-capacity ECG steganography, both of which are capable of hiding confidential patient data in ECG signals. The reversible data hiding method can not only hide secret messages but also completely restore the original ECG signal after bit extraction. Simulations confirmed that the perceived quality generated by the lossy ECG steganography methods was good, while hiding capacity was acceptable. In addition, these methods have a certain degree of robustness, which is rare in conventional ECG stegangraphy schemes. Moreover, the proposed reversible ECG steganography method can not only successfully extract hidden messages but also completely recover the original ECG data.

  15. Extinction Coefficient of Gold Nanostars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Puig, Helena; Tam, Justina O; Yen, Chun-Wan; Gehrke, Lee; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly

    2015-07-30

    Gold nanostars (NStars) are highly attractive for biological applications due to their surface chemistry, facile synthesis and optical properties. Here, we synthesize NStars in HEPES buffer at different HEPES/Au ratios, producing NStars of different sizes and shapes, and therefore varying optical properties. We measure the extinction coefficient of the synthesized NStars at their maximum surface plasmon resonances (SPR), which range from 5.7 × 10 8 to 26.8 × 10 8 M -1 cm -1 . Measured values correlate with those obtained from theoretical models of the NStars using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA), which we use to simulate the extinction spectra of the nanostars. Finally, because NStars are typically used in biological applications, we conjugate DNA and antibodies to the NStars and calculate the footprint of the bound biomolecules.

  16. Kerr scattering coefficients via isomonodromy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Bruno Carneiro da [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco,50670-901, Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil); Novaes, Fábio [International Institute of Physics, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte,Av. Odilon Gomes de Lima 1722, Capim Macio, Natal-RN 59078-400 (Brazil)

    2015-11-23

    We study the scattering of a massless scalar field in a generic Kerr background. Using a particular gauge choice based on the current conservation of the radial equation, we give a generic formula for the scattering coefficient in terms of the composite monodromy parameter σ between the inner and the outer horizons. Using the isomonodromy flow, we calculate σ exactly in terms of the Painlevé V τ-function. We also show that the eigenvalue problem for the angular equation (spheroidal harmonics) can be calculated using the same techniques. We use recent developments relating the Painlevé V τ-function to Liouville irregular conformal blocks to claim that this scattering problem is solved in the combinatorial sense, with known expressions for the τ-function near the critical points.

  17. Factorization of Transport Coefficients in Macroporous Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2000-01-01

    We prove the fundamental theorem about factorization of the phenomenological coefficients for transport in macroporous media. By factorization we mean the representation of the transport coefficients as products of geometric parameters of the porous medium and the parameters characteristic...

  18. Symmetry chains and adaptation coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzer, H.P.; Gruber, B.

    1985-01-01

    Given a symmetry chain of physical significance it becomes necessary to obtain states which transform properly with respect to the symmetries of the chain. In this article we describe a method which permits us to calculate symmetry-adapted quantum states with relative ease. The coefficients for the symmetry-adapted linear combinations are obtained, in numerical form, in terms of the original states of the system and can thus be represented in the form of numerical tables. In addition, one also obtains automatically the matrix elements for the operators of the symmetry groups which are involved, and thus for any physical operator which can be expressed either as an element of the algebra or of the enveloping algebra. The method is well suited for computers once the physically relevant symmetry chain, or chains, have been defined. While the method to be described is generally applicable to any physical system for which semisimple Lie algebras play a role we choose here a familiar example in order to illustrate the method and to illuminate its simplicity. We choose the nuclear shell model for the case of two nucleons with orbital angular momentum l = 1. While the states of the entire shell transform like the smallest spin representation of SO(25) we restrict our attention to its subgroup SU(6) x SU(2)/sub T/. We determine the symmetry chains which lead to total angular momentum SU(2)/sub J/ and obtain the symmetry-adapted states for these chains

  19. Kinetic coefficients for the biological treatment of tannery wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haydar, S.

    2008-01-01

    Determination of kinetic coefficients for a particular wastewater is imperative for the rational design of biological treatment-facilities. The present study was undertaken with the objective of finding out kinetic coefficients for tannery wastewater. A bench-scale model of aerated lagoon, consisting of an aeration tank and final clarifier, was use to conduct the studies. The model was operated continuously for 96 days, by varying the detention times from 3 to 9 days. Influent for the aerated lagoon was settled tannery wastewater. Biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) of the influent and effluent and the mixed-liquor suspended solids (MLSS) of aeration tank were determined at various detention-times so as to generate data for kinetic coefficients. The kinetic coefficients k, Ks, Y and Ed were found to be 3.125 day/sup -1/, 488 mg/L, 0.64 and 0.035 day/sup -1/ respectively. Overall rate-constant of BOD, removal 'K' was also determined and was found to be 1.43 day/sup -1/. Kinetic coefficients were determined, at mean reactor-temperature of 30.2 degree C. These coefficients may be utilized for the design of biological-treatment facilities for tannery wastewater. (author)

  20. Standards for Standardized Logistic Regression Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Standardized coefficients in logistic regression analysis have the same utility as standardized coefficients in linear regression analysis. Although there has been no consensus on the best way to construct standardized logistic regression coefficients, there is now sufficient evidence to suggest a single best approach to the construction of a…

  1. Anomalous Seebeck coefficient in boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aselage, T.L.; Emin, D.; Wood, C.; Mackinnon, I.D.R.; Howard, I.A.

    1987-01-01

    Boron carbides exhibit an anomalously large Seebeck coefficient with a temperature coefficient that is characteristic of polaronic hopping between inequivalent sites. The inequivalence in the sites is associated with disorder in the solid. The temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient for materials prepared by different techniques provides insight into the nature of the disorder

  2. Coefficient rings of formal group laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchstaber, V M; Ustinov, A V

    2015-01-01

    We describe the coefficient rings of universal formal group laws which arise in algebraic geometry, algebraic topology and their application to mathematical physics. We also describe the homomorphisms of these coefficient rings coming from reductions of one formal group law to another. The proofs are based on the number-theoretic properties of binomial coefficients. Bibliography: 37 titles

  3. Soccer Ball Lift Coefficients via Trajectory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, John Eric; Carre, Matt J.

    2010-01-01

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin…

  4. Diffusion coefficient in photon diffusion theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, R; Ten Bosch, JJ

    2000-01-01

    The choice of the diffusion coefficient to be used in photon diffusion theory has been a subject of discussion in recent publications on tissue optics. We compared several diffusion coefficients with the apparent diffusion coefficient from the more fundamental transport theory, D-app. Application to

  5. Energy coefficients for a propeller series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anders Smærup

    2004-01-01

    The efficiency for a propeller is calculated by energy coefficients. These coefficients are related to four types of losses, i.e. the axial, the rotational, the frictional, and the finite blade number loss, and one gain, i.e. the axial gain. The energy coefficients are derived by use...... of the potential theory with the propeller modelled as an actuator disk. The efficiency based on the energy coefficients is calculated for a propeller series. The results show a good agreement between the efficiency based on the energy coefficients and the efficiency obtained by a vortex-lattice method....

  6. Index-free heat kernel coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, Anton E. M.

    1998-08-01

    Using index-free notation, we present the diagonal values 0264-9381/15/8/014/img1 of the first five heat kernel coefficients 0264-9381/15/8/014/img2 associated with a general Laplace-type operator on a compact Riemannian space without boundary. The fifth coefficient 0264-9381/15/8/014/img3 appears here for the first time. For the special case of a flat space, but with a gauge connection, the sixth coefficient is given too. Also provided are the leading terms for any coefficient, both in ascending and descending powers of the Yang-Mills and Riemann curvatures, to the same order as required for the fourth coefficient. These results are obtained by directly solving the relevant recursion relations, working in the Fock-Schwinger gauge and Riemann normal coordinates. Our procedure is thus non-covariant, but we show that for any coefficient the `gauged', respectively `curved', version is found from the corresponding `non-gauged', respectively `flat', coefficient by making some simple covariant substitutions. These substitutions being understood, the coefficients retain their `flat' form and size. In this sense the fifth and sixth coefficient have only 26 and 75 terms, respectively, allowing us to write them down. Using index-free notation also clarifies the general structure of the heat kernel coefficients. In particular, in flat space we find that from the fifth coefficient onward, certain scalars are absent. This may be relevant for the anomalies of quantum field theories in ten or more dimensions.

  7. Determination of Dimensionless Attenuation Coefficient in Shaped Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, C.; Steinetz, B.; Finkbeiner, J.; Raman, G.; Li, X.

    2003-01-01

    The value of dimensionless attenuation coefficient is an important factor when numerically predicting high-amplitude acoustic waves in shaped resonators. Both the magnitude of the pressure waveform and the quality factor rely heavily on this dimensionless parameter. Previous authors have stated the values used, but have not completely explained their methods. This work fully describes the methodology used to determine this important parameter. Over a range of frequencies encompassing the fundamental resonance, the pressure waves were experimentally measured at each end of the shaped resonators. At the corresponding dimensionless acceleration, the numerical code modeled the acoustic waveforms generated in the resonator using various dimensionless attenuation coefficients. The dimensionless attenuation coefficient that most closely matched the pressure amplitudes and quality factors of the experimental and numerical results was determined to be the value to be used in subsequent studies.

  8. Reproducibility of The Random Incidence Absorption Coefficient Converted From the Sabine Absorption Coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Chang, Ji-ho

    2015-01-01

    Absorption coefficients measured in reverberation chambers, Sabine absorption coefficients, suffer from two major problems. Firstly, they sometimes exceed unity. Secondly, the reproducibility of the Sabine absorption coefficients is quite poor, meaning that the Sabine absorption coefficients vary...... resistivity optimization outperforms the surface impedance optimization in terms of the reproducibility....

  9. Incremental Aerodynamic Coefficient Database for the USA2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Annie Catherine

    2016-01-01

    In March through May of 2016, a wind tunnel test was conducted by the Aerosciences Branch (EV33) to visually study the unsteady aerodynamic behavior over multiple transition geometries for the Universal Stage Adapter 2 (USA2) in the MSFC Aerodynamic Research Facility's Trisonic Wind Tunnel (TWT). The purpose of the test was to make a qualitative comparison of the transonic flow field in order to provide a recommended minimum transition radius for manufacturing. Additionally, 6 Degree of Freedom force and moment data for each configuration tested was acquired in order to determine the geometric effects on the longitudinal aerodynamic coefficients (Normal Force, Axial Force, and Pitching Moment). In order to make a quantitative comparison of the aerodynamic effects of the USA2 transition geometry, the aerodynamic coefficient data collected during the test was parsed and incorporated into a database for each USA2 configuration tested. An incremental aerodynamic coefficient database was then developed using the generated databases for each USA2 geometry as a function of Mach number and angle of attack. The final USA2 coefficient increments will be applied to the aerodynamic coefficients of the baseline geometry to adjust the Space Launch System (SLS) integrated launch vehicle force and moment database based on the transition geometry of the USA2.

  10. Shear flexoelectric coefficient μ1211 in polyvinylidene fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuwen; Xu, Minglong; Liang, Xu; Shen, Shengping

    2015-05-01

    Defined as a strain gradient-induced electric polarization, flexoelectricity exists in all dielectric materials. The coefficient that exists between the strain gradient and the electric polarization defines the flexoelectric coefficient tensor. The tensor components along the longitudinal and transverse directions have been studied widely. However, little progress has been reported on flexoelectric properties in the shear direction to date. In this work, a novel method for measurement of the shear flexoelectric coefficient μ1211 of polyvinylidene fluoride is presented. An experiment is conducted on a tubular unpolarized specimen, where shear strain gradient is generated along the radial direction by applying torque to the ends of the tube-shaped specimen. Dynamic torque is exerted on specimens with a static bias value and at different frequencies. The generated shear strain gradient is calculated via finite element analysis and the corresponding induced electrical polarization is measured using a charge amplifier. The shear flexoelectric coefficient μ1211 is found to have an average value of 7.318 × 10-10 C/m at room temperature. The experimental results show good agreement with the theoretical predictions and indicate the potential value of this material property for electromechanical device fabrication.

  11. Apparatus for measurement of coefficient of friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slifka, A. J.; Siegwarth, J. D.; Sparks, L. L.; Chaudhuri, Dilip K.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus designed to measure the coefficient of friction in certain controlled atmospheres is described. The coefficient of friction observed during high-load tests was nearly constant, with an average value of 0.56. This value is in general agreement with that found in the literature and also with the initial friction coefficient value of 0.67 measured during self-mated friction of 440C steel in an oxygen environment.

  12. Extended obstruction tensors and renormalized volume coefficients

    OpenAIRE

    Graham, C. Robin

    2009-01-01

    The behavior under conformal change of the renormalized volume coefficients associated to a pseudo-Riemannian metric is investigated. It is shown that they define second order fully nonlinear operators in the conformal factor whose algebraic structure is elucidated via the introduction of "extended obstruction tensors". These together with the Schouten tensor constitute building blocks for the coefficients in the ambient metric expansion. The renormalized volume coefficients have recently bee...

  13. Index-free Heat Kernel Coefficients

    OpenAIRE

    van de Ven, Anton E. M.

    1997-01-01

    Using index-free notation, we present the diagonal values of the first five heat kernel coefficients associated with a general Laplace-type operator on a compact Riemannian space without boundary. The fifth coefficient appears here for the first time. For a flat space with a gauge connection, the sixth coefficient is given too. Also provided are the leading terms for any coefficient, both in ascending and descending powers of the Yang-Mills and Riemann curvatures, to the same order as require...

  14. Comparing linear probability model coefficients across groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anders; Ejrnæs, Mette; Karlson, Kristian Bernt

    2015-01-01

    This article offers a formal identification analysis of the problem in comparing coefficients from linear probability models between groups. We show that differences in coefficients from these models can result not only from genuine differences in effects, but also from differences in one or more...... of the following three components: outcome truncation, scale parameters and distributional shape of the predictor variable. These results point to limitations in using linear probability model coefficients for group comparisons. We also provide Monte Carlo simulations and real examples to illustrate...... these limitations, and we suggest a restricted approach to using linear probability model coefficients in group comparisons....

  15. Fuzzy solution of the linear programming problem with interval coefficients in the constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Dorota Kuchta

    2005-01-01

    A fuzzy concept of solving the linear programming problem with interval coefficients is proposed. For each optimism level of the decision maker (where the optimism concerns the certainty that no errors have been committed in the estimation of the interval coefficients and the belief that optimistic realisations of the interval coefficients will occur) another interval solution of the problem will be generated and the decision maker will be able to choose the final solution having a complete v...

  16. Probability based calibration of pressure coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Svend Ole; Pedersen, Marie Louise; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2015-01-01

    .3, the Eurocode partial factor of 1.5 for variable actions agrees well with the inherent uncertainties of wind actions when the pressure coefficients are determined using wind tunnel test results. The increased bias and uncertainty when pressure coefficients mainly are based on structural codes lead to a larger...

  17. Problems with Discontinuous Diffusion/Dispersion Coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Ferraris

    2012-01-01

    accurate on smooth solutions and based on a special numerical treatment of the diffusion/dispersion coefficients that makes its application possible also when such coefficients are discontinuous. Numerical experiments confirm the convergence of the numerical approximation and show a good behavior on a set of benchmark problems in two space dimensions.

  18. Parabolic by Shilov systems with variable coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Litovchenko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Because of the parabolic instability of the Shilov systems to change their coefficients, the definition parabolicity of Shilov for systems with time-dependent $t$ coefficients, unlike the definition parabolicity of Petrovsky, is formulated by imposing conditions on the matricant of corresponding dual by Fourier system. For parabolic systems by Petrovsky with time-dependent coefficients, these conditions are the property of a matricant, which follows directly from the definition of parabolicity. In connection with this, the question of the wealth of the class Shilov systems with time-dependent coefficients is important.A new class of linear parabolic systems with partial derivatives to the first order by the time $t$ with time-dependent coefficients is considered in this work. It covers the class by Petrovsky systems with time-dependent younger coefficients. A main part of differential expression of each such system is parabolic (by Shilov expression with constant coefficients. The fundamental solution of the Cauchy problem for systems of this class is constructed by the Fourier transform method. Also proved their parabolicity by Shilov. Only the structure of the system and the conditions on the eigenvalues of the matrix symbol were used. First of all, this class characterizes the wealth by Shilov class of systems with time-dependents coefficients.Also it is given a general method for investigating a fundamental solution of the Cauchy problem for Shilov parabolic systems with positive genus, which is the development of the well-known method of Y.I. Zhitomirskii.

  19. A gain-coefficient switched Alexandrite laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chris J; Van der Slot, Peter J M; Boller, Klaus-J

    2013-01-01

    We report on a gain-coefficient switched Alexandrite laser. An electro-optic modulator is used to switch between high and low gain states by making use of the polarization dependent gain of Alexandrite. In gain-coefficient switched mode, the laser produces 85 ns pulses with a pulse energy of 240 mJ at a repetition rate of 5 Hz.

  20. Prediction of friction coefficients for gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M. F.

    1969-01-01

    Empirical relations are used for correlating laminar and turbulent friction coefficients for gases, with large variations in the physical properties, flowing through smooth tubes. These relations have been used to correlate friction coefficients for hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and air.

  1. Coefficient Alpha Bootstrap Confidence Interval under Nonnormality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Miguel A.; Divers, Jasmin; Newton, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Three different bootstrap methods for estimating confidence intervals (CIs) for coefficient alpha were investigated. In addition, the bootstrap methods were compared with the most promising coefficient alpha CI estimation methods reported in the literature. The CI methods were assessed through a Monte Carlo simulation utilizing conditions…

  2. Heat transfer coefficient for boiling carbon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hans Jørgen Høgaard; Jensen, Per Henrik

    1998-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop for boiling carbon dioxide (R744) flowing in a horizontal pipe has been measured. The calculated heat transfer coeeficient has been compared with the Chart correlation of Shah. The Chart Correlation predits too low heat transfer coefficient but the ratio...

  3. Estimating Runoff Coefficients Using Weather Radars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahm, Malte; Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a method for estimating runoff coefficients of urban drainage catchments based on a combination of high resolution weather radar data and insewer flow measurements. By utilising the spatial variability of the precipitation it is possible to estimate the runoff coefficients...

  4. Regularity of the interband light absorption coefficient

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In experimental studies the absorption coefficient is a means to study the band gaps at ... to l2( ), where. ⊂ Zd is a finite set. (usually taken to be a lattice cube centred at the origin) and λ±,uλ± are eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of H. ±. ,ω . Then the interband light absorption coefficient A for such finite volume models can.

  5. Helioseismic Solar Cycle Changes and Splitting Coefficients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Abstract. Using the GONG data for a period over four years, we have studied the variation of frequencies and splitting coefficients with solar cycle. Frequencies and even-order coefficients are found to change signi- ficantly with rising phase of the solar cycle. We also find temporal varia- tions in the rotation rate near the solar ...

  6. Determination of the surface drag coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahrt, L.; Vickers, D.; Sun, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    This study examines the dependence of the surface drag coefficient on stability, wind speed, mesoscale modulation of the turbulent flux and method of calculation of the drag coefficient. Data sets over grassland, sparse grass, heather and two forest sites are analyzed. For significantly unstable ...

  7. Gini coefficient as a life table function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a toolkit for measuring and analyzing inter-individual inequality in length of life by Gini coefficient. Gini coefficient and four other inequality measures are defined on the length-of-life distribution. Properties of these measures and their empirical testing on mortality data suggest a possibility for different judgements about the direction of changes in the degree of inequality by using different measures. A new computational procedure for the estimation of Gini coefficient from life tables is developed and tested on about four hundred real life tables. The estimates of Gini coefficient are precise enough even for abridged life tables with the final age group of 85+. New formulae have been developed for the decomposition of differences between Gini coefficients by age and cause of death. A new method for decomposition of age-components into effects of mortality and composition of population by group is developed. Temporal changes in the effects of elimination of causes of death on Gini coefficient are analyzed. Numerous empirical examples show: Lorenz curves for Sweden, Russia and Bangladesh in 1995, proportional changes in Gini coefficient and four other measures of inequality for the USA in 1950-1995 and for Russia in 1959-2000. Further shown are errors of estimates of Gini coefficient when computed from various types of mortality data of France, Japan, Sweden and the USA in 1900-95, decompositions of the USA-UK difference in life expectancies and Gini coefficients by age and cause of death in 1997. As well, effects of elimination of major causes of death in the UK in 1951-96 on Gini coefficient, age-specific effects of mortality and educational composition of the Russian population on changes in life expectancy and Gini coefficient between 1979 and 1989. Illustrated as well are variations in life expectancy and Gini coefficient across 32 countries in 1996-1999 and associated changes in life expectancy and Gini

  8. Experimental approach for measuring cylindrical flexoelectric coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuwen; Liu, Kaiyuan; Wu, Tonghui; Xu, Minglong; Shen, Shengping

    2017-10-01

    Flexoelectricity is a property of dielectric materials by which applied strain gradients induce electric polarizations within dielectric materials. Experimental research into the tensor components of the flexoelectric coefficient is essential. In this work, an experimental approach for measurement of the flexoelectric coefficient tensor components in cylindrical coordinates is developed. Two different experimental methods are designed to obtain the two related unknown flexoelectric coefficient tensor components. Theoretical and finite element analyses are developed and simplified for each experiment, and the related designs are then tested to obtain the coupled electric polarization charges. The two unknown flexoelectric coefficient tensor components of polyvinylidene fluoride are then decoupled. This work provides an experimental method that can be used to obtain multiple unknown flexoelectric coefficient tensor components in solid dielectric materials.

  9. Development of database on the distribution coefficient. 1. Collection of the distribution coefficient data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takebe, Shinichi; Abe, Masayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    The distribution coefficient is very important parameter for environmental impact assessment on the disposal of radioactive waste arising from research institutes. The literature survey in the country was mainly carried out for the purpose of selecting the reasonable distribution coefficient value on the utilization of this value in the safety evaluation. This report was arranged much informations on the distribution coefficient for inputting to the database for each literature, and was summarized as a literature information data on the distribution coefficient. (author)

  10. Soccer ball lift coefficients via trajectory analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, John Eric [Department of Physics, Lynchburg College, Lynchburg, VA 24501 (United States); Carre, Matt J, E-mail: goff@lynchburg.ed [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin parameters that have not been obtained by today's wind tunnels. Our trajectory analysis technique is not only a valuable tool for professional sports scientists, it is also accessible to students with a background in undergraduate-level classical mechanics.

  11. Identifying node spreading influence for tunable clustering coefficient networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi-Yi; Han, Jing-Ti; Zhao, Jun

    2017-11-01

    Identifying the node spreading influence is of significant for information and innovation diffusion. In this paper, we argue that the spreading process should be taken into account for identifying the node spreading influence and investigate the effect of the network structure, measured by the clustering coefficient, on the performance of spreading dynamics. Firstly, we generate a series of networks with tunable clustering coefficients. Then, taking into account the spreading process, we explore the performances among the Dynamics-sensitive (DS) index and the degree, between, closeness, eigenvector indices. Comparing with the Susceptible-Infective-Removed (SIR) model, the extensive results show that, for different spreading time steps and clustering coefficients, the DS centrality outperforms the performance, τ > 0 . 97, of degree, betweenness, closeness and eigenvector measures. Moreover, the accuracy of closeness and eigenvector centrality is similar and conducts better in networks with larger spreading rate β = 0 . 20 , τ > 0 . 93. As the clustering coefficient increases, all the performances decrease but DS centrality with least percent of 1.16 at most under β = 0 . 10, and Closeness with the largest percent of 9.75 under β = 0 . 05. This work suggests that the spreading influence not only depends on the network structure, more importantly, the spreading dynamic process also affect the performance greatly, which should be taken into account simultaneously.

  12. Friction coefficient dependence on electrostatic tribocharging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgo, Thiago A L; Silva, Cristiane A; Balestrin, Lia B S; Galembeck, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Friction between dielectric surfaces produces patterns of fixed, stable electric charges that in turn contribute electrostatic components to surface interactions between the contacting solids. The literature presents a wealth of information on the electronic contributions to friction in metals and semiconductors but the effect of triboelectricity on friction coefficients of dielectrics is as yet poorly defined and understood. In this work, friction coefficients were measured on tribocharged polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), using three different techniques. As a result, friction coefficients at the macro- and nanoscales increase many-fold when PTFE surfaces are tribocharged, but this effect is eliminated by silanization of glass spheres rolling on PTFE. In conclusion, tribocharging may supersede all other contributions to macro- and nanoscale friction coefficients in PTFE and probably in other insulating polymers.

  13. Roughness coefficients for stream channels in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, B.N.; Garrett, J.M.

    1973-01-01

    When water flows in an open channel, energy is lost through friction along the banks and bed of the channel and through turbulence within the channel. The amount of energy lost is governed by channel roughness, which is expressed in terms of a roughness coefficient. An evaluation of the roughness coefficient is necessary in many hydraulic computations that involve flow in an open channel. Owing to the lack of satisfactory quantitative procedure, the ability of evaluate roughness coefficients can be developed only through experience; however, a basic knowledge of the methods used to assign the coefficients and the factors affecting them will be a great help. One of the most commonly used equations in open-channel hydraulics is that of Manning. The Manning equation is       1.486

  14. Explicit formulas for Clebsch-Gordan coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudnicki-Bujnowski, G.

    1975-01-01

    The problem is to obtain explicit algebraic formulas of Clebsch-Gordan coefficients for high values of angular momentum. The method of solution is an algebraic method based on the Racah formula using the FORMAC programming language. (Auth.)

  15. Second coefficient of viscosity in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Robert L.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Zheng, Zhonquan

    1991-01-01

    Acoustic attenuation measurements in air were analyzed in order to estimate the second coefficient of viscosity. Data over a temperature range of 11 C to 50 C and at relative humidities between 6 percent and 91 percent were used. This analysis showed that the second coefficient of viscosity varied between 1900 and 20,000 times larger than the dynamic or first coefficient of viscosity over the temperature and humidity range of the data. In addition, the data showed that the molecular relaxation effects, which are responsible for the magnitude of the second coefficient of viscosity, place severe limits on the use of time-independent, thermodynamic equations of state. Compressible flows containing large streamwise velocity gradients, like shock waves, which cause significant changes in particle properties to occur during time intervals shorter than hundredths of seconds, must be modeled using dynamic equations of state. The dynamic model approach is described briefly.

  16. Heat transfer coefficient of cryotop during freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W J; Zhou, X L; Wang, H S; Liu, B L; Dai, J J

    2013-01-01

    Cryotop is an efficient vitrification method for cryopreservation of oocytes. It has been widely used owing to its simple operation and high freezing rate. Recently, the heat transfer performance of cryotop was studied by numerical simulation in several studies. However, the range of heat transfer coefficient in the simulation is uncertain. In this study, the heat transfer coefficient for cryotop during freezing process was analyzed. The cooling rates of 40 percent ethylene glycol (EG) droplet in cryotop during freezing were measured by ultra-fast measurement system and calculated by numerical simulation at different value of heat transfer coefficient. Compared with the results obtained by two methods, the range of the heat transfer coefficient necessary for the numerical simulation of cryotop was determined, which is between 9000 W/(m(2)·K) and 10000 W/(m (2)·K).

  17. Modeling Ballasted Tracks for Runoff Coefficient C

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    In this study, the Regional Transportation District (RTD)s light rail tracks were modeled to determine the Rational Method : runoff coefficient, C, values corresponding to ballasted tracks. To accomplish this, a laboratory study utilizing a : rain...

  18. Estimation of Okun Coefficient for Algeria

    OpenAIRE

    KORI YAHIA, Abdellah

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the presence of Okun’s (1962) relationship for Algeria for the 1970- 2015 period. Two methodologies are employed to estimate the Okun coefficient: An Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) linear model and a Bayesian Normal Linear Regression model. The results indicate an Okun coefficient of about -0.2 which suggests some rigidity of the labour market in Algeria.

  19. Measuring Resource Inequality: The Gini Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Catalano

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper stems from work done by the authors at the Mathematics for Social Justice Workshop held in June of 2007 at Middlebury College. We provide a description of the Gini coefficient and some discussion of how it can be used to promote quantitative literacy skills in mathematics courses. The Gini Coefficient was introduced in 1921 by Italian statistician Corrado Gini as a measure of inequality. It is defined as twice the area between two curves. One, the Lorenz curve for a given population with respect to a given resource, represents the cumulative percentage of the resource as a function of the cumulative percentage of the population that shares that percentage of the resource. The second curve is the line y = x which is the Lorenz curve for a population which shares the resource equally. The Gini coefficient can be interpreted as the percentage of inequality represented in the population with respect to the given resource. We propose that the Gini coefficient can be used to enhance students’ understanding of calculus concepts and provide practice for students in using both calculus and quantitative literacy skills. Our examples are based mainly on distribution of energy resources using publicly available data from the Energy Information Agency of the United States Government. For energy resources within the United States, we find that by household, the Gini coefficient is 0.346, while using the 51 data points represented by the states and Washington D.C., the Gini coefficient is 0.158. When we consider the countries of the world as a population of 210, the Gini coefficient is 0.670. We close with ideas for questions which can be posed to students and discussion of the experiences two other mathematics instructors have had incorporating the Gini coefficient into pre-calculus-level mathematics classes.

  20. Monitoring device for local power peaking coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuhashi, Ishi

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To monitor the local power peaking coefficients obtained by the method not depending on the combination of fuel types. Method: A plurality of representative values for the local power distribution determined by the nuclear constant calculation for one fuel assembly are memorized regarding each of the burn-up degree and the void coefficient on every positions and fuel types in fuel rod assemblies. While on the other hand, the representative values for the local power distribution as described above are compensated by a compensation coefficient considering the effect of adjacent segments and a control rod compensation coefficient considering the effect due to the control rod insertion relative to the just-mentioned compensation coefficient. Then, the maximum value among them is selected to determine the local power peaking coefficient at each of the times and each of the segments, which is monitored. According to this system, the calculation and the working required for the fitting work depending on the combination of fuel types are no more required at all to facilitate the maintenance as well. (Horiuchi, T.)

  1. Reactivity feedback coefficients Pakistan research reactor-1 using PRIDE code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansoor, Ali; Ahmed, Siraj-ul-Islam; Khan, Rustam [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Inam-ul-Haq [Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Physics

    2017-05-15

    Results of the analyses performed for fuel, moderator and void's temperature feedback reactivity coefficients for the first high power core configuration of Pakistan Research Reactor - 1 (PARR-1) are summarized. For this purpose, a validated three dimensional model of PARR-1 core was developed and confirmed against the reference results for reactivity calculations. The ''Program for Reactor In-Core Analysis using Diffusion Equation'' (PRIDE) code was used for development of global (3-dimensional) model in conjunction with WIMSD4 for lattice cell modeling. Values for isothermal fuel, moderator and void's temperature feedback reactivity coefficients have been calculated. Additionally, flux profiles for the five energy groups were also generated.

  2. Radon emanation coefficients in sandy soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holy, K.; Polaskova, A.; Baranova, A.; Sykora, I.; Hola, O.

    1998-01-01

    In this contribution the results of the study of an influence of the water content on the emanation coefficient for two sandy soil samples are reported. These samples were chosen on the because of the long-term continual monitoring of the 222 Rn concentration just in such types of soils and this radon concentration showed the significant variations during a year. These variations are chiefly given in connection with the soil moisture. Therefore, the determination of the dependence of the emanation coefficient of radon on the water content can help to evaluate the influence of the soil moisture variations of radon concentrations in the soil air. The presented results show that the emanation coefficient reaches the constant value in the wide interval of the water content for both sandy soil samples. Therefore, in the common range of the soil moisture (5 - 20 %) it is impossible to expect the variations of the radon concentration in the soil air due to the change of the emanation coefficient. The expressive changes of the radon concentration in the soil air can be observed in case of the significant decrease of the emanation coefficient during the soil drying when the water content decreases under 5 % or during the complete filling of the soil pores by the water. (authors)

  3. A Solution Methodology and Computer Program to Efficiently Model Thermodynamic and Transport Coefficients of Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlemann, Paul G.

    2000-01-01

    A solution methodology has been developed to efficiently model multi-specie, chemically frozen, thermally perfect gas mixtures. The method relies on the ability to generate a single (composite) set of thermodynamic and transport coefficients prior to beginning a CFD solution. While not fundamentally a new concept, many applied CFD users are not aware of this capability nor have a mechanism to easily and confidently generate new coefficients. A database of individual specie property coefficients has been created for 48 species. The seven coefficient form of the thermodynamic functions is currently used rather then the ten coefficient form due to the similarity of the calculated properties, low temperature behavior and reduced CPU requirements. Sutherland laminar viscosity and thermal conductivity coefficients were computed in a consistent manner from available reference curves. A computer program has been written to provide CFD users with a convenient method to generate composite specie coefficients for any mixture. Mach 7 forebody/inlet calculations demonstrated nearly equivalent results and significant CPU time savings compared to a multi-specie solution approach. Results from high-speed combustor analysis also illustrate the ability to model inert test gas contaminants without additional computational expense.

  4. Computation of Clebsch-Gordan and Gaunt coefficients using binomial coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guseinov, I.I.; Oezmen, A.; Atav, Ue

    1995-01-01

    Using binomial coefficients the Clebsch-Gordan and Gaunt coefficients were calculated for extremely large quantum numbers. The main advantage of this approach is directly calculating these coefficients, instead of using recursion relations. Accuracy of the results is quite high for quantum numbers l 1 , and l 2 up to 100. Despite direct calculation, the CPU times are found comparable with those given in the related literature. 11 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  5. Curvature of Indoor Sensor Network: Clustering Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the geometric properties of the communication graph in realistic low-power wireless networks. In particular, we explore the concept of the curvature of a wireless network via the clustering coefficient. Clustering coefficient analysis is a computationally simplified, semilocal approach, which nevertheless captures such a large-scale feature as congestion in the underlying network. The clustering coefficient concept is applied to three cases of indoor sensor networks, under varying thresholds on the link packet reception rate (PRR. A transition from positive curvature (“meshed” network to negative curvature (“core concentric” network is observed by increasing the threshold. Even though this paper deals with network curvature per se, we nevertheless expand on the underlying congestion motivation, propose several new concepts (network inertia and centroid, and finally we argue that greedy routing on a virtual positively curved network achieves load balancing on the physical network.

  6. Nozzle geometry variations on the discharge coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M.A. Alam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerical works have been conducted to investigate the effect of nozzle geometries on the discharge coefficient. Several contoured converging nozzles with finite radius of curvatures, conically converging nozzles and conical divergent orifices have been employed in this investigation. Each nozzle and orifice has a nominal exit diameter of 12.7×10−3 m. A 3rd order MUSCL finite volume method of ANSYS Fluent 13.0 was used to solve the Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations in simulating turbulent flows through various nozzle inlet geometries. The numerical model was validated through comparison between the numerical results and experimental data. The results obtained show that the nozzle geometry has pronounced effect on the sonic lines and discharge coefficients. The coefficient of discharge was found differ from unity due to the non-uniformity of flow parameters at the nozzle exit and the presence of boundary layer as well.

  7. Control in the coefficients with variational crimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evgrafov, Anton; Marhadi, Kun Saptohartyadi

    2012-01-01

    We study convergence of discontinuous Galerkin-type discretizations of the problems of control in the coefficients of uniformly elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs). As a model problem we use that of the optimal design of thin (Kirchhoff) plates, where the governing equations are of the......We study convergence of discontinuous Galerkin-type discretizations of the problems of control in the coefficients of uniformly elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs). As a model problem we use that of the optimal design of thin (Kirchhoff) plates, where the governing equations...... to “volumetric” Lebesgue norm, changes of the coefficients is generally speaking not continuous. We utilize the lifting formulation of the discontinuous Galerkin method to deal with this issue.Our main result is that limit points of sequences of designs verifying discrete versions of stationarity can also...

  8. Optical distortion coefficients of laser windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of describing and evaluating thermal lensing phenomena that occur as a result of the absorption of laser light in solid windows. The aberration-function expansion method is applied for deriving the two optical distortion coefficients χ + and χ - that characterize the degradation in light intensity at the Gaussian focus of an initially diffraction-limited laser beam passing through a weakly absorbing stress-birefringent window. In a pulsed mode of operation, the concept of an effective optical distortion coefficient. χ eff, which properly combines the coefficients χ + and χ - in terms of potential impact on focal irradiances, then leads to the definition of a figure of merit for distortion. The theory and the calculations presented in this papers provide simple analytical tools for predicting the optical performance of a window-material candidate in a specific system's environment

  9. Experimental estimate of energy accommodation coefficient at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, I. S.; Lee, D.; Song, J.; Choi, M.

    2001-11-01

    The energy accommodation coefficient (EAC), which is used to characterize gas-surface interactions, was experimentally estimated at high temperatures. A method utilizing laser irradiation to heat up nanoparticles that are generated in a flame was proposed. From the obtained dependence of particle temperature upon laser power, the EAC was derived to be approximately equal to 0.005, which agrees nicely with our recent rigorous theoretical result. It indicates that the efficiency of heat transfer between gas and particles is sufficiently small in high temperature system at large Knudsen numbers.

  10. Criterions for fixing regulatory seismic acceleration coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costes, D.

    1988-03-01

    Acceleration coeffficients to be taken into account in seismic areas for calculation of structures are defined in national seismic regulations. Joined to the described qualitative requirements, these coefficients represent a balance between precaution costs and avoided damages, both in terms of material repairing costs and damage to human life. Persons in charge of fixing these coefficients must be informed of corresponding quantitative aspects. Data on seismic motions occurrencies and consequences are gathered here and convoluted to mean damage evaluations. Indications on precaution costs are joined, which shows that currently recommended levels of seismic motions are high relatively to financial profitability, and represent in fact an aethical choice about human life value [fr

  11. Dependence of sputtering coefficient on ion dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colligon, J.S.; Patel, M.H.

    1977-01-01

    The sputtering coefficient of polycrystalline gold bombarded by 10-40 keV Ar + ions had been measured as a function of total ion dose and shown to exhibit oscillations in magnitude between 30 and 100%. Possible experimental errors which would give rise to such an oscillation have been considered, but it is apparent that these factors are unable to explain the measurements. It is proposed that a change in the Sublimation Energy associated with either bulk damage or formation of surface topographical features arising during ion bombardment may be responsible for the observed variations in sputtering coefficient. (author)

  12. Absorption coefficient instrument for turbid natural waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.; Cherdak, A.; Poole, L.; Houghton, W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents an instrument that directly measures multispectral absorption coefficient of turbid natural water. Attention is given to the design, which is shown to incorporate methods for the compensation of variation in the internal light source intensity, correction of the spectrally dependent nature of the optical elements, and correction for variation in the background light level. In addition, when used in conjunction with a spectrally matched total attenuation instrument, the spectrally dependent scattering coefficient can also be derived. Finally, it is reported that systematic errors associated with multiple scattering have been estimated using Monte Carlo techniques.

  13. A drying coefficient for building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheffler, Gregor Albrecht; Plagge, Rudolf

    2009-01-01

    , in many cases such a coefficient would be highly appreciated, e.g. in interaction of industry and research or for the distinction and selection of suitable building materials throughout design and practise. This article first highlights the importance of drying experiments for hygrothermal...... and defined as a new and independent material parameter. It contains information about the moisture transport properties throughout the wide range of moisture contents from hygroscopic up to saturation. With this new and valuable coefficient, it is now possible to distinguish and select building materials...

  14. Shear viscosity coefficient of liquid lanthanides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, H. P., E-mail: patel.harshal2@gmail.com; Thakor, P. B., E-mail: pbthakore@rediffmail.com; Prajapati, A. V., E-mail: anand0prajapati@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Veer Narmad South Gujarat University, Surat 395 007, Gujarat (India); Sonvane, Y. A., E-mail: yas@ashd.svnit.ac.in [Department of Applied Physics, S. V. National Institute of Technology, Surat 395 007, Gujarat (India)

    2015-05-15

    Present paper deals with the computation of shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides. The effective pair potential v(r) is calculated through our newly constructed model potential. The Pair distribution function g(r) is calculated from PYHS reference system. To see the influence of local field correction function, Hartree (H), Tailor (T) and Sarkar et al (S) local field correction function are used. Present results are compared with available experimental as well as theoretical data. Lastly, we found that our newly constructed model potential successfully explains the shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides.

  15. Reaction rate calculations via transmission coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feit, M.D.; Alder, B.J.

    1985-01-01

    The transmission coefficient of a wavepacket traversing a potential barrier can be determined by steady state calculations carried out in imaginary time instead of by real time dynamical calculations. The general argument is verified for the Eckart barrier potential by a comparison of transmission coefficients calculated from real and imaginary time solutions of the Schroedinger equation. The correspondence demonstrated here allows a formulation for the reaction rate that avoids difficulties due to both rare events and explicitly time dependent calculations. 5 refs., 2 figs

  16. Introduction and application of the multiscale coefficient of variation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abney, Drew H; Kello, Christopher T; Balasubramaniam, Ramesh

    2017-10-01

    Quantifying how patterns of behavior relate across multiple levels of measurement typically requires long time series for reliable parameter estimation. We describe a novel analysis that estimates patterns of variability across multiple scales of analysis suitable for time series of short duration. The multiscale coefficient of variation (MSCV) measures the distance between local coefficient of variation estimates within particular time windows and the overall coefficient of variation across all time samples. We first describe the MSCV analysis and provide an example analytical protocol with corresponding MATLAB implementation and code. Next, we present a simulation study testing the new analysis using time series generated by ARFIMA models that span white noise, short-term and long-term correlations. The MSCV analysis was observed to be sensitive to specific parameters of ARFIMA models varying in the type of temporal structure and time series length. We then apply the MSCV analysis to short time series of speech phrases and musical themes to show commonalities in multiscale structure. The simulation and application studies provide evidence that the MSCV analysis can discriminate between time series varying in multiscale structure and length.

  17. OF CHEZY DISCHARGE COEFFICIENT C AND RELATIVE ROUGHNESS COEFFICIENT n WITHIN THE FRAMWEWORK OF RESEARCH OF FREE-FLOW PIPELINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlov Vladimir Aleksandrovich

    2012-10-01

    The software is also capable of generating graphs (curves to describe the relations in question. The proposed methodology and the software designated for the calculation of Chezy and roughness coefficients makes it possible for users to identify the hydraulic properties of pipelines made of advanced materials or having advanced coatings. The availability of the above information is to optimize the selection of the pipeline repair material on the basis of the assessment of hydraulic compatibility between the sections of the pipeline in operation and those being repaired.

  18. Vertical diffuse attenuation coefficient (Kd) based optical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    The optical classification of the different water types provides vital input for studies related to primary productivity, water clarity and determination of euphotic depth. Image data of the IRS-. P3 MOS-B, for Path 90 of 27th February, 1998 was used for deriving vertical diffuse attenuation coefficient (Kd) and an optical ...

  19. Coefficient Omega Bootstrap Confidence Intervals: Nonnormal Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Miguel A.; Divers, Jasmin

    2013-01-01

    The performance of the normal theory bootstrap (NTB), the percentile bootstrap (PB), and the bias-corrected and accelerated (BCa) bootstrap confidence intervals (CIs) for coefficient omega was assessed through a Monte Carlo simulation under conditions not previously investigated. Of particular interests were nonnormal Likert-type and binary items.…

  20. Tracking Time-Varying Coefficient-Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Aalborg; Nielsen, Torben Skov; Joensen, Alfred K.

    1999-01-01

    A conditional parametric ARX-model is an ARX-model in which the parameters re replaced by smooth functions of an, possibly multivariate, externalinput signal. These functions are called coefficient functions is suggested. Essentially, in its most simple form, this method is a combination of recur...

  1. Ideal related K-theory with coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eilers, Soren; Restorff, Gunnar; Ruiz, Efren

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we define an invariant, which we believe should be the substitute for total K-theory in the case when there is one distinguished ideal. Moreover, some diagrams relating the new groups to the ordinary K-groups with coefficients are constructed. These diagrams will in most cases help...

  2. Regularity of the Interband Light Absorption Coefficient

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper we consider the interband light absorption coefficient (ILAC), in a symmetric form, in the case of random operators on the -dimensional lattice. We show that the symmetrized version of ILAC is either continuous or has a component which has the same modulus of continuity as the density of states.

  3. Prediction of longitudinal dispersion coefficient using multivariate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. River water quality; artificial neural network; longitudinal dispersion coefficient; pollution transmission ... Error indices showed that MARS model has suitable performanceand is more accurate compared to multi-layer neural network model and empirical formulas. Results ofthe Gamma test and MARS model ...

  4. Friction Coefficient Determination by Electrical Resistance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunyagi, A.; Kandrai, K.; Fülöp, Z.; Kapusi, Z.; Simon, A.

    2018-01-01

    A simple and low-cost, DIY-type, Arduino-driven experiment is presented for the study of friction and measurement of the friction coefficient, using a conductive rubber cord as a force sensor. It is proposed for high-school or college/university-level students. We strongly believe that it is worthwhile planning, designing and performing Arduino…

  5. Molar extinction coefficients of some fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, G.K.; Singh, K.; Lark, B.S.

    2002-01-01

    ) and stearic acid (C18H36O2), has been measured at the photon energies 81, 356, 511, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV. Experimental values for the molar extinction coefficient, the effective atomic number and the electron density have been derived and compared with theoretical calculations. There is good agreement...

  6. Effective stress coefficient for uniaxial strain condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, M.M.; Fabricius, I.L.

    2012-01-01

    one dimensional rock mechanical deformation. We further investigated the effect of boundary condition on the stress dependency of effective stress coefficient and discussed its application in reservoir study. As stress field in the reservoirs are most unlikely to be hydrostatic, effective stress...... determined under uniaxial strain condition will be more relevant in reservoir studies. Copyright 2012 ARMA, American Rock Mechanics Association....

  7. Modelling of power-reactivity coefficient measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strmensky, C.; Petenyi, V.; Jagrik, J.; Minarcin, M.; Hascik, R.; Toth, L.

    2005-01-01

    Report describes results of modeling of power-reactivity coefficient analysis on power-level. In paper we calculate values of discrepancies arisen during transient process. These discrepancies can be arisen as result of experiment evaluation and can be caused by disregard of 3D effects on neutron distribution. The results are critically discussed (Authors)

  8. Pressure-viscosity coefficient of biobased lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Film thickness is an important tribological property that is dependent on the combined effect of lubricant properties, material property of friction surfaces, and the operating conditions of the tribological process. Pressure-viscosity coefficient (PVC) is one of the lubricant properties that influe...

  9. Bayesian Meta-Analysis of Coefficient Alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannick, Michael T.; Zhang, Nanhua

    2013-01-01

    The current paper describes and illustrates a Bayesian approach to the meta-analysis of coefficient alpha. Alpha is the most commonly used estimate of the reliability or consistency (freedom from measurement error) for educational and psychological measures. The conventional approach to meta-analysis uses inverse variance weights to combine…

  10. Infinite matrices, wavelet coefficients and frames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Sheikh

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the action of A on f∈L2(ℝ and on its wavelet coefficients, where A=(almjklmjk is a double infinite matrix. We find the frame condition for A-transform of f∈L2(ℝ whose wavelet series expansion is known.

  11. Rate coefficient for the reaction N + NO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence has been advanced that the rate coefficient for the reaction N + NO right arrow N2 + O has a small positive temperature dependence at the high temperatures (900 to 1500 K) that prevail in the terrestrial middle and upper thermosphere by Siskind and Rusch (1992), and at the low temperatures (100 to 200 K) of the Martian lower thermosphere by Fox (1993). Assuming that the rate coefficient recommended by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory evaluation (DeMore et al., 1992) is accurate at 300 K, we derive here the low temperature value of the activation energy for this reaction and thus the rate coefficient that best fits the Viking 1 measured NO densities. We find that the fit is acceptable for a rate coefficient of about 1.3 x 10(exp -10)(T/300)(exp 0.5)exp(-400/T) and better for a value of about 2.5 x 10(exp -10)(T/300)(exp 0.5)exp(-600/T)cu cm/s.

  12. Cohomology with coefficients for operadic coalgebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Corepresentations of a coalgebra over a quadratic operad are defined, and various characterizations of them are given. Cohomology of such an operadic coalgebra with coefficients in a corepresentation is then studied. Author Affiliations. Anita Majumdar1 Donald Yau2. Department of Mathematics, Indian Institute of ...

  13. Problems on Divisibility of Binomial Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osler, Thomas J.; Smoak, James

    2004-01-01

    Twelve unusual problems involving divisibility of the binomial coefficients are represented in this article. The problems are listed in "The Problems" section. All twelve problems have short solutions which are listed in "The Solutions" section. These problems could be assigned to students in any course in which the binomial theorem and Pascal's…

  14. Power coefficient anomaly in Joyo, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Makoto; Yamashita, Yoshioki; Sasaki, Makoto; Nara, Yoshihiko.

    1981-12-01

    In this report, the presumption about the mechanism having caused the power coefficient anomaly in Joyo during the 75 MW power-raising test in 1979 is described. After the previous report, the new information about the results of the post-irradiation examination and the analysis of the power coefficient of Joyo were able to be obtained. From these information, the mechanism of causing the anomaly was presumed as follows. In 50 MW operation, the fuel burnup reached about 10,000 MWD/ton at the end of second cycle, and produced fission gas was almost retained in fuel pellets. When the power was raised from 50 MW to 75 MW for the first time, the fission gas began to be released when 50 MW was somewhat exceeded. The fission gas release caused the temperature rise and cracking of fuel pellets, and elongated fuel stack length abruptly. These phenomena induced to enlarge the fuel expansion reactivity effect and Doppler reactivity effect, and caused the anomalous behavior of power coefficient. After reaching 75 MW, the fuel stack length did not respond normally to reactor power change, and the magnitude of power coefficient became smaller. The reactivity was lost considerably from the core after the anomaly. (Kako, I.)

  15. A Graphical Interpretation of Probit Coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, William E.; Waldman, Donald M.

    1989-01-01

    Contends that, when discrete choice models are taught, particularly the probit model, it is the method rather than the interpretation of the results that is emphasized. This article provides a graphical technique for interpretation of an estimated probit coefficient that will be useful in statistics and econometrics courses. (GG)

  16. Vertical diffuse attenuation coefficient (Kd) based optical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    mary production and diffuse attenuation coeffi- cient (Austin 1981; Sathyendranath et al 2000). The Indian IRS-P3 ... oceanic and coastal production of phytoplank- ton (Tyler 1975; Pennock and Sharp 1986). As a result basic ... cient to the plant pigment content. The term dif- fuse attenuation coefficient, most commonly used.

  17. Recursive harmonic analysis for computing Hansen coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adel Sharaf, Mohamed; Hassan Selim, Hadia

    2010-12-01

    We report on a simple pure numerical method developed for computing Hansen coefficients by using a recursive harmonic analysis technique. The precision criteria of the computations are very satisfactory and provide materials for computing Hansen's and Hansen's like expansions, and also to check the accuracy of some existing algorithms.

  18. An alternative coefficient for sound absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnant, Ysbrand H.; Kuipers, E.R.; de Boer, Andries; Sas, P; Jonckheere, S.; Moens, D.

    2013-01-01

    The acoustic absorption coefficient is a number that indicates which fraction of the incident acoustic power impinging on a surface is being absorbed. The incident acoustic power is obtained by spatial integration of the incident intensity, which is (classically) defined as the time-averaged

  19. Skidding Coefficients on an Alluvial Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. N. Darwin

    1965-01-01

    The Southern Hardwoods Laboratory is studying the influence of ground conditions and load characteristics on the performance of skidding vehicles in southern bottom lands. The exploratory test was aimed at evaluating the effects of bark on skidding coefficients, but it also yielded information on other log characteristics and on effects of soil moisture.

  20. Effective stress coefficient for uniaxial strain condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2012-01-01

    The effective stress coefficient, introduced by Biot, is used for predicting effective stress or pore pressure in the subsurface. It is not a constant value. It is different for different types of sediment and it is stress dependent. We used a model, based on contact between the grains to describe...

  1. Determination of the convective heat transfer coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierings, D.; Bosman, F.; Peters, T.; Plasschaert, F.

    The value of the convective heat transfer coefficient (htc) is determined under different loading conditions by using a computer aided method. The thermal load has been applied mathematically as well as experimentally to the coronal surface of an axisymmetric tooth model. To verify the assumptions

  2. Uncertainties in Cancer Risk Coefficients for Environmental Exposure to Radionuclides. An Uncertainty Analysis for Risk Coefficients Reported in Federal Guidance Report No. 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, David [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL; Nelson, Christopher [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    2007-01-01

    Federal Guidance Report No. 13 (FGR 13) provides risk coefficients for estimation of the risk of cancer due to low-level exposure to each of more than 800 radionuclides. Uncertainties in risk coefficients were quantified in FGR 13 for 33 cases (exposure to each of 11 radionuclides by each of three exposure pathways) on the basis of sensitivity analyses in which various combinations of plausible biokinetic, dosimetric, and radiation risk models were used to generate alternative risk coefficients. The present report updates the uncertainty analysis in FGR 13 for the cases of inhalation and ingestion of radionuclides and expands the analysis to all radionuclides addressed in that report. The analysis indicates that most risk coefficients for inhalation or ingestion of radionuclides are determined within a factor of 5 or less by current information. That is, application of alternate plausible biokinetic and dosimetric models and radiation risk models (based on the linear, no-threshold hypothesis with an adjustment for the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor) is unlikely to change these coefficients by more than a factor of 5. In this analysis the assessed uncertainty in the radiation risk model was found to be the main determinant of the uncertainty category for most risk coefficients, but conclusions concerning the relative contributions of risk and dose models to the total uncertainty in a risk coefficient may depend strongly on the method of assessing uncertainties in the risk model.

  3. NGA-West 2 GMPE average site coefficients for use in earthquake-resistant design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherdt, Roger D.

    2015-01-01

    Site coefficients corresponding to those in tables 11.4–1 and 11.4–2 of Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures published by the American Society of Civil Engineers (Standard ASCE/SEI 7-10) are derived from four of the Next Generation Attenuation West2 (NGA-W2) Ground-Motion Prediction Equations (GMPEs). The resulting coefficients are compared with those derived by other researchers and those derived from the NGA-West1 database. The derivation of the NGA-W2 average site coefficients provides a simple procedure to update site coefficients with each update in the Maximum Considered Earthquake Response MCER maps. The simple procedure yields average site coefficients consistent with those derived for site-specific design purposes. The NGA-W2 GMPEs provide simple scale factors to reduce conservatism in current simplified design procedures.

  4. Optimized Finite-Difference Coefficients for Hydroacoustic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Responsible utilization of marine renewable energy sources through the use of current energy converter (CEC) and wave energy converter (WEC) devices requires an understanding of the noise generation and propagation from these systems in the marine environment. Acoustic noise produced by rotating turbines, for example, could adversely affect marine animals and human-related marine activities if not properly understood and mitigated. We are utilizing a 3-D finite-difference acoustic simulation code developed at Sandia that can accurately propagate noise in the complex bathymetry in the near-shore to open ocean environment. As part of our efforts to improve computation efficiency in the large, high-resolution domains required in this project, we investigate the effects of using optimized finite-difference coefficients on the accuracy of the simulations. We compare accuracy and runtime of various finite-difference coefficients optimized via criteria such as maximum numerical phase speed error, maximum numerical group speed error, and L-1 and L-2 norms of weighted numerical group and phase speed errors over a given spectral bandwidth. We find that those coefficients optimized for L-1 and L-2 norms are superior in accuracy to those based on maximal error and can produce runtimes of 10% of the baseline case, which uses Taylor Series finite-difference coefficients at the Courant time step limit. We will present comparisons of the results for the various cases evaluated as well as recommendations for utilization of the cases studied. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Determination of thermal reactivity coefficients for the first fuel loading of MO34

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lueley, J.; Vrban, B.; Farkas, G.; Hascik, J.; Hinca, R.; Petriska, M.; Slugen, V.

    2012-01-01

    The article introduces determination of thermal reactivity coefficients, especially summarized (isothermal) and moderator (density) reactivity coefficients between 200 grad C and 260 grad C with 2 grad C step, - in compliance with the assignment - for the first fuel loading into the RC of NP Mochovce units using 2 nd generation fuel during the start-up using calculation code MCNP5 1.60. (authors)

  6. Accurate reactivity void coefficient calculation for the fast spectrum reactor FBR-IME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Fabiano P.C.; Vellozo, Sergio de O.; Velozo, Marta J., E-mail: fabianopetruceli@outlook.com, E-mail: vellozo@cbpf.br, E-mail: martajann@gmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Engenharia Militar

    2017-07-01

    This paper aims to present an accurate calculation of the void reactivity coefficient for the FBR-IME, a fast spectrum reactor in development at the Engineering Military Institute (IME). The main design peculiarity lies in using mixed oxide [MOX - PuO{sub 2} + U(natural uranium)O{sub 2}] as fuel core. For this task, SCALE system was used to calculate the reactivity for several voids distributions generated by bubbles in the sodium beyond its boiling point. The results show that although the void reactivity coefficient is positive and location dependent, they are offset by other feedback effects, resulting in a negative overall coefficient. (author)

  7. Weyl q-coefficients for uq(3) and Racah q -coefficients for suq(2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asherova, R.M.; Smirnov, Yu.F.; Tolstoy, V.N.

    1996-01-01

    With the aid of the projection-operator technique, the general analytic expression for the elements of the matrix that relates the U and T bases of an arbitrary finite-dimensional irreducible representation of the uq(3) quantum algebra (Weyl q-coefficients) is obtained for the case where the deformation parameter q is not equal to a square root of unity. The procedure for resummation of q-factorial expressions is used to prove that, modulo phase factors, these Weyl q-coefficients coincide with Racah q-coefficients for the suq(2) quantum algebra. It is also shown that, on the basis of one general formula, the q-analogs of all known general analytic expressions for the 6j symbols (and Racah coefficients) of the Lie algebras of the angular momentum can be obtained by using this resummation procedure. The symmetry properties of these q coefficients are discussed. The result is formulated in the following way: the general formulas for the q-6j symbols (Racah q-coefficients) of the suq(2) quantum algebra are obtained from the general formulas for the conventional 6j symbols (Racah coefficients) of the su(2) Lie algebra by replacing directly all factorials with q-factorials, the symmetry properties of the q-6j symbols being completely coincident with the symmetry properties of the conventional 6j symbols

  8. Instability analysis and drag coefficient prediction on a swept RAE2822 wing with constant lift coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenrong JING

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Swept wing is widely used in civil aircraft, whose airfoil is chosen, designed and optimized to increase the cruise speed and decrease the drag coefficient. The parameters of swept wing, such as sweep angle and angle of attack, are determined according to the cruise lift coefficient requirement, and the drag coefficient is expected to be predicted accurately, which involves the instability characteristics and transition position of the flow. The pressure coefficient of the RAE2822 wing with given constant lift coefficient is obtained by solving the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equation numerically, and then the mean flow is calculated by solving the boundary layer (BL equation with spectral method. The cross-flow instability characteristic of boundary layer of swept wing in the windward and leeward is analyzed by linear stability theory (LST, and the transition position is predicted by eN method. The drag coefficient is numerically predicted by introducing a laminar/turbulent indicator. A simple approach to calculate the lift coefficient of swept wing is proposed. It is found that there is a quantitative relationship between the angle of attack and sweep angle when the lift coefficient keeps constant; when the angle of attack is small, the flow on the leeward of the wing is stable. when the angle of attack is larger than 3°, the flow becomes unstable quickly; with the increase of sweep angle or angle of attack the disturbance on the windward becomes more unstable, leading to the moving forward of the transition position to the leading edge of the wing; the drag coefficient has two significant jumping growth due to the successive occurrence of transition in the windward and the leeward; the optimal range of sweep angle for civil aircraft is suggested.

  9. Meromorphic univalent function with negative coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dernek

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Let Mn be the classes of regular functions f(z=z−1+a0+a1z+… defined in the annulus 00, (n∈ℕ0, where I0f(z=f(z, If(z=(z−1−z(z−1−2∗f(z, Inf(z=I(In−1f(z, and ∗ is the Hadamard convolution. We denote by Γn=Mn⋃Γ, where Γ denotes the class of functions of the form f(z=z−1+∑k=1∞|ak|zk. We obtained that relates the modulus of the coefficients to starlikeness for the classes Mn and Γn, and coefficient inequalities for the classes Γn.

  10. Gate Control Coefficient Effect on CNFET Characteristic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanudin, Rahmat; Ma'Radzi, Ahmad Alabqari; Nayan, Nafarizal

    2009-01-01

    The development of carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNFET) as alternative to existing transistor technology has long been published and discussed. The emergence of this device offers new material and structure in building a transistor. This paper intends to do an analysis of gate control coefficient effect on CNFET performance. The analysis is based on simulation study of current-voltage (I-V) characteristic of ballistic CNFET. The simulation study used the MOSFET-like CNFET mathematical model to establish the device output characteristic. Based on the analysis of simulation result, it is found that the gate control coefficient contributes to a significant effect on the performance of CNFET. The result also shown the parameter could help to improve the device performance in terms of its output and response as well. Nevertheless, the characteristic of the carbon nanotube that acts as the channel is totally important in determining the performance of the transistor as a whole.

  11. Doppler coefficient measurements in Zebra Core 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, A.R.; Wheeler, R.C.

    1965-11-01

    Measurements using a central hot loop in Zebra Core 5 are described. Results are given for the Doppler coefficients found in a number of assemblies with PuO 2 and 16% PuO 2 /84% depleted UO 2 pins, loaded with different combinations of steel, sodium or void pins. The mixed oxide results are in general about 20% more negative than was calculated using the FD2 data set, but agreement is good if the plutonium contributions in the calculations are omitted. The small positive Doppler coefficient calculated for Pu239 was not observed, and two measurements indicated instead a small negative effect. The Doppler effect in the mixed oxide systems was found to vary approximately as 1/T. The results from the empty loop and non-fissile assemblies indicate either a small negative Doppler effect in steel or alternatively the presence of an unexplained expansion effect. (author)

  12. The coefficient of friction, particularly of ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, Allan

    2008-01-01

    The static and dynamic coefficients of friction are defined, and values from 0.3 to 0.6 are quoted for common materials. These drop to about 0.15 when oil is added as a lubricant. Water ice at temperatures not far below 0 °C is remarkable for low coefficients of around 0.05 for static friction and 0.04–0.02 for dynamic friction, but these figures increase as the temperature diminishes. Reasons for the slipperiness of ice are summarized, but they are still not entirely clear. One hypothesis suggests that it is related to the transient formation of a lubricating film of liquid water produced by frictional heating. If this is the case, some composition melting a little above ambient temperatures might provide a skating rink that did not require expensive refrigeration. Various compositions have been tested, but an entirely satisfactory material has yet to be found

  13. Analytical expressions for the electron backscattering coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    August, H.J.; Wernisch, J.

    1989-01-01

    Several analytical expressions for the electron backscattering coefficient for massive homogeneous samples are compared with experimental data, directing special attention to the dependence of this quantity on the electron acceleration energy. It is shown that this dependence generally cannot be neglected. The expression proposed by Hunger and Kuechler turns out to be better than that of Love and Scott, although even the better formula can be slightly improved by a small modification. (author)

  14. Effective stress coefficient for uniaxial strain condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, M.M.; Fabricius, I.L.

    2012-01-01

    The effective stress coefficient, introduced by Biot, is used for predicting effective stress or pore pressure in the subsurface. It is not a constant value. It is different for different types of sediment and it is stress dependent. We used a model, based on contact between the grains to describ...... determined under uniaxial strain condition will be more relevant in reservoir studies. Copyright 2012 ARMA, American Rock Mechanics Association....

  15. Varying coefficients model with measurement error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Greene, Tom

    2008-06-01

    We propose a semiparametric partially varying coefficient model to study the relationship between serum creatinine concentration and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) among kidney donors and patients with chronic kidney disease. A regression model is used to relate serum creatinine to GFR and demographic factors in which coefficient of GFR is expressed as a function of age to allow its effect to be age dependent. GFR measurements obtained from the clearance of a radioactively labeled isotope are assumed to be a surrogate for the true GFR, with the relationship between measured and true GFR expressed using an additive error model. We use locally corrected score equations to estimate parameters and coefficient functions, and propose an expected generalized cross-validation (EGCV) method to select the kernel bandwidth. The performance of the proposed methods, which avoid distributional assumptions on the true GFR and residuals, is investigated by simulation. Accounting for measurement error using the proposed model reduced apparent inconsistencies in the relationship between serum creatinine and GFR among different clinical data sets derived from kidney donor and chronic kidney disease source populations.

  16. Verifying the Dependence of Fractal Coefficients on Different Spatial Distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gospodinov, Dragomir; Marekova, Elisaveta; Marinov, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    : - Simple way to quantify scale-invariant distributions of complex objects or phenomena by a small number of parameters. - It is becoming evident that the applicability of fractal distributions to geological problems could have a more fundamental basis. Chaotic behaviour could underlay the geotectonic processes and the applicable statistics could often be fractal.The application of fractal distribution analysis has, however, some specific aspects. It is usually difficult to present an adequate interpretation of the obtained values of fractal coefficients for earthquake epicenter or hypocenter distributions. That is why in this paper we aimed at other goals - to verify how a fractal coefficient depends on different spatial distributions. We simulated earthquake spatial data by generating randomly points first in a 3D space - cube, then in a parallelepiped, diminishing one of its sides. We then continued this procedure in 2D and 1D space. For each simulated data set we calculated the points' fractal coefficient (correlation fractal dimension of epicentres) and then checked for correlation between the coefficients values and the type of spatial distribution.In that way one can obtain a set of standard fractal coefficients' values for varying spatial distributions. These then can be used when real earthquake data is analyzed by comparing the real data coefficients values to the standard fractal coefficients. Such an approach can help in interpreting the fractal analysis results through different types of spatial distributions.

  17. Comparison of field-measured radon diffusion coefficients with laboratory-measured coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepel, E.A.; Silker, W.B.; Thomas, V.W.; Kalkwarf, D.R.

    1983-04-01

    Experiments were conducted to compare radon diffusion coefficients determined for 0.1-m depths of soils by a steady-state method in the laboratory and diffusion coefficients evaluated from radon fluxes through several-fold greater depths of the same soils covering uranium-mill tailings. The coefficients referred to diffusion in the total pore volume of the soils and are equivalent to values for the quantity, D/P, in the Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Uranium Milling prepared by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Two soils were tested: a well-graded sand and an inorganic clay of low plasticity. For the flux evaluations, radon was collected by adsorption on charcoal following passive diffusion from the soil surface and also from air recirculating through an aluminum tent over the soil surface. An analysis of variance in the flux evaluations showed no significant difference between these two collection methods. Radon diffusion coefficients evaluated from field data were statistically indistinguishable, at the 95% confidence level, from those measured in the laboratory; however, the low precision of the field data prevented a sensitive validation of the laboratory measurements. From the field data, the coefficients were calculated to be 0.03 +- 0.03 cm 2 /s for the sand cover and 0.0036 +- 0.0004 cm 2 /s for the clay cover. The low precision in the coefficients evaluated from field data was attributed to high variation in radon flux with time and surface location at the field site

  18. Test research of consistency for amplitude calibration coefficients of pulsed electric field sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Cui; Guo Xiaoqiang; Chen Xiangyue; Nie Xin; Mao Congguang; Xiang Hui; Cheng Jianping

    2007-01-01

    The amplitude calibration of an electric field sensor is important in the measurement of electromagnetic pulse. In this paper, an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) is used to generate multi-waveform electric field in the TEM cell and the dipole antenna pulsed electric field sensor is calibrated. In the frequency band of the sensor, the calibrated amplitude coefficients with different waveforms are identical. The coefficient derived from the TEM cell calibration system suits to the measurement of unknown electric field pulse within the frequency band. (authors)

  19. On separation of exchange term from the coefficient of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The purpose of this analysis is to introduce the separated exchange coefficient and to graphically investigate it. This coefficient, depending on the electromagnetic constant plus two coefficients of the electromechanical and magnetomechanical couplings, form the coefficient of magnetoelectromechanical coupling ...

  20. Determination of coefficient matrices for ARMA model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Dinh Tri.

    1990-10-01

    A new recursive algorithm for determining coefficient matrices of ARMA model from measured data is presented. The Yule-Walker equations for the case of ARMA model are derived from the ARMA innovation equation. The recursive algorithm is based on choosing appropriate form of the operator functions and suitable representation of the (n+1)-th order operator functions according to ones with the lower order. Two cases, when the order of the AR part is equal to one of the MA part, and the optimal case, were considered. (author) 5 refs

  1. Kinetic coefficients in isotopically disordered crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhernov, Arkadii P; Inyushkin, Alexander V

    2002-01-01

    Peculiarities of the behavior of kinetic coefficients, like thermal conductivity, electric conductivity, and thermoelectric power, in isotopically disordered materials are reviewed in detail. New experimental and theoretical results on the isotope effects in the thermal conductivity of diamond, Ge, and Si semiconductors are presented. The suppression effect of phonon-drag thermopower in the isotopically disordered Ge crystals is discussed. The influence of dynamic and static crystal lattice deformations on the electric conductivity of metals as well as on the ordinary phonon spectrum deformations is considered. (reviews of topical problems)

  2. Peltier coefficient measurement in a thermoelectric module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrido, Javier; Casanovas, Alejandro; Chimeno, José María

    2013-01-01

    A new method for measuring the Peltier coefficient in a thermocouple X/Y based on the energy balance at the junction has been proposed recently. This technique needs only the hot and cold temperatures of a thermoelectric module when an electric current flows through it as the operational variables. The temperature evolutions of the two module sides provide an evident and accurate idea of the Peltier effect. From these temperatures, the heat transfer between the module and the ambient is also evaluated. The thermoelectric phenomena are described in the framework of an observable theory. Based on this procedure, an experiment is presented for a university teaching laboratory at the undergraduate level. (paper)

  3. Transport coefficients in copper vapor arc plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahal, A.M.; Rahhaoui, B.; Vacquie, S.

    1985-01-01

    The presence of copper vapors modifies the properties of arc discharges. The paper deals with a region not investigated earlier, where in the core of the positive column of very short or high current arcs there is a high copper concentration. At these values the relative losses take a greater part in the energy balance. Using the charged-charged collision integrals, the transport coefficients (axial temperature, thermal and electric conductivity, viscosity) of the plasma with higher copper vapor concentration are calculated as the function of the arc current intensity. (D.Gy.)

  4. Quenching of Einstein-coefficients by photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aumayr, F.; Lee, W.; Skinner, C.H.; Suckewer, S.

    1991-03-01

    Experimental evidence is presented for the change of Einstein's A- coefficients for spontaneous transitions from the upper laser level of argon ion laser discharge due to the presence of the high- intensity laser flux. To demonstrate that this quenching effect cannot be attributed to a reduction in self-absorption of the strong spontaneous emission line, absorption and line profile measurements have been performed. Computer modelling of the reduction of self absorption due to Rabi splitting also indicated that this effect is too small to explain the observed quenching of spontaneous line emissions. 13 refs., 11 figs

  5. Effective Diffusion Coefficients in Coal Chars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Jensen, Anker

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge of effective diffusion coefficients in char particles is important when interpreting experimental reactivity measurements and modeling char combustion or NO and N2O reduction. In this work, NO and N2O reaction with a bituminous coal char was studied in a fixed-bed quartz glass reactor....... In the case of strong pore diffusion limitations, the error in the interpretation of experimental results using the mean pore radius could be a factor of 5 on the intrinsic rate constant. For an average coal char reacting with oxygen at 1300 K, this would be the case for particle sizes larger than about 50...

  6. Friction coefficient determination by electrical resistance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunyagi, A.; Kandrai, K.; Fülöp, Z.; Kapusi, Z.; Simon, A.

    2018-05-01

    A simple and low-cost, DIY-type, Arduino-driven experiment is presented for the study of friction and measurement of the friction coefficient, using a conductive rubber cord as a force sensor. It is proposed for high-school or college/university-level students. We strongly believe that it is worthwhile planning, designing and performing Arduino and compatible sensor-based experiments in physics class in order to ensure a better understanding of phenomena, develop theoretical knowledge and multiple experimental skills.

  7. The convergence coefficient across political systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Maria; Schofield, Norman

    2013-01-01

    Formal work on the electoral model often suggests that parties or candidates should locate themselves at the electoral mean. Recent research has found no evidence of such convergence. In order to explain nonconvergence, the stochastic electoral model is extended by including estimates of electoral valence. We introduce the notion of a convergence coefficient, c. It has been shown that high values of c imply that there is a significant centrifugal tendency acting on parties. We used electoral surveys to construct a stochastic valence model of the the elections in various countries. We find that the convergence coefficient varies across elections in a country, across countries with similar regimes, and across political regimes. In some countries, the centripetal tendency leads parties to converge to the electoral mean. In others the centrifugal tendency dominates and some parties locate far from the electoral mean. In particular, for countries with proportional electoral systems, namely, Israel, Turkey, and Poland, the centrifugal tendency is very high. In the majoritarian polities of the United States and Great Britain, the centrifugal tendency is very low. In anocracies, the autocrat imposes limitations on how far from the origin the opposition parties can move.

  8. Sets of Fourier coefficients using numerical quadrature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyness, J. N.

    2001-01-01

    One approach to the calculation of Fourier trigonometric coefficients f(r) of a given function f(x) is to apply the trapezoidal quadrature rule to the integral representation f(r)=(line i ntegral)(sub 0)(sup 1) f(x)e(sup -2(pi)irx)dx. Some of the difficulties in this approach are discussed. A possible way of overcoming many of these is by means of a subtraction function. Thus, one sets f(x)= h(sub p-1)(x)+ g(sub p)(x), where h(sub -1)(x) is an algebraic polynomial of degree p-1, specified in such a way that the Fourier series of g(sub p)(x) converges more rapidly than that of f(x). To obtain the Fourier coefficients of f(x), one uses an analytic expression for those of h(sub p-1)(x) and numerical quadrature to approximately those of g(sub p)(x)

  9. Full wave-field reflection coefficient inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, Jan; Dosso, Stan E; Holland, Charles W

    2007-12-01

    This paper develops a Bayesian inversion for recovering multilayer geoacoustic (velocity, density, attenuation) profiles from a full wave-field (spherical-wave) seabed reflection response. The reflection data originate from acoustic time series windowed for a single bottom interaction, which are processed to yield reflection coefficient data as a function of frequency and angle. Replica data for inversion are computed using a wave number-integration model to calculate the full complex acoustic pressure field, which is processed to produce a commensurate seabed response function. To address the high computational cost of calculating short range acoustic fields, the inversion algorithms are parallelized and frequency averaging is replaced by range averaging in the forward model. The posterior probability density is interpreted in terms of optimal parameter estimates, marginal distributions, and credibility intervals. Inversion results for the full wave-field seabed response are compared to those obtained using plane-wave reflection coefficients. A realistic synthetic study indicates that the plane-wave assumption can fail, producing erroneous results with misleading uncertainty bounds, whereas excellent results are obtained with the full-wave reflection inversion.

  10. The Convergence Coefficient across Political Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Norman

    2013-01-01

    Formal work on the electoral model often suggests that parties or candidates should locate themselves at the electoral mean. Recent research has found no evidence of such convergence. In order to explain nonconvergence, the stochastic electoral model is extended by including estimates of electoral valence. We introduce the notion of a convergence coefficient, c. It has been shown that high values of c imply that there is a significant centrifugal tendency acting on parties. We used electoral surveys to construct a stochastic valence model of the the elections in various countries. We find that the convergence coefficient varies across elections in a country, across countries with similar regimes, and across political regimes. In some countries, the centripetal tendency leads parties to converge to the electoral mean. In others the centrifugal tendency dominates and some parties locate far from the electoral mean. In particular, for countries with proportional electoral systems, namely, Israel, Turkey, and Poland, the centrifugal tendency is very high. In the majoritarian polities of the United States and Great Britain, the centrifugal tendency is very low. In anocracies, the autocrat imposes limitations on how far from the origin the opposition parties can move. PMID:24385886

  11. Thermal neutron diffusion cooling coefficient for plexiglass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozdowicz, K.

    1992-08-01

    The thermal neutron diffusion cooling coefficient is a macroscopic material parameter. It is needed for description of the decay of the thermal neutron pulse in a medium and gives information of the diffusion cooling of the thermal neutron spectrum in a bounded volume. Experimental results from various measurements for plexiglass are overviewed in the paper. A method for theoretical, exact calculation of the parameter is presented. The formula utilizes some other thermal neutron parameters and a cooling function, i.e. the function which describes the deviation of the neutron spectrum in a bounded system from the distribution in an infinite one. The energy dependence of the function is obtained numerically from relations which results from the eigenvalue problem of the scattering operator when both the decay constant and the spectrum of the thermal neutron flux are developed on powers of the geometrical buckling. The case of a 1/ν absorption cross section is considered. The calculation utilizes a synthetic scattering function elaborated for hydrogenous media by GRANADA (1985). The influence of some quantities used in the calculation on the final result is investigated. The obtained value of the diffusion cooling coefficient for plexiglass is C = 6514 cm 4 s -1 at the temperature of 20 degrees C. The uncertainty is estimated to be ± 100 cm 4 s -1 within the physical model of the scattering kernel used. (au)

  12. Reactivity Coefficient Calculation for AP1000 Reactor Using the NODAL3 Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinem, Surian; Malem Sembiring, Tagor; Tukiran; Deswandri; Sunaryo, Geni Rina

    2018-02-01

    The reactivity coefficient is a very important parameter for inherent safety and stability of nuclear reactors operation. To provide the safety analysis of the reactor, the calculation of changes in reactivity caused by temperature is necessary because it is related to the reactor operation. In this paper, the temperature reactivity coefficients of fuel and moderator of the AP1000 core are calculated, as well as the moderator density and boron concentration. All of these coefficients are calculated at the hot full power condition (HFP). All neutron diffusion constant as a function of temperature, water density and boron concentration were generated by the SRAC2006 code. The core calculations for determination of the reactivity coefficient parameter are done by using NODAL3 code. The calculation results show that the fuel temperature, moderator temperature and boron reactivity coefficients are in the range between -2.613 pcm/°C to -4.657pcm/°C, -1.00518 pcm/°C to 1.00649 pcm/°C and -9.11361 pcm/ppm to -8.0751 pcm/ppm, respectively. For the water density reactivity coefficients, the positive reactivity occurs at the water temperature less than 190 °C. The calculation results show that the reactivity coefficients are accurate because the results have a very good agreement with the design value.

  13. DNN Filter Bank Cepstral Coefficients for Spoofing Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Hong; Tan, Zheng-Hua; Zhang, Yiming

    2017-01-01

    With the development of speech synthesis techniques, automatic speaker verification systems face the serious challenge of spoofing attack. In order to improve the reliability of speaker verification systems, we develop a new filter bank-based cepstral feature, deep neural network (DNN) filter bank...... cepstral coefficients, to distinguish between natural and spoofed speech. The DNN filter bank is automatically generated by training a filter bank neural network (FBNN) using natural and synthetic speech. By adding restrictions on the training rules, the learned weight matrix of FBNN is band limited...... and sorted by frequency, similar to the normal filter bank. Unlike the manually designed filter bank, the learned filter bank has different filter shapes in different channels, which can capture the differences between natural and synthetic speech more effectively. The experimental results on the ASVspoof...

  14. Determination of friction coefficient in unconfined compression of brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Badar; Destrade, Michel; Gilchrist, Michael D

    2012-10-01

    Unconfined compression tests are more convenient to perform on cylindrical samples of brain tissue than tensile tests in order to estimate mechanical properties of the brain tissue because they allow homogeneous deformations. The reliability of these tests depends significantly on the amount of friction generated at the specimen/platen interface. Thus, there is a crucial need to find an approximate value of the friction coefficient in order to predict a possible overestimation of stresses during unconfined compression tests. In this study, a combined experimental-computational approach was adopted to estimate the dynamic friction coefficient μ of porcine brain matter against metal platens in compressive tests. Cylindrical samples of porcine brain tissue were tested up to 30% strain at variable strain rates, both under bonded and lubricated conditions in the same controlled environment. It was established that μ was equal to 0.09±0.03, 0.18±0.04, 0.18±0.04 and 0.20±0.02 at strain rates of 1, 30, 60 and 90/s, respectively. Additional tests were also performed to analyze brain tissue under lubricated and bonded conditions, with and without initial contact of the top platen with the brain tissue, with different specimen aspect ratios and with different lubricants (Phosphate Buffer Saline (PBS), Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and Silicone). The test conditions (lubricant used, biological tissue, loading velocity) adopted in this study were similar to the studies conducted by other research groups. This study will help to understand the amount of friction generated during unconfined compression of brain tissue for strain rates of up to 90/s. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Questionnaire discrimination: (re-introducing coefficient δ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hankins Matthew

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Questionnaires are used routinely in clinical research to measure health status and quality of life. Questionnaire measurements are traditionally formally assessed by indices of reliability (the degree of measurement error and validity (the extent to which the questionnaire measures what it is supposed to measure. Neither of these indices assesses the degree to which the questionnaire is able to discriminate between individuals, an important aspect of measurement. This paper introduces and extends an existing index of a questionnaire's ability to distinguish between individuals, that is, the questionnaire's discrimination. Methods Ferguson (1949 1 derived an index of test discrimination, coefficient δ, for psychometric tests with dichotomous (correct/incorrect items. In this paper a general form of the formula, δG, is derived for the more general class of questionnaires allowing for several response choices. The calculation and characteristics of δG are then demonstrated using questionnaire data (GHQ-12 from 2003–2004 British Household Panel Survey (N = 14761. Coefficients for reliability (α and discrimination (δG are computed for two commonly-used GHQ-12 coding methods: dichotomous coding and four-point Likert-type coding. Results Both scoring methods were reliable (α > 0.88. However, δG was substantially lower (0.73 for the dichotomous coding of the GHQ-12 than for the Likert-type method (δG = 0.96, indicating that the dichotomous coding, although reliable, failed to discriminate between individuals. Conclusion Coefficient δG was shown to have decisive utility in distinguishing between the cross-sectional discrimination of two equally reliable scoring methods. Ferguson's δ has been neglected in discussions of questionnaire design and performance, perhaps because it has not been implemented in software and was restricted to questionnaires with dichotomous items, which are rare in health care research. It is

  16. Tomography based determination of permeability, Dupuit-Forchheimer coefficient, and interfacial heat transfer coefficient in reticulate porous ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrasch, Joerg; Meier, Fabian; Friess, Hansmartin; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2008-01-01

    A computer tomography based methodology is applied to determine the transport properties of fluid flow across porous media. A 3D digital representation of a 10-ppi reticulate porous ceramic (RPC) sample was generated by X-ray tomographic scans. Structural properties such as the porosity, specific interfacial surface area, pore-size distribution, mean survival time, two-point correlation function s 2 , and local geometry distribution of the RPC sample are directly extracted from the tomographic data. Reference solutions of the fluid flow governing equations are obtained for Re = 0.2-200 by applying finite volume direct pore-level numerical simulation (DPLS) using unstructured, body-fitted, tetrahedral mesh discretization. The permeability and the Dupuit-Forchheimer coefficient are determined from the reference solutions by DPLS, and compared to the values predicted by selected porous media flow models, namely: conduit-flow, hydraulic radius theory, drag models, mean survival time bound, s 2 -bound, fibrous bed correlations, and local porosity theory-based models. DPLS is further employed to determine the interfacial heat transfer coefficient and to derive a corresponding Nu-correlation, which is compared to empirical correlations

  17. Modeling and data analysis of the NASA-WSTF frictional heating apparatus - Effects of test parameters on friction coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Sheng-Hu; Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Benz, Frank J.; Yuen, Walter W.

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical model is being developed jointly by the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) and the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) to analyze data generated from the WSTF frictional heating test facility. Analyses of the data generated in the first seconds of the frictional heating test are shown to be effective in determining the friction coefficient between the rubbing interfaces. Different friction coefficients for carobn steel and Monel K-500 are observed. The initial condition of the surface is shown to affect only the initial value of the friction coefficient but to have no significant influence on the average steady-state friction coefficient. Rotational speed and the formation of oxide film on the rotating surfaces are shown to have a significant effect on the friction coefficient.

  18. APRECOT - analysis program for reactivity coefficient tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telford, A.R.R.

    1979-05-01

    A computer program has been written which provides a rapid and convenient analysis route for fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity measurements, as carried out at Hinkley Point 'B' Power Station. This replaces the earlier, more tedious, iterative analysis using KINAGRAX. The program has been tested by analysing computer simulations of reactor tests. This has shown that APRECOT introduces errors which are small (approximately 11/2%) in comparison with other sources of error (approximately 10%), that the effect of axial flux shape changes is acceptably small and that effects due to xenon, which is not modelled in the current version of the program, can be dealt with adequately. This note describes the APRECOT method, including details of input and output to the program and gives results of the numerical tests made of the method. (author)

  19. Stochastic algorithm for simulating gas transport coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudyak, V. Ya.; Lezhnev, E. V.

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to create a molecular algorithm for modeling the transport processes in gases that will be more efficient than molecular dynamics method. To this end, the dynamics of molecules are modeled stochastically. In a rarefied gas, it is sufficient to consider the evolution of molecules only in the velocity space, whereas for a dense gas it is necessary to model the dynamics of molecules also in the physical space. Adequate integral characteristics of the studied system are obtained by averaging over a sufficiently large number of independent phase trajectories. The efficiency of the proposed algorithm was demonstrated by modeling the coefficients of self-diffusion and the viscosity of several gases. It was shown that the accuracy comparable to the experimental one can be obtained on a relatively small number of molecules. The modeling accuracy increases with the growth of used number of molecules and phase trajectories.

  20. Clustering stocks using partial correlation coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sean S.; Chang, Woojin

    2016-11-01

    A partial correlation analysis is performed on the Korean stock market (KOSPI). The difference between Pearson correlation and the partial correlation is analyzed and it is found that when conditioned on the market return, Pearson correlation coefficients are generally greater than those of the partial correlation, which implies that the market return tends to drive up the correlation between stock returns. A clustering analysis is then performed to study the market structure given by the partial correlation analysis and the members of the clusters are compared with the Global Industry Classification Standard (GICS). The initial hypothesis is that the firms in the same GICS sector are clustered together since they are in a similar business and environment. However, the result is inconsistent with the hypothesis and most clusters are a mix of multiple sectors suggesting that the traditional approach of using sectors to determine the proximity between stocks may not be sufficient enough to diversify a portfolio.

  1. Tracking time-varying coefficient-functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Aalborg; Nielsen, Torben Skov; Joensen, Alfred K.

    2000-01-01

    A method for adaptive and recursive estimation in a class of non-linear autoregressive models with external input is proposed. The model class considered is conditionally parametric ARX-models (CPARX-models), which is conventional ARX-models in which the parameters are replaced by smooth, but oth......A method for adaptive and recursive estimation in a class of non-linear autoregressive models with external input is proposed. The model class considered is conditionally parametric ARX-models (CPARX-models), which is conventional ARX-models in which the parameters are replaced by smooth...... is a combination of recursive least squares with exponential forgetting and local polynomial regression. It is argued, that it is appropriate to let the forgetting factor vary with the value of the external signal which is the argument of the coefficient functions. Some of the key properties of the modified method...

  2. Molar extinction coefficients of some fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, G.K.; Singh, K.; Lark, B.S.

    2002-01-01

    The attenuation of gamma rays in some fatty acids, viz. formic acid (CH2O2), acetic acid (C2H4O2), propionic acid (C3H6O2), butyric acid (C4H8O2), n-hexanoic acid (C6H12O2), n-caprylic acid (C8H16O2), lauric acid (C12H24O2), myristic acid (C14H28O2), palmitic acid (C16H32O2), oleic acid (C18H34O2......) and stearic acid (C18H36O2), has been measured at the photon energies 81, 356, 511, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV. Experimental values for the molar extinction coefficient, the effective atomic number and the electron density have been derived and compared with theoretical calculations. There is good agreement...

  3. Coefficient of performance of Stirling refrigerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    E Mungan, Carl

    2017-09-01

    Stirling coolers transfer heat in or out of the working fluid during all four stages of their operation, and their coefficient of performance depends on whether the non-isothermal heat exchanges are performed reversibly or irreversibly. Both of these possibilities can in principle be arranged. Notably, if the working fluid is an ideal gas, the input of energy in the form of heat during one isochoric step is equal in magnitude to the output during the other isochoric step in the cycle. The theoretical performance of the fridge can then attain the reversible Carnot limit if a regenerator is used, which is a high heat capacity material through which the gas flows. Various Stirling refrigerator configurations are analysed in this article at a level of presentation suitable for an introductory undergraduate thermodynamics course.

  4. Thermal expansion coefficient determination by CBED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelini, P.; Bentley, J.

    1984-01-01

    The present application of CBED involves measurements of thermal-expansion coefficients by measurement of changes in HOLZ line positions as a function of temperature. Previous work on this subject was performed on Si at a constant accelerating voltage of 100 kV between about 90 and 600 K. Diffraction patterns were recorded and line shifts correlated to lattice parameter changes. Differences were noted between values determined by CBED and accepted thermal expansion values. Significant HOLZ line interactions and splitting occurring in the (111) patterns were noted to contribute to the differences. Preliminary measurements have been made on Al, Al 2 O 3 , and single-crystal tau (Ni/sub 20.3/Ti/sub 2.7/B 6 ). An example of changes in HOLZ lines present in (114) patterns for Al are shown and the effect of temperature on the position of lines in the pattern illustrated

  5. Upper bounds for flexoelectric coefficients in ferroelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudin, P. V.; Ahluwalia, R.; Tagantsev, A. K.

    2014-02-01

    Flexoelectric effect is the response of electric polarization to the mechanical strain gradient. At the nano-scale, where large strain gradients are expected, the flexoelectric effect becomes appreciable and may substitute piezoelectric effect in centrosymmetric materials. These features make flexoelectricity of growing interest during the last decade. At the same time, the available theoretical and experimental results are rather contradictory. In particular, experimentally measured flexoelectric coefficients in some ferroelectric materials largely exceed theoretically predicted values. Here, we determine the upper limits for the magnitude of the static bulk contribution to the flexoelectric effect in ferroelectrics, the contribution which was customarily considered as the dominating one. The magnitude of the upper bounds obtained suggests that the anomalously high flexoelectric coupling documented for perovskite ceramics can hardly be attributed to a manifestation of the static bulk effect.

  6. Thermal linear expansion coefficient of structural graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgil'ev, Yu.S.

    1995-01-01

    The data now available on radiation induced changes of linear thermal expansion coefficients (CTE) for native structural carbon materials (SCM) irradiated with high fluences are summarized. For different types of native and foreign SCM dose dependences of CTE changes in the temperature range of 300...1600 K and at fluences up to (2...3)x10 22 n/cm 2 (E>0.18 meV) are compared. On the base of this comparison factors defined the CTE changes under neutron irradiation are revealed and the explanation of observed phenomena is offered. Large number of the factors revealed does not allowed to calculate CTE radiation induced changes. 39 refs.; 16 figs.; 5 tabs

  7. Friction Experiments for Dynamical Coefficient Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Arnoux

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study, including three experimental devices, is presented in order to investigate dry friction phenomena in a wide range of sliding speeds for the steel on steel contact. A ballistic setup, with an air gun launch, allows to estimate the friction coefficient between 20 m/s and 80 m/s. Tests are completed by an adaptation of the sensor on a hydraulic tensile machine (0.01 m/s to 3 m/s and a pin-on-disk tribometer mounted on a CNC lathe (1 to 30 m/s. The interactions at the asperity scale are characterized by a white light interferometer surface analysis.

  8. Densities, isobaric thermal expansion coefficients and isothermal compressibilities of linear alkylbenzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, X; Zhang, Z Y; Zhang, Q M; Liu, Q; Ding, Y Y; Zhou, L; Cao, J

    2015-01-01

    We report the measurements of the densities of linear alkylbenzene at three temperatures over 4 to 23 °C with pressures up to 10 MPa. The measurements have been analysed to yield the isobaric thermal expansion coefficients and, so far for the first time, isothermal compressibilities of linear alkylbenzene. Relevance of results for current generation (i.e., Daya Bay) and next generation (i.e. JUNO) large liquid scintillator neutrino detectors are discussed. (paper)

  9. A combinatorial interpretation of the $κ^{\\star}_{g}(n)$ coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Thomas Jiaxian; M. Reidys, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Studying the virtual Euler characteristic of the moduli space of curves, Harer and Zagier compute the generating function $C_g(z)$ of unicellular maps of genus $g$. They furthermore identify coefficients, $\\kappa^{\\star}_{g}(n)$, which fully determine the series $C_g(z)$. The main result of this ...

  10. Computing exact Fourier series coefficients of IC rectilinear polygons from low-resolution fast Fourier coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibler, Robin; Hurley, Paul

    2012-03-01

    We present a novel, accurate and fast algorithm to obtain Fourier series coefficients from an IC layer whose description consists of rectilinear polygons on a plane, and how to implement it using off-the-shelf hardware components. Based on properties of Fourier calculus, we derive a relationship between the Discrete Fourier Transforms of the sampled mask transmission function and its continuous Fourier series coefficients. The relationship leads to a straightforward algorithm for computing the continuous Fourier series coefficients where one samples the mask transmission function, compute its discrete Fourier transform and applies a frequency-dependent multiplicative factor. The algorithm is guaranteed to yield the exact continuous Fourier series coefficients for any sampling representing the mask function exactly. Computationally, this leads to significant saving by allowing to choose the maximal such pixel size and reducing the fast Fourier transform size by as much, without compromising accuracy. In addition, the continuous Fourier series is free from aliasing and follows closely the physical model of Fourier optics. We show that in some cases this can make a significant difference, especially in modern very low pitch technology nodes.

  11. Temperature coefficient for modeling denitrification in surface water sediments using the mass transfer coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    T.W. Appelboom; G.M. Chescheir; F. Birgand; R.W. Skaggs; J.W. Gilliam; D. Amatya

    2010-01-01

    Watershed modeling has become an important tool for researchers. Modeling nitrate transport within drainage networks requires quantifying the denitrification within the sediments in canals and streams. In a previous study, several of the authors developed an equation using a term called a mass transfer coefficient to mathematically describe sediment denitrification....

  12. Temperature Coefficient for Modeling Denitrification in Surface Water Sediments Using the Mass Transfer Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. W. Appelboom; G. M. Chescheir; R. W. Skaggs; J. W. Gilliam; Devendra M. Amatya

    2006-01-01

    Watershed modeling has become an important tool for researchers with the high costs of water quality monitoring. When modeling nitrate transport within drainage networks, denitrification within the sediments needs to be accounted for. Birgand et. al. developed an equation using a term called a mass transfer coefficient to mathematically describe sediment...

  13. CALCULATION OF IONIZATION RATE COEFFICIENTS OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We use a simple numerical method to generate the ionization rates starting from the cross sections. These last are obtained by code FAC (Flexible Atomic Code). Our computation results will be compared with those published. Key words: Atomic data, radiative collisional Models, Ionization rate, cross Sections of ionization.

  14. On separation of exchange term from the coefficient of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 86; Issue 6 ... plus two coefficients of the electromechanical and magnetomechanical couplings, form the coefficient of magnetoelectromechanical coupling (CMEMC), a very important characteristic used for analysingmagnetoelectroelastic smart (composite) materials.

  15. Influence of roughness parameters on coefficient of friction under ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mm). Peak count. FD. Fractal dimension. Figure 3. Correlation coefficient between coefficient of friction and roughness parameters under lubricated conditions. White and black bars represent positive and negative correlations, respectively.

  16. Solution of heat equation with variable coefficient using derive

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lebelo, RS

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available are considered. The first one involves quadratic approximation of the variable coefficient by direct integration. This case is studied using a conic domain. The second case approximates the variable coefficient quadratically and by step functions. The solution...

  17. Prediction of octanol/water partition coefficient of selected ferrocene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    water partition coefficient of selected ferrocenes bearing different substituents, the calculation is based on the adaptation of the Rekker method. Our prediction of obtained theoretical partition coefficients values of logP for all studied substituted ...

  18. On separation of exchange term from the coefficient of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    coefficients of the electromechanical and magnetomechanical couplings, form the coefficient of magnetoelectromechanical coupling (CMEMC), a very important characteristic used for analysing magnetoelectroelastic smart (composite) materials. It was analytically and graphically demon- strated that the CMEMC can have a ...

  19. Measurements of soil-solution distribution coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, Hirofumi; Hasegawa, Hidenao; Hisamatsu, Shunichi; Sakurai, Naoyuki; Koyama, Kenji

    1999-01-01

    The soil-solution distribution coefficient (Kd) is defined as the ratio of element concentrations in a soil-solid phase to that in a solution phase. It is commonly used as an important parameter for transfer models of radionuclides in different environments, such as describing the migration behavior in the geosphere and transfer behavior in the biosphere. We plan to measure the Kd of elements by means of an extraction method in soils throughout Aomori Prefecture and to probe related factors affecting their variance. However, Kd values vary widely, dependent upon conditions of measurements even if a similar soil sample is measured. Therefore, measurement conditions for the Kd of elements were examined in the present study and the following conditions were adopted. A collected soil sample was passed through a 2 mm sieve and dried at 50degC. The ratio of solution to solid was 10. The mixture sample was shaken for 24 h at 20degC in a clean centrifuge bottle which was made of polypropylene copolymer (PPCO). According to the literature, common soil types in Aomori Prefecture are as follows: andosols in the Sanpachi-Kamikita region, gray lowland and upland soils in the Tsugaru region, sand-dune regosols in Kizukuri-machi, peat soils around lakes and so on. The Kd values for those soil types will be measured hereafter. (author)

  20. Townsend coefficients of gases in avalanche counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, G.

    1978-01-01

    Though much work has been done by many authors in the last few years in the development and application of avalanche counters for ion radiation, it is based upon values of the Townsend coefficients as the essential gas parameter, which were determined many years ago for much lower reduced field strengths F/p than prevail in such counters. Therefore absolute determinations of α in vapours of methyl alcohol, cyclohexane, acetone, and n-heptene were performed under original conditions of avalanche counters. The values obtained do not differ by more than 30%-50% from the former values indeed, extrapolated over F/p for the first three mentioned substances, but the amounts of A and B in the usual representation α/p=A exp(-B(F/p)) are much greater for the stronger reduced fields. This is of importance for such counter properties as the dependence of pulse heights on pressure, voltage, electrode distance etc., which are governed by other combinations of A and B than α/p itself. A comparison of results for different ionic radiations shows a marked influence of the primary ionization density along the particle tracks which is hard to explain. (Auth.)

  1. Asymmetrical slip propensity: required coefficient of friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jung-suk; Kim, Sukwon

    2013-07-31

    Most studies in performing slips and falls research reported their results after the ipsilateral leg of subjects (either right foot or left foot) was guided to contact the contaminated floor surface although many studies indicated concerns for asymmetries of legs in kinematic or kinetic variables. Thus, the present study evaluated if dominant leg's slip tendency would be different from non-dominant leg's slip tendency by comparing the Required Coefficient of Friction (RCOF) of the two lower limbs. Forty seven health adults participated in the present study. RCOF was measured when left or right foot of subjects contacted the force platforms respectively. Paired t-test was performed to test if RCOF and heel velocity (HCV) of dominant legs was different from that of non-dominant legs. It was suggested that the asymmetry in RCOFs and HCV between the two lower limbs existed. The RCOFs of non-dominant legs were higher than that of dominant legs. The results indicated that asymmetry in slip propensity, RCOF, was existed in lower extremity. The results from the study suggested that it would be benefit to include a variable, such as asymmetry, in slips and falls research.

  2. Coefficient of Friction of Human Corneal Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Tawnya; Aeschlimann, Rudolf; Tosatti, Samuele; Toubouti, Youssef; Kakkassery, Joseph; Osborn Lorenz, Katherine

    2015-09-01

    A novel property evaluation methodology was used to determine the elusive value for the human corneal coefficient of friction (CoF). Using a microtribometer on 28 fresh human donor corneas with intact epithelia, the CoF was determined in 4 test solutions (≥5 corneas/solution): tear-mimicking solution (TMS) in borate-buffered saline (TMS-PS), TMS in phosphate-buffered saline (TMS-PBS), TMS with HEPES-buffered saline (TMS-HEPES), and tear-like fluid in PBS (TLF-PBS). Mean (SD) CoF values ranged from 0.006 to 0.015 and were 0.013 (0.010) in TMS-PS, 0.006 (0.003) in TMS-PBS, 0.014 (0.005) in TMS-HEPES, and 0.015 (0.009) in TLF-PBS. Statistically significant differences were shown for TMS-PBS versus TLF (P = 0.0424) and TMS-PBS versus TMS-HEPES (P = 0.0179), but not for TMS-PBS versus TMS-PS (P = 0.2389). Successful measurement of the fresh human corneal tissue CoF was demonstrated, with values differing in the evaluated buffer solutions, within this limited sample size.

  3. Volatilization: a soil degassing coefficient for iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, M.I.; Thibault, D.H.; Smith, P.A.; Hawkins, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Iodine, an element essential to some animals, is ubiquitous in the biosphere. Unlike other metallic elements, molecular I is volatile, and other inorganic species present in aerated soils, such as I - and IO 3 - , may also volatilize as hydrides, hydrogen iodide (HI), or hydrogen iodates (HIO 3 , HIO 4 ). Methyl iodide has been measured in soils, and it is likely evolved from soils and plants. The long-lived radioisotope 129 I is abundant in nuclear wastes, and its high solubility in groundwater makes it an important element in the performance assessment of underground disposal facilities. Overestimates of soil I residence half-times by traditional foodchain models may be due to underestimation of volatilization. Field and lysimeter experiments over a 3-year period, and direct trapping experiments in the laboratory are reported. The results, combined with values from the literature, indicate the soil I degassing coefficient for a wide range of soil types, vegetated and bare, wet and dry, is lognormally distributed with a geometric mean of 2.1 x 10 -2 year -1 , a range of 1.8 x 10 -4 to 3.1 year -1 and a geometric standard deviation of 3.0. The results of a biosphere model simulation including degassing reduces soil I concentrations fivefold and increases air concentrations 25-fold at steady state, compared to simulations without degassing. (author)

  4. First-principles calculations of flexoelectric coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jiawang; Vanderbilt, David

    2013-03-01

    Flexoelectricity, which is the linear response of polarization to a strain gradient, can have a significant effect on the functional properties of dielectric thin films, superlattices and nanostructures. Despite growing experimental interest, there have been relatively few theoretical studies of flexoelectricity, especially in the context of first-principles calculations. In this talk, we present a complete theory of both the electronic (or ``frozen-ion'')[1] and lattice contributions to flexoelectricity, and demonstrate a supercell method for calculating the flexoelectric coefficients using first-principles density-functional methods. Results are presented for cubic materials including CsCl and SrTiO3. In order to obtain all the elements of the flexoelectric tensor, transverse as well as longitudinal, we carry out calculations on supercells extended along different orientations (e.g., [110] as well as [100]), taking special care to carry out conversions between objects calculated under fixed E or fixed D electric boundary conditions in different parts of the procedure. In this way, all the elements of both the electronic and lattice contributions to the flexoelectric tensor are determined.

  5. Automatic Subspace Learning via Principal Coefficients Embedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xi; Lu, Jiwen; Yi, Zhang; Yan, Rui

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we address two challenging problems in unsupervised subspace learning: 1) how to automatically identify the feature dimension of the learned subspace (i.e., automatic subspace learning) and 2) how to learn the underlying subspace in the presence of Gaussian noise (i.e., robust subspace learning). We show that these two problems can be simultaneously solved by proposing a new method [(called principal coefficients embedding (PCE)]. For a given data set , PCE recovers a clean data set from and simultaneously learns a global reconstruction relation of . By preserving into an -dimensional space, the proposed method obtains a projection matrix that can capture the latent manifold structure of , where is automatically determined by the rank of with theoretical guarantees. PCE has three advantages: 1) it can automatically determine the feature dimension even though data are sampled from a union of multiple linear subspaces in presence of the Gaussian noise; 2) although the objective function of PCE only considers the Gaussian noise, experimental results show that it is robust to the non-Gaussian noise (e.g., random pixel corruption) and real disguises; and 3) our method has a closed-form solution and can be calculated very fast. Extensive experimental results show the superiority of PCE on a range of databases with respect to the classification accuracy, robustness, and efficiency.

  6. Assessing Reliability of a Multi-Dimensional Scale by Coefficient Alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Šerbetar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to assess internal consistency by calculating coefficient alpha. It presents the variation in coefficient alpha, depending on questionnaire length and the homogeneity or heterogeneity of the questionnaire. The maximum possible value for coefficient alpha was also calculated by the item elimination method. The study included 99 children aged 10. The children completed The Athletic Coping Skills Inventory – 28 (ACSI-28; Smith et al., 1995, which contains seven constructs: coping with adversity, coachability, concentration, confidence and achievement motivation, goal setting and mental preparation, peaking under pressure and freedom from worry. The results confirmed that the values of the alpha coefficient vary depending on the number and composition of items and the sample size. In terms of item structure, homogeneous constructs yielded lower values for the alpha coefficient (in a range from .48 to .61 than the questionnaire with all the constructs (alpha = .79, despite higher inter-item correlations. In terms of the number of items, the longer test generated higher alpha coefficients (alpha = .79 than the shorter test (half-sets of items = .60, .73, .69, .70. A higher overall value (alpha = .83 can be achieved by item elimination.

  7. The Gini coefficient: a methodological pilot study to assess fetal brain development employing postmortem diffusion MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viehweger, Adrian; Sorge, Ina; Hirsch, Wolfgang [University Hospital Leipzig, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Leipzig (Germany); Riffert, Till; Dhital, Bibek; Knoesche, Thomas R.; Anwander, Alfred [Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig (Germany); Stepan, Holger [University Leipzig, Department of Obstetrics, Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is important in the assessment of fetal brain development. However, it is clinically challenging and time-consuming to prepare neuromorphological examinations to assess real brain age and to detect abnormalities. To demonstrate that the Gini coefficient can be a simple, intuitive parameter for modelling fetal brain development. Postmortem fetal specimens(n = 28) were evaluated by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) on a 3-T MRI scanner using 60 directions, 0.7-mm isotropic voxels and b-values of 0, 150, 1,600 s/mm{sup 2}. Constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD) was used as the local diffusion model. Fractional anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and complexity (CX) maps were generated. CX was defined as a novel diffusion metric. On the basis of those three parameters, the Gini coefficient was calculated. Study of fetal brain development in postmortem specimens was feasible using DWI. The Gini coefficient could be calculated for the combination of the three diffusion parameters. This multidimensional Gini coefficient correlated well with age (Adjusted R{sup 2} = 0.59) between the ages of 17 and 26 gestational weeks. We propose a new method that uses an economics concept, the Gini coefficient, to describe the whole brain with one simple and intuitive measure, which can be used to assess the brain's developmental state. (orig.)

  8. The Gini coefficient: a methodological pilot study to assess fetal brain development employing postmortem diffusion MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viehweger, Adrian; Sorge, Ina; Hirsch, Wolfgang; Riffert, Till; Dhital, Bibek; Knoesche, Thomas R.; Anwander, Alfred; Stepan, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is important in the assessment of fetal brain development. However, it is clinically challenging and time-consuming to prepare neuromorphological examinations to assess real brain age and to detect abnormalities. To demonstrate that the Gini coefficient can be a simple, intuitive parameter for modelling fetal brain development. Postmortem fetal specimens(n = 28) were evaluated by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) on a 3-T MRI scanner using 60 directions, 0.7-mm isotropic voxels and b-values of 0, 150, 1,600 s/mm 2 . Constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD) was used as the local diffusion model. Fractional anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and complexity (CX) maps were generated. CX was defined as a novel diffusion metric. On the basis of those three parameters, the Gini coefficient was calculated. Study of fetal brain development in postmortem specimens was feasible using DWI. The Gini coefficient could be calculated for the combination of the three diffusion parameters. This multidimensional Gini coefficient correlated well with age (Adjusted R 2 = 0.59) between the ages of 17 and 26 gestational weeks. We propose a new method that uses an economics concept, the Gini coefficient, to describe the whole brain with one simple and intuitive measure, which can be used to assess the brain's developmental state. (orig.)

  9. Determining the Gruneisen coefficient for liquids using the PAZ-scan technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantiste, Olivier A.

    Measurement of Gruneisen coefficient is utterly important in developing efficient molecular photoacoustic (PA) contrast agents. It is one of the two parameters that describes how efficient a molecule is in transforming optical energy into sound, the other being absorption coefficient. Using the PAZ-scan technique, the Gruneisen coefficient was obtained for various samples and the values are compared with standard techniques. In a PAZ-scan, the sample is translated through the path of a focused laser beam in small steps while the generated PA signal is recorded. The incident intensity is optimum at the focal point and decreases gradually on either side of the focus. As such, the absorption and the PA signal varies according to the sample properties. Therefore at positions away from the focal point, the incident intensities are weak and the PA signal varies linearly with intensity. A plot of the PA signal versus the intensity is used to obtain the Gruneisen coefficient. Using this technique, the Gruneisen coefficients for crystal violet in two different solvents, food coloring dyes that are dissolved in water were determined. Results show that the linear part of the PAZ-scan can be used to determine the Gruneisen coefficient for liquids.

  10. A Maximum Likelihood Approach to Determine Sensor Radiometric Response Coefficients for NPP VIIRS Reflective Solar Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ning; Chiang, Kwo-Fu; Oudrari, Hassan; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2011-01-01

    Optical sensors aboard Earth orbiting satellites such as the next generation Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) assume that the sensors radiometric response in the Reflective Solar Bands (RSB) is described by a quadratic polynomial, in relating the aperture spectral radiance to the sensor Digital Number (DN) readout. For VIIRS Flight Unit 1, the coefficients are to be determined before launch by an attenuation method, although the linear coefficient will be further determined on-orbit through observing the Solar Diffuser. In determining the quadratic polynomial coefficients by the attenuation method, a Maximum Likelihood approach is applied in carrying out the least-squares procedure. Crucial to the Maximum Likelihood least-squares procedure is the computation of the weight. The weight not only has a contribution from the noise of the sensor s digital count, with an important contribution from digitization error, but also is affected heavily by the mathematical expression used to predict the value of the dependent variable, because both the independent and the dependent variables contain random noise. In addition, model errors have a major impact on the uncertainties of the coefficients. The Maximum Likelihood approach demonstrates the inadequacy of the attenuation method model with a quadratic polynomial for the retrieved spectral radiance. We show that using the inadequate model dramatically increases the uncertainties of the coefficients. We compute the coefficient values and their uncertainties, considering both measurement and model errors.

  11. Producing of Impedance Tube for Measurement of Acoustic Absorption Coefficient of Some Sound Absorber Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Golmohammadi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Noise is one of the most important harmful agents in work environment. In spit of industrial improvements, exposure with over permissible limit of noise is counted as one of the health complication of workers. In Iran, do not exact information of the absorption coefficient of acoustic materials. Iranian manufacturer have not laboratory for measured of sound absorbance of their products, therefore using of sound absorber is limited for noise control in industrial and non industrial constructions. The goal of this study was to design an impedance tube based on pressure method for measurement of the sound absorption coefficient of acoustic materials.Materials & Methods: In this study designing of measuring system and method of calculation of sound absorption based on a available equipment and relatively easy for measurement of the sound absorption coefficient related to ISO10534-1 was performed. Measuring system consist of heavy asbestos tube, a pure tone sound generator, calibrated sound level meter for measuring of some commonly of sound absorber materials was used. Results: In this study sound absorption coefficient of 23 types of available acoustic material in Iran was tested. Reliability of results by three repeat of measurement was tested. Results showed that the standard deviation of sound absorption coefficient of study materials was smaller than .Conclusion: The present study performed a necessary technology of designing and producing of impedance tube for determining of acoustical materials absorption coefficient in Iran.

  12. Correlation and path coefficient analysis of some quantitative traits ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty-seven wheat genotypes and three check varieties were studied for correlation and path coefficient analysis of some quantitative traits in wheat at Kisan (P.G), College, Simbhaoli in India. Generally, the estimates of genotypic correlation coefficients were higher than the corresponding phenotypic correlation coefficients ...

  13. Transfer coefficients in elliptical tubes and plate fin heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saboya, S.M.

    1979-09-01

    Mean transfer coefficients in elliptical tubes and plate fin heat exchangers were determined by application of heat and mass transfer analogy in conjunction with the naphthalene sublimation technique. The transfer coefficients are presented in a dimensionless form as functions of the Reynolds number. By using the least squares method analytical expressions for the transfer coefficients were determined with low scattering. (E.G.) [pt

  14. On Estimation and Hypothesis Testing Problems for Correlation Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Helena Chmura

    1975-01-01

    A selection of statistical problems commonly encountered in psychological or psychiatric research concerning correlation coefficients are re-evaluated in the light of recently developed simplifications in the forms of the distribution theory of the intraclass correlation coefficient, of the product-moment correlation coefficient, and the Spearman…

  15. Generating Units

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Generating Units are any combination of physically connected generators, reactors, boilers, combustion turbines, and other prime movers operated together to produce...

  16. Correlation between satellite vegetation indices and crop coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, A. L.; Simoniello, T.; Greco, M.; Squicciarrino, G.; Lanfredi, M.; Macchiato, M.

    2010-05-01

    Accurate estimations of plant evapotranspiration and its spatial distribution are fundamental for the evaluation of vegetation water stress. Satellite remote sensing techniques represent precious tools for the evapotranspiration estimations at large scale. Many studies are based on the use of thermal signals as inputs for energy balance equations that are solved to estimate evapotranspiration (e.g., Bastiaanssen et al., 1998; Ayenew, 2003). This approach requires many inputs and a detailed theoretical background knowledge. Other works (e.g., Calera at al., 2005; Gonzalez-Dugo and Mateos, 2008) explored a second approach based on the FAO method that estimates the plant evapotranspiration by weighting the reference evapotranspiration with a crop coefficient (Kc) derived from satellite based vegetation indices. Such studies mainly investigated the usefulness of high resolution satellite data, such as Quickbird, Ikonos, TM, that in spite of the high spatial sampling, are not suitable for a dense temporal sampling. In order to generate spatially distributed values of Kc that capture field-specific crop development, we investigated the usefulness of vegetation indices derived from a time series (2005-2008) of medium resolution MODIS data. We analyzed the spatial and temporal correlation of different indices (NDVI, EVI, and WDVI) with crop coefficients available in literature for different herbaceous and arboreal cultivations present in the study area (Basilicata region, southern Italy). To take into account the background of the cultivation covers, we weighted the Kc by considering the vegetation fraction within each the pixel. By evaluating altogether the cultivations, we found that the correlation increases during the growing season (R2 > 0.80) whereas it decreases during the winter period (R2 wheat (R2 = 0.89) and vineyards (R2 = 0.83). For the cultivation with more homogeneous canopy, e.g. kiwifruit, the best performing index was the WDVI showing a determination

  17. Organ and effective dose rate coefficients for submersion exposure in occupational settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veinot, K.G. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dewji, S.A.; Hiller, M.M. [Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eckerman, K.F.; Easterly, C.E. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2017-11-15

    External dose coefficients for environmental exposure scenarios are often computed using assumption on infinite or semi-infinite radiation sources. For example, in the case of a person standing on contaminated ground, the source is assumed to be distributed at a given depth (or between various depths) and extending outwards to an essentially infinite distance. In the case of exposure to contaminated air, the person is modeled as standing within a cloud of infinite, or semi-infinite, source distribution. However, these scenarios do not mimic common workplace environments where scatter off walls and ceilings may significantly alter the energy spectrum and dose coefficients. In this paper, dose rate coefficients were calculated using the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference voxel phantoms positioned in rooms of three sizes representing an office, laboratory, and warehouse. For each room size calculations using the reference phantoms were performed for photons, electrons, and positrons as the source particles to derive mono-energetic dose rate coefficients. Since the voxel phantoms lack the resolution to perform dose calculations at the sensitive depth for the skin, a mathematical phantom was developed and calculations were performed in each room size with the three source particle types. Coefficients for the noble gas radionuclides of ICRP Publication 107 (e.g., Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and Rn) were generated by folding the corresponding photon, electron, and positron emissions over the mono-energetic dose rate coefficients. Results indicate that the smaller room sizes have a significant impact on the dose rate per unit air concentration compared to the semi-infinite cloud case. For example, for Kr-85 the warehouse dose rate coefficient is 7% higher than the office dose rate coefficient while it is 71% higher for Xe-133. (orig.)

  18. Organ and effective dose rate coefficients for submersion exposure in occupational settings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veinot, K.G.; Dewji, S.A.; Hiller, M.M.; Eckerman, K.F.; Easterly, C.E.

    2017-01-01

    External dose coefficients for environmental exposure scenarios are often computed using assumption on infinite or semi-infinite radiation sources. For example, in the case of a person standing on contaminated ground, the source is assumed to be distributed at a given depth (or between various depths) and extending outwards to an essentially infinite distance. In the case of exposure to contaminated air, the person is modeled as standing within a cloud of infinite, or semi-infinite, source distribution. However, these scenarios do not mimic common workplace environments where scatter off walls and ceilings may significantly alter the energy spectrum and dose coefficients. In this paper, dose rate coefficients were calculated using the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference voxel phantoms positioned in rooms of three sizes representing an office, laboratory, and warehouse. For each room size calculations using the reference phantoms were performed for photons, electrons, and positrons as the source particles to derive mono-energetic dose rate coefficients. Since the voxel phantoms lack the resolution to perform dose calculations at the sensitive depth for the skin, a mathematical phantom was developed and calculations were performed in each room size with the three source particle types. Coefficients for the noble gas radionuclides of ICRP Publication 107 (e.g., Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and Rn) were generated by folding the corresponding photon, electron, and positron emissions over the mono-energetic dose rate coefficients. Results indicate that the smaller room sizes have a significant impact on the dose rate per unit air concentration compared to the semi-infinite cloud case. For example, for Kr-85 the warehouse dose rate coefficient is 7% higher than the office dose rate coefficient while it is 71% higher for Xe-133. (orig.)

  19. Systematic Risk on Istanbul Stock Exchange: Traditional Beta Coefficient Versus Downside Beta Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülfen TUNA

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to test the validity of Downside Capital Asset Pricing Model (D-CAPM on the ISE. At the same time, the explanatory power of CAPM's traditional beta and D-CAPM's downside beta on the changes in the average return values are examined comparatively. In this context, the monthly data for seventy three stocks that are continuously traded on the ISE for the period 1991-2009 is used. Regression analysis is applied in this study. The research results have shown that D-CAPM is valid on the ISE. In addition, it is obtained that the power of downside beta coefficient is higher than traditional beta coefficient on explaining the return changes. Therefore, it can be said that the downside beta is superior to traditional beta in the ISE for chosen period.

  20. Application of K1/3 weather coefficient to tropical cyclone avoidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymański Maciej

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of an application of K1/3 weather coefficient to tropical cyclone avoidance manoeuvre on the example of a tropical cyclones GASTON in the North Atlantic in. Avoidance manoeuvre was planned with the use of the Bon Voyage ORS (Onboard Routing System of the AWT and also with the use of the programme CYKLON. The routes considered in the Bon Voyage system were generated by the route optimization algorithms of the system and routes programmed manually were generated by the system operator. Weather coefficient K1/3 was utilized as an index of safety of navigation in decision making regarding the ultimate route choice of all route variants generated and programmed in both decision making support systems. Results obtained point at the legitimacy of utilizing several decision support systems in solving the problem of tropical cyclone avoidance manoeuvre.

  1. Carbon emission coefficient measurement of the coal-to-power energy chain in China

    OpenAIRE

    Shiwei Yu; Yi-Ming Wei; Haixiang Guo; Liping Ding

    2012-01-01

    Coal-fired electricity generation has become the largest source of carbon emission in China. This study utilizes life-cycle assessment to assess the effect of carbon emissions and to calculate the coefficient of carbon emissions in coal-to-energy chains. Results show that the carbon emission coefficient of the coal-to-energy chain in China is 875 g/kW h-1, which is a relatively low level compared with that of other countries. CO2 is the main type of greenhouse gas emission and the most abunda...

  2. Absorption coefficients for water vapor at 193 nm from 300 to 1073 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, W. J.; Carleton, K. L.; Marinelli, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of the water absorption coefficient at 193 nm from 300 to 1073 K are reported. The measurements were made using broadband VUV radiation and a monochromator-based detection system. The water vapor was generated by a saturator and metered into a flowing, 99 cm absorption cell via a water vapor mass flow meter. The 193 nm absorption coefficient measurements are compared to room temperature and high temperature shock tube measurements with good agreement. The absorption can be parameterized by a nu3 vibrational mode reaction coordinate and the thermal population of the nu3 mode.

  3. Measurement of the sound absorption coefficient for an advanced undergraduate physics laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho-Stadler, E.; Elejalde-García, M. J.

    2017-09-01

    We present a simple experiment that allows advanced undergraduates to learn the basics of the acoustic properties of materials. The impedance tube-standing wave method is applied to study the normal absorption coefficient of acoustics insulators. The setup includes a tube, a speaker, a microphone, a digital function generator and an oscilloscope, material available in an undergraduate laboratory. Results of the change of the absorption coefficient with the frequency, the sample thickness and the sample density are analysed and compared with those obtained with a commercial system.

  4. Transfer coefficients for terrestrial foodchain: their derivation and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Y.C.; Colsher, C.S.; Thompson, S.E.

    1979-01-01

    Transfer coefficients to predict the passage of isotopes from the environment to terrestrial foods have been derived for various radionuclides of importance in the nuclear fuel cycle. These data update and extend previously recommended handbook values. We derive transfer coefficients to terrestrial foods and describe the systematics of the derived transfer coefficients. Suggestions are offered for changes in the values of transfer coefficients to terrestrial foods that now appear in federal regulatory guides. Deficiencies in our present knowledge concerning transfer coefficients and limitations in the use of these values to ensure compliance with radiation protection standards are discussed

  5. Generational diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Linda W

    2010-01-01

    Generational diversity has proven challenges for nurse leaders, and generational values may influence ideas about work and career planning. This article discusses generational gaps, influencing factors and support, and the various generational groups present in today's workplace as well as the consequences of need addressing these issues. The article ends with a discussion of possible solutions.

  6. Estimating inbreeding coefficients from NGS data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garrett Vieira, Filipe Jorge; Fumagalli, Matteo; Albrechtsen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Most methods for Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) data analyses incorporate information regarding allele frequencies using the assumption of Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) as a prior. However, many organisms including domesticated, partially selfing or with asexual life cycles show strong......-Maximization (EM) algorithm. We assess the impact of taking inbreeding into account when calling genotypes or estimating the Site Frequency Spectrum (SFS), and demonstrate a marked increase in accuracy on low coverage highly inbred samples. We demonstrate the applicability and efficacy of these methods in both...

  7. Changes in Electrokinetic Coupling Coefficients of Granite under Triaxial Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Kuwano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrokinetic phenomena are believed to be the most likely origin of electromagnetic signals preceding or accompanying earthquakes. The intensity of the source current due to the electrokinetic phenomena is determined by the fluid flux and the electrokinetic coupling coefficient called streaming current coefficient; therefore, how the coefficient changes before rupture is essential. Here, we show how the electrokinetic coefficients change during the rock deformation experiment up to failure. The streaming current coefficient did not increase before failure, but continued to decrease up to failure, which is explained in terms of the elastic closure of capillary. On the other hand, the streaming potential coefficient, which is the product of the streaming current coefficient and bulk resistivity of the rock, increased at the onset of dilatancy. It may be due to change in bulk resistivity. Our result indicates that the zeta potential of the newly created surface does not change so much from that of the preexisting fluid rock interface.

  8. Experimental determination of the distributed dynamic coefficients for a hydrodynamic fluid film bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyurko, John Harrison

    Most current rotor bearing analysis utilizes lumped parameter bearing coefficients to model the static and dynamic characteristics of fluid film bearings. By treating the stiffness and damping properties of the fluid film as acting upon the axial centerline of the rotor, these models are limited in their analysis to first order lateral rotor-bearing motion. The development of numerical methods that distribute the dynamic properties of the fluid film around the bearing circumference allow for higher order analysis of the motion between the bearing and rotor. Assessment of the accuracy of the numerical method used to calculate distributed dynamic fluid film bearing coefficients is performed by developing a novel hydrodynamic journal bearing test rig and experimental testing procedure capable of obtaining measured distributed dynamic coefficients over a range of bearing operating conditions. The instrumented bearing test rig is used to measure the dynamic bearing displacement and fluid film pressure responses from application of an externally applied excitation force. Least squares solution to a system of perturbated pressure equations, populated by measured displacement and pressure responses, is used to determine the hydrodynamic stiffness and damping properties for a finite region of the bearing surface. Incremental rotation of pressure sensors embedded in the body of the test bearing allow for measurement of the fluid film circumferential pressure distribution which is used to calculate a set of experimentally determined dynamic bearing coefficients. Distributed bearing coefficients derived from experimental measurements are compared to numerically calculated distributed coefficients as well as to lumped parameter coefficients generated from experimental and numerical methods found in the literature. Overall, the numerically calculated distributed coefficients successfully model both the circumferential distribution and the operating conditions of the experimental

  9. Using wind setdown and storm surge on Lake Erie to calibrate the air-sea drag coefficient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Drews

    Full Text Available The air-sea drag coefficient controls the transfer of momentum from wind to water. In modeling storm surge, this coefficient is a crucial parameter for estimating the surge height. This study uses two strong wind events on Lake Erie to calibrate the drag coefficient using the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Wave Sediment Transport (COAWST modeling system and the the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS. Simulated waves are generated on the lake with Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN. Wind setdown provides the opportunity to eliminate wave setup as a contributing factor, since waves are minimal at the upwind shore. The study finds that model results significantly underestimate wind setdown and storm surge when a typical open-ocean formulation without waves is used for the drag coefficient. The contribution of waves to wind setdown and storm surge is 34.7%. Scattered lake ice also increases the effective drag coefficient by a factor of 1.1.

  10. Parametric imaging of the local attenuation coefficient in human axillary lymph nodes assessed using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolaro, Loretta; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Klyen, Blake R.; Wood, Benjamin A.; Robbins, Peter D.; Saunders, Christobel M.; Jacques, Steven L.; Sampson, David D.

    2012-01-01

    We report the use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to determine spatially localized optical attenuation coefficients of human axillary lymph nodes and their use to generate parametric images of lymphoid tissue. 3D-OCT images were obtained from excised lymph nodes and optical attenuation coefficients were extracted assuming a single scattering model of OCT. We present the measured attenuation coefficients for several tissue regions in benign and reactive lymph nodes, as identified by histopathology. We show parametric images of the measured attenuation coefficients as well as segmented images of tissue type based on thresholding of the attenuation coefficient values. Comparison to histology demonstrates the enhancement of contrast in parametric images relative to OCT images. This enhancement is a step towards the use of OCT for in situ assessment of lymph nodes. PMID:22312589

  11. Investigation of La3+ Doping Effect on Piezoelectric Coefficients of BLT Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wodecka-Dus B.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Effects of La3+ admixture in barium lanthanum titanate (BLT ceramics system with colossal permittivity on performance of prospective piezoelectric cold plasma application were studied. Usage of cold atmospheric pressure plasma appears promising in terms of industrial and healthcare applications. Performed investigation provide consistent evaluation of doping lanthanum amount on piezoelectric coefficients values with simultaneous capability of charge accumulation for effective plasma generation. Modification of ferroelectric materials with heterovalent ions, however with the lower radii than the original atoms, significantly affects their domain mobility and consequently electromechanical properties. To determine the piezoelectric coefficients, the resonance-antiresonance method was implemented, and values of piezoelectric and dielectric parameters were recorded. Finally the results indicated that addition of 0.4 mol.% of La3+ ions to the ceramic structure maximally increased the values of piezoelectric coefficient to d33 = 20 pC/N and to huge dielectric constant to ε33T = 29277.

  12. Consequences of using home-made radon sources for measuring the radon diffusion coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrovolny, T.; Jiranek, M.

    2017-01-01

    The applicability of home-made radon sources for determining the radon diffusion coefficient of waterproofing materials was studied for three representatives of materials with a high radium content: uraninite, slag concrete and filter sand. The results of our investigation confirmed that the radon production rate of home-made radon sources is significantly lower than the radon production rate of artificial sources. Consequently, home-made sources are usually unable to generate concentrations higher than 100 kBq/m 3 in the source container. Therefore, they cannot be used for determining radon diffusion coefficients lower than 1 x 10 -12 m 2 /s. In addition, when home-made radon sources are used, only time-dependent mathematical solutions of the non-stationary radon diffusion can be used for determining the radon diffusion coefficient from the measured data. (authors)

  13. Measurements of recombination coefficient of hydrogen atoms on plasma deposited thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drenik, A.; Vesel, A.; Mozetic, M.

    2006-01-01

    We have performed experiments in plasma afterglow in order to determine the recombination coefficients of plasma deposited thin films of tungsten and graphite. Plasma deposited films rather than bulk material were used in order to more closely emulate surface structure of plasma-facing material deposits in fusion reactors. We have also determined the recombination coefficient of 85250 borosilicate glass and Teflon. Plasma was created by means of a radio frequency generator in a mixture of argon and hydrogen at the pressures between 60 Pa and 280 Pa. The degree of dissociation of hydrogen molecules was found to be between 0.1 and 1. The H-atom density was measured by Fiber Optic Catalytic Probe. The recombination coefficient was determined by measuring the axial profile of the H-atom density and using Smith's side arm diffusion model. (author)

  14. Experimental measurement of fluid force coefficients for helical tube arrays in air cross flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Shifang; Liu Reilan

    1993-01-01

    A helical coil steam generator is extensively used in the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGCR) and Sodium Cooled Reactor (SCR) nuclear power stations because of its compact structure, good heat-exchange, and small volume. The experimental model is established by the structure parameter of 200MW HTGCR. The fluid elastic instability of helical tube arrays in air cross flow is studied in this experiment, and the fluid force coefficients of helical tube arrays having the same notational direction of two adjacent layers in air cross flow are obtained. As compared to the fluid force coefficients of cylinder tube arrays, the fluid force coefficients of helical tube arrays are smaller in the low velocity area, and greater in the high velocity area. The experimental results help the study of the dynamic characteristics of helical tube arrays in air cross flow

  15. Roughness coefficient and its uncertainty in gravel-bed river

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Sung Kim

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Manning's roughness coefficient was estimated for a gravel-bed river reach using field measurements of water level and discharge, and the applicability of various methods used for estimation of the roughness coefficient was evaluated. Results show that the roughness coefficient tends to decrease with increasing discharge and water depth, and over a certain range it appears to remain constant. Comparison of roughness coefficients calculated by field measurement data with those estimated by other methods shows that, although the field-measured values provide approximate roughness coefficients for relatively large discharge, there seems to be rather high uncertainty due to the difference in resultant values. For this reason, uncertainty related to the roughness coefficient was analyzed in terms of change in computed variables. On average, a 20% increase of the roughness coefficient causes a 7% increase in the water depth and an 8% decrease in velocity, but there may be about a 15% increase in the water depth and an equivalent decrease in velocity for certain cross-sections in the study reach. Finally, the validity of estimated roughness coefficient based on field measurements was examined. A 10% error in discharge measurement may lead to more than 10% uncertainty in roughness coefficient estimation, but corresponding uncertainty in computed water depth and velocity is reduced to approximately 5%. Conversely, the necessity for roughness coefficient estimation by field measurement is confirmed.

  16. A methodology to quantify the stochastic distribution of friction coefficient required for level walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Ruey; Chang, Chien-Chi; Matz, Simon; Lesch, Mary F

    2008-11-01

    The required friction coefficient is defined as the minimum friction needed at the shoe and floor interface to support human locomotion. The available friction is the maximum friction coefficient that can be supported without a slip at the shoe and floor interface. A statistical model was recently introduced to estimate the probability of slip and fall incidents by comparing the available friction with the required friction, assuming that both the available and required friction coefficients have stochastic distributions. This paper presents a methodology to investigate the stochastic distributions of the required friction coefficient for level walking. In this experiment, a walkway with a layout of three force plates was specially designed in order to capture a large number of successful strikes without causing fatigue in participants. The required coefficient of friction data of one participant, who repeatedly walked on this walkway under four different walking conditions, is presented as an example of the readiness of the methodology examined in this paper. The results of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit test indicated that the required friction coefficient generated from each foot and walking condition by this participant appears to fit the normal, log-normal or Weibull distributions with few exceptions. Among these three distributions, the normal distribution appears to fit all the data generated with this participant. The average of successful strikes for each walk achieved with three force plates in this experiment was 2.49, ranging from 2.14 to 2.95 for each walking condition. The methodology and layout of the experimental apparatus presented in this paper are suitable for being applied to a full-scale study.

  17. Normalized lift: an energy interpretation of the lift coefficient simplifies comparisons of the lifting ability of rotating and flapping surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Burgers

    Full Text Available For a century, researchers have used the standard lift coefficient C(L to evaluate the lift, L, generated by fixed wings over an area S against dynamic pressure, ½ρv(2, where v is the effective velocity of the wing. Because the lift coefficient was developed initially for fixed wings in steady flow, its application to other lifting systems requires either simplifying assumptions or complex adjustments as is the case for flapping wings and rotating cylinders.This paper interprets the standard lift coefficient of a fixed wing slightly differently, as the work exerted by the wing on the surrounding flow field (L/ρ·S, compared against the total kinetic energy required for generating said lift, ½v(2. This reinterpreted coefficient, the normalized lift, is derived from the work-energy theorem and compares the lifting capabilities of dissimilar lift systems on a similar energy footing. The normalized lift is the same as the standard lift coefficient for fixed wings, but differs for wings with more complex motions; it also accounts for such complex motions explicitly and without complex modifications or adjustments. We compare the normalized lift with the previously-reported values of lift coefficient for a rotating cylinder in Magnus effect, a bat during hovering and forward flight, and a hovering dipteran.The maximum standard lift coefficient for a fixed wing without flaps in steady flow is around 1.5, yet for a rotating cylinder it may exceed 9.0, a value that implies that a rotating cylinder generates nearly 6 times the maximum lift of a wing. The maximum normalized lift for a rotating cylinder is 1.5. We suggest that the normalized lift can be used to evaluate propellers, rotors, flapping wings of animals and micro air vehicles, and underwater thrust-generating fins in the same way the lift coefficient is currently used to evaluate fixed wings.

  18. Thermal group contribution to the fuel-temperature coefficient revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallfelz, J.M.; Beldlidia, L.A.; Grimm, P.; Abu-Zaied, G.

    1993-01-01

    A project at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) involves the development of simulation models for the transient analysis of the reactors in Switzerland (STARS) (Ref. 1). This project, funded in part by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate, also involves the calculation and evaluation of certain transients for Swiss light water reactors. To generate the nuclear data for these analyses, we have employed various codes, including the cell/assembly codes BOXER (Refs. 2 and 3) and CASMO-3 (Ref. 4). For certain reactivity insertion accidents, the fuel-temperature coefficient (FTC) determines the major component of the feedback reactivity, which limits the peak fuel enthalpy during the transient. The FTC has a component due to the temperature dependence of the oxygen scattering in the fuel that causes changes in the thermal group cross sections. However, this and other sources of a thermal group contribution to the FTC (TFTC) are sometimes ignored. In this paper, we present some results of investigations of contributions to the TFTC

  19. Evaluation of gravimetric techniques to estimate the microvascular filtration coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongaonkar, R M; Laine, G A; Stewart, R H; Quick, C M

    2011-06-01

    Microvascular permeability to water is characterized by the microvascular filtration coefficient (K(f)). Conventional gravimetric techniques to estimate K(f) rely on data obtained from either transient or steady-state increases in organ weight in response to increases in microvascular pressure. Both techniques result in considerably different estimates and neither account for interstitial fluid storage and lymphatic return. We therefore developed a theoretical framework to evaluate K(f) estimation techniques by 1) comparing conventional techniques to a novel technique that includes effects of interstitial fluid storage and lymphatic return, 2) evaluating the ability of conventional techniques to reproduce K(f) from simulated gravimetric data generated by a realistic interstitial fluid balance model, 3) analyzing new data collected from rat intestine, and 4) analyzing previously reported data. These approaches revealed that the steady-state gravimetric technique yields estimates that are not directly related to K(f) and are in some cases directly proportional to interstitial compliance. However, the transient gravimetric technique yields accurate estimates in some organs, because the typical experimental duration minimizes the effects of interstitial fluid storage and lymphatic return. Furthermore, our analytical framework reveals that the supposed requirement of tying off all draining lymphatic vessels for the transient technique is unnecessary. Finally, our numerical simulations indicate that our comprehensive technique accurately reproduces the value of K(f) in all organs, is not confounded by interstitial storage and lymphatic return, and provides corroboration of the estimate from the transient technique.

  20. Transport coefficients from energy loss studies in an expanding QGP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Alejandro; Dominguez, Isabel; Jalilian-Marian, Jamal; Tejeda-Yeomans, Maria Elena

    2017-08-01

    We use linear viscous hydrodynamics to describe the energy and momentum deposited by a fast moving parton in a quark gluon plasma. This energy-momentum is used to compute the probability density for the production of soft partons by means of the Cooper-Frye formula. Using this probability density, we render manifest a relation between the average transverse momentum given to the fast moving parton from the medium, q̂, the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio, η/s, and the energy lost by the fast moving parton, ΔE, in an expanding medium under similar conditions to those generated in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC and RHIC energies. We find that q̂ increases with ΔE. On the other hand, η/s is more stable with ΔE. The behavior of q̂, with ΔE is understood as arising from the length of medium the parton traverses from the point where it is produced. However, since η/s is proportional to the ratio of the length of medium traversed by the fast parton and the average number of scatterings it experiences, it has a milder dependence on the energy it loses. This study represents a tool to obtain a direct connection between transport coefficients and the description of in-medium energy loss within a linear viscous hydrodynamical evolution of the bulk.

  1. Automatic estimation of pressure-dependent rate coefficients

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Joshua W.

    2012-01-01

    A general framework is presented for accurately and efficiently estimating the phenomenological pressure-dependent rate coefficients for reaction networks of arbitrary size and complexity using only high-pressure-limit information. Two aspects of this framework are discussed in detail. First, two methods of estimating the density of states of the species in the network are presented, including a new method based on characteristic functional group frequencies. Second, three methods of simplifying the full master equation model of the network to a single set of phenomenological rates are discussed, including a new method based on the reservoir state and pseudo-steady state approximations. Both sets of methods are evaluated in the context of the chemically-activated reaction of acetyl with oxygen. All three simplifications of the master equation are usually accurate, but each fails in certain situations, which are discussed. The new methods usually provide good accuracy at a computational cost appropriate for automated reaction mechanism generation. This journal is © the Owner Societies.

  2. Collisional Dissociation of CO: ab initio Potential Energy Surfaces and Quasiclassical Trajectory Rate Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenke, David W.; Jaffe, Richard L.; Chaban, Galina M.

    2016-01-01

    We have generated accurate global potential energy surfaces for CO+Ar and CO+O that correlate with atom-diatom pairs in their ground electronic states based on extensive ab initio electronic structure calculations and used these potentials in quasi-classical trajectory nuclear dynamics calculations to predict the thermal dissociation rate coefficients over 5000- 35000 K. Our results are not compatible with the 20-45 year old experimental results. For CO + Ar we obtain fairly good agreement with the experimental rate coefficients of Appleton et al. (1970) and Mick and Roth (1993), but our computed rate coefficients exhibit a stronger temperature dependence. For CO + O our dissociation rate coefficient is in close agreement with the value from the Park model, which is an empirical adjustment of older experimental results. However, we find the rate coefficient for CO + O is only 1.5 to 3.3 times larger than CO + Ar over the temperature range of the shock tube experiments (8000-15,000 K). The previously accepted value for this rate coefficient ratio is 15, independent of temperature. We also computed the rate coefficient for the CO + O ex- change reaction which forms C + O2. We find this reaction is much faster than previously believed and is the dominant process in the removal of CO at temperatures up to 16,000 K. As a result, the dissociation of CO is accomplished in two steps (react to form C+O2 and then O2 dissociates) that are endothermic by 6.1 and 5.1 eV, instead of one step that requires 11.2 eV to break the CO bond.

  3. Combined experimental-numerical identification of radiative transfer coefficients in white LED phosphor layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akolkar, A.; Petrasch, J.; Finck, S.; Rahmatian, N.

    2018-02-01

    An inverse analysis of the phosphor layer of a commercially available, conformally coated, white LED is done based on tomographic and spectrometric measurements. The aim is to determine the radiative transfer coefficients of the phosphor layer from the measurements of the finished device, with minimal assumptions regarding the composition of the phosphor layer. These results can be used for subsequent opto-thermal modelling and optimization of the device. For this purpose, multiple integrating sphere and gonioradiometric measurements are done to obtain statistical bounds on spectral radiometric values and angular color distributions for ten LEDs belonging to the same color bin of the product series. Tomographic measurements of the LED package are used to generate a tetrahedral grid of the 3D LED geometry. A radiative transfer model using Monte Carlo Ray Tracing in the tetrahedral grid is developed. Using a two-wavelength model consisting of a blue emission wavelength and a yellow, Stokes-shifted re-emission wavelength, the angular color distribution of the LED is simulated over wide ranges of the absorption and scattering coefficients of the phosphor layer, for the blue and yellow wavelengths. Using a two-step, iterative space search, combinations of the radiative transfer coefficients are obtained for which the simulations are consistent with the integrating sphere and gonioradiometric measurements. The results show an inverse relationship between the scattering and absorption coefficients of the phosphor layer for blue light. Scattering of yellow light acts as a distribution and loss mechanism for yellow light and affects the shape of the angular color distribution significantly, especially at larger viewing angles. The spread of feasible coefficients indicates that measured optical behavior of the LEDs may be reproduced using a range of combinations of radiative coefficients. Given that coefficients predicted by the Mie theory usually must be corrected in order

  4. High radon emanation coefficients of porous matters produced through filtration and precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Tomozo; Gunji, Yasuyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Previous theoretical predictions of high radon emanation coefficients were verified in experiments using porous matters artificially produced through filtration and precipitation. Such porous matters were prepared by replicating uranium-bearing waste generating processes used in fuel fabrication facilities in Japan except that radium was employed instead of uranium. In the replication, a liquid containing a trace amount of naturally occurring radium was processed by filtration or precipitation, resulting in radium adsorption on the surfaces of the matrices used as agents for the processing. The matrices were diatomaceous earth for filtration and iron (III) hydroxide for precipitation. Radon emanation coefficients of these matrices were measured and proved to be very high as expected from the authors' previous theoretical calculations which predicted that chemical procedures like filtration or precipitation could lead to very high radon emanation coefficients. Filtration and precipitation are the most common processes employed in chemical industries. Therefore, the present study also provides important information on radon emanation coefficients for workers in those chemical industries which handle substances containing naturally occurring radium. The findings further imply that man-made artificial industrial products containing naturally occurring radium should be distinguished from ubiquitous minerals, rocks and soils containing naturally occurring radium from a radiological exposure viewpoint, because the radon emanation coefficients of the former are generally higher than those of the latter. (author)

  5. Surplus thermal energy model of greenhouses and coefficient analysis for effective utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hwan Yang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available If a greenhouse in the temperate and subtropical regions is maintained in a closed condition, the indoor temperature commonly exceeds that required for optimal plant growth, even in the cold season. This study considered this excess energy as surplus thermal energy (STE, which can be recovered, stored and used when heating is necessary. To use the STE economically and effectively, the amount of STE must be estimated before designing a utilization system. Therefore, this study proposed an STE model using energy balance equations for the three steps of the STE generation process. The coefficients in the model were determined by the results of previous research and experiments using the test greenhouse. The proposed STE model produced monthly errors of 17.9%, 10.4% and 7.4% for December, January and February, respectively. Furthermore, the effects of the coefficients on the model accuracy were revealed by the estimation error assessment and linear regression analysis through fixing dynamic coefficients. A sensitivity analysis of the model coefficients indicated that the coefficients have to be determined carefully. This study also provides effective ways to increase the amount of STE.

  6. Modified Regression Correlation Coefficient for Poisson Regression Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaengthong, Nattacha; Domthong, Uthumporn

    2017-09-01

    This study gives attention to indicators in predictive power of the Generalized Linear Model (GLM) which are widely used; however, often having some restrictions. We are interested in regression correlation coefficient for a Poisson regression model. This is a measure of predictive power, and defined by the relationship between the dependent variable (Y) and the expected value of the dependent variable given the independent variables [E(Y|X)] for the Poisson regression model. The dependent variable is distributed as Poisson. The purpose of this research was modifying regression correlation coefficient for Poisson regression model. We also compare the proposed modified regression correlation coefficient with the traditional regression correlation coefficient in the case of two or more independent variables, and having multicollinearity in independent variables. The result shows that the proposed regression correlation coefficient is better than the traditional regression correlation coefficient based on Bias and the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE).

  7. Object detection by correlation coefficients using azimuthally averaged reference projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, William V

    2004-11-01

    A method of computing correlation coefficients for object detection that takes advantage of using azimuthally averaged reference projections is described and compared with two alternative methods-computing a cross-correlation function or a local correlation coefficient versus the azimuthally averaged reference projections. Two examples of an application from structural biology involving the detection of projection views of biological macromolecules in electron micrographs are discussed. It is found that a novel approach to computing a local correlation coefficient versus azimuthally averaged reference projections, using a rotational correlation coefficient, outperforms using a cross-correlation function and a local correlation coefficient in object detection from simulated images with a range of levels of simulated additive noise. The three approaches perform similarly in detecting macromolecular views in electron microscope images of a globular macrolecular complex (the ribosome). The rotational correlation coefficient outperforms the other methods in detection of keyhole limpet hemocyanin macromolecular views in electron micrographs.

  8. Calibration of integral diffraction coefficients of TIAP crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan Xinshi; China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang; Yang Jiamin; Yi Rongqing; Zhang Jiyan; Zhao Yang; Zhao Yidong; Cui Mingqi; Deng Aihong

    2007-01-01

    The first, second and third order integral diffraction coefficients of TIAP crystal were calibrated at 4B7 X-ray source on Beijing synchrotron radiation facility with photon energy ranging from 2.1 keV to 6.0 keV. It is shown that the peak diffraction coefficients of the TIAP crystal are rather high. The first order integral diffraction coefficient tends to increase with the decreasing photon energy. But in the range of 2.6 keV to 5.4 keV, the integral diffraction coefficient is about 1.53 x 10 -4 rad. The diffraction coefficients decrease gradually as the diffraction order increases. The second order integral diffraction coefficient is only 1/4 of the first order, and the third order is about one magnitude lower than the first order. The calibrated TIAP crystal can be used to quantitatively analyze X-ray spectrum of laser-produced plasma. (authors)

  9. Osmotic second virial cross coefficients for star and linear polystyrenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Striolo, Alberto; Prausnitz, John M.

    2000-01-01

    Experimental osmotic second virial cross coefficients are reported for linear and 8-arm star polystyrenes in three solvents: toluene, cyclohexane, and methylcyclohexane. The osmotic second virial cross coefficient for 8-arm star and linear polystyrene is always positive and within the osmotic second virial coefficients measured for the single polymers. The positive cross coefficient indicates net repulsion between the two different polymers in dilute solution. The extent of repulsion is greatest in toluene and least in cyclohexane. To relate the macroscopic second virial coefficient to microscopic interactions, the potential of mean force between linear and 6-arm star polymers was computed by molecular simulation. The interaction between nonbonded polymer segments is given by a square-well potential. Well width was set equal to one half of the segment diameter. Different solvent conditions were investigated by using different well depths. Potentials of mean force were then used to compute the osmotic second virial cross coefficients. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  10. Verifying reciprocal relations for experimental diffusion coefficients in multicomponent mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medvedev, Oleg; Shapiro, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    into Onsager coefficients and a subsequent symmetry check make it possible to evaluate different thermodynamic models with regard to their possibility of being used for prediction of the transport properties. We performed several checks of this kind for ternary mixtures of hydrocarbons and alcohols, where......The goal of the present study is to verify the agreement of the available data on diffusion in ternary mixtures with the theoretical requirement of linear non-equilibrium thermodynamics consisting in symmetry of the matrix of the phenomenological coefficients. A common set of measured diffusion...... diffusion coefficients into Onsager coefficients for a non-ideal mixture involves derivatives of the chemical potentials and, thus, should be based on a certain thermodynamic model (cubic equation of state (EoS), an activity coefficient model, etc.). Transformation of the Fickian diffusion coefficients...

  11. Research on friction coefficient of nuclear Reactor Vessel Internals Hold Down Spring: Stress coefficient test analysis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linjun, Xie; Guohong, Xue; Ming, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: HDS stress coefficient test apparatus. - Highlights: • This paper performs mathematic deduction to the physical model of Hold Down Spring (HDS), establishes a mathematic model of axial load P and stress, stress coefficient and friction coefficient and designs a set of test apparatuses for simulating the pretightening process of the HDS for the first time according to a model similarity criterion. • The mathematical relation between the load and the strain is obtained about the HDS, and the mathematical model of the stress coefficient and the friction coefficient is established. So, a set of test apparatuses for obtaining the stress coefficient is designed according to the model scaling criterion and the friction coefficient of the K1000 HDS is calculated to be 0.336 through the obtained stress coefficient. • The relation curve between the theoretical load and the friction coefficient is obtained through analysis and indicates that the change of the friction coefficient f would influence the pretightening load under the condition of designed stress. The necessary pretightening load in the design process is calculated to be 5469 kN according to the obtained friction coefficient. Therefore, the friction coefficient and the pretightening load under the design conditions can provide accurate pretightening data for the analysis and design of the reactor HDS according to the operations. - Abstract: This paper performs mathematic deduction to the physical model of Hold Down Spring (HDS), establishes a mathematic model of axial load P and stress, stress coefficient and friction coefficient and designs a set of test apparatuses for simulating the pretightening process of the HDS for the first time according to a model similarity criterion. By carrying out tests and researches through a stress testing technique, P–σ curves in loading and unloading processes of the HDS are obtained and the stress coefficient k f of the HDS is obtained. So, the

  12. Research on friction coefficient of nuclear Reactor Vessel Internals Hold Down Spring: Stress coefficient test analysis method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linjun, Xie, E-mail: linjunx@zjut.edu.cn [College of Mechanical Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Guohong, Xue; Ming, Zhang [Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research & Design Institute, Shanghai 200233 (China)

    2016-08-01

    Graphical abstract: HDS stress coefficient test apparatus. - Highlights: • This paper performs mathematic deduction to the physical model of Hold Down Spring (HDS), establishes a mathematic model of axial load P and stress, stress coefficient and friction coefficient and designs a set of test apparatuses for simulating the pretightening process of the HDS for the first time according to a model similarity criterion. • The mathematical relation between the load and the strain is obtained about the HDS, and the mathematical model of the stress coefficient and the friction coefficient is established. So, a set of test apparatuses for obtaining the stress coefficient is designed according to the model scaling criterion and the friction coefficient of the K1000 HDS is calculated to be 0.336 through the obtained stress coefficient. • The relation curve between the theoretical load and the friction coefficient is obtained through analysis and indicates that the change of the friction coefficient f would influence the pretightening load under the condition of designed stress. The necessary pretightening load in the design process is calculated to be 5469 kN according to the obtained friction coefficient. Therefore, the friction coefficient and the pretightening load under the design conditions can provide accurate pretightening data for the analysis and design of the reactor HDS according to the operations. - Abstract: This paper performs mathematic deduction to the physical model of Hold Down Spring (HDS), establishes a mathematic model of axial load P and stress, stress coefficient and friction coefficient and designs a set of test apparatuses for simulating the pretightening process of the HDS for the first time according to a model similarity criterion. By carrying out tests and researches through a stress testing technique, P–σ curves in loading and unloading processes of the HDS are obtained and the stress coefficient k{sub f} of the HDS is obtained. So, the

  13. Taylor coefficients and coefficient multipliers of Hardy and Bergman-type spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Jevtić, Miroljub; Arsenović, Miloš

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a systematic overview of the theory of Taylor coefficients of functions in some classical spaces of analytic functions and especially of the coefficient multipliers between spaces of Hardy type. Offering a comprehensive reference guide to the subject, it is the first of its kind in this area. After several introductory chapters covering the basic material, a large variety of results obtained over the past 80 years, including the most recent ones, are treated in detail. Several chapters end with discussions of practical applications and related topics that graduate students and experts in other subjects may find useful for their own purposes. Thus, a further aim of the book is to communicate to non-specialists some concrete facts that may be of value in their own work. The book can also be used as a textbook or a supplementary reference for an advanced graduate course. It is primarily intended for specialists in complex and functional analysis, graduate students, and experts in other related...

  14. Aerosol Angstrom Absorption Coefficient Comparisons during MILAGRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, N. A.; Marchany-Rivera, A.; Kelley, K. L.; Mangu, A.; Gaffney, J. S.

    2007-12-01

    Measurements of aerosol absorption were obtained as part of the MAX-Mex component of the MILAGRO field campaign at site T0 (Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City) by using a 7-channel aethalometer (Thermo- Anderson) during the month of March, 2006. The absorption measurements obtained in the field at 370, 470, 520, 590, 660, 880, and 950 nm were used to determine the aerosol Angstrom absorption exponents by linear regression. Since, unlike other absorbing aerosol species (e.g. humic like substances, nitrated PAHs), black carbon absorption is relatively constant from the ultraviolet to the infrared with an Angstrom absorption exponent of -1 (1), a comparison of the Angstrom exponents can indicate the presence of aerosol components with an enhanced UV absorption over that expected from BC content alone. The Angstrom exponents determined from the aerosol absorption measurements obtained in the field varied from - 0.7 to - 1.3 during the study and was generally lower in the afternoon than the morning hours, indicating an increase in secondary aerosol formation and photochemically generated UV absorbing species in the afternoon. Twelve-hour integrated samples of fine atmospheric aerosols (Petroleo (IMP) and CENICA.

  15. Instant Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveland, Elaina

    2017-01-01

    Generation Z students (born between 1995-2010) have replaced millennials on college campuses. Generation Z students are entrepreneurial, desire practical skills with their education, and are concerned about the cost of college. This article presents what need to be known about this new generation of students.

  16. Isotope generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The patent describes an isotope generator incorporating the possibility of stopping elution before the elution vessel is completely full. Sterile ventilation of the whole system can then occur, including of both generator reservoir and elution vessel. A sterile, and therefore pharmaceutically acceptable, elution fluid is thus obtained and the interior of the generator is not polluted with non-sterile air. (T.P.)

  17. Coefficient of restitution of model repaired car body parts

    OpenAIRE

    D. Hadryś; M. Miros

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The qualification of influence of model repaired car body parts on the value of coefficient of restitution and evaluation of impact energy absorption of model repaired car body parts.Design/methodology/approach: Investigation of plastic strain and coefficient of restitution of new and repaired model car body parts with using impact test machine for different impact energy.Findings: The results of investigations show that the value of coefficient of restitution changes with speed (ene...

  18. Clebsch-Gordan and Racah coefficients of SUpq(2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachurik, I.I.

    1993-01-01

    Explicit expressions for the Clebsch-Gordan coefficients and for the Racah coefficients of the two-parametric quantum algebra SU pq (2) are derived. They are given as finite sums and as terminating basic hypergeometric functions 3 φ 2 and 4 φ 3 . It is indicated how other expressions for these coefficients can be derived with the help of basic hypergeometric functions. (author). 11 refs

  19. Table for constructing the spin coefficients in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cocke, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    The spin coefficients in spinor calculus in Riemannian space-time are linear functions of the curls of the connecting quantities (the Infeld--Van der Waerden symbols). We show that in the Newman-Penrose formalism the expressions for the spin coefficients are quite manageable, if they are written in terms of the Newman-Penrose tetrad vectors. We present a table of the components of the spin coefficients explicitly in terms of the curls of the individual tetrad vectors

  20. On the Connection Coefficients of the Chebyshev-Boubaker Polynomials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Barry

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Chebyshev-Boubaker polynomials are the orthogonal polynomials whose coefficient arrays are defined by ordinary Riordan arrays. Examples include the Chebyshev polynomials of the second kind and the Boubaker polynomials. We study the connection coefficients of this class of orthogonal polynomials, indicating how Riordan array techniques can lead to closed-form expressions for these connection coefficients as well as recurrence relations that define them.

  1. DCFPAK: Dose coefficient data file package for Sandia National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckerman, K.F.; Leggett, R.W.

    1996-07-31

    The FORTRAN-based computer package DCFPAK (Dose Coefficient File Package) has been developed to provide electronic access to the dose coefficient data files summarized in Federal Guidance Reports 11 and 12. DCFPAK also provides access to standard information regarding decay chains and assembles dose coefficients for all dosimetrically significant radioactive progeny of a specified radionuclide. DCFPAK was designed for application on a PC but, with minor modifications, may be implemented on a UNIX workstation.

  2. On the connection coefficients of the Chebyshev-Boubaker polynomials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The Chebyshev-Boubaker polynomials are the orthogonal polynomials whose coefficient arrays are defined by ordinary Riordan arrays. Examples include the Chebyshev polynomials of the second kind and the Boubaker polynomials. We study the connection coefficients of this class of orthogonal polynomials, indicating how Riordan array techniques can lead to closed-form expressions for these connection coefficients as well as recurrence relations that define them.

  3. Balancing of rotating machines using influence coefficients calculated by numerical models; Equilibrage des machines tournantes par coefficients d`influence a l`aide de modeles numeriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevalier, R.; Bigret, R.; Karajani, R.; Vialard, S.

    1995-09-01

    The balancing of large rotating machines (turbine-generator sets and reactor coolant pumps) is generally carried out at Electricite de France using a influence coefficient method. For this, the influence of unbalances in the balancing planes have to be ascertained and, as a consequence, involves stopping and starting the machines several times. The purpose of the presented study is to analyse the possibility of reducing machine unavailability through the use of influence coefficients calculated with the help of a adjusted numerical (unbalance response) model for the balancing process. The principles of this method are shown and applied to a mock-up of a shaft line fitted with a full set of instruments (bearings and shaft) and having modal characteristics similar to common machines. The results are encouraging. They show the feasibility of the method.

  4. Determination of partition and diffusion coefficients of formaldehyde in selected building materials and impact of relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Zhang, Jianshun S; Liu, Xiaoyu; Gao, Zhi

    2012-06-01

    The partition and effective diffusion coefficients of formaldehyde were measured for three materials (conventional gypsum wallboard, "green" gypsum wallboard, and "green" carpet) under three relative humidity (RH) conditions (20%, 50%, and 70% RH). The "green" materials contained recycled materials and were friendly to environment. A dynamic dual-chamber test method was used. Results showed that a higher relative humidity led to a larger effective diffusion coefficient for two kinds of wallboards and carpet. The carpet was also found to be very permeable resulting in an effective diffusion coefficient at the same order of magnitude with the formaldehyde diffusion coefficient in air. The partition coefficient (K(ma)) of formaldehyde in conventional wallboard was 1.52 times larger at 50% RH than at 20% RH, whereas it decreased slightly from 50% to 70% RH, presumably due to the combined effects of water solubility of formaldehyde and micro-pore blocking by condensed moisture at the high RH level. The partition coefficient of formaldehyde increased slightly with the increase of relative humidity in "green" wallboard and "green" carpet. At the same relative humidity level, the "green" wallboard had larger partition coefficient and effective diffusion coefficient than the conventional wallboard, presumably due to the micro-pore structure differences between the two materials. The data generated could be used to assess the sorption effects of formaldehyde on building materials and to evaluate its impact on the formaldehyde concentration in buildings.

  5. Classification of coefficients of variation in experiments with commercial layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DE Faria Filho

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at determining a specific classification of coefficients of variation in experiments with commercial layers. Coefficients of variation were collected from papers published in Brazilian journals between 2000 and 2009 for performance, internal egg quality, and eggshell quality parameters. The coefficients of variation of each parameter were classified as low, intermediate, high, and very high according to the ratio between the median and the pseudo-sigma. It was concluded that the parameters used in experiments with commercial layers have a specific classification of coefficients of variation, and that this must be considered to evaluate experimental accuracy.

  6. Diffusion coefficient of three-dimensional Yukawa liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Ramazanov, T. S.; Masheeva, R. U. [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, 71, al Farabi ave., Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan)

    2013-11-15

    The purpose of this work is an investigation of the diffusion coefficient of the dust component in complex plasma. The computer simulation of the Yukawa liquids was made on the basis of the Langevin equation, which takes into account the influence of buffer plasma on the dust particles dynamics. The Green–Kubo relation was used to calculate the diffusion coefficient. Calculations of the diffusion coefficient for a wide range of the system parameters were performed. Using obtained numerical data, we constructed the interpolation formula for the diffusion coefficient. We also show that the interpolation formula correctly describes experimental data obtained under microgravity conditions.

  7. 40 CFR 799.6756 - TSCA partition coefficient (n-octanol/water), generator column method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... Medicinal Chemistry Project, Pomona College, Claremont, CA. (10) Hawker, D.W. and Connell, D.W. Octanol... aromatic hydrocarbons by a coupled column liquid chromatographic technique,” Analytical Chemistry, 50:175... Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Water,” Analytical Chemistry 50:997-1000 (1978). (13) Miller, M.M. et al. Aqueous...

  8. Determination of the radioactive aerosols transport coefficients generated in open pit uranium mining areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo Py Junior, D. de.

    1978-01-01

    The classical atmospheric transport model is applied to uranium mining operations. Among the transport parameters there is one concerned with radioactive decay, but it does not include the radioactive decay series which is the specific case for uranium. Therefore, an extension of the transport theory is developed and tested, giving results greater than the ones obtained with the classical model, as expected. (author)

  9. Improved Power Control Using Optimal Adjustable Coefficients for Three-Phase Photovoltaic Inverter under Unbalanced Grid Voltage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianggang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Unbalanced grid faults will lead to several drawbacks in the output power quality of photovoltaic generation (PV converters, such as power fluctuation, current amplitude swell, and a large quantity of harmonics. The aim of this paper is to propose a flexible AC current generation method by selecting coefficients to overcome these problems in an optimal way. Three coefficients are brought in to tune the output current reference within the required limits of the power quality (the current harmonic distortion, the AC current peak, the power fluctuation, and the DC voltage fluctuation. Through the optimization algorithm, the coefficients can be determined aiming to generate the minimum integrated amplitudes of the active and reactive power references with the constraints of the inverter current and DC voltage fluctuation. Dead-beat controller is utilized to track the optimal current reference in a short period. The method has been verified in PSCAD/EMTDC software.

  10. Improved power control using optimal adjustable coefficients for three-phase photovoltaic inverter under unbalanced grid voltage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qianggang; Zhou, Niancheng; Lou, Xiaoxuan; Chen, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Unbalanced grid faults will lead to several drawbacks in the output power quality of photovoltaic generation (PV) converters, such as power fluctuation, current amplitude swell, and a large quantity of harmonics. The aim of this paper is to propose a flexible AC current generation method by selecting coefficients to overcome these problems in an optimal way. Three coefficients are brought in to tune the output current reference within the required limits of the power quality (the current harmonic distortion, the AC current peak, the power fluctuation, and the DC voltage fluctuation). Through the optimization algorithm, the coefficients can be determined aiming to generate the minimum integrated amplitudes of the active and reactive power references with the constraints of the inverter current and DC voltage fluctuation. Dead-beat controller is utilized to track the optimal current reference in a short period. The method has been verified in PSCAD/EMTDC software.

  11. LONG TERM WIND SPEED PREDICTION USING WAVELET COEFFICIENTS AND SOFT COMPUTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manju Khanna

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the past researches, scholars have carried out short-term prediction for wind speed. The present work deals with long-term wind speed prediction, required for hybrid power generation design and contract planning. As the total database is quite large for long-term prediction, feature extraction of data by application of Lifting wavelet coefficients is exploited, along with soft computing techniques for time series data, which is scholastic in nature.

  12. Rigorous theory of graded thermoelectric converters including finite heat transfer coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstenmaier, York Christian; Wachutka, Gerhard

    2017-11-01

    Maximization of thermoelectric (TE) converter performance with an inhomogeneous material and electric current distribution has been investigated in previous literature neglecting thermal contact resistances to the heat reservoirs. The heat transfer coefficients (HTCs), defined as inverse thermal contact resistances per unit area, are thus infinite, whereas in reality, always parasitic thermal resistances, i.e., finite HTCs, are present. Maximization of the generated electric power and of cooling power in the refrigerator mode with respect to Seebeck coefficients and heat conductivity for a given profile of the material's TE figure of merit Z are mathematically ill-posed problems in the presence of infinite HTCs. As will be shown in this work, a fully self consistent solution is possible for finite HTCs, and in many respects, the results are fundamentally different. A previous theory for 3D devices will be extended to include finite HTCs and is applied to 1D devices. For the heat conductivity profile, an infinite number of solutions exist leading to the same device performance. Cooling power maximization for finite HTCs in 1D will lead to a strongly enhanced corresponding efficiency (coefficient of performance), whereas results with infinite HTCs lead to a non-monotonous temperature profile and coefficient of performance tending to zero for the prescribed heat conductivities. For maximized generated electric power, the corresponding generator efficiency is nearly a constant independent from the finite HTC values. The maximized efficiencies in the generator and cooling mode are equal to the efficiencies for the infinite HTC, provided that the corresponding powers approach zero. These and more findings are condensed in 4 theorems in the conclusions.

  13. Carbon emission coefficient of power consumption in India: baseline determination from the demand side

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nag, Barnali; Parikh, J.K.

    2005-01-01

    Substantial investments are expected in the Indian power sector under the flexibility mechanisms (CDM/JI) laid down in Article 12 of the Kyoto Protocol. In this context it is important to evolve a detailed framework for baseline construction in the power sector so as to incorporate the major factors that would affect the baseline values directly or indirectly. It is also important to establish carbon coefficients from electricity generation to help consider accurate project boundaries for numerous electricity conservation and DSM schemes. The objective of this paper is to provide (i) time series estimates of indirect carbon emissions per unit of power consumption (which can also be thought of as emission coefficient of power consumption) and (ii) baseline emissions for the power sector till 2015. Annual time series data on Indian electricity generating industry, for 1974-1998, has been used to develop emission projections till 2015. The impacts of generation mix, fuel efficiency, transmission and distribution losses and auxiliary consumption are studied in a Divisia decomposition framework and their possible future impacts on baseline emissions are studied through three scenarios of growth in power consumption. The study also estimates and projects the carbon emission coefficient per unit of final consumption of electricity that can be used for conducting cost benefit of emission reduction potential for several electricity conserving technologies and benchmarking policy models

  14. Determination of gamma ray attenuation coefficients of Al–4% Cu ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gamma ray attenuation coefficients of metal matrix composites have been investigated. For this purpose, the linear attenuation coefficients of composites containing boron carbide (B4C) at different rates have been measured using a gamma spectrometer that contains a NaI(Tl) detector and MCA at 662, 1173 and 1332 keV, ...

  15. Ventilation coefficient trends in the recent decades over four major ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A decreasing trend in ventilation coefficient is observed in all the four metros during the 30 years period indicating increasing pollution potential and a degradation in the air quality over these urban centers. In Delhi, the ventilation coefficient decreased at the rate of 49 and 32 m2/s/year in the months of December and ...

  16. Reflection and absorption coefficients for use in room acoustic simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Two ideas to improve the boundary conditions for room acoustic simulations are presented. First, all rooms have finite boundary surfaces, thereby a reflection coefficient for finite surfaces should be physically more suitable than that for infinitely large surfaces. Second, absorption coefficients...

  17. Minimum wall pressure coefficient of orifice plate energy dissipater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-zheng Ai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Orifice plate energy dissipaters have been successfully used in large-scale hydropower projects due to their simple structure, convenient construction procedure, and high energy dissipation ratio. The minimum wall pressure coefficient of an orifice plate can indirectly reflect its cavitation characteristics: the lower the minimum wall pressure coefficient is, the better the ability of the orifice plate to resist cavitation damage is. Thus, it is important to study the minimum wall pressure coefficient of the orifice plate. In this study, this coefficient and related parameters, such as the contraction ratio, defined as the ratio of the orifice plate diameter to the flood-discharging tunnel diameter; the relative thickness, defined as the ratio of the orifice plate thickness to the tunnel diameter; and the Reynolds number of the flow through the orifice plate, were theoretically analyzed, and their relationships were obtained through physical model experiments. It can be concluded that the minimum wall pressure coefficient is mainly dominated by the contraction ratio and relative thickness. The lower the contraction ratio and relative thickness are, the larger the minimum wall pressure coefficient is. The effects of the Reynolds number on the minimum wall pressure coefficient can be neglected when it is larger than 105. An empirical expression was presented to calculate the minimum wall pressure coefficient in this study.

  18. Permeability dependence of streaming potential coefficient in porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thanh, L.D.; Sprik, R.

    2015-01-01

    In theory, the streaming potential coefficient depends not only on the zeta potential but also on the permeability of the rocks that partially determines the surface conductivity of the rocks. However, in practice, it is hard to show the permeability dependence of streaming potential coefficients

  19. Micro- and macroscale coefficients of friction of cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomboy, Gilson; Sundararajan, Sriram; Wang, Kejin

    2013-01-01

    Millions of metric tons of cementitious materials are produced, transported and used in construction each year. The ease or difficulty of handling cementitious materials is greatly influenced by the material friction properties. In the present study, the coefficients of friction of cementitious materials were measured at the microscale and macroscale. The materials tested were commercially-available Portland cement, Class C fly ash, and ground granulated blast furnace slag. At the microscale, the coefficient of friction was determined from the interaction forces between cementitious particles using an Atomic Force Microscope. At the macroscale, the coefficient of friction was determined from stresses on bulk cementitious materials under direct shear. The study indicated that the microscale coefficient of friction ranged from 0.020 to 0.059, and the macroscale coefficient of friction ranged from 0.56 to 0.75. The fly ash studied had the highest microscale coefficient of friction and the lowest macroscale coefficient of friction. -- Highlights: •Microscale (interparticle) coefficient of friction (COF) was determined with AFM. •Macroscale (bulk) COF was measured under direct shear. •Fly ash had the highest microscale COF and the lowest macroscale COF. •Portland cement against GGBFS had the lowest microscale COF. •Portland cement against Portland cement had the highest macroscale COF

  20. A Note on the Correlated Random Coefficient Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolodziejczyk, Christophe

    In this note we derive the bias of the OLS estimator for a correlated random coefficient model with one random coefficient, but which is correlated with a binary variable. We provide set-identification to the parameters of interest of the model. We also show how to reduce the bias of the estimator...

  1. Mayer coefficients in two-dimensional Coulomb systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speer, E.R.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that, for neutral systems of particles of arbitrary charges in two dimensions, with hard cores, coefficients of the Mayer series for the pressure exist in the thermodynamic limit below certain thresholds in the temperature. The methods used here apply also to correlation functions and yield bounds on the asymptotic behavior of their Mayer coefficients

  2. Comparison of activity coefficient models for electrolyte systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Yi; ten Kate, Antoon; Mooijer, Miranda

    2010-01-01

    Three activity coefficient models for electrolyte solutions were evaluated and compared. The activity coefficient models are: The electrolyte NRTL model (ElecNRTL) by Aspentech, the mixed solvent electrolyte model (MSE) by OLI Systems Inc., and the Extended UNIQUAC model from the Technical Univer...

  3. Frictional coefficient depending on active friction radius with BPV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The comparison of estimated frictional coefficient from numerical output is in agreement with vis-à-vis corresponding similar computed from the virtual braking system model in the Simulink. The results indicated that highest frictional coefficient of 0.7 was obtained on the piston side of the rotor disc and active friction radius is ...

  4. The κ-Generalizations of Stirling Approximation and Multinominal Coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuaki Wada

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Stirling approximation of the factorials and multinominal coefficients are generalized based on the κ-generalized functions introduced by Kaniadakis. We have related the κ-generalized multinominal coefficients to the κ-entropy by introducing a new κ-product operation, which exists only when κ ≠ 0.

  5. Estimating octanol/water partition coefficient for selected ferrocene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Octanol/water partition coefficients P of several substituted ferrocene were calculated on the basis of the adaptation of the existing XlogPv2.0 approach. The predicted of calculated partition coefficients values of logP for selected ferrocene derivatives was compared with known experimental values taken from literature.

  6. Determination of gamma ray attenuation coefficients of Al–4% Cu ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Gamma ray attenuation coefficients of metal matrix composites have been investigated. For this purpose, the linear attenuation coefficients of composites containing boron carbide (B4C) at different rates have been measured using a gamma spectrometer that contains a NaI(Tl) detector and MCA at 662, 1173 and.

  7. Graphical Solution of the Monic Quadratic Equation with Complex Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    There are many geometrical approaches to the solution of the quadratic equation with real coefficients. In this article it is shown that the monic quadratic equation with complex coefficients can also be solved graphically, by the intersection of two hyperbolas; one hyperbola being derived from the real part of the quadratic equation and one from…

  8. Visualising the Roots of Quadratic Equations with Complex Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardell, Nicholas S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a natural extension of the root visualisation techniques first presented by Bardell (2012) for quadratic equations with real coefficients. Consideration is now given to the familiar quadratic equation "y = ax[superscript 2] + bx + c" in which the coefficients "a," "b," "c" are generally…

  9. Predicting blood:air partition coefficients using basic physicochemical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, H.E.; Wit-Bos, L. de; Bouwman, T.; Vaes, W.H.J.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative Property Property Relationships (QPPRs) for human and rat blood:air partition coefficients (PBAs) have been derived, based on vapour pressure (Log(VP)), the octanol:water partition coefficient (Log(K_OW)) and molecular weight (MW), using partial least squares multilinear modelling.

  10. Molar extinction coefficients of solutions of some organic compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The experimental determination of molar extinction coefficients of materials of com- mon use and of biological .... arrangement, error caused by deviation in thickness was reduced to a minimum by taking average value of ... Using the present experimental data of mass attenuation coefficients of solutions and of H, C and O at ...

  11. Confidence bounds for normal and lognormal distribution coefficients of variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steve Verrill

    2003-01-01

    This paper compares the so-called exact approach for obtaining confidence intervals on normal distribution coefficients of variation to approximate methods. Approximate approaches were found to perform less well than the exact approach for large coefficients of variation and small sample sizes. Web-based computer programs are described for calculating confidence...

  12. Xenon tissue/blood partition coefficient for pig urinary bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K K; Bülow, J; Nielsen, S L

    1990-01-01

    In four landrace pigs the tissue/blood partition coefficient (lambda) for xenon (Xe) for the urinary bladder was calculated after chemical analysis for lipid, water and protein content and determination of the haematocrit. The coefficients varied from bladder to bladder owing to small differences...

  13. Hydrodynamic Coefficients Identification and Experimental Investigation for an Underwater Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaorong XIE

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamic coefficients are the foundation of unmanned underwater vehicles modeling and controller design. In order to reduce identification complexity and acquire necessary hydrodynamic coefficients for controllers design, the motion of the unmanned underwater vehicle was separated into vertical motion and horizontal motion models. Hydrodynamic coefficients were regarded as mapping parameters from input forces and moments to output velocities and acceleration of the unmanned underwater vehicle. The motion models of the unmanned underwater vehicle were nonlinear and Genetic Algorithm was adopted to identify those hydrodynamic coefficients. To verify the identification quality, velocities and acceleration of the unmanned underwater vehicle was measured using inertial sensor under the same conditions as Genetic Algorithm identification. Curves similarity between measured velocities and acceleration and those identified by Genetic Algorithm were used as optimizing standard. It is found that the curves similarity were high and identified hydrodynamic coefficients of the unmanned underwater vehicle satisfied the measured motion states well.

  14. Theoretical investigation of the extinction coefficient of magnetic fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang Xiaopeng; Xuan Yimin, E-mail: ymxuan@mail.njust.edu.cn; Li Qiang [Nanjing University of Science and Technology, School of Energy and Power Engineering (China)

    2013-05-15

    A new theoretical approach for calculating the extinction coefficient of magnetic fluid is proposed, which is based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and T-matrix method. By means of this approach, the influence of particle diameter, particle volume fraction, and external magnetic filed on the extinction coefficient of magnetic fluid is investigated. The results show that the extinction coefficient of the magnetic fluid linearly increases with increase in the particle volume fraction. For a given particle volume fraction, the extinction coefficient increases with increase in the particle diameter which varies from 5 to 20 nm. When a uniform external magnetic filed is applied to the magnetic fluid, the extinction coefficient of the magnetic fluid presents an anisotropic feature. These results agree well with the reported experimental results. The proposed approach is applicable to investigating the optical properties of magnetic fluids.

  15. Influence of effective stress coefficient on mechanical failure of chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Hjuler, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    and vice versa. However, as the effective stress working on the rock decreases with increased effective stress coefficient, the reduction of elastic region will have less effect on pore collapse strength if we consider the change in the effective stress coefficient. This finding will help estimate a more......The Effective stress coefficient is a measure of how chalk grains are connected with each other. The stiffness of chalk may decrease if the amount of contact cements between the grains decreases, which may lead to an increase of the effective stress coefficient. We performed CO2 injection in chalk......, as this process could affect the grain contact cement. If this happens, the effective stress at the grain contacts in a reservoir will change according to the effective stress principle of Biot. In a p′-q space for failure analysis, we observed that a higher effective stress coefficient reduces the elastic region...

  16. Calculation of effective absorption coefficient for aerosols of internal mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Bo; Huang Yinbo; Fan Chengyu; Qiao Chunhong

    2012-01-01

    The effective absorption coefficient with time of strong absorbing aerosol made of carbon dusts and water of internal mixture is analyzed, and the influence of different wavelengths and radius ratios on it is discussed. The shorter the wavelength is, the larger the effective absorption coefficient is , and more quickly it increases during 1-100 μs, and the largest increase if 132.65% during 1-100 μs. Different ratios between inner and outer radius have large influence on the effective absorption coefficient. The larger the ratio is, the larger the effective absorption coefficient is, and more quickly it increases during 1-100 μs. The increase of the effective absorption coefficient during 1-100 μs is larger than that during 100-1000 μs, and the largest increase is 138.66% during 1-100 μs. (authors)

  17. The Discharge Coefficient of a Centre-Pivot Roof Window

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iqbal, Ahsan; Afshari, Alireza; Nielsen, Peter V.

    2012-01-01

    Accuracy in estimation of airflow through windows is the key parameter for modelling and designing of naturally ventilated buildings. The flow through windows is usually described by the orifice flow plate equation. This equation involves the discharge coefficient. In practice, often a constant...... value of discharge coefficient is used. The constant value of discharge coefficient leads to deceptive airflow estimation in the cases of centre-pivot roof windows. The object of this paper is to study and evaluate the discharge coefficient of the centre pivot roof window. Focus is given...... on unidirectional flows i.e. inflow and outflow. CFD techniques are used to predict the airflow through the modelled window. Analytical orifice flow equation is used to calculate the discharge coefficient. Results are compared with experimental results. It is concluded that the single value of the discharge...

  18. Riesz frames and approximation of the frame coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casazza, P.; Christensen, Ole

    1998-01-01

    A frame is a fmaily {f i } i=1 ∞ of elements in a Hilbert space with the property that every element in can be written as a (infinite) linear combination of the frame elements. Frame theory describes how one can choose the corresponding coefficients, which are called frame coefficients. From...... the mathematical point of view this is gratifying, but for applications it is a problem that the calculation requires inversion of an operator on . The projection method is introduced in order to avoid this problem. The basic idea is to consider finite subfamilies {f i } i=1 n of the frame and the orthogonal...... projection Pn onto its span. For has a representation as a linear combination of fi, i=1,2,..., n and the corresponding coefficients can be calculated using finite dimensional methods. We find conditions implying that those coefficients converge to the correct frame coefficients as n→∞, in which case we have...

  19. Implementing Families of Implicit Chebyshev Methods with Exact Coefficients for the Numerical Integration of First- and Second-Order Differential Equations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mitchell, Jason

    2002-01-01

    A method is presented for the generation of exact numerical coefficients found in two families of implicit Chebyshev methods for the numerical integration of first- and second-order ordinary differential equations...

  20. Isotropic apparent diffusion coefficient mapping of postnatal cerebral development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevblad, K.O. [Unite de Neuroradiologie, Departement de Radiodiagnostic, Hopital Cantonal Universitaire HUG, 24 rue Micheli-du-Crest, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Department of Neuroradiology, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Schneider, J. [MRI Unit, Children' s Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland); Ruoss, K.; Schroth, G. [Department of Neuroradiology, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Steinlin, M. [Neurology Department, Children' s Hospital, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Fusch, C. [Department of Neonatology, University of Greifswald (Germany)

    2003-06-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) allows us to image the motion of tissue water. This has been used to demonstrate acute ischaemia. Diffusion imaging is also sensitive to water movement along neuronal tracts. Our objective was to map brain maturation in vivo using maps of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). We studied 22 children without neurological disease aged between 2 and 720 days. MRI was performed at 1.5 tesla. Multislice single-shot echoplanar DWI was performed at b 0 and 1000 s/mm{sup 2}. ADC maps were generated automatically and measurements were performed in the basal ganglia, frontal and temporal white matter and the pons. There was a decrease over time in water diffusion in the areas examined, most marked in the frontal (0.887-1.898 x 10-3 mm{sup 2}/s) and temporal (1.077-1.748 x 10-3 mm{sup 2}/s)lobes. There was little change, after an initial decrease, in the basal ganglia (0.690-1.336 x 10-3 mm{sup 2}/s). There was a difference in water diffusion between the anterior (0.687-1.581 x 10-3 mm{sup 2}/s) and posterior (0.533-1.393 x 10-3 mm{sup 2}/s) pons. These changes correlate well with those observed in progressive myelination: the increased water content probably reflects incomplete myelination and the decrease with time in water motion reflects the increase in myelinated brain. (orig.)

  1. Generative Semantics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Margaret

    The first section of this paper deals with the attempts within the framework of transformational grammar to make semantics a systematic part of linguistic description, and outlines the characteristics of the generative semantics position. The second section takes a critical look at generative semantics in its later manifestations, and makes a case…

  2. Generative collectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Osch, W.; Avital, M.; Sabherwal, R.; Sumner, M.

    2010-01-01

    Analyzing generative group activities against the backdrop of an increasingly connected world, this theory development paper introduces the concept of "generative collectives" as a new framework for classifying internet-based collectives and a novel theoretical lens for explaining why some

  3. Generational Phenomenology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    by Xers, and how Millennials not only accept but expect diversity (320 ff.). However, nothing is actually said to the effect that generational relations might be affected by the different styles of thinking, speaking, and values of women. Moreover, it seems likely that generations and their relations are different for people of color,.

  4. Sound generator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2008-01-01

    A sound generator, particularly a loudspeaker, configured to emit sound, comprising a rigid element (2) enclosing a plurality of air compartments (3), wherein the rigid element (2) has a back side (B) comprising apertures (4), and a front side (F) that is closed, wherein the generator is provided

  5. Sound generator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2010-01-01

    A sound generator, particularly a loudspeaker, configured to emit sound, comprising a rigid element (2) enclosing a plurality of air compartments (3), wherein the rigid element (2) has a back side (B) comprising apertures (4), and a front side (F) that is closed, wherein the generator is provided

  6. Pulse Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Lawrence (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An apparatus and a computer-implemented method for generating pulses synchronized to a rising edge of a tachometer signal from rotating machinery are disclosed. For example, in one embodiment, a pulse state machine may be configured to generate a plurality of pulses, and a period state machine may be configured to determine a period for each of the plurality of pulses.

  7. Sound generator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2007-01-01

    A sound generator, particularly a loudspeaker, configured to emit sound, comprising a rigid element (2) enclosing a plurality of air compartments (3), wherein the rigid element (2) has a back side (B) comprising apertures (4), and a front side (F) that is closed, wherein the generator is provided

  8. Generative Semantics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagha, Karim Nazari

    2011-01-01

    Generative semantics is (or perhaps was) a research program within linguistics, initiated by the work of George Lakoff, John R. Ross, Paul Postal and later McCawley. The approach developed out of transformational generative grammar in the mid 1960s, but stood largely in opposition to work by Noam Chomsky and his students. The nature and genesis of…

  9. Approximate reflection coefficients for a thin VTI layer

    KAUST Repository

    Hao, Qi

    2017-09-18

    We present an approximate method to derive simple expressions for the reflection coefficients of P- and SV-waves for a thin transversely isotropic layer with a vertical symmetry axis (VTI) embedded in a homogeneous VTI background. The layer thickness is assumed to be much smaller than the wavelengths of P- and SV-waves inside. The exact reflection and transmission coefficients are derived by the propagator matrix method. In the case of normal incidence, the exact reflection and transmission coefficients are expressed in terms of the impedances of vertically propagating P- and S-waves. For subcritical incidence, the approximate reflection coefficients are expressed in terms of the contrast in the VTI parameters between the layer and the background. Numerical examples are designed to analyze the reflection coefficients at normal and oblique incidence, and investigate the influence of transverse isotropy on the reflection coefficients. Despite giving numerical errors, the approximate formulae are sufficiently simple to qualitatively analyze the variation of the reflection coefficients with the angle of incidence.

  10. Measurement of chemical diffusion coefficients in liquid binary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keita, M.; Steinemann, S.; Kuenzi, H.U.

    1976-01-01

    New measurements of the chemical diffusion coefficient in liquid binary alloys are presented. The wellknown geometry of the 'capillary-reservoir' is used and the concentration is obtained from a resistivity measurement. The method allows to follow continuously the diffusion process in the liquid state. A precision of at least 10% in the diffusion coefficient is obtained with a reproductibility better than 5%. The systems Hg-In, Al-Sn, Al-Si have been studied. Diffusion coefficients are obtained as a function of temperature, concentration, and geometrical factors related to the capillary (diameter, relative orientation of density gradient and gravity). (orig.) [de

  11. Non-linear Bayesian update of PCE coefficients

    KAUST Repository

    Litvinenko, Alexander

    2014-01-06

    Given: a physical system modeled by a PDE or ODE with uncertain coefficient q(?), a measurement operator Y (u(q), q), where u(q, ?) uncertain solution. Aim: to identify q(?). The mapping from parameters to observations is usually not invertible, hence this inverse identification problem is generally ill-posed. To identify q(!) we derived non-linear Bayesian update from the variational problem associated with conditional expectation. To reduce cost of the Bayesian update we offer a unctional approximation, e.g. polynomial chaos expansion (PCE). New: We apply Bayesian update to the PCE coefficients of the random coefficient q(?) (not to the probability density function of q).

  12. Robust Stabilization of Nonlinear Systems with Uncertain Varying Control Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaiyue Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the stabilization problem for a class of nonlinear systems, whose control coefficient is uncertain and varies continuously in value and sign. The study emphasizes the development of a robust control that consists of a modified Nussbaum function to tackle the uncertain varying control coefficient. By such a method, the finite-time escape phenomenon has been prevented when the control coefficient is crossing zero and varying its sign. The proposed control guarantees the asymptotic stabilization of the system and boundedness of all closed-loop signals. The control performance is illustrated by a numerical simulation.

  13. Influence of effective stress coefficient on mechanical failure of chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Hjuler, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    , as this process could affect the grain contact cement. If this happens, the effective stress at the grain contacts in a reservoir will change according to the effective stress principle of Biot. In a p′-q space for failure analysis, we observed that a higher effective stress coefficient reduces the elastic region...... and vice versa. However, as the effective stress working on the rock decreases with increased effective stress coefficient, the reduction of elastic region will have less effect on pore collapse strength if we consider the change in the effective stress coefficient. This finding will help estimate a more...

  14. Questionnaire on the measurement condition of distribution coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takebe, Shinichi; Kimura, Hideo; Matsuzuru, Hideo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2001-05-01

    The distribution coefficient is used for various transport models to evaluate the migration behavior of radionuclides in the environment and is very important parameter in environmental impact assessment of nuclear facility. The questionnaire was carried out for the purpose of utilizing for the proposal of the standard measuring method of distribution coefficient. This report is summarized the result of questionnairing on the sampling methods and storage condition, the pretreatment methods, the analysis items in the physical/chemical characteristics of the sample, and the distribution coefficient measuring method and the measurement conditions in the research institutes within country. (author)

  15. Determination of BEACON Coupling Coefficients using data from Xenon transient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozic, M.; Kurincic, B.

    2007-01-01

    NEK uses BEACO TM code (BEACO TM - Westinghouse Best Estimate Analyzer for Core Operating Nuclear) for core monitoring, analysis and core behaviour prediction. Coupling Coefficients determine relationship between core response and excore instrumentation. Measured power distribution using incore moveable detectors during Xenon transient with sufficient power axial offset change is the most important data for further analysis. Classic methodology and BEACO TM Conservative methodology using established Coupling Coefficients are compared on NPP Krsko case. BEACON TM Conservative methodology with predefined Coupling Coefficients is used as a surveillance tool for verification of relationship between core and excore instrumentation during power operation. (author)

  16. Restricted mass energy absorption coefficients for use in dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brahme, A.

    1977-02-01

    When matter is irradiated by a photon beam the fraction of energy absorbed locally in some region Rsub(Δ) (where the size of the region Rsub(Δ) is related to the range of secondary electrons of some restriction energy Δ) is expressed by the restricted mass energy absorption coefficient. In this paper an example is given of how restricted mass energy absorption coefficients can be calculated from existing differential photon interaction cross sections. Some applications of restricted mass absorption coefficients in dosimetry are also given. (B.D.)

  17. Optimality Conditions for Fuzzy Number Quadratic Programming with Fuzzy Coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Gang Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present paper is to investigate optimality conditions and duality theory in fuzzy number quadratic programming (FNQP in which the objective function is fuzzy quadratic function with fuzzy number coefficients and the constraint set is fuzzy linear functions with fuzzy number coefficients. Firstly, the equivalent quadratic programming of FNQP is presented by utilizing a linear ranking function and the dual of fuzzy number quadratic programming primal problems is introduced. Secondly, we present optimality conditions for fuzzy number quadratic programming. We then prove several duality results for fuzzy number quadratic programming problems with fuzzy coefficients.

  18. A data-drive analysis for heavy quark diffusion coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yingru; Nahrgang, Marlene; Cao, Shanshan; Bernhard, Jonah E.; Bass, Steffen A.

    2018-02-01

    We apply a Bayesian model-to-data analysis on an improved Langevin framework to estimate the temperature and momentum dependence of the heavy quark diffusion coefficient in the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). The spatial diffusion coefficient is found to have a minimum around 1-3 near Tc in the zero momentum limit, and has a non-trivial momentum dependence. With the estimated diffusion coefficient, our improved Langevin model is able to simultaneously describe the D-meson RAA and v2 in three different systems at RHIC and the LHC.

  19. Development of a SCALE tool for continuous-energy eigenvalue sensitivity coefficient calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perfetti, C.M.; Rearden, B.T.

    2013-01-01

    Two methods for calculating eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients in continuous-energy Monte Carlo applications were implemented in the KENO code within the SCALE code package. The methods were used to calculate sensitivity coefficients for several criticality safety problems. The 2 methods are: the Iterated Fission Probability (IFP) method and the newly developed Contribution-Linked eigenvalue sensitivity/Uncertainty estimation via Track-length importance Characterization (CLUTCH) method. Unlike MG TSUNAMI, the IFP and CLUTCH methods avoid directly simulating adjoint particle histories by instead storing additional information about each particle that is later used to determine the importance of the particle during its lifetime. The IFP method uses this information to estimate the importance of events according to the concept that the importance of an event is proportional to the population of neutrons present in the system during some future generation. The CLUTCH method calculates the importance of events during a particle's lifetime by examining how many fission neutrons are created by that particle after those events occur. Both methods have produced sensitivity coefficients that agreed well with reference direct perturbation sensitivity coefficients although some differences were observed around energies corresponding to large neutron capture resonances. The CLUTCH method has been consistently more efficient than the IFP method and has required less memory that the IFP and MG TSUNAMI methods

  20. Effective diffusion coefficients of DNAPL waste components in saturated low permeability soil materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayral-Cinar, Derya; Demond, Avery H.

    2017-12-01

    Diffusion is regarded as the dominant transport mechanism into and out of low permeable subsurface lenses and layers in the subsurface. But, some reports of mass storage in such zones are higher than what might be attributable to diffusion, based on estimated diffusion coefficients. Despite the importance of diffusion to efforts to estimate the quantity of residual contamination in the subsurface, relatively few studies present measured diffusion coefficients of organic solutes in saturated low permeability soils. This study reports the diffusion coefficients of a trichloroethylene (TCE), and an anionic surfactant, Aerosol OT (AOT), in water-saturated silt and a silt-montmorillonite (25:75) mixture, obtained using steady-state experiments. The relative diffusivity ranged from 0.11 to 0.17 for all three compounds for the silt and the silt-clay mixture that was allowed to expand. In the case in which the swelling was constrained, the relative diffusivity was about 0.07. In addition, the relative diffusivity of 13C-labeled TCE through a water saturated silt-clay mixture that had contacted a field dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) for 18 months was measured and equaled 0.001. These experimental results were compared with the estimates generated using common correlations, and it was found that, in all cases, the measured diffusion coefficients were significantly lower than the estimated. Thus, the discrepancy between mass accumulations observed in the field and the mass storage that can attributable to diffusion may be greater than previously believed.

  1. Carbon emission coefficient measurement of the coal-to-power energy chain in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Shiwei; Wei, Yi-Ming; Guo, Haixiang; Ding, Liping

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • CO 2 emissions coefficient of the coal-energy chain in China is currently at 875 g/kW h −1 . • The emission coefficient is a relatively low level compared with other countries. • CO 2 is the main type of GHG emission and the most direct emission in the chain. • A great decline of potential energy use exists in the coal mining process of China compared with other countries. - Abstract: Coal-fired electricity generation has become the largest source of carbon emission in China. This study utilizes life-cycle assessment to assess the effect of carbon emissions and to calculate the coefficient of carbon emissions in coal-to-energy chains. Results show that the carbon emission coefficient of the coal-to-energy chain in China is 875 g/kW h −1 , which is a relatively low level compared with that of other countries. CO 2 is the main type of greenhouse gas emission and is the most abundant type of direct emission. China has to reduce electrical consumption in the coal-mining process to reduce carbon emissions in coal-to-energy chains. Moreover, China has to facilitate railway-line construction to improve the proportion of railway transportation to coal transportation

  2. A novel method measuring optical fiber nonlinear coefficient based on XPM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuangxi; Wu, Xuqiang; Ai, Fei; Zhang, Chengmei; Zhang, Bo; Yu, Benli

    2009-11-01

    In optic communication systems, the nonlinear effect of the optical fiber is of great importance. There are several methods measuring optical fiber nonlinear coefficient. A novel method measuring optical fiber nonlinear coefficient is proposed, which is based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer fabricated with 3×3 coupler, polarization controller and so on. According to cross phase modulation (XPM), when two optical waves are injected into the same optical fiber, the phase of one optical wave will be changed because of the other one. So a sinusoidal phase signal will be generated through coupling a sinusoidal modulated high-power laser into one arm of the interferometer, and then the three outputs of the interferometer will contain the sinusoidal phase signal. According to the characteristic of the 3×3 coupler, the phase difference between the three outputs is 2π / 3 . Through mathematics disposition of the three outputs of the interferometer, a couple of orthogonal signals can be yielded. Then the amplitude of the sinusoidal phase signal can be demodulated accurately by arctan method. The length of the optical fiber and the power of the laser can be measured easily, according to expression about the nonlinear phase shift induced by XPM, the optical fiber nonlinear coefficient of certain wavelength will be calculated. The optical fiber nonlinear effect is simulated by the software optisystem, and the process measuring the optical fiber nonlinear coefficient is analyzed in detail based on the schematic design.

  3. The Impact of Variable Wind Shear Coefficients on Risk Reduction of Wind Energy Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Allan; Yoonesi, Behrang; McNutt, Josiah

    2016-01-01

    Estimation of wind speed at proposed hub heights is typically achieved using a wind shear exponent or wind shear coefficient (WSC), variation in wind speed as a function of height. The WSC is subject to temporal variation at low and high frequencies, ranging from diurnal and seasonal variations to disturbance caused by weather patterns; however, in many cases, it is assumed that the WSC remains constant. This assumption creates significant error in resource assessment, increasing uncertainty in projects and potentially significantly impacting the ability to control gird connected wind generators. This paper contributes to the body of knowledge relating to the evaluation and assessment of wind speed, with particular emphasis on the development of techniques to improve the accuracy of estimated wind speed above measurement height. It presents an evaluation of the use of a variable wind shear coefficient methodology based on a distribution of wind shear coefficients which have been implemented in real time. The results indicate that a VWSC provides a more accurate estimate of wind at hub height, ranging from 41% to 4% reduction in root mean squared error (RMSE) between predicted and actual wind speeds when using a variable wind shear coefficient at heights ranging from 33% to 100% above the highest actual wind measurement. PMID:27872898

  4. Flywheel Generator

    OpenAIRE

    Yuniarsih, Pratitis; Bachtiyar, Fahmi; Rosyidin, Mufti; Prabawanto, Trisakti

    2014-01-01

    Lately, the needs of energy is increasing but its availability is very limited. Therefore,it is important to do more research on energy reform. Generator is one of the alternative energy which commonly used by the public, but it has a minus value such as the voltage instability and low efficiency of the generator . Based on those issues,so we made an application flywheel in electrical generator, which aims to produce a concept of power efficiency increase, stabilize the output voltage of the ...

  5. Accounting for Missing Correlation Coefficients in Fixed-Effects MASEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jak, Suzanne; Cheung, Mike W-L

    2018-01-01

    Meta-analytic structural equation modeling (MASEM) is increasingly applied to advance theories by synthesizing existing findings. MASEM essentially consists of two stages. In Stage 1, a pooled correlation matrix is estimated based on the reported correlation coefficients in the individual studies. In Stage 2, a structural model (such as a path model) is fitted to explain the pooled correlations. Frequently, the individual studies do not provide all the correlation coefficients between the research variables. In this study, we modify the currently optimal MASEM-method to deal with missing correlation coefficients, and compare its performance with existing methods. This study is the first to evaluate the performance of fixed-effects MASEM methods under different levels of missing correlation coefficients. We found that the often used univariate methods performed very poorly, while the multivariate methods performed well overall.

  6. Using two coefficients modeling of nonsubsampled Shearlet transform for despeckling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Saeed; Ghofrani, Sedigheh

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images are inherently affected by multiplicative speckle noise. Two approaches based on modeling the nonsubsampled Shearlet transform (NSST) coefficients are presented. Two-sided generalized Gamma distribution and normal inverse Gaussian probability density function have been used to model the statistics of NSST coefficients. Bayesian maximum a posteriori estimator is applied to the corrupted NSST coefficients in order to estimate the noise-free NSST coefficients. Finally, experimental results, according to objective and subjective criteria, carried out on both artificially speckled images and the true SAR images, demonstrate that the proposed methods outperform other state of art references via two points of view, speckle noise reduction and image quality preservation.

  7. Research on the Fault Coefficient in Complex Electrical Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Sun

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Fault detection and isolation in a complex system are research hotspots and frontier problems in the reliability engineering field. Fault identification can be regarded as a procedure of excavating key characteristics from massive failure data, then classifying and identifying fault samples. In this paper, based on the fundamental of feature extraction about the fault coefficient, we will discuss the fault coefficient feature in complex electrical engineering in detail. For general fault types in a complex power system, even if there is a strong white Gaussian stochastic interference, the fault coefficient feature is still accurate and reliable. The results about comparative analysis of noise influence will also demonstrate the strong anti-interference ability and great redundancy of the fault coefficient feature in complex electrical engineering.

  8. Measurement of Dynamic Friction Coefficient on the Irregular Free Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeom, S. H.; Seo, K. S.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, K. H.

    2007-01-01

    A spent fuel storage cask must be estimated for a structural integrity when an earthquake occurs because it freely stands on ground surface without a restriction condition. Usually the integrity estimation for a seismic load is performed by a FEM analysis, the friction coefficient for a standing surface is an important parameter in seismic analysis when a sliding happens. When a storage cask is placed on an irregular ground surface, measuring a friction coefficient of an irregular surface is very difficult because the friction coefficient is affected by the surface condition. In this research, dynamic friction coefficients on the irregular surfaces between a concrete cylinder block and a flat concrete slab are measured with two methods by one direction actuator

  9. Heat unit-based crop coefficient for grapefruit trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, E.C.; Hla, A.K.; Waller, P.M.; Slack, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    The onset and rate of sap moving up the branches of grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macfadyen) trees were monitored hourly using portable sap flow sensors at Waddell, Arizona. Hourly reference evapotranspiration (ETo) estimates were calculated using data from a nearby weather station. Crop water use was estimated from soil moisture measurements using a neutron probe. These data were used to first delineate the upper and lower temperature threshold values for the determination of heat units. A heat unit-based crop coefficient was then derived from a correlation of the crop coefficient with heat units over a crop year. The heat unit-based crop coefficient was found to be similar to crop coefficients derived by other reseachers

  10. Approximate equations at breaking for nearshore wave transformation coefficients

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chandramohan, P.; Nayak, B.U.; SanilKumar, V.

    Based on small amplitude wave theory approximate equations are evaluated for determining the coefficients of shoaling, refraction, bottom friction, bottom percolation and viscous dissipation at breaking. The results obtainEd. by these equations...

  11. Enhancing blooming period and propagation coefficient of tulip ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enhancing blooming period and propagation coefficient of tulip (Tulipa gesneriana L.) using growth regulators. Ramesh Kumar, Nazeer Ahmed, Desh Beer Singh, Om Chand Sharma, Shiv Lal, Mohammad Muzamil Salmani ...

  12. Determining Composite Validity Coefficients for Army Jobs and Job Families

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zeidner, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    ...) is to compute composite validity coefficients. using criterion data derived from the 1987 - 1989 Skill Qualifications Test program, for the 7-test ASVAB for 150, 17, and 9 job family structures...

  13. Approximation of the Frame Coefficients using Finite Dimensional Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ole; Casazza, P.

    1997-01-01

    A frame is a family $\\{f_i \\}_{i=1}^{\\infty}$ of elements in aHilbert space $\\cal H $with the property that every element in $\\cal H $ can be written as a(infinite) linear combination of the frame elements. Frame theorydescribes how one can choose the corresponding coefficients, which arecalled......_i \\}_{i=1}^{n}$ of the frame and theorthogonal projection $P_n$ onto its span. For $f \\in \\h ,P_nf$ has a representation as a linear combination of $f_i , i=1,2,..n,$and the corresponding coefficients can be calculated using finite dimensionalmethods. We find conditions implying that those coefficients...... frame coefficients. From the mathematical point of view this is gratifying, but for applications it is a problem that the calculationrequires inversion of an operator on $\\cal H $. \\The projection method is introduced in order to avoid thisproblem. The basic idea is toconsider finite subfamilies $\\{f...

  14. Seal assembly for materials with different coefficients of thermal expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minford, Eric [Laurys Station, PA

    2009-09-01

    Seal assembly comprising (a) two or more seal elements, each element having having a coefficient of thermal expansion; and (b) a clamping element having a first segment, a second segment, and a connecting segment between and attached to the first and second segments, wherein the two or more seal elements are disposed between the first and second segments of the clamping element. The connecting segment has a central portion extending between the first segment of the clamping element and the second segment of the clamping element, and the connecting segment is made of a material having a coefficient of thermal expansion. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the material of the connecting segment is intermediate the largest and smallest of the coefficients of thermal expansion of the materials of the two or more seal elements.

  15. System to Measure Thermal Conductivity and Seebeck Coefficient for Thermoelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Jung; Skuza, Jonathan R.; Park, Yeonjoon; King, Glen C.; Choi, Sang H.; Nagavalli, Anita

    2012-01-01

    The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential property measurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectric materials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at elevated temperatures. This has led to the implementation of nonstandardized practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. The major objective of the procedure described is for the simultaneous measurement of the Seebeck coefficient and thermal diffusivity within a given temperature range. These thermoelectric measurements must be precise, accurate, and reproducible to ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data. The custom-built thermal characterization system described in this NASA-TM is specifically designed to measure the inplane thermal diffusivity, and the Seebeck coefficient for materials in the ranging from 73 K through 373 K.

  16. Analysis of punctuality coefficients in the static method of research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz WOCH

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex research of punctuality requires analysis of many coefficients. In the article the analysis and the example of application one of the basic methods of punctuality measurement – the static one – has been presented.

  17. Transport Coefficients for Holographic Hydrodynamics at Finite Energy Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Hui Ge

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the relations between black hole thermodynamics and holographic transport coefficients in this paper. The formulae for DC conductivity and diffusion coefficient are verified for electrically single-charged black holes. We examine the correctness of the proposed expressions by taking charged dilatonic and single-charged STU black holes as two concrete examples, and compute the flows of conductivity and diffusion coefficient by solving the linear order perturbation equations. We then check the consistence by evaluating the Brown-York tensor at a finite radial position. Finally, we find that the retarded Green functions for the shear modes can be expressed easily in terms of black hole thermodynamic quantities and transport coefficients.

  18. Retrieving complex surface impedances from statistical absorption coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondet, Boris Jean-Francois; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2017-01-01

    coefficients, prior information about the absorber of interest can be used as constraints, which is shown to help determine the correct impedance from absorption coefficient. Further stability and sensitivity investigations indicate that the method presented constitutes an efficient solution to convert sound......In room acoustic simulations the surface materials are commonly represented with energy parameters, such as the absorption and scattering coefficients, which do not carry phase information. This paper presents a method to transform statistical absorption coefficients into complex surface impedances...... that the impedance found has a physical meaning and respects causality in the time domain. Known material models, such as Miki’s and Maa’s models, are taken as references to assess the validity of the suggested model. Due to the non-uniqueness of retrieving complex-valued impedances from real-valued absorption...

  19. Clustering coefficient and community structure of bipartite networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Wang, Jinliang; Li, Xiaojia; Li, Menghui; Di, Zengru; Fan, Ying

    2008-12-01

    Many real-world networks display natural bipartite structure, where the basic cycle is a square. In this paper, with the similar consideration of standard clustering coefficient in binary networks, a definition of the clustering coefficient for bipartite networks based on the fraction of squares is proposed. In order to detect community structures in bipartite networks, two different edge clustering coefficients LC4 and LC3 of bipartite networks are defined, which are based on squares and triples respectively. With the algorithm of cutting the edge with the least clustering coefficient, communities in artificial and real world networks are identified. The results reveal that investigating bipartite networks based on the original structure can show the detailed properties that is helpful to get deep understanding about the networks.

  20. correlation and path coefficient analysis of yield characters of bambara

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Finance DAC

    academicjournals.org/AJEST. African Journal of Environmental Science and. Technology. Full Length Research Paper. Correlation and path coefficient analysis of yield characters of bambara (Vigna subterranea L.Verdc.) S. M. Maunde. 1. *, B. Tanimu.

  1. On the friction coefficient of straight-chain aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isella, Lorenzo; Drossinos, Yannis

    2011-04-15

    A methodology to calculate the friction coefficient of an aggregate in the continuum regime is proposed. The friction coefficient and the monomer shielding factors, aggregate-average or individual, are related to the molecule-aggregate collision rate that is obtained from the molecular diffusion equation with an absorbing boundary condition on the aggregate surface. Calculated friction coefficients of straight chains are in very good agreement with previous results, suggesting that the friction coefficients may be accurately calculated from the product of the collision rate and an average momentum transfer, the latter being independent of aggregate morphology. Langevin-dynamics simulations show that the diffusive motion of straight-chain aggregates may be described either by a monomer-dependent or an aggregate-average random force, if the shielding factors are appropriately chosen. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Use of appropriate absorption coefficients in gamma-ray dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopinath, D.V.; Natarajan, A.; Subbaiah, K.V.

    1985-01-01

    The current use of the different types of absorption coefficients in the computation of γ-ray energy deposition rates and air dose is critically analyzed. Transport calculations are presented to bring out the errors associated with the use of different absorption coefficients. It is observed that except for source energies in the range of 0.3 to 3.0 MeV the consistent use of the absorption coefficient, μ/sub a/ results in an underestimate of the air dose everywhere and of energy deposition at regions away from source. The underestimate becomes more significant with increased atomic number (Z) of the medium. Based on the computations and analysis it is concluded that the absorption coefficients μ/sub a/ and μ/sub k/ are of very limited use in practical γ-ray dosimetry

  3. Activity coefficients from molecular simulations using the OPAS method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohns, Maximilian; Horsch, Martin; Hasse, Hans

    2017-10-01

    A method for determining activity coefficients by molecular dynamics simulations is presented. It is an extension of the OPAS (osmotic pressure for the activity of the solvent) method in previous work for studying the solvent activity in electrolyte solutions. That method is extended here to study activities of all components in mixtures of molecular species. As an example, activity coefficients in liquid mixtures of water and methanol are calculated for 298.15 K and 323.15 K at 1 bar using molecular models from the literature. These dense and strongly interacting mixtures pose a significant challenge to existing methods for determining activity coefficients by molecular simulation. It is shown that the new method yields accurate results for the activity coefficients which are in agreement with results obtained with a thermodynamic integration technique. As the partial molar volumes are needed in the proposed method, the molar excess volume of the system water + methanol is also investigated.

  4. Solving Variable Coefficient Fourth-Order Parabolic Equation by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, a Modified initial guess Variational Iteration Method (MigVIM) is used to solve a non-homogeneous variable coefficient fourth order parabolic partial differential equations. The new method shows rapid convergence to the exact solution.

  5. Determination of ion diffusion coefficients by the electromigration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonchev, G.D.; Milanov, M.V.; Bozhikov, G.A.; Ivanov, P.I.; Priemyshev, A.N.; Maslov, O.D.; Dmitriev, S.N.

    2003-01-01

    An electrophoretic method for measuring ion diffusion coefficients in aqueous solutions is developed. The value of the diffusion coefficient can be determined from the linear relationship between the square standard deviation of the electrophoretic zone and the time from the start of the diffusion process. Using the device for horizontal zone electrophoresis in a free electrolyte, a series of diffusion experiments are performed with no-carrier-added radionuclides in microconcentrations (10 -9 - 10 -10 M). Diffusion coefficients of 111 In(III), 175 Hf(IV) and 237 Pu(VI) ions at 25 0 C are determined in nitric acid media. Simultaneous determination of the diffusion coefficient and electrophoretic mobility allows one to calculate the effective charge of the investigated ions in accordance with the Nernst-Einstein law

  6. Induration and Biot’s Coefficient of Palaeogene Limestone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling

    2017-01-01

    specimens aids in performing fluid substitution with Gassmann’s equation. For the soft H2 specimens the shear wave could not be obtained and isoframe modelling is applied. A correlation is found; although, the Biot coefficient for the intermediate indurations H3 and H4 overlap. The dry density is found...... to very competent/slightly metamorphic rock. The Biot coefficient links to the degree of cementation in the capacity of how it relates the elastic deformations with the change in pore pressure. A hypothesis is that the degree of induration could be correlated to the magnitude of the Biot coefficient....... This is tested on 11 Copenhagen Limestone specimens of varying porosity and densities obtained from one borehole with a limestone interval of 30 m. Their induration varies from H2 to H5. Elastic wave propagation measurements are used to establish the Biot coefficient and determination of the mineralogy for H5...

  7. Age-dependent dose coefficients for tritium in Asian populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, A.

    1999-10-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publications 56 (1989) and 67 (1993) have prescribed the biokinetic models and age-dependent dose coefficients for tritiated water and organically bound tritium. The dose coefficients are computed from values selected to specify the anatomical, morphological and physiological characteristics of a three-month-old, one-year-old, five-year-old, 10-year-old, 15-year-old and adult (Reference Man) Caucasian living in North America and Western Europe. However, values for Reference Man and other age groups are not directly applicable to Asians, because of differences in race, custom, dietary habits and climatic conditions. An Asian Man model, including five age groups, has been proposed by Tanaka and Kawamura (1996, 1998) for use in internal dosimetry. The basic concept of the ICRP Reference Man and the system describing body composition in ICRP Publication 23 (1975) were used. Reference values for Asians were given for the body weight and height, the mass of soft tissue, the mass of body water and the daily fluid balance, and are used to compute the dose coefficients for tritium. The age-dependent dose coefficients for Asians for tritiated water intakes are smaller by 20 to 30% of the currently prescribed values (Trivedi, 1998). The reduction in the dose coefficient values is caused by the increased daily fluid balance among Asians. The dose coefficient for tritiated water is 1.4 x 10 -11 Sv Bq -1 for Asian Man compared to 2.0 x 10 -11 Sv Bq -1 for Reference Man. The dose coefficients for organically bound tritium are only marginally different from those of the ICRP values. The dose coefficient for organically bound tritium for Asian Man is 4.0 x 10 -11 Sv Bq -11 compared to 4.6 x 10 -11 Sv Bq -1 for Reference Man. (author)

  8. Symmetry and piezoelectricity: evaluation of α-quartz coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannous, C.

    2017-11-01

    Piezoelectric coefficients of α-quartz are derived from symmetry arguments based on Neumann’s principle using three different methods: Fumi, Landau-Lifshitz and Royer-Dieulesaint. While the Fumi method is tedious and the Landau-Lifshitz method requires additional physical principles to evaluate the piezoelectric coefficients, the Royer-Dieulesaint method is the most elegant and most efficient of the three techniques.

  9. Exact solutions to a nonlinear dispersive model with variable coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Jun; Lai Shaoyong; Qing Yin

    2009-01-01

    A mathematical technique based on an auxiliary differential equation and the symbolic computation system Maple is employed to investigate a prototypical and nonlinear K(n, n) equation with variable coefficients. The exact solutions to the equation are constructed analytically under various circumstances. It is shown that the variable coefficients and the exponent appearing in the equation determine the quantitative change in the physical structures of the solutions.

  10. On the misinterpretation of the correlation coefficient in pharmaceutical sciences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnergaard, Jørn

    2006-01-01

    The correlation coefficient is often used and more often misused as a universal parameter expressing the quality in linear regression analysis. The popularity of this dimensionless quantity is evident as it is easy to communicate and considered to be unproblematic to comprehend. However...... technique depends on the purpose of the investigation. These relevant and precise methods in quality assurance of linear regression as alternative to the correlation coefficient are presented....

  11. Analytical computation of reflection and transmission coefficients for love waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanelli, F.; Vaccari, F.

    1995-09-01

    The computation of the transmission and reflection coefficients is an important step in the construction, if modal summation technique is used, of synthetic seismograms for 2-D or 3-D media. These coupling coefficients for Love waves at a vertical discontinuity are computed analytically. Numerical test for realistic structures show how the energy carried by an incoming mode is redistributed on the various modes existing on both sides of the vertical interface. (author). 15 refs, 8 figs

  12. Age-dependent dose coefficients for tritium in Asian populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, A

    1999-10-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publications 56 (1989) and 67 (1993) have prescribed the biokinetic models and age-dependent dose coefficients for tritiated water and organically bound tritium. The dose coefficients are computed from values selected to specify the anatomical, morphological and physiological characteristics of a three-month-old, one-year-old, five-year-old, 10-year-old, 15-year-old and adult (Reference Man) Caucasian living in North America and Western Europe. However, values for Reference Man and other age groups are not directly applicable to Asians, because of differences in race, custom, dietary habits and climatic conditions. An Asian Man model, including five age groups, has been proposed by Tanaka and Kawamura (1996, 1998) for use in internal dosimetry. The basic concept of the ICRP Reference Man and the system describing body composition in ICRP Publication 23 (1975) were used. Reference values for Asians were given for the body weight and height, the mass of soft tissue, the mass of body water and the daily fluid balance, and are used to compute the dose coefficients for tritium. The age-dependent dose coefficients for Asians for tritiated water intakes are smaller by 20 to 30% of the currently prescribed values (Trivedi, 1998). The reduction in the dose coefficient values is caused by the increased daily fluid balance among Asians. The dose coefficient for tritiated water is 1.4 x 10{sup -11} Sv Bq{sup -1} for Asian Man compared to 2.0 x 10{sup -11} Sv Bq{sup -1} for Reference Man. The dose coefficients for organically bound tritium are only marginally different from those of the ICRP values. The dose coefficient for organically bound tritium for Asian Man is 4.0 x 10{sup -11} Sv Bq{sup -11} compared to 4.6 x 10{sup -11} Sv Bq{sup -1} for Reference Man. (author)

  13. Characterization of the effective electrostriction coefficients in ferroelectric thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholkin, A. L.; Akdogan, E. K.; Safari, A.; Chauvy, P.-F.; Setter, N.

    2001-06-01

    Electromechanical properties of a number of ferroelectric films including PbZrxTi1-xO3(PZT), 0.9PbMg1/3Nb2/3O3-0.1PbTiO3(PMN-PT), and SrBi2Ta2O9(SBT) are investigated using laser interferometry combined with conventional dielectric measurements. Effective electrostriction coefficients of the films, Qeff, are determined using a linearized electrostriction equation that couples longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient, d33, with the polarization and dielectric constant. It is shown that, in PZT films, electrostriction coefficients slightly increase with applied electric field, reflecting the weak contribution of non-180° domains to piezoelectric properties. In contrast, in PMN-PT and SBT films electrostriction coefficients are field independent, indicating the intrinsic nature of the piezoelectric response. The experimental values of Qeff are significantly smaller than those of corresponding bulk materials due to substrate clamping and possible size effects. Electrostriction coefficients of PZT layers are shown to depend strongly on the composition and preferred orientation of the grains. In particular, Qeff of (100) textured rhombohedral films (x=0.7) is significantly greater than that of (111) layers. Thus large anisotropy of the electrostrictive coefficients is responsible for recently observed large piezoelectric coefficients of (100) textured PZT films. Effective electrostriction coefficients obtained by laser interferometry allow evaluation of the electromechanical properties of ferroelectric films based solely on the dielectric parameters and thus are very useful in the design and fabrication of microsensors and microactuators.

  14. First sound absorption and dissipation coefficients of HeII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamenko, I.N.; Belyaev, N.R.; Tsyganok, V.I.

    1988-01-01

    The first sound absorption coefficient is obtained on the basis of kinetic equations for phonons and rotons. The second viscosity coefficient of He II is calculated at different pressures in a wide temperature range including the phonon-roton and pure phonon regions and taking into account the inelastic phonon scattering by rotons and the phonon spectrum dispersion. The calculation is compared with experimental results

  15. The temperature variation of hydrogen diffusion coefficients in metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogen diffusion coefficients were measured as a function of temperature for a few metal alloys using an electrochemical evolution technique. Results from these measurements are compared to those obtained by the time-lag method. In all cases, diffusion coefficients obtained by the electrochemical method are larger than those by the time-lag method by an order of magnitude or more. These differences are attributed mainly to hydrogen trapping.

  16. Determination of the scattering coefficient, the reduced scattering coefficient, and the anisotropy factor of tissue with differential interference contrast microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelo, Bianca; Arzumanov, Grant; Shanley, Patrick; Xu, Zhang; Xu, M.

    2012-03-01

    We report an approach for determination of the scattering coefficient, the reduced scattering coefficient, and the anisotropy factor from the quantitative phase map measured by differential interference contrast microscopy based on the scatteringphase theorem. The approach is first validated by showing the excellent agreement between the retrieved optical properties of polystyrene spheres and Intralipid-20% suspension and their known values. The scattering properties of unstained pathological prostate cancer slides and fresh cancerous and normal colon tissue samples are then investigated. A clear trend with cancer in the reduced scattering coefficient and the anisotropy factor is shown. The potential of the approach for tissue diagnosis is discussed at the end.

  17. Determining Pitch-angle Diffusion Coefficients from Test Particle Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivascenko, Alex; Lange, Sebastian; Spanier, Felix; Vainio, Rami

    2016-12-01

    The transport and acceleration of charged particles in turbulent media are topics of great interest in space physics and interstellar astrophysics. These processes are dominated by the scattering of particles off magnetic irregularities. The scattering process itself is usually described by small-angle scattering, with the pitch-angle coefficient {D}μ μ playing a major role. Since the diffusion coefficient {D}μ μ can be determined analytically only for the approximation of quasilinear theory, the determination of this coefficient from numerical simulations has become more important. So far these simulations have yielded particle tracks for small-scale scattering, which can then be interpreted using the running diffusion coefficients. This method has a limited range of validity. This paper presents two new methods that allow for the calculation of the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient from numerical simulations. These methods no longer analyze particle trajectories and instead examine the change of particle distribution functions. It is shown that these methods provide better resolved results and allow for the analysis of strong turbulence. The application of these methods to Monte Carlo simulations of particle scattering and hybrid MHD-particle simulations is presented. Both analysis methods are able to recover the diffusion coefficients used as input for the Monte Carlo simulations and provide better results in MHD simulations, especially for stronger turbulence.

  18. EXPERIMENTALl ANALYSIS OF PARTITION COEFFICIENT IN Al-Mg ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Avazkonandeh-Gharavo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Because the partition coefficient is one of the most important parameters affecting microsegregation, the aim of this research is to experimentally analyse the partition coefficient in Al-Mg alloys. In order to experimentally measure the partition coefficient, a series of quenching experiments during solidification were carried out. For this purpose binary Al-Mg alloys containing 6.7 and 10.2 wt-% Mg were melted and solidified in a DTA furnace capable of quenching samples during solidification. Cooling rates of 0.5 and 5 K/min were used and samples were quenched from predetermined temperatures during solidification. The fractions and compositions of the phases were measured by quantitative metallography and SEM/EDX analyses, respectively. These results were used to measure the experimental partition coefficients. The resultant partition coefficients were used to model the concentration profile in the primary phase and the results were compared with equilibrium calculations and experimental profiles. The results of calculations based on the experimental partition coefficients show better consistency with experimental concentration profiles than the equilibrium calculations.

  19. Limits of the memory coefficient in measuring correlated bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Hiraoka, Takayuki

    2018-03-01

    Temporal inhomogeneities in event sequences of natural and social phenomena have been characterized in terms of interevent times and correlations between interevent times. The inhomogeneities of interevent times have been extensively studied, while the correlations between interevent times, often called correlated bursts, are far from being fully understood. For measuring the correlated bursts, two relevant approaches were suggested, i.e., memory coefficient and burst size distribution. Here a burst size denotes the number of events in a bursty train detected for a given time window. Empirical analyses have revealed that the larger memory coefficient tends to be associated with the heavier tail of the burst size distribution. In particular, empirical findings in human activities appear inconsistent, such that the memory coefficient is close to 0, while burst size distributions follow a power law. In order to comprehend these observations, by assuming the conditional independence between consecutive interevent times, we derive the analytical form of the memory coefficient as a function of parameters describing interevent time and burst size distributions. Our analytical result can explain the general tendency of the larger memory coefficient being associated with the heavier tail of burst size distribution. We also find that the apparently inconsistent observations in human activities are compatible with each other, indicating that the memory coefficient has limits to measure the correlated bursts.

  20. Breakdown coefficients and scaling properties of rain fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Harris

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The theory of scale similarity and breakdown coefficients is applied here to intermittent rainfall data consisting of time series and spatial rain fields. The probability distributions (pdf of the logarithm of the breakdown coefficients are the principal descriptor used. Rain fields are distinguished as being either multiscaling or multiaffine depending on whether the pdfs of breakdown coefficients are scale similar or scale dependent, respectively. Parameter  estimation techniques are developed which are applicable to both multiscaling and multiaffine fields. The scale parameter (width, σ, of the pdfs of the log-breakdown coefficients is a measure of the intermittency of a field. For multiaffine fields, this scale parameter is found to increase with scale in a power-law fashion consistent with a bounded-cascade picture of rainfall modelling. The resulting power-law exponent, H, is indicative of the smoothness of the field. Some details of breakdown coefficient analysis are addressed and a theoretical link between this analysis and moment scaling analysis is also presented. Breakdown coefficient properties of cascades are also investigated in the context of parameter estimation for modelling purposes.

  1. Technique for Determining Lock Coefficient of Differential "Quif"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Fominyh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the traction qualities of cars on the black ice and snow-covered roads is a relevant task. There are two ways to solve this task, i.e. optimize distribution of the power stream between the driving wheels of the car; introduce a differential (differentials of the increased friction in transmission.Now, an installation of the increased friction differential in transmission is the most widespread measure to increase traction properties of cars. The differential of design "Quif" is one of such differentials. To estimate the efficiency degree of using such a differential is possible either experimentally or theoretically. In case of theoretically determined usefulness of this differential design, as an estimate indicator of the differential installation in transmission a coefficient of lock is accepted.The article considers an algorithm and a technique to calculate a lock coefficient of the differential design "Quif" allowing us to define numeric values of the lock coefficient of such differential at designing stage. It also considers how the lock coefficient depends on the gearing angle and tilt angle of the gear wheel teeth of differential. The given estimating algorithm of designated parameter of differential has more logical and compact structure with regard to the known ones. The lock coefficient values calculated by the offered technique differ from the experimental data by no more than 12%. Taking into account abovementioned, the presented technique for calculating lock coefficient of differential "Quif" is advisable for practical application.

  2. Earning on Response Coefficient in Automobile and Go Public Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisdawati Arifin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to analyze factors that influence earnings response coefficients (ERC, simultaneously and partially, composed of leverage, the systematic risk (beta, growth opportunities (market to book value ratio, and the size of the firm (firm size, selection of the sample in this study the author take 12 automakers and components that meet the criteria of completeness of the data from the year 2008 to 2012, entirely based on consideration of the following criteria: (1 the company's automotive and components are listed on the stock exchange, (2 have the financial statements years 2008-2012 (3 has a return data (closing price the first day after the date of issuance of the financial statements. This study uses secondary data applying multiple linear regression models to analyze and test the effect of independent variables on the dependent variable partially (t-test, simultaneous (f-test, and the goodness of fit (R-square on a research model. The result shows that leverage, beta, growth opportunities (market to book value ratio and size along with (simultaneously the effect on the dependent variable (dependent variable earnings response coefficients. Partially leverage negatively affect earnings response coefficients, partially beta negatively correlated earnings response coefficients, partially growth opportunities (market to book value ratio significant effect on earnings response coefficients, partially sized companies (firm size significantly influence earnings response coefficients.

  3. Effect of Variable Manning Coefficients on Tsunami Inundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberopoulou, A.; Rees, D.

    2017-12-01

    Numerical simulations are commonly used to help estimate tsunami hazard, improve evacuation plans, issue or cancel tsunami warnings, inform forecasting and hazard assessments and have therefore become an integral part of hazard mitigation among the tsunami community. Many numerical codes exist for simulating tsunamis, most of which have undergone extensive benchmarking and testing. Tsunami hazard or risk assessments employ these codes following a deterministic or probabilistic approach. Depending on the scope these studies may or may not consider uncertainty in the numerical simulations, the effects of tides, variable friction or estimate financial losses, none of which are necessarily trivial. Distributed manning coefficients, the roughness coefficients used in hydraulic modeling, are commonly used in simulating both riverine and pluvial flood events however, their use in tsunami hazard assessments is primarily part of limited scope studies and for the most part, not a standard practice. For this work, we investigate variations in manning coefficients and their effects on tsunami inundation extent, pattern and financial loss. To assign manning coefficients we use land use maps that come from the New Zealand Land Cover Database (LCDB) and more recent data from the Ministry of the Environment. More than 40 classes covering different types of land use are combined into major classes such as cropland, grassland and wetland representing common types of land use in New Zealand, each of which is assigned a unique manning coefficient. By utilizing different data sources for variable manning coefficients, we examine the impact of data sources and classification methodology on the accuracy of model outputs.

  4. Investigation on Thrust and Moment Coefficients of a Centrifugal Turbomachine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Hu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In radial pumps and turbines, the centrifugal through-flow in both the front and the back chambers is quite common. It strongly impacts the core swirl ratio, pressure distribution, axial thrust and frictional torque. In order to investigate these relationships experimentally, a test rig was designed at the University of Duisburg-Essen and described in this paper. Based on both the experimental and numerical results, correlations are determined to predict the impacts of the centrifugal through-flow on the core swirl ratio, the thrust coefficient and the moment coefficient. Two correlations respectively are determined to associate the core swirl ratio with the local through-flow coefficient for both Batchelor type flow and Stewartson type flow. The correlations describing the thrust coefficient and the moment coefficient in a rotor-stator cavity with centripetal through-flow (Hu et al., 2017 are modified for the case of centrifugal through-flow. The Daily and Nece diagram distinguishing between different flow regimes in rotor-stator cavities is extended with a through-flow coordinate into 3D. The achieved results provide a comprehensive data base which is intended to support the calculation of axial thrust and moment coefficients during the design process of radial pumps and turbines in a more accurate manner.

  5. A Compensatory Approach to Multiobjective Linear Transportation Problem with Fuzzy Cost Coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hale Gonce Kocken

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the Multiobjective Linear Transportation Problem that has fuzzy cost coefficients. In the solution procedure, many objectives may conflict with each other; therefore decision-making process becomes complicated. And also due to the fuzziness in the costs, this problem has a nonlinear structure. In this paper, fuzziness in the objective functions is handled with a fuzzy programming technique in the sense of multiobjective approach. And then we present a compensatory approach to solve Multiobjective Linear Transportation Problem with fuzzy cost coefficients by using Werner's and operator. Our approach generates compromise solutions which are both compensatory and Pareto optimal. A numerical example has been provided to illustrate the problem.

  6. Experimental determination of the attachment coefficients of atoms and ions on monodisperse aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porstendoerfer, J.; Roebig, G.; Ahmed, A.

    1979-01-01

    The attachment coefficients of 212 Pb atoms and ions were measured for aerosols in the diameter range 0.1 to 5 μm. The attachment of the Tn-decay products to the aerosol was carried out in laminar flow through a cylindrical tube. Under the same experimental conditions (but without aerosols) the diffusion coefficient of the atoms was determined. The generation of the monodisperse di-2-ethylhexyl sebacate (DEHS) aerosol was carried out by controlled condensation of vapour upon nuclei. The aerosols had standard deviations of 3 to 5%. The aerosol size distributions and concentrations were determined by means of an aerosol size spectrometer, which measured the intensity of the scattered light from single-particles or droplets. The experimental results agree well with the values of the diffusion attachment theory based on the kinetic theory of gases with the assumption of a sticking probability of the Pb atoms, S = 1. (author)

  7. A theoretical framework for quantitatively characterizing sound field diffusion based on scattering coefficient and absorption coefficient of walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanyu, Toshiki

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes the development of a theoretical framework for quantitatively characterizing sound field diffusion based on scattering coefficient and absorption coefficient of walls. The concepts of equivalent scattering area, equivalent scatter reflection area, average scattering coefficient and average scatter reflection coefficient are introduced in order to express all walls' capability of scatter in a room. Using these concepts and the mean free path, scatter-to-absorption ratio, mean scatter time and diffusion time are defined in order to evaluate degree of diffusion of a space. Furthermore the effect of spatial scattering objects to sound field diffusion is formulated. In addition the time variation of specular and scattered components in a room impulse response is formulated. The verification of these characterization methods was performed with computer simulations based on the sound ray tracing method. The results supported that the ideas presented are basically valid.

  8. Simultaneous interferometric measurement of linear coefficient of thermal expansion and temperature-dependent refractive index coefficient of optical materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsetti, James A; Green, William E; Ellis, Jonathan D; Schmidt, Greg R; Moore, Duncan T

    2016-10-10

    Characterizing the thermal properties of optical materials is necessary for understanding how to design an optical system for changing environmental conditions. A method is presented for simultaneously measuring both the linear coefficient of thermal expansion and the temperature-dependent refractive index coefficient of a sample interferometrically in air. Both the design and fabrication of the interferometer is presented as well as a discussion of the results of measuring both a steel and a CaF2 sample.

  9. PULSE GENERATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeschke, C.W.

    1957-09-24

    An improvement in pulse generators is described by which there are produced pulses of a duration from about 1 to 10 microseconds with a truly flat top and extremely rapid rise and fall. The pulses are produced by triggering from a separate input or by modifying the current to operate as a free-running pulse generator. In its broad aspect, the disclosed pulse generator comprises a first tube with an anode capacitor and grid circuit which controls the firing; a second tube series connected in the cathode circuit of the first tube such that discharge of the first tube places a voltage across it as the leading edge of the desired pulse; and an integrator circuit from the plate across the grid of the second tube to control the discharge time of the second tube, determining the pulse length.

  10. Chondroitin sulfate reduces the friction coefficient of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basalo, Ines M; Chahine, Nadeen O; Kaplun, Michael; Chen, Faye H; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of chondroitin sulfate (CS)-C on the frictional response of bovine articular cartilage. The main hypothesis is that CS decreases the friction coefficient of articular cartilage. Corollary hypotheses are that viscosity and osmotic pressure are not the mechanisms that mediate the reduction in the friction coefficient by CS. In Experiment 1, bovine articular cartilage samples (n=29) were tested in either phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or in PBS containing 100mg/ml of CS following 48h incubation in PBS or in PBS+100mg/ml CS (control specimens were not subjected to any incubation). In Experiment 2, samples (n=23) were tested in four different solutions: PBS, PBS+100mg/ml CS, and PBS+polyethylene glycol (PEG) (133 or 170mg/ml). In Experiment 3, samples (n=18) were tested in three solutions of CS (0, 10 and 100mg/ml). Frictional tests (cartilage-on-glass) were performed under constant stress (0.5MPa) for 3600s and the time-dependent friction coefficient was measured. Samples incubated or tested in a 100mg/ml CS solution exhibited a significantly lower equilibrium friction coefficient than the respective PBS control. PEG solutions delayed the rise in the friction coefficient relative to the PBS control, but did not reduce the equilibrium value. Testing in PBS+10mg/ml of CS did not cause any significant decrease in the friction coefficient. In conclusion, CS at a concentration of 100mg/ml significantly reduces the friction coefficient of bovine articular cartilage and this mechanism is neither mediated by viscosity nor osmolarity. These results suggest that direct injection of CS into the joint may provide beneficial tribological effects.

  11. Predicting cyclohexane/water distribution coefficients for the SAMPL5 challenge using MOSCED and the SMD solvation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Rodriguez, Sebastian; Bozada, Samantha M.; Phifer, Jeremy R.; Paluch, Andrew S.

    2016-11-01

    We present blind predictions using the solubility parameter based method MOSCED submitted for the SAMPL5 challenge on calculating cyclohexane/water distribution coefficients at 298 K. Reference data to parameterize MOSCED was generated with knowledge only of chemical structure by performing solvation free energy calculations using electronic structure calculations in the SMD continuum solvent. To maintain simplicity and use only a single method, we approximate the distribution coefficient with the partition coefficient of the neutral species. Over the final SAMPL5 set of 53 compounds, we achieved an average unsigned error of 2.2± 0.2 log units (ranking 15 out of 62 entries), the correlation coefficient ( R) was 0.6± 0.1 (ranking 35), and 72± 6 % of the predictions had the correct sign (ranking 30). While used here to predict cyclohexane/water distribution coefficients at 298 K, MOSCED is broadly applicable, allowing one to predict temperature dependent infinite dilution activity coefficients in any solvent for which parameters exist, and provides a means by which an excess Gibbs free energy model may be parameterized to predict composition dependent phase-equilibrium.

  12. Generation Next

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, B. Denise

    2010-01-01

    There is a shortage of accounting professors with Ph.D.s who can prepare the next generation. To help reverse the faculty deficit, the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (CPAs) has created the new Accounting Doctoral Scholars program by pooling more than $17 million and soliciting commitments from more than 70 of the nation's…

  13. Generative Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyles, Dan Allen

    Educational research has identified how science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) practice and education have underperforming metrics in racial and gender diversity, despite decades of intervention. These disparities are part of the construction of a culture of science that is alienating to these populations. Recent studies in a social science framework described as "Generative Justice" have suggested that the context of social and scientific practice might be modified to bring about more just and equitable relations among the disenfranchised by circulating the value they and their non-human allies create back to them in unalienated forms. What is not known are the underlying principles of social and material space that makes a system more or less generative. I employ an autoethnographic method at four sites: a high school science class; a farm committed to "Black and Brown liberation"; a summer program geared towards youth environmental mapping; and a summer workshop for Harlem middle school students. My findings suggest that by identifying instances where material affinity, participatory voice, and creative solidarity are mutually reinforcing, it is possible to create educational contexts that generate unalienated value, and circulate it back to the producers themselves. This cycle of generation may help explain how to create systems of justice that strengthen and grow themselves through successive iterations. The problem of lack of diversity in STEM may be addressed not merely by recruiting the best and the brightest from underrepresented populations, but by changing the context of STEM education to provide tools for its own systematic restructuring.

  14. Exact coefficients for higher dimensional operators with sixteen supersymmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wei-Ming [Department of Physics and Astronomy, National Taiwan University,Taipei 10617, Taiwan, R.O.C. (China); Huang, Yu-tin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, National Taiwan University,Taipei 10617, Taiwan, R.O.C. (China); School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study,Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Wen, Congkao [INFN Sezione di Roma “Tor Vergata' ,Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Roma (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    We consider constraints on higher-dimensional operators for supersymmetric effective field theories. In four dimensions with maximal supersymmetry and SU(4) R-symmetry, we demonstrate that the coefficients of abelian operators F{sup n} with MHV helicity configurations must satisfy a recursion relation, and are completely determined by that of F{sup 4}. As the F{sup 4} coefficient is known to be one-loop exact, this allows us to derive exact coefficients for all such operators. We also argue that the results are consistent with the SL(2,Z) duality symmetry. Breaking SU(4) to Sp(4), in anticipation for the Coulomb branch effective action, we again find an infinite class of operators whose coefficients are determined exactly. We also consider three-dimensional N=8 as well as six-dimensional N=(2,0),(1,0) and (1,1) theories. In all cases, we demonstrate that the coefficient of dimension-six operator must be proportional to the square of that of dimension-four.

  15. PZT/PLZT - elastomer composites with improved piezoelectric voltage coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harikrishnan, K.; Bavbande, D. V.; Mohan, Dhirendra; Manoharan, B.; Prasad, M. R. S.; Kalyanakrishnan, G.

    2018-02-01

    Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) and Lanthanum-modified Lead Zirconate Titanate (PLZT) ceramic sensor materials are widely used because of their excellent piezoelectric coefficients. These materials are brittle, high density and have low achievable piezoelectric voltage coefficients. The density of the sintered ceramics shall be reduced by burnable polymeric sponge method. The achievable porosity level in this case is nearly 60 - 90%. However, the porous ceramic structure with 3-3 connectivity produced by this method is very fragile in nature. The strength of the porous structure is improved with Sylgard®-184 (silicone elastomer) by vacuum impregnation method maintaining the dynamic vacuum level in the range of -650 mm Hg. The elastomer Sylgard®-184 is having low density, low dielectric constant and high compliance (as a resultant stiffness of the composites is increased). To obtain a net dipole moment, the impregnated ceramic composites were subjected to poling treatment with varying conditions of D.C. field and temperature. The properties of the poled PZT/PLZT - elastomer composites were characterized with LCR meter for measuring the dielectric constant values (k), d33 meter used for measuring piezo-electric charge coefficient values (d33) and piezo-electric voltage coefficient (g33) values which were derived from d33 values. The voltage coefficient (g33) values of these composites are increased by 10 fold as compared to the conventional solid ceramics demonstrates that it is possible to fabricate a conformable detector.

  16. Apparent Coefficient of Friction of Wheat on Denim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Charles V

    2017-07-31

    Calculation of the extraction force for a grain entrapment victim requires a coefficient of friction between the grain and the surface of the victim. Because denim is a common fabric for the work clothes that cover entrapment victims, the coefficient of friction between grain and denim becomes necessary. The purpose of this research was to calculate the apparent coefficient of friction of wheat on denim fabric using a proven procedure. The expectation is to improve the current understanding of conditions that influence extraction forces for victims buried in wheat. The apparent coefficient of friction of wheat on denim fabric was calculated to be 0.167 with a standard deviation of ±0.013. The wheat had a moisture content of 10.7% (w.b.) and bulk density of 778.5 kg m-3. The apparent coefficient of friction of wheat on denim was not significantly affected by pull speeds of 0.004, 0.008, and 0.021 mm s-1 nor normal grain pressures of 3.2, 4.8, 6.3, 7.9, and 11.1 kPa. This is a beginning of understanding the conditions that influence the extraction forces for grain entrapment victims. Copyright© by the American Society of Agricultural Engineers.

  17. The influence of hydrogen bonding on partition coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Nádia Melo; Kenny, Peter W.; Montanari, Carlos A.; Prokopczyk, Igor M.; Ribeiro, Jean F. R.; Rocha, Josmar R.; Sartori, Geraldo Rodrigues

    2017-02-01

    This Perspective explores how consideration of hydrogen bonding can be used to both predict and better understand partition coefficients. It is shown how polarity of both compounds and substructures can be estimated from measured alkane/water partition coefficients. When polarity is defined in this manner, hydrogen bond donors are typically less polar than hydrogen bond acceptors. Analysis of alkane/water partition coefficients in conjunction with molecular electrostatic potential calculations suggests that aromatic chloro substituents may be less lipophilic than is generally believed and that some of the effect of chloro-substitution stems from making the aromatic π-cloud less available to hydrogen bond donors. Relationships between polarity and calculated hydrogen bond basicity are derived for aromatic nitrogen and carbonyl oxygen. Aligned hydrogen bond acceptors appear to present special challenges for prediction of alkane/water partition coefficients and this may reflect `frustration' of solvation resulting from overlapping hydration spheres. It is also shown how calculated hydrogen bond basicity can be used to model the effect of aromatic aza-substitution on octanol/water partition coefficients.

  18. Exact coefficients for higher dimensional operators with sixteen supersymmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Ming; Huang, Yu-tin; Wen, Congkao

    2015-09-01

    We consider constraints on higher-dimensional operators for supersymmetric effective field theories. In four dimensions with maximal supersymmetry and SU(4) R-symmetry, we demonstrate that the coefficients of abelian operators F n with MHV helicity configurations must satisfy a recursion relation, and are completely determined by that of F 4. As the F 4 coefficient is known to be one-loop exact, this allows us to derive exact coefficients for all such operators. We also argue that the results are consistent with the SL(2,Z) duality symmetry. Breaking SU(4) to Sp(4), in anticipation for the Coulomb branch effective action, we again find an infinite class of operators whose coefficients are determined exactly. We also consider three-dimensional N = 8 as well as six-dimensional N = (2 ,0) ,(1 ,0) and (1 ,1) theories. In all cases, we demonstrate that the coefficient of dimension-six operator must be proportional to the square of that of dimension-four.

  19. New Insights into Signed Path Coefficient Granger Causality Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Li, Chong; Jiang, Tianzi

    2016-01-01

    Granger causality analysis, as a time series analysis technique derived from econometrics, has been applied in an ever-increasing number of publications in the field of neuroscience, including fMRI, EEG/MEG, and fNIRS. The present study mainly focuses on the validity of "signed path coefficient Granger causality," a Granger-causality-derived analysis method that has been adopted by many fMRI researches in the last few years. This method generally estimates the causality effect among the time series by an order-1 autoregression, and defines a positive or negative coefficient as an "excitatory" or "inhibitory" influence. In the current work we conducted a series of computations from resting-state fMRI data and simulation experiments to illustrate the signed path coefficient method was flawed and untenable, due to the fact that the autoregressive coefficients were not always consistent with the real causal relationships and this would inevitablely lead to erroneous conclusions. Overall our findings suggested that the applicability of this kind of causality analysis was rather limited, hence researchers should be more cautious in applying the signed path coefficient Granger causality to fMRI data to avoid misinterpretation.

  20. The viscous slip coefficient for a binary gas mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knackfuss, Rosenei F.

    2009-01-01

    For a moderately small rarefaction, the Navier-Stokes equations are associated with of the slip boundary condition, i e the velocity of the gas on the surface is different from zero at the surface, but its tangential component, depends on the profile distribution of velocity and temperature near the surface. The slip for the velocity profile near the surface is determined by the viscous slip coefficient. The viscous slip coefficient can be determined solving the equation of the Boltzmann or the kinetic equations which are simplified forms of Boltzmann equation with respect to the operator of collision. For this reason, in this work is presented the derivation of the solution of the viscous-slip problem for the mixtures of two noble gases, based on the McCormack model that is developed in terms of an analytical version of the discrete ordinates method has been applied with excellent results, to derive solutions to several problems in rarefied gas dynamics. To complete the problem, include the gas-surface interaction, based on the model of Cercignani-Lampis, which, unlike the model of Maxwell, has two accommodation coefficients: the coefficient of accommodation of tangential moment and the energy accommodation coefficient kinetics due to normal component of velocity. (author)

  1. Stochastic back analysis of permeability coefficient using generalized Bayesian method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Guilan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the fact that the conventional deterministic back analysis of the permeability coefficient cannot reflect the uncertainties of parameters, including the hydraulic head at the boundary, the permeability coefficient and measured hydraulic head, a stochastic back analysis taking consideration of uncertainties of parameters was performed using the generalized Bayesian method. Based on the stochastic finite element method (SFEM for a seepage field, the variable metric algorithm and the generalized Bayesian method, formulas for stochastic back analysis of the permeability coefficient were derived. A case study of seepage analysis of a sluice foundation was performed to illustrate the proposed method. The results indicate that, with the generalized Bayesian method that considers the uncertainties of measured hydraulic head, the permeability coefficient and the hydraulic head at the boundary, both the mean and standard deviation of the permeability coefficient can be obtained and the standard deviation is less than that obtained by the conventional Bayesian method. Therefore, the present method is valid and applicable.

  2. Condensation coefficient of water in a weak condensation state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Kazumichi; Watanabe, Shunsuke; Yamano, Daigo; Yano, Takeru; Fujikawa, Shigeo

    2008-01-01

    The condensation coefficient of water at a vapor-liquid interface is determined by combining shock tube experiments and numerical simulations of the Gaussian-BGK Boltzmann equation. The time evolution in thickness of a liquid film, which is formed on the shock tube endwall behind the shock wave reflected at the endwall, is measured with an optical interferometer consisting of the physical beam and the reference one. The reference beam is utilized to eliminate systematic noises from the physical beam. The growth rate of the film is evaluated from the measured time evolution and it is incorporated into the kinetic boundary condition for the Boltzmann equation. From a numerical simulation using the boundary condition, the condensation coefficient of water is uniquely deduced. The results show that, in a condition of weak condensation near a vapor-liquid equilibrium state, the condensation coefficient of water is almost equal to the evaporation coefficient estimated by molecular dynamics simulations near a vapor-liquid equilibrium state and it decreases as the system becomes a nonequilibrium state. The condensation coefficient of water is nearly identical with that of methanol [Mikami, S., Kobayashi, K., Ota, T., Fujikawa, S., Yano, T., Ichijo, M., 2006. Molecular gas dynamics approaches to interfacial phenomena accompanied with condensation. Exp. Therm. Fluid Sci. 30, 795-800].

  3. Condensation coefficient of water in a weak condensation state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazumichi; Watanabe, Shunsuke; Yamano, Daigo; Yano, Takeru; Fujikawa, Shigeo

    2008-07-01

    The condensation coefficient of water at a vapor-liquid interface is determined by combining shock tube experiments and numerical simulations of the Gaussian-BGK Boltzmann equation. The time evolution in thickness of a liquid film, which is formed on the shock tube endwall behind the shock wave reflected at the endwall, is measured with an optical interferometer consisting of the physical beam and the reference one. The reference beam is utilized to eliminate systematic noises from the physical beam. The growth rate of the film is evaluated from the measured time evolution and it is incorporated into the kinetic boundary condition for the Boltzmann equation. From a numerical simulation using the boundary condition, the condensation coefficient of water is uniquely deduced. The results show that, in a condition of weak condensation near a vapor-liquid equilibrium state, the condensation coefficient of water is almost equal to the evaporation coefficient estimated by molecular dynamics simulations near a vapor-liquid equilibrium state and it decreases as the system becomes a nonequilibrium state. The condensation coefficient of water is nearly identical with that of methanol [Mikami, S., Kobayashi, K., Ota, T., Fujikawa, S., Yano, T., Ichijo, M., 2006. Molecular gas dynamics approaches to interfacial phenomena accompanied with condensation. Exp. Therm. Fluid Sci. 30, 795-800].

  4. Determination of corneal elasticity coefficient using the ORA database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avetisov, Sergei E; Novikov, Ivan A; Bubnova, Irina A; Antonov, Alexei A; Siplivyi, Vladimir I

    2010-07-01

    To propose a new approach for the study of corneal biomechanics using the Reichert Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA) database, which is based on changes in velocity retardation in the central cornea at the peak of flattening. The ORA applanation curve was analyzed using a mathematical technique, which allowed calculation of the elasticity coefficient (Ke), which is primarily characteristic of the elastic properties of the cornea. Elasticity coefficient values were obtained in patients with presumably different biomechanical properties of the cornea: "normal" cornea (71 eyes, normal group), keratoconus (34 eyes, keratoconus group), LASIK (36 eyes, LASIK group), and glaucoma with elevated and compensated intraocular pressure (lOP) (38 eyes, glaucoma group). The mean Ke value in the normal group was 11.05 +/- 1.6, and the corneal thickness correlation coefficient r2 was 0.48. In the keratoconus group, the mean Ke value was 4.91 +/- 1.87 and the corneal thickness correlation coefficient r2 was 0.47. In the LASIK group, Ke and r2 were 5.99 +/- 1.18 and 0.39, respectively. In the glaucoma group, the same eyes that experienced a two-fold reduction in lOP developed a statistically significant reduction in the Ke (1.06 times lower), whereas their corneal hysteresis value increased 1.25 times. The elasticity coefficient calculated using the ORA applanation curve can be used in the evaluation of corneal biomechanical properties.

  5. Empirical evidence for site coefficients in building code provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherdt, R.D.

    2002-01-01

    Site-response coefficients, Fa and Fv, used in U.S. building code provisions are based on empirical data for motions up to 0.1 g. For larger motions they are based on theoretical and laboratory results. The Northridge earthquake of 17 January 1994 provided a significant new set of empirical data up to 0.5 g. These data together with recent site characterizations based on shear-wave velocity measurements provide empirical estimates of the site coefficients at base accelerations up to 0.5 g for Site Classes C and D. These empirical estimates of Fa and Fnu; as well as their decrease with increasing base acceleration level are consistent at the 95 percent confidence level with those in present building code provisions, with the exception of estimates for Fa at levels of 0.1 and 0.2 g, which are less than the lower confidence bound by amounts up to 13 percent. The site-coefficient estimates are consistent at the 95 percent confidence level with those of several other investigators for base accelerations greater than 0.3 g. These consistencies and present code procedures indicate that changes in the site coefficients are not warranted. Empirical results for base accelerations greater than 0.2 g confirm the need for both a short- and a mid- or long-period site coefficient to characterize site response for purposes of estimating site-specific design spectra.

  6. Distributing Correlation Coefficients of Linear Structure-Activity/Property Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorana D. BOLBOACA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative structure-activity/property relationships are mathematical relationships linking chemical structure and activity/property in a quantitative manner. These in silico approaches are frequently used to reduce animal testing and risk-assessment, as well as to increase time- and cost-effectiveness in characterization and identification of active compounds. The aim of our study was to investigate the pattern of correlation coefficients distribution associated to simple linear relationships linking the compounds structure with their activities. A set of the most common ordnance compounds found at naval facilities with a limited data set with a range of toxicities on aquatic ecosystem and a set of seven properties was studied. Statistically significant models were selected and investigated. The probability density function of the correlation coefficients was investigated using a series of possible continuous distribution laws. Almost 48% of the correlation coefficients proved fit Beta distribution, 40% fit Generalized Pareto distribution, and 12% fit Pert distribution.

  7. Variable Eddington factors and flux-limiting diffusion coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whalen, P.P.

    1982-01-01

    Variable Eddington factors and flux limiting diffusion coefficients arise in two common techniques of closing the moment equations of transport. The first two moment equations of the full transport equation are still frequently used to solve many problems of radiative or particle transport. An approximate analysis, developed by Levermore, exhibits the relation between the coefficients of the two different techniques. This analysis is described and then used to test the validity of several commonly used flux limiters and Eddington factors. All of the ad-hoc flux limiters have limited validity. All of the variable Eddington factors derived from some underlying description of the angular distribution function are generally valid. The use of coefficients from Minerbo's elegant maximum entropy Eddington factor analysis is suggested for use in either flux limited diffusion or variable Eddington factor equations

  8. Isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient measurement in TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagar, T.; Ravnik, M.; Trkov, A.

    2002-01-01

    Direct measurement of an isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient at room temperatures in TRIGA Mark II research reactor at Jozef Stefan Institute in Ljubljana is presented. Temperature reactivity coefficient was measured in the temperature range between 15 o C and 25 o C. All reactivity measurements were performed at almost zero reactor power to reduce or completely eliminate nuclear heating. Slow and steady temperature decrease was controlled using the reactor tank cooling system. In this way the temperatures of fuel, of moderator and of coolant were kept in equilibrium throughout the measurements. It was found out that TRIGA reactor core loaded with standard fuel elements with stainless steel cladding has small positive isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient in this temperature range.(author)

  9. Identification of MIMO systems with sparse transfer function coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wanzhi; Saleem, Syed Khusro; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2012-12-01

    We study the problem of estimating transfer functions of multivariable (multiple-input multiple-output--MIMO) systems with sparse coefficients. We note that subspace identification methods are powerful and convenient tools in dealing with MIMO systems since they neither require nonlinear optimization nor impose any canonical form on the systems. However, subspace-based methods are inefficient for systems with sparse transfer function coefficients since they work on state space models. We propose a two-step algorithm where the first step identifies the system order using the subspace principle in a state space format, while the second step estimates coefficients of the transfer functions via L1-norm convex optimization. The proposed algorithm retains good features of subspace methods with improved noise-robustness for sparse systems.

  10. Determination of the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen ion in hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuszter, Gábor; Gehér-Herczegh, Tünde; Szűcs, Árpád; Tóth, Ágota; Horváth, Dezső

    2017-05-17

    The role of diffusion in chemical pattern formation has been widely studied due to the great diversity of patterns emerging in reaction-diffusion systems, particularly in H + -autocatalytic reactions where hydrogels are applied to avoid convection. A custom-made conductometric cell is designed to measure the effective diffusion coefficient of a pair of strong electrolytes containing sodium ions or hydrogen ions with a common anion. This together with the individual diffusion coefficient for sodium ions, obtained from PFGSE-NMR spectroscopy, allows the determination of the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen ions in hydrogels. Numerical calculations are also performed to study the behavior of a diffusion-migration model describing ionic diffusion in our system. The method we present for one particular case may be extended for various hydrogels and diffusing ions (such as hydroxide) which are relevant e.g. for the development of pH-regulated self-healing mechanisms and hydrogels used for drug delivery.

  11. Estimation of tracer diffusion coefficients of ions in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    Equations are given for estimating tracer diffusion coefficients D/sub i/ 0 of ions at infinite dilution in terms of limiting ionic conductances Λ/sub i/ 0 . Also given are generalized Nernst-Hartley equations for binary and multicomponent diffusion coefficients D 0 and D/sub ij/ 0 , respectively, at infinite dilution. Data, estimates, and correlations for Λ/sub i/ 0 at 25 0 C and other temperatures are discussed. Estimated values of Λ/sub i/ 0 are tabulated from 0-300 0 C for ions of waste isolation interest and for ions of economic interest in geothermal brines. Estimates of their tracer diffusion coefficients at infinite dilution are tabulated. A rule of thumb, good to a factor of 2, is presented. Very limited data (available only at 25 0 C) indicate that D/sub i//D/sub i/ 0 generally declines as the concentration of salt or supporting electrolyte increases. 6 figures, 2 tables

  12. On the conversion coefficients for cosmic ray dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrari, Alfredo

    2003-01-01

    Calculations of fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients have typically been limited to the standard irradiation geometries of the human body: anterior-to-posterior (AP), posterior-to-anterior (PA), lateral from the right side to the left side (RLAT), lateral from the left side to the right side (LLAT), rotational around the vertical axis (ROT), and isotropic incidence from all directions (ISO). In order to estimate the doses to air crew members exposed to cosmic radiation, the geometrical conditions of irradiation are usually assumed to be isotropic. However, the assumption of isotropic irradiation is in many cases invalid for the high energy component of the radiation field, which is often peaked in the forward direction. Therefore, it was considered useful to extend the calculations of conversion coefficients to other geometries. New sets of conversion coefficients fluence-to-effective dose are presented for the semiisotropic irradiation of the human body and for the irradiation from the top. Thei...

  13. Modification of Einstein A Coefficient in Dissipative Gas Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chang-Qi; Cao, Hui; Qin, Ke-Cheng

    1996-01-01

    Spontaneous radiation in dissipative gas medium such as plasmas is investigated by Langevin equations and the modified Weisskopf-Wigner approximation. Since the refractive index of gas medium is expected to be nearly unity, we shall first neglect the medium polarization effect. We show that absorption in plasmas may in certain case modify the Einstein A coefficient significantly and cause a pit in the A coefficient-density curves for relatively low temperature plasmas and also a pit in the A coefficient-temperature curves. In the next, the effect of medium polarization is taken into account in addition. To our surprise, its effect in certain case is quite significant. The dispersive curves show different behaviors in different region of parameters.

  14. Higher-order Cn dispersion coefficients for hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitroy, J.; Bromley, M.W.J.

    2005-01-01

    The complete set of second-, third-, and fourth-order van der Waals coefficients C n up to n=32 for the H(1s)-H(1s) dimer have been determined. They are computed by diagonalizing the nonrelativistic Hamiltonian for hydrogen to obtain a set of pseudostates that are used to evaluate the appropriate sum rules. A study of the convergence pattern for n≤16 indicates that all the C n/16 coefficients are accurate to 13 significant digits. The relative size of the fourth-order C n (4) to the second-order C n (2) coefficients is seen to increase as n increases and at n=32 the fourth-order term is actually larger

  15. Coupling coefficients for tensor product representations of quantum SU(2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groenevelt, Wolter

    2014-01-01

    We study tensor products of infinite dimensional irreducible * -representations (not corepresentations) of the SU(2) quantum group. We obtain (generalized) eigenvectors of certain self-adjoint elements using spectral analysis of Jacobi operators associated to well-known q-hypergeometric orthogonal polynomials. We also compute coupling coefficients between different eigenvectors corresponding to the same eigenvalue. Since the continuous spectrum has multiplicity two, the corresponding coupling coefficients can be considered as 2 × 2-matrix-valued orthogonal functions. We compute explicitly the matrix elements of these functions. The coupling coefficients can be considered as q-analogs of Bessel functions. As a results we obtain several q-integral identities involving q-hypergeometric orthogonal polynomials and q-Bessel-type functions

  16. Coupling coefficients for tensor product representations of quantum SU(2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenevelt, Wolter

    2014-10-01

    We study tensor products of infinite dimensional irreducible *-representations (not corepresentations) of the SU(2) quantum group. We obtain (generalized) eigenvectors of certain self-adjoint elements using spectral analysis of Jacobi operators associated to well-known q-hypergeometric orthogonal polynomials. We also compute coupling coefficients between different eigenvectors corresponding to the same eigenvalue. Since the continuous spectrum has multiplicity two, the corresponding coupling coefficients can be considered as 2 × 2-matrix-valued orthogonal functions. We compute explicitly the matrix elements of these functions. The coupling coefficients can be considered as q-analogs of Bessel functions. As a results we obtain several q-integral identities involving q-hypergeometric orthogonal polynomials and q-Bessel-type functions.

  17. Static and dynamic effective stress coefficient of chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, M. Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Christensen, Helle Foged

    2012-01-01

    Deformation of a hydrocarbon reservoir can ideally be used to estimate the effective stress acting on it. The effective stress in the subsurface is the difference between the stress due to the weight of the sediment and a fraction (effective stress coefficient) of the pore pressure. The effective...... stress coefficient is thus relevant for studying reservoir deformation and for evaluating 4D seismic for the correct pore pressure prediction. The static effective stress coefficient n is estimated from mechanical tests and is highly relevant for effective stress prediction because it is directly related...... with differential stress (overburden stress-pore pressure). For Valhall reservoir chalk with 40% porosity, α ranges between 0.98 and 0.85 and decreases by 10% if the differential stress is increased by 25 MPa. In contrast, for chalk with 15% porosity from the same reservoir, α ranges between 0.85 and 0...

  18. Mass attenuation coefficients of X-rays in different barite concrete used in radiation protection as shielding against ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida Junior, T. Airton; Nogueira, M. S.; Vivolo, V.; Potiens, M. P. A.; Campos, L. L.

    2017-11-01

    The probability of a photon interacting in a particular way with a given material, per unit path length, is usually called the linear attenuation coefficient (μ), and it is of great importance in radiation shielding. Plates of barite concrete with different thickness were fabricated in order to determining their mass attenuation coefficients at different energies. The plates were irradiated with ISO X-ray beams (N60, N80, N110 and N150), generated by Pantak HF320 X-ray equipment, at the IPEN laboratory. The mass attenuation coefficients of barite concrete have been measured using X-ray attenuation for different thicknesses of barite concrete qualities of the ISO. The attenuator material issued from different regions of Brazil. The experimental procedure in this research was validated by comparison between the experimental measurements of mass attenuation coefficients and coefficients determined by the same atomic composition, using as a tool to XCOM. The highest value of (μ/ρ) found experimentally was in the energy of 48 keV, in ISO 60 N quality, being 1.32(±0.49) for purple barite; 1.47(±0.41) for white barite and 1.75(±0.41) for cream barite. The determination of the chemical composition of the barite samples was of fundamental importance for the characterization of these materials. It can be seen that both calculated and measured data for the linear attenuation coefficients increase with the increasing materials density, as it is expected. It can be concluded that the photon attenuation coefficients depends on the photon energy and the materials density is the main contribution to the photon attenuation coefficients, which is important for radiation shielding.

  19. A technique for measuring dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y L; Qin, J G; Chen, R; Zhao, P D; Lu, F Y

    2014-09-01

    We develop a novel setup based on the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique to test the dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading. In the setup, the major improvement is that the end of the incident bar near the specimen is wedge-shaped, which results in a combined compressive and shear loading applied to the specimen. In fact, the shear loading is caused by the interfacial friction between specimen and bars. Therefore, when the two loading force histories are measured, the friction coefficient histories can be calculated without any assumptions and theoretical derivations. The geometry of the friction pairs is simple, and can be either cuboid or cylindrical. Regarding the measurements, two quartz transducers are used to directly record the force histories, and an optical apparatus is designed to test the interfacial slip movement. By using the setup, the dynamic friction coefficient of PTFE/aluminum 7075 friction pairs was tested. The time resolved dynamic friction coefficient and slip movement histories were achieved. The results show that the friction coefficient changes during the loading process, the average data of the relatively stable flat plateau section of the friction coefficient curves is 0.137, the maximum normal pressure is 52 MPa, the maximum relative slip velocity is 1.5 m/s, and the acceleration is 8400 m(2)/s. Furthermore, the friction test was simulated using an explicit FEM code LS-DYNA. The simulation results showed that the constant pressure and slip velocity can both be obtained with a wide flat plateau incident pulse. For some special friction pairs, normal pressure up to a few hundred MPa, interfacial slip velocities up to 10 m/s, and slip movement up to centimeter-level can be expected.

  20. Evidence for validity of ileal digestibility coefficients in monogastrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Columbus, Daniel; de Lange, Cornelis F M

    2012-08-01

    Measures of amino acid (AA) digestibility are used widely to estimate bioavailability of AA in feed and food ingredients for monogastric animals. In principle, the digestibility assay is simpler than in vivo assessments of AA bioavailability and allows for simultaneous estimation of the bioavailability of all AA in an experimental diet. It is generally assumed that absorption of intact AA in the hindgut of monogastrics is minimal, even though colonocytes do contain AA transporters and have been shown to absorb AA. This assumption is supported by the observation that infusion of AA into the hindgut does not improve nitrogen balance in monogastrics. In addition, growth performance of monogastrics is more highly correlated with ileal than faecal AA digestibility. Therefore, ileal digestibility coefficients provide better estimates of AA bioavailability than faecal digestibility coefficients. Measures of apparent ileal digestibility (AID) of AA are confounded with endogenous gut AA losses (EAAL). The curvilinear increase in AID of AA with increasing dietary AA level has been attributed to the relatively large contribution of EAAL to total ileal AA flows at low dietary AA levels. Subtracting basal EAAL from total ileal AA flows yields standardized ileal digestibility (SID) coefficients that appear to be more additive than AID coefficients in mixtures of feed ingredients. An implicit assumption when using SID AA coefficients in diet formulation is that the post-absorptive utilization of AA is not influenced by the dietary protein source. This assumption appears inappropriate when using feed or food ingredients that have been over-heated, induce large amounts of EAAL, or contain substantial amounts of fermentable fibre. Improved understanding of processes that contribute to the discrepancy between bioavailability and ileal digestibility will allow a more effective use of AA digestibility coefficients in diet formulation.

  1. Coefficient of Friction Measurements for Thermoplastics and Fiber Composites under Low Sliding Velocity and High Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Svendsen, G.; Hiller, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    materials which are untypical for brake applications, like thermoplastics and fiber composites, can offer superior performance in terms of braking torque, wear resistance and cost than typical brake linings. In this paper coefficient of friction measurements for various thermoplastic and fiber composite......Friction materials for typical brake applications are normally designed considering thermal stability as the major performance criterion. There are however brake applications with very limited sliding velocities, where the generated heat is insignificant. In such cases it is possible that friction...

  2. Coefficient of Friction Measurements for Thermoplastics and Fibre Composites Under Low Sliding Velocity and High Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Svendsen, Gustav Winther; Hiller, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    that friction materials which are untypical for brake applications, like thermoplastics and fibre composites, can offer superior performance in terms of braking torque, wear resistance and cost than typical brake linings. In this paper coefficient of friction measurements for various thermoplastic and fibre......Friction materials for typical brake applications are normally designed considering thermal stability as the major performance criterion. There are, however, brake applications with very limited sliding velocities, where the generated heat is insignificant. In such cases it is possible...... in order to interpret the changes of friction observed during the running-in phase....

  3. [Study of biometric identification of heart sound base on Mel-Frequency cepstrum coefficient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Zhao, Yihua; Lei, Sheng; Zhao, Zikai; Pan, Min

    2012-12-01

    Heart sound is a physiological parameter with individual characteristics generated by heart beat. To do the individual classification and recognition, in this paper, we present our study of using wavelet transform in the signal denoising, with the Mel-Frequency cepstrum coefficients (MFCC) as the feature parameters, and propose a research of reducing the dimensionality through principal components analysis (PCA). We have done the preliminary study to test the feasibility of biometric identification method using heart sound. The results showed that under the selected experimental conditions, the system could reach a 90% recognition rate. This study can provide a reference for further research.

  4. Load Coefficients on Grates used for Wind Turbine Access Platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Rasmussen, Michael R.; Frigaard, Peter

    In this report is presented the results of tests carried out at Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University (AAU) on behalf of DONG Energy A/S and Vattenfall A/S, Denmark. The objective of the tests was to investigate the load coefficient on different platform grates and a solid plate for desi......In this report is presented the results of tests carried out at Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University (AAU) on behalf of DONG Energy A/S and Vattenfall A/S, Denmark. The objective of the tests was to investigate the load coefficient on different platform grates and a solid plate...

  5. Partially linear varying coefficient models stratified by a functional covariate

    KAUST Repository

    Maity, Arnab

    2012-10-01

    We consider the problem of estimation in semiparametric varying coefficient models where the covariate modifying the varying coefficients is functional and is modeled nonparametrically. We develop a kernel-based estimator of the nonparametric component and a profiling estimator of the parametric component of the model and derive their asymptotic properties. Specifically, we show the consistency of the nonparametric functional estimates and derive the asymptotic expansion of the estimates of the parametric component. We illustrate the performance of our methodology using a simulation study and a real data application.

  6. Chemical evolution coefficients for the study of galactic evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallik, D.C.V.

    1980-01-01

    A new evaluation of chemical evolution coefficients has been made using recent stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis data. The role of the low and intermediate mass stars in galactic nuclosynthesis has been emphasized. A significant amount of 4 He, 12 C and neutron-rich species is found to be contributed by these stars. Comparison with observed abundances suggests a primary origin of 14 N. The simple model of galactic evolution with the new coefficients has been used to derive the ratio of helium to heavy element enrichment in the Galaxy. The new stellar evolution data do not explain the large value of this ratio that has been determined observationally. (orig.)

  7. Theoretical assessment of sound absorption coefficient for anisotropic nonwovens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klara Kalinova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The anisotropy factor as a function of fiber arrangement, fiber fineness and sample thickness has been derived from the theories of soundwave transformation due to phase changing. The sound absorption coefficient of the anisotropic fibrous material is then theoretically calculated. The fibrous materials were prepared so that the fibers are arranged parallel (perpendicularly laid fiber web called STRUTO technology in the direction of soundwave propagation or perpendicularly (longitudinally laid fiber web to the direction of sound propagation. The sound absorption coefficient was measured due to the Impedance tube. The theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental findings.

  8. Nitrogen ion implantation effect on friction coefficient of tool steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velichko, N.I.; Udovenko, V.F.; Markus, A.M.; Presnyakova, G.N.; Gamulya, G.D.

    1988-01-01

    Effect of nitrogen molecular ion implantation into KhVSG steel on the friction coefficient in the air and vacuum is investigated. Irradiation is carried out by the N 2 + beam with energy 120 keV and flux density 5 μ/cm 2 at room temperature in vacuum 5x10 -4 Pa. The integral dose of irradiation is 10 17 particle/cm 2 . Nitrogen ion implantation is shown to provide the formation of the modified layer changing friction properties of steel. The friction coefficient can either increase or decrease depending on implantation and test conditions. 4 refs.; 2 figs

  9. Plasma sheath properties calculated using measured secondary electron emission coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedgley, J.M.; McCracken, G.M.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of secondary electron emission (SEE) are presented for graphite, hydrogen-implanted graphite and an amorphous graphite (a-C:H) carbon layer, over a wide range of energies and angles of incidence. These data have been integrated over a Maxwellian velocity distribution to simulate the effect of SEE due to plasma electrons. The SEE yields have then been used to calculate plasma sheath potentials, sheath heat transmission coefficients and sputtering yields for a range of ions as a function of plasma temperature. The increased SEE yield with temperature reduces the normalized sheath potential and increases the sheath transmission coefficient markedly. The role of space charge in the sheath is discussed. (Author)

  10. A technique to measure rotordynamic coefficients in hydrostatic bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capaldi, Russell J.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental technique is described for measuring the rotordynamic coefficients of fluid film journal bearings. The bearing tester incorporates a double-spool shaft assembly that permits independent control over the journal spin speed and the frequency of an adjustable-magnitude circular orbit. This configuration yields data that enables determination of the full linear anisotropic rotordynamic coefficient matrices. The dynamic force measurements were made simultaneously with two independent systems, one with piezoelectric load cells and the other with strain gage load cells. Some results are presented for a four-recess, oil-fed hydrostatic journal bearing.

  11. The Influence of Particle Charge on Heterogeneous Reaction Rate Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikin, A. C.; Pesnell, W. D.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of particle charge on heterogeneous reaction rates are presented. Many atmospheric particles, whether liquid or solid are charged. This surface charge causes a redistribution of charge within a liquid particle and as a consequence a perturbation in the gaseous uptake coefficient. The amount of perturbation is proportional to the external potential and the square of the ratio of debye length in the liquid to the particle radius. Previous modeling has shown how surface charge affects the uptake coefficient of charged aerosols. This effect is now included in the heterogeneous reaction rate of an aerosol ensemble. Extension of this analysis to ice particles will be discussed and examples presented.

  12. Calculation of self-diffusion coefficients in iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baohua Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of available P-V-T equation of state of iron, the temperature and pressure dependence of self-diffusion coefficients in iron polymorphs (α, δ, γ and ɛ phases have been successfully reproduced in terms of the bulk elastic and expansivity data by means of a thermodynamical model that interconnects point defects parameters with bulk properties. The calculated diffusion parameters, such as self-diffusion coefficient, activation energy and activation volume over a broad temperature range (500-2500 K and pressure range (0-100 GPa, compare favorably well with experimental or theoretical ones when the uncertainties are considered.

  13. Infinite time interval backward stochastic differential equations with continuous coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Zhaojun; Hu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study the existence theorem for [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] solutions to a class of 1-dimensional infinite time interval backward stochastic differential equations (BSDEs) under the conditions that the coefficients are continuous and have linear growths. We also obtain the existence of a minimal solution. Furthermore, we study the existence and uniqueness theorem for [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] solutions of infinite time interval BSDEs with non-uniformly Lipschitz coefficients. It should be pointed out that the assumptions of this result is weaker than that of Theorem 3.1 in Zong (Turkish J Math 37:704-718, 2013).

  14. Transfer coefficients for plate fin and elliptical tube heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saboya, S.M.; Saboya, F.E.M.

    1981-01-01

    In order to determine transfer coefficients for plate fin and elliptical tube exchangers, mass transfer experiments have been performed using the naphthalene sublimation technique. By means of the heat-mass transfer analogy, the results can be converted to heat transfer results. The transfer coefficients were compared with those for circular tube exchangers and the comparison revealed no major differences. This is a positive outcome, since the use of elliptical tubes may reduce substantially the pressure drop, without affecting the transfer characteristics.(Author) [pt

  15. Cluster generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donchev, Todor I [Urbana, IL; Petrov, Ivan G [Champaign, IL

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  16. Pulse amplitude method for determining the pyroelectric coefficient of pyroelectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuzzolino, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    A simple amplitude method of measuring the pyroelectric coefficient of pyroelectric materials is described. Intense, short-duration (0.4 μs) light pulses generated by a semiconductor laser diode are absorbed at one surface of a thermally insulated sample of pyroelectric material, resulting in thermal pulses in the sample. The time and amplitude characteristics of the resulting charge pulses from the sample are measured using electronics of the type used with semiconductor charged-particle detectors. Theoretical calculations of the charge pulse shapes expected from samples having various assumed volume polarization distributions and measured charge rise times are used to determine optimum time constants for the pulse shaping electronics. These techniques are applied to a number of pyroelectric samples of polyvinylidene fluoride and lithium tantalate with thickness in the range 9 μm to 1 mm, and area of 0.07 cm 2 and 0.28 cm 2 . The absolute pyroelectric coefficient of the sample is obtained directly from the measured amplitude distribution of the charge pulses, the measured sample reflectivity, and the photon and electronic calibrations for the system. In addition, useful information regarding the polarization distribution in the sample is directly obtained during measurements. The results of these studies are reported and show that the pyroelectric coefficients determined by this method are in good agreement with previously reported values for these materials. (orig.)

  17. A Study on the Determination of the Seasonal Heat Transfer Coefficient in KURT Under Forced Convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Chan Hoon; Hwang, In Phil; Kim, Jin; Kwon, Sang Ki

    2010-01-01

    In a high-level waste (HLW) repository, heat is generated by the radioactive decay of the waste. This can affect the safety of the repository because the surrounding environment can be changed by the heat transfer through the rock. Thus, it is important to determine the heat transfer coefficient of the atmosphere in the underground repository. In this study, the heat transfer coefficient was estimated by measuring the indoor environmental factors in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute Underground Research Tunnel (KURT) under forced convection. For the experiment, a heater of 5 kw capacity, 2 meters long, was inserted through the tunnel wall in the heating section of KURT in order to heat up the inside of the rock to 90 .deg. C, and fresh air was provided by an air supply fan connected to the outside of the tunnel. The results showed that the average air velocity in the heating section after the provision of the air from outside of the tunnel was 0.81 m/s with the Reynolds number of 310,000 ∼ 340,000. The seasonal heat transfer coefficient in the heating section under forced convection was 7.68 W/m 2 K in the summer and 7.24 W/mm 2 K in the winter

  18. Employing the Gini coefficient to measure participation inequality in treatment-focused Digital Health Social Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mierlo, Trevor; Hyatt, Douglas; Ching, Andrew T

    2016-01-01

    Digital Health Social Networks (DHSNs) are common; however, there are few metrics that can be used to identify participation inequality. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the Gini coefficient, an economic measure of statistical dispersion traditionally used to measure income inequality, could be employed to measure DHSN inequality. Quarterly Gini coefficients were derived from four long-standing DHSNs. The combined data set included 625,736 posts that were generated from 15,181 actors over 18,671 days. The range of actors (8-2323), posts (29-28,684), and Gini coefficients (0.15-0.37) varied. Pearson correlations indicated statistically significant associations between number of actors and number of posts (0.527-0.835, p  addiction networks (0.619 and 0.276, p  networks ( t  = -4.305 and -5.934, p  network engagement. Further, mixed-methods research investigating quantitative performance metrics is required.

  19. Use of SCALE Continuous-Energy Monte Carlo Tools for Eigenvalue Sensitivity Coefficient Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perfetti, Christopher M [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The TSUNAMI code within the SCALE code system makes use of eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients for an extensive number of criticality safety applications, such as quantifying the data-induced uncertainty in the eigenvalue of critical systems, assessing the neutronic similarity between different critical systems, and guiding nuclear data adjustment studies. The need to model geometrically complex systems with improved fidelity and the desire to extend TSUNAMI analysis to advanced applications has motivated the development of a methodology for calculating sensitivity coefficients in continuous-energy (CE) Monte Carlo applications. The CLUTCH and Iterated Fission Probability (IFP) eigenvalue sensitivity methods were recently implemented in the CE KENO framework to generate the capability for TSUNAMI-3D to perform eigenvalue sensitivity calculations in continuous-energy applications. This work explores the improvements in accuracy that can be gained in eigenvalue and eigenvalue sensitivity calculations through the use of the SCALE CE KENO and CE TSUNAMI continuous-energy Monte Carlo tools as compared to multigroup tools. The CE KENO and CE TSUNAMI tools were used to analyze two difficult models of critical benchmarks, and produced eigenvalue and eigenvalue sensitivity coefficient results that showed a marked improvement in accuracy. The CLUTCH sensitivity method in particular excelled in terms of efficiency and computational memory requirements.

  20. Drag Coefficient of Water Droplets Approaching the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Mario; Sor, Suthyvann; Magarino, Adelaida Garcia

    2013-01-01

    This work presents results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. An airfoil model was placed at the end of the rotating arm and a monosize droplet generator produced droplets that fell from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil. The interaction between the droplets and the airfoil was captured with high speed imaging and allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. Image processing software was used to measure the position of the droplet centroid, equivalent diameter, perimeter, area, and the major and minor axes of an ellipse superimposed over the deforming droplet. The horizontal and vertical displacement of each droplet against time was also measured, and the velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of the droplet to the beginning of breakup. Results are presented and discussed for drag coefficients of droplets with diameters in the range of 300 to 1800 micrometers, and airfoil velocities of 50, 70 and 90 meters/second. The effect of droplet oscillation on the drag coefficient is discussed.

  1. Turbulent transport coefficients in spherical wedge dynamo simulations of solar-like stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnecke, J.; Rheinhardt, M.; Tuomisto, S.; Käpylä, P. J.; Käpylä, M. J.; Brandenburg, A.

    2018-01-01

    Aims: We investigate dynamo action in global compressible solar-like convective dynamos in the framework of mean-field theory. Methods: We simulate a solar-type star in a wedge-shaped spherical shell, where the interplay between convection and rotation self-consistently drives a large-scale dynamo. To analyze the dynamo mechanism we apply the test-field method for azimuthally (φ) averaged fields to determine the 27 turbulent transport coefficients of the electromotive force, of which six are related to the α tensor. This method has previously been used either in simulations in Cartesian coordinates or in the geodynamo context and is applied here for the first time to fully compressible simulations of solar-like dynamos. Results: We find that the φφ-component of the α tensor does not follow the profile expected from that of kinetic helicity. The turbulent pumping velocities significantly alter the effective mean flows acting on the magnetic field and therefore challenge the flux transport dynamo concept. All coefficients are significantly affected by dynamically important magnetic fields. Quenching as well as enhancement are being observed. This leads to a modulation of the coefficients with the activity cycle. The temporal variations are found to be comparable to the time-averaged values and seem to be responsible for a nonlinear feedback on the magnetic field generation. Furthermore, we quantify the validity of the Parker-Yoshimura rule for the equatorward propagation of the mean magnetic field in the present case.

  2. The research of effective flexoelectric coefficient along 1123 direction in polyvinylidene fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kaiyuan; Zhang, Shuwen; Xu, Minglong; Wu, Tonghui; Shen, Shengping

    2017-05-01

    All dielectric materials exhibit flexoelectricity defined as a strain gradient-induced electric polarization. The flexoelectric coefficient measures electric polarization induced by strain gradient in dielectric materials. In this work, an approach to measure the 1123 component of the flexoelectric coefficient of polymeric materials is presented. Theoretical analysis and finite element analysis are performed on an un-polarized polyvinylidene fluoride rectangular beam. When deformation occurs in the specimen, a normal strain gradient is generated. The consistency of the elastic deformation determined through calculations and experimental measurements under applied loads was good. The experimental system was set up as follows: a circular sine wave load with bias value was applied to the specimen and the strain gradient-induced electric charge curve was measured. The flexoelectric coefficient μ1123 was obtained and was consistent with our theoretical calculations of the electric polarization induced by the strain gradients. This study provides experimental support for further theoretical investigations of flexoelectricity in polymers and may expand the range of applications of flexoelectric effects.

  3. Heat conduction coefficient and coefficient of linear thermal expansion of electric insulation materials for superconducting magnetic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deev, V.I.; Sobolev, V.P.; Kruglov, A.B.; Pridantsev, A.I.

    1984-01-01

    Results of experimental investigation of heat conduction coefficient and coefficient of linear thermal expansion and thermal shrinkages of the STEF-1 textolite-glass widely used in superconducting magnetic systems as electric insulating and structural material are presented. Samples of two types have been died: sample axisa is perpendicular to a plae of fiberglass layers ad sample axis is parallel to a plane of fiberglass layers. Heat conduction coefficient was decreased almost a five times with temperature decrease from 300 up to 5K and was slightly dependent on a sample type. Temperature variation of linear dimensions in a sample of the first type occurs in twice as fast as compared to the sample of the second type

  4. Dose coefficients for radionuclides produced in high energy proton accelerator facilities. Coefficients for radionuclides not listed in ICRP publications

    CERN Document Server

    Kawai, K; Noguchi, H

    2002-01-01

    Effective dose coefficients, the committed effective dose per unit intake, by inhalation and ingestion have been calculated for 304 nuclides, including (1) 230 nuclides with half-lives >= 10 min and their daughters that are not listed in ICRP Publications and (2) 74 nuclides with half-lives < 10 min that are produced in a spallation target. Effective dose coefficients for inhalation of soluble or reactive gases have been calculated for 21 nuclides, and effective dose rates for inert gases have been calculated for 9 nuclides. Dose calculation was carried out using a general-purpose nuclear decay database DECDC developed at JAERI and a decay data library newly compiled from the ENSDF for the nuclides abundantly produced in a spallation target. The dose coefficients were calculated with the computer code DOCAP based on the respiratory tract model and biokinetic model of ICRP. The effective dose rates were calculated by considering both external irradiation from the surrounding cloud and irradiation of the lun...

  5. The effect analysis of conic coefficient error based on data measured from Talysurf and simulation of Zernike coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Jiang; Liu, Kai; Song, Chong; Peng, Qiu; Peng, Wang; Li, Gang

    2016-09-01

    Derivation of the conic coefficient error of practical aspheric optic surface is quite significant to aspheric machining accuracy, optical system imaging quality analysis and decomposition analysis of optical lenses. The primary mirror of R-c telescope system was tested by Taylor Hobson Talysurf. The practical surface was fitted using Zernike polynomials based on the date measured from Talysurf. Though taking the Zernike coefficients into the optical system, the effect of the aberration which was brought by optical machining to the optical system imaging quality was obtained. The analysis shows that the spherical aberration was brought into the optical system because of the figure error of the primary mirror. And the value of the spherical aberration was same to the practical alignment result. Then the conicoid aspherical degree of the primary mirror was tested by the Talysurf. The machining deviation of the conic coefficient was gotten though comparing the conicoid aspherical degree of the practical primary mirror with that of the perfect primary mirror. The practical conic coefficient was calculated by the deviation. Taking the practical conic coefficient into the R-c telescope system, the degradation of the optical system imaging quality was known. Also the spherical aberration was brought into the optical system. Experimental results show that the value of the spherical aberration analyzed by the two methods is same and consist with the practical alignment result. That is to say that the conic coefficient changed due to machining error of the conicoid aspherical degree. Because of the change the spherical aberration was attached to primary mirror. And which caused the optical system imaging quality declined. Finally, corrector was designed to balance the spherical aberration of the primary mirror. Ensure that the optical system imaging quality meet the requirement.

  6. Aerodynamic force coefficients of plain bridge cables in wet conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matteoni, Giulia; Georgakis, Christos T.

    In this paper, the aerodynamic forces and force coefficients from preliminary static wind tunnel tests on a plain cable in wet conditions are presented. The presented results are for several different relative cable wind-angles. A comparison is made with tests in dry conditions. In dry conditions...

  7. Variational problem with complex coefficient of a nonlinear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mining the quantum-mechanical potential in the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) while the control is a part of the ... quantum-mechanical and modern physics and chemistry [4–8]. Standard results of boundary ... hand, we chose unbounded coefficients and larger classes of controls. 2. The optimal control problem.

  8. Second-degree Stokes coefficients from multi-satellite SLR

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blossfeld, M.; Mueller, H.; Gerstl, M.; Štefka, Vojtěch; Bouman, J.; Goettl, F.; Horwath, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 9 (2015), s. 857-871 ISSN 0949-7714 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : multi-satellite SLR * stokes coefficients * equatorial excitation functions Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 2.486, year: 2015

  9. Atmospheric ventilation corridors and coefficients for pollution plume ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuoyo Aghomotsegin

    Information Science and Technology, Nanjing, China. Received 21 April, 2016; Accepted 11 August, 2016. This study presents a comparative investigation of atmospheric ventilation corridors and coefficients for gaseous pollution plume released from an isolated industrial facility into the ambient air of the host community in ...

  10. Modeling of adipose/blood partition coefficient for environmental chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadaki, K C; Karakitsios, S P; Sarigiannis, D A

    2017-12-01

    A Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) model was developed in order to predict the adipose/blood partition coefficient of environmental chemical compounds. The first step of QSAR modeling was the collection of inputs. Input data included the experimental values of adipose/blood partition coefficient and two sets of molecular descriptors for 67 organic chemical compounds; a) the descriptors from Linear Free Energy Relationship (LFER) and b) the PaDEL descriptors. The datasets were split to training and prediction set and were analysed using two statistical methods; Genetic Algorithm based Multiple Linear Regression (GA-MLR) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANN). The models with LFER and PaDEL descriptors, coupled with ANN, produced satisfying performance results. The fitting performance (R 2 ) of the models, using LFER and PaDEL descriptors, was 0.94 and 0.96, respectively. The Applicability Domain (AD) of the models was assessed and then the models were applied to a large number of chemical compounds with unknown values of adipose/blood partition coefficient. In conclusion, the proposed models were checked for fitting, validity and applicability. It was demonstrated that they are stable, reliable and capable to predict the values of adipose/blood partition coefficient of "data poor" chemical compounds that fall within the applicability domain. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Hydrodynamic coefficients for water-wave diffraction by spherical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    The work presented here is the result of water-wave interaction with submerged spheres. Analytical expressions for various hydrodynamic coefficients and loads due to the diffraction of water waves by a submerged sphere are obtained. The exciting force components due to surge and heave motions are derived by solving ...

  12. Variability, correlation and path coefficient analysis of seedling traits ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indirect selection is a useful means for improving yield in cotton crop. The objective of the present study was to determine the genetic variability, broad sense heritability, genetic advance and correlation among the six seedling traits and their direct and indirect effects on cotton yield by using path coefficient analysis.

  13. Determination of Local Barley (Hordeum Vulgare) Crop Coefficient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    , 0.88 and. 0.68 kg m. -3 ... irrigated barley fields. This could be due to lack of information on water requirement of local barley. General crop coefficient values for various crops including for barley are available in ..... Soil salinity and barley.

  14. Coefficient Estimate Problem for a New Subclass of Biunivalent Functions

    OpenAIRE

    N. Magesh; T. Rosy; S. Varma

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a unified subclass of the function class Σ of biunivalent functions defined in the open unit disc. Furthermore, we find estimates on the coefficients |a2| and |a3| for functions in this subclass. In addition, many relevant connections with known or new results are pointed out.

  15. Statistical analyses of local transport coefficients in Ohmic ASDEX discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmet, E.; Stroth, U.; Wagner, F.; Fahrbach, H.U.; Herrmann, W.; Kardaun, O.J.W.F.; Mayer, H.M.

    1991-01-01

    Tokamak energy transport is still an unsolved problem. Many theoretical models have been developed, which try to explain the anomalous high energy-transport coefficients. Up to now these models have been applied to global plasma parameters. A comparison of transport coefficients with global confinement time is only conclusive if the transport is dominated by one process across the plasma diameter. This, however, is not the case in most Ohmic confinement regimes, where at least three different transport mechanisms play an important role. Sawtooth activity leads to an increase in energy transport in the plasma centre. In the intermediate region turbulent transport is expected. Candidates here are drift waves and resistive fluid turbulences. At the edge, ballooning modes or rippling modes could dominate the transport. For the intermediate region, one can deduce theoretical scaling laws for τ E from turbulent theories. Predicted scalings reproduce the experimentally found density dependence of τ E in the linear Ohmic confinement regime (LOC) and the saturated regime (SOC), but they do not show the correct dependence on the isotope mass. The relevance of these transport theories can only be tested in comparing them to experimental local transport coefficients. To this purpose we have performed transport calculations on more than a hundred Ohmic ASDEX discharges. By Principal Component Analysis we determine the dimensionless components which dominate the transport coefficients and we compare the results to the predictions of various theories. (author) 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  16. Lifshitz Tails for the Interband Light Absorption Coefficient

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper we consider the interband light absorption coefficient (ILAC) for various models. We show that at the lower and upper edges of the spectrum the Lifshitz tails behaviour of the density of states implies similar behaviour for the ILAC at appropriate energies. The Lifshitz tails property is also exhibited at some points ...

  17. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Value of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and National Hospital Complex, in Bloemfontein. Women of all ages. Value of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in evaluating response of carcinoma of the cervix treated with chemoradiotherapy. A le Roux, F Gebremariam, W Harmse. Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Free ...

  18. Pair configurations to molecular activity coefficients : PAC-MAC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sweere, A.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis provides an overview of the development of the Pair Configuration to Molecular Activity Coefficient (PAC-MAC) model. PAC-MAC is a computational method to predict thermodynamic miscibility properties of various molecular solutions. Examples of calculated thermodynamic miscibility

  19. Modelling the change in the oxidation coefficient during the aerobic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work the aerobic degradation of phenol by acclimated activated sludge was studied. Results demonstrate that while the phenol removal rate by acclimated activated sludge follows the Monod model, the oxygen uptake rate obeys a Haldane-type equation. The phenol oxidation coefficient obtained at different intial ...

  20. Analysis of the Coupling Coefficient in Inductive Energy Transfer Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Mendes Duarte

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In wireless energy transfer systems, the energy is transferred from a power source to an electrical load without the need of physical connections. In this scope, inductive links have been widely studied as a way of implementing these systems. Although high efficiency can be achieved when the system is operating in a static state, it can drastically decrease if changes in the relative position and in the coupling coefficient between the coils occur. In this paper, we analyze the coupling coefficient as a function of the distance between two planar and coaxial coils in wireless energy transfer systems. A simple equation is derived from Neumann’s equation for mutual inductance, which is then used to calculate the coupling coefficient. The coupling coefficient is computed using CST Microwave Studio and compared to calculation and experimental results for two coils with an excitation signal of up to 10 MHz. The results showed that the equation presents good accuracy for geometric parameters that do not lead the solution of the elliptic integral of the first kind to infinity.

  1. Ionic conductivity and diffusion coefficient of barium-chloride-based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 40; Issue 4. Ionic conductivity and diffusion coefficient of barium-chloride-based polymer electrolyte with poly(vinyl alcohol)–poly(4-styrenesulphonic acid) polymer complex. MAYANK PANDEY GIRISH M JOSHI NARENDRA NATH GHOSH. Volume 40 Issue 4 August ...

  2. Determination of optical constants and nonlinear optical coefficients ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    −7 cm2/W and nonlinear absorption coefficient, β = 6.31×10. −3 cm/W. Optical limiting characteris- tics of the dye-doped polymer film was studied. The result reveals that Violet 1 can be a promising material for optical limiting applications. Keywords. Absorption spectra; nonlinear optics; optical constants; optical limiting.

  3. Heat transfer coefficient between UO2 and Zircaloy-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, A.M.; Stoute, R.L.

    1962-06-01

    This paper provides some experimental values of the heat-transfer coefficient between UO 2 and Zircaloy-2 surfaces in contact under conditions of interfacial pressure, temperature, surface roughness and interface atmosphere, that are relevant to UO 2 /Zircaloy-2 fuel elements operating in pressurized-water power reactors. Coefficients were obtained from eight UO 2 / Zircaloy-2 pairs in atmospheres of helium, argon, krypton or xenon, at atmosphere pressure and in vacuum. Interfacial pressures were varied from 50 to 550 kgf/cm 2 while surface roughness heights were in the range 0.2 x 10 -4 to 3.5 x 10 -4 cm. The effect on the coefficients of cycling the interfacial pressure, of interface gas pressure and of temperature were examined. The experimental values of the coefficients were used to test the predictions of expressions for the heat-transfer between two solids in contact. For the particular UO 2 / Zircaloy-2 pairs examined, numerical values were assigned to several parameters that related the surface roughnesses to either the radius of solid/solid contact spots or to the mean thickness of the interface voids and that accounted for the imperfect accommodation of the void gas on the test surfaces. (author)

  4. Evaluation of coefficient of friction in bulk metal forming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solhjoo, Soheil

    In this study an upper bound analysis for cylindrical "Barrel Compression Test" (BCT) is developed. BCT method is a very simple method which can be utilized in order to evaluate quantitatively the coefficient of friction by means of just one cylindrical specimen in an upsetting test. The method is

  5. Using Plasticine (TM) to Measure the Rolling Friction Coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellvi, Francesc; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents an experiment that makes manifest the energy lost to friction of an iron ball moving along an inclined iron rail, which allows students to compute the rolling friction coefficient. Uses a method based on measurement of deformation produced in a piece of Plasticine by an inelastic collision with the ball and combines mechanical concepts…

  6. A Simple Measurement of the Sliding Friction Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratton, Luigi M.; Defrancesco, Silvia

    2006-01-01

    We present a simple computer-aided experiment for investigating Coulomb's law of sliding friction in a classroom. It provides a way of testing the possible dependence of the friction coefficient on various parameters, such as types of materials, normal force, apparent area of contact and sliding velocity.

  7. Friction analysis of kinetic schemes : the friction coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, Juke S.

    1995-01-01

    Friction analysis is proposed as the application of general control analysis to single enzymes to describe the control of elementary kinetic steps on the overall catalytic rate. For each transition, a friction coefficient is defined that measures the sensitivity of the turnover rate to the free

  8. Coefficient Inverse Problem for Poisson's Equation in a Cylinder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solov'ev, V. V.

    2011-01-01

    The inverse problem of determining the coefficient on the right-hand side of Poisson's equation in a cylindrical domain is considered. The Dirichlet boundary value problem is studied. Two types of additional information (overdetermination) can be specified: (i) the trace of the solution to the

  9. Coefficient of standardized total tract digestibility of phosphorus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coefficient of standardized total tract digestibility of phosphorus in oilseed meals and distillers dried grains in growing-finishing pigs. ... soybean meal produced in India (SBM-I), soybean meal produced in Korea (SBM-K), corn high-protein distiller dried grains (HPDDGs), tapioca distillers dried grains (TDDG), canola meal ...

  10. Effective dose rate coefficients for exposure to contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veinot, K.G. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eckerman, K.F.; Easterly, C.E. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Bellamy, M.B.; Hiller, M.M.; Dewji, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hertel, N.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Manger, R. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge has undertaken calculations related to various environmental exposure scenarios. A previous paper reported the results for submersion in radioactive air and immersion in water using age-specific mathematical phantoms. This paper presents age-specific effective dose rate coefficients derived using stylized mathematical phantoms for exposure to contaminated soils. Dose rate coefficients for photon, electron, and positrons of discrete energies were calculated and folded with emissions of 1252 radionuclides addressed in ICRP Publication 107 to determine equivalent and effective dose rate coefficients. The MCNP6 radiation transport code was used for organ dose rate calculations for photons and the contribution of electrons to skin dose rate was derived using point-kernels. Bremsstrahlung and annihilation photons of positron emission were evaluated as discrete photons. The coefficients calculated in this work compare favorably to those reported in the US Federal Guidance Report 12 as well as by other authors who employed voxel phantoms for similar exposure scenarios. (orig.)

  11. Influence of roughness parameters on coefficient of friction under ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy technique. For a given surface texture, the ... Figure 3 shows the results of the correlation analysis between surface roughness parameters and coefficient of friction under ... ious roughness parameters the plowing component is controlled by the roughness parameter,. Del a. Table 2.

  12. Analysis of genetic diversity and estimation of inbreeding coefficient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of genetic diversity and estimation of inbreeding coefficient within Caspian horse population using microsatellite markers. ... structure and to the assessment of genetic diversity that may be helpful to horse breeders in designing and managing breeding or conservation strategies for the Caspian horse breed.

  13. Methodology update for determination of the erosion coefficient(Z

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tošić Radislav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The research and mapping the intensity of mechanical water erosion that have begun with the empirical methodology of S. Gavrilović during the mid-twentieth century last, by various intensity, until the present time. A many decades work on the research of these issues pointed to some shortcomings of the existing methodology, and thus the need for its innovation. In this sense, R. Lazarević made certain adjustments of the empirical methodology of S. Gavrilović by changing the tables for determination of the coefficients Φ, X and Y, that is, the tables for determining the mean erosion coefficient (Z. The main objective of this paper is to update the existing methodology for determining the erosion coefficient (Z with the empirical methodology of S. Gavrilović and amendments made by R. Lazarević (1985, but also with better adjustments to the information technologies and the needs of modern society. The proposed procedure, that is, the model to determine the erosion coefficient (Z in this paper is the result of ten years of scientific research and project work in mapping the intensity of mechanical water erosion and its modeling using various models of erosion in the Republic of Srpska and Serbia. By analyzing the correlation of results obtained by regression models and results obtained during the mapping of erosion on the territory of the Republic of Srpska, a high degree of correlation (R² = 0.9963 was established, which is essentially a good assessment of the proposed models.

  14. Thermal expansion coefficient and characteristic temperature of cubic dodecaborides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mojseenko, L.L.

    1980-01-01

    Temperature dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of cubic dodecaborides was studied within the 77-1200 K range. The Debye characteristic temperatures were determined from the experimental results of the TEC. Application of various ratios to calculate the Debye temperatures is analyzed relative to the ratios validity. These temperatures are compared with characteristic ones determined by X-raying

  15. Calculation of generalized secant integral using binomial coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guseinov, I.I.; Mamedov, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    A single series expansion relation is derived for the generalized secant (GS) integral in terms of binomial coefficients, exponential integrals and incomplete gamma functions. The convergence of the series is tested by the concrete cases of parameters. The formulas given in this study for the evaluation of GS integral show good rate of convergence and numerical stability

  16. SOME ASPECTS OF MOTOR CAR COERCION COEFFICIENT DETERMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. Denysenko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A short review of motor car coercion coefficient determination is presented. The models designed for the determination of motor car queues time intervals at the stop line is presented. The estimation of modeling results according to experimental data is carried out.

  17. Ventilation coefficient trends in the recent decades over four major ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the coefficient, the more efficiently the atmosphere is able to dispose the pollutants and better is the air quality. On the other hand, low ventilation coef- ficients lead to poor dispersal of pollutants causing stagnation and poor air quality leading to possible pollution related hazards. The ventilation coeffi- cient is a function of ...

  18. Scaling the Raman gain coefficient: Applications to Germanosilicate fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Bromage, J.; Stentz, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the temperature dependence of a Raman amplifier and the scaling of the Raman gain coefficient with wavelength, modal overlap, and material composition. The temperature dependence is derived by applying a quantum theoretical description, whereas the ...

  19. Determination of sedimentation rates and absorption coefficient of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. MIKE HORSFALL

    particles have pores that can absorb radiation. Gamma rays have been used to study the absorption coefficients of cobalt(II) insoluble compounds (Essien and Ekpe, 1998), densities of marine sediments. (Gerland and Villinger, 1995) and soil particle-size distribution (Vaz et al., 1992). In this study, sedimentation rates of ...

  20. Measurement of mass attenuation coefficients in some Cr, Co and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present measured values of mass attenuation coefficients in some compounds at different energies were calculated using eq. (1) and are listed in table 1. The validity of the mixture rule is considered for compounds. The estimated error in the experimentally measured μ/ρ value is <3%. The error arises due to the.

  1. Musical Instrument Identification using Multiscale Mel-frequency Cepstral Coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturm, Bob L.; Morvidone, Marcela; Daudet, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the benefits of evaluating Mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCCs) over several time scales in the context of automatic musical instrument identification for signals that are monophonic but derived from real musical settings. We define several sets of features derived from MFCCs...

  2. Adaptive Finite Element Methods for Elliptic Problems with Discontinuous Coefficients

    KAUST Repository

    Bonito, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Elliptic PDEs with discontinuous diffusion coefficients occur in application domains such as diffusions through porous media, electromagnetic field propagation on heterogeneous media, and diffusion processes on rough surfaces. The standard approach to numerically treating such problems using finite element methods is to assume that the discontinuities lie on the boundaries of the cells in the initial triangulation. However, this does not match applications where discontinuities occur on curves, surfaces, or manifolds, and could even be unknown beforehand. One of the obstacles to treating such discontinuity problems is that the usual perturbation theory for elliptic PDEs assumes bounds for the distortion of the coefficients in the L∞ norm and this in turn requires that the discontinuities are matched exactly when the coefficients are approximated. We present a new approach based on distortion of the coefficients in an Lq norm with q < ∞ which therefore does not require the exact matching of the discontinuities. We then use this new distortion theory to formulate new adaptive finite element methods (AFEMs) for such discontinuity problems. We show that such AFEMs are optimal in the sense of distortion versus number of computations, and report insightful numerical results supporting our analysis. © 2013 Societ y for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  3. Coefficient Inequalities for Certain New Classes of Analytic and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, the Authors introduce and study the classes Φ and Φ which provides an interesting movement from starlikeness to convexity using Aouf et al derivative operator. The consequences of the parametrics are also discussed. Keywords: Analytic functions, univalent functions, w -starlike, w -convex, coefficient ...

  4. Temperature and Coefficient of Restitution of a Table Tennis Ball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoonyoung Chang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The coefficient of restitution (COR of a bouncing table tennis ball was measured at varying ball temperatures with a Motion Detector. It was found that there is a negative linear relationship between the COR and the temperature of the table tennis ball for temperatures ranging from 5 to 56 ̊C.

  5. Symmetry Reductions of Two-Dimensional Variable Coefficient Burgers Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Li, Biao

    2005-05-01

    By use of a direct method, we discuss symmetries and reductions of the two-dimensional Burgers equation with variable coefficient (VCBurgers). Five types of symmetry-reducing VCBurgers to (1+1)-dimensional partial differential equation and three types of symmetry reducing VCBurgers to ordinary differential equation are obtained.

  6. Bias in regression coefficient estimates upon different treatments of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this simulation study, the bias in regression coefficient estimates was investigated in a four-predictor multiple regression model involving four missing data treatments, namely expectation maximization (EM), mean substitution (MS), pairwise deletion (PD) and regression imputation (RI) methods. This was done under ...

  7. Coefficients and constants in the partial fractions of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emumejaye and Ekeh, [3] to trigonometric inverse functions. It determines the unknown constants and coefficients in resolving rational functions containing trigonometric inverse functions in their denominator, into the sum of its partial fractions equivalent by recursive method. For each of the cases of functions considered, ...

  8. An experimental assembly for precise measurement of thermal accommodation coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, Wayne M.; Castañeda, Jaime N.; Torczynski, John R.; Gallis, Michael A.; Rader, Daniel J.

    2011-03-01

    An experimental apparatus has been developed to determine thermal accommodation coefficients for a variety of gas-surface combinations. Results are obtained primarily through measurement of the pressure dependence of the conductive heat flux between parallel plates separated by a gas-filled gap. Measured heat-flux data are used in a formula based on Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulations to determine the coefficients. The assembly also features a complementary capability for measuring the variation in gas density between the plates using electron-beam fluorescence. Surface materials examined include 304 stainless steel, gold, aluminum, platinum, silicon, silicon nitride, and polysilicon. Effects of gas composition, surface roughness, and surface contamination have been investigated with this system; the behavior of gas mixtures has also been explored. Without special cleaning procedures, thermal accommodation coefficients for most materials and surface finishes were determined to be near 0.95, 0.85, and 0.45 for argon, nitrogen, and helium, respectively. Surface cleaning by in situ argon-plasma treatment reduced coefficient values by up to 0.10 for helium and by ˜0.05 for nitrogen and argon. Results for both single-species and gas-mixture experiments compare favorably to DSMC simulations.

  9. CALCULATION OF COEFFICIENT OF SHARING OCTANOL-WATER ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    31 déc. 2010 ... ABSTRACT. A quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) study is carried out to develop correlations that relate the molecular structures of organic compounds to their Octanol-. Water partition coefficients, Kow , using molecular descriptors. The correlations are simple in application with good ...

  10. Rate coefficients for hydrogen abstraction reaction of pinonaldehyde

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The H abstraction reaction from the –CHO group was found to be the most dominant reaction channelamong all the possible reaction pathways and its corresponding rate coefficient at 300 K is kEckart's unsymmetrical= 3.86 ×10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. Whereas the channel with immediate lower activation energy is the ...

  11. Measurements of gaseous multiplication coefficient in pure isobutane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Iara Batista de

    2010-01-01

    In this work it is presented measurements of gaseous multiplication coefficient (α) in pure isobutane obtained with a parallel plate chamber, protected against discharges by one electrode (anode) of high resistivity glass (ρ = 2 x 10 12 Ω.cm). The method applied was the Pulsed Townsend, where the primary ionization is produced through the incidence of a nitrogen laser beam onto a metallic electrode (cathode). The electric currents measured with the chamber operating in both ionization and avalanche regimes were used to calculate the gaseous multiplication coefficient by the solution of the Townsend equation for uniform electric fields. The validation of the technique was provided by the measurements of gaseous multiplication coefficient in pure nitrogen, a widely studied gas, which has well-established data in literature. The α coefficients in isobutane were measured as a function of the reduced electric field in the range of 139Td up to 208Td. The obtained values were compared with those simulated by Imonte software (version 4.5) and the only experimental results available in the literature, recently obtained in our group. This comparison showed that the results are concordant within the experimental errors. (author)

  12. Photon mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The attenuation coefficient data were then used to compute the effective atomic number and the electron density of TLD compounds. The interpolation of total attenuation cross-sections of photons of energy in elements of atomic number was performed using the logarithmic regression analysis of the data measured by ...

  13. Experimental partition determination of octanol-water coefficients of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An electrochemical method based on square wave voltammetry was developed for the measurement of octanol-water partition coefficient, LogP, for ten ferrocene derivatives. Measured LogP values ranged over two orders of magnitude, between 2.18 for 1- ferrocenylethanol and 4.38 for ferrocenyl-2-nitrophenyl.

  14. Quantum elasticity of graphene: Thermal expansion coefficient and specific heat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burmistrov, I.S.; Gornyi, I.V.; Kachorovskii, V.Y.; Katsnelson, M.I.; Mirlin, A.D.

    2016-01-01

    We explore thermodynamics of a quantum membrane, with a particular application to suspended graphene membrane and with a particular focus on the thermal expansion coefficient. We show that an interplay between quantum and classical anharmonicity-controlled fluctuations leads to unusual elastic

  15. ANALYTIC SOLUTIONS OF MATRIX RICCATI EQUATIONS WITH ANALYTIC COEFFICIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curtain, Ruth; Rodman, Leiba

    2010-01-01

    For matrix Riccati equations of platoon-type systems and of systems arising from PDEs, assuming the coefficients are analytic or rational functions in a suitable domain, analyticity of the stabilizing solution is proved under various hypotheses. General results on analytic behavior of stabilizing

  16. Visualising the Complex Roots of Quadratic Equations with Real Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardell, Nicholas S.

    2012-01-01

    The roots of the general quadratic equation y = ax[superscript 2] + bx + c (real a, b, c) are known to occur in the following sets: (i) real and distinct; (ii) real and coincident; and (iii) a complex conjugate pair. Case (iii), which provides the focus for this investigation, can only occur when the values of the real coefficients a, b, and c are…

  17. Wave drag coefficient of a model `Busemann biplane' catamaran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebenberg, L.; Bunt, E. A.

    1990-09-01

    Tests conducted on a model ‘Busemann biplane’ catamaran in a towing basin qualitatively showed that the form of the wave drag coefficient curve followed the typical drag curve for a single unswept supersonic wing, but on this was superimposed that of the Busemann wave drag curve (giving a local minimum near the design Froude number).

  18. Lightweight cordierite–mullite refractories with low coefficients of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MS received 6 January 2014; revised 26 May 2014. Abstract. Lightweight cordierite–mullite refractories with low coefficients of thermal conductivity (CTCs), high strengths and high thermal-shock resistances were prepared using porous cordierite ceramics as aggregates. Phase compositions and microstructures of ...

  19. Ionic conductivity and diffusion coefficient of barium-chloride-based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-07-26

    Jul 26, 2017 ... Therefore this polymer electrolyte can be further studied for the development of electrochemical device applications. Keywords. Polymer electrolytes; impedance spectroscopy; diffusion coefficient; ionic conductivity. 1. Introduction .... The structural characterization of BaCl2-doped polymer elec- trolytes was ...

  20. The mass energy transfer and mass absorption coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomljenovic, I.; Stankovic, S.; Ninkovic, M.

    2002-01-01

    The calculation of the mass energy transfer and the mass absorption coefficients is presented and data for their change by energy, in range from 0,01 MeV to 10 MeV, are given. Data are numerically and graphically presented for following materials: air, water, polyethylene, lucite and polystyrene (author)

  1. Conversion coefficients for determining organ doses in paediatric spine radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidenbusch, Michael; Schneider, Karl [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Institute of Clinical Radiology - Paediatric Radiology, Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    Knowledge of organ and effective doses achieved during paediatric x-ray examinations is an important prerequisite for assessment of radiation burden to the patient. Conversion coefficients for reconstruction of organ and effective doses from entrance doses for segmental spine radiographs of 0-, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15- and 30-year-old patients are provided regarding the Guidelines of Good Radiographic Technique of the European Commission. Using the personal computer program PCXMC developed by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (Saeteilyturvakeskus STUK), conversion coefficients for conventional segmental spine radiographs were calculated performing Monte Carlo simulations in mathematical hermaphrodite phantom models describing patients of different ages. The clinical variation of beam collimation was taken into consideration by defining optimal and suboptimal radiation field settings. Conversion coefficients for the reconstruction of organ doses in about 40 organs and tissues from measured entrance doses during cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine radiographs of 0-, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15- and 30-year-old patients were calculated for the standard sagittal and lateral beam projections and the standard focus detector distance of 115 cm. The conversion coefficients presented may be used for organ dose assessments from entrance doses measured during spine radiographs of patients of all age groups and all field settings within the optimal and suboptimal standard field settings. (orig.)

  2. Regression Models for Predicting Force Coefficients of Aerofoils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed ABDUL AKBAR

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Renewable sources of energy are attractive and advantageous in a lot of different ways. Among the renewable energy sources, wind energy is the fastest growing type. Among wind energy converters, Vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs have received renewed interest in the past decade due to some of the advantages they possess over their horizontal axis counterparts. VAWTs have evolved into complex 3-D shapes. A key component in predicting the output of VAWTs through analytical studies is obtaining the values of lift and drag coefficients which is a function of shape of the aerofoil, ‘angle of attack’ of wind and Reynolds’s number of flow. Sandia National Laboratories have carried out extensive experiments on aerofoils for the Reynolds number in the range of those experienced by VAWTs. The volume of experimental data thus obtained is huge. The current paper discusses three Regression analysis models developed wherein lift and drag coefficients can be found out using simple formula without having to deal with the bulk of the data. Drag coefficients and Lift coefficients were being successfully estimated by regression models with R2 values as high as 0.98.

  3. Atmospheric ventilation corridors and coefficients for pollution plume ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study presents a comparative investigation of atmospheric ventilation corridors and coefficients for gaseous pollution plume released from an isolated industrial facility into the ambient air of the host community in Ile-Ife suburb, southwest Nigeria. For the months of September to December in the year 2012 and 2013, ...

  4. Ventilation coefficient trends in the recent decades over four major ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thirty years radiosonde data (1971–2000) at 00 UTC for winter months over four major Indian metros, viz., Mumbai, Delhi, Kolkata and Chennai is analysed to study the trends and long term variations in ventilation coefficients and the consequences on the air quality due to these variations in the four metros. A decreasing ...

  5. Thermally induced lensing determination from the coefficient of defocus aberration

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bell, Teboho

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of a temperature gradient in a laser crystal in an end-pumped configuration in a solid-state laser resonator results in thermally induced aberrations. Of particular interest we measure the thermally induced lens from the coefficient...

  6. Estimation of bulk transfer coefficient for latent heat flux (Ce)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.

    The bulk transfer coefficient for latent heat flux (Ce) has been estimated over the Arabian Sea from the moisture budget during the pre-monsoon season of 1988. The computations have been made over two regions (A: 0-8 degrees N: 60-68 degrees E: B: 0...

  7. PENGARUH PENGUNGKAPAN CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY TERHADAP EARNING RESPONSE COEFFICIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MI Mitha Dwi Restuti

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui pengaruh negatif pengungkapan Corporate Sosial Responsibility (CSR disclosure terhadap Earning Response Coefficient (ERC. Alat analisis yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini menggunakan metode analisis regresi berganda.Sampel yang digunakan adalah sebanyak 150 perusahaan yang terdaftar pada Bursa Efek Indonesia pada tahun 2010. Berdasarkan hasil penelitian ditemukan bahwa pengungkapan Corporate Social Responsibility tidak berpengaruh terhadap Earning Response Coefficient (ERC. Hal ini dapat dikatakan bahwa investor belum memperhatikan informasi-informasi sosial yang diungkapkan dalam laporan tahunan perusahaan sebagai informasi yang dapat mempengaruhi investor dalam melakukan keputusan investasi. Investor masih mengganggap informasi laba lebih bermanfaat dalam menilai perusahaan dan dianggap lebih mampu memberikan informasi untuk mendapatkan return saham yang diharapkan oleh investor dibandingkan dengan informasi sosial yang diungkapkan oleh perusahaan.The purpose of this study is to determine the negative effect of Corporate Social Responsibility disclosure (CSR disclosure of Earnings Response Coefficient (ERC. Multiple regressions were used to analyze the data. The samples were 150 companies listed on the Indonesia Stock Exchange in 2010. Based on the research, the result was the disclosures of Corporate Social Responsibility did not influence Earning Response Coefficient (ECR. It can be said that investors did not pay attention to social information that was disclosed in the company’s annual report as information that could affect investors in making investment decisions. Investor did not consider sosial information; they only consider profit information to assess the company value and their investment return

  8. Gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient in stirred tank reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yawalkar, Archis A.; Heesink, Albertus B.M.; Versteeg, Geert; Pangarkar, Vishwas G.

    2003-01-01

    Volumetric gas—liquid mass transfer coefficient (kLa) data available in the literature for larger tanks (T = 0.39 m to 2.7 m) have been analyzed on the basis of relative dispersion parameter, N/Ncd. It was observed that at a given superficial gas velocity (VG), kLa values were approximately the same

  9. On the successive coefficients of certain Univalent functions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    known conjecture of Robertson on the coefficient of close-to-convex functions. Journal of the Nigerian Association of Mathematical Physics Vol. 10 2006: pp. 177-180. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/jonamp.v10i1.40123 · AJOL African Journals ...

  10. Distribution coefficient of plutonium between sediment and seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duursma, E.K.; Parsi, P.

    1974-01-01

    Using plutonium 237 as a tracer, a series of experiments were conducted to determine the distribution coefficient of plutonium onto sediments both under oxic and anoxic conditions, where the plutonium was added to seawater in three different valence states: III, IV and VI

  11. Rate coefficients for hydrogen abstraction reaction of pinonaldehyde ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The H abstraction reaction from the –CHO group was found to be the most dominant reaction channelamong all the possible reaction pathways and its corresponding rate coefficient at 300 K is kEckart's unsymmetrical= 3.86 ×10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. Whereas the channel with immediate lower activation energy is the ...

  12. Recursive Harmonic Analysis for Computational of Hansen Coefficients

    OpenAIRE

    Sharaf, Mohamed Adel; Selim, Hadia Hassan

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple pure numerical method developed for computing Hansen coefficients by using recursive harmonic analysis technique. The precision criteria of the computations are very satisfactory and provide materials for computing Hansen's and Hansen's like expansions, also to check the accuracy of some existing algorithms.

  13. Determination of the Static Friction Coefficient from Circular Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Bolívar, J. A.; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a physics laboratory exercise for determining the coefficient of static friction between two surfaces. The circular motion of a coin placed on the surface of a rotating turntable has been studied. For this purpose, the motion is recorded with a high-speed digital video camera recording at 240 frames s[superscript-1], and the…

  14. Value of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in evaluating response ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To determine whether the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value obtained by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) can be used as a reliable detector of response of carcinoma of the cervix treated with chemoradiotherapy, compared with conventional. T2-weighted MRI. Design.

  15. Cubic Polynomials with Real or Complex Coefficients: The Full Picture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardell, Nicholas S.

    2016-01-01

    The cubic polynomial with real coefficients has a rich and interesting history primarily associated with the endeavours of great mathematicians like del Ferro, Tartaglia, Cardano or Vieta who sought a solution for the roots (Katz, 1998; see Chapter 12.3: The Solution of the Cubic Equation). Suffice it to say that since the times of renaissance…

  16. An experimental assembly for precise measurement of thermal accommodation coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, Wayne M; Castañeda, Jaime N; Torczynski, John R; Gallis, Michael A; Rader, Daniel J

    2011-03-01

    An experimental apparatus has been developed to determine thermal accommodation coefficients for a variety of gas-surface combinations. Results are obtained primarily through measurement of the pressure dependence of the conductive heat flux between parallel plates separated by a gas-filled gap. Measured heat-flux data are used in a formula based on Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulations to determine the coefficients. The assembly also features a complementary capability for measuring the variation in gas density between the plates using electron-beam fluorescence. Surface materials examined include 304 stainless steel, gold, aluminum, platinum, silicon, silicon nitride, and polysilicon. Effects of gas composition, surface roughness, and surface contamination have been investigated with this system; the behavior of gas mixtures has also been explored. Without special cleaning procedures, thermal accommodation coefficients for most materials and surface finishes were determined to be near 0.95, 0.85, and 0.45 for argon, nitrogen, and helium, respectively. Surface cleaning by in situ argon-plasma treatment reduced coefficient values by up to 0.10 for helium and by ∼0.05 for nitrogen and argon. Results for both single-species and gas-mixture experiments compare favorably to DSMC simulations.

  17. Overall mass-transfer coefficients in non-linear chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Jørgen; Hansen, Ernst

    1998-01-01

    In case of mass transfer where concentration differences in both phases must be taken into account, one may define an over-all mass-transfer coefficient basd on the apparent over-all concentration difference. If the equilibrium relationship is linear, i.e. in cases where a Henry´s law relationshi...

  18. n-Alcohol/Water Partition Coefficients for Decachlorobiphenyl (PCB 209)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measurements of n-octanol/water partition coefficients (Kow) for highly hydrophobic chemicals are extremely difficult and are rarely made, in part due to the large volumes of water typically needed to quantify these compounds in the aqueous phase. An extrapolation approach using ...

  19. Temperature and Coefficient of Restitution of a Table Tennis Ball

    OpenAIRE

    Yoonyoung Chang

    2016-01-01

    The coefficient of restitution (COR) of a bouncing table tennis ball was measured at varying ball temperatures with a Motion Detector. It was found that there is a negative linear relationship between the COR and the temperature of the table tennis ball for temperatures ranging from 5 to 56 ̊C.

  20. Methods for measuring diffusion coefficients of radon in building materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cozmuta, [No Value; van der Graaf, ER

    2001-01-01

    Two methods for determining the Rn-222 diffusion coefficient in concrete are presented. Experimentally, the flush and adsorption technique to measure radon release rates underlines both methods. Theoretically, the first method was developed fur samples of cubical geometry. The radon diffusion