WorldWideScience

Sample records for generating carbon finance

  1. Financing Distributed Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, A.

    2001-06-29

    This paper introduces the engineer who is undertaking distributed generation projects to a wide range of financing options. Distributed generation systems (such as internal combustion engines, small gas turbines, fuel cells and photovoltaics) all require an initial investment, which is recovered over time through revenues or savings. An understanding of the cost of capital and financing structures helps the engineer develop realistic expectations and not be offended by the common requirements of financing organizations. This paper discusses several mechanisms for financing distributed generation projects: appropriations; debt (commercial bank loan); mortgage; home equity loan; limited partnership; vendor financing; general obligation bond; revenue bond; lease; Energy Savings Performance Contract; utility programs; chauffage (end-use purchase); and grants. The paper also discusses financial strategies for businesses focusing on distributed generation: venture capital; informal investors (''business angels''); bank and debt financing; and the stock market.

  2. Financing Distributed Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper introduces the engineer who is undertaking distributed generation projects to a wide range of financing options. Distributed generation systems (such as internal combustion engines, small gas turbines, fuel cells and photovoltaics) all require an initial investment, which is recovered over time through revenues or savings. An understanding of the cost of capital and financing structures helps the engineer develop realistic expectations and not be offended by the common requirements of financing organizations. This paper discusses several mechanisms for financing distributed generation projects: appropriations; debt (commercial bank loan); mortgage; home equity loan; limited partnership; vendor financing; general obligation bond; revenue bond; lease; Energy Savings Performance Contract; utility programs; chauffage (end-use purchase); and grants. The paper also discusses financial strategies for businesses focusing on distributed generation: venture capital; informal investors (''business angels''); bank and debt financing; and the stock market

  3. Guideposts for Low Carbon Finance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizer, Billy

    2015-01-01

    The author proposes four guideposts for efficient low carbon finance: remove subsidies for high-carbon technologies, improve the cost-effectiveness of low-carbon subsidies, encourage private sector innovation and maintain transparent public policy tools that support cost-benefit accounting

  4. Generating carbon finance through avoided deforestation and its potential to create climatic, conservation and human development benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebeling, Johannes; Yasué, Maï

    2008-05-27

    Recent proposals to compensate developing countries for reducing emissions from deforestation (RED) under forthcoming climate change mitigation regimes are receiving increasing attention. Here we demonstrate that if RED credits were traded on international carbon markets, even moderate decreases in deforestation rates could generate billions of Euros annually for tropical forest conservation. We also discuss the main challenges for a RED mechanism that delivers real climatic benefits. These include providing sufficient incentives while only rewarding deforestation reductions beyond business-as-usual scenarios, addressing risks arising from forest degradation and international leakage, and ensuring permanence of emission reductions. Governance may become a formidable challenge for RED because some countries with the highest RED potentials score poorly on governance indices. In addition to climate mitigation, RED funds could help achieve substantial co-benefits for biodiversity conservation and human development. However, this will probably require targeted additional support because the highest biodiversity threats and human development needs may exist in countries that have limited income potentials from RED. In conclusion, how successfully a market-based RED mechanism can contribute to climate change mitigation, conservation and development will strongly depend on accompanying measures and carefully designed incentive structures involving governments, business, as well as the conservation and development communities.

  5. Financing low carbon energy access in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gujba, Haruna; Thorne, Steve; Mulugetta, Yacob; Rai, Kavita; Sokona, Youba

    2012-01-01

    Modern energy access in Africa is critical to meeting a wide range of developmental challenges including poverty reduction and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Despite having a huge amount and variety of energy resources, modern energy access in the continent is abysmal, especially Sub-Saharan Africa. Only about 31% of the Sub-Saharan African population have access to electricity while traditional biomass energy accounts for over 80% of energy consumption in many Sub-Saharan African countries. With energy use per capita among the lowest in the world, there is no doubt that Africa will need to increase its energy consumption to drive economic growth and human development. Africa also faces a severe threat from global climate change with vulnerabilities in several key areas or sectors in the continent including agriculture, water supply, energy, etc. Low carbon development provides opportunities for African countries to improve and expand access to modern energy services while also building low-emission and climate-resilient economies. However, access to finance from different sources will be critical in achieving these objectives. This paper sets out to explore the financial instruments available for low carbon energy access in Africa including the opportunities, markets and risks in low carbon energy investments in the continent. - Highlights: ► Access to finance will be critical to achieving low carbon energy access in Africa. ► Domestic finance will be important in leveraging private finance. ► Private sector participation in modern and clean energy in Africa is still low. ► Many financing mechanisms exist for low carbon energy access in Africa. ► The right institutional frameworks are critical to achieving low carbon energy access in Africa.

  6. Carbon finance options in renewable energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahar, P.

    2010-01-01

    The Kyoto Protocol splits the world into two categories, notably Annex 1 with binding targets; and non-Annex 1 without any binding targets. This presentation discussed the Kyoto Protocol, with particular reference to the flexibility mechanisms which allow countries to achieve their emission targets in a cost effective way through emission trading, joint implementation, or clean development mechanisms (CDM). The CDM was outlined in detail in terms of how it works. The CDM key concepts include baseline use, additionality, and monitoring. Reasons for risk and CDM renewable energy projects were also outlined. Other topics that were presented included the impact of carbon finance; United States federal climate policy; European Union policy; EVO structured carbon; portfolio management; and EVO structured carbon. tabs., figs.

  7. Carbon reduction in the NHS : a role for finance

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Steve

    2009-01-01

    HFMA briefing sponsored by ACCA NHS bodies’ performance on carbon reduction is increasingly having an impact on annual audit assessments, and a new energy efficiency scheme, involving the purchase and trading of carbon emissions allowances, will provide real financial consequences for under or over consumption of carbon. But perhaps the biggest driver for the finance community is the fact that carbon reduction should in fact help them meet their key challenge – the need for efficienc...

  8. Strategies for Financing Large-scale Carbon Capture and Storage Power Plants in China

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, X.; Liu, H.; Reiner, D.

    2014-01-01

    Building on previous stakeholder consultations from 2006 to 2010, we conduct a financial analysis for a generic CCS power plant in China. In comparison with conventional thermal generation technologies, a coal-fired power plant with CCS requires either a 70% higher on-grid electricity tariff or carbon price support of approximately US$50/tonne CO2 in the absence of any other incentive mechanisms or financing strategies. Given the difficulties of relying on any one single measure to finance a ...

  9. A proposal to finance low carbon investment in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aglietta, Michel; Espagne, Etienne; Perrissin Fabert, Baptiste

    2015-02-01

    This year, Europe is confronted with a critical double challenge: addressing the climate change issue and pulling itself out of a persistent low growth trap. Today these two challenges are addressed separately. On the one hand, climate negotiations must reach a historical agreement in the Paris conference in December 2015. On the other hand, the Juncker Plan of 315 billion euros of investment, and above all the ECB announcement of a massive purchase of assets for an amount of around 1100 billion euros, must help to avoid a deflationary spiral and stimulate a new flow of investments. Regarding climate policies, public regulators have essentially focused on a carbon price, which remains today at an insufficient level to trigger the financing needs of the low carbon transition. The potential of the banking and saving channels (targets of the asset purchase program of the ECB) to scale up climate finance is however neglected. This 'Note d'analyse' proposes to make private low-carbon assets eligible for the ECB asset purchase program. The carbon impact of these assets would benefit from a public guarantee that would value their carbon externality at a level sufficient to compensate the absence of an adequate carbon price. This mechanism would immediately impact the investment decisions of private actors with a positive effect on growth. It would also strongly incite governments to progressively implement carbon pricing tools to ensure that the public backing of the value of the carbon assets remains neutral with respect to public budgets. (authors)

  10. Power generation: country risk and other financing issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassou, M.

    2000-01-01

    Larger banks are very familiar with power generation financing. However, financing nuclear power plants remains a very peculiar field where nothing is possible without an agreement between the country of the buyer (sovereign guarantee) and the country of the supplier (intervention of the Export Credit Agency). The banks involved in such financing will commit themselves for a very long period of time which will exceed the financial markets' standard capabilities. Therefore it is only the intervention of the Export Credit Agencies which will allow the implementation of the required financing. It is, in fact, impossible to by-pass the country risks for these operations. Who, in 1986, during the signing ceremony of the Daya Bay contract, in the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, would have imagined that, three years later, the tanks would be rolling in on the adjacent Tien An Men Square, to confront the students and that one of the consequences would be the re-scheduling of the credits granted to Bank of China? Nobody. The Power Generation, above all the nuclear one, is a long term process and, as ever, all the parameters are not known from the very beginning. This situation provides an ideal setting for a good combination of joys and shudders. (author)

  11. The carbon market: major operational carbon funds and financed projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markandya, A.; Nobili, V.

    2008-01-01

    The flexible mechanisms envisaged by the Kyoto Protocol have led gradually to a global carbon market that has become very appetizing for companies operating in the sector. Financial instruments such as carbon funds, and investments in greenhouse-gas-reduction projects, now operate at the international level, counting on the development of new technologies and energy efficiency, and contributing to sustainable development in the countries that host the projects [it

  12. Financing renewable energy infrastructure: Formulation, pricing and impact of a carbon revenue bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Amy; Chiara, Nicola; Taylor, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Renewable energy systems depend on large financial incentives to compete with conventional generation methods. Market-based incentives, including state-level REC markets and international carbon markets have been proposed as solutions to increase renewable energy investment. In this paper we introduce and formulate a carbon revenue bond, a financing tool to complement environmental credit markets to encourage renewable energy investment. To illustrate its use, we value the bond by predicting future revenue using stochastic processes after analyzing historical price data. Three illustrative examples are presented for renewable energy development in three different markets: Europe, Australia and New Jersey. Our findings reveal that the sale of a carbon revenue bond with a ten year maturity can finance a significant portion of a project's initial cost. - Highlights: ► Current financial incentives for renewable energy in the US are inadequate. ► We introduce and structure a “carbon revenue bond” as an innovative financing tool. ► Stochastic models of environmental credit prices are used to illustrate bond pricing. ► Three examples illustrate revenue bond impact on initial cost of infrastructure.

  13. Research on the Development of Green Finance in Shenzhen to Boost the Carbon Trading Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiping; Xiong, Siqin; Zhou, Yucheng; Zou, Zijian; Ma, Xiaoming

    2017-08-01

    This paper analyses the current development situations of Shenzhen carbon trading market and China’s green finance, and makes the policy recommendations for promoting the carbon trading market by developing green finance in Shenzhen. Shenzhen should take the lead in driving the localized application of green principle, and formulate Shenzhen green bond guidelines ASAP, to promote carbon trading associated enterprises to finance by using green bonds; it shall work to lower the threshold for financial institutions to participate in carbon trading market, and explore development of carbon derivatives.

  14. Finance

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Voici la 17e édition du Rapport moral sur l’argent dans le monde, publié chaque année depuis 1994 par l’Association d’économie financière avec le soutien de la Caisse des Dépôts. Abordant une nouvelle fois les grands débats qui traversent actuellement le monde de la finance, il se consacre dans un premier temps à la lutte contre la criminalité et les délits financiers, et plus particulièrement à la lutte contre la corruption, la délinquance dans la finance et la fraude fiscale. Dans un second...

  15. Finance

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Ces deux ouvrages tirent les enseignements de l’impact de la crise de la finance mondiale sur l’économie réelle et se focalisent, dans ce contexte, sur le financement du Mittelstand. Le banquier JASCHINSKI, lorsqu’il passe en revue le système bancaire allemand, constate ainsi que si les moyennes entreprises trouvent les crédits nécessaires auprès de leurs solides partenaires de toujours que sont les Sparkassen, les grandes sociétés, internationales, que compte le Mittelstand n’ont pas de part...

  16. Sources of finance for power generation: an Asian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggard, Melville

    1994-01-01

    Data are presented which show there is no standard framework for financing independent power projects (IPPs) and that there is a close correlation between the simplicity of the financing solution and the state of development of the local capital market. Some aspects of the optimization of capital structure for IPP financing are considered. In order to increase access to finance, risks need to be minimized. Three principal areas of risk are identified. These are transparency and political risks, cashflow issues and bidding procedures. Strategies for minimizing these risks are outlined. Finally, fuel supply, technology and plant operation are briefly examined as factors influencing electricity price competitiveness. (1 table, 6 figures) (UK)

  17. Media reporting, carbon information disclosure, and the cost of equity financing: evidence from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Liu, Quanqi; Tang, Dengli; Xiong, Jucheng

    2017-04-01

    By using Shanghai and Shenzhen A-share listed companies in heavy polluting industry as research object from 2009 to 2014, this paper examines the relationship between media reporting, carbon information disclosure, and the cost of equity financing. The results show that media reporting can improve the quality of carbon information disclosure, and carbon information disclosure level is negatively associated with the cost of equity financing. This study also finds that financial carbon information disclosure and non-financial carbon information disclosure have significant negative relationship with the cost of equity financing respectively. Moreover, this paper shows that media reporting can strengthen the relationship between carbon information disclosure and the cost of equity financing.

  18. Finance

    OpenAIRE

    Spremann, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Bisher veröffentlicht unter dem Titel: "Modern Finance" Das Buch beinhaltet ebenso einige Portraits: Die didaktische Erfahrung lehrt, dass man sich wissenschaftliche Ergebnisse und Ansätze besser merken kann, wenn eine Assoziation zu jener Person bildlich konkret wird, der wir den betreffenden Denkansatz verdanken. Aus Fragen der Finanzierung und der Investitionsentscheidungen von Unternehmen ist in der Verschmelzung mit der Analyse von Kapitalmärkten ein grosses Gebiet entstanden, da...

  19. Carbon Emission Reduction with Capital Constraint under Greening Financing and Cost Sharing Contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Juanjuan; Zhao, Yuhui; Xia, Liangjie

    2018-04-13

    Motivated by the industrial practices, this work explores the carbon emission reductions for the manufacturer, while taking into account the capital constraint and the cap-and-trade regulation. To alleviate the capital constraint, two contracts are analyzed: greening financing and cost sharing. We use the Stackelberg game to model four cases as follows: (1) in Case A1, the manufacturer has no greening financing and no cost sharing; (2) in Case A2, the manufacturer has greening financing, but no cost sharing; (3) in Case B1, the manufacturer has no greening financing but has cost sharing; and, (4) in Case B2, the manufacturer has greening financing and cost sharing. Then, using the backward induction method, we derive and compare the equilibrium decisions and profits of the participants in the four cases. We find that the interest rate of green finance does not always negatively affect the carbon emission reduction of the manufacturer. Meanwhile, the cost sharing from the retailer does not always positively affect the carbon emission reduction of the manufacturer. When the cost sharing is low, both of the participants' profits in Case B1 (under no greening finance) are not less than that in Case B2 (under greening finance). When the cost sharing is high, both of the participants' profits in Case B1 (under no greening finance) are less than that in Case B2 (under greening finance).

  20. Carbon Emission Reduction with Capital Constraint under Greening Financing and Cost Sharing Contract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Juanjuan; Zhao, Yuhui; Xia, Liangjie

    2018-01-01

    Motivated by the industrial practices, this work explores the carbon emission reductions for the manufacturer, while taking into account the capital constraint and the cap-and-trade regulation. To alleviate the capital constraint, two contracts are analyzed: greening financing and cost sharing. We use the Stackelberg game to model four cases as follows: (1) in Case A1, the manufacturer has no greening financing and no cost sharing; (2) in Case A2, the manufacturer has greening financing, but no cost sharing; (3) in Case B1, the manufacturer has no greening financing but has cost sharing; and, (4) in Case B2, the manufacturer has greening financing and cost sharing. Then, using the backward induction method, we derive and compare the equilibrium decisions and profits of the participants in the four cases. We find that the interest rate of green finance does not always negatively affect the carbon emission reduction of the manufacturer. Meanwhile, the cost sharing from the retailer does not always positively affect the carbon emission reduction of the manufacturer. When the cost sharing is low, both of the participants’ profits in Case B1 (under no greening finance) are not less than that in Case B2 (under greening finance). When the cost sharing is high, both of the participants’ profits in Case B1 (under no greening finance) are less than that in Case B2 (under greening finance). PMID:29652859

  1. Carbon Finance – A Platform for Development of Sustainable Business in Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Nahar AL-HUSSAINI

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Since 1880, the temperature of global has increased by 0.85 degree Celsius. Due to the increase in temperature, the impact of climate change is constantly increasing, which is known as global warming. The increase in temperature is due to emission of greenhouse gases. Carbon dioxide is a major greenhouse gas, which is capable of causing serious hazardous influence to the environment. Carbon emission reduction and low-carbon economy development have become global targets and national policy in both developing and developed countries. Carbon finance is a tool for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG emissions using a process called capture and storage (CCS. Using this process, the carbon dioxide is captured and stored for further usage as a renewable resource. Carbon finance has a high impact on the growth of sustainable business development. This research analyzes the various possibilities of developing sustainable business through carbon trading in Kuwait and the strategic options offered by both government, as well as private sectors for carbon trading in Kuwait. The central focus of research is to discover the role of carbon finance in developing sustainable business and environmental quality. Since no previous research is conducted on the specific role of carbon finance in developing a sustainable business preferably in Kuwait, the influence of carbon financing in sustainable business development and environmental quality are analyzed in this research.

  2. Assessing the appropriateness of carbon financing for micro-scale projects in terms of capabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin Trethewy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Micro-scale development projects are currently underrepresented in global carbon markets. This paper outlines the process of becoming eligible to generate carbon credits and examines some of the barriers that may inhibit access to carbon markets. In particular, it focuses on barriers relating to the capacity and resources of the organisation developing the project. This approach represents a deviation from the standard discourse which has traditionally focused on barriers relating to the availability of up-front finance and the capacity of local public and private sector institutions required to participate in the carbon standard certification process. The paper contains an analysis of the carbon offset project cycle from which follows a discussion of potential capacity- related barriers focusing on time, skills and resources. Recommendations are made as to how these may be overcome with a particular focus on the role of technical organisations in assisting project developers. Completed during 2012 this research comes at an interesting time for global carbon markets as the Kyoto Protocol’s first commitment period ended in 2012 and negotiations have failed to produce and agreement that would commit major emitters to reductions targets from 2013 onward. Despite this, reducing greenhouse gas emissions has gained momentum on the national level and many governments are in the process of formulating and introducing emissions trading schemes.

  3. Examining possible relationship between carbon finance availability and growth of wind energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins C Ngwakwe

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the possible relationship between carbon fund availability and the growth of wind energy. This has become apposite considering global quest for renewable energies as a veritable option for carbon reduction and sustainable development. Whilst some extant literature blames delay in climate policy as an obstacle to green energy, others regard carbon finance availability as a booster to renewable energy. Raging argument is that similar to any other investment, renewable energy finance availability may mar or catalyse growth in renewable energy. Consequently, in this paper, a conceptual overview of carbon finance and renewable energy is undertaken and a test of the relationship between the World Bank carbon finance availability and wind energy growth is conducted. The result indicates a significant positive relationship between World Bank carbon financing and global growth in wind energy. The paper thus concludes that aside from policy options, renewable energy financing seems to be a contributory catalyst that may spur improvement in global renewable energy. The paper highlights that achieving green economic development in developing countries would depend, not only on climate policies alone, but also on sustainable financing. Hence government and private sources of funding is very desirable in achieving global green economic development, most importantly, for developing economies. The paper thus offers a research agenda on awareness creating for local and international sources of green energy for developing countries.

  4. Finance

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Régulièrement au cœur de l'actualité, les trois agences de notation (Standard & Poor's, Moody's et Fitch) règnent sur le monde de la finance internationale. Mais quelles sont-elles et à qui appartiennent-elles véritablement ? Détenues par de puissants fonds d'investissements, elles ont progressivement renforcé leurs rôles et pouvoirs. L'auteur interpelle le citoyen sur un système dans lequel les fonds d'investissements profitent des agences de notation (et de leur rôle de « gardien des marché...

  5. Finance

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Les investisseurs financiers et a fortiori les hedge fonds sont accusés de tous les maux. Ces « sauterelles » tomberaient sur les entreprises allemandes pour s’enrichir en les dépeçant. Un journaliste économique du quotidien des affaires Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung publie là un portrait objectif et factuel de ces « nouvelles stars » de la finance mondiale. Un portrait de branche, doublé d’une analyse de l’impact sur le « capitalisme rhénan » de la montée en puissance de ces nouveaux acteur...

  6. “Investments and public finance in a green, low carbon, economy”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carraro, Carlo; Favero, Alice; Massetti, Emanuele

    2012-01-01

    The paper evaluates the impacts on investments and public finance of a transition to a green, low carbon, economy induced by carbon taxation. Four global tax scenarios are examined using the integrated assessment model WITCH. Taxes are levied on all greenhouse gases (GHGs) and lead to global GHG concentrations equal to 680, 560, 500 and 460 ppm CO 2 -eq in 2100. Investments in the power sector increase with respect to the Reference scenario only with the two highest taxes. Investments in energy-related R and D increase in all tax scenarios, but they are a small fraction of GDP. Investments in oil upstream decline in all scenarios. As a result, total investments decline with respect to the Reference scenario. Carbon tax revenues are high in absolute terms and as share of GDP. With high carbon taxes, tax revenues follow a “carbon Laffer” curve. The model assumes that tax revenues are flawlessly recycled lump-sum into the economy. In all scenarios, the power sector becomes a net recipient of subsidies to support the absorption of GHGs. In some regions, with high carbon taxes, subsidies to GHG removal are higher than tax revenues at the end of the century. - Highlights: ► Costs, investments and tax revenues induced by carbon taxes are only loosely related. ► Investments in power generation increase only with stabilization targets below 550 ppm CO 2 -eq. ► The carbon taxes induce an overall contraction of investments. ► Tax revenues can be as high as 20% of GDP and follow a “carbon” Laffer curve. ► Subsidies for absorption of GHG may be higher than carbon taxes at the end of the century.

  7. Institute a modest carbon tax to reduce carbon emissions, finance clean energy technology development, cut taxes, and reduce the deficit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muro, Mark; Rothwell, Jonathan

    2012-11-15

    The nation should institute a modest carbon tax in order to help clean up the economy and stabilize the nation’s finances. Specifically, Congress and the president should implement a $20 per ton, steadily increasing carbon excise fee that would discourage carbon dioxide emissions while shifting taxation onto pollution, financing energy efficiency (EE) and clean technology development, and providing opportunities to cut taxes or reduce the deficit. The net effect of these policies would be to curb harmful carbon emissions, improve the nation’s balance sheet, and stimulate job-creation and economic renewal.

  8. The Status Quo and Developing Trend Analysis of Global Carbon Finance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Qian; Wang Yao

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives a systematic view of the new trends of global carbon finance innovation under the challenge of global climate change and in the process of transition to achieve economic growth from "high carbon" to 'low carbon', covering the following aspects: the structure, status quo and developing trend of global carbon market. The paper discusses the innovation in financial organization and service systems and governments' overall guidance and policy support, and draws the conclusion that the world is undergoing massive changes with governments actively responding to carbon finance to embrace the tremendous opportunities for clean energy and climate change in financial industry. To seize the opportunity, a complete and overall carbon finance system of China should be put in the top of the agenda. Given the current tasks of energy conservation and pollution reduction and the growing demand for capital input, China needs to construct an clear of policy guidance, a diversified financia service system, and a multi-approach carbon finance system to intensify and widen the participation of financial industry, to expand financing channels for sustainable economy and spread risks, and finally, work out an inexpensive solution to the realization of China's low carbon target.

  9. A monetary plan for upgrading climate finance and support the low-carbon transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hourcade, Jean Charles; Cassen, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This article examines how carbon finance can be part of a general reform of the financial system. Climate policies can indeed stimulate a sustainable and inclusive climate finance, in line with the call of the Cancun Agreement for a paradigm shift in climate negotiations. The mechanism described in this article is based on the adoption by Parties to the negotiations of a social value of carbon to trigger a wave of low-carbon investments in the world. Central banks offer credit lines for commercial banks backed by this social value of carbon, which are then used to cut the risk to invest in low- carbon investments. A future agreement in Paris next year should support this type of mechanisms.

  10. Point Climat no. 27 'Unlocking private investments in energy efficiency through carbon finance'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishlov, Igor; Bellassen, Valentin

    2013-01-01

    Among the publications of CDC Climat Research, 'Climate Briefs' presents, in a few pages, hot topics in climate change policy. This issue addresses the following points: According to the latest IEA World Energy Outlook, energy efficiency is a 'key option' in transition to a low-carbon economy. A decade of experience with the CDM and JI demonstrates that carbon finance can be used as an effective tool to unlock private investments in energy efficiency. Capital investments in offset projects may significantly exceed the expected carbon revenues resulting in an average weighted leverage ratio of 4:1 and 9:1 for the CDM and JI respectively, which is comparable to other international financial instruments. So far carbon finance has been used mostly for large-scale industrial energy efficiency projects in advanced developing countries and economies in transition, although it is increasingly suited to tap into scattered household energy efficiency projects

  11. A carbon finance fund for local communities: why? how? Study report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Nicolas; Delbosc, Anais; Dupont, Marion; Leseur, Alexia

    2013-09-01

    This study aims at promoting practices of ecological and social transition and sustainable development for local communities, and at developing the North-South solidarity in terms of development and struggle against poverty on issues like access to water and sanitation, and access to electrification by means of renewable energies. The first part describes the role of voluntary offsetting within the carbon finance, gives an overview of the use of carbon finance by local communities. The second part discusses the involvement of local communities in decentralized cooperation for climate-energy projects. The third one reports the analysis of the main benefits and constraints of the implementation of a local carbon fund in relationship with a decentralized cooperation approach

  12. For a conditional financing of low carbon risky projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meunier, Guy; Ponssard, Jean-Pierre

    2016-09-01

    Subsidies are extensively used for promoting the deployment of green technologies (renewables, clean development mechanism, electric vehicles...). Such policies may generate high windfall profits: some of the projects that benefited from the subsidies would have been undertaken anyway. The paper formalizes this situation using a simple principal agent framework under adverse selection. The agent may invest or not and obtain some private benefit in case of success. The principal observes both the investment and the eventual success, which generates a social benefit. Under some conditions it is shown that a subsidy paid conditional on failure (and not on success) limits the windfall profit while encouraging a large portfolio of projects to be invested. The relevance of this policy is discussed in the context of facilitating investment for infrastructure for fuel cell electric vehicles. (authors)

  13. Generating Electricity from Water through Carbon Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yifan; Chen, Peining; Peng, Huisheng

    2018-01-09

    Over the past ten years, electricity generation from water in carbon-based materials has aroused increasing interest. Water-induced mechanical-to-electrical conversion has been discovered in carbon nanomaterials, including carbon nanotubes and graphene, through the interaction with flowing water as well as moisture. In this Concept article, we focus on the basic principles of electric energy harvesting from flowing water through carbon nanomaterials, and summarize the material modification and structural design of these nanogenerators. The current challenges and potential applications of power conversion with carbon nanomaterials are finally highlighted. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Carbon abatement potential of solar home systems in India and their cost reduction due to carbon finance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaurey, A.; Kandpal, T.C.

    2009-01-01

    About 78 million rural households in India reportedly lack access to grid electricity. About 67 million of them use kerosene for lighting. Government of India is promoting the use of solar home systems (SHS) as one of the options for meeting lighting requirements in households in remote and less inhabited villages. About 363,399 SHS were reportedly disseminated across the country by December 2007. Apart from meeting the basic lighting need of the households, SHS also help in abating the emissions of green house gases (GHGs) by directly displacing the use of kerosene in households that currently use it for lighting. This study has attempted at estimating the CO 2 mitigation potential of SHS in India by studying the potential for their diffusion and the appropriate baseline. Subsequently, the scope for cost reduction to the user due to carbon finance, if received, is also studied. It is found that carbon finance could reduce the effective burden of SHS to the user by 19% if carbon prices were $10/tCO 2 and no transaction costs were involved in getting the carbon revenues. These benefits are also estimated for scenarios where transaction costs are incurred by the project proponent in getting the carbon benefits

  15. Mainstreaming Low-Carbon Climate-Resilient growth pathways into Development Finance Institutions' activities. A research project on the standards, tools and metrics to support transition to the low-carbon climate-resilient development models. Paper 1 - Climate and development finance institutions: linking climate finance, development finance and the transition to low-carbon, climate-resilient economic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschalier, Claire; Cochran, Ian; Deheza, Mariana; Risler, Ophelie; Forestier, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    Development finance institutions (DFIs) are in a position to be key actors in aligning development and the 2 deg. challenge. One of the principal challenges today is to scale-up the financial flows to the trillions of dollars per year necessary to achieve the 2 deg. C long-term objectives. Achieving this transition to a low-carbon, climate resilient (LCCR) economic model requires the integration or 'mainstreaming' of climate issues as a prism through which all investment decisions should be made. This paper presents an overview of the opportunities and challenges of linking a LCCR transition with the objectives of development finance. It first presents the two-fold challenge of climate change and development for countries around the world. Second, the paper explores the role of development finance institutions and their support for the transition to a low-carbon, climate-resilient economic model. Finally, it examines a necessary paradigm shift to integrate climate and development objectives to establish a 'LCCR development model' able to simultaneously tackling development priorities and needs for resilient, low-carbon growth. This will necessitate a move from focusing on a 'siloed' vision of climate finance to a means of aligning activities across the economy with the LCCR objectives to ensure that the majority of investments are coherent with this long-term transition. (authors)

  16. Innovative financing models for low carbon transitions: Exploring the case for revolving funds for domestic energy efficiency programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouldson, Andy; Kerr, Niall; Millward-Hopkins, Joel; Freeman, Mark C.; Topi, Corrado; Sullivan, Rory

    2015-01-01

    The IEA has estimated that over the next four decades US$31 trillion will be required to promote energy efficiency in buildings. However, the opportunities to make such investments are often constrained, particularly in contexts of austerity. We consider the potential of revolving funds as an innovative financing mechanism that could reduce investment requirements and enhance investment impacts by recovering and reinvesting some of the savings generated by early investments. Such funds have been created in various contexts, but there has never been a formal academic evaluation of their potential to contribute to low carbon transitions. To address this, we propose a generic revolving fund model and apply it using data on the costs and benefits of domestic sector retrofit in the UK. We find that a revolving fund could reduce the costs of domestic sector retrofit in the UK by 26%, or £9 billion, whilst also making such a scheme cost-neutral, albeit with significant up-front investments that would only pay for themselves over an extended period of time. We conclude that revolving funds could enable countries with limited resources to invest more heavily and more effectively in low carbon development, even in contexts of austerity. - Highlights: • Examines the need for substantially higher levels of low carbon investment. • Explores the need for innovative financing mechanisms such as revolving funds. • Shows that revolving a fund could reduce the cost of UK retrofit by £9 billion or 26%. • Also shows that a revolving fund could make retrofit cost-neutral in the long term. • Concludes that revolving funds could dramatically increase low carbon investment.

  17. The impact of financing schemes and income taxes on electricity generation costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertel, E.; Plante, J.

    2007-01-01

    Electricity generation cost estimates reported in many national and international studies provide a wealth of data to support economic assessments, and eventually to guide choices on generation sources and technologies. However, although the electricity generating cost is the criterion generally selected to present results, it is calculated by various means in different studies because the chosen approach must be relevant to the context of the specific project (private vs. stated-owned investor, regional differences...). The traditional constant-money levelized generation cost methodology is widely used by utilities, government agencies and international organisations to provide economic assessments of alternative generation options. It gives transparent and robust results, especially suitable for screening studies and international comparisons. However, the method, which is strictly economic, does not take into account all the factors influencing the choice of investors in liberalized electricity markets. In particular, it does not take into account financing schemes and income taxes which may hate a significant impact on the capital cost to be supported by the investor. The approach described below is based on the overall framework of average levelized lifetime cost evaluation, but it takes into account the financing scheme adopted by the investor and the income taxes supported by the plant operator/utility. It is similar to models which are used to analyse the economics of competing electricity generation sources in liberalized electricity markets, such as the merchant plant cash flow model adopted in the MIT study. (authors)

  18. Stakeholder views on financing carbon capture and storage demonstration projects in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, David; Liang, Xi

    2012-01-17

    Chinese stakeholders (131) from 68 key institutions in 27 provinces were consulted in spring 2009 in an online survey of their perceptions of the barriers and opportunities in financing large-scale carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) demonstration projects in China. The online survey was supplemented by 31 follow-up face-to-face interviews. The National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) was widely perceived as the most important institution in authorizing the first commercial-scale CCS demonstration project and authorization was viewed as more similar to that for a power project than a chemicals project. There were disagreements, however, on the appropriate size for a demonstration plant, the type of capture, and the type of storage. Most stakeholders believed that the international image of the Chinese Government could benefit from demonstrating commercial CCS and that such a project could also create advantages for Chinese companies investing in CCS technologies. In more detailed interviews with 16 financial officials, we found striking disagreements over the perceived risks of demonstrating CCS. The rate of return seen as appropriate for financing demonstration projects was split between stakeholders from development banks (who supported a rate of 5-8%) and those from commercial banks (12-20%). The divergence on rate alone could result in as much as a 40% difference in the cost of CO(2) abatement and 56% higher levelized cost of electricity based on a hypothetical case study of a typical 600-MW new build ultrasupercritical pulverized coal-fired (USCPC) power plant. To finance the extra operational costs, there were sharp divisions over which institutions should bear the brunt of financing although, overall, more than half of the support was expected to come from foreign and Chinese governments.

  19. Assessing the appropriateness of carbon financing for micro-scale projects in terms of capabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Caitlin Trethewy

    2013-01-01

    Micro-scale development projects are currently underrepresented in global carbon markets. This paper outlines the process of becoming eligible to generate carbon credits and examines some of the barriers that may inhibit access to carbon markets. In particular, it focuses on barriers relating to the capacity and resources of the organisation developing the project. This approach represents a deviation from the standard discourse which has traditionally focused on barriers relating to the avai...

  20. Wind power projects in the CDM: Methodologies and tools for baselines, carbon financing and sustainability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringius, L.; Grohnheit, P.E.; Nielsen, L.H.; Olivier, A.L.; Painuly, J.; Villavicencio, A.

    2002-12-01

    The report is intended to be a guidance document for project developers, investors, lenders, and CDM host countries involved in wind power projects in the CDM. The report explores in particular those issues that are important in CDM project assessment and development - that is, baseline development, carbon financing, and environmental sustainability. It does not deal in detail with those issues that are routinely covered in a standard wind power project assessment. The report tests, compares, and recommends methodologies for and approaches to baseline development. To present the application and implications of the various methodologies and approaches in a concrete context, Africa's largest wind farm-namely the 60 MW wind farm located in Zafarana, Egypt- is examined as a hypothetical CDM wind power project The report shows that for the present case example there is a difference of about 25% between the lowest (0.5496 tCO2/MWh) and the highest emission rate (0.6868 tCO 2 /MWh) estimated in accordance with these three standardized approaches to baseline development according to the Marrakesh Accord. This difference in emission factors comes about partly as a result of including hydroelectric power in the baseline scenario. Hydroelectric resources constitute around 21% of the generation capacity in Egypt, and, if excluding hydropower, the difference between the lowest and the highest baseline is reduced to 18%. Furthermore, since the two variations of the 'historical' baseline option examined result in the highest and the lowest baselines, by disregarding this baseline option altogether the difference between the lowest and the highest is reduced to 16%. The ES3-model, which the Systems Analysis Department at Risoe National Laboratory has developed, makes it possible for this report to explore the project-specific approach to baseline development in some detail. Based on quite disaggregated data on the Egyptian electricity system, including the wind power production

  1. Wind power projects in the CDM: Methodologies and tools for baselines, carbon financing and substainability analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringius, L.; Grohnheit, Poul Erik; Nielsen, Lars Henrik

    2002-01-01

    and implications of the various methodologies and approaches in a concrete context, Africa's largest wind farm-namely the 60 MW wind farm located in Zafarana,Egypt is examined as a hypothetical CDM wind power project The report shows that for the present case example there is a difference of about 25% between......The report is intended to be a guidance document for project developers, investors, lenders, and CDM host countries involved in wind power projects in the CDM. The report explores in particular those issues that are important in CDM project assessment anddevelopment - that is, baseline development......, carbon financing, and environmental sustainability. It does not deal in detail with those issues that are routinely covered in a standard wind power project assessment. The report tests, compares, andrecommends methodologies for and approaches to baseline development. To present the application...

  2. Mobilizing climate finance - A road-map to finance a low-carbon economy. Report of the Canfin-Grandjean Commission June 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canfin, Pascal; Grandjean, Alain; Cochran, Ian; Martini, Mireille

    2015-06-01

    This report presents the conclusions of the Canfin-Grandjean Commission and proposes to the President of the French Republic paths of action to mobilize increased public and private funding in the fight against climate change. It also forwards proposals on how the French government could advance the 'innovative climate finance agenda' in the various international forums in which it participates (G7, G20, IMF, OECD, etc.). The present report covers the financial instruments identified more than a decade ago as 'innovative' (financial transaction tax, carbon market auctions revenues, etc.). It, however, goes further to also look at the means of finding 'innovative' ways of using existing tools in the 'toolboxes' of both private and public actors to scale-up financial flows for the low-carbon economy. (authors)

  3. How to use SVMAs to reduce the Carbon Pricing and Climate Finance Gap: numerical illustrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hourcade, Jean-Charles; Pryadarshi, Shukla; La Rovere, Emilio

    A temporary gap is generated by the difference between the Social Value of Mitigation Activities (SVMA) and implementable carbon prices. A spectrum of options are available to handle this. These options encompass policy instruments that give different weights to ‘command and control’ measures...

  4. Next Generation Carbon-Nitrogen Dynamics Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C.; Fisher, R. A.; Vrugt, J. A.; Wullschleger, S. D.; McDowell, N. G.

    2012-12-01

    Nitrogen is a key regulator of vegetation dynamics, soil carbon release, and terrestrial carbon cycles. Thus, to assess energy impacts on the global carbon cycle and future climates, it is critical that we have a mechanism-based and data-calibrated nitrogen model that simulates nitrogen limitation upon both above and belowground carbon dynamics. In this study, we developed a next generation nitrogen-carbon dynamic model within the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM). This next generation nitrogen-carbon dynamic model utilized 1) a mechanistic model of nitrogen limitation on photosynthesis with nitrogen trade-offs among light absorption, electron transport, carboxylation, respiration and storage; 2) an optimal leaf nitrogen model that links soil nitrogen availability and leaf nitrogen content; and 3) an ecosystem demography (ED) model that simulates the growth and light competition of tree cohorts and is currently coupled to CLM. Our three test cases with changes in CO2 concentration, growing temperature and radiation demonstrate the model's ability to predict the impact of altered environmental conditions on nitrogen allocations. Currently, we are testing the model against different datasets including soil fertilization and Free Air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments across different forest types. We expect that our calibrated model will considerably improve our understanding and predictability of vegetation-climate interactions.itrogen allocation model evaluations. The figure shows the scatter plots of predicted and measured Vc,max and Jmax scaled to 25 oC (i.e.,Vc,max25 and Jmax25) at elevated CO2 (570 ppm, test case one), reduced radiation in canopy (0.1-0.9 of the radiation at the top of canopy, test case two) and reduced growing temperature (15oC, test case three). The model is first calibrated using control data under ambient CO2 (370 ppm), radiation at the top of the canopy (621 μmol photon/m2/s), the normal growing temperature (30oC). The fitted model

  5. CO2 and H2O: Understanding Different Stakeholder Perspectives on the Use of Carbon Credits to Finance Household Water Treatment Projects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K Summers

    Full Text Available Carbon credits are an increasingly prevalent market-based mechanism used to subsidize household water treatment technologies (HWT. This involves generating credits through the reduction of carbon emissions from boiling water by providing a technology that reduces greenhouse gas emissions linked to climate change. Proponents claim this process delivers health and environmental benefits by providing clean drinking water and reducing greenhouse gases. Selling carbon credits associated with HWT projects requires rigorous monitoring to ensure households are using the HWT and achieving the desired benefits of the device. Critics have suggested that the technologies provide neither the benefits of clean water nor reduced emissions. This study explores the perspectives of carbon credit and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH experts on HWT carbon credit projects.Thirteen semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with key informants from the WASH and carbon credit development sectors. The interviews explored perceptions of the two groups with respect to the procedures applied in the Gold Standard methodology for trading Voluntary Emission Reduction (VER credits.Agreement among the WASH and carbon credit experts existed for the concept of suppressed demand and parameters in the baseline water boiling test. Key differences, however, existed. WASH experts' responses highlighted a focus on objectively verifiable data for monitoring carbon projects while carbon credit experts called for contextualizing observed data with the need for flexibility and balancing financial viability with quality assurance.Carbon credit projects have the potential to become an important financing mechanism for clean energy in low- and middle-income countries. Based on this research we recommend that more effort be placed on building consensus on the underlying assumptions for obtaining carbon credits from HWT projects, as well as the approved methods for monitoring

  6. CO2 and H2O: Understanding Different Stakeholder Perspectives on the Use of Carbon Credits to Finance Household Water Treatment Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Sarah K; Rainey, Rochelle; Kaur, Maneet; Graham, Jay P

    2015-01-01

    Carbon credits are an increasingly prevalent market-based mechanism used to subsidize household water treatment technologies (HWT). This involves generating credits through the reduction of carbon emissions from boiling water by providing a technology that reduces greenhouse gas emissions linked to climate change. Proponents claim this process delivers health and environmental benefits by providing clean drinking water and reducing greenhouse gases. Selling carbon credits associated with HWT projects requires rigorous monitoring to ensure households are using the HWT and achieving the desired benefits of the device. Critics have suggested that the technologies provide neither the benefits of clean water nor reduced emissions. This study explores the perspectives of carbon credit and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) experts on HWT carbon credit projects. Thirteen semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with key informants from the WASH and carbon credit development sectors. The interviews explored perceptions of the two groups with respect to the procedures applied in the Gold Standard methodology for trading Voluntary Emission Reduction (VER) credits. Agreement among the WASH and carbon credit experts existed for the concept of suppressed demand and parameters in the baseline water boiling test. Key differences, however, existed. WASH experts' responses highlighted a focus on objectively verifiable data for monitoring carbon projects while carbon credit experts called for contextualizing observed data with the need for flexibility and balancing financial viability with quality assurance. Carbon credit projects have the potential to become an important financing mechanism for clean energy in low- and middle-income countries. Based on this research we recommend that more effort be placed on building consensus on the underlying assumptions for obtaining carbon credits from HWT projects, as well as the approved methods for monitoring correct and

  7. CO2 and H2O: Understanding Different Stakeholder Perspectives on the Use of Carbon Credits to Finance Household Water Treatment Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Sarah K.; Rainey, Rochelle; Kaur, Maneet; Graham, Jay P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Carbon credits are an increasingly prevalent market-based mechanism used to subsidize household water treatment technologies (HWT). This involves generating credits through the reduction of carbon emissions from boiling water by providing a technology that reduces greenhouse gas emissions linked to climate change. Proponents claim this process delivers health and environmental benefits by providing clean drinking water and reducing greenhouse gases. Selling carbon credits associated with HWT projects requires rigorous monitoring to ensure households are using the HWT and achieving the desired benefits of the device. Critics have suggested that the technologies provide neither the benefits of clean water nor reduced emissions. This study explores the perspectives of carbon credit and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) experts on HWT carbon credit projects. Methods Thirteen semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with key informants from the WASH and carbon credit development sectors. The interviews explored perceptions of the two groups with respect to the procedures applied in the Gold Standard methodology for trading Voluntary Emission Reduction (VER) credits. Results Agreement among the WASH and carbon credit experts existed for the concept of suppressed demand and parameters in the baseline water boiling test. Key differences, however, existed. WASH experts’ responses highlighted a focus on objectively verifiable data for monitoring carbon projects while carbon credit experts called for contextualizing observed data with the need for flexibility and balancing financial viability with quality assurance. Conclusions Carbon credit projects have the potential to become an important financing mechanism for clean energy in low- and middle-income countries. Based on this research we recommend that more effort be placed on building consensus on the underlying assumptions for obtaining carbon credits from HWT projects, as well as the approved

  8. Financing Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    William R. Kerr; Ramana Nanda

    2014-01-01

    We review the recent literature on the financing of innovation, inclusive of large companies and new startups. This research strand has been very active over the past five years, generating important new findings, questioning some long-held beliefs, and creating its own puzzles. Our review outlines the growing body of work that documents a role for debt financing related to innovation. We highlight the new literature on learning and experimentation across multi-stage innovation projects and h...

  9. Project finance and its limitations in terms of difficult political and structural horizons - the case of electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiancette, Georges; Penz, Philippe

    1994-01-01

    Illustrations are given of the kinds of difficulties attendant on the project financing of electricity generation in some developing countries and former socialist countries of Eastern Europe. There are risks due to the instability of the legal framework because of political considerations and also because the organization and regulation of the electricity supply industry is still being developed. Problems may arise because of the gap between the relatively short term of the repayable debt (10 to 12 years) and the lifetime of a typical project (of the order of 30 years). Project investment is usually entrusted to an independent body which often relies on the local electricity company to operate the power station. In this situation, the two bodies involved cannot mutually insure the risks. Exchange rates generate problems associated with convertibility on the one hand and fluctuations on the other. The particular problems which occur in the project financing of power station restoration are discussed. (UK)

  10. Energy and climate hand-in-hand: Financing RES-E support with carbon revenues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verde, Stefano F.; Pazienza, Maria Grazia

    2016-01-01

    In Italy, the cost of support for renewable electricity (RES-E) is largely recovered through the “A3 surcharge”, which weighs heavily on electricity bills. Using household survey data, we show the A3 surcharge is markedly regressive. Carbon taxation in the non-ETS sector is envisaged as a means to reduce CO_2 emissions cost-effectively and generate revenue to lower the A3 surcharge. A non-ETS carbon tax would be less regressive than the A3 surcharge and its cost would be more evenly distributed across households. We calculate the revenue of a €20/tCO_2 non-ETS carbon tax would have allowed a cut in the A3 surcharge of about 68% in 2011, and 39% in 2012. The impact of the carbon tax plus the reduced A3 surcharge would have been less regressive, but the cost higher for most households. The restrictions imposed in the simulations mean the results are only appropriate to render first-round effects of the reform. Policy relevance: In the vast majority of the EU Member States, the cost of RES-E support is largely paid by electricity consumers, most often through specific surcharges. Rising electricity prices are a common concern given the implications for competitiveness and equity. The Member States facing this issue could conveniently address it through environmental tax reforms consistent with the Climate and Energy Package. Replacing RES-E surcharges with carbon taxes in the non-ETS sector would permit cost-effective reduction of CO_2 emissions while allocating the cost of RES-E support more equitably. The difference in regressivity would stem from the different consumption patterns of home fuels (including electricity) and motor fuels across income distribution. A cross-country comparison of energy household budget shares proves the structural nature of this difference between home fuels and motor fuels. Moreover, the notion that electricity consumers should pay for RES-E support is questioned on the grounds that electricity is a basic necessity good and RES

  11. Financing a nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, R.

    2010-10-01

    Nuclear power plant construction projects have many characteristics in common with other types of large infrastructure investment, both within the power generation sector and elsewhere. However, nuclear power itself has special features that can make nuclear financing particularly challenging. These features include the high capital cost, the relatively long period required to recoup investments, the often controversial nature of nuclear projects. The need for clear solutions and financing schemes for radioactive waste management and decommissioning and the need for nuclear power plants to operate at high capacity factors, preferably under base load conditions. During the previous major expansion of nuclear power in the 1970 and 1980, many nuclear projects suffered very large construction delays and cost overruns. The legacy of such problems increases the risks perceived by potential investors. A recent study undertaken jointly by the Iea and the Nea showed that the competitiveness of nuclear power strongly depends on the cost of financing due to the high share of fixed capital costs in the total lifetime costs of nuclear power. A key issue in this context is the long-term predictability of carbon pricing arrangements, which, for the time being and despite positive evolutions in this respect, most notably in Europe, does not yet exist. This paper will consider how the risks can be mitigated and examine in detail various models for corporate finance and the role of government assistance in providing a suitable financial basis. (Author)

  12. The impact of carbon prices on generation-cycling costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denny, Eleanor; O'Malley, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of mechanisms aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions can have a serious impact on electricity system costs. A carbon mechanism that forces generators to internalise their emissions costs may alter the merit order in which generators are dispatched in the market. Heavy carbon dioxide polluters may switch from operating continuously to having to operate on the margin more often. This results in these units being required to switch on and off and vary their output more frequently, which has a significant impact on their costs. In this paper, the impact of carbon prices on the operating profiles of generators in a real electricity system is investigated. A large number of potential scenarios are considered and it is found that carbon prices significantly increase the cycling costs. These increased cycling costs significantly offset the carbon dioxide reduction benefits of the carbon price

  13. Off-balance-sheet financing can generate capital for strategic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campobasso, F D

    2000-06-01

    To manage their real estate portfolios effectively and obtain funding for strategic development, IDSs should consider adopting off-balance-sheet financing strategies, such as sale-and-leaseback transactions, synthetic leases, and joint-venture arrangements. Under these approaches, real estate assets are moved off of the organization's balance sheet via a partial or complete transfer of ownership to a third-party entity. The organization typically retains a satisfactory degree of control over the assets as lessee in sale-and-leaseback and synthetic-lease arrangements, or limited or minority partner in a joint venture, while freeing up cash to use for other strategic purposes.

  14. Interphase and intergranular stress generation in carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, E.C.; Daymond, M.R.; Withers, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    Neutron diffraction spectra have been acquired during tensile straining of high and low carbon steels, in order to compare the evolution of internal stress in ferritic steel with and without a reinforcing phase. In low carbon steel, the generation of intergranular stresses predominates, while in high carbon steel similar intergranular stresses among ferrite grain families are superposed upon a large redistribution of stress between phases. Comparison is made to calculations using elastoplastic self-consistent and finite element methods

  15. Financing options and economic impact: distributed generation using solar photovoltaic systems in Normal, Illinois

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin H. Jo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to increasing price volatility in fossil-fuel-produced energy, the demand for clean, renewable, and abundant energy is more prevalent than in past years. Solar photovoltaic (PV systems have been well documented for their ability to produce electrical energy while at the same time offering support to mitigate the negative externalities associated with fossil fuel combustion. Prices for PV systems have decreased over the past few years, however residential and commercial owners may still opt out of purchasing a system due to the overall price required for a PV system installation. Therefore, determining optimal financing options for residential and small-scale purchasers is a necessity. We report on payment methods currently used for distributed community solar projects throughout the US and suggest appropriate options for purchasers in Normal, Illinois given their economic status. We also examine the jobs and total economic impact of a PV system implementation in the case study area.

  16. Flow-driven voltage generation in carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The flow of various liquids and gases over single-walled carbon nanotube bundles induces an electrical signal (voltage/current) in the sample along the direction of the flow. The electrical response generated by the flow of liquids is found to be logarithmic in the flow speed over a wide range. In contrast, voltage generated ...

  17. Financing energy projects in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godier, Kevin; Marks, Jon

    1999-12-01

    Contains Executive Summary and Chapters on: Overview of financing trends in Africa; Multilateral support - Bedrock of Africa's first generation energy projects; ECA insurance and financing; Bilateral development finance; Offshore commercial bank lending; Local commercial bank finance; Capital markets; Legal ramifications ; Risk factors; Conclusions. (Author)

  18. 27.12 MHz plasma generation in supercritical carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Ayato; Toyota, Hiromichi; Nomura, Shinfuku; Takemori, Toshihiko; Mukasa, Shinobu; Maehara, Tsunehiro; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    An experiment was conducted for generating high-frequency plasma in supercritical carbon dioxide; it is expected to have the potential for applications in various types of practical processes. It was successfully generated at 6-20 MPa using electrodes mounted in a supercritical cell with a gap of 1 mm. Emission spectra were then measured to investigate the physical properties of supercritical carbon dioxide plasma. The results indicated that while the emission spectra for carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide could be mainly obtained at a low pressure, the emission spectra for atomic oxygen could be obtained in the supercritical state, which increased with the pressure. The temperature of the plasma in supercritical state was estimated to be approximately 6000-7000 K on the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium and the calculation results of thermal equilibrium composition in this state showed the increase of atomic oxygen by the decomposition of CO 2

  19. Financing the low-carbon transition in a fragile world economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hourcade, Jean-Charles

    2015-01-01

    An unfavorable economic situation will hinder the launching of the 'low-carbon transition' in compliance with an increase of approximately 2 deg. C - the official goal set by the international community for global warming. Reversing the perspective, this transition is seen, herein, as the grounds for a 'sustainable' growth based on a monetary policy that ties the emission of liquidities to investments in low-carbon facilities. 'Climate remediation [sic] assets' with a social value set by an agreement in the framework of the Convention on the Climate are discussed

  20. Financing the next generation of new reactors in the united states. Panel Discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, Kyle; Simard, Ron; Tran, K.C.; Kelly, Patrick; Green, Barrett E.; Quinn, Edward L.; Stamos, John

    2001-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: With the California energy shortage and new growth forecasts in the United States, significant new base-load generation will be needed in the near future to meet electricity demands. New figures for growth in electricity demand for the United States rose significantly because of Internet and related business expansion. Lack of sufficient natural gas supplies to support new generation in some regions is causing a renewed interest in building new nuclear plants. Speakers will address the current status of available and near-term design options including both the U.S. Department of Energy Generation III and IV design packages, infrastructure challenges, and financial models that show that nuclear is competitive with alternatives and a prudent and profitable investment. (authors)

  1. Pt coating on flame-generated carbon particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, In Dae; Lee, Dong Geun

    2008-01-01

    Carbon black, activated carbon and carbon nanotube have been used as supporting materials for precious metal catalysts used in fuel cell electrodes. One-step flame synthesis method is used to coat 2-5nm Pt dots on flame-generated carbon particles. By adjusting flame temperature, gas flow rates and resident time of particles in flame, we can obtain Pt/C nano catalyst-support composite particles. Additional injection of hydrogen gas facilitates pyrolysis of Pt precursor in flame. The size of as-incepted Pt dots increases along the flame due to longer resident time and sintering in high temperature flame. Surface coverage and dispersion of the Pt dots is varied at different sampling heights and confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Energy Dispersive Spectra (EDS) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Crystallinity and surface bonding groups of carbon are investigated through X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscoy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy

  2. Tendances Carbone no. 103. EU ETS auctions revenues: few guidelines to improve use for the low-carbon transition financing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidyula, Manasvini; Alberola, Emilie

    2015-05-01

    Among the publications of CDC Climat Research, 'Tendances Carbone' bulletin specifically studies the developments of the European market for CO 2 allowances. Beside some statistical figures about energy production/consumption and carbon markets, this issue specifically addresses the following points: - EU ETS - MSR negotiations: On May 26, the Environment Committee of the EU Parliament approved the consolidated text for the implementation of the MSR as from 2019, and a placement of back-loaded as well as unused allowances straight into the reserve. A vote in plenary session is scheduled on 7 July. - EU ETS reform: A vote in EU Parliament is scheduled on 7 July to endorse the MSR. The European Commission should propose measures to tackle carbon leakages issues in the six months following the adoption of the MSR. - EU ETS emissions: Emissions under the EU ETS decreased by 4,5 % in 2014, and reached 1,812 Mt CO 2 e

  3. Data Mining in Finance: Using Counterfactuals To Generate Knowledge from Organizational Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Vasant

    1998-01-01

    Shows how counterfactuals and machine learning methods can be used to guide exploration of large databases that addresses some of the fundamental problems that organizations face in learning from data. Discusses data mining, particularly in the financial arena; generating useful knowledge from data; and the evaluation of counterfactuals. (LRW)

  4. BANKING RETAIL CONSUMER FINANCE DATA GENERATOR – CREDIT SCORING DATA REPOSITORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karol Przanowski

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents two cases of random banking data generators based on migration matrices and scoring rules. The banking data generator is a breakthrough in researches aimed at finding a method to compare various credit scoring techniques. These data are very useful for various analyses to understand the complexity of banking processes in a better way and are also of use for students and their researches. Another application can be in the case of small samples, e.g. when historical data are too fresh or are connected with the processing of a small number of exposures. In these cases a data generator can extend a sample to an adequate size for advanced analysis. The influence of one cyclic macro-economic variable on client characteristics and their stability over time is analyzed. Some stimulating conclusions for crisis behavior are presented, namely that if a crisis is impacted by both factors: application and behavioral, then it is very difficult to clearly indicate these factors in a typical scoring analysis and the crisis becomes widespread in every kind of risk report.

  5. Financing investment in new electricity generation capacity in Northwest Europe. Policy brief

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozdemir, O.; De Joode, J.; Koutstaal, P.R. [ECN Policy Studies, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-05-15

    Current Northwest European electricity markets are designed as 'energy-only' markets. In an energy-only market the price received for electricity produced is set by the marginal generation unit and potentially leaves the owners of these units with 'missing money': i.e. money that is required to recover investment cost. With a much higher penetration of intermittent electricity sources such as wind and solar PV, these markets may not be capable of providing sufficient incentives for investment in generation capacity, because operating hours and scarcity rents for peak and mid-merit order capacity will be considerably reduced. There are a number of options available to address this missing money problem. First of all, options should be explored which focus on improving the existing electricity markets. These options include increasing flexibility in both supply and demand improving the profitability of investments, for example by means of removing (implicit) price caps and allowing for long-term contracts. Next to these options which can help increase the revenue for generation investments some form of capacity mechanism such as capacity payments or capacity markets could be introduced. These capacity mechanisms have attracted considerable attention in recent years, both in the literature and in the policy debate, with a number of countries considering the introduction of such mechanisms. However, unilateral introduction of capacity mechanisms in integrated electricity markets can have a considerable impact on cross border electricity flows and investment decisions. It might negatively affect security of supply in neighbouring countries and will result in price differences between consumers within a country which have to bear the costs of capacity mechanisms and those outside those countries. Moreover, unilateral capacity mechanisms can disrupt the functioning of the internal energy market. Before the implementation of capacity mechanisms

  6. Payments for environmental services – Carbon finance options for smallholders’ agroforestry in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Seeberg-Elverfeldt

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Up to 25 percent of all anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions are caused by deforestation, and Indonesia is the third largest greenhouse gas emitter worldwide due to land use change and deforestation. On the island of Sulawesi in the vicinity of the Lore Lindu National Park (LLNP, many smallholders contribute to conversion processes at the forest margin as a result of their agricultural practices. Specifically the area dedicated to cocoa plantations has increased from zero (1979 to nearly 18,000 hectares (2001. Some of these plots have been established inside the 220,000 hectares of the LLNP. An intensification process is observed with a consequent reduction of the shade tree density. This study assesses which impact carbon sequestration payments for forest management systems have on the prevailing land use systems. Additionally, the level of incentives is determined which motivates farmers to desist from further deforestation and land use intensification activities. Household behaviour and resource allocation is analysed with a comparative static linear programming model. As these models prove to be a reliable tool for policy analysis, the output can indicate the adjustments in resource allocation and land use shifts when introducing compensation payments. The data was collected in a household survey in six villages around the LLNP. Four household categories are identified according to their dominant agroforestry systems. These range from low intensity management with a high degree of shading to highly intensified systems with no shade cover. At the plot level, the payments required for inducing the adoption of more sustainable land use practices are the highest for the full shade cocoa agroforestry system, but with low carbon prices of €5 tCO2e-1 these constitute 5 percent of the cocoa gross margin. Focusing on the household level, however, an increase up to 18 percent of the total gross margin can be realised. Furthermore, for

  7. Dynamics of carbon abatement in the Second Generation Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sands, Ronald D.

    2004-01-01

    The Second Generation Model (SGM) is a collection of computable-general-equilibrium models developed for analysis of policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Behavior of the Second Generation Model, with respect to changes in carbon prices, can be summarized using marginal abatement cost curves. Marginal abatement costs vary over time, as capital stocks adjust to a new set of prices, and across countries, depending in part on the mix of fuels in the existing energy system. This paper documents the production structure in SGM, marginal abatement cost curves derived from SGM with constant-carbon-price experiments, an application to several Energy Modeling Forum scenarios, and a methodology for including carbon capture and disposal in SGM

  8. Can conservation funding be left to carbon finance? Evidence from participatory future land use scenarios in Peru, Indonesia, Tanzania, and Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikumar, Ashwin; Larjavaara, Markku; Larson, Anne; Kanninen, Markku

    2017-01-01

    Revenues derived from carbon have been seen as an important tool for supporting forest conservation over the past decade. At the same time, there is high uncertainty about how much revenue can reasonably be expected from land use emissions reductions initiatives. Despite this uncertainty, REDD+ projects and conservation initiatives that aim to take advantage of available or, more commonly, future funding from carbon markets have proliferated. This study used participatory multi-stakeholder workshops to develop divergent future scenarios of land use in eight landscapes in four countries around the world: Peru, Indonesia, Tanzania, and Mexico. The results of these future scenario building exercises were analyzed using a new tool, CarboScen, for calculating the landscape carbon storage implications of different future land use scenarios. The findings suggest that potential revenues from carbon storage or emissions reductions are significant in some landscapes (most notably the peat forests of Indonesia), and much less significant in others (such as the low-carbon forests of Zanzibar and the interior of Tanzania). The findings call into question the practicality of many conservation programs that hinge on expectations of future revenue from carbon finance. The future scenarios-based approach is useful to policy-makers and conservation program developers in distinguishing between landscapes where carbon finance can substantially support conservation, and landscapes where other strategies for conservation and land use should be prioritized.

  9. Generation, capture, and utilization of industrial carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Andrew J; Sin, Emily H K; Marriott, Ray; Clark, James H

    2010-03-22

    efficiency and lower per capita consumption, and replacing fossil energy sources with sources such as wind, wave, and solar, respectively). "Low carbon" is of inherently less value to the chemical and plastics industries at least in terms of raw materials although a version of (2), the use of biomass, does apply, especially if we use carbon sources that are renewable on a human timescale. There is however, another renewable, natural source of carbon that is widely available and for which greater utilization would help restore material balance and the natural cycle for carbon in terms of resource and waste. CO(2), perhaps the most widely discussed and feared chemical in modern society, is as fundamental to our survival as water, and like water we need to better understand the human as well as natural production and consumption of CO(2) so that we can attempt to get these into a sustainable balance. Current utilization of this valuable resource by the chemical industry is only 90 megatonne per year, compared to the 26.3 gigatonne CO(2) generated annually by combustion of fossil fuels for energy generation, as such significant opportunities exist for increased utilization of CO(2) generated from industrial processes. It is also essential that renewable energy is used if CO(2) is to be utilized as a C1 building block.

  10. Financing landfill gas projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bull, R.

    1992-01-01

    The problems of financing landfill gas projects in the UK in the last few years are discussed. The approach of the author in setting up a company to finance such projects in the power generation field and a separate company to design and supply turnkey packages is reported. (UK)

  11. FINANCING OF INTERNATIONAL TRANSACTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RADU NICOLAE BĂLUNĂ

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Financing (funding is essentially the purchase of funds necessary for a business. This can be done from internal sources (company’s own funds or external (borrowed funds. The high value of goods traded in international trade makes revenues generated from internal resources not sufficient to settle the value of the goods. Thus, it is frequent to resort to borrowed funds. In International Business Transactions, external financing is done both by classical techniques of credit (credit supplier and buyer credit and modern techniques of financing (factoring, forfeiting, leasing all trade tailored. In terms of the length of financing, accounting funding is short-term (1-12 months and long-term financing (over a year. In principle, export and import operations prevailing short-term financing techniques, while international investment and industrial cooperation actions are specific long-term funding

  12. Status of thermal power generation in India-Perspectives on capacity, generation and carbon dioxide emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Subhodip

    2010-01-01

    India's reliance on fossil-fuel based electricity generation has aggravated the problem of high carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from combustion of fossil fuels, primarily coal, in the country's energy sector. The objective of this paper is to analyze thermal power generation in India for a four-year period and determine the net generation from thermal power stations and the total and specific CO 2 emissions. The installed generating capacity, net generation and CO 2 emissions figures for the plants have been compared and large generators, large emitters, fuel types and also plant vintage have been identified. Specific emissions and dates of commissioning of plants have been taken into account for assessing whether specific plants need to be modernized. The focus is to find out areas and stations which are contributing more to the total emissions from all thermal power generating stations in the country and identify the overall trends that are emerging.

  13. Who? What? Why? Wind power and the finance industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rave, K.

    1999-01-01

    This article focuses on the financing of wind energy projects and examines worldwide energy markets. Questioning raised include who invests in energy project and seeks financing; where is the project to be sited and under what legal background the investment is to be made; and how much power can be generated and the effect of this on the proposal feasibility. The provision of a stable basis for financing, the probable integration of wind power into energy services, the use of wind energy to supply the carbon dioxide reductions obligations, and the opportunities for financial services are discussed

  14. Integrated biofuel facility, with carbon dioxide consumption and power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, E.E.; Hill, G.A. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2009-07-01

    This presentation provided details of an economical design for a large-scale integrated biofuel facility for coupled production of bioethanol and biodiesel, with carbon dioxide capture and power generation. Several designs were suggested for both batch and continuous culture operations, taking into account all costs and revenues associated with the complete plant integration. The microalgae species Chlorella vulgaris was cultivated in a novel photobioreactor (PBR) in order to consume industrial carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). This photosynthetic culture can also act as a biocathode in a microbial fuel cell (MFC), which when coupled to a typical yeast anodic half cell, results in a complete biological MFC. The photosynthetic MFC produces electricity as well as valuable biomass and by-products. The use of this novel photosynthetic microalgae cathodic half cell in an integrated biofuel facility was discussed. A series of novel PBRs for continuous operation can be integrated into a large-scale bioethanol facility, where the PBRs serve as cathodic half cells and are coupled to the existing yeast fermentation tanks which act as anodic half cells. These coupled MFCs generate electricity for use within the biofuel facility. The microalgae growth provides oil for biodiesel production, in addition to the bioethanol from the yeast fermentation. The photosynthetic cultivation in the cathodic PBR also requires carbon dioxide, resulting in consumption of carbon dioxide from bioethanol production. The paper also discussed the effect of plant design on net present worth and internal rate of return. tabs., figs.

  15. Laser-generated plasma by carbon nanoparticles embedded into polyethylene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Torrisi, L.; Ceccio, G.; Cutroneo, Mariapompea

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 375, MAY (2016), s. 93-99 ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : carbon nanoparticles * laser-generated plasma * Time-of-flight measurements * advanced targets Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.109, year: 2016

  16. The carbon emissions generated in all that we consume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    perspectives. This reallocation shows that: The emissions from Electricity Production can be completely reallocated to the end user categories of that electricity. For example, the Hotels, Catering and Pubs category now includes the emissions from the generation of the electricity used to heat hotels and refrigerate and cook restaurant food; and The supply chains in the Hotels, Catering and Pubs category now have the largest carbon emissions at 8.3 MtC. This is followed by Motor Vehicle Production and Health and Veterinary Services, at 7.1 MtC and 6.1 MtC respectively. Finally, the consumption categories can be summed together into high-level consumer needs. In these perspectives, emissions from domestic electricity, domestic fuel use and domestic private transport fuel use are added in. Aviation fuel emissions are still excluded. This perspective shows: The supply chains associated with Recreation and Leisure have the highest emissions at 31.6 MtC. Just under half of this is transport emissions; This is followed by Space Heating of buildings with 24.0 MtC and Food and Catering at 22.4 MtC. The majority of Space Heating emissions occur directly in the building, whereas two thirds of carbon emissions from Food and Catering are embodied in the products consumed; and in total, UK consumers use products and services with a combined carbon footprint of 176.4 MtC. This is 11.7 MtC greater than the emissions from all UK production. This means that the UK is a net importer of carbon intensive products and services from abroad. (UK)

  17. Electricity generation from wetlands with activated carbon bioanode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudirjo, E.; Buisman, C. J. N.; Strik, D. P. B. T. B.

    2018-03-01

    Paddy fields are potential non-tidal wetlands to apply Plant Microbial Fuel Cell (PMFC) technology. World widely they cover about 160 million ha of which 13.3 million ha is located in Indonesia. With the PMFC, in-situ electricity is generated by a bioanode with electrochemically active bacteria which use primary the organic matter supplied by the plant (e.g. as rhizodeposits and plant residues). One of limitations when installing a PMFC in a non-tidal wetland is the usage of “expensive” large amounts of electrodes to overcome the poor conductivity of wet soils. However, in a cultivated wetland such as rice paddy field, it is possible to alter soil composition. Adding a conductive carbon material such as activated carbon is believed to improve soil conductivity with minimum impact on plant vitality. The objective of this research was to study the effect of activated carbon as an alternative bioanode material on the electricity output and plants vitality. Lab result shows that activated carbon can be a potential alternative for bioanode material. It can continuously deliver current on average 1.54 A/m3 anode (0.26 A/m2 PGA or 66 mW/m2 PGA) for 98 days. Based on this result the next step is to do a test of this technology in the real paddy fields.

  18. Assessment of the Aerosol Generation and Toxicity of Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick T. O'Shaughnessy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Current interest in the pulmonary toxicity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs has resulted in a need for an aerosol generation system that is capable of consistently producing a CNT aerosol at a desired concentration level. This two-part study was designed to: (1 assess the properties of a commercially-available aerosol generator when producing an aerosol from a purchased powder supply of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs; and (2 assess the pulmonary sub-acute toxicity of DWCNTs in a murine model during a 5-day (4 h/day whole-body exposure. The aerosol generator, consisting of a novel dustfeed mechanism and venturi ejector was determined to be capable of producing a DWCNT consistently over a 4 h exposure period at an average level of 10.8 mg/m3. The count median diameter was 121 nm with a geometric standard deviation of 2.04. The estimated deposited dose was 32 µg/mouse. The total number of cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid was significantly (p < 0.01 increased in exposed mice compared to controls. Similarly, macrophages in BAL fluid were significantly elevated in exposed mice, but not neutrophils. All animals exposed to CNT and euthanized immediately after exposure had changes in the lung tissues showing acute inflammation and injury; however these pathological changes resolved two weeks after the exposure.

  19. Solution-Processed Carbon Nanotube True Random Number Generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaviria Rojas, William A; McMorrow, Julian J; Geier, Michael L; Tang, Qianying; Kim, Chris H; Marks, Tobin J; Hersam, Mark C

    2017-08-09

    With the growing adoption of interconnected electronic devices in consumer and industrial applications, there is an increasing demand for robust security protocols when transmitting and receiving sensitive data. Toward this end, hardware true random number generators (TRNGs), commonly used to create encryption keys, offer significant advantages over software pseudorandom number generators. However, the vast network of devices and sensors envisioned for the "Internet of Things" will require small, low-cost, and mechanically flexible TRNGs with low computational complexity. These rigorous constraints position solution-processed semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as leading candidates for next-generation security devices. Here, we demonstrate the first TRNG using static random access memory (SRAM) cells based on solution-processed SWCNTs that digitize thermal noise to generate random bits. This bit generation strategy can be readily implemented in hardware with minimal transistor and computational overhead, resulting in an output stream that passes standardized statistical tests for randomness. By using solution-processed semiconducting SWCNTs in a low-power, complementary architecture to achieve TRNG, we demonstrate a promising approach for improving the security of printable and flexible electronics.

  20. Project financing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, A.

    1998-01-01

    Project financing was defined ('where a lender to a specific project has recourse only to the cash flow and assets of that project for repayment and security respectively') and its attributes were described. Project financing was said to be particularly well suited to power, pipeline, mining, telecommunications, petro-chemicals, road construction, and oil and gas projects, i.e. large infrastructure projects that are difficult to fund on-balance sheet, where the risk profile of a project does not fit the corporation's risk appetite, or where higher leverage is required. Sources of project financing were identified. The need to analyze and mitigate risks, and being aware that lenders always take a conservative view and gravitate towards the lowest common denominator, were considered the key to success in obtaining project financing funds. TransAlta Corporation's project financing experiences were used to illustrate the potential of this source of financing

  1. Corporate finance

    OpenAIRE

    P. Quiry; Y. Le Fur; A. Salvi; M. Dallocchio; P. Vernimmen

    2011-01-01

    Corporate Finance: Theory and Practice, 3rd Edition, the website www.vernimmen.com and the Vernimmen.com newsletter are all written and created by an author team who are both investment bankers/corporate financiers and academics. This book covers the theory and practice of Corporate Finance from a truly European perspective. It shows how to use financial theory to solve practical problems and is written for students of corporate finance and financial analysis and practising corporate financie...

  2. Consumer Finance

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Tufano

    2009-01-01

    Although consumer finance is a substantial element of the economy, it has had a smaller footprint within financial economics. In this review, I suggest a functional definition of the subfield of consumer finance, focusing on four key functions: payments, risk management, moving funds from today to tomorrow (saving/investing), and from tomorrow to today (borrowing). I provide data showing the economic importance of consumer finance in the American economy. I propose a historical explanation fo...

  3. Project financing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, M.U.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the basic concepts and components of the project financing of large industrial facilities. Diagrams of a simple partnership structure and a simple leveraged lease structure are included. Finally, a Hypothetical Project is described with basic issues identified for discussion purposes. The topics of the paper include non-recourse financing, principal advantages and objectives, disadvantages, project financing participants and agreements, feasibility studies, organization of the project company, principal agreements in a project financing, insurance, and an examination of a hypothetical project

  4. Abatement and mitigation of carbon dioxide emissions from power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freund, P.; Audus, H.

    1998-01-01

    Current understanding of the world's climate indicates that human-induced changes are occurring and may be sufficient in magnitude to require preventative action, such as limiting atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. The main anthropogenic greenhouse gas is carbon dioxide and its largest source is combustion of fossil fuels for power generation. Many different technologies can be used for reducing emissions, as well as increasing the removal of CO 2 from the atmosphere through enhancement of natural sinks, such as by forestry. Some of these options are available today and could be implemented at relatively little overall cost. For example, improving energy efficiency and switching from high carbon fuels to low carbon fuels, if suitable supplies are available. These can achieve significant reductions in CO 2 emissions. Introduction of renewable sources of energy or nuclear power to displace fossil fuels would achieve deep reductions in emissions if applied widely. However, to avoid disruptive changes, it will also be necessary to find ways of continuing to use fossil fuels but with much less emissions. Capture and storage of CO 2 is a technology which could deliver deep reductions in emissions from fossil fuels. In this paper, methods of removing CO 2 from the flue gas streams of coal and gas-fired power plants are examined, considering both plant as built today as well as possible future variants. Methods of CO 2 storage are also discussed. The results on capture and storage of CO 2 are put into perspective by comparison with studies of the large-scale application of forestry for sequestering atmospheric CO 2 , and also large-scale use of renewable energy sources, in this case growth and harvesting of woody biomass for power generation. Each of these options has different characteristics, providing a range of choices of ways of tackling climate change

  5. The financing of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, M.

    2009-01-01

    Existing nuclear generating capacity plays an important role in providing secure, economic and low-carbon electricity supplies in many OECD countries. At the same time, there is increasing recognition that an expansion of nuclear power could play a valuable role in reducing future carbon dioxide emissions. However, in recent years only a handful of new nuclear power plants (NPPs) have been built in just a few OECD countries. An important reason for this is the challenges associated with financing the construction of new NPPs

  6. Behavioral finance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapor Predrag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discuss some general principles of behavioral finance Behavioral finance is the dynamic and promising field of research that mergers concepts from financial economics and cognitive psychology in attempt to better understand systematic biases in decision-making process of financial agents. While the standard academic finance emphasizes theories such as modern portfolio theory and the efficient market hypothesis, the behavioral finance investigates the psychological and sociological issues that impact the decision-making process of individuals, groups and organizations. Most of the research behind behavioral finance has been empirical in nature, concentrating on what people do and why. The research has shown that people do not always act rationally, nor they fully utilise all information available to them.

  7. Water electrolysis with a conducting carbon cloth: subthreshold hydrogen generation and superthreshold carbon quantum dot formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, Mandakini; Deshpande, Aparna; Kelkar, Sarika; Ogale, Satishchandra

    2014-03-01

    A conducting carbon cloth, which has an interesting turbostratic microstructure and functional groups that are distinctly different from other ordered forms of carbon, such as graphite, graphene, and carbon nanotubes, was synthesized by a simple one-step pyrolysis of cellulose fabric. This turbostratic disorder and surface chemical functionalities had interesting consequences for water splitting and hydrogen generation when such a cloth was used as an electrode in the alkaline electrolysis process. Importantly, this work also gives a new twist to carbon-assisted electrolysis. During electrolysis, the active sites in the carbon cloth allow slow oxidation of its surface to transform the surface groups from COH to COOH and so forth at a voltage as low as 0.2 V in a two-electrode system, along with platinum as the cathode, instead of 1.23 V (plus overpotential), which is required for platinum, steel, or even graphite anodes. The quantity of subthreshold hydrogen evolved was 24 mL cm(-2)  h(-1) at 1 V. Interestingly, at a superthreshold potential (>1.23 V+overpotential), another remarkable phenomenon was found. At such voltages, along with the high rate and quantity of hydrogen evolution, rapid exfoliation of the tiny nanoscale (5-7 nm) units of carbon quantum dots (CQDs) are found in copious amounts due to an enhanced oxidation rate. These CQDs show bright-blue fluorescence under UV light. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Terahertz generation via laser coupling to anharmonic carbon nanotube array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Soni; Vijay, A.

    2018-02-01

    A scheme of terahertz radiation generation employing a matrix of anharmonic carbon nanotubes (CNTs) embedded in silica is proposed. The matrix is irradiated by two collinear laser beams that induce large excursions on CNT electrons and exert a nonlinear force at the beat frequency ω = ω1-ω2. The force derives a nonlinear current producing THz radiation. The THz field is resonantly enhanced at the plasmon resource, ω = ω p ( 1 + β ) / √{ 2 } , where ωp is the plasma frequency and β is a characteristic parameter. Collisions are a limiting factor, suppressing the plasmon resonance. For typical values of plasma parameters, we obtain power conversion efficiency of the order of 10-6.

  9. Low-carbon energy generates public health savings in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Christina B.; Yang, Chris; Yeh, Sonia; Ogden, Joan; Kleeman, Michael J.

    2018-04-01

    California's goal to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to a level that is 80 % below 1990 levels by the year 2050 will require adoption of low-carbon energy sources across all economic sectors. In addition to reducing GHG emissions, shifting to fuels with lower carbon intensity will change concentrations of short-lived conventional air pollutants, including airborne particles with a diameter of less than 2.5 µm (PM2.5) and ozone (O3). Here we evaluate how business-as-usual (BAU) air pollution and public health in California will be transformed in the year 2050 through the adoption of low-carbon technologies, expanded electrification, and modified activity patterns within a low-carbon energy scenario (GHG-Step). Both the BAU and GHG-Step statewide emission scenarios were constructed using the energy-economic optimization model, CA-TIMES, that calculates the multi-sector energy portfolio that meets projected energy supply and demand at the lowest cost, while also satisfying scenario-specific GHG emissions constraints. Corresponding criteria pollutant emissions for each scenario were then spatially allocated at 4 km resolution to support air quality analysis in different regions of the state. Meteorological inputs for the year 2054 were generated under a Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 future climate. Annual-average PM2.5 and O3 concentrations were predicted using the modified emissions and meteorology inputs with a regional chemical transport model. In the final phase of the analysis, mortality (total deaths) and mortality rate (deaths per 100 000) were calculated using established exposure-response relationships from air pollution epidemiology combined with simulated annual-average PM2.5 and O3 exposure. Net emissions reductions across all sectors are -36 % for PM0.1 mass, -3.6 % for PM2.5 mass, -10.6 % for PM2.5 elemental carbon, -13.3 % for PM2.5 organic carbon, -13.7 % for NOx, and -27.5 % for NH3. Predicted deaths associated with air

  10. Low-carbon energy generates public health savings in California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. B. Zapata

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available California's goal to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG emissions to a level that is 80 % below 1990 levels by the year 2050 will require adoption of low-carbon energy sources across all economic sectors. In addition to reducing GHG emissions, shifting to fuels with lower carbon intensity will change concentrations of short-lived conventional air pollutants, including airborne particles with a diameter of less than 2.5 µm (PM2.5 and ozone (O3. Here we evaluate how business-as-usual (BAU air pollution and public health in California will be transformed in the year 2050 through the adoption of low-carbon technologies, expanded electrification, and modified activity patterns within a low-carbon energy scenario (GHG-Step. Both the BAU and GHG-Step statewide emission scenarios were constructed using the energy–economic optimization model, CA-TIMES, that calculates the multi-sector energy portfolio that meets projected energy supply and demand at the lowest cost, while also satisfying scenario-specific GHG emissions constraints. Corresponding criteria pollutant emissions for each scenario were then spatially allocated at 4 km resolution to support air quality analysis in different regions of the state. Meteorological inputs for the year 2054 were generated under a Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP 8.5 future climate. Annual-average PM2.5 and O3 concentrations were predicted using the modified emissions and meteorology inputs with a regional chemical transport model. In the final phase of the analysis, mortality (total deaths and mortality rate (deaths per 100 000 were calculated using established exposure-response relationships from air pollution epidemiology combined with simulated annual-average PM2.5 and O3 exposure. Net emissions reductions across all sectors are −36 % for PM0.1 mass, −3.6 % for PM2.5 mass, −10.6 % for PM2.5 elemental carbon, −13.3 % for PM2.5 organic carbon, −13.7 % for NOx, and −27.5 % for NH3

  11. Wind power projects in the CDM: Methodologies and tools for baselines, carbon financing and substainability analysis[CDM=Clean Development Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringius, L.; Grohnheit, P.E.; Nielsen, L.H.; Olivier, A.L.; Painuly, J.; Villavicencio, A.

    2002-12-01

    The report is intended to be a guidance document for project developers, investors, lenders, and CDM host countries involved in wind power projects in the CDM. The report explores in particular those issues that are important in CDM project assessment and development - that is, baseline development, carbon financing, and environmental sustainability. It does not deal in detail with those issues that are routinely covered in a standard wind power project assessment. The report tests, compares, and recommends methodologies for and approaches to baseline development. To present the application and implications of the various methodologies and approaches in a concrete context, Africa's largest wind farm-namely the 60 MW wind farm located in Zafarana, Egypt- is examined as a hypothetical CDM wind power project The report shows that for the present case example there is a difference of about 25% between the lowest (0.5496 tCO2/MWh) and the highest emission rate (0.6868 tCO{sub 2}/MWh) estimated in accordance with these three standardized approaches to baseline development according to the Marrakesh Accord. This difference in emission factors comes about partly as a result of including hydroelectric power in the baseline scenario. Hydroelectric resources constitute around 21% of the generation capacity in Egypt, and, if excluding hydropower, the difference between the lowest and the highest baseline is reduced to 18%. Furthermore, since the two variations of the 'historical' baseline option examined result in the highest and the lowest baselines, by disregarding this baseline option altogether the difference between the lowest and the highest is reduced to 16%. The ES3-model, which the Systems Analysis Department at Risoe National Laboratory has developed, makes it possible for this report to explore the project-specific approach to baseline development in some detail. Based on quite disaggregated data on the Egyptian electricity system, including the wind

  12. Financing Investment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirth, Stefan; Flor, Christian Riis

    Intuition suggests that corporate investment should be decreasing in financing constraints. We show that even when financing is obtained using a standard debt contract and there is symmetric information between the firm and outside investors, the relation is actually U-shaped. We thus provide a new...... theoretical explanation for the recent empirical findings of Cleary et al. (2007). We split up the endogenously implied financing costs and propose a trade-off between expected liquidation costs and second-best investment costs. For rather unconstrained firms, the risk of costly liquidation dominates the cost...

  13. Carbon dioxide based power generation in renewable energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Pramod; Srinivasan, Kandadai

    2016-01-01

    After a substantial impact on refrigeration, carbon dioxide (CO_2) is gaining considerable attention as a working fluid for thermal power generation. This can be attributed mainly to its excellent heat transfer properties and compactness of components arising from its high density. It has the merit of being amenable to operation in sub-, trans- or super-critical Brayton cycle modes. However, inhibiting factors are high pressures needed when operated in trans- or supercritical cycles and the work of compression eroding most of the work of expansion in sub-critical cycle operation. Some of the lacunae of CO_2 such as high work of compression can be alleviated by using non-mechanical means such as thermal compression using the adsorption technique either for partial compression in high pressure Brayton cycles or for total compression in low pressure cycles. CO_2 has also been proposed as an additive to flammable hydrocarbons such that their flammability can be suppressed and yet retaining their other desirable thermodynamic qualities. This review explores the potential and limitations of thermodynamic cycles where either CO_2 is used alone or as a component in mixture of working fluids. Inter alia, it also highlights the issues of regulation of load management using the efficiency-specific power output plane. When used as a blending component, pinch point in the regenerators affects the cycle performance. The objective is to identify research and developmental challenges involving CO_2 as a working fluid specifically for solar power generation.

  14. Will the use of a carbon tax for revenue generation produce an incentive to continue carbon emissions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Moreno-Cruz, Juan; Caldeira, Ken

    2017-05-01

    Integrated assessment models are commonly used to generate optimal carbon prices based on an objective function that maximizes social welfare. Such models typically project an initially low carbon price that increases with time. This framework does not reflect the incentives of decision makers who are responsible for generating tax revenue. If a rising carbon price is to result in near-zero emissions, it must ultimately result in near-zero carbon tax revenue. That means that at some point, policy makers will be asked to increase the tax rate on carbon emissions to such an extent that carbon tax revenue will fall. Therefore, there is a risk that the use of a carbon tax to generate revenue could eventually create a perverse incentive to continue carbon emissions in order to provide a continued stream of carbon tax revenue. Using the Dynamic Integrated Climate Economy (DICE) model, we provide evidence that this risk is not a concern for the immediate future but that a revenue-generating carbon tax could create this perverse incentive as time goes on. This incentive becomes perverse at about year 2085 under the default configuration of DICE, but the timing depends on a range of factors including the cost of climate damages and the cost of decarbonizing the global energy system. While our study is based on a schematic model, it highlights the importance of considering a broader spectrum of incentives in studies using more comprehensive integrated assessment models. Our study demonstrates that the use of a carbon tax for revenue generation could potentially motivate implementation of such a tax today, but this source of revenue generation risks motivating continued carbon emissions far into the future.

  15. Relationship finance, market finance and endogenous business cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Deidda, Luca Gabriele; Fattouh, Bassam

    2010-01-01

    This paper develops an overlapping generation model with asymmetric information in the credit market such that the interplay between relationship finance supplied by investors who monitor investment decisions ex-ante and market finance supplied by investors who relay on public information can be the source of endogenous business fluctuations. Monitoring helps reducing the inefficiency caused by moral hazard. However, the incentives of entrepreneurs to demand relationship finance to induce mon...

  16. ECONOMIC COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF COMBINATION OF ACTIVATED CARBON GENERATION AND SPENT ACTIVATED CARBON REGENERATION PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TINNABHOP SANTADKHA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the maximum annual profit of proposed three project plants as follows: (i a generation process of activated carbon (AC prepared from coconut shells; (ii a regeneration process of spent AC obtained from petrochemical industries; and (iii a project combined the AC generation process with the regeneration process. The maximum annual profit obtained from the sole regeneration plant was about 1.2- and 15.4- fold higher than that obtained from the integrated and the generation plants, respectively. The sensitivity of selected variables to net present value (NPV, AC sales price was the most sensitive to NPV while fixed costs of generation and regeneration, and variable cost of regeneration were the least sensitive to NPV. Based on the optimal results of each project plant, the economic indicators namely NPV, return on investment (ROI, internal rate of return (IRR, and simple payback period (SPP were determined. Applying a rule of thumb of 12% IRR and 7-year SPP, the AC sales prices for the generation, regeneration, and integrated plants were 674.31, 514.66 and 536.66 USD/ton of product, respectively. The economic analysis suggested that the sole regeneration project yields more profitable.

  17. International energy financing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedavalli, Rangaswamy

    1994-01-01

    Some of the innovative financing options being considered by developing countries and economies in transition as ways of mobilizing international energy financing are discussed. Build-Own-Operate (BOO) and Transfer (BOOT) is the most commonly adopted approach. This involves limited resource financing of a project on the basis of the associated cash flow and risks and not on the credit of the project owners. The World Bank has set up the Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency to provide, on a fee basis, guarantees against certain non-commercial forms of risk in order to promote international capital flow to developing countries. In 1989, the World Bank introduced the Expanded Co-financing Operations (ECO) programme as an instrument to catalyze the flow of private finance into developing countries and to improve their access to international financial markets. Other financial instruments currently being established include: leasing of equipment or whole plants by foreign investors; private ownership or operation of generation and distribution facilities; exchange of specific export goods for energy imports; developing instruments to finance local costs; revenue bonds; tax-exempt bonds; sale of electricity futures to those seeking more stable, longer term electricity price contracts. (UK)

  18. Financing power projects in emerging markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, G.T.

    1996-01-01

    Financing for power generation projects in the developing countries of the world has been provided by the United States Export-Import Bank. The loans provided by its new Project Finance Division, totalling $8.3 billion are described. The future of project financing for the power generation industry should, it is argued, rest not with government financing agencies, but with private sector financial markets. (UK)

  19. Precision Controlled Carbon Materials for Next-Generation Optoelectronic and Photonic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-08

    engineer next-generation carbon-based optoelectronic and photonic devices with superior performance and capabilities. These devices include carbon...electronics; (4) nanostructured graphene plasmonics; and (5) polymer-nanotube conjugate chemistry . (1) Semiconducting carbon nanotube-based...applications (In Preparation, 2018). (5) Polymer-nanotube conjugate chemistry Conjugated polymers can be exploited as agents for selectively wrapping and

  20. Quantitative Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative finance is a field that has risen to prominence over the last few decades. It encompasses the complex models and calculations that value financial contracts, particularly those which reference events in the future, and apply probabilities to these events. While adding greatly to the flexibility of the market available to corporations and investors, it has also been blamed for worsening the impact of financial crises. But what exactly does quantitative finance encompass, and where did these ideas and models originate? We show that the mathematics behind finance and behind games of chance have tracked each other closely over the centuries and that many well-known physicists and mathematicians have contributed to the field.

  1. Natural Gas, Wind and Nuclear Options for Generating Electricity in a Carbon Constrained World

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooten, van G.C.

    2012-01-01

    A linear programming model is used to examine the impact of carbon taxes on the optimal generation mix in the Alberta electrical system. The model permits decommissioning of generating assets with high carbon dioxide emissions and investment in new gas-fired, wind and, in some scenarios, nuclear

  2. Inorganic membranes for carbon capture and power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Matthew T.

    Inorganic membranes are under consideration for cost-effective reductions of carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants, both in the capture of pollutants post-firing and in the direct electrochemical conversion of coal-derived fuels for improved plant efficiency. The suitability of inorganic membrane materials for these purposes stems as much from thermal and chemical stability in coal plant operating conditions as from high performance in gas separations and power generation. Hydrophilic, micro-porous zeolite membrane structures are attractive for separating CO2 from N2 in gaseous waste streams due to the attraction of CO2 to the membrane surface and micropore walls that gives the advantage to CO2 transport. Recent studies have indicated that retention of the templating agent used in zeolite synthesis can further block N2 from the micropore interior and significantly improve CO2/N2 selectivity. However, the role of the templating agent in micro-porous transport has not been well investigated. In this work, gas sorption studies were conducted by high-pressure thermo-gravimetric analysis on Zeolite Y membrane materials to quantify the effect of the templating agent on CO2, N2, and H2O adsorption/desorption, as well as to examine the effect of humidification on overall membrane performance. In equilibrium conditions, the N2 sorption enthalpy was nearly unchanged by the presence of the templating agent, but the N2 pore occupation was reduced ˜1000x. Thus, the steric nature of the blocking of N2 from the micropores by the templating agent was confirmed. CO2 and H2O sorption enthalpies were similarly unaffected by the templating agent, and the micropore occupations were only reduced as much as the void volume taken up by the templating agent. Thus, the steric blocking effect did not occur for molecules more strongly attracted to the micropore walls. Additionally, in time-transient measurements the CO 2 and H2O mobilities were significantly enhanced by the presence

  3. The financing of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Many countries have recognised that greater use of nuclear power could play a valuable role in reducing carbon dioxide emissions. However, given the high capital cost and complexity of nuclear power plants, financing their construction often remains a challenge. This is especially true where such financing is left to the private sector in the context of competitive electricity markets. This study examines the financial risks involved in investing in a new nuclear power plant, how these can be mitigated, and how projects can be structured so that residual risks are taken by those best able to manage them. Given that expansion of nuclear power programmes will require strong and sustained government support, the study highlights the role of governments in facilitating and encouraging investment in new nuclear generating capacity

  4. Electricity generation: options for reduction in carbon emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, H W

    2002-08-15

    Historically, the bulk production of electricity has been achieved by burning fossil fuels, with unavoidable gaseous emissions, including large quantities of carbon dioxide: an average-sized modern coal-burning power station is responsible for more than 10 Mt of CO(2) each year. This paper details typical emissions from present-day power stations and discusses the options for their reduction. Acknowledging that the cuts achieved in the past decade in the UK CO(2) emissions have been achieved largely by fuel switching, the remaining possibilities offered by this method are discussed. Switching to less-polluting fossil fuels will achieve some measure of reduction, but the basic problem of CO(2) emissions continues. Of the alternatives to fossil fuels, only nuclear power represents a zero-carbon large-scale energy source. Unfortunately, public concerns over safety and radioactive waste have still to be assuaged. Other approaches include the application of improved combustion technology, the removal of harmful gases from power-station flues and the use of waste heat to improve overall power-station efficiency. These all have a part to play, but many consider our best hope for emissions reduction to be the use of renewable energy. The main renewable energy contenders are assessed in this paper and realistic estimates of the contribution that each could provide are indicated. It appears that, in the time-scale envisaged by planners for reduction in CO(2) emission, in many countries renewable energy will be unlikely to deliver. At the same time, it is worth commenting that, again in many countries, the level of penetration of renewable energy will fall short of the present somewhat optimistic targets. Of renewable options, wind energy could be used in the short to medium term to cover for thermal plant closures, but for wind energy to be successful, the network will have to be modified to cope with wind's intermittent nature. Globally, hydroelectricity is currently the

  5. Sustainable finance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma-de Jong, Margreet F.

    2012-01-01

    Presentation for Springschool of Strategy, University of Groningen, 10 October 2012. The role of CSR is to stimulate ethical behaviour, and as a result, mutual trust in society. Advantage of CSR for the company and the evolution of CSR. From CSR to Sustainable Finance: how does CSR influence

  6. Financing Vidalia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagassa, G.

    1991-01-01

    This article examines the innovative techniques the participants in the Vidalia, Mississippi hydropower project used to overcome the numerous obstacles to the financing of the project. The topics of the article are early obstacles, funding and permitting, hydrology questions, matching income to debt, unorthodox provisions and a tough closing

  7. HEALTH & FINANCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HEALTH & FINANCE. Patrick Thokwa Masobe. Patrick Thokwa Masobe completed his undergraduate studies at Grinnel/. University in the USA, and a Master. Degreefrom the University of London in. 1995. He is wrrently employed by the national Department of Health, where he led the task team charged with making.

  8. Computational Finance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lykke

    One of the major challenges in todays post-crisis finance environment is calculating the sensitivities of complex products for hedging and risk management. Historically, these derivatives have been determined using bump-and-revalue, but due to the increasing magnitude of these computations does...

  9. Green Nanotechnology from Waste Carbon-Polyaniline Composite: Generation of Wavelength-Independent Multiband Photoluminescence for Sensitive Ion Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Goswami, Sumita; Nandy, Suman; Deuermeier, Jonas; Marques, Ana C.; Nunes, Daniela; Patole, Shashikant P.; Da Costa, Pedro M. F. J.; Martins, Rodrigo; Fortunato, Elvira

    2017-01-01

    This study reports on the qualitative analysis of photoluminescence effect generated from waste carbon of cooking oven by facile cost-effective material engineering. The waste carbon product as a form of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) is incorporated

  10. Household Finance

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, John

    2006-01-01

    The welfare benefits of financial markets depend in large part on how effectively households use these markets. The study of household finance is challenging because household behavior is difficult to measure accurately, and because households face constraints that are not captured by textbook models, including fixed costs, uninsurable income risk, borrowing constraints, and contracts that are non-neutral with respect to inflation. Evidence on participation, diversification, and the exercise ...

  11. Financing off-grid sustainable energy access for the poor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glemarec, Yannick

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the role of public instruments in promoting private finance to achieve off-grid sustainable energy access. Renewable energy technologies are increasingly becoming the cheapest solutions for off-grid energy access. The dramatic uptake of mobile phones in developing countries shows how quickly decentralized services can develop on a commercial basis under the right conditions, and raises the prospect that private finance could also drive decentralized energy access for the poor. Indeed, there are already a number of instances of clean energy solutions – such as solar portable lights, household biogas units or solar home systems – that have managed to scale-up through leveraging private finance. However, the experience gained from first-generation market development projects show that, in almost all cases, significant public resources have been necessary to increase the affordability of clean energy technologies, provide access to financing for the poor, and remove non-economic barriers. Such public interventions may be funded by international public finance, domestic budgets and carbon finance. Despite mounting fiscal constraints facing governments worldwide, the emergence of new sources of climate finance and the political momentum in support of energy subsidy reforms, as well as new programming modalities, offer opportunities to leverage additional resources to achieve universal energy access by 2030. - Highlights: ► Renewable energy is increasingly the cheapest solution for off-grid energy access. ► Universal access to energy now depends less on technology and more business models. ► Substantial public finance will still be required to support universal energy access.

  12. Deposition of carbon nanostructures by surfatron generated discharge

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Davydova, Marina; Šmíd, Jiří; Hubička, Zdeněk; Kromka, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 6 (2014), s. 389-393 ISSN 1210-2709 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01011740; GA ČR(CZ) GP14-06054P Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : carbon nanostructures * microwave plasma * PECVD * surfatron Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  13. Determinants of the costs of carbon capture and sequestration for expanding electricity generation capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovanni, Emily; Richards, Kenneth R.

    2010-01-01

    This study models the costs of electricity generation with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS), from generation at the power plant to carbon injection at the reservoir, examining the economic factors that affect technology choice and CCS costs at the individual plant level. The results suggest that natural gas and coal prices have profound impacts on the carbon price needed to induce CCS. To extend previous analyses we develop a 'cost region' graph that models technology choice as a function of carbon and fuel prices. Generally, the least-cost technology at low carbon prices is pulverized coal, while intermediate carbon prices favor natural gas technologies and high carbon prices favor coal gasification with capture. However, the specific carbon prices at which these transitions occur is largely determined by the price of natural gas. For instance, the CCS-justifying carbon price ranges from $27/t CO 2 at high natural gas prices to $54/t CO 2 at low natural gas prices. This result has important implications for potential climate change legislation. The capital costs of the generation and CO 2 capture plant are also highly important, while pipeline distance and criteria pollutant control are less significant.

  14. Assessing the value of wind generation in future carbon constrained electricity industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vithayasrichareon, Peerapat; MacGill, Iain F.

    2013-01-01

    This paper employs a novel Monte-Carlo based generation portfolio assessment tool to explore the implications of increasing wind penetration and carbon prices within future electricity generation portfolios under considerable uncertainty. This tool combines optimal generation mix techniques with Monte Carlo simulation and portfolio analysis methods to determine expected overall generation costs, associated cost uncertainty and expected CO 2 emissions for different possible generation portfolios. A case study of an electricity industry with coal, Combined Cycle Gas Turbines (CCGT), Open Cycle Gas Turbines (OCGT) and wind generation options that faces uncertain future fossil-fuel prices, carbon pricing, electricity demand and plant construction costs is presented to illustrate some of the key issues associated with growing wind penetrations. The case study uses half-hourly demand and wind generation data from South Eastern Australia, and regional estimates of new-build plant costs and characteristics. Results suggest that although wind generation generally increases overall industry costs, it reduces associated cost uncertainties and CO 2 emissions. However, there are some cases in which wind generation can reduce the overall costs of generation portfolios. The extent to which wind penetration affects industry expected costs and uncertainties depends on the level of carbon price and the conventional technology mix in the portfolios. - Highlights: ► A probabilistic portfolio analysis tool to assess generation portfolios with wind power. ► Explore the impacts of wind penetrations and carbon prices under uncertainties. ► Wind generation increases overall portfolio costs but reduces cost risks and emissions. ► The value of wind power depends on the carbon price and the technology mix. ► Complex interactions between wind penetration level and carbon pricing.

  15. Carbon finance and pro-poor co-benefits: The Gold Standard and Climate, Community and Biodiversity Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Rachel

    2011-04-15

    This paper assesses the practical contribution of the Gold Standard (GS) and Climate Community and Biodiversity (CCB) Standards to local development through the identification of high quality carbon offset projects and ensuring high standards of consultation with local communities during project development and implementation. It is based on desk research, involving analysis of the GS and CCB Standards' project databases, project design documents, and secondary literature. In addition, over 20 representatives of the two standards systems, project developers, NGO representatives, and researchers were interviewed. The paper concludes that both standard systems successfully reward high quality projects which have a demonstrated commitment to local consultations and sustainable development benefits. Moreover, they serve to give well-meaning project developers frameworks with which to ensure that a wide range of criteria are considered in planning and implementing projects. As voluntary standards, it is unrealistic to expect either the GS or CCB Standards to improve poor-quality or unsustainable projects.

  16. Carbon finance and pro-poor co-benefits: The Gold Standard and Climate, Community and Biodiversity Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Rachel

    2011-04-15

    This paper assesses the practical contribution of the Gold Standard (GS) and Climate Community and Biodiversity (CCB) Standards to local development through the identification of high quality carbon offset projects and ensuring high standards of consultation with local communities during project development and implementation. It is based on desk research, involving analysis of the GS and CCB Standards' project databases, project design documents, and secondary literature. In addition, over 20 representatives of the two standards systems, project developers, NGO representatives, and researchers were interviewed. The paper concludes that both standard systems successfully reward high quality projects which have a demonstrated commitment to local consultations and sustainable development benefits. Moreover, they serve to give well-meaning project developers frameworks with which to ensure that a wide range of criteria are considered in planning and implementing projects. As voluntary standards, it is unrealistic to expect either the GS or CCB Standards to improve poor-quality or unsustainable projects.

  17. Renewable Methane Generation from Carbon Dioxide and Sunlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinlechner, Christoph; Junge, Henrik

    2018-01-02

    The direct approach: Methane is a potential key player in the world's transition to a more sustainable energy future. The direct conversion of carbon dioxide into methane is highly desirable to lower the concentration of CO 2 in the atmosphere and also to store renewable energy. This Highlight describes the first homogeneous system for the light-driven conversion of CO 2 into CH 4 . © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Current status of waste power generation in Japan and its impact on carbon dioxide reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaoka, Masaki; Takeda, Nobuo; Yamagata, Naruo; Masuda, Takahiro

    2010-01-01

    In this research, we discuss current status of waste power generation (WPG) in Japan and various scenarios about the indirect reduction of carbon dioxide by WPG. The numbers of WPG facilities are 291 domestically as of 2006. Power generation capacity achieves 1584 MW and power generation amount is 7179 G Wh/ year. When we consider to reduce the used electricity for operation and office by WPG and emission coefficient of electricity for operation and office is to be 0.555 kg-CO 2 / kWh in default value, then carbon dioxide reduction amount is calculated to 3.9 million tons, which is equivalent to 26.7 % of 14.6 million tons of carbon dioxide emitted by municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) in 2005. Using various existing technological options, it finds that the efficiency of power generation will achieve more than 20 % in MSWI with the power generation efficiency of 20% as a feasible assumption, the total power generation amount and the carbon dioxide reduction amount will become 16540 G Wh/ year and 9.18 million tons, respectively. So, it is equivalent to 62.7% of carbon dioxide emitted by MSWI. Also, the ratio of additional reduction amount of carbon dioxide by WPG to total additional reduction amount in Japan during the first commitment period is 26.3%, which suggests that the promotion of WPG in MSWI is one of effective options for prevention of global warming. (author)

  19. Investment strategy for low-carbon power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Yukihiro; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Yoshida, Yoshikuni

    2011-01-01

    Recently, it is needed to reduce CO 2 emissions for prevention of global warming. In Japan, the power generation sector is the biggest part in terms of CO 2 emissions, therefore it is very important to cope with the reduction of the emissions from this sector. From this point of view, it is assumed that the nuclear power generation is the most practical option to reduce them. In order to evaluate the possibility of introduction of the nuclear power, we built a generation planning model and simulate to analyze the transition of the optimal generation mix. Also, we evaluate the investment in the introduction of the nuclear power quantitatively using the real option analysis. (author)

  20. Renewable methane generation from carbon dioxide and sunlight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinlechner, Christoph; Junge, Henrik [Leibniz Institut fuer Katalyse, Universitaet Rostock e.V., Rostock (Germany)

    2018-01-02

    The direct approach: Methane is a potential key player in the world's transition to a more sustainable energy future. The direct conversion of carbon dioxide into methane is highly desirable to lower the concentration of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere and also to store renewable energy. This Highlight describes the first homogeneous system for the light-driven conversion of CO{sub 2} into CH{sub 4}. (copyright 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Thermodynamic and carbon analyses of micro-generators for UK households

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, S.R.; Hammond, G.P.

    2010-01-01

    Micro-generators have the potential to reduce carbon emissions and enhance energy security by providing heat or electricity either from renewable sources, or via the more efficient use of fossil fuels. Such potential is often, however, unquantified or unclear, and hence a thermodynamic and related carbon analysis of micro-generators for UK household energy supply has been performed. Where pertinent, the thermodynamic concept of exergy is employed alongside that of energy. Analysis begins with a description of the established methods of energy supply to, and use within, typical UK households. On these foundations a grid-tied micro-wind turbine, a grid-tied solar photovoltaic array, and a solar hot-water system are analysed. Annual outputs are estimated and contextualised against the demands of representative households. The annual energy-resource and carbon savings provided by the micro-generators are determined on the basis that they (partially) displace the established supply systems. Savings are then compared with the energy-resource and carbon-emission 'debts' of the micro-generators, to assess the latter's net performance. Given appropriate installations, all three micro-generators are found to provide significant net energy and carbon benefits, confirming that all three technologies can provide net reductions in both carbon emissions and dependence on conventional energy resources.

  2. Life cycle analysis on carbon emissions from power generation – The nuclear energy example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nian, Victor; Chou, S.K.; Su, Bin; Bauly, John

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper discusses about a methodology on the life cycle analysis of power generation using nuclear as an example. • The methodology encompasses generic system, input–output, and boundaries definitions. • The boundaries facilitate the use of Kaya Identity and decomposition technique to identify carbon emission streams. - Abstract: A common value of carbon emission factor, t-CO 2 /GWh, in nuclear power generation reported in the literature varies by more than a factor of 100. Such a variation suggests a margin of uncertainty and reliability. In this study, we employ a bottom-up approach to better define the system, its input and output, and boundaries. This approach offers improved granularity at the process level and consistency in the results. Based on this approach, we have developed a methodology to enable comparison of carbon emissions from nuclear power generation. The proposed methodology employs the principle of energy balance on a defined power generation system. The resulting system boundary facilitates the use of the “Kaya Identity” and the decomposition technique to identify the carbon emission streams. Using nuclear power as a case study, we obtained a carbon emission factor of 22.80 t-CO 2 /GWh, which falls to within 2.5% of the median of globally reported LCA results. We demonstrate that the resulting methodology could be used as a generic tool for life cycle analysis of carbon emissions from other power generation technologies and systems

  3. Project Financing

    OpenAIRE

    S. GATTI

    2005-01-01

    Στην εισαγωγή της παρούσας εργασίας δίνεται ο ορισμός του project financing, τα ιστορικά στοιχεία και οι τάσεις αγοράς του. Στο πρώτο κεφάλαιο αναφέρεται γιατί οι εταιρείες προτιμούν την χρηματοδότηση με project financing. Γίνεται λόγος για τα πλεονεκτήματά του έναντι της άμεσης χρηματοδότησης, καθώς και για τα μειονεκτήματα του project financing. Στο δεύτερο κεφάλαιο παρουσιάζονται τα χρηματοοικονομικά στοιχεία και ο ρόλος του χρηματοοικονομικού συμβούλου. Στην τρίτη ενότητα γίνεται η αναγνώ...

  4. Hybrid Carbon Fibers/Carbon Nanotubes Structures for Next Generation Polymeric Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Al-Haik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pitch-based carbon fibers are commonly used to produce polymeric carbon fiber structural composites. Several investigations have reported different methods for dispersing and subsequently aligning carbon nanotubes (CNTs as a filler to reinforce polymer matrix. The significant difficulty in dispersing CNTs suggested the controlled-growth of CNTs on surfaces where they are needed. Here we compare between two techniques for depositing the catalyst iron used toward growing CNTs on pitch-based carbon fiber surfaces. Electrochemical deposition of iron using pulse voltametry is compared to DC magnetron iron sputtering. Carbon nanostructures growth was performed using a thermal CVD system. Characterization for comparison between both techniques was compared via SEM, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy analysis. It is shown that while both techniques were successful to grow CNTs on the carbon fiber surfaces, iron sputtering technique was capable of producing more uniform distribution of iron catalyst and thus multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs compared to MWCNTs grown using the electrochemical deposition of iron.

  5. Division of Finance Homepage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Top Department of Administration logo Alaska Department of Administration Division of Finance Search Search the Division of Finance site DOF State of Alaska Finance Home Content Area Accounting Charge Cards You are here Administration / Finance Division of Finance Updates IRIS Expenditure Object Codes

  6. Financing the UK power sector: Is the money available?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blyth, William; McCarthy, Rory; Gross, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The UK power generation sector faces a major new round of investment: the coincidence of asset retiring and ambitious goals for decarbonisation is not unique, but is particularly acute in the UK. The UK government has put in place a raft of new policies that seek to promote new, low carbon investment and ensure security of supply. The traditional channel for financing the sector has been through large utility companies, but this now looks challenging for various reasons. The UK therefore offers an interesting case study on several counts; the scale of the challenge, effectiveness of new policies, and the availability of alternative finance. We find that the link between the finance sector and the electricity sector is not ‘broken’, but the flow of money to the sector is threatened by the current weakness of the utilities’ business model. This paper compares estimates of the scale of investment required in the UK with historical investment rates. It summarises contemporary finance industry views of conditions and trends, and potential policy interventions that might be needed to bridge the investment gap. The potential for channelling institutional investor funds directly into energy assets is reviewed. - Highlights: • Power investment need to scale up compared to historical trends, but is achievable. • Traditionally, low-cost finance has been through bonds and shares of large utilities. • Utilities are suffering high debt, reduced demand, and suppressed prices. • Policy interventions to scale-up investment are reviewed.

  7. Electrochemical Membrane for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghezel-Ayagh, Hossein [FuelCell Energy, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States)

    2017-12-21

    FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE), in collaboration with AECOM Corporation (formerly URS Corporation) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has been developing a novel Combined Electric Power and Carbon-dioxide Separation (CEPACS) system. The CEPACS system is based on electrochemical membrane (ECM) technology derived from FCE’s carbonate fuel cell products featuring internal (methane steam) reforming and carrying the trade name of Direct FuelCell®. The unique chemistry of carbonate fuel cells offers an innovative approach for separation of CO2 from existing fossil-fuel power plant exhaust streams (flue gases). The ECM-based CEPACS system has the potential to become a transformational CO2-separation technology by working as two devices in one: it separates the CO2 from the exhaust of other plants such as an existing coal-fired plant and simultaneously produces clean electric power at high efficiency using a supplementary fuel. The development effort was carried out under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cooperative agreement DE-FE0007634. The overall objective of this project was to successfully demonstrate the ability of FCE’s ECM-based CEPACS system technology to separate ≥90% of the CO2 from a simulated Pulverized Coal (PC) power plant flue gas stream and to compress the captured CO2 to a state that can be easily transported for sequestration or beneficial use. In addition, a key objective was to show, through the technical and economic feasibility study and bench scale testing, that the ECM-based CEPACS system is an economical alternative for CO2 capture in PC power plants, and that it meets DOE’s objective related to the incremental cost of electricity (COE) for post-combustion CO2 capture (no more than 35% increase in COE). The project was performed in three budget periods (BP). The specific objective for BP1 was to complete the Preliminary Technical and Economic Feasibility Study

  8. Development of molten carbonate fuel cells for power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    The broad and comprehensive program included elements of system definition, cell and system modeling, cell component development, cell testing in pure and contaminated environments, and the first stages of technology scale up. Single cells, with active areas of 45 sq cm and 582 sq cm, were operated at 650 C and improved to state of the art levels through the development of cell design concepts and improved electrolyte and electrode components. Performance was shown to degrade by the presence of fuel contaminants, such as sulfur and chlorine, and due to changes in electrode structure. Using conventional hot press fabrication techniques, electrolyte structures up to 20" x 20" were fabricated. Promising approaches were developed for nonhot pressed electrolyte structure fabrication and a promising electrolyte matrix material was identified. This program formed the basis for a long range effort to realize the benefits of molten carbonate fuel cell power plants.

  9. Organising the Finances For and the Finances From Transnational Corporate Bribery

    OpenAIRE

    Lord, Nicholas; Michael Levi,

    2016-01-01

    This article analyses the finances for and the finances from corporate bribery in international business transactions and how they are organised. Transnational corporate bribery involves non-criminal commercial enterprises that operate in licit markets but that use corrupt means to win or maintain business contracts inforeign jurisdictions. This article first considers what needs to be financed, how much finance is needed, and how the bribes can be generated and distributed. Second, the artic...

  10. Generation rate of carbon monoxide from CO2 arc welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima, Jun

    2013-01-01

    CO poisoning has been a serious industrial hazard in Japanese workplaces. Although incomplete combustion is the major cause of CO generation, there is a risk of CO poisoning during some welding operations. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the generation rate of CO from CO2 arc welding under controlled laboratory conditions and estimate the ventilation requirements for the prevention of CO poisoning. Bead on plate welding was carried out with an automatic welding robot on a rolled steel base metal under several conditions. The concentration of emitted CO from the welding was measured by a real-time CO monitor in a well-ventilated laboratory that was free from ambient CO contamination. The generation rate of CO was obtained from the three measurements-the flow rate of the welding exhaust gas, CO concentration in the exhaust gas and the arcing time. Then the ventilation requirement to prevent CO poisoning was calculated. The generation rate of CO was found to be 386-883 ml/min with a solid wire and 331-1,293 ml/min with a flux cored wire respectively. It was found that the CO concentration in a room would be maintained theoretically below the OSHA PEL (50 ppm) providing the ventilation rate in the room was 6.6-25.9 m3/min. The actual ventilation requirement was then estimated to be 6.6-259 m3/min considering incomplete mixing. In order to prevent CO poisoning, some countermeasures against gaseous emission as well as welding fumes should be taken eagerly.

  11. Creative Bus Financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Wade

    1982-01-01

    Alternative ways of financing school bus purchases include financing privately through contractors or commercial banks, financing through sources such as insurance companies and pension funds, leasing the buses, or contracting for transportation services. (Author/MLF)

  12. Finance and Management Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Substance Misuse and Addiction Prevention Finance & Management Services Health Care Services Juvenile health care provider about vitamin D and the risks and benefits of supplementation. Finance and Management Services The Division of Finance and Management Services (FMS) provides financial, administrative

  13. European windpower: project financing examined

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, Catherine

    1993-01-01

    In part two of an examination of funding mechanisms for wind-generated electricity, the financing of wind projects in the major producers - Denmark, the Netherlands, Germany and the UK is examined. Part one examined the tariff and subsidy mechanisms available for wind generation in the same countries. (author)

  14. Direct radiative effect due to brownness in organic carbon aerosols generated from biomass combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathod, T.D.; Sahu, S.K.; Tiwari, M.; Pandit, G.G.

    2016-01-01

    We report the enhancement in the direct radiative effect due the presence of Brown carbon (BrC) as a part of organic carbon aerosols. The optical properties of organic carbon aerosols generated from pyrolytic combustion of mango tree wood (Magnifera Indica) and dung cake at different temperatures were considered. Mie codes were used to calculate absorption and scattering coefficients coupled with experimentally derived imaginary complex refractive index. The direct radiative effect (DRE) for sampled organic carbon aerosols was estimated using a wavelength dependent radiative transfer equation. The BrC DRE was estimated taking virtually non absorbing organic aerosols as reference. The BrC DRE from wood and dung cake was compared at different combustion temperatures and conditions. The BrC contributed positively to the direct top of the atmosphere radiative effect. Dung cake generated BrC aerosols were found to be strongly light absorbing as compared to BrC from wood combustion. It was noted that radiative effects of BrC from wood depended on its generation temperature and conditions. For BrC aerosols from dung cake such strong dependence was not observed. The average BrC aerosol DRE values were 1.53±0.76 W g"−"1 and 17.84±6.45 W g"−"1 for wood and dung cake respectively. The DRE contribution of BrC aerosols came mainly (67–90%) from visible light absorption though they exhibited strong absorption in shorter wavelengths of the UV–visible spectrum. - Highlights: • Biomass fuels (wood and dung cake) were studied for brown carbon direct radiative effects. • Model calculations predicted positive contribution of Brown carbon aerosols to organic carbon direct radiative effect. • Average direct radiative values for brown carbon from dung cake were higher compare to wood. • The visible light absorption played major role in brown carbon contribution (67–90 %) to total direct radiative effect.

  15. Finance and climate, which stakes?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauthier, Alice

    2016-03-01

    As the financing emerged during the Paris COP21 and in IPCC reports as a need as well as a mean to act against climate change, the author first discusses the issue of the cost of adaptation and of its financing. She also discusses whether mitigation costs would result in destabilising financial flows. She comments the possible stronger decline of investments in fossil energies, and addresses the problem of fund raising for adaptation and mitigation. She discusses the possibility of a pricing action (notably regarding CO_2) to constrain economic actors, and the necessity of a re-assessment of the carbon risk

  16. Self-assembly of the second-generation of nitroaryl-ended dendrons onto carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farías, E.D.; Paez, J.I.; Strumia, M.C.; Baruzzi, A.M.; Passeggi Jr, M.C.G.; Brunetti, V.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: We report the self-assembly of the second-generation of nitroaryl-ended dendrons onto carbon surfaces. The immobilized layer was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The response was analyzed in comparison to the first-generation dendron behavior. Reduction of both layers generates the hydroxylamine product. The resulting redox-active layer exhibits a well-behaved redox response for the adsorbed nitroso/hydroxylamine couple. The thermodynamic of the adsorption of both dendrons on glassy carbon electrodes was also studied by CV. The Frumkin adsorption isotherm was the best to describe the specific interactions. The AFM images showed a network film formation with embedded aggregates that completely covered the carbon surface. The average height suggests a tilted preferential adsorption for both molecules

  17. Functionalizing carbon nitride with heavy atom-free spin converters for enhanced 1 O 2 generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wenting; Han, Congcong; Zhang, Qinhua; Zhang, Qinggang; Li, Zhongtao; Gosztola, David J.; Wiederrecht, Gary P.; Wu, Mingbo

    2018-05-01

    advanced photosensitizers for singlet oxygen (1O2) generation. However, the intersystem crossing (ISC) process is quite insufficient in carbon nitride, limiting the 1O2 generation. Here, we report a facile and general strategy to confined benzophenone as a heavy atom-free spin converter dopant in carbon nitride via the facile copolymerization. With proper energy level matching between the heavy atom-free spin converter and various ligands based on carbon nitride precursors, the proper combination can decrease the singlet-triplet energy gap (DEST) and hence generate 1O2 effectively. Due to its significant and selectivity for 1O2 generation, the as-prepared carbon nitride-based photosensitizer shows a high selective photooxidation activity for 1,5-dihydroxy-naphthalene (1,5-DHN). The product yield reached 71.8% after irradiation for 60 min, which was higher than that of cyclometalated PtII complexes (53.6%) in homogeneous photooxidation. This study can broaden the application of carbon nitride in the field of selective heterogeneous photooxidation due to simple operation, low cost, and high efficiency, making it a strong candidate for future industrialization.

  18. Financing of nuclear projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diel, R.

    1983-01-01

    Delays in the completion of nuclear power plants aggravate the financing of such ventures because the contractual sums to be paid for interest and amortization are not generated. Moreover, economic feasibility analyses by the banks are rendered ineffective by changes in the underlying data, such as the structure of electricity rates and the supply monopoly held by utilities. The German nuclear power plants at present in operation or under construction were financed mainly through subsidiares of the participating utilities outside the balance sheets of the parent companies. The banks have developed a number of financing concepts to adapt funding to the specific needs of practice. Future nuclear power plants make-up one third of the present capacity of the participating utilities. However, they will require three to four times the previous volume of capital investments. Yet it is certain that the expansion of nuclear power in the Federal Republic of Germany will not be hampered by financial problems. The funding models developed for nuclear power plants have already proved their qualities. However, the problems of nuclear power have not become less. Attention must also be drawn to some weak spots in the financial sector. (orig.) [de

  19. Tools for computational finance

    CERN Document Server

    Seydel, Rüdiger U

    2017-01-01

    Computational and numerical methods are used in a number of ways across the field of finance. It is the aim of this book to explain how such methods work in financial engineering. By concentrating on the field of option pricing, a core task of financial engineering and risk analysis, this book explores a wide range of computational tools in a coherent and focused manner and will be of use to anyone working in computational finance. Starting with an introductory chapter that presents the financial and stochastic background, the book goes on to detail computational methods using both stochastic and deterministic approaches. Now in its sixth edition, Tools for Computational Finance has been significantly revised and contains:    Several new parts such as a section on extended applications of tree methods, including multidimensional trees, trinomial trees, and the handling of dividends; Additional material in the field of generating normal variates with acceptance-rejection methods, and on Monte Carlo methods...

  20. Generation of Microcellular Biodegradable Polycaprolactone Foams in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Qun; Ren Xian-wen; Chang Yu-ning; Yu Long; Wang Jing-wu

    2004-01-01

    Present now the application of microcellular polymeric materials in biomedical field is growing rapidly, as that of guided tissue regeneration and cell transplantation. As far as guided tissue regeneration is concerned, porous implants are used as size selective membrane to promote the growth of a special tissue in a healing site. Ideally, the implant should be inherently biocompatible,have well-defined cell size and be resorbable with appropriate biodegradation rates.Poly(a-caprolactone) (PCL) is a kind of materials suit for the demands above. PCL is biocompatible and biodegradable aliphatic polyester which is nontoxic for living organisms and bioresorbable after a period of implantation. Because of its unique combination of biocompatibility, permeability and biodegradability, PCL and some of its copolymer with lactides and glycolide have been widely applied in medicine as artificial skin, artificial bone and containers for sustained drug release.Goel and Beckman have reported a new method to generate microcellular poly(methy l methacrylate) foams in which the samples are saturated with CO2 under a series of supercritical (SC)conditions, and then the system is rapidly depressurized to atmospheric pressure at constant temperature. Unlike traditional methods, it reduces glass-transition temperature (Tg) of the mixture to below the experimental temperature rather than directly heat the system above Tg. In this process of nucleation, no phase separation occurs as well as no phase boundary meets, so the cellular structure of the foam can be retained better.In this work, we have generated PCL foams by using supercritical CO2. Because of the low glass transition temperature (Tg = -60 ℃) of PCL far below the ice point, the experimental temperature in our study is much higher than Tg, which is different from the studies by others before. A series of variable factors on the foam structure as saturation temperature, saturation pressure, saturation time and depressurization

  1. Generating porosity spectrum of carbonate reservoirs using ultrasonic imaging log

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Nie, Xin; Xiao, Suyun; Zhang, Chong; Zhang, Chaomo; Zhang, Zhansong

    2018-03-01

    Imaging logging tools can provide us the borehole wall image. The micro-resistivity imaging logging has been used to obtain borehole porosity spectrum. However, the resistivity imaging logging cannot cover the whole borehole wall. In this paper, we propose a method to calculate the porosity spectrum using ultrasonic imaging logging data. Based on the amplitude attenuation equation, we analyze the factors affecting the propagation of wave in drilling fluid and formation and based on the bulk-volume rock model, Wyllie equation and Raymer equation, we establish various conversion models between the reflection coefficient β and porosity ϕ. Then we use the ultrasonic imaging logging and conventional wireline logging data to calculate the near-borehole formation porosity distribution spectrum. The porosity spectrum result obtained from ultrasonic imaging data is compared with the one from the micro-resistivity imaging data, and they turn out to be similar, but with discrepancy, which is caused by the borehole coverage and data input difference. We separate the porosity types by performing threshold value segmentation and generate porosity-depth distribution curves by counting with equal depth spacing on the porosity image. The practice result is good and reveals the efficiency of our method.

  2. Behavioral finance: Finance with normal people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meir Statman

    2014-06-01

    Behavioral finance substitutes normal people for the rational people in standard finance. It substitutes behavioral portfolio theory for mean-variance portfolio theory, and behavioral asset pricing model for the CAPM and other models where expected returns are determined only by risk. Behavioral finance also distinguishes rational markets from hard-to-beat markets in the discussion of efficient markets, a distinction that is often blurred in standard finance, and it examines why so many investors believe that it is easy to beat the market. Moreover, behavioral finance expands the domain of finance beyond portfolios, asset pricing, and market efficiency and is set to continue that expansion while adhering to the scientific rigor introduced by standard finance.

  3. Acoustical characterisation of carbon nanotube-loaded polydimethylsiloxane used for optical ultrasound generation

    OpenAIRE

    Alles, E. J.; Heo, J.; Noimark, S.; Colchester, R.; Parkin, I.; Baac, H. W.; Desjardins, A.

    2017-01-01

    An optical ultrasound generator was used to perform broadband (2-35 MHz) acoustical characterisation measurements of a nanocomposite comprising carbon nanotubes (CNT) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a composite that is commonly used as optical ultrasound generator. Samples consisting of either pure PDMS or CNT-loaded PDMS were characterised to determine the influence of CNTs on the speed of sound and power-law acoustic attenuation parameters. A small weight fraction (

  4. Integration between direct steam generation in linear solar collectors and supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton power cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Coco Enríquez, Luis; Muñoz Antón, Javier; Martínez-Val Peñalosa, José María

    2015-01-01

    Direct Steam Generation in Parabolic Troughs or Linear Fresnel solar collectors is a technology under development since beginning of nineties (1990's) for replacing thermal oils and molten salts as heat transfer fluids in concentrated solar power plants, avoiding environmental impacts. In parallel to the direct steam generation technology development, supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton power cycles are maturing as an alternative to traditional Rankine cycles for increasing net plant efficie...

  5. Accessing international financing for climate change mitigation - A guidebook for developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limaye, D.R.; Zhu, X.

    2012-08-15

    This guidebook has been prepared by the UNEP Risoe Centre (URC) as part of its Technology Needs Assessment (TNA) project. The TNA project assists developing countries to identify national mitigation and adaptation technology priorities and to develop Technology Action Plans (TAPs) for mitigation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and climate change adaptation. This guidebook provides information to help TNA countries better identify and access financial resources for the mitigation activities included in their national TAPs. This guidebook covers both mitigation 'projects' (such as a wind farm or a solar PV generation facility) and 'programmes' (such as a credit line for financing energy efficiency projects in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), or bulk procurement and distribution of compact fluorescent lamps to households). The primary emphasis is on multilateral and bilateral sources of financing but the guidebook also includes an overview of private funding sources and public-private partnerships (PPPs). This guidebook only covers international financing for mitigation actions in developing countries. For example, EU funding for EU member countries and Chinese funding for mitigation in China are not covered in this guidebook. However, the EU funding for mitigation in developing countries and Chinese funding supporting mitigation in other developing countries are included. Special funds established in some developing countries by pooling financing support from developed countries are also covered in this guidebook. Information on the financing sources was compiled in a standard format and reviewed and analysed to categorise the financing sources. For the multilateral and bilateral financing sources, the available information was used to define their major characteristics (such as geographic coverage, technology/sector focus, funding sources, financing objectives, financing mechanisms, and management and governance). In addition, the

  6. Nuclear fuel financing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lurf, G.

    1975-01-01

    Fuel financing is only at its beginning. A logical way of developing financing model is a step by step method starting with the financing of pre-payments. The second step will be financing of natural uranium and enrichment services to the point where the finished fuel elements are delivered to the reactor operator. The third step should be the financing of fuel elements during the time the elements are inserted in the reactor. (orig.) [de

  7. "Money in Finance"

    OpenAIRE

    L. Randall Wray

    2011-01-01

    This paper begins by defining, and distinguishing between, money and finance, and addresses alternative ways of financing spending. We next examine the role played by financial institutions (e.g., banks) in the provision of finance. The role of government as both regulator of private institutions and provider of finance is also discussed, and related topics such as liquidity and saving are explored. We conclude with a look at some of the new innovations in finance, and at the global financial...

  8. Reactions of carbon radicals generated by 1,5-transposition of reactive centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZIVORAD CEKOVIC

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Radical intermediates can undergo specific reactions, such as intramolecular rearrangements, i.e., the transpositions of radical centers, which are not known in classical ionic organic reactions. 1,5-Transposition of a radical center to a non-activated carbon atom are of great synthetic importance. It can be successfully applied for the introduction of different functional groups (oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, halogens onto a carbon atom remote from the present functional group. In addition to functionalization of a remote non-activated carbon atom, the formation of new C-C bonds on the d-carbon atom have also been achieved. 1,5-Transposition of the radical centers takes place from alkoxyl, aminyl and carbon radicals to a remote carbon atom. Relocation of the radical centers preferentially involves 1,5-transfer of a hydrogen atom, although migrations of some other groups are known. The reactions of the carbon radical generated by 1,5-relocation of the radical center are presented and their synthetic applications are reviewed.

  9. Synthesis and applications of carbon nanomaterials for energy generation and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notarianni, Marco; Liu, Jinzhang; Vernon, Kristy; Motta, Nunzio

    2016-01-01

    The world is facing an energy crisis due to exponential population growth and limited availability of fossil fuels. Over the last 20 years, carbon, one of the most abundant materials found on earth, and its allotrope forms such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphene have been proposed as sources of energy generation and storage because of their extraordinary properties and ease of production. Various approaches for the synthesis and incorporation of carbon nanomaterials in organic photovoltaics and supercapacitors have been reviewed and discussed in this work, highlighting their benefits as compared to other materials commonly used in these devices. The use of fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphene in organic photovoltaics and supercapacitors is described in detail, explaining how their remarkable properties can enhance the efficiency of solar cells and energy storage in supercapacitors. Fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphene have all been included in solar cells with interesting results, although a number of problems are still to be overcome in order to achieve high efficiency and stability. However, the flexibility and the low cost of these materials provide the opportunity for many applications such as wearable and disposable electronics or mobile charging. The application of carbon nanotubes and graphene to supercapacitors is also discussed and reviewed in this work. Carbon nanotubes, in combination with graphene, can create a more porous film with extraordinary capacitive performance, paving the way to many practical applications from mobile phones to electric cars. In conclusion, we show that carbon nanomaterials, developed by inexpensive synthesis and process methods such as printing and roll-to-roll techniques, are ideal for the development of flexible devices for energy generation and storage - the key to the portable electronics of the future.

  10. The impact of future carbon prices on CCS investment for power generation in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Ning; Parsons, John E.; Polenske, Karen R.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) in China is currently discussed extensively but few in-depth analyses focusing on economics are observed. In this study, we answer two related questions about the development of CCS and power generation technologies in China: (1) what is the breakeven carbon-dioxide price to justify CCS installation investment for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and pulverized coal (PC) power plants, and, (2) what are the risks associated with investment for CCS. To answer these questions, we build a net present value model for IGCC and PC plants with capacity of 600 MW, with assumptions best representing the current technologies in China. Then, we run a sensitivity analysis of capital costs and fuel costs to reveal their impact on the carbon price, and analyze the risk on investment return caused by the carbon price volatility. Our study shows that in China, a breakeven carbon price of $61/tonne is required to justify investment on CCS for PC plants, and $72/tonne for IGCC plants. In this analysis, we also advise investors on the impact of capital and fuel costs on the carbon price and suggest optimal timing for CCS investment. - Highlights: ► We collect data on CCS and power generation which best represents technologies and costs in China. ► We model power plants' net present value to find the breakeven carbon prices. ► IGCC needs $72 per tonne to breakeven while PC requires $61 in China. ► Capital and fuel costs impact the carbon prices noticeably. ► We also examine the sensitivity, impact on return and time for investment

  11. Synthesis and applications of carbon nanomaterials for energy generation and storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Notarianni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The world is facing an energy crisis due to exponential population growth and limited availability of fossil fuels. Over the last 20 years, carbon, one of the most abundant materials found on earth, and its allotrope forms such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphene have been proposed as sources of energy generation and storage because of their extraordinary properties and ease of production. Various approaches for the synthesis and incorporation of carbon nanomaterials in organic photovoltaics and supercapacitors have been reviewed and discussed in this work, highlighting their benefits as compared to other materials commonly used in these devices. The use of fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphene in organic photovoltaics and supercapacitors is described in detail, explaining how their remarkable properties can enhance the efficiency of solar cells and energy storage in supercapacitors. Fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphene have all been included in solar cells with interesting results, although a number of problems are still to be overcome in order to achieve high efficiency and stability. However, the flexibility and the low cost of these materials provide the opportunity for many applications such as wearable and disposable electronics or mobile charging. The application of carbon nanotubes and graphene to supercapacitors is also discussed and reviewed in this work. Carbon nanotubes, in combination with graphene, can create a more porous film with extraordinary capacitive performance, paving the way to many practical applications from mobile phones to electric cars. In conclusion, we show that carbon nanomaterials, developed by inexpensive synthesis and process methods such as printing and roll-to-roll techniques, are ideal for the development of flexible devices for energy generation and storage – the key to the portable electronics of the future.

  12. INVESTMENT FINANCING THROUGH THE "PROJECT FINANCE"

    OpenAIRE

    Molina Arenaza, Hércules; Del Carpio Gallegos, Javier

    2014-01-01

    This article analizes and compares the various aspects related to the "Project Finance" technique using projects financing in the Capital Market, both in developed countries and in developing countries. Likewise, the application's technique is illustrated by Antamina mining enterprise. El artículo analiza y compara los diferentes aspectos relacionados con la técnica del Project finance usado en el financiamiento de proyectos en el mercado de capitales, tanto en los países desarrollados com...

  13. Use of a pulsed neutron generator for in vivo measurement of body carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kehayias, J.J.; Ellis, K.J.; Cohn, S.H.; Yasumura, S.

    1986-01-01

    The measurement of total body fat is of importance in studies of nutritional assessment, dietary regimens, and for the management of obesity. In the past, fat has been determined either by anthropometric methods, which introduce high uncertainties, or by model-dependent estimation of fat-free tissue. The validity, however, of the different models in disease is questionable. Total body carbon measurements provide a more direct evaluation of body fat both in normal subjects and in patients. The authors present here a facility for carbon measurements without the use of a major accelerator. The same facility can be used for the measurement of other major body elements and for the evaluation of the body's compartments. Carbon is measured in vivo through neutron inelastic scattering, by detecting the 4.44 MeV gamma rays. A miniature (10 cm long) 14 MeV D-T neutron generator is used. The short half-life of the 4.44 MeV state of carbon requires detection of the gamma rays simultaneously with the 10 μs neutron pulse. Generators with low pulsing rate were found inappropriate for carbon measurement because of their low duty-cycle (high neutron output during pulse). The detection system consists of NaI(T1) detectors and fast electronics for handling the high even rate during the neutron pulse. A description of the facility and an evaluation of the technique will be presented

  14. Integrated assessment of IGCC power generation technology with carbon capture and storage (CCS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormos, Calin-Cristian

    2012-01-01

    IGCC (Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle) is a power generation technology in which the solid feedstock is partially oxidized with oxygen and steam to produce syngas. In a conventional IGCC design without carbon capture, the syngas is purified for dust and hydrogen sulphide removal and then it is sent to a CCGT (Combined Cycle Gas Turbine) for power generation. CCS (Carbon capture and storage) technologies are expected to play a significant role in the coming decades for reducing the greenhouse gas emissions. IGCC is one of the power generation technologies having the highest potential to capture CO 2 with low penalties in term of plant energy efficiency, capital and operational costs. This paper investigates the most important techno-economic and environmental indicators (e.g. power output, ancillary consumption, energy efficiency, CW consumption, normalised mass and energy balances and plant construction materials, capital and O and M (operational and maintenance) costs, specific CO 2 emissions, cost of electricity, CO 2 removal and avoidance costs etc.) for IGCC with CCS. Coal-based IGCC cases produce around 400–450 MW net electricity with 90% carbon capture rate. Similar IGCC plants without CCS were presented as references. Future IGCC developments for energy vectors poly-generation were also presented. -- Highlights: ► Techno-economical evaluations of coal-based IGCC power generation with CCS. ► Model development for capital, O and M, CO 2 capture costs and cash flow estimations. ► Technical and economic investigations of key plant design characteristics. ► Evaluations of carbon capture options for IGCC power generation technology.

  15. CO2 bubble generation and migration during magma-carbonate interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blythe, L. S.; Deegan, F. M.; Freda, C.; Jolis, E. M.; Masotta, M.; Misiti, V.; Taddeucci, J.; Troll, V. R.

    2015-04-01

    We conducted quantitative textural analysis of vesicles in high temperature and pressure carbonate assimilation experiments (1200 °C, 0.5 GPa) to investigate CO2 generation and subsequent bubble migration from carbonate into magma. We employed Mt. Merapi (Indonesia) and Mt. Vesuvius (Italy) compositions as magmatic starting materials and present three experimental series using (1) a dry basaltic-andesite, (2) a hydrous basaltic-andesite (2 wt% H2O), and (3) a hydrous shoshonite (2 wt% H2O). The duration of the experiments was varied from 0 to 300 s, and carbonate assimilation produced a CO2-rich fluid and CaO-enriched melts in all cases. The rate of carbonate assimilation, however, changed as a function of melt viscosity, which affected the 2D vesicle number, vesicle volume, and vesicle size distribution within each experiment. Relatively low-viscosity melts (i.e. Vesuvius experiments) facilitated efficient removal of bubbles from the reaction site. This allowed carbonate assimilation to continue unhindered and large volumes of CO2 to be liberated, a scenario thought to fuel sustained CO2-driven eruptions at the surface. Conversely, at higher viscosity (i.e. Merapi experiments), bubble migration became progressively inhibited and bubble concentration at the reaction site caused localised volatile over-pressure that can eventually trigger short-lived explosive outbursts. Melt viscosity therefore exerts a fundamental control on carbonate assimilation rates and, by consequence, the style of CO2-fuelled eruptions.

  16. [Involvement of carbonate/bicarbonate ions in the superoxide-generating reaction of adrenaline autoxidation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirota, T V

    2015-01-01

    An important role of carbonate/bicarbonate ions has been recognized in the superoxide generating reaction of adrenaline autooxidation in an alkaline buffer (a model of quinoid adrenaline oxidation in the body). It is suggested that these ions are directly involved not only in formation of superoxide anion radical (О(2)(-)) but also other radicals derived from the carbonate/bicarbonate buffer. Using various buffers it was shown that the rate of accumulation of adrenochrome, the end product of adrenaline oxidation, and the rate of О(2)(-)· formation depend on concentration of carbonate/bicarbonate ions in the buffer and that these ions significantly accelerate adrenaline autooxidation thus demonstrating prooxidant properties. The detectable amount of diformazan, the product of nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction, was significantly higher than the amount of adrenochrome formed; taking into consideration the literature data on О(2)(-)· detection by NBT it is suggested that adrenaline autooxidation is accompanied by one-electron reduction not only of oxygen dissolved in the buffer and responsible for superoxide formation but possible carbon dioxide also dissolved in the buffer as well as carbonate/bicarbonate buffer components leading to formation of corresponding radicals. The plots of the dependence of the inhibition of adrenochrome and diformazan formation on the superoxide dismutase concentration have shown that not only superoxide radicals are formed during adrenaline autooxidation. Since carbonate/bicarbonate ions are known to be universally present in the living nature, their involvement in free radical processes proceeding in the organism is discussed.

  17. Carbon Isotopic Measurements of Third-Generation Salts from LEW 85320

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, C.; Wright, I. P.; Grady, M. M.; Romanek, C. S.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1993-07-01

    Preterrestrial salts associated with SNC meteorites indicate that water-based chemical activity probably took place on the parent body of these samples. One way of trying to understand the nature of these weathering processes is to look at situations on Earth where analogous effects might occur. For an initial investigation, an ordinary chondrite collected from Antarctica, LEW85320 (H5), has been selected. When this sample was found it was extensively coated with carbonate deposits (subsample ,39). After their removal, a second generation of minerals grew while the sample was in storage at Houston under an atmosphere of dry nitrogen sample ,15. Subsequently, a third crop has formed (subsample ,103). Subsamples ,39 and ,15 have been identified as the magnesium carbonate nesquehonite with (value for pure nesquehonite (Mg (HCO3) (OH).2H2O). The carbon release profile over the temperature range 200-600 degrees C shows two well resolved peaks. The first (300- 425 degrees C) reached a maximum yield at 375 degrees C with a delta^13C = +4.4 per mil, while the second (450-550 degrees C) had a delta^13C of +5.4 per mil. A similar experiment with the second generation carbonate (,15), affords what appears to be a single release of carbon, although a small partially resolved second component may be present (400-550 degrees C). The overall release seen in subsample ,15 reaches a delta^13C = +3.6 per mil and accounts for 9.2 wt% of the sample. The third generation of carbonate (,103), which formed only after several years of storage, has an overall carbon content of 6.8 wt%. Upon stepped heating a double release of carbon is observed, similar to ,39, but with the highest delta^13C value observed being -0.8 per mil. The double carbon release seen in ,39 and ,103 may be associated with dehydration of the nesquehonite followed by decrepitation of the anhydrous salt, or it may be related to the salt's formation conditions since both ,39 and,103 formed over a period of years in

  18. PM, carbon, and PAH emissions from a diesel generator fuelled with soy-biodiesel blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Jen-Hsiung; Chen, Shui-Jen; Huang, Kuo-Lin; Lin, Yuan-Chung; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Lin, Chih-Chung; Lin, Wen-Yinn

    2010-01-01

    Biodiesels have received increasing attention as alternative fuels for diesel engines and generators. This study investigates the emissions of particulate matter (PM), total carbon (TC), e.g., organic/elemental carbons, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from a diesel generator fuelled with soy-biodiesel blends. Among the tested diesel blends (B0, B10 (10 vol% soy-biodiesel), B20, and B50), B20 exhibited the lowest PM emission concentration despite the loads (except the 5 kW case), whereas B10 displayed lower PM emission factors when operating at 0 and 10 kW than the other fuel blends. The emission concentrations or factors of EC, OC, and TC were the lowest when B10 or B20 was used regardless of the loading. Under all tested loads, the average concentrations of total-PAHs emitted from the generator using the B10 and B20 were lower (by 38% and 28%, respectively) than those using pure petroleum diesel fuel (B0), while the emission factors of total-PAHs decreased with an increasing ratio of biodiesel to premium diesel. With an increasing loading, although the brake specific fuel consumption decreased, the energy efficiency increased despite the bio/petroleum diesel ratio. Therefore, soy-biodiesel is promising for use as an alternative fuel for diesel generators to increase energy efficiency and reduce the PM, carbon, and PAH emissions.

  19. Quantum finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaden, Martin

    2002-12-01

    Quantum theory is used to model secondary financial markets. Contrary to stochastic descriptions, the formalism emphasizes the importance of trading in determining the value of a security. All possible realizations of investors holding securities and cash is taken as the basis of the Hilbert space of market states. The temporal evolution of an isolated market is unitary in this space. Linear operators representing basic financial transactions such as cash transfer and the buying or selling of securities are constructed and simple model Hamiltonians that generate the temporal evolution due to cash flows and the trading of securities are proposed. The Hamiltonian describing financial transactions becomes local when the profit/loss from trading is small compared to the turnover. This approximation may describe a highly liquid and efficient stock market. The lognormal probability distribution for the price of a stock with a variance that is proportional to the elapsed time is reproduced for an equilibrium market. The asymptotic volatility of a stock in this case is related to the long-term probability that it is traded.

  20. Carbon intensity of electricity generation and CDM baseline: case studies of three Chinese provinces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chi; Heller, T.C.; May, M.M.

    2005-01-01

    A difficult and persistent issue in the discussion of Clean Development Mechanism is estimating a carbon emissions baseline, against which tradable permits may be certified. This paper examines the proposition of adopting sectoral, as opposed to project level, baselines by conducting case studies of the electricity industry in three Chinese provinces. We find that complicated central planning, financial and institutional factors have been behind the declining trend of carbon intensity in electricity generation and its provincial variations. Government planned electricity development which incorporates many of these factors and the associated industry carbon intensity may serve as a second best baseline. However, the limitation of the baseline we examine in this study plus difficulties numerous studies have revealed in baseline setting suggests that using baselines based on counterfactuals of what would happen will in the end either miss good emission reduction opportunities, or compromise the integrity of the regime

  1. Energy Finance Data Warehouse Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sangkeun [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chinthavali, Supriya [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shankar, Mallikarjun [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Zeng, Claire [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hendrickson, Stephen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-11-30

    The Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis s finance team (EPSA-50) requires a suite of automated applications that can extract specific data from a flexible data warehouse (where datasets characterizing energy-related finance, economics and markets are maintained and integrated), perform relevant operations and creatively visualize them to provide a better understanding of what policy options affect various operators/sectors of the electricity system. In addition, the underlying data warehouse should be structured in the most effective and efficient way so that it can become increasingly valuable over time. This report describes the Energy Finance Data Warehouse (EFDW) framework that has been developed to accomplish the defined requirement above. We also specifically dive into the Sankey generator use-case scenario to explain the components of the EFDW framework and their roles. An excel-based data warehouse was used in the creation of the energy finance Sankey diagram and other detailed data finance visualizations to support energy policy analysis. The framework also captures the methodology, calculations and estimations analysts used for the calculation as well as relevant sources so newer analysts can build on work done previously.

  2. Statistics for Finance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindström, Erik; Madsen, Henrik; Nielsen, Jan Nygaard

    Statistics for Finance develops students’ professional skills in statistics with applications in finance. Developed from the authors’ courses at the Technical University of Denmark and Lund University, the text bridges the gap between classical, rigorous treatments of financial mathematics...

  3. Nuclear financing in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urrutia, C.G.-T.

    1975-04-01

    The basic objectives of the Spanish National Energy Plan are summarized as (1) To obtain maximum guarantees for continuity of supplies, (2) Reduce the cost of energy supplies to the maximum possible degree, (3) Reduce the difference in the balance of payments due to importation of primary energy sources, (4) Pro-mote the rational use of energy with the aim of moderating the growth rates in demand without affecting economic development (5) Reduce to an economical minimum the effect on the environment of energy-producing installations, and (6) Contribute to the technological development of the country and promote research in the energy field. To fulfil these objectives, the following forecasts are made: With the Gross National Product increasing at a rate of 5% or 6%, the demand on primary energy sources in 1985 will be 173 or 194 million e.c.t. (equivalent coal tons), i.e. annual growth rates of energy consumption of 6% and 7.2% respectively, compared with growths during the last decade of 9.2%. It is projected that generation of electrical energy from nuclear sources will grow to attain in a share of approximately 60% by 1985, i.e. an installed nuclear power level of 23.8.GW. The cost of the Spanish National Energy Plan, particularly the cost and financing of the nuclear program, is reviewed. Finally, the growing need for self-financing is stressed. (B.P.)

  4. Uncertainties in key low carbon power generation technologies - Implication for UK decarbonisation targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannan, R.

    2009-01-01

    The UK government's economy-wide 60% carbon dioxide reduction target by 2050 requires a paradigm shift in the whole energy system. Numerous analytical studies have concluded that the power sector is a critical contributor to a low carbon energy system, and electricity generation has dominated the policy discussion on UK decarbonisation scenarios. However, range of technical, social and market challenges, combined with alternate market investment strategies mean that large scale deployment of key classes of low carbon electricity technologies is fraught with uncertainty. The UK MARKAL energy systems model has been used to investigate these long-term uncertainties in key electricity generation options. A range of power sector specific parametric sensitivities have been performed under a 'what-if' framework to provide a systematic exploration of least-cost energy system configurations under a broad, integrated set of input assumptions. In this paper results of six sensitivities, via restricted investments in key low carbon technologies to reflect their technical and political uncertainties, and an alternate investment strategies from perceived risk and other barriers, have been presented. (author)

  5. Hydrothermal Carbonization of Spent Osmotic Solution (SOS Generated from Osmotic Dehydration of Blueberries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushlendra Singh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermal carbonization of spent osmotic solution (SOS, a waste generated from osmotic dehydration of fruits, has the potential of transformation into hydrochars, a value-added product, while reducing cost and overall greenhouse gas emissions associated with waste disposal. Osmotic solution (OS and spent osmotic solution (SOS generated from the osmotic dehydration of blueberries were compared for their thermo-chemical decomposition behavior and hydrothermal carbonization. OS and SOS samples were characterized for total solids, elemental composition, and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA. In addition, hydrothermal carbonization was performed at 250 °C and for 30 min to produce hydrochars. The hydrochars were characterized for elemental composition, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET surface area, particle shape and surface morphology. TGA results show that the SOS sample loses more weight in the lower temperature range than the OS sample. Both samples produced, approximately, 40%–42% (wet-feed basis hydrochar during hydrothermal carbonization but with different properties. The OS sample produced hydrochar, which had spherical particles of 1.79 ± 1.30 μm diameter with a very smooth surface. In contrast, the SOS sample produced hydrochar with no definite particle shape but with a raspberry-like surface.

  6. The role of accelerated power generation technology development to carbon dioxide emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russ, P.

    2004-01-01

    The paper focuses on the role of advanced power generation technology in the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions. In order to quantify the importance of these technologies a scenario approach is applied comparing a 'business as usual' scenario with technology cases which assume the accelerated development and earlier availability of certain advanced technologies. The simulations with the POLES world energy model demonstrate that the availability of advanced technology for power generation alone does not lead to emission reductions needed to stabilise carbon dioxide emissions in the atmosphere at a sustainable level. To achieve that additional policy measures are necessary. It is however shown, that the availability of advanced technology has a crucial impact on the cost to meet emission reduction targets. (Author)

  7. Estimation of Carbon Dioxide Emissions Generated by Building and Traffic in Taichung City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou-Tsang Chang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The emissions of carbon dioxide generated by urban traffic is generally reflected by urban size. In order to discuss the traffic volume generated in developed buildings and road crossings in a single urban block, with the metropolitan area in Taichung, Taiwan as an example, this study calculates the mutual relationship between the carbon dioxide generated by the traffic volume and building development scale, in order to research energy consumption and relevance. In this research, the entire-day traffic volume of an important road crossing is subject to statistical analysis to obtain the prediction formula of total passenger car units in the main road crossing within 24 h. Then, the total CO2 emissions generated by the traffic volume in the entire year is calculated according to the investigation data of peak traffic hours within 16 blocks and the influential factors of the development scale of 95 buildings are counted. Finally, this research found that there is a passenger car unit of 4.72 generated in each square meter of land in the urban block every day, 0.99 in each square meter of floor area in the building and the average annual total CO2 emissions of each passenger car unit is 41.4 kgCO2/yr. In addition, the basic information of an integrated road system and traffic volume is used to present a readable urban traffic hot map, which can calculate a distribution map of passenger car units within one day in Taichung. This research unit can be used to forecast the development scale of various buildings in future urban blocks, in order to provide an effective approach to estimate the carbon dioxide generated by the traffic volume.

  8. Finance/security/life.

    OpenAIRE

    Langley, P.

    2017-01-01

    What is the contemporary relation between finance and security? This essay encourages further research into the securitization of finance by developing the notion of ‘finance/security/life’. A focus on the intersections of finance/security/life will be shown to prompt a broadened range of critical, cross-disciplinary concerns with the various ways in which financial markets are positioned as vital to securing wealth, welfare and wellbeing.

  9. Financing petroleum agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robson, C.J.V.

    1994-01-01

    This chapter describes the typical type of financing agreements which are currently used to finance North Sea petroleum projects whether they are in the cause of development or have been developed and are producing. It deals with the agreements which are entered into to finance borrowings for petroleum projects on a non-resource or limited resource basis. (UK)

  10. Essays in household finance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djordjevic, Ljubica

    2015-01-01

    Household finance is a young and vibrant research field that continuously attracts public attention. There may be very few matters that people care so much about as their personal finance. Recent rise of academic interest in household finance is to a great extent due to households’ more active role

  11. Independent power project finance rating criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, D.; Chew W.; Moulton, C.

    1992-01-01

    Continuing growth of project financing for non-utility generators in the US and abroad has led to growing focus on their credit strength. In general, the financings remain relatively risky and would likely be rated below investment grade, because of various factors: loose power purchase arrangements, poor match between power pricing and fuel costs, aggressive leverage, troubled operating performance. But S and P believes some projects have the credit strength to support investment grade ratings. As traditional financing markets for these projects --- bank lending and private placements with highly specialized institutional investors --- have contracted, project sponsors and developers are considering broader markets. These include institutional investors without specialized focus on power project finance. In these markets, distinctions among projects may lead to greater liquidity and efficiency in developing the pricing and terms under which projects can be financed. This paper reports that ratings are most appropriate for projects seeking permanent financing as they enter commercial operations. They also may be useful for projects which have been operating for some time and for some very strong projects which are raising construction financing. To guide both project developers and investors in project financing, S and P has developed the following approach for rating these types of financings

  12. Micro-bubble generated by laser irradiation on an individual carbon nanocoil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yanming; Pan, Lujun; Liu, Yuli; Sun, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We have investigated laser irradiated microbubbles which can be generated at fixed point on surface of an individual carbon nanocoil (CNC) immerged in deionized water. • The microbubble can be operated easily and flexibly. • Based on classical heat and mass transfer theories, the bubble growth data is in good agreement with the simplified model. - Abstract: We have investigated the micro-bubbles generated by laser induction on an individual carbon nanocoil (CNC) immerged in deionized water. The photon energy of the incident focused laser beam is absorbed by CNC and converted to thermal energy, which efficiently vaporizes the surrounding water, and subsequently a micro-bubble is generated at the laser location. The dynamics behavior of bubble generation, including its nucleation, expansion and steady-state, has been studied experimentally and theoretically. We have derived equations to analyze the expansion process of a bubble based on classical heat and mass transfer theories. The conclusion is in good agreement with the experiment. CNC, which acts as a realistic micro-bubble generator, can be operated easily and flexibly

  13. Chip-based generation of carbon nanodots via electrochemical oxidation of screen printed carbon electrodes and the applications for efficient cell imaging and electrochemiluminescence enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuanhong; Liu, Jingquan; Zhang, Jizhen; Zong, Xidan; Jia, Xiaofang; Li, Dan; Wang, Erkang

    2015-06-07

    A portable lab-on-a-chip methodology to generate ionic liquid-functionalized carbon nanodots (CNDs) was developed via electrochemical oxidation of screen printed carbon electrodes. The CNDs can be successfully applied for efficient cell imaging and solid-state electrochemiluminescence sensor fabrication on the paper-based chips.

  14. Developing country finance in a post-2020 global climate agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannam, Phillip M.; Liao, Zhenliang; Davis, Steven J.; Oppenheimer, Michael

    2015-11-01

    A central task for negotiators of the post-2020 global climate agreement is to construct a finance regime that supports low-carbon development in developing economies. As power sector investments between developing countries grow, the climate finance regime should incentivize the decarbonization of these major sources of finance by integrating them as a complement to the commitments of developed nations. The emergence of the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, South-South Cooperation Fund and other nascent institutions reveal the fissures that exist in rules and norms surrounding international finance in the power sector. Structuring the climate agreement in Paris to credit qualified finance from the developing world could have several advantages, including: (1) encouraging low-carbon cooperation between developing countries; (2) incentivizing emerging investors to prefer low-carbon investments; and (3) enabling more cost-effective attainment of national and global climate objectives. Failure to coordinate on standards now could hinder low-carbon development in the decades to come.

  15. A Public Finance Perspective on Climate Policy: Six Interactions That May Enhance Welfare

    OpenAIRE

    Siegmeier, Jan; Mattauch, Linus; Franks, Max; Klenert, David; Schultes, Anselm; Edenhofer, Ottmar

    2015-01-01

    Climate change economics mostly neglects sizeable interactions of carbon pricing with other fiscal policy instruments. Conversely, public finance typically overlooks the effects of future decarbonization efforts when devising instruments for the major goals of fiscal policy. We argue that such a compartmentalisation is undesirable: policy design taking into account such interdependencies may enhance welfare and change the distribution of mitigation costs within and across generations. This cl...

  16. Commercially Available Activated Carbon Fiber Felt Enables Efficient Solar Steam Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haoran; He, Yurong; Hu, Yanwei; Wang, Xinzhi

    2018-03-21

    Sun-driven steam generation is now possible and has the potential to help meet future energy needs. Current technologies often use solar condensers to increase solar irradiance. More recently, a technology for solar steam generation that uses heated surface water and low optical concentration is reported. In this work, a commercially available activated carbon fiber felt is used to generate steam efficiently under one sun illumination. The evaporation rate and solar conversion efficiency reach 1.22 kg m -2 h -1 and 79.4%, respectively. The local temperature of the evaporator with a floating activated carbon fiber felt reaches 48 °C. Apart from the high absorptivity (about 94%) of the material, the evaporation performance is enhanced thanks to the well-developed pores for improved water supply and steam escape and the low thermal conductivity, which enables reduced bulk water temperature increase. This study helps to find a promising material for solar steam generation using a water evaporator that can be produced economically (∼6 $/m 2 ) with long-term stability.

  17. Methodology for calculation of carbon emission and energy generation efficiency by fossil coal thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Licks, Leticia A.; Pires, Marcal

    2008-01-01

    This work intends to evaluate the emissions of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emitted by the burning of fossil coal in Brazil. So, a detailed methodology is proposed for calculation of CO 2 emissions from the carbon emission coefficients specific for the Brazilian carbons. Also, the using of secondary fuels (fuel oil and diesel oil) were considered and the power generation for the calculation of emissions and efficiencies of each power plant as well. The obtained results indicate carbon emissions for the year 2002 approximately of the order of 1,794 Gg, with 20% less than the obtained by the official methodology (MCT). Such differences are related to the non consideration of the humidity containment of the coals as well as the using of generic coefficients not adapted to the Brazilian coals. The obtained results indicate the necessity to review the emission inventories and the modernization of the burning systems aiming the increase the efficiency and reduction of the CO 2 and other pollutants, as an alternative for maintaining the sustainable form of using the fossil coal in the country

  18. Lung clearance of inhaled particles after exposure to carbon black generated from a resuspension system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, P.S.; Gorski, R.A.; Hering, W.E.; Chan, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    A system to resuspend carbon black particles for providing submicron aerosols for inhalation exposure studies has been developed. The effect of continuous exposure to carbonaceous material (as a surrogate for the carbonaceous particles in diesel exhaust) on the pulmonary clearance of inhaled diesel tracer particles was studied in male Fischer 344 rats. Submicron carbon black particles with a mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of 0.22 micron and a size distribution similar to that of exhaust particles from a GM 5.7-liter diesel engine were successfully generated and administered to test animals at a nominal concentration of 6 mg/m3 for 20 hr/day, 7 days/week, for periods lasting 1 to 11 weeks. Immediately after the carbon black exposure, test animals were administered 14 C-tagged diesel particles for 45 min in a nose-only chamber. The pulmonary retention of inhaled radioactive tracer particles was determined at preselected time intervals. Based upon the data collected up to 1 year postexposure, prolonged exposure to carbon black particles exhibits a similar inhibitory effect on pulmonary clearance as does prolonged exposure to diesel exhaust with a comparable particulate dose. This observation indicates that the excessive accumulation of carbonaceous material may be the predominant factor affecting lung clearance

  19. Assessment of wall-thinning in carbon steel pipe by using laser-generated guided wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Do Yong; Cho, Youn Ho; Lee, Joon Hyun [Pusan National University, School of Mechanical Engineering, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    The objective of this research is to estimate the crack location and size of a carbon steel pipe by using a laser ultrasound guided wave for the wall thinning evaluation of an elbow. The wall thinning of the carbon steel pipe is one of the most serious problems in nuclear power plants, especially the wall thinning of the carbon steel elbow caused by Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC). Therefore, a non-destructive inspection method of elbow is essential for the nuclear power plants to operate safely. The specimens used in this study were carbon steel elbows, which represented the main elements of real nuclear power plants. The shape of the wall thinning was an oval with a width of 120mm, a length of 80mm, and a depth of 5mm. The L(0,1) and L(0,2) modes variation of the ultrasound guided wave signal is obtained from the response of the laser generation/air-coupled detection ultrasonic hybrid system represent the characteristics of the defect. The trends of these characteristics and signal processing were use dto estimate the size and location of wall thinning

  20. The Impact of a Carbon Tax on the Chilean Electricity Generation Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Benavides

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to analyse the economy-wide implications of a carbon tax applied on the Chilean electricity generation sector. In order to analyse the macroeconomic impacts, both an energy sectorial model and a Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium model have been used. During the year 2014 a carbon tax of 5 US$/tCO2e was approved in Chile. This tax and its increases (10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 US$/tCO2e are evaluated in this article. The results show that the effectiveness of this policy depends on some variables which are not controlled by policy makers, for example, non-conventional renewable energy investment cost projections, natural gas prices, and the feasibility of exploiting hydroelectric resources. For a carbon tax of 20 US$/tCO2e, the average annual emission reduction would be between 1.1 and 9.1 million tCO2e. However, the price of the electricity would increase between 8.3 and 9.6 US$/MWh. This price shock would decrease the annual GDP growth rate by a maximum amount of 0.13%. This article compares this energy policy with others such as the introduction of non-conventional renewable energy sources and a sectorial cap. The results show that the same global greenhouse gas (GHG emission reduction can be obtained with these policies, but the impact on the electricity price and GDP are lower than that of the carbon tax.

  1. Assessment of wall-thinning in carbon steel pipe by using laser-generated guided wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Do Yong; Cho, Youn Ho; Lee, Joon Hyun

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research is to estimate the crack location and size of a carbon steel pipe by using a laser ultrasound guided wave for the wall thinning evaluation of an elbow. The wall thinning of the carbon steel pipe is one of the most serious problems in nuclear power plants, especially the wall thinning of the carbon steel elbow caused by Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC). Therefore, a non-destructive inspection method of elbow is essential for the nuclear power plants to operate safely. The specimens used in this study were carbon steel elbows, which represented the main elements of real nuclear power plants. The shape of the wall thinning was an oval with a width of 120mm, a length of 80mm, and a depth of 5mm. The L(0,1) and L(0,2) modes variation of the ultrasound guided wave signal is obtained from the response of the laser generation/air-coupled detection ultrasonic hybrid system represent the characteristics of the defect. The trends of these characteristics and signal processing were use dto estimate the size and location of wall thinning

  2. An Atomistic Carbide-Derived Carbon Model Generated Using ReaxFF-Based Quenched Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W. Thompson

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a novel atomistic model of carbide-derived carbons (CDCs, which are nanoporous carbons with high specific surface areas, synthesis-dependent degrees of graphitization, and well-ordered, tunable porosities. These properties make CDCs viable substrates in several energy-relevant applications, such as gas storage media, electrochemical capacitors, and catalytic supports. These materials are heterogenous, non-ideal structures and include several important parameters that govern their performance. Therefore, a realistic model of the CDC structure is needed in order to study these systems and their nanoscale and macroscale properties with molecular simulation. We report the use of the ReaxFF reactive force field in a quenched molecular dynamics routine to generate atomistic CDC models. The pair distribution function, pore size distribution, and adsorptive properties of this model are reported and corroborated with experimental data. Simulations demonstrate that compressing the system after quenching changes the pore size distribution to better match the experimental target. Ring size distributions of this model demonstrate the prevalence of non-hexagonal carbon rings in CDCs. These effects may contrast the properties of CDCs against those of activated carbons with similar pore size distributions and explain higher energy densities of CDC-based supercapacitors.

  3. Assessing the environmental impact of energy production from hydrochar generated via hydrothermal carbonization of food wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Nicole D; Li, Liang; Flora, Joseph R V; Ro, Kyoung S

    2015-09-01

    Although there are numerous studies suggesting hydrothermal carbonization is an environmentally advantageous process for transformation of wastes to value-added products, a systems level evaluation of the environmental impacts associated with hydrothermal carbonization and subsequent hydrochar combustion has not been conducted. The specific objectives of this work are to use a life cycle assessment approach to evaluate the environmental impacts associated with the HTC of food wastes and the subsequent combustion of the generated solid product (hydrochar) for energy production, and to understand how parameters and/or components associated with food waste carbonization and subsequent hydrochar combustion influence system environmental impact. Results from this analysis indicate that HTC process water emissions and hydrochar combustion most significantly influence system environmental impact, with a net negative GWP impact resulting for all evaluated substituted energy-sources except biomass. These results illustrate the importance of electricity production from hydrochar particularly when it is used to offset coal-based energy sources. HTC process water emissions result in a net impact to the environment, indicating a need for developing appropriate management strategies. Results from this analysis also highlight a need for additional exploration of liquid and gas-phase composition, a better understanding of how changes in carbonization conditions (e.g., reaction time and temperature) influence metal and nutrient fate, and the exploration of liquid-phase treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Life cycle analysis of geothermal power generation with supercritical carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, Edward D; Sullivan, John L; Wang, Michael Q

    2012-01-01

    Life cycle analysis methods were employed to model the greenhouse gas emissions and fossil energy consumption associated with geothermal power production when supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO 2 ) is used instead of saline geofluids to recover heat from below ground. Since a significant amount of scCO 2 is sequestered below ground in the process, a constant supply is required. We therefore combined the scCO 2 geothermal power plant with an upstream coal power plant that captured a portion of its CO 2 emissions, compressed it to scCO 2 , and transported the scCO 2 by pipeline to the geothermal power plant. Emissions and energy consumption from all operations spanning coal mining and plant construction through power production were considered, including increases in coal use to meet steam demand for the carbon capture. The results indicated that the electricity produced by the geothermal plant more than balanced the increase in energy use resulting from carbon capture at the coal power plant. The effective heat rate (BTU coal per total kW h of electricity generated, coal plus geothermal) was comparable to that of traditional coal, but the ratio of life cycle emissions from the combined system to that of traditional coal was 15% when 90% carbon capture efficiency was assumed and when leakage from the surface was neglected. Contributions from surface leakage were estimated with a simple model for several hypothetical surface leakage rates. (letter)

  5. Freer markets and the abatement of carbon emissions. The electricity-generating sector in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, Madhu; Zilberman, David

    1999-01-01

    This paper develops a framework to explore the implications of trade and domestic policy distortions for the magnitude of carbon emissions and for the welfare costs of abating these emissions. An application to the electricity-generating sector in India shows that economic policy reforms can also be effective environmental policy instruments and reduce carbon emissions even in the absence of an emissions tax. This reduction in emissions is accompanied by an increase in domestic welfare, an increase in electricity output, and conservation of coal. Coordinating trade and domestic policy reform with an emissions tax policy reduces emissions further, while leading to gains in welfare that are greater than those under an emissions tax policy alone

  6. Bond financing for renewable energy in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Thiam Hee; Tao, Jacqueline Yujia

    2016-01-01

    Addressing the financing gap for renewable energy (RE) projects in Asia is critical to ensure that the rapidly increasing energy needs could be met sustainably. This paper explores the cause of the financing gap in Asia and proposes the use of bond financing to address the financing gap. Specifically, three fixed income instruments, namely local currency denominated (LCY) corporate bonds, asset backed project bonds and financial green bonds, will be assessed. Whilst the potential for these three instruments to mobilize large flows of private sector financing is great, key supportive policies aimed at reducing the capital market bias for conventional power generation technologies and supportive RE policies are required. Another key aspect would be the necessary deepening of local and regional fixed income markets before such capital market instruments are able to play a big role. - Highlights: •This study looks at the current financing gap and RE financing landscape in developing Asia. •LCY corporate bonds, asset backed projects bonds and financial green bonds could help to address the financing gap for RE in the region. •Policy recommendations for building the fixed income market for RE projects are provided.

  7. Integration of direct carbon and hydrogen fuel cells for highly efficient power generation from hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muradov, Nazim; Choi, Pyoungho; Smith, Franklyn; Bokerman, Gary [Florida Solar Energy Center, University of Central Florida, 1679 Clearlake Road, Cocoa, FL 32922-5703 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    In view of impending depletion of hydrocarbon fuel resources and their negative environmental impact, it is imperative to significantly increase the energy conversion efficiency of hydrocarbon-based power generation systems. The combination of a hydrocarbon decomposition reactor with a direct carbon and hydrogen fuel cells (FC) as a means for a significant increase in chemical-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency is discussed in this paper. The data on development and operation of a thermocatalytic hydrocarbon decomposition reactor and its coupling with a proton exchange membrane FC are presented. The analysis of the integrated power generating system including a hydrocarbon decomposition reactor, direct carbon and hydrogen FC using natural gas and propane as fuels is conducted. It was estimated that overall chemical-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency of the integrated system varied in the range of 49.4-82.5%, depending on the type of fuel and FC used, and CO{sub 2} emission per kW{sub el}h produced is less than half of that from conventional power generation sources. (author)

  8. Combining hybrid cars and synthetic fuels with electricity generation and carbon capture and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vliet, Oscar van; Broek, Machteld van den; Turkenburg, Wim; Faaij, Andre

    2011-01-01

    We examined the co-evolution of the transportation, and electricity and heat generation sectors in the Netherlands until 2040 using a MARKAL bottom-up cost optimisation model. All scenario variants investigated indicate a switch away from crude oil-based diesel and petrol for transportation. Lowest overall CO 2 abatement cost is achieved by accommodating transportation first and using relatively expensive options for emissions reduction in electricity generation if needed. Biomass and carbon capture and storage (CCS) are used to full potential. Transportation CO 2 emissions are reduced by switching to ethanol or bio-based synthetic fuels combined with CCS, and series hybrid cars if needed. Depending on the availability of biomass and carbon storage capacity, electricity is produced from biomass, coal with CCS, or wind complemented with natural gas. Indirect greenhouse gas emissions rise to 34-54% of national emissions in 2040. The difference in annual investment required between the scenario variants with and without CO 2 emissions reductions of 68% by 2040 is 4-7 billion euro/year, or 0.5-1.2% of projected GDP. Investment costs are mostly determined by the cost of cars and electricity generation capacity. We observe competition for limited biomass supply and CO 2 storage capacity between the transportation and power sectors.

  9. Application of Carbon Nanotube Assemblies for Sound Generation and Heat Dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Mikhail; Haines, Carter; Oh, Jiyoung; Lima, Marcio; Fang, Shaoli

    2011-03-01

    Nanotech approaches were explored for the efficient transformation of an electrical signal into sound, heat, cooling action, and mechanical strain. The studies are based on the aligned arrays of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT forests) that can be grown on various substrates using a conventional CVD technique. They form a three-dimensional conductive network that possesses uncommon electrical, thermal, acoustic and mechanical properties. When heated with an alternating current or a near-IR laser modulated in 0.01--20 kHz range, the nanotube forests produce loud, audible sound. High generated sound pressure and broad frequency response (beyond 20 kHz) show that the forests act as efficient thermo-acoustic (TA) transducers. They can generate intense third and fourth TA harmonics that reveal peculiar interference-like patterns from ac-dc voltage scans. A strong dependence of the patterns on forest height can be used for characterization of carbon nanotube assemblies and for evaluation of properties of thermal interfaces. Because of good coupling with surrounding air, the forests provide excellent dissipation of heat produced by IC chips. Thermoacoustic converters based on forests can be used for thermo- and photo-acoustic sound generation, amplification and noise cancellation.

  10. Carbon emission as a function of energy generation in hydroelectric reservoirs in Brazilian dry tropical biome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ometto, Jean P.; Cimbleris, André C.P.; Santos, Marco A. dos; Rosa, Luiz P.; Abe, Donato; Tundisi, José G.; Stech, José L.; Barros, Nathan; Roland, Fábio

    2013-01-01

    Most energy generation globally is fueled by coal and oil, raising concerns about greenhouse gas emissions. Hydroelectric reservoirs are anthropogenic aquatic systems that occur across a wide geographical extent, and, in addition to their importance for energy production, they have the potential to release two important greenhouse gases (GHGs), carbon dioxide and methane. We report results from an extensive study of eight hydroelectric reservoirs located in central and southeastern tropical Brazil. In the Brazilian dry tropical biome reservoirs, emissions (in tons of CO 2 Eq. per MW h) varied from 0.01 to 0.55, and decreased with reservoir age. Total emissions were higher in the reservoir lake when compared to the river downstream the dam; however, emissions per unit area, in the first kilometer of the river after the dam, were higher than that in the reservoir. The results showed, despite higher carbon emissions per energy production in the youngest reservoirs, lower emission from hydroelectric reservoirs from the studied region in relation to thermo electrical supply, fueled by coal or fossil fuel. The ratio emission of GHG per MWh produced is an important parameter in evaluating the service provided by hydroelectric reservoir and for energy planning policies. - Highlights: ► Hydroelectric reservoirs construction is growing worldwide. ► The effect of hydropower reservoir in the carbon cycle is dependent on environment characteristics. ► Carbon emissions per energy production are higher in the youngest tropical savannah reservoirs. ► Methane emissions decrease with reservoir age in tropical savannah reservoirs. ► In general, the effect of hydropower in the carbon cycle is lower than other energy sources

  11. Conference on energy transition financing in France and Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faucheux, Ivan; Rid, Urban; Sickenberger, Peter; Ricordeau, Damien; Schmidt, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    The French-German office for Renewable energies (OFAEnR) organised a conference on the energy transition financing in France and in Germany. In the framework of this French-German exchange of experience, participants exchanged views on the legal framework, the instruments and the role of financing institutions in the development of a low-carbon society and economy. Questions regarding the successful financing of renewable energy projects and the expectations of financiers were addressed. This document brings together the available presentations (slides) made during this event: 1 - Regulatory framework for investment in the 'green sector' in France (Ivan Faucheux); 2 - Overview of the financing framework for the German 'Energiewende' (Rid, Urban); 3 - Financing Renewables - KfW's Instruments and Track Record (Peter Sickenberger); 4 - French Overview on Renewable energy Financing (Damien Ricordeau); 5 - Profitability analysis of renewable energies in Germany: Which stakeholders and financing models have proven successful? (Gerrit Schmidt)

  12. Carbon emission and mitigation cost comparisons between fossil fuel, nuclear and renewable energy resources for electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, R.E.H.; Rogner, H.-H.; Gregory, Ken

    2003-01-01

    A study was conducted to compare the electricity generation costs of a number of current commercial technologies with technologies expected to become commercially available within the coming decade or so. The amount of greenhouse gas emissions resulting per kWh of electricity generated were evaluated. A range of fossil fuel alternatives (with and without physical carbon sequestration), were compared with the baseline case of a pulverised coal, steam cycle power plant. Nuclear, hydro, wind, bioenergy and solar generating plants were also evaluated. The objectives were to assess the comparative costs of mitigation per tonne of carbon emissions avoided, and to estimate the total amount of carbon mitigation that could result from the global electricity sector by 2010 and 2020 as a result of fuel switching, carbon dioxide sequestration and the greater uptake of renewable energy. Most technologies showed potential to reduce both generating costs and carbon emission avoidance by 2020 with the exception of solar power and carbon dioxide sequestration. The global electricity industry has potential to reduce its carbon emissions by over 15% by 2020 together with cost saving benefits compared with existing generation

  13. Dying to play video games: carbon monoxide poisoning from electrical generators used after hurricane Ike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fife, Caroline E; Smith, Latisha A; Maus, Erik A; McCarthy, James J; Koehler, Michelle Z; Hawkins, Trina; Hampson, Neil B

    2009-06-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is common after major storms because of loss of electrical power and use of alternate fuel sources for heat and electricity. In past epidemics of hurricane-related CO poisoning, the source has typically been gasoline-powered electrical generators. Although it is typically believed that generators were used to power air conditioning and refrigeration, this report demonstrates an unsuspected reason for their use. After Hurricane Ike's landfall in September 2008, major power outages were associated with an epidemic of CO poisoning from electrical generators, as expected. Staff at Memorial Hermann Hospital-Texas Medical Center treated or telephone-triaged cases from the Houston area. A review of the details of those cases forms the basis of this report. Memorial Hermann Hospital-Texas Medical Center staff treated or triaged 37 individuals exposed to CO from gasoline-powered electrical generators in 13 incidents in the first 36 hours after landfall of the hurricane. Notably, 54% (20 of 37) of the patients were under the age of 18 years. Symptoms ranged from mild to severe, with 1 child dying at the scene. Eleven patients were treated with hyperbaric oxygen. Among 9 incidents in which the reason for generator use was determined, 5 were due to generators powering video games or televisions to watch movies or programs. These 5 incidents in which video games were being powered accounted for 75% (15 of 20) of the pediatric poisonings. Generator-related CO poisoning is indeed common during power outages after hurricanes. However, generators are commonly being used to provide electricity to power entertainment devices for children, such as video games. Additional public education about CO risk is needed, perhaps directed at older children and teenagers through the schools in regions susceptible to hurricanes.

  14. Manipulation of cell membrane using carbon nanotube scaffold as a photoresponsive stimuli generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sada, Takao; Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2014-08-01

    We describe, for the first time, the perforation of the cell membrane in the targeted single cell based on the nanosecond pulsed near-infrared (NIR) laser irradiation of a thin film of carbon nanotubes that act as an effective photon absorber as well as stimuli generator. When the power of NIR laser is over 17.5 μ J/pulse, the cell membrane after irradiation is irreversibly disrupted and results in cell death. In sharp contrast, the perforation of the cell membrane occurs at suitable laser power (∼15 μ J/pulse) without involving cell termination.

  15. Advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) for 2-nd generation carbon radiotherapy facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Shornikov, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we analyze how advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) can facilitate the progress of carbon therapy facilities. We will demonstrate that advanced ion sources enable operation of 2-nd generation ion beam therapy (IBT) accelerators. These new accelerator concepts with designs dedicated to IBT provide beams better suited for therapy and, are more cost efficient than contemporary IBT facilities. We will give a sort overview of the existing new IBT concepts and focus on those where ion source technology is the limiting factor. We will analyse whether this limitation can be overcome in the near future thanks to ongoing EBIS development.

  16. Financing public healthcare institutions in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akortsu, Mercy Akosua; Abor, Patience Aseweh

    2011-01-01

    The financing of healthcare services has been of a major concern to all governments in the face of increasing healthcare costs. For developing countries, where good health is considered a poverty reduction strategy, it is imperative that the hospitals used in the delivery of healthcare services are well financed to accomplish their tasks. The purpose of this paper is to examine how public hospitals in Ghana are financed, and the challenges facing the financing modes adopted. To achieve the objectives of the study, one major public healthcare institution in Ghana became the main focus. The findings of the study revealed that the main sources of financing the public healthcare institution are government subvention, internally-generated funds and donor-pooled funds. Of these sources, the internally generated fund was regarded as the most reliable, and the least reliable was the donor-pooled funds. Several challenges associated with the various financing sources were identified. These include delay in receipt of government subvention, delay in the reimbursement of services provided to subscribers of health insurance schemes, influence of government in setting user fees, and the specifications to which donor funds are put. The findings of this study have important implications for improving the financing of public healthcare institutions in Ghana. A number of recommendations are provided in this regard.

  17. The Housing Finance Revolution

    OpenAIRE

    Richard K. Green; Susan M. Wachter

    2007-01-01

    While other countries dismantled their segmented housing finance systems and linked housing finance to capital markets through deregulated depositories, the US linked housing finance to capital markets through depository deregulation and securitization. Elsewhere securitization has not developed. The US provided the underpinnings for its mortgage security infrastructure with the creation of FNMA in 1938 and in order to create liquidity in the mortgage market required the standardization of mo...

  18. Project Finance: Basic Components

    OpenAIRE

    Alfieri Li Ojeda, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    The natural speed of the contemporary world demands large investment projects which require specialized financial techniques such as Project Finance, defined as a fund to finance investment projects of great magnitude. Every Project Finance involves a wide range of elements such as promoters, government, contractors andsuppliers, among others, that will ensure project success. La rapidez del mundo contemporáneo exige que los grandes proyectos de inversión requieran de técnicas financieras ...

  19. What is project finance?

    OpenAIRE

    João M. Pinto

    2017-01-01

    Project finance is the process of financing a specific economic unit that the sponsors create, in which creditors share much of the venture’s business risk and funding is obtained strictly for the project itself. Project finance creates value by reducing the costs of funding, maintaining the sponsors financial flexibility, increasing the leverage ratios, avoiding contamination risk, reducing corporate taxes, improving risk management, and reducing the costs associated with market ...

  20. Financing nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheriffah Noor Khamseah Al-Idid Syed Ahmad Idid

    2009-01-01

    Global energy security and climate change concerns sparked by escalating oil prices, high population growth and the rapid pace of industrialization are fueling the current interest and investments in nuclear power. Globally, a significant number policy makers and energy industry leaders have identified nuclear power as a favorable alternative energy option, and are presently evaluating either a new or an expanded role for nuclear power. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has reported that as of October 2008, 14 countries have plans to construct 38 new nuclear reactors and about 100 more nuclear power plants have been written into the development plans of governments for the next three decades. Hence as new build is expected to escalate, issues of financing will become increasingly significant. Energy supply, including nuclear power, considered as a premium by government from the socio-economic and strategic perspective has traditionally been a sector financed and owned by the government. In the case for nuclear power, the conventional methods of financing include financing by the government or energy entity (utility or oil company) providing part of the funds from its own resources with support from the government. As national financing is, as in many cases, insufficient to fully finance the nuclear power plants, additional financing is sourced from international sources of financing including, amongst others, Export Credit Agencies (ECAs) and Multilateral Development Institutions. However, arising from the changing dynamics of economics, financing and business model as well as increasing concerns regarding environmental degradation , transformations in methods of financing this energy sector has been observed. This paper aims to briefly present on financing aspects of nuclear power as well as offer some examples of the changing dynamics of financing nuclear power which is reflected by the evolution of ownership and management of nuclear power plants

  1. Financing Constraints and Entrepreneurship

    OpenAIRE

    William R. Kerr; Ramana Nanda

    2009-01-01

    Financing constraints are one of the biggest concerns impacting potential entrepreneurs around the world. Given the important role that entrepreneurship is believed to play in the process of economic growth, alleviating financing constraints for would-be entrepreneurs is also an important goal for policymakers worldwide. We review two major streams of research examining the relevance of financing constraints for entrepreneurship. We then introduce a framework that provides a unified perspecti...

  2. Co-Generation and Renewables: Solutions for a Low-Carbon Energy Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    Co-generation and renewables: solutions for a low-carbon energy future shows that powerful synergies exist when co-generation and renewables work together. The report documents, for the first time, some of the little-known complementary aspects of the two technologies. It also re-emphasises the stand-alone benefits of each technology. Thus, decision makers can use the report as a 'one-stop shop' when they need credible information on co-generation, renewables and the possible synergies between the two. It also provides answers to policy makers' questions about the potential energy and environmental benefits of an increased policy commitment to both co-generation and renewables. Secure, reliable, affordable and clean energy supplies are fundamental to economic and social stability and development. Energy and environmental decision-makers are faced with major challenges that require action now in order to ensure a more sustainable future. More efficient use of, and cleaner primary energy sources can help to achieve this goal. Co-generation -- also known as combined heat and power (CHP) -- represents a proven, cost-effective and energy-efficient solution for delivering electricity and heat. Renewable sources provide clean and secure fuels for producing electricity and heat.

  3. Financing Preference Behaviour for Private Finance Initiative (PFI Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yati Md Lasa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Project Financing Initiative (PFI projects require the private sector to invest an enormous amount of capital for the development of public projects. The private sector has to seek cost-effective financing sources for their survival in the long-term concession. Conventional financing uses widely; however, Islamic financing promises better financing through profit and loss sharing. This paper reviews financing preferences for PFI projects and the factors influencing the choice of funding. The results show that religious perspective, quality of services, financing facilities and reputation are the factors that are expected will influence the financing preference behaviour, either Islamic or conventional finance.

  4. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Generation System Definition: Concept Definition and Capital Cost Estimate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoddard, Larry [Black & Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States); Galluzzo, Geoff [Black & Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States); Andrew, Daniel [Black & Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States); Adams, Shannon [Black & Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2016-06-30

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Renewable Power (ORP) has been tasked to provide effective program management and strategic direction for all of the DOE’s Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy’s (EERE’s) renewable power programs. The ORP’s efforts to accomplish this mission are aligned with national energy policies, DOE strategic planning, EERE’s strategic planning, Congressional appropriation, and stakeholder advice. ORP is supported by three renewable energy offices, of which one is the Solar Energy Technology Office (SETO) whose SunShot Initiative has a mission to accelerate research, development and large scale deployment of solar technologies in the United States. SETO has a goal of reducing the cost of Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) by 75 percent of 2010 costs by 2020 to reach parity with base-load energy rates, and 30 percent further reductions by 2030. The SunShot Initiative is promoting the implementation of high temperature CSP with thermal energy storage allowing generation during high demand hours. The SunShot Initiative has funded significant research and development work on component testing, with attention to high temperature molten salts, heliostats, receiver designs, and high efficiency high temperature supercritical CO2 (sCO2) cycles. DOE retained Black & Veatch to support SETO’s SunShot Initiative for CSP solar power tower technology in the following areas: 1. Concept definition, including costs and schedule, of a flexible test facility to be used to test and prove components in part to support financing. 2. Concept definition, including costs and schedule, of an integrated high temperature molten salt (MS) facility with thermal energy storage and with a supercritical CO2 cycle generating approximately 10MWe. 3. Concept definition, including costs and schedule, of an integrated high temperature falling particle facility with thermal energy storage and with a supercritical CO2 cycle

  5. Multiple exciton generation in chiral carbon nanotubes: Density functional theory based computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryjevski, Andrei; Mihaylov, Deyan; Kilina, Svetlana; Kilin, Dmitri

    2017-10-01

    We use a Boltzmann transport equation (BE) to study time evolution of a photo-excited state in a nanoparticle including phonon-mediated exciton relaxation and the multiple exciton generation (MEG) processes, such as exciton-to-biexciton multiplication and biexciton-to-exciton recombination. BE collision integrals are computed using Kadanoff-Baym-Keldysh many-body perturbation theory based on density functional theory simulations, including exciton effects. We compute internal quantum efficiency (QE), which is the number of excitons generated from an absorbed photon in the course of the relaxation. We apply this approach to chiral single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), such as (6,2) and (6,5). We predict efficient MEG in the (6,2) and (6,5) SWCNTs within the solar spectrum range starting at the 2Eg energy threshold and with QE reaching ˜1.6 at about 3Eg, where Eg is the electronic gap.

  6. Generation of various carbon nanostructures in water using IR/UV laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortazavi, Seyedeh Zahra; Parvin, Parviz; Reyhani, Ali; Mirershadi, Soghra; Sadighi-Bonabi, Rasoul

    2013-01-01

    A wide variety of carbon nanostructures were generated by a Q-switched Nd : YAG laser (1064 nm) while mostly nanodiamonds were created by an ArF excimer laser (193 nm) in deionized water. They were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that the IR laser affected the morphology and structure of the nanostructures due to the higher inverse bremsstrahlung absorption rate within the plasma plume with respect to the UV laser. Moreover, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy was carried out so that the plasma created by the IR laser was more energetic than that generated by the UV laser. (paper)

  7. Major design issues of molten carbonate fuel cell power generation unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, T.P.

    1996-04-01

    In addition to the stack, a fuel cell power generation unit requires fuel desulfurization and reforming, fuel and oxidant preheating, process heat removal, waste heat recovery, steam generation, oxidant supply, power conditioning, water supply and treatment, purge gas supply, instrument air supply, and system control. These support facilities add considerable cost and system complexity. Bechtel, as a system integrator of M-C Power`s molten carbonate fuel cell development team, has spent substantial effort to simplify and minimize these supporting facilities to meet cost and reliability goals for commercialization. Similiar to other fuels cells, MCFC faces design challenge of how to comply with codes and standards, achieve high efficiency and part load performance, and meanwhile minimize utility requirements, weight, plot area, and cost. However, MCFC has several unique design issues due to its high operating temperature, use of molten electrolyte, and the requirement of CO2 recycle.

  8. Sub-nanosecond light-pulse generation with waveguide-coupled carbon nanotube transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Pyatkov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have recently been integrated into optical waveguides and operated as electrically-driven light emitters under constant electrical bias. Such devices are of interest for the conversion of fast electrical signals into optical ones within a nanophotonic circuit. Here, we demonstrate that waveguide-integrated single-walled CNTs are promising high-speed transducers for light-pulse generation in the gigahertz range. Using a scalable fabrication approach we realize hybrid CNT-based nanophotonic devices, which generate optical pulse trains in the range from 200 kHz to 2 GHz with decay times below 80 ps. Our results illustrate the potential of CNTs for hybrid optoelectronic systems and nanoscale on-chip light sources.

  9. Carbon steel corrosion prevention during chemical cleaning of steam generator secondary side components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulger, M.; Lucan, D.; Velciu, L.

    2009-01-01

    During operation of a nuclear power plant, many contaminants, such as solid particles or dissolved species are formed in the secondary circuit, go into steam generator and deposit as scales on heat transfer tubing, support plate or as sludge on tube sheet. By accumulation of these impurities, heat transfer is reduced and the integrity of the steam generator tubing is influenced. Chemical cleaning is a qualified, efficient measure to improve steam generator corrosion performance. The corrosion mechanism can be counteracted by the chemical cleaning of the deposits on the tube sheet and the scales on the heat transfer tubing. The major component of the scales is magnetite, which can be dissolved using an organic chelating agent (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, EDTA) in combination with a complexing agent such as citric acid in an alkaline reducing environment. As the secondary side of SG is a conglomerate of alloys it is necessary to choose an optimal chemical cleaning solution for an efficient cleaning properties and at the same time with capability of corrosion prevention of carbon steel components during the process. The paper presents laboratory tests initiated to confirm the ability of this process to clean the SG components. The experiments followed two paths: - first, carbon steel samples have been autoclavized in specific secondary circuit solutions of steam generator to simulate the deposits constituted during operation of this equipment; - secondly, autoclavized samples have been cleaned with a solvent composed of EDTA citric acid, hydrazine of pH = 5 and temperature of 85 deg. C. Before chemical cleaning, the oxide films were characterized by surface analysis techniques including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Applied to dissolve corrosion products formed in a steam generator, the solvents based on chelating agents are aggressive toward carbon steels and corrosion inhibitors are

  10. Molten carbonate fuel cell power generation system. Yoyu tansan prime en gata nenryo denchi hatsuden sochi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uematsu, K; Hatori, S [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1991-11-01

    In an indirect internal reforming type molten carbonate fuel cell, the reforming temperature is limited less than the operating temperature of the fuel cell, as the heat source for reforming is depended on the reaction heat at about 650 {degree} C of the fuel cell. To improve the reforming rate at the low temperature range, it is considered to increase S/C (ratio of steam to carbon), but this scheme will cause such problems as to increase the voltage drop of the anode, to drop the heat recovery ratio on the cogenerator, to increase the capacity of the heat exchanger, etc. In this invention, in the power generating plant of a molten carbonate fuel cell the inert gas is added to the reforming raw gas, and in addition to the above the gas is mixed with steam and led into the reforming chamber of the plant. When the inert gas which is not directly concerned in the reforming reaction is added to, total mol number increases and the reforming reaction is acceralated. Consequently, the reforming rate can be raised, though the reforming temperature is low. 2 figs.

  11. Is carbon / CO2 taxes implementation timely for electricity and heat generation in Romania ?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tutuianu, O.; Fulger, E.D.; Vieru, A.; Feher, M.

    1996-01-01

    Lately, carbon / CO 2 taxes are very much discussed in Europe and in many countries of the world as economic and financial instruments for reducing the CO 2 emissions. Some countries have already introduced such taxes while in other countries or international organisations they are under study, especially concerning the moment, the way of implementation and the amount of taxes. CO 2 emissions in Romania, in absolute and specific values (per capita, per kWh equivalent) are lower than in other countries. This can be justified by the low level of electricity and heat output owing to the recent economic restructuring and by the energy sector characteristics: natural gas major contribution, hydroelectric power, cogeneration and nuclear power implementation. We can also mention, as a positive factor, the CO 2 absorption potential of the Romanian forests. Carbon / CO 2 taxes introduction has severe economic and social impact, such as: domestic coal extraction blockage, increase in the electricity and heat prices, decrease of Romanian export products competitiveness and reduction of population standard of living. Therefore, the authors are considering that carbon / CO 2 taxes introduction is not timely by the year 2000 for the Romanian electricity and heat generation. (author). 3 figs. 2 tabs. 10 refs

  12. Modeling and assessing international climate financing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Tang, Lichun; Mohamed, Rayman; Zhu, Qianting; Wang, Zheng

    2016-06-01

    Climate financing is a key issue in current negotiations on climate protection. This study establishes a climate financing model based on a mechanism in which donor countries set up funds for climate financing and recipient countries use the funds exclusively for carbon emission reduction. The burden-sharing principles are based on GDP, historical emissions, and consumptionbased emissions. Using this model, we develop and analyze a series of scenario simulations, including a financing program negotiated at the Cancun Climate Change Conference (2010) and several subsequent programs. Results show that sustained climate financing can help to combat global climate change. However, the Cancun Agreements are projected to result in a reduction of only 0.01°C in global warming by 2100 compared to the scenario without climate financing. Longer-term climate financing programs should be established to achieve more significant benefits. Our model and simulations also show that climate financing has economic benefits for developing countries. Developed countries will suffer a slight GDP loss in the early stages of climate financing, but the longterm economic growth and the eventual benefits of climate mitigation will compensate for this slight loss. Different burden-sharing principles have very similar effects on global temperature change and economic growth of recipient countries, but they do result in differences in GDP changes for Japan and the FSU. The GDP-based principle results in a larger share of financial burden for Japan, while the historical emissions-based principle results in a larger share of financial burden for the FSU. A larger burden share leads to a greater GDP loss.

  13. Islamic Public Infrastructure Financing: An Analysis of Alternative Financing Instruments with Application in Developing Countries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Islam, Saiful

    2004-01-01

    .... This financing mixture, however, may lead to fiscal constraints when debt service occurs. If the investment funds are unproductive, then the infrastructure project may not generate sufficient revenue to offset debt service obligations...

  14. The International Finance Corporation and financing of sustainable energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The International Finance Corporation (IFC), a member of the World Bank Group, is the largest multilateral source of loan and equity financing for private sector projects in the developing world. IFC participates in an investment only when it can make a special contribution that complements the role of market operators. Since its founding 40 years ago, IFC has provided more than $18.8 billion in financing for 1,706 companies in developing countries. Its share capital is provided by its 170 member countries, which collectively determine its policies and activities. Strong shareholder support and a substantial paid-in capital base have allowed IFC to raise funds for its lending activities through its triple-A rated bond issues in international financial markets. IFC created an Infrastructure Department in 1992 in response to the growing demand for its services in this area. During fiscal 1996 IFC approved 33 projects for new investments of $715 million of which 27% were in the power sector. In recognition of the continuing demand growth for private power investments an expanded Power Department has been formed to handle IFC`s investments in electric power generation projects using renewable resources such as: run-of-the-river hydro, geothermal, biomass cogeneration, wind energy, and solar (photovoltaic, solar thermal, etc.), as well as conventional thermal generation projects, transmission and distribution projects, and energy efficiency investments.

  15. Carbon dioxide capture and separation techniques for advanced power generation point sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennline, H.W.; Luebke, D.R.; Morsi, B.I.; Heintz, Y.J.; Jones, K.L.; Ilconich, J.B.

    2006-09-01

    The capture/separation step for carbon dioxide (CO2) from large-point sources is a critical one with respect to the technical feasibility and cost of the overall carbon sequestration scenario. For large-point sources, such as those found in power generation, the carbon dioxide capture techniques being investigated by the in-house research area of the National Energy Technology Laboratory possess the potential for improved efficiency and costs as compared to more conventional technologies. The investigated techniques can have wide applications, but the research has focused on capture/separation of carbon dioxide from flue gas (postcombustion from fossil fuel-fired combustors) and from fuel gas (precombustion, such as integrated gasification combined cycle – IGCC). With respect to fuel gas applications, novel concepts are being developed in wet scrubbing with physical absorption; chemical absorption with solid sorbents; and separation by membranes. In one concept, a wet scrubbing technique is being investigated that uses a physical solvent process to remove CO2 from fuel gas of an IGCC system at elevated temperature and pressure. The need to define an ideal solvent has led to the study of the solubility and mass transfer properties of various solvents. Fabrication techniques and mechanistic studies for hybrid membranes separating CO2 from the fuel gas produced by coal gasification are also being performed. Membranes that consist of CO2-philic silanes incorporated into an alumina support or ionic liquids encapsulated into a polymeric substrate have been investigated for permeability and selectivity. An overview of two novel techniques is presented along with a research progress status of each technology.

  16. Carbon Dioxide Capture and Separation Techniques for Gasification-based Power Generation Point Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennline, H.W.; Luebke, D.R.; Jones, K.L.; Morsi, B.I. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA); Heintz, Y.J. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA); Ilconich, J.B. (Parsons)

    2007-06-01

    The capture/separation step for carbon dioxide (CO2) from large-point sources is a critical one with respect to the technical feasibility and cost of the overall carbon sequestration scenario. For large-point sources, such as those found in power generation, the carbon dioxide capture techniques being investigated by the in-house research area of the National Energy Technology Laboratory possess the potential for improved efficiency and reduced costs as compared to more conventional technologies. The investigated techniques can have wide applications, but the research has focused on capture/separation of carbon dioxide from flue gas (post-combustion from fossil fuel-fired combustors) and from fuel gas (precombustion, such as integrated gasification combined cycle or IGCC). With respect to fuel gas applications, novel concepts are being developed in wet scrubbing with physical absorption; chemical absorption with solid sorbents; and separation by membranes. In one concept, a wet scrubbing technique is being investigated that uses a physical solvent process to remove CO2 from fuel gas of an IGCC system at elevated temperature and pressure. The need to define an ideal solvent has led to the study of the solubility and mass transfer properties of various solvents. Pertaining to another separation technology, fabrication techniques and mechanistic studies for membranes separating CO2 from the fuel gas produced by coal gasification are also being performed. Membranes that consist of CO2-philic ionic liquids encapsulated into a polymeric substrate have been investigated for permeability and selectivity. Finally, dry, regenerable processes based on sorbents are additional techniques for CO2 capture from fuel gas. An overview of these novel techniques is presented along with a research progress status of technologies related to membranes and physical solvents.

  17. Into the deep: A coarse-grained carbonate turbidite thalweg generated by gigantic submarine chutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Thierry; Gillet, Hervé; Reijmer, John; Droxler, André; cavailhes, Thibault; Hanquiez, Vincent; Fauquembergue, Kelly; Bujan, Stéphane; Blanck, David; bashah, Sara; Guiastrennec, Léa; Fabregas, Natacha; Recouvreur, Audrey; Seibert, Chloé

    2017-04-01

    New high-resolution multibeam mapping, in the Southeastern Bahamas, images in exquisite details the southern part of Exuma Sound, and its unchartered transition area to the deep abyssal plain of the Western North Atlantic bounded by the Bahama Escarpment (BE) between San Salvador Island and Samana Cay, referred here to the San Salvador abyssal plain. The transition area is locally referred to as Crooked Island Passage, loosely delineated by Crooked, Long, and Conception Islands, Rum and Samana Cays. Surprisingly in such a pure carbonate landscape, the newly established map reveals the detailed and complex morphology of a giant valley formed by numerous gravity flows originated in Exuma Sound itself, in addition to many secondary slope gullies and smaller tributaries draining the surrounding upper slopes. The valley referred here as the Exuma canyon system starts with a perched valley with low sinuosity, characterized by several flow restrictions and knickpoints initiated by the presence of drowned isolated platforms and merging tributaries. The valley abruptly transforms itself into a deep incised canyon, rivaling the depth of the Colorado Grand Canyon, through two major knickpoints with outsized chutes exceeding several hundred of meters in height, a total of 1600-1800 m. The sudden transformation of the wide valley into a deep narrow canyon, occurring when the flows incised deep into an underlying lower Cretaceous drowned carbonate platform, generates a huge hydraulic jump and creates an enormous plunge pool and related deposits with mechanisms comparable to the ones operating along giant subaerial waterfalls. The high kinetic flow energy, constrained by this narrow and deeply incised canyon, formed, when it is released at its mouth in the abyssal plain, a wide deep-sea channel with well-developed levees and fan, made of coarse-grained carbonate defined layers separated by fine carbonate sediments mixed with fine siliciclastics transported along the BE by the

  18. Financing - general considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Various aspects of the problems of financing a multinational regional fuel cycle centre (RFCC) are briefly discussed. Some of the points covered are: financing by participants; floating long-term loans on capital markets outside the countries of the participants; and export credits for the purchase of equipment manufactured outside the countries of the participants

  19. Caring finance practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.P. van Staveren (Irene)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe 2008 financial crisis has demonstrated the failure of both utilitarian and deontological ethics in finance. Alternatives do not need to be created from nothing, because the crisis itself has stimulated the emergence of ethically sound finance practices from within the sector. This

  20. POST BEHAVIORAL FINANCE ADOLESCENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADRIAN MITROI

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of behavioral finance combines the investigation and expertise from research and practice into smart portfolios of individual investors’ portfolios. Understanding cognitive errors and misleading emotions drive investors to their long-term goals of financial prosperity and capital preservation. 10 years ago, Behavioral Finance was still considered an incipient, adolescent science. First Nobel Prize in Economics awarded to the study of Behavioral Economics in 2002 established the field as a new, respected study of economics. 2013 Nobel Prize was awarded to three economists, one of them considered the one of the founders of the Behavioral Finance. As such, by now we are entering the coming of age of behavioral finance. It is now recognized as a science of understanding investors behaviors and their biased patterns. It applies quantitative finance and provides practical models grounded on robust understanding of investors behavior toward financial risk. Financial Personality influences investment decisions. Behavioral portfolio construction methods combine classic finance with rigorously quantified psychological metrics and improves models for financial advice to enhance investors chances in reaching their lifetime financial goals. Behavioral finance helps understanding psychological profile dissimilarities of individuals and how these differences manifest in investment decision process. This new science has become now a must topic in modern finance.

  1. Geothermal Financing Workbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battocletti, E.C.

    1998-02-01

    This report was prepared to help small firm search for financing for geothermal energy projects. There are various financial and economics formulas. Costs of some small overseas geothermal power projects are shown. There is much discussion of possible sources of financing, especially for overseas projects. (DJE-2005)

  2. Financing Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejerskov, Adam Moe; Funder, Mikkel; Engberg-Pedersen, Lars

    . But what are in fact the interests and modes of operation of such actors in the context of development financing, and to what extent do they align with the aims of the SDGs? And how do national governments of developing countries themselves perceive and approach these new sources of financing?...

  3. Financing climate change adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwer, L.M.; Aerts, J.C.J.H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the topic of financing adaptation in future climate change policies. A major question is whether adaptation in developing countries should be financed under the 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), or whether funding should come from other sources.

  4. Financing medical office buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, J W

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses financing medical office buildings. In particular, financing and ownership options from a not-for-profit health care system perspective are reviewed, including use of tax-exempt debt, taxable debt, limited partnerships, sale, and real estate investment trusts (REITs).

  5. Financing Canadian international operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beagle, G.

    1996-01-01

    A primer on financing international operations by Canadian corporations was provided. Factors affecting the availability to project finance (location, political risk), the various forms of financing (debt, equity, and combinations), the main sources of government backed financing to corporations (the International Finance Corporation) (IFC), the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), the Asian Development Bank (ADB), the Overseas Property Insurance Corporation (OPIC), government or agency guarantees, political risk coverage, the use of offshore financial centres, and the where, when and how these various organizations operate, were reviewed. Examples of all of the above, taken from the experiences of Canadian Occidental Petroleum of Calgary in the U.S., in South America, in the Middle and Far East, and in Kazakhstan, were used as illustrations. figs

  6. Derivatives in energy project finance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, Lloyd

    1999-01-01

    This chapter focuses on risk management of merchant power generation projects and describes project finance as balancing risk and reward over time. The historical background to risk management is traced, and the case for derivatives in energy project finance is put forward with the hedging of forward output, and forwards and power purchase agreements discussed. Current and prospective usage, and the implementation issues of market liquidity, margin calls, letters of credit, derivative counterparty credit risk, and accounting policy are considered. A detailed example of a gas-fired plant in the US is presented with details given of the distribution of project earnings before tax. Oil field operating cashflows are examined, with reserved flow models, leverage effects, and price hedging addressed

  7. Mainstreaming Low-Carbon Climate-Resilient growth pathways into Development Finance Institutions' activities. A research program on the standards, tools and metrics to support transition to the low-carbon climate-resilient development models. Paper 2 - Lessons from the use of climate-related decision-making standards and tools by DFIs to facilitate the transition to a low-carbon, climate-resilient future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran, Ian; Eschalier, Claire; Deheza, Mariana

    2015-10-01

    The integration or 'mainstreaming' of climate change into development finance decisions poses a broad number of operational challenges. Drawing from the current practice of Development Finance Institutions (DFIs), this paper first identifies three families of tools and metrics used by DFIs to integrate both mitigation and adaptation objectives into investment decision making. Based on this analysis, it then establishes a framework for integrating carbon standards and tools into the upstream strategic and downstream assessment stages of investment decision making. It principally considers the integration into the assessment of direct project finance and investment, but also looks at budget support, programmatic and indirect interventions. Finally, the paper identifies the next steps to build on existing tools and indicators that currently focus on climate finance tracking to those that foster the alignment of long-term development with the 2 deg. C climate objective. This alignment implies moving from 'static' assessment tools - that identify whether or not emissions are reduced or resiliency is increased by an action - to a 'dynamic' process within which the 'transition impact' is assessed. (authors)

  8. Climate finance, climate investors and assets for low emission development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins C Ngwakwe

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This research examines the relationship between climate finance, growth in climate investors and growth in climate assets for low emission development. It also evaluates the effect of climate policy evolution on the growth of climate investors and climate assets. Adopting a positivist paradigm, the paper makes use of a quantitative research approach and applies the causal and correlational research design. The paper made use of secondary data from the World Bank Carbon Finance Unit and from the Carbon Disclosure Project (ADP. The major objective was to examine the combined effect of climate finance and climate policy on the growth of carbon investors and carbon assets for the companies in the Carbon Disclosure Project which includes the 100 JSE companies. Findings from the test reveal that the combined effect of growth in climate finance and climate policy evolution has a significant relationship with growth in climate investors and climate assets. Given this result the paper proceeded to examine if the growth in climate finance has any correlation with South Africa’s emission reduction trend. Results however indicate that South Africa’s GHG emission trend does not correlate with climate finance availability; GHG emissions in South Africa have continued to soar despite a seeming growth in climate finance. The paper reasoned that the global climate finance might not be effectively available to corporates in South Africa at the expected level of financing to initiate the expected level of climate investment to effect a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. This confirms literature assertions that global climate finance might not easily be accessible, at least to entities in developing countries. In conclusion, the paper suggests the establishment of a Southern African Climate Finance pool where the public and private sector can contribute and that such pool should be made easily available to carbon investors at a cheap rate with

  9. Carbon-supported cobalt catalyst for hydrogen generation from alkaline sodium borohydride solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Dongyan; Liu, Xinmin; Cao, Changqing; Guo, Qingjie [College of Chemical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China); Dai, Ping [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061 (China)

    2008-08-01

    Low cost transition metal catalysts with high performance are attractive for the development of on-board hydrogen generation systems by catalytic hydrolysis of sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) in fuel cell fields. In this study, hydrogen production from alkaline NaBH{sub 4} via hydrolysis process over carbon-supported cobalt catalysts was studied. The catalytic activity of the supported cobalt catalyst was found to be highly dependent on the calcination temperatures. The hydrogen generation rate increases with calcination temperatures in the range of 200-400 C, but a high calcination temperature above 500 C led to markedly decreased activity. X-ray diffraction patterns reveal that the catalysts experience phase transition from amorphous Co-B to crystalline cobalt hydroxide with increase in calcination temperatures. The reaction performance is also dependent on the concentration of NaBH{sub 4}, and the hydrogen generation rate increases for lower NaBH{sub 4} concentrations and decreases after reaching a maximum at 10 wt.% of NaBH{sub 4}. (author)

  10. Greener corona discharge for enhanced wind generation with a simple dip-coated carbon nanotube decoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yishan; Li, Jun; Ye, Jianchun; Chen, Xiaohong; Li, Huili; Huang, Sumei; Zhao, Ran; Ou-Yang, Wei

    2017-10-01

    Corona discharge-induced wind (CDIW) has been widely utilized in production lines in the food and semiconductor industries and in indoor devices such as electrostatic precipitators. Some ozone is inevitably emitted, posing serious health risks to respiratory system and lung function of a human being. In this work, a greener corona discharge with enhanced wind generation for a needle-to-cylinder discharge structure is demonstrated using a simple dip-coating method to attach carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to the discharge electrode of a stainless steel needle. Compared with a conventional discharge electrode without CNT decoration, the velocity of the CDIW is greatly enhanced, the onset voltage is lowered, the energy conversion efficiency is greatly improved and the concentration of generated ozone is much reduced, making this easy method of CNT decoration a promising candidate for greener corona discharge systems. In addition, several impact factors for improved performance are discussed mathematically and phenomenologically, providing an insight into the corona discharge and wind generation.

  11. Competitiveness and Carbon Dioxide Emissions of Potential Electricity Generating Options in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feretic, D.

    2008-01-01

    As part of analysis of options needed to generate additional 6-8 TWh of electrical energy for Croatian consumers by the end of next decade, a comparison between natural gas combined cycle plants jointly with wind electricity generator and nuclear power plants has been performed. The choice is a real challenge, but it is logical that the criteria for optimal option are maximal net cash flow and minimal carbon dioxide emission. Since the comparison has to include analysis of discounted net cash flow during plants operating period (including total life time period and period of most insensitive capital return) and since foreseen potential long term fuel cost variations (gas, uranium concentrate and uranium enrichment) contain substantial uncertainties, the best method is to calculate discounted net cash flow with probabilistic method. Prognosis for long term nuclear fuel cycle and gas costs is included in the analyses. Results, obtained in form of probabilistic distributions, showed that selection of option with nuclear plant would doubtlessly result in higher net cash flow for the investor, and of course, in lower CO 2 emissions. Effect of plant selection to net cash flow and CO 2 emissions is additionally analyzed by comparing systems containing wind and gas plants versus system with gas plants only. The difference is less pronounced in case when wind generators have low capacity factors (similar to experienced for wind plants already operating on Adriatic coast). (author)

  12. Extremely Black Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Arrays for Solar Steam Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhe; Wang, Huimin; Jian, Muqiang; Li, Yanshen; Xia, Kailun; Zhang, Mingchao; Wang, Chunya; Wang, Qi; Ma, Ming; Zheng, Quan-Shui; Zhang, Yingying

    2017-08-30

    The unique structure of a vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) array makes it behave most similarly to a blackbody. It is reported that the optical absorptivity of an extremely black VACNT array is about 0.98-0.99 over a large spectral range of 200 nm-200 μm, inspiring us to explore the performance of VACNT arrays in solar energy harvesting. In this work, we report the highly efficient steam generation simply by laminating a layer of VACNT array on the surface of water to harvest solar energy. It is found that under solar illumination the temperature of upper water can significantly increase with obvious water steam generated, indicating the efficient solar energy harvesting and local temperature rise by the thin layer of VACNTs. We found that the evaporation rate of water assisted by VACNT arrays is 10 times that of bare water, which is the highest ratio for solar-thermal-steam generation ever reported. Remarkably, the solar thermal conversion efficiency reached 90%. The excellent performance could be ascribed to the strong optical absorption and local temperature rise induced by the VACNT layer, as well as the ultrafast water transport through the VACNT layer due to the frictionless wall of CNTs. Based on the above, we further demonstrated the application of VACNT arrays in solar-driven desalination.

  13. Greener corona discharge for enhanced wind generation with a simple dip-coated carbon nanotube decoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yishan; Ye, Jianchun; Chen, Xiaohong; Li, Huili; Huang, Sumei; Zhao, Ran; Ou-Yang, Wei; Li, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Corona discharge-induced wind (CDIW) has been widely utilized in production lines in the food and semiconductor industries and in indoor devices such as electrostatic precipitators. Some ozone is inevitably emitted, posing serious health risks to respiratory system and lung function of a human being. In this work, a greener corona discharge with enhanced wind generation for a needle-to-cylinder discharge structure is demonstrated using a simple dip-coating method to attach carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to the discharge electrode of a stainless steel needle. Compared with a conventional discharge electrode without CNT decoration, the velocity of the CDIW is greatly enhanced, the onset voltage is lowered, the energy conversion efficiency is greatly improved and the concentration of generated ozone is much reduced, making this easy method of CNT decoration a promising candidate for greener corona discharge systems. In addition, several impact factors for improved performance are discussed mathematically and phenomenologically, providing an insight into the corona discharge and wind generation. (paper)

  14. The Determinants of Debt Financing

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Chenkai

    2013-01-01

    Debt financing is an important part in capital structure. Over the fifty years, most scholars and researchers focus primarily on the balance between debt financing and equity financing. And only few research involve in types of debt financing, as well as the determinant of debt financing. This study is aim to analyse the determinate of debt financing, which examine that the influence by eight different elements. This dissertation examined by quantitative techniques with 591 UK listed comp...

  15. Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) at Fossil-Fueled Electric Generating Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Alan Mays; Bert R. Bock; Gregory A. Brodie; L. Suzanne Fisher; J. Devereux Joslin; Donald L. Kachelman; Jimmy J. Maddox; N. S. Nicholas; Larry E. Shelton; Nick Taylor; Mark H. Wolfe; Dennis H. Yankee; John Goodrich-Mahoney

    2005-08-30

    2025. Other potential benefits of the demonstration include developing a passive technology for water treatment for trace metal and nutrient release reductions, using power plant by-products to improve coal mine land reclamation and carbon sequestration, developing wildlife habitat and green-space around production facilities, generating Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) credits for the use of process water, and producing wood products for use by the lumber and pulp and paper industry. Project activities conducted during the five year project period include: Assessing tree cultivation and other techniques used to sequester carbon; Project site assessment; Greenhouse studies to determine optimum plant species and by-product application; Designing, constructing, operating, monitoring, and evaluating the CCWESTRS system; and Reporting (ongoing). The ability of the system to sequester carbon will be the primary measure of effectiveness, measured by accessing survival and growth response of plants within the CCWESTRS. In addition, costs associated with design, construction, and monitoring will be evaluated and compared to projected benefits of other carbon sequestration technologies. The test plan involves the application of three levels each of two types of power plant by-products--three levels of FGD gypsum mulch, and three levels of ash pond irrigation water. This design produces nine treatment levels which are being tested with two species of hardwood trees (sweet gum and sycamore). The project is examining the effectiveness of applications of 0, 8-cm, and 15-cm thick gypsum mulch layers and 0, 13 cm, and 25 cm of coal fly ash water for irrigation. Each treatment combination is being replicated three times, resulting in a total of 54 treatment plots (3 FGD gypsum levels X 3 irrigation water levels x 2 tree species x 3 replicates). Survival and growth response of plant species in terms of sequestering carbon in plant material and soil will be the primary measure of

  16. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization: Carbon nanohorn-induced reactive oxygen species generation and toxicity by this neglected mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Mei, E-mail: happy_deercn@163.com [Nanotube Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology 5-2, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8565 (Japan); Zhang, Minfang; Tahara, Yoshio; Chechetka, Svetlana; Miyako, Eijiro [Nanotube Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology 5-2, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8565 (Japan); Iijima, Sumio [Nanotube Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology 5-2, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8565 (Japan); Faculty of Science and Technology, Meijo University, 1-501 Shiogamaguchi, Tenpaku, Nagoya 468-8502 (Japan); Yudasaka, Masako, E-mail: m-yudasaka@aist.go.jp [Nanotube Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology 5-2, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8565 (Japan)

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the cytotoxic effects of carbon nanomaterials is important for their future biomedical applications. Carbon nanotubular materials induce the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which causes cell death; however, the exact details of this process are still unclear. Here, we identify a mechanism of ROS generation that is involved in the apoptosis of RAW264.7 macrophages caused by excess uptake of carbon nanohorns (CNHs), a typical type of carbon nanotubule. CNH accumulated in the lysosomes, where they induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and the subsequent release of lysosomal proteases, such as cathepsins, which in turn caused mitochondrial dysfunction and triggered the generation of ROS in the mitochondria. The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase was not directly involved in CNH-related ROS production, and the ROS generation cannot be regulated by mitochondrial electron transport chain. ROS fed back to amplify the mitochondrial dysfunction, leading to the subsequent activation of caspases and cell apoptosis. Carbon nanotubules commonly accumulate in the lysosomes after internalization in cells; however, lysosomal dysfunction has not attracted much attention in toxicity studies of these materials. These results suggest that LMP, a neglected mechanism, may be the primary reason for carbon nanotubule toxicity. - Highlights: • We clarify an apoptotic mechanism of RAW264.7 cells caused by carbon nanohorns. • In the meantime, the mechanism of CNH-induced ROS generation is identified. • LMP is the initial factor of CNH-induced ROS generation and cell death. • Cathepsins work as mediators that connect LMP and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  17. The Japanese approach to financing LNG projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Wataru

    1995-01-01

    The Japanese approach approach to financing LNG project has been what could be called a combined purchase and finance system which has been arranged mainly at the initiative of japan's Sogo Shosh (general trading companies) with the support of japanese governmental financial agencies and a purchase commitment from japanese utilities. In the QATARGAS project, despite it being the first greenfield LNG project in decade since North West Shelf Australia LNG project, financing for the LNG plant phase has been successfully arranged through Japanese financing. The structuring of the financial facilities for the QATARGAS project seems to have lessons for future development of the next generation of greenfield LNG projects. Discharge of the parties' liability, proper sharing of the risk burden and reconfirmation of the spirit of mutual understanding and trust among the parties concerned are key factors for the success of any new LNG project in the future. (Author)

  18. Beyond pure offsetting: Assessing options to generate Net-Mitigation-Effects in carbon market mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnecke, Carsten; Wartmann, Sina; Höhne, Niklas; Blok, Kornelis

    2014-01-01

    The current project-based carbon market mechanisms such as the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) and the Joint Implementation (JI) do not have a direct impact on global greenhouse gas emission levels, because they only replace or offset emissions. Nor do they contribute to host country's national greenhouse gas emission reduction targets. Contributions to net emission reductions in host countries is likely to become mandatory in new mechanisms under development such as in the framework for various approaches, a new market-based mechanism and even in a reformed JI. This research analysed the question if approaches for carbon market-based mechanisms exist that allow the generation of net emission reductions in host countries while keeping project initiation attractive. We present a criteria-based assessment method and apply it for four generic options in existing mechanisms and derive implications for future mechanism frameworks. We identified the application of “discounts” on the amount of avoided emissions for the issuance of carbon credits and “standardisation below business as usual” as most promising options over “limiting the crediting period” and “over-conservativeness”. We propose to apply these options differentiated over project types based on internal rate of return to ensure cost-efficiency and attractiveness. - Highlights: • Options for net emission reductions of market-based mechanisms are assessed. • Research combines past and current views for project and sector-based mechanisms. • Implementation ensures initiation of mitigation activities is not discouraged. • Important insights for methodological design of new market-based mechanisms. • Profitability-based approach for project-based mechanisms suggested

  19. Low temperature heat source for power generation: Exhaustive analysis of a carbon dioxide transcritical power cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velez, Fredy; Segovia, Jose; Chejne, Farid; Antolin, Gregorio; Quijano, Ana; Carmen Martin, M.

    2011-01-01

    The main results of a theoretical work on the use of a low temperature heat source for power generation through a carbon dioxide transcritical power cycle are reported in this paper. The procedure for analyzing the behaviour of the proposed cycle consisted in modifying the input pressure to the turbine from 66 bar, maintained constant each evaluated temperature (60 o C, 90 o C, 120 o C and 150 o C) until the net work was approximately zero. As a result, the maximum exergy efficiency was 50%, while the energy efficiencies obtained were 9.8%, 7.3%, 4.9% and 2.4% and the net specific work was 18.2 kJ/kg, 12.8 kJ/kg, 7.8 kJ/kg and 3.5 kJ/kg, respectively. Furthermore, the effect of the addition of an internal heat exchanger, which obviously supposed an increase in the efficiency, was analyzed. The analysis of the proposed system shows the viability of implementing this type of process as an energy alternative and/or strengthener of non-conventional energy sources in non-provided zones, or for increasing the energy efficiency in the industry. -- Highlights: → Energy and exergy analysis of a carbon dioxide transcritical power cycle is reported. → The effect of the inlet temperature to the turbine is evaluated. → Conditions of maximum efficiency and maximum net work are compared. → The inclusion of an IHX is also analysed.

  20. Qualification of diesel generator exhaust carbon steel piping to intermitted elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratiu, M.D.; Moisidis, N.T.

    1996-01-01

    The diesel generator exhaust piping, usually made up of carbon steel piping (e.g., ASME SA-106, SA-53), is subjected to successive short time exposures at elevated temperatures up to 1,000 F (538 C). A typical design of this piping, without consideration for creep-fatigue cumulative damage, is at least incomplete, if not inappropriate. Also, a design for creep-fatigue, usually employed for long-term exposure to elevated temperatures, would be too conservative and will impose replacement of the carbon steel piping with heat-resistant CrMo alloy piping. The existing ASME standard procedures do not explicitly provide acceptance criteria for the design qualification to withstand these intermittent exposures to elevated temperatures. The serviceability qualification proposed is based on the evaluation of equivalent full temperature cycles which are presumed/expected to be experienced by the exhaust piping during the design operating life of the diesel engine. The proposed serviceability analysis consists of: (a) determination of the permissible stress at elevated temperatures, and (b) estimation of creep-fatigue damage for the total expected cycles of elevated temperature exposures following the procedure provided in ASME Code Cases N-253-6 and N-47-28

  1. Energy loss of argon in a laser-generated carbon plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, A; Blazević, A; Grande, P L; Harres, K; Hessling, T; Hoffmann, D H H; Knobloch-Maas, R; Kuznetsov, P G; Nürnberg, F; Pelka, A; Schaumann, G; Schiwietz, G; Schökel, A; Schollmeier, M; Schumacher, D; Schütrumpf, J; Vatulin, V V; Vinokurov, O A; Roth, M

    2010-02-01

    The experimental data presented in this paper address the energy loss determination for argon at 4 MeV/u projectile energy in laser-generated carbon plasma covering a huge parameter range in density and temperature. Furthermore, a consistent theoretical description of the projectile charge state evolution via a Monte Carlo code is combined with an improved version of the CasP code that allows us to calculate the contributions to the stopping power of bound and free electrons for each projectile charge state. This approach gets rid of any effective charge description of the stopping power. Comparison of experimental data and theoretical results allows us to judge the influence of different plasma parameters.

  2. Fabrication of Glass Microchannel via Glass Imprinting using a Vitreous Carbon Stamp for Flow Focusing Droplet Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refatul Haq, Muhammad; Kim, Youngkyu; Kim, Jun; Oh, Pyoung-hwa; Ju, Jonghyun; Kim, Seok-Min; Lim, Jiseok

    2017-01-01

    This study reports a cost-effective method of replicating glass microfluidic chips using a vitreous carbon (VC) stamp. A glass replica with the required microfluidic microstructures was synthesized without etching. The replication method uses a VC stamp fabricated by combining thermal replication using a furan-based, thermally-curable polymer with carbonization. To test the feasibility of this method, a flow focusing droplet generator with flow-focusing and channel widths of 50 µm and 100 µm, respectively, was successfully fabricated in a soda-lime glass substrate. Deviation between the geometries of the initial shape and the vitreous carbon mold occurred because of shrinkage during the carbonization process, however this effect could be predicted and compensated for. Finally, the monodispersity of the droplets generated by the fabricated microfluidic device was evaluated. PMID:29286341

  3. Fabrication of Glass Microchannel via Glass Imprinting using a Vitreous Carbon Stamp for Flow Focusing Droplet Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyungjun Jang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study reports a cost-effective method of replicating glass microfluidic chips using a vitreous carbon (VC stamp. A glass replica with the required microfluidic microstructures was synthesized without etching. The replication method uses a VC stamp fabricated by combining thermal replication using a furan-based, thermally-curable polymer with carbonization. To test the feasibility of this method, a flow focusing droplet generator with flow-focusing and channel widths of 50 µm and 100 µm, respectively, was successfully fabricated in a soda-lime glass substrate. Deviation between the geometries of the initial shape and the vitreous carbon mold occurred because of shrinkage during the carbonization process, however this effect could be predicted and compensated for. Finally, the monodispersity of the droplets generated by the fabricated microfluidic device was evaluated.

  4. Financing Sustainable Small-Scale Forestry: Lessons from Developing National Forest Financing Strategies in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Savenije

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The problems that hamper the financing of sustainable forest management (SFM are manifold and complex. However, forestry is also facing unprecedented opportunities. The multiple functions and values of forests are increasingly recognized as part of the solution to pressing global issues (e.g., climate change, energy scarcity, poverty, environmental degradation, biodiversity loss and raw material supply. Emerging initiatives to enhance forest carbon stocks and cut greenhouse gas emissions associated with forest clearing (known as REDD+, together with voluntary carbon markets, are offering additional funding options for SFM. Indigenous peoples, local communities and small scale farmers feature as key players in the discourse on implementing such initiatives. Based on the experience of countries developing national forest financing strategies and instruments, we suggest the following points be considered when financing such initiatives, particularly for small scale forestry: (1 Integrate financing of REDD+ and similar initiatives within broader national strategies for SFM financing; (2 Design REDD+ finance mechanisms that are ‘community ready’, i.e., tailored to local realities; (3 Consider existing livelihood strategies as the starting point; (4 Build on existing structures, but be mindful of their strengths and weaknesses; (5 Be strategic with your priority actions; and (6 Promote innovation, knowledge sharing and information exchange.

  5. Essays in Household Finance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanspal, Tobin

    This Ph.D. thesis, entitled Essays in Household Finance, analyzes the determinants and implications of investment biases, personal experiences in financial markets, and financing disruptions on households, individual investors, and entrepreneurs and small business owners. The first essay...... on risk taking is the potential bias resulting from inertia and inattention, which has been shown to be endemic in household finance. If individuals are inert or inattentive, it is difficult to establish whether changes in risk taking are caused by personal experiences or whether the change in risk taking...

  6. The Finance Curse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, John; Shaxson, Nick; Wigan, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    The Global Financial Crisis placed the utility of financial services in question. The crash, great recession, wealth transfers from public to private, austerity and growing inequality cast doubt on the idea that finance is a boon to the host economy. This article systematizes these doubts......, economic instability, inequality, conflict, rent-seeking and corruption. The Finance Curse produces similar effects, often for similar reasons. Beyond a point, a growing financial sector can do more harm than good. Unlike the Resource Curse, these harms transcend borders. The concept of a Finance Curse...

  7. Trends in Japan's power generation costs after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident and their influence on finance of electric utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Yuhji; Yamaguchi, Yuhji; Murakami, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    Following the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, the nuclear reactors that were suspended for periodic inspections after the Fukushima accident were not permitted to resume operation, and nuclear power generation in Japan continued to decline. In this article, the authors quantitatively evaluated the effects on power generation costs of Japan's situation, using electric utilities financial reports up to FY 2011. We also analyzed the profitability of the Japanese electric industry, using the financial statements included in the reports, and quantitatively evaluated the effects of changes in power generation costs. The total cost of power generation has increased from 7.5 trillion yen in FY 2010 before the Fukushima accident to 9.6 trillion yen in FY 2011 and to 10.6 trillion yen in FY 2012. In particular, the fuel cost for thermal power generation rose sharply from 3.7 trillion yen in FY 2010 to 6.1 trillion yen in FY 2011 and 7.3 trillion yen in FY 2012, almost doubling in the two years from FY 2010 to 2012. The unit cost of power generation rose sharply from 8.6 yen/kWh in FY 2010 to 11.8 yen/kWh in FY 2011 and 13.5 yen/kWh in FY 2012. The unit cost is expected to rise even further in FY 2013 due to the weak yen. As the result not only Tokyo Electric Power Company, but also the other general electric utilities registered huge net losses. Their retained earnings (total of eight utilities) dropped by 2 trillion yen between FY 2010 and 2012. With increased thermal power generation, the risk of rising costs associated with changes in primary energy prices and exchange rates has increased drastically. For the stability of the electricity industry and the development of the Japanese economy, the government should clearly formulate a basic policy regarding the composition of power sources, and an effective plan both at home and abroad, and should develop a system that will be also to handle sudden changes in the composition of power sources. (author)

  8. Scaling up climate finance for sustainable infrastructure in developing cities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jun

    2010-09-15

    This article investigates the role of carbon finance and seeks to establish a policy framework that allows reorientation of upfront investment in urban infrastructure for facilitating transition towards low-carbon development trajectory in developing cities. It draws on an in-depth exploration of different climate finance mechanisms and their applicability in the context of fast urbanization. We suggest an integrated approach should be adopted to aggregate city-based multiple individual GHG mitigation projects dealing with buildings and transport efficiency. The sectoral approach and NAMAs-based financing schemes be included in post-Kyoto regime for shifting the current trajectories in fast growing developing cities.

  9. Power generation using carbon mesh cathodes with different diffusion layers in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Yong

    2011-11-01

    An inexpensive carbon material, carbon mesh, was examined to replace the more expensive carbon cloth usually used to make cathodes in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Three different diffusion layers were tested using carbon mesh: poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), and Goretex cloth. Carbon mesh with a mixture of PDMS and carbon black as a diffusion layer produced a maximum power density of 1355 ± 62 mW m -2 (normalized to the projected cathode area), which was similar to that obtained with a carbon cloth cathode (1390 ± 72 mW m-2). Carbon mesh with a PTFE diffusion layer produced only a slightly lower (6.6%) maximum power density (1303 ± 48 mW m-2). The Coulombic efficiencies were a function of current density, with the highest value for the carbon mesh and PDMS (79%) larger than that for carbon cloth (63%). The cost of the carbon mesh cathode with PDMS/Carbon or PTFE (excluding catalyst and binder costs) is only 2.5% of the cost of the carbon cloth cathode. These results show that low cost carbon materials such as carbon mesh can be used as the cathode in an MFC without reducing the performance compared to more expensive carbon cloth. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Stochastic Processes in Finance and Behavioral Finance

    OpenAIRE

    Steinbacher, Matjaz

    2008-01-01

    In the paper, we put some foundations for studying asset pricing and finance as a stochastic and behavioral process. In such process, preferences and psychology of agents represent the most important factor in the decision-making of people. Individuals have their own ways of acquiring the information they need, how to deal with them and how to make predictions and decisions. People usually also do not behave consistent in time, but learn. Therefore, in order to understand the behavior on the ...

  11. A Multi-Objective Unit Commitment Model for Setting Carbon Tax to Reduce CO2 Emission: Thailand's Electricity Generation Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuchjarin Intalar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon tax policy is a cost-effective instrument for emission reduction. However, setting the carbon tax is one of the challenging task for policy makers as it will lead to higher price of emission-intensive sources especially the utility price. In a large-scale power generation system, minimizing the operational cost and the environmental impact are conflicting objectives and it is difficult to find the compromise solution. This paper proposes a methodology of finding a feasible carbon tax rate on strategic level using the operational unit commitment model. We present a multi-objective mixed integer linear programming model to solve the unit commitment problem and consider the environmental impacts. The methodology of analyzing of the effect of carbon tax rates on the power generation, operating cost, and CO2 emission is also provided. The trade-off relationship between total operating cost and total CO2 emission is presented in the Pareto-optimal curve to analyze the feasible carbon tax rate that is influencing on electricity operating cost. The significant outcome of this paper is a modeling framework for the policy makers to determine the possible carbon tax that can be imposed on the electricity generation.

  12. FUZZY INFERENCE SYSTEM MODELING FOR BED ACTIVE CARBON RE-GENERATION PROCESS (CO2 GAS FACTORY CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Febriana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Bed active carbon is one of the most important materials that had great impact in determining level of impurities in production of CO2 gas. In this particular factory case, there is unavailability of standard duration time of heating and cooling and steam flow rate for the re-generation process of bed active carbon. The paper discusses the fuzzy inference system for modeling of re-generation process of bed active carbon to find the optimum setting parameter. The fuzzy inference system was build using real historical daily processing data. After validation process, surface plot analysis was performed to find the optimum setting. The result of re-generation parameter setting is 9-10 hours of heating process, 4.66-5.32 hours of cooling process, and 1500-2500 kg/hr of steam flow rate.

  13. Guidebook to financing CDM projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamel, S.

    2007-07-01

    One of the challenges facing Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) projects today is their limited ability to secure financing for the underlying greenhouse gas emission reduction activities, particularly in the least developed countries. Among the key reasons for this is the fact that most financial intermediaries in the CDM host countries have limited or no knowledge of the CDM Modalities and Procedures. Moreover, approaches, tools and skills for CDM project appraisal are lacking or are asymmetrical to the skills in comparable institutions in developed countries. Consequently, developing country financial institutions are unable to properly evaluate the risks and rewards associated with investing or lending to developers undertaking CDM projects, and therefore have, by-and-large, refrained from financing these projects. In addition, some potential project proponents lack experience in structuring arrangements for financing a project. This Guidebook - commissioned by the UNEP Risoe Centre as part of the activities of the Capacity Development for CDM (CD4CDM) project (http://www.cd4cdm.org) - addresses these barriers by providing information aimed at both developing country financial institutions and at CDM project proponents. It should be noted that while the Guidebook was developed particularly with the CDM in mind, most sections will also be relevant for Joint Implementation (JI) project activities. For more detailed information on JI modalities and procedures please consult: http://ji.unfccc.int The purpose of this Guidebook is two-fold: 1) To guide project developers on obtaining financing for the implementation of activities eligible under the CDM; and 2) To demonstrate to developing country financial institutions typical approaches and methods for appraising the viability of CDM projects and for optimally integrating carbon revenue into overall project financing. The target audiences for the Guidebook are therefore, primarily: 1) CDM project proponents in

  14. Calcium and chemical looping technology for power generation and carbon dioxide (CO2) capture solid oxygen- and CO2-carriers

    CERN Document Server

    Fennell, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Calcium and Chemical Looping Technology for Power Generation and Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture reviews the fundamental principles, systems, oxygen carriers, and carbon dioxide carriers relevant to chemical looping and combustion. Chapters review the market development, economics, and deployment of these systems, also providing detailed information on the variety of materials and processes that will help to shape the future of CO2 capture ready power plants. Reviews the fundamental principles, systems, oxygen carriers, and carbon dioxide carriers relevant to calcium and chemical loopingProvi

  15. Can premium tariffs for micro-generation and small scale renewable heat help the fuel poor, and if so, how? Case studies of innovative finance for community energy schemes in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, R.W.; Gross, R.J.K.; Wade, J.

    2012-01-01

    In the UK, the introduction of micro-generation Feed in Tariffs (FiTs) and a proposed Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) for domestic and small scale schemes have re-energised the market for investment in domestic scale renewable energy. These incentives may provide financial opportunities for those with capital to spend but for the record numbers with low incomes in ‘fuel poverty’, these benefits may seem out of reach. This paper shows that with appropriate financial intermediaries it is possible for renewable energy incentives to be used to alleviate fuel poverty. Simple financial analysis demonstrates the theoretical potential of FiTs to help those in fuel poverty. Two case studies of renewable energy projects in low income areas investigate how the incentives may be used in practice, what barriers exist and what success factors are evident. The analysis shows that local energy organisations (LEOs) are key if the poor are to access benefits from premium tariff schemes. Low interest finance mechanisms, good information sharing and community involvement are found as key success factors. - Highlights: ► This paper researches the potential for FiTs and RHIs to help those in fuel poverty. ► Simple financial modelling shows the potential benefit of FiTs to the fuel poor. ► Original case study research investigates how these benefits can be realised. ► The action of local energy organisations (LEOs) is important to optimise outcomes. ► Financing and dynamics between the community and LEOs are key to success.

  16. Access to finance from different finance provider types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wulandari, Eliana; Meuwissen, Miranda P.M.; Karmana, Maman H.; Oude Lansink, Alfons G.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Analysing farmer knowledge of the requirements of finance providers can provide valuable insights to policy makers about ways to improve farmers’ access to finance. This study compares farmer knowledge of the requirements to obtain finance with the actual requirements set by different finance

  17. FINANCING SME FUTURE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorica CERBUSCA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper highlights the problems faced by the SMEs in accessing adequate financing as one of the most significant barriers of the sector. Financial access is critical for SMEs’ growth and development. At the same time, the author emphasize that there is no unique way of financing SMEs. The need depends on the stage of maturity and size of the enterprise. In order to facilitate the SME access to finance it is necessary to adapt the best international practices and to adapt them at the local condition. Article aims to present microfinancing as a tool that could improve the SME access to finance, thus contributing to the economic development of the country by creating new jobs, new products and services

  18. Export development financing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balint, J.

    1995-01-01

    The main activities of the Export Development Corporation (EDC) were described, as well as some of the changes currently being implemented. EDC is Canada's official export credit agency, providing risk management services such as insurance, loans, guarantees, equity and leasing. EDC's project finance initiative started in 1991, and focused mainly on the up-front process. It has established itself as a recognized leader in project financing. It has over 15 years experience in a variety of sectors and countries. Energy projects financed to date include hydro projects in India, Argentina and Pakistan, and thermal projects in Thailand, China, Indonesia and Egypt. Lending criteria used to select projects were outlined, along with the risks endemic to project financing

  19. Financing Alternatives Comparison Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    FACT is a financial analysis tool that helps identify the most cost-effective method to fund a wastewater or drinking water management project. It produces a comprehensive analysis that compares various financing options.

  20. Interacting agents in finance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommes, C.; Durlauf, S.N.; Blume, L.E.

    2008-01-01

    Interacting agents in finance represent a behavioural, agent-based approach in which financial markets are viewed as complex adaptive systems consisting of many boundedly rational agents interacting through simple heterogeneous investment strategies, constantly adapting their behaviour in response

  1. Clean Energy Finance Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    State and local governments interested in developing a financing program can use this Excel tool to support energy efficiency and clean energy improvements for large numbers of buildings within their jurisdiction.

  2. To finance the transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regnier, Yannick; Maciel, Guillaume; Zeroual, Bouchra; Leca, Christel; Guillou, Maelle; Mossalgue, Marc; Raguet, Alex; Sabot, Guillaume; Coton, Patrice; Olesen, Gunnar Boye; Friggens, Sam; Pouyet, Regis; Blanc, Nicolas; Laurent, Pierre; Ruedinger, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A set of brief articles illustrates the emergence of innovating and operational financing tools aimed at supporting energy transition in France and in Europe. As far as France is concerned, different examples are evoked: raising local savings, crowd-funding for renewable energies, citizen investment, cooperation between industries, communities and citizens, a semi-public company with citizen participation, the case of the Nancy urban community, a joint experience by a local public company and an investment fund. As far as Europe is concerned, the following topics or examples are evoked: local policies as lever for European financing, the Danish example of citizen-based financing, crowd-funding in the UK, the European emergence of cooperatives. As far as banks and institutions are concerned, the following topics are addressed: tools implemented by the Caisse des Depots for energy transition, the roles of banks and of public institutions in the financing of energy transition

  3. Financial accounting as a method of household finance capacity valuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Untanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents existing household finance capacity investigations. Comparison conducting allowed to determinate collisions and flaws of previous works. That substantiates to find a new approach in household finance capacity valuation necessity. The article contains theoretical research of household finance fundamental categories. In particular, it notes significant difference between domestic and foreign experience of household finance determination. Although emphasizing key similarities allows identifying household finance capacity composition. Moreover, the article provides a public and corporate finance sectors experience, which contains a huge knowledge of finance capacity investigations. Used research allows classify finance capacity not only as a resource valuation, but also as an economic entity’s ability to generate financial result. In terms of resource valuation, the paper suggests assessing both financial resources in classical meaning and any other property, which participating household economic activity and could be evaluated. The author’s position in terms of household finance capacity valuation is suggested. A broad definition of finance capacity causes applying conceptually different approach in this paper. Thus, comparative analysis method is suggested to substantiate household and corporate firm similarities. Used method allows forming household financial accounting, which leads to clear determination of household finance capacity composition and structure. Specificity forming household financial accounting is considered. An author’s position in regards existing contradictions with early research is suggested.

  4. Finance and Economic Development

    OpenAIRE

    Panizza, Ugo

    2012-01-01

    Published by Palgrave Macmillan This chapter reviews the literature on finance and economic development. It starts with a description of the roles of finance, a definition of financial efficiency, and a discussion of whether countries may have financial sectors that are ‘too large’ compared to the size of the domestic economy. Next, the author describes several indicators of financial development and reviews the literature on the relationship between financial development and economic growth....

  5. Distributed generation to reduce carbon dioxide emissions : a case study for residential sector in Oman

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solanki, P.S. [Caledonian College of Engineering, Muscat (Oman); Mallela, V.S. [G. Narayanamma Inst. of Technology and Sciences Shaikpet, Hyderabad (India); Allan, M.; Zhou, C. [Glasgow Caledonian Univ., Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    This paper presented a case study undertaken in Oman involving the use of a proposed hybrid diesel-photovoltaic distributed power system to reduce carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions. A model of the hybrid power system comprising a photovoltaic module, a diesel generator, and essential auxiliary devices was presented. Solar energy was selected for the Distributed Generation Technology (DGT) because Oman has an abundance of direct solar radiation. A typical house located in a remote area was considered to determine the potential greenhouse gas reduction and the economic feasibility when it is powered by the proposed hybrid system, the diesel system alone, and the main interconnected grid. The Hybrid Optimization Model for Electricity Renewables (HOMER) software was used for energy simulation, economic analysis, and the calculation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The results of the simulation indicated that the proposed hybrid system would reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by 38 percent relative to the stand-alone diesel system and by 2.67 percent compared to the main grid. The hybrid system has lower operating costs and a lower per-unit energy cost than the diesel system, but the per-unit energy cost estimated for the main interconnected system is better. The latter system is less favourable for GHG emissions. Extending the hybrid system to the entire residential sector has the potential to substantially reduce GHG emissions. The proposed hybrid system is also a cost effective choice for remote locations. 18 refs., 8 tabs., 7 figs.

  6. The Promoting Role of Different Carbon Allotropes Cocatalysts for Semiconductors in Photocatalytic Energy Generation and Pollutants Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Han

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor based photocatalytic process is of great potential for solving the fossil fuels depletion and environmental pollution. Loading cocatalysts for the modification of semiconductors could increase the separation efficiency of the photogenerated hole-electron pairs, enhance the light absorption ability of semiconductors, and thus obtain new composite photocatalysts with high activities. Kinds of carbon allotropes, such as activated carbon, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and carbon quantum dots have been used as effective cocatalysts to enhance the photocatalytic activities of semiconductors, making them widely used for photocatalytic energy generation, and pollutants degradation. This review focuses on the loading of different carbon allotropes as cocatalysts in photocatalysis, and summarizes the recent progress of carbon materials based photocatalysts, including their synthesis methods, the typical applications, and the activity enhancement mechanism. Moreover, the cocatalytic effect among these carbon cocatalysts is also compared for different applications. We believe that our work can provide enriched information to harvest the excellent special properties of carbon materials as a platform to develop more efficient photocatalysts for solar energy utilization.

  7. Enhanced ocean carbon storage from anaerobic alkalinity generation in coastal sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Thomas

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The coastal ocean is a crucial link between land, the open ocean and the atmosphere. The shallowness of the water column permits close interactions between the sedimentary, aquatic and atmospheric compartments, which otherwise are decoupled at long time scales (≅ 1000 yr in the open oceans. Despite the prominent role of the coastal oceans in absorbing atmospheric CO2 and transferring it into the deep oceans via the continental shelf pump, the underlying mechanisms remain only partly understood. Evaluating observations from the North Sea, a NW European shelf sea, we provide evidence that anaerobic degradation of organic matter, fuelled from land and ocean, generates total alkalinity (AT and increases the CO2 buffer capacity of seawater. At both the basin wide and annual scales anaerobic AT generation in the North Sea's tidal mud flat area irreversibly facilitates 7–10%, or taking into consideration benthic denitrification in the North Sea, 20–25% of the North Sea's overall CO2 uptake. At the global scale, anaerobic AT generation could be accountable for as much as 60% of the uptake of CO2 in shelf and marginal seas, making this process, the anaerobic pump, a key player in the biological carbon pump. Under future high CO2 conditions oceanic CO2 storage via the anaerobic pump may even gain further relevance because of stimulated ocean productivity.

  8. Private sector finance for adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atteridge, A.; Pauw, W.P.; Terpstra, P.; Bedini, F.; Bosi, L; Costella, C.

    2016-01-01

    An emphasis on private finance has emerged in climate finance discussions, particularly in the context of international climate change negotiations. This is partly because the overall volume of finance needed to support adaptation in developing countries is beyond what many expect public finance to

  9. Exploring Higher Education Financing Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkrumah-Young, Kofi K.; Powell, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Higher education can be financed privately, financed by governments, or shared. Given that the benefits of education accrue to the individual and the state, many governments opt for shared financing. This article examines the underpinnings of different options for financing higher education and develops a model to compare conditions to choices and…

  10. Systematically controlled pore system of ordered mesoporous carbons using phosphoric acid as the in situ generated catalysts for carbonization and activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Xing; Lee, Chang Hyun; Kim, Jin Hoe; You, Dae Jong; Shon, Jeong Kuk; Kim, Ji Man [Dept. of Chemistry, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Pak, Chan Ho [Fuel Cell Group, Corporate R and D Center, Samsung SDI Co. Ltd., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    We report on a facile synthesis of the ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) materials with systematically controlled microporosity and mesoporosity simultaneously through the nano-replication route using phosphoric acid as the acid catalyst and activation agent. The use of phosphoric acid affects the pore structures of OMC materials, such as the formation of numerous micropores by activation of the carbon framework and the enlargement of mesopores by spontaneous phase separation during the carbonization. The mesopore sizes, surface areas, total pore volumes, and micropore volumes of the OMC materials are highly dependent on the phosphoric acid content and can be systematically controlled in the range 3.7–7.5 nm, 1027–2782 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}, 1.12–3.53 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1} and 0.34–0.95 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1}, respectively. OMC materials with systematically controlled pore structures were successfully synthesized using phosphoric acid as the carbonization catalyst and mesoporous silica materials with cubic Ia3d and 2-D hexagonal mesostructures as the templates. The phosphoric acid in the synthesis of ordered mesoporous carbon materials acts as the chemical activating agent for micropore generation of the carbon framework and pore-expanding agent for controlling of mesopore size, in addition to functioning as the acid catalyst. The present synthesis pathway is very useful for preparing OMC materials with tunable mesopore sizes and well-developed microporosities at the same time.

  11. Innovative financing in the service of climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buba, Johanne; Fichen, Anne; Ben-Jelloul, Mahdi; Schaff, Clement

    2011-11-01

    By 2020, nearly 100 billion dollars a year that developed countries have pledged to finance action against climate change in developing countries (DCs). Given the current economic situation, they will nevertheless find it difficult to collect the money in their budgets: new sources of funding will be needed. If revenue from the auction of emission allowances within the EU will be primarily used for national or European, a party may nevertheless be redirected to developing countries. Impose on international aviation and maritime sectors to pay the price of carbon will take several years but will provide revenue of tens of billions. The tax on financial transactions, including foreign exchange transactions, could generate significant revenue. Beyond these resources, a large part of the solution will come from the complementarity between private and public funds. The Cancun agreement opens a new path by providing that promised 100 billion may come in part from the private sector - yet he will provide the latter with the right incentives. Public funds should promote private investment and seek to find the maximum leverage. Properly used, new sources of funding to the tune of 30 to 40 billion by 2020 would be enough then to keep the promise made at Cancun to developing countries. Contents: - In search of public funding; - Public funds to guide private investment to action against climate change

  12. The financing of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, M.

    2009-01-01

    Existing nuclear generating capacity plays an important role in providing secure, economic and low-carbon electricity supplies in many OECD countries. At the same time, there is increasing recognition that an expansion of nuclear power could play a valuable role in reducing future carbon dioxide emissions. However, in recent years only a handful of new nuclear power plants (NPPs) have been built in just a few OECD countries. An important reason for this is the challenges associated with financing the construction of new NPPs. The just-published NEA report entitled The Financing of Nuclear Power Plants examines these challenges. In addition, recognizing that any expansion of nuclear power programmes will require strong and sustained government support, the report highlights the role of governments in facilitating and encouraging investment in new nuclear capacity. Key actions that should be considered by governments that wish to see investment in new NPPs include: - Provide clear and sustained policy support for the development of nuclear power, by setting out the case for a nuclear component in energy supply as part of a long-term national energy strategy. - Work with electricity utilities, financial companies and other potential investors, and the nuclear industry from an early stage to address concerns that may prevent nuclear investment and to avoid mistakes in establishing the parameters for new NPPs. - Establish an efficient and effective regulatory system which provides adequate opportunities for public involvement in the decision-making process, while also providing potential investors with the certainty they require to plan such a major investment. - Put arrangements in place for the management of radioactive waste and spent fuel, and show progress towards a solution for final disposal of waste. For investors in NPPs, the financial arrangements for paying their fair share of the costs must be clearly defined. - Ensure that electricity market regulation does

  13. Issues in energy finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokher, Zeigham Islam

    As opposed to the well developed and understood equity markets, the energy markets are still in their infancy. The explosion of contracts, of both the primary and derivative types, are testament both to the existing size and the untapped growth potential of this exciting industry. However, because of its relative youth many basic issues in the energy markets remain unresolved. This thesis introduces some interesting questions and provides insights into these issues. Thematically, the chapters of this thesis are linked by an emphasis on valuation and risk management decisions. A contribution of this thesis is to show that subtle differences between the endogenous price process in our general equilibrium setting and the exogenous processes considered in earlier papers can generate significant differences in both financial and real option values. In addition to these valuation concerns there has been much debate about the corporate risk management function. Finance theory suggests that a value maximizing corporation should either be indifferent to hedging or, in the presence of certain imperfections, it should completely hedge all exposures. Both these extremes contradict empirical evidence. We show that existing corporate hedging behaviour is best explained in light of both physical market imperfections and directional predictions on future prices. While these speculative motives may arise from corporate hubris or genuine informational advantages, we argue that it would be difficult to implement private information in the absence of noise traders. Related to the risk management decision is the existence of futures risk premia. These premia have been thought to be cause by covariance with priced factors or due to the hedging demands of consumers and producers. This thesis argues that inventories serve as a signal of available quantity, which coupled with consumers fears regarding stockouts can induce a positive relationship between premia and inventories. In

  14. Optimization of finances into regional energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Yuryevich Domnikov

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of modern Russian energy collides with the need for major investments in the modernization and renewal of generation and transmission capacity. In terms of attracting sufficient financial resources and find ways to increase, energy sector profitability and investment attractiveness of particular importance is the problem of investment financing optimizing aimed at minimizing the cost of financing while maintaining financial stability of the power companies and the goals and objectives of Russian energy system long-term development. The article discusses the problem of investment projects financing in power generation from the point of view of the need to achieve optimal investment budget. Presents the author’s approach to the investment financing optimization of power generation company that will achieve the minimum cost of resources involved, taking into account the impact of the funding structure for the power generating company financial sustainability. The developed model is applied to the problem of investment budget optimizing, for example, regional power generating company. The results can improve the efficiency of investment in energy, sustainable and competitive development of regional energy systems.

  15. Biogenic Methane Generation Potential in the Eastern Nankai Trough, Japan: Effect of Reaction Temperature and Total Organic Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, T. T.; Fujii, T.; Amo, M.; Suzuki, K.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding potential of methane flux from the Pleistocene fore-arc basin filled turbiditic sedimentary formation along the eastern Nankai Trough is important in the quantitative assessment of gas hydrate resources. We considered generated methane could exist in sedimentary basin in the forms of three major components, and those are methane in methane hydrate, free gas and methane dissolved in water. Generation of biomethane strongly depends on microbe activity and microbes in turn survive in diverse range of temperature, salinity and pH. This study aims to understand effect of reaction temperature and total organic carbon on generation of biomethane and its components. Biomarker analysis and cultural experiment results of the core samples from the eastern Nankai Trough reveal that methane generation rate gets peak at various temperature ranging12.5°to 35°. Simulation study of biomethane generation was made using commercial basin scale simulator, PetroMod, with different reaction temperature and total organic carbon to predict how these effect on generation of biomethane. Reaction model is set by Gaussian distribution with constant hydrogen index and standard deviation of 1. Series of simulation cases with peak reaction temperature ranging 12.5°to 35° and total organic carbon of 0.6% to 3% were conducted and analyzed. Simulation results show that linear decrease in generation potential while increasing reaction temperature. But decreasing amount becomes larger in the model with higher total organic carbon. At higher reaction temperatures, >30°, extremely low generation potential was found. This is due to the fact that the source formation modeled is less than 1 km in thickness and most of formation do not reach temperature more than 30°. In terms of the components, methane in methane hydrate and free methane increase with increasing TOC. Drastic increase in free methane was observed in the model with 3% of TOC. Methane amount dissolved in water shows almost

  16. Characterization of EUV induced carbon films using laser-generated surface acoustic waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Juequan; Lee, Christopher James; Louis, Eric; Bijkerk, Frederik; Kunze, Reinhard; Schmidt, Hagen; Schneider, Dieter; Moors, Roel

    2009-01-01

    The deposition of carbon layers on the surfaces of optics exposed to extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation has been observed in EUV lithography. It has become of critical importance to detect the presence of the carbon layer in the order of nanometer thickness due to carbon's extremely strong

  17. Chemistry for Kids: Generating Carbon Dioxide in Elementary School Chemistry and Using a Computer To Write about It.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, Richard M.; Yoshida, Sarah

    This material describes an activity using vinegar and baking soda to generate carbon dioxide, and writing a report using the Appleworks word processing program for grades 3 to 8 students. Time requirement, relevant process skills, vocabulary, mathematics skills, computer skills, and materials are listed. Activity procedures including class…

  18. Nuclear power programmes in developing countries: Costs and financing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpentier, J.P.; Bennett, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    This article refers to a seminar (organized by the IAEA) on Costs and Financing of Nuclear Power Programmes in Developing Countries held in Vienna from 9-12 September 1985. Its main objective was to promote a dialogue among the various parties involved in the domain of nuclear power financing, i.e. buyers, suppliers and financing organizations. At the meeting the Agency presented information showing that nuclear power plants are an economic means of generating electricity. In relation hereto the article deals with such topics as performance records, economic records, projected nuclear plant additions, financing constraints, current debt problems and new working relationships

  19. Public health benefits of strategies to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions: low-carbon electricity generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markandya, Anil; Armstrong, Ben G; Hales, Simon; Chiabai, Aline; Criqui, Patrick; Mima, Silvana; Tonne, Cathryn; Wilkinson, Paul

    2009-12-12

    In this report, the third in this Series on health and climate change, we assess the changes in particle air pollution emissions and consequent effects on health that are likely to result from greenhouse-gas mitigation measures in the electricity generation sector in the European Union (EU), China, and India. We model the effect in 2030 of policies that aim to reduce total carbon dioxide (CO(2)) emissions by 50% by 2050 globally compared with the effect of emissions in 1990. We use three models: the POLES model, which identifies the distribution of production modes that give the desired CO(2) reductions and associated costs; the GAINS model, which estimates fine particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter 2.5 microm or less (PM(2.5)) concentrations; and a model to estimate the effect of PM(2.5) on mortality on the basis of the WHO's Comparative Risk Assessment methods. Changes in modes of production of electricity to reduce CO(2) emissions would, in all regions, reduce PM(2.5) and deaths caused by it, with the greatest effect in India and the smallest in the EU. Health benefits greatly offset costs of greenhouse-gas mitigation, especially in India where pollution is high and costs of mitigation are low. Our estimates are approximations but suggest clear health gains (co-benefits) through decarbonising electricity production, and provide additional information about the extent of such gains.

  20. Storm-generated bedforms and relict dissolution pits and channels on the Yucatan carbonate platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulick, S. P.; Goff, J. A.; Stewart, H. A.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Davis, M. B.; Duncan, D.; Saustrup, S.; Sanford, J. C.; Fucugauchi, J. U.

    2013-12-01

    The Yucatan 2013 (cruise number 2013/4_ECORD) geophysical and geotechnical hazard site survey took place aboard the R/V Justo Sierra in April 2013. Our study was conducted within the Chicxulub impact crater, encompassing three potential IODP drilling sites. The survey was located ~32 km northwest of Progreso, Mexico; data acquired included ~15.6 km2 of complete multibeam bathymetry coverage, ~435 line km of side scan sonar and CHIRP data, 204 line kilometers of magnetometer data, and 194 line kilometers of surface tow boomer profiles. Based on these data, this portion of the Yucatan Shelf consists of flat-lying, hard limestone rock overlain by isolated ribbons of carbonate sand limestone bedrock. This reflector is flat-lying and undisturbed throughout the survey area. Therefore, none of these dissolution pits appear to be underlain by a cenote or sink hole. The NW sector of the survey area exhibits a more complex morphology than the alternating ribbon/bare rock morphology elsewhere, including linear scarps (up to ~1 m relief), deeper pitting (up to ~1 m relief), and sinuous, dendritic channeling (up to ~2 m relief). The geologic origin of these features will require further investigation. Sand drifts are present in this region, but are thinner and cover less area. These observations show the dominant modern sediment formation and transport processes on this starved platform are from large storms and hurricanes that place large regions of the platform at wave base. Remaining observed features were generated during times of lower sea level.

  1. Financing and insurance problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurenge, M.-T.

    1975-01-01

    The author analyses the papers presented at the Paris Conference on the maturity of nuclear energy. It is evident that financing possibilities will be a determinant factor in the rate of development of nuclear power during the years to come. After having evaluated the capital requirements necessitated for the development of nuclear programmes, the parties intervening have examined the means at the disposal of electricity manufacturers to meet these needs (self-financing, recourse to external financing, regrouping, on an international scale of the electricity manufacturers of the setting up of high capacity plants). As concerns the insurance problems, they are becoming more and more involved as nuclear applications, are further diversified and intensified. The parties intervening have discussed new tarification techniques likely to be applied and pointed out the possibilities offered by regrouping or pooling of insurers (Market Pool) which allow for a maximum of risks to be covered without exceeding the means proper to each company concerned [fr

  2. Financing tourist activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujović Slavoljub

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper researches which of the possible financing models (self-financing, loan, mutual fund, issuing securities and leasing is the most convenient for tourism financing on the grounds of opinions and views of student population. Taking into account that future social and economic development depends on student population, that in every society intellectual endeavor (science and art exists ever since man exists, that the overall progress of mankind is based on the great intellectual endeavor of former civilizations, as well as the fact that Western Serbia has remarkable natural and anthropogenic characteristics suitable for valorization for the purpose of tourism development, the research questions were formulated and the research was performed. The methods used were: analysis, correlation, deduction and induction. Field research has been of the primary importance and it was based on questionnaires, interviews and in-depth interview. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 46001 i br. 47007

  3. Personal Finance: Teaching Concepts and Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioia, John

    1989-01-01

    The author describes essential components of a course on personal finance. Concepts to be taught are (1) decision making, (2) income generation, (3) goal setting, (4) budgeting, (5) wise buying, (6) housing, (7) transportation, (8) risk management, and (9) investments. (CH)

  4. Small finance banks: Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayadev M

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A recent innovation in the Indian banking structure has been the formation of a new banking institution—small finance banks (SFBs. These banks are expected to penetrate into financial inclusion by providing basic banking and credit services with a differentiated banking model to the larger population. In this context the new SFBs have multiple challenges in coming out with a new, differentiated business model. The challenges include building low cost liability portfolio, technology management, and balancing the regulatory compliances. This paper also presents the top of mind views of three senior executives of new small finance banks.

  5. Financing renewables - wind energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the status of the wind energy markets world-wide, in Europe and in the UK. It outlines the main methods of financing wind energy installations and discusses why different institutional structures have led to different markets in the UK and in Germany, with some concern about the state of the UK onshore industry. The paper looks ahead to the opening up of the potentially much larger offshore wind resource, concluding that in this area, existing UK development and financing structures are well suited. (Author)

  6. Guidebook to Geothermal Finance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmon, J. P.; Meurice, J.; Wobus, N.; Stern, F.; Duaime, M.

    2011-03-01

    This guidebook is intended to facilitate further investment in conventional geothermal projects in the United States. It includes a brief primer on geothermal technology and the most relevant policies related to geothermal project development. The trends in geothermal project finance are the focus of this tool, relying heavily on interviews with leaders in the field of geothermal project finance. Using the information provided, developers and investors may innovate in new ways, developing partnerships that match investors' risk tolerance with the capital requirements of geothermal projects in this dynamic and evolving marketplace.

  7. Aligning climate policy with finance ministers' G20 agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edenhofer, Ottmar; Knopf, Brigitte; Bak, Céline; Bhattacharya, Amar

    2017-07-01

    There is no longer a choice between climate policy and no climate policy. G20 finance ministers have to play a key role in implementing smart climate policies like carbon pricing. Yet they remain reluctant to take advantage of the merits of carbon pricing for sound fiscal policy.

  8. Risk Sharing in Corporate and Public Finance: The Contribution of Islamic Finance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obiyathulla Ismath Bacha

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Financial crises have become a recurring problem for modern economies with increasingly detrimental fallouts. Risk-sharing finance (RSF contracts may be the best instrument for addressing the problem and its fallout, and in particular the risk-sharing principles of Islamic finance offer a potential alternative. This paper offers some preliminary thoughts on the design and implementation of RSF for both private and public sector funding, for revenue and non-revenue generating projects. It is argued that such form of financing avoids the leverage of conventional debt, minimizes the costs of dilution, reduces macroeconomic vulnerability, and enhances financial inclusion. It also has the potential to be a less risky alternative for developing countries to finance public spending and economic growth. JEL Classifications: G32, P43, O16

  9. The impact of carbon taxes or allowances on the electric generation market in the Ohio and ECAR region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadley, S.W.

    1998-07-01

    The North American electricity grid is separated into 11 regional reliability councils, collectively called the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC). The East Central Area Reliability Coordination Agreement (ECAR) is the reliability council that covers Ohio and Indiana, along with parts of Kentucky, Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. Ohio and the rest of the ECAR region rely more heavily on coal-fired generation than any other US region. The purpose of this report is to study the effect of carbon reduction policies on the cost and price of generation in the ECAR region, with an emphasis on Ohio. In order to do that, the author modeled the possible electric generation system for the ECAR and Ohio region for the year 2010 using a model developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory called the Oak Ridge Competitive Electric Dispatch model (ORCED). He let the model optimize the system based on various factors and carbon reduction policies to understand their impact. He then used the electricity prices and assumed demand elasticities to change the demands while also requiring all power plants to be profitable. The author discusses the different potential policies for carbon reduction and issues involving a restructured market; describes the model used for this analysis, the ECAR electricity sector, and the establishment of a base case; and describes the results of applying various carbon emission reduction approaches to the region. 14 figs., 5 tabs

  10. Exhaust circulation into dry gas desulfurization process to prevent carbon deposition in an Oxy-fuel IGCC power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Makoto; Nakao, Yoshinobu; Oki, Yuso

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Power plant with semi-closed gas turbine and O 2 –CO 2 coal gasifier was studied. • We adopt dry gas sulfur removal process to establish the system. • The exhaust gas circulation remarkably prevented carbon deposition. • Efficiency loss for exhaust gas circulation is quite small. • Appropriate operating condition of sulfur removal process is revealed. - Abstract: Semi-closed cycle operation of gas turbine fueled by oxygen–CO 2 blown coal gasification provides efficient power generation with CO 2 separation feature by excluding pre-combustion type CO 2 capture that usually brings large efficiency loss. The plant efficiency at transmission end is estimated as 44% at lower heating value (LHV) providing compressed CO 2 with concentration of 93 vol%. This power generation system will solve the contradiction between economical resource utilization and reduction of CO 2 emission from coal-fired power plant. The system requires appropriate sulfur reduction process to protect gas turbine from corrosion and environment from sulfur emission. We adopt dry gas sulfur removal process to establish the system where apprehension about the detrimental carbon deposition from coal gas. The effect of circulation of a portion of exhaust gas to the process on the retardation of carbon deposition was examined at various gas compositions. The circulation remarkably prevented carbon deposition in the sulfur removal sorbent. The impact of the circulation on the thermal efficiency is smaller than the other auxiliary power consumption. Thus, the circulation is appropriate operation for the power generation

  11. Hydrothermal carbonization of food waste and associated packaging materials for energy source generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Diederick, Ryan; Flora, Joseph R V; Berge, Nicole D

    2013-11-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a thermal conversion technique that converts food wastes and associated packaging materials to a valuable, energy-rich resource. Food waste collected from local restaurants was carbonized over time at different temperatures (225, 250 and 275°C) and solids concentrations to determine how process conditions influence carbonization product properties and composition. Experiments were also conducted to determine the influence of packaging material on food waste carbonization. Results indicate the majority of initial carbon remains integrated within the solid-phase at the solids concentrations and reaction temperatures evaluated. Initial solids concentration influences carbon distribution because of increased compound solubilization, while changes in reaction temperature imparted little change on carbon distribution. The presence of packaging materials significantly influences the energy content of the recovered solids. As the proportion of packaging materials increase, the energy content of recovered solids decreases because of the low energetic retention associated with the packaging materials. HTC results in net positive energy balances at all conditions, except at a 5% (dry wt.) solids concentration. Carbonization of food waste and associated packaging materials also results in net positive balances, but energy needs for solids post-processing are significant. Advantages associated with carbonization are not fully realized when only evaluating process energetics. A more detailed life cycle assessment is needed for a more complete comparison of processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Incentive Structure of Financing a Project: An Islamic Finance Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Lone, Fayaz Ahmad; Quadir, Abdul

    2017-01-01

    Financing is an important component in any project. Without finance, it is impossible to run any project as it is considered the lifeblood of the business. But due to the presence of predetermined rate of interest, economists have provided alternative approach for financing the project. In this paper a model using Profit and Loss Sharing (PLS) system and comparison of it with the conventional financing model is developed. Thrust in this paper is towards establishing a new theoretical reasonin...

  13. Project financing versus corporate financing under asymmetric information

    OpenAIRE

    Anton Miglo

    2008-01-01

    In recent years financing through the creation of an independent project company or financing by non-recourse debt has become an important part of corporate decisions. Shah and Thakor (JET, 1987) argue that project financing can be optimal when asymmetric information exists between firm's insiders and market participants. In contrast to that paper, we provide an asymmetric information argument for project financing without relying on corporate taxes, costly information production or an assump...

  14. Financing CFM through REDD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skutsch, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    The Technology and Sustainable Development section of the Clean Technology and Environmental Policy Group, University of Twente, is working on a project financed by Netherlands Development Cooperation entitled “Kyoto: Think Global, Act Local” which will run from 2003 to 2009. The project is

  15. Bitcoin and Islamic Finance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    It is argued that a Bitcoin-style money-like informational commodity may constitute an effective instrument for the further development of Islamic Finance. The argument involves the following elements: (i) an application of circulation theory to Bitcoin with the objective to establish the

  16. Specialized financing techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, J.

    1992-01-01

    Specific financing techniques applicable to wind energy projects in Canada are discussed. A limited partnership is the classic Canadian approach to tax-advantaged financing. For a typical wind project, the limited partners would get an internal rate of return of around 8% over 20 years as well as income tax deductions on Class 34 investments. This rate can be improved if the investors borrow some of the money; they get tax-free cash flow while having deductible loan interest, raising their rate of return after taxes to ca 9-10%. Special situation investors can get to take all of the Class 34 deduction right away, raising their return up to the 12% range. These investors include principal business corporations (such as utilities or oil companies), or companies who have sold their business. A second type of financing structure is related to inflation-indexed debt. The loan is structured like a mortgage, with the annual payments indexed to inflation but nevertheless low enough to provide an early positive cash flow from the project. Other possible financing structures are the immigrant investor fund and the provincial incentive corporations

  17. CHIEF OF STAFF FINANCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fifth Chief of Staff Division, namely Finance, is the end result of ... 1946 was able to report in 1948 that there had ... the same time however, the Secretary referred ... mended that because 'the existing dual arrange- ... tigate the division of functions in the Department. ... randum discussing the different arguments sur-.

  18. Frontiers in Pension Finance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeders, D.W.G.A.; Eijffinger, S.C.W.; Houben, A.

    2008-01-01

    How to deliver adequate pension benefits at reasonable costs is a huge challenge confronting our ageing societies. This book delivers a comprehensive overview of the latest insights into pension finance, pension system design, pension governance and risk based supervision. It combines

  19. Financing emerging energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Row, J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the financing of emerging energies in Canada. Transforming energy markets will involve billions of dollars of investment from businesses and residents. Many different types of return on investment can be expected. These benefits will continue to grow over time and provide a permanent i ncome

  20. Nuclear Physicists in Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattoni, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    The financial services industry presents an interesting alternative career path for nuclear physicists. Careers in finance typically offer intellectual challenge, a fast pace, high caliber colleagues, merit-based compensation with substantial upside, and an opportunity to deploy skills learned as a physicist. Physicists are employed at a wide range of financial institutions on both the ``buy side'' (hedge fund managers, private equity managers, mutual fund managers, etc.) and the ``sell side'' (investment banks and brokerages). Historically, physicists in finance were primarily ``quants'' tasked with applying stochastic calculus to determine the price of financial derivatives. With the maturation of the field of derivative pricing, physicists in finance today find work in a variety of roles ranging from quantification and management of risk to investment analysis to development of sophisticated software used to price, trade, and risk manage securities. Only a small subset of today's finance careers for physicists require the use of advanced math and practically none provide an opportunity to tinker with an apparatus, yet most nevertheless draw on important skills honed during the training of a nuclear physicist. Intellectually rigorous critical thinking, sophisticated problem solving, an attention to minute detail and an ability to create and test hypotheses based on incomplete information are key to both disciplines.

  1. Campaign Finance: Reporter Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieder, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Campaign finance might seem like the exclusive province of political reporters, but there are many good reasons why authors should be paying attention--both in races for education positions and in other key races at the local, state, and federal levels with implications for education. Basic math is a necessary skill and familiarity with a…

  2. A Monte Carlo based decision-support tool for assessing generation portfolios in future carbon constrained electricity industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vithayasrichareon, Peerapat; MacGill, Iain F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel decision-support tool for assessing future generation portfolios in an increasingly uncertain electricity industry. The tool combines optimal generation mix concepts with Monte Carlo simulation and portfolio analysis techniques to determine expected overall industry costs, associated cost uncertainty, and expected CO 2 emissions for different generation portfolio mixes. The tool can incorporate complex and correlated probability distributions for estimated future fossil-fuel costs, carbon prices, plant investment costs, and demand, including price elasticity impacts. The intent of this tool is to facilitate risk-weighted generation investment and associated policy decision-making given uncertainties facing the electricity industry. Applications of this tool are demonstrated through a case study of an electricity industry with coal, CCGT, and OCGT facing future uncertainties. Results highlight some significant generation investment challenges, including the impacts of uncertain and correlated carbon and fossil-fuel prices, the role of future demand changes in response to electricity prices, and the impact of construction cost uncertainties on capital intensive generation. The tool can incorporate virtually any type of input probability distribution, and support sophisticated risk assessments of different portfolios, including downside economic risks. It can also assess portfolios against multi-criterion objectives such as greenhouse emissions as well as overall industry costs. - Highlights: ► Present a decision support tool to assist generation investment and policy making under uncertainty. ► Generation portfolios are assessed based on their expected costs, risks, and CO 2 emissions. ► There is tradeoff among expected cost, risks, and CO 2 emissions of generation portfolios. ► Investment challenges include economic impact of uncertainties and the effect of price elasticity. ► CO 2 emissions reduction depends on the mix of

  3. Carbon behavior in the cyclic operation of dry desulfurization process for oxy-fuel integrated gasification combined cycle power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Makoto; Akiho, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Power plant with semi-closed gas turbine and O_2–CO_2 coal gasifier was studied. • Dry gas sulfur removal sorbent was improved for durability to carbon deposition. • The improved sorbent showed very low amount of deposited carbon during operation. • The sorbent is regenerable to be used repeatedly in the cyclic operation. • The sorbent exhibited high sulfur-removal performance in the cyclic operation. - Abstract: The dry sulfur-removal process is essential to provide suitable syngas treatment for the oxy-fuel integrated gasification combined cycle power generation plant. It is required that the dry sulfur-removal process to be durable to the carbon deposition due to syngas containing high concentration of carbon monoxide in addition to achieve sufficient performance for sulfur removal. Zinc ferrite sorbent is the most promising candidate for the dry sulfur-removal process. The sorbent was improved to enhance durability to the carbon deposition by modifying preparation. The improved sorbent was prepared from sulfates as the raw materials of zinc ferrite, while the former sorbent was using nitrates as the raw materials. The improved sorbent as well as the former sorbent were evaluated on the performance and carbon deposition tendency in oxy-fuel syngas condition in a fixed bed reactor at elevated pressure and temperature. The results expressed that the improved sorbent has higher desulfurization performance and durability to carbon deposition in the condition expected for cyclic operation of the sulfur-removal process in comparison with the former sorbent. The improved sorbent possessed the superior desulfurization performance as well as the capability for inhibit carbon deposition in the oxy-fuel syngas conditions. The results confirmed the enhanced feasibility of the dry sulfur-removal process by utilizing the improved sorbent.

  4. Electron beam generation and structure of defects in carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zobelli, A

    2007-10-15

    The nature and role of defects is of primary importance to understand the physical properties of C and BN (boron nitride) single walled nano-tubes (SWNTs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a well known powerful tool to study the structure of defects in materials. However, in the case of SWNTs, the electron irradiation of the TEM may knock out atoms. This effect may alter the native structure of the tube, and has also been proposed as a potential tool for nano-engineering of nano-tubular structures. Here we develop a theoretical description of the irradiation mechanism. First, the anisotropy of the emission energy threshold is obtained via density functional based calculations. Then, we numerically derive the total Mott cross section for different emission sites of carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes with different chiralities. Using a dedicated STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope) microscope with experimental conditions optimised on the basis of derived cross-sections, we are able to control the generation of defects in nano-tubular systems. Either point or line defects can be obtained with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers. The structure, energetics and electronics of point and line defects in BN systems have been investigated. Stability of mono- and di- vacancy defects in hexagonal boron nitride layers is investigated, and their activation energies and reaction paths for diffusion have been derived using the nudged elastic band method (NEB) combined with density functional based techniques. We demonstrate that the appearance of extended linear defects under electron irradiation is more favorable than a random distribution of point defects and this is due to the existence of preferential sites for atom emission in the presence of pre-existing defects, rather than thermal vacancy nucleation and migration. (author)

  5. Electron beam generation and structure of defects in carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zobelli, A.

    2007-10-01

    The nature and role of defects is of primary importance to understand the physical properties of C and BN (boron nitride) single walled nano-tubes (SWNTs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a well known powerful tool to study the structure of defects in materials. However, in the case of SWNTs, the electron irradiation of the TEM may knock out atoms. This effect may alter the native structure of the tube, and has also been proposed as a potential tool for nano-engineering of nano-tubular structures. Here we develop a theoretical description of the irradiation mechanism. First, the anisotropy of the emission energy threshold is obtained via density functional based calculations. Then, we numerically derive the total Mott cross section for different emission sites of carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes with different chiralities. Using a dedicated STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope) microscope with experimental conditions optimised on the basis of derived cross-sections, we are able to control the generation of defects in nano-tubular systems. Either point or line defects can be obtained with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers. The structure, energetics and electronics of point and line defects in BN systems have been investigated. Stability of mono- and di- vacancy defects in hexagonal boron nitride layers is investigated, and their activation energies and reaction paths for diffusion have been derived using the nudged elastic band method (NEB) combined with density functional based techniques. We demonstrate that the appearance of extended linear defects under electron irradiation is more favorable than a random distribution of point defects and this is due to the existence of preferential sites for atom emission in the presence of pre-existing defects, rather than thermal vacancy nucleation and migration. (author)

  6. Etude Climat no. 32 'Financing climate actions in developing countries: what role is there for NAMAs?'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, Romain; Delbosc, Anais

    2012-01-01

    Among the publications of CDC Climat Research, 'Climate Reports' offer in-depth analyses on a given subject. This issue addresses the following points: The Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) framework has emerged as a result of the Copenhagen and Cancun Agreements and is used to encourage developing countries to reduce their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Theses NAMAs can be part of more comprehensive domestic low-carbon development strategies. However, new projects and policies, eligible to be considered as NAMAs, will only be put in place if adequate financing is provided by developed countries. This new structure could provide the opportunity to restore trust between Annex 1 countries and developing countries. This Climate Report analyses the difficulties that can arise both during the financing process and the implementation of climate change mitigation measures. The financing issues are related to transparency and the committed and disbursed amounts. The implementation of climate policies in developing countries will require an increase in financing flows. Both the public and private sectors will have to contribute. Whereas the public sector could draw on revenue from new levies, the private sector should be encouraged by acceptable 'risk/reward' ratios. Incentives will also be generated by the implementation of binding global and/or local policies as well as an appropriate governance. This will facilitate private investment both by stabilising the political horizon but also by setting a price for carbon. This study will also examine in some detail NAMAs, which can be an opportunity to implement new financing systems. Whilst short-term solutions exist, they should not be applied to the detriment of long-term solutions. Thus, institutional capacity-building will be needed if we are to create reliable administrations that encourage investment and the country's independence. Their implementation will allow broader GHG reduction policies to be

  7. Financing private power in Eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, A.

    1993-01-01

    Finance is needed for upgrading Eastern Europe's electric power industries. Capacity is not a problem, as all countries have more than adequate capacity in the light of the deep industrial recession. However, much of the capacity is elderly and poorly maintained, so availability is low. Coal fired plant may have electrostatic precipitators, but no desulfurization or de-NO x equipment is present. Price rises in oil and gas imported from Russia have however increased interest in energy efficiency measures. Power generation is mainly coal or lignite based. Commercial banks will be little involved in financing. The best viable sources of large scale financing will be the IBRD, EIB, EBRD, and IFC, among the multilateral investment banks. Loans so far have mainly gone to Poland. The multilateral institutions have great experience in lending to developing countries, but long procurement processes are often involved. Raising finance is inevitably a difficult process. The financing of the Cracow Environmental Project, a model private power venture in Poland is described and discussed, with particular reference to contract, legal and economic problems

  8. Carbon Trading. Literature Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerste, M.; Weda, J.; Rosenboom, N.

    2010-12-01

    From Pigou and Coase to the Kyoto Protocol, carbon trading has resulted in pricing of the negative externalities emanating from pollution. This report highlights leading literature and empirical findings on carbon trading, amongst others addressing the relevant carbon and related markets, the (lack of) success of carbon trading so far and room for improvement as well as its impact on investments in emission reduction. This report is part of a set of SEO-reports on finance and sustainability. The other reports deal with: Financing the Transition to Sustainable Energy; Innovations in financing environmental and social sustainability; and Sustainable investment.

  9. Power generation using carbon mesh cathodes with different diffusion layers in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Yong; Zhang, Fang; Wei, Bin; Liu, Guangli; Zhang, Renduo; Logan, Bruce E.

    2011-01-01

    to that obtained with a carbon cloth cathode (1390 ± 72 mW m-2). Carbon mesh with a PTFE diffusion layer produced only a slightly lower (6.6%) maximum power density (1303 ± 48 mW m-2). The Coulombic efficiencies were a function of current density, with the highest

  10. Aligned Carbon Nanotubes for Highly Efficient Energy Generation and Storage Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    solution processing methods, including filtration, solution-casting, electrophoretic deposition, and Langmuir - Blodgett deposition. However, most...supercapacitors with environmentally friendly ionic liquid electrolytes. These new nanocomposite electrodes consist of the high-surface-area activated...carbons, carbon nanotubes, and ionic liquids as the integrated constituent components. The resultant composites show significantly improved charge

  11. Power generation using an activated carbon fiber felt cathode in an upflow microbial fuel cell

    KAUST Repository

    Deng, Qian; Li, Xinyang; Zuo, Jiane.; Ling, Alison; Logan, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber felt (ACFF) cathode lacking metal catalysts is used in an upflow microbial fuel cell (UMFC). The maximum power density with the ACFF cathode is 315 mW m-2, compared to lower values with cathodes made of plain carbon paper

  12. Financing of Renewable Energy Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santizo, Rodolfo; Berganza, Jose

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes the role of the Banco Centroamericano de Integracion Economica in financing renewable energy projects in Central America. Also decribes the different financing modes to the goverment and private sectors

  13. Finance and the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radtke, G.G.

    1983-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: the energy situation today; energy investment and capital requirements (finding the necessary funds); further possibilities; future financing (project financing); summary. (U.K.)

  14. NPS transportation innovative finance options

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    This paper provides a summary of innovative transportation finance techniques and discusses their applicability to the National Park Service (NPS). The primary finding of this analysis is that while NPS is engaging in innovative finance techniques su...

  15. From Finance Capitalism to Financialization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per H.

    2014-01-01

    In this article I interpret 150 years of financial history with a focus on shifts in the role of finance in society. I argue that over time the role of finance has shifted twice from that of servant to that of master of society, and that this process has been driven by sense making through...... narratives that legitimized and shaped these changes. When finance became a master rent seeking, cultural capture and out-of control financial innovation resulted in financial and social instability. Finance as a master was the characteristic of finance capitalism from around 1900......–1931 and of financialization from around 1980 to today. Finance capitalism and financialization were enabled by a dominant narrative that legitimized the power of finance. The shifts in the role of finance happened when crises undermined the meaning of the existing narrative and created for a new narrative able to make sense...

  16. Water Finance Webinars and Forums

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Center hosts a series of water finance forums. These forums bring together communities with drinking water, wastewater, and stormwater project financing needs in an interactive peer-to-peer networking format.

  17. Financing renewable energy: Obstacles and solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.H.

    1994-06-01

    The majority of renewable energy technology projects now being developed use long term project financing to raise capital. The financial community scrutinizes renewables more closely than some conventionally fueled electric generation facilities because it perceives renewables as risky and expensive. Renewables pay for this perceived risk through higher interest charges and other more restrictive loan covenants. Risks that are not eliminated in the power sales agreement or through some other means generally result in higher project costs during financing. In part, this situation is a product of the private placement market and project finance process in which renewable energy facilities must function. The project finance process attracts banks and institutional lenders as well as equity investors (often pension funds) who do not want to place their capital at great risk. Energy project finance exists on the basis of a secure revenue stream and a thorough understanding of electric generation technology. Renewables, like all energy projects, operating in uncertain regulatory environments are often difficult to finance. In the uncertain regulatory environment in which renewables now operate, investors and lenders are nervous about challenges to existing contracts between independent power producers and utilities. Challenges to existing contracts could foretell challenges to contracts in the future. Investors and lenders now look to state regulatory environments as an indicator of project risk. Renewable energy technology evolves quickly. Yet, often the information about technological evolution is not available to those who invest in the energy projects. Or, those who have invested in new renewable energy technology in the past have lost money and are nervous about doing so in the future - even though technology may have improved. Inadequate or unfavorable information is a barrier to the development of renewables.

  18. Finance organizations, decisions and emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pixley, Jocelyn

    2002-03-01

    Analyses of global financial markets are dominated by atomized models of decision-making and behavioural psychology ('exuberance' or 'panic'). In contrast, this paper argues that overwhelmingly, finance organizations rather than 'individuals' make decisions, and routinely use emotions in formulating expectations. Keynes introduced emotion (business confidence and animal spirits) but in economics, emotion remains individualistic and irrational. Luhmann's system theory lies at the other extreme, where emotions like trust and confidence are central variables, functional in the reduction of complexity in sub-systems like the economy. The gap between irrational emotions aggregated to 'herd' behaviour in economics, and 'system trust' applied to finance and money as a 'medium of communication' in sociology, remains largely unfilled. This paper argues that while organizations cannot be said to 'think' or 'feel', they are rational and emotional, because impersonal trust, confidence and their contrary emotions are unavoidable in decision-making due to fundamental uncertainty. These future-oriented emotions are prevalent within and between organizations in the financial sector, primarily in generating expectations. The dynamic of corporate activities of tense and ruthless struggle is a more plausible level of analysis than either financial 'manias' in aggregate or 'system trust'.

  19. The Challenge of Islamic Finance

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng, Andrew; Singh, Ajit

    2012-01-01

    From its humble beginnings in the 1990s, Islamic finance has become a trillion US dollar industry. The market consensus is that Islamic finance has a bright future due to favourable demographics and rising incomes in the Muslim community. Moreover, despite voices sceptical of an accommodation between Islamic and global finance, leading global banks are buying Islamic bonds and forming subsidiaries specially to conduct Islamic finance business. Special laws have been passed in non-Muslim fi...

  20. FINANCING DECISION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

    OpenAIRE

    ANDREI STANCULESCU; DAN NICOLAE IVANESCU; PETRE BREZEANU

    2011-01-01

    This paper sustains the existence of a biunivocal link between a company’s financing decision and the corporate governance. On the one hand, the financing decision has an impact on corporate performance, which has been confirmed. According to the agency theory, the financing decision will contribute to solving interest conflicts between shareholders and managers. On the other hand, the corporate governance mechanism provides the proper contractual framework for attracting financing resources....

  1. Innovative financing for HIV response in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atun, Rifat; Silva, Sachin; Ncube, Mthuli; Vassall, Anna

    2016-06-01

    In 2015 around 15 million people living with HIV were receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa. Sustained provision of ART, though both prudent and necessary, creates substantial long-term fiscal obligations for countries affected by HIV/AIDS. As donor assistance for health remains constrained, novel financing mechanisms are needed to augment funding domestic sources. We explore how Innovative Financing has been used to co-finance domestic HIV/AIDS responses. Based on analysis of non-health sectors, we identify innovative financing instruments that could be used in the HIV response. We undertook a systematic review to identify innovative financing instruments used for (1) domestic HIV/AIDS financing in sub-Saharan Africa (2) international health financing and (3) financing in non-health sectors. We analyzed peer-reviewed and grey literature published between 2002 and 2014. We examined the nature and volume of funds mobilized with innovative financing, then in consultation with leading experts, identified instruments that held potential for financing the HIV response. Our analysis revealed three innovative financing instruments in use: Zimbabwe's AIDS Trust Fund (a tax/levy-based instrument), Botswana's National HIV/AIDS Prevention Support (BNAPS) International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) Buy-Down (a debt conversion instrument), and Côte d'Ivoire's Debt2Health Debt Swap Agreement (a debt conversion instrument). Zimbabwe's AIDS Trust Fund generated US$ 52.7 million between 2008 and 2011, Botswana's IBRD Buy-Down generated US$ 20 million, and Côte d'Ivoire's Debt2Health Debt Swap Agreement generated US$ 27 million, at least half of which was to be invested in HIV/AIDS programs. Four additional categories of innovative financing instruments met our criteria for future use: (1) remittances and diaspora bonds (2) social and development impact bonds (3) sovereign wealth funds (4) risk and credit guarantees. A limited number of

  2. Innovative financing for HIV response in sub–Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atun, Rifat; Silva, Sachin; Ncube, Mthuli; Vassall, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2015 around 15 million people living with HIV were receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART) in sub–Saharan Africa. Sustained provision of ART, though both prudent and necessary, creates substantial long–term fiscal obligations for countries affected by HIV/AIDS. As donor assistance for health remains constrained, novel financing mechanisms are needed to augment funding domestic sources. We explore how Innovative Financing has been used to co–finance domestic HIV/AIDS responses. Based on analysis of non–health sectors, we identify innovative financing instruments that could be used in the HIV response. Methods We undertook a systematic review to identify innovative financing instruments used for (1) domestic HIV/AIDS financing in sub–Saharan Africa (2) international health financing and (3) financing in non–health sectors. We analyzed peer–reviewed and grey literature published between 2002 and 2014. We examined the nature and volume of funds mobilized with innovative financing, then in consultation with leading experts, identified instruments that held potential for financing the HIV response. Results Our analysis revealed three innovative financing instruments in use: Zimbabwe’s AIDS Trust Fund (a tax/levy–based instrument), Botswana’s National HIV/AIDS Prevention Support (BNAPS) International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) Buy–Down (a debt conversion instrument), and Côte d'Ivoire's Debt2Health Debt Swap Agreement (a debt conversion instrument). Zimbabwe’s AIDS Trust Fund generated US$ 52.7 million between 2008 and 2011, Botswana’s IBRD Buy–Down generated US$ 20 million, and Côte d’Ivoire’s Debt2Health Debt Swap Agreement generated US$ 27 million, at least half of which was to be invested in HIV/AIDS programs. Four additional categories of innovative financing instruments met our criteria for future use: (1) remittances and diaspora bonds (2) social and development impact bonds (3) sovereign wealth

  3. Financing bidders in takeover contests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vladimirov, V.

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies how bidders' choice of financing for cash bids affects takeover prices. Endogenizing this choice shows that takeover premia are lower than when bidders are not cash-constrained for equity-like financing, but higher for debt financing. Intuitively, unlike debt (which leads to

  4. 24 CFR 811.110 - Refunding of obligations issued to finance Section 8 projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... finance Section 8 projects. 811.110 Section 811.110 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to... RELATED AMENDMENTS § 811.110 Refunding of obligations issued to finance Section 8 projects. (a) This... refunding which generate the McKinney Act savings and, if necessary, HUD will finance in refunding bond debt...

  5. Thermal characteristics of spent activated carbon generated from air cleaning units in korean nuclear power plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Yang So

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To identify the feasibility of disposing of spent activated carbon as a clearance level waste, we performed characterization of radioactive pollution for spent activated carbon through radioisotope analysis; results showed that the C-14 concentrations of about half of the spent activated carbon samples taken from Korean NPPs exceeded the clearance level limit. In this situation, we selected thermal treatment technology to remove C-14 and analyzed the moisture content and thermal characteristics. The results of the moisture content analysis showed that the moisture content of the spent activated carbon is in the range of 1.2–23.9 wt% depending on the operation and storage conditions. The results of TGA indicated that most of the spent activated carbon lost weight in 3 temperature ranges. Through py-GC/MS analysis based on the result of TGA, we found that activated carbon loses weight rapidly with moisture desorption reaching to 100°C and desorbs various organic and inorganic carbon compounds reaching to 200°C. The result of pyrolysis analysis showed that the experiment of C-14 desorption using thermal treatment technology requires at least 3 steps of heat treatment, including a heat treatment at high temperature over 850°C, in order to reduce the C-14 concentration below the clearance level.

  6. Thermal characteristics of spent activated carbon generated from air cleaning units in Korean nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hang Rae; So, Ji Yang [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To identify the feasibility of disposing of spent activated carbon as a clearance level waste, we performed characterization of radioactive pollution for spent activated carbon through radioisotope analysis; results showed that the C-14 concentrations of about half of the spent activated carbon samples taken from Korean NPPs exceeded the clearance level limit. In this situation, we selected thermal treatment technology to remove C-14 and analyzed the moisture content and thermal characteristics. The results of the moisture content analysis showed that the moisture content of the spent activated carbon is in the range of 1.2–23.9 wt% depending on the operation and storage conditions. The results of TGA indicated that most of the spent activated carbon lost weight in 3 temperature ranges. Through py-GC/MS analysis based on the result of TGA, we found that activated carbon loses weight rapidly with moisture desorption reaching to 100°C and desorbs various organic and inorganic carbon compounds reaching to 200°C. The result of pyrolysis analysis showed that the experiment of C-14 desorption using thermal treatment technology requires at least 3 steps of heat treatment, including a heat treatment at high temperature over 850°C, in order to reduce the C-14 concentration below the clearance level.

  7. Cooked Food Waste-An Efficient and Less Expensive Precursor for the Generation of Activated Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krithiga, Thangavelu; Sabina, Xavier Janet; Rajesh, Baskaran; Ilbeygi, Hamid; Shetty, Adka Nityananda; Reddy, Ramanjaneya; Karthikeyan, Jayabalan

    2018-06-01

    Activated carbon was synthesized from cooked food waste, especially dehydrated rice kernels, by chemical activation method using NaOH and KOH as activating agents. It was then characterized by ultimate and proximate analysis, BET surface analysis, XRD, FTIR, Raman and SEM. The XRD patterns and Raman spectra confirmed the amorphous nature of the prepared activated carbons. Ultimate analysis showed an increase in the carbon content after activation of the raw carbon samples. Upon activation with NaOH and KOH, the surface area of the carbon sample was found to have increased from 0.3424 to 539.78 and 306.83 m2g-1 respectively. The SEM images revealed the formation of heterogeneous pores on the surface of the activated samples. The samples were then tested for their adsorption activity using acetic acid and methylene blue. Based on the regression coefficients, the adsorption kinetics of methylene blue dye were fitted with pseudo-second order model for both samples. Similarly, the Freundlich isotherm was found to be a better fit than Langmuir isotherm for both samples. The activity of thus prepared activated carbons was found to be comparable with the commercial carbon.

  8. Chemical Properties of Brown Carbon Aerosol Generated at the Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Womack, C.; Franchin, A.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Wagner, N.; Manfred, K.

    2017-12-01

    Aerosol scattering and absorption are still among the largest uncertainties in quantifying radiative forcing. Biomass burning is a major source of light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosol in the United States. These aerosol are generally classified into two categories: black carbon (graphitic-like aerosol that absorbs broadly across the ultraviolet and visible spectral regions) and brown carbon (organic aerosol that absorbs strongly in the ultraviolet and near-visible spectral regions). The composition, volatility, and chemical aging of brown carbon are poorly known, but are important to understanding its radiative effects. We deployed three novel instruments to the Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory in 2016 to measure brown carbon absorption: a photoacoustic spectrometer, broadband cavity enhanced spectrometer, and particle-into-liquid sampler coupled to a liquid waveguide capillary cell. The instruments sampled from a shared inlet with well-characterized dilution and thermal denuding. We sampled smoke from 32 controlled burns of fuels relevant to western U.S. wildfires. We use these measurements to determine the volatility of water-soluble brown carbon, and compare this to the volatility of water-soluble organic aerosol and total organic aerosol. We further examine the wavelength-dependence of the water-soluble brown carbon absorption as a function of denuder temperature. Together this gives new information about the solubility, volatility, and chemical composition of brown carbon.

  9. Information,Informal finance,and SME financing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Justin Yifu; SUN Xifang

    2006-01-01

    Informal finance exists extensively and has been playing an important role in small-and medium-sized enterprise (SME) financing in developing economies,This paper tries to rationalize the extensiveness of informal finance.SME financing suffers more serious information asymmetry to the extent that most SMEs are more opaque and can only provide less collateral.Informal lenders have an advantage over formal financial institutions in collecting "soft information" about SME borrowers.This paper establishes a model including formal and informal lenders and high-and low-risk borrowers with or without sufficient collateral and shows that the credit market in which informal finance is eliminated will allocate funds in some inefficient way,and the efficiency of allocating credit funds can be improved once informal finance is allowed to coexist with formal finance.

  10. Investigating the Impact of Carbon Tax to Power Generation in Java-Bali System by Applying Optimization Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Maxensius Tri Sambodo

    2010-01-01

    Java-Bali power system dominates the national installed capacity and will contribute to about 76% of the national CO2 emissions from the electricity sector in the future. Thus, minimizing CO2 emission from the Java-Bali system can help Indonesia to reduce the national CO2 emissions level. We apply optimization approach to investigate this problem by including carbon tax into the cost function. We analyzed data based on electricity generating system in 2008. In general the optimization showed ...

  11. Oxygen reduction activity of carbon fibers cathode, and application for current generation from the NAD+ and NADH recycling reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Maeda

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fibers treated at 700 oC for 10 min were found to have O2 reduction activity when being used as a cathode. The special type of partition combined with both cationic and anionic exchange membranes was applied between anode cell and cathode cell in order to use a highly acidic solution such as 0.5 M H2SO4 as an electrolyte of the cathode cell for increasing the efficiency of O2 reduction activity. The current generation from NAD+ and NADH recycling system combined with D-gluconolactone production from 500 mg of D-glucose was performed by applying only carbon fibers for both anode and cathode. The total current volume obtained was 81.4 mAh during the reaction for 10 h, and the current efficiency was 93%. One gram of carbon fibers was pressed with Nafion paste on a piece of carbon paper(area : 50 mm×50mm with heating to prepare the cathode, and this construct was combined with conventional fuel cell. The power density was 3.6 mW/cm2, and the total power volume was calculated to be 90 mW per 1 g of carbon fibers.

  12. Alternative windpower ownership structures: Financing terms and project costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, R.; Kahn, E.

    1996-05-01

    Most utility-scale renewable energy projects in the United States are developed and financed by private renewable energy companies. Electric output is then sold to investor-owned and public utilities under long-term contracts. Limited partnerships, sale/leaseback arrangements, and project-financing have historically been the dominant forms of finance in the windpower industry, with project-finance taking the lead more recently. Although private ownership using project-finance is still the most popular form of windpower development, alternative approaches to ownership and financing are becoming more prevalent. U.S. public and investor-owned electric utilities (IOUs) have begun to participate directly in windpower projects by owning and financing their own facilities rather than purchasing windpower from independent non-utility generators (NUGs) through power purchase agreements (PPAs). In these utility-ownership arrangements, the wind turbine equipment vendor/developer typically designs and constructs a project under a turnkey contract for the eventual project owner (the utility). The utility will also frequently sign an operations and maintenance (O&M) contract with the project developer/equipment vendor. There appear to be a number of reasons for utility involvement in recent and planned U.S. wind projects. One important claim is that utility ownership and self-finance provides substantial cost savings compared to contracting with private NUGs to supply wind-generated power. In this report, we examine that assertion.

  13. Biological effects of carbon nanotubes generated in forest wildfire ecosystems rich in resinous trees on native plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Lara-Romero

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have a broad range of applications and are generally considered human-engineered nanomaterials. However, carbon nanostructures have been found in ice cores and oil wells, suggesting that nature may provide appropriate conditions for CNT synthesis. During forest wildfires, materials such as turpentine and conifer tissues containing iron under high temperatures may create chemical conditions favorable for CNT generation, similar to those in synthetic methods. Here, we show evidence of naturally occurring multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs produced from Pinus oocarpa and Pinus pseudostrobus, following a forest wildfire. The MWCNTs showed an average of 10 walls, with internal diameters of ∼2.5 nm and outer diameters of ∼14.5 nm. To verify whether MWCNT generation during forest wildfires has a biological effect on some characteristic plant species of these ecosystems, germination and development of seedlings were conducted. Results show that the utilization of comparable synthetic MWCNTs increased seed germination rates and the development of Lupinus elegans and Eysenhardtia polystachya, two plants species found in the burned forest ecosystem. The finding provides evidence that supports the generation and possible ecological functions of MWCNTs in nature.

  14. Finance and Economic Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugo Panizza

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Published by Palgrave MacmillanThis chapter reviews the literature on finance and economic development. It starts with a description of the roles of finance, a definition of financial efficiency, and a discussion of whether countries may have financial sectors that are ‘too large’ compared to the size of the domestic economy. Next, the author describes several indicators of financial development and reviews the literature on the relationship between financial development and economic growth. In the literature review, he discusses in detail some recent evidence indicating that the marginal contribution of financial development to gross domestic product (GDP growth becomes negative when credit to the private sector reaches 110 per cent of GDP. The chapter concludes with some policy conclusions targeted to developing countries.

  15. Statistics for Finance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindström, Erik; Madsen, Henrik; Nielsen, Jan Nygaard

    Statistics for Finance develops students’ professional skills in statistics with applications in finance. Developed from the authors’ courses at the Technical University of Denmark and Lund University, the text bridges the gap between classical, rigorous treatments of financial mathematics...... that rarely connect concepts to data and books on econometrics and time series analysis that do not cover specific problems related to option valuation. The book discusses applications of financial derivatives pertaining to risk assessment and elimination. The authors cover various statistical...... and mathematical techniques, including linear and nonlinear time series analysis, stochastic calculus models, stochastic differential equations, Itō’s formula, the Black–Scholes model, the generalized method-of-moments, and the Kalman filter. They explain how these tools are used to price financial derivatives...

  16. Theory and Evidence on the Finance-Growth Relationship: The Virtuous and Unvirtuous Cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Lauretta, Eliana; Chaudhry, Sajid; Mullineux, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1980s, financial crises have tended to reoccur with increasing frequency and growing intensity. They are endogenously generated by the established OTD (Originate-To-Distribute) model within the new finance-growth paradigm. Good finance fosters the correct allocation of financial resources, the fair redistribution of wealth and positive economic growth (the virtuous cycle), whereas bad finance captures part of the created wealth and, thanks to a highly technologically advanced financ...

  17. Financing Creative Destruction

    OpenAIRE

    Samaniego, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    This paper uncovers evidence of s potentially important channel linking financial development to growth: the financing of innovations introduced by entrepreneurs. Using internationally comparable data on European countries, entry and exit in research-intensive industries are found to be disproportionately sensitive to the level of financial development. Furthermore, financial development is related to increased R&D spending. The results are robust to several different measures of financial de...

  18. Property Rights and Finance

    OpenAIRE

    Simon Johnson; John McMillan; Christopher Woodruff

    2002-01-01

    Which is the tighter constraint on private sector investment: weak property rights or limited access to external finance? From a survey of new firms in post-communist countries, we find that weak property rights discourage firms from reinvesting their profits, even when bank loans are available. Where property rights are relatively strong, firms reinvest their profits; where they are relatively weak, entrepreneurs do not want to invest from retained earnings.

  19. Supply chain finance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasavica Petar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of supply chain finance is a response to global illiquidity, intensified through the global economic crisis and globalization of commercial and financial flows. The growing illiquidity undermines credit ratings of economic entities, thereby reducing the potential for achieving the projected goals (profitability and portfolio quality. In order to overcome this, banks have introduced certain products flexible to the requirements of specific transactions. The concerned products redirect the focus from a client's credit rating and risk to the credit rating and risk of a business partner (buyer, resulting in benefits for all transaction participants ('win-win-win'. Moreover, the activities are targeted at transaction analysis, i.e. the isolation and protection of the cash flow as the source of financial instrument's repayment. On the other hand, there has been an increasing number of transactions based on the risk of the commercial bank of the client's business partner, or on the risk of collateral (inventory. The focus is actually placed on the financing of adequate supply chain stages, given that counterparty relationship management has been proven to be crucial for efficient management of one's own business. The tensions existing in the relations between partners (increasingly long payment deadlines are in the basis of the supply chain finance concept. Decisions made by banks are based on the entire supply chain (wide information basis, thereby shifting the focus from the product (as was the case before the crisis to the client's needs. Thus, decisions become increasingly comprehensive, quicker, and more precise, and portfolios less risky. Through the individual portfolio of banks, the market of national economies also becomes safer and more liquid. These are rather profitable transactions, because, due to the risk transfer, financing is enabled to companies to whom classic crediting in most cases is not available.

  20. The Finance Franchise

    OpenAIRE

    Omarova, Saule; Hockett, Robert

    2018-01-01

    102 Cornell Law Review 1143 (2017) The dominant view of banks and other financial institutions is that they function primarily as intermediaries, managing flows of scarce funds from those who have accumulated them to those who have need of them and can pay for their use. This understanding pervades textbooks, scholarly writings, and policy discussions – yet it is fundamentally false as a description of how a modern financial system works. Finance today is no more primarily “intermediated” tha...

  1. Financing Public Service Broadcasting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Christian Edelvold; Lund, Anker Brink

    2012-01-01

    Broadcasting (PSB) financing regimes in Europe, concluding that Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden may still be considered conventional, licence fee PSB countries, but with some interesting differences in relation to competitive and market oriented alternatives of resource provision......Recently several European countries have abolished the traditional public service licence fee system, replacing it with direct public funding. But except for Iceland, the Nordic countries have not followed suit. The article discusses this development within a comparative framework of Public Service...

  2. Redox Deposition of Nanoscale Metal Oxides on Carbon for Next-Generation Electrochemical Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    conductive carbon supports. Many pro- tocols, including electrodeposition ,17 vapor deposi- tion,18 impregnation/decomposition,19 and solgel chemistry20 have...can be mitigated by dispersing the oxide on high-surface-area carbons (via solgel, impregnation, CVD, or electrodeposition methods), a strategy that...et al. Christopher Chervin is a staff scientist at the NRL, where his research focuses on redesigning cathodes for metalair batteries and exploring

  3. Solubilization of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes with Single- stranded DNA Generated from Asymmetric PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhai Fan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs can be effectively dispersed and functionalized bywrapping with long single-stranded DNA (ssDNA synthesized by asymmetric PCR. ThessDNA-CNTs attached on surface of glass carbon electrode made it possible forelectrochemical analysis and sensing, which was demonstrated by reduction of H2O2 onhemoglobin/ssDNA-CNTs modified electrodes. This research showed the potentialapplication of DNA-functionalised CNTs in construction of future electrochemicalbiosensors.

  4. Social security financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    After nearly 2 years of study, the 1979 Advisory Council on Social Security submitted its findings and recommendations in December. In February the Bulletin published the Executive Summary of the Council's report. Because of the continuing wide public interest in the future of social security financing, the Council's detailed findings and recommendations on that subject are published below. The Council unanimously reports that all current and future beneficiaries can count on receiving the payments to which they are entitled. Among the recommendations it calls for are partial financing with nonpayroll-tax revenues. Suggested changes include hospital insurance (HI) financed through portins of personal and corporate income taxes and a part of the HI insurance payroll tax diverted to cash benefits with the balance of this tax repealed. The Council also recommends that the social security cash benefits program be brought into long-run actuarial balance--with a payroll-tax rate increase in the year 2005. It rejects the idea of a value-added tax as being inflationary. Parenthetical remarks represent additional views of the Council members cited.

  5. [Dilemmas of health financing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Zárate, M; González Torres, R

    1989-01-01

    The economic crisis had had a profound effect on the finances of health services in Mexico. The expenditure on health has decreased, both in absolute terms and in relation to the national gross product. Funding problems have been aggravated by inequities in budget distribution: social security institutions have been favored; geographical distribution of resources is concentrated in the central areas of the country and in the more developed states, and curative health care has prevailed over preventive medicine. Administrative inefficiency hinders even more the appropriate utilization of resources. Diversification of funding sources has been proposed, through external debt, local funding, and specific health taxing. But these proposals are questionable. The high cost of the debt service has reduced international credits as a source of financing. Resource concentration at the federal level, and the different compromises related to the economic solidarity pact have also diminished the potentiality of local state financing. On the other hand, a special health tax is not viable within the current fiscal framework. The alternatives are a better budget planning, a change in the institutional and regional distribution of resources, and improvement in the administrative mechanisms of funding.

  6. Removal of carbon contaminations by RF plasma generated reactive species and subsequent effects on optical surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, P. K., E-mail: praveenyadav@rrcat.gov.in; Rai, S. K.; Modi, M. H.; Nayak, M.; Lodha, G. S. [Indus Synchrotron Utilization Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore-452013 (India); Kumar, M.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A. [Laser Plasma Laboratory, Laser Plasma Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore-452013 (India)

    2015-06-24

    Carbon contamination on optical elements is a serious issue in synchrotron beam lines for several decades. The basic mechanism of carbon deposition on optics and cleaning strategies are not fully understood. Carbon growth mechanism and optimized cleaning procedures are worldwide under development stage. Optimized RF plasma cleaning is considered an active remedy for the same. In present study carbon contaminated optical test surfaces (carbon capped tungsten thin film) are exposed for 30 minutes to four different gases, rf plasma at constant power and constant dynamic pressure. Structural characterization (thickness, roughness and density) of virgin samples and plasma exposed samples was done by soft x-ray (λ=80 Å) reflectivity measurements at Indus-1 reflectivity beam line. Different gas plasma removes carbon with different rate (0.4 to 0.65 nm /min). A thin layer 2 to 9 nm of different roughness and density is observed at the top surface of tungsten film. Ar gas plasma is found more suitable for cleaning of tungsten surface.

  7. Project financing renewable energy schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandler, A.

    1993-01-01

    The viability of many Renewable Energy projects is critically dependent upon the ability of these projects to secure the necessary financing on acceptable terms. The principal objective of the study was to provide an overview to project developers of project financing techniques and the conditions under which project finance for Renewable Energy schemes could be raised, focussing on the potential sources of finance, the typical project financing structures that could be utilised for Renewable Energy schemes and the risk/return and security requirements of lenders, investors and other potential sources of financing. A second objective is to describe the appropriate strategy and tactics for developers to adopt in approaching the financing markets for such projects. (author)

  8. Analysis of a novel solar energy-powered Rankine cycle for combined power and heat generation using supercritical carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X.R.; Yamaguchi, H.; Uneno, D. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyoto 630-0321 (Japan); Fujima, K. [Mayekawa MFG Co., Ltd., 2000 Tatsuzawa Moriya-city, Ibaraki-Pref. 302-0118 (Japan); Enomoto, M. [Showa Denko K. K., 1-480, Inuzuka, Oyama-city, Tochigi 323-8679 (Japan); Sawada, N. [Showa Tansan Co., Ltd., 7-1, Ogimachi, Kawasaki-Ku, Kawasaki-city, Kanagawa 210-0867 (Japan)

    2006-10-15

    Theoretical analysis of a solar energy-powered Rankine thermodynamic cycle utilizing an innovative new concept, which uses supercritical carbon dioxide as a working fluid, is presented. In this system, a truly 'natural' working fluid, carbon dioxide, is utilized to generate firstly electricity power and secondly high-grade heat power and low-grade heat power. The uniqueness of the system is in the way in which both solar energy and carbon dioxide, available in abundant quantities in all parts of the world, are simultaneously used to build up a thermodynamic cycle and has the potential to reduce energy shortage and greatly reduce carbon dioxide emissions and global warming, offering environmental and personal safety simultaneously. The system consists of an evacuated solar collector system, a power-generating turbine, a high-grade heat recovery system, a low-grade heat recovery system and a feed pump. The performances of this CO{sub 2}-based Rankine cycle were theoretically investigated and the effects of various design conditions, namely, solar radiation, solar collector area and CO{sub 2} flow rate, were studied. Numerical simulations show that the proposed system may have electricity power efficiency and heat power efficiency as high as 11.4% and 36.2%, respectively. It is also found that the cycle performances strongly depend on climate conditions. Also the electricity power and heat power outputs increase with the collector area and CO{sub 2} flow rate. The estimated COP{sub power} and COP{sub heat} increase with the CO{sub 2} flow rate, but decrease with the collector area. The CO{sub 2}-based cycle can be optimized to provide maximum power, maximum heat recovery or a combination of both. The results suggest the potential of this new concept for applications to electricity power and heat power generation. (author)

  9. Mainstreaming Low-Carbon Climate-Resilient growth pathways into Development Finance Institutions' activities A research program on the standards, tools and metrics to support transition to the low-carbon climate-resilient development model. Paper 3 - Case Study: Integration of Climate Change into the operational activities of Agence Francaise de Developpement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschalier, Claire; Deheza, Mariana; Cochran, Ian; Risler, Ophelie; Forestier, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    This case study examines the AFD's integration of climate and transition-related information and tools into its activities. It first presents the general investment process and the range of financial instruments used by AFD. Second, the framework elaborated in paper 2 of this series is used to analyze the upstream and downstream integration of long-term climate and transition objectives. It begins with the analysis of the upstream standards and information that are applied to transpose AFD's global strategy and Climate Action Plan into local and sectoral intervention plans and to guide AFD's initial project screening. It then explores the tools and instruments that are used during downstream process for project and program level assessments and optimization, before the final investment decision is made. Although the tools and standards implemented by AFD constitute a solid base for mainstreaming climate considerations into its activities, it seems that they could be further developed to allow for a more qualitative assessment of a project's contribution to 'low-carbon transformation' of a given country's economy. A number of opportunities and challenges to build on AFD's existing tools are identified to take this next step - first among which is the need to work with recipient countries and other development finance institutions to identify country-specific low-carbon climate resilient development pathways. (authors)

  10. Financing arrangements for nuclear power projects in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This reference book reviews the main features and problems or difficulties involved in the financing of nuclear power projects with special reference to developing countries. It provides basic information and advice to developing countries interested in nuclear power projects as part of their power sector planning. The book outlines the general characteristics of financing a nuclear power project and presents innovative approaches for power generation financing. It discusses the special conditions and requirements of nuclear power projects and their financing complexities. The focus is on the practical issues that need to be dealt with in order to successfully finance these power projects, as well as the constraints faced by most developing countries. Possible ways and means of dealing with these constraints are presented. 58 refs, figs and tabs

  11. Delays help German utilities maintain self-financing ratios. [Financing nuclear power projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radtke, G [Dresden Bank, AG (Germany, F.R.)

    1979-05-01

    Estimates of electricity consumption have been substantially reduced and nuclear plant is now expected to be 22% of total generating capacity in 1985 instead of the earlier forecast of 36%. The decline in the ordering of new plant has benefited the financial position of the electricity utilities and the expected fall in self-financing ratios has not occurred.

  12. Free-standing carbon nanotube/graphene hybrid papers as next generation adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichiara, Anthony B; Sherwood, Tyler J; Benton-Smith, Jared; Wilson, Jonathan C; Weinstein, Steven J; Rogers, Reginald E

    2014-06-21

    The adsorption of a series of aromatic compounds from aqueous solution onto purified, free-standing single-walled carbon nanotube/graphene nanoplatelet hybrid papers is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Experimental data is obtained via changes in optical absorption spectra of the aqueous solutions and is used to extract all parameters required to implement a semi-empirical mass-transfer model. Agreement between experiment and theory is excellent and data from all compounds can be cast on a universal adsorption curve. Results indicate that the rate of adsorption and long-time capacity of many aromatic compounds on hybrid paper adsorbent significantly exceeds that of activated carbon by at least an order of magnitude. The combination of carbon nanotubes and graphene also promotes on the order of a 25% improvement in adsorption rates and capacities than either component alone. Hybrid nanocomposites show significant promise as adsorption materials used for environmental remediation efforts.

  13. Power generation using an activated carbon and metal mesh cathode in a microbial fuel cell

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Fang

    2009-11-01

    An inexpensive activated carbon (AC) air cathode was developed as an alternative to a platinum-catalyzed electrode for oxygen reduction in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). AC was cold-pressed with a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) binder to form the cathode around a Ni mesh current collector. This cathode construction avoided the need for carbon cloth or a metal catalyst, and produced a cathode with high activity for oxygen reduction at typical MFC current densities. Tests with the AC cathode produced a maximum power density of 1220 mW/m2 (normalized to cathode projected surface area; 36 W/m3 based on liquid volume) compared to 1060 mW/m2 obtained by Pt catalyzed carbon cloth cathode. The Coulombic efficiency ranged from 15% to 55%. These findings show that AC is a cost-effective material for achieving useful rates of oxygen reduction in air cathode MFCs. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Inhibitory effect of self-generated extracellular dissolved organic carbon on carbon dioxide fixation in sulfur-oxidizing bacteria during a chemoautotrophic cultivation process and its elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Nan; Tsang, Yiu Fai; Wang, Lei; Fu, Xiaohua; Hu, Jiajun; Li, Huan; Le, Yiquan

    2018-03-01

    The features of extracellular dissolved organic carbon (EDOC) generation in two typical aerobic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Thiobacillus thioparus DSM 505 and Halothiobacillus neapolitanus DSM 15147) and its impact on CO 2 fixation during chemoautotrophic cultivation process were investigated. The results showed that EDOC accumulated in both strains during CO 2 fixation process. Large molecular weight (MW) EDOC derived from cell lysis and decay was dominant during the entire process in DSM 505, whereas small MW EDOC accounted for a large proportion during initial and middle stages of DSM 15147 as its cytoskeleton synthesis rate did not keep up with CO 2 assimilation rate. The self-generated EDOC feedback repressed cbb gene transcription and thus decreased total bacterial cell number and CO 2 fixation yield in both strains, but DSM 505 was more sensitive to this inhibition effect. Moreover, the membrane bioreactor effectively decreased the EDOC/TOC ratio and improved carbon fixation yield of DSM 505. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Green Nanotechnology from Waste Carbon-Polyaniline Composite: Generation of Wavelength-Independent Multiband Photoluminescence for Sensitive Ion Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Goswami, Sumita

    2017-12-11

    This study reports on the qualitative analysis of photoluminescence effect generated from waste carbon of cooking oven by facile cost-effective material engineering. The waste carbon product as a form of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) is incorporated within a conjugate polymer, namely, polyaniline (PANI) to produce CNP-PANI composites that have shown excitation-wavelength-independent triple-band photoluminescence emission effect and highly sensitive Fe+3 ion detection ability. Herein the waste carbon material, while functionalized within the conjugated polymer, needs no further acid treatment or surface modification thus making the process cheaper, environmentally benign, and useful for green nanotechnology. The excitation-wavelength-independent unique triple-band photoluminescence spectrum is the direct consequence of carbon–polyaniline synergy in π–π transition and the surface passivation of CNPs by the [BOND]NH2 group rich aniline during in-situ polymerization. The current scenario has been studied for the samples prepared with different CNP concentrations for different reaction times and discussed in details with supportive physico-chemical characterizations. Moreover, the present study has demonstrated that the current material can be used as a fluorescent sensing platform for Fe+3 ions with high sensitivity and selectivity criteria where the detection limit of the sensing probe has a value as low as 12 × 10−9 nM.

  16. An in situ generated carbon as integrated conductive additive for hierarchical negative plate of lead-acid battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, M.; Ganesan, M.; Ambalavanan, S.

    2014-04-01

    In this work, we report an in situ generated carbon from sugar as additive in the Negative Active Mass (NAM) which enhances the charge-discharge characteristics of the lead-acid cells. In situ formed sugar derived carbon (SDC) with leady oxide (LO) provides a conductive network and excellent protection against NAM irreversible lead sulfation. The effect of SDC and carbon black (CB) added negative plates are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), galvanostatic charge-discharge, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), respectively. The results show that subtle changes in the addition of carbon to NAM led to subsequent changes on the performance during partial-state-of-charge (PSoC) operations in lead-acid cells. Furthermore, SDC added cells exhibit remarkable improvement in the rate capability, active material utilization, cycle performance and charge acceptance compared to that of the conventional CB added cells. The impact of SDC with LO at various synthesis conditions on the electrochemical performance of the negative plate is studied systematically.

  17. 25 CFR 170.300 - May tribes use flexible financing to finance IRR transportation projects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Financing § 170.300 May tribes use flexible financing to finance IRR transportation projects? Yes. Tribes may use flexible financing in the same manner as States to finance IRR transportation projects, unless... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May tribes use flexible financing to finance IRR...

  18. Mechanism Research on Standardized Development of Rural Private Finance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In generalizing the researching conditions of researchers on private finance,the paper introduces the connoted meaning of rural private finance broadly and narrowly.The paper states the forms of rural private finance(including private loaning,private bank,rural private collecting,financing organizations,cooperatives,NGO,small loaning organizations and so on),the relations between rural private finance and rural economic relations,pointing out that it is the combination of the strong and the weak,which may generate benefits with the operation of marketing mechanisms.The paper analyzes the historical causes,supervision causes and cultural causes of rural private finance,discussing mechanisms of standardized development of rural private finance:firstly,standardize the organization management mechanisms,including scaled controlling mechanisms and bank management mechanisms;secondly,complete finance supervision mechanisms;thirdly,moderate government intervention,including affording liberal policy environment and reducing the improper intervention;fourthly,upgrading qualities mechanisms,including cultivating the rural credit culture and improving the quality of regulatory personnel.

  19. Energy storage financing :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Project financing is emerging as the linchpin for the future health, direction, and momentum of the energy storage industry. Market leaders have so far relied on selffunding or captive lending arrangements to fund projects. New lenders are proceeding hesitantly as they lack a full understanding of the technology, business, and credit risks involved in this rapidly changing market. The U.S. Department of Energy is poised to play a critical role in expanding access to capital by reducing the barriers to entry for new lenders, and providing trusted analytical benchmarks to better judge and price the risk in systematic ways.

  20. F# for quantitative finance

    CERN Document Server

    Astborg, Johan

    2013-01-01

    To develop your confidence in F#, this tutorial will first introduce you to simpler tasks such as curve fitting. You will then advance to more complex tasks such as implementing algorithms for trading semi-automation in a practical scenario-based format.If you are a data analyst or a practitioner in quantitative finance, economics, or mathematics and wish to learn how to use F# as a functional programming language, this book is for you. You should have a basic conceptual understanding of financial concepts and models. Elementary knowledge of the .NET framework would also be helpful.

  1. Assessing the environmental impact of energy production from hydrochar generated via hydrothermal carbonization waste management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a relatively low temperature thermal conversion process that is gaining significant attention as a sustainable and environmentally beneficial approach for the transformation of biomass and waste streams to value-added products. Although there are numerous studies ...

  2. Power generation using an activated carbon and metal mesh cathode in a microbial fuel cell

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Fang; Cheng, Shaoan; Pant, Deepak; Bogaert, Gilbert Van; Logan, Bruce E.

    2009-01-01

    a maximum power density of 1220 mW/m2 (normalized to cathode projected surface area; 36 W/m3 based on liquid volume) compared to 1060 mW/m2 obtained by Pt catalyzed carbon cloth cathode. The Coulombic efficiency ranged from 15% to 55%. These findings

  3. Second Generation CO2 FEP Analysis: CASSIF - Carbon Storage Scenario Identification Framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yavuz, F.; Tilburg, T. van; David, P.; Spruijt, M.; Wildenborg, T.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS) is a promising contribution to reduce further increase of atmospheric CO2 emissions from fossil fuels. The CCS concept anticipates that large amounts of CO2 are going to be stored in the subsurface for the long term. Since CCS is a rather new technology,

  4. A New Generation of Sub Mm Telescopes, Made of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezger, P.; Baars, J. W. M.; Ulich, B. L.

    1984-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) appears to be the material most suited for the construction of submillimeter telescopes (SMT) not only for ground-based use but also for space applications. The accuracy of the CFRP reflectors needs to be improved beyond value of the 17 micron rms envisaged for the 10 m SMT.

  5. Power generation using an activated carbon fiber felt cathode in an upflow microbial fuel cell

    KAUST Repository

    Deng, Qian

    2010-02-01

    An activated carbon fiber felt (ACFF) cathode lacking metal catalysts is used in an upflow microbial fuel cell (UMFC). The maximum power density with the ACFF cathode is 315 mW m-2, compared to lower values with cathodes made of plain carbon paper (67 mW m-2), carbon felt (77 mW m-2), or platinum-coated carbon paper (124 mW m-2, 0.2 mg-Pt cm-2). The addition of platinum to the ACFF cathode (0.2 mg-Pt cm-2) increases the maximum power density to 391 mW m-2. Power production is further increased to 784 mW m-2 by increasing the cathode surface area and shaping it into a tubular form. With ACFF cutting into granules, the maximum power is 481 mW m-2 (0.5 cm granules), and 667 mW m-2 (1.0 cm granules). These results show that ACFF cathodes lacking metal catalysts can be used to substantially increase power production in UMFC compared to traditional materials lacking a precious metal catalyst. © 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Influence and efficiency of catalytic stripper in organic carbon removal from laboratory generated soot aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    A catalytic stripper (CS) is a device used to remove the semi-volatile, typically organic carbon, fraction by passing raw or diluted exhaust over an oxidation catalyst heated to 300˚C. The oxidation catalyst used in this study is a commercially available diesel oxidation ca...

  7. Analysis of Carbon Policies for Electricity Networks with High Penetration of Green Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feijoo, Felipe A.

    In recent decades, climate change has become one of the most crucial challenges for humanity. Climate change has a direct correlation with global warming, caused mainly by the green house gas emissions (GHG). The Environmental Protection Agency in the U.S. (EPA) attributes carbon dioxide to account for approximately 82% of the GHG emissions. Unfortunately, the energy sector is the main producer of carbon dioxide, with China and the U.S. as the highest emitters. Therefore, there is a strong (positive) correlation between energy production, global warming, and climate change. Stringent carbon emissions reduction targets have been established in order to reduce the impacts of GHG. Achieving these emissions reduction goals will require implementation of policies like as cap-and-trade and carbon taxes, together with transformation of the electricity grid into a smarter system with high green energy penetration. However, the consideration of policies solely in view of carbon emissions reduction may adversely impact other market outcomes such as electricity prices and consumption. In this dissertation, a two-layer mathematical-statistical framework is presented, that serves to develop carbon policies to reduce emissions level while minimizing the negative impacts on other market outcomes. The bottom layer of the two layer model comprises a bi-level optimization problem. The top layer comprises a statistical model and a Pareto analysis. Two related but different problems are studied under this methodology. The first problem looks into the design of cap-and-trade policies for deregulated electricity markets that satisfy the interest of different market constituents. Via the second problem, it is demonstrated how the framework can be used to obtain levels of carbon emissions reduction while minimizing the negative impact on electricity demand and maximizing green penetration from microgrids. In the aforementioned studies, forecasts for electricity prices and production cost

  8. Should the EPR be financed by industrialists?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jemain, A.

    2005-01-01

    As a reciprocal arrangement, the industrialists should be invited to contribute to the financing of the new generation reactor EPR (European pressurized reactor) which will be built in Flamanville (Manche, France). In exchange to their financial participation, the industrialists will receive the contractual warranty of stable electricity prices during 10 to 15 years periods. This short paper presents the opposite opinion of two representative of French industries concerning this proposal. Short paper. (J.S.)

  9. Financing of Competing Projects with Venture Capital

    OpenAIRE

    Goldfain, Ekaterina; Kovac, Eugen

    2005-01-01

    We analyze innovation race in a moral hazard setting. We develop a model in which two competing entrepreneurs work independently on the same project. The entrepreneurs do not possess any wealth of their own and their research is financed by a venture capitalist. The project, if successful, generates a prize, which is to be shared between the winning entrepreneur and the venture capitalist. The venture capitalist cannot observe the allocation of funds he provides, which creates a moral hazard ...

  10. Emerging trends in health care finance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterns, J B

    1994-01-01

    Access to capital will become more difficult. Capital access is dependent on ability to repay debt, which, in turn, is dependent on internally generated cash flows. Under any health care reform proposal, revenue inflows will be slowed. The use of corporate finance techniques to limit financial risk and lower cost will be a permanent response to fundamental changes to the health care system. These changes will result in greater balance sheet management, centralized capital allocation, and alternative sources of capital.

  11. Treatment of carbon fiber brush anodes for improving power generation in air–cathode microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Feng, Yujie

    2010-04-02

    Carbon brush electrodes have been used to provide high surface areas for bacterial growth and high power densities in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). A high-temperature ammonia gas treatment has been used to enhance power generation, but less energy-intensive methods are needed for treating these electrodes in practice. Three different treatment methods are examined here for enhancing power generation of carbon fiber brushes: acid soaking (CF-A), heating (CF-H), and a combination of both processes (CF-AH). The combined heat and acid treatment improve power production to 1370 mW m-2, which is 34% larger than the untreated control (CF-C, 1020 mW m-2). This power density is 25% higher than using only acid treatment (1100 mW m-2) and 7% higher than that using only heat treatment (1280 mW m-2). XPS analysis of the treated and untreated anode materials indicates that power increases are related to higher N1s/C1s ratios and a lower C-O composition. These findings demonstrate efficient and simple methods for improving power generation using graphite fiber brushes, and provide insight into reasons for improving performance that may help to further increase power through other graphite fiber modifications. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Islamic Public Infrastructure Financing: An Analysis of Alternative Financing Instruments with Application in Developing Countries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Islam, Saiful

    2004-01-01

    This project examines the structure of public infrastructure financing in Indonesia and examines whether financing based on Islamic principles is a feasible alternative to current financing mechanisms...

  13. Empirical techniques in finance

    CERN Document Server

    Bhar, Ramaprasad

    2005-01-01

    This book offers the opportunity to study and experience advanced empi- cal techniques in finance and in general financial economics. It is not only suitable for students with an interest in the field, it is also highly rec- mended for academic researchers as well as the researchers in the industry. The book focuses on the contemporary empirical techniques used in the analysis of financial markets and how these are implemented using actual market data. With an emphasis on Implementation, this book helps foc- ing on strategies for rigorously combing finance theory and modeling technology to extend extant considerations in the literature. The main aim of this book is to equip the readers with an array of tools and techniques that will allow them to explore financial market problems with a fresh perspective. In this sense it is not another volume in eco- metrics. Of course, the traditional econometric methods are still valid and important; the contents of this book will bring in other related modeling topics tha...

  14. Financing energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kariwara, Y.

    1990-01-01

    The 1990s is likely to be a decade of double growth: in energy demand and environmental protection. This leads the author of this paper to ask the pertinent questions of where the money will come from, and in what form, to finance the growth in capacity to produce this energy and the technology required to produce and burn it cleanly. With a focus on Asian energy markets, this paper first illustrates the problem by describing the rapid growth of energy demand in the region. It describes the growth in Japan as well as China and the fast-growing economies of Hong Kong, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand. Energy demand growth rates of almost 5 percent in the 1980s are expected to continue to grow at that rate at least until 2005, doubling today's level of consumption and putting the energy supply system under great strain. Because of the large sums involved, this paper pints out the necessity of inventing new, innovative devices for future fund raising. This will require the participation of institutions such as insurance companies and regional banks that have little experience in the energy field. This paper suggests that these and the established players in energy finance will have recourse to two new approaches: Build-Operate-Transfer and Trustee Borrowing schemes

  15. Financing wind energy projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blom, P.

    1996-01-01

    Triodos Bank has more than 10 years of experience with developing and financing wind projects in the Netherlands. Over 50 Megawatt has been installed with direct involvement of the bank. The experience is both as a bank and as a venture capital fund. In this contribution the perspective will be more from a venture capital point of view than as a bank. The bank's activities in the wind energy sector started in 1986 by forming a joint venture with an engineering bureau, experienced i wind energy but not yet in developing wind projects. From 1989 onwards the joint venture started to build wind farms, both as a private company and in a joint venture with utilities. The European Investment Bank became involved with a long-term debt finance facility (15 years, fixed interest loan). The main difficulties were long-term commitments from landowners (Dike authorities) and utilities with regard to power contracts. The development got really stuck when utilities refused to pay a fair price anymore. Also, site development became more and more difficult. Even the poor technical performance improved drastically and did not frighten developers and banks too much. (author)

  16. Asset Pricing Implications of Firms' Financing Constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Joao F; Yaron, Amir; Zhang, Lu

    2002-01-01

    We incorporate costly external finance in a production based asset pricing model and investigate whether financing frictions are quantitatively important for pricing a cross-section of expected returns. We show that the common assumptions about the nature of the financing frictions are captured by a simple ‘financing cost’ function, equal to the product of the financing premium and the amount of external finance. This approach provides a tractable framework to examine the role of financing fr...

  17. Radiological hazards of TENORM in precipitated calcium carbonate generated as waste at nitrophosphate fertilizer plant in Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javied, Sabiha, E-mail: sabihajavied@yahoo.com [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Nilore 45650, Islamabad (Pakistan); Akhtar, Nasim [Nuclear Institute for Agriculture and Biology (NIAB), Jhang Road, Faisalabad (Pakistan); Tufail, M. [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Nilore 45650, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} NORM (naturally occurring radioactive material) in phosphate rock (PR) is converted to TENORM (technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material) as a result of chemical processing of the PR to make phosphate fertilizers. {yields} Precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) is generated as process waste during nitrophosphate fertilizer production, which contains TENORM. {yields} Activity concentration of the radionuclide in the TENORM was measured using gamma spectrometry and radiological hazard was derived from the measured activities. {yields} Radiological pollution in the environment from TENORM in the PCC has been addressed. {yields} Restricted application of the PCC dose not pose a significant radiological hazard. -- Abstract: The NORM (naturally occurring radioactive material) in phosphate rock is transferred as TENORM (technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material) to phosphatic fertilizers and to the waste generated by the chemical processes. The waste generated at the NP (nitrophosphate) fertilizer plant at Multan in Pakistan is PCC (precipitated calcium carbonate). Thirty samples of the PCC were collected from the heaps of the waste near the fertilizer plant. Activity concentrations of radionuclides in the waste samples were measured by using the technique of gamma ray spectrometry consisting of coaxial type HPGe (high purity germanium) detector coupled with a PC (personal computer) based MCA (multichannel analyzer) through a spectroscopy amplifier. Activity concentrations of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K in the waste samples were determined to be 273 {+-} 23 (173-398), 32 {+-} 4 (26-39) and 56 {+-} 5 (46-66) Bq kg{sup -1} respectively. The activity concentration of {sup 226}Ra in the PCC waste was found to be higher than that in naturally occurring calcium carbonate (limestone and marble) and in worldwide soil. Radiological hazard was estimated from indoor and outdoor exposure to gamma rays from

  18. Financing of nuclear power projects in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    This document is a summary of the ''Topical Seminar on Financing of Nuclear Power Projects in Developing Countries, held in Jakarta between 4-7 September, 1990. The seminar presentations were divided into the following sessions: Keynote session (3 papers), Perspective of Nuclear and Fossil-fired Generation Costs (9 papers), Assessment of Problems and Constraints for the Financing of Large Power Projects, with particular Attention to Nuclear Power Projects (9 papers), Mechanisms for Financing Nuclear Power Projects in Developing Countries (11 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs, tabs and charts

  19. Generation of nitric oxide from nitrite by carbonic anhydrase: a possible link between metabolic activity and vasodilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aamand, Rasmus; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Jensen, Frank Bo

    2009-01-01

    In catalyzing the reversible hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate and protons, the ubiquitous enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) plays a crucial role in CO2 transport, in acid-base balance, and in linking local acidosis to O2 unloading from hemoglobin. Considering the structural similarity between...... bicarbonate and nitrite, we hypothesized that CA uses nitrite as a substrate to produce the potent vasodilator nitric oxide (NO) to increase local blood flow to metabolically active tissues. Here we show that CA readily reacts with nitrite to generate NO, particularly at low pH, and that the NO produced...

  20. Assesment of Carbon Credits for Power Generation Systems at GSM Base Station Site

    OpenAIRE

    Ani, Vincent Anayochukwu; Ani, Emmanuel Onyeka

    2016-01-01

    Electricity production is often a source of CO2 emissions, for instance when fossil fuel is combusted in power plants. Therefore the root cause of pollution coming from telecommunication industry is the source of energy (diesel genset) the network operators used in running their Base station sites. Energy consumption of using diesel to power base station by telecom networks is a contributor to global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This paper presents the comparative carbon credits of hybrid ...

  1. Comparative Analysis of Pine Needles and Coal for Electricity Generation using Carbon Taxation and Emission Reductions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaundiyal Alok

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitigating global climate change via emission control and taxation is promising for strengthening the economic benefits of bioenergy generation and utilization. This study examines the cost effectiveness of pine needles as an alternative fuel for off-grid electricity generation in India. We first examined the changes of prices in coal for electricity generation due to CO2 emission reductions and taxes using experimental data of gasification plants. The time value of money and depreciation scale were used to find out the real levellized cost of electricity generation of gasification plants. Then, the costs of electricity generation fuelled by pine needles and coal were estimated using the cost analysis method. Our results indicate that pine needles would have more competitive edge than coal if emission had taxed at about an emission tax INR 525.15 Mg-1 of CO2 (US$ 8.4, or higher would be needed for pine needles at a yield of 202.176 dry Mg hm-2 yr. The price of coal used for electricity generation would have significantly increased if global CO2 emission had abridged by 20% or more. However, pine needles were found a much better fuel source with an increasing yield of 5.05 Mg hm-2 yr (with respect to power generation and 2.335 Mg hm-2 yr (with respect to feedstock production.

  2. The rates and financing of electric sector expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiganer, L.; Coutinho, L.H.S.A.; Dias, L.E.N.; Silva Pegado, P.A. da; Foletto, N.S.; Guerreiro, A.G.

    1993-01-01

    The current economic and political crisis of Brazilian society reach the several productive sectors that compose the national economy, and among them the electric sector. An adequate rate policy, new ways of getting resources to its financing, costs reduction, and the increase of internal generation of resources, are the objective of this work, that evaluates and evidences these questions in order to their repercussion in financing of electric sector expansion. (C.M.)

  3. Project of the borehole neutron generator for the direct determination of oxygen and carbon by activation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanovich, B. Yu; Vovchenko, E. D.; Iliinskiy, A. V.; Isaev, A. A.; Kozlovskiy, K. I.; Nesterovich, A. V.; Senyukov, V. A.; Shikanov, A. E.

    2016-09-01

    The paper deals with application features of borehole neutron generator (BNG) based on the vacuum accelerating tube (AT) with laser-plasma ion source for determination of oxygen isotope 16O and carbon isotope 12C by direct activation. The project of pulsed BNG for realization of an activation method in the conditions of natural presence of productive hydrocarbons is offered. The diode system with radial acceleration, magnetic electron insulation and laser-plasma source of deuterons at the anode in a sealed-off vacuum accelerating tube is applied. The permanent NdFeB magnet with induction about 0.5 T for produce the insulating magnetic field in the diode gap is proposed. In the experiments on the model of BNG with the accelerating voltage source (≈350 kV), performed by the scheme of Arkadiev-Marx generator, the output of (d, d) neutrons was ∼107 pulse-1.

  4. Non-Darcy flow of water-based carbon nanotubes with nonlinear radiation and heat generation/absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hayat

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Here modeling and computations are presented to introduce the novel concept of Darcy-Forchheimer three-dimensional flow of water-based carbon nanotubes with nonlinear thermal radiation and heat generation/absorption. Bidirectional stretching surface induces the flow. Darcy’s law is commonly replace by Forchheimer relation. Xue model is implemented for nonliquid transport mechanism. Nonlinear formulation based upon conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy is first modeled and then solved by optimal homotopy analysis technique. Optimal estimations of auxiliary variables are obtained. Importance of influential variables on the velocity and thermal fields is interpreted graphically. Moreover velocity and temperature gradients are discussed and analyzed. Physical interpretation of influential variables is examined. Keywords: Porous medium, Heat generation/absorption, SWCNTs and MWCNTs, Nonlinear radiation

  5. FINANCING CAPACITY, AN INDICATOR OF SELF FINANCING FOR COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodor Hada

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the introduction of this paper the research objectives are presented on a case study, the research method, as well as the literature in the field and the novelty of this study. Furthermore, several aspects on the source of information for determining intermediate management balances are covered. In the third part of the study the indicator of self-financing capacity of companies is determined. The correlation between the self-financing capacity and term debts are shown in the fourth part and the fifth part of this study presents some aspects regarding global self-financing, maintaining self-financing, net self-financing, and finally the results of the study are presented.

  6. Demonstration using EPR spin-trapping of an oxygen-dependent, carbon-centered free radical generated by soybean lipoxygenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, M.F.; Smith, F.L.

    1986-01-01

    Purified prostaglandin synthase produces a carbon-centered, oxygen-dependent free radical which they have shown forms a spin-trapped adduct with 4-POBN and has characteristic hyperfine spin coupling constants (hfsc). As production of this radical is cyclooxygenase-dependent, additional studies on radical production were done using soybean lipoxygenase. The latter generates a lipid substrate-derived free radical trapped by the EPR spin trap 4-POBN [α-(4-pyridyl 1-oxide)N-tert-butyl nitrone]. With linoleate as substrate, the hfsc are a/sub N/ = 15.5 G, a/sub β//sup H/ = 2.7 G. This signal is inhibited by ETYA, various antioxidants and heat inactivation of the enzyme. Additional hfsc are not seen when the enzyme is incubated in an 17 O 2 atmosphere, but the signal is inhibited by anaerobeosis. Substitution of 13 C 18 carbon free fatty acids from Chlorella pyrenoisdosa for linoleate produces 2 new lines for each of the original 6 observed with 12 C substrate; the new spectrum has hfsc of a/sub N/ = 16.0 G, a/sub β//sup H/ = 2.4 G, a/sub β/ 13 C = 4.2 G. This demonstrates that the radical is carbon centered and oxygen-dependent and appears not to be the same radical formed by enzymic hydrogen abstraction from the lipid substrate. This radical and the prostaglandin synthase-dependent radical appear to be nearly identical

  7. Financing electricity expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyman, L.S.

    1994-01-01

    Expansion of electricity supply is associated with economic development. The installation and enlargement of power systems in developing countries entails a huge financial burden, however. Energy consumers in such countries must pay not only for supplies but for the cost of raising the capital for expansion on the international markets. Estimates are presented for the capital expenditure for electricity supply over the period 1990 to 2020 for the major world regions, using approximations for the cost of plant and capital and for the returns earned. These data lead to the conclusion that the five regions with the lowest per capita incomes are those which will need the major part of the capital expenditure and the highest percentage of external finance. (6 tables) (UK)

  8. Applied quantitative finance

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Cathy; Overbeck, Ludger

    2017-01-01

    This volume provides practical solutions and introduces recent theoretical developments in risk management, pricing of credit derivatives, quantification of volatility and copula modeling. This third edition is devoted to modern risk analysis based on quantitative methods and textual analytics to meet the current challenges in banking and finance. It includes 14 new contributions and presents a comprehensive, state-of-the-art treatment of cutting-edge methods and topics, such as collateralized debt obligations, the high-frequency analysis of market liquidity, and realized volatility. The book is divided into three parts: Part 1 revisits important market risk issues, while Part 2 introduces novel concepts in credit risk and its management along with updated quantitative methods. The third part discusses the dynamics of risk management and includes risk analysis of energy markets and for cryptocurrencies. Digital assets, such as blockchain-based currencies, have become popular b ut are theoretically challenging...

  9. Romanian SMEs Financing Options:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan E. Nistor

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the most pressing problems faced by micro, small and medium sized enterprises (henceforth SMEs in Europe is the access to sufficient funds to sustain their long term growth. Romanian SMEs make no exception. In this context the present paper focuses on analyzing the extent to which external funding sources have contributed to the value added created by the Romanian SMEs between 2007 and 2011.The investigation’s results indicate the existence of a causal link between some forms of external financing (namely bank loans, leasing, factoring, guarantee products and European funds and the value added created by the Romanian micro, small and medium sized enterprises in the aforementioned period.

  10. Does literacy improve finance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Martha; Olen, Helaine

    2015-04-01

    When economists ask questions about basic financial principles, most ordinary people answer incorrectly. Economic experts call this condition "financial illiteracy," which suggests that poor financial outcomes are due to a personal deficit of reading-related skills. The analogy to reading is compelling because it suggests that we can teach our way out of population-wide financial failure. In this comment, we explain why the idea of literacy appeals to policy makers in the advanced industrial nations. But we also show that the narrow skill set laid out by economists does not satisfy the politically inclusive definition of literacy that literacy studies fought for. We identify several channels through which people engage with ideas about finance and demonstrate that not all forms of literacy will lead people to the educational content prescribed by academic economists. We argue that truly financial literate people can defy the demands of financial theory and financial institutions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Financing children's vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E Anthony S; Sack, David; Wolfson, Lara; Walker, Damian G; Seng, Lim Fong; Steele, Duncan

    2009-11-20

    A 2006 Commonwealth Association of Paediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition workshop on financing children's vaccines highlighted the potential for vaccines to control diarrhoea and other diseases as well as spur economic development through better health. Clear communication of vaccination value to decision-makers is required, together with sustainable funding mechanisms. GAVI and partners have made great progress providing funding for vaccines for children in the poorest countries but other solutions may be required to achieve the same gains in middle- and high-income countries. World Health Organization has a wealth of freely available country-level data on immunisation that academics and advocates can use to communicate the economic and health benefits of vaccines to decision-makers.

  12. Financing wind projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manson, J.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation reviewed some of the partnership opportunities available from GE Energy. GE Energy's ecomagination commitment has promised to double research investment, make customers true partners and reduce greenhouse gases (GHGs). GE Energy's renewable energy team provides a broad range of financial products, and has recently funded 30 wind farms and 2 large solar projects. The company has a diverse portfolio of technology providers and wind regimes, and is increasing their investment in technology. GE Energy recognizes that the wind industry is growing rapidly and has received increased regulatory support that is backed by strong policy and public support. It is expected that Canada will have 3006 wind projects either planned or under construction by 2007. According to GE Energy, successful wind financing is dependent on the location of the site and its wind resources, as well as on the wind developer's power sales agreement. The success of a wind project is also determined by clear financing goals. Site-specific data is needed to determine the quality of wind resource, and off-site data can also be used to provide validation. Proximity to load centres will help to minimize capital costs. Power sales agreements should be based on the project's realistic net capacity factor as well as on the cost of the turbines. The economics of many wind farms is driven by the size of the turbines used. Public consultations are also needed to ensure the success of wind power projects. It was concluded that a good partner will have staying power in the wind power industry, and will understand the time-lines and needs that are peculiar to wind energy developers. refs., tabs., figs

  13. Building the Next Generation of Earth Scientists: the Deep Carbon Observatory Early Career Scientist Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, K.; Fellowes, J.; Giovannelli, D.; Stagno, V.

    2016-12-01

    Building a network of collaborators and colleagues is a key professional development activity for early career scientists (ECS) dealing with a challenging job market. At large conferences, young scientists often focus on interacting with senior researchers, competing for a small number of positions in leading laboratories. However, building a strong, international network amongst their peers in related disciplines is often as valuable in the long run. The Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) began funding a series of workshops in 2014 designed to connect early career researchers within its extensive network of multidisciplinary scientists. The workshops, by design, are by and for early career scientists, thus removing any element of competition and focusing on peer-to-peer networking, collaboration, and creativity. The successful workshops, organized by committees of early career deep carbon scientists, have nucleated a lively community of like-minded individuals from around the world. Indeed, the organizers themselves often benefit greatly from the leadership experience of pulling together an international workshop on budget and on deadline. We have found that a combination of presentations from all participants in classroom sessions, professional development training such as communication and data management, and field-based relationship building and networking is a recipe for success. Small groups within the DCO ECS network have formed; publishing papers together, forging new research directions, and planning novel and ambitious field campaigns. Many DCO ECS also have come together to convene sessions at major international conferences, including the AGU Fall Meeting. Most of all, there is a broad sense of camaraderie and accessibility within the DCO ECS Community, providing the foundation for a career in the new, international, and interdisciplinary field of deep carbon science.

  14. p-doped multiwall carbon nanotube/perylene diimide derivative photoelectrochemical cells for photocurrent generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troeger, Anna; Ledendecker, Marc; Margraf, Johannes T.; Sgobba, Vito; Guldi, Dirk M. [Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy and Interdisciplinary Center for Molecular Materials, Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Vieweg, Benito F.; Spiecker, Erdmann [Center for Nanoanalysis and Electron Microscopy (CENEM) and Department Werkstoffwissenschaften/VII, Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Suraru, Sabin-Lucian; Wuerthner, Frank [Institut fuer Organische Chemie and Roentgen Research Center for Complex Material Systems, Universitaet Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    A perylene diimide (PDI) derivative bearing four chlorine substituents in the bay area is deposited together with pristine multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and/or Nafion p-doped MWNTs (p-MWNTs) onto indium tin oxide (ITO) solid substrates by means of air-brushing. The resulting photoanodes are studied in photoelectrochemical cells and reveal highest photocurrent efficiencies when PDI and p-MWNT are combined as photoactive materials, indicating the beneficial effect of Nafion. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Mastering R for quantitative finance

    CERN Document Server

    Berlinger, Edina; Badics, Milán; Banai, Ádám; Daróczi, Gergely; Dömötör, Barbara; Gabler, Gergely; Havran, Dániel; Juhász, Péter; Margitai, István; Márkus, Balázs; Medvegyev, Péter; Molnár, Julia; Szucs, Balázs Árpád; Tuza, Ágnes; Vadász, Tamás; Váradi, Kata; Vidovics-Dancs, Ágnes

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended for those who want to learn how to use R's capabilities to build models in quantitative finance at a more advanced level. If you wish to perfectly take up the rhythm of the chapters, you need to be at an intermediate level in quantitative finance and you also need to have a reasonable knowledge of R.

  16. Accounting & Finance; a Basic Introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    drs. Ewoud Jansen

    2011-01-01

    The book is about finance and accounting, subjects widely discussed in many other books. What sets this book apart from most others is that it discusses all the basic aspects of finance and accounting in one single textbook. Three areas of interest are discussed: Financial Management; Management

  17. Public Finance Administration. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, B. J.; Swain, John W.

    This book is intended for the nonexpert in finance who has a public administration background. It opens with a broad introduction to public finance administration and how this job is related to public budgeting, the practice of public-sector accounting, and the economic concepts of money and value. Issues surrounding public revenue, its sources,…

  18. Financing bidders in takeover contests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vladimirov, V.

    2015-01-01

    This paper argues that endogenizing how acquirers finance their cash bids is just as important for understanding bidding in takeovers as endogenizing acquirers' payment method choice. The paper shows that acquirers finance their cash bids with equity only if they lack access to competitive

  19. Paiton II financing locked up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    The 2 x 610 MW Paiton II coal-fired independent power project in Indonesia became a reality last week with the completion of a 1.36 billion dollars commercial financing for the 1.65 billion dollar undertaking. Details of the financing are given. A table lists Indonesia`s independent power projects and their current status.

  20. Clean air and project financing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmer, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    This article examines how environmental requirements are challenging the developers ability to secure financing for independent energy projects. The topics addressed in the article include a review of the US Environmental Protection Agency auction rules for acid rain emission allowances, short term and long term market demand, project financing issues, credit value and matching interests

  1. Default risk in project finance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klompjan, R.; Wouters, Marc

    2002-01-01

    Understanding default risk in project finance is relevant to investors. This article investigates which factors are most strongly associated with the occurrence of project finance default, using data from 210 projects, of which 37 were in default. The authors found that the use of proven technology,

  2. The Possibilities of Strategic Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffee, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Strategic finance is aligning financial decisions--regarding revenues, creating and maintaining institutional assets, and using those assets--with the institution's mission and strategic plan. The concept known as "strategic finance" increasingly is being seen as a useful perspective for helping boards and presidents develop a sustainable…

  3. Family control and financing decisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croci, Ettore; Doukas, John A.; Gonenc, Halit

    2011-01-01

    This study uses a comprehensive European dataset to investigate the role of family control in corporate financing decisions during the period 1998-2008. We find that family firms have a preference for debt financing, a non-control-diluting security, and are more reluctant than non-family firms to

  4. Barriers to the Transfer of Low-carbon Electricity Generation Technologies in Four Latin American Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desgain, Denis DR; Haselip, James Arthur

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the conclusions of four national Technology Needs Assessment (TNA) processes in Latin America (2011-2013), as applied to the electricity sector. The primary focus is on the financial and economic barriers identified by countries to the transfer of prioritized low-carbon ene......This article discusses the conclusions of four national Technology Needs Assessment (TNA) processes in Latin America (2011-2013), as applied to the electricity sector. The primary focus is on the financial and economic barriers identified by countries to the transfer of prioritized low......-carbon energy technologies. While many electricity markets in Latin America were liberalized during the 1990s and 2000s, such market-driven reform policies were far from uniform and in reality there exist a diversity of governance frameworks for national electricity markets, exemplified here by Argentina, Cuba...... to the debate about the relationship between financial and economic barriers to technology transfer and electricity market structures, based on a new round of country-driven priorities and analysis, in support of the UNFCCC process on climate change mitigation....

  5. Anion-Regulated Selective Generation of Cobalt Sites in Carbon: Toward Superior Bifunctional Electrocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Gang [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Ding-xi Road Shanghai 200050 P. R. China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 P. R. China; Yang, Ce [Chemical Science and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 Cass Avenue Lemont IL 60439 USA; Zhao, Wanpeng [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Ding-xi Road Shanghai 200050 P. R. China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 P. R. China; Li, Qianru [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Ding-xi Road Shanghai 200050 P. R. China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 P. R. China; Wang, Ning [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Ding-xi Road Shanghai 200050 P. R. China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 P. R. China; Li, Tao [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 Cass Avenue Lemont IL 60439 USA; Zhou, Hua [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 Cass Avenue Lemont IL 60439 USA; Chen, Hangrong [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Ding-xi Road Shanghai 200050 P. R. China; Shi, Jianlin [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Ding-xi Road Shanghai 200050 P. R. China

    2017-11-06

    The introduction of active transition metal sites (TMSs) in carbon enables the synthesis of noble-metal-free electrocatalysts for clean energy conversion applications, however, there are often multiple existing forms of TMSs, which are of different natures and catalytic models. Regulating the evolution of distinctive TMSs is highly desirable but remains challenging to date. Anions, as essential elements involved in the synthesis, have been totally neglected previously in the construction of TMSs. Herein, the effects of anions on the creation of different types of TMSs is investigated for the first time. It is found that the active cobalt-nitrogen sites tend to be selectively constructed on the surface of N-doped carbon by using chloride, while metallic cobalt nanoparticles encased in protective graphite layers are the dominant forms of cobalt species with nitrate ions. The obtained catalysts demonstrate cobalt-sites-dependent activity for ORR and HER in acidic media. And the remarkably enhanced catalytic activities approaching that of benchmark Pt/C in acidic medium has been obtained on the catalyst dominated with cobalt-nitrogen sites, confirmed by the advanced spectroscopic . Our finding demonstrates a general paradigm of anion-regulated evolution of distinctive TMSs, providing a new pathway for enhancing performances of various targeted reactions related with TMSs.

  6. Statistics and finance an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Ruppert, David

    2004-01-01

    This textbook emphasizes the applications of statistics and probability to finance. Students are assumed to have had a prior course in statistics, but no background in finance or economics. The basics of probability and statistics are reviewed and more advanced topics in statistics, such as regression, ARMA and GARCH models, the bootstrap, and nonparametric regression using splines, are introduced as needed. The book covers the classical methods of finance such as portfolio theory, CAPM, and the Black-Scholes formula, and it introduces the somewhat newer area of behavioral finance. Applications and use of MATLAB and SAS software are stressed. The book will serve as a text in courses aimed at advanced undergraduates and masters students in statistics, engineering, and applied mathematics as well as quantitatively oriented MBA students. Those in the finance industry wishing to know more statistics could also use it for self-study. David Ruppert is the Andrew Schultz, Jr. Professor of Engineering, School of Oper...

  7. Capital financing in prospective payment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oszustowicz, R J; Dreachslin, J L

    1984-03-01

    In the era of prospective payment, arranging financing for hospital capital projects is expected to become even more complicated than under cost-based reimbursement systems. This article outlines the information needed for a bond issue in the prospective payment environment, defines the roles and duties of several external persons and organizations involved with planning a major capital financing, and provides an overview of the entire process. This article assumes for illustrative purposes that a tax-exempt bond issue is going to be used to finance a facility expansion. This method was chosen since over 70% of all major capital financing for hospitals use the tax-exempt bond as the principal vehicle for attracting the necessary debt to finance a major construction project. The tax-exempt bond issue also requires the most detail in documentation and legal provisions.

  8. Contributions of past and present human generations to committed warming caused by carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlingstein, Pierre; Solomon, Susan

    2005-08-02

    We developed a highly simplified approach to estimate the contributions of the past and present human generations to the increase of atmospheric CO(2) and associated global average temperature increases. For each human generation of adopted 25-year length, we use simplified emission test cases to estimate the committed warming passed to successive children, grandchildren, and later generations. We estimate that the last and the current generation contributed approximately two thirds of the present-day CO(2)-induced warming. Because of the long time scale required for removal of CO(2) from the atmosphere as well as the time delays characteristic of physical responses of the climate system, global mean temperatures are expected to increase by several tenths of a degree for at least the next 20 years even if CO(2) emissions were immediately cut to zero; that is, there is a commitment to additional CO(2)-induced warming even in the absence of emissions. If the rate of increase of CO(2) emissions were to continue up to 2025 and then were cut to zero, a temperature increase of approximately 1.3 degrees C compared to preindustrial conditions would still occur in 2100, whereas a constant-CO(2)-emissions scenario after 2025 would more than double the 2100 warming. These calculations illustrate the manner in which each generation inherits substantial climate change caused by CO(2) emissions that occurred previously, particularly those of their parents, and shows that current CO(2) emissions will contribute significantly to the climate change of future generations.

  9. Multi-criteria Generation-Expansion Planning with Carbon dioxide emissions and Nuclear Safety considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hun Gyu; Kim, Young Chang

    2010-01-01

    A multiple criteria decision making (MCDM) method is developed to aid decision makers in Generation Expansion planning and management. Traditionally, the prime objective of an electric utility's generation-expansion planning has been to determine the minimum cost supply plans that meet expected demands over a planning horizon (typically 10 to 30 years). Today, however, the nature of decision environments has changed substantially. Increased policy attention is given to solve the multiple tradeoff function including environmental and social factors as well as economic one related to nuclear power expansion. In order to deal with this MCDM problem, the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) Model is applied

  10. The Fundamental Equation in Tourism Finance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael McAleer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to present the fundamental equation in tourism finance that connects tourism research to empirical finance and financial econometrics. The energy industry, which includes, oil, gas and bio-energy fuels, together with the tourism industry, are two of the most important industries in the world today in terms of employment and generating income. The primary purpose in attracting domestic and international tourists to a country, region or city is to maximize tourism expenditure. The paper will concentrate on daily tourism expenditure, regardless of whether such data might be readily available. If such data are not available, a practical method is presented to calculate the appropriate data.

  11. The Effects of Financing on Enterprise Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta BARBUTA-MISU

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we are proposing to approach a theme very topical in our country: choose of the most profitable and comfortable sources of financing. The major objective of research in this work is the foundation of essential decisions in the enterprise activitythat faces one of the most pressing problems: the search for a reliable source of funding. This foundation is based on the compared calculation to a series of financial indicators. Also, we are reflecting the impact of the operational leasing compared to the banking credit on the enterprise's financial situation, assessing the financial indicators, static and in dynamics by discounting of the financial flows generated, and choice of financing source considered the best and most advantageous to the enterprise “SCENT”. In theend of the paper are presented synthetic the main conclusions drawn from the analysis, related on operational leasing and its benefits and limits compared with the banking loan.

  12. Financing drug discovery via dynamic leverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazerhodjat, Vahid; Frishkopf, John J; Lo, Andrew W

    2016-03-01

    We extend the megafund concept for funding drug discovery to enable dynamic leverage in which the portfolio of candidate therapeutic assets is predominantly financed initially by equity, and debt is introduced gradually as assets mature and begin generating cash flows. Leverage is adjusted so as to maintain an approximately constant level of default risk throughout the life of the fund. Numerical simulations show that applying dynamic leverage to a small portfolio of orphan drug candidates can boost the return on equity almost twofold compared with securitization with a static capital structure. Dynamic leverage can also add significant value to comparable all-equity-financed portfolios, enhancing the return on equity without jeopardizing debt performance or increasing risk to equity investors. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Catalytic hydrolysis of ammonia borane for hydrogen generation using cobalt nanocluster catalyst supported on polydopamine functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, Ernest Evans; Li, Fang; Momade, Francis W.Y.; Kim, Hern

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen was generated from ammonia borane complex by hydrolysis using cobalt nanocluster catalyst supported on polydopamine functionalized MWCNTs (multi-walled carbon nanotubes). The impregnation-chemical reduction method was used for the preparation of the supported catalyst. The nanocluster catalyst support was formed by in-situ oxidative polymerization of dopamine on the MWCNTs in alkaline solution at room temperature. The structural and physical–chemical properties of the nanocluster catalyst were characterized by FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), EDX (energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy), SEM (scanning electron microscope), XRD (X-ray diffraction) and TEM (transmission electron microscopy). The nanocluster catalyst showed good catalytic activity for the hydrogen generation from aqueous ammonia borane complex. A reusability test to determine the practical usage of the catalyst was also investigated. The result revealed that the catalyst maintained an appreciable catalytic performance and stability in terms of its reusability after three cycle of reuse for the hydrolysis reaction. Also, the activation energy for the hydrolysis of ammonia borane complex was estimated to be 50.41 kJmol −1 , which is lower than the values of some of the reported catalyst. The catalyst can be considered as a promising candidate in developing highly efficient portable hydrogen generation systems such as PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cells). - Highlights: • Co/Pdop-o-MWCNT (Pdop functionalized MWCNT supported cobalt nanocluster) catalyst was synthesized for hydrogen generation. • It is an active catalyst for hydrogen generation via hydrolysis of ammonia borane. • It showed good stability in terms of reusability for the hydrogen generation

  14. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage: Annual Report FY09

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolery, T; Aines, R; Hao, Y; Bourcier, W; Wolfe, T; Haussman, C

    2009-11-25

    This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF). The aquifer pressure resulting from the energy required to inject the carbon dioxide provides all or part of the inlet pressure for the desalination system. Residual brine is reinjected into the formation at net volume reduction, such that the volume of fresh water extracted balances the volume of CO{sub 2} injected into the formation. This process provides additional CO{sub 2} storage capacity in the aquifer, reduces operational risks (cap-rock fracturing, contamination of neighboring fresh water aquifers, and seismicity) by relieving overpressure in the formation, and provides a source of low-cost fresh water to offset costs or operational water needs. This multi-faceted project combines elements of geochemistry, reservoir engineering, and water treatment engineering. The range of saline formation waters is being identified and analyzed. Computer modeling and laboratory-scale experimentation are being used to examine mineral scaling and osmotic pressure limitations. Computer modeling is being used to evaluate processes in the storage aquifer, including the evolution of the pressure field. Water treatment costs are being evaluated by comparing the necessary process facilities to those in common use for seawater RO. There are presently limited brine composition data available for actual CCS sites by the site operators including in the U.S. the seven regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (CSPs). To work around this, we are building a 'catalog' of compositions representative of 'produced' waters (waters produced in the course of seeking or producing oil and gas), to which we are adding data from actual CCS sites as they become available. Produced waters comprise the most common

  15. Financing schemes increasing energy efficiency and renewable energy use in public and private buildings. Comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-03-01

    What are the solutions to the municipal budget cuts? How can the cities finance their energy transition? What can we do to make it a driving force to boost the local economy and job creation? What are the new financial cash flows for this new economy? One of the solutions is to rethink financing solutions, and the local authorities that are engaged in energy transition are the best placed to do so. Many cities have voluntarily committed to reducing CO_2 emissions on their territories, notably by increasing energy efficiency and the use of renewable energy sources. Nearly 6,500 cities are committed to the objective to meet and exceed the European Union 20% CO_2 reduction objective by 2020. They have already developed their Baseline Emissions Inventories and Sustainable Energy Action Plans and thus are well aware of the energy flows on their territories, energy saving potential and the cost-effectiveness of the planned measures. The next step is to secure their financing sources and here both the private and public sector play a key role. Governments at all levels (European, national, regional and local), financial institutions, businesses, citizens and other local stakeholders should channel part of their funds to measures that help achieving our common energy and climate goals. Local authorities' role is to motivate and coordinate players on their territory. For its part, the European Union increased the amount allocated to energy efficiency and renewable energy projects in its 2014-2020 budget, giving a signal that a shift towards a low carbon economy is one of its top priorities. This could be a significant boost for local energy transition. However, the European Commission also announced that the EU budget should be spent in a more sustainable way and announced a progressive move from grants to loans and innovative financial instruments, in particular for projects that are viable on the current market. Many front-running Covenant signatories dedicate their human

  16. From public to private climate change adaptation finance : Adapting finance or financing adaptation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pauw, W.P.

    2017-01-01

    Private financing is the latest mark of the privatisation of global governance. The implementation of international agreements in the fields of environment, climate change and development has always been supported by public finance from developed countries. This tradition is broken by a

  17. Carbon Nanotube Enhanced Aerospace Composite Materials A New Generation of Multifunctional Hybrid Structural Composites

    CERN Document Server

    Kostopoulos, V

    2013-01-01

    The well documented increase in the use of high performance composites as structural materials in aerospace components is continuously raising the demands in terms of dynamic performance, structural integrity, reliable life monitoring systems and adaptive actuating abilities. Current technologies address the above issues separately; material property tailoring and custom design practices aim to the enhancement of dynamic and damage tolerance characteristics, whereas life monitoring and actuation is performed with embedded sensors that may be detrimental to the structural integrity of the component. This publication explores the unique properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT) as an additive in the matrix of Fibre Reinforced Plastics (FRP), for producing structural composites with improved mechanical performance as well as sensing/actuating capabilities. The successful combination of the CNT properties and existing sensing actuating technologies leads to the realization of a multifunctional FRP structure. The curre...

  18. Financing Solar Thermal Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kistner, Rainer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Price, Henry W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    1999-04-14

    The commercialization of concentrating solar power technology took a major step forward in the mid 1980s and early 1990s with the development of the SEGS plants in California. Over the years they have proven that parabolic trough power technologies are the most cost-effective approach for commercial scale solar power generation in the sunbelt countries of the world. However, the question must be asked why no additional solar power plants have been build following the bankruptcy of the developer of the SEGS projects, LUZ International Limited. Although many believe the SEGS projects were a success as a result of parabolic trough technology they employ, in truth, the SEGS projects were developed simply because they represented an attractive opportunity for investors. Simply stated, no additional projects have been developed because no one has been able to put together a similarly attractive financial package to potential investors. More than $1.2 billion in private capital was raised in debt and equity financing for the nine SEGS plants. Investors and bankers who make these investments are the real clients for solar power technologies. They are not interested in annual solar to electric efficiencies, but in risk, return on investments, and coverage ratios. This paper will take a look at solar power projects from the financier’s perspective. The challenge in moving forward is to attract private investors, commercial lenders, and international development agencies and to find innovative solutions to the difficult issues that investment in the global power market poses for solar power technologies.

  19. Financing Solar Thermal Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Henry W.; Kistner, Rainer

    1999-01-01

    The commercialization of concentrating solar power technology took a major step forward in the mid 1980s and early 1990s with the development of the SEGS plants in California. Over the years they have proven that parabolic trough power technologies are the most cost-effective approach for commercial scale solar power generation in the sunbelt countries of the world. However, the question must be asked why no additional solar power plants have been build following the bankruptcy of the developer of the SEGS projects, LUZ International Limited. Although many believe the SEGS projects were a success as a result of parabolic trough technology they employ, in truth, the SEGS projects were developed simply because they represented an attractive opportunity for investors. Simply stated, no additional projects have been developed because no one has been able to put together a similarly attractive financial package to potential investors. More than $1.2 billion in private capital was raised in debt and equity financing for the nine SEGS plants. Investors and bankers who make these investments are the real clients for solar power technologies. They are not interested in annual solar to electric efficiencies, but in risk, return on investments, and coverage ratios. This paper will take a look at solar power projects from the financier's perspective. The challenge in moving forward is to attract private investors, commercial lenders, and international development agencies and to find innovative solutions to the difficult issues that investment in the global power market poses for solar power technologies

  20. Financing solar thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kistner, R.; Price, H.

    1999-01-01

    The commercialization of concentrating solar power technology took a major step forward in the mid 1980s and early 1990s with the development of the SEGS plants in California. Over the years they have proven that parabolic trough power technologies are the most cost-effective approach for commercial scale solar power generation in the sunbelt countries of the world. However, the question must be asked why no additional solar power plants have been built following the bankruptcy of the developer of the SEGS projects, LUZ International Limited. Although many believe the SEGS projects were a success as a result of parabolic trough technology they employ, in truth, the SEGS projects were developed simply because they represented an attractive opportunity for investors. Simply states, no additional projects have been developed because no one has been able to put together a similarly attractive financial package to potential investors. More than $1.2 billion in private capital was raised in debt and equity financing for the nine SEGS plants. Investors and bankers who make these investments are the real clients for solar power technologies. They are not interested in annual solar to electric efficiencies, but in risk, return on investments, and coverage ratios. This paper will take a look at solar power projects form the financier's perspective. The challenge in moving forward is to attract private investors, commercial lenders, and international development agencies and to find innovative solutions to the difficult issues that investment in the global power market poses for solar power technologies

  1. Sharing of risks in Islamic finance

    OpenAIRE

    Sekreter, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    For most of the people the prohibition on interest is the well known part of Islamic finance. Indeed, the concept of Islamic finance was not being discussed enough till financial crisis, after crisis it started to be seen as an alternative financial system for conventional finance. Sharing the risks is the main concept of Islamic finance and one of the main differences between conventional and Islamic finance. Depositors/savers do not bear any risk in conventional finance however Islamic fina...

  2. Financing long term liabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noviello, Luigi

    2003-01-01

    In the '80 even if there were no precise law disposition in this specific matter, Enel has created a fund for the plants decommissioning and a fund for the irradiated fuel management. A setting aside pluri-annual plan has been defined. Cumulated funds transferred to the Sogin at the date of its constitution amount to about 1500 MLD ITL (750 M Euro). This amount was adequate to complete decommissioning activities within the Safe Store strategy. Following the separation of Sogin from Enel, a funding mechanism has been defined to provide resources for additional costs deriving from the different economic conditions (new discount rate and taxes), from the management costs for the new company, and from the change in strategy (from Safe Store to DECON). A Decree of the Ministry of the Industry, issued on 26 January 2000, states that the above mentioned extra costs for Sogin shall be financed on a levy on the price of the sold kWh. Every year Sogin shall present the program of future activities, with associated costs: on this basis, the national Authority for Electric energy and Gas (the national body which defines tariff policy) shall re-evaluate the global amount to be granted to Sogin and the levy on the price of the kWh due to Sogin for next three years. The re-evaluation will take into account economic efficiency criteria. For the period 2002- 2004 the Authority has defined a global amount of about 362 M euros to be granted to Sogin, corresponding to ∼0,04 cents of Euro per kWh. The same procedure is foreseen by the Decree in order to finance Sogin for additional costs related to the dismantling of nuclear installations now property of ENEA. In this context, a Consortium between ENEA and Sogin has been established. The Authority for the period 2002-2004 has defined a global amount of about 106 M euros to be granted to the Consortium, corresponding to ∼0,015 cents of Euro per kWh. (author)

  3. Micropatterned Carbon-on-Quartz Electrode Chips for Photocurrent Generation from Thylakoid Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunea, Ada-Ioana; Heiskanen, Arto R.; Pankratova, Galina

    2018-01-01

    Harvesting the energy generated by photosynthetic organisms through light-dependent reactions is a significant step towards a sustainable future energy supply. Thylakoid membranes are the site of photosynthesis, and thus particularly suited for developing photo-bioelectrochemical cells. Novel ele......]+/2+) are used for evaluating photocurrent generation from thylakoid membranes with different electrode geometries. Current densities up to 71 µA cm-2 are measured upon illumination through the transparent electrode chip with solar simulated irradiance (1000 W m-2)....... electrode materials and geometries could potentially improve the efficiency of energy harvesting using thylakoid membranes. For commercial applications, electrodes with large surface areas are needed. Photolithographic patterning of a photoresist, followed by pyrolysis, is a flexible and fast approach...

  4. Field Assessment of Yeast- and Oxalic Acid-generated Carbon Dioxide for Mosquito Surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    SentinelTM, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention light trap, sugar- fermenting yeast, electrolyzed oxalic acid INTRODUCTION Successful vector-borne...and Eisen 2008). Population data from trap surveil- lance provide key information for the develop- ment of disease risk assessment models (Diuk- Wasser...generated by a fermentation chamber, in which yeast metabolized sucrose. This source had been shown to attract various mosquito species in field and

  5. Potential reduction of carbon dioxide emissions from the use of electric energy storage on a power generation unit/organic Rankine system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mago, Pedro J.; Luck, Rogelio

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A power generation organic Rankine cycle with electric energy storage is evaluated. • The potential carbon dioxide emissions reduction of the system is evaluated. • The system performance is evaluated for a building in different climate zones. • The system emissions and cost are compared with those of conventional systems. • Use of carbon emissions cap and trade programs on the system is evaluated. - Abstract: This paper evaluates the potential carbon dioxide emissions reduction from the implementation of electric energy storage to a combined power generation unit and an organic Rankine cycle relative to a conventional system that uses utility gas for heating and utility electricity for electricity needs. Results indicate that carbon dioxide emission reductions from the operation of the proposed system are directly correlated to the ratio of the carbon dioxide emission conversion factor for electricity to that of the fuel. The location where the system is installed also has a strong influence on the potential of the proposed system to save carbon dioxide emissions. Finally, it is shown that by using carbon emissions cap and trade programs, it is possible to establish a frame of reference to compare/exchange operational cost gains with carbon dioxide emission reductions/gains.

  6. Power project financing in the People's Republic of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomm, R.

    1998-01-01

    The current state of financing and security issues which in the past have constrained the amount of foreign investment and project financing in the electric power market in the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) are reviewed. Past impediments to foreign investment and financing of power projects revolved around the rate of return on investment, the difficulties of obtaining project approvals, conflict of interest issues wherein the Chinese power bureau could act in its interest as a contracted party rather than for the joint venture as an equity investor, and currency convertibility. Recent developments such as the new security law, the new electricity law, and new project financing regulations represent major improvements, but foreign investment and financing is still much less than originally anticipated, the potential of the PRC power market for foreign investments notwithstanding. (For example, in 1997, 13,500 MW of new generation capacity was added to the Chinese grid system. This increased the total installed capacity to 250,000 MW, making China the second largest installed capacity in the world.) Recent trends in the market and the likely future of foreign investment in the PRC are also discussed, the conclusion being that although the size of the IPP and project finance market in China is probably smaller than originally hoped, a sufficient proportion of new generation capacity has been allocated to foreign investors to ensure a steady stream of investment opportunities

  7. Important role of calcium chloride in preventing carbon monoxide generation during desflurane degradation with alkali hydroxide-free carbon dioxide absorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Takahiro; Mori, Atsushi; Ito, Rie; Nishiwaki, Kimitoshi

    2017-12-01

    We investigated whether calcium chloride (CaCl 2 ), a supplementary additive in carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) absorbents, could affect carbon monoxide (CO) production caused by desflurane degradation, using a Japanese alkali-free CO 2 absorbent Yabashi Lime ® -f (YL-f), its CaCl 2 -free and 1% CaCl 2 -added derivatives, and other commercially available alkali-free absorbents with or without CaCl 2 . The reaction between 1 L of desflurane gas (3-10%) and 20 g of desiccated specimen was performed in an artificial closed-circuit anesthesia system for 3 min at 20 or 40 °C. The CO concentration was measured using a gas chromatograph equipped with a semiconductor sensor detector. The systems were validated by detecting dose-dependent CO production with an alkali hydroxide-containing CO 2 absorbent, Sodasorb ® . Compared with YL-f, the CaCl 2 -free derivative caused the production of significantly more CO, while the 1% CaCl 2 -added derivative caused the production of a comparable amount of CO. These phenomena were confirmed using commercially available absorbents AMSORB ® PLUS, an alkali-free absorbent with CaCl 2 , and LoFloSorb™, an alkali-free absorbent without CaCl 2 . These results suggest that CaCl 2 plays an important role in preventing CO generation caused by desflurane degradation with alkali hydroxide-free CO 2 absorbents like YL-f.

  8. Green financing - Are European banks and insurers contributing?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamelgarn, Yona; Blanc, Dominique

    2015-02-01

    The analysis of the public communication of the 32 largest banking and insurance groups led to the following observations. Awareness of the role of the financial sector in the transition to a low-carbon economy has grown since 2012, and companies are increasingly conducting environmental risk analysis. But these practices are more akin to risk management policies - initiated to limit exposure to the most controversial projects - than to real reallocation strategies contributing to the transition to a low-carbon economy. Information on green financing is developing but focuses more on image than on business activities. The companies in the sample are communicating more on their green financing, and in particular on their contribution to renewable energy projects. But the indicators are very heterogeneous, are not monitored over time and cannot be compared between companies. Generally speaking, banks and insurers have not committed to increase their allocations to green financing and fail to discuss the financing of fossil fuels. Information on environmental and social risk management policies is becoming more structured. Process consists in introducing sector-based policies, setting forth minimum standards below which companies do not invest, notably in the energy sector, as well as developing environmental and social (ES) risk analysis tools for transactions. Analyses theoretically encompass the environmental impact of financed activities, but little information exists on the type of criteria used. These practices, developed initially for project finance, have since been extended to other banking activities and, more recently, to insurance activities. Reporting on the environmental impact of financed products remains rudimentary. Over three-quarters of the companies in the sample acknowledge the environmental responsibility stemming from their business activities, but measures continue to focus on the impact of premises and business travel. While almost all the

  9. Molecular characterization of brown carbon (BrC) chromophores in secondary organic aerosol generated from photo-oxidation of toluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Peng; Liu, Jiumeng; Shilling, John E; Kathmann, Shawn M; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2015-09-28

    Atmospheric brown carbon (BrC) is a significant contributor to light absorption and climate forcing. However, little is known about a fundamental relationship between the chemical composition of BrC and its optical properties. In this work, light-absorbing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was generated in the PNNL chamber from toluene photo-oxidation in the presence of NOx (Tol-SOA). Molecular structures of BrC components were examined using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) and liquid chromatography (LC) combined with UV/Vis spectroscopy and electrospray ionization (ESI) high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The chemical composition of BrC chromophores and the light absorption properties of toluene SOA (Tol-SOA) depend strongly on the initial NOx concentration. Specifically, Tol-SOA generated under high-NOx conditions (defined here as initial NOx/toluene of 5/1) appears yellow and mass absorption coefficient of the bulk sample (MACbulk@365 nm = 0.78 m(2) g(-1)) is nearly 80 fold higher than that measured for the Tol-SOA sample generated under low-NOx conditions (NOx/toluene atmosphere.

  10. Computing for Finance

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    The finance sector is one of the driving forces for the use of distributed or Grid computing for business purposes. The speakers will review the state-of-the-art of high performance computing in the financial sector, and provide insight into how different types of Grid computing – from local clusters to global networks - are being applied to financial applications. They will also describe the use of software and techniques from physics, such as Monte Carlo simulations, in the financial world. There will be four talks of 20min each. The talk abstracts and speaker bios are listed below. This will be followed by a Q&A panel session with the speakers. From 19:00 onwards there will be a networking cocktail for audience and speakers. This is an EGEE / CERN openlab event organized in collaboration with the regional business network rezonance.ch. A webcast of the event will be made available for subsequent viewing, along with powerpoint material presented by the speakers. Attendance is free and open to all. R...

  11. Healthcare financing in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevenka Kovač

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare financing system is of crucial importance for the functioning of any healthcare system, especially because there is no country in the world that is able to provide all its residents with access to all the benefits afforded by modern medicine. Lack of resources in general and rising healthcare expenditures are considered a difficult issue to solve in Croatia as well. Since Croatia gained its independence, its healthcare system has undergone a number of reforms, the primary objective of which was to optimize healthcare services to the actual monetary capacity of the Croatian economy. The objectives of the mentioned re - forms were partially achieved. The solutions that have been offered until now, i.e. consolidation measures undertaken in the last 10 years were necessary; however, they have not improved the operating conditions. There is still the issue of the deficit from the previous years, i.e. outstanding payments, the largest in the last decade. Analysis of the performance of healthcare institutions in 2011 shows that the decision makers will have to take up a major challenge of finding a solution to the difficulties the Croatian healthcare system has been struggling with for decades, causing a debt of 7 billion kuna. At the same time, they will need to uphold the basic principles of the Healthcare Act, i.e. to provide access to healthcare and ensure its continuity, comprehensiveness and solidarity, keeping in mind that the National Budget Act and Fiscal Responsibility Act have been adopted.

  12. Behavioural Finance: Theory and Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiva Jurevičienė

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the importance of behavioural finance theories in household decision-making process. Behavioural finance theories investigate emotional characteristics to explain subjective factors and irrational anomalies in financial markets. In this regard, behavioural theories and behavioural anomalies in the decision-making process are examined; the application opportunities in the financial market are described. The aim of investigation is to determine the basic features and slopes of behavioural finance in concordance with financial decisions of a household. The survey method was applied to ascertain financial behaviour of literate households.

  13. PUBLIC FINANCING OF HEALTHCARE SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Bem

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare in Poland is mainly financed by public sector entities, among them the National Health Fund (NFZ, state budget and local government budgets. The task of the National Health Fund, as the main payer in the system, is chiefly currently financing the services. The state budget plays a complementary role in the system, and finances selected groups of services, health insurance premiums and investments in healthcare infrastructure. The basic role of the local governments is to ensure access to the services, mostly by performing ownership functions towards healthcare institutions.

  14. CoP nanosheet assembly grown on carbon cloth: A highly efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen generation

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xiulin

    2015-07-01

    There exists a strong demand to replace expensive noble metal catalysts with cheap metal sulfides or phosphides for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Recently metal phosphides such as NixP, FeP and CoP have been considered as promising candidates to replace Pt cathodes. Here we report that the nanocrystalline CoP nanosheet assembly on carbon cloth can be formed by a two-step process: electrochemical deposition of Co species followed by gas phase phosphidation. The CoP catalyst in this report exhibits a Tafel slope of 30.1mV/dec in 0.5M H2SO4 and 42.6mV/dec in 1M KOH. The high HER performance of our CoP catalysts is attributed to the rugae-like morphology which results in a high double-layer capacitance and high density of active sites, estimated as 7.77×1017sites/cm2. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Institutional Governance Framework for Determining Carbon-related Accounting Practices: An Exploratory Study of Electricity Generating Companies in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrazi, B.; Mat Husin, N.

    2016-03-01

    Electricity industry is the major contributor of the global carbon emissions which has been scientifically identified as the main cause of climate change. With the various initiatives being implemented at the international, national, and industry levels, companies in the electricity industry are currently facing immense pressure from various stakeholders to demonstrate their policies, initiatives, targets, and performance on climate change. Against this background, accounting system is argued to be able to be play important roles in combating climate change. Using institutional governance as the underlying framework, we have identified several governance mechanisms as the determining factors for companies to have a systematic accounting system related to carbon emissions. The factors include environmental management system certification, environmental organization, publication of stand-alone sustainability reports, the use of GRI guidelines, environmental strategic planning, governance quality, and participation in CDP surveys and emissions trading scheme. We explored this issue in the context of major electricity generating companies in Malaysia and found that except for certified environmental management system, the other governance mechanisms are still lacking. The findings suggest that companies in Malaysia, in particular, from the electricity industry are not well prepared in facing risks related to climate change.

  16. Assessing "dangerous climate change": required reduction of carbon emissions to protect young people, future generations and nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James; Kharecha, Pushker; Sato, Makiko; Masson-Delmotte, Valerie; Ackerman, Frank; Beerling, David J; Hearty, Paul J; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Hsu, Shi-Ling; Parmesan, Camille; Rockstrom, Johan; Rohling, Eelco J; Sachs, Jeffrey; Smith, Pete; Steffen, Konrad; Van Susteren, Lise; von Schuckmann, Karina; Zachos, James C

    2013-01-01

    We assess climate impacts of global warming using ongoing observations and paleoclimate data. We use Earth's measured energy imbalance, paleoclimate data, and simple representations of the global carbon cycle and temperature to define emission reductions needed to stabilize climate and avoid potentially disastrous impacts on today's young people, future generations, and nature. A cumulative industrial-era limit of ∼500 GtC fossil fuel emissions and 100 GtC storage in the biosphere and soil would keep climate close to the Holocene range to which humanity and other species are adapted. Cumulative emissions of ∼1000 GtC, sometimes associated with 2°C global warming, would spur "slow" feedbacks and eventual warming of 3-4°C with disastrous consequences. Rapid emissions reduction is required to restore Earth's energy balance and avoid ocean heat uptake that would practically guarantee irreversible effects. Continuation of high fossil fuel emissions, given current knowledge of the consequences, would be an act of extraordinary witting intergenerational injustice. Responsible policymaking requires a rising price on carbon emissions that would preclude emissions from most remaining coal and unconventional fossil fuels and phase down emissions from conventional fossil fuels.

  17. Assessing “Dangerous Climate Change”: Required Reduction of Carbon Emissions to Protect Young People, Future Generations and Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James; Kharecha, Pushker; Sato, Makiko; Masson-Delmotte, Valerie; Ackerman, Frank; Beerling, David J.; Hearty, Paul J.; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Hsu, Shi-Ling; Parmesan, Camille; Rockstrom, Johan; Rohling, Eelco J.; Sachs, Jeffrey; Smith, Pete; Steffen, Konrad; Van Susteren, Lise; von Schuckmann, Karina; Zachos, James C.

    2013-01-01

    We assess climate impacts of global warming using ongoing observations and paleoclimate data. We use Earth’s measured energy imbalance, paleoclimate data, and simple representations of the global carbon cycle and temperature to define emission reductions needed to stabilize climate and avoid potentially disastrous impacts on today’s young people, future generations, and nature. A cumulative industrial-era limit of ∼500 GtC fossil fuel emissions and 100 GtC storage in the biosphere and soil would keep climate close to the Holocene range to which humanity and other species are adapted. Cumulative emissions of ∼1000 GtC, sometimes associated with 2°C global warming, would spur “slow” feedbacks and eventual warming of 3–4°C with disastrous consequences. Rapid emissions reduction is required to restore Earth’s energy balance and avoid ocean heat uptake that would practically guarantee irreversible effects. Continuation of high fossil fuel emissions, given current knowledge of the consequences, would be an act of extraordinary witting intergenerational injustice. Responsible policymaking requires a rising price on carbon emissions that would preclude emissions from most remaining coal and unconventional fossil fuels and phase down emissions from conventional fossil fuels. PMID:24312568

  18. Assessing "dangerous climate change": required reduction of carbon emissions to protect young people, future generations and nature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Hansen

    Full Text Available We assess climate impacts of global warming using ongoing observations and paleoclimate data. We use Earth's measured energy imbalance, paleoclimate data, and simple representations of the global carbon cycle and temperature to define emission reductions needed to stabilize climate and avoid potentially disastrous impacts on today's young people, future generations, and nature. A cumulative industrial-era limit of ∼500 GtC fossil fuel emissions and 100 GtC storage in the biosphere and soil would keep climate close to the Holocene range to which humanity and other species are adapted. Cumulative emissions of ∼1000 GtC, sometimes associated with 2°C global warming, would spur "slow" feedbacks and eventual warming of 3-4°C with disastrous consequences. Rapid emissions reduction is required to restore Earth's energy balance and avoid ocean heat uptake that would practically guarantee irreversible effects. Continuation of high fossil fuel emissions, given current knowledge of the consequences, would be an act of extraordinary witting intergenerational injustice. Responsible policymaking requires a rising price on carbon emissions that would preclude emissions from most remaining coal and unconventional fossil fuels and phase down emissions from conventional fossil fuels.

  19. Assessing 'Dangerous Climate Change': Required Reduction of Carbon Emissions to Protect Young People, Future Generations and Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James; Kharecha, Pushker; Sato, Makiko; Masson-Demotte, Valerie; Ackerman, Frank; Beerling, David J.; Hearty, Paul J.; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Hsu, Shi-Ling; Parmesan, Camille; hide

    2013-01-01

    We assess climate impacts of global warming using ongoing observations and paleoclimate data. We use Earth's measured energy imbalance, paleoclimate data, and simple representations of the global carbon cycle and temperature to define emission reductions needed to stabilize climate and avoid potentially disastrous impacts on today's young people, future generations, and nature. A cumulative industrial-era limit of approx.500 GtC fossil fuel emissions and 100 GtC storage in the biosphere and soil would keep climate close to the Holocene range to which humanity and other species are adapted. Cumulative emissions of approx.1000 GtC, sometimes associated with 2 C global warming, would spur "slow" feedbacks and eventual warming of 3-4 C with disastrous consequences. Rapid emissions reduction is required to restore Earth's energy balance and avoid ocean heat uptake that would practically guarantee irreversible effects. Continuation of high fossil fuel emissions, given current knowledge of the consequences, would be an act of extraordinary witting intergenerational injustice. Responsible policymaking requires a rising price on carbon emissions that would preclude emissions from most remaining coal and unconventional fossil fuels and phase down emissions from conventional fossil fuels.

  20. Investigation of the Makeup, Source, and Removal Strategies for Total Organic Carbon in the Oxygen Generation System Recirculation Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Elizabeth M.; Carpenter, Joyce; Roy, Robert J.; Van Keuren, Steve; Wilson, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Since 2007, the Oxygen Generation System (OGS) on board the International Space Station (ISS) has been producing oxygen for crew respiration via water electrolysis. As water is consumed in the OGS recirculating water loop, make-up water is furnished by the ISS potable water bus. A rise in Total Organic Carbon (TOC) was observed beginning in February, 2011, which continues through the present date. Increasing TOC is of concern because the organic constituents responsible for the TOC were unknown and had not been identified; hence their impacts on the operation of the electrolytic cell stack components and on microorganism growth rates and types are unknown. Identification of the compounds responsible for the TOC increase, their sources, and estimates of their loadings in the OGA as well as possible mitigation strategies are presented.

  1. Generation of 2-Furfurylthiol by Carbon-Sulfur Lyase from the Baijiu Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae G20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Musu; Sun, Baoguo; Yin, Sheng; Mehmood, Arshad; Cheng, Lei; Wang, Chengtao

    2018-03-07

    2-Furfurylthiol is the representative aroma compound of Chinese sesame-flavored baijiu. Previous studies demonstrated that baijiu yeasts could generate 2-furfurylthiol using furfural and l-cysteine as precursors and that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes STR3 and CYS3 are closely related to 2-furfurylthiol biosynthesis. To confirm the mechanism of the STR3- and CYS3-gene products on 2-furfurylthiol biosynthesis, their encoded proteins were purified, and we confirmed their activities as carbon-sulfur lyases. Str3p and Cys3p were able to cleave the cysteine-furfural conjugate to release 2-furfurylthiol. Moreover, the characterization of the enzymatic properties of the purified proteins shows good thermal stabilities and wide pH tolerances, which enable their strong potential for various applications. These data provide direct evidence that yeast Str3p and Cys3p release 2-furfurylthiol in vitro, which can be applied to improve baijiu flavor.

  2. Non-Darcy flow of water-based carbon nanotubes with nonlinear radiation and heat generation/absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, T.; Ullah, Siraj; Khan, M. Ijaz; Alsaedi, A.; Zaigham Zia, Q. M.

    2018-03-01

    Here modeling and computations are presented to introduce the novel concept of Darcy-Forchheimer three-dimensional flow of water-based carbon nanotubes with nonlinear thermal radiation and heat generation/absorption. Bidirectional stretching surface induces the flow. Darcy's law is commonly replace by Forchheimer relation. Xue model is implemented for nonliquid transport mechanism. Nonlinear formulation based upon conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy is first modeled and then solved by optimal homotopy analysis technique. Optimal estimations of auxiliary variables are obtained. Importance of influential variables on the velocity and thermal fields is interpreted graphically. Moreover velocity and temperature gradients are discussed and analyzed. Physical interpretation of influential variables is examined.

  3. Ozone generation in positive and negative corona discharge fed by humid oxygen and carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skalny, J D; Orszagh, J; MatejcIk, S; Mason, N J

    2008-01-01

    The effect of humidity on ozone generation of positive and negative corona discharges fed by O 2 and CO 2 has been studied in the humidity range of 100-20 000 ppm. The experiments were carried out at an ambient temperature and pressure of 100 kPa. The increase in humidity of CO 2 conspicuously suppressed the ozone generation in negative corona discharge at all values of the input energy densities into the discharge. The effect was less pronounced in oxygen. In contrast to decrease of ozone concentration observed in negative corona discharge, the presence of water both in O 2 and CO 2 acts catalytically. The ozone concentration has been found to increase remarkably (approximately 10 times) in oxygen, if the humidity was increased from 100 to 20 000 ppm. The dependence of ozone concentration on the gas humidity exhibited an extreme. The increase observed at humidity up to approximately 5000 ppm was followed by the marginal reduction in ozone concentration. Anyway, the values of this were considerably higher than those found in dry CO 2 . The effect of humidity on ozone concentration will be discussed in relation to plasma chemical processes in studied discharges and their macroscopic parameters.

  4. Developing financeable projects in Central Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chelberg, R.; Prerad, V. [POWER International, Josefov (Czechoslovakia)

    1995-12-01

    POWER`s engineering and development experience in the Czech Republic creating financeable projects within the power generation industry will be presented. POWER has been involved in the Czech Republic`s privatization process, environmental legislation as well as formation of the regulatory environment. Strategic methods for accomplishing the development of financeable projects often include ownership and financial restructuring of the projects. This is done by utilizing internal cash flows, external debt and equity placement (provided by international financial institutions) by restructuring the facility`s contractual relationships and operations (providing as least cost solution to engineering) and possibly using existing governmental guarantees. In order to make any recommendations on how to come into compliance with the country`s environmental legislation, it is necessary to begin with an analysis of the existing facility. This involves preparation of technical and economic feasibility study, evaluation of technology and preliminary engineering solutions. It further involves restructuring of power sales agreements, heat sales agreements, and fuel supply agreements. The goal is to provide suitable security for the equity and debt financing participants by mitigating risk and creating a single purpose business unit with predictable life and economics.

  5. Financing the UK's renewable energy boom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindley, D.

    1996-01-01

    The opportunity to invest in and operate renewable energy power projects in the United Kingdom is the result of the financial measures established by the Electricity Act 1989, which created the Non-Fossil Fuel Obligation. In the three different orders specified so far, approximately 1400 MW (declared net capacity) of contracts have been awarded to schemes generating electricity from wind, hydro, landfill gas, sewage gas, waste combustion and other combustion (using forestry wastes and biomass) schemes. The majority of projects that have become operational so far have been financed either on 'balance sheet' or by a combination of non-recourse or limited recourse project loans and investor equity. In order to fulfil the government's goal to have 1500 MW (declared net capacity) of electricity from renewables by 2000 and a total investment of in excess of 1.5 billion pounds will be required. This paper reviews the terms of the Non Fossil Fuel Obligation, gives details of contracts awarded so far, reviews the financing methods used, summarises the project risk and the means of mitigation and provides case histories of several different renewable energy projects financed in the UK. (author) 11 tabs., 10 refs

  6. Quantification of CO2 generation in sedimentary basins through carbonate/clays reactions with uncertain thermodynamic parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceriotti, G.; Porta, G. M.; Geloni, C.; Dalla Rosa, M.; Guadagnini, A.

    2017-09-01

    We develop a methodological framework and mathematical formulation which yields estimates of the uncertainty associated with the amounts of CO2 generated by Carbonate-Clays Reactions (CCR) in large-scale subsurface systems to assist characterization of the main features of this geochemical process. Our approach couples a one-dimensional compaction model, providing the dynamics of the evolution of porosity, temperature and pressure along the vertical direction, with a chemical model able to quantify the partial pressure of CO2 resulting from minerals and pore water interaction. The modeling framework we propose allows (i) estimating the depth at which the source of gases is located and (ii) quantifying the amount of CO2 generated, based on the mineralogy of the sediments involved in the basin formation process. A distinctive objective of the study is the quantification of the way the uncertainty affecting chemical equilibrium constants propagates to model outputs, i.e., the flux of CO2. These parameters are considered as key sources of uncertainty in our modeling approach because temperature and pressure distributions associated with deep burial depths typically fall outside the range of validity of commonly employed geochemical databases and typically used geochemical software. We also analyze the impact of the relative abundancy of primary phases in the sediments on the activation of CCR processes. As a test bed, we consider a computational study where pressure and temperature conditions are representative of those observed in real sedimentary formation. Our results are conducive to the probabilistic assessment of (i) the characteristic pressure and temperature at which CCR leads to generation of CO2 in sedimentary systems, (ii) the order of magnitude of the CO2 generation rate that can be associated with CCR processes.

  7. Implementation of New System for Oxygen Generation and Carbon Dioxide Removal =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavolos, Angelo Peter

    This research effort develops an integrated system for CO2 removal and O2 production. A unique material, dodeca-tungsto-phosphoric acid (H3PO4W12O3; henceforth referred to as DTPA) is mixed with tetra-ethyl-ortho-silicate Si(OC2H 5)4 or TEOS. This mixture exhibits unique properties of heat absorption and high electrical conductivity. In the system described herein, the DTPA resides within a cross linked arrangement of TEOS. The DTPA furnishes a source of O2, while the TEOS furnishes structural support for the large DTPA crystals. In addition, the large amount of H2O within the crystal also adsorbs CO2. It can also be cross-linked with other polymers such as polycarbonate, for different applications and properties such as flexible textiles. A set of isolated bench experiments were designed to test CO2 adsorption, O2 production, heat production, and voltage production were conducted to test the hypothesis that DTPA can provide CO2 adsorption, O2 generation, heat generation and electrical generation. Five experiments with this apparatus were conducted: (1) a mass balance experiment; (2) an X-ray diffraction experiment; (3) a photo spectroscopic experiment; (4) a calorimetric experiment; and (5) a dielectric experiment. Results illustrate that approximately 2880 grams of this material produces 576 grams of O2, and removes 1760 grams of CO2. The reaction also produces approximately 844 kJ/mole heat, and can supply 12.2 V potential over a period of 4.5 hours. The amount of unused material and the recycling ability suggests the usefulness of the technique to achieve between a 50-75% closed system. In addition, an experiment using 18O tracer demonstrated that approximately 20% of the O2 produced comes from processed CO2 adsorbed by the crystal, while the remaining 80% of the O2 produced comes from replaced O2 within the crystal itself. The device has multiple applications including environmental control and life support for aircraft cabins, space vehicle interiors

  8. Corruption, Growth, and Public Finances

    OpenAIRE

    Vito Tanzi; Hamid R Davoodi

    2000-01-01

    The paper discusses some channels through which corruption affects growth such as the impact of corruption on enterprises, on the allocation of talent, and on investment. It also discusses the impact of corruption on some aspects of public finance.

  9. The financing of nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazauran, B.

    1978-01-01

    Having first recalled the usual financing rules related to the economic activities, the author analyses the applying of those rules in the nuclear field, taking into account the specific characteristics of this industrial branch [fr

  10. Participatory financing for green growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laville, Dorine; Phantharangsi, Maryvonne; Monnoyer-Smith, Laurence; Demeulenaere, Laurence; Lequeux, Typhaine; Cuny, Alicia

    2017-01-01

    As for the French Ministry of the Environment, participatory financing can be an innovating and mobilising tool to finance projects related to the energy and ecological transition, and as such a financing is promoted by the law on energy transition for a green growth, this publication presents this type of financing. It evokes its legal framework, its different forms (loan to companies, loan to individuals, gift, capital investment), its safe legal framework (definition of different types of status). It outlines how it can be a lever for energy and ecological transition even if green projects are difficult to quantify. It evokes the future introduction of a label, and the introduction of legal and regulatory measures to develop the renewable energy sector

  11. Health, autonomic financing and transferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cantarero Prieto

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper has as objective to study the whole relative problem to the autonomous communities and regional heath care expenditure financing in Spain. This article has a dual purpose. First, the financing of the current health care attendance is approached in the Spanish regions passing magazine to its possible variants and we observe that the balance of our system is clearly inclined towards the side of the integration in the general pattern of financing («Fiscal Room» with specific conditions («Mixed System». Secondly, we examine the new situation in the mark of health care and its corresponding financing in the new model approved in 2001, in terms of the effects of tax assignment on autonomous communities.

  12. Innovative Financing for Green Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    provides an overview of financing strategies and highlights a community that leveraged Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) resources for a flood mitigation project that provided multiple economic, environmental, and social benefits.

  13. African Journals Online: Finance & Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 16 of 16 ... The African Journal of Finance and Management is designed to carry articles, ... Operations, Human Resource, Organisational Behaviour, Marketing Services, ... AJMR aims to serve management and business academics.

  14. Innovative finance : strategic research project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Its time to rethink how we fund transportation infrastructure because most transportation : experts agree: theres a transportation funding and financing crisis looming. : Projected revenues from current sources of transportation funding will am...

  15. Financing the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephany, M.

    1975-01-01

    While conventional power stations usually have fossil fuel reserves for only a few weeks, nuclear power stations, because of the relatively long time required for uranium processing from ore extraction to the delivery of the fuel elements and their prolonged in-pile time, require fuel reserves for a period of several years. Although the specific fuel costs of nuclear power stations are much lower than those of conventional power stations, this results in consistently higher financial requirements. But the problems involved in financing the nuclear fuel do not only include the aspect of financing the requirements of reactor operators, but also of financing the facilities of the nuclear fuel cycle. As far as the fuel supply is concerned, the true financial requirements greatly exceed the mere purchasing costs because the costs of financing are rather high as a consequence of the long lead times. (orig./UA) [de

  16. Saudi Arabia: Terrorist Financing Issues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blanchard, Christoper M; Prados, Alfred B

    2007-01-01

    According to the U.S. State Department 2007 International Narcotics Control Strategy Report, Saudi donors and unregulated charities have been a major source of financing to extremist and terrorist groups over the past 25 years...

  17. De-risking concentrated solar power in emerging markets: The role of policies and international finance institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisari, Gianleo; Stadelmann, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Concentrated solar power (CSP) is a promising technology for low-carbon energy systems, as combined with thermal storage it can store solar energy as heat, and deliver power more flexibly and when most needed by the grid. However, its high cost prevents its rapid deployment and affects its affordability in emerging economies. International financial institutions (IFIs) have emerged as key players to enable CSP in emerging economies, especially when cooperating with national policymakers. Through the analysis of two CSP plants in India and Morocco where IFIs provided the lion's share of finance, this paper aims to assess the effectiveness of their support and estimate the impact of IFIs financing on electricity production costs and mobilization of private investments. The two case studies show that public financial institutions can play a leading role in reducing the cost of CSP support on public budgets by providing concessional loans in countries where public and/or private finance would be too expensive, or extending maturities where commercial investors are present but poorly suited for project finance. Finally, we show that, combined with competitive tariff setting mechanism (tenders and auctions), public financial support can also be a cost-effective tool to engage private investors in CSP. -- Highlights: •We analyze the financial model of two large-scale concentrated solar power (CSP) plants in two emerging markets (India and Morocco). •We focus on the role of policies and public finance in reducing investment risks and generation costs. •Development banks' concessional loans can reduce the weight of CSP support on public budgets. •Even when non-concessional, development banks' loans can reduce investment costs by extending debt maturities. •Competitive tariff setting mechanisms can ensure cost-effectiveness of public financial support

  18. PUBLIC FINANCE SUSTAINABILITY IN ROMANIA. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mura Petru-Ovidiu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to evaluate the sustainability of public finance in Romania and to explore the fiscal threats Romania might face in the future. A sound fiscal policy implies avoiding excessive liabilities of the government, but at the same time delivering the proper public goods and services, including the necessary safety net in times of crisis. An unsustainable fiscal position negatively impacts on macroeconomic stability; moreover, if public finances are perceived to be unsustainable in the long run, the reaction of the international financial markets could generate a fiscal crisis, which might surprise the fiscal planners. The main findings of the paper are the following: i according to the multidimensional approach of the European Commission, in the short run, it seems that Romania is free from fiscal stress, there is a low risk in the medium term, and in the long run the risk becomes medium; ii a potential medium-term fiscal sustainability risk derives from the accumulation of losses and arrears in the business and companies sectors in which the state is a majority shareholder; iii Romania records one of the lowest budget revenues to GDP ratios in EU, while the Romanian tax system is characterized by a poor tax collection, inefficient administration and excessive bureaucracy; iv the structure of public spending in Romania is characterized by the predominance of wage spending and social assistance, while the poor state of the public pension system is an important vulnerability of the public finance position; v overall, the degree of tax compliance in Romania was only 55.8% in 2013, and according to the calculations made by the Fiscal Council, tax evasion represented 16.2% of GDP in 2013. All these aspects make up a grim picture of sustainability of public finances, which has to be considered by the public decision makers regarding future fiscal policy actions.

  19. Science Shaping Sustainable Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Osuna, V.; Vorosmarty, C. J.; Koehler, D.; Klop, P.; Spengler, J.; Buonocore, J.; Cak, A. D.; Tessler, Z. D.; Corsi, F.; Green, P. A.; Sánchez, R.

    2017-12-01

    Sustainable investment is confronting a period of rapid growth and fundamental change. However, the methods used to evaluate corporate sustainability are failing to keep pace with this new reality. In contrast to the 1990s when corporate data on pollution or occupational health were not available in the public domain, today's investors can take advantage of rich data streams, owing to voluntary corporate disclosures of their business practices. Yet, the data companies declare are hardly standardized, difficult to verify, and thus run the risk of creating unreliable assertions, a form of "green-washing". A partnership comprising a pension fund, an asset manager and two research universities has created a science-based approach to quantify context and place it into a decision-making framework for investors. We have tested this framework on US$2.5 billion of assets held by a large European pension fund with an initial focus on four domains—water, climate change, human health and food security. Our standardized metrics enable coherent comparison of individual company and portfolios over time. To place a company's impact on water systems or climate change into context requires geographically co-locating company operations, combining these with estimates of industrial emissions or mitigation potential, baseline Earth system science data and geopolitical and demographic statistics. Recent developments regarding the Paris Accord are a warning that progress toward a sustainable future requires rethinking the roles that the public and private sectors can play in effecting meaningful change. The finance sector, if given the proper guideposts, could rapidly transform fraught public policy challenges like climate adaptation or the global loss of biodiversity into business opportunities. By utilizing a science-based yardstick to evaluate and compare companies on the basis of their impacts, attention could be drawn to companies that are verifiably contributing to sustainability.

  20. Changes in carbon footprint when integrating production of filamentous fungi in 1st generation ethanol plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancoli, Pedro; Ferreira, Jorge A; Bolton, Kim; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2018-02-01

    Integrating the cultivation of edible filamentous fungi in the thin stillage from ethanol production is presently being considered. This integration can increase the ethanol yield while simultaneously producing a new value-added protein-rich biomass that can be used for animal feed. This study uses life cycle assessment to determine the change in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions when integrating the cultivation of filamentous fungi in ethanol production. The result shows that the integration performs better than the current scenario when the fungal biomass is used as cattle feed for system expansion and when energy allocation is used. It performs worse if the biomass is used as fish feed. Hence, integrating the cultivation of filamentous fungi in 1st generation ethanol plants combined with proper use of the fungi can lead to a reduction of GHG emissions which, considering the number of existing ethanol plants, can have a significant global impact. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The hourly life cycle carbon footprint of electricity generation in Belgium, bringing a temporal resolution in life cycle assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messagie, Maarten; Mertens, Jan; Oliveira, Luis; Rangaraju, Surendraprabu; Sanfelix, Javier; Coosemans, Thierry; Van Mierlo, Joeri; Macharis, Cathy

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper brings a temporal resolution in LCA of electricity generation. • Dynamic life cycle assessment of electricity production in Belgium for 2011. • The overall average GWP per kW h is 0.184 kg CO 2 eq/kW h. • The carbon footprint of Belgian electricity ranges from 0.102 to 0.262 kg CO 2 eq/kW h. - Abstract: In the booming research on the environmental footprint of, for example, electrical vehicles, heat pumps and other (smart) electricity consuming appliances, there is a clear need to know the hourly CO 2 content of one kW h of electricity. Since the CO 2 footprint of electricity can vary every hour; the footprint of for example an electric vehicle is influenced by the time when the vehicle is charged. With the availability of the hourly CO 2 content of one kW h, a decision support tool is provided to fully exploit the advantages of a future smart grid. In this paper, the GWP (Global Warming Potential) per kW h for each hour of the year is calculated for Belgium using a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach. This enables evaluating the influence of the electricity demand on the greenhouse gas emissions. Because of the LCA approach, the CO 2 equivalent content does not only reflect activities related to the production of the electricity within a power plant, but includes carbon emissions related to the building of the infrastructure and the fuel supply chain. The considered feedstocks are nuclear combustible, oil, coal, natural gas, biowaste, blast furnace gas, and wood. Furthermore, renewable electricity production technologies like photovoltaic cells, hydro installations and wind turbines are covered by the research. The production of the wind turbines and solar panels is more carbon intensive (expressed per generated kW h of electricity) than the production of other conventional power plants, due to the lower electricity output. The overall average GWP per kW h is 0.184 kg CO 2 eq/kW h. Throughout the 2011 this value ranges from a

  2. Property Rights, Finance, and Entrepreneurship

    OpenAIRE

    Simon Johnson; John McMillan; Christopher Woodruff

    1999-01-01

    Is investment constrained more by insecure property rights or by limited external finance? For five transition economies in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union we find that weak property rights limit the reinvestment of profits in startup ma nufacturing firms. Access to credit does not appear to explain differences in investment. At least in the early stages of post-communist reform, retained earnings appear to have been enough to finance the investments that managers wanted to make.

  3. Project finance for alternative energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, S.J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is intended to provide general advice to sponsors of renewable energy projects who expect to raise project-based financing from commercial banks to fund the development of their projects. It will set out, for the benefit of such sponsors, how bankers typically approach the analysis of these undertakings and in particular the risk areas on which they concentrate. By doing so it should assist sponsors to maximise their prospects of raising bank finance. (author)

  4. Wind power: valuation and finance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aastrand, C.; Mose, O.; Sorensen, B.

    1996-01-01

    The past 20 years of wind energy experience in Denmark has primarily been based upon three financing schemes, tailored to individually owned, guild owned and utility owned wind turbines. The merits of and problems with these schemes are discussed, as well as their relations to specific legislation regarding e.g. taxation. It is finally explored, whether new forms of organisation, valuation and financing may be needed. (author)

  5. Long Term Financing of Infrastructure

    OpenAIRE

    Sinha, Sidharth

    2014-01-01

    Infrastructure projects, given their long life, require long term financing. The main sources of long term financings are insurance and pension funds who seek long term investments with low credit risk. However, in India household financial savings are mainly invested in bank deposits. Insurance and pension funds account for only a small percentage of household financial savings. In addition most infrastructure projects do not qualify for investment by insurance and pension funds because of t...

  6. The financing of innovative firms

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Bronwyn H.

    2009-01-01

    To what extent are new and/or innovative firms fundamentally different from established firms, and therefore require a different form of financing? The theoretical background for this proposition is presented, and the empirical evidence on its importance is reviewed. Owing to the intangible nature of their investment, asymmetric-information and moral-hazard, these firms are more likely to be financed by equity than debt and behave in some cases as though they are cash-constrained, especially ...

  7. Corporate Finance and Comparative Advantage

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Egger; Christian Keuschnigg

    2009-01-01

    Since innovative firms are often financially constrained, access to external funds is important for the expansion of innovative industries. This paper reports four important results. First, comparative advantage is shaped by factor endowments as well as fundamental determinants of corporate finance. In particular, a larger equity ratio of firms and tough governance standards relax finance constraints and create a comparative advantage in innovative industries. Second, factor price equalizatio...

  8. Development assistance and climate finance

    OpenAIRE

    Arndt, Channing

    2015-01-01

    The distinction between development assistance and climate finance is driven by an optic of compensation largely derived from the 'polluter pays' principle. For practical as well as conceptual reasons, this principle provides a weak basis for climate finance. The distinction also cuts against the need to holistically consider developmental, adaptation, and mitigation policies and naturally focuses on government-to-government flows despite the manifest need to catalyse non-official sources of ...

  9. Spontaneous Ag-Nanoparticle Growth at Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Defect Sites: A Tool for In Situ Generation of SERS Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Maley

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver nanoparticles were spontaneously formed on pristine and oxidized single-wall nanotubes. Nanoparticles were observed on carbon nanotubes with AFM, and the presence of Ag nanoparticles were confirmed by ESR experiments. Raman spectroscopy of the Ag-treated carbon nanotubes had a 4–10X enhancement of intensity compared to untreated carbon nanotubes. Ag nanoparticles formed at defect sites on the CNT surface, where free electrons located at the defect sites reduced Ag+ to Ag. A mechanism for the propagation of the nanoparticles is through a continual negative charge generation on the nanoparticle by electron transfer from doublet oxygen (O2−.

  10. Analysis of IGCC-based plants with carbon capture for an efficient and flexible electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorgenfrei, Max

    2016-01-01

    In this work, systems based on the Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology with carbon capture are analyzed regarding an efficient and flexible electric power generation. All analysis are related to a high-efficiency or low-cost IGCC base case with carbon capture which are both commercially available. In the high-efficiency base case, thermodynamic inefficiencies are determined based on a conventional exergy analysis. The gasifier followed by the combustion chamber of the gas turbine running on syngas are rated to the largest inefficiencies. Based on an advanced exergy analysis, the inefficiencies are split into an avoidable and unavoidable part as well as an endogenous and exogenous part. For example, it was found that about half of the inefficiencies within the gasifier are caused by other components of the overall system(exogenous part). Further investigations on the combination of both splitting types are presented. The gas turbine system is identified to be a major component and therefore a detailed model was developed using state-of-the-art technologies. Based on this model, 12 types of characteristic inefficiencies were determined and rated by their exergy destruction. Chemical-Looping Combustion (CLC) is one of the most promising technologies to enhance the available IGCC design. CLC uses composite metal particles acting as an oxygen carrier to transport oxygen from the air to the fuel gas through a redox-cycle. Thus, the inefficiencies associated with the combustion process decrease and the application of physical absorption for capturing CO 2 is replaced by an inherent CO 2 -capture. In this work, the most suitable oxygen carriers for CLC using syngas (nickel oxide and iron oxide) are analyzed at different temperatures. Moreover, different types of gasifier as well as CLC reactor designs are analyzed. Regenerating the oxygen carrier by steam and air, produces additional hydrogen from the reduction of steam which is further combusted

  11. Updated (BP3) Technical and Economic Feasibility Study - Electrochemical Membrane for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghezel-Ayagh, Hossein

    2016-10-12

    This topical report summarizes the results of an updated Technical & Economic Feasibility Study (T&EFS) which was conducted in Budget Period 3 of the project to evaluate the performance and cost of the Electrochemical Membrane (ECM)-based CO2 capture system. The ECM technology is derived from commercially available inorganic membranes; the same used in FuelCell Energy’s commercial fuel cell power plants and sold under the trade name Direct FuelCell® (DFC®). The ECM stacks are utilized in the Combined Electric Power (generation) And Carbon dioxide Separation (CEPACS) systems which can be deployed as add-ons to conventional power plants (Pulverized Coal, Combined Cycle, etc.) or industrial facilities to simultaneously produce power while capturing >90% of the CO2 from the flue gas. In this study, an ECM-based CEPACS plant was designed to capture and compress >90% of the CO2 (for sequestration or beneficial use) from the flue gas of a reference 550 MW (nominal, net AC) Pulverized Coal (PC) Rankine Cycle (Subcritical steam) power plant. ECM performance was updated based on bench scale ECM stack test results. The system process simulations were performed to generate the CEPACS plant performance estimates. The performance assessment included estimation of the parasitic power consumption for CO2 capture and compression, and the efficiency impact on the PC plant. While the ECM-based CEPACS system for the 550 MW PC plant captures 90% of CO2 from the flue gas, it generates additional (net AC) power after compensating for the auxiliary power requirements of CO2 capture and compression. An equipment list, ECM stacks packaging design, and CEPACS plant layout were developed to facilitate the economic analysis. Vendor quotes were also solicited. The economic feasibility study included estimation of CEPACS plant capital cost, cost of electricity (COE) analyses and estimation of cost per ton of CO2 captured. The incremental COE for the ECM-based CO2 capture is expected to meet

  12. Updated (BP3) Technical and Economic Feasibility Study - Electrochemical Membrane for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghezel-Ayagh, Hossein [FuelCell Energy, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States)

    2017-12-21

    This topical report summarizes the results of an updated Technical & Economic Feasibility Study (T&EFS) which was conducted in Budget Period 3 of the project to evaluate the performance and cost of the Electrochemical Membrane (ECM)-based CO2 capture system. The ECM technology is derived from commercially available inorganic membranes; the same used in FuelCell Energy’s commercial fuel cell power plants and sold under the trade name Direct FuelCell® (DFC®). The ECM stacks are utilized in the Combined Electric Power (generation) And Carbon dioxide Separation (CEPACS) systems which can be deployed as add-ons to conventional power plants (Pulverized Coal, Combined Cycle, etc.) or industrial facilities to simultaneously produce power while capturing >90% of the CO2 from the flue gas. In this study, an ECM-based CEPACS plant was designed to capture and compress >90% of the CO2 (for sequestration or beneficial use) from the flue gas of a reference 550 MW (nominal, net AC) Pulverized Coal (PC) Rankine Cycle (Subcritical steam) power plant. ECM performance was updated based on bench scale ECM stack test results. The system process simulations were performed to generate the CEPACS plant performance estimates. The performance assessment included estimation of the parasitic power consumption for CO2 capture and compression, and the efficiency impact on the PC plant. While the ECM-based CEPACS system for the 550 MW PC plant captures 90% of CO2 from the flue gas, it generates additional (net AC) power after compensating for the auxiliary power requirements of CO2 capture and compression. An equipment list, ECM stacks packaging design, and CEPACS plant layout were developed to facilitate the economic analysis. Vendor quotes were also solicited. The economic feasibility study included estimation of CEPACS plant capital cost, cost of electricity (COE) analyses and estimation of cost per ton of CO2

  13. SABER-School Finance : Data Collection Instrument

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the SABER-school finance initiative is to collect, analyze and disseminate comparable data about education finance systems across countries. SABER-school finance assesses education finance systems along six policy goals: (i) ensuring basic conditions for learning; (ii) monitoring learning conditions and outcomes; (iii) overseeing service delivery; (iv) budgeting with adequate an...

  14. 48 CFR 32.109 - Termination financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Termination financing. 32... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Non-Commercial Item Purchase Financing 32.109 Termination financing. To encourage contractors to invest their own funds in performance despite the susceptibility of...

  15. 24 CFR 882.405 - Financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Financing. 882.405 Section 882.405... § 882.405 Financing. (a) Types. Any type of public or private financing may be utilized with the... Contract as security for financing. An Owner may pledge, or offer as security for any loan or obligation...

  16. 7 CFR 3560.71 - Construction financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Construction financing. 3560.71 Section 3560.71... Construction financing. (a) Construction financing plan. Prior to loan approval, applicants must submit to the Agency for its concurrence a plan for the construction financing and securing of the loan. (b) Interim...

  17. 48 CFR 12.210 - Contract financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contract financing. 12.210... financing. Customary market practice for some commercial items may include buyer contract financing. The contracting officer may offer Government financing in accordance with the policies and procedures in part 32. ...

  18. 7 CFR 1735.75 - Interim financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interim financing. 1735.75 Section 1735.75... Involving Loan Funds § 1735.75 Interim financing. (a) A borrower may submit a written request for RUS approval of interim financing if it is necessary to close an acquisition before the loan to finance the...

  19. 24 CFR 883.307 - Financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Financing. 883.307 Section 883.307... § 883.307 Financing. (a) Types of financing. A State Agency that used the Fast Track Procedures formerly in this part must provide permanent financing for any new construction or substantial rehabilitation...

  20. 13 CFR 120.476 - Prohibited financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Prohibited financing. 120.476... Business Lending Companies (sblc) § 120.476 Prohibited financing. An SBLC may not make a loan to a small business that has received financing (or a commitment for financing) from an SBIC that is an Associate of...

  1. 7 CFR 1735.17 - Facilities financed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Basic Policies § 1735.17 Facilities financed. (a) RUS makes hardship and guaranteed loans to finance the... section. (b) RUS makes concurrent RUS cost-of-money and RTB loans to finance the improvement, expansion... type of loan to finance the following items: (1) Station apparatus (including PBX and key systems) not...

  2. Third party financing of renewable energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Institut of Energy Saving and Diversification (IDAE) hosted the third party on financing Renewable Energy Sources in Spain. The main aspects were : 1) Experiences in renewable energy. 2) Financing of small hydro-power projects. 3) Third party financing of biomass projects. 4) Financing of wind energy projects

  3. Analysis of Project Finance | Energy Analysis | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Analysis of Project Finance Analysis of Project Finance NREL analysis helps potential renewable energy developers and investors gain insights into the complex world of project finance. Renewable energy project finance is complex, requiring knowledge of federal tax credits, state-level incentives, renewable

  4. Third party financing of renewable energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IDAE.

    1994-01-01

    IDAE (Institute of Energy Saving and Diversification) Hosted the Third party on financing renewable energy sources. The meeting was articulated into chapters: 1.- Experiences in the renewable energy field. 2.- Third party financing of small hydro-power projects. 3.- Third party financing of biomass projects. 4.- Third party financing of wind energy projects

  5. SABER-School Finance: Data Collection Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Elizabeth; Patrinos, Harry; Rogers, Halsey

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the SABER-school finance initiative is to collect, analyze and disseminate comparable data about education finance systems across countries. SABER-school finance assesses education finance systems along six policy goals: (i) ensuring basic conditions for learning; (ii) monitoring learning conditions and outcomes; (iii) overseeing…

  6. Carbonization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennebutte, H G; Goutal, E

    1921-07-04

    Materials such as coal, peat, or schist are subjected to a rising temperature in successive stages in apparatus in which the distillation products are withdrawn at each stage. For example in a three-stage process, the acid products of the first or low-temperature stage are fixed in a suitable reagent, the basic products from a second or higher-temperature stage are absorbed in an acid reagent, hydrocarbons being retained by solvents, while the third are subjected to a pyrogenation process carried out in a closed vessel. Wherein the material is subjected in stages to a rising temperature, the gasified products being withdrawn at each stage, and are prevented as far as possible from mixing with the carbonized products.

  7. Financing energy projects: experience of the International Finance Corporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, Gary; Carter, Laurence

    1995-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the recent trend towards private ownership and financing of power projects in the developing countries, focusing on the role played by both private and public agencies in meeting the large financing challenges. The paper draws upon the operational experience of the International Finance Corporation, which has been involved in the financing of more than 30 private power projects in the developing countries over the past three decades. Among the issues that affect implementation of private power projects is the balancing of risk and reward to equity investors and to commercial lenders. The paper discusses the principal sources of risk and the strategies used to manage them. A related issue is the competition for capital on the international markets, and the techniques that are being devised to bring more finance to the power sector. Finally, the paper considers the role of government in bringing private investors to the power sector, and the approaches being adopted to balance the needs of investors with the needs of the public. (author)

  8. Financing nuclear power in the U.K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, F.E.

    1979-01-01

    In the United Kingdom the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) are responsible for bulk supplies of electricity to the 12 Area Boards responsible for retailing in England and Wales. As such, the Board are responsible for over 90% of total generation in the UK and are therefore the body principally concerned with the financing of nuclear power growth. The author first looks at the problem of financing nuclear power from the point of view of the CEGB. Thereafter the situation in the UK is dealt with more generally and in that section reference is also made to the total call on the UK's resources involved in financing energy growth in general and nuclear power in particular. (author)

  9. Financing Asset Sales and Business Cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Marc; Hackbarth, Dirk; Puhan, Tatjana-Xenia

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the decision of firms to sell assets to fund investments (financing asset sales). For a sample of U.S. manufacturing firms during the 1971-2010 period, we document new stylized facts about financing asset sales that cannot be explained by traditional motives for selling assets, such as financial distress or financing constraints. Using a structural model of financing, investment, and macroeconomic risk, we show that financing asset sales attenuate the debt overhang problem...

  10. The Finance Curse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, John; Shaxson, Nick; Wigan, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    to highlight the perils of an oversized financial sector. States failing to harness natural resources for development led to the concept of the Resource Curse. In many countries, resource dependence generated slower growth, crowding out, reduced economic diversity, lost entrepreneurialism, unemployment...... starkly illuminates the condition of Britain’s political economy and the character of its relations with the rest of the world....

  11. Financing Trans-European Energy Infrastructures - Past, Present and Perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirschhausen, Christian von

    2011-01-01

    The transformation of the European energy system towards a low carbon industry requires substantial investment and financing. According to the Energy Infrastructure Package (EIP), around one trillion euros must be invested in the European energy system until 2020. Out of the euro 200 billion required investment for transmission networks, only half of the capital will be provided by markets. This leaves a financial gap of ca. euro 100 bn. and poses a question on the EU role in financing European energy infrastructures. This policy paper by Christian Von Hirschhausen focuses on the future financing of trans-European energy infrastructures. After providing an overview of the long-term infrastructure needs and of the various instruments that currently exist to finance these infrastructures, the author discusses various aspects related with the planning and financing of cross border energy infrastructures with the help of a case study: the North Sea Grid Project. On the basis of the North Sea example, he highlights the importance of adopting a regulatory approach balancing European and Member States' interests as well as of streamlining and expanding the EU financial support to sustainable energy infrastructures

  12. The international Finance Corporation and financing of sustainable energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younger, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    The International Finance Corporation (IFC), a member of the World Bank Group, is the largest multilateral source of loan and equity financing for private sector projects in the developing world. IFC participates in an investment only when it can make a special contribution that complements the role of market operators. Since its founding 40 years ago, IFC has provided more than $18.8 billion in financing for 1,706 companies in developing countries. Its share capital is provided by its 170 member countries, which collectively determine its policies and activities. Strong shareholder support and a substantial paid-in capital base have allowed IFC to raise funds for its lending activities through its triple-A rated bond issues in international financial markets. (orig.)

  13. Power generation plants with carbon capture and storage: A techno-economic comparison between coal combustion and gasification technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tola, Vittorio; Pettinau, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Techno-economic performance of coal-fired power plants (without and with CCS). • Without CCS system, USC is more efficient and cost-competitive than IGCC. • CCS energy penalties are more relevant for USC than IGCC. • Higher SNOX system costs are partially compensated by better USC performance. • CCS technologies cannot be profitable without adequate policies and incentives. - Abstract: Worldwide energy production requirements could not be fully satisfied by nuclear and renewables sources. Therefore a sustainable use of fossil fuels (coal in particular) will be required for several decades. In this scenario, carbon capture and storage (CCS) represents a key solution to control the global warming reducing carbon dioxide emissions. The integration between CCS technologies and power generation plants currently needs a demonstration at commercial scale to reduce both technological risks and high capital and operating cost. This paper compares, from the technical and economic points of view, the performance of three coal-fired power generation technologies: (i) ultra-supercritical (USC) plant equipped with a conventional flue gas treatment (CGT) process, (ii) USC plant equipped with SNOX technology for a combined removal of sulphur and nitrogen oxides and (iii) integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant based on a slurry-feed entrained-flow gasifier. Each technology was analysed in its configurations without and with CO 2 capture, referring to a commercial-scale of 1000 MW th . Technical assessment was carried out by using simulation models implemented through Aspen Plus and Gate-Cycle tools, whereas economic assessment was performed through a properly developed simulation model. USC equipped with CGT systems shows an overall efficiency (43.7%) comparable to IGCC (43.9%), whereas introduction of SNOX technology increases USC efficiency up to 44.8%. Being the CCS energy penalties significantly higher for USC (about 10.5% points vs. about 8

  14. Mesoporous generation-inspired ultrahigh capacitive deionization performance by sono-assembled activated carbon/inter-connected graphene network architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Haiou; Wu, Yifan; Zhang, Shupeng; Li, Wentao; Wang, Baijun; Wang, Changming; Gao, Juanjuan; Li, Aimin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • 3D AC/inter-connected graphene network architecture has been constructed for CDI application. • Generated mesoporous structures can inspire ultrahigh capacitive deionization performance. • Usage of the smaller amounts (5 wt%) of functionalized graphene reduce the secondary pollution. • Inter-connected graphene network as the conductive bridge can decrease the aggregation of AC. • The environmental and economical composite electrode is suitable for practical CDI application. - Abstract: Capacitive deionization (CDI) is an emerging technology that supplies deionized water to resolve the fresh water shortage. CDI electrodes are mainly made up of carbon materials, of which the deionization performance is closely related to their physical properties and structures. Hence, a rational design of electrode material structure is essentially significant. Functionalized graphene (fG) in particular has recently been regarded as characteristic CDI electrode material. However, preparation of fG based on graphene oxide usually results in serious secondary pollution due to usage of highly poisonous chemicals, and thus still cannot meet the demand of practical application. It is feasible that environmentally-friendly activated carbon (AC) and small amounts of fGs can be combined rationally, and used as CDI electrodes. Here, sono-assembled AC/m-phenylenediamine (mPEA) or p-phenylenediaminefG inter-connected network architecture has been constructed for the first time successfully. The specific capacitances of the AC/fG composites were found to be significantly higher than that of the AC electrode owing to mesoporous generation. Also, among all the samples, the AC composite with 5 wt % mPEA-fG exhibited an ultrahigh electrosorption capacity of 12.58 mg/g (or 0.22 mmol/g) in NaCl solution. These observations indicate that fG can serve as an efficient conductive bridge to decrease the aggregation of AC particles, and improve the electron transfer with the

  15. To Own or Lease Solar: Understanding Commercial Retailers' Decisions to Use Alternative Financing Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, David [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Margolis, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This report examines the tradeoffs among financing methods for businesses installing onsite photovoltaics (PV). We present case studies of PV financing strategies used by two large commercial retailers that have deployed substantial U.S. PV capacity: IKEA, which owns its PV, and Staples, which purchases power generated from onsite PV systems through power purchase agreements (PPAs). We also analyze the financial considerations that influence any company's choice of PV financing strategy. Our goal in this report is to clarify the financial and institutional costs and benefits of financing strategies and to inform other companies that are considering launching or expanding similar PV programs.

  16. Algal capture of carbon dioxide; biomass generation as a tool for greenhouse gas mitigation with reference to New Zealand energy strategy and policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packer, Mike

    2009-01-01

    The use of algae to capture carbon dioxide as a method for greenhouse gas mitigation is discussed. A small fraction of the sunlight energy that bathes Earth is captured by photosynthesis and drives most living systems. Life on Earth is carbon-based and the energy is used to fix atmospheric carbon dioxide into biological material (biomass), indeed fossil fuels that we consume today are a legacy of mostly algal photosynthesis. Algae can be thought of as marine and freshwater plants that have higher photosynthetic efficiencies than terrestrial plants and are more efficient capturing carbon (Box 1). They have other favourable characteristics for this purpose. In the context of New Zealand energy strategy and policy I discuss progress in growing algae and seaweeds with emphasis on their application for exhaust flue carbon recycling for possible generation of useful biomass. I also introduce schemes utilising wild oceanic algae for carbon dioxide sequestration and the merits and possible adverse effects of using this approach. This paper is designed as an approachable review of the science and technology for policy makers and a summary of the New Zealand policy environment for those wishing to deploy biological carbon sequestration.

  17. Generation and Use of Thermal Energy in the Industrial Sector and Opportunities to Reduce its Carbon Emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMillan, Colin; Boardman, Richard; McKellar, Michael; Sabharwall, Piyush; Ruth, Mark; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Changes are occurring throughout the U.S. economy, especially in regard to how energy is generated and used in the electricity, buildings, industrial, and transportation sectors. These changes are being driven by environmental and energy security concerns and by economics. The electric-sector market share of natural gas and variable renewable generation, such as wind and solar photovoltaics (PV), continues to grow. The buildings sector is evolving to meet efficiency standards, the transportation sector is evolving to meet efficiency and renewable fuels standards, and the industrial sector is evolving to reduce emissions. Those changes are driving investment and utilization strategies for generation and other assets. Nuclear and renewable energy sources are important to consider in the energy sector’s evolution because both are considered to be clean and non-carbon-emitting energy sources. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are jointly investigating potential synergies between technologies exploiting nuclear and renewable energy sources. The two laboratories have held several joint workshops since 2011. Those workshops brought together experts in both areas to identify synergies and potential opportunities to work together. Workshop participants identified nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems (N-R HESs) as one of the opportunities and recommended investigating whether N-R HESs could both generate dispatchable electricity without carbon emissions and provide clean energy to industrial processes. They also recommended analyzing the potential for N-R HESs to provide dispatchable capacity to a grid with high penetrations of non-dispatchable resources and to investigate whether real inertia provided by thermal power cycles within N-R HESs provides value to the grid. This report is one of a series of reports INL and NREL are producing to investigate the technical and economic aspects of N-R HESs. Previous reports

  18. Generation and Use of Thermal Energy in the Industrial Sector and Opportunities to Reduce its Carbon Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, Colin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Boardman, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McKellar, Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sabharwall, Piyush [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ruth, Mark [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bragg-Sitton, Shannon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Changes are occurring throughout the U.S. economy, especially in regard to how energy is generated and used in the electricity, buildings, industrial, and transportation sectors. These changes are being driven by environmental and energy security concerns and by economics. The electric-sector market share of natural gas and variable renewable generation, such as wind and solar photovoltaics (PV), continues to grow. The buildings sector is evolving to meet efficiency standards, the transportation sector is evolving to meet efficiency and renewable fuels standards, and the industrial sector is evolving to reduce emissions. Those changes are driving investment and utilization strategies for generation and other assets. Nuclear and renewable energy sources are important to consider in the energy sector’s evolution because both are considered to be clean and non-carbon-emitting energy sources. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are jointly investigating potential synergies between technologies exploiting nuclear and renewable energy sources. The two laboratories have held several joint workshops since 2011. Those workshops brought together experts in both areas to identify synergies and potential opportunities to work together. Workshop participants identified nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems (N-R HESs) as one of the opportunities and recommended investigating whether N-R HESs could both generate dispatchable electricity without carbon emissions and provide clean energy to industrial processes. They also recommended analyzing the potential for N-R HESs to provide dispatchable capacity to a grid with high penetrations of non-dispatchable resources and to investigate whether real inertia provided by thermal power cycles within N-R HESs provides value to the grid. This report is one of a series of reports INL and NREL are producing to investigate the technical and economic aspects of N-R HESs. Previous reports

  19. The Adaptation Finance Gap Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    UNEP’s Adaptation Gap Report series focuses on Finance, Technology and Knowledge gaps in climate change adaptation. It compliments the Emissions Gap Report series, and explores the implications of failing to close the emissions gap. The report builds on a 2014 assessment by the United Nations...... Environment Programme (UNEP), which laid out the concept of ‘adaptation gaps’ and outlined three such gaps: technology, finance and knowledge. The 2016 Adaptation Gap Report assesses the difference between the financial costs of adapting to climate change in developing countries and the amount of money...... actually available to meet these costs – a difference known as the “adaptation finance gap”. Like the 2014 report, the 2016 report focuses on developing countries, where adaptation capacity is often the lowest and needs the highest, and concentrates on the period up to 2050. The report identifies trends...

  20. Behavioural Finance and Its Postulates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Vučinić

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The reasons for dealing with the chosen topic can be found in the fact that there is a certain number of anomalies, system errors and conduct leaving the frames of rational behaviour, not being included and presented synthetically within a concise scientific work. Instead, the analysis deals with definite, already identified postulates of behavioural economics and finance. During the research, induction, deduction, comparative and abstraction methods are used. The challenge of the research lies in the identification of those system errors, partialities and behaviours deviating from postulates of rational, typical for classical finance, not being covered by standard behavioural, economic and finance literature. However, the challenge is even bigger because of the fact that it deals with answers to demands of universality and conciseness. Its greatest importance is reflected in the extent of identified and processed anomalies decision makers face, as well as in the identification and description of factors implying absence of rationality during the decision making process.