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Sample records for generates natural chromosomal

  1. The transposon Galileo generates natural chromosomal inversions in Drosophila by ectopic recombination.

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    Alejandra Delprat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transposable elements (TEs are responsible for the generation of chromosomal inversions in several groups of organisms. However, in Drosophila and other Dipterans, where inversions are abundant both as intraspecific polymorphisms and interspecific fixed differences, the evidence for a role of TEs is scarce. Previous work revealed that the transposon Galileo was involved in the generation of two polymorphic inversions of Drosophila buzzatii. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To assess the impact of TEs in Drosophila chromosomal evolution and shed light on the mechanism involved, we isolated and sequenced the two breakpoints of another widespread polymorphic inversion from D. buzzatii, 2z(3. In the non inverted chromosome, the 2z(3 distal breakpoint was located between genes CG2046 and CG10326 whereas the proximal breakpoint lies between two novel genes that we have named Dlh and Mdp. In the inverted chromosome, the analysis of the breakpoint sequences revealed relatively large insertions (2,870-bp and 4,786-bp long including two copies of the transposon Galileo (subfamily Newton, one at each breakpoint, plus several other TEs. The two Galileo copies: (i are inserted in opposite orientation; (ii present exchanged target site duplications; and (iii are both chimeric. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our observations provide the best evidence gathered so far for the role of TEs in the generation of Drosophila inversions. In addition, they show unequivocally that ectopic recombination is the causative mechanism. The fact that the three polymorphic D. buzzatii inversions investigated so far were generated by the same transposon family is remarkable and is conceivably due to Galileo's unusual structure and current (or recent transpositional activity.

  2. The generation of successive unmarked mutations and chromosomal insertion of heterologous genes in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae using natural transformation.

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    Janine T Bossé

    Full Text Available We have developed a simple method of generating scarless, unmarked mutations in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae by exploiting the ability of this bacterium to undergo natural transformation, and with no need to introduce plasmids encoding recombinases or resolvases. This method involves two successive rounds of natural transformation using linear DNA: the first introduces a cassette carrying cat (which allows selection by chloramphenicol and sacB (which allows counter-selection using sucrose flanked by sequences to either side of the target gene; the second transformation utilises the flanking sequences ligated directly to each other in order to remove the cat-sacB cassette. In order to ensure efficient uptake of the target DNA during transformation, A. pleuropneumoniae uptake sequences are added into the constructs used in both rounds of transformation. This method can be used to generate multiple successive deletions and can also be used to introduce targeted point mutations or insertions of heterologous genes into the A. pleuropneumoniae chromosome for development of live attenuated vaccine strains. So far, we have applied this method to highly transformable isolates of serovars 8 (MIDG2331, which is the most prevalent in the UK, and 15 (HS143. By screening clinical isolates of other serovars, it should be possible to identify other amenable strains.

  3. Chromosomal fragments transmitted through three generations in Oncopeltus (Hemiptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaChance, L E; Degrugillier, M

    1969-10-10

    Chromosomal fragments and translocations induced by x-rays in the sperm of adult milkweed bugs, Oncopeltus fasciatus (Dallas), were detected in the meiotic cells of F(1), F(2), and F(3), males and caused high levels of sterility in lintreated progeny. The persistence of these fragments through numerous generations of cells confirmed the holokinetic nature of the milkweed bug chromosomes.

  4. Rapid generation of region-specific probes by chromosome microdissection: Application to the identification of chromosomal rearrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trent, J.M.; Guan, X.Y.; Zang, J.; Meltzer, P.S. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The authors present results using a novel strategy for chromosome microdissection and direct in vitro amplification of specific chromosomal regions, to identify cryptic chromosome alterations, and to rapidly generate region-specific genomic probes. First, banded chromosomes are microdissected and directly PCR amplified by a procedure which eliminates microchemistry (Meltzer, et al., Nature Genetics, 1:24, 1992). The resulting PCR product can be used for several applications including direct labeling for fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to normal metaphase chromosomes. A second application of this procedure is the extremely rapid generation of chromosome region-specific probes. This approach has been successfully used to determine the derivation of chromosome segments unidentifiable by standard chromosome banding analysis. In selected instances these probes have also been used on interphase nuclei and provides the potential for assessing chromosome abnormalities in a variety of cell lineages. The microdissection probes (which can be generated in <24 hours) have also been utilized in direct library screening and provide the possibility of acquiring a significant number of region-specific probes for any chromosome band. This procedure extends the limits of conventional cytogenetic analysis by providing an extremely rapid source of numerous band-specific probes, and by enabling the direct analysis of essentially any unknown chromosome region.

  5. Natural language generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maybury, Mark T.

    The goal of natural language generation is to replicate human writers or speakers: to generate fluent, grammatical, and coherent text or speech. Produced language, using both explicit and implicit means, must clearly and effectively express some intended message. This demands the use of a lexicon and a grammar together with mechanisms which exploit semantic, discourse and pragmatic knowledge to constrain production. Furthermore, special processors may be required to guide focus, extract presuppositions, and maintain coherency. As with interpretation, generation may require knowledge of the world, including information about the discourse participants as well as knowledge of the specific domain of discourse. All of these processes and knowledge sources must cooperate to produce well-written, unambiguous language. Natural language generation has received less attention than language interpretation due to the nature of language: it is important to interpret all the ways of expressing a message but we need to generate only one. Furthermore, the generative task can often be accomplished by canned text (e.g., error messages or user instructions). The advent of more sophisticated computer systems, however, has intensified the need to express multisentential English.

  6. Chromosome aberrations in solid tumors have a stochastic nature

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    Castro, Mauro A.A. [Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Rua Ramiro Barcelos 2600-anexo, Porto Alegre 90035-003 (Brazil) and Departamento de Medicina Interna, Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Rua Ramiro Barcelos 2350, Porto Alegre 90035-903 (Brazil) and Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, Porto Alegre 91501-970 (Brazil) and Universidade Luterana do Brasil, Rua Miguel Tostes 101, Canoas 92420-280 (Brazil)]. E-mail: mauro@ufrgs.br; Onsten, Tor G.H. [Departamento de Medicina Interna, Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Rua Ramiro Barcelos 2350, Porto Alegre 90035-903 (Brazil); Universidade Luterana do Brasil, Rua Miguel Tostes 101, Canoas 92420-280 (Brazil); Moreira, Jose C.F. [Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Rua Ramiro Barcelos 2600-anexo, Porto Alegre 90035-003 (Brazil); Almeida, Rita M.C. de [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, Porto Alegre 91501-970 (Brazil)

    2006-08-30

    An important question nowadays is whether chromosome aberrations are random events or arise from an internal deterministic mechanism, which leads to the delicate task of quantifying the degree of randomness. For this purpose, we have defined several Shannon information functions to evaluate disorder inside a tumor and between tumors of the same kind. We have considered 79 different kinds of solid tumors with 30 or more karyotypes retrieved from the Mitelman Database of Chromosome Aberrations in Cancer. The Kaplan-Meier cumulative survival was also obtained for each solid tumor type in order to correlate data with tumor malignance. The results here show that aberration spread is specific for each tumor type, with high degree of diversity for those tumor types with worst survival indices. Those tumor types with preferential variants (e.g. high proportion of a given karyotype) have shown better survival statistics, indicating that aberration recurrence is a good prognosis. Indeed, global spread of both numerical and structural abnormalities demonstrates the stochastic nature of chromosome aberrations by setting a signature of randomness associated to the production of disorder. These results also indicate that tumor malignancy correlates not only with karyotypic diversity taken from different tumor types but also taken from single tumors. Therefore, by quantifying aberration spread, we could confront diverse models and verify which of them points to the most likely outcome. Our results suggest that the generating process of chromosome aberrations is neither deterministic nor totally random, but produces variations that are distributed between these two boundaries.

  7. Natural Language Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-31

    Generator "* Grammars for each language "* Two lexicons "* A semantic Knowledge Base "* Interlanguage Translation Rules (in systems without an interlingua...represents both syntactic and semantic aspects of the input. Interlanguage Translation Rules: Many MT systems contain a set of rules that trans- form certain

  8. [Biological effects in natural populations of small rodents in radiation-polluted territories. Dynamics of chromosome aberration frequency in a number of generations of European bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus, Schreber)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharova, R I; Riabokon', N I

    1998-01-01

    The dynamics of chromosome aberration frequency in bone marrow cells of many generations (14) of bank vole living in the radioactive trace of the Chernobyl catastrophe (1986-1992) has been analysed. The study revealed that the chromosome aberration frequency in voles in the areas with radio-contamination density 220 and 1526 kBq/m2 (for 137Cs) significantly exceeds the control level 3-7 times over the whole period under investigation. The dynamics of the frequency of structural chromosome injuries from 1986 to 1991-1992 is characterised by the tendency to increase in all populations inhabiting the areas with various radio-contamination density (8-1526 kBq/m2).

  9. Multiple forms of atypical rearrangements generating supernumerary derivative chromosome 15

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    Sigman Marian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternally-derived duplications that include the imprinted region on the proximal long arm of chromosome 15 underlie a complex neurobehavioral disorder characterized by cognitive impairment, seizures and a substantial risk for autism spectrum disorders1. The duplications most often take the form of a supernumerary pseudodicentric derivative chromosome 15 [der(15] that has been called inverted duplication 15 or isodicentric 15 [idic(15], although interstitial rearrangements also occur. Similar to the deletions found in most cases of Angelman and Prader Willi syndrome, the duplications appear to be mediated by unequal homologous recombination involving low copy repeats (LCR that are found clustered in the region. Five recurrent breakpoints have been described in most cases of segmental aneuploidy of chromosome 15q11-q13 and previous studies have shown that most idic(15 chromosomes arise through BP3:BP3 or BP4:BP5 recombination events. Results Here we describe four duplication chromosomes that show evidence of atypical recombination events that involve regions outside the common breakpoints. Additionally, in one patient with a mosaic complex der(15, we examined homologous pairing of chromosome 15q11-q13 alleles by FISH in a region of frontal cortex, which identified mosaicism in this tissue and also demonstrated pairing of the signals from the der(15 and the normal homologues. Conclusion Involvement of atypical BP in the generation of idic(15 chromosomes can lead to considerable structural heterogeneity.

  10. Linear Chromosome-generating System of Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wai Mun; DaGloria, Jeanne; Fox, Heather; Ruan, Qiurong; Tillou, John; Shi, Ke; Aihara, Hideki; Aron, John; Casjens, Sherwood

    2012-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58, the pathogenic bacteria that causes crown gall disease in plants, harbors one circular and one linear chromosome and two circular plasmids. The telomeres of its unusual linear chromosome are covalently closed hairpins. The circular and linear chromosomes co-segregate and are stably maintained in the organism. We have determined the sequence of the two ends of the linear chromosome thus completing the previously published genome sequence of A. tumefaciens C58. We found that the telomeres carry nearly identical 25-bp sequences at the hairpin ends that are related by dyad symmetry. We further showed that its Atu2523 gene encodes a protelomerase (resolvase) and that the purified enzyme can generate the linear chromosomal closed hairpin ends in a sequence-specific manner. Agrobacterium protelomerase, whose presence is apparently limited to biovar 1 strains, acts via a cleavage-and-religation mechanism by making a pair of transient staggered nicks invariably at 6-bp spacing as the reaction intermediate. The enzyme can be significantly shortened at both the N and C termini and still maintain its enzymatic activity. Although the full-length enzyme can uniquely bind to its product telomeres, the N-terminal truncations cannot. The target site can also be shortened from the native 50-bp inverted repeat to 26 bp; thus, the Agrobacterium hairpin-generating system represents the most compact activity of all hairpin linear chromosome- and plasmid-generating systems to date. The biochemical analyses of the protelomerase reactions further revealed that the tip of the hairpin telomere may be unusually polymorphically capable of accommodating any nucleotide. PMID:22582388

  11. Ontogeny of Unstable Chromosomes Generated by Telomere Error in Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinert, Ted

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication errors at certain sites in the genome initiate chromosome instability that ultimately leads to stable genomic rearrangements. Where instability begins is often unclear. And, early instability may form unstable chromosome intermediates whose transient nature also hinders mechanistic understanding. We report here a budding yeast model that reveals the genetic ontogeny of genome rearrangements, from initial replication error to unstable chromosome formation to their resolution. Remarkably, the initial error often arises in or near the telomere, and frequently forms unstable chromosomes. Early unstable chromosomes may then resolve to an internal "collection site" where a dicentric forms and resolves to an isochromosome (other outcomes are possible at each step). The initial telomere-proximal unstable chromosome is increased in mutants in telomerase subunits, Tel1, and even Rad9, with no known telomere-specific function. Defects in Tel1 and in Rrm3, a checkpoint protein kinase with a role in telomere maintenance and a DNA helicase, respectively, synergize dramatically to generate unstable chromosomes, further illustrating the consequence of replication error in the telomere. Collectively, our results suggest telomeric replication errors may be a common cause of seemingly unrelated genomic rearrangements located hundreds of kilobases away. PMID:27716774

  12. Ontogeny of Unstable Chromosomes Generated by Telomere Error in Budding Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Tracey; Weinert, Ted

    2016-10-01

    DNA replication errors at certain sites in the genome initiate chromosome instability that ultimately leads to stable genomic rearrangements. Where instability begins is often unclear. And, early instability may form unstable chromosome intermediates whose transient nature also hinders mechanistic understanding. We report here a budding yeast model that reveals the genetic ontogeny of genome rearrangements, from initial replication error to unstable chromosome formation to their resolution. Remarkably, the initial error often arises in or near the telomere, and frequently forms unstable chromosomes. Early unstable chromosomes may then resolve to an internal "collection site" where a dicentric forms and resolves to an isochromosome (other outcomes are possible at each step). The initial telomere-proximal unstable chromosome is increased in mutants in telomerase subunits, Tel1, and even Rad9, with no known telomere-specific function. Defects in Tel1 and in Rrm3, a checkpoint protein kinase with a role in telomere maintenance and a DNA helicase, respectively, synergize dramatically to generate unstable chromosomes, further illustrating the consequence of replication error in the telomere. Collectively, our results suggest telomeric replication errors may be a common cause of seemingly unrelated genomic rearrangements located hundreds of kilobases away.

  13. Aquifer parameter identification by the best chromosome clone plus younger generation chromosome prepotency genetic algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing-sheng; LI Kai; YAO Lei-hua

    2005-01-01

    This paper developed an improved combinatorial method called the best chromosome clone plus younger generation chromosome prepotency genetic algorithm (BCC-YGCP-GA) to evaluate aquifer parameters. This method is based on a decimal simple genetic algorithm (SGA). A synthetic example for unsteady-state flow in a two-dimensional, inhomogeneous, confined aquifer containing three hydraulically distinct zones, is used to develop data to test the model. The simulation utilizes SGA and BCC-YGCP-GA coupled to the finite element method to identify the mean zonal hydraulic conductivities, and storage coefficients of the three-compartment model. For this geometrically simple model, used as a prototype of more complex systems, the SGA does not reach convergence within 100 generations. Conversely, the convergence rate of the BCC-YGCD-GA model is very fast. The objective function value calculated by BCC-YGCD-GA is reduced to 1/1 000th of the starting value within 100 generations,and the hydraulic conductivity and storage of three zones are within a few percent of the "true" values of the ideal model, highlighting the power of the method for aquifer parameterization.

  14. A review of metaphase chromosome image selection techniques for automatic karyotype generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Tanvi; Dhir, Renu

    2016-08-01

    The karyotype is analyzed to detect the genetic abnormalities. It is generated by arranging the chromosomes after extracting them from the metaphase chromosome images. The chromosomes are non-rigid bodies that contain the genetic information of an individual. The metaphase chromosome image spread contains the chromosomes, but these chromosomes are not distinct bodies; they can either be individual chromosomes or be touching one another; they may be bent or even may be overlapping and thus forming a cluster of chromosomes. The extraction of chromosomes from these touching and overlapping chromosomes is a very tedious process. The segmentation of a random metaphase chromosome image may not give us correct and accurate results. Therefore, before taking up a metaphase chromosome image for analysis, it must be analyzed for the orientation of the chromosomes it contains. The various reported methods for metaphase chromosome image selection for automatic karyotype generation are compared in this paper. After analysis, it has been concluded that each metaphase chromosome image selection method has its advantages and disadvantages.

  15. Linear Chromosome-generating System of Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58: Protelomerase Generates and Protects Hairpin Ends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Wai Mun; DaGloria, Jeanne; Fox, Heather; Ruan, Qiurong; Tillou, John; Shi, Ke; Aihara, Hideki; Aron, John; Casjens, Sherwood (Utah); (UMM)

    2012-09-05

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58, the pathogenic bacteria that causes crown gall disease in plants, harbors one circular and one linear chromosome and two circular plasmids. The telomeres of its unusual linear chromosome are covalently closed hairpins. The circular and linear chromosomes co-segregate and are stably maintained in the organism. We have determined the sequence of the two ends of the linear chromosome thus completing the previously published genome sequence of A. tumefaciens C58. We found that the telomeres carry nearly identical 25-bp sequences at the hairpin ends that are related by dyad symmetry. We further showed that its Atu2523 gene encodes a protelomerase (resolvase) and that the purified enzyme can generate the linear chromosomal closed hairpin ends in a sequence-specific manner. Agrobacterium protelomerase, whose presence is apparently limited to biovar 1 strains, acts via a cleavage-and-religation mechanism by making a pair of transient staggered nicks invariably at 6-bp spacing as the reaction intermediate. The enzyme can be significantly shortened at both the N and C termini and still maintain its enzymatic activity. Although the full-length enzyme can uniquely bind to its product telomeres, the N-terminal truncations cannot. The target site can also be shortened from the native 50-bp inverted repeat to 26 bp; thus, the Agrobacterium hairpin-generating system represents the most compact activity of all hairpin linear chromosome- and plasmid-generating systems to date. The biochemical analyses of the protelomerase reactions further revealed that the tip of the hairpin telomere may be unusually polymorphically capable of accommodating any nucleotide.

  16. Alteration of chromosome behavior and synchronization of parental chromosomes after successive generations in Brassica napus x Orychophragmus violaceus hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhigang; Ma, Ni; Li, Zaiyun

    2007-02-01

    In an earlier study, the progenies of intergeneric hybrids Brassica napus (2n = 38) x Orychophragmus violaceus (2n = 24) were investigated in successive generations (F1-F4) for the cytological phenomenon of parental genome separation during mitotic and meiotic division. In the present study, inbred lines (F5-F8) derived from 1 such hybrid were characterized for morphology, chromosome pairing behaviour, and genome composition. One F5 plant (2n = 31) with slightly yellow petals and 12:19 and 15:16 segregation ratios in its pollen mother cells (PMCs) produced F6 plants with distinct morphological characteristics and wide variations in fertility and chromosome numbers (2n = 25-38). F7 and F8 lines with distinctive morphology and wide ranges in chromsome numbers were established. In PMCs of F7 plants from 4 F6 plants, 0-12 labelled chromosomes from O. violaceus, which predominantly appeared as bivalents, were identified by genomic in situ hybridization. They behaved synchronously with B. napus chromosomes during meiotic division. The results provide molecular cytogenetic evidence of the inclusion of O. violaceus chromosomes in the original hybrids and the cytology in the hybrids documented earlier. They also show that chromosome behaviour was altered and the parental chromosomes became synchronized after successive generations.

  17. Chromosome

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    Chromosomes are structures found in the center (nucleus) of cells that carry long pieces of DNA. DNA ... is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist in ...

  18. Generating natural language under pragmatic constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Hovy, Eduard H

    2013-01-01

    Recognizing that the generation of natural language is a goal- driven process, where many of the goals are pragmatic (i.e., interpersonal and situational) in nature, this book provides an overview of the role of pragmatics in language generation. Each chapter states a problem that arises in generation, develops a pragmatics-based solution, and then describes how the solution is implemented in PAULINE, a language generator that can produce numerous versions of a single underlying message, depending on its setting.

  19. Strategies for cloning and manipulating natural and synthetic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karas, Bogumil J; Suzuki, Yo; Weyman, Philip D

    2015-02-01

    Advances in synthetic biology methods to assemble and edit DNA are enabling genome engineering at a previously impracticable scale and scope. The synthesis of the Mycoplasma mycoides genome followed by its transplantation to convert a related cell into M. mycoides has transformed strain engineering. This approach exemplifies the combination of newly emerging chromosome-scale genome editing strategies that can be defined in three main steps: (1) chromosome acquisition into a microbial engineering platform, (2) alteration and improvement of the acquired chromosome, and (3) installation of the modified chromosome into the original or alternative organism. In this review, we outline recent progress in methods for acquiring chromosomes and chromosome-scale DNA molecules in the workhorse organisms Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We present overviews of important genetic strategies and tools for each of the three organisms, point out their respective strengths and weaknesses, and highlight how the host systems can be used in combination to facilitate chromosome assembly or engineering. Finally, we highlight efforts for the installation of the cloned/altered chromosomes or fragments into the target organism and present remaining challenges in expanding this powerful experimental approach to a wider range of target organisms.

  20. Gene alterations at Drosophila inversion breakpoints provide prima facie evidence for natural selection as an explanation for rapid chromosomal evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillén, Yolanda; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2012-02-01

    Chromosomal inversions have been pervasive during the evolution of the genus Drosophila, but there is significant variation between lineages in the rate of rearrangement fixation. D. mojavensis, an ecological specialist adapted to a cactophilic niche under extreme desert conditions, is a chromosomally derived species with ten fixed inversions, five of them not present in any other species. In order to explore the causes of the rapid chromosomal evolution in D. mojavensis, we identified and characterized all breakpoints of seven inversions fixed in chromosome 2, the most dynamic one. One of the inversions presents unequivocal evidence for its generation by ectopic recombination between transposon copies and another two harbor inverted duplications of non-repetitive DNA at the two breakpoints and were likely generated by staggered single-strand breaks and repair by non-homologous end joining. Four out of 14 breakpoints lay in the intergenic region between preexisting duplicated genes, suggesting an adaptive advantage of separating previously tightly linked duplicates. Four out of 14 breakpoints are associated with transposed genes, suggesting these breakpoints are fragile regions. Finally two inversions contain novel genes at their breakpoints and another three show alterations of genes at breakpoints with potential adaptive significance. D. mojavensis chromosomal inversions were generated by multiple mechanisms, an observation that does not provide support for increased mutation rate as explanation for rapid chromosomal evolution. On the other hand, we have found a number of gene alterations at the breakpoints with putative adaptive consequences that directly point to natural selection as the cause of D. mojavensis rapid chromosomal evolution.

  1. Gene alterations at Drosophila inversion breakpoints provide prima facie evidence for natural selection as an explanation for rapid chromosomal evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillén Yolanda

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosomal inversions have been pervasive during the evolution of the genus Drosophila, but there is significant variation between lineages in the rate of rearrangement fixation. D. mojavensis, an ecological specialist adapted to a cactophilic niche under extreme desert conditions, is a chromosomally derived species with ten fixed inversions, five of them not present in any other species. Results In order to explore the causes of the rapid chromosomal evolution in D. mojavensis, we identified and characterized all breakpoints of seven inversions fixed in chromosome 2, the most dynamic one. One of the inversions presents unequivocal evidence for its generation by ectopic recombination between transposon copies and another two harbor inverted duplications of non-repetitive DNA at the two breakpoints and were likely generated by staggered single-strand breaks and repair by non-homologous end joining. Four out of 14 breakpoints lay in the intergenic region between preexisting duplicated genes, suggesting an adaptive advantage of separating previously tightly linked duplicates. Four out of 14 breakpoints are associated with transposed genes, suggesting these breakpoints are fragile regions. Finally two inversions contain novel genes at their breakpoints and another three show alterations of genes at breakpoints with potential adaptive significance. Conclusions D. mojavensis chromosomal inversions were generated by multiple mechanisms, an observation that does not provide support for increased mutation rate as explanation for rapid chromosomal evolution. On the other hand, we have found a number of gene alterations at the breakpoints with putative adaptive consequences that directly point to natural selection as the cause of D. mojavensis rapid chromosomal evolution.

  2. A System To Generate Chromosomal Mutations in Lactococcus lactis Which Allows Fast Analysis of Targeted Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Law, Jean; Buist, Girbe; Haandrikman, Alfred; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerhardus; Leenhouts, Kees

    1995-01-01

    A system for generating chromosomal insertions in lactococci is described. It is based on the conditional replication of lactococcal pWV01-derived Ori+ RepA- vector pORI19, containing lacZα and the multiple cloning site of pUC19. Chromosomal AluI fragments of Lactococcus lactis were cloned in pORI19

  3. Bibliography of Research in Natural Language Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-01

    17-19, 1979. [575] Ronald Kaplan, Klaus Netter, Jorgen Wedekind , [589] Martin Kiy. Unification grammar. Technical re- and Annie Zaenen. Translation by...ble, parallel model ofNatural [11801 Jllrgen Wedekind . Generation as structure driven Language Generation. PhD thegi, University of derivation. In

  4. Chromosome catastrophes involve replication mechanisms generating complex genomic rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengfei; Erez, Ayelet; Nagamani, Sandesh C Sreenath; Dhar, Shweta U; Kołodziejska, Katarzyna E; Dharmadhikari, Avinash V; Cooper, M Lance; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Zhang, Feng; Withers, Marjorie A; Bacino, Carlos A; Campos-Acevedo, Luis Daniel; Delgado, Mauricio R; Freedenberg, Debra; Garnica, Adolfo; Grebe, Theresa A; Hernández-Almaguer, Dolores; Immken, LaDonna; Lalani, Seema R; McLean, Scott D; Northrup, Hope; Scaglia, Fernando; Strathearn, Lane; Trapane, Pamela; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau Wai; Hastings, P J; Stankiewicz, Paweł; Lupski, James R; Bi, Weimin

    2011-09-16

    Complex genomic rearrangements (CGRs) consisting of two or more breakpoint junctions have been observed in genomic disorders. Recently, a chromosome catastrophe phenomenon termed chromothripsis, in which numerous genomic rearrangements are apparently acquired in one single catastrophic event, was described in multiple cancers. Here, we show that constitutionally acquired CGRs share similarities with cancer chromothripsis. In the 17 CGR cases investigated, we observed localization and multiple copy number changes including deletions, duplications, and/or triplications, as well as extensive translocations and inversions. Genomic rearrangements involved varied in size and complexities; in one case, array comparative genomic hybridization revealed 18 copy number changes. Breakpoint sequencing identified characteristic features, including small templated insertions at breakpoints and microhomology at breakpoint junctions, which have been attributed to replicative processes. The resemblance between CGR and chromothripsis suggests similar mechanistic underpinnings. Such chromosome catastrophic events appear to reflect basic DNA metabolism operative throughout an organism's life cycle.

  5. Learning generative models of natural images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiann-Ming; Lin, Zheng-Han

    2002-04-01

    This work proposes an unsupervised learning process for analysis of natural images. The derivation is based on a generative model, a stochastic coin-flip process directly operating on many disjoint multivariate Gaussian distributions. Following the maximal likelihood principle and using the Potts encoding, the goodness-of-fit of the generative model to tremendous patches randomly sampled from natural images is quantitatively expressed by an objective function subject to a set of constraints. By further combination of the objective function and the minimal wiring criterion, we achieve a mixed integer and linear programming. A hybrid of the mean field annealing and the gradient descent method is applied to the mathematical framework and produces three sets of interactive dynamics for the learning process. Numerical simulations show that the learning process is effective for extraction of orientation, localization and bandpass features and the generative model can make an ensemble of a sparse code for natural images.

  6. SQL Generation for Natural Language Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    László Kovács

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A hot issue in the area of database management is to provide a high level interface for nontechnical users. An important research direction is the application of natural language interface. The paperpresents an interface module that converts user’s query given in natural language into a corresponding SQL command. After clustering the input sentence, a pushdown automaton is used to verify the syntax. The corresponding SQL code is generated by a semantic matcher module.

  7. Segregation of an X ring chromosome in two generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallapiccola, B; Bruni, L; Boscherini, B; Pasquino, A M; Chessa, L; Vignetti, P

    1980-01-01

    A 45,X/46,X,r(X) mosaicism was found in a mother and daughter. Characterisation of the ring by banding studies showed that breakpoints had occurred at bands Xp13 and Xq27. It is confirmed that women heterozygotes for partial deficiencies of the short arm of an X chromosome are fertile. Although the mother developed secondary amenorrhoea at the age of 29, it is suggested that fertility per se may not be affected by deficiencies of the distal part of Xq. Images PMID:7205906

  8. Meiotic chromosome pairing behaviour of natural tetraploids and induced autotetraploids of Actinidia chinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin-Hu; Datson, Paul M; Manako, Kelvina I; Murray, Brian G

    2014-03-01

    Non-preferential chromosome pairing was identified in tetraploid Actinidia chinensis and a higher mean multivalent frequency in pollen mother cells was found in colchine-induced tetraploids of A. chinensis compared with naturally occurring tetraploids. Diploid and tetraploid Actinidia chinensis are used for the development of kiwifruit cultivars. Diploid germplasm can be exploited in a tetraploid breeding programme via unreduced (2n) gametes and chemical-induced chromosome doubling of diploid cultivars and selections. Meiotic chromosome behaviour in diploid A. chinensis 'Hort16A' and colchicine-induced tetraploids from 'Hort16A' was analysed and compared with that in a diploid male and tetraploid males of A. chinensis raised from seeds sourced from the wild in China. Both naturally occurring and induced tetraploids formed multivalents, but colchicine-induced tetraploids showed a higher mean multivalent frequency in the pollen mother cells. Lagging chromosomes at anaphase I and II were observed at low frequencies in the colchicine-induced tetraploids. To investigate whether preferential or non-preferential chromosome pairing occurs in tetraploid A. chinensis, the inheritance of microsatellite alleles was analysed in the tetraploid progeny of crosses between A. chinensis (4x) and A. arguta (4x). The frequencies of inherited microsatellite allelic combinations in the hybrids suggested that non-preferential chromosome pairing had occurred in the tetraploid A. chinensis parent.

  9. Geographical changes in relative frequency of inversions in chromosome III of Drosophila pseudoobscura among natural populations from Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salceda Víctor M.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal polymorphism in natural populations of Drosophila pseudoobscura have been broadly studied in the USA but scarcely in Mexico where only about 60 localities have been analyzed. Differences among both regions are notorious with respect to their chromosomal constitution. Northern populations, those of USA, have as representative inversions the sequences ST, AR and CH contrasting with those in Southern populations (Mexico in which prevail the gene arrangements TL, CU and SC. Assuming as a probable mechanism that has allowed these substitutions the flow generated by the presence of a North - South clines, we took as a goal find out if such clines really exist. With that objective in mind we studied 29 populations of this species distributed along four North - South transects. Specimens of D. pseudoobscura caught by attracting them with fermenting bananas were carried to the laboratory where from each female an isofemale line was established. When their offspring appeared a single larva from each isofemale was taken, its salivary glands extracted and stained with a solution of lacto-aceto- orcein, by these means the polytene chromosomes were obtained. On these chromosomes we identified, for each larva, the inversion (s carried in the third chromosome, in such a way 3439 third chromosomes were analyzed. Among the 29 localities we identified 17 different inversions but the number of them varied from population to population from three to eleven. Relative frequencies of each inversion at every location were calculated and with them for each transect the presence or absence of clines was determined. Among each transect the existence of clines was observed only between two or three near by populations, but we were not able to find a clear manifestation of the presence of clines along a complete transect. Our results at this respect are similar to those previously reported for USA populations. A mechanism that explains North - South substitutions

  10. Ethnobotany and Ethnomedicinal Uses, Chromosomal Status and Natural Propagation of Some Plants of Lahaul-Spiti and Adjoining Hills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study documented the ethnobotanical and medicinal uses of plants from an ecologically fragile cold desert area of Lahaul-Spiti (Himachal Pradesh, India. Local people use plants for curing the stomach troubles, pain reliever, cough, gastric disorders, and aphrodisiac and other household purposes. In addition, chromosome numbers, male meiosis, and natural propagation were also investigated in these ethnobotanically used plants. Present investigations also form the basis for exploitation of intraspecific chromosomal variation/new cytotypes recorded in some of the presently studied species to detect biochemical diversity in the medicinally important plants. For documentation of ethnobotanical information, personal observations and interviews were conducted with medicine men, hakims, farmers, shepherds, local healers, and old aged people. This study identified 40 plant species under 33 genera belonging to 17 families which have been used locally for curing various diseases and other purposes. All the chromosome counts are new to the study area. On worldwide basis, meiotic chromosome counts of n=14 and n=8 in Rosularia alpestris and Corydalis govaniana, respectively, are the first ever reports. The present study indicates that the people of the area possess good knowledge about the different uses of plants in the area. It has been noticed that due to the lack of interest among younger generations in the preservation of invaluable ethnic knowledge, there is every possible chance of losing such a rich heritage of knowledge. It is very urgent to conserve such invaluable ethnic knowledge before it gets lost.

  11. Chromosomal duplications and cointegrates generated by the bacteriophage lamdba Red system in Escherichia coli K-12

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    Nadkarni Ashwini

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An Escherichia coli strain in which RecBCD has been genetically replaced by the bacteriophage λ Red system engages in efficient recombination between its chromosome and linear double-stranded DNA species sharing sequences with the chromosome. Previous studies of this experimental system have focused on a gene replacement-type event, in which a 3.5 kbp dsDNA consisting of the cat gene and flanking lac operon sequences recombines with the E. coli chromosome to generate a chloramphenicol-resistant Lac- recombinant. The dsDNA was delivered into the cell as part of the chromosome of a non-replicating λ vector, from which it was released by the action of a restriction endonuclease in the infected cell. This study characterizes the genetic requirements and outcomes of a variety of additional Red-promoted homologous recombination events producing Lac+ recombinants. Results A number of observations concerning recombination events between the chromosome and linear DNAs were made: (1 Formation of Lac+ and Lac- recombinants depended upon the same recombination functions. (2 High multiplicity and high chromosome copy number favored Lac+ recombinant formation. (3 The Lac+ recombinants were unstable, segregating Lac- progeny. (4 A tetracycline-resistance marker in a site of the phage chromosome distant from cat was not frequently co-inherited with cat. (5 Recombination between phage sequences in the linear DNA and cryptic prophages in the chromosome was responsible for most of the observed Lac+ recombinants. In addition, observations were made concerning recombination events between the chromosome and circular DNAs: (6 Formation of recombinants depended upon both RecA and, to a lesser extent, Red. (7 The linked tetracycline-resistance marker was frequently co-inherited in this case. Conclusions The Lac+ recombinants arise from events in which homologous recombination between the incoming linear DNA and both lac and cryptic prophage

  12. Acquiring Correct Knowledge for Natural Language Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Reiter, E; Sripada, S G; 10.1613/jair.1176

    2011-01-01

    Natural language generation (NLG) systems are computer software systems that produce texts in English and other human languages, often from non-linguistic input data. NLG systems, like most AI systems, need substantial amounts of knowledge. However, our experience in two NLG projects suggests that it is difficult to acquire correct knowledge for NLG systems; indeed, every knowledge acquisition (KA) technique we tried had significant problems. In general terms, these problems were due to the complexity, novelty, and poorly understood nature of the tasks our systems attempted, and were worsened by the fact that people write so differently. This meant in particular that corpus-based KA approaches suffered because it was impossible to assemble a sizable corpus of high-quality consistent manually written texts in our domains; and structured expert-oriented KA techniques suffered because experts disagreed and because we could not get enough information about special and unusual cases to build robust systems. We bel...

  13. v-Src Causes Chromosome Bridges in a Caffeine-Sensitive Manner by Generating DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeuchi, Masayoshi; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Honda, Takuya; Kuga, Takahisa; Saito, Youhei; Yamaguchi, Naoto; Nakayama, Yuji

    2016-06-02

    An increase in Src activity is commonly observed in epithelial cancers. Aberrant activation of the kinase activity is associated with malignant progression. However, the mechanisms that underlie the Src-induced malignant progression of cancer are not completely understood. We show here that v-Src, an oncogene that was first identified from a Rous sarcoma virus and a mutant variant of c-Src, leads to an increase in the number of anaphase and telophase cells having chromosome bridges. v-Src increases the number of γH2AX foci, and this increase is inhibited by treatment with PP2, a Src kinase inhibitor. v-Src induces the phosphorylation of KAP1 at Ser824, Chk2 at Thr68, and Chk1 at Ser345, suggesting the activation of the ATM/ATR pathway. Caffeine decreases the number of cells having chromosome bridges at a concentration incapable of inhibiting Chk1 phosphorylation at Ser345. These results suggest that v-Src induces chromosome bridges via generation of DNA damage and the subsequent DNA damage response, possibly by homologous recombination. A chromosome bridge gives rise to the accumulation of DNA damage directly through chromosome breakage and indirectly through cytokinesis failure-induced multinucleation. We propose that v-Src-induced chromosome bridge formation is one of the causes of the v-Src-induced malignant progression of cancer cells.

  14. Chromosome engineering: generation of mono- and dicentric isochromosomes in a somatic cell hybrid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, A W; Schueler, M G; Willard, H F

    1999-08-01

    The most common isochromosome found in humans involves the long arm of the X, i(Xq), and is associated with a subset of Turner syndrome cases. To study the formation and behavior of isochromosomes in a more tractable experimental system, we have developed a somatic cell hybrid model system that allows for the selection of mono- or dicentric isochromosomes involving the short arm of the X, i(Xp). Simultaneous positive and negative counterselection of a mouse/human somatic cell hybrid containing a human X chromosome, selecting for retention of the UBE1 locus in Xp but against the HPRT locus in Xq, results in a variety of abnormalities of the X chromosome involving deletions of Xq. We have generated 70 such "Pushmi-Pullyu" hybrids derived from seven independent X chromosomes. Cytogenetic analysis of these hybrids using fluorescence in situ hybridization showed i(Xp) chromosomes in approximately 19% of the hybrids. Southern blot and polymerase chain reaction analyses of the Pushmi-Pullyu hybrids revealed a distribution of breakpoints along Xq. The distance between the centromeres of the dicentric i(Xp)s generated ranged from approximately 2 Mb to approximately 20 Mb. To examine centromeric activity in these dicentric i(Xp)s, we used indirect immunofluorescence with antibodies to centromere protein E (CENP-E). CENP-E was detected at only one of the centromeres of a dicentric i(Xp) with approximately 2-3 Mb of Xq DNA. In contrast, CENP-E was detected at both centromeres of a dicentric i(Xp) with approximately 14 Mb of Xq DNA. Two other dicentric i(Xp) chromosomes were heterogeneous with respect to centromeric activity, suggesting that centromeric activity and chromosome stability of dicentric chromosomes may be more complicated than previously thought. The Pushmi-Pullyu model system presented in this study may provide a tool for examining the structure and function of mammalian centromeres.

  15. Cytogenetic Analysis of an SD Chromosome from a Natural Population of DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippa, G.; Loverre, A.; Cicchetti, R.

    1980-01-01

    The discovery and the cytogenetic characterization of a new SD (Segregation Distorter) chromosome 2 from a natural population in Ranna (Sicily, Italy), SDRa, are reported. The main features of this chromosome are as follows: (a) it contains an SdRa gene with a moderate degree of segregation distortion (k = 0.72), (b) a recessive female sterile gene, fs(2)TLM, responsible for modifications of the morphology and structure of the tests and ovaries is located at 89.7, (c) SDRa/SDRa males and females are viable but sterile, the females due to homozygosis of fs(2)TLM and the males because of homozygosis of a region containing the Sd locus, and (d) SDi/SDj combinations are fertile, thus suggesting that the different Sd factors found in natural populations constitute a multiple allelic series.—These data may indicate that each population containing SD chromosomes has evolved its own genetic architecture for the complex SD system, with specific modifiers and perhaps different Sd genes. The possibility of reconstructing the evolutionary pattern of the SDRa chromosome in the natural Ranna population after the model of Charlesworth and Hartl (1978) and Crow (1979) is considered. PMID:17249043

  16. Generation of meiomaps of genome-wide recombination and chromosome segregation in human oocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottolini, Christian S; Capalbo, Antonio; Newnham, Louise

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a protocol for the generation of genome-wide maps (meiomaps) of recombination and chromosome segregation for the three products of human female meiosis: the first and second polar bodies (PB1 and PB2) and the corresponding oocyte. PB1 is biopsied and the oocyte is artificially......-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genome-wide by microarray. Informative maternal heterozygous SNPs are phased using a haploid PB2 or oocyte as a reference. A simple algorithm is then used to identify the maternal haplotypes for each chromosome, in all of the products of meiosis for each oocyte. This allows mapping...

  17. Kinetochore dynein generates a poleward pulling force to facilitate congression and full chromosome alignment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Li; Wei Yu; Yun Liang; Xueliang Zhu

    2007-01-01

    For proper chromosome segregation, all kinetochores must achieve bipolar microtubule (MT) attachment and subsequently align at the spindle equator before anaphase onset. The MT minus end-directed motor dynein/dynactin binds kinetochores in prometaphase and has long been implicated in chromosome congression. Unfortunately, inactivation of dynein usually disturbs spindle organization, thus hampering evaluation of its kinetochore roles. Here we specifically eliminated kinetochore dynein/dynactin by RNAi-mediated depletion of ZW10, a protein essential for kinetochore localization of the motor. Time-lapse microscopy indicated markedly-reduced congression efficiency, though congressing chromosomes displayed similar velocities as in control cells. Moreover, cells frequently failed to achieve full chromosome alignment, despite their normal spindles. Confocal microcopy revealed that the misaligned kinetochores were monoori-ented or unattached and mostly lying outside the spindle, suggesting a difficulty to capture MTs from the opposite pole. Kinetochores on monoastral spindles were dispersed farther away from the pole and exhibited only mild oscillation. Furthermore, inactivating dynein by other means generated similar phenotypes. Therefore, kinetochore dynein produces on monooriented kinetochores a poleward pulling force, which may contribute to efficient bipolar attachment by facilitating their proper microtubule captures to promote congression as well as full chromosome alignment.

  18. Unique signatures of natural background radiation on human Y chromosomes from Kerala, India.

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    Sanjay Premi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The most frequently observed major consequences of ionizing radiation are chromosomal lesions and cancers, although the entire genome may be affected. Owing to its haploid status and absence of recombination, the human Y chromosome is an ideal candidate to be assessed for possible genetic alterations induced by ionizing radiation. We studied the human Y chromosome in 390 males from the South Indian state of Kerala, where the level of natural background radiation (NBR is ten-fold higher than the worldwide average, and that from 790 unexposed males as control. RESULTS: We observed random microdeletions in the Azoospermia factor (AZF a, b and c regions in >90%, and tandem duplication and copy number polymorphism (CNP of 11 different Y-linked genes in about 80% of males exposed to NBR. The autosomal homologues of Y-linked CDY genes largely remained unaffected. Multiple polymorphic copies of the Y-linked genes showing single Y-specific signals suggested their tandem duplication. Some exposed males showed unilocus duplication of DAZ genes resulting in six copies. Notably, in the AZFa region, approximately 25% of exposed males showed deletion of the DBY gene, whereas flanking genes USP9Y and UTY remained unaffected. All these alterations were detected in blood samples but not in the germline (sperm samples. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to high levels of NBR correlated with several interstitial polymorphisms of the human Y chromosome. CNPs and enhanced transcription of the SRY gene after duplication are envisaged to compensate for the loss of Y chromosome in some cells. The aforesaid changes, confined to peripheral blood lymphocytes, suggest a possible innate mechanism protecting the germline DNA from the NBR. Genome analysis of a larger population focusing on greater numbers of genes may provide new insights into the mechanisms and risks of the resultant genetic damages. The present work demonstrates unique signatures of NBR on human Y chromosomes

  19. A First Generation Comparative Chromosome Map between Guinea Pig (Cavia porcellus) and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, Svetlana A; Perelman, Polina L; Trifonov, Vladimir A; Serdyukova, Natalia A; Li, Tangliang; Fu, Beiyuan; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Ng, Bee L; Nie, Wenhui; Liehr, Thomas; Stanyon, Roscoe; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Yang, Fengtang

    2015-01-01

    The domesticated guinea pig, Cavia porcellus (Hystricomorpha, Rodentia), is an important laboratory species and a model for a number of human diseases. Nevertheless, genomic tools for this species are lacking; even its karyotype is poorly characterized. The guinea pig belongs to Hystricomorpha, a widespread and important group of rodents; so far the chromosomes of guinea pigs have not been compared with that of other hystricomorph species or with any other mammals. We generated full sets of chromosome-specific painting probes for the guinea pig by flow sorting and microdissection, and for the first time, mapped the chromosomal homologies between guinea pig and human by reciprocal chromosome painting. Our data demonstrate that the guinea pig karyotype has undergone extensive rearrangements: 78 synteny-conserved human autosomal segments were delimited in the guinea pig genome. The high rate of genome evolution in the guinea pig may explain why the HSA7/16 and HSA16/19 associations presumed ancestral for eutherians and the three syntenic associations (HSA1/10, 3/19, and 9/11) considered ancestral for rodents were not found in C. porcellus. The comparative chromosome map presented here is a starting point for further development of physical and genetic maps of the guinea pig as well as an aid for genome assembly assignment to specific chromosomes. Furthermore, the comparative mapping will allow a transfer of gene map data from other species. The probes developed here provide a genomic toolkit, which will make the guinea pig a key species to unravel the evolutionary biology of the Hystricomorph rodents.

  20. Natural genetic transformation generates a population of merodiploids in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

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    Calum Johnston

    Full Text Available Partial duplication of genetic material is prevalent in eukaryotes and provides potential for evolution of new traits. Prokaryotes, which are generally haploid in nature, can evolve new genes by partial chromosome duplication, known as merodiploidy. Little is known about merodiploid formation during genetic exchange processes, although merodiploids have been serendipitously observed in early studies of bacterial transformation. Natural bacterial transformation involves internalization of exogenous donor DNA and its subsequent integration into the recipient genome by homology. It contributes to the remarkable plasticity of the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae through intra and interspecies genetic exchange. We report that lethal cassette transformation produced merodiploids possessing both intact and cassette-inactivated copies of the essential target gene, bordered by repeats (R corresponding to incomplete copies of IS861. We show that merodiploidy is transiently stimulated by transformation, and only requires uptake of a ~3-kb DNA fragment partly repeated in the chromosome. We propose and validate a model for merodiploid formation, providing evidence that tandem-duplication (TD formation involves unequal crossing-over resulting from alternative pairing and interchromatid integration of R. This unequal crossing-over produces a chromosome dimer, resolution of which generates a chromosome with the TD and an abortive chromosome lacking the duplicated region. We document occurrence of TDs ranging from ~100 to ~900 kb in size at various chromosomal locations, including by self-transformation (transformation with recipient chromosomal DNA. We show that self-transformation produces a population containing many different merodiploid cells. Merodiploidy provides opportunities for evolution of new genetic traits via alteration of duplicated genes, unrestricted by functional selective pressure. Transient stimulation of a varied population of

  1. The scale and nature of Viking settlement in Ireland from Y-chromosome admixture analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Brian; Brady, Claire; Moore, Laoise T; Bradley, Daniel G

    2006-12-01

    The Vikings (or Norse) played a prominent role in Irish history but, despite this, their genetic legacy in Ireland, which may provide insights into the nature and scale of their immigration, is largely unexplored. Irish surnames, some of which are thought to have Norse roots, are paternally inherited in a similar manner to Y-chromosomes. The correspondence of Scandinavian patrilineal ancestry in a cohort of Irish men bearing surnames of putative Norse origin was examined using both slow mutating unique event polymorphisms and relatively rapidly changing short tandem repeat Y-chromosome markers. Irish and Scandinavian admixture proportions were explored for both systems using six different admixture estimators, allowing a parallel investigation of the impact of method and marker type in Y-chromosome admixture analysis. Admixture proportion estimates in the putative Norse surname group were highly consistent and detected little trace of Scandinavian ancestry. In addition, there is scant evidence of Scandinavian Y-chromosome introgression in a general Irish population sample. Although conclusions are largely dependent on the accurate identification of Norse surnames, the findings are consistent with a relatively small number of Norse settlers (and descendents) migrating to Ireland during the Viking period (ca. AD 800-1200) suggesting that Norse colonial settlements might have been largely composed of indigenous Irish. This observation adds to previous genetic studies that point to a flexible Viking settlement approach across North Atlantic Europe.

  2. Chromosome doubling in early spermatogonia produces diploid spermatozoa in a natural clonal fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Morishima, Kagayaki; Fujimoto, Takafumi; Saito, Taiju; Kobayashi, Tohru; Yamaha, Etsuro; Arai, Katsutoshi

    2009-05-01

    The natural clonal loach Misgurnus anguillicaudatus (Teleostei: Cobitidae) is diploid (2n = 50) and produces genetically identical unreduced eggs, which develop into diploid individuals without any genetic contribution from sperm. Artificially sex-reversed clones created by the administration of 17alpha-methyltestosterone produce clonal diploid sperm. In metaphase spreads from testicular cells of the sex-reversed clones, spermatocytes had twice the normal number of chromosomes (50 bivalents) compared with those of normal diploids (25 bivalents). Thus, the production of unreduced diploid spermatozoa is initiated by premeiotic endomitosis (or endoreduplication), chromosome doubling before meiosis, and is followed by two quasinormal divisions. Larger nuclei in the germ cells were observed in all stages of type B spermatogonia in the testes of the sex-reversed clones. In contrast, besides having larger type A spermatogonia, the sex-reversed clones also had the type A spermatogonia that were the same size as those of normal diploids. It follows that chromosome duplication causing unreduced spermatogenesis occurred in the type A spermatogonia. The presence of tetraploid type A and early type B spermatogonia, identified by labeling with antispermatogonia-specific antigen 1, was verified using DNA content flow cytometry. These results support the conclusion that chromosome doubling occurs at the type A spermatogonial stage in diploid spermatogenesis in the clonal fish.

  3. Simple and rapid in vivo generation of chromosomal rearrangements using CRISPR/Cas9 technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Rafael B; Karaca, Elif; Ambrogio, Chiara; Cheong, Taek-Chin; Karayol, Emre; Minero, Valerio G; Voena, Claudia; Chiarle, Roberto

    2014-11-20

    Generation of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) for chromosomal translocations in the endogenous loci by a knockin strategy is lengthy and costly. The CRISPR/Cas9 system provides an innovative and flexible approach for genome engineering of genomic loci in vitro and in vivo. Here, we report the use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for engineering a specific chromosomal translocation in adult mice in vivo. We designed CRISPR/Cas9 lentiviral vectors to induce cleavage of the murine endogenous Eml4 and Alk loci in order to generate the Eml4-Alk gene rearrangement recurrently found in non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). Intratracheal or intrapulmonary inoculation of lentiviruses induced Eml4-Alk gene rearrangement in lung cells in vivo. Genomic and mRNA sequencing confirmed the genome editing and the production of the Eml4-Alk fusion transcript. All mice developed Eml4-Alk-rearranged lung tumors 2 months after the inoculation, demonstrating that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a feasible and simple method for the generation of chromosomal rearrangements in vivo.

  4. Data Mining Empowers the Generation of a Novel Class of Chromosome-specific DNA Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Hui; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Kwan, Johnson; Wang, Mei; O' Brien, Benjamin

    2011-03-08

    Probes that allow accurate delineation of chromosome-specific DNA sequences in interphase or metaphase cell nuclei have become important clinical tools that deliver life-saving information about the gender or chromosomal make-up of a product of conception or the probability of an embryo to implant, as well as the definition of tumor-specific genetic signatures. Often such highly specific DNA probes are proprietary in nature and have been the result of extensive probe selection and optimization procedures. We describe a novel approach that eliminates costly and time consuming probe selection and testing by applying data mining and common bioinformatics tools. Similar to a rational drug design process in which drug-protein interactions are modeled in the computer, the rational probe design described here uses a set of criteria and publicly available bioinformatics software to select the desired probe molecules from libraries comprised of hundreds of thousands of probe molecules. Examples describe the selection of DNA probes for the human X and Y chromosomes, both with unprecedented performance, but in a similar fashion, this approach can be applied to other chromosomes or species.

  5. Chromosomal gene inactivation in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum by natural transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, N-U; Bryant, D A

    2001-01-01

    Conditions for inactivating chromosomal genes of Chlorobium tepidum by natural transformation and homologous recombination were established. As a model, mutants unable to perform nitrogen fixation were constructed by interrupting nifD with various antibiotic resistance markers. Growth of wild...

  6. Chromosomal translocations in human cells are generated by canonical nonhomologous end-joining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezraoui, Hind; Piganeau, Marion; Renouf, Benjamin; Renaud, Jean-Baptiste; Sallmyr, Annahita; Ruis, Brian; Oh, Sehyun; Tomkinson, Alan E; Hendrickson, Eric A; Giovannangeli, Carine; Jasin, Maria; Brunet, Erika

    2014-09-18

    Breakpoint junctions of the chromosomal translocations that occur in human cancers display hallmarks of nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). In mouse cells, translocations are suppressed by canonical NHEJ (c-NHEJ) components, which include DNA ligase IV (LIG4), and instead arise from alternative NHEJ (alt-NHEJ). Here we used designer nucleases (ZFNs, TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas9) to introduce DSBs on two chromosomes to study translocation joining mechanisms in human cells. Remarkably, translocations were altered in cells deficient for LIG4 or its interacting protein XRCC4. Translocation junctions had significantly longer deletions and more microhomology, indicative of alt-NHEJ. Thus, unlike mouse cells, translocations in human cells are generated by c-NHEJ. Human cancer translocations induced by paired Cas9 nicks also showed a dependence on c-NHEJ, despite having distinct joining characteristics. These results demonstrate an unexpected and striking species-specific difference for common genomic rearrangements associated with tumorigenesis.

  7. Identification of chromosome abnormalities in the horse using a panel of chromosome-specific painting probes generated by microdissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugno, Monika; Słota, Ewa; Pieńkowska-Schelling, Aldona; Schelling, Claude

    2009-09-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) using a panel of molecular probes for all chromosome pairs obtained by chromosome microdissection of the domestic horse ( Equus caballus ) was used to diagnose karyotype abnormalities in 35 horses (32 mares, 2 stallions and 1 intersex), which were selected for the study due to infertility (23 horses), reduced fertility (10 horses) and developmental anomalies (2 horses). The use of the FISH technique with probes for each horse chromosome pair enabled the diagnosis of many different chromosome aberrations in this population. Among the horses analysed, 21 animals had normal karyotype - 64,XX (19 mares) and 64,XY (2 stallions). Fourteen animals, constituting 40% of the population studied, showed the following chromosome abnormalities: 63,X (1 mare); 63,X/64,XX (6 mares); 63,X/64,XX/65,XXX (3 mares); 63,X/65,XXX (1 mare); 64,XX/65,XX+Xp (1 mare); 63,X/64,XX/65,XX+Xq (1 mare), and 63,X/64,XX/65,XX+delY (1 intersex). When only the mares studied because of complete infertility were taken into consideration, this proportion exceeded 56%. Due to the increased frequency of the above-mentioned aberrations in the mosaic form of two or more lines, it was necessary to analyse a large number (100-300) of metaphase spreads. The use of specific molecular probes obtained by chromosome microdissection made these diagnoses much easier.

  8. Generation and Analysis of Transposon Ac/Ds-Induced Chromosomal Rearrangements in Rice Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Yuan Hu; Peterson, Thomas; Han, Chang-Deok

    2016-01-01

    Closely-located transposable elements (TEs) have been known to induce chromosomal breakage and rearrangements via alternative transposition. To study genome rearrangements in rice, an Ac/Ds system has been employed. This system comprises an immobile Ac element expressed under the control of CaMV 35S promoter, and a modified Ds element. A starter line carried Ac and a single copy of Ds at the OsRLG5 (Oryza sativa receptor-like gene 5). To enhance the transpositional activity, seed-derived calli were cultured and regenerated into plants. Among 270 lines regenerated from the starter, one line was selected that contained a pair of inversely-oriented Ds elements at the OsRLG5 (Oryza sativa receptor-like gene 5). The selected line was again subjected to tissue culture to obtain a regenerant population. Among 300 regenerated plants, 107 (36 %) contained chromosomal rearrangements including deletions, duplications, and inversions of various sizes. From 34 plants, transposition mechanisms leading to such genomic rearrangements were analyzed. The rearrangements were induced by sister chromatid transposition (SCT), homologous recombination (HR), and single chromatid transposition (SLCT). Among them, 22 events (65 %) were found to be transmitted to the next generation. These results demonstrate a great potential of tissue culture regeneration and the Ac/Ds system in understanding alternative transposition mechanisms and in developing chromosome engineering in plants.

  9. Generation of chicken Z-chromosome painting probes by microdissection for screening large-insert genomic libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, R; King, W A; Verrinder Gibbins, A M

    1997-01-01

    A strategy for rapid generation of chicken sex chromosome-Z painting probes has been developed using microdissection. Whole chromosome painting probes (WCPs) were prepared from 10-15 copies of mitotic metaphase chicken Z chromosomes. The microisolated chromosomes were subjected to PEG/proteinase K treatment in a collection drop to release DNA, which was then amplified using a degenerate oligonucleotide-primed shuttle PCR (DOP-Shuttle-PCR) strategy. Size distributions of the PCR products were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis and smears of DNA were revealed that ranged in size from 200-800 bp, without any evidence of preferential amplification. Both specificity and complexity of the probes have been analyzed by Southern blot and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Non-specific hybridization was efficiently blocked by using chicken competitor DNA. Analysis of the WCPs produced shows that collectively they provide uniform hybridization signals along the entire length of the chicken Z chromosome. To demonstrate one possible application of these complex probes, we screened a large-insert bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) chicken genomic library to select Z chromosome-specific clones. To address specificity of the selected clones and to physically map them to the Z chromosome, FISH analysis was used. Of the 3 clones initially tested, one clone (C3) carrying a 250-kb insert mapped to the distal portion of the short arm of the chicken Z chromosome. Therefore, this technique has provided appropriate probes for screening large-insert genomic libraries. Further application of these probes includes the analysis of chromosome rearrangements, studies of cases of heteroploidy involving the Z chromosome, positional cloning of Z-linked genes and studies on mechanisms of sex-chromosome evolution in birds.

  10. A first-generation X-inactivation profile of the human X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrel, L; Cottle, A A; Goglin, K C; Willard, H F

    1999-12-01

    In females, most genes on the X chromosome are generally assumed to be transcriptionally silenced on the inactive X as a result of X inactivation. However, particularly in humans, an increasing number of genes are known to "escape" X inactivation and are expressed from both the active (Xa) and inactive (Xi) X chromosomes; such genes reflect different molecular and epigenetic responses to X inactivation and are candidates for phenotypes associated with X aneuploidy. To identify genes that escape X inactivation and to generate a first-generation X-inactivation profile of the X, we have evaluated the expression of 224 X-linked genes and expressed sequence tags by reverse-transcription-PCR analysis of a panel of multiple independent mouse/human somatic cell hybrids containing a normal human Xi but no Xa. The resulting survey yields an initial X-inactivation profile that is estimated to represent approximately 10% of all X-linked transcripts. Of the 224 transcripts tested here, 34 (three of which are pseudoautosomal) were expressed in as many as nine Xi hybrids and thus appear to escape inactivation. The genes that escape inactivation are distributed nonrandomly along the X; 31 of 34 such transcripts map to Xp, implying that the two arms of the X are epigenetically and/or evolutionarily distinct and suggesting that genetic imbalance of Xp may be more severe clinically than imbalance of Xq. A complete X-inactivation profile will provide information relevant to clinical genetics and genetic counseling and should yield insight into the genomic and epigenetic organization of the X chromosome.

  11. Next generation haplotyping to decipher nuclear genomic interspecific admixture in Citrus species: analysis of chromosome 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curk, Franck; Ancillo, Gema; Garcia-Lor, Andres; Luro, François; Perrier, Xavier; Jacquemoud-Collet, Jean-Pierre; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2014-12-29

    The most economically important Citrus species originated by natural interspecific hybridization between four ancestral taxa (Citrus reticulata, Citrus maxima, Citrus medica, and Citrus micrantha) and from limited subsequent interspecific recombination as a result of apomixis and vegetative propagation. Such reticulate evolution coupled with vegetative propagation results in mosaic genomes with large chromosome fragments from the basic taxa in frequent interspecific heterozygosity. Modern breeding of these species is hampered by their complex heterozygous genomic structures that determine species phenotype and are broken by sexual hybridisation. Nevertheless, a large amount of diversity is present in the citrus gene pool, and breeding to allow inclusion of desirable traits is of paramount importance. However, the efficient mobilization of citrus biodiversity in innovative breeding schemes requires previous understanding of Citrus origins and genomic structures. Haplotyping of multiple gene fragments along the whole genome is a powerful approach to reveal the admixture genomic structure of current species and to resolve the evolutionary history of the gene pools. In this study, the efficiency of parallel sequencing with 454 methodology to decipher the hybrid structure of modern citrus species was assessed by analysis of 16 gene fragments on chromosome 2. 454 amplicon libraries were established using the Fluidigm array system for 48 genotypes and 16 gene fragments from chromosome 2. Haplotypes were established from the reads of each accession and phylogenetic analyses were performed using the haplotypic data for each gene fragment. The length of 454 reads and the level of differentiation between the ancestral taxa of modern citrus allowed efficient haplotype phylogenetic assignations for 12 of the 16 gene fragments. The analysis of the mixed genomic structure of modern species and cultivars (i) revealed C. maxima introgressions in modern mandarins, (ii) was

  12. Functional human artificial chromosomes are generated and stably maintained in human embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandegar, Mohammad A.; Moralli, Daniela; Khoja, Suhail; Cowley, Sally; Chan, David Y.L.; Yusuf, Mohammed; Mukherjee, Sayandip; Blundell, Michael P.; Volpi, Emanuela V.; Thrasher, Adrian J.; James, William; Monaco, Zoia L.

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel and efficient non-integrating gene expression system in human embryonic stem cells (hESc) utilizing human artificial chromosomes (HAC), which behave as autonomous endogenous host chromosomes and segregate correctly during cell division. HAC are important vectors for investigating the organization and structure of the kinetochore, and gene complementation. HAC have so far been obtained in immortalized or tumour-derived cell lines, but never in stem cells, thus limiting their potential therapeutic application. In this work, we modified the herpes simplex virus type 1 amplicon system for efficient transfer of HAC DNA into two hESc. The deriving stable clones generated green fluorescent protein gene-expressing HAC at high frequency, which were stably maintained without selection for 3 months. Importantly, no integration of the HAC DNA was observed in the hESc lines, compared with the fibrosarcoma-derived control cells, where the exogenous DNA frequently integrated in the host genome. The hESc retained pluripotency, differentiation and teratoma formation capabilities. This is the first report of successfully generating gene expressing de novo HAC in hESc, and is a significant step towards the genetic manipulation of stem cells and potential therapeutic applications. PMID:21593218

  13. Generation of Gross Chromosomal Rearrangements by a Single Engineered DNA Double Strand Break

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhijun; Zhang, Zhenhua; Roschke, Anna; Varga, Tamas; Aplan, Peter D.

    2017-01-01

    Gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCRs), including translocations, inversions amplifications, and deletions, can be causal events leading to malignant transformation. GCRs are thought to be triggered by DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), which in turn can be spontaneous or induced by external agents (eg. cytotoxic chemotherapy, ionizing radiation). It has been shown that induction of DNA DSBs at two defined loci can produce stable balanced chromosomal translocations, however, a single engineered DNA DSB could not. Herein, we report that although a single engineered DNA DSB in H2AX “knockdown” cells did not generate GCRs, repair of a single engineered DNA DSB in fibroblasts that had ablated H2ax did produce clonal, stable GCRs, including balanced translocations and megabase-pair inversions. Upon correction of the H2ax deficiency, cells no longer generated GCRs following a single engineered DNA DSB. These findings demonstrate that clonal, stable GCRs can be produced by a single engineered DNA DSB in H2ax knockout cells, and that the production of these GCRs is ameliorated by H2ax expression. PMID:28225067

  14. Stability in chromosome number and DNA content in synthetic tetraploids of Lolium multiflorum after two generations of selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roselaine Cristina Pereira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Chromosome doubling of Italian ryegrass genotypes ( Lolium multiflorum Lam. adapted to the brazilian edaphoclimatic conditions is an important strategy used by breeders and aims to obtain more vigorous genotypes with better forage quality and disease resistance. The effectiveness of chromosome doubling can be measured by genetic stability and fertility rates of plants over generations. However, a common problem in the polyploidization process is the regeneration of mixoploid plants that have impaired fertility and genetic stability. The objective of this study was to verify if progenies of recently tetraploidized plants remain stable regarding DNA content and chromosome number, over two generations. Progenies of L. multiflorum plants artificially tetraploidized with colchicine treatment were evaluated. Chromosome counting and estimates of the DNA content were used to evaluate the genetic stability. The percentage of tetraploid plants (4X increased over generations (18%, 34% and 91% in cycle 0, 1 and 2, respectively. All progenies identified as tetraploid by flow citometry showed variation in chromosome number (mixoploidy, but produced viable seeds. Results showed that stabilization in chromosome number and DNA content in tetraploidized plant progenies requires time and that the success of this procedure depends on a continuous and accurate screening and selection.

  15. The dynamic nature and territory of transcriptional machinery in the bacterial chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Jun Jin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Our knowledge of the regulation of genes involved in bacterial growth and stress responses is extensive; however, we have only recently begun to understand how environmental cues influence the dynamic, three-dimensional distribution of RNA polymerase (RNAP in Escherichia coli on the level of single cell, using wide-field fluorescence microscopy and state-of-the-art imaging techniques. Live-cell imaging using either an agarose-embedding procedure or a microfluidic system further underscores the dynamic nature of the distribution of RNAP in response to changes in the environment. A general agreement between live-cell and fixed-cell images has validated the formaldehyde-fixing procedure, which is a technical breakthrough in the study of the cell biology of RNAP. In this review we use a systems biology perspective to summarize the advances in the cell biology of RNAP in E. coli, including the discoveries of the bacterial nucleolus, the spatial compartmentalization of the transcription machinery at the periphery of the nucleoid, and the segregation of the chromosome territories for the two major cellular functions of transcription and replication in fast-growing cells. Our understanding of the coupling of transcription and bacterial chromosome (or nucleoid structure is also summarized. Using E. coli as a simple model system, co-imaging of RNAP with DNA and other factors during growth and stress responses will continue to be a useful tool for studying bacterial growth and adaptation in changing environment.

  16. Automatic Item Generation via Frame Semantics: Natural Language Generation of Math Word Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Paul; Sheehan, Kathleen

    This paper is an exploration of the conceptual issues that have arisen in the course of building a natural language generation (NLG) system for automatic test item generation. While natural language processing techniques are applicable to general verbal items, mathematics word problems are particularly tractable targets for natural language…

  17. Chromosome oscillations in mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campas, Otger

    2008-03-01

    Successful cell division necessitates a tight regulation of chromosome movement via the activity of molecular motors. Many of the key players at the origin of the forces generating the motion have been identified, but their spatial and temporal organization remains elusive. In animal cells, chromosomes periodically switch between phases of movement towards and away from the pole. This characteristic oscillatory behaviour cannot be explained by the current models of chromosome positioning and congression. We perform a self-contained theoretical analysis in which the motion of mono-oriented chromosomes results from the competition between the activity of the kinetochore and chromokinesin motors on the chromosome arms. Our analysis, consistent with the available experimental data, proposes that the interplay between the aster-like morphology of the spindle and the collective kinetics of molecular motors is at the origin of chromosome oscillations, positioning and congression. It provides a natural explanation for the so-called chromosome directional instability and for the mechanism by which chromosomes sense their position in space. In addition, we estimate the in vivo velocity of chromokinesins at vanishing load and propose new experiments to assess the mechanism at the origin of chromosome movement in cell division.

  18. Are Preons Dyons? Naturalness of Three Generations

    CERN Document Server

    Das, C R; Laperashvili, Larisa

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper the model of preons and their composites is constructed in the framework of the superstring-inspired E_6\\times \\widetilde{E_6} gauge group of symmetry which reveals a generalized dual symmetry. Here E_6 and \\widetilde{E_6} are non-dual and dual sectors of theory with hyper-electric g and hyper-magnetic \\tilde g charges, respectively. We follow the old idea by J. Pati presuming that preons are dyons, which in our model are confined by hyper-magnetic strings - composite {\\bf N}=1 supersymmetric non-Abelian flux tubes created by the condensation of spreons near the Planck scale. Considering preons belonging to the 27-plet of E_6, we have investigated the breakdown of E_6 (and \\widetilde{E_6}) near the Planck scale into the SU(6)\\times U(1) (and \\widetilde{SU(6)}\\times \\widetilde{U(1)}) gauge group and shown that the six types of strings having fluxes \\Phi_n=n\\Phi_0 (n=\\pm 1,\\pm 2,\\pm 3) produce three (and only three) generations of composite quark-leptons and bosons. The model predicts the e...

  19. Competition and natural monopoly. The case for generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelegry, E.A. [Union Electrica, SA, Madrid (Spain)

    1996-12-31

    Traditionally, economic theory has considered the generation, transport and distribution of electricity to be a natural monopoly, primarily as a result of the economies of scale associated with the electricity industry. Recently, and partly as a consequence of the deregulation trends within Europe, this paradigm of a natural monopoly in electricity generation has come under question. Some examples and references are used to support the existence of economies of scale and scope of electricity generation, and for this, and in accordance with economic theory, can be argued the existence of natural monopoly. Competition in generation is discussed, with the aim of lowering the cost of electricity that can be achieved by other means than the competition between generators over the bidding price. The advantages and disadvantages of the new generation are considered, such as gas in combined cycle, cogeneration systems and renewables. (R.P.).

  20. Induced pluripotent stem cell generation from a man carrying a complex chromosomal rearrangement as a genetic model for infertility studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouka, Aurélie; Izard, Vincent; Tachdjian, Gérard; Brisset, Sophie; Yates, Frank; Mayeur, Anne; Drévillon, Loïc; Jarray, Rafika; Leboulch, Philippe; Maouche-Chrétien, Leila; Tosca, Lucie

    2017-01-01

    Despite progress in human reproductive biology, the cause of male infertility often remains unknown, due to the lack of appropriate and convenient in vitro models of meiosis. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from the cells of infertile patients could provide a gold standard model for generating primordial germ cells and studying their development and the process of spermatogenesis. We report the characterization of a complex chromosomal rearrangement (CCR) in an azoospermic patient, and the successful generation of specific-iPSCs from PBMC-derived erythroblasts. The CCR was characterized by karyotype, fluorescence in situ hybridization and oligonucleotide-based array-comparative genomic hybridization. The CCR included five breakpoints and was caused by the inverted insertion of a chromosome 12 segment into the short arm of one chromosome 7 and a pericentric inversion of the structurally rearranged chromosome 12. Gene mapping of the breakpoints led to the identification of a candidate gene, SYCP3. Erythroblasts from the patient were reprogrammed with Sendai virus vectors to generate iPSCs. We assessed iPSC pluripotency by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence staining and teratoma induction. The generation of specific-iPSCs from patients with a CCR provides a valuable in vitro genetic model for studying the mechanisms by which chromosomal abnormalities alter meiosis and germ cell development. PMID:28045072

  1. Induced pluripotent stem cell generation from a man carrying a complex chromosomal rearrangement as a genetic model for infertility studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouka, Aurélie; Izard, Vincent; Tachdjian, Gérard; Brisset, Sophie; Yates, Frank; Mayeur, Anne; Drévillon, Loïc; Jarray, Rafika; Leboulch, Philippe; Maouche-Chrétien, Leila; Tosca, Lucie

    2017-01-03

    Despite progress in human reproductive biology, the cause of male infertility often remains unknown, due to the lack of appropriate and convenient in vitro models of meiosis. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from the cells of infertile patients could provide a gold standard model for generating primordial germ cells and studying their development and the process of spermatogenesis. We report the characterization of a complex chromosomal rearrangement (CCR) in an azoospermic patient, and the successful generation of specific-iPSCs from PBMC-derived erythroblasts. The CCR was characterized by karyotype, fluorescence in situ hybridization and oligonucleotide-based array-comparative genomic hybridization. The CCR included five breakpoints and was caused by the inverted insertion of a chromosome 12 segment into the short arm of one chromosome 7 and a pericentric inversion of the structurally rearranged chromosome 12. Gene mapping of the breakpoints led to the identification of a candidate gene, SYCP3. Erythroblasts from the patient were reprogrammed with Sendai virus vectors to generate iPSCs. We assessed iPSC pluripotency by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence staining and teratoma induction. The generation of specific-iPSCs from patients with a CCR provides a valuable in vitro genetic model for studying the mechanisms by which chromosomal abnormalities alter meiosis and germ cell development.

  2. Electric fields generated by synchronized oscillations of microtubules, centrosomes and chromosomes regulate the dynamics of mitosis and meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yue

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Super-macromolecular complexes play many important roles in eukaryotic cells. Classical structural biological studies focus on their complicated molecular structures, physical interactions and biochemical modifications. Recent advances concerning intracellular electric fields generated by cell organelles and super-macromolecular complexes shed new light on the mechanisms that govern the dynamics of mitosis and meiosis. In this review we synthesize this knowledge to provide an integrated theoretical model of these cellular events. We suggest that the electric fields generated by synchronized oscillation of microtubules, centrosomes, and chromatin fibers facilitate several events during mitosis and meiosis, including centrosome trafficking, chromosome congression in mitosis and synapsis between homologous chromosomes in meiosis. These intracellular electric fields are generated under energy excitation through the synchronized electric oscillations of the dipolar structures of microtubules, centrosomes and chromosomes, three of the super-macromolecular complexes within an animal cell.

  3. Electric fields generated by synchronized oscillations of microtubules, centrosomes and chromosomes regulate the dynamics of mitosis and meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Zhan, Qimin

    2012-07-02

    Super-macromolecular complexes play many important roles in eukaryotic cells. Classical structural biological studies focus on their complicated molecular structures, physical interactions and biochemical modifications. Recent advances concerning intracellular electric fields generated by cell organelles and super-macromolecular complexes shed new light on the mechanisms that govern the dynamics of mitosis and meiosis. In this review we synthesize this knowledge to provide an integrated theoretical model of these cellular events. We suggest that the electric fields generated by synchronized oscillation of microtubules, centrosomes, and chromatin fibers facilitate several events during mitosis and meiosis, including centrosome trafficking, chromosome congression in mitosis and synapsis between homologous chromosomes in meiosis. These intracellular electric fields are generated under energy excitation through the synchronized electric oscillations of the dipolar structures of microtubules, centrosomes and chromosomes, three of the super-macromolecular complexes within an animal cell.

  4. Restrictions Limiting the Generation of DNA Double Strand Breaks during Chromosomal V(D)J Recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Robert E.; Wooley, Andrea L.; Hughes, Maureen M.; Wehrly, Tara D.; Swat, Wojciech; Sleckman, Barry P.

    2002-01-01

    Antigen receptor loci are composed of numerous variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) gene segments, each flanked by recombination signal sequences (RSSs). The V(D)J recombination reaction proceeds through RSS recognition and DNA cleavage steps making it possible for multiple DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) to be introduced at a single locus. Here we use ligation-mediated PCR to analyze DNA cleavage intermediates in thymocytes from mice with targeted RSS mutations at the endogenous TCRβ locus. We show that DNA cleavage does not occur at individual RSSs but rather must be coordinated between RSS pairs flanking gene segments that ultimately form coding joins. Coordination of the DNA cleavage step occurs over great distances in the chromosome and favors intra- over interchromosomal recombination. Furthermore, through several restrictions imposed on the generation of both nonpaired and paired DNA DSBs, this requirement promotes antigen receptor gene integrity and genomic stability in developing lymphocytes undergoing V(D)J recombination. PMID:11828005

  5. The nucleotide excision repair (NER system of Helicobacter pylori: Role in mutation prevention and chromosomal import patterns after natural transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moccia Claudia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extensive genetic diversity and rapid allelic diversification are characteristics of the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori, and are believed to contribute to its ability to cause chronic infections. Both a high mutation rate and frequent imports of short fragments of exogenous DNA during mixed infections play important roles in generating this allelic diversity. In this study, we used a genetic approach to investigate the roles of nucleotide excision repair (NER pathway components in H. pylori mutation and recombination. Results Inactivation of any of the four uvr genes strongly increased the susceptibility of H. pylori to DNA damage by ultraviolet light. Inactivation of uvrA and uvrB significantly decreased mutation frequencies whereas only the uvrA deficient mutant exhibited a significant decrease of the recombination frequency after natural transformation. A uvrC mutant did not show significant changes in mutation or recombination rates; however, inactivation of uvrC promoted the incorporation of significantly longer fragments of donor DNA (2.2-fold increase into the recipient chromosome. A deletion of uvrD induced a hyper-recombinational phenotype. Conclusions Our data suggest that the NER system has multiple functions in the genetic diversification of H. pylori, by contributing to its high mutation rate, and by controlling the incorporation of imported DNA fragments after natural transformation.

  6. Nearby inverted repeats fuse to generate acentric and dicentric palindromic chromosomes by a replication template exchange mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Ken'Ichi; Lambert, Sarah; Baldacci, Giuseppe; Murray, Johanne M; Carr, Antony M

    2009-12-15

    Gene amplification plays important roles in the progression of cancer and contributes to acquired drug resistance during treatment. Amplification can initiate via dicentric palindromic chromosome production and subsequent breakage-fusion-bridge cycles. Here we show that, in fission yeast, acentric and dicentric palindromic chromosomes form by homologous recombination protein-dependent fusion of nearby inverted repeats, and that these fusions occur frequently when replication forks arrest within the inverted repeats. Genetic and molecular analyses suggest that these acentric and dicentric palindromic chromosomes arise not by previously described mechanisms, but by a replication template exchange mechanism that does not involve a DNA double-strand break. We thus propose an alternative mechanism for the generation of palindromic chromosomes dependent on replication fork arrest at closely spaced inverted repeats.

  7. Identification of copy number variations associated with congenital heart disease by chromosomal microarray analysis and next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiangyu; Li, Jie; Ru, Tong; Wang, Yaping; Xu, Yan; Yang, Ying; Wu, Xing; Cram, David S; Hu, Yali

    2016-04-01

    To determine the type and frequency of pathogenic chromosomal abnormalities in fetuses diagnosed with congenital heart disease (CHD) using chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) and validate next-generation sequencing as an alternative diagnostic method. Chromosomal aneuploidies and submicroscopic copy number variations (CNVs) were identified in amniocytes DNA samples from CHD fetuses using high-resolution CMA and copy number variation sequencing (CNV-Seq). Overall, 21 of 115 CHD fetuses (18.3%) referred for CMA had a pathogenic chromosomal anomaly. In six of 73 fetuses (8.2%) with an isolated CHD, CMA identified two cases of DiGeorge syndrome, and one case each of 1q21.1 microdeletion, 16p11.2 microdeletion and Angelman/Prader Willi syndromes, and 22q11.21 microduplication syndrome. In 12 of 42 fetuses (28.6%) with CHD and additional structural abnormalities, CMA identified eight whole or partial trisomies (19.0%), five CNVs (11.9%) associated with DiGeorge, Wolf-Hirschhorn, Miller-Dieker, Cri du Chat and Blepharophimosis, Ptosis, and Epicanthus Inversus syndromes and four other rare pathogenic CNVs (9.5%). Overall, there was a 100% diagnostic concordance between CMA and CNV-Seq for detecting all 21 pathogenic chromosomal abnormalities associated with CHD. CMA and CNV-Seq are reliable and accurate prenatal techniques for identifying pathogenic fetal chromosomal abnormalities associated with cardiac defects. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. A Structural Algorithm for Complex Natural Languages Parse Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enikuomehin, A. O.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In artificial intelligence, the study of how humans understand natural languages is cognitive based and such science is essential in the development of a modern day embedded robotic systems. Such systems should have the capability to process natural languages and generate meaningful output. As against machines, humans have the ability to understand a natural language sentence due to the in-born facility inherent in them and such is used to process it. Robotics requires appropriate PARSE systems to be developed in order to handle language based operations. In this paper, we present a new method of generating parse structures on complex natural language using algorithmic processes. The paper explores the process of generating meaning via parse structure and improves on the existing results using well established parsing scheme. The resulting algorithm was implemented in Java and a natural language interface for parse generation is presented. The result further shows that tokenizing sentences into their respective units affects the parse structure in the first instance and semantic representation in the larger scale. Efforts were made to limit the rules used in the generation of the grammar since natural language rules are almost infinite depending on the language set. (Abstract

  9. Infantile spasms and 15q11.2q13.1 chromosome duplication in two successive generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riikonen, Raili Sylvia; Wallden, Tiina; Kokkonen, Hannaleena

    2016-01-01

    Familial cases of West syndrome have been reported only in Japan. In that study no chromosomal analyses were made. It has been suggested that microarray analysis should be included in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with infantile spasms and developmental delay, when an evaluation for structural brain lesions and metabolic disorders reveal no abnormal findings. We report here the first case of infantile spasms and 15q11.2q13.1 chromosome duplication in two successive generations. The daughter and mother with infantile spasms, and the autistic son had the duplication. The clinical course of infantile spasms was very similar in the mother and daughter. The spasms were primarily considered to be of unknown aetiology. Chromosomal microarray analysis revealed a 6.2 Mb size 15q11.2q13.1 duplication. The duplication belongs to the 15q11q13 duplication syndrome (OMIM 608636) which when maternally derived is characterised by neuro-behavioural disorders like autism, hypotonia, cognitive deficit, language delay and epilepsy. The proportion of patients with unknown aetiology for infantile spasms will decrease when more careful chromosomal studies are made. Our report expands the phenotype of chromosome 15q duplication syndrome and is the first report of this abnormality in two successive generations of infantile spasms.

  10. Chromosomal Location of Gene for Earbranching of Barley Natural Mutant "f151" Using SSR Markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Zongyun(冯宗云); Zhang Lili; Zhang Yizheng; Ling Hongqing

    2004-01-01

    f151, a natural earbranching mutant from naked barley landrace, has better structural characteristics of spike and is thought to be a very valuable germplasm to high-yield breeding of barley. Genetic analysis of earbranching trait is carried out in the populations of F1, F2, B1 and B2 which are produced by crossing including reciprocals and backcrossing between f151 and different barley varieties. The results show that earbranching trait of f151 is controlled by one pair of recessive genes without cytoplasm effects. The linkage between the earbranching gene and the SSR marker HVM40 on the short arm of chromosome 4H is found by bulked segregated analysis using SSR markers based on the F2 population of the hybrid "f151×Gateway". It can be inferred from the recombinant value of 0.087 between the gene and HVM40 that this gene is located on 4HS. The gene is temporarily named "mb".

  11. Trans-generational radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the female enhances the action of chemical mutagens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camats, Nuria [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, Francisca [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Parrilla, Juan Jose [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, 30120 El Palmar, Murcia (Spain); Calaf, Joaquim [Servei de Ginecologia i Obstetricia, Hospital Universitari de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Martin, Miguel [Departament de Pediatria, d' Obstetricia i Ginecologia i de Medicina Preventiva, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Caldes, Montserrat Garcia [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: Montserrat.Garcia.Caldes@uab.es

    2008-04-02

    Genomic instability can be produced by ionising radiation, so-called radiation-induced genomic instability, and chemical mutagens. Radiation-induced genomic instability occurs in both germinal and somatic cells and also in the offspring of irradiated individuals, and it is characterised by genetic changes including chromosomal rearrangements. The majority of studies of trans-generational, radiation-induced genomic instability have been described in the male germ line, whereas the authors who have chosen the female as a model are scarce. The aim of this work is to find out the radiation-induced effects in the foetal offspring of X-ray-treated female rats and, at the same time, the possible impact of this radiation-induced genomic instability on the action of a chemical mutagen. In order to achieve both goals, the quantity and quality of chromosomal damage were analysed. In order to detect trans-generational genomic instability, a total of 4806 metaphases from foetal tissues from the foetal offspring of X-irradiated female rats (5 Gy, acute dose) were analysed. The study's results showed that there is radiation-induced genomic instability: the number of aberrant metaphases and the breaks per total metaphases studied increased and were found to be statistically significant (p {<=} 0.05), with regard to the control group. In order to identify how this trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability could influence the chromosomal behaviour of the offspring of irradiated rat females in front of a chemical agent (aphidicolin), a total of 2481 metaphases were studied. The observed results showed that there is an enhancement of the action of the chemical agent: chromosomal breaks per aberrant metaphases show significant differences (p {<=} 0.05) in the X-ray- and aphidicolin-treated group as regards the aphidicolin-treated group. In conclusion, our findings indicate that there is trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the foetal

  12. Generating natural language descriptions using speaker-dependent information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castro Ferreira, Thiago; Paraboni, Ivandré

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the issue of human variation in natural language referring expression generation. We introduce a model of content selection that takes speaker-dependent information into account to produce descriptions that closely resemble those produced by each individual, as seen in a number

  13. Simple and Rapid In Vivo Generation of Chromosomal Rearrangements using CRISPR/Cas9 Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael B. Blasco

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Generation of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs for chromosomal translocations in the endogenous loci by a knockin strategy is lengthy and costly. The CRISPR/Cas9 system provides an innovative and flexible approach for genome engineering of genomic loci in vitro and in vivo. Here, we report the use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for engineering a specific chromosomal translocation in adult mice in vivo. We designed CRISPR/Cas9 lentiviral vectors to induce cleavage of the murine endogenous Eml4 and Alk loci in order to generate the Eml4-Alk gene rearrangement recurrently found in non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs. Intratracheal or intrapulmonary inoculation of lentiviruses induced Eml4-Alk gene rearrangement in lung cells in vivo. Genomic and mRNA sequencing confirmed the genome editing and the production of the Eml4-Alk fusion transcript. All mice developed Eml4-Alk-rearranged lung tumors 2 months after the inoculation, demonstrating that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a feasible and simple method for the generation of chromosomal rearrangements in vivo.

  14. Generating Bijections between HOAS and the Natural Numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Boyland, John Tang

    2010-01-01

    A provably correct bijection between higher-order abstract syntax (HOAS) and the natural numbers enables one to define a "not equals" relationship between terms and also to have an adequate encoding of sets of terms, and maps from one term family to another. Sets and maps are useful in many situations and are preferably provided in a library of some sort. I have released a map and set library for use with Twelf which can be used with any type for which a bijection to the natural numbers exists. Since creating such bijections is tedious and error-prone, I have created a "bijection generator" that generates such bijections automatically together with proofs of correctness, all in the context of Twelf.

  15. Chromosome studies of European cyprinid fishes: cross-species painting reveals natural allotetraploid origin of a Carassius female with 206 chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knytl, M; Kalous, L; Symonová, R; Rylková, K; Ráb, P

    2013-01-01

    A single female with 206 chromosomes and another 26 females with 156 chromosomes identified as Prussian carp, Carassius gibelio, and 5 individuals with 100 chromosomes identified as crucian carp, C. carassius, were sampled during field survey in one locality in the upper Elbe River. To identify the origin of females with high chromosome numbers, comparative karyotype analysis, GISH, with whole C. carassius DNA as probe and phylogenetic positions of sampled individuals revealed by cytochrome b mitochondrial marker were performed. GISH showed consistently bright labeling of 50 chromosomal elements out of 206, corresponding to the haploid chromosome number of C. carassius. The position of these females with high chromosome numbers in a reconstructed phylogenetic tree was within the clade of C. gibelio, documenting its affiliation to C. gibelio mitochondrial, i.e. maternal lineage. Our findings indicated that the mother of the female with high chromosome numbers was a gynogenetically reproducing 156-chromosome C. gibelio female and the father a bisexually reproducing C. carassius male. We, therefore, hypothesized that the C. gibelio × C. carassius allopolyploid female with 206 chromosomes arose by a mechanism of sperm genome addition to an unreduced egg of the mother.

  16. 53BP1 nuclear bodies form around DNA lesions generated by mitotic transmission of chromosomes under replication stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, Claudia; Savic, Velibor; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Completion of genome duplication is challenged by structural and topological barriers that impede progression of replication forks. Although this can seriously undermine genome integrity, the fate of DNA with unresolved replication intermediates is not known. Here, we show that mild replication...... bodies shield chromosomal fragile sites sequestered in these compartments against erosion. Together, these data indicate that restoration of DNA or chromatin integrity at loci prone to replication problems requires mitotic transmission to the next cell generations....... increases after genetic ablation of BLM, a DNA helicase associated with dissolution of entangled DNA. Conversely, 53BP1 nuclear bodies are partially suppressed by knocking down SMC2, a condensin subunit required for mechanical stability of mitotic chromosomes. Finally, we provide evidence that 53BP1 nuclear...

  17. Chromosome Mis-segregation Generates Cell-Cycle-Arrested Cells with Complex Karyotypes that Are Eliminated by the Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santaguida, Stefano; Richardson, Amelia; Iyer, Divya Ramalingam; M'Saad, Ons; Zasadil, Lauren; Knouse, Kristin A; Wong, Yao Liang; Rhind, Nicholas; Desai, Arshad; Amon, Angelika

    2017-06-19

    Aneuploidy, a state of karyotype imbalance, is a hallmark of cancer. Changes in chromosome copy number have been proposed to drive disease by modulating the dosage of cancer driver genes and by promoting cancer genome evolution. Given the potential of cells with abnormal karyotypes to become cancerous, do pathways that limit the prevalence of such cells exist? By investigating the immediate consequences of aneuploidy on cell physiology, we identified mechanisms that eliminate aneuploid cells. We find that chromosome mis-segregation leads to further genomic instability that ultimately causes cell-cycle arrest. We further show that cells with complex karyotypes exhibit features of senescence and produce pro-inflammatory signals that promote their clearance by the immune system. We propose that cells with abnormal karyotypes generate a signal for their own elimination that may serve as a means for cancer cell immunosurveillance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Next Generation Sequencing of Actinobacteria for the Discovery of Novel Natural Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Gomez-Escribano

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Like many fields of the biosciences, actinomycete natural products research has been revolutionised by next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS. Hundreds of new genome sequences from actinobacteria are made public every year, many of them as a result of projects aimed at identifying new natural products and their biosynthetic pathways through genome mining. Advances in these technologies in the last five years have meant not only a reduction in the cost of whole genome sequencing, but also a substantial increase in the quality of the data, having moved from obtaining a draft genome sequence comprised of several hundred short contigs, sometimes of doubtful reliability, to the possibility of obtaining an almost complete and accurate chromosome sequence in a single contig, allowing a detailed study of gene clusters and the design of strategies for refactoring and full gene cluster synthesis. The impact that these technologies are having in the discovery and study of natural products from actinobacteria, including those from the marine environment, is only starting to be realised. In this review we provide a historical perspective of the field, analyse the strengths and limitations of the most relevant technologies, and share the insights acquired during our genome mining projects.

  19. Next Generation Sequencing of Actinobacteria for the Discovery of Novel Natural Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Escribano, Juan Pablo; Alt, Silke; Bibb, Mervyn J

    2016-04-13

    Like many fields of the biosciences, actinomycete natural products research has been revolutionised by next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS). Hundreds of new genome sequences from actinobacteria are made public every year, many of them as a result of projects aimed at identifying new natural products and their biosynthetic pathways through genome mining. Advances in these technologies in the last five years have meant not only a reduction in the cost of whole genome sequencing, but also a substantial increase in the quality of the data, having moved from obtaining a draft genome sequence comprised of several hundred short contigs, sometimes of doubtful reliability, to the possibility of obtaining an almost complete and accurate chromosome sequence in a single contig, allowing a detailed study of gene clusters and the design of strategies for refactoring and full gene cluster synthesis. The impact that these technologies are having in the discovery and study of natural products from actinobacteria, including those from the marine environment, is only starting to be realised. In this review we provide a historical perspective of the field, analyse the strengths and limitations of the most relevant technologies, and share the insights acquired during our genome mining projects.

  20. Cells with dysfunctional telomeres are susceptible to reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide via generation of multichromosomal fusions and chromosomal fragments bearing telomeres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Seon Rang [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong-Eun; Juhn, Kyoung-Mi; Ju, Yeun-Jin; Jeong, Jaemin [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chang-Mo; Yun, Hyun Jin [Division of Radiation Effect, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Mi Yong; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Joo, Hyun-Yoo; Park, Eun-Ran; Park, In-Chul; Hong, Sung Hee; Hwang, Sang-Gu [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Haekwon [Department of Biotechnology, Seoul Woman' s University, Seoul 139-774 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Myung-Haing [Laboratory of Toxicology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Hoon [Department of Biology, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Gil Hong [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kee-Ho, E-mail: khlee@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Under conditions of telomere erosion, cells become extremely sensitive to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chromosomal regions adjacent to telomeres are cleaved by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} under such conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} thus causes multichromosomal fusions and generation of small chromosomal fragments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-acetylcysteine prevents H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced chromosomal aberrations. -- Abstract: During genotoxic stress, reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) is a prime mediator of the DNA damage response. Telomeres function both to assist in DNA damage repair and to inhibit chromosomal end-to-end fusion. Here, we show that telomere dysfunction renders cells susceptible to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, via generation of multichromosomal fusion and chromosomal fragments. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} caused formation of multichromosomal end-to-end fusions involving more than three chromosomes, preferentially when telomeres were erosive. Interestingly, extensive chromosomal fragmentation (yielding small-sized fragments) occurred only in cells exhibiting such multichromosomal fusions. Telomeres were absent from fusion points, being rather present in the small fragments, indicating that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} cleaves chromosomal regions adjacent to telomeres. Restoration of telomere function or addition of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine prevented development of chromosomal aberrations and rescued the observed hypersensitivity to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Thus, chromosomal regions adjacent to telomeres become sensitive to reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide when telomeres are dysfunctional, and are cleaved to produce multichromosomal fusions and small chromosomal fragments bearing the telomeres.

  1. A simple method to generate chromosomal mutations in Lactobacillus plantarum strain TF103 to eliminate undesired fermentation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siqing

    2006-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria have been explored to convert lignocellulosic biomass to biofuel and bioproducts. Our long-term goal is to create genetically engineered lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains that convert agricultural biomass into ethanol and other value-added products. The immediate approaches toward this goal involve genetic manipulations by either introducing ethanol production pathway genes or inactivating pathways genes that lead to production of undesired byproducts. The widely studied species Lactobacillus plantarum is now considered a model for genetic manipulations of LAB. In this study, L. plantarum TF103 strain, in which two of the chromosomal L-ldh and D-ldh genes are inactivated, was used to introduce additional mutations on the chromosome to eliminate undesired fermentation products. We targeted the acetolactate synthase gene (als) that converts pyruvate to acetolactate, to eliminate the production of acetoin and 2,3-butanodial. A pBluescript derivative containing sections of the als coding region and an erythromycin resistance gene was directly introduced into L. plantarum TF103 cells to create mutations under selection pressure. The resulting erythromycin resistant (Emr) TF103 strain appears to have chromosomal mutations of both the als and the adjacent lysP genes as revealed by polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot analyses. Mutations were thus generated via targeted homologous recombination using a Gram-negative cloning vector, eliminating the use of a shuttle vector. This method should facilitate research in targeted inactivation of other genes in LAB.

  2. Overview of recurrent chromosomal losses in retinoblastoma detected by low coverage next generation sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Chequer, A.J.; Méndez-Tenorio, A.; Olguín-Ruiz, G.; Sánchez-Vallejo, C.; Isa, P.; Arias, C.F.; Torres, J.; Hernández-Angeles, A.; Ramírez-Ortiz, M.A.; Lara, C.; Cabrera-Muñoz, M.L.; Sadowinski-Pine, S.; Bravo-Ortiz, J.C.; Ramón-García, G.; Diegopérez-Ramírez, J.; Ramírez-Reyes, G.; Casarrubias-Islas, R.; Ramírez, J.; Orjuela, M.A.; Ponce-Castañeda, M.V.

    2016-01-01

    Genes are frequently lost or gained in malignant tumors and the analysis of these changes can be informative about the underlying tumor biology. Retinoblastoma is a pediatric intraocular malignancy, and since deletions in chromosome 13 have been described in this tumor, we performed genome wide sequencing with the Illumina platform to test whether recurrent losses could be detected in low coverage data from DNA pools of Rb cases. An in silico reference profile for each pool was created from the human genome sequence GRCh37p5; a chromosome integrity score and a graphics 40 Kb window analysis approach, allowed us to identify with high resolution previously reported non random recurrent losses in all chromosomes of these tumors. We also found a pattern of gains and losses associated to clear and dark cytogenetic bands respectively. We further analyze a pool of medulloblastoma and found a more stable genomic profile and previously reported losses in this tumor. This approach facilitates identification of recurrent deletions from many patients that may be biological relevant for tumor development. PMID:26883451

  3. Chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of employees in transformer and generator production exposed to electromagnetic fields and mineral oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyberg, K; Hansteen, I L; Vistnes, A I

    2001-04-01

    The objective was to study the risk of cytogenetic damage among high voltage laboratory workers exposed to electromagnetic fields and mineral oil. This is a cross sectional study of 24 exposed and 24 matched controls in a Norwegian transformer factory. The exposure group included employees in the high voltage laboratory and in the generator soldering department. Electric and magnetic fields and oil mist and vapor were measured. Blood samples were analyzed for chromosomal aberrations in cultured lymphocytes. In addition to conventional cultures, the lymphocytes were also treated with hydroxyurea and caffeine. This procedure inhibits DNA synthesis and repair in vitro, revealing in vivo genotoxic lesions that are repaired during conventional culturing. In conventional cultures, the exposure group and the controls showed similar values for all cytogenetic parameters. In the DNA synthesis- and repair-inhibited cultures, generator welders showed no differences compared to controls. Among high voltage laboratory testers, compared to the controls, the median number of chromatid breaks was doubled (5 vs. 2.5 per 50 cells; P0.05) and the median number of aberrant cells was 5 vs. 3.5 (Poil exposure may produce chromosomal aberrations.

  4. Topological analysis of a mixing flow generated by natural convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Pablo Sebastián; de la Cruz, Luis Miguel; Ramos, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    We use topological tools to describe the natural convective motion and the Lagrangian trajectories of a flow generated by stepwise, alternating heating and cooling protocol of opposite vertical walls of a cubic container. The working fluid considered is Newtonian and the system is in presence of the acceleration of gravity but the nonlinear terms are neglected, i.e., we study the piece-wise steady and linear problem. For this convective mixing flow, we identify invariant surfaces formed by the Lagrangian orbits of massless tracers that are topologically equivalent to spherical shells and period-1 lines with elliptic and hyperbolic segments that are located on symmetry planes. We describe the previous features as functions of the Rayleigh number in the range 3 × 104 ≤ Ra ≤ 5 × 105. We show that this system shares properties with other systems with non-toroidal invariant surfaces.

  5. Department of Energy power generation programs for natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajura, R.A.

    1995-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring two major programs to develop high efficiency, natural gas fueled power generation technologies. These programs are the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program and the Fuel Cell Program. While natural gas is gaining acceptance in the electric power sector, the improved technology from these programs will make gas an even more attractive fuel, particularly in urban areas where environmental concerns are greatest. Under the auspices of DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy (DOE/FE) and Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (DOE/EE), the 8-year ATS Program is developing and will demonstrate advanced gas turbine power systems for both large central power systems and smaller industrial-scale systems. The large-scale systems will have efficiencies significantly greater than 60 percent, while the industrial-scale systems will have efficiencies with at least an equivalent 15 percent increase over the best 1992-vintage technology. The goal is to have the system ready for commercial offering by the year 2000.

  6. Linkage of morbid obesity with polymorphic microsatellite markers on chromosome 1q31 in a three-generation Canadian kindred

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, J.D.; Bulman, D.E.; Ebers, G.C. [University Hospital, London (Canada)]|[INSERM, Paris (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Obesity is the most common nutritional disorder affecting Western societies. An estimated 3.7 million Canadians are considered to be overweight, a condition associated with hypertension, accelerated atherosclerosis, diabetes and a host of other medical problems. We have identified a 3 generation kindred in which morbid obesity appears to segregate in an autosomal dominant manner. All individuals were examined. Mass (kg) and heights (m) were measured in order to determine a body mass index (BMI) for each individual. Those individuals with BMI of greater than or equal to 30.0 were designated as affected. In the pedigree studied 25 individuals met this criteria and 12 of these were morbidly obese (BMI greater or equal to 40.0). A search of candidate genes proved unfruitful. A linkage study was initiated. All individuals in the pedigree were genotyped for microsatellite markers which were spaced every 20 centimorgans (cM). Positive evidence of linkage was detected with markers which map to 1q31-32 (lod score of 3.6 at {theta} = 0.05). Notably, strong effects for fatness in pigs have been found on pig chromosome 4 which has synteny with human chromosome 1q21-32. We are currently attempting to refine the position of this gene using linkage analysis with other microsatellite markers from this region of the genome. In addition we are screening other families in which obesity segregates for linkage to 1q31.

  7. Generating knock-in parasites: integration of an ornithine decarboxylase transgene into its chromosomal locus in Leishmania donovani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Sigrid C; Kline, Chelsey; Liu, Wei; Ullman, Buddy

    2011-06-01

    Leishmania null mutants created by targeted gene replacement are typically complemented with chimeric episomes harboring the replaced gene in order to validate that the observed phenotype is due to the specific gene deletion. However, the current inventory of available episomes for complementation of genetic lesions in Leishmania is unstable in the absence of drug selection, and levels of gene expression cannot be controlled, especially in vivo. To circumvent this impediment, a strategy to re-introduce the targeted gene into the original chromosomal locus to generate "knock-in" parasites within selectable null backgrounds has been developed. A genomic fragment encompassing the ornithine decarboxylase locus and lacking heterologous DNA sequences was transfected into ornithine decarboxylase-deficient Leishmania donovani. The construct randomly integrated into either chromosomal allele by homologous recombination restoring polyamine prototrophy and revealing that LdODC was functionally expressed in the knock-in clones. This strategy offers a mechanism for complementing a genetic lesion amenable to positive selection in a manner that facilitates stable gene expression from its original locus in the absence of continuous drug pressure.

  8. Mapping Breakpoints of Complex Chromosome Rearrangements Involving a Partial Trisomy 15q23.1-q26.2 Revealed by Next Generation Sequencing and Conventional Techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Pan

    Full Text Available Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs, which are rather rare in the whole population, may be associated with aberrant phenotypes. Next-generation sequencing (NGS and conventional techniques, could be used to reveal specific CCRs for better genetic counseling. We report the CCRs of a girl and her mother, which were identified using a combination of NGS and conventional techniques including G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and PCR. The girl demonstrated CCRs involving chromosomes 3 and 8, while the CCRs of her mother involved chromosomes 3, 5, 8, 11 and 15. HumanCytoSNP-12 Chip analysis identified a 35.4 Mb duplication on chromosome 15q21.3-q26.2 in the proband and a 1.6 Mb microdeletion at chromosome 15q21.3 in her mother. The proband inherited the rearranged chromosomes 3 and 8 from her mother, and the duplicated region on chromosome 15 of the proband was inherited from the mother. Approximately one hundred genes were identified in the 15q21.3-q26.2 duplicated region of the proband. In particular, TPM1, SMAD6, SMAD3, and HCN4 may be associated with her heart defects, and HEXA, KIF7, and IDH2 are responsible for her developmental and mental retardation. In addition, we suggest that a microdeletion on the 15q21.3 region of the mother, which involved TCF2, TCF12, ADMA10 and AQP9, might be associated with mental retardation. We delineate the precise structures of the derivative chromosomes, chromosome duplication origin and possible molecular mechanisms for aberrant phenotypes by combining NGS data with conventional techniques.

  9. Radiochemical and radioecological studies on Brazilian areas of high natural background. Progress report, October 30, 1974--October 30, 1975. [Etiology of radioinduced chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa-Ribeiro, C.; Penna-Franca, E.; Rocha-Nogueira, A.; Christian-Pfeiffer, W.

    1975-11-01

    The absorption of /sup 212/Pb and/or /sup 212/Bi by ertythrocytes was investigated in an attempt to explain the in vivo genesis of somatic chromosomal aberrations of the type detected in peripheral blood lymphocytes of workers professionally exposed to /sup 220/Rn and its decay products, as well as in dwellers of Brazilian areas of high natural radioactivity. (auth)

  10. Effect of the genetic background on recombination frequency in the cn-vg region of the second chromosome of natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmanová, J

    1975-01-01

    Newly established test stocks made it possible to follow the effect of three different defined genetic backgrounds (first and third chromosomes) on recombination frequency in the cn-vg region of the second chromosomes isolated from four natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster. One background was composed of the chromosomes with inversions obtained from the stock (see article) and another two backgrounds were of the standard type consisting one-half of the original chromosomes from the natural population and one-half of the chromosomes of the stocks Oregon R or Samarkand. Using the analysis of variance significant differences in RF values were found between and within populations and especially between the different backgrounds. Some simple and double interactions between the above factors played a role. The highest RF values were obtained on the background [corrected] with inversions. The effect of the different genetic backgrounds [corrected] by the action of the genetic modifiers of RF. The different genetic backgrounds affected the variations in RF values in individual populations and the different populations reacted differentially to the changed genetic background. The design of the experiment permitted an estimation of the causal compoenents of variance and heritability of RF from the sib analysis. The additive component of variance was present in only two of the populations under test; the respective estimates of heritability were very low.

  11. Generation of New Genotypic and Phenotypic Features in Artificial and Natural Yeast Hybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter P. Pfliegler

    2014-01-01

    the S. cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii hybrids. Saccharomyces cerevisiae × S. uvarum artificial and natural hybrids showed considerable differences in osmolyte tolerance and sensitivity to miconazole, whereas the S. cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii hybrids exhibited differences also in maltotriose utilization. The results of this study suggest that chromosomal rearrangements and genomic reorganizations as post-hybridization processes may affect the phenotypic properties of the hybrid progeny substantially. Relative to their ancestors, the F1 segregants may generate different phenotypes, indicating novel routes of evolution in response to environmental growth conditions.

  12. Viral Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes: Generation, Mutagenesis, and Removal of Mini-F Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Karsten Tischer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance and manipulation of large DNA and RNA virus genomes had presented an obstacle for virological research. BAC vectors provided a solution to both problems as they can harbor large DNA sequences and can efficiently be modified using well-established mutagenesis techniques in Escherichia coli. Numerous DNA virus genomes of herpesvirus and pox virus were cloned into mini-F vectors. In addition, several reverse genetic systems for RNA viruses such as members of Coronaviridae and Flaviviridae could be established based on BAC constructs. Transfection into susceptible eukaryotic cells of virus DNA cloned as a BAC allows reconstitution of recombinant viruses. In this paper, we provide an overview on the strategies that can be used for the generation of virus BAC vectors and also on systems that are currently available for various virus species. Furthermore, we address common mutagenesis techniques that allow modification of BACs from single-nucleotide substitutions to deletion of viral genes or insertion of foreign sequences. Finally, we review the reconstitution of viruses from BAC vectors and the removal of the bacterial sequences from the virus genome during this process.

  13. Viral bacterial artificial chromosomes: generation, mutagenesis, and removal of mini-F sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischer, B Karsten; Kaufer, Benedikt B

    2012-01-01

    Maintenance and manipulation of large DNA and RNA virus genomes had presented an obstacle for virological research. BAC vectors provided a solution to both problems as they can harbor large DNA sequences and can efficiently be modified using well-established mutagenesis techniques in Escherichia coli. Numerous DNA virus genomes of herpesvirus and pox virus were cloned into mini-F vectors. In addition, several reverse genetic systems for RNA viruses such as members of Coronaviridae and Flaviviridae could be established based on BAC constructs. Transfection into susceptible eukaryotic cells of virus DNA cloned as a BAC allows reconstitution of recombinant viruses. In this paper, we provide an overview on the strategies that can be used for the generation of virus BAC vectors and also on systems that are currently available for various virus species. Furthermore, we address common mutagenesis techniques that allow modification of BACs from single-nucleotide substitutions to deletion of viral genes or insertion of foreign sequences. Finally, we review the reconstitution of viruses from BAC vectors and the removal of the bacterial sequences from the virus genome during this process.

  14. Generating and Executing Complex Natural Language Queries across Linked Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamon, Thierry; Mougin, Fleur; Grabar, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    With the recent and intensive research in the biomedical area, the knowledge accumulated is disseminated through various knowledge bases. Links between these knowledge bases are needed in order to use them jointly. Linked Data, SPARQL language, and interfaces in Natural Language question-answering provide interesting solutions for querying such knowledge bases. We propose a method for translating natural language questions in SPARQL queries. We use Natural Language Processing tools, semantic resources, and the RDF triples description. The method is designed on 50 questions over 3 biomedical knowledge bases, and evaluated on 27 questions. It achieves 0.78 F-measure on the test set. The method for translating natural language questions into SPARQL queries is implemented as Perl module available at http://search.cpan.org/ thhamon/RDF-NLP-SPARQLQuery.

  15. Approximate N-Gram Markov Model for Natural Language Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, H H; Chen, Hsin-Hsi; Lee, Yue-Shi

    1994-01-01

    This paper proposes an Approximate n-gram Markov Model for bag generation. Directed word association pairs with distances are used to approximate (n-1)-gram and n-gram training tables. This model has parameters of word association model, and merits of both word association model and Markov Model. The training knowledge for bag generation can be also applied to lexical selection in machine translation design.

  16. Meiotic chromosome configurations in triploid progeny from reciprocal crosses between wild-type diploid and natural tetraploid loach Misgurnus anguillicaudatus in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya-Juan; Gao, Yang-Chun; Zhou, He; Ma, Hai-Yan; Li, Jia-Qi; Arai, Katsutoshi

    2015-10-01

    Here, we showed meiotic chromosome configurations prepared from oocyte germinal vesicles and spermatocytes of triploid loaches produced from reciprocal crosses between wild-type diploids (2n = 50) obtained from Dalian, Liaoning Province, China and natural tetraploids (4n = 100) from Chibi, Hubei Province, China. Major meiotic cells in triploids comprised 25 bivalents and 25 univalents, but cells with one to five trivalents were also observed. When three homologous chromosomes bearing nucleolar organizing regions (NOR) were identified with the detection of signals or positive sites by silver staining, chromomycin A3 staining and fluorescence in situ hybridization with a 5.8S + 28S rDNA probe, two third of selected triploid cells gave a configuration including one bivalent with two NORs (association of two homologous chromosomes) and one univalent with one NOR. However, other triploid cells showed three univalent each of which had one NOR, suggesting a failure of synapsis between homologous chromosomes. These results suggested that triploid female and male should produce aneuploid gametes with the theoretical mode at 1.5n (37 or 38 chromosomes).

  17. Translocations used to generate chromosome segment duplications in Neurospora can disrupt genes and create novel open reading frames

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Parmit K Singh; Srividhya V Iyer; T Naga Sowjanya; B Kranthi Raj; Durgadas P Kasbekar

    2010-12-01

    In Neurospora crassa, crosses between normal sequence strains and strains bearing some translocations can yield progeny bearing a duplication (Dp) of the translocated chromosome segment. Here, 30 breakpoint junction sequences of 12 Dp-generating translocations were determined. The breakpoints disrupted 13 genes (including predicted genes), and created 10 novel open reading frames. Insertion of sequences from LG III into LG I as translocation T(UK818) disrupts the eat-3 gene, which is the ortholog of the Podospora anserine gene ami1. Since ami1-homozygous Podospora crosses were reported to increase the frequency of repeat-induced point mutation (RIP), we performed crosses homozygous for a deficiency in eat-3 to test for a corresponding increase in RIP frequency. However, our results suggested that, unlike in Podospora, the eat-3 gene might be essential for ascus development in Neurospora. Duplication–heterozygous crosses are generally barren in Neurospora; however, by using molecular probes developed in this study, we could identify Dp segregants from two different translocation–heterozygous crosses, and using these we found that the barren phenotype of at least some duplication–heterozygous crosses was incompletely penetrant.

  18. Natural language computing an English generative grammar in Prolog

    CERN Document Server

    Dougherty, Ray C

    2013-01-01

    This book's main goal is to show readers how to use the linguistic theory of Noam Chomsky, called Universal Grammar, to represent English, French, and German on a computer using the Prolog computer language. In so doing, it presents a follow-the-dots approach to natural language processing, linguistic theory, artificial intelligence, and expert systems. The basic idea is to introduce meaningful answers to significant problems involved in representing human language data on a computer. The book offers a hands-on approach to anyone who wishes to gain a perspective on natural language

  19. Colorado's Millennial Generation: Youth Perceptions and Experiences of Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Karen S.

    2012-01-01

    This study uses survey and focus group methods to explore attitudes toward and experiences of nature among millennial-aged students in northern Colorado. First, results confirm that young people possess a strong interest in the outdoors yet time, transportation, and new technologies hamper their ability to visit public lands and outdoor spaces.…

  20. Colorado's Millennial Generation: Youth Perceptions and Experiences of Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Karen S.

    2012-01-01

    This study uses survey and focus group methods to explore attitudes toward and experiences of nature among millennial-aged students in northern Colorado. First, results confirm that young people possess a strong interest in the outdoors yet time, transportation, and new technologies hamper their ability to visit public lands and outdoor spaces.…

  1. Coolant rate distribution in horizontal steam generator under natural circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blagovechtchenski, A.; Leontieva, V.; Mitrioukhin, A. [St. Petersburg State Technical Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    In the presentation the major factors determining the conditions of NCC (Natural Coolant Circulation) in the primary circuit and in particular conditions of coolant rate distribution on the horizontal tubes of PGV-1000 in NPP with VVER-1000 under NCC are considered. 5 refs.

  2. SRY mutation analysis by next generation (deep sequencing in a cohort of chromosomal Disorders of Sex Development (DSD patients with a mosaic karyotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hersmus Remko

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of the Y-chromosome or Y chromosome-derived material is seen in 4-60% of Turner syndrome patients (Chromosomal Disorders of Sex Development (DSD. DSD patients with specific Y-chromosomal material in their karyotype, the GonadoBlastoma on the Y-chromosome (GBY region, have an increased risk of developing type II germ cell tumors/cancer (GCC, most likely related to TSPY. The Sex determining Region on the Y gene (SRY is located on the short arm of the Y-chromosome and is the crucial switch that initiates testis determination and subsequent male development. Mutations in this gene are responsible for sex reversal in approximately 10-15% of 46,XY pure gonadal dysgenesis (46,XY DSD cases. The majority of the mutations described are located in the central HMG domain, which is involved in the binding and bending of the DNA and harbors two nuclear localization signals. SRY mutations have also been found in a small number of patients with a 45,X/46,XY karyotype and might play a role in the maldevelopment of the gonads. Methods To thoroughly investigate the presence of possible SRY gene mutations in mosaic DSD patients, we performed next generation (deep sequencing on the genomic DNA of fourteen independent patients (twelve 45,X/46,XY, one 45,X/46,XX/46,XY, and one 46,XX/46,XY. Results and conclusions The results demonstrate that aberrations in SRY are rare in mosaic DSD patients and therefore do not play a significant role in the etiology of the disease.

  3. Chromosome numbers, characterization of chromosomal pairing during meiosis, origin and natural propagation in polyploid cytotypes (4x, 5x and 6x) of Agrimonia eupatoria L. (Rosaceae) in northwest Himalayas (India).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Puneet; Rana, Pawan K; Himshikha; Singhal, Vijay Kumar; Gupta, R C

    2014-07-01

    Despite the presence of intraspecific polyploidy (2x, 4x, 5x and 6x) in Agrimonia eupatoria, origin of these cytotypes has never been addressed adequately. The aim of the present study was to record the original chromosome counts and characterize chromosomal pairing during meiosis and microsporogenesis in the 5x cytotype, and discussing the hypothesis regarding the possible origin of polyploid cytotypes (4x, 5x and 6x) in the species. The geographical distribution pattern of cytotypes in the Indian Himalayas and elsewhere has also been analyzed. The present meiotic analysis revealed three chromosomes counts, the tetraploid (2n = 4x = 56), the pentaploid (2n = 5x = 70) and the hexaploid (2n = 6x = 84) cytotypes based on x = 14. Meiotic course was perfectly normal in the 4x and 6x cytotypes resulting into high pollen fertility (94-100 %). Meiotic course in the imbalanced 5x cytotype has been found to be irregular characterized by the presence of high frequency of univalents at diakinesis and metaphase-I. Abnormal meiotic course contributed towards high pollen sterility (74-88 %). Even the apparently fertile/stained pollen grains were of irregular shape and of heterogeneous sizes. Meiotic behaviour of the 5x cytotype is like typical of allopolyploid. Individuals of 5x cytotype did not produce seeds and propagate vegetatively (root suckers) while 4x and 6x cytotypes exploited sexual (seeds) as well as vegetative means for propagation. Chromosomal pairing in pentaploid cytotype is like typical of an allopolyploid and we assume that it might have originated owing to natural inter-cytotype hybridization between 4x and 6x cytotypes in a mixed population. Analysis of geographical distribution pattern of cytotypes shows that Indian Himalayas represent the most cytotype-diverse region for A. eupatoria with the existence of all the four cytotypes (2x, 4x, 5x, 6x). This shows the dynamic nature of the species at chromosomal level in this part of the world.

  4. Generation of an integrated transcription map of the BRCA2 region on chromosome 13q12-q13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couch, F.J.; Peng, Yi; Thakur, Sanjay [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-15

    An integrated approach involving physical mapping, identification of transcribed sequences, and computational analysis of genomic sequence was used to generate a detailed transcription map of the 1.0-Mb region containing the breast cancer susceptibility locus BRCA2 on chromosome 13q12-q13. This region is included in the genetic interval bounded by D13S1444 and D13S310. Retrieved sequences from exon amplification or hybrid selection procedures were grouped into physical intervals and subsequently grouped into transcription units by clone overlap. Overlap was established by direct hybridization, cDNA library screening, PCR cDNA linking (island hopping), and/or sequence alignment. Extensive genomic sequencing was performed in an effort to understand transcription unit organization. In total, approximately 500 kb of genomic sequence was completed. The transcription units were further characterized by hybridization to RNA from a series of human tissues. Evidence for seven genes, two putative pseudogenes, and nine additional putative transcription units was obtained. One of the transcription units was recently identified as BRCA2 but all others are novel genes of unknown function as only limited alignment to sequences in public databases was observed. Several retrieved transcribed sequences were not aligned into transcription units because no corresponding cDNAs were obtained when screening libraries or because of a lack of definitive evidence for splicing signals or putative coding sequence based on computational analysis. However, the presence of additional genes in the BRCA2 interval is suggested as groups of putative exons and hybrid selected clones that were transcribed in consistent orientations could be localized to common physical intervals. 25 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Engineering of plant chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mette, Michael Florian; Houben, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Engineered minimal chromosomes with sufficient mitotic and meiotic stability have an enormous potential as vectors for stacking multiple genes required for complex traits in plant biotechnology. Proof of principle for essential steps in chromosome engineering such as truncation of chromosomes by T-DNA-mediated telomere seeding and de novo formation of centromeres by cenH3 fusion protein tethering has been recently obtained. In order to generate robust protocols for application in plant biotechnology, these steps need to be combined and supplemented with additional methods such as site-specific recombination for the directed transfer of multiple genes of interest on the minichromosomes. At the same time, the development of these methods allows new insight into basic aspects of plant chromosome functions such as how centromeres assure proper distribution of chromosomes to daughter cells or how telomeres serve to cap the chromosome ends to prevent shortening of ends over DNA replication cycles and chromosome end fusion.

  6. Simple generation of site-directed point mutations in the Escherichia coli chromosome using Red®/ET® Recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Kirsten

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Introducing point mutations into bacterial chromosomes is important for further progress in studies relying on functional genomics, systems- and synthetic biology, and for metabolic engineering. For many investigations, chromosomal systems are required rather than artificial plasmid based systems. Results Here we describe the introduction of a single point mutation into the Escherichia coli chromosome by site-directed mutagenesis without leaving any selection marker. We used Red®/ET® Recombination in combination with rpsL counter-selection to introduce a single point mutation into the E. coli MG1655 genome, one of the widely used bacterial model strains in systems biology. The method we present is rapid and highly efficient. Since single-stranded synthetic oligonucleotides can be used for recombination, any chromosomal modification can be designed. Conclusion Chromosomal modifications performed by rpsL counter-selection may also be used for other bacteria that contain an rpsL homologue, since Red®/ET® Recombination has been applied to several enteric bacteria before.

  7. Fuel prices, emission standards, and generation costs for coal vs natural gas power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratson, Lincoln F; Haerer, Drew; Patiño-Echeverri, Dalia

    2013-05-07

    Low natural gas prices and stricter, federal emission regulations are promoting a shift away from coal power plants and toward natural gas plants as the lowest-cost means of generating electricity in the United States. By estimating the cost of electricity generation (COE) for 304 coal and 358 natural gas plants, we show that the economic viability of 9% of current coal capacity is challenged by low natural gas prices, while another 56% would be challenged by the stricter emission regulations. Under the current regulations, coal plants would again become the dominant least-cost generation option should the ratio of average natural gas to coal prices (NG2CP) rise to 1.8 (it was 1.42 in February 2012). If the more stringent emission standards are enforced, however, natural gas plants would remain cost competitive with a majority of coal plants for NG2CPs up to 4.3.

  8. PREVENTING THE CHROMOSOMAL TRANSLOCATIONS THAT CAUSE CANCER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hromas, Robert; Williamson, Elizabeth; Lee, Suk-Hee; Nickoloff, Jac

    2016-01-01

    Approximately half of all cancers harbor chromosomal translocations that can either contribute to their origin or govern their subsequent behavior. Chromosomal translocations by definition can only occur when there are two DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) on distinct chromosomes that are repaired heterologously. Thus, chromosomal translocations are by their very nature problems of DNA DSB repair. Such DNA DSBs can be from internal or external sources. Internal sources of DNA DSBs that can lead to translocations can occur are inappropriate immune receptor gene maturation during V(D)J recombination or heavy-chain switching. Other internal DNA DSBs can come from aberrant DNA structures, or are generated at collapsed and reversed replication forks. External sources of DNA DSBs that can generate chromosomal translocations are ionizing radiation and cancer chemotherapy. There are several known nuclear and chromatin properties that enhance translocations over homologous chromosome DSB repair. The proximity of the region of the heterologous chromosomes to each other increases translocation rates. Histone methylation events at the DSB also influence translocation frequencies. There are four DNA DSB repair pathways, but it appears that only one, alternative non-homologous end-joining (a-NHEJ) can mediate chromosomal translocations. The rate-limiting, initial step of a-NHEJ is the binding of poly-adenosine diphosphate ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1) to the DSB. In our investigation of methods for preventing oncogenic translocations, we discovered that PARP1 was required for translocations. Significantly, the clinically approved PARP1 inhibitors can block the formation of chromosomal translocations, raising the possibility for the first time that secondary oncogenic translocations can be reduced in high risk patients.

  9. Nonrandom X chromosome inactivation in natural killer cells from obligate carriers of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wengler, G.S.; Parolini, O.; Conley, M.E. (Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis (United States) St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)); Allen, R.C. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Smith, H. (St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States))

    1993-01-15

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) is characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia, markedly reduced numbers of T cells, absent mitogen responses, decreased numbers of NK cells, and normal or elevated numbers of B cells. The abnormalities in the NK cell and B cell lineages could be attributed to dependence of these cell lineages on T cells or T cell-derived factors, or to expression of the XSCID gene defect in these cell lineages. In past experiments, the authors have examined X chromosome inactivation patterns in T cells and cultured B cells from female obligate carriers of XSCID and have found that both cell lineages demonstrate nonrandom X chromosome inactivation. This indicates that the gene defect is intrinsic to both of these cell lineages. In the present experiments, a polymerase chain reaction technique was used to evaluate X chromosome inactivation patterns in highly purified populations of freshly isolated NK cells, B cells, CD4[sup +] cells, and CD8[sup +] cells from three obligate carriers of XSCID. All four lymphoid cell populations from these three women exhibited exclusive use of a single X as the active X. In contrast, both X chromosomes were used as the active X in neutrophils and monocytes. These findings indicate that the XSCID gene is expressed in the NK cell lineage as well as in T cells and B cells. This observation makes it highly unlikely that the XSCID gene is involved in Ag receptor gene rearrangements. 21 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Algorithms for reconstruction of chromosomal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubetsky, Vassily; Gershgorin, Roman; Seliverstov, Alexander; Gorbunov, Konstantin

    2016-01-19

    One of the main aims of phylogenomics is the reconstruction of objects defined in the leaves along the whole phylogenetic tree to minimize the specified functional, which may also include the phylogenetic tree generation. Such objects can include nucleotide and amino acid sequences, chromosomal structures, etc. The structures can have any set of linear and circular chromosomes, variable gene composition and include any number of paralogs, as well as any weights of individual evolutionary operations to transform a chromosome structure. Many heuristic algorithms were proposed for this purpose, but there are just a few exact algorithms with low (linear, cubic or similar) polynomial computational complexity among them to our knowledge. The algorithms naturally start from the calculation of both the distance between two structures and the shortest sequence of operations transforming one structure into another. Such calculation per se is an NP-hard problem. A general model of chromosomal structure rearrangements is considered. Exact algorithms with almost linear or cubic polynomial complexities have been developed to solve the problems for the case of any chromosomal structure but with certain limitations on operation weights. The computer programs are tested on biological data for the problem of mitochondrial or plastid chromosomal structure reconstruction. To our knowledge, no computer programs are available for this model. Exactness of the proposed algorithms and such low polynomial complexities were proved. The reconstructed evolutionary trees of mitochondrial and plastid chromosomal structures as well as the ancestral states of the structures appear to be reasonable.

  11. The Mechanism of Negative-ion Generation of Natural Fiber Fabrics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BI Peng-yu; CHEN Yue-hua; LI Ru-qin

    2007-01-01

    Generally there are three kinds of substances used as negative-ion generator in textiles, natural silicate minerals (ceramic/tourmaline), natural rare-earth minerals and natural sediment with ultra-fine pores. Based on different additive, the mechanism of negative-ion generation is largely divided into three kinds, the piezoelectricity and pyroelectricity of tourmaline crystal, air ionization caused by low-level radiation and breaking up of the clusters of moisture in air when going through the ultra-fine pores of natural sediment. In this paper, the negative-ion generating properties of natural fiber fabrics-cotton, wool, silk and linen were first proposed. By some kind of physical stimulation, rubbing or vibrating, natural fiber fabrics without any additive could also emit negative ions. Considering that the piezoelectric effect was observed in wool fibers, silk fibers and cellulose fibers, the piezoelectricity was studied as a mechanism of negative-ion generation of natural fiber fabrics. Another possible mechanism was the triboelectricity produced by the sense of rubbing or vibrating and tip discharge of hairiness. The final experiment results verified that the latter would be the main reason, and the electrolytic dissociation of moisture was also ontributing to negative-ion generation.

  12. Rapid chromosome evolution in recently formed polyploids in Tragopogon (Asteraceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Yoong Lim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polyploidy, frequently termed "whole genome duplication", is a major force in the evolution of many eukaryotes. Indeed, most angiosperm species have undergone at least one round of polyploidy in their evolutionary history. Despite enormous progress in our understanding of many aspects of polyploidy, we essentially have no information about the role of chromosome divergence in the establishment of young polyploid populations. Here we investigate synthetic lines and natural populations of two recently and recurrently formed allotetraploids Tragopogon mirus and T. miscellus (formed within the past 80 years to assess the role of aberrant meiosis in generating chromosomal/genomic diversity. That diversity is likely important in the formation, establishment and survival of polyploid populations and species. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Applications of fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH to natural populations of T. mirus and T. miscellus suggest that chromosomal rearrangements and other chromosomal changes are common in both allotetraploids. We detected extensive chromosomal polymorphism between individuals and populations, including (i plants monosomic and trisomic for particular chromosomes (perhaps indicating compensatory trisomy, (ii intergenomic translocations and (iii variable sizes and expression patterns of individual ribosomal DNA (rDNA loci. We even observed karyotypic variation among sibling plants. Significantly, translocations, chromosome loss, and meiotic irregularities, including quadrivalent formation, were observed in synthetic (S(0 and S(1 generations polyploid lines. Our results not only provide a mechanism for chromosomal variation in natural populations, but also indicate that chromosomal changes occur rapidly following polyploidisation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data shed new light on previous analyses of genome and transcriptome structures in de novo and establishing polyploid species. Crucially our

  13. Lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions of coal, conventional and unconventional natural gas for electricity generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    An analysis of the lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with natural gas use recently published by Howarth et al. (2011) stated that use of natural gas produced from shale formations via hydraulic fracturing would generate greater lifecycle GHG emissions than petro...

  14. "Chromosome": a knowledge-based system for the chromosome classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramstein, G; Bernadet, M

    1993-01-01

    Chromosome, a knowledge-based analysis system has been designed for the classification of human chromosomes. Its aim is to perform an optimal classification by driving a tool box containing the procedures of image processing, pattern recognition and classification. This paper presents the general architecture of Chromosome, based on a multiagent system generator. The image processing tool box is described from the met aphasic enhancement to the fine classification. Emphasis is then put on the knowledge base intended for the chromosome recognition. The global classification process is also presented, showing how Chromosome proceeds to classify a given chromosome. Finally, we discuss further extensions of the system for the karyotype building.

  15. A new human natural killer leukemia cell line, IMC-1. A complex chromosomal rearrangement defined by spectral karyotyping: functional and cytogenetic characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, I-Ming; Whalen, Margaret; Bankhurst, Arthur; Sever, Cordelia E; Doshi, Rashmi; Hardekopf, David; Montgomery, Karen; Willman, Cheryl L

    2004-03-01

    A new human IL-2 dependent leukemic cell line with a natural killer (NK) cell phenotype, IMC-1, was established from an adult patient with aggressive NK cell leukemia. The IMC-1 cell line expresses the CD56, CD2, CD11a, CD38 and HLA-DR cell surface antigens, whereas the CD16 and CD8 antigens expressed on the primary leukemic blasts from which the cell line was derived were lost after 7 and 28 weeks of culture, respectively. The IMC-1 cell line displays functional NK cytotoxicity and lyses target cells in a non-MHC restricted, antibody-independent manner with equal or superior efficiency to freshly isolated NK cells. Cytogenetic analysis at presentation and after 55 weeks in culture revealed complex structural and numerical abnormalities, defined by classic G-banding and by spectral karyotyping (SKY). Three apparently intact copies of chromosome 8 occurred in the diagnostic bone marrow specimen; the cell line also contains three copies of chromosome 8 but each was structurally altered. The development and detailed characterization of this new NK leukemic cell line will facilitate biologic and functional studies of NK cells and chromosomal aberrations potentially important in leukemic transformation.

  16. Marker chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Kiran Prabhaker; Belogolovkin, Victoria

    2013-04-01

    Marker chromosomes are a morphologically heterogeneous group of structurally abnormal chromosomes that pose a significant challenge in prenatal diagnosis. Phenotypes associated with marker chromosomes are highly variable and range from normal to severely abnormal. Clinical outcomes are very difficult to predict when marker chromosomes are detected prenatally. In this review, we outline the classification, etiology, cytogenetic characterization, and clinical consequences of marker chromosomes, as well as practical approaches to prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  17. Towards a consensus Y-chromosomal phylogeny and Y-SNP set in forensics in the next-generation sequencing era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmuseau, Maarten H D; Van Geystelen, Anneleen; Kayser, Manfred; van Oven, Mannis; Decorte, Ronny

    2015-03-01

    Currently, several different Y-chromosomal phylogenies and haplogroup nomenclatures are presented in scientific literature and at conferences demonstrating the present diversity in Y-chromosomal phylogenetic trees and Y-SNP sets used within forensic and anthropological research. This situation can be ascribed to the exponential growth of the number of Y-SNPs discovered due to mostly next-generation sequencing (NGS) studies. As Y-SNPs and their respective phylogenetic positions are important in forensics, such as for male lineage characterization and paternal bio-geographic ancestry inference, there is a need for forensic geneticists to know how to deal with these newly identified Y-SNPs and phylogenies, especially since these phylogenies are often created with other aims than to carry out forensic genetic research. Therefore, we give here an overview of four categories of currently used Y-chromosomal phylogenies and the associated Y-SNP sets in scientific research in the current NGS era. We compare these categories based on the construction method, their advantages and disadvantages, the disciplines wherein the phylogenetic tree can be used, and their specific relevance for forensic geneticists. Based on this overview, it is clear that an up-to-date reduced tree with a consensus Y-SNP set and a stable nomenclature will be the most appropriate reference resource for forensic research. Initiatives to reach such an international consensus are therefore highly recommended.

  18. In vivo generation of decidual natural killer cells from resident hematopoietic progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiossone, Laura; Vacca, Paola; Orecchia, Paola; Croxatto, Daniele; Damonte, Patrizia; Astigiano, Simonetta; Barbieri, Ottavia; Bottino, Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo; Mingari, Maria Cristina

    2014-03-01

    Decidual natural killer cells accumulate at the fetal-maternal interface and play a key role in a successful pregnancy. However, their origin is still unknown. Do they derive from peripheral natural killer cells recruited in decidua or do they represent a distinct population that originates in situ? Here, we identified natural killer precursors in decidua and uterus of pregnant mice. These precursors underwent rapid in situ differentiation and large proportions of proliferating immature natural killer cells were present in decidua and uterus as early as gestation day 4.5. Here, we investigated the origin of decidua- and uterus-natural killer cells by performing transfer experiments of peripheral mature natural killer cells or precursors from EGFP(+) mice. Results showed that mature natural killer cells did not migrate into decidua and uterus, while precursors were recruited in these organs and differentiated towards natural killer cells. Moreover, decidua- and uterus-natural killer cells displayed unique phenotypic and functional features. They expressed high levels of the activating Ly49D receptor in spite of their immature phenotype. In addition, decidua- and uterus-natural killer cells were poorly cytolytic and produced low amounts of IFN-γ, while they released factors (GM-CSF, VEGF, IP-10) involved in neo-angiogenesis and tissue remodeling. Our data reveal in situ generation of decidual natural killer cells and provide an important correlation between mouse and human decidual natural killer cells, allowing further studies to be carried out on their role in pregnancy-related diseases.

  19. Features of the type Ⅲ-like source rock and its generated natural gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The mother matter of Ordovician source are mainly sapropelic and generate oil in mature stage, since the high plants did not appear in Ordovician period, which is well known by internal and external scholars. Now we find a kind of Orodovician source rock generating mainly light oil and gas in mature stage during appraising source rocks in the Tarim Basin. The organic matters of this source rock are chiefly constructed by benthic brown algae in organisms (showing as macro algae), and are similar to humic source in hydrocarbon generation. The natural gas generated by this kind of source matters is obviously different from the sapropelic gas.

  20. Identification of natural images and computer-generated graphics based on statistical and textural features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fei; Li, Jiao-ting; Long, Min

    2015-03-01

    To discriminate the acquisition pipelines of digital images, a novel scheme for the identification of natural images and computer-generated graphics is proposed based on statistical and textural features. First, the differences between them are investigated from the view of statistics and texture, and 31 dimensions of feature are acquired for identification. Then, LIBSVM is used for the classification. Finally, the experimental results are presented. The results show that it can achieve an identification accuracy of 97.89% for computer-generated graphics, and an identification accuracy of 97.75% for natural images. The analyses also demonstrate the proposed method has excellent performance, compared with some existing methods based only on statistical features or other features. The method has a great potential to be implemented for the identification of natural images and computer-generated graphics. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  1. Chromosomal rearrangements in cattle and pigs revealed by chromosome microdissection and chromosome painting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yerle Martine

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A pericentric inversion of chromosome 4 in a boar, as well as a case of (2q-;5p+ translocation mosaicism in a bull were analysed by chromosome painting using probes generated by conventional microdissection. For the porcine inversion, probes specific for p arms and q arms were produced and hybridised simultaneously on metaphases of a heterozygote carrier. In the case of the bovine translocation, two whole chromosome probes (chromosome 5, and derived chromosome 5 were elaborated and hybridised independently on chromosomal preparations of the bull who was a carrier of the mosaic translocation. The impossibility of differentiating chromosomes 2 and der(2 from other chromosomes of the metaphases did not allow the production of painting probes for these chromosomes. For all experiments, the quality of painting was comparable to that usually observed with probes obtained from flow-sorted chromosomes. The results obtained allowed confirmation of the interpretations proposed with G-banding karyotype analyses. In the bovine case, however, the reciprocity of the translocation could not be proven. The results presented in this paper show the usefulness of the microdissection technique for characterising chromosomal rearrangements in species for which commercial probes are not available. They also confirmed that the main limiting factor of the technique is the quality of the chromosomal preparations, which does not allow the identification of target chromosomes or chromosome fragments in all cases.

  2. Using Open Geographic Data to Generate Natural Language Descriptions for Hydrological Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Molina; Javier Sanchez-Soriano; Oscar Corcho

    2015-01-01

    Providing descriptions of isolated sensors and sensor networks in natural language, understandable by the general public, is useful to help users find relevant sensors and analyze sensor data. In this paper, we discuss the feasibility of using geographic knowledge from public databases available on the Web (such as OpenStreetMap, Geonames, or DBpedia) to automatically construct such descriptions. We present a general method that uses such information to generate sensor descriptions in natural...

  3. Effect of an External Oriented Magnetic Field on Entropy Generation in Natural Convection

    OpenAIRE

    Atef El Jery; Nejib Hidouri; Mourad Magherbi; Ammar Ben Brahim

    2010-01-01

    The influence of an external oriented magnetic field on entropy generation in natural convection for air and liquid gallium is numerically studied in steady-unsteady states by solving the mass, the momentum and the energy conservation equations. Entropy generation depends on five parameters which are: the Prandtl number, the irreversibility coefficients, the inclination angle of the magnetic field, the thermal Grashof and the Hartmann numbers. Effects of these parameters on total and local ir...

  4. Neanderthal introgression at chromosome 3p21.31 was under positive natural selection in East Asians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qiliang; Hu, Ya; Xu, Shuhua; Wang, Jiucun; Jin, Li

    2014-03-01

    Studies of the Neanderthal and Denisovan genomes demonstrate archaic hominin introgression in Eurasians. Here, we present evidence of Neanderthal introgression within the chromosome 3p21.31 region, occurring with a high frequency in East Asians (ranging from 49.4% to 66.5%) and at a low frequency in Europeans. We also detected a signal of strong positive selection in this region only in East Asians. Our data indicate that likely candidate targets of selection include rs12488302-T and its associated alleles--among which four are nonsynonymous, including rs35455589-G in HYAL2, a gene related to the cellular response to ultraviolet-B irradiation. Furthermore, suggestive evidence supports latitude-dependent selection, implicating a role of ultraviolet-B. Interestingly, the distribution of rs35455589-G suggests that this allele was lost during the exodus of ancestors of modern Eurasians from Africa and reintroduced to Eurasians from Neanderthals.

  5. Application of dissociation curve analysis to radiation hybrid panel marker scoring: generation of a map of river buffalo (B. bubalis chromosome 20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schäffer Alejandro A

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluorescence of dyes bound to double-stranded PCR products has been utilized extensively in various real-time quantitative PCR applications, including post-amplification dissociation curve analysis, or differentiation of amplicon length or sequence composition. Despite the current era of whole-genome sequencing, mapping tools such as radiation hybrid DNA panels remain useful aids for sequence assembly, focused resequencing efforts, and for building physical maps of species that have not yet been sequenced. For placement of specific, individual genes or markers on a map, low-throughput methods remain commonplace. Typically, PCR amplification of DNA from each panel cell line is followed by gel electrophoresis and scoring of each clone for the presence or absence of PCR product. To improve sensitivity and efficiency of radiation hybrid panel analysis in comparison to gel-based methods, we adapted fluorescence-based real-time PCR and dissociation curve analysis for use as a novel scoring method. Results As proof of principle for this dissociation curve method, we generated new maps of river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis chromosome 20 by both dissociation curve analysis and conventional marker scoring. We also obtained sequence data to augment dissociation curve results. Few genes have been previously mapped to buffalo chromosome 20, and sequence detail is limited, so 65 markers were screened from the orthologous chromosome of domestic cattle. Thirty bovine markers (46% were suitable as cross-species markers for dissociation curve analysis in the buffalo radiation hybrid panel under a standard protocol, compared to 25 markers suitable for conventional typing. Computational analysis placed 27 markers on a chromosome map generated by the new method, while the gel-based approach produced only 20 mapped markers. Among 19 markers common to both maps, the marker order on the map was maintained perfectly. Conclusion Dissociation curve

  6. Sex-determining chromosomes and sexual dimorphism: insights from genetic mapping of sex expression in a natural hybrid Fragaria × ananassa subsp. cuneifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajulu, R; Liston, A; Ashman, T-L

    2013-05-01

    We studied the natural hybrid (Fragaria × ananassa subsp. cuneifolia) between two sexually dimorphic octoploid strawberry species (Fragaria virginiana and Fragaria chiloensis) to gain insight into the dynamics of sex chromosomes and the genesis of sexual dimorphism. Male sterility is dominant in both the parental species and thus will be inherited maternally, but the chromosome that houses the sex-determining region differs. Thus, we asked whether (1) the cytotypic composition of hybrid populations represents one or both maternal species, (2) the sex-determining chromosome of the hybrid reflects the location of male sterility within the maternal donor species and (3) crosses from the hybrid species show less sexual dimorphism than the parental species. We found that F. × ananassa subsp. cuneifolia populations consisted of both parental cytotypes but one predominated within each population. Genetic linkage mapping of two crosses showed dominance of male sterility similar to the parental species, however, the map location of male sterility reflected the maternal donor in one cross, but not the other. Moreover, female function mapped to a single region in the first cross, but to two regions in the second cross. Aside from components of female function (fruit set and seed set), other traits that have been found to be significantly sexually dimorphic in the pure species were either not dimorphic or were dimorphic in the opposite direction to the parental species. These results suggest that hybrids experience some disruption of dimorphism in secondary sexual traits, as well as novel location and number of quantitative trait locus (QTL) affecting sex function.

  7. Outlook of natural gas thermal generation; A geracao termeletrica a gas natural e o PPT (Programa Prioritario de Termoeletricidade)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felix, Makyo A.; Correia Junior, Clovis [Bahiagas - Companhia de Gas da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Garcia, Celestino B. [Agencia Nacional do Petroleo, Gas Natural e Biocombustiveis (ANP), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    The national integrated system has always had hydroelectricity as its main source of energy supply. However, a long period of lack of investment in sector put the country in a complacent position in which there was an overabundance of energy supply. The subsequent power shortage of 2001, led to a long term strategy of assuring supply with perspective of attending demand quickly and guaranteeing the security of the system by exploiting a source of energy rarely used in the country: thermal energy using natural gas. For this reason, the federal government launched the PPT Program (Priority Program of Thermoelectricity) with the aim of stimulating investment in thermo electrical plants, utilizing natural gas which is cheaper and less polluting. However, investment by the private sector did not fulfill expectations even with regular production, financial incentives of the government and favourable points through thermal generation using natural gas. Therefore, PETROBRAS decided to assume the risk and form partnerships to assure investments in thermo electrical plants. In the strategy of implanting thermal plants, who would be responsible to carry out this process along with guarantees of supply, was not properly defined. The establishment of thermal plants without a regulatory framework and undefined investment plan, compromises the essence of its creation. It is from this angle, that evaluates the recent collapse of energy of the Northeast region and the effective implantation of thermoelectricity utilizing natural gas. (author)

  8. Tandem duplication and copy number polymorphism of the SRY gene in patients with sex chromosome anomalies and males exposed to natural background radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premi, Sanjay; Srivastava, Jyoti; Chandy, Sebastian Padinjarel; Ahmad, Jamal; Ali, Sher

    2006-02-01

    Mutations in the SRY gene encompassing the HMG box have been well characterized in gonadal dysgenesis, male infertility and other types of sex chromosome related anomalies (SCRA). However, no information is available on copy number status of this gene under such abnormal conditions. Employing 'Taqman Probe Assay' specific to the SRY gene, we screened 16 DNA samples from patients with SCRA and 36 samples from males exposed to high levels of natural background radiation (HNBR). Patients with SCRA showed 2-16 copies of the SRY gene of which, one, Oxen (49, XYYYY) had eight copies with sequences different from one another. Of the 36 HNBR samples, 12 had one copy whereas 24 harboured 2-8 copies of the SRY gene. A HNBR male 33F had one normal and one mutated copy of this gene. Analysis of 25 DNA samples from blood and semen of normal males showed only one copy of this gene. Despite multiple copies in affected males, fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) with SRY probe detected a single signal on the Y chromosome in HNBR males suggesting its possible localized tandem duplication. Copy number status of the other Y-linked loci is envisaged to augment DNA diagnostics facilitating genetic counselling to affected patients.

  9. Some apparently disjoint aims and requirements for grammar development environments the case of natural language generation

    CERN Document Server

    Bateman, J A

    1997-01-01

    Grammar development environments (GDE's) for analysis and for generation have not yet come together. Despite the fact that analysis-oriented GDE's (such as ALEP) may include some possibility of sentence generation, the development techniques and kinds of resources suggested are apparently not those required for practical, large-scale natural language generation work. Indeed, there is no use of `standard' (i.e., analysis-oriented) GDE's in current projects/applications targetting the generation of fluent, coherent texts. This unsatisfactory situation requires some analysis and explanation, which this paper attempts using as an example an extensive GDE for generation. The support provided for distributed large-scale grammar development, multilinguality, and resource maintenance are discussed and contrasted with analysis-oriented approaches.

  10. Nature and frequency of drug therapy alerts generated by clinical decision support in community pharmacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heringa, Mette; Floor-Schreudering, Annemieke; Tromp, P. Chris; de Smet, Peter A G M; Bouvy, Marcel L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the nature, frequency, and determinants of drug therapy alerts generated by a clinical decision support system (CDSS) in community pharmacy in order to propose CDSS improvement strategies. Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of dispensed dru

  11. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of petroleum and natural gas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mango, F.D.

    1997-01-21

    This project originated on the premise that natural gas could be formed catalytically in the earth rather than thermally as commonly believed. The intention was to test this hypothetical view and to explore generally the role of sedimentary metals in the generation of light hydrocarbons (C1 - C9). We showed the metalliferous source rocks are indeed catalytic in the generation of natural gas. Various metal compounds in the pure state show the same levels of catalytic activity as sedimentary rocks and the products are identical. Nickel is particularly active among the early transition metals and is projected to remain catalytically robust at all stages of catagenesis. Nickel oxide promotes the formation of n-alkanes in addition to natural gas (NG), demonstrating the full scope of the hypothetical catalytic process: The composition of catalytic gas duplicates the entire range of natural gas, from so-called wet gas to dry gas (60 to 95+ wt % methane), while gas generated thermally is consistently depleted in methane (10 to 60 wt % methane). These results support the view that metal catalysis is a major pathway through which natural gas is formed in the earth.

  12. Using Open Geographic Data to Generate Natural Language Descriptions for Hydrological Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Martin; Sanchez-Soriano, Javier; Corcho, Oscar

    2015-07-03

    Providing descriptions of isolated sensors and sensor networks in natural language, understandable by the general public, is useful to help users find relevant sensors and analyze sensor data. In this paper, we discuss the feasibility of using geographic knowledge from public databases available on the Web (such as OpenStreetMap, Geonames, or DBpedia) to automatically construct such descriptions. We present a general method that uses such information to generate sensor descriptions in natural language. The results of the evaluation of our method in a hydrologic national sensor network showed that this approach is feasible and capable of generating adequate sensor descriptions with a lower development effort compared to other approaches. In the paper we also analyze certain problems that we found in public databases (e.g., heterogeneity, non-standard use of labels, or rigid search methods) and their impact in the generation of sensor descriptions.

  13. Breakpoint mapping by next generation sequencing reveals causative gene disruption in patients carrying apparently balanced chromosome rearrangements with intellectual deficiency and/or congenital malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schluth-Bolard, Caroline; Labalme, Audrey; Cordier, Marie-Pierre; Till, Marianne; Nadeau, Gwenaël; Tevissen, Hélène; Lesca, Gaétan; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Rossignol, Sylvie; Rocas, Delphine; Dubruc, Estelle; Edery, Patrick; Sanlaville, Damien

    2013-03-01

    Apparently balanced chromosomal rearrangements (ABCR) are associated with an abnormal phenotype in 6% of cases. This may be due to cryptic genomic imbalances or to the disruption of genes at the breakpoint. However, breakpoint cloning using conventional methods (ie, fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH), Southern blot) is often laborious and time consuming. In this work, we used next generation sequencing (NGS) to locate breakpoints at the molecular level in four patients with multiple congenital abnormalities and/or intellectual deficiency (MCA/ID) who were carrying ABCR (one translocation, one complex chromosomal rearrangement and two inversions), which corresponded to nine breakpoints. Genomic imbalance was previously excluded by array comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) in all four patients. Whole genome paired-end protocol was used to identify breakpoints. The results were verified by FISH and by PCR with Sanger sequencing. We were able to map all nine breakpoints. NGS revealed an additional breakpoint due to a cryptic inversion at a breakpoint junction in one patient. Nine of 10 breakpoints occurred in repetitive elements and five genes were disrupted in their intronic sequence (TCF4, SHANK2, PPFIA1, RAB19, KCNQ1). NGS is a powerful tool allowing rapid breakpoint cloning of ABCR at the molecular level. We showed that in three out of four patients, gene disruption could account for the phenotype, allowing adapted genetic counselling and stopping unnecessary investigations. We propose that patients carrying ABCR with an abnormal phenotype should be explored systematically by NGS once a genomic imbalance has been excluded by array CGH.

  14. Variance Analysis of Wind and Natural Gas Generation under Different Market Structures: Some Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, B.; Jenkin, T.; Lipowicz, D.; Arent, D. J.; Cooke, R.

    2012-01-01

    Does large scale penetration of renewable generation such as wind and solar power pose economic and operational burdens on the electricity system? A number of studies have pointed to the potential benefits of renewable generation as a hedge against the volatility and potential escalation of fossil fuel prices. Research also suggests that the lack of correlation of renewable energy costs with fossil fuel prices means that adding large amounts of wind or solar generation may also reduce the volatility of system-wide electricity costs. Such variance reduction of system costs may be of significant value to consumers due to risk aversion. The analysis in this report recognizes that the potential value of risk mitigation associated with wind generation and natural gas generation may depend on whether one considers the consumer's perspective or the investor's perspective and whether the market is regulated or deregulated. We analyze the risk and return trade-offs for wind and natural gas generation for deregulated markets based on hourly prices and load over a 10-year period using historical data in the PJM Interconnection (PJM) from 1999 to 2008. Similar analysis is then simulated and evaluated for regulated markets under certain assumptions.

  15. Technique for the comparison of light spectra from natural and laboratory generated lightning current arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchard, D.; Clark, D.; Carr, D.; Haddad, A.

    2016-08-01

    A technique was developed for the comparison of observed emission spectra from lightning current arcs generated through self-breakdown in air and the use of two types of initiation wire, aluminum bronze and nichrome, against previously published spectra of natural lightning events. A spectrograph system was used in which the wavelength of light emitted by the lightning arc was analyzed to derive elemental interactions. A lightning impulse of up to 100 kA was applied to a two hemispherical tungsten electrode configuration which allowed the effect of the lightning current and lightning arc length to be investigated. A natural lightning reference spectrum was reconstructed from literature, and generated lightning spectra were obtained from self-breakdown across a 14.0 mm air gap and triggered along initiation wires of length up to 72.4 mm. A comparison of the spectra showed that the generated lightning arc induced via self-breakdown produced a very similar spectrum to that of natural lightning, with the addition of only a few lines from the tungsten electrodes. A comparison of the results from the aluminum bronze initiation wire showed several more lines, whereas results from the nichrome initiation wire differed greatly across large parts of the spectrum. This work highlights the potential use for spectrographic techniques in the study of lightning interactions with surrounding media and materials, and in natural phenomena such as recently observed ball lightning.

  16. Technique for the comparison of light spectra from natural and laboratory generated lightning current arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchard, D., E-mail: mitcharddr@cardiff.ac.uk; Clark, D.; Carr, D.; Haddad, A. [Morgan-Botti Lightning Laboratory, Advanced High Voltage Research Centre, School of Engineering, Cardiff University, CF24 3AA Wales (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-29

    A technique was developed for the comparison of observed emission spectra from lightning current arcs generated through self-breakdown in air and the use of two types of initiation wire, aluminum bronze and nichrome, against previously published spectra of natural lightning events. A spectrograph system was used in which the wavelength of light emitted by the lightning arc was analyzed to derive elemental interactions. A lightning impulse of up to 100 kA was applied to a two hemispherical tungsten electrode configuration which allowed the effect of the lightning current and lightning arc length to be investigated. A natural lightning reference spectrum was reconstructed from literature, and generated lightning spectra were obtained from self-breakdown across a 14.0 mm air gap and triggered along initiation wires of length up to 72.4 mm. A comparison of the spectra showed that the generated lightning arc induced via self-breakdown produced a very similar spectrum to that of natural lightning, with the addition of only a few lines from the tungsten electrodes. A comparison of the results from the aluminum bronze initiation wire showed several more lines, whereas results from the nichrome initiation wire differed greatly across large parts of the spectrum. This work highlights the potential use for spectrographic techniques in the study of lightning interactions with surrounding media and materials, and in natural phenomena such as recently observed ball lightning.

  17. Chemical generation of volatile species of copper - Optimization, efficiency and investigation of volatile species nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šoukal, Jakub; Benada, Oldřich; Matoušek, Tomáš; Dědina, Jiří; Musil, Stanislav

    2017-07-18

    This work is a comprehensive study on chemical generation of volatile species (VSG) of copper for analytical atomic spectrometry. VSG was carried out in a flow injection mode in a special arrangement of the generator. Atomization in a diffusion flame atomizer (DF) with atomic absorption spectrometry detection was mostly used for VSG optimization. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was utilized to investigate generation efficiencies and feasibility of VSG system for ultratrace analysis. Concentration of individual reagents, namely of nitric acid, sodium tetrahydroborate and various reaction modifiers, was optimized with respect to generation efficiency. Triton X-100 and Antifoam B were chosen as the best combination of the modifiers owing to sixfold increase in sensitivity, decrease of tailing of measured signals and long-term repeatability. The addition of 500 μg L(-1) of Ag was found crucial to maintain identical generation efficiency at low concentrations of Cu. This phenomenon was ascribed to the change in the size of generated species. The release and generation efficiency were accurately determined as 56-58 and 31-32%, respectively. The contribution of co-generated aerosol to release and generation efficiency measured by means of Cs and Ba was found negligible, only 0.40 and 0.13%, respectively, which underlines highly efficient VSG of Cu. The nature of volatile species was investigated by various approaches. The results cannot provide the decisive evidence. However, experiments with the DF, ICP-MS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicate that the generated species are not volatile in the true sense but that they are strongly associated with fine aerosol co-generated during VSG. Cu clusters or nanoparticles of very small size (copper hydride cannot be conclusively excluded. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Parametric numerical investigaion of natural convection in a heat-generating fluid with phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksenova, A.E.; Chudanov, V.V.; Strizhov, V.F.; Vabishchevich, P.N. [Institute of Nuclear Safety Russian Academy Science, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-09-01

    Unsteady natural convection of a heat-generating fluid with phase transitions in the enclosures of a square section with isothermal rigid walls is investigated numerically for a wide range of dimensionless parameters. The quasisteady state solutions of conjugate heat and mass transfer problem are compared with available experimental results. Correlation relations for heat flux distributions at the domain boundaries depending on Rayleigh and Ostrogradskii numbers are obtained. It is shown that generally heat transfer is governed both by natural circulation and crust formation phenomena. Results of this paper may be used for analysis of experiments with prototypic core materials.

  19. Systemic functional grammar in natural language generation linguistic description and computational representation

    CERN Document Server

    Teich, Elke

    1999-01-01

    This volume deals with the computational application of systemic functional grammar (SFG) for natural language generation. In particular, it describes the implementation of a fragment of the grammar of German in the computational framework of KOMET-PENMAN for multilingual generation. The text also presents a specification of explicit well-formedness constraints on syntagmatic structure which are defined in the form of typed feature structures. It thus achieves a model of systemic functional grammar that unites both the strengths of systemics, such as stratification, functional diversification

  20. Nonlinear scattering of acoustic waves by natural and artificially generated subsurface bubble layers in sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovsky, Lev A; Sutin, Alexander M; Soustova, Irina A; Matveyev, Alexander L; Potapov, Andrey I; Kluzek, Zigmund

    2003-02-01

    The paper describes nonlinear effects due to a biharmonic acoustic signal scattering from air bubbles in the sea. The results of field experiments in a shallow sea are presented. Two waves radiated at frequencies 30 and 31-37 kHz generated backscattered signals at sum and difference frequencies in a bubble layer. A motorboat propeller was used to generate bubbles with different concentrations at different times, up to the return to the natural subsurface layer. Theoretical consideration is given for these effects. The experimental data are in a reasonably good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  1. Chromosomal breakpoints characterization of two supernumerary ring chromosomes 20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guediche, N; Brisset, S; Benichou, J-J; Guérin, N; Mabboux, P; Maurin, M-L; Bas, C; Laroudie, M; Picone, O; Goldszmidt, D; Prévot, S; Labrune, P; Tachdjian, G

    2010-02-01

    The occurrence of an additional ring chromosome 20 is a rare chromosome abnormality, and no common phenotype has been yet described. We report on two new patients presenting with a supernumerary ring chromosome 20 both prenatally diagnosed. The first presented with intrauterine growth retardation and some craniofacial dysmorphism, and the second case had a normal phenotype except for obesity. Conventional cytogenetic studies showed for each patient a small supernumerary marker chromosome (SMC). Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, these SMCs corresponded to ring chromosomes 20 including a part of short and long arms of chromosome 20. Detailed molecular cytogenetic characterization showed different breakpoints (20p11.23 and 20q11.23 for Patient 1 and 20p11.21 and 20q11.21 for Patient 2) and sizes of the two ring chromosomes 20 (13.6 Mb for case 1 and 4.8 Mb for case 2). Review of the 13 case reports of an extra r(20) ascertained postnatally (8 cases) and prenatally (5 cases) showed varying degrees of phenotypic abnormalities. We document a detailed molecular cytogenetic chromosomal breakpoints characterization of two cases of supernumerary ring chromosomes 20. These results emphasize the need to characterize precisely chromosomal breakpoints of supernumerary ring chromosomes 20 in order to establish genotype-phenotype correlation. This report may be helpful for prediction of natural history and outcome, particularly in prenatal diagnosis.

  2. A review of football injuries on third and fourth generation artificial turfs compared with natural turf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Sean; Hume, Patria A; Kara, Stephen

    2011-11-01

    Football codes (rugby union, soccer, American football) train and play matches on natural and artificial turfs. A review of injuries on different turfs was needed to inform practitioners and sporting bodies on turf-related injury mechanisms and risk factors. Therefore, the aim of this review was to compare the incidence, nature and mechanisms of injuries sustained on newer generation artificial turfs and natural turfs. Electronic databases were searched using the keywords 'artificial turf', 'natural turf', 'grass' and 'inj*'. Delimitation of 120 articles sourced to those addressing injuries in football codes and those using third and fourth generation artificial turfs or natural turfs resulted in 11 experimental papers. These 11 papers provided 20 cohorts that could be assessed using magnitude-based inferences for injury incidence rate ratio calculations pertaining to differences between surfaces. Analysis showed that 16 of the 20 cohorts showed trivial effects for overall incidence rate ratios between surfaces. There was increased risk of ankle injury playing on artificial turf in eight cohorts, with incidence rate ratios from 0.7 to 5.2. Evidence concerning risk of knee injuries on the two surfaces was inconsistent, with incidence rate ratios from 0.4 to 2.8. Two cohorts showed beneficial inferences over the 90% likelihood value for effects of artificial surface on muscle injuries for soccer players; however, there were also two harmful, four unclear and five trivial inferences across the three football codes. Inferences relating to injury severity were inconsistent, with the exception that artificial turf was very likely to have harmful effects for minor injuries in rugby union training and severe injuries in young female soccer players. No clear differences between surfaces were evident in relation to training versus match injuries. Potential mechanisms for differing injury patterns on artificial turf compared with natural turf include increased peak torque and

  3. Generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession.

  4. Next Generation Sequencing of Classical Swine Fever Virus and Border Disease virus cloned in Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahnøe, Ulrik; Höper, Dirk; Beer, martin

    2012-01-01

    Next generation sequencing is a powerful tool for complete sequencing of large amounts of DNA. We have recently cloned full genome cDNA copies (obtained by long-range RT-PCR) of entire genomes of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) strain Koslov and Border disease virus strain Gifhorn into bacterial...

  5. Implementation of Imitation Learning using Natural Learner Central Pattern Generator Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Hamed; Parandeh, Reyhaneh; Jamshidi, Kamal

    2016-11-01

    In this paper a new design of neural networks is introduced, which is able to generate oscillatory patterns. The fundamental building block of the neural network is O-neurons that can generate an oscillation in its transfer functions. Since the natural policy gradient learning has been used in training a central pattern generator paradigm, it is called Natural Learner CPG Neural Networks (NLCPGNN). O-neurons are connected and coupled to each other in order to shape a network and their unknown parameters are found by a natural policy gradient learning algorithm. The main contribution of this paper is design of this learning algorithm which is able to simultaneously search for the weights and topology of the network. This system is capable to obtain any complex motion and rhythmic trajectory via first layer and learn rhythmic trajectories in the second layer and converge towards all these movements. Moreover this two layers system is able to provide various features of a learner model for instance resistance against perturbations, modulation of trajectories amplitude and frequency. Simulation of the learning system in the robot simulator (WEBOTS) that is linked with MATLAB software has been done. Implementation on a real NAO robot demonstrates that the robot has learned desired motion with high accuracy. These results show proposed system produces high convergence rate and low test errors.

  6. Integral transform solution of natural convection in a square cavity with volumetric heat generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. An

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The generalized integral transform technique (GITT is employed to obtain a hybrid numerical-analytical solution of natural convection in a cavity with volumetric heat generation. The hybrid nature of this approach allows for the establishment of benchmark results in the solution of non-linear partial differential equation systems, including the coupled set of heat and fluid flow equations that govern the steady natural convection problem under consideration. Through performing the GITT, the resulting transformed ODE system is then numerically solved by making use of the subroutine DBVPFD from the IMSL Library. Therefore, numerical results under user prescribed accuracy are obtained for different values of Rayleigh numbers, and the convergence behavior of the proposed eigenfunction expansions is illustrated. Critical comparisons against solutions produced by ANSYS CFX 12.0 are then conducted, which demonstrate excellent agreement. Several sets of reference results for natural convection with volumetric heat generation in a bi-dimensional square cavity are also provided for future verification of numerical results obtained by other researchers.

  7. Analysis on Non-Uniform Flow in Steam Generator During Steady State Natural Circulation Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susyadi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Investigation on non uniform flow behavior among U-tube in steam generator during natural circulation cooling has been conducted using RELAP5. The investigation is performed by modeling the steam generator into multi channel models, i.e. 9-tubes model. Two situations are implemented, high pressure and low pressure cases. Using partial model, the calculation simulates situation similar to the natural circulation test performed in LSTF. The imposed boundary conditions are flow rate, quality, pressure of the primary side, feed water temperature, steam generator liquid level, and pressure in the secondary side. Calculation result shows that simulation using model with nine tubes is capable to capture important non-uniform phenomena such as reverse flow, fill-and-dump, and stagnant vertical stratification. As a result of appropriate simulation of non uniform flow, the calculated steam generator outlet flow in the primary loop is stable as observed in the experiments. The results also clearly indicate the importance of simulation of non-uniform flow in predicting both the flow stability and heat transfer between the primary and secondary side. In addition, the history of transient plays important role on the selection of the flow distribution among tubes. © 2007 Atom Indonesia. All rights reserved

  8. Synergistic microbial consortium for bioenergy generation from complex natural energy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Victor Bochuan; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong; Chua, Song-Lin; Zhang, Qichun; Cao, Bin; Chye, Joachim Loo Say; Yang, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Microbial species have evolved diverse mechanisms for utilization of complex carbon sources. Proper combination of targeted species can affect bioenergy production from natural waste products. Here, we established a stable microbial consortium with Escherichia coli and Shewanella oneidensis in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to produce bioenergy from an abundant natural energy source, in the form of the sarcocarp harvested from coconuts. This component is mostly discarded as waste. However, through its usage as a feedstock for MFCs to produce useful energy in this study, the sarcocarp can be utilized meaningfully. The monospecies S. oneidensis system was able to generate bioenergy in a short experimental time frame while the monospecies E. coli system generated significantly less bioenergy. A combination of E. coli and S. oneidensis in the ratio of 1:9 (v:v) significantly enhanced the experimental time frame and magnitude of bioenergy generation. The synergistic effect is suggested to arise from E. coli and S. oneidensis utilizing different nutrients as electron donors and effect of flavins secreted by S. oneidensis. Confocal images confirmed the presence of biofilms and point towards their importance in generating bioenergy in MFCs.

  9. Synergistic Microbial Consortium for Bioenergy Generation from Complex Natural Energy Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Bochuan Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial species have evolved diverse mechanisms for utilization of complex carbon sources. Proper combination of targeted species can affect bioenergy production from natural waste products. Here, we established a stable microbial consortium with Escherichia coli and Shewanella oneidensis in microbial fuel cells (MFCs to produce bioenergy from an abundant natural energy source, in the form of the sarcocarp harvested from coconuts. This component is mostly discarded as waste. However, through its usage as a feedstock for MFCs to produce useful energy in this study, the sarcocarp can be utilized meaningfully. The monospecies S. oneidensis system was able to generate bioenergy in a short experimental time frame while the monospecies E. coli system generated significantly less bioenergy. A combination of E. coli and S. oneidensis in the ratio of 1 : 9 (v : v significantly enhanced the experimental time frame and magnitude of bioenergy generation. The synergistic effect is suggested to arise from E. coli and S. oneidensis utilizing different nutrients as electron donors and effect of flavins secreted by S. oneidensis. Confocal images confirmed the presence of biofilms and point towards their importance in generating bioenergy in MFCs.

  10. Recent Progress in Understanding Natural-Hazards-Generated TEC Perturbations: Measurements and Modeling Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komjathy, A.; Yang, Y. M.; Meng, X.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.; Mannucci, A. J.; Langley, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Natural hazards, including earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and tsunamis, have been significant threats to humans throughout recorded history. The Global Positioning System satellites have become primary sensors to measure signatures associated with such natural hazards. These signatures typically include GPS-derived seismic deformation measurements, co-seismic vertical displacements, and real-time GPS-derived ocean buoy positioning estimates. Another way to use GPS observables is to compute the ionospheric total electron content (TEC) to measure and monitor post-seismic ionospheric disturbances caused by earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and tsunamis. Research at the University of New Brunswick (UNB) laid the foundations to model the three-dimensional ionosphere at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory by ingesting ground- and space-based GPS measurements into the state-of-the-art Global Assimilative Ionosphere Modeling (GAIM) software. As an outcome of the UNB and NASA research, new and innovative GPS applications have been invented including the use of ionospheric measurements to detect tiny fluctuations in the GPS signals between the spacecraft and GPS receivers caused by natural hazards occurring on or near the Earth's surface.We will show examples for early detection of natural hazards generated ionospheric signatures using ground-based and space-borne GPS receivers. We will also discuss recent results from the U.S. Real-time Earthquake Analysis for Disaster Mitigation Network (READI) exercises utilizing our algorithms. By studying the propagation properties of ionospheric perturbations generated by natural hazards along with applying sophisticated first-principles physics-based modeling, we are on track to develop new technologies that can potentially save human lives and minimize property damage. It is also expected that ionospheric monitoring of TEC perturbations might become an integral part of existing natural hazards warning systems.

  11. The generation and its sealing condition of natural gas in the Tadong area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Focusing on the two natural gas exploration geological problems with abundant source of oil cracking gas in the late stage and the sealing condition of the oil cracking gas reservoir,the kinetics of oil cracking gas and the evaluation parameters of gas cap rock are adopted to the study on the natural gas accumulation conditions in the Tadong area. Both the study on the kinetics of oil cracking gas and the statistical results of reservoir bitumen reveal that the geological formation of oil cracking gas in the Tadong area is located in the top of Cambrian. Two kinds of oil cracking gas geological models at least,namely well Mandong-1’s early rapid generation model(Middle Ordovician-end Silurian) and peak cracking model(with the natural gas conversion rate >90%) ,namely well Yingnan-2’s two-stage generation model of oil cracking gas,have been set up. The oil cracking gas of Yingnan-2 in the late stage is very significant in the evaluation of natural gas exploration in the Tadong area. The evaluation results of the cap rock show that the microscopic parameters of cap rock from the lower assemblage of Cambrian-Ordovician are better than those from the upper assemblage. The former has strong capillary sealing ability and higher cap rock breakthrough pressure than the upper assemblage,with strong sealing ability,so that natural gas dissipates mainly by diffusion. According to the above investigations,the lower assemblage Cambrian-Ordovician natural gas of Kongquehe slope,Tadong low uplift and Yingjisu depression in the Tadong area prospects well.

  12. Effect of an External Oriented Magnetic Field on Entropy Generation in Natural Convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atef El Jery

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The influence of an external oriented magnetic field on entropy generation in natural convection for air and liquid gallium is numerically studied in steady-unsteady states by solving the mass, the momentum and the energy conservation equations. Entropy generation depends on five parameters which are: the Prandtl number, the irreversibility coefficients, the inclination angle of the magnetic field, the thermal Grashof and the Hartmann numbers. Effects of these parameters on total and local irreversibilities as well as on heat transfer and fluid flow are studied. It was found that the magnetic field tends to decrease the convection currents, the heat transfer and entropy generation inside the enclosure. Influence of inclination angle of the magnetic field on local irreversibility is then studied.

  13. Modeling Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Learning about chromosomes is standard fare in biology classrooms today. However, students may find it difficult to understand the relationships among the "genome", "chromosomes", "genes", a "gene locus", and "alleles". In the simple activity described in this article, which follows the 5E approach…

  14. A Method to Quantify Cell-Free Fetal DNA Fraction in Maternal Plasma Using Next Generation Sequencing: Its Application in Non-Invasive Prenatal Chromosomal Aneuploidy Detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-Ping Xu

    Full Text Available The fraction of circulating cell-free fetal (cff DNA in maternal plasma is a critical parameter for aneuploidy screening with non-invasive prenatal testing, especially for those samples located in equivocal zones. We developed an approach to quantify cff DNA fractions directly with sequencing data, and increased cff DNAs by optimizing library construction procedure.Artificial DNA mixture samples (360, with known cff DNA fractions, were used to develop a method to determine cff DNA fraction through calculating the proportion of Y chromosomal unique reads, with sequencing data generated by Ion Proton. To validate our method, we investigated cff DNA fractions of 2,063 pregnant women with fetuses who were diagnosed as high risk of fetal defects. The z-score was calculated to determine aneuploidies for chromosomes 21, 18 and 13. The relationships between z-score and parameters of pregnancies were also analyzed. To improve cff DNA fractions in our samples, two groups were established as follows: in group A, the large-size DNA fragments were removed, and in group B these were retained, during library construction.A method to determine cff DNA fractions was successfully developed using 360 artificial mixture samples in which cff DNA fractions were known. A strong positive correlation was found between z-score and fetal DNA fraction in the artificial mixture samples of trisomy 21, 18 and 13, as well as in clinical maternal plasma samples. There was a positive correlation between gestational age and the cff DNA fraction in the clinical samples, but no correlation for maternal age. Moreover, increased fetal DNA fractions were found in group A compared to group B.A relatively accurate method was developed to determine the cff DNA fraction in maternal plasma. By optimizing, we can improve cff DNA fractions in sequencing samples, which may contribute to improvements in detection rate and reliability.

  15. A divergent P element and its associated MITE, BuT5, generate chromosomal inversions and are widespread within the Drosophila repleta species group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rius, Nuria; Delprat, Alejandra; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    The transposon BuT5 caused two chromosomal inversions fixed in two Drosophila species of the repleta group, D. mojavensis and D. uniseta. BuT5 copies are approximately 1-kb long, lack any coding capacity, and do not resemble any other transposable element (TE). Because of its elusive features, BuT5 has remained unclassified to date. To fully characterize BuT5, we carried out bioinformatic similarity searches in available sequenced genomes, including 21 Drosophila species. Significant hits were only recovered for D. mojavensis genome, where 48 copies were retrieved, 22 of them approximately 1-kb long. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and dot blot analyses on 54 Drosophila species showed that BuT5 is homogeneous in size and has a widespread distribution within the repleta group. Thus, BuT5 can be considered as a miniature inverted-repeat TE. A detailed analysis of the BuT5 hits in D. mojavensis revealed three partial copies of a transposon with ends very similar to BuT5 and a P-element-like transposase-encoding region in between. A putatively autonomous copy of this P element was isolated by PCR from D. buzzatii. This copy is 3,386-bp long and possesses a seven-exon gene coding for an 822-aa transposase. Exon-intron boundaries were confirmed by reverse transcriptase-PCR experiments. A phylogenetic tree built with insect P superfamily transposases showed that the D. buzzatii P element belongs to an early diverging lineage within the P-element family. This divergent P element is likely the master transposon mobilizing BuT5. The BuT5/P element partnership probably dates back approximately 16 Ma and is the ultimate responsible for the generation of the two chromosomal inversions in the Drosophila repleta species group.

  16. Use of lambda Red-mediated recombineering and Cre/lox for generation of markerless chromosomal deletions in avian pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuntufye, Huruma N; Goddeeris, Bruno M

    2011-12-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) are bacteria associated with extraintestinal diseases in poultry. A method to generate markerless deletions of APEC genome is described. Lambda Red recombination is used to introduce a LoxP cassette (loxP-rpsL-neo-loxP) containing the rpsL gene for streptomycin sensitivity and the neo gene for kanamycin/neomycin resistance into the APEC genome, with attendant deletion of a desired chromosomal gene. The loxP sites are incorporated into primers used to amplify the rpsL-neo marker during the construction of the LoxP cassette, making the method rapid and efficient. The cassette is specifically integrated into the fiu gene or intergenic region 2051-52, and the Cre/lox system is used to remove the marker, hence deletion of the drug-resistance genes. The results demonstrate that the Cre/lox system can successfully be used to generate markerless deletions in APEC, and rpsL counter-selection can be used to select the deletions so that one does not have to pick and test to find the desired product. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Ex vivo generated natural killer cells acquire typical natural killer receptors and display a cytotoxic gene expression profile similar to peripheral blood natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Dorit; Spanholtz, Jan; Osl, Markus; Tordoir, Marleen; Lipnik, Karoline; Bilban, Martin; Schlechta, Bernhard; Dolstra, Harry; Hofer, Erhard

    2012-11-01

    Ex vivo differentiation systems of natural killer (NK) cells from CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells are of potential importance for adjuvant immunotherapy of cancer. Here, we analyzed ex vivo differentiation of NK cells from cord blood-derived CD34+ stem cells by gene expression profiling, real-time RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and functional analysis. Additionally, we compared the identified characteristics to peripheral blood (PB) CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells. The data show sequential expression of CD56 and the CD94 and NKG2 receptor chains during ex vivo NK cell development, resulting finally in the expression of a range of genes with partial characteristics of CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells from PB. Expression of characteristic NK cell receptors and cytotoxic genes was mainly found within the predominant ex vivo generated population of NKG2A+ NK cells, indicating the importance of NKG2A expression during NK cell differentiation and maturation. Furthermore, despite distinct phenotypic characteristics, the detailed analysis of cytolytic genes expressed within the ex vivo differentiated NK cells revealed a pattern close to CD56(dim) NK cells. In line with this finding, ex vivo generated NK cells displayed potent cytotoxicity. This supports that the ex vivo differentiation system faithfully reproduces major steps of the differentiation of NK cells from their progenitors, constitutes an excellent model to study NK cell differentiation, and is valuable to generate large-scale NK cells appropriate for immunotherapy.

  18. Evanescent magnetic field effects on entropy generation at the onset of natural convection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mourad Magherbi; Atef El Jery; Nejib Hidouri; Ammar Ben Brahim

    2010-04-01

    This paper numerically investigates the effect of an externally evanescent magnetic field on total entropy generation in a fluid enclosed in a square cavity by using a control volume finite element method to solve the conservation equations at Prandtl number of 0·71. The values of relaxation time of the magnetic field are chosen, so that the Lorentz force acts only in the transient state of entropy generation in natural convection. The total entropy generation was calculated for, fixed value of irreversibility distribution ratio, different relaxation time varying from 0 to 1/5 and Grashof number varying from 104 to 105. The effects of the Hartman number and the magnetic field inclination angle on the evolution of total entropy generation throughout the transient regime were investigated. Results show that the application of evanescent magnetic field not only suppresses the fluctuation of the total entropy generation in the transient state, but also reduces the gap for magnetic field relaxation time less than 1/10.

  19. Detection of Natural Hazards Generated TEC Perturbations and Related New Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komjathy, A.; Yang, Y.; Langley, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    Natural hazards, including earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and tsunamis, have been significant threats to humans throughout recorded history. The Global Positioning System satellites have become primary sensors to measure signatures associated with such natural hazards. These signatures typically include GPS-derived seismic deformation measurements, co-seismic vertical displacements, and real-time GPS-derived ocean buoy positioning estimates. Another way to use GPS observables is to compute the ionospheric total electron content (TEC) to measure and monitor post-seismic ionospheric disturbances caused by earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and tsunamis. Research at the University of New Brunswick (UNB) laid the foundations to model the three-dimensional ionosphere at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory by ingesting ground- and space-based GPS measurements into the state-of-the-art Global Assimilative Ionosphere Modeling (GAIM) software. As an outcome of the UNB and NASA research, new and innovative GPS applications have been invented including the use of ionospheric measurements to detect tiny fluctuations in the GPS signals between the spacecraft and GPS receivers caused by natural hazards occurring on or near the Earth's surface. This continuing research is expected to provide early warning for tsunamis, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and meteor impacts, for example, using GPS and other global navigation satellite systems. We will demonstrate new and upcoming applications including recent natural hazards and artificial explosions that generated TEC perturbations to perform state-of-the-art imaging and modeling of earthquakes, tsunamis and meteor impacts. By studying the propagation properties of ionospheric perturbations generated by natural hazards along with applying sophisticated first-principles physics-based modeling, we are on track to develop new technologies that can potentially save human lives and minimize property damage.

  20. Generation and Migration of Natural Gas in Miocene Strata, Offshore Southeastern Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Byeong-Kook

    2016-04-01

    Natural gas and condensate are produced from Miocene strata of the Tertiary marine basin, called Ulleung Basin, which is located offshore southeastern Korea. Petroleum system in the basin has not been fully understood, because effective source rocks have not been identified in the area. However, 1-D petroleum system modelling and isotope data indicate that the source rock of the natural gas and condensate might be present at deeper strata than 5,000 m in the basin. In addition, the analysis of diamondoids in the condensate shows that the gas was transformed from type II kerogen. Based on this source rock information and other geological data, 2-D petroleum system modelling was conducted on two cross sections in the southwestern margin of the basin. The 2-D models show two phase generation and migration, which are caused by the geometry of source bed and the maturity level of each pod of the bed. In addition, the accumulation of hydrocarbon is constrained greatly by the timing of development of the regional seal. The first generation and migration of oil and gas begins with a high rate of sedimentation at a deeply and early buried pod of the source bed at 15 Ma. The hydrocarbon, however, migrates upward and diffuses toward the surface. The second generation and migration occurs at around 11 Ma from the other pod of the source bed. This hydrocarbon migrates updip toward anticlines and accumulates into the traps of anticlines. On the other hand, the model shows that the generation and migration is dominated by gas, rather than oil. This model indicates that the accumulation of hydrocarbon can be completed only by the proper and sophisticated combination of the geological elements and the timing of hydrocarbon migration in time and space. This 2-D feature of generation and migration is supported by additional 1-D models of two pseudo-wells drilled on the 2-D section.

  1. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) generated from lignite-fired power plants in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasani, F; Shala, F; Xhixha, G; Xhixha, M K; Hodolli, G; Kadiri, S; Bylyku, E; Cfarku, F

    2014-12-01

    The energy production in Kosovo depends primarily on lignite-fired power plants. During coal combustion, huge amounts of fly ash and bottom ash are generated, which may result in enriched natural radionuclides; therefore, these radionuclides need to be investigated to identify the possible processes that may lead to the radiological exposure of workers and the local population. Lignite samples and NORMs of fly ash and bottom ash generated in lignite-fired power plants in Kosovo are analyzed using a gamma-ray spectrometry method for the activity concentration of natural radionuclides. The average activity concentrations of (40)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th in lignite are found to be 36 ± 8 Bq kg(-1), 9 ± 1 Bq kg(-1) and 9 ± 3 Bq kg(-1), respectively. Indications on the occurrence and geochemical behavior of uranium in the lignite matrix are suggested. The activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in fly ash and bottom ash samples are found to be concentrated from 3 to 5 times that of the feeding lignite. The external gamma-ray absorbed dose rate and the activity concentration index are calculated to assess the radiological hazard arising from ash disposal and recycling in the cement industry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Modification of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) and preparation of intact BAC DNA for generation of transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Shiaoching; Yang, X William

    2005-05-01

    BAC transgenesis is a powerful tool for the study of gene expression and gene function in the mouse in vivo. In this unit, detailed protocols are provided for modification (i.e., marker gene insertion, deletion, or point mutation) of BACs by homologous recombination in E. coli. This method utilizes a shuttle vector that allows transient expression of the E. coli RecA gene to support homologous recombination in the BAC host bacteria. In addition, two protocols are provided for purification of BAC DNA for microinjection to generate transgenic mice. Since BAC DNA is prone to degradation, which may introduce positional effects in transgenic mice, two methods are given for purification of intact BAC DNA for subsequent microinjection.

  3. Determination of photochemically-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) in natural water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN Manjun

    2009-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be produced by interactions between sunlight and light-absorbing substances in natural water environment. ROS may participate in the indirect photolysis of trace organic pollutants, therefore resulting in the changing of their environmental fates and ecological risks in natural water system. Bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine-disrupting chemical, exits widely in natural water. The photodegradation of BPA promoted by ROS (·OH, 1O2, HO2·/O2·-) which were produced on the excitation of ubiquitous constituents (such as nitrate ion, humic substances and Fe(III)-oxalate complexes) in natural water under simulated solar radiation was investigated. Both molecular probe method and electron spin resonance (ESR) test were used for the determine the characterization of generated ROS. It was found that ·OH was photochemically produced with the presence of nitrate ion, humic substances and Fe(III)-oxalate complexes and 1O2 was produced with the presence of humic substances. The steady-state concentrations of ·OH was 1.27×10-14 mol/L in nitrate ion, and the second-order rate constant of BPA with ·OH was 1.01×1010L/( mol·s).

  4. Chromatographic generator systems for the actinides and natural decay series elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAlister, D.R.; Horwitz, E.P. [PG Research Foundation, Lisle, IL (United States)

    2011-07-01

    This work describes chromatographic radionuclide generator systems for the production of actinides and natural decay series elements. The generator systems begin with alpha emitting parent radioisotopes with half-lives (T{sub 1/2}) of greater than one year and produce alpha or beta emitting radioisotopes with half-lives of hours to days. Chromatographic systems were chosen to minimize radiolytic damage to chromatographic supports, preserve the parent activity for repeated use, provide high purity daughter radionuclide tracers, and to minimize or eliminate the need for evaporation of solutions of the parent or daughter nuclides. Useful secondary separations involving the daughters of the initial parent radionuclide are also described. Separation systems for {sup 210}Bi, {sup 210}Po, {sup 211}Pb, {sup 212}Pb, {sup 223}Ra, {sup 224}Ra, {sup 225}Ra, {sup 225}Ac, {sup 227}Th, {sup 228}Th, {sup 231}Th, {sup 234}Th, and {sup 239}Np are outlined in detail. (orig.)

  5. ANT: Software for Generating and Evaluating Degenerate Codons for Natural and Expanded Genetic Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engqvist, Martin K M; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-08-21

    The Ambiguous Nucleotide Tool (ANT) is a desktop application that generates and evaluates degenerate codons. Degenerate codons are used to represent DNA positions that have multiple possible nucleotide alternatives. This is useful for protein engineering and directed evolution, where primers specified with degenerate codons are used as a basis for generating libraries of protein sequences. ANT is intuitive and can be used in a graphical user interface or by interacting with the code through a defined application programming interface. ANT comes with full support for nonstandard, user-defined, or expanded genetic codes (translation tables), which is important because synthetic biology is being applied to an ever widening range of natural and engineered organisms. The Python source code for ANT is freely distributed so that it may be used without restriction, modified, and incorporated in other software or custom data pipelines.

  6. HAIR CELL-LIKE CELL GENERATION INDUCED BY NATURE CULTURE OF ADULT RAT AUDITORY EPITHELIUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Hui; Zhu Hongliang; Li Shengli; Yao Xiaobao; Wang Xiaoxia

    2006-01-01

    Objective To establish adult rat auditory epithelial cell culture and try to find precursor cells of auditory hair cells in vitro. Methods With refinement of culture media and techniques, cochlear sensory epithelial cells of adult rat were cultured. Immunocytochemistry and Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)labeling were used to detect properties and mitotic status of cultured cells. Results The cultured auditory epithelial cells showed a large, flat epithelial morphotype and expressed F-actin and cytokeratin, a subset of cells generated from auditory epithelium were labeled by calretinin, a specific marker of early hair cell. Conclusion Adult rat auditory epithelium can be induced to generate hair cell-like cells by nature culture, this phenomenon suggests that progenitor cells may exist in rat cochlea and they may give birth to new hair cells. Whether these progenitor cells are tissue specific stem cells is still need more study.

  7. Decoding the `Nature Encoded' Messages for Distributed Energy Generation Control in Microgrid

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Shuping; Lai, Lifeng; Qiu, Robert C

    2010-01-01

    The communication for the control of distributed energy generation (DEG) in microgrid is discussed. Due to the requirement of realtime transmission, weak or no explicit channel coding is used for the message of system state. To protect the reliability of the uncoded or weakly encoded messages, the system dynamics are considered as a `nature encoding' similar to convolution code, due to its redundancy in time. For systems with or without explicit channel coding, two decoding procedures based on Kalman filtering and Pearl's Belief Propagation, in a similar manner to Turbo processing in traditional data communication systems, are proposed. Numerical simulations have demonstrated the validity of the schemes, using a linear model of electric generator dynamic system.

  8. Efficiency of a mathematical model in generating CAD/CAM-partial crowns with natural tooth morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ender, Andreas; Mörmann, Werner H; Mehl, Albert

    2011-04-01

    The "biogeneric tooth model" can be used for computer-aided design (CAD) of the occlusal surface of dental restorations. From digital 3D-data, it automatically retrieves a morphology matching the natural surface left after preparation. This study evaluates the potential of this method for generating well-matched and well-adjusted CAD/computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) fabricated partial crowns. Twelve models with partial crown preparations were mounted into an articulator. Partial crowns were designed with the Cerec 3D CAD software based on the biogeneric tooth model (Biog.CAD) and, for control, with a conventional data-based Cerec 3D CAD software (Conv.CAD). The design time was measured, and the naturalness of the morphology was visually assessed. The restorations were milled, cemented on the models, and the vertical discrepancy and the time for final occlusal adjustment were measured. The Biog.CAD software offered a significantly higher naturalness (up to 225 to 11 scores) and was significantly faster by 251 (± 78) s in designing partial crowns (p < 0.01) compared to Conv.CAD software. Vertical discrepancy, 0.52 (± 0.28) mm for Conv.CAD and 0.46 (± 0.19)mm for Biog.CAD, and occlusal adjustment time, 118 (± 132)s for Conv.CAD and 102 (± 77)s for Biog.CAD, did not differ significantly. In conclusion, the biogeneric tooth model is able to generate occlusal morphology of partial crowns in a fully automated process with higher naturalness compared to conventional interactive CAD software.

  9. Absence of Non-histone Protein Complexes at Natural Chromosomal Pause Sites Results in Reduced Replication Pausing in Aging Yeast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleny Cabral

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available There is substantial evidence that genomic instability increases during aging. Replication pausing (and stalling at difficult-to-replicate chromosomal sites may induce genomic instability. Interestingly, in aging yeast cells, we observed reduced replication pausing at various natural replication pause sites (RPSs in ribosomal DNA (rDNA and non-rDNA locations (e.g., silent replication origins and tRNA genes. The reduced pausing occurs independent of the DNA helicase Rrm3p, which facilitates replication past these non-histone protein-complex-bound RPSs, and is independent of the deacetylase Sir2p. Conditions of caloric restriction (CR, which extend life span, also cause reduced replication pausing at the 5S rDNA and at tRNA genes. In aged and CR cells, the RPSs are less occupied by their specific non-histone protein complexes (e.g., the preinitiation complex TFIIIC, likely because members of these complexes have primarily cytosolic localization. These conditions may lead to reduced replication pausing and may lower replication stress at these sites during aging.

  10. Valuing natural gas power generation assets in the new competitive marketplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Michael Chun-Wei

    1999-10-01

    The profitability of natural gas fired power plants depends critically on the spread between electricity and natural gas prices. The price levels of these two energy commodities are the key uncertain variables in determining the operating margin and therefore the value of a power plant. The owner of a generation unit has the decision of dispatching the plant only when profit margins are positive. This operating flexibility is a real option with real value. In this dissertation I introduce the spark spread call options and illustrate how such paper contracts replicate the uncertain payoff space facing power asset owners and, therefore, how the financial options framework can be applied in estimating the value of natural gas generation plants. The intrinsic value of gas power plants is approximated as the sum of a series of spark spread call options with succeeding maturity dates. The Black-Scholes spread option pricing model, with volatility and correlation term structure adjustments, is utilized to price the spark spread options. Sensitivity analysis is also performed on the BS spread option formulation to compare different asset types. In addition I explore the potential of using compound and compound-exchange option concepts to evaluate, respectively, the benefits of delaying investment in new generation and in repowering existing antiquated units. The compound option designates an option on top of another option. In this case the series of spark spread call options is the 'underlying' option while the option to delay new investments is the 'overlying.' The compound-exchange option characterizes the opportunity to 'exchange' the old power plant, with its series of spark spread call options, for a set of new spark spread call options that comes with the new generation unit. The strike price of the compound-exchange option is the repowering capital investment and typically includes the purchase of new steam generators and combustion turbines, as well as other

  11. Review and perspectives: Understanding natural-hazards-generated ionospheric perturbations using GPS measurements and coupled modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komjathy, Attila; Yang, Yu-Ming; Meng, Xing; Verkhoglyadova, Olga; Mannucci, Anthony J.; Langley, Richard B.

    2016-07-01

    Natural hazards including earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and tsunamis have been significant threats to humans throughout recorded history. Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS; including the Global Positioning System (GPS)) receivers have become primary sensors to measure signatures associated with natural hazards. These signatures typically include GPS-derived seismic deformation measurements, coseismic vertical displacements, and real-time GPS-derived ocean buoy positioning estimates. Another way to use GPS observables is to compute the ionospheric total electron content (TEC) to measure, model, and monitor postseismic ionospheric disturbances caused by, e.g., earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and tsunamis. In this paper, we review research progress at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and elsewhere using examples of ground-based and spaceborne observation of natural hazards that generated TEC perturbations. We present results for state-of-the-art imaging using ground-based and spaceborne ionospheric measurements and coupled atmosphere-ionosphere modeling of ionospheric TEC perturbations. We also report advancements and chart future directions in modeling and inversion techniques to estimate tsunami wave heights and ground surface displacements using TEC measurements and error estimates. Our initial retrievals strongly suggest that both ground-based and spaceborne GPS remote sensing techniques could play a critical role in detection and imaging of the upper atmosphere signatures of natural hazards including earthquakes and tsunamis. We found that combining ground-based and spaceborne measurements may be crucial in estimating critical geophysical parameters such as tsunami wave heights and ground surface displacements using TEC observations. The GNSS-based remote sensing of natural-hazard-induced ionospheric disturbances could be applied to and used in operational tsunami and earthquake early warning systems.

  12. Flame generation and maintenance by non-stationary discharge in mixture of air and natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Henrique De Souza; Sagas, Julio; Lacava, Pedro

    2013-09-01

    Plasma assisted combustion is a promising research field, where the high generation of reactive species by non-equilibrium plasmas is used to modify the combustion kinetics in order to improve the process either by increasing the production of specific species (like molecular hydrogen) or by decreasing pollutant emission. One typical issue observed in plasma assisted combustion is the increase of inflammability limits, i.e the observation of combustion and flame in situation where it is not observed in conventional combustion. To study the effect of a non-stationary discharge in flame generation and maintenance in a mixture for air and natural gas, the air mass flow rate was fixed in 0.80 g/s and the natural gas flow rate was varied between 0.02 and 0.14 g/s, resulting in a variation of equivalence ratio from 0.4 to 3.0. It is observed a dependence of inflammability limits with the applied power. The analysis by mass spectrometry indicates that the increase of inflammability limits with plasma is due not only applied power, but also to hydrogen production in the discharge. Visual analysis together with high speed camera measurements show a modification in spatial distribution of the flame, probably due to modifications both in flow velocity and flame velocity. Supported by FAPESP PRONEX project grant 11/50773-0.

  13. Natural Convection Flow along an Isothermal Vertical Flat Plate with Temperature Dependent Viscosity and Heat Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Mamun Molla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the natural convection laminar flow along an isothermal vertical flat plate immersed in a fluid with viscosity which is the exponential function of fluid temperature in presence of internal heat generation. The governing boundary layer equations are transformed into a nondimensional form and the resulting nonlinear system of partial differential equations is reduced to a convenient form which are solved numerically using an efficient marching order implicit finite difference method with double sweep technique. Numerical results are presented in terms of the velocity and temperature distribution of the fluid as well as the heat transfer characteristics, namely, the wall shear stress and the local and average rate of heat transfer in terms of the local skin-friction coefficient, the local and average Nusselt number for a wide range of the viscosity-variation parameter, heat generation parameter, and the Rayleigh number. Increasing viscosity variation parameter and Rayleigh number lead to increasing the local and average Nusselt number and decreasing the wall shear stress. Wall shear stress and the rate of heat transfer decreased due to the increase of heat generation.

  14. Clean Power Generation from the Intractable Natural Coalfield Fires: Turn Harm into Benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bobo; Su, Hetao; Li, Jinshi; Qi, Haining; Zhou, Fubao; Torero, José L; Chen, Zhongwei

    2017-07-13

    The coal fires, a global catastrophe for hundreds of years, have been proved extremely difficult to control, and hit almost every coal-bearing area globally. Meanwhile, underground coal fires contain tremendous reservoir of geothermal energy. Approximately one billion tons of coal burns underground annually in the world, which could generate ~1000 GW per annum. A game-changing approach, environmentally sound thermal energy extraction from the intractable natural coalfield fires, is being developed by utilizing the waste energy and reducing the temperature of coalfield fires at the same time. Based on the Seebeck effect of thermoelectric materials, the temperature difference between the heat medium and cooling medium was employed to directly convert thermal energy into clean electrical energy. By the time of December 2016, the power generation from a single borehole at Daquan Lake fire district in Xinjiang has been exceeded 174.6 W. The field trial demonstrates that it is possible to exploit and utilize the waste heat resources in the treated coal fire areas. It promises a significant impact on the structure of global energy generation and can also promote progress in thermoelectric conversion materials, geothermal exploration, underground coal fires control and other energy related areas.

  15. Correlation of Steam Generator Mixing Parameters for Severe Accident Hot-Leg Natural Circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Yehong; Guentay, Salih [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI, CH-5232 (Switzerland)

    2008-07-01

    Steam generator inlet plenum mixing phenomenon with hot-leg counter-current natural circulation during a PWR station blackout severe accident is one of the important processes governing which component will fail first as a result of thermal challenge from the circulating gas with high temperature and pressure. Since steam generator tube failure represents bypass release of fission product from the reactor to environment, study of inlet plenum mixing parameters is important to risk analysis. Probability distribution functions of individual mixing parameter should be obtained from experiments or calculated by analysis. In order to perform sensitivity studies of the synergetic effects of all mixing parameters on the severe accident-induced steam generator tube failure, the distribution and correlation of these mixing parameters must be known to remove undue conservatism in thermal-hydraulic calculations. This paper discusses physical laws governing three mixing parameters in a steady state and setups the correlation among these mixing parameters. The correlation is then applied to obtain the distribution of one of the mixing parameters that has not been given in the previous CFD analysis. Using the distributions and considering the inter-dependence of the three mixing parameters, three sensitivity cases enveloping the mixing parameter uncertainties are recommended for the plant analysis. (authors)

  16. Ionospheric plasma disturbances generated by naturally occurring large-scale anomalous heat sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradipta, Rezy; Lee, Min-Chang; Coster, Anthea J.; Tepley, Craig A.; Sulzer, Michael P.; Gonzalez, Sixto A.

    2017-04-01

    We report the findings from our investigation on the possibility of large-scale anomalous thermal gradients to generate acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) and traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). In particular, here we consider the case of summer 2006 North American heat wave event as a concrete example of such large-scale natural thermal gradients. This special scenario of AGW/TID generation was formulated based on the results of our experiments at the Arecibo Observatory in July 2006, followed by a systematic monitoring/surveillance of total electron content (TEC) fluctuations over North America in 2005-2007 using the MIT Haystack Observatory's Madrigal database. The data from our Arecibo experiments indicate a continual occurrence of intense AGW/TID over the Caribbean on 21-24 July 2006, and the Madrigal TEC data analysis shows that the overall level of TID activity over North America had increased by ∼0.2 TECU during the summer 2006 heat wave event. Our proposed scenario is in agreement with these empirical observations, and is generally consistent with a number of past ionospheric HF heating experiments related to AGW/TID generation.

  17. Synthetic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Daniel; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    What a living organism looks like and how it works and what are its components-all this is encoded on DNA, the genetic blueprint. Consequently, the way to change an organism is to change its genetic information. Since the first pieces of recombinant DNA have been used to transform cells in the 1970s, this approach has been enormously extended. Bigger and bigger parts of the genetic information have been exchanged or added over the years. Now we are at a point where the construction of entire chromosomes becomes a reachable goal and first examples appear. This development leads to fundamental new questions, for example, about what is possible and desirable to build or what construction rules one needs to follow when building synthetic chromosomes. Here we review the recent progress in the field, discuss current challenges and speculate on the appearance of future synthetic chromosomes.

  18. A simplified method for generation of pseudo natural colours from colour infrared aerial photos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Thomas; Olsen, Brian Pilemann

    . In the second step the blue colour component is estimated using tailored models for each domain. Green and red colour components are taken directly fron the CIR photo. The visual impression of the results from the 2 step method is only slightly inferior to the original 7 step method. The implementation, however......In spite of their high potential for automated discrimination between vegetation and human made objects, colour-infrared (CIR) aerial photos have not been in widespread use for traditional photogrammetric mapping. This is probably due to their awkward colour representation invalidating the visual...... analytical experience of the stereo analysts doing the actual registration of the topographical data. In this paper, we present a method for generating pseudo natural colour (PNC) representations from CIR photos. This enables the combination of automated vegetation discrimination with traditional manual...

  19. Alpal, a Program to Generate Physics Simulation Codes from Natural Descriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, G. O.

    A Livermore Physics Applications Language (ALPAL), a new computer language, is described. ALPAL is a tool that generates a Fortran code module from a natural description of a physics model. This capability gives the computational physicist a significant productivity boost. While ALPAL is a working computer program, significant additions are being made to it. Some of the factors that make ALPAL an important tool are: first, it eliminates many sources of errors; second, it permits building program modules with far greater speed than is otherwise possible; third, it provides a means of specifying many numerical algorithms; and fourth, it is a language that is close to a journal-style presentation of physics models and numerical methods for solving them. In sum, ALPAL is designed to magnify the abilities and creativity of computational physicists.

  20. Isolation and characterization of (15Z)-lycopene thermally generated from a natural source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Munenori; Kuwa, Takahiro; Inoue, Yoshinori; Kitamura, Chitoshi; Honda, Masaki

    2015-11-06

    (15Z)-Lycopene was prepared by thermal isomerization of (all-E)-lycopene derived from tomatoes, and isolated by using a series of chromatographies. The fine red crystalline powder of (15Z)-lycopene was obtained from 556 mg of (all-E)-lycopene with a yield of 0.6 mg (purity: reversed-phase HPLC, 97.2%; normal-phase HPLC, ≥99.9%), and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of the isomer were fully assigned. More refined computational analyses that considered differences in the energy levels of the conformers involved in isomerization have also determined the stabilities of (15Z)-lycopene and other geometric isomers, along with the activation energies during isomerization from the all-E form. The fine control of conditions for HPLC separation and an advanced theoretical insight into geometric isomerization have led to the discovery of the 15Z-isomer generated from a natural source.

  1. A simplified method for generation of pseudo natural colours from colour infrared aerial photos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Thomas; Olsen, Brian Pilemann

    In spite of their high potential for automated discrimination between vegetation and human made objects, colour-infrared (CIR) aerial photos have not been in widespread use for traditional photogrammetric mapping. This is probably due to their awkward colour representation invalidating the visual...... analytical experience of the stereo analysts doing the actual registration of the topographical data. In this paper, we present a method for generating pseudo natural colour (PNC) representations from CIR photos. This enables the combination of automated vegetation discrimination with traditional manual...... mapping methods. The method presented is a dramatic simplification of a recently published method, going from a 7 step to a 2 step procedure. The first step is a classification of the input image into 4 domains, based on simple thresholding of a vegetation index and a saturation measure for each pixel...

  2. Determination of reactive oxygen generated from natural medicines and their antibacterial activity$

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noriko Tajima; Makiko Takasaki; Haruka Fukamachi; Takeshi Igarashi; Yoshijiro Nakajima; Hidetoshi Arakawa

    2016-01-01

    Extracts of 16 natural medicine powders (Galla chinensis, Malloti cortex, Cassiae semen, Sophorae radix, Myricae cortex, Crataegi fructus, Gambir, Mume fructus, Geranii herba, Phellodendri cortex, Coptidis rhizoma, Swertiae herba, and Cinnamomi cortex) were assayed for reactive oxygen concentrations using the per-oxyoxalate chemiluminescent detection system. High luminescence intensity was observed in Galla chinensis, Geranii herba, Malloti cortex, Myricae cortex, and Cinnamomi cortex. Additional experiments identified the reactive oxygen species as hydrogen peroxide. Galla chinensis generated 2.4 ? 10 ? 4 mol/L hydrogen peroxide from a 1 mg/mL solution. In bacterial growth tests, Galla chinensis extract had antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Campylobacter sputorum biovar sputorum, Streptococcus salivarius thermophilus, Lactobacillus casei, and Bifidobacterium longum infantis. This antibacterial activity was de-creased by the addition of catalase. It revealed that hydrogen peroxide which Galla chinensis produced participated in antibacterial activity.

  3. Chromosome protein framework from proteome analysis of isolated human metaphase chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Kiichi; Uchiyama, Susumu

    2007-01-01

    We have presented a structural model of the chromosome based on its constituent proteins. Development of a method of mass isolation for intact human metaphase chromosomes and proteome analysis by mass spectrometry of the isolated chromosomal proteins enabled us to develop a four-layer structural model of human metaphase chromosomes. The model consists of four layers, each with different chromosomal protein sets, i.e., chromosome coating proteins (CCPs), chromosome peripheral proteins (CPPs), chromosome structural proteins (CSPs), and chromosome fibrous proteins (CFPs). More than 200 identified proteins have been classified and assigned to the four layers with each layer occupying a distinct region of the chromosome. CCPs are localized at the most outer regions of the chromosomes and they attach to the regions tentatively and occasionally. CCPs include mostly mitochondrial and cytoplasmic proteins, e.g., 70 kDa heat shock protein 9B and Hsp60. CPPs are also localized at the peripheral regions of the chromosomes, but as the essential part of the chromosomes. CPPs include nucleolin, lamin A/C, fibrillarin, etc. CSPs are the primary chromosomal structure proteins, and include topoisomerase IIalpha, condensin subunits, histones, etc. CFPs have a fibrous nature, e.g., beta-actin, vimentin, myosin II, tublin, etc. A data set of these proteins, which we developed, contains essential chromosome proteins with classified information based on this four-layer model and presents useful leads for further studies on chromosomal structure and function.

  4. Constructing vulnerability: the historical, natural and social generation of flooding in metropolitan Manila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankoff, Greg

    2003-09-01

    Flooding is not a recent hazard in the Philippines but one that has occurred throughout the recorded history of the archipelago. On the one hand, it is related to a wider global ecological crisis to do with climatic change and rising sea levels but on the other hand, it is also the effect of more localised human activities. A whole range of socio-economic factors such as land use practices, living standards and policy responses are increasingly influencing the frequency of natural hazards such as floods and the corresponding occurrence of disasters. In particular, the reason why flooding has come to pose such a pervasive risk to the residents of metropolitan Manila has its basis in a complex mix of inter-relating factors that emphasise how the nature of vulnerability is constructed through the lack of mutuality between environment and human activity over time. This paper examines three aspects of this flooding: first, the importance of an historical approach in understanding how hazards are generated; second, the degree of interplay between environment and society in creating risk; and third, the manner in which vulnerability is a complex construction.

  5. The Case for Natural Gas Fueled Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power Systems for Distributed Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chick, Lawrence A.; Weimar, Mark R.; Whyatt, Greg A.; Powell, Michael R.

    2015-02-01

    Natural-gas-fueled solid oxide fuel cell (NGSOFC) power systems yield electrical conversion efficiencies exceeding 60% and may become a viable alternative for distributed generation (DG) if stack life and manufacturing economies of scale can be realized. Currently, stacks last approximately 2 years and few systems are produced each year because of the relatively high cost of electricity from the systems. If mass manufacturing (10,000 units per year) and a stack life of 15 years can be reached, the cost of electricity from an NGSOFC system is estimated to be about 7.7 ¢/kWh, well within the price of commercial and residential retail prices at the national level (9.9-10¢/kWh and 11-12 ¢/kWh, respectively). With an additional 5 ¢/kWh in estimated additional benefits from DG, NGSOFC could be well positioned to replace the forecasted 59-77 gigawatts of capacity loss resulting from coal plant closures due to stricter emissions regulations and low natural gas prices.

  6. [Natural history and eighteenth-century ideas regarding generation and heredity: Buffon and Bonnet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, L A

    1995-01-01

    The intellectual course of natural history reveals three conceptual approaches. The first was the taxonomic point of view, where naturalists worked to name and classify the living beings created by God. The second approach was provided by the eighteenth century's philosophical doctrine of mechanism, which lent natural history its method of endeavoring to comprehend the workings of organisms, inasmuch as the world "ran". Calling into question the adequacy of prior message, the third approach argued that living things display characteristics quite distinct from those of non-living matter, making it necessary to understand processes rather than simply decompose phenomena to then analyze them. This inadequacy became apparent at the moment when ideas of generation and heredity ascribed a reproductive history to living things, a history where the act of one fellow creature being formed by another plays an important role in coming to understand the workings of life. The paper analyzes these conceptual approaches from the perspective of Buffon's and Bonnet's ideas on reproduction and heredity, which represented opposite schools of thought: epigenesis and preformation.

  7. Three-dimensional unsteady natural convection and entropy generation in an inclined cubical trapezoidal cavity with

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Kadhim Hussein

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerical computation of unsteady laminar three-dimensional natural convection and entropy generation in an inclined cubical trapezoidal air-filled cavity is performed for the first time in this work. The vertical right and left sidewalls of the cavity are maintained at constant cold temperatures. The lower wall is subjected to a constant hot temperature, while the upper one is considered insulated. Computations are performed for Rayleigh numbers varied as 103 ⩽ Ra ⩽ 105, while the trapezoidal cavity inclination angle is varied as 0° ⩽ Φ ⩽ 180°. Prandtl number is considered constant at Pr = 0.71. Second law of thermodynamics is applied to obtain thermodynamic losses inside the cavity due to both heat transfer and fluid friction irreversibilities. The variation of local and average Nusselt numbers is presented and discussed, while, streamlines, isotherms and entropy contours are presented in both two and three-dimensional pattern. The results show that when the Rayleigh number increases, the flow patterns are changed especially in three-dimensional results and the flow circulation increases. Also, the inclination angle effect on the total entropy generation becomes insignificant when the Rayleigh number is low. Moreover, when the Rayleigh number increases the average Nusselt number increases.

  8. Experimental verification of the horizontal steam generator boil-off transfer degradation at natural circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyvaerinen, J. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland); Kouhia, J. [VTT Energy, Lappeenranta (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    The presentation summarises the highlights of experimental results obtained for VVER type horizontal steam generator heat transfer, primary side flow pattern, and mixing in the hot collector during secondary side boil-off with primary at single-phase natural circulation. The experiments were performed using the PACTEL facility with Large Diameter (LD) steam generator models, with collector instrumentation designed specifically for these tests. The key findings are as follows: (1) the primary to secondary heat transfer degrades as the secondary water inventory is depleted, following closely the wetted tube area; (2) a circulatory flow pattern exists in the tube bundle, resulting in reversed flow (from cold to the hot collector) in the lower part of the tube bundle, and continuous flow through the upper part, including the tubes that have already dried out; and (3) mixing of the hot leg flow entering the hot collector and reversed, cold, tube flow remains confined within the collector itself, extending only a row or two above the elevation at which tube flow reversal has taken place. 6 refs.

  9. Genetic engineering of hematopoietic stem cells to generate invariant natural killer T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Drake J; Liu, Siyuan; Ji, Sunjong; Li, Bo; McLaughlin, Jami; Cheng, Donghui; Witte, Owen N; Yang, Lili

    2015-02-03

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells comprise a small population of αβ T lymphocytes. They bridge the innate and adaptive immune systems and mediate strong and rapid responses to many diseases, including cancer, infections, allergies, and autoimmunity. However, the study of iNKT cell biology and the therapeutic applications of these cells are greatly limited by their small numbers in vivo (∼0.01-1% in mouse and human blood). Here, we report a new method to generate large numbers of iNKT cells in mice through T-cell receptor (TCR) gene engineering of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We showed that iNKT TCR-engineered HSCs could generate a clonal population of iNKT cells. These HSC-engineered iNKT cells displayed the typical iNKT cell phenotype and functionality. They followed a two-stage developmental path, first in thymus and then in the periphery, resembling that of endogenous iNKT cells. When tested in a mouse melanoma lung metastasis model, the HSC-engineered iNKT cells effectively protected mice from tumor metastasis. This method provides a powerful and high-throughput tool to investigate the in vivo development and functionality of clonal iNKT cells in mice. More importantly, this method takes advantage of the self-renewal and longevity of HSCs to generate a long-term supply of engineered iNKT cells, thus opening up a new avenue for iNKT cell-based immunotherapy.

  10. Watershed Scale Monitoring and Modeling of Natural Organic Matter (NOM) Generation and Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, R.; Rees, P. L.; Reckhow, D. A.; Castellon, C. M.

    2006-05-01

    This study describes a coupled watershed scale monitoring campaign, laboratory study, and hydrological modeling study which has been focused on determining the sources and transport mechanisms for Natural Organic Matter (NOM), in a small, mostly forested New England watershed. For some time, the state conservation authorities and a large metropolitan water authority have been concerned that the level of naturally-occurring disinfection byproducts in drinking water supplied by a large surface water reservoir (Watchusett Reservoir, MA) have been increasing over time. The resulting study has attempted to investigate how these compounds, which are mostly formed by the chlorination process at the water treatment plant, are related to NOM precursor compounds which are generated from organic matter and transported by runoff processes in the watershed of the Watchusett Reservoir. The laboratory study measures disinfection byproduct formation potential (DBPFP) through chlorination of raw water samples obtained through field monitoring. Samples are analysed for trihalomethanes (THMs), and haloacetic acids (HAAs). Samples are also analysed for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm (UV254). The samples have been collected from as many components of the hydrological cycle as possible in one of the subcatchments of Watchusett Reservoir (Stillwater River). To date the samples include, stream runoff, water impounded naturally in small ponds by beaver dams, rainfall, snow, throughfall (drainage from tree canopies) and samples pumped from shallow suction lysimeters which were installed to monitor soil water in the riparian zone. The current monitoring program began in late-Summer 2005, however infrequent stream samples are available dating back to 2000 from an earlier research project and water quality monitoring by various regulatory authorities. The monitoring program has been designed to capture as much seasonal variation in water chemistry as

  11. Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2003-08-13

    Against the backdrop of increasingly volatile natural gas prices, renewable energy resources, which by their nature are immune to natural gas fuel price risk, provide a real economic benefit. Unlike many contracts for natural gas-fired generation, renewable generation is typically sold under fixed-price contracts. Assuming that electricity consumers value long-term price stability, a utility or other retail electricity supplier that is looking to expand its resource portfolio (or a policymaker interested in evaluating different resource options) should therefore compare the cost of fixed-price renewable generation to the hedged or guaranteed cost of new natural gas-fired generation, rather than to projected costs based on uncertain gas price forecasts. To do otherwise would be to compare apples to oranges: by their nature, renewable resources carry no natural gas fuel price risk, and if the market values that attribute, then the most appropriate comparison is to the hedged cost of natural gas-fired generation. Nonetheless, utilities and others often compare the costs of renewable to gas-fired generation using as their fuel price input long-term gas price forecasts that are inherently uncertain, rather than long-term natural gas forward prices that can actually be locked in. This practice raises the critical question of how these two price streams compare. If they are similar, then one might conclude that forecast-based modeling and planning exercises are in fact approximating an apples-to-apples comparison, and no further consideration is necessary. If, however, natural gas forward prices systematically differ from price forecasts, then the use of such forecasts in planning and modeling exercises will yield results that are biased in favor of either renewable (if forwards < forecasts) or natural gas-fired generation (if forwards > forecasts). In this report we compare the cost of hedging natural gas price risk through traditional gas-based hedging instruments (e

  12. Generation of a Stable Transgenic Swine Model Expressing a Porcine Histone 2B-eGFP Fusion Protein for Cell Tracking and Chromosome Dynamics Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Sean; Collins, Bruce; Sommer, Jeff; Petters, Robert M.; Caballero, Ignacio; Platt, Jeff L.

    2017-01-01

    Transgenic pigs have become an attractive research model in the field of translational research, regenerative medicine, and stem cell therapy due to their anatomic, genetic and physiological similarities with humans. The development of fluorescent proteins as molecular tags has allowed investigators to track cell migration and engraftment levels after transplantation. Here we describe the development of two transgenic pig models via SCNT expressing a fusion protein composed of eGFP and porcine Histone 2B (pH2B). This fusion protein is targeted to the nucleosomes resulting a nuclear/chromatin eGFP signal. The first model (I) was generated via random insertion of pH2B-eGFP driven by the CAG promoter (chicken beta actin promoter and rabbit Globin poly A; pCAG-pH2B-eGFP) and protected by human interferon-β matrix attachment regions (MARs). Despite the consistent, high, and ubiquitous expression of the fusion protein pH2B-eGFP in all tissues analyzed, two independently generated Model I transgenic lines developed neurodegenerative symptoms including Wallerian degeneration between 3–5 months of age, requiring euthanasia. A second transgenic model (II) was developed via CRISPR-Cas9 mediated homology-directed repair (HDR) of IRES-pH2B-eGFP into the endogenous β-actin (ACTB) locus. Model II transgenic animals showed ubiquitous expression of pH2B-eGFP on all tissues analyzed. Unlike the pCAG-pH2B-eGFP/MAR line, all Model II animals were healthy and multiple pregnancies have been established with progeny showing the expected Mendelian ratio for the transmission of the pH2B-eGFP. Expression of pH2B-eGFP was used to examine the timing of the maternal to zygotic transition after IVF, and to examine chromosome segregation of SCNT embryos. To our knowledge this is the first viable transgenic pig model with chromatin-associated eGFP allowing both cell tracking and the study of chromatin dynamics in a large animal model. PMID:28081156

  13. Next-Generation Real-Time Geodetic Station Sensor Web for Natural Hazards Research and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Y.; Clayton, R. W.; Fang, P.; Geng, J.; Gutman, S. I.; Kedar, S.; Laber, J. L.; Moore, A. W.; Owen, S. E.; Small, I.; Squibb, M. B.; Webb, F.; Yu, E.

    2012-12-01

    We report on a NASA AIST project focused on better forecasting, assessing, and mitigating natural hazards, including earthquakes, tsunamis, and extreme storms and flooding through development and implementation of a modular technology for the next-generation in-situ geodetic station, and a Geodetic Sensor Web to support the flow of information from multiple stations to scientists, mission planners, decision makers, and first responders. Meaningful warnings save lives when issued within 1-2 minutes for destructive earthquakes, several tens of minutes for tsunamis, and up to several hours for extreme storms and flooding, and can be provided by on-site fusion of multiple data types and generation of higher-order data products: GPS and accelerometer measurements to estimate point displacements, and GPS and meteorological measurements to estimate moisture variability in the free atmosphere. By operating semi-autonomously, each station can provide low-latency, high-fidelity and compact data products within the constraints of narrow communications bandwidth that often accompanies natural disasters. The project encompasses the following tasks, including hardware and software components: (1) Development of a power-efficient, low-cost, plug-in Geodetic Module for fusion of data from in situ sensors including GPS, a MEMS accelerometer package, and a MEMS meteorological sensor package, for deployment at 26 existing continuous GPS stations in southern California. The low-cost modular design is scalable to the many existing continuous GPS stations worldwide. (2) Estimation of new on-the-fly data products with 1 mm precision and accuracy, including three-dimensional broadband displacements and precipitable water, by new software embedded in the Geodetic Module's processor, rather than at a central processing facility. (3) Development of a Geodetic Sensor Web to allow the semi-autonomous sensors to transmit and receive information in real time by means of redundant sensor proxy

  14. Generation of ethylene tracer by noncatalytic pyrolysis of natural gas at elevated pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y.; Chen, S.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Ruch, R.; Coleman, D.; Benson, L.J.

    2005-01-01

    There is a critical need within the pipeline gas industry for an inexpensive and reliable technology to generate an identification tag or tracer that can be added to pipeline gas to identify gas that may escape and improve the deliverability and management of gas in underground storage fields. Ethylene is an ideal tracer, because it does not exist naturally in the pipeline gas, and because its physical properties are similar to the pipeline gas components. A pyrolysis process, known as the Tragen process, has been developed to continuously convert the ???2%-4% ethane component present in pipeline gas into ethylene at common pipeline pressures of 800 psi. In our studies of the Tragen process, pyrolysis without steam addition achieved a maximum ethylene yield of 28%-35% at a temperature range of 700-775 ??C, corresponding to an ethylene concentration of 4600-5800 ppm in the product gas. Coke deposition was determined to occur at a significant rate in the pyrolysis reactor without steam addition. The ?? 13C isotopic analysis of gas components showed a ?? 13C value of ethylene similar to ethane in the pipeline gas, indicating that most of the ethylene was generated from decomposition of the ethane in the raw gas. However, ?? 13C isotopic analysis of the deposited coke showed that coke was primarily produced from methane, rather than from ethane or other heavier hydrocarbons. No coke deposition was observed with the addition of steam at concentrations of > 20% by volume. The dilution with steam also improved the ethylene yield. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  15. Chromosomal instability in Streptomyces avermitilis: major deletion in the central region and stable circularized chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Ying

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chromosome of Streptomyces has been shown to be unstable, frequently undergoing gross chromosomal rearrangements. However, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain unclear, with previous studies focused on two chromosomal ends as targets for rearrangements. Here we investigated chromosomal instability of Streptomyces avermitilis, an important producer of avermectins, and characterized four gross chromosomal rearrangement events, including a major deletion in the central region. The present findings provide a valuable contribution to the mechanistic study of genetic instability in Streptomyces. Results Thirty randomly-selected "bald" mutants derived from the wild-type strain all contained gross chromosomal rearrangements of various types. One of the bald mutants, SA1-8, had the same linear chromosomal structure as the high avermectin-producing mutant 76-9. Chromosomes of both strains displayed at least three independent chromosomal rearrangements, including chromosomal arm replacement to form new 88-kb terminal inverted repeats (TIRs, and two major deletions. One of the deletions eliminated the 36-kb central region of the chromosome, but surprisingly did not affect viability of the cells. The other deletion (74-kb was internal to the right chromosomal arm. The chromosome of another bald mutant, SA1-6, was circularized with deletions at both ends. No obvious homology was found in all fusion sequences. Generational stability analysis showed that the chromosomal structure of SA1-8 and SA1-6 was stable. Conclusions Various chromosomal rearrangements, including chromosomal arm replacement, interstitial deletions and chromosomal circularization, occurred in S. avermitilis by non-homologous recombination. The finding of an inner deletion involving in the central region of S. avermitilis chromosome suggests that the entire Streptomyces chromosome may be the target for rearrangements, which are not limited, as previously

  16. Gene duplication of the human peptide YY gene (PYY) generated the pancreatic polypeptide gene (PPY) on chromosome 17q21.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hort, Y.; Shine, J.; Herzog, H. [Garvan Inst. of Medical Research, Sydney (Australia)

    1995-03-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY), peptide YY (PYY), and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) are structurally related but functionally diverse peptides, encoded by separate genes and expressed in different tissues. Although the human NPY gene has been mapped to chromosome 7, the authors demonstrate here that the genes for human PYY and PP (PPY) are localized only 10 kb apart from each another on chromosome 17q21.1. The high degree of homology between the members of this gene family, both in primary sequence and exon/intron structure, suggests that the NYP and the PYY genes arose from an initial gene duplication event, with a subsequent tandem duplication of the PYY gene being responsible for the creation of the PPY gene. A second weaker hybridization signal also found on chromosome 17q11 and results obtained by Southern blot analysis suggest that the entire PYY-PPY region has undergone a further duplication event. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  17. The Chromosomes of Birds during Meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigozzi, María I

    2016-01-01

    The cytological analysis of meiotic chromosomes is an exceptional tool to approach complex processes such as synapsis and recombination during the division. Chromosome studies of meiosis have been especially valuable in birds, where naturally occurring mutants or experimental knock-out animals are not available to fully investigate the basic mechanisms of major meiotic events. This review highlights the main contributions of synaptonemal complex and lampbrush chromosome research to the current knowledge of avian meiosis, with special emphasis on the organization of chromosomes during prophase I, the impact of chromosome rearrangements during meiosis, and distinctive features of the ZW pair.

  18. Chromosome Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Perceptive Scientific Instruments, Inc., provides the foundation for the Powergene line of chromosome analysis and molecular genetic instrumentation. This product employs image processing technology from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and image enhancement techniques from Johnson Space Center. Originally developed to send pictures back to earth from space probes, digital imaging techniques have been developed and refined for use in a variety of medical applications, including diagnosis of disease.

  19. The Nature of Science and the Next Generation Science Standards: Analysis and Critique

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, William F.; Nouri, Noushin

    2016-08-01

    This paper provides a detailed analysis of the inclusion of aspects of nature of science (NOS) in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). In this new standards document, NOS elements in eight categories are discussed in Appendix H along with illustrative statements (called exemplars). Many, but not all, of these exemplars are linked to the standards by their association with either the "practices of science" or "crosscutting concepts," but curiously not with the recommendations for science content. The study investigated all aspects of NOS in NGSS including the accuracy and inclusion of the supporting exemplar statements and the relationship of NOS in NGSS to other aspects of NOS to support teaching and learning science. We found that while 92 % of these exemplars are acceptable, only 78 % of those written actually appear with the standards. "Science as a way of knowing" is a recommended NOS category in NGSS but is not included with the standards. Also, several other NOS elements fail to be included at all grade levels thus limiting their impact. Finally, NGSS fails to include or insufficiently emphasize several frequently recommended NOS elements such as creativity and subjectivity. The paper concludes with a list of concerns and solutions to the challenges of NOS in NGSS.

  20. Field studies of streamflow generation using natural and injected tracers on Bickford and Walker Branch Watersheds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genereux, D.; Hemond, H. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Mulholland, P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-05-01

    Field studies of streamflow generation were undertaken on two forested watersheds, the West Road subcatchment of Bickford Watershed in central Massachusetts and the West Fork of Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee. A major component of the research was development of a two-stage methodology for the use of naturally-occurring {sup 222}Rn as a tracer. The first of the two stages was solving a mass-balance equation for {sup 222}Rn around a stream reach of interest in order to calculate Rn{sub q}, the {sup 222}Rn content of the lateral inflow to the reach; a conservative tracer (chloride) and a volatile tracer (propane) were injected into the study stream to account for lateral inflow to, and volatilization from, the study reach. The second stage involved quantitative comparison of Rn{sub q} to the measured {sup 222}Rn concentrations of different subsurface waters in order to assess how important these waters were in contributing lateral inflow to the stream reach.

  1. Generating natural hazard risk maps for Styria to highlight differences in the social vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heß, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Costs of natural hazards are commonly classified as either damage costs or risk mitigation costs. These categories are not independent, as risk mitigation aims at reducing damage costs. However, the factors that influence the risk of damage costs are still not completely understood. Commonly, the risk is defined as a function of hazard, exposure and vulnerability and we want to produce risk maps that combine existing information about these factors under a common framework. Because of good data availability, the risk maps will be produced for Styria, Austria, where detailed hazard and land-use maps are available on a municipality level and the costs can be verified with private damage data from the Austrian disaster fond. A key issue is the generation of a social vulnerability map by the use of demographic and socio-economic data. We use a statistical model to analyze how much of the variance in the damage data are explainable by considering social characteristics across municipalities. The combination of the aforementioned maps results in a risk map, which can not only display areas of high risks, but also the underlying reasons. Knowledge about risk increasing factors consequently allow for better suited risk mitigation measures. Especially soft measures need to be clearly targeted towards local needs to increase the resilience and adaptive capacity of municipalities.

  2. Generation of a persistently infected MDBK cell line with natural bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongseob Tark

    Full Text Available Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE is a zoonotic transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE thought to be caused by the same prion strain as variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD. Unlike scrapie and chronic wasting disease there is no cell culture model allowing the replication of proteinase K resistant BSE (PrPBSE and the further in vitro study of this disease. We have generated a cell line based on the Madin-Darby Bovine Kidney (MDBK cell line over-expressing the bovine prion protein. After exposure to naturally BSE-infected bovine brain homogenate this cell line has shown to replicate and accumulate PrPBSE and maintain infection up to passage 83 after initial challenge. Collectively, we demonstrate, for the first time, that the BSE agent can infect cell lines over-expressing the bovine prion protein similar to other prion diseases. These BSE infected cells will provide a useful tool to facilitate the study of potential therapeutic agents and the diagnosis of BSE.

  3. Reversible solid oxide fuel cell for natural gas/renewable hybrid power generation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yu; Shi, Yixiang; Zheng, Yi; Cai, Ningsheng

    2017-02-01

    Renewable energy (RE) is expected to be the major part of the future energy. Presently, the intermittence and fluctuation of RE lead to the limitation of its penetration. Reversible solid oxide fuel cell (RSOFC) as the energy storage device can effectively store the renewable energy and build a bidirectional connection with natural gas (NG). In this paper, the energy storage strategy was designed to improve the RE penetration and dynamic operation stability in a distributed system coupling wind generators, internal combustion engine, RSOFC and lithium-ion batteries. By compromising the relative deviation of power supply and demand, RE penetration, system efficiency and capacity requirement, the strategy that no more than 36% of the maximum wind power output is directly supplied to users and the other is stored by the combination of battery and reversible solid oxide fuel cell is optimal for the distributed system. In the case, the RE penetration reached 56.9% and the system efficiency reached 55.2%. The maximum relative deviation of power supply and demand is also lower than 4%, which is significantly superior to that in the wind curtailment case.

  4. Generation of a persistently infected MDBK cell line with natural bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tark, Dongseob; Kim, Hyojin; Neale, Michael H; Kim, Minjeong; Sohn, Hyunjoo; Lee, Yoonhee; Cho, Insoo; Joo, Yiseok; Windl, Otto

    2015-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a zoonotic transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) thought to be caused by the same prion strain as variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD). Unlike scrapie and chronic wasting disease there is no cell culture model allowing the replication of proteinase K resistant BSE (PrPBSE) and the further in vitro study of this disease. We have generated a cell line based on the Madin-Darby Bovine Kidney (MDBK) cell line over-expressing the bovine prion protein. After exposure to naturally BSE-infected bovine brain homogenate this cell line has shown to replicate and accumulate PrPBSE and maintain infection up to passage 83 after initial challenge. Collectively, we demonstrate, for the first time, that the BSE agent can infect cell lines over-expressing the bovine prion protein similar to other prion diseases. These BSE infected cells will provide a useful tool to facilitate the study of potential therapeutic agents and the diagnosis of BSE.

  5. Familial concordance for age at natural menopause: results from the Breakthrough Generations Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Danielle H; Jones, Michael E; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony J

    2011-09-01

    Existing estimates of the heritability of menopause age have a wide range. Furthermore, few studies have analyzed to what extent familial similarities might reflect shared environment, rather than shared genes. We therefore analyzed familial concordance for age at natural menopause and the effects of shared genetic and environmental factors on this concordance. Participants were 2,060 individuals comprising first-degree relatives, aged 31 to 90 years, and participating in the UK Breakthrough Generations Study. Menopause data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire and analyzed using logistic regression and variance-components models. Women were at an increased risk of early menopause (≤45 y) if their mother (odds ratio, 6.2; P menopause. Likewise, women had an increased risk of late menopause (≥54 y) if their relative had had a late menopause (mother: odds ratio, 6.1; P menopause age attributed to environmental factors shared by sisters. We confirm that early menopause aggregates within families and show, for the first time, that there is also strong familial concordance for late menopause. Both genes and shared environment were the source of variation in menopause age. Past heritability estimates have not accounted for shared environment, and thus, the effect of genetic variants on menopause age may previously have been overestimated.

  6. Electrochemical energy generation from natural and synthetic salinity gradients using reverse electrodialysis and capacitive mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzell, Marta C.

    Salinity gradient energy (SGE) technologies are emerging systems designed to recover energy from engineered and natural mixing processes. Two electricity producing SGE systems are reverse electrodialysis (RED) and capacitive mixing (CapMix). RED captures mixing energy using a series of ion exchange membranes that drive electrochemical reactions at redox electrodes. CapMix utilizes polarizable electrodes to store charge in the surfaces electric double layer (EDL). Energy generation can then occur when the EDL is expanded and compressed in different concentration solutions. The use of themolytic salt solutions (e.g. ammonium bicarbonate--AmB) within a RED system is promising, as AmB can be regenerated using low-grade waste--heat (e.g. 40--60°C). One disadvantage to using AmB is the potential for gas bubbles (CO2, NH3) to form within the stack. Accumulation of bubbles can impede ion migration, and reduce system performance. The management and minimization of gaseous bubbles in RED flow fields is an important operational issue, and has not previously been addressed within RED literature. Flow field design with and without spacers in a RED stack was analyzed to determine how fluid flow and geometry effected the accumulation and removal of bubbles. In addition, the performance changes, in terms of power and resistance were measured in the presence of bubbles. Gaseous bubble accumulation was minimized using short vertically aligned channels, which resulted in a reduction in the amount of the membrane area which was restricted due to bubbles from ~20% to 7%. The stack power density improved by 12% when all gaseous bubbles were removed from the cell. AmB-RED systems can potentially produce hydrogen or electrical energy through altering the cathodic reaction. With a kinetically favorable cathodic reaction (oxygen reduction reaction), the projected electrical energy generated by a single pass AmB--RED system approached 78 Wh per m--3 (low concentrate). However, when RED was

  7. Whole chromosome painting of B chromosomes of the red-eye tetra Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae (Teleostei, Characidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudeler, Patricia Elda Sobrinho; Diniz, Débora; Wasko, Adriane Pinto; Oliveira, Claudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    Abstract B chromosomes are dispensable genomic elements found in different groups of animals and plants. In the present study, a whole chromosome probe was generated from a specific heterochromatic B chromosome occurring in cells of the characidae fish Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae (Steindachner, 1907). The chromosome painting probes were used in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments for the assessment of metaphase chromosomes obtained from individuals from three populations of Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae. The results revealed that DNA sequences were shared between a specific B chromosome and many chromosomes of the A complement in all populations analyzed, suggesting a possible intra-specific origin of these B chromosomes. However, no hybridization signals were observed in other B chromosomes found in the same individuals, implying a possible independent origin of B chromosome variants in this species. FISH experiments using 18S rDNA probes revealed the presence of non-active ribosomal genes in some B chromosomes and in some chromosomes of the A complement, suggesting that at least two types of B chromosomes had an independent origin. The role of heterochromatic segments and ribosomal sequences in the origin of B chromosomes were discussed. PMID:26753081

  8. Whole chromosome painting of B chromosomes of the red-eye tetra Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae (Teleostei, Characidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudeler, Patricia Elda Sobrinho; Diniz, Débora; Wasko, Adriane Pinto; Oliveira, Claudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    B chromosomes are dispensable genomic elements found in different groups of animals and plants. In the present study, a whole chromosome probe was generated from a specific heterochromatic B chromosome occurring in cells of the characidae fish Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae (Steindachner, 1907). The chromosome painting probes were used in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments for the assessment of metaphase chromosomes obtained from individuals from three populations of Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae. The results revealed that DNA sequences were shared between a specific B chromosome and many chromosomes of the A complement in all populations analyzed, suggesting a possible intra-specific origin of these B chromosomes. However, no hybridization signals were observed in other B chromosomes found in the same individuals, implying a possible independent origin of B chromosome variants in this species. FISH experiments using 18S rDNA probes revealed the presence of non-active ribosomal genes in some B chromosomes and in some chromosomes of the A complement, suggesting that at least two types of B chromosomes had an independent origin. The role of heterochromatic segments and ribosomal sequences in the origin of B chromosomes were discussed.

  9. Natural gas power generation: interruptible gas distribution network regulation; Geracao termoeletrica a gas natural: regulacao do segmento interruptivel de distribuicao de gas canalizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paula, Claudio Paiva de; Kann, Zevi [Agencia Reguladora de Saneamento e Energia do Estado de Sao Paulo (ARSESP), SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The paper relates studies regarding the natural gas distribution network interruptible branch. This new service can be appropriate for thermal power generation on flexible dispatch mode, as 'take or pay' contracts surplus jobs. The paper indicates no regulatory restraints in an interruptible network implantation. The final conclusion is that interruptible contracts can be an improvement on the distribution business and certainly can accommodate a suitable demand and supply volumes in the long-term gas market balance. (author)

  10. Dynamics of chromosome segregation in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck

    2007-01-01

    in the cell by labeling specific parts of it. Later the dynamics of chromosome segregation was included. Investigating chromosome organization by labeling of specific loci was already a widely used technique when I started on this thesis, but the data acquisition and treatment was slow and generally poorly......, and it is obvious that structured cellular actions are required to unpack it, as required for its replication, and refold the two daughter chromosomes separately without getting them entangled in the process each generation. The intention of the study was initially to find out how the chromosome is organized....... Adding the results of the thesis together with known data results in the following description of the chromosome dynamics of slowly growing E.coli cells: The chromosome of slow growing cells is organized with the origin at the cell center when it is newborn. It has one chromosomal arm on one side...

  11. Data bank on hydrodynamics, thermal tests and tube temperature regimes of PGV-4 and PVG-1000 natural steam generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ageev, A.G.; Vasileva, R.V.; Nigmatulin, B.I.; Titov, V.F.; Tarankov, G.N. [EREC Electrogorsk Research and Engineering Centre of Nuclear Plants Safety, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    The data bank was prepared by EREC, OKB `Hydropress` using results of static and dynamic tests of PGV-4 and PGV- 1000 natural steam generators cared out at Kolskaya, Novo-Voronezhskaya, Ugno-Ukrainskaya, Balakov-skaya and Hmelnitskaya NPP within period of 1974-1993. It is destined for making calculation codes verification. (authors).

  12. The chromosomal passenger complex and the spindle assembly checkpoint: kinetochore-microtubule error correction and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Maia André F; Vader Gerben; Lens Susanne MA

    2008-01-01

    Abstract During mitosis, correct bipolar chromosome attachment to the mitotic spindle is an essential prerequisite for the equal segregation of chromosomes. The spindle assembly checkpoint can prevent chromosome segregation as long as not all chromosome pairs have obtained bipolar attachment to the spindle. The chromosomal passenger complex plays a crucial role during chromosome alignment by correcting faulty chromosome-spindle interactions (e.g. attachments that do not generate tension). In ...

  13. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of petroleum and natural gas. Final report, September 1, 1992--October 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mango, F.D.

    1997-01-21

    This project originated on the premise that natural gas could be formed catalytically in the earth rather than thermally as commonly believed. The intention was to test this hypothetical view and to explore generally the role of sedimentary metals in the generation of light hydrocarbons (C1 - C9). We showed the metalliferous source rocks are indeed catalytic in the generation of natural gas. Various metal compounds in the pure state show the same levels of catalytic activity as sedimentary rocks and the products are identical. Nickel is particularly active among the early transition metals and is projected to remain catalytically robust at all stages of catagenesis. Nickel oxide promotes the formation of n-alkanes in addition to natural gas (NG), demonstrating the full scope of the hypothetical catalytic process. The composition of catalytic gas duplicates the entire range of natural gas, from so-called wet gas to dry gas (60 to 95+ wt % methane), while gas generated thermally is consistently depleted in methane (10 to 60 wt % methane). These results support the view that metal catalysis is a major pathway through which natural gas is formed in the earth.

  14. Ex vivo generated natural killer cells acquire typical natural killer receptors and display a cytotoxic gene expression profile similar to peripheral blood natural killer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann, D.; Spanholtz, J.; Osl, M.; Tordoir, M.; Lipnik, K.; Bilban, M.; Schlechta, B.; Dolstra, H.; Hofer, E.

    2012-01-01

    Ex vivo differentiation systems of natural killer (NK) cells from CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells are of potential importance for adjuvant immunotherapy of cancer. Here, we analyzed ex vivo differentiation of NK cells from cord blood-derived CD34+ stem cells by gene expression profiling, real-time RT

  15. Ex vivo generated natural killer cells acquire typical natural killer receptors and display a cytotoxic gene expression profile similar to peripheral blood natural killer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann, D.; Spanholtz, J.; Osl, M.; Tordoir, M.; Lipnik, K.; Bilban, M.; Schlechta, B.; Dolstra, H.; Hofer, E.

    2012-01-01

    Ex vivo differentiation systems of natural killer (NK) cells from CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells are of potential importance for adjuvant immunotherapy of cancer. Here, we analyzed ex vivo differentiation of NK cells from cord blood-derived CD34+ stem cells by gene expression profiling, real-time

  16. Application Status and Problem Investigation of Distributed Generation in China: The Case of Natural Gas, Solar and Wind Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-tian Feng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of distributed energy systems in China is one of the important measures to promote the revolution for energy production and its utilization patterns. First of all, we analyze the present application status of China’s distributed generation from three major types: natural gas, photovoltaic, and distributed wind. Secondly, based on the analysis of the project overview, project scale, and project effect in three patterns of distributed generation, we summarize the policy deficiencies and development obstacles. Finally, aiming to promote the development of distributed energy in China, we propose some relevant policies corresponding to countermeasures on the problems existing in the development process of China’s distributed generation of natural gas, photovoltaic, and wind power.

  17. Microdissection and chromosome painting of X and B chromosomes in Locusta migratoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teruel, María; Cabrero, Josefa; Montiel, Eugenia E; Acosta, Manuel J; Sánchez, Antonio; Camacho, Juan Pedro M

    2009-01-01

    Acquisition of knowledge of the nature and DNA content of B chromosomes has been triggered by a collection of molecular techniques, one of which, microdissection, has provided interesting results in a number of B chromosome systems. Here we provide the first data on the molecular composition of B chromosomes in Locusta migratoria, after microdissection of the B and X chromosomes, DNA amplification by one (B) or two (X) different methods, and chromosome painting. The results showed that B chromosomes share at least two types of repetitive DNA sequences with the A chromosomes, suggesting that Bs in this species most likely arose intraspecifically. One of these repetitive DNAs is located on the heterochromatic distal half of the B chromosome and in the pericentromeric regions of about half of the A chromosomes, including the X. The other type of repetitive DNA is located interspersedly over the non-centromeric euchromatic regions of all A chromosomes and in an interstitial part of the proximal euchromatic half of the B chromosome. Chromosome painting, however, did not provide results sufficiently reliable to determine, in this species, which A chromosome gave rise to the B; this might be done by detailed analysis of the microdissected DNA sequences.

  18. Natural Gas, Wind and Nuclear Options for Generating Electricity in a Carbon Constrained World

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooten, van G.C.

    2012-01-01

    A linear programming model is used to examine the impact of carbon taxes on the optimal generation mix in the Alberta electrical system. The model permits decommissioning of generating assets with high carbon dioxide emissions and investment in new gas-fired, wind and, in some scenarios, nuclear

  19. Natural Gas, Wind and Nuclear Options for Generating Electricity in a Carbon Constrained World

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooten, van G.C.

    2012-01-01

    A linear programming model is used to examine the impact of carbon taxes on the optimal generation mix in the Alberta electrical system. The model permits decommissioning of generating assets with high carbon dioxide emissions and investment in new gas-fired, wind and, in some scenarios, nuclear cap

  20. Stress induced by premature chromatin condensation triggers chromosome shattering and chromothripsis at DNA sites still replicating in micronuclei or multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzoudi, Georgia I; Karakosta, Maria; Pantelias, Antonio; Hatzi, Vasiliki I; Karachristou, Ioanna; Pantelias, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Combination of next-generation DNA sequencing, single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses and bioinformatics has revealed the striking phenomenon of chromothripsis, described as complex genomic rearrangements acquired in a single catastrophic event affecting one or a few chromosomes. Via an unproven mechanism, it is postulated that mechanical stress causes chromosome shattering into small lengths of DNA, which are then randomly reassembled by DNA repair machinery. Chromothripsis is currently examined as an alternative mechanism of oncogenesis, in contrast to the present paradigm that considers a stepwise development of cancer. While evidence for the mechanism(s) underlying chromosome shattering during cancer development remains elusive, a number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain chromothripsis, including ionizing radiation, DNA replication stress, breakage-fusion-bridge cycles, micronuclei formation and premature chromosome compaction. In the present work, we provide experimental evidence on the mechanistic basis of chromothripsis and on how chromosomes can get locally shattered in a single catastrophic event. Considering the dynamic nature of chromatin nucleoprotein complex, capable of rapid unfolding, disassembling, assembling and refolding, we first show that chromatin condensation at repairing or replicating DNA sites induces the mechanical stress needed for chromosome shattering to ensue. Premature chromosome condensation is then used to visualize the dynamic nature of interphase chromatin and demonstrate that such mechanical stress and chromosome shattering can also occur in chromosomes within micronuclei or asynchronous multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis. Following an aberrant mitosis, chromosomes could find themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time so that they may undergo massive DNA breakage and rearrangement in a single catastrophic event. Specifically, our results support the hypothesis that premature chromosome

  1. Large-scale reconstruction of 3D structures of human chromosomes from chromosomal contact data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieu, Tuan; Cheng, Jianlin

    2014-04-01

    Chromosomes are not positioned randomly within a nucleus, but instead, they adopt preferred spatial conformations to facilitate necessary long-range gene-gene interactions and regulations. Thus, obtaining the 3D shape of chromosomes of a genome is critical for understanding how the genome folds, functions and how its genes interact and are regulated. Here, we describe a method to reconstruct preferred 3D structures of individual chromosomes of the human genome from chromosomal contact data generated by the Hi-C chromosome conformation capturing technique. A novel parameterized objective function was designed for modeling chromosome structures, which was optimized by a gradient descent method to generate chromosomal structural models that could satisfy as many intra-chromosomal contacts as possible. We applied the objective function and the corresponding optimization method to two Hi-C chromosomal data sets of both a healthy and a cancerous human B-cell to construct 3D models of individual chromosomes at resolutions of 1 MB and 200 KB, respectively. The parameters used with the method were calibrated according to an independent fluorescence in situ hybridization experimental data. The structural models generated by our method could satisfy a high percentage of contacts (pairs of loci in interaction) and non-contacts (pairs of loci not in interaction) and were compatible with the known two-compartment organization of human chromatin structures. Furthermore, structural models generated at different resolutions and from randomly permuted data sets were consistent.

  2. Natural R parity conservation with horizontal symmetries a four generation model

    CERN Document Server

    Berezhiani, Z G; Berezhiani, Zurab; Nardi, Enrico

    1995-01-01

    The absence of R parity violating operators can be naturally ensured in the presence of a SU(N)_H\\ (N=4,6...) horizontal gauge symmetry, independently of the vertical gauge group. We study an extension of the supersymmetric standard model with four families and gauged SU(4)_H. Beyond preserving R parity, the model gives rise to the realistic fermion mass matrices which naturally ensure the heaviness of the fourth family fermions b',t',\\tau',\

  3. On the nature of the fourth generation neutrino and its implications

    CERN Document Server

    Aparici, Alberto; Rius, Nuria; Santamaria, Arcadi

    2012-01-01

    We consider the neutrino sector of a Standard Model with four generations. While the three light neutrinos can obtain their masses from a variety of mechanisms with or without new neutral fermions, fourth-generation neutrinos need at least one new relatively light right-handed neutrino. If lepton number is not conserved this neutrino must have a Majorana mass term whose size depends on the underlying mechanism for lepton number violation. Majorana masses for the fourth generation neutrinos induce relative large two-loop contributions to the light neutrino masses which could be even larger than the cosmological bounds. This sets strong limits on the mass parameters and mixings of the fourth generation neutrinos.

  4. Adaptive chromosomal divergence driven by mixed geographic mode of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, Jeffrey L; Gejji, Richard; Powell, Thomas H Q; Nosil, Patrik

    2011-08-01

    Chromosomal inversions are ubiquitous in nature and of great significance for understanding adaptation and speciation. Inversions were the first markers used to investigate the genetic structure of natural populations, leading to the concept of coadapted gene complexes and theories concerning founder effects and genetic drift in small populations. However, we still lack elements of a general theory accounting for the origins and distribution of inversions in nature. Here, we use computer simulations to show that a "mixed geographic mode" of evolution involving allopatric separation of populations followed by secondary contact and gene flow generates chromosomal divergence by natural selection under wider conditions than previous hypotheses. This occurs because inversions arising in allopatry contain a full complement of locally adapted genes. Once gene flow ensues, reduced recombination within inversions keeps these favorable genotypic combinations intact, resulting in inverted genomic regions being favored over collinear regions. This process allows inversions to establish to high frequencies. Our model can account for several classic patterns in the geographic distribution of inversions and highlights how selection on standing genetic variation allows rapid chromosomal evolution without the waiting time for new mutations. As inversion differences often separate closely related taxa, mixed modes of divergence could be common. © 2011 The Author(s). Evolution© 2011 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  5. Qualitative analysis of mouse specific-locus mutations: information on genetic organization, gene expression, and the chromosomal nature of induced lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, L.B.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of mouse specific-locus (SL) mutations at three loci has identified over 33 distinct complementation groups - most of which are probably overlapping deficiencies - and 13 to 14 new functional units. The complementation maps that have been generated for the d-se and c regions include numerous vital functions; however, some of the genes in these regions are non-vital. At such loci, hypomorphic mutants must represent intragenic alterations, and some viable nulls could conceivably be intragenic lesions also. Analysis of SL mutations has provided information on genetic expression. Homozygous deficiencies can be completely viable or can kill at any one of a range of developmental stages. Heterozygonus deficiencies of up to 6 cM or more in genetic length have been recovered and propagated. The time of death of homozygous and the degree of inviability of heterozygous deficiencies are related more to specific content of the missing segment than to its length. Combinations of deficiencies with x-autosome translocations that inactivate the homologous region in a mosaic fashion have shown that organismic lethals are not necessarily cell lethal. The spectrum of mutations induced depends on the nature of the mutagen and the type of germ cell exposed. Radiation of spermatogonia produces intragenic as well as null mutations. Spontaneous mutations have an admixture of types not present in populations of mutations induced in germ cells, and this raises doubts concerning the accuracy of doubling-dose calculations in genetic risk estimation. The analysis of SL mutations has yielded genetic tools for the construction of detailed gene-dosage series, cis-trans comparisons, the mapping of known genes and identification of new genes, genetic rescue of various types, and the identification and isolation of DNA sequences. (ERB)

  6. Accounting for fuel price risk when comparing renewable togas-fired generation: the role of forward natural gas prices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2004-07-17

    Unlike natural gas-fired generation, renewable generation (e.g., from wind, solar, and geothermal power) is largely immune to fuel price risk. If ratepayers are rational and value long-term price stability, then--contrary to common practice--any comparison of the levelized cost of renewable to gas-fired generation should be based on a hedged gas price input, rather than an uncertain gas price forecast. This paper compares natural gas prices that can be locked in through futures, swaps, and physical supply contracts to contemporaneous long-term forecasts of spot gas prices. We find that from 2000-2003, forward gas prices for terms of 2-10 years have been considerably higher than most contemporaneous long-term gas price forecasts. This difference is striking, and implies that comparisons between renewable and gas-fired generation based on these forecasts over this period have arguably yielded results that are biased in favor of gas-fired generation.

  7. Perspectives for thermoelectric power generation: the potential of natural gas cogeneration; Perspectivas da geracao termeletrica: o potencial da cogeracao a gas natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paula, Claudio Paiva de [Comissao de Servicos Publicos de Energia (CSPE), Sao Paulo, (SP) (Brazil)]. E-mail: cpaula@sp.gov.br

    2006-07-01

    The principal objective of this paper is to evaluate the potential for self-production of combined heat and power - CHP generation - in the expansion of the Brazilian electric power supply system. The potential was determined by simulating operation of CHP plants in industries, which had previously used oil derivates to supply process heat as well as of plants for service sectors, which had consumed electricity for air conditioning. The results for a national program with incentives for CHP indicate a potential additional supply of 42,500 MW, composed of CHP systems implemented in industry, sugarcane mills and service sectors. It is estimated the additional consumption of natural gas would reach 33 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}/year and it is important to observe that there are new natural gas reserves available in the Santos Basin (near large load centers), with a proven value of 419 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}. The final part of the thesis describes the policy incentives which should be implemented so that CHP can make a significant contribution at the national level. The broad growth of CHP would permit better use of natural resources in the expansion of electricity supply, improve the efficiency of electricity use and leverage the penetration of natural gas in the energy market, with favorable impacts on national development. (author)

  8. Entropy Generation Due to Natural Convection in a Partially Heated Cavity by Local RBF-DQ Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soleimani, S.; Qajarjazi, A.; Bararnia, H.

    2011-01-01

    The Local Radial Basis Function-Differential Quadrature (RBF-DQ) method is applied to twodimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in primitive form. Numerical results of heatlines and entropy generation due to heat transfer and fluid friction have been obtained for laminar natural...... convection. The variations of the entropy generation for different Rayleigh numbers are also investigated. Comparison between the present results and previous works demonstrated excellent agreements which verify the accuracy and flexibility of the method in simulating the fluid mechanics and heat transfer...

  9. Photocurrent generation by dye-sensitized solar cells using natural pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armendáriz-Mireles, Eddie Nahúm; Rocha-Rangel, Enrique; Caballero-Rico, Frida; Ramírez-de-León, José Alberto; Vázquez, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The development of photovoltaic panels has improved the conversion of solar radiation into electrical energy. This paper deals with the electrical and thermal characteristics (voltage, current, and temperature) of photovoltaic solar cells sensitized with natural pigments (dye-sensitized solar cell, DSSC) based on a titanium dioxide semiconductor. Several natural pigments (blackberry, beets, eggplant skin, spinach, flame tree flower, papaya leaf, and grass extracts) were evaluated to determine their sensitizing effect on titanium dioxide. The results showed the great potential of natural pigments for use in solar cells. The best results were obtained with the blackberry pigment, reaching a value of 7.1 mA current, open-circuit voltage (Voc ) of 0.72 V in 2 cm(2) , and fill factor (ff) of 0.51 in the DSSC. This performance is well above than that currently offers by actual cells.

  10. Generation of a Natural Glycan Microarray Using 9-Fluorenylmethyl Chloroformate (FmocCl) as a Cleavable Fluorescent Tag

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Xuezheng; Lasanajak, Yi; Rivera-Marrero, Carlos; Luyai, Anthony; Willard, Margaret; Smith, David F.; Cummings, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Glycan microarray technology has become a successful tool for studying protein-carbohydrate interactions, but a limitation has been the laborious synthesis of glycan structures by enzymatic and chemical methods. Here we describe a new method to generate quantifiable glycan libraries from natural sources by combining widely used protease digestion of glycoproteins and Fmoc chemistry. Glycoproteins including chicken ovalbumin, bovine fetuin, and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were digested by pro...

  11. Comparative life-cycle air emissions of coal, domestic natural gas, LNG, and SNG for electricity generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Paulina; Griffin, W Michael; Matthews, H Scott

    2007-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that in the coming decades the United States' natural gas (NG) demand for electricity generation will increase. Estimates also suggest that NG supply will increasingly come from imported liquefied natural gas (LNG). Additional supplies of NG could come domestically from the production of synthetic natural gas (SNG) via coal gasification-methanation. The objective of this study is to compare greenhouse gas (GHG), SOx, and NOx life-cycle emissions of electricity generated with NG/LNG/SNG and coal. This life-cycle comparison of air emissions from different fuels can help us better understand the advantages and disadvantages of using coal versus globally sourced NG for electricity generation. Our estimates suggest that with the current fleet of power plants, a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have lower GHG emissions than coal. If advanced technologies with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) are used, however, coal and a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have very similar life-cycle GHG emissions. For SOx and NOx we find there are significant emissions in the upstream stages of the NG/ LNG life-cycles, which contribute to a larger range in SOx and NOx emissions for NG/LNG than for coal and SNG.

  12. Low handicap golfers generate more torque at the shoe-natural grass interface when using a driver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsfold, Paul; Smith, Neal A; Dyson, Rosemary J

    2008-01-01

    The aim was to determine the rotational torque occurring at the shoe-natural grass interface during golf swing performance with different clubs, and to determine the influence of handicap and golf shoe design. Twenty-four golfers (8 low 0-7; 8 medium 8-14; and 8 high 15+) performed 5 shots with a driver, 3-iron and 7-iron when 3 shoes were worn: a modern 8 mm metal 7-spike shoe, an alternative 7-spike shoe and a flat soled shoe. Torque was measured at the front and back foot by grass covered force platforms in an outdoor field. Torque at the shoe- natural turf interface was similar at the front foot when using a driver, 3-iron and 7-iron with maximum mean torque (Tzmax 17-19 Nm) and torque generation in the entire backswing and downswing approximately 40 Nm. At the back foot, torque was less than at the front foot when using the driver, 3-iron and 7-iron. At the back foot Tzmax was 6-7 Nm, and torque generation was 10-16 Nm, with a trend for greater torque generation when using the driver rather than the irons. The metal spike shoe allowed significantly more back foot torque generation when using a driver than a flat- soled shoe (p 0.05), although back foot mean torques generated tended to be greater for the metal spike shoe. The golf shot outcomes were similar for low, medium and high handicappers in both metal and alternative spike shoes (metal: 87%; 76%; 54%; alternative: 85%; 74%; 54% respectively). The better, low handicap golfers generated significantly more back foot torque (metal spike: 18.2 Nm; alternative: 15.8 Nm; p low handicap and lighter body-weight golfers. Key pointsShoe to natural turf torque generation is an important component in performing a golf swing with a driver club.Torque at the shoe to natural turf interface was similar at the front foot when using a driver, 3-iron and 7-iron with Tzmax (17-19 Nm approx) and torque generation in the entire backswing and downswing of 40 Nm.Torque at the back foot was less than at the front foot when using

  13. Chromosome aberrations induced by zebularine in triticale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xuhui; Wang, Qing; Wang, Yanzhi; Ma, Jieyun; Wu, Nan; Ni, Shuang; Luo, Tengxiao; Zhuang, Lifang; Chu, Chenggen; Cho, Seong-Woo; Tsujimoto, Hisashi; Qi, Zengjun

    2016-07-01

    Chromosome engineering is an important approach for generating wheat germplasm. Efficient development of chromosome aberrations will facilitate the introgression and application of alien genes in wheat. In this study, zebularine, a DNA methylation transferase inhibitor, was successfully used to induce chromosome aberrations in the octoploid triticale cultivar Jinghui#1. Dry seeds were soaked in zebularine solutions (250, 500, and 750 μmol/L) for 24 h, and the 500 μmol/L treatment was tested in three additional treatment times, i.e., 12, 36, and 48 h. All treatments induced aberrations involving wheat and rye chromosomes. Of the 920 cells observed in 67 M1 plants, 340 (37.0%) carried 817 aberrations with an average of 0.89 aberrations per cell (range: 0-12). The aberrations included probable deletions, telosomes and acentric fragments (49.0%), large segmental translocations (28.9%), small segmental translocations (17.1%), intercalary translocations (2.6%), long chromosomes that could carry more than one centromere (2.0%), and ring chromosomes (0.5%). Of 510 M2 plants analyzed, 110 (21.6%) were found to carry stable aberrations. Such aberrations included 79 with varied rye chromosome numbers, 7 with wheat and rye chromosome translocations, 15 with possible rye telosomes/deletions, and 9 with complex aberrations involving variation in rye chromosome number and wheat-rye translocations. These indicated that aberrations induced by zebularine can be steadily transmitted, suggesting that zebularine is a new efficient agent for chromosome manipulation.

  14. Biomass & Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Fuel For Gas Turbine (Power Generation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant progress has been made by major power generation equipment manufacturers in the development of market applications for hydrogen fuel use in gas turbines in recent years. Development of a new application using gas turbines for significant reduction of power plant CO2 e...

  15. CHROMOSOME ABNORMALITIES IN INFERTILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Smogavec

    2009-08-01

    Conclusions Chromosomal analysis is an important method in diagnostic procedures of infertility, because chromosomal abnormalities could play the important role in etiology of infertility and are more frequently detected in this group of patients compared to general population. In the infertile couples balanced chromosomal abnormalities are the main cause of spontaneous abortions. Sex chromosome aneuploidies are highly correlated to infertility of females and males.

  16. How the active and diffusional nature of brain tissues can generate monopole signals at micrometer sized measures

    CERN Document Server

    Cabo, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    We investigate mechanisms which could generate transient monopole signals in measuring current source density (CSD), as it had been indicated to occur in recent small volume experiments. A simple model is defined for this purpose. It is emphasized that the active nature of the neural biological activity, with its ability to generate ionic density imbalances, might be able to induce appreciable monopole signals in CSD detectors at micrometer scales. Thus, it follows that when both diffusive and ohmic transport are considered to be present in neural tissues, potential measures in micrometer regions can include appreciable electric monopole signals, for sufficiently small values of the ratio (\\sigma a^{2})/(\\epsilon D), where "\\sigma" is the conductivity, "\\epsilon" is the dielectric constant, "D" is the diffusion constant and "a" is the linear dimension of the ionic charge densities generated by the neural processes. Ranges of possible magnitudes for these parameters in the considered experimental studies are e...

  17. Efficient generation of recombinant RNA viruses using targeted recombination-mediated mutagenesis of bacterial artificial chromosomes containing full-length cDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Risager, Peter Christian; Fahnøe, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    . This strategy allows manipulation of viral cDNA by targeted recombination-mediated mutagenesis within bacteria. Results A new CSFV-BAC (pBeloR26) derived from the Riems vaccine strain has been constructed and subsequently modified in the E2 coding sequence, using the targeted recombination strategy to enable......Background Infectious cDNA clones are a prerequisite for directed genetic manipulation of RNA viruses. Here, a strategy to facilitate manipulation and rescue of classical swine fever viruses (CSFVs) from full-length cDNAs present within bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) is described...... recombination-mediated mutagenesis provides a powerful tool for expediting the construction of novel RNA genomes and should be applicable to the manipulation of other RNA viruses....

  18. LOW HANDICAP GOLFERS GENERATE MORE TORQUE AT THE SHOE-NATURAL GRASS INTERFACE WHEN USING A DRIVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Worsfold

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to determine the rotational torque occurring at the shoe-natural grass interface during golf swing performance with different clubs, and to determine the influence of handicap and golf shoe design. Twenty-four golfers (8 low 0-7; 8 medium 8-14; and 8 high 15+ performed 5 shots with a driver, 3-iron and 7-iron when 3 shoes were worn: a modern 8 mm metal 7-spike shoe, an alternative 7-spike shoe and a flat soled shoe. Torque was measured at the front and back foot by grass covered force platforms in an outdoor field. Torque at the shoe- natural turf interface was similar at the front foot when using a driver, 3-iron and 7-iron with maximum mean torque (Tzmax 17-19 Nm and torque generation in the entire backswing and downswing approximately 40 Nm. At the back foot, torque was less than at the front foot when using the driver, 3-iron and 7-iron. At the back foot Tzmax was 6-7 Nm, and torque generation was 10-16 Nm, with a trend for greater torque generation when using the driver rather than the irons. The metal spike shoe allowed significantly more back foot torque generation when using a driver than a flat- soled shoe (p 0.05, although back foot mean torques generated tended to be greater for the metal spike shoe. The golf shot outcomes were similar for low, medium and high handicappers in both metal and alternative spike shoes (metal: 87%; 76%; 54%; alternative: 85%; 74%; 54% respectively. The better, low handicap golfers generated significantly more back foot torque (metal spike: 18.2 Nm; alternative: 15.8 Nm; p < 0.05 when using a driver. Further research should consider back foot shoe-grass interface demands during driver usage by low handicap and lighter body-weight golfers

  19. Patan hospital experience in treating philadelphia chromosome/BCR-ABL1 positive chronic myeloid leukemia patients with gleevec (imatinib mesylate; the first generation specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimmerman Mark

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML is caused by the abnormal fusion protein BCR-ABL1, a constitutively active tyrosine kinase and product of the Philadelphia chromosome. Gleevec (Imatinib mesylate is a selective inhibitor of this kinase. Treatment with this agent is known to result in hematologic, cytogenetic, and molecular responses. Patan hospital (Patan, Nepal is one of the Gleevec International Patient Assistance Program (GIPAP centers for patients with CML. Methods A total of 106 Philadelphia positive CML patients were enrolled in our center between Feb 2003 and Jun 2008, and 103 of them were eligible for cytogenetic and/or hematologic response analyses. Results Out of 103 patients, 27% patients underwent cytogenetic analysis. Imatinib induced major cytogenetic responses in 89% and complete hematologic responses in almost 100% of the patients with confirmed CML. After a mean follow up of 27 months, an estimated 90% of the patients on imatinib remained in hematologic remission and more than 90% of the patients are still alive. About 30% of patients developed some form of manageable myelosuppression. A few patients developed non-hematologic toxic side effects such as edema and hepatotoxicity. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that imatinib is safe to use in a developing country. Furthermore, we demonstrate that imatinib is very effective and induced long lasting responses in a high proportion of patients with Ph chromosome/BCR-ABL1 positive CML. Imatinib is well tolerated by our patients. The lack of cytogenetic analysis in the majority of our patients hindered our ability to detect inadequate responses to imatinib and adjust therapy appropriately.

  20. One loop effects of natural SUSY in third generation fermion production at the ILC

    CERN Document Server

    Kouda, Yusaku; Kurihara, Yoshimasa; Ishikawa, Tadashi; Jimbo, Masato; Kato, Kiyoshi; Kuroda, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the 1-loop effects of supersymmetric particles on the third-generation fermion-pair production at the ILC within the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. Three sets of the SUSY parameters are proposed which are consistent with the observed Higgs mass, the muon $g$-$2$, the Dark Matter abundance, etc. We discuss on the possibility of discovering the signals consistent with SUSY as well as of experimentally distinguishing the proposed sets of SUSY parameters.

  1. PV output smoothing using a battery and natural gas engine-generator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Jay Dean; Ellis, Abraham; Denda, Atsushi; Morino, Kimio; Shinji, Takao; Ogata, Takao; Tadokoro, Masayuki

    2013-02-01

    In some situations involving weak grids or high penetration scenarios, the variability of photovoltaic systems can affect the local electrical grid. In order to mitigate destabilizing effects of power fluctuations, an energy storage device or other controllable generation or load can be used. This paper describes the development of a controller for coordinated operation of a small gas engine-generator set (genset) and a battery for smoothing PV plant output. There are a number of benefits derived from using a traditional generation resource in combination with the battery; the variability of the photovoltaic system can be reduced to a specific level with a smaller battery and Power Conditioning System (PCS) and the lifetime of the battery can be extended. The controller was designed specifically for a PV/energy storage project (Prosperity) and a gas engine-generator (Mesa Del Sol) currently operating on the same feeder in Albuquerque, New Mexico. A number of smoothing simulations of the Prosperity PV were conducted using power data collected from the site. By adjusting the control parameters, tradeoffs between battery use and ramp rates could be tuned. A cost function was created to optimize the control in order to balance, in this example, the need to have low ramp rates with reducing battery size and operation. Simulations were performed for cases with only a genset or battery, and with and without coordinated control between the genset and battery, e.g., without the communication link between sites or during a communication failure. The degree of smoothing without coordinated control did not change significantly because the battery dominated the smoothing response. It is anticipated that this work will be followed by a field demonstration in the near future.

  2. Determination of reactive oxygen generated from natural medicines and their antibacterial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Tajima

    2016-08-01

    Galla chinensis generated 2.4×10−4 mol/L hydrogen peroxide from a 1 mg/mL solution. In bacterial growth tests, Galla chinensis extract had antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Campylobacter sputorum biovar sputorum, Streptococcus salivarius thermophilus, Lactobacillus casei, and Bifidobacterium longum infantis. This antibacterial activity was decreased by the addition of catalase. It revealed that hydrogen peroxide which Galla chinensis produced participated in antibacterial activity.

  3. Next Generation of Advanced Laser Fluorescence Technology for Characterization of Natural Aquatic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    described in a manuscript to be sumbitted in Oct. 2011 for peer review publication in the Journal of Plankton Reseach (Chekalyuk et al. 2011). 3...pollution, fisheries, coastal management, etc., which may ultimately help to inprove the quality of life. Science Education and Communication The...potential future impact of developing the next generation on the ALF technology will include introduction of the the new scientific data and

  4. Coolant stratification and its thermohydrodynamic specificity under natural circulation in horizontal steam generator collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blagovechtchenski, A.; Leontieva, V.; Mitriukhin, A. [Saint-Petersburg Technical Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The experiments and the test facilities for the study of the stratification phenomenon in the hot plenum of reactor and the upper parts of the steam generator collectors in a nuclear power plant are described. The aim of the experiments was to define the conditions of the stratification initiation, to study the temperature field in the upper part, the definition of the characteristics in the stratification layer, and also to study the factors which cause the intensity of the stagnant volume cooling.

  5. Interdependence of the Electricity Generation System and the Natural Gas System and Implications for Energy Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-15

    individual backup generators, but recently has begun to examine microgrids , power systems that can purposefully disconnect from the utility grid...and operate in an islanded mode, as a more robust and cost-effective solution to long-term power outages [17, 18]. As microgrid systems become larger... Microgrid study: energy security for DoD installations. Lexington, MA: MIT Lincoln Laboratory. Report number: TR 1164. 100 pp. 18. Anderson, E

  6. Screening of natural yeast isolates under the effects of stresses associated with second-generation biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Rajni; Jakeer, Shaik; Gaur, Naseem A

    2016-05-01

    Robust microorganisms are required for sustainable second-generation biofuel production. We evaluated the growth and fermentation performance of six natural isolates that were derived from grape wine and medicinal herbs using a wide range of carbon sources, rice and wheat straw hydrolysates as well as stress conditions associated with second-generation ethanol production. Sequence analysis of the 5.8S internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and species-specific PCR amplification of the HO gene region assigned the natural isolates to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the mitochondrial DNA revealed that natural yeast isolates are genetically closer to the laboratory strain BY4741 than to the CEN.PK strains. Dextrose fermentation by a natural isolate, MTCC4780, under semi-anaerobic conditions produced maximum ethanol yields of 0.44 g/g and 0.39 g/g, respectively, with and without the stresses encountered during lignocellulosic ethanol fermentation. However, MTCC4780 produced ethanol yields of 0.48 g/g, 0.42 g/g and 0.45 g/g, respectively, with glucose, rice and wheat straw enzymatic hydrolysate fermentation in a bioreactor. The isolates MTCC4781 and MTCC4796 showed higher growth and fermentation performance than did MTCC4780 in the presence of elevated temperature and pre-treatment inhibitors. Taken together, the MTCC4780, MTCC4781 and MTCC4796 strains have the potential to serve as a platform for lignocellulosic ethanol production under stresses associated with second-generation biofuel production.

  7. The first step towards a respiratory motion prediction for natural-breathing by using a motion generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moo-Sub; Jung, Joo-Young; Yoon, Do-Kun; Shin, Han-Back; Suh, Tae Suk; Jung, Jae-Hong

    2017-03-01

    Respiratory gated radiation therapy (RGRT) gives accurate results when a patient's breathing is stable and regular. Thus, the patient should be acutely aware during respiratory pattern training before undergoing the RGRT treatment. To bypass the process of respiratory pattern training, we propose a tumor location prediction system for RGRT that uses only the natural respiratory volume, and we confirm its application. In order to verify the proposed tumor location prediction system, we used an in-house phantom set. The set involved a chest phantom with target, external markers and a motion generator. Natural respiratory volume signals were generated using the random function in the MATLAB code. In the chest phantom, the target undergoes linear motion based on the respiratory signal. After a four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scan of the in-house phantom, the motion trajectory was derived as a linear equation. The accuracy of the linear equation was compared with that of the motion algorithm used by the operating motion generator. In addition, we attempted to predict the tumor's location by using the random respiratory volume values. The correspondence rate of the linear equation derived from the 4DCT images with the motion algorithm of the motion generator was 99.41% ( p > 0.05). Also, the average error rate of the tumor-location prediction was 1.23% for 26 cases. We confirmed the applicability of our proposed tumor location prediction system using the natural respiratory volume for RGRT. If additional clinical studies can be conducted, a more accurate prediction that would not require respiratory pattern training can be realized.

  8. Chromosomal painting and ZW sex chromosomes differentiation in Characidium (Characiformes, Crenuchidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artoni Roberto F

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Characidium (a Neotropical fish group have a conserved diploid number (2n = 50, but show remarkable differences among species and populations in relation to sex chromosome systems and location of nucleolus organizer regions (NOR. In this study, we isolated a W-specific probe for the Characidium and characterized six Characidium species/populations using cytogenetic procedures. We analyzed the origin and differentiation of sex and NOR-bearing chromosomes by chromosome painting in populations of Characidium to reveal their evolution, phylogeny, and biogeography. Results A W-specific probe for efficient chromosome painting was isolated by microdissection and degenerate oligonucleotide primed-polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR amplification of W chromosomes from C. gomesi. The W probe generated weak signals dispersed on the proto sex chromosomes in C. zebra, dispersed signals in both W and Z chromosomes in C. lauroi and, in C. gomesi populations revealed a proximal site on the long arms of the Z chromosome and the entire W chromosome. All populations showed small terminal W probe sites in some autosomes. The 18S rDNA revealed distinctive patterns for each analyzed species/population with regard to proto sex chromosome, sex chromosome pair, and autosome location. Conclusions The results from dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (dual-color FISH using W and 18S rDNA probes allowed us to infer the putative evolutionary pathways for the differentiation of sex chromosomes and NORs, from structural rearrangements in a sex proto-chromosome, followed by gene erosion and heterochromatin amplification, morphological differentiation of the sex chromosomal pair, and NOR transposition, giving rise to the distinctive patterns observed among species/populations of Characidium. Biogeographic isolation and differentiation of sex chromosomes seem to have played a major role in the speciation process in this group of fish.

  9. Nature of the coupling between neural drive and force-generating capacity in the human quadriceps muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, François; Goupille, Clément; Baum, Daniel; Raiteri, Brent J; Hodges, Paul W; Tucker, Kylie

    2015-11-22

    The force produced by a muscle depends on both the neural drive it receives and several biomechanical factors. When multiple muscles act on a single joint, the nature of the relationship between the neural drive and force-generating capacity of the synergistic muscles is largely unknown. This study aimed to determine the relationship between the ratio of neural drive and the ratio of muscle force-generating capacity between two synergist muscles (vastus lateralis (VL) and vastus medialis (VM)) in humans. Twenty-one participants performed isometric knee extensions at 20 and 50% of maximal voluntary contractions (MVC). Myoelectric activity (surface electromyography (EMG)) provided an index of neural drive. Physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) was estimated from measurements of muscle volume (magnetic resonance imaging) and muscle fascicle length (three-dimensional ultrasound imaging) to represent the muscles' force-generating capacities. Neither PCSA nor neural drive was balanced between VL and VM. There was a large (r = 0.68) and moderate (r = 0.43) correlation between the ratio of VL/VM EMG amplitude and the ratio of VL/VM PCSA at 20 and 50% of MVC, respectively. This study provides evidence that neural drive is biased by muscle force-generating capacity, the greater the force-generating capacity of VL compared with VM, the stronger bias of drive to the VL.

  10. Enhanced DNA Profiling of the Semen Donor in Late Reported Sexual Assaults: Use of Y-Chromosome-Targeted Pre-amplification and Next Generation Y-STR Amplification Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Erin K; Ballantyne, Jack

    2016-01-01

    In some cases of sexual assault the victim may not report the assault for several days after the incident due to various factors. The ability to obtain an autosomal STR profile of the semen donor from a living victim rapidly diminishes as the post-coital interval is extended due to the presence of only a small amount of male DNA amidst an overwhelming amount of female DNA. Previously, we have utilized various technological tools to overcome the limitations of male DNA profiling in extended interval post-coital samples including the use of Y-chromosome STR profiling, cervical sample, and post-PCR purification permitting the recovery of Y-STR profiles of the male DNA from samples collected 5-6 days after intercourse. Despite this success, the reproductive biology literature reports the presence of spermatozoa in the human cervix up to 7-10 days post-coitus. Therefore, novel and improved methods for recovery of male profiles in extended interval post-coital samples were required. Here, we describe enhanced strategies, including Y-chromosome-targeted pre-amplification and next generation Y-STR amplification kits, that have resulted in the ability to obtain probative male profiles from samples collected 6-9 days after intercourse.

  11. natural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Gómez Macías

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partiendo de óxido de magnesio comercial se preparó una suspensión acuosa, la cual se secó y calcinó para conferirle estabilidad térmica. El material, tanto fresco como usado, se caracterizó mediante DRX, área superficial BET y SEM-EPMA. El catalizador mostró una matriz de MgO tipo periclasa con CaO en la superficie. Las pruebas de actividad catalítica se efectuaron en lecho fijo empacado con partículas obtenidas mediante prensado, trituración y clasificación del material. El flujo de reactivos consistió en mezclas gas natural-aire por debajo del límite inferior de inflamabilidad. Para diferentes flujos y temperaturas de entrada de la mezcla reactiva, se midieron las concentraciones de CH4, CO2 y CO en los gases de combustión con un analizador de gases tipo infrarrojo no dispersivo (NDIR. Para alcanzar conversión total de metano se requirió aumentar la temperatura de entrada al lecho a medida que se incrementó el flujo de gases reaccionantes. Los resultados obtenidos permiten desarrollar un sistema de combustión catalítica de bajo costo con un material térmicamente estable, que promueva la alta eficiencia en la combustión de gas natural y elimine los problemas de estabilidad, seguridad y de impacto ambiental negativo inherentes a los procesos de combustión térmica convencional.

  12. Generating Natural Language Explanations in a Computer-Aided Design System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    cursor moves. 10) 1 teach CS 110. 11) Dr. Bernard Lovell teaches CS 267. -28- The generation of modals is done b translating a given modal specifier...easily enough. CGEN has a set of morpholog routines capable of adding ", =nK, s, to words, and stores arW irregular past tense or participle forMs...under the root word. Some examples are shown below. 18) I took CS 100. 19) I am taking CS 110. 20) I had taken CS 110. 21) He has been teaching CS 110. 22

  13. Unusual maternal uniparental isodisomic x chromosome mosaicism with asymmetric y chromosomal rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B Y; Kim, S Y; Park, J Y; Choi, E Y; Kim, D J; Kim, J W; Ryu, H M; Cho, Y H; Park, S Y; Seo, J T

    2014-01-01

    Infertile men with azoospermia commonly have associated microdeletions in the azoospermia factor (AZF) region of the Y chromosome, sex chromosome mosaicism, or sex chromosome rearrangements. In this study, we describe an unusual 46,XX and 45,X mosaicism with a rare Y chromosome rearrangement in a phenotypically normal male patient. The patient's karyotype was 46,XX[50]/45,X[25]/46,X,der(Y)(pter→q11.222::p11.2→pter)[25]. The derivative Y chromosome had a deletion at Yq11.222 and was duplicated at Yp11.2. Two copies of the SRY gene were confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis, and complete deletion of the AZFb and AZFc regions was shown by multiplex-PCR for microdeletion analysis. Both X chromosomes of the predominant mosaic cell line (46,XX) were isodisomic and derived from the maternal gamete, as determined by examination of short tandem repeat markers. We postulate that the derivative Y chromosome might have been generated during paternal meiosis or early embryogenesis. Also, we suggest that the very rare mosaicism of isodisomic X chromosomes might be formed during maternal meiosis II or during postzygotic division derived from the 46,X,der(Y)/ 45,X lineage because of the instability of the derivative Y chromosome. To our knowledge, this is the first confirmatory study to verify the origin of a sex chromosome mosaicism with a Y chromosome rearrangement.

  14. Per aspera ad astra: When harmful chromosomal translocations become a plus value in genetic evolution. Lessons from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Tosato

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this review we will focus on chromosomal translocations (either spontaneous or induced in budding yeast. Indeed, very few organisms tolerate so well aneuploidy like Saccharomyces, allowing in depth studies on chromosomal numerical aberrations. Many wild type strains naturally develop chromosomal rearrangements while adapting to different environmental conditions. Translocations, in particular, are valuable not only because they naturally drive species evolution, but because they might allow the artificial generation of new strains that can be optimized for industrial purposes. In this area, several methodologies to artificially trigger chromosomal translocations have been conceived in the past years, such as the chromosomal fragmentation vector (CFV technique, the Cre-loxP procedure, the FLP/FRT recombination method and, recently, the bridge – induced translocation (BIT system. An overview of the methodologies to generate chromosomal translocations in yeast will be presented and discussed considering advantages and drawbacks of each technology, focusing in particular on the recent BIT system. Translocants are important for clinical studies because translocated yeast cells resemble cancer cells from morphological and physiological points of view and because the translocation event ensues in a transcriptional deregulation with a subsequent multi-factorial genetic adaptation to new, selective environmental conditions. The phenomenon of post-translocational adaptation (PTA is discussed, providing some new unpublished data and proposing the hypothesis that translocations may drive evolution through adaptive genetic selection.

  15. Non-heme iron oxygenases generate natural structural diversity in carbapenem antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodner, Micah J; Phelan, Ryan M; Freeman, Michael F; Li, Rongfeng; Townsend, Craig A

    2010-01-13

    Carbapenems are a clinically important antibiotic family. More than 50 naturally occurring carbapenam/ems are known and are distinguished primarily by their C-2/C-6 side chains where many are only differentiated by the oxidation states of these substituents. With a limited palette of variations the carbapenem family comprises a natural combinatorial library, and C-2/C-6 oxidation is associated with increased efficacy. We demonstrate that ThnG and ThnQ encoded by the thienamycin gene cluster in Streptomyces cattleya oxidize the C-2 and C-6 moieties of carbapenems, respectively. ThnQ stereospecifically hydroxylates PS-5 (5) giving N-acetyl thienamycin (2). ThnG catalyzes sequential desaturation and sulfoxidation of PS-5 (5), giving PS-7 (7) and its sulfoxide (9). The enzymes are relatively substrate selective but are proposed to give rise to the oxidative diversity of carbapenems produced by S. cattleya, and orthologues likely function similarly in allied streptomyces. Elucidating the roles of ThnG and ThnQ will focus further investigations of carbapenem antibiotic biosynthesis.

  16. Undetected sex chromosome aneuploidy by chromosomal microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus-Bustani, Keren; Yaron, Yuval; Goldstein, Myriam; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Ben-Shachar, Shay

    2012-11-01

    We report on a case of a female fetus found to be mosaic for Turner syndrome (45,X) and trisomy X (47,XXX). Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) failed to detect the aneuploidy because of a normal average dosage of the X chromosome. This case represents an unusual instance in which CMA may not detect chromosomal aberrations. Such a possibility should be taken into consideration in similar cases where CMA is used in a clinical setting.

  17. 二代测序技术检测早期自然流产胚胎染色体异常%Detection of chromosome abnormality by next-generation sequencing technology of miscarried embryo in the first-trimester

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丽; 徐凤琴; 邸建永; 刘清华; 李毅

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical values of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology in diagnosis of miscarried chorionic villi genetic disorders. Methods Patients who underwent miscarriage (n=87) were enrolled in this study. Among all patients, 32 cases were of recurrent miscarrage and 55 cases were of sporadic miscarriage. In all collected patients, 35 women were 35 years or older while other 52 women were less than 35 years old. Positive detection rate and the abnormal detection rate were compared between these two methods. Chromosomes abnormal rates were also compared among different types of miscarrage and different ages. All aborted villi tissue were analyzed by NGS of whole genome and G-band⁃ing karyotype. Results The successful detection rate of chorionic villi by NGS (100.00%) was higher than that of G-band⁃ing karyotype (74.71%), and the detection rate of abnormal chorionic villi by NGS (58.62%) was also higher than that of G-banding karyotype (50.77%). Three cases of chromosome structure anomaly were found in those 51 chromosome anomalies (5.88%). Other 48 cases of chromosome anomalies were aneuploidy anomalies (94.12%) include 39 cases of trisomy, 2 cases of double trisomy and 1 case of triple trisomy and 6 cases of monomer. On the other hand, 32 cases of chromosome aneuploi⁃dy anomalies were found in 33 chromosome anomalies by G-banding karyotype, which include 24 cases of trisomy, 2 cases of double trisomy, 1 case of triple trisomy, 5 cases of monomer and 1 case of chromosome structure anomaly. Most NGS re⁃sults (n=64) were in agreement with G-banding karyotype but with 1 case of discrepancy. Chromosomal abnormality rate de⁃tected by NGS in sporadic miscarrage group and recurrent spontaneous miscarrage group were 60.00%and 56.25%respective⁃ly. There was no significant difference (P>0.05). Chromosomal abnormality rate picked by NGS in women aged≥35 years old (71.43%) was higher than that in women<35 years old (50.00%) with

  18. Intraspecific chromosome variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Dubinin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available (Editorial preface. The publication is presented in order to remind us of one of dramatic pages of the history of genetics. It re-opens for the contemporary reader a comprehensive work marking the priority change from plant cytogenetics to animal cytogenetics led by wide population studies which were conducted on Drosophila polytene chromosomes. The year of the publication (1937 became the point of irretrievable branching between the directions of Old World and New World genetics connected with the problems of chromosome variability and its significance for the evolution of the species. The famous book of T. Dobzhansky (1937 was published by Columbia University in the US under the title “Genetics and the origin of species”, and in the shadow of this American ‘skybuilding’ all other works grew dim. It is remarkable that both Dobzhansky and Dubinin come to similar conclusions about the role of chromosomes in speciation. This is not surprising given that they both might be considered as representatives of the Russian genetic school, by their birth and education. Interestingly, Dobzhansky had never referred to the full paper of Dubinin et al. (1937, though a previous short communication in Nature (1936 was included together with all former papers on the related subject. In full, the volume of the original publication printed in the Biological Journal in Moscow comprised 47 pages, in that number 41 pages of the Russian text accompanied by 16 Figs, a table and reference list, and, above all, 6 pages of the English summary. This final part in English is now reproduced in the authors’ version with the only addition being the reference list in the originally printed form.

  19. Generation of natural killer cells from hematopoietic stem cells in vitro for immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luevano, Martha; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are part of the innate immune system and are an alluring option for immunotherapy due to their ability to kill infected cells or cancer cells without prior sensitization. Throughout the past 20 years, different groups have been able to reproduce NK cell development in vitro, and NK cell ontogeny studies have provided the basis for the establishment of protocols to produce NK cells in vitro for immunotherapy. Here, we briefly discuss NK cell development and NK cell immunotherapy approaches. We review the factors needed for NK cell differentiation in vitro, which stem cell sources have been used, published protocols, challenges and future directions for Good Manufacturing Practice protocols. PMID:22705914

  20. Remote sensing estimation of isoprene and monoterpene emissions generated by natural vegetation in Monterrey, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastelum, Sandra L; Mejía-Velázquez, G M; Lozano-García, D Fabián

    2016-06-01

    In addition to oxygen, hydrocarbons are the most reactive chemical compounds produced by plants into the atmosphere. These compounds are part of the family of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and are discharged in a great variety of forms. Among the VOCs produced by natural sources such as vegetation, the most studied until today are the isoprene and monoterpene. These substances can play an important role in the chemical balance of the atmosphere of a region. In this project, we develop a methodology to estimate the natural (vegetation) emission of isoprene and monoterpenes and applied it to the Monterrey Metropolitan Area, Mexico and its surrounding areas. Landsat-TM data was used to identify the dominant vegetation communities and field work to determine the foliage biomass density of key species. The studied communities were submontane scrub, oak, and pine forests and a combination of both. We carried out the estimation of emissions for isoprene and monoterpenes compounds in the different plant communities, with two different criteria: (1) taking into account the average foliage biomass density obtained from the various sample point in each vegetation community, and (2) using the foliage biomass density obtained for each transect, associated to an individual spectral class within a particular vegetation type. With this information, we obtained emission maps for each case. The results show that the main producers of isoprene are the communities that include species of the genus Quercus, located mainly on the Sierra Madre Oriental and Sierra de Picachos, with average isoprene emissions of 314.6 ton/day and 207.3 ton/day for the two methods utilized. The higher estimates of monoterpenes were found in the submontane scrub areas distributed along the valley of the metropolitan zone, with an estimated average emissions of 47.1 ton/day and 181.4 tons for the two methods respectively.

  1. Thermodynamic, energy efficiency, and power density analysis of reverse electrodialysis power generation with natural salinity gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Ngai Yin; Vermaas, David A; Nijmeijer, Kitty; Elimelech, Menachem

    2014-05-06

    Reverse electrodialysis (RED) can harness the Gibbs free energy of mixing when fresh river water flows into the sea for sustainable power generation. In this study, we carry out a thermodynamic and energy efficiency analysis of RED power generation, and assess the membrane power density. First, we present a reversible thermodynamic model for RED and verify that the theoretical maximum extractable work in a reversible RED process is identical to the Gibbs free energy of mixing. Work extraction in an irreversible process with maximized power density using a constant-resistance load is then examined to assess the energy conversion efficiency and power density. With equal volumes of seawater and river water, energy conversion efficiency of ∼ 33-44% can be obtained in RED, while the rest is lost through dissipation in the internal resistance of the ion-exchange membrane stack. We show that imperfections in the selectivity of typical ion exchange membranes (namely, co-ion transport, osmosis, and electro-osmosis) can detrimentally lower efficiency by up to 26%, with co-ion leakage being the dominant effect. Further inspection of the power density profile during RED revealed inherent ineffectiveness toward the end of the process. By judicious early discontinuation of the controlled mixing process, the overall power density performance can be considerably enhanced by up to 7-fold, without significant compromise to the energy efficiency. Additionally, membrane resistance was found to be an important factor in determining the power densities attainable. Lastly, the performance of an RED stack was examined for different membrane conductivities and intermembrane distances simulating high performance membranes and stack design. By thoughtful selection of the operating parameters, an efficiency of ∼ 37% and an overall gross power density of 3.5 W/m(2) represent the maximum performance that can potentially be achieved in a seawater-river water RED system with low

  2. Tailoring enzyme-rich environmental DNA clones: a source of enzymes for generating libraries of unnatural natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Jacob J; Craig, Jeffrey W; Calle, Paula Y; Brady, Sean F

    2010-11-10

    A detailed bioinformatics analysis of six glycopeptide biosynthetic gene clusters isolated from soil environmental DNA (eDNA) megalibraries indicates that a subset of these gene clusters contains collections of tailoring enzymes that are predicted to result in the production of new glycopeptide congeners. In particular, sulfotransferases appear in eDNA-derived gene clusters at a much higher frequency than would be predicted from the characterization of glycopeptides from cultured Actinomycetes . Enzymes found on tailoring-enzyme-rich eDNA clones associated with these six gene clusters were used to produce a series of new sulfated glycopeptide derivatives in both in vitro and in vivo derivatization studies. The derivatization of known natural products with eDNA-derived tailoring enzymes is likely to be a broadly applicable strategy for generating libraries of new natural product variants.

  3. Fundamental investigations of natural and laboratory generated SAR dose response curves for quartz OSL in the high dose range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timar-Gabor, Alida; Constantin, Daniela; Buylaert, Jan-Pieter

    2015-01-01

    SAR-OSL investigations on quartz from Romanian loess resulted in non concordant fine and coarse-grain ages for equivalent doses higher than ~100 Gy. The laboratory dose response for both grain sizes is well represented by a sum of two saturating exponential functions, fine and coarse grains chara...... equivalent dose of 2000e2500 Gy were found to be below the saturation level of the laboratory dose response curve for both grain sizes; this also applied to the luminescence signals measured after >5000 Gy given on top of natural doses. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....... characterised by D01 and D02 values of ~140 and ~1400 Gy and ~65 and ~650 Gy respectively. Pulsed OSL experiments confirmed that this behaviour is almost certainly inherent to quartz and not caused by contamination with another mineral. Natural doseeresponse curves do not follow the same pattern and enter...... saturation much earlier. Analysis of time resolved spectra indicated similar luminescence lifetimes for both fine and coarse quartz grains, and natural and laboratory generated OSL signals seem to use the same non-dosedependent recombination pathways. The natural signals of a sample with an expected...

  4. Natural selection for genetic variants in sport: the role of Y chromosome genes in elite female athletes with 46,XY DSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Bavington, L Dawn

    2014-12-01

    At present, it is widely assumed that hyperandrogenism in female athletes confers an unfair competitive advantage. This view is perpetuated in current regulations governing eligibility of female athletes with hyperandrogenism to compete, which identify testosterone levels in the male range as the critical factor. Detailed evidence is presented here for the first time that genes for stature (and possibly other genes) on the Y chromosome are responsible for the increased frequency of 46,XY disorder of sex development (46,XY DSD) among elite female athletes identified by eligibility tests. In many cases, androgens are non-functional or, alternatively, absent and therefore testosterone cannot be responsible for their athletic success. Genetic variation has a major role in the selection of individuals for training and success in competition; however, this variation is not grounds for determining who should compete in athletic events. There is no convincing evidence to support the view that hyperandrogenism is associated with performance advantage in female athletes. Current time-consuming regulations may lead to the unwelcome resurgence of innuendo in the media and coercion of female athletes into accepting gonadectomy and other treatments to which they might otherwise not have been subjected. These regulations should be withdrawn on the grounds that they are not supported scientifically, are discriminatory towards women and place some female athletes at risk of unnecessary and potentially harmful investigations. Improved understanding about genetic factors that lead to selection in sport should offer reassurance that women with hyperandrogenism possess no physical attribute relevant to athletic performance that is neither attainable, nor present in other women.

  5. Technological evaluation of fuel cells using natural gas for distributed power generation; Avaliacao tecnologica da utilizacao de gas natural em celulas a combustivel para geracao distribuida de energia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Mauricio O. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Programa de Engenharia Mecanica; Giannini, Marcio P.; Arouca, Mauricio C. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Programa de Planejamento Energetico

    2004-07-01

    The search for sustainable and more rational means of power generation motivates the scientific crew to search for more efficient and cleaner systems. Oil dependence becomes from the kind of development that the humanity had and cannot be dismissed. The question is how to use this source in a more intelligent way. Fuel Cells are electrochemical devices that convert into electric energy the chemical energy from oxi-reduction reactions between a fuel and an oxidant. The current fuel used in a Fuel Cell is hydrogen and oxygen is the oxidant. The great advantage of this device is its efficiency, higher than the one achieved with internal combustion engines. Also Fuel Cells are not limited by Carnot's efficiency. This paper is about the implementation of a distributed generation system using Fuel Cells. Technical aspects are approached together with economical and environmental needs. The already existence of Gas pipelines and the grown production of Natural Gas presented by Brazil turns it into a good market for the implementation of this energy source. The evaluation of this paper shows that is technically possible to use NG in Fuel Cells, mostly in South and Southeast regions, applying the distributed generation of energy concept. The most interesting in a strategic manner is that Brazil already have an indication that it's capable of developing this technology, opening a new market tuning with world's new technological developments. Many research centers develop this technology, not only from the cell composition itself, but also manufacturing techniques. (author)

  6. Greenhouse gases generated from the anaerobic biodegradation of natural offshore asphalt seepages in southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenson, T.D.; Wong, Florence L.; Dartnell, Peter; Sliter, Ray W.

    2014-01-01

    Significant offshore asphaltic deposits with active seepage occur in the Santa Barbara Channel offshore southern California. The composition and isotopic signatures of gases sampled from the oil and gas seeps reveal that the coexisting oil in the shallow subsurface is anaerobically biodegraded, generating CO2 with secondary CH4 production. Biomineralization can result in the consumption of as much as 60% by weight of the original oil, with 13C enrichment of CO2. Analyses of gas emitted from asphaltic accumulations or seeps on the seafloor indicate up to 11% CO2 with 13C enrichment reaching +24.8‰. Methane concentrations range from less than 30% up to 98% with isotopic compositions of –34.9 to –66.1‰. Higher molecular weight hydrocarbon gases are present in strongly varying concentrations reflecting both oil-associated gas and biodegradation; propane is preferentially biodegraded, resulting in an enriched 13C isotopic composition as enriched as –19.5‰. Assuming the 132 million barrels of asphaltic residues on the seafloor represent ~40% of the original oil volume and mass, the estimated gas generated is 5.0×1010 kg (~76×109 m3) CH4 and/or 1.4×1011 kg CO2 over the lifetime of seepage needed to produce the volume of these deposits. Geologic relationships and oil weathering inferences suggest the deposits are of early Holocene age or even younger. Assuming an age of ~1,000 years, annual fluxes are on the order of 5.0×107 kg (~76×106 m3) and/or 1.4×108 kg for CH4 and CO2, respectively. The daily volumetric emission rate (2.1×105 m3) is comparable to current CH4 emission from Coal Oil Point seeps (1.5×105 m3/day), and may be a significant source of both CH4 and CO2 to the atmosphere provided that the gas can be transported through the water column.

  7. Greenhouse gases generated from the anaerobic biodegradation of natural offshore asphalt seepages in southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenson, Thomas D.; Wong, Florence L.; Dartnell, Peter; Sliter, Ray W.

    2014-06-01

    Significant offshore asphaltic deposits with active seepage occur in the Santa Barbara Channel offshore southern California. The composition and isotopic signatures of gases sampled from the oil and gas seeps reveal that the coexisting oil in the shallow subsurface is anaerobically biodegraded, generating CO2 with secondary CH4 production. Biomineralization can result in the consumption of as much as 60% by weight of the original oil, with 13C enrichment of CO2. Analyses of gas emitted from asphaltic accumulations or seeps on the seafloor indicate up to 11% CO2 with 13C enrichment reaching +24.8‰. Methane concentrations range from less than 30% up to 98% with isotopic compositions of -34.9 to -66.1‰. Higher molecular weight hydrocarbon gases are present in strongly varying concentrations reflecting both oil-associated gas and biodegradation; propane is preferentially biodegraded, resulting in an enriched 13C isotopic composition as enriched as -19.5‰. Assuming the 132 million barrels of asphaltic residues on the seafloor represent ~40% of the original oil volume and mass, the estimated gas generated is 5.0×1010 kg (~76×109 m3) CH4 and/or 1.4×1011 kg CO2 over the lifetime of seepage needed to produce the volume of these deposits. Geologic relationships and oil weathering inferences suggest the deposits are of early Holocene age or even younger. Assuming an age of ~1,000 years, annual fluxes are on the order of 5.0×107 kg (~76×106 m3) and/or 1.4×108 kg for CH4 and CO2, respectively. The daily volumetric emission rate (2.1×105 m3) is comparable to current CH4 emission from Coal Oil Point seeps (1.5×105 m3/day), and may be a significant source of both CH4 and CO2 to the atmosphere provided that the gas can be transported through the water column.

  8. Generating executable knowledge for evidence-based medicine using natural language and semantic processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borlawsky, Tara; Friedman, Carol; Lussier, Yves A

    2006-01-01

    With an increase in the prevalence of patients having multiple medical conditions, along with the increasing number of medical information sources, an intelligent approach is required to integrate the answers to physicians' patient-related questions into clinical practice in the shortest, most specific way possible. Cochrane Scientific Reviews are currently considered to be the "gold standard" for evidence-based medicine (EBM), because of their well-defined systematic approach to assessing the available medical information. In order to develop semantic approaches for enabling the reuse of these Reviews, a system for producing executable knowledge was designed using a natural language processing (NLP) system we developed (BioMedLEE), and semantic processing techniques. Though BioMedLEE was not designed for or trained over the Cochrane Reviews, this study shows that disease, therapy and drug concepts can be extracted and correlated with an overall recall of 80.3%, coding precision of 94.1%, and concept-concept relationship precision of 87.3%.

  9. Styrene grafted natural rubber reinforced by in situ silica generated via sol–gel technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sittiphan, Torpong [Program of Petrochemistry and Polymer Sciences, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Prasassarakich, Pattarapan [Department of Chemical Technology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Poompradub, Sirilux, E-mail: sirilux.p@chula.ac.th [Department of Chemical Technology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Sol–gel reaction by NR latex was the absence of use of organic solvent and base catalyst. • Well dispersed in situ formed silica particles in the rubber matrix were obtained. • In situ silica was better to improve mechanical properties of rubber vulcanizates. -- Abstract: The filling of styrene graft natural rubber (ST-GNR) with in situ formed silica was performed using the sol–gel reaction via the latex solution method. The mechanical properties of ST-GNR/NR vulcanizate were improved when using the in situ formed silica to levels higher than those obtained with the commercial ex situ formed silica filled ST-GNR/NR vulcanizates at a comparable silica content of 12 parts by weight per hundred parts of rubber. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that the in situ silica particles were small (∼40 nm diameter) and well dispersed, while the commercial silica particles were larger (∼60 nm diameter) and markedly agglomerated in the rubbery matrix. The mechanical properties of the composites prepared via both the solid rubber and latex solution methods were comparable.

  10. Computational simulation of a diesel generator consuming vegetable oil "in nature" and air enriched with hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Augusto Seawright-de Campos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulamos un generador diesel para operar con aceite de palma e hidrógeno como combustibles. El objetivo era investigar cómo la adición de hidrógeno puede acelerar el final de la combustión de aceite vegetal, y en consecuencia mejorar la eficiencia eléctrica del generador, para la misma tasa de flujo de masa de combustible. Las simulaciones fueron realizadas utilizando el software AVL BOOST y validadas con datos experimentales. El generador fue simulado para operar con 75%, 80% y 100% de la carga utilizando aceite de palma natural, y el hidrógeno comenzó a ser inyectado en el colector de admisión en porciones de 5% a 20% que substituían el combustible principal. Las simulaciones mostraron aumento de la potencia eléctrica, reducción en el consumo específico de combustible y mejora de la eficiencia global de la operación del conjunto generador a una carga de 100%. Resultados satisfactorios de funcionamiento se obtuvieron con carga del 75%.

  11. Radiological dose assessment related to management of naturally occurring radioactive materials generated by the petroleum industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K.P.; Blunt, D.L.; Williams, G.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.; Tebes, C.L. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01

    A preliminary radiological dose assessment of equipment decontamination, subsurface disposal, landspreading, equipment smelting, and equipment burial was conducted to address concerns regarding the presence of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in production waste streams. The assessment estimated maximum individual dose equivalents for workers and the general public. Sensitivity analyses of certain input parameters also were conducted. On the basis of this assessment, it is concluded that (1) regulations requiring workers to wear respiratory protection during equipment cleaning operations are likely to result in lower worker doses, (2) underground injection and downhole encapsulation of NORM wastes present a negligible risk to the general public, and (3) potential doses to workers and the general public related to smelting NORM-contaminated equipment can be controlled by limiting the contamination level of the initial feed. It is recommended that (1) NORM wastes be further characterized to improve studies of potential radiological doses; (2) states be encouraged to permit subsurface disposal of NORM more readily, provided further assessments support this study; results; (3) further assessment of landspreading NORM wastes be conducted; and (4) the political, economic, sociological, and nonradiological issues related to smelting NORM-contaminated equipment be studied to fully examine the feasibility of this disposal option.

  12. Biogas production generated through continuous digestion of natural and cultivated seaweeds with dairy slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Muhammad Rizwan; Wall, David M; Murphy, Jerry D

    2016-11-01

    The technical feasibility of long term anaerobic mono-digestion of two brown seaweeds, and co-digestion of both seaweeds with dairy slurry was investigated whilst increasing the organic loading rate (OLR). One seaweed was natural (L. digitata); the second seaweed (S. Latissima) was cultivated. Higher proportions of L. digitata in co-digestion (66.6%) allowed the digester to operate more efficiently (OLR of 5kgVSm(-3)d(-1) achieving a specific methane yield (SMY) of 232LCH4kg(-1)VS) as compared to lower proportions (33.3%). Co-digestion of 66.6% cultivated S. latissima, with dairy slurry allowed a higher SMY of 252LCH4kg(-1)VS but at a lower OLR of 4kgVSm(-3)d(-1). Optimum conditions for mono-digestion of both seaweeds were effected at 4kgVSm(-3)d(-1). Chloride concentrations increased to high levels in the digestion of both seaweeds but were not detrimental to operation.

  13. A second generation genetic map of the bumblebee Bombus terrestris (Linnaeus, 1758 reveals slow genome and chromosome evolution in the Apidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kube Michael

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bumblebee Bombus terrestris is an ecologically and economically important pollinator and has become an important biological model system. To study fundamental evolutionary questions at the genomic level, a high resolution genetic linkage map is an essential tool for analyses ranging from quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping to genome assembly and comparative genomics. We here present a saturated linkage map and match it with the Apis mellifera genome using homologous markers. This genome-wide comparison allows insights into structural conservations and rearrangements and thus the evolution on a chromosomal level. Results The high density linkage map covers ~ 93% of the B. terrestris genome on 18 linkage groups (LGs and has a length of 2'047 cM with an average marker distance of 4.02 cM. Based on a genome size of ~ 430 Mb, the recombination rate estimate is 4.76 cM/Mb. Sequence homologies of 242 homologous markers allowed to match 15 B. terrestris with A. mellifera LGs, five of them as composites. Comparing marker orders between both genomes we detect over 14% of the genome to be organized in synteny and 21% in rearranged blocks on the same homologous LG. Conclusions This study demonstrates that, despite the very high recombination rates of both A. mellifera and B. terrestris and a long divergence time of about 100 million years, the genomes' genetic architecture is highly conserved. This reflects a slow genome evolution in these bees. We show that data on genome organization and conserved molecular markers can be used as a powerful tool for comparative genomics and evolutionary studies, opening up new avenues of research in the Apidae.

  14. Generating relevant climate adaptation science tools in concert with local natural resource agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheli, L.; Flint, L. E.; Veloz, S.; Heller, N. E.

    2015-12-01

    To create a framework for adapting to climate change, decision makers operating at the urban-wildland interface need to define climate vulnerabilities in the context of site-specific opportunities and constraints relative to water supply, land use suitability, wildfire risks, ecosystem services and quality of life. Pepperwood's TBC3.org is crafting customized climate vulnerability assessments with selected water and natural resource agencies of California's Sonoma, Marin, Napa and Mendocino counties under the auspices of Climate Ready North Bay, a public-private partnership funded by the California Coastal Conservancy. Working directly with managers from the very start of the process to define resource-specific information needs, we are developing high-resolution, spatially-explicit data products to help local governments and agency staff implement informed and effective climate adaptation strategies. Key preliminary findings for the region using the USGS' Basin Characterization Model (at a 270 m spatial resolution) include a unidirectional trend, independent of greater or lesser precipitation, towards increasing climatic water deficits across model scenarios. Therefore a key message is that managers will be facing an increasingly arid environment. Companion models translate the impacts of shifting climate and hydrology on vegetation composition and fire risks. The combination of drought stress on water supplies and native vegetation with an approximate doubling of fire risks may demand new approaches to watershed planning. Working with agencies we are exploring how to build capacity for protection and enhancement of key watershed functions with a focus on groundwater recharge, facilitating greater drought tolerance in forest and rangeland systems, and considering more aggressive approaches to management of fuel loads. Lessons learned about effective engagement include the need for extended in-depth dialog, translation of key climate adaptation questions into

  15. Chromosome Disorder Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BLOG Join Us Donate You are not alone. Chromosome Disorder Outreach, Inc. is a non-profit organization, ... Support For all those diagnosed with any rare chromosome disorder. Since 1992, CDO has supported the parents ...

  16. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in si

  17. ZEBRAFISH CHROMOSOME-BANDING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PIJNACKER, LP; FERWERDA, MA

    1995-01-01

    Banding techniques were carried out on metaphase chromosomes of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. The karyotypes with the longest chromosomes consist of 12 metacentrics, 26 submetacentrics, and 12 subtelocentrics (2n = 50). All centromeres are C-band positive. Eight chromosomes have a pericentric C-b

  18. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in

  19. On the Origin and Evolution of the Extant System of B Chromosomes in Oryzomyini Radiation (Rodentia, Sigmodontinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Karen; O'Brien, Patricia Caroline Mary; do Nascimento Moreira, Camila; Yonenaga-Yassuda, Yatiyo; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous supernumerary chromosomes (Bs) are recognized in the oryzomyines Holochilus brasiliensis, Nectomys rattus, N. squamipes, Oligoryzomys flavescens and Sooretamys angouya, representing about 10% of all known B-containing rodent species. They provide an outstanding model for understanding the origin, evolution and diversity of Bs in a phylogenetic context. Therefore, whole chromosome-specific probes were generated from flow-sorted Holochilus brasiliensis (HBR) autosomes 11 and 25+26 and chromosomes X, Y and Bs. Hybridizations were performed on male metaphases of 15 Oryzomyini species of which 3 are B-containing species. The results reveal that among the species sampled, 12 of them, belonging to a monophyletic Oryzomiyini subclade, are positive for an anonymous Oryzomyini shared heterochromatic region (OSHR) on both sex chromosomes. The OSHR is also present on Bs of Holochilus brasiliensis, Nectomys rattus and N. squamipes but not on Bs of O. flavescens and S. angouya. Two distinct additional OSHR/autosome associations are observed on S. angouya. The three species that are OSHR negative belong to an outgroup. Molecular dating suggests that the OSHR originated between 7.8 and 3 Mya on ancestral sex chromosomes. A tentative explanation for the OSHR-positive nature of B regions in three species could be that transposable elements (TEs) from this specific sex chromosome region may have invaded existing B chromosomes. The presence of the OSHR on entire Xp and Yp adjacent to interstitial telomeric sequences at pericentromeric positions, as observed in Drymoreomys albimaculatus, show a similar organization as on B chromosomes in Nectomys squamipes. The diversity of the Oryzomyini Bs in number, size, morphology and genetic content may be explained by the independent origin of B chromosomes in different subgroups of species, with Bs in Holochilus brasiliensis, Nectomys squamipes and N. rattus sharing the OSHR with sex chromosomes, and those in Oligoryzomys

  20. Numerical analysis of Al2O3/water nano-fluids natural convection and entropy generation in enclosures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warda, Boudaoud; Amina, Sabeur; Souad, Morsli

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the natural convection phenomena and entropy generation of water-based Al2O3 nanofluids in square enclosure. The simulated domain corresponds to a square cavity heated from below and cooled from the top. The left and right walls are heated up to a height H = (3/4 W) and are adiabatic in the remaining part (1-H). Numerical investigations have been carried out based on coupled partial differential equations of momentum and energy which are solved using finite volume method. The effective thermal conductivity of the nanofluid was expressed by the Maxwell-Garnetts model however the dynamic viscosity was calculated according to the Brinkman formula. The obtained results were presented by average Nusselt number, streamlines, isotherms and entropy generation with various pertinent parameters, namely, Rayleigh number (100 ≤ Ra ≤ 106), volumetric fraction of nanoparticles (1% ≤ ϕ ≤ 4% ). It was found that the heat transfer increases with the increase of Rayleigh number and volume fraction. The choice of these parameters is important to obtain maximum enhancement of heat transfer with minimum entropy generation. Contribution to the topical issue "Materials for Energy harvesting, conversion and storage II (ICOME 2016)", edited by Jean-Michel Nunzi, Rachid Bennacer and Mohammed El Ganaoui

  1. Electricity generation cost in isolated system: The complementarities of natural gas and renewables in the Canary Islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrero, Gustavo A. [Facultad de Ciencias Economicas, Campus de Guajara, Universidad de La Laguna, 38071 Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Canary Islands) (Spain); Fundacion de Estudios de Economia Aplicada (FEDEA), C/Jorge Juan 46, 28001 Madrid (Spain); Ramos-Real, Francisco Javier [Facultad de Ciencias Economicas, Campus de Guajara, Universidad de La Laguna, 38071 Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Canary Islands) (Spain); Instituto Universitario de Desarrollo Regional, Facultad de Ciencias Economicas, Campus de Guajara, Universidad de La Laguna, 38071 Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Canary Islands) (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    The Canary Islands offer an example of an isolated electric grid of relative important size within the EU. Due to its peculiarities, the role of renewable energies and their complementarity with fossil fuels offers a solid path to achieving the main energy policy goals of the Islands. The purpose of this paper is to assess the current situation and the energy objectives proposed in the Energy Plan of the Canaries (PECAN, 2006) for the electricity industry, taking into account the average cost and the risk associated with the different alternatives for generating electricity by means of the Mean-Variance Portfolio Theory. Our analysis highlights the inefficiency of the current electricity generating mix in terms of cost, risk and lack of diversification. Shifting toward an efficient system would involve optimizing the use of endogenous energy sources and introducing natural gas to generate electricity. This scenario would mean reducing both cost and risk by almost 30% each, as well as atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions. Our results agree with the PECAN philosophy. (author)

  2. Natural - synthetic - artificial!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2010-01-01

    The terms "natural," "synthetic" and "artificial" are discussed in relation to synthetic and artificial chromosomes and genomes, synthetic and artificial cells and artificial life.......The terms "natural," "synthetic" and "artificial" are discussed in relation to synthetic and artificial chromosomes and genomes, synthetic and artificial cells and artificial life....

  3. Use of chromosome microdissection in fish molecular cytogenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Henning

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome microdissection is a technique in which whole chromosomes or chromosomal segments are dissected under an inverted microscope yielding chromosome-specific sequences. Several protocol modifications introduced during the past 15 years reduced the number of chromosomes required for most applications. This is of particular interest to fish molecular cytogenetics, since most species present highly uniform karyotypes which make impossible the collection of multiple copies of the same chromosome. Probes developed in this manner can be used to investigate chromosome homologies in closely related species. Here we describe a protocol recently used in the gymnotiform species group Eigenmannia and review the major steps involved in the generation of these markers focusing on protocol modifications aiming to reduce the number of required chromosomes.

  4. Shaping mitotic chromosomes: From classical concepts to molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kschonsak, Marc; Haering, Christian H

    2015-07-01

    How eukaryotic genomes are packaged into compact cylindrical chromosomes in preparation for cell divisions has remained one of the major unsolved questions of cell biology. Novel approaches to study the topology of DNA helices inside the nuclei of intact cells, paired with computational modeling and precise biomechanical measurements of isolated chromosomes, have advanced our understanding of mitotic chromosome architecture. In this Review Essay, we discuss - in light of these recent insights - the role of chromatin architecture and the functions and possible mechanisms of SMC protein complexes and other molecular machines in the formation of mitotic chromosomes. Based on the information available, we propose a stepwise model of mitotic chromosome condensation that envisions the sequential generation of intra-chromosomal linkages by condensin complexes in the context of cohesin-mediated inter-chromosomal linkages, assisted by topoisomerase II. The described scenario results in rod-shaped metaphase chromosomes ready for their segregation to the cell poles.

  5. CViT: “Chromosome Visualization Tool” – A whole-genome viewer

    Science.gov (United States)

    CViT (Chromosome Visualization Tool) is a Perl utility for quickly generating images of features on a whole genome at once. It reads GFF3-format data representing chromosomes (linkage groups or pseudomolecules), and features on those chromosomes. It can display features on any chromosomal unit syste...

  6. Mapping strategies: Chromosome 16 workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    The following topics from a workshop on chromosome 16 are briefly discussed: genetic map of chromosome 16; chromosome breakpoint map of chromosome 16; integrated physical/genetic map of chromosome 16; pulsed field map of the 16p13.2--p13.3 region (3 sheets); and a report of the HGM10 chromosome 16 committee.

  7. Bacterial Chromosome Organization and Segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Toro, Esteban; Shapiro, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial chromosomes are generally ∼1000 times longer than the cells in which they reside, and concurrent replication, segregation, and transcription/translation of this crowded mass of DNA poses a challenging organizational problem. Recent advances in cell-imaging technology with subdiffraction resolution have revealed that the bacterial nucleoid is reliably oriented and highly organized within the cell. Such organization is transmitted from one generation to the next by progressive segrega...

  8. Characterization of the folding energy landscapes of computer generated proteins suggests high folding free energy barriers and cooperativity may be consequences of natural selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalley-Kim, Michelle; Baker, David

    2004-04-30

    To determine the extent to which protein folding rates and free energy landscapes have been shaped by natural selection, we have examined the folding kinetics of five proteins generated using computational design methods and, hence, never exposed to natural selection. Four of these proteins are complete computer-generated redesigns of naturally occurring structures and the fifth protein, called Top7, has a computer-generated fold not yet observed in nature. We find that three of the four redesigned proteins fold much faster than their naturally occurring counterparts. While natural selection thus does not appear to operate on protein folding rates, the majority of the designed proteins unfold considerably faster than their naturally occurring counterparts, suggesting possible selection for a high free energy barrier to unfolding. In contrast to almost all naturally occurring proteins of less than 100 residues but consistent with simple computational models, the folding energy landscape for Top7 appears to be quite complex, suggesting the smooth energy landscapes and highly cooperative folding transitions observed for small naturally occurring proteins may also reflect the workings of natural selection.

  9. Telomere disruption results in non-random formation of de novo dicentric chromosomes involving acrocentric human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpson, Kaitlin M; Song, Ihn Young; Jauch, Anna; Holtgreve-Grez, Heidi; Hayden, Karen E; Bridger, Joanna M; Sullivan, Beth A

    2010-08-12

    Genome rearrangement often produces chromosomes with two centromeres (dicentrics) that are inherently unstable because of bridge formation and breakage during cell division. However, mammalian dicentrics, and particularly those in humans, can be quite stable, usually because one centromere is functionally silenced. Molecular mechanisms of centromere inactivation are poorly understood since there are few systems to experimentally create dicentric human chromosomes. Here, we describe a human cell culture model that enriches for de novo dicentrics. We demonstrate that transient disruption of human telomere structure non-randomly produces dicentric fusions involving acrocentric chromosomes. The induced dicentrics vary in structure near fusion breakpoints and like naturally-occurring dicentrics, exhibit various inter-centromeric distances. Many functional dicentrics persist for months after formation. Even those with distantly spaced centromeres remain functionally dicentric for 20 cell generations. Other dicentrics within the population reflect centromere inactivation. In some cases, centromere inactivation occurs by an apparently epigenetic mechanism. In other dicentrics, the size of the alpha-satellite DNA array associated with CENP-A is reduced compared to the same array before dicentric formation. Extra-chromosomal fragments that contained CENP-A often appear in the same cells as dicentrics. Some of these fragments are derived from the same alpha-satellite DNA array as inactivated centromeres. Our results indicate that dicentric human chromosomes undergo alternative fates after formation. Many retain two active centromeres and are stable through multiple cell divisions. Others undergo centromere inactivation. This event occurs within a broad temporal window and can involve deletion of chromatin that marks the locus as a site for CENP-A maintenance/replenishment.

  10. Telomere disruption results in non-random formation of de novo dicentric chromosomes involving acrocentric human chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlin M Stimpson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome rearrangement often produces chromosomes with two centromeres (dicentrics that are inherently unstable because of bridge formation and breakage during cell division. However, mammalian dicentrics, and particularly those in humans, can be quite stable, usually because one centromere is functionally silenced. Molecular mechanisms of centromere inactivation are poorly understood since there are few systems to experimentally create dicentric human chromosomes. Here, we describe a human cell culture model that enriches for de novo dicentrics. We demonstrate that transient disruption of human telomere structure non-randomly produces dicentric fusions involving acrocentric chromosomes. The induced dicentrics vary in structure near fusion breakpoints and like naturally-occurring dicentrics, exhibit various inter-centromeric distances. Many functional dicentrics persist for months after formation. Even those with distantly spaced centromeres remain functionally dicentric for 20 cell generations. Other dicentrics within the population reflect centromere inactivation. In some cases, centromere inactivation occurs by an apparently epigenetic mechanism. In other dicentrics, the size of the alpha-satellite DNA array associated with CENP-A is reduced compared to the same array before dicentric formation. Extra-chromosomal fragments that contained CENP-A often appear in the same cells as dicentrics. Some of these fragments are derived from the same alpha-satellite DNA array as inactivated centromeres. Our results indicate that dicentric human chromosomes undergo alternative fates after formation. Many retain two active centromeres and are stable through multiple cell divisions. Others undergo centromere inactivation. This event occurs within a broad temporal window and can involve deletion of chromatin that marks the locus as a site for CENP-A maintenance/replenishment.

  11. Chromosome Territory Modeller and Viewer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkacz, Magdalena A; Chromiński, Kornel; Idziak-Helmcke, Dominika; Robaszkiewicz, Ewa; Hasterok, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents ChroTeMo, a tool for chromosome territory modelling, accompanied by ChroTeVi-a chromosome territory visualisation software that uses the data obtained by ChroTeMo. These tools have been developed in order to complement the molecular cytogenetic research of interphase nucleus structure in a model grass Brachypodium distachyon. Although the modelling tool has been initially created for one particular species, it has universal application. The proposed version of ChroTeMo allows for generating a model of chromosome territory distribution in any given plant or animal species after setting the initial, species-specific parameters. ChroTeMo has been developed as a fully probabilistic modeller. Due to this feature, the comparison between the experimental data on the structure of a nucleus and the results obtained from ChroTeMo can indicate whether the distribution of chromosomes inside a nucleus is also fully probabilistic or is subjected to certain non-random patterns. The presented tools have been written in Python, so they are multiplatform, portable and easy to read. Moreover, if necessary they can be further developed by users writing their portions of code. The source code, documentation, and wiki, as well as the issue tracker and the list of related articles that use ChroTeMo and ChroTeVi, are accessible in a public repository at Github under GPL 3.0 license.

  12. Natural Language Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-01

    name Paris, and a photograph of the Eiffel Tower . Available modalities: maps, spoken and written language, pictures, tables, graphs, ordered lists. The...parallel. 64 [ _ Coordinates Name Photograph Information JJ_48N 2E Paris E iffel Tower Dimensionality double single single Volume I little singular

  13. Antileukemic HLA-restricted T-cell clones generated with naturally processed peptides eluted from acute myeloblastic leukemia blasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostankovitch, M; Buzyn, A; Bonhomme, D; Connan, F; Bouscary, D; Heshmati, F; Dreyfus, F; Choppin, J; Guillet, J G

    1998-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that transfusions of HLA-compatible donor lymphocytes may induce complete remission in marrow-grafted patients with relapses of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML). We investigated the in vitro generation of antileukemia T-cell clones obtained from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a partially HLA-compatible donor (HLA-A2 and B7 molecules in common with the leukemic blasts) after stimulation with a pool of naturally processed peptides extracted from leukemic blast cells collected at diagnosis from a patient with hyperleucocytosis AML. We recovered a significant quantity of peptides that bound to the HLA-A2 or HLA-B7 molecules that were able to induce cytolytic T-lymphocyte (CTL) lines and clones specific for the eluted AML peptides and restricted to the HLA-A2 or B7 molecules. Such CTL line did not recognize the patient's nonleukemic cells, and one clone was able to interact with the leukemic blasts from which the naturally processed peptides had been eluted. Such T-cell clones might provide a rationale for the development of adoptive immunotherapy and could be used to improve the efficiency of HLA-compatible T-lymphocyte transfusions and the graft-versus-leukemia response in patients with AML.

  14. Magnetic Field Effect on Natural Convection Flow with Internal Heat Generation using Fast  –  Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Taghikhani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic field effect on laminar natural convection flow is investigated in a filled enclosure with internal heat generation using two-dimensional numerical simulation. The enclosure is heated by a uniform volumetric heat density and walls have constant temperature. A fixed magnetic field is applied to the enclosure. The dimensionless governing equations are solved numerically for the stream function, vorticity and temperature using finite difference method for various Rayleigh (Ra and Hartmann (Ha numbers in MATLAB software. The stream function equation is solved using fast Poisson's equation solver on a rectangular grid (POICALC function in MATLAB, voricity and temperature equations are solved using red-black Gauss-Seidel and bi-conjugate gradient stabilized (BiCGSTAB methods respectively. The results show that the strength of the magnetic field has significant effects on the flow and temperature fields. For the square cavity, the maximum temperature reduces with increasing Ra number. It is also observed that at low Ra number, location of the maximum temperature is at the centre of the cavity and it shifts upwards with increase in Ra number. Circulation inside the enclosure and therefore the convection becomes stronger as the Ra number increases while the magnetic field suppresses the convective flow and the heat transfer rate. The ratio of the Lorentz force to the buoyancy force (Ha2/Ra is as an index to compare the contribution of natural convection and magnetic field strength on heat transfer.

  15. Comparing Statewide Economic Impacts of New Generation from Wind, Coal, and Natural Gas in Arizona, Colorado, and Michigan: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegen, S.

    2005-08-01

    With increasing concerns about energy independence, job outsourcing, and risks of global climate change, it is important for policy makers to understand all impacts from their decisions about energy resources. This paper assesses one aspect of the impacts: direct economic effects. The paper compares impacts to states from equivalent new electrical generation from wind, natural gas, and coal. Economic impacts include materials and labor for construction, operations, maintenance, fuel extraction, and fuel transport, as well as project financing, property tax, and landowner revenues. We examine spending on plant construction during construction years, in addition to all other operational expenditures over a 20-year span. Initial results indicate that adding new wind power can be more economically effective than adding new gas or coal power, and that a higher percentage of dollars spent on coal and gas will leave the state. For this report, we interviewed industry representatives and energy experts, in addition to consulting government documents, models, and existing literature. The methodology for this research can be adapted to other contexts for determining economic effects of new power generation in other states and regions.

  16. Comparing Statewide Economic Impacts of New Generation from Wind, Coal, and Natural Gas in Arizona, Colorado, and Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegen, S.

    2006-05-01

    With increasing concerns about energy independence, job outsourcing, and risks of global climate change, it is important for policy makers to understand all impacts from their decisions about energy resources. This paper assesses one aspect of the impacts: direct economic effects. The paper compares impacts to states from equivalent new electrical generation from wind, natural gas, and coal. Economic impacts include materials and labor for construction, operations, maintenance, fuel extraction, and fuel transport, as well as project financing, property tax, and landowner revenues. We examine spending on plant construction during construction years, in addition to all other operational expenditures over a 20-year span. Initial results indicate that adding new wind power can be more economically effective than adding new gas or coal power and that a higher percentage of dollars spent on coal and gas will leave the state. For this report, we interviewed industry representatives and energy experts, in addition to consulting government documents, models, and existing literature. The methodology for this research can be adapted to other contexts for determining economic effects of new power generation in other states and regions.

  17. ZERO MODE NATURAL FREQUENCY AND NONLINEAR VIBRATION OF COUPLED LATERAL AND TORSION OF A LARGE TURBINE GENERATOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ta Na; Qiu Jiajun; Cai Ganhua

    2005-01-01

    Zero mode natural frequency (ZMNF) is found during experiments. The ZMNF and vibrations resulted by it are studied. First, calculating method of the ZMNF excited by electromagnetic in vibrational system of coupled mechanics and electrics are given from the view of magnetic energy.Laws that the ZMNF varies with active power and exciting current are obtained and are verified by experiments. Then, coupled lateral and torsional vibration of rotor shaft system is studied by considering rest eccentricity, rotating eccentricity and swing eccentricity. Using Largrange-Maxwell equation when three phases are asymmetric derives differential equation of the coupled vibration. With energy method of nonlinear vibration, amplitude-frequency characteristics of resonance are studied when rotating speed of rotor equals to ZMNF. The results show that ZMNF will occur in turbine generators by the action of electromagnetic. Because ZMNF varies with electromagnetic parameters,resonance can occur when exciting frequency of the rotor speed is fixed whereas exciting current change. And also find that a generator is in the state of large amplitude in rated exciting current.

  18. Informatics in radiology: RADTF: a semantic search-enabled, natural language processor-generated radiology teaching file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Bao H; Wu, Andrew; Biswal, Sandip; Kamaya, Aya; Rubin, Daniel L

    2010-11-01

    Storing and retrieving radiology cases is an important activity for education and clinical research, but this process can be time-consuming. In the process of structuring reports and images into organized teaching files, incidental pathologic conditions not pertinent to the primary teaching point can be omitted, as when a user saves images of an aortic dissection case but disregards the incidental osteoid osteoma. An alternate strategy for identifying teaching cases is text search of reports in radiology information systems (RIS), but retrieved reports are unstructured, teaching-related content is not highlighted, and patient identifying information is not removed. Furthermore, searching unstructured reports requires sophisticated retrieval methods to achieve useful results. An open-source, RadLex(®)-compatible teaching file solution called RADTF, which uses natural language processing (NLP) methods to process radiology reports, was developed to create a searchable teaching resource from the RIS and the picture archiving and communication system (PACS). The NLP system extracts and de-identifies teaching-relevant statements from full reports to generate a stand-alone database, thus converting existing RIS archives into an on-demand source of teaching material. Using RADTF, the authors generated a semantic search-enabled, Web-based radiology archive containing over 700,000 cases with millions of images. RADTF combines a compact representation of the teaching-relevant content in radiology reports and a versatile search engine with the scale of the entire RIS-PACS collection of case material.

  19. Application of chromosomal microdissection, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and reverse chromosome painting in prenatal diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, N.; Xu, J.; Cedrone, E. [Univ. of Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, NY (United States)

    1994-09-01

    De novo marker chromosomes have been found in about 0.04% of amniotic fluid cultures. The origin of these marker chromosomes is difficult to identify by routine chromosome banding analysis. In the present study, we applied microdissection, PCR, and reverse chromosome painting to two amniotic fluid cases with a karyotype of 47,XX,+mar, and 47,XX,+?i(9p), respectively. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of the biotin-labeled DNA probe generated from 5 copies of the dissected marker chromosomes was applied to the normal metaphase spreads and revealed that the marker originated from the p arm of chromosomes 14 and 22, while the ?i(9p) was actually i(4p). Reverse painting of the same probe to the metaphase spreads of the patients completely painted the marker chromosomes in question, which confirms the accuracy of the analysis. Our study provides an example of the application of chromosome microdissection and molecular cytogenetics in prenatal diagnosis for the identification of marker chromosomes unidentifiable by routine analysis.

  20. Whole chromosome gain does not in itself confer cancer-like chromosomal instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valind, Anders; Jin, Yuesheng; Baldetorp, Bo; Gisselsson, David

    2013-12-24

    Constitutional aneuploidy is typically caused by a single-event meiotic or early mitotic error. In contrast, somatic aneuploidy, found mainly in neoplastic tissue, is attributed to continuous chromosomal instability. More debated as a cause of aneuploidy is aneuploidy itself; that is, whether aneuploidy per se causes chromosomal instability, for example, in patients with inborn aneuploidy. We have addressed this issue by quantifying the level of somatic mosaicism, a proxy marker of chromosomal instability, in patients with constitutional aneuploidy by precise background-filtered dual-color FISH. In contrast to previous studies that used less precise methods, we find that constitutional trisomy, even for large chromosomes that are often trisomic in cancer, does not confer a significantly elevated rate of somatic chromosomal mosaicism in individual cases. Constitutional triploidy was associated with an increased level of somatic mosaicism, but this consisted mostly of reversion from trisomy to disomy and did not correspond to a proportionally elevated level of chromosome mis-segregation in triploids, indicating that the observed mosaicism resulted from a specific accumulation of cells with a hypotriploid chromosome number. In no case did the rate of somatic mosaicism in constitutional aneuploidy exceed that of "chromosomally stable" cancer cells. Our findings show that even though constitutional aneuploidy was in some cases associated with low-level somatic mosaicism, it was insufficient to generate the cancer-like levels expected if aneuploidy single-handedly triggered cancer-like chromosomal instability.

  1. Chromosomal instability in meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tilborg, Angela A G; Al Allak, Bushra; Velthuizen, Sandra C J M; de Vries, Annie; Kros, Johan M; Avezaat, Cees J J; de Klein, Annelies; Beverloo, H Berna; Zwarthoff, Ellen C

    2005-04-01

    Approximately 60% of sporadic meningiomas are caused by inactivation of the NF2 tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 22. No causative gene is known for the remaining 40%. Cytogenetic analysis shows that meningiomas caused by inactivation of the NF2 gene can be divided into tumors that show monosomy 22 as the sole abnormality and tumors with a more complex karyotype. Meningiomas not caused by the NF2 gene usually have a diploid karyotype. Here we report that, besides the clonal chromosomal aberrations, the chromosome numbers in many meningiomas varied from one metaphase spread to the other, a feature that is indicative of chromosomal instability. Unexpectedly and regardless of genotype, a subgroup of tumors was observed with an average number of 44.9 chromosomes and little variation in the number of chromosomes per metaphase spread. In addition, a second subgroup was recognized with a hyperdiploid number of chromosomes (average 48.5) and considerable variation in numbers per metaphase. However, this numerical instability resulted in a clonal karyotype with chromosomal gains and losses in addition to loss of chromosome 22 only in meningiomas caused by inactivation of the NF2 gene. In cultured cells of all tumor groups, bi- and multinucleated cells were seen, as well as anaphase bridges, residual chromatid strings, multiple spindle poles, and unseparated chromatids, suggesting defects in the mitotic apparatus or kinetochore. Thus, we conclude that even a benign and slow-growing tumor like a meningioma displays chromosomal instability.

  2. Novel gene acquisition on carnivore Y chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Murphy

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite its importance in harboring genes critical for spermatogenesis and male-specific functions, the Y chromosome has been largely excluded as a priority in recent mammalian genome sequencing projects. Only the human and chimpanzee Y chromosomes have been well characterized at the sequence level. This is primarily due to the presumed low overall gene content and highly repetitive nature of the Y chromosome and the ensuing difficulties using a shotgun sequence approach for assembly. Here we used direct cDNA selection to isolate and evaluate the extent of novel Y chromosome gene acquisition in the genome of the domestic cat, a species from a different mammalian superorder than human, chimpanzee, and mouse (currently being sequenced. We discovered four novel Y chromosome genes that do not have functional copies in the finished human male-specific region of the Y or on other mammalian Y chromosomes explored thus far. Two genes are derived from putative autosomal progenitors, and the other two have X chromosome homologs from different evolutionary strata. All four genes were shown to be multicopy and expressed predominantly or exclusively in testes, suggesting that their duplication and specialization for testis function were selected for because they enhance spermatogenesis. Two of these genes have testis-expressed, Y-borne copies in the dog genome as well. The absence of the four newly described genes on other characterized mammalian Y chromosomes demonstrates the gene novelty on this chromosome between mammalian orders, suggesting it harbors many lineage-specific genes that may go undetected by traditional comparative genomic approaches. Specific plans to identify the male-specific genes encoded in the Y chromosome of mammals should be a priority.

  3. Analysis of plant meiotic chromosomes by chromosome painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysak, Martin A; Mandáková, Terezie

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome painting (CP) refers to visualization of large chromosome regions, entire chromosome arms, or entire chromosomes via fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). For CP in plants, contigs of chromosome-specific bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) from the target species or from a closely related species (comparative chromosome painting, CCP) are typically applied as painting probes. Extended pachytene chromosomes provide the highest resolution of CP in plants. CP enables identification and tracing of particular chromosome regions and/or entire chromosomes throughout all meiotic stages as well as corresponding chromosome territories in premeiotic interphase nuclei. Meiotic pairing and structural chromosome rearrangements (typically inversions and translocations) can be identified by CP. Here, we describe step-by-step protocols of CP and CCP in plant species including chromosome preparation, BAC DNA labeling, and multicolor FISH.

  4. Mechanisms for chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouet, Jean-Yves; Stouf, Mathieu; Lebailly, Elise; Cornet, François

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria face the problem of segregating their gigantic chromosomes without a segregation period restricted in time and space, as Eukaryotes do. Segregation thus involves multiple activities, general or specific of a chromosome region and differentially controlled. Recent advances show that these various mechanisms conform to a “pair and release” rule, which appears as a general rule in DNA segregation. We describe the latest advances in segregation of bacterial chromosomes with emphasis on the different pair and release mechanisms.

  5. The Precarious Prokaryotic Chromosome

    OpenAIRE

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary selection for optimal genome preservation, replication, and expression should yield similar chromosome organizations in any type of cells. And yet, the chromosome organization is surprisingly different between eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The nuclear versus cytoplasmic accommodation of genetic material accounts for the distinct eukaryotic and prokaryotic modes of genome evolution, but it falls short of explaining the differences in the chromosome organization. I propose that the t...

  6. Double-strand break repair on sex chromosomes: challenges during male meiotic prophase

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Lin-Yu; Yu, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    During meiotic prophase, DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair-mediated homologous recombination (HR) occurs for exchange of genetic information between homologous chromosomes. Unlike autosomes or female sex chromosomes, human male sex chromosomes X and Y share little homology. Although DSBs are generated throughout male sex chromosomes, homologous recombination does not occur for most regions and DSB repair process is significantly prolonged. As a result, male sex chromosomes are coated with ...

  7. Bacterial chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possoz, Christophe; Junier, Ivan; Espeli, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Dividing cells have mechanisms to ensure that their genomes are faithfully segregated into daughter cells. In bacteria, the description of these mechanisms has been considerably improved in the recent years. This review focuses on the different aspects of bacterial chromosome segregation that can be understood thanks to the studies performed with model organisms: Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Caulobacter crescentus and Vibrio cholerae. We describe the global positionning of the nucleoid in the cell and the specific localization and dynamics of different chromosomal loci, kinetic and biophysic aspects of chromosome segregation are presented. Finally, a presentation of the key proteins involved in the chromosome segregation is made.

  8. A three-generation family with terminal microdeletion involving 5p15.33-32 due to a whole-arm 5;15 chromosomal translocation with a steady phenotype of atypical cri du chat syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmakky, Amira; Carli, Diana; Lugli, Licia; Torelli, Paola; Guidi, Battista; Falcinelli, Cristina; Fini, Sergio; Ferrari, Fabrizio; Percesepe, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    Cri du chat syndrome is characterized by cat-like cry, facial dysmorphisms, microcephaly, speech delay, intellectual disability and slow growth rate, which are present with variable frequency. The typical cri du chat syndrome, due to 5p15.2 deletion, includes severe intellectual disability, facial dysmorphisms, neonatal hypotonia and pre- and post-natal growth retardation, whereas more distal deletions in 5p15.3 lead to cat-like cry and speech delay and produce the clinical picture of the atypical cri du chat syndrome, with minimal or absent intellectual impairment. In this article we report a three-generation family with an unbalanced whole arm translocation between chromosome 5 and 15 and a microdeletion of 5.5 Mb involving 5p15.33-32. By reporting the smallest terminal deletion of 5p15.3 described so far and by reviewing the literature we discuss the genotype/phenotype correlations of the distal region of the cri du chat syndrome. The previously described critical region for the speech delay may be narrowed down and microcephaly, growth retardation and dysmorphic facial features can be included in the phenotypic expression of the atypical cri du chat syndrome due to 5p15.3 deletions.

  9. Successful treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive mixed phenotype acute leukemia by appropriate alternation of second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors according to BCR-ABL1 mutation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawajiri, Chika; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Hashimoto, Shinichiro; Takeda, Yusuke; Sakai, Shio; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Takeuchi, Masahiro; Ohwada, Chikako; Sakaida, Emiko; Shimizu, Naomi; Nakaseko, Chiaki

    2014-04-01

    Philadelphia chromosome-positive mixed phenotype acute leukemia (Ph(+)MPAL) is a rare type of acute leukemia having myeloid and lymphoid features. In the present study, we describe the successful treatment of a 71-year-old Japanese female patient with Ph(+)MPAL by the alternation of second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors according to BCR-ABL1 mutations. The patient survived in her third complete remission (CR) for over 4 years. In her first CR, the patient was treated with multiple-agent chemotherapy and underwent maintenance therapy with imatinib and monthly vincristine and prednisolone (VP). At the first relapse, an examination of the bone marrow revealed a transformation into acute lymphoblastic leukemia and an F317L mutation in BCR-ABL1 gene, which responded preferentially to nilotinib over dasatinib. She achieved second CR, and nilotinib with VP therapy was selected for maintenance treatment. At second relapse, BCR-ABL1 mutational analysis revealed Y253H mutation instead of F317L mutation, resulting in resistance to nilotinib. The patient achieved third CR with dasatinib and VP therapy, and maintained CR with this treatment. This suggests that appropriate alternation of TKIs may contribute to long-term survival in elderly patients with Ph(+)MPAL.

  10. Engineered human dicentric chromosomes show centromere plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Anne W; Gustashaw, Karen M; Willard, Huntington F

    2005-01-01

    The centromere is essential for the faithful distribution of a cell's genetic material to subsequent generations. Despite intense scrutiny, the precise genetic and epigenetic basis for centromere function is still unknown. Here, we have used engineered dicentric human chromosomes to investigate mammalian centromere structure and function. We describe three classes of dicentric chromosomes isolated in different cell lines: functionally monocentric chromosomes, in which one of the two genetically identical centromeres is consistently inactivated; functionally dicentric chromosomes, in which both centromeres are consistently active; and dicentric chromosomes heterogeneous with respect to centromere activity. A study of serial single cell clones from heterogeneous cell lines revealed that while centromere activity is usually clonal, the centromere state (i.e. functionally monocentric or dicentric) in some lines can switch within a growing population of cells. Because pulsed field gel analysis indicated that the DNA at the centromeres of these chromosomes did not change detectably, this switching of the centromere state is most likely due to epigenetic changes. Inactivation of one of the two active centromeres in a functionally dicentric chromosome was observed in a percentage of cells after treatment with Trichostatin A, an inhibitor of histone deacetylation. This study provides evidence that the activity of human centromeres, while largely stable, can be subject to dynamic change, most likely due to epigenetic modification.

  11. Transmission Behavior of B Chromosomes in Prochilodus lineatus (Characiformes, Prochilodontidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penitente, Manolo; Daniel, Sandro N; Senhorini, José A; Foresti, Fausto; Porto-Foresti, Fábio

    2015-01-01

    The population of Prochilodus lineatus found in the Mogi-Guaçu River is karyotypically polymorphic, carrying acrocentric, metacentric, and submetacentric B chromosomes. The analysis of each B chromosome frequency in this species revealed a variation in the distribution pattern, with the metacentric type having the highest frequency (73.30%), followed by submetacentric (25.22%) and acrocentric B chromosomes (1.48%). The transmission pattern of the supernumerary chromosomes was identified by controlled crosses, and it was shown that the acro- and submetacentric B chromosomes have a transmission pattern below the Mendelian rate (kB = 0.333 and kB = 0.385, respectively), but the metacentric variant has a cumulative transmission pattern (kB = 0.587). These results indicate that the acro- and submetacentric B chromosomes are undergoing an extinction process, while the metacentric B chromosomes appear to be accumulating in frequency with each generation.

  12. Simple field device for measurement of dimethyl sulfide and dimethylsulfoniopropionate in natural waters, based on vapor generation and chemiluminescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahata, Takanori; Kajiwara, Hidetaka; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Toda, Kei

    2013-05-07

    A small, simple device was developed for trace analysis of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) in natural waters. These compounds are known to be the major sources of cloud condensation nuclei in the oceanic atmosphere and ideally should be measured onsite because of their volatility and instability. First, chemical and physical vapor generations were examined, and simple pressurizing by injection of 30 mL of air using a syringe was adopted. Pressurized headspace air above a 10 mL water sample was introduced to a detection cell as a result of the pressure differential and mixed with ozone to induce chemiluminescence. Although the measurement procedure was simple, the method was very sensitive: sharp peaks appeared within seconds for nanomolar levels of DMS, and the limit of detection was 0.02 nmol L(-1) (1 ng L(-1)). Although interference from methanethiol was significant, this was successfully addressed by adding a small amount of Cd(2+) before DMS vapor generation. DMSP was also measured after hydrolysis to DMS, as previously reported. Pond water and seawater samples were analyzed, and DMS was found in both types of sample, whereas DMSP was observed only in seawater. The DMS/DMSP data obtained using the developed method were compared with data obtained by purge/trap and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the data from the two methods agreed, with good correlation (R(2) = 0.9956). The developed device is inexpensive, light (5 kg), simple to use, can be applied in the field, and is sensitive enough for fresh- and seawater analysis.

  13. Distribution of repetitive DNA sequences in chromosomes of five opisthorchid species (Trematoda, Opisthorchiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadesenets, Kira S; Karamysheva, Tatyana V; Katokhin, Alexei V; Mordvinov, Viatcheslav A; Rubtsov, Nikolay B

    2012-03-01

    Genomes of opisthorchid species are characterized by small size, suggesting a reduced amount of repetitive DNA in their genomes. Distribution of repetitive DNA sequences in the chromosomes of five species of the family Opisthorchiidae (Opisthorchis felineus 2n = 14 (Rivolta, 1884), Opisthorchis viverrini 2n = 12 (Poirier, 1886), Metorchis xanthosomus 2n = 14 (Creplin, 1846), Metorchis bilis 2n = 14 (Braun, 1890), Clonorchis sinensis 2n = 14 (Cobbold, 1875)) was studied with C- and AgNOR-banding, generation of microdissected DNA probes from individual chromosomes and fluorescent in situ hybridization on mitotic and meiotic chromosomes. Small-sized C-bands were discovered in pericentric regions of chromosomes. Ag-NOR staining of opisthorchid chromosomes and FISH with ribosomal DNA probe showed that karyotypes of all studied species were characterized by the only nucleolus organizer region in one of small chromosomes. The generation of DNA probes from chromosomes 1 and 2 of O. felineus and M. xanthosomus was performed with chromosome microdissection followed by DOP-PCR. FISH of obtained microdissected DNA probes on chromosomes of these species revealed chromosome specific DNA repeats in pericentric C-bands. It was also shown that microdissected DNA probes generated from chromosomes could be used as the Whole Chromosome Painting Probes without suppression of repetitive DNA hybridization. Chromosome painting using microdissected chromosome specific DNA probes showed the overall repeat distribution in opisthorchid chromosomes.

  14. PM2.5 and ultrafine particulate matter emissions from natural gas-fired turbine for power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Eli; Li, Yang; Finken, Bob; Quartucy, Greg; Muzio, Lawrence; Baez, Al; Garibay, Mike; Jung, Heejung S.

    2016-04-01

    The generation of electricity from natural gas-fired turbines has increased more than 200% since 2003. In 2007 the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) funded a project to identify control strategies and technologies for PM2.5 and ultrafine emissions from natural gas-fired turbine power plants and test at pilot scale advanced PM2.5 technologies to reduce emissions from these gas turbine-based power plants. This prompted a study of the exhaust from new facilities to better understand air pollution in California. To characterize the emissions from new natural gas turbines, a series of tests were performed on a GE LMS100 gas turbine located at the Walnut Creek Energy Park in August 2013. These tests included particulate matter less than 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5) and wet chemical tests for SO2/SO3 and NH3, as well as ultrafine (less than 100 nm in diameter) particulate matter measurements. After turbine exhaust was diluted sevenfold with filtered air, particle concentrations in the 10-300 nm size range were approximately two orders of magnitude higher than those in the ambient air and those in the 2-3 nm size range were up to four orders of magnitude higher. This study also found that ammonia emissions were higher than expected, but in compliance with permit conditions. This was possibly due to an ammonia imbalance entering the catalyst, some flue gas bypassing the catalyst, or not enough catalyst volume. SO3 accounted for an average of 23% of the total sulfur oxides emissions measured. While some of the SO3 is formed in the combustion process, it is likely that the majority formed as the SO2 in the combustion products passed across the oxidizing CO catalyst and SCR catalyst. The 100 MW turbine sampled in this study emitted particle loadings of 3.63E-04 lb/MMBtu based on Methods 5.1/201A and 1.07E-04 lb/MMBtu based on SMPS method, which are similar to those previously measured from turbines in the SCAQMD area (FERCo et al., 2014), however, the turbine

  15. Generation of novel cationic antimicrobial peptides from natural non-antimicrobial sequences by acid-amide substitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamada Yasushi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs are well recognized to be promising as novel antimicrobial and antitumor agents. To obtain novel skeletons of CAMPs, we propose a simple strategy using acid-amide substitution (i.e. Glu→Gln, Asp→Asn to confer net positive charge to natural non-antimicrobial sequences that have structures distinct from known CAMPs. The potential of this strategy was verified by a trial study. Methods The pro-regions of nematode cecropin P1-P3 (P1P-P3P were selected as parent sequences. P1P-P3P and their acid-amide-substituted mutants (NP1P-NP3P were chemically synthesized. Bactericidal and membrane-disruptive activities of these peptides were evaluated. Conformational changes were estimated from far-ultraviolet circular dichroism (CD spectra. Results NP1P-NP3P acquired potent bactericidal activities via membrane-disruption although P1P-P3P were not antimicrobial. Far-ultraviolet CD spectra of NP1P-NP3P were similar to those of their parent peptides P1P-P3P, suggesting that NP1P-NP3P acquire microbicidal activity without remarkable conformational changes. NP1P-NP3P killed bacteria in almost parallel fashion with their membrane-disruptive activities, suggesting that the mode of action of those peptides was membrane-disruption. Interestingly, membrane-disruptive activity of NP1P-NP3P were highly diversified against acidic liposomes, indicating that the acid-amide-substituted nematode cecropin pro-region was expected to be a unique and promising skeleton for novel synthetic CAMPs with diversified membrane-discriminative properties. Conclusions The acid-amide substitution successfully generated some novel CAMPs in our trial study. These novel CAMPs were derived from natural non-antimicrobial sequences, and their sequences were completely distinct from any categories of known CAMPs, suggesting that such mutated natural sequences could be a promising source of novel skeletons of CAMPs.

  16. Fetal chromosome analysis: screening for chromosome disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, Ann; Bang, J

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the rationale of the current indications for fetal chromosome analysis. 5372 women had 5423 amniocentesis performed, this group constituting a consecutive sample at the chromosome laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen from March 1973 to September 1980 (Group...... to women having amniocentesis, although considered not to have any increased risk of fetal chromosome abnormality (1390 pregnancies, group B). They were also compared with 750 consecutive pregnancies in women 25-34 years of age, in whom all heritable diseases were excluded (group C). The risk of unbalanced...... with women without elevated risk. Spontaneous abortion rate and prematurity rate did not differ from rates expected without amniocentesis. It is concluded that current indications may be characterized as a mixture of evident high risk factors and factors with only a minor influence on risk. Indications...

  17. Chromosome replication and segregation in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Lamothe, Rodrigo; Nicolas, Emilien; Sherratt, David J

    2012-01-01

    In dividing cells, chromosome duplication once per generation must be coordinated with faithful segregation of newly replicated chromosomes and with cell growth and division. Many of the mechanistic details of bacterial replication elongation are well established. However, an understanding of the complexities of how replication initiation is controlled and coordinated with other cellular processes is emerging only slowly. In contrast to eukaryotes, in which replication and segregation are separate in time, the segregation of most newly replicated bacterial genetic loci occurs sequentially soon after replication. We compare the strategies used by chromosomes and plasmids to ensure their accurate duplication and segregation and discuss how these processes are coordinated spatially and temporally with growth and cell division. We also describe what is known about the three conserved families of ATP-binding proteins that contribute to chromosome segregation and discuss their inter-relationships in a range of disparate bacteria.

  18. Assessing "dangerous climate change": required reduction of carbon emissions to protect young people, future generations and nature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Hansen

    Full Text Available We assess climate impacts of global warming using ongoing observations and paleoclimate data. We use Earth's measured energy imbalance, paleoclimate data, and simple representations of the global carbon cycle and temperature to define emission reductions needed to stabilize climate and avoid potentially disastrous impacts on today's young people, future generations, and nature. A cumulative industrial-era limit of ∼500 GtC fossil fuel emissions and 100 GtC storage in the biosphere and soil would keep climate close to the Holocene range to which humanity and other species are adapted. Cumulative emissions of ∼1000 GtC, sometimes associated with 2°C global warming, would spur "slow" feedbacks and eventual warming of 3-4°C with disastrous consequences. Rapid emissions reduction is required to restore Earth's energy balance and avoid ocean heat uptake that would practically guarantee irreversible effects. Continuation of high fossil fuel emissions, given current knowledge of the consequences, would be an act of extraordinary witting intergenerational injustice. Responsible policymaking requires a rising price on carbon emissions that would preclude emissions from most remaining coal and unconventional fossil fuels and phase down emissions from conventional fossil fuels.

  19. Assessing 'Dangerous Climate Change': Required Reduction of Carbon Emissions to Protect Young People, Future Generations and Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James; Kharecha, Pushker; Sato, Makiko; Masson-Demotte, Valerie; Ackerman, Frank; Beerling, David J.; Hearty, Paul J.; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Hsu, Shi-Ling; Parmesan, Camille; hide

    2013-01-01

    We assess climate impacts of global warming using ongoing observations and paleoclimate data. We use Earth's measured energy imbalance, paleoclimate data, and simple representations of the global carbon cycle and temperature to define emission reductions needed to stabilize climate and avoid potentially disastrous impacts on today's young people, future generations, and nature. A cumulative industrial-era limit of approx.500 GtC fossil fuel emissions and 100 GtC storage in the biosphere and soil would keep climate close to the Holocene range to which humanity and other species are adapted. Cumulative emissions of approx.1000 GtC, sometimes associated with 2 C global warming, would spur "slow" feedbacks and eventual warming of 3-4 C with disastrous consequences. Rapid emissions reduction is required to restore Earth's energy balance and avoid ocean heat uptake that would practically guarantee irreversible effects. Continuation of high fossil fuel emissions, given current knowledge of the consequences, would be an act of extraordinary witting intergenerational injustice. Responsible policymaking requires a rising price on carbon emissions that would preclude emissions from most remaining coal and unconventional fossil fuels and phase down emissions from conventional fossil fuels.

  20. Dicentric chromosomes: unique models to study centromere function and inactivation

    OpenAIRE

    Kaitlin M Stimpson; Matheny, Justyne E.; Sullivan, Beth A.

    2012-01-01

    Dicentric chromosomes are products of genome rearrangement that place two centromeres on the same chromosome. Depending on the organism, dicentric stability varies after formation. In humans, dicentrics occur naturally in a substantial portion of the population and usually segregate successfully in mitosis and meiosis. Their stability has been attributed to inactivation of one of the two centromeres, creating a functionally monocentric chromosome that can segregate normally during cell divisi...

  1. Interchromosomal duplications on the Bactrocera oleae Y chromosome imply a distinct evolutionary origin of the sex chromosomes compared to Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrieli, Paolo; Gomulski, Ludvik M; Bonomi, Angelica; Siciliano, Paolo; Scolari, Francesca; Franz, Gerald; Jessup, Andrew; Malacrida, Anna R; Gasperi, Giuliano

    2011-03-07

    Diptera have an extraordinary variety of sex determination mechanisms, and Drosophila melanogaster is the paradigm for this group. However, the Drosophila sex determination pathway is only partially conserved and the family Tephritidae affords an interesting example. The tephritid Y chromosome is postulated to be necessary to determine male development. Characterization of Y sequences, apart from elucidating the nature of the male determining factor, is also important to understand the evolutionary history of sex chromosomes within the Tephritidae. We studied the Y sequences from the olive fly, Bactrocera oleae. Its Y chromosome is minute and highly heterochromatic, and displays high heteromorphism with the X chromosome. A combined Representational Difference Analysis (RDA) and fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) approach was used to investigate the Y chromosome to derive information on its sequence content. The Y chromosome is strewn with repetitive DNA sequences, the majority of which are also interdispersed in the pericentromeric regions of the autosomes. The Y chromosome appears to have accumulated small and large repetitive interchromosomal duplications. The large interchromosomal duplications harbour an importin-4-like gene fragment. Apart from these importin-4-like sequences, the other Y repetitive sequences are not shared with the X chromosome, suggesting molecular differentiation of these two chromosomes. Moreover, as the identified Y sequences were not detected on the Y chromosomes of closely related tephritids, we can infer divergence in the repetitive nature of their sequence contents. The identification of Y-linked sequences may tell us much about the repetitive nature, the origin and the evolution of Y chromosomes. We hypothesize how these repetitive sequences accumulated and were maintained on the Y chromosome during its evolutionary history. Our data reinforce the idea that the sex chromosomes of the Tephritidae may have distinct evolutionary

  2. Interchromosomal duplications on the Bactrocera oleae Y chromosome imply a distinct evolutionary origin of the sex chromosomes compared to Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Gabrieli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diptera have an extraordinary variety of sex determination mechanisms, and Drosophila melanogaster is the paradigm for this group. However, the Drosophila sex determination pathway is only partially conserved and the family Tephritidae affords an interesting example. The tephritid Y chromosome is postulated to be necessary to determine male development. Characterization of Y sequences, apart from elucidating the nature of the male determining factor, is also important to understand the evolutionary history of sex chromosomes within the Tephritidae. We studied the Y sequences from the olive fly, Bactrocera oleae. Its Y chromosome is minute and highly heterochromatic, and displays high heteromorphism with the X chromosome. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A combined Representational Difference Analysis (RDA and fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH approach was used to investigate the Y chromosome to derive information on its sequence content. The Y chromosome is strewn with repetitive DNA sequences, the majority of which are also interdispersed in the pericentromeric regions of the autosomes. The Y chromosome appears to have accumulated small and large repetitive interchromosomal duplications. The large interchromosomal duplications harbour an importin-4-like gene fragment. Apart from these importin-4-like sequences, the other Y repetitive sequences are not shared with the X chromosome, suggesting molecular differentiation of these two chromosomes. Moreover, as the identified Y sequences were not detected on the Y chromosomes of closely related tephritids, we can infer divergence in the repetitive nature of their sequence contents. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The identification of Y-linked sequences may tell us much about the repetitive nature, the origin and the evolution of Y chromosomes. We hypothesize how these repetitive sequences accumulated and were maintained on the Y chromosome during its evolutionary history. Our data

  3. Effects of hepatitis B virus infection on human sperm chromosomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Min Huang; Tian-Hua Huang; Huan-Ying Qiu; Xiao-Wu Fang; Tian-Gang Zhuang; Hong-Xi Liu; Yong-Hua Wang; Li-Zhi Deng; Jie-Wen Qiu

    2003-01-01

    /or induction chromosome aberrations, as well as the possibility of vertical transmission of HBV via the germ line to the next generation.

  4. Isolation and characterization of DNA probes for human chromosome 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, P C

    1990-01-01

    A coordinated effort to map and sequence the human genome has recently become a national priority. Chromosome 21, the smallest human chromosome accounting for less than 2% of the human genome, is an attractive model system for developing and evaluating genome mapping technology. Several strategies are currently being explored including the development of chromosome 21 libraries from somatic cell hybrids as reported here, the cloning of chromosome 21 in yeast artificial chromosomes (McCormick et al., 1989b), and the construction of chromosome 21 libraries using chromosome flow-sorting techniques (Fuscoe et al., 1989). This report describes the approaches used to identify DNA probes that are useful for mapping chromosome 21. Probes were successfully isolated from both phage and cosmid libraries made from two somatic cell hybrids that contain human chromosome 21 as the only human chromosome. The 15 cosmid clones from the WA17 library, reduced to cloned DNA sequences of an average size of 3 kb, total 525 kb of DNA which is approximately 1% of chromosome 21. From these clones, a set of polymorphic DNA markers that span the length of the long arm of chromosome 21 has been generated. All of the probes thus far analyzed from the WA17 libraries have been mapped to chromosome 21 both by physical and genetic mapping methods. It is therefore likely that the WA17 hybrid cell line contains human chromosome 21 as the only human component, in agreement with cytogenetic observation. The 153E7b cosmid libraries will provide an alternative source of cloned chromosome 21 DNA. Library screening techniques can be employed to obtain cloned DNA sequences from the same genetic loci of the two different chromosome 21s. Comparative analysis will allow direct estimation of DNA sequence variation for different regions of chromosome 21. Mapped DNA probes make possible the molecular analysis of chromosome 21 at a level of resolution not achievable by classical cytogenetic techniques (Graw et al

  5. Possible origin of B chromosome in Dichotomius sericeus (Coleoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Igor Costa; Milani, Diogo; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti; Rocha, Marília França; Moura, Rita Cássia

    2016-08-01

    B chromosomes have so far been described in about 80 species of Coleoptera, mainly using conventional staining analysis. In this study, 152 individuals of the dung beetle Dichotomius sericeus (Coleoptera), collected from three isolated geographical areas in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil, were analyzed to determine the frequency, prevalence, distribution, meiotic behavior, and possible B chromosome origin. The cytogenetic analysis consisted of conventional staining, C-banding, triple fluorochrome staining (CMA3/DA/DAPI), and fluorescent in situ hybridization using ribosomal DNAs (rDNAs) and H3 histone gene as probes, as well as microdissection and chromosome painting of the B chromosome. The B chromosomes were detected in all populations analyzed. Analysis revealed the heterochromatic nature and the presence of G+C-rich blocks and 18S rDNA on the B chromosome. FISH with DNA from microdissected B chromosome painted the entire extension of the B chromosome for all populations, besides the pericentromeric regions of all the autosomes, as well as the X chromosome. Finally, cross-hybridization in nine related species of Dichotomius using the microdissected B chromosome as probe did not reveal any hybridization signal. The results suggest an intraspecific and monophyletic origin for B chromosomes in D. sericeus, probably from the second or third autosomal pair.

  6. XYY chromosome anomaly and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, M; MacBeth, R; Varma, S L

    1998-02-07

    Sex chromosome anomalies have been associated with psychoses, and most of the evidence is linked to the presence of an additional X chromosome. We report a patient with XYY chromosome anomaly who developed schizophrenia.

  7. Electochemical detection of chromosome translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Dimaki, Maria; Silahtaroglu, Asli

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetics is a study of the cell structure with a main focus on chromosomes content and their structure. Chromosome abnormalities, such as translocations may cause various genetic disorders and heametological malignancies. Chromosome translocations are structural rearrangements of two chromoso...

  8. Condensin-mediated chromosome organization and gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa Christine Lau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In many organisms sexual fate is determined by a chromosome-based method which entails a difference in sex chromosome-linked gene dosage. Consequently, a gene regulatory mechanism called dosage compensation equalizes X-linked gene expression between the sexes. Dosage compensation initiates as cells transition from pluripotency to differentiation. In C. elegans, dosage compensation is achieved by the dosage compensation complex (DCC binding to both X chromosomes in hermaphrodites to downregulate gene expression by two fold. The DCC contains a subcomplex (condensin IDC similar to the evolutionarily conserved condensin complexes which play a fundamental role in chromosome dynamics during mitosis. Therefore, mechanisms related to mitotic chromosome condensation are hypothesized to mediate dosage compensation. Consistent with this hypothesis, monomethylation of histone H4 lysine 20 (H4K20 is increased, whereas acetylation of histone H4 lysine 16 (H4K16 is decreased, both on mitotic chromosomes and on interphase dosage compensated X chromosomes in worms. These observations suggest that interphase dosage compensated X chromosomes maintain some characteristics associated with condensed mitotic chromosome. This chromosome state is stably propagated from one cell generation to the next. In this review we will speculate on how the biochemical activities of condensin can achieve both mitotic chromosome compaction and gene repression.

  9. Topical report: Natural convection shutdown heat removal test facility (NSTF) evaluation for generating additional reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) data.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Tzanos, C.P.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R.W.; Pointer, D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2005-09-01

    As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Generation IV roadmapping activity, the Very High Temperature gas cooled Reactor (VHTR) has been selected as the principal concept for hydrogen production and other process-heat applications such as district heating and potable water production. On this basis, the DOE has selected the VHTR for additional R&D with the ultimate goal of demonstrating emission-free electricity and hydrogen production with this advanced reactor concept. One of the key passive safety features of the VHTR is the potential for decay heat removal by natural circulation of air in a Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). The air-cooled RCCS concept is notably similar to the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) that was developed for the General Electric PRISM sodium-cooled fast reactor. As part of the DOE R&D program that supported the development of this fast reactor concept, the Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) was developed at ANL to provide proof-of-concept data for the RVACS under prototypic natural convection flow, temperature, and heat flux conditions. Due to the similarity between RVACS and the RCCS, current VHTR R&D plans call for the utilization of the NSTF to provide RCCS model development and validation data, in addition to supporting design validation and optimization activities. Both air-cooled and water-cooled RCCS designs are to be included. In support of this effort, ANL has been tasked with the development of an engineering plan for mechanical and instrumentation modifications to NSTF to ensure that sufficiently detailed temperature, heat flux, velocity and turbulence profiles are obtained to adequately qualify the codes under the expected range of air-cooled RCCS flow conditions. Next year, similar work will be carried out for the alternative option of a water-cooled RCCS design. Analysis activities carried out in support of this experiment planning task have shown that: (a) in the RCCS, strong

  10. Evaluating the relationship between spermatogenic silencing of the X chromosome and evolution of the Y chromosome in chimpanzee and human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eskeatnaf Mulugeta Achame

    Full Text Available Chimpanzees and humans are genetically very similar, with the striking exception of their Y chromosomes, which have diverged tremendously. The male-specific region (MSY, representing the greater part of the Y chromosome, is inherited from father to son in a clonal fashion, with natural selection acting on the MSY as a unit. Positive selection might involve the performance of the MSY in spermatogenesis. Chimpanzees have a highly polygamous mating behavior, so that sperm competition is thought to provide a strong selective force acting on the Y chromosome in the chimpanzee lineage. In consequence of evolution of the heterologous sex chromosomes in mammals, meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI results in a transcriptionally silenced XY body in male meiotic prophase, and subsequently also in postmeiotic repression of the sex chromosomes in haploid spermatids. This has evolved to a situation where MSCI has become a prerequisite for spermatogenesis. Here, by analysis of microarray testicular expression data representing a small number of male chimpanzees and men, we obtained information indicating that meiotic and postmeiotic X chromosome silencing might be more effective in chimpanzee than in human spermatogenesis. From this, we suggest that the remarkable reorganization of the chimpanzee Y chromosome, compared to the human Y chromosome, might have an impact on its meiotic interactions with the X chromosome and thereby on X chromosome silencing in spermatogenesis. Further studies will be required to address comparative functional aspects of MSCI in chimpanzee, human, and other placental mammals.

  11. Evaluating the relationship between spermatogenic silencing of the X chromosome and evolution of the Y chromosome in chimpanzee and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulugeta Achame, Eskeatnaf; Baarends, Willy M; Gribnau, Joost; Grootegoed, J Anton

    2010-12-14

    Chimpanzees and humans are genetically very similar, with the striking exception of their Y chromosomes, which have diverged tremendously. The male-specific region (MSY), representing the greater part of the Y chromosome, is inherited from father to son in a clonal fashion, with natural selection acting on the MSY as a unit. Positive selection might involve the performance of the MSY in spermatogenesis. Chimpanzees have a highly polygamous mating behavior, so that sperm competition is thought to provide a strong selective force acting on the Y chromosome in the chimpanzee lineage. In consequence of evolution of the heterologous sex chromosomes in mammals, meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) results in a transcriptionally silenced XY body in male meiotic prophase, and subsequently also in postmeiotic repression of the sex chromosomes in haploid spermatids. This has evolved to a situation where MSCI has become a prerequisite for spermatogenesis. Here, by analysis of microarray testicular expression data representing a small number of male chimpanzees and men, we obtained information indicating that meiotic and postmeiotic X chromosome silencing might be more effective in chimpanzee than in human spermatogenesis. From this, we suggest that the remarkable reorganization of the chimpanzee Y chromosome, compared to the human Y chromosome, might have an impact on its meiotic interactions with the X chromosome and thereby on X chromosome silencing in spermatogenesis. Further studies will be required to address comparative functional aspects of MSCI in chimpanzee, human, and other placental mammals.

  12. New insights on the origin of B chromosomes in Astyanax scabripinnis obtained by chromosome painting and FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicari, Marcelo Ricardo; de Mello Pistune, Helena Flávia; Castro, Jonathan Pena; de Almeida, Mara Cristina; Bertollo, Luiz Antonio Carlos; Moreira-Filho, Orlando; Camacho, Juan Pedro M; Artoni, Roberto Ferreira

    2011-08-01

    Chromosome painting (CP) with a probe of B chromosome obtained by microdissection and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with probes of As51 satellite DNA, C( o )t-1 DNA, and 18S and 5S rDNA confirmed sharing of some repetitive DNA but not rDNA between A and B chromosomes in the fish Astyanax scabripinnis. Meiotic analysis revealed a pachytene B chromosome bivalent nearly half the size of its mitotic configuration, suggesting a self-pairing of B chromosome arms. Such an isochromosome nature of somatic B chromosome was further evidenced by CP and FISH. All the findings obtained suggest (i) intraspecific origin of B chromosome, and (ii) evolutionary enrichment of repetitive DNA classes, especially those contained in the C( o )t-1 and the As51 probes, in B chromosome. However, the precise origin of B chromosome in the present species remains to be elucidated by further molecular cytogenetic analysis because of painting of some A chromosome regions with the B chromosome-derived probe.

  13. The Consequences of Chromosome Segregation Errors in Mitosis and Meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Potapova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mistakes during cell division frequently generate changes in chromosome content, producing aneuploid or polyploid progeny cells. Polyploid cells may then undergo abnormal division to generate aneuploid cells. Chromosome segregation errors may also involve fragments of whole chromosomes. A major consequence of segregation defects is change in the relative dosage of products from genes located on the missegregated chromosomes. Abnormal expression of transcriptional regulators can also impact genes on the properly segregated chromosomes. The consequences of these perturbations in gene expression depend on the specific chromosomes affected and on the interplay of the aneuploid phenotype with the environment. Most often, these novel chromosome distributions are detrimental to the health and survival of the organism. However, in a changed environment, alterations in gene copy number may generate a more highly adapted phenotype. Chromosome segregation errors also have important implications in human health. They may promote drug resistance in pathogenic microorganisms. In cancer cells, they are a source for genetic and phenotypic variability that may select for populations with increased malignance and resistance to therapy. Lastly, chromosome segregation errors during gamete formation in meiosis are a primary cause of human birth defects and infertility. This review describes the consequences of mitotic and meiotic errors focusing on novel concepts and human health.

  14. To what end does nature produce superoxide? NADPH oxidase as an autocrine modifier of membrane phospholipids generating paracrine lipid messengers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saran, Manfred

    2003-10-01

    Production of superoxide anion O2*- by the membrane-bound enzyme NADPH oxidase of phagocytes is a long-known phenomenon; it is generally assumed that O2*-helps phagocytes kill bacterial intruders. The details and the chemistry of the killing process have, however, remained a mystery. Isoforms of NADPH oxidase exist in membranes of nearly every cell, suggesting that reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate in intra- and intercellular signaling processes. What the nature of the signal is exactly, how it is transmitted, and what structural characteristics a receptor of a "radical message" must have, have not been addressed convincingly. This review discusses how the action of messengers is in agreement with radical-specific behavior. In search for the smallest common denominator of cellular free radical activity we hypothesize that O2*- and its conjugate acid, HO2*, may have evolved under primordial conditions as regulators of membrane mechanics and that isoprostanes, widely used markers of "oxidative stress", may be an adventitious correlate of this biologic activity of O2*-/HO2*. An overall picture is presented that suggests that O2*-/HO2* radicals, by modifying cell membranes, help other agents gain access to the hydrophobic region of phospholipid bilayers and hence contribute to lipid-dependent signaling cascades. With this, O2*-/HO2* are proposed as indispensable adjuvants for the generation of cellular signals, for membrane transport, channel gating and hence, in a global sense, for cell viability and growth. We also suggest that many of the allegedly O2*- dependent bacterial pathologies and carcinogenic derailments are due to membrane-modifying activity rather than other chemical reactions of O2*-/HO2*. A consequence of this picture is the potential evolution of the "radical theory of ageing" to a "lipid theory of aging".

  15. Chromosomal mosaicism goes global

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurov Yuri B

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Intercellular differences of chromosomal content in the same individual are defined as chromosomal mosaicism (alias intercellular or somatic genomic variations or, in a number of publications, mosaic aneuploidy. It has long been suggested that this phenomenon poorly contributes both to intercellular (interindividual diversity and to human disease. However, our views have recently become to change due to a series of communications demonstrated a higher incidence of chromosomal mosaicism in diseased individuals (major psychiatric disorders and autoimmune diseases as well as depicted chromosomal mosaicism contribution to genetic diversity, the central nervous system development, and aging. The later has been produced by significant achievements in the field of molecular cytogenetics. Recently, Molecular Cytogenetics has published an article by Maj Hulten and colleagues that has provided evidences for chromosomal mosaicism to underlie formation of germline aneuploidy in human female gametes using trisomy 21 (Down syndrome as a model. Since meiotic aneuploidy is suggested to be the leading genetic cause of human prenatal mortality and postnatal morbidity, these data together with previous findings define chromosomal mosaicism not as a casual finding during cytogenetic analyses but as a more significant biological phenomenon than previously recognized. Finally, the significance of chromosomal mosaicism can be drawn from the fact, that this phenomenon is involved in genetic diversity, normal and abnormal prenatal development, human diseases, aging, and meiotic aneuploidy, the intrinsic cause of which remains, as yet, unknown.

  16. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacks, S.A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes. 9 figs.

  17. New inversion of calcite twin data for paleostress tested and calibrated on numerically-generated and natural data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlangeau, Camille; Lacombe, Olivier; Schueller, Sylvie; Daniel, Jean-Marc

    2016-04-01

    The inversion of calcite twin data is a powerful tool to reconstruct paleostresses sustained by carbonate rocks during their geological history. Following Etchecopar's (1984) pioneering work, this study presents a new technique of inversion of calcite twin data, which allows reconstructing the 5 parameters of the deviatoric stress tensor. In order to determine the applicability domain of the technique as well as to estimate the uncertainties on the reconstructed stress tensors, we first carried out tests on numerically generated calcite twin data and tested the separability of superimposed stress tensors with various degrees of similarity and the influence of optical bias, heterogeneities and occurrence of different grain size classes as met in natural samples. For monophase datasets with homogeneous grain size, the errors on the different stress parameters (orientation of principal stress axes, stress ratio and differential stresses) are negligible except for the differential stress (error of 5%). In cases displaying distinct grain sizes, misfits remain negligible but may reach 20% for the differential stress if the differential stress applied is greater than 60-65 MPa. Incorporation of optical bias slightly increases uncertainties up to 25% for the differential stress, 5% for the stress ratio and 8° for the orientation of the principal stress axes. For polyphase datasets with homogeneous grain size, the misfit on the orientation of the principal stress axes increases up to 10°, the stress ratio remains well constrained and the misfit on differential stress reaches 20% (applied differential stress > 70 MPa). Incorporation of optical bias increases the misfit of the orientation of the principal stress axes (average misfit: 6-8°; maximum: 17°), the misfit on stress ratio (average misfit: 2%; maximum: 26%) and the misfit on the differential stress (average misfit: 15%; maximum: 30%) These tests demonstrate that it is better to analyze twin data from subsets of

  18. Genome size, karyotype polymorphism and chromosomal evolution in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata T Souza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Trypanosoma cruzi genome was sequenced from a hybrid strain (CL Brener. However, high allelic variation and the repetitive nature of the genome have prevented the complete linear sequence of chromosomes being determined. Determining the full complement of chromosomes and establishing syntenic groups will be important in defining the structure of T. cruzi chromosomes. A large amount of information is now available for T. cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei, providing the opportunity to compare and describe the overall patterns of chromosomal evolution in these parasites. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The genome sizes, repetitive DNA contents, and the numbers and sizes of chromosomes of nine strains of T. cruzi from four lineages (TcI, TcII, TcV and TcVI were determined. The genome of the TcI group was statistically smaller than other lineages, with the exception of the TcI isolate Tc1161 (José-IMT. Satellite DNA content was correlated with genome size for all isolates, but this was not accompanied by simultaneous amplification of retrotransposons. Regardless of chromosomal polymorphism, large syntenic groups are conserved among T. cruzi lineages. Duplicated chromosome-sized regions were identified and could be retained as paralogous loci, increasing the dosage of several genes. By comparing T. cruzi and T. brucei chromosomes, homologous chromosomal regions in T. brucei were identified. Chromosomes Tb9 and Tb11 of T. brucei share regions of syntenic homology with three and six T. cruzi chromosomal bands, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Despite genome size variation and karyotype polymorphism, T. cruzi lineages exhibit conservation of chromosome structure. Several syntenic groups are conserved among all isolates analyzed in this study. The syntenic regions are larger than expected if rearrangements occur randomly, suggesting that they are conserved owing to positive selection. Mapping of the syntenic regions on T. cruzi chromosomal bands

  19. Can molecular cell biology explain chromosome motions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagliardi L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitotic chromosome motions have recently been correlated with electrostatic forces, but a lingering "molecular cell biology" paradigm persists, proposing binding and release proteins or molecular geometries for force generation. Results Pole-facing kinetochore plates manifest positive charges and interact with negatively charged microtubule ends providing the motive force for poleward chromosome motions by classical electrostatics. This conceptual scheme explains dynamic tracking/coupling of kinetochores to microtubules and the simultaneous depolymerization of kinetochore microtubules as poleward force is generated. Conclusion We question here why cells would prefer complex molecular mechanisms to move chromosomes when direct electrostatic interactions between known bound charge distributions can accomplish the same task much more simply.

  20. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  1. Chromosomes in the flow to simplify genome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doležel, Jaroslav; Vrána, Jan; Safář, Jan; Bartoš, Jan; Kubaláková, Marie; Simková, Hana

    2012-08-01

    Nuclear genomes of human, animals, and plants are organized into subunits called chromosomes. When isolated into aqueous suspension, mitotic chromosomes can be classified using flow cytometry according to light scatter and fluorescence parameters. Chromosomes of interest can be purified by flow sorting if they can be resolved from other chromosomes in a karyotype. The analysis and sorting are carried out at rates of 10(2)-10(4) chromosomes per second, and for complex genomes such as wheat the flow sorting technology has been ground-breaking in reducing genome complexity for genome sequencing. The high sample rate provides an attractive approach for karyotype analysis (flow karyotyping) and the purification of chromosomes in large numbers. In characterizing the chromosome complement of an organism, the high number that can be studied using flow cytometry allows for a statistically accurate analysis. Chromosome sorting plays a particularly important role in the analysis of nuclear genome structure and the analysis of particular and aberrant chromosomes. Other attractive but not well-explored features include the analysis of chromosomal proteins, chromosome ultrastructure, and high-resolution mapping using FISH. Recent results demonstrate that chromosome flow sorting can be coupled seamlessly with DNA array and next-generation sequencing technologies for high-throughput analyses. The main advantages are targeting the analysis to a genome region of interest and a significant reduction in sample complexity. As flow sorters can also sort single copies of chromosomes, shotgun sequencing DNA amplified from them enables the production of haplotype-resolved genome sequences. This review explains the principles of flow cytometric chromosome analysis and sorting (flow cytogenetics), discusses the major uses of this technology in genome analysis, and outlines future directions.

  2. CHROMOSOMES OF AMERICAN MARSUPIALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BIGGERS, J D; FRITZ, H I; HARE, W C; MCFEELY, R A

    1965-06-18

    Studies of the chromosomes of four American marsupials demonstrated that Caluromys derbianus and Marmosa mexicana have a diploid number of 14 chromosomes, and that Philander opossum and Didelphis marsupialis have a diploid number of 22. The karyotypes of C. derbianus and M. mexicana are similar, whereas those of P. opossum and D. marsupialis are dissimilar. If the 14-chromosome karyotype represents a reduction from a primitive number of 22, these observations suggest that the change has occurred independently in the American and Australasian forms.

  3. Paternal inheritance of B chromosomes in a parthenogenetic hermaphrodite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukeboom, Leo W.; Seif, Miriam; Mettenmeyer, Thomas; Plowman, Amy B.; Michiels, Nicolaas K.

    1996-01-01

    B chromosomes are dispensable elements extra to the standard (A) chromosome complement. They have been described from many sexually reproducing species where they often exploit meiosis to accumulate from one generation to the next. Polycelis nigra is a simultaneously hermaphroditic flatworm that can

  4. Evaluating the relationship between spermatogenic silencing of the X chromosome and evolution of the Y chromosome in chimpanzee and human

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Achame; W.M. Baarends (Willy); J.H. Gribnau (Joost); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractChimpanzees and humans are genetically very similar, with the striking exception of their Y chromosomes, which have diverged tremendously. The male-specific region (MSY), representing the greater part of the Y chromosome, is inherited from father to son in a clonal fashion, with natural

  5. Chromosomal abnormalities in patients with sperm disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Y. Pylyp

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities are among the most common genetic causes of spermatogenic disruptions. Carriers of chromosomal abnormalities are at increased risk of infertility, miscarriage or birth of a child with unbalanced karyotype due to the production of unbalanced gametes. The natural selection against chromosomally abnormal sperm usually prevents fertilization with sperm barring in cases of serious chromosomal abnormalities. However, assisted reproductive technologies in general and intracytoplasmic sperm injection in particular, enable the transmission of chromosomal abnormalities to the progeny. Therefore, cytogenetic studies are important in patients with male factor infertility before assisted reproduction treatment. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the types and frequencies of chromosomal abnormalities in 724 patients with infertility and to estimate the risk of chromosomal abnormalities detection in subgroups of patients depending on the severity of spermatogenic disruption, aiming at identifying groups of patients in need of cytogenetic studies. Karyotype analysis was performed in 724 blood samples of men attending infertility clinic. Chromosomal preparation was performed by standard techniques. At least 20 GTG-banded metaphase plates with the resolution from 450 to 750 bands per haploid set were analysed in each case. When chromosomal mosaicism was suspected, this number was increased to 50. Abnormal karyotypes were observed in 48 (6.6% patients, including 67% of autosomal abnormalities and 33% of gonosomal abnormalities. Autosomal abnormalities were represented by structural rearrangements. Reciprocal translocations were the most common type of structural chromosomal abnormalities in the studied group, detected with the frequency of 2.6% (n = 19, followed by Robertsonian translocation, observed with the frequency of 1.2% (n = 9. The frequency of inversions was 0.6% (n = 4. Gonosomal abnormalities included 14 cases

  6. Ecologic Generation on electricity during the transport and distribution of natural gas; Generacion ecologica de energia electrica en los procesos de transporte y de distribucion de gas natural canalizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, A. M.

    2002-07-01

    The pipeline transmission and distribution of natural gas is carried out at high pressure. However, the pressure has to be reduced to supply the natural gas to local networks. The decrease of the pressure take place in the so-called Regulating an Metering Gas Stations. Currently, it is possible to make use of this gas expansion process to generate electrical energy by means of Gas Expanders. These technologies do not consume chemically natural gas to generate electricity and, consequently do not producer air-pollutants such as CO. SO2, and NOx in comparison with the fuel driven combustion technologies. Environmentally, the Gas Expanders are clean energy devices and should be legally kept in mind as the renewable energies are considered. (Author)

  7. Entropy generation analysis of the revised Cheng-Minkowycz problem for natural convective boundary layer flow of nanofluid in a porous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashidi Mohammad Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The similar solution on the equations of the revised Cheng-Minkowycz problem for natural convective boundary layer flow of nanofluid through a porous medium gives (using an analytical method, a system of non-linear partial differential equations which are solved by optimal homotopy analysis method. Effects of various drastic parameters on the fluid and heat transfer characteristics have been analyzed. A very good agreement is observed between the obtained results and the numerical ones. The entropy generation has been derived and a comprehensive parametric analysis on that has been done. Each component of the entropy generation has been analyzed separately and the contribution of each one on the total value of entropy generation has been determined. It is found that the entropy generation as an important aspect of the industrial applications has been affected by various parameters which should be controlled to minimize the entropy generation.

  8. Electric power self generation in residential condominium; Auto geracao de energia eletrica em condominios residenciais utilizando biogas de esgoto/gas natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guardabassi, Patricia; Pires, Rodrigo Goncalves; Coelho, Suani Teixeira; Velazquez, Silvia M.S.G. [Centro Nacional de Referencia em Biomassa (CENBIO), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2002-07-01

    This paper studies the technical and economical feasibility of using biomass (biogas from sewage treatment) associated to natural gas for decentralized electric power generation in a residential condominium in the Sao Paulo city. This model can may be applied in other regions of the country.

  9. DDQ-promoted dehydrogenation from natural rigid polycyclic acids or flexible alkyl acids to generate lactones by a radical ion mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ye; Huang, Zhangjian; Yin, Jian; Lai, Yisheng; Zhang, Shibo; Zhang, Zhiguo; Fang, Lei; Peng, Sixun; Zhang, Yihua

    2011-09-07

    A novel and facile DDQ-mediated dehydrogenation from natural rigid polycyclic acids or flexible alkyl acids to generate lactones is described. The formation of lactones proceeds by a radical ion mechanism, which has been established by DPPH˙-mediated chemical identification, ESR spectroscopy and an enol intermediate trapping.

  10. ANALYSIS AND FORECASTING OF CONSEQUENCES PERTAINING TO PRICE CHANGES ON IMPORTED NATURAL GAS BY POWER-GENERATING ENTERPRISES OF THE REPUBLIC OF BELARUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Коndratiev

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of consequences of price changes for imported natural gas used at enterprises involved in energy generation has been carried out by example of one of Belarusian regional power supply systems.The offers for maximum compensation of economic losses at the expense of price increase for the gas supplied by Russia have been proposed in the paper.

  11. Combined IL-15 and IL-12 drives the generation of CD34-derived natural killer cells with superior maturation and alloreactivity potential following adoptive transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cany, J.S.; Waart, A.B. van der; Spanholtz, J.; Tordoir, M.; Jansen, J.H.; Voort, R. van der; Schaap, N.P.; Dolstra, H.

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of allogeneic natural killer (NK) cells represents a promising treatment approach against cancer, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Previously, we reported a cytokine-based culture method for the generation of NK cell products with high cell number and purity. In this system,

  12. Caulobacter chromosome segregation is an ordered multistep process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebelut, Conrad W; Guberman, Jonathan M; van Teeffelen, Sven; Yakhnina, Anastasiya A; Gitai, Zemer

    2010-08-10

    Despite its fundamental nature, bacterial chromosome segregation remains poorly understood. Viewing segregation as a single process caused multiple proposed mechanisms to appear in conflict and failed to explain how asymmetrically dividing bacteria break symmetry to move only one of their chromosomes. Here, we demonstrate that the ParA ATPase extends from one cell pole and pulls the chromosome by retracting upon association with the ParB DNA-binding protein. Surprisingly, ParA disruption has a specific effect on chromosome segregation that only perturbs the latter stages of this process. Using quantitative high-resolution imaging, we demonstrate that this specificity results from the multistep nature of chromosome translocation. We propose that Caulobacter chromosome segregation follows an ordered pathway of events with distinct functions and mechanisms. Initiation releases polar tethering of the origin of replication, distinction spatially differentiates the two chromosomes, and commitment irreversibly translocates the distal centromeric locus. Thus, much as eukaryotic mitosis involves a sequence of distinct subprocesses, Caulobacter cells also segregate their chromosomes through an orchestrated series of steps. We discuss how the multistep view of bacterial chromosome segregation can help to explain and reconcile outstanding puzzles and frame future investigation.

  13. Aplastic Anemia in Two Patients with Sex Chromosome Aneuploidies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Eric T; Schaefer, G Bradley; Sanger, Warren G; Coccia, Peter F

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosome aneuploidies range in incidence from rather common to exceedingly rare and have a variable phenotype. We report 2 patients with sex chromosome aneuploidies who developed severe aplastic anemia requiring treatment. The first patient had tetrasomy X (48,XXXX) and presented at 9 years of age, and the second patient had trisomy X (47,XXX) and presented at 5 years of age. Although aplastic anemia has been associated with other chromosomal abnormalities, sex chromosome abnormalities have not been traditionally considered a risk factor for this condition. A review of the literature reveals that at least one other patient with a sex chromosome aneuploidy (45,X) has suffered from aplastic anemia and that other autosomal chromosomal anomalies have been described. Despite the uncommon nature of each condition, it is possible that the apparent association is coincidental. A better understanding of the genetic causes of aplastic anemia remains important.

  14. Cytogenetics in solid tumors: lessons from the Philadelphia Chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudoyo, Aru W; Hardi, Fransiska

    2011-01-01

    Although presently known as an environmentally-related disease and appears mostly sporadic, cancer is regarded as a genetic disease based on the presence of gene mutation as a consistent factor. The "Philadelphia Chromosome" found consistently among chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients was the first significant finding of a chromosomal abnormality specifically related to a particular disease. Starting from this point, cytogenetics as the study of chromosomes has become a valuable tool in the assessment of cancer - as an aid in diagnosis, thus guiding therapy, and as a prognostic marker. As is the nature of the proliferating marrow, chromosomal abnormalities were found mostly in hematologic malignancies, and the findings more pathognomonic. The situation is different in solid tumors, which when visible to the naked eye already will have complex chromosomal changes and thus pose technical difficulties to the cytogeneticist. However, scientists believe that the shift in chromosomal studies from conventional cytogenetics to molecular cytogenetics will provide further information regarding solid tumors.

  15. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  16. Environmental costs associated to the electric generation: hydroelectric versus natural gas thermoelectric; Custos ambientais associados a geracao eletrica: hidreletricas versus termeletricas a gas natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Marcelo de Miranda

    2001-01-15

    This works presents the methodologies for valuation of the environmental costs resulting from the main damages of the cycles of electric energy arrange through hydroelectric and natural gas thermoelectric. Initially theoretical concepts are established, embracing: the description of the valuation methodologies, the possible ways of damages internalization in the value of the products, the environmental impacts of hydroelectric and natural gas thermoelectric in these fuel cycles, and the methodologies that can be applied for value the main damages caused by the impacts. Then case studies are developed, with application of the methodologies in the hydroelectric plants of Simplicio and Serra da Mesa, and in the thermoelectric complex composed for RioGen and RioGen Merchant plants. Finally, conclusions and recommendations for a better future application in Brazil of the valuation methodologies are presented. (author)

  17. [Sex chromosomes and meiosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guichaoua, M-R; Geoffroy-Siraudin, C; Tassistro, V; Ghalamoun-Slaimi, R; Perrin, J; Metzler-Guillemain, C

    2009-01-01

    Sex chromosome behaviour fundamentally differs between male and female meiosis. In oocyte, X chromosomes synapse giving a XX bivalent which is not recognizable in their morphology and behaviour from autosomal bivalents. In human male, X and Y chromosomes differ from one another in their morphology and their genetic content, leading to a limited pairing and preventing genetic recombination, excepted in homologous region PAR1. During pachytene stage of the first meiotic prophase, X and Y chromosomes undergo a progressive condensation and form a transcriptionally silenced peripheral XY body. The condensation of the XY bivalent during pachytene stage led us to describe four pachytene substages and to localize the pachytene checkpoint between substages 2 and 3. We also defined the pachytene index (PI=P1+P2/P1+P2+P3+P4) which is always less than 0.50 in normal meiosis. XY body undergoes decondensation at diplotene stage, but transcriptional inactivation of the two sex chromosomes or Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation (MSCI) persists through to the end of spermatogenesis. Sex chromosome inactivation involves several proteins, some of them were now identified. Two isoforms of the HP1 protein, HP1beta and HP1gamma, are involved in the facultative heterochromatinization of the XY body, but the initiation of this process involves the phosphorylation of the protein H2AX by the kinase ATR whose recruitment depends on BRCA1. Extensive researches on the inactivation of the sex chromosomes during male meiosis will allow to a better understanding of some male infertilities.

  18. Chromosome doubling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Akio

    2006-11-14

    The invention provides methods for chromosome doubling in plants. The technique overcomes the low yields of doubled progeny associated with the use of prior techniques for doubling chromosomes in plants such as grasses. The technique can be used in large scale applications and has been demonstrated to be highly effective in maize. Following treatment in accordance with the invention, plants remain amenable to self fertilization, thereby allowing the efficient isolation of doubled progeny plants.

  19. Microdissection and chromosome painting of X and B chromosomes in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teruel, M; Cabrero, J; Perfectti, F; Acosta, M J; Sánchez, A; Camacho, J P M

    2009-01-01

    The relative location of 2 repetitive DNAs, i.e. ribosomal (rDNA) and a tandemly repeated satellite DNA (satDNA), with respect to the centromere, suggested that B chromosomes in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans derived intraspecifically from the X chromosome. To test this hypothesis, we microdissected X and B chromosomes and amplified the obtained DNA by 2 different procedures, the conventional DOP-PCR method and the single-cell whole-genome amplification GenomePlex method. We then generated DNA probes to perform chromosome painting. Our results have confirmed that X and B chromosomes share many DNA sequences between them and with most of the autosomes, especially at locations where the satDNA and rDNA reside, in consistency with previous information. This supports the hypothesis of an intraspecific origin of B chromosomes in E. plorans. Nevertheless, the present results did not help to clarify whether Bs were derived from the X chromosome or else from 1 or more autosomes.

  20. Activation of X Chromosome Inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Maduro (Cheryl)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractIn mammals, males are the heterogametic sex having an X chromosome and a Y chromosome whereas females have two X chromosomes. Despite originating from an ancient homologous autosomal pair, the X and Y chromosome now differ greatly in size and gene content after ~180 MY of evolution.

  1. Activation of X Chromosome Inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Maduro (Cheryl)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractIn mammals, males are the heterogametic sex having an X chromosome and a Y chromosome whereas females have two X chromosomes. Despite originating from an ancient homologous autosomal pair, the X and Y chromosome now differ greatly in size and gene content after ~180 MY of evolution.

  2. Vibrio chromosomes share common history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gevers Dirk

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While most gamma proteobacteria have a single circular chromosome, Vibrionales have two circular chromosomes. Horizontal gene transfer is common among Vibrios, and in light of this genetic mobility, it is an open question to what extent the two chromosomes themselves share a common history since their formation. Results Single copy genes from each chromosome (142 genes from chromosome I and 42 genes from chromosome II were identified from 19 sequenced Vibrionales genomes and their phylogenetic comparison suggests consistent phylogenies for each chromosome. Additionally, study of the gene organization and phylogeny of the respective origins of replication confirmed the shared history. Conclusions Thus, while elements within the chromosomes may have experienced significant genetic mobility, the backbones share a common history. This allows conclusions based on multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA for one chromosome to be applied equally to both chromosomes.

  3. Sex-biased gene expression at homomorphic sex chromosomes in emus and its implication for sex chromosome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicoso, Beatriz; Kaiser, Vera B; Bachtrog, Doris

    2013-04-16

    Sex chromosomes originate from autosomes. The accumulation of sexually antagonistic mutations on protosex chromosomes selects for a loss of recombination and sets in motion the evolutionary processes generating heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Recombination suppression and differentiation are generally viewed as the default path of sex chromosome evolution, and the occurrence of old, homomorphic sex chromosomes, such as those of ratite birds, has remained a mystery. Here, we analyze the genome and transcriptome of emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae) and confirm that most genes on the sex chromosome are shared between the Z and W. Surprisingly, however, levels of gene expression are generally sex-biased for all sex-linked genes relative to autosomes, including those in the pseudoautosomal region, and the male-bias increases after gonad formation. This expression bias suggests that the emu sex chromosomes have become masculinized, even in the absence of ZW differentiation. Thus, birds may have taken different evolutionary solutions to minimize the deleterious effects imposed by sexually antagonistic mutations: some lineages eliminate recombination along the protosex chromosomes to physically restrict sexually antagonistic alleles to one sex, whereas ratites evolved sex-biased expression to confine the product of a sexually antagonistic allele to the sex it benefits. This difference in conflict resolution may explain the preservation of recombining, homomorphic sex chromosomes in other lineages and illustrates the importance of sexually antagonistic mutations driving the evolution of sex chromosomes.

  4. Modeling chromosomes in mouse to explore the function of genes, genomic disorders, and chromosomal organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Brault

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the challenges of genomic research after the completion of the human genome project is to assign a function to all the genes and to understand their interactions and organizations. Among the various techniques, the emergence of chromosome engineering tools with the aim to manipulate large genomic regions in the mouse model offers a powerful way to accelerate the discovery of gene functions and provides more mouse models to study normal and pathological developmental processes associated with aneuploidy. The combination of gene targeting in ES cells, recombinase technology, and other techniques makes it possible to generate new chromosomes carrying specific and defined deletions, duplications, inversions, and translocations that are accelerating functional analysis. This review presents the current status of chromosome engineering techniques and discusses the different applications as well as the implication of these new techniques in future research to better understand the function of chromosomal organization and structures.

  5. Increased Use of Natural Gas for Power Generation in the U.S. and the Resulting Reductions in Emissions of CO2, NOx and SO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gouw, J. A.; Parrish, D. D.; Trainer, M.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past decades, natural gas has increasingly replaced coal as a fuel for electrical power generation in the U.S. As a result, there have been significant reductions in the emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). Power plant emissions are continuously measured at the stack using continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS) required by the EPA. Previous studies using airborne measurements have shown these CEMS measurements to be accurate. Here, we use annual emissions since 1995 from all point sources included in the CEMS database to quantify the changes in CO2, NOx and SO2 emissions that have resulted from the changing use of fuels and technologies for power generation. In 1997, 83% of electrical power in the CEMS database was generated from coal-fired power plants. In 2012, the contribution from coal had decreased to 59%, and natural gas contributed 34% of the electrical power. Natural gas-fired power plants, in particular those equipped with combined cycle technology, emit less than 50% of CO2 per kWh produced compared to coal-fired plants. As a result of the increased use of natural gas, total CO2 emissions from U.S. power plants have decreased since 2008. In addition, natural gas-fired power plants emit less NOx and far less SO2 per kWh produced than coal-fired power plants. The increased use of natural gas has therefore led to significant emissions reductions of NOx and SO2 in addition to those obtained from the implementation of emissions control systems on coal-fired power plants. The increased use of natural gas for power generation has led to significant reductions in CO2 emissions as well as improvements in U.S. air quality. We will illustrate these points with examples from airborne measurements made using the NOAA WP-3D aircraft in the Southeastern U.S. in 2013 as part of the NOAA Southeast Nexus (SENEX) study. The emissions reductions from U.S. power plants due to the increased use of natural gas will

  6. Acquisition and processing of a conditional dicentric chromosome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, A.; Bloom, K.

    1989-01-01

    The introduction of a conditional centromere into chromosome III of Saccharomyces cerevisiae provided an opportunity to evaluate phenotypic and karyotypic consequences in cells harboring dicentric chromosomes upon entry into mitosis. A mitotic pause ensued, and monocentric derivatives of chromosome III were generated at a high frequency.

  7. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome structure modulate the contribution of individual chromosomes in abnormal nuclear morphologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pampalona, J.; Soler, D.; Genesca, A. [Department of Cell Biology, Physiology and Immunology, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra E-08193 (Spain); Tusell, L., E-mail: laura.tusell@uab.es [Department of Cell Biology, Physiology and Immunology, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra E-08193 (Spain)

    2010-01-05

    The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay has emerged as a biomarker of chromosome damage relevant to cancer. Although it was initially developed to measure micronuclei, it is also useful for measuring nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds. Abnormal nuclear morphologies are frequently observed in malignant tissues and short-term tumour cell cultures. Changes in chromosome structure and number resulting from chromosome instability are important factors in oncogenesis. Telomeres have become key players in the initiation of chromosome instability related to carcinogenesis by means of breakage-fusion-bridge cycles. To better understand the connection between telomere dysfunction and the appearance of abnormal nuclear morphologies, we have characterised the presence of micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds in human mammary primary epithelial cells. These cells can proliferate beyond the Hayflick limit by spontaneously losing expression of the p16{sup INK4a} protein. Progressive telomere shortening leads to the loss of the capping function, and the appearance of end-to-end chromosome fusions that can enter into breakage-fusion-bridge cycles generating massive chromosomal instability. In human mammary epithelial cells, different types of abnormal nuclear morphologies were observed, however only nucleoplasmatic bridges and buds increased significantly with population doublings. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation using centromeric and painting specific probes for chromosomes with eroded telomeres has revealed that these chromosomes are preferentially included in the different types of abnormal nuclear morphologies observed, thus reflecting their common origin. Accordingly, real-time imaging of cell divisions enabled us to determine that anaphase bridge resolution was mainly through chromatin breakage and the formation of symmetric buds in daughter nuclei. Few micronuclei emerged in this cell system thus validating the scoring of nucleoplasmic bridges and

  8. Recovery and Visualization of 3D Structure of Chromosomes from Tomographic Reconstruction Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsap Leonid V

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this work include automatic recovery and visualization of a 3D chromosome structure from a sequence of 2D tomographic reconstruction images taken through the nucleus of a cell. Structure is very important for biologists as it affects chromosome functions, behavior of the cell, and its state. Analysis of chromosome structure is significant in the detection of diseases, identification of chromosomal abnormalities, study of DNA structural conformation, in-depth study of chromosomal surface morphology, observation of in vivo behavior of the chromosomes over time, and in monitoring environmental gene mutations. The methodology incorporates thresholding based on a histogram analysis with a polyline splitting algorithm, contour extraction via active contours, and detection of the 3D chromosome structure by establishing corresponding regions throughout the slices. Visualization using point cloud meshing generates a 3D surface. The 3D triangular mesh of the chromosomes provides surface detail and allows a user to interactively analyze chromosomes using visualization software.

  9. Pre-fractionated Microbial Samples – The Second Generation Natural Products Library at Wyeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa M. Wagenaar

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available From the beginning of the antibiotic era in the 1940s to the present, Wyeth has sustained an active research program in the area of natural products discovery. This program has continually evolved through the years in order to best align with the “current” drug discovery paradigm in the pharmaceutical industry. The introduction of highthroughput screening and the miniaturization of assays have created a need to optimize natural product samples to better suit these new technologies. Furthermore, natural product programs are faced with an ever shortening time period from hit detection to lead characterization. To address these issues, Wyeth has created a pre-fractionated natural products library using reversed-phase HPLC to complement their existing library of crude extracts. The details of the pre-fractionated library and a cost-benefit analysis will be presented in this review.

  10. Rendering of surface-geometries at job-generation level for camouflaging the layered nature of Additively Manufactured parts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, D. B.; Hansen, H. N.; Nielsen, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    . An often used method for visualization of complex geometries within CGI is by producing a geometrical primitive after which the primitive is passed through a renderer.[2] Examples can be geometries with hair, leather structure and their like. Should the entire geometry including surface definition sought......] It is proposed to camouflage these layers in order to produce parts with a better visual appeal, and to add functional surface structures. In order to generate such surface structures without adding a challenging computational overhead at job-generation, inspiration from Computer Generated Imaging (CGI) is found...

  11. On the 'artificial' nature of Tc and the 'carrier-free' nature of {sup 99m}Tc from {sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Tc generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfassi, Zeev B. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Ben Gurion University, Beer Sheva, 84105 (Israel)]. E-mail: alfassi@bgumail.bgu.ac.il; Groppi, Flavia [Universita degli Studi and INFN-Milano, LASA, Radiochemistry Laboratory Via F.lli Cervi 201, 20090 Segrate, Milan (Italy); Bonardi, Mauro L. [Interfaculty Reactor Institute Delft, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Goeij, Jeroen J.M. de [Interfaculty Reactor Institute Delft, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2005-07-01

    Two widespread misconceptions regarding Tc are dealt with. First, it is shown that although primordial Tc has decayed completely, Tc is still present in nature due to natural processes, in addition to substantial man-made quantities. Thus, Tc cannot be considered as a purely artificial element. Second, it is shown that {sup 99m}Tc from {sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Tc generators is certainly not carrier-free (CF) and that, 'no-carrier-added' (NCA) is a more appropriate designation. As a quantitative measure of the amount of long-lived {sup 99g}Tc carrier present in {sup 99m}Tc preparations from generators, the Isotope Dilution Factor (IDF) is used and calculated for some practical situations.

  12. CDE-1 affects chromosome segregation through uridylation of CSR-1-bound siRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wolfswinkel, Josien C; Claycomb, Julie M; Batista, Pedro J; Mello, Craig C; Berezikov, Eugene; Ketting, René F

    2009-10-02

    We have studied the function of a conserved germline-specific nucleotidyltransferase protein, CDE-1, in RNAi and chromosome segregation in C. elegans. CDE-1 localizes specifically to mitotic chromosomes in embryos. This localization requires the RdRP EGO-1, which physically interacts with CDE-1, and the Argonaute protein CSR-1. We found that CDE-1 is required for the uridylation of CSR-1 bound siRNAs, and that in the absence of CDE-1 these siRNAs accumulate to inappropriate levels, accompanied by defects in both meiotic and mitotic chromosome segregation. Elevated siRNA levels are associated with erroneous gene silencing, most likely through the inappropriate loading of CSR-1 siRNAs into other Argonaute proteins. We propose a model in which CDE-1 restricts specific EGO-1-generated siRNAs to the CSR-1 mediated, chromosome associated RNAi pathway, thus separating it from other endogenous RNAi pathways. The conserved nature of CDE-1 suggests that similar sorting mechanisms may operate in other animals, including mammals.

  13. Massive Amplification at an Unselected Locus Accompanies Complex Chromosomal Rearrangements in Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnès Thierry

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene amplification has been observed in different organisms in response to environmental constraints, such as limited nutrients or exposure to a variety of toxic compounds, conferring them with specific phenotypic adaptations via increased expression levels. However, the presence of multiple gene copies in natural genomes has generally not been found in the absence of specific functional selection. Here, we show that the massive amplification of a chromosomal locus (up to 880 copies per cell occurs in the absence of any direct selection, and is associated with low-order amplifications of flanking segments in complex chromosomal alterations. These results were obtained from mutants with restored phenotypes that spontaneously appeared from genetically engineered strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae suffering from severe fitness reduction. Grossly extended chromosomes (macrotene were formed, with complex structural alterations but sufficient stability to propagate unchanged over successive generations. Their detailed molecular analysis, including complete genome sequencing, identification of sequence breakpoints, and comparisons between mutants, revealed novel mechanisms causing their formation, whose combined action underlies the astonishing dynamics of eukaryotic chromosomes and their consequences.

  14. Chromosomal polymorphism in two species of Hypancistrus (Siluriformes: Loricariidae): an integrative approach for understanding their biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Maelin; Ribeiro, Emanuell D; Matoso, Daniele A; Sousa, Leandro M; Hrbek, Tomas; Py-Daniel, Lucia Rapp; Feldberg, Eliana

    2014-04-01

    Structural chromosome changes are widely described in different vertebrate groups and generate genetic, phenotypic and behavioral diversity. During the evolution of loricariids, several rearrangements (fissions, fusions, inversions) seem to have occurred. Hypancistrus, tribe Ancistrini, are highly demanded for fishkeeping around the world. In this tribe, the diploid chromosome number 2n = 52 is considered a synapomorphy, and paracentric-type inversions appear to be involved in the chromosomal evolution of the tribe. The present study investigated the karyotypes of H. zebra and H. cf. debilittera using cytogenetic, classical and molecular tools, as well as DNA barcoding. Data reveal that, although diploid number in both species corroborates the proposed synapomorphy for the tribe, there is a complex karyotype dynamics, reflected in the intense chromosomal polymorphism, resulting from rearrangements involving ribosomal regions (5S and 18S rDNA), which are suggested to be paracentric inversions. Besides, DNA barcode confirms reciprocal monophyletism between the species, validating the existence of two species, only. This scenario, coupled with genomic instability caused by exogenous sequences such as Rex-3 retrotransposons and the species' sedentary lifestyle, which helps the fast polymorphism fixation, may reflect different phenotypic color patterns in natural populations, as observed in H. cf. debilittera.

  15. Those amazing dinoflagellate chromosomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PETER J RIZZO

    2003-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are a very large and diverse group of eukaryotic algae that play a major role in aquatic food webs of both fresh water and marine habitats. Moreover, the toxic members of this group pose a health threat in the form of red tides. Finally, dinoflagellates are of great evolutionary importance,because of their taxonomic position, and their unusual chromosome structure and composition. While the cytoplasm of dinoflagellates is typically eukaryotic, the nucleus is unique when compared to the nucleus of other eukaryotes. More specifically, while the chromosomes of all other eukaryotes contain histones,dinoflagellate chromosomes lack histones completely. There are no known exceptions to this observation: all dinoflagellates lack histones, and all other eukaryotes contain histones. Nevertheless, dinoflagellates remain a relatively unstudied group of eukaryotes.

  16. Chromosome numbers in Bromeliaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotias-de-Oliveira Ana Lúcia Pires

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports chromosome numbers of 17 species of Bromeliaceae, belonging to the genera Encholirium, Bromelia, Orthophytum, Hohenbergia, Billbergia, Neoglaziovia, Aechmea, Cryptanthus and Ananas. Most species present 2n = 50, however, Bromelia laciniosa, Orthophytum burle-marxii and O. maracasense are polyploids with 2n = 150, 2n = 100 and 2n = 150, respectively, while for Cryptanthus bahianus, 2n = 34 + 1-4B. B chromosomes were observed in Bromelia plumieri and Hohenbergia aff. utriculosa. The chromosome number of all species was determined for the first time, except for Billbergia chlorosticta and Cryptanthus bahianus. Our data supports the hypothesis of a basic number of x = 25 for the Bromeliaceae family and decreasing aneuploidy in the genus Cryptanthus.

  17. Complex chromosome 17p rearrangements associated with low-copy repeats in two patients with congenital anomalies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, L.E.L.M.; Stankiewicz, P.; Yatsenko, S.A.; Crawford, E.; Creswick, H.; Proud, V.K.; Vries, B. de; Pfundt, R.; Marcelis, C.L.M.; Zackowski, J.; Bi, W.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.; Lupski, J.R.; Veltman, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Recent molecular cytogenetic data have shown that the constitution of complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs) may be more complicated than previously thought. The complicated nature of these rearrangements challenges the accurate delineation of the chromosomal breakpoints and mechanisms involved. H

  18. Targeted tandem duplication of a large chromosomal segment in Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tadashi; Sato, Atsushi; Ogawa, Masahiro; Hanya, Yoshiki; Oguma, Tetsuya

    2014-08-01

    We describe here the first successful construction of a targeted tandem duplication of a large chromosomal segment in Aspergillus oryzae. The targeted tandem chromosomal duplication was achieved by using strains that had a 5'-deleted pyrG upstream of the region targeted for tandem chromosomal duplication and a 3'-deleted pyrG downstream of the target region. Consequently,strains bearing a 210-kb targeted tandem chromosomal duplication near the centromeric region of chromosome 8 and strains bearing a targeted tandem chromosomal duplication of a 700-kb region of chromosome 2 were successfully constructed. The strains bearing the tandem chromosomal duplication were efficiently obtained from the regenerated protoplast of the parental strains. However, the generation of the chromosomal duplication did not depend on the introduction of double-stranded breaks(DSBs) by I-SceI. The chromosomal duplications of these strains were stably maintained after five generations of culture under nonselective conditions. The strains bearing the tandem chromosomal duplication in the 700-kb region of chromosome 2 showed highly increased protease activity in solid-state culture, indicating that the duplication of large chromosomal segments could be a useful new breeding technology and gene analysis method.

  19. Filament depolymerization can pull a chromosome during bacterial mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banigan, Edward; Gelbart, Michael; Gitai, Zemer; Liu, Andrea; Wingreen, Ned

    2011-03-01

    Chromosome segregation is fundamental to all cells, but the force-generating mechanisms underlying chromosome translocation in bacteria remain mysterious. Caulobacter crescentus utilizes a depolymerization-driven process in which a ParA protein structure elongates from the new cell pole and binds to a ParB-decorated chromosome, and then retracts via disassembly, thus pulling the chromosome across the cell. This poses the question of how a depolymerizing structure can robustly pull the chromosome that is disassembling it. We perform Brownian dynamics simulations with a simple and physically consistent model of the ParABS system. The simulations suggest that the mechanism of translocation is ``self-diffusiophoretic'': by disassembling ParA, ParB generates a ParA concentration gradient so that the concentration of ParA is higher in front of the chromosome than behind it. Since the chromosome is attracted to ParA via ParB, it moves up the ParA gradient and across the cell. We find that translocation is controlled by the product of an effective relaxation time for the chromosome and the rate of ParA disassembly. Our results provide a physical explanation of the mechanism of depolymerization-driven translocation and suggest physical explanations for recent experimental observations.

  20. Chromosome duplication in Brachiaria (A. Rich. Stapf allows intraspecific crosses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carine Simioni

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachiaria decumbens cv. Basilisk is the single most important forage grass used for pastures in the tropics.Breeding to produce improved cultivars has been impossible until now due to the lack of compatible sexual ecotypes. Thispaper reports the success of somatic chromosome duplication of sexually reproducing diploid plants of B. decumbens and ofa diploid hybrid between B. decumbens and B. brizantha, which should allow intraspecific crosses with natural apomictictetraploid accessions of either species. Polyploidization was induced in explants cultured in vitro on a medium supplementedwith colchicine at 0.01% for 48 hours, transferred to the same medium without colchicine until shoot regeneration occurred.Five sexual tetraploid plants (3.9% of plants recovered were obtained. Crosses with apomictic cultivars recovered 14 seeds.The novel sexual tetraploids generated were unique and represented a major breakthrough in breeding B. decumbens toobtain superior hybrids.

  1. Dynamo generated magnetic configurations in accretion discs and the nature of quasi-periodic oscillations in accreting binary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, David; Suleimanov, Valery

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields are important for accretion disc structure. Magnetic fields in a disc system may be transported with the accreted matter. They can be associated with either the central body and/or jet, and be fossil or dynamo excited in situ. We consider dynamo excitation of magnetic fields in accretion discs of accreting binary systems in an attempt to clarify possible configurations of dynamo generated magnetic fields. We first model the entire disc with realistic radial extent and thickness using an alpha-quenching non-linearity. We then study the simultaneous effect of feedback from the Lorentz force from the dynamo-generated field. We perform numerical simulations in the framework of a relatively simple mean-field model which allows the generation of global magnetic configurations. We explore a range of possibilities for the dynamo number, and find quadrupolar-type solutions with irregular temporal oscillations that might be compared to observed rapid luminosity fluctuations. The dipolar symmetry models ...

  2. The chromosomal passenger complex and the spindle assembly checkpoint: kinetochore-microtubule error correction and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia André F

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During mitosis, correct bipolar chromosome attachment to the mitotic spindle is an essential prerequisite for the equal segregation of chromosomes. The spindle assembly checkpoint can prevent chromosome segregation as long as not all chromosome pairs have obtained bipolar attachment to the spindle. The chromosomal passenger complex plays a crucial role during chromosome alignment by correcting faulty chromosome-spindle interactions (e.g. attachments that do not generate tension. In the process of doing so, the chromosomal passenger complex generates unattached chromosomes, a specific situation that is known to promote checkpoint activity. However, several studies have implicated an additional, more direct role for the chromosomal passenger complex in enforcing the mitotic arrest imposed by the spindle assembly checkpoint. In this review, we discuss the different roles played by the chromosomal passenger complex in ensuring proper mitotic checkpoint function. Additionally, we discuss the possibility that besides monitoring the presence of unattached kinetochores, the spindle assembly checkpoint may also be capable of responding to chromosome-microtubule interactions that do not generate tension and we propose experimental set-ups to study this.

  3. The chromosomal passenger complex and the spindle assembly checkpoint: kinetochore-microtubule error correction and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vader, Gerben; Maia, André F; Lens, Susanne Ma

    2008-05-28

    During mitosis, correct bipolar chromosome attachment to the mitotic spindle is an essential prerequisite for the equal segregation of chromosomes. The spindle assembly checkpoint can prevent chromosome segregation as long as not all chromosome pairs have obtained bipolar attachment to the spindle. The chromosomal passenger complex plays a crucial role during chromosome alignment by correcting faulty chromosome-spindle interactions (e.g. attachments that do not generate tension). In the process of doing so, the chromosomal passenger complex generates unattached chromosomes, a specific situation that is known to promote checkpoint activity. However, several studies have implicated an additional, more direct role for the chromosomal passenger complex in enforcing the mitotic arrest imposed by the spindle assembly checkpoint. In this review, we discuss the different roles played by the chromosomal passenger complex in ensuring proper mitotic checkpoint function. Additionally, we discuss the possibility that besides monitoring the presence of unattached kinetochores, the spindle assembly checkpoint may also be capable of responding to chromosome-microtubule interactions that do not generate tension and we propose experimental set-ups to study this.

  4. Synthetic secondary chromosomes in Escherichia coli based on the replication origin of chromosome II in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerschmidt, Sonja J; Kemter, Franziska S; Schindler, Daniel; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2015-02-01

    Recent developments in DNA-assembly methods make the synthesis of synthetic chromosomes a reachable goal. However, the redesign of primary chromosomes bears high risks and still requires enormous resources. An alternative approach is the addition of synthetic chromosomes to the cell. The natural secondary chromosome of Vibrio cholerae could potentially serve as template for a synthetic secondary chromosome in Escherichia coli. To test this assumption we constructed a replicon named synVicII based on the replication module of V. cholerae chromosome II (oriII). A new assay for the assessment of replicon stability was developed based on flow-cytometric analysis of unstable GFP variants. Application of this assay to cells carrying synVicII revealed an improved stability compared to a secondary replicon based on E. coli oriC. Cell cycle analysis and determination of cellular copy numbers of synVicII indicate that replication timing of the synthetic replicon in E. coli is comparable to the natural chromosome II (ChrII) in V. cholerae. The presented synthetic biology work provides the basis to use secondary chromosomes in E. coli to answer basic research questions as well as for several biotechnological applications.

  5. Sex ratios in natural populations of Drosophila pseudoobscura from Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salceda Victor M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most species show an equal proportion of individuals of both sexes. In diploid species sex ratio is determined by a genic balance between sex chromosomes. In Drosophila sex is determined by the ratio of X- chromosomes versus autosomes and in some species of the genus it is related to the presence of an inversion in the sex chromosome. The present work analyses the sex ratio in 27 natural populations of Drosophila pseudoobscura that inhabit Mexico. Female flies captured in nature were counted and their sex ratio calculated and been called generation P, then cultured individualy, allowed to leave adult offspring which was quantified in order to get its sex ratio and designated generation F1. sex ratio was calculated using the expression: number of males times 100 divided by the number of females proposed by Darwin (1871. The sex ratio of each population was taken using the average of all the individual counts from each sample. The values found varied among different generations and populations, so for generation P their values varieded 37.4 to 190.4 and in generation F1 from 31.3 up to 96.4 males for each 100 females. According to their geographical distribution four North to South transects were arranged and in them means varied from 60.8 to 81.7 males for each 100 females. All this means that in Mexican population are more females than males, exceptionally more males than females.

  6. Chromosomal replicons of higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van' t Hof, J.

    1987-03-16

    This brief discussion of replicons of higher plants offers a glimpse into the properties of chromosomal DNA replication. It gives evidence that the S phase of unrelated plant species is comprised of temporally ordered replicon families that increase in number with genome size. This orderly process, which assures a normal inheritance of genetic material to recipient daughter cells, is maintained at the level of replicon clusters by two mutually exclusive mechanisms, one involving the rate at which single replicons replicate their allotment of DNA, and another by means of the tempo-pause. The same two mechanisms are used by cells to alter the pattern of chromosomal DNA replication just prior to and during normal development. Both mechanisms are genetically determined and produce genetic effects when disturbed of disrupted by additional non-conforming DNAs. Further insight into how these two mechanisms operate requires more molecular information about the nature of replicons and the factors that govern when a replicon family replicates. Plant material is a rich and ideal source for this information just awaiting exploitation. 63 refs.

  7. Allocation of the S-genome chromosomes of Aegilops variabilis Eig. carrying powdery mildew resistance in triticale (× Triticosecale Wittmack).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatek, M; Belter, J; Majka, M; Wiśniewska, H

    2016-03-01

    It has been hypothesized that the powdery mildew adult plant resistance (APR) controlled by the Pm13 gene in Aegilops longissima Schweinf. & Muschl. (S(l)S(l)) has been evolutionary transferred to Aegilops variabilis Eig. (UUSS). The molecular marker analysis and the visual evaluation of powdery mildew symptoms in Ae. variabilis and the Ae. variabilis × Secale cereale amphiploid forms (2n = 6x = 42, UUSSRR) showed the presence of product that corresponded to Pm13 marker and the lower infection level compared to susceptible model, respectively. This study also describes the transfer of Ae. variabilis Eig. (2n = 4x = 28, U(v)U(v)S(v)S(v)) chromosomes, carrying powdery mildew resistance, into triticale (× Triticosecale Wittm., 2n = 6x = 42, AABBRR) using Ae. variabilis × S. cereale amphiploid forms. The individual chromosomes of Ae. variabilis, triticale 'Lamberto' and hybrids were characterized by genomic and fluorescence in situ hybridization (GISH/FISH). The chromosome configurations of obtained hybrid forms were studied at first metaphase of meiosis of pollen mother cells (PMCs) using GISH. The statistical analysis showed that the way of S-genome chromosome pairing and transmission to subsequent hybrid generations was diploid-like and had no influence on chromosome pairing of triticale chromosomes. The cytogenetic study of hybrid forms were supported by the marker-assisted selection using Pm13 marker and visual evaluation of natural infection by Blumeria graminis, that allowed to select the addition or substitution lines of hybrids carrying chromosome 3S(v) which were tolerant to the powdery mildew infection.

  8. The potential of renewables versus natural gas with CO2 capture and storage for power generation under CO2 constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Broek, Machteld|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/092946895; Berghout, Niels|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/328201057; Rubin, Edward S.

    2015-01-01

    The costs of intermittent renewable energy systems (IRES) and power storage technologies are compared on a level playing field to those of natural gas combined cycle power plants with CO2 capture and storage (NGCC-CCS). To account for technological progress over time, an "experience curve

  9. The potential of renewables versus natural gas with CO2 capture and storage for power generation under CO2 constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Broek, Machteld; Berghout, Niels; Rubin, Edward S.

    2015-01-01

    The costs of intermittent renewable energy systems (IRES) and power storage technologies are compared on a level playing field to those of natural gas combined cycle power plants with CO2 capture and storage (NGCC-CCS). To account for technological progress over time, an "experience curve

  10. The potential of renewables versus natural gas with CO2 capture and storage for power generation under CO2 constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Broek, Machteld; Berghout, Niels; Rubin, Edward S.

    2015-01-01

    The costs of intermittent renewable energy systems (IRES) and power storage technologies are compared on a level playing field to those of natural gas combined cycle power plants with CO2 capture and storage (NGCC-CCS). To account for technological progress over time, an "experience

  11. Chromosomal rearrangement interferes with meiotic X chromosome inactivation

    OpenAIRE

    Homolka, David; Ivanek, Robert; Capkova, Jana; Jansa, Petr; Forejt, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    Heterozygosity for certain mouse and human chromosomal rearrangements is characterized by the incomplete meiotic synapsis of rearranged chromosomes, by their colocalization with the XY body in primary spermatocytes, and by male-limited sterility. Previously, we argued that such X–autosomal associations could interfere with meiotic sex chromosome inactivation. Recently, supporting evidence has reported modifications of histones in rearranged chromosomes by a process called the meiotic silencin...

  12. Use of biogas generated from swine manure as preliminary agent in the feasibility construction of natural gas networks; Utilizacao do biogas gerado a partir de dejetos suinos como agente preliminar na viabilizacao da construcao de redes de gas natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Antonio Rogerio; Ferraz, Andre; Rocha, Ivan; Azevedo, Jorge; Oshiro, Hugo K.; Konishi, Ricardo; Piazza, Walter; Lehmkuhl, Willian [Companhia de Gas de Santa Catarina (SCGAS), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2011-12-21

    Santa Catarina state has over 800 km of natural gas distributed along the coast line, however, has an area of 95.700 km{sup 2}. Due to mountainous relief, constructing pipeline that will supply natural gas to remote areas will prove difficult. Supplying gas to remote areas through biogas from pig manure is a feasible alternative to building a gas pipeline to these regions. Using data from the IBGE and by aid of computer programs it was found that Santa Catarina has a potential to generate biogas from 900.000 m{sup 3}/day which are located predominantly in the western region of state. Thus, through the provision of biogas in this region a market that uses natural gas as an energy source can stimulate. As result the pay-back time and the feasibility risk of a network gas project can be reduced. It was found that only in the west there is an energy potential to be shifted to natural gas equivalent of 389.583 m{sup 3}/day and as expected output is estimated to reach 16.728 m{sup 3}/day. This helps anticipate the building of a natural gas network that links the coast with outskirts of the state, while the environmental impact of swine as methane emissions and waste are reduced. (author)

  13. Chromosomes, cancer and radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samouhos, E.

    1983-08-01

    Some specific chromosomal abnormalities are associated with certain cancers. The earliest description of such a specific association is the one of the Philadelphia chromosome and myelogenous leukemia (1960). Other congenital karyotype abnormalities are associated with specific cancers. Examples of these are Down's syndrome with leukemia and Klinefelter's syndrome with male breast cancer. Genetic diseases of increased chromosome breakage, or of defective chromosome repair, are associated with greatly increased cancer incidence. Three such diseases have been recognized: 1) Fanconi's anemia, associated with leukemias and lymphomas, 2) Bloom's syndrome, associated with acute leukemias and lymphosarcoma, and 3) ataxia telangiectasia, associated with Hodgkin's disease, leukemia, and lymphosarcomas. Ten percent of individuals with ataxia telangiectasia will develop one of these neoplasms. Individuals with certain of these syndromes display an unusually high radiosensitivity. Radiation therapy for cancers has been fatal in patients who received as low as 3000 rad. This remarkable radiosensitivity has been quantitated in cell cultures from such cases. Evidence suggests that the apparent sensitivity may reflect subnormal ability to repair radiation damage. The rapid proliferation of information in this field stems from the interdigitation of many disciplines and specialties, including cytogenetics, cell biology, molecular biology, epidemiology, radiobiology, and several others. This paper is intended for clinicians; it presents a structured analytic scheme for correlating and classifying this multidisciplinary information as it becomes available.

  14. Ring chromosome 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C A; Hertz, Jens Michael; Petersen, M B;

    1992-01-01

    A stillborn male child with anencephaly and multiple malformations was found to have the karyotype 46,XY,r(13) (p11q21.1). The breakpoint at 13q21.1, determined by high resolution banding, is the most proximal breakpoint ever reported in patients with ring chromosome 13. In situ hybridisation...

  15. The Y Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Y chromosome is of great interest to students and can be used to teach about many important biological concepts in addition to sex determination. This paper discusses mutation, recombination, mammalian sex determination, sex determination in general, and the evolution of sex determination in mammals. It includes a student activity that…

  16. Why Chromosome Palindromes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Betrán

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We look at sex-limited chromosome (Y or W evolution with particular emphasis on the importance of palindromes. Y chromosome palindromes consist of inverted duplicates that allow for local recombination in an otherwise nonrecombining chromosome. Since palindromes enable intrachromosomal gene conversion that can help eliminate deleterious mutations, they are often highlighted as mechanisms to protect against Y degeneration. However, the adaptive significance of recombination resides in its ability to decouple the evolutionary fates of linked mutations, leading to both a decrease in degeneration rate and an increase in adaptation rate. Our paper emphasizes the latter, that palindromes may exist to accelerate adaptation by increasing the potential targets and fixation rates of incoming beneficial mutations. This hypothesis helps reconcile two enigmatic features of the “palindromes as protectors” view: (1 genes that are not located in palindromes have been retained under purifying selection for tens of millions of years, and (2 under models that only consider deleterious mutations, gene conversion benefits duplicate gene maintenance but not initial fixation. We conclude by looking at ways to test the hypothesis that palindromes enhance the rate of adaptive evolution of Y-linked genes and whether this effect can be extended to palindromes on other chromosomes.

  17. The Y Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Y chromosome is of great interest to students and can be used to teach about many important biological concepts in addition to sex determination. This paper discusses mutation, recombination, mammalian sex determination, sex determination in general, and the evolution of sex determination in mammals. It includes a student activity that…

  18. Chromosome Variations And Human Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudek, D.

    1974-01-01

    Article focused on the science of cytogenetics, which studied the transmission of the units of heredity called chromosomes, and considered the advantage of proper diagnosis of genetic diseases, treated on the chromosomal level. (Author/RK)

  19. Does natural larval parasitism of Lobesia botrana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) vary between years, generation, density of the host and vine cultivar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuéreb, A; Thiéry, D

    2006-04-01

    Populations of European grapevine moth Lobesia botrana Denis & Schiffermüller and its larval parasitoids were studied for two consecutive years on an experimental insecticide-free vineyard in France planted with adjacent plots of five grape cultivars (Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Sauvignon, Cabernet Sauvignon and Sémillon) using a natural L. botrana population during the first year, and a natural population supplemented with artificially inoculated individuals during the second year. Levels of natural populations of larval parasitoids were measured by their parasitism rate. The ichneumonid Campoplex capitator Aubert was the most common species collected from L. botrana larvae. Its incidence was higher during the spring compared to summer. The overall parasitism rate found on the experimental vineyard varied from 23% in 2000 to 53% in 2001, and was mainly due to C. capitator. Parasitism was not affected by the grape cultivar on which the host developed but was positively correlated with the host density, per bunch or per stock, suggesting that among the five grape cultivars tested, C. capitator females probably do not discriminate between hosts feeding on different grape cultivars, but rather the densities of L. botrana larvae.

  20. On-site measurement of trace-level sulfide in natural waters by vapor generation and microchannel collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Kei; Kuwahara, Haruka; Ohira, Shin-Ichi

    2011-07-01

    Aqueous sulfide plays an important role in the environment even at low concentrations. However, it is unstable, which means field samples cannot be transported to the laboratory for analysis without fixation. In this work, a novel method was developed to determine trace levels of sulfide on site. This method is based on vapor generation and collection in a special microchannel device followed by fluorescence measurement (VG-μGAS). The microchannel scrubber gave a high enrichment factor, and a high sensitivity was achieved, which allowed measurement of nanomolar (nM) levels of sulfide. The theoretical approach to vapor generation for several compounds is discussed to evaluate the applicability of the method to these analytes, and compounds having a low Henry's law constant (Ariake Sea and Lake Baikal.

  1. [Dicentric Y chromosome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmoula, N Bouayed; Amouri, A

    2005-01-01

    Dicentric Y chromosomes are the most common Y structural abnormalities and their influence on gonadal and somatic development is extremely variable. Here, we report the third comprehensive review of the literature concerning dicentric Y chromosomes reported since 1994. We find 78 new cases for which molecular studies (PCR or FISH) have been widely applied to investigate SRY (68% of cases), GBY, ZFY, RFS4Y, GCY and different genes at AZF region. For dic(Yq), all cases (n = 20) were mosaic for 45,X and 4 of them were also mosaic for a 46,XY cell line. When breakpoints were available (15/20 cases), they were in Yp11. 50% of cases were phenotypic female and 20% phenotypic male while 20% of cases were reported with gonadal dysgenesis. Gonadal histology was defined in 8 cases but only in one case, gonadal tissu was genetically investigated because of gonadoblastoma. For dic(Yp) (n = 55), mosaicism concerned only 45,X cell line and was found in 50 cases while the remainder five cases were homogeneous. When breakpoints were available, it was at Yq11 in 50 cases and at Yq12 in two cases. 54% of cases were phenotypic female, 26% were phenotypic male and 18% were associated with genitalia ambiguous. SRY was analyzed in 33 cases, sequenced in 9 cases and was muted in only one case. Gonads were histologically explored in 34 cases and genetically investigated in 8 cases. Gonadoblastoma was found in only two cases. Through this review, it seems that phenotype-genotype correlations are still not possible and that homogeneous studies of dic(Y) in more patients using molecular tools for structural characterization of the rearranged Y chromosome and assessment of mosaicism in many organs are necessary to clarify the basis of the phenotypic heterogeneity of dicentric Y chromosomes and then to help phenotypic prediction of such chromosome rearrangement.

  2. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murnane, John P., E-mail: jmurnane@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94143-1331 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    The ends of chromosomes are composed of a short repeat sequence and associated proteins that together form a cap, called a telomere, that keeps the ends from appearing as double-strand breaks (DSBs) and prevents chromosome fusion. The loss of telomeric repeat sequences or deficiencies in telomeric proteins can result in chromosome fusion and lead to chromosome instability. The similarity between chromosome rearrangements resulting from telomere loss and those found in cancer cells implicates telomere loss as an important mechanism for the chromosome instability contributing to human cancer. Telomere loss in cancer cells can occur through gradual shortening due to insufficient telomerase, the protein that maintains telomeres. However, cancer cells often have a high rate of spontaneous telomere loss despite the expression of telomerase, which has been proposed to result from a combination of oncogene-mediated replication stress and a deficiency in DSB repair in telomeric regions. Chromosome fusion in mammalian cells primarily involves nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), which is the major form of DSB repair. Chromosome fusion initiates chromosome instability involving breakage-fusion-bridge (B/F/B) cycles, in which dicentric chromosomes form bridges and break as the cell attempts to divide, repeating the process in subsequent cell cycles. Fusion between sister chromatids results in large inverted repeats on the end of the chromosome, which amplify further following additional B/F/B cycles. B/F/B cycles continue until the chromosome acquires a new telomere, most often by translocation of the end of another chromosome. The instability is not confined to a chromosome that loses its telomere, because the instability is transferred to the chromosome donating a translocation. Moreover, the amplified regions are unstable and form extrachromosomal DNA that can reintegrate at new locations. Knowledge concerning the factors promoting telomere loss and its consequences is

  3. Dynamics of X Chromosome Inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Loos (Friedemann)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Dosage compensation evolved to account for the difference in expression of sex chromosome-linked genes. In mammals dosage compensation is achieved by inactivation of one X chromosome during early female embryogenesis in a process called X chromosome inactivation (XCI).

  4. Complete kinetochore tracking reveals error-prone homologous chromosome biorientation in mammalian oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Tomoya S; Ohsugi, Miho; Ellenberg, Jan

    2011-08-19

    Chromosomes must establish stable biorientation prior to anaphase to achieve faithful segregation during cell division. The detailed process by which chromosomes are bioriented and how biorientation is coordinated with spindle assembly and chromosome congression remain unclear. Here, we provide complete 3D kinetochore-tracking datasets throughout cell division by high-resolution imaging of meiosis I in live mouse oocytes. We show that in acentrosomal oocytes, chromosome congression forms an intermediate chromosome configuration, the prometaphase belt, which precedes biorientation. Chromosomes then invade the elongating spindle center to form the metaphase plate and start biorienting. Close to 90% of all chromosomes undergo one or more rounds of error correction of their kinetochore-microtubule attachments before achieving correct biorientation. This process depends on Aurora kinase activity. Our analysis reveals the error-prone nature of homologous chromosome biorientation, providing a possible explanation for the high incidence of aneuploid eggs observed in mammals, including humans.

  5. Distance Geometry Protocol to Generate Conformations of Natural Products to Structurally Interpret Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Collision Cross Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) allows the separation of ionized molecules based on their charge-to-surface area (IM) and mass-to-charge ratio (MS), respectively. The IM drift time data that is obtained is used to calculate the ion-neutral collision cross section (CCS) of the ionized molecule with the neutral drift gas, which is directly related to the ion conformation and hence molecular size and shape. Studying the conformational landscape of these ionized molecules computationally provides interpretation to delineate the potential structures that these CCS values could represent, or conversely, structural motifs not consistent with the IM data. A challenge in the IM-MS community is the ability to rapidly compute conformations to interpret natural product data, a class of molecules exhibiting a broad range of biological activity. The diversity of biological activity is, in part, related to the unique structural characteristics often observed for natural products. Contemporary approaches to structurally interpret IM-MS data for peptides and proteins typically utilize molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to sample conformational space. However, MD calculations are computationally expensive, they require a force field that accurately describes the molecule of interest, and there is no simple metric that indicates when sufficient conformational sampling has been achieved. Distance geometry is a computationally inexpensive approach that creates conformations based on sampling different pairwise distances between the atoms within the molecule and therefore does not require a force field. Progressively larger distance bounds can be used in distance geometry calculations, providing in principle a strategy to assess when all plausible conformations have been sampled. Our results suggest that distance geometry is a computationally efficient and potentially superior strategy for conformational analysis of natural products to interpret gas-phase CCS data. PMID:25360896

  6. Coordinating cohesion, co-orientation, and congression during meiosis: lessons from holocentric chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schvarzstein, Mara; Wignall, Sarah M; Villeneuve, Anne M

    2010-02-01

    Organisms that reproduce sexually must reduce their chromosome number by half during meiosis to generate haploid gametes. To achieve this reduction in ploidy, organisms must devise strategies to couple sister chromatids so that they stay together during the first meiotic division (when homologous chromosomes separate) and then segregate away from one another during the second division. Here we review recent findings that shed light on how Caenorhabditis elegans, an organism with holocentric chromosomes, deals with these challenges of meiosis by differentiating distinct chromosomal subdomains and remodeling chromosome structure during prophase. Furthermore, we discuss how features of chromosome organization established during prophase affect later chromosome behavior during the meiotic divisions. Finally, we illustrate how analysis of holocentric meiosis can inform our thinking about mechanisms that operate on monocentric chromosomes.

  7. The X and Y chromosome in meiosis: how and why they keep silent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Godfried W van der Heijden; Maureen Eijpe; Willy M Baarends

    2011-01-01

    The XX/XY sex chromosomal system of mammals,including human,challenges the chromosome pairing mechanism during male meiosis.Pairing and subsequent separation of homologous chromosomes generates haploid cells from diploid cells during the meiotic divisions.One of the basic requirements for recognition between homologous chromosomes is DNA sequence identity.Since the X and Y chromosome share little homology,their quest for each other is difficult,and has special characteristics.During the lengthy meiotic prophase,all autosomal chromosomes synapse,by forming a special protein structure called the synaptonemal complex,which connects the chromosomal axes.In contrast,the X and Y chromosome synapse only in the short homologous pseudoautosomal regions,and form the so-called XY body.

  8. Familial complex chromosomal rearrangement resulting in a recombinant chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berend, Sue Ann; Bodamer, Olaf A F; Shapira, Stuart K; Shaffer, Lisa G; Bacino, Carlos A

    2002-05-15

    Familial complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCRs) are rare and tend to involve fewer breakpoints and fewer chromosomes than CCRs that are de novo in origin. We report on a CCR identified in a child with congenital heart disease and dysmorphic features. Initially, the child's karyotype was thought to involve a straightforward three-way translocation between chromosomes 3, 8, and 16. However, after analyzing the mother's chromosomes, the mother was found to have a more complex rearrangement that resulted in a recombinant chromosome in the child. The mother's karyotype included an inverted chromosome 2 and multiple translocations involving chromosomes 3, 5, 8, and 16. No evidence of deletion or duplication that could account for the clinical findings in the child was identified.

  9. Filament depolymerization can explain chromosome pulling during bacterial mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banigan, Edward J; Gelbart, Michael A; Gitai, Zemer; Wingreen, Ned S; Liu, Andrea J

    2011-09-01

    Chromosome segregation is fundamental to all cells, but the force-generating mechanisms underlying chromosome translocation in bacteria remain mysterious. Caulobacter crescentus utilizes a depolymerization-driven process in which a ParA protein structure elongates from the new cell pole, binds to a ParB-decorated chromosome, and then retracts via disassembly, pulling the chromosome across the cell. This poses the question of how a depolymerizing structure can robustly pull the chromosome that disassembles it. We perform Brownian dynamics simulations with a simple, physically consistent model of the ParABS system. The simulations suggest that the mechanism of translocation is "self-diffusiophoretic": by disassembling ParA, ParB generates a ParA concentration gradient so that the ParA concentration is higher in front of the chromosome than behind it. Since the chromosome is attracted to ParA via ParB, it moves up the ParA gradient and across the cell. We find that translocation is most robust when ParB binds side-on to ParA filaments. In this case, robust translocation occurs over a wide parameter range and is controlled by a single dimensionless quantity: the product of the rate of ParA disassembly and a characteristic relaxation time of the chromosome. This time scale measures the time it takes for the chromosome to recover its average shape after it is has been pulled. Our results suggest explanations for observed phenomena such as segregation failure, filament-length-dependent translocation velocity, and chromosomal compaction.

  10. Filament depolymerization can explain chromosome pulling during bacterial mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J Banigan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome segregation is fundamental to all cells, but the force-generating mechanisms underlying chromosome translocation in bacteria remain mysterious. Caulobacter crescentus utilizes a depolymerization-driven process in which a ParA protein structure elongates from the new cell pole, binds to a ParB-decorated chromosome, and then retracts via disassembly, pulling the chromosome across the cell. This poses the question of how a depolymerizing structure can robustly pull the chromosome that disassembles it. We perform Brownian dynamics simulations with a simple, physically consistent model of the ParABS system. The simulations suggest that the mechanism of translocation is "self-diffusiophoretic": by disassembling ParA, ParB generates a ParA concentration gradient so that the ParA concentration is higher in front of the chromosome than behind it. Since the chromosome is attracted to ParA via ParB, it moves up the ParA gradient and across the cell. We find that translocation is most robust when ParB binds side-on to ParA filaments. In this case, robust translocation occurs over a wide parameter range and is controlled by a single dimensionless quantity: the product of the rate of ParA disassembly and a characteristic relaxation time of the chromosome. This time scale measures the time it takes for the chromosome to recover its average shape after it is has been pulled. Our results suggest explanations for observed phenomena such as segregation failure, filament-length-dependent translocation velocity, and chromosomal compaction.

  11. A natural connection between neutrino mass generation and the lightness of a next-to-minimal supersymmetric Standard Model pseudoscalar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debottam Das; Asmaa Abada; Gautam Bhattacharyya; Cédric Weiland

    2012-10-01

    One of the attractive properties of the NMSSM is that it can accommodate a light pseudoscalar of order 10 GeV. However, such scenarios are constrained by several experimental results, especially those related to the fermionic decays of the pseudoscalar. In this work, extending the NMSSM field content by two gauge singlets, with lepton number +1 and −1, we generate neutrino masses via the inverse see-saw mechanism at one hand and on the other hand a very light pseudoscalar becomes experimentally viable by having dominant invisible decay channels which help it to evade the existing bounds.

  12. Natural Atmospheric Environment Model Development for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Barry C.; Leahy, Frank; Overbey, Glenn; Batts, Glen W.; Parker, Nelson (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) recently began development of a new reusable launch vehicle. The program office is located at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and is called the Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (2GRLV). The purpose of the program is to improve upon the safety and reliability of the first generation reusable launch vehicle, the Space Shuttle. Specifically, the goals are to reduce the risk of crew loss to less than 1-in-10,000 missions and decreased costs by a factor of 10 to approximately $1,000 per pound of payload launched to low Earth orbit. The program is currently in the very early stages of development and many two-stage vehicle concepts will be evaluated. Risk reduction activities are also taking place. These activities include developing new technologies and advancing current technologies to be used by the vehicle. The Environments Group at MSFC is tasked by the 2GRLV Program to develop and maintain an extensive series of analytical tools and environmental databases which enable it to provide detailed atmospheric studies in support of structural, guidance, navigation and control, and operation of the 2GRLV.

  13. Polyploidy and b chromosomes in Alium flavum from Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujošević M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The most intriguing karyological features of the genus Allium are polyploidy and the frequent appearance of supernumerary or B chromosomes (Bs. Specimens of Allium flavum from natural populations at the Gornjačka Gorge in the vicinity of Gornjak Monastery, Serbia, were analyzed karyologically. All studied plants were tetraploid (2n = 32. One submetacentric B chromosome representing 1% of the genome, smaller than the smallest chromosomes of the standard set, was present in some plants. This is the first finding of Bs in tetraploid A. flavum. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173003

  14. Potential control of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) with Piper aduncum L. (Piperaceae) extracts demonstrated by chromosomal biomarkers and toxic effects on interphase nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafael, M S; Hereira-Rojas, W J; Roper, J J; Nunomura, S M; Tadei, W P

    2008-01-01

    Dillapiol, a phenylpropanoid isolate from essential oils of leaves of Piper aduncum (Piperaceae), has insecticidal, fungicidal and antimicrobial activities. The insecticidal activity of dillapiol was tested in vivo on the larvae and pupae of Aedes aegypti, the mosquito vector of dengue. Specifically, the effect of dillapiol on the formation of micronuclei and chromosome aberrations was analyzed. Dillapiol treatments comprised two concentrations of 200 and 400 micro dissolved in well water, and a pure well water control used to rear four generations of mosquitoes. Micronuclei occurred in mitotic diploid and tetraploid chromosomes of larvae; nuclear abnormalities also occurred in interphase, metaphase, telophase, and single nucleus cells of pupae. Mortality, oviposition, chromosome breakage, and anaphase bridges were significantly greater in the extract treatments than in controls. The genotoxic effects of dillapiol described here suggest that this natural product may be a useful alternative for the control of A. aegypti.

  15. Sedimentation of mixed cultures using natural coagulants for the treatment of effluents generated in terrestrial fuel distribution terminals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, R.B., E-mail: rafaelbrunovieira@yahoo.com.br [Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica - Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Campus Santa Monica, 2121 - CEP: 38400-902, Uberlandia, MG (Brazil); Vieira, P.A., E-mail: patriciavieira@feq.ufu.br [Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica - Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Campus Santa Monica, 2121 - CEP: 38400-902, Uberlandia, MG (Brazil); Cardoso, S.L., E-mail: saulo_shaulin_@hotmail.com [Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica - Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Campus Santa Monica, 2121 - CEP: 38400-902, Uberlandia, MG (Brazil); Ribeiro, E.J., E-mail: ejribeiro@ufu.br [Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica - Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Campus Santa Monica, 2121 - CEP: 38400-902, Uberlandia, MG (Brazil); Cardoso, V.L., E-mail: vicelma@ufu.br [Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica - Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Campus Santa Monica, 2121 - CEP: 38400-902, Uberlandia, MG (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moringa oleifera and chitosan as natural coagulant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chitosan is a superior coagulant compared with Moringa oleifera for the sedimentation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chitosan reduced the process cost without compromising the process performance. - Abstract: This study evaluated the use of natural coagulants (Moringa oleifera and chitosan) under different conditions with a mixed culture (C1 mixed culture). This culture was used for the biodegradation of hydrocarbons present in the effluent from fuel distribution terminals contaminated with diesel oil and gasoline. The biodegradation was evaluated by two central composite design (CCD) experiments: the first with varying concentrations of Moringa oleifera (MO), drying temperatures (TE) and seed drying times (TI); the second with varying concentrations of chitosan and the hydrochloric acid in which chitosan had been solubilized. The responses monitored in the CCD experiments included the sludge volume index (SVI), the turbidity removal (TR) and the specific rate of oxygen uptake (SOUR). Subsequently, the biodegradation was monitored in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) under the optimal conditions obtained for each CCD experiment. The results indicated that the best coagulant was chitosan solubilized in 0.25 N HCl at a concentration of 50 mg/L. Within five cycles with chitosan as a coagulant, the total organic carbon (TOC) removal increased from 77 {+-} 1.0% to 82 {+-} 0.5%, the volatile suspended solids (VSS) increased from 1.4 {+-} 0.3 to 2.25 {+-} 0.3 g/L and the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) removal increased from 75 {+-} 1.0% to 81 {+-} 0.5%.

  16. Circular permutation of a synthetic eukaryotic chromosome with the telomerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Leslie A.; Boeke, Jef D.

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome engineering is a major focus in the fields of systems biology, genetics, synthetic biology, and the functional analysis of genomes. Here, we describe the “telomerator,” a new synthetic biology device for use in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The telomerator is designed to inducibly convert circular DNA molecules into mitotically stable, linear chromosomes replete with functional telomeres in vivo. The telomerator cassette encodes convergent yeast telomere seed sequences flanking the I-SceI homing endonuclease recognition site in the center of an intron artificially transplanted into the URA3 selectable/counterselectable auxotrophic marker. We show that inducible expression of the homing endonuclease efficiently generates linear molecules, identified by using a simple plate-based screening method. To showcase its functionality and utility, we use the telomerator to circularly permute a synthetic yeast chromosome originally constructed as a circular molecule, synIXR, to generate 51 linear variants. Many of the derived linear chromosomes confer unexpected phenotypic properties. This finding indicates that the telomerator offers a new way to study the effects of gene placement on chromosomes (i.e., telomere proximity). However, that the majority of synIXR linear derivatives support viability highlights inherent tolerance of S. cerevisiae to changes in gene order and overall chromosome structure. The telomerator serves as an important tool to construct artificial linear chromosomes in yeast; the concept can be extended to other eukaryotes. PMID:25378705

  17. Chromosome 19 International Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pericak-Vance, M.A. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Medical Center); Ropers, H.H. (Univ. Hospital Nijmegen, (The Netherlands). Dept. of Human Genetics); Carrano, A.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1993-01-04

    The Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 19 was hosted on January 25 and 26, 1992, by the Department of Human Genetics, University Hospital Nijmegen, The Netherlands, at the 'Meerdal Conference Center'. The workshop was supported by a grant from the European Community obtained through HUGO, the Dutch Research Organization (NWO) and the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA). Travel support for American participants was provided by the Department of Energy. The goals of this workshop were to produce genetic, physical and integrated maps of chromosome 19, to identify inconsistencies and gaps, and to discuss and exchange resources and techniques available for the completion of these maps. The second day of the meeting was largely devoted to region or disease specific efforts. In particular, the meeting served as a platform for assessing and discussing the recent progress made into the molecular elucidation of myotonic dystrophy.

  18. Present geotemperature and its suggestion to natural gas generation in Xujiaweizi fault-depression of the northern Songliao Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    According to stastistic of present geotemperatures at the depths of 1000,2000,3000 and 4000 m,respectively in the Xujiaweizi fault-depression of the north Songliao Basin,the result indicates that Xujiaweizi fault-depression falls in the high geotemperature area,with the higher geothermal gradient in the depression layer than that in the fault-depression layer.The geothermal gradient decreases with the increasing of the depth.The thermal conductivity of rock greatly controls the geothermal gradient.The main factors constraining the current geotemperature include thermal configuration of the earth’s crust, deep faults,distribution and abundance of radioelements.The high geotemperature is in favour of generation of deep gas.

  19. The nature of arm movement in children with cerebral palsy when using computer-generated exercise games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weightman, Andrew; Preston, Nick; Levesley, Martin; Bhakta, Bipin; Holt, Raymond; Mon-Williams, Mark

    2014-05-01

    To compare upper limb kinematics of children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) using a passive rehabilitation joystick with those of adults and able-bodied children, to better understand the design requirements of computer-based rehabilitation devices. A blocked comparative study involving seven children with spastic CP, nine able-bodied adults and nine able-bodied children, using a joystick system to play a computer game whilst the kinematics of their upper limb were recorded. The translational kinematics of the joystick's end point and the participant's shoulder movement (protraction/retraction) and elbow rotational kinematics (flexion/extension) were analysed for each group. Children with spastic CP matched their able-bodied peers in the time taken to complete the computer task, but this was due to a failure to adhere to the task instructions of travelling along a prescribed straight line when moving between targets. The spastic CP group took longer to initiate the first movement, which showed jerkier trajectories and demonstrated qualitatively different movement patterns when using the joystick, with shoulder movements that were significantly of greater magnitude than the able-bodied participants. Children with spastic CP generate large shoulder and hence trunk movements when using a joystick to undertake computer-generated arm exercises. This finding has implications for the development and use of assistive technologies to encourage exercise and the instructions given to users of such systems. A kinematic analysis of upper limb function of children with CP when using joystick devices is presented. Children with CP may use upper body movements to compensate for limitations in voluntary shoulder and elbow movements when undertaking computer games designed to encourage the practice of arm movement. The design of rehabilitative computer exercise systems should consider movement of the torso/shoulder as it may have implications for the quality of therapy in the

  20. Associated chromosomal DNA changes in polyploids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina, S N; Parida, A; Koul, K K; Salimath, S S; Bisht, M S; Raja, V; Khoshoo, T N

    1994-08-01

    The 2C and 4C nuclear DNA amounts were estimated in eight diploid species, belonging to three diverse genera (Vicia, Tephrosia, and Phlox) and their corresponding colchitetraploids. In P. drummondii, T. purpurea, and T. oxygona tetraploids the deviation from the expectation was highly significant. The DNA in P. drummondii was further discarded in subsequent (C1, C2) generations, thus attaining an overall reduction of about 25%. The DNA content in the subsequent generations was the same as that of C2. It is concluded that rapid DNA loss in the first and subsequent generations was not only associated with the substantial increase (30-66%) in the seed set, but it also helped in the establishment and stabilization of the tetraploid. The possible relationship between such a nucleotypic change and success of polyploids is discussed. The DNA change from the expected value in the P. drummondii tetraploid was achieved by equal decrement to each chromosome independent of size, i.e., small chromosomes loose the same amount of DNA as the large chromosomes.

  1. The external costs of electricity generation. A comparison of environmental damage of silicon photovoltaic electricity, produced with different electricity mixes, vs natural gas and coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, C.L.; Veltkamp, A.C.; Sinke, W.C. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-09-15

    In this paper the environmental damages of crystalline silicon photovoltaics are calculated, using the most recent photovoltaics data, and compared with those of the prevalent conventional energy technologies. A life cycle assessment of selected environmental impacts of 1kWh of electricity generated by various technologies was performed using Simapro software (version 7.2.4) in conjunction with the Ecoinvent database (version 2.2). The environmental impacts were assessed using the ReCiPe methodology. Because of the important role of coal and natural gas in the global electricity generation portfolio, special attention is given to the comparison of PV with those technologies. The environmental consequences of manufacturing PV modules with renewable, UCTE or 100% coal electricity mixes are explored. A brief update of the estimated monetarization of damages due to coal and climate change is included. A rough estimate of the true cost of coal and PV electricity is made in 2011.

  2. Chromosomes with a life of their own.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R N; González-Sánchez, M; González-García, M; Vega, J M; Puertas, M J

    2008-01-01

    B chromosomes (Bs) can be described as 'passengers in the genome', a term that has been used for the repetitive DNA which comprises the bulk of the genome in large genome species, except that Bs have a life of their own as independent chromosomes. As with retrotransposons they can accumulate in number, but in this case by various processes of mitotic or meiotic drive, based on their own autonomous ways of using spindles, especially in the gametophyte phase of the life cycle of flowering plants. This selfish property of drive ensures their survival and spread in natural populations, even against a gradient of harmful effects on the host plant phenotype. Bs are inhabitants of the nucleus and they are subject to control by 'genes' in the A chromosome (As) complement. This interaction with the As, together with the balance between drive and harmful effects makes a dynamic system in the life of a B chromosome, notwithstanding the fact that we are only now beginning to unravel the story in a few favoured species. In this review we concentrate mainly on recent developments in the Bs of rye and maize, two of the species currently receiving most attention. We focus on their population dynamics and on the molecular basis of their structural organisation and mechanisms of drive, as well as on their mode of origin and potential applications in plant biotechnology.

  3. Development of the ceramic natural gas engine co-generation system; Developpement d'un systeme de cogeneration a moteur a gaz naturel en ceramique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, K.; Sakamoto, H.; Iwamoto, H. [Japan Gas Association (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    The Japan Gas Association is developing ceramic gas engines (CGE) for use in co-generation systems driven by natural gas. Ceramic gas engines are lightweight, compact power units with high power generation efficiency, enabling a high level of waste heat utilization from the hot exhaust. Although the Japanese office building market has the potential of becoming a major market for co-generation systems, the heat-electricity ratio of such facilities (with a significantly large electricity demand in comparison to the heat demand) renders conventional co-generation systems unsuitable for application to office buildings. The newly-developed engine system should allow this previously unexplored market to be exploited. Development of the engine system was initiated in 1993, and has now entered its seventh year. This report describes the current development status of the CGE technology. Development of the engine was funded as an auxiliary project by the Ministry of International Trade. and Industry (MITI) from 1993 through 1999, after which activities will continue within the private sector. (authors)

  4. Generation of Novel Traj18-Deficient Mice Lacking Vα14 Natural Killer T Cells with an Undisturbed T Cell Receptor α-Chain Repertoire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyambayar Dashtsoodol

    Full Text Available Invariant Vα14 natural killer T (NKT cells, characterized by the expression of a single invariant T cell receptor (TCR α chain encoded by rearranged Trav11 (Vα14-Traj18 (Jα18 gene segments in mice, and TRAV10 (Vα24-TRAJ18 (Jα18 in humans, mediate adjuvant effects to activate various effector cell types in both innate and adaptive immune systems that facilitates the potent antitumor effects. It was recently reported that the Jα18-deficient mouse described by our group in 1997 harbors perturbed TCRα repertoire, which raised concerns regarding the validity of some of the experimental conclusions that have been made using this mouse line. To resolve this concern, we generated a novel Traj18-deficient mouse line by specifically targeting the Traj18 gene segment using Cre-Lox approach. Here we showed the newly generated Traj18-deficient mouse has, apart from the absence of Traj18, an undisturbed TCRα chain repertoire by using next generation sequencing and by detecting normal generation of Vα19Jα33 expressing mucosal associated invariant T cells, whose development was abrogated in the originally described Jα18-KO mice. We also demonstrated here the definitive requirement for NKT cells in the protection against tumors and their potent adjuvant effects on antigen-specific CD8 T cells.

  5. Field cryofocussing hydride generation applied to the simultaneous multi-elemental determination of alkyl-metal(loid) species in natural waters using ICP-MS detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, C M; Amouroux, D; Brindle, I D; Donard, O F

    2000-12-01

    Two hydride generation manifold systems, utilizing flow injection and cryotrapping techniques for alkyl-metal(loid) speciation analysis in natural waters, are described in this paper. They provide shipboard capacity for simultaneous derivatization of analytes with NaBH4 and cryotrapping of the generated products in a field packed column at -196 degrees C. The first system is a large-volume hydride generator, using a reagent-injection flow technique as a flow batch type, that has been fully optimized and applied to the simultaneous detection of alkylated species in estuarine waters. The technique permits the analysis of a large volume sample (0.5-11) at a sampling rate of 3 h-1. The second is an online continuous flow hydride generator. A sampling rate of 3-12 h-1 can be achieved with samples of 0.1-0.51. In addition, shipboard operation eliminates major problems related to sample pretreatment, transport and storage. Ultra-trace multi-element determination is finally performed in the laboratory by cryogenic GC hyphenated with ICP-MS. Routine detection limits of 0.5-10 pg (as metal) for 0.51 water samples were achieved for the selected alkyl-metal(loid) species of arsenic, germanium, mercury and tin. Concentrations of various species, obtained from water samples taken from the Rhine estuary, are also presented. These species include alkylated arsenic compounds, other than methyl derivatives, that have been tentatively identified and are reported here for the first time.

  6. Sedimentation of mixed cultures using natural coagulants for the treatment of effluents generated in terrestrial fuel distribution terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, R B; Vieira, P A; Cardoso, S L; Ribeiro, E J; Cardoso, V L

    2012-09-15

    This study evaluated the use of natural coagulants (Moringa oleifera and chitosan) under different conditions with a mixed culture (C1 mixed culture). This culture was used for the biodegradation of hydrocarbons present in the effluent from fuel distribution terminals contaminated with diesel oil and gasoline. The biodegradation was evaluated by two central composite design (CCD) experiments: the first with varying concentrations of Moringa oleifera (MO), drying temperatures (TE) and seed drying times (TI); the second with varying concentrations of chitosan and the hydrochloric acid in which chitosan had been solubilized. The responses monitored in the CCD experiments included the sludge volume index (SVI), the turbidity removal (TR) and the specific rate of oxygen uptake (SOUR). Subsequently, the biodegradation was monitored in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) under the optimal conditions obtained for each CCD experiment. The results indicated that the best coagulant was chitosan solubilized in 0.25 N HCl at a concentration of 50mg/L. Within five cycles with chitosan as a coagulant, the total organic carbon (TOC) removal increased from 77±1.0% to 82±0.5%, the volatile suspended solids (VSS) increased from 1.4±0.3 to 2.25±0.3 g/L and the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) removal increased from 75±1.0% to 81±0.5%.

  7. Energetic-economical analysis of a stationary for energy generation with fuel cells and natural gas reforming; Analise energetico-economica de um sistema estacionario de geracao de energia com celulas a combustivel e reforma de gas natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furtado, Jose Geraldo de Melo; Silva Junior, Fernando Rodrigues; Silva, Cristiane Abrantes da; Soares, Guilherme Fleury Wanderley; Lopes, Francisco da Costa; Serra, Eduardo Torres [Centro de Pesquisas de Energia Eletrica (CEPEL), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: furtado@cepel.br; Codeceira Neto, Alcides [Companhia HidroEletrica do Sao Francisco (CHESF), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Power systems based on fuel cells have been considered for residential and commercial applications in energy Distributed Generation (DG) market as these systems can minimize their acquisition, installation and operation high costs. In this work we present an experimental analysis of a power generation system formed by a 5 kW proton exchange membrane fuel cell unit and a natural gas reformer (fuel processor) for hydrogen production, of the CEPEL's Fuel Cell Laboratory. It was determined the electrical performance of the cogeneration system in function of the design and operational power plant parameters. Additionally, it was verified the influence of the activation conditions of the fuel cell electrocatalytic system on the system performance. It also appeared that the use of hydrogen produced from the natural gas catalytic reforming provided the system operation in excellent electrothermal stability conditions resulting in increase of the energy conversion efficiency and of the economicity of the cogeneration power plant. The maximum electrical efficiency achieved was around 38% and in all power range unit operated with average potential per single fuel cell higher than 0.60 V. (author)

  8. Chromosomal phylogeny of Vampyressine bats (Chiroptera, Phyllostomidae) with description of two new sex chromosome systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Anderson José Baia; Nagamachi, Cleusa Yoshiko; Rodrigues, Luis Reginaldo Ribeiro; Benathar, Thayse Cristine Melo; Ribas, Talita Fernanda Augusto; O'Brien, Patricia Caroline Mary; Yang, Fengtang; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm Andrew; Pieczarka, Julio Cesar

    2016-06-04

    The subtribe Vampyressina (sensu Baker et al. 2003) encompasses approximately 43 species and seven genera and is a recent and diversified group of New World leaf-nosed bats specialized in fruit eating. The systematics of this group continues to be debated mainly because of the lack of congruence between topologies generated by molecular and morphological data. We analyzed seven species of all genera of vampyressine bats by multidirectional chromosome painting, using whole-chromosome-painting probes from Carollia brevicauda and Phyllostomus hastatus. Phylogenetic analyses were performed using shared discrete chromosomal segments as characters and the Phylogenetic Analysis Using Parsimony (PAUP) software package, using Desmodontinae as outgroup. We also used the Tree Analysis Using New Technology (TNT) software. The result showed a well-supported phylogeny congruent with molecular topologies regarding the sister taxa relationship of Vampyressa and Mesophylla genera, as well as the close relationship between the genus Chiroderma and Vampyriscus. Our results supported the hypothesis that all genera of this subtribe have compound sex chromosome systems that originated from an X-autosome translocation, an ancestral condition observed in the Stenodermatinae. Additional rearrangements occurred independently in the genus Vampyressa and Mesophylla yielding the X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y sex chromosome system. This work presents additional data supporting the hypothesis based on molecular studies regarding the polyphyly of the genus Vampyressa and its sister relationship to Mesophylla.

  9. [Fluorescence in situ hybridization with DNA probes derived from individual chromosomes and chromosome regions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolov, A G; Karamysheva, T V; Rubtsov, N B

    2014-01-01

    A significant part of the eukaryotic genomes consists of repetitive DNA, which can form large clusters or distributed along euchromatic chromosome regions. Repeats located in chromosomal regions make a problem in analysis and identification of the chromosomal material with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In most cases, the identification of chromosome regions using FISH requires detection of the signal produced with unique sequences. The feasibility, advantages and disadvantages of traditional methods of suppression of repetitive DNA hybridization, methods of repeats-free probe construction and methods of chromosome-specific DNA sequences visualization using image processing of multicolor FISH results are considered in the paper. The efficiency of different techniques for DNA probe generation, different FISH protocols, and image processing of obtained microscopic images depends on the genomic size and structure of analyzing species. This problem was discussed and different approaches were considered for the analysis of the species with very large genome, rare species and species which specimens are too small in size to obtain the amount of genomic and Cot-1 DNA required for suppression of repetitive DNA hybridization.

  10. Genome landscape and evolutionary plasticity of chromosomes in malaria mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai Xia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nonrandom distribution of rearrangements is a common feature of eukaryotic chromosomes that is not well understood in terms of genome organization and evolution. In the major African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae, polymorphic inversions are highly nonuniformly distributed among five chromosomal arms and are associated with epidemiologically important adaptations. However, it is not clear whether the genomic content of the chromosomal arms is associated with inversion polymorphism and fixation rates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To better understand the evolutionary dynamics of chromosomal inversions, we created a physical map for an Asian malaria mosquito, Anopheles stephensi, and compared it with the genome of An. gambiae. We also developed and deployed novel Bayesian statistical models to analyze genome landscapes in individual chromosomal arms An. gambiae. Here, we demonstrate that, despite the paucity of inversion polymorphisms on the X chromosome, this chromosome has the fastest rate of inversion fixation and the highest density of transposable elements, simple DNA repeats, and GC content. The highly polymorphic and rapidly evolving autosomal 2R arm had overrepresentation of genes involved in cellular response to stress supporting the role of natural selection in maintaining adaptive polymorphic inversions. In addition, the 2R arm had the highest density of regions involved in segmental duplications that clustered in the breakpoint-rich zone of the arm. In contrast, the slower evolving 2L, 3R, and 3L, arms were enriched with matrix-attachment regions that potentially contribute to chromosome stability in the cell nucleus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results highlight fundamental differences in evolutionary dynamics of the sex chromosome and autosomes and revealed the strong association between characteristics of the genome landscape and rates of chromosomal evolution. We conclude that a unique combination of various

  11. VC++ PROGRAMMING AUTOMATIC GENERATING WITH NATURAL LANGUAGE INTERFACE%以自然语言为界面实现VC++程序的自动生成

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周玉龙; 辛运帏; 谷大勇; 陈有祺

    2001-01-01

    本文提出以自然语言为界面实现程序自动生成的研究成果.该研究系统使用面向对象的方法与技术,以自然语言为输入界面,使用扩充的格语法进行语法语义分析,将用户描述的VC++期望程序功能的汉语篇章依次进行自动切词处理、语法处理、语义分析理解、目标程序的自动生成,最终形成满足用户要求且符合Visual C++语法的结果程序.%The study of realizing programming automatic generation with natural language interface by combined two important fields of natural language processing and software automation is reported in this paper.   Using object-oriented technology and method, with chinese character text input interface, regarding case grammar as the theory foundaton, after doing automatic word segmenting and syntactic and semantic analyzing, as a final output results, the correct executable visual C++ programs with functions described by user in chinese character texts are automatically generated by the researched system.

  12. Thymus medulla fosters generation of natural Treg cells, invariant γδ T cells, and invariant NKT cells: what we learn from intrathymic migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Jennifer E; Jenkinson, William E; Anderson, Graham

    2015-03-01

    The organization of the thymus into distinct cortical and medullary regions enables it to control the step-wise migration and development of immature T-cell precursors. Such a process provides access to specialized cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cells at defined stages of maturation, ensuring the generation of self-tolerant and MHC-restricted conventional CD4(+) and CD8(+) αβ T cells. The migratory cues and stromal cell requirements that regulate the development of conventional αβ T cells have been well studied. However, the thymus also fosters the generation of several immunoregulatory T-cell populations that form key components of both innate and adaptive immune responses. These include Foxp3(+) natural regulatory T cells, invariant γδ T cells, and CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells). While less is known about the intrathymic requirements of these nonconventional T cells, recent studies have highlighted the importance of the thymus medulla in their development. Here, we review recent findings on the mechanisms controlling the intrathymic migration of distinct T-cell subsets, and relate this to knowledge of the microenvironmental requirements of these cells.

  13. Cytotoxic chromosomal targeting by CRISPR/Cas systems can reshape bacterial genomes and expel or remodel pathogenicity islands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reuben B Vercoe

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In prokaryotes, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs and their associated (Cas proteins constitute a defence system against bacteriophages and plasmids. CRISPR/Cas systems acquire short spacer sequences from foreign genetic elements and incorporate these into their CRISPR arrays, generating a memory of past invaders. Defence is provided by short non-coding RNAs that guide Cas proteins to cleave complementary nucleic acids. While most spacers are acquired from phages and plasmids, there are examples of spacers that match genes elsewhere in the host bacterial chromosome. In Pectobacterium atrosepticum the type I-F CRISPR/Cas system has acquired a self-complementary spacer that perfectly matches a protospacer target in a horizontally acquired island (HAI2 involved in plant pathogenicity. Given the paucity of experimental data about CRISPR/Cas-mediated chromosomal targeting, we examined this process by developing a tightly controlled system. Chromosomal targeting was highly toxic via targeting of DNA and resulted in growth inhibition and cellular filamentation. The toxic phenotype was avoided by mutations in the cas operon, the CRISPR repeats, the protospacer target, and protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM beside the target. Indeed, the natural self-targeting spacer was non-toxic due to a single nucleotide mutation adjacent to the target in the PAM sequence. Furthermore, we show that chromosomal targeting can result in large-scale genomic alterations, including the remodelling or deletion of entire pre-existing pathogenicity islands. These features can be engineered for the targeted deletion of large regions of bacterial chromosomes. In conclusion, in DNA-targeting CRISPR/Cas systems, chromosomal interference is deleterious by causing DNA damage and providing a strong selective pressure for genome alterations, which may have consequences for bacterial evolution and pathogenicity.

  14. Cytotoxic chromosomal targeting by CRISPR/Cas systems can reshape bacterial genomes and expel or remodel pathogenicity islands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reuben B Vercoe

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In prokaryotes, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs and their associated (Cas proteins constitute a defence system against bacteriophages and plasmids. CRISPR/Cas systems acquire short spacer sequences from foreign genetic elements and incorporate these into their CRISPR arrays, generating a memory of past invaders. Defence is provided by short non-coding RNAs that guide Cas proteins to cleave complementary nucleic acids. While most spacers are acquired from phages and plasmids, there are examples of spacers that match genes elsewhere in the host bacterial chromosome. In Pectobacterium atrosepticum the type I-F CRISPR/Cas system has acquired a self-complementary spacer that perfectly matches a protospacer target in a horizontally acquired island (HAI2 involved in plant pathogenicity. Given the paucity of experimental data about CRISPR/Cas-mediated chromosomal targeting, we examined this process by developing a tightly controlled system. Chromosomal targeting was highly toxic via targeting of DNA and resulted in growth inhibition and cellular filamentation. The toxic phenotype was avoided by mutations in the cas operon, the CRISPR repeats, the protospacer target, and protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM beside the target. Indeed, the natural self-targeting spacer was non-toxic due to a single nucleotide mutation adjacent to the target in the PAM sequence. Furthermore, we show that chromosomal targeting can result in large-scale genomic alterations, including the remodelling or deletion of entire pre-existing pathogenicity islands. These features can be engineered for the targeted deletion of large regions of bacterial chromosomes. In conclusion, in DNA-targeting CRISPR/Cas systems, chromosomal interference is deleterious by causing DNA damage and providing a strong selective pressure for genome alterations, which may have consequences for bacterial evolution and pathogenicity.

  15. Cytotoxic Chromosomal Targeting by CRISPR/Cas Systems Can Reshape Bacterial Genomes and Expel or Remodel Pathogenicity Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercoe, Reuben B.; Chang, James T.; Dy, Ron L.; Taylor, Corinda; Gristwood, Tamzin; Clulow, James S.; Richter, Corinna; Przybilski, Rita; Pitman, Andrew R.; Fineran, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    In prokaryotes, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and their associated (Cas) proteins constitute a defence system against bacteriophages and plasmids. CRISPR/Cas systems acquire short spacer sequences from foreign genetic elements and incorporate these into their CRISPR arrays, generating a memory of past invaders. Defence is provided by short non-coding RNAs that guide Cas proteins to cleave complementary nucleic acids. While most spacers are acquired from phages and plasmids, there are examples of spacers that match genes elsewhere in the host bacterial chromosome. In Pectobacterium atrosepticum the type I-F CRISPR/Cas system has acquired a self-complementary spacer that perfectly matches a protospacer target in a horizontally acquired island (HAI2) involved in plant pathogenicity. Given the paucity of experimental data about CRISPR/Cas–mediated chromosomal targeting, we examined this process by developing a tightly controlled system. Chromosomal targeting was highly toxic via targeting of DNA and resulted in growth inhibition and cellular filamentation. The toxic phenotype was avoided by mutations in the cas operon, the CRISPR repeats, the protospacer target, and protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) beside the target. Indeed, the natural self-targeting spacer was non-toxic due to a single nucleotide mutation adjacent to the target in the PAM sequence. Furthermore, we show that chromosomal targeting can result in large-scale genomic alterations, including the remodelling or deletion of entire pre-existing pathogenicity islands. These features can be engineered for the targeted deletion of large regions of bacterial chromosomes. In conclusion, in DNA–targeting CRISPR/Cas systems, chromosomal interference is deleterious by causing DNA damage and providing a strong selective pressure for genome alterations, which may have consequences for bacterial evolution and pathogenicity. PMID:23637624

  16. [Generation mechanism of woodland runoff and sediment on Loess Plateau under hypo-rainfall--a case study of artificial P. tabulaeformis and secondary natural P. dadidiana stands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chengzhong; Shangguan, Zhouping

    2005-09-01

    Based on the long-term observation and from the viewpoints of water balance and runoff-and sediment generation, this paper studied the generation processes of runoff and sediment on two typical woodlands, artificial P. tabulaeformis and secondary natural P. dadidiana, and uncultivated slope-land in Loess Plateau under hypo-rainfall. The results showed that within the range of 5.0 - 50.0 mm rainfall, the total interception of canopy and litter was 15.45 % - 56.80 % for P. tabulaeformis and 20.56% - 47.81% for P. dadidiana, and decreased with increasing rainfall. Woodlands had a higher soil water infiltration capacity than uncultivated slope-land, especially in 0-20 cm soil layer. Both the two woodlands did not generate runoff under regular rainfall. Under the assumed rainfall of 2.5 mm x min(-1) intensity and 30 min duration, P. dadidiana stand did not produce runoff, but the runoff velocity and sediment-carrying capacity of uncultivated slope-land were 23.5 times, and runoff shearing stress and energy were 8 times as much as P. tabulaeformis stand. The runoff-and sediment generation on P. tabulaeformis stand decreased by 87.6% and 99.4%, respectively, compared with those on uncultivated slopeland, which was well accorded with the average observed value in runoff plots during 1988 - 2000. The theoretical analysis on the generation mechanism of woodland runoff and sediment may be effective to evaluate the benefits of forest in soil and water conservation.

  17. Chromosomal instability in near-diploid colorectal cancer: a link between numbers and structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Muleris

    Full Text Available Chromosomal instability (CIN plays a crucial role in tumor development and occurs mainly as the consequence of either missegregation of normal chromosomes (MSG or structural rearrangement (SR. However, little is known about the respective chromosomal targets of MSG and SR and the way these processes combined within tumors to generate CIN. To address these questions, we karyotyped a consecutive series of 96 near-diploid colorectal cancers (CRCs and distinguished chromosomal changes generated by either MSG or SR in tumor cells. Eighty-three tumors (86% presented with chromosomal abnormalities that contained both MSGs and SRs to varying degrees whereas all 13 others (14% showed normal karyotype. Using a maximum likelihood statistical method, chromosomes affected by MSG or SR and likely to represent changes that are selected for during tumor progression were found to be different and mostly mutually exclusive. MSGs and SRs were not randomly associated within tumors, delineating two major pathways of chromosome alterations that consisted of either chromosome gains by MSG or chromosomal losses by both MSG and SR. CRCs showing microsatellite instability (MSI presented with either normal karyotype or chromosome gains whereas MSS (microsatellite stable CRCs exhibited a combination of the two pathways. Taken together, these data provide new insights into the respective involvement of MSG and SR in near-diploid colorectal cancers, showing how these processes target distinct portions of the genome and result in specific patterns of chromosomal changes according to MSI status.

  18. Preferential Breakpoints in the Recovery of Broken Dicentric Chromosomes in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Hunter; Golic, Kent G

    2015-10-01

    We designed a system to determine whether dicentric chromosomes in Drosophila melanogaster break at random or at preferred sites. Sister chromatid exchange in a Ring-X chromosome produced dicentric chromosomes with two bridging arms connecting segregating centromeres as cells divide. This double bridge can break in mitosis. A genetic screen recovered chromosomes that were linearized by breakage in the male germline. Because the screen required viability of males with this X chromosome, the breakpoints in each arm of the double bridge must be closely matched to produce a nearly euploid chromosome. We expected that most linear chromosomes would be broken in heterochromatin because there are no vital genes in heterochromatin, and breakpoint distribution would be relatively unconstrained. Surprisingly, approximately half the breakpoints are found in euchromatin, and the breakpoints are clustered in just a few regions of the chromosome that closely match regions identified as intercalary heterochromatin. The results support the Laird hypothesis that intercalary heterochromatin can explain fragile sites in mitotic chromosomes, including fragile X. Opened rings also were recovered after male larvae were exposed to X-rays. This method was much less efficient and produced chromosomes with a strikingly different array of breakpoints, with almost all located in heterochromatin. A series of circularly permuted linear X chromosomes was generated that may be useful for investigating aspects of chromosome behavior, such as crossover distribution and interference in meiosis, or questions of nuclear organization and function.

  19. Common descent of B chromosomes in two species of the fish genus Prochilodus (Characiformes, Prochilodontidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voltolin, T A; Pansonato Alves, J C; Senhorini, J A; Foresti, F; Camacho, J P M; Porto-Foresti, F

    2013-01-01

    To ascertain the origin of B chromosomes in 2 fish species of the genus Prochilodus, i.e. P. lineatus and P. nigricans, we microdissected them and generated B-specific DNA probes. These probes were used to perform chromosome painting in both species and in 3 further ones belonging to the same genus (P. argenteus, P. brevis and P. costatus). Both probes hybridized with the B chromosomes in P. lineatus and P. nigricans, but with none of the chromosomes in the 5 species. This indicates that the B chromosomes have low similarity with DNAs located in the A chromosomes and suggests the possibility that the B chromosomes in the 2 species have a common origin. The most parsimonious explanation would imply intergeneric hybridization in an ancestor of P. lineatus and P. nigricans yielding the B chromosome as a byproduct, which remained in these 2 species after their phylogenetic origin, but was perhaps lost in other Prochilodus species. This hypothesis predicts that B chromosomes are old genomic elements in this genus, and this could be tested once a species from a relative genus would be found showing homology of its A chromosomes with the B-probes employed here, through a comparison of B chromosome DNA sequences with those in the A chromosomes of this other species.

  20. Chromosome assortment in Saccharum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Janabi, S M; Honeycutt, R J; Sobral, B W

    1994-12-01

    Recent work has revealed random chromosome pairing and assortment in Saccharum spontaneum L., the most widely distributed, and morphologically and cytologically variable of the species of Saccharum. This conclusion was based on the analysis of a segregating population from across between S. spontaneum 'SES 208' and a spontaneously-doubled haploid of itself, derived from anther culture. To determine whether polysomic inheritance is common in Saccharum and whether it is observed in a typical biparental cross, we studied chromosome pairing and assortment in 44 progeny of a cross between euploid, meiotically regular, 2n=80 forms of Saccharum officinarum 'LA Purple' and Saccharum robustum ' Mol 5829'. Papuan 2n=80 forms of S. robustum have been suggested as the immediate progenitor species for cultivated sugarcane (S. officinarum). A total of 738 loci in LA Purple and 720 loci in Mol 5829 were amplified and typed in the progeny by arbitrarily primed PCR using 45 primers. Fifty and 33 single-dose polymorphisms were identified in the S. officinarum and S. robustum genomes, respectively (χ 2 at 98%). Linkage analysis of single-dose polymorphisms in both genomes revealed linkages in repulsion and coupling phases. In the S. officinarum genome, a map hypothesis gave 7 linkage groups with 17 linked and 33 unlinked markers. Four of 13 pairwise linkages were in repulsion phase and 9 were in coupling phase. In the S. robustum genome, a map hypothesis gave 5 linkage groups, defined by 12 markers, with 21 markers unlinked, and 2 of 9 pairwise linkages were in repulsion phase. Therefore, complete polysomic inheritance was not observed in either species, suggesting that chromosomal behavior is different from that observed by linkage analysis of over 500 markers in the S. spontaneum map. Implications of this finding for evolution and breeding are discussed.

  1. B chromosomes have a functional effect on female sex determination in Lake Victoria cichlid fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kohta; Terai, Yohey; Mizoiri, Shinji; Aibara, Mitsuto; Nishihara, Hidenori; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Kuroiwa, Asato; Hirai, Hirohisa; Hirai, Yuriko; Matsuda, Yoichi; Okada, Norihiro

    2011-08-01

    The endemic cichlid fishes in Lake Victoria are a model system for speciation through adaptive radiation. Although the evolution of the sex-determination system may also play a role in speciation, little is known about the sex-determination system of Lake Victoria cichlids. To understand the evolution of the sex-determination system in these fish, we performed cytogenetic analysis in 11 cichlid species from Lake Victoria. B chromosomes, which are present in addition to standard chromosomes, were found at a high prevalence rate (85%) in these cichlids. In one species, B chromosomes were female-specific. Cross-breeding using females with and without the B chromosomes demonstrated that the presence of the B chromosomes leads to a female-biased sex ratio in this species. Although B chromosomes were believed to be selfish genetic elements with little effect on phenotype and to lack protein-coding genes, the present study provides evidence that B chromosomes have a functional effect on female sex determination. FISH analysis using a BAC clone containing B chromosome DNA suggested that the B chromosomes are derived from sex chromosomes. Determination of the nucleotide sequences of this clone (104.5 kb) revealed the presence of several protein-coding genes in the B chromosome, suggesting that B chromosomes have the potential to contain functional genes. Because some sex chromosomes in amphibians and arthropods are thought to be derived from B chromosomes, the B chromosomes in Lake Victoria cichlids may represent an evolutionary transition toward the generation of sex chromosomes.

  2. B chromosomes have a functional effect on female sex determination in Lake Victoria cichlid fishes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohta Yoshida

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The endemic cichlid fishes in Lake Victoria are a model system for speciation through adaptive radiation. Although the evolution of the sex-determination system may also play a role in speciation, little is known about the sex-determination system of Lake Victoria cichlids. To understand the evolution of the sex-determination system in these fish, we performed cytogenetic analysis in 11 cichlid species from Lake Victoria. B chromosomes, which are present in addition to standard chromosomes, were found at a high prevalence rate (85% in these cichlids. In one species, B chromosomes were female-specific. Cross-breeding using females with and without the B chromosomes demonstrated that the presence of the B chromosomes leads to a female-biased sex ratio in this species. Although B chromosomes were believed to be selfish genetic elements with little effect on phenotype and to lack protein-coding genes, the present study provides evidence that B chromosomes have a functional effect on female sex determination. FISH analysis using a BAC clone containing B chromosome DNA suggested that the B chromosomes are derived from sex chromosomes. Determination of the nucleotide sequences of this clone (104.5 kb revealed the presence of several protein-coding genes in the B chromosome, suggesting that B chromosomes have the potential to contain functional genes. Because some sex chromosomes in amphibians and arthropods are thought to be derived from B chromosomes, the B chromosomes in Lake Victoria cichlids may represent an evolutionary transition toward the generation of sex chromosomes.

  3. Curtailed T-cell activation curbs effector differentiation and generates CD8(+) T cells with a naturally-occurring memory stem cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanon, Veronica; Pilipow, Karolina; Scamardella, Eloise; De Paoli, Federica; De Simone, Gabriele; Price, David A; Martinez Usatorre, Amaia; Romero, Pedro; Mavilio, Domenico; Roberto, Alessandra; Lugli, Enrico

    2017-09-01

    Human T memory stem (TSCM ) cells with superior persistence capacity and effector functions are emerging as important players in the maintenance of long-lived T-cell memory and are thus considered an attractive population to be used in adoptive transfer-based immunotherapy of cancer. However, the molecular signals regulating their generation remain poorly defined. Here we show that curtailed T-cell receptor stimulation curbs human effector CD8(+) T-cell differentiation and allows the generation of CD45RO(-) CD45RA(+) CCR7(+) CD27(+) CD95(+) -phenotype cells from highly purified naïve T-cell precursors, resembling naturally-occurring human TSCM . These cells proliferate extensively in vitro and in vivo, express low amounts of effector-associated genes and transcription factors and undergo considerable self-renewal in response to IL-15 while retaining effector differentiation potential. Such a phenotype is associated with a lower number of mitochondria compared to highly-activated effector T cells committed to terminal differentiation. These results shed light on the molecular signals that are required to generate long-lived memory T cells with potential application in adoptive cell transfer immunotherapy. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co.KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Effect of Spatial Heterogeneity of Runoff Generation Mechanisms on the Scaling Behavior of Event Runoff Responses in a Natural River Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hongyi; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2011-05-26

    This paper investigates the effects of spatial heterogeneity of runoff generation processes on the scaling behavior of event runoff responses in a natural catchment, the Illinois River Basin near Tahlequah in Oklahoma. A previous study in this basin had revealed a systematic spatial trend in the relative dominance of different runoff generation mechanisms, with the fraction of total runoff generation due to the subsurface stormflow mechanism shown to increase in the downstream direction, while surface runoff generation by saturation excess showed a corresponding decrease. These trends were attributable to corresponding systematic trends in landscape properties, namely, saturated hydraulic conductivity of soils and topographic slope. Considering the differences in the timing of hillslope responses between the different runoff generation mechanisms, this paper then explores their impacts on the runoff routing responses, including how they change with increasing spatial scale. For this purpose we utilize a distributed, physically based hydrological model, with a fully hydraulic stream network routing component. The model is used to generate instantaneous response functions (IRF) for nested catchments of a range of sizes along the river network, as well as quantitative measures of their shape, e.g., peak and time-to-peak. In order to decipher and separate the effects of landscape heterogeneity from those due to basin geomorphology and hydrologic regime, the model simulations are carried out for three hypothetical cases that make assumptions about regarding landscape properties (uniform, a systematic trend, and heterogeneity plus the trend), repeating these simulations under wet and dry antecedent conditions. The simulations produced expected (consistent with previous theoretical studies) and also somewhat surprising results. For example, the power-law relationship between peak of the IRF and drainage area is shown to be flatter under wet conditions than under dry

  5. Vibrio chromosome-specific families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukjancenko, Oksana; Ussery, David

    2014-01-01

    families, 1169 and 153 are uniquely found in chromosomes 1 and 2, respectively. Gene ontology (GO) terms for each of the protein families were determined, and the different sets for each chromosome were compared. A total of 363 different "Molecular Function" GO categories were found for chromosome 1......We have compared chromosome-specific genes in a set of 18 finished Vibrio genomes, and, in addition, also calculated the pan- and core-genomes from a data set of more than 250 draft Vibrio genome sequences. These genomes come from 9 known species and 2 unknown species. Within the finished...

  6. Clinical Expression of an Inherited Unbalanced Translocation in Chromosome 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bani Bandana Ganguly

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Unbalanced chromosomal rearrangements are not common; however, they have a significant clinical expression. The parental balanced translocation produces unbalanced chromosome, which is transmitted to next generation through fertilization of gametes carrying the derivative chromosome. The carriers of balanced rearrangements mostly do not have recognizable phenotypic expression. We report a family comprising of healthy and non-consanguineous young parents and their preemie newborn severely affected with congenital anomalies and systemic disorders. Conventional Gbanding analysis of somatic chromosomes identified a balanced translocation, t(6;10(p23;q24, in mother and an unbalanced rearrangement, der(6t(6:10(p23;q24mat, in the child. The child has inherited a derivative chromosome 6 with partial deletion of 6(p23-pter and partial trisomy 10(q24-qter, which has resulted in fusion of genes of two different chromosomes. The prominent phenotypic features of del(6p, including high forehead, flat nasal bridge, agenesis of left ear, atrial septal defect (ASD, craniosynostosis, and growth retardation, are overlapping with specific Axenfeld-Reiger-, Larsen-, and Ritscher-Sinzel/3-C syndromes, however, lacking in ocular anomalies, skeletal laxity, or cerebellar malformation. Therefore, this paper rules out the isolated effect of del(6p23 or trisomy 10(q24 on distinct previously reported syndromes and proposes the combined effect of unbalanced chromosomal alteration.

  7. Perichromosomal protein Ki67 supports mitotic chromosome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Masatoshi; Natsume, Toyoaki; Kanemaki, Masato T; Imamoto, Naoko

    2016-10-01

    Although the condensin complexes and topoisomerase IIα (TopoIIα) are the central players in mitotic chromosome formation, they are insufficient for its completion, and additional factors involved in the process have been extensively sought. In this study, we examined the possibility that Ki67, a perichromosomal protein widely used as a cell proliferation marker, is one such factor. Using a combination of auxin-inducible degron and CRISPR-Cas9-based gene editing technologies, we generated a human HCT116 cell line in which Ki67 is rapidly depleted in a few hours. The removal of Ki67 before mitotic entry did not impact the early mitotic chromosome assembly observed in prophase but subsequently resulted in the formation of misshapen mitotic chromosomes. When Ki67 was removed after mitotic entry, preassembled rod-shaped mitotic chromosomes became disorganized. In addition, we show that Ki67 and TopoIIα are reciprocally coimmunoprecipitated from mitotic cell extracts. These observations indicate that Ki67 aids the finalization of mitotic chromosome formation and helps maintain rod-shaped chromosome architecture, likely in collaboration with TopoIIα. Together, these findings represent a new model in which mitotic chromosome architecture is supported both internally and externally. © 2016 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Palindrome-mediated Translocations in Humans: A New Mechanistic Model for Gross Chromosomal Rearrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidehito Inagaki

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Palindromic DNA sequences, which can form secondary structures, are widely distributed in the human genome. Although the nature of the secondary structure—single-stranded hairpin or double-stranded cruciform—has been extensively investigated in vitro, the existence of such unusual non-B DNA in vivo remains controversial. Here, we review palindrome-mediated gross chromosomal rearrangements possibly induced by non-B DNA in humans. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing have not yet overcome the difficulty of palindromic sequence analysis. However, a dozen palindromic AT-rich repeat (PATRR sequences have been identified at the breakpoints of recurrent or non-recurrent chromosomal translocations in humans. The breakages always occur at the center of the palindrome. Analyses of polymorphisms within the palindromes indicate that the symmetry and length of the palindrome affect the frequency of the de novo occurrence of these palindrome-mediated translocations, suggesting the involvement of non-B DNA. Indeed, experiments using a plasmid-based model system showed that the formation of non-B DNA is likely the key to palindrome-mediated genomic rearrangements. Some evidence implies a new mechanism that cruciform DNAs may come close together first in nucleus and illegitimately joined. Analysis of PATRR-mediated translocations in humans will provide further understanding of gross chromosomal rearrangements in many organisms.

  9. A novel pyroelectric generator utilising naturally driven temperature fluctuations from oscillating heat pipes for waste heat recovery and thermal energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabek, D.; Taylor, J.; Ayel, V.; Bertin, Y.; Romestant, C.; Bowen, C. R.

    2016-07-01

    Low temperature thermal to electrical energy converters have the potential to provide a route for recovering waste energy. In this paper, we propose a new configuration of a thermal harvester that uses a naturally driven thermal oscillator free of mechanical motion and operates between a hot heat source and a cold heat sink. The system exploits a heat induced liquid-vapour transition of a working fluid as a primary driver for a pyroelectric generator. The two-phase instability of a fluid in a closed looped capillary channel of an oscillating heat pipe (OHP) creates pressure differences which lead to local high frequency temperature oscillations in the range of 0.1-5 K. Such temperature changes are suitable for pyroelectric thermal to electrical energy conversion, where the pyroelectric generator is attached to the adiabatic wall of the OHP, thereby absorbing thermal energy from the passing fluid. This new pyroelectric-oscillating heat pipe (POHP) assembly of a low temperature generator continuously operates across a spatial heat source temperature of 55 °C and a heat sink temperature of 25 °C, and enables waste heat recovery and thermal energy harvesting from small temperature gradients at low temperatures. Our electrical measurements with lead zirconate titanate (PZT) show an open circuit voltage of 0.4 V (AC) and with lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) an open circuit voltage of 0.8 V (AC) at a frequency of 0.45 Hz, with an energy density of 95 pJ cm-3 for PMN-PT. Our novel POHP device therefore has the capability to convert small quantities of thermal energy into more desirable electricity in the nW to mW range and provides an alternative to currently used batteries or centralised energy generation.

  10. The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Antagonist StemRegenin1 Improves In Vitro Generation of Highly Functional Natural Killer Cells from CD34(+) Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeven, Mieke W H; Thordardottir, Soley; Kohela, Arwa; Maas, Frans; Preijers, Frank; Jansen, Joop H; Blijlevens, Nicole M; Cany, Jeannette; Schaap, Nicolaas; Dolstra, Harry

    2015-12-15

    Early natural killer (NK)-cell repopulation after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) has been associated with reduced relapse rates without an increased risk of graft-versus-host disease, indicating that donor NK cells have specific antileukemic activity. Therefore, adoptive transfer of donor NK cells is an attractive strategy to reduce relapse rates after allo-SCT. Since NK cells of donor origin will not be rejected, multiple NK-cell infusions could be administered in this setting. However, isolation of high numbers of functional NK cells from transplant donors is challenging. Hence, we developed a cytokine-based ex vivo culture protocol to generate high numbers of functional NK cells from granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). In this study, we demonstrate that addition of aryl hydrocarbon receptor antagonist StemRegenin1 (SR1) to our culture protocol potently enhances expansion of CD34(+) HSPCs and induces expression of NK-cell-associated transcription factors promoting NK-cell differentiation. As a result, high numbers of NK cells with an active phenotype can be generated using this culture protocol. These SR1-generated NK cells exert efficient cytolytic activity and interferon-γ production toward acute myeloid leukemia and multiple myeloma cells. Importantly, we observed that NK-cell proliferation and function are not inhibited by cyclosporin A, an immunosuppressive drug often used after allo-SCT. These findings demonstrate that SR1 can be exploited to generate high numbers of functional NK cells from G-CSF-mobilized CD34(+) HSPCs, providing great promise for effective NK-cell-based immunotherapy after allo-SCT.

  11. Chromosomal rearrangement interferes with meiotic X chromosome inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homolka, David; Ivanek, Robert; Capkova, Jana; Jansa, Petr; Forejt, Jiri

    2007-10-01

    Heterozygosity for certain mouse and human chromosomal rearrangements is characterized by the incomplete meiotic synapsis of rearranged chromosomes, by their colocalization with the XY body in primary spermatocytes, and by male-limited sterility. Previously, we argued that such X-autosomal associations could interfere with meiotic sex chromosome inactivation. Recently, supporting evidence has reported modifications of histones in rearranged chromosomes by a process called the meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin (MSUC). Here, we report on the transcriptional down-regulation of genes within the unsynapsed region of the rearranged mouse chromosome 17, and on the subsequent disturbance of X chromosome inactivation. The partial transcriptional suppression of genes in the unsynapsed chromatin was most prominent prior to the mid-pachytene stage of primary spermatocytes. Later, during the mid-late pachytene, the rearranged autosomes colocalized with the XY body, and the X chromosome failed to undergo proper transcriptional silencing. Our findings provide direct evidence on the MSUC acting at the mRNA level, and implicate that autosomal asynapsis in meiosis may cause male sterility by interfering with meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

  12. Chromosome Connections: Compelling Clues to Common Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammer, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Students compare banding patterns on hominid chromosomes and see striking evidence of their common ancestry. To test this, human chromosome no. 2 is matched with two shorter chimpanzee chromosomes, leading to the hypothesis that human chromosome 2 resulted from the fusion of the two shorter chromosomes. Students test that hypothesis by looking for…

  13. Dynamics of Escherichia coli chromosome segregation during multifork replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Henrik J; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G; Austin, Stuart

    2007-12-01

    Slowly growing Escherichia coli cells have a simple cell cycle, with replication and progressive segregation of the chromosome completed before cell division. In rapidly growing cells, initiation of replication occurs before the previous replication rounds are complete. At cell division, the chromosomes contain multiple replication forks and must be segregated while this complex pattern of replication is still ongoing. Here, we show that replication and segregation continue in step, starting at the origin and progressing to the replication terminus. Thus, early-replicated markers on the multiple-branched chromosomes continue to separate soon after replication to form separate protonucleoids, even though they are not segregated into different daughter cells until later generations. The segregation pattern follows the pattern of chromosome replication and does not follow the cell division cycle. No extensive cohesion of sister DNA regions was seen at any growth rate. We conclude that segregation is driven by the progression of the replication forks.

  14. Dynamics of Escherichia coli Chromosome Segregation during Multifork Replication▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Henrik J.; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G.; Austin, Stuart

    2007-01-01

    Slowly growing Escherichia coli cells have a simple cell cycle, with replication and progressive segregation of the chromosome completed before cell division. In rapidly growing cells, initiation of replication occurs before the previous replication rounds are complete. At cell division, the chromosomes contain multiple replication forks and must be segregated while this complex pattern of replication is still ongoing. Here, we show that replication and segregation continue in step, starting at the origin and progressing to the replication terminus. Thus, early-replicated markers on the multiple-branched chromosomes continue to separate soon after replication to form separate protonucleoids, even though they are not segregated into different daughter cells until later generations. The segregation pattern follows the pattern of chromosome replication and does not follow the cell division cycle. No extensive cohesion of sister DNA regions was seen at any growth rate. We conclude that segregation is driven by the progression of the replication forks. PMID:17905986

  15. Ab initio study of the circular intensity difference in electric-field-induced second harmonic generation of chiral natural amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Antonio; Agren, Hans

    2013-01-28

    We present a systematic computational study of circular intensity difference (CID) in electric-field-induced second harmonic generation (EFISHG) of some representative chiral natural amino acids (Alanine, Arginine, Aspartic Acid, Cysteine and Tryptophan), taking into account the electric-dipole, electric-quadrupole and magnetic-dipole interactions. The calculations are performed by applying cubic response theory at both Hartree-Fock and Density Functional theory levels, the latter with the popular Becke-three parameters, Lee, Yang and Parr (B3LYP) functional. Special focus is given to the basis set, electron correlation and origin dependence of the properties. The full set of molecular parameters defined by Lam and Thirunamachandran in their reference theoretical paper published in 1982 [J. Chem. Phys., 1982, 77, 3810] is obtained and discussed. This permits the prediction of the CID observable for different possible experimental setups.

  16. Graphite furnace and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometric determination of cadmium, lead, and tin traces in natural surface waters: study of preconcentration technique performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsogas, George Z; Giokas, Dimosthenis L; Vlessidis, Athanasios G

    2009-04-30

    In this study three major types of preconcentration methods based upon different principles (cation exchange, physical absorption and hydrophobic extraction) were evaluated and optimized for the extraction and determination of three highly toxic heavy metals namely Cd, Pb and Sn by graphite furnace and hybrid generation atomic absorption spectrometry in real samples. The optimum analytical conditions were examined and the analytical features of each method were revealed and compared. Detection limits as low as 0.003-0.025 microg L(-1) for Cd(2+), 0.05-0.10 microg L(-1) for Pb(2+) and 0.1-0.25 microg L(-1) for Sn(4+) depending on the extraction method were obtained with RSD values between 3.08% and 6.11%. A preliminary assessment of the pollution status of three important natural ecosystems in Epirus region (NW Greece) was performed and some early conclusions were drawn and discussed.

  17. Chromosomal evolution of sibling species of the Drosophila willistoni group. I. Chromosomal arm IIR (Muller's element B).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Claudia; Garcia, Ana Cristina Lauer; Valiati, Victor Hugo; Valente, Vera Lúcia S

    2006-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among nine entities of Drosophila belonging to the D. willistoni subgroup were investigated by establishing the homologous chromosomal segments of IIR chromosome, Muller's element B (equivalent to chromosome 2L of D. melanogaster). The sibling species of the D. willistoni group investigated include D. willistoni, D. tropicalis tropicalis, D. tropicalis cubana, D. equinoxialis, D. insularis and four semispecies of the D. paulistorum complex. The phylogenetic relationships were based on the existence of segments in different triads of species, which could only be produced by overlapping inversions. Polytene banding similarity maps and break points of inversions between species are presented. The implications of the chromosomal data for the phylogeny of the species and comparisons with molecular data are discussed. The aim of this study is to produce phylogenetic trees depicting accurately the sequence of natural events that have occurred in the evolution of these sibling species.

  18. Ac/Ds-induced chromosomal rearrangements in rice genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Yuan Hu; Zhang, Jianbo; Peterson, Thomas; Han, Chang-Deok

    2012-03-01

    A closely-linked pair of Ac/Ds elements induces chromosomal rearrangements in Arabidopsis and maize. This report summarizes the Ac/Ds systems that generate an exceptionally high frequency of chromosomal rearrangements in rice genomes. From a line containing a single Ds element inserted at the OsRLG5 locus, plants containing a closely-linked pair of inversely-oriented Ds elements were obtained at 1% frequency among the population regenerated from tissue culture. Subsequent regeneration of the lines containing cis-paired Ds elements via tissue culture led to a high frequency (35.6%) of plants containing chromosomal rearrangements at the OsRLG5 locus. Thirty-four rearrangement events were characterized, revealing diverse chromosomal aberrations including deletions, inversions and duplications. Many rearrangements could be explained by sister chromatid transposition (SCT) and homologous recombination (HR), events previously demonstrated in Arabidopsis and maize. In addition, novel events were detected and presumably generated via a new alternative transposition mechanism. This mechanism, termed single chromatid transposition (SLCT), resulted in juxtaposed inversions and deletions on the same chromosome. This study demonstrated that the Ac/Ds system coupled with tissue culture-mediated plant regeneration could induce higher frequencies and a greater diversity of chromosomal rearrangements than previously reported. Understanding transposon-induced chromosomal rearrangements can provide new insights into the relationship between transposable elements and genome evolution, as well as a means to perform chromosomal engineering for crop improvement. Rice is a staple cereal crop worldwide. Complete genome sequencing and rich genetic resources are great advantages for the study of the genomic complexity induced by transposable elements.(1) (-) (2) The combination of tissue culture with genetic lines carrying a pair of closely located Ac/Ds elements greatly increases the

  19. Chromosome Bridges Maintain Kinetochore-Microtubule Attachment throughout Mitosis and Rarely Break during Anaphase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Pampalona

    Full Text Available Accurate chromosome segregation during cell division is essential to maintain genome stability, and chromosome segregation errors are causally linked to genetic disorders and cancer. An anaphase chromosome bridge is a particular chromosome segregation error observed in cells that enter mitosis with fused chromosomes/sister chromatids. The widely accepted Breakage/Fusion/Bridge cycle model proposes that anaphase chromosome bridges break during mitosis to generate chromosome ends that will fuse during the following cell cycle, thus forming new bridges that will break, and so on. However, various studies have also shown a link between chromosome bridges and aneuploidy and/or polyploidy. In this study, we investigated the behavior and properties of chromosome bridges during mitosis, with the idea to gain insight into the potential mechanism underlying chromosome bridge-induced aneuploidy. We find that only a small number of chromosome bridges break during anaphase, whereas the rest persist through mitosis into the subsequent cell cycle. We also find that the microtubule bundles (k-fibers bound to bridge kinetochores are not prone to breakage/detachment, thus supporting the conclusion that k-fiber detachment is not the cause of chromosome bridge-induced aneuploidy. Instead, our data suggest that while the microtubules bound to the kinetochores of normally segregating chromosomes shorten substantially during anaphase, the k-fibers bound to bridge kinetochores shorten only slightly, and may even lengthen, during anaphase. This causes some of the bridge kinetochores/chromosomes to lag behind in a position that is proximal to the cell/spindle equator and may cause the bridged chromosomes to be segregated into the same daughter nucleus or to form a micronucleus.

  20. Chromosome Bridges Maintain Kinetochore-Microtubule Attachment throughout Mitosis and Rarely Break during Anaphase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampalona, Judit; Roscioli, Emanuele; Silkworth, William T; Bowden, Brent; Genescà, Anna; Tusell, Laura; Cimini, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during cell division is essential to maintain genome stability, and chromosome segregation errors are causally linked to genetic disorders and cancer. An anaphase chromosome bridge is a particular chromosome segregation error observed in cells that enter mitosis with fused chromosomes/sister chromatids. The widely accepted Breakage/Fusion/Bridge cycle model proposes that anaphase chromosome bridges break during mitosis to generate chromosome ends that will fuse during the following cell cycle, thus forming new bridges that will break, and so on. However, various studies have also shown a link between chromosome bridges and aneuploidy and/or polyploidy. In this study, we investigated the behavior and properties of chromosome bridges during mitosis, with the idea to gain insight into the potential mechanism underlying chromosome bridge-induced aneuploidy. We find that only a small number of chromosome bridges break during anaphase, whereas the rest persist through mitosis into the subsequent cell cycle. We also find that the microtubule bundles (k-fibers) bound to bridge kinetochores are not prone to breakage/detachment, thus supporting the conclusion that k-fiber detachment is not the cause of chromosome bridge-induced aneuploidy. Instead, our data suggest that while the microtubules bound to the kinetochores of normally segregating chromosomes shorten substantially during anaphase, the k-fibers bound to bridge kinetochores shorten only slightly, and may even lengthen, during anaphase. This causes some of the bridge kinetochores/chromosomes to lag behind in a position that is proximal to the cell/spindle equator and may cause the bridged chromosomes to be segregated into the same daughter nucleus or to form a micronucleus.

  1. Cohesin in determining chromosome architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haering, Christian H., E-mail: christian.haering@embl.de [Cell Biology and Biophysics Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Heidelberg (Germany); Jessberger, Rolf, E-mail: rolf.jessberger@tu-dresden.de [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Cells use ring-like structured protein complexes for various tasks in DNA dynamics. The tripartite cohesin ring is particularly suited to determine chromosome architecture, for it is large and dynamic, may acquire different forms, and is involved in several distinct nuclear processes. This review focuses on cohesin's role in structuring chromosomes during mitotic and meiotic cell divisions and during interphase.

  2. Effects of heavy-ion beams on chromosomes of common wheat, Triticum aestivum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Shinji; Saito, Yoshinaka [Laboratory of Plant Genetics and Breeding Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Tottori University, 4-101 Koyama-Minami, Tottori 680-8553 (Japan); Ryuto, Hiromichi; Fukunishi, Nobuhisa; Abe, Tomoko [RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Tanaka, Hiroyuki [Laboratory of Plant Genetics and Breeding Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Tottori University, 4-101 Koyama-Minami, Tottori 680-8553 (Japan); Tsujimoto, Hisashi, E-mail: tsujim@muses.tottori-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Plant Genetics and Breeding Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Tottori University, 4-101 Koyama-Minami, Tottori 680-8553 (Japan)

    2009-10-02

    To investigate the nature of plant chromosomes irradiated by heavy-ion beams, the effects of nitrogen (N) and neon (Ne) ion beams on hexaploid wheat chromosomes were compared with those of X-ray. Chromosome aberrations, such as short, ring and dicentric chromosomes appeared in high frequency. The average numbers of chromosome breaks at LD-50 by irradiation with X-ray, N and Ne ion beams were 32, 20 and 20, respectively. These values may be underestimated because chromosome rearrangement without change in chromosome morphology was not counted. Thus, we subsequently used a wheat line with a pair of extra chromosomes from an alien species (Leymus racemosus) and observed the fate of the irradiated marker chromosomes by genomic in situ hybridization. This analysis revealed that 50 Gy of neon beam induced about eight times more breaks than those induced by X-ray. This result suggests that heavy-ion beams induce chromosome rearrangement in high frequency rather than loss of gene function. This suggests further that most of the novel mutations produced by ion beam irradiation, which have been used in plant breeding, may not be caused by ordinary gene disruption but by chromosome rearrangements.

  3. Centromere inactivation on a neo-Y fusion chromosome in threespine stickleback fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cech, Jennifer N; Peichel, Catherine L

    2016-12-01

    Having one and only one centromere per chromosome is essential for proper chromosome segregation during both mitosis and meiosis. Chromosomes containing two centromeres are known as dicentric and often mis-segregate during cell division, resulting in aneuploidy or chromosome breakage. Dicentric chromosome can be stabilized by centromere inactivation, a process which reestablishes monocentric chromosomes. However, little is known about this process in naturally occurring dicentric chromosomes. Using a combination of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunofluorescence combined with FISH (IF-FISH) on metaphase chromosome spreads, we demonstrate that centromere inactivation has evolved on a neo-Y chromosome fusion in the Japan Sea threespine stickleback fish (Gasterosteus nipponicus). We found that the centromere derived from the ancestral Y chromosome has been inactivated. Our data further suggest that there have been genetic changes to this centromere in the two million years since the formation of the neo-Y chromosome, but it remains unclear whether these genetic changes are a cause or consequence of centromere inactivation.

  4. Chromosomal variation in Argentine populations of Akodon montensis Thomas, 1913 (Rodentia, Cricetidae, Sigmodontinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malleret, Matías Maximiliano; Labaroni, Carolina Alicia; García, Gabriela Verónica; Ferro, Juan Martín; Martí, Dardo Andrea; Lanzone, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    The genus Akodon Meyen, 1833 is one of the most species-rich among sigmodontine rodents and has great chromosome variability. Akodon montensis has a relatively broad distribution in South America, and Argentine populations are located in the southernmost region of its range. Brazilian populations have important chromosomal variability, but cytogenetic data from Argentina are scarce. We performed a chromosome characterization of natural populations of Akodon montensis using conventional staining, C-banding, Ag-NORs and base-specific fluorochromes. A total of 31 specimens from five localities of Misiones Province, in Argentina, were analyzed. The 2n=24 chromosomes was the most frequently observed karyotype. However, five individuals presented 25 chromosomes due to a supernumerary B-chromosome; and one individual had 2n=26 due to one B plus a trisomy for chromosome 11. Additionally, two XY females and two variants of the X chromosomes were found. C-positive centromeric bands occurred in all chromosomes; additional C-bands were observed in some autosomes, the X, Y and B chromosomes. Ag-NORs were observed in five autosomes, and the B chromosome was frequently marked. Fluorochrome banding was similar among karyotypes of the analyzed populations. Comparisons of cytogenetic data among populations of Argentina and Brazil showed the presence of high intraspecific variability in Akodon montensis and some differences among regions.

  5. The chromosomal nature of LT-II enterotoxins solved: a lambdoid prophage encodes both LT-II and one of two novel pertussis-toxin-like toxin family members in type II enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobling, Michael G

    2016-04-01

    Heat-labile enterotoxins (LT) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are structurally and functionally related to cholera toxin (CT). LT-I toxins are plasmid-encoded and flanked by IS elements, while LT-II toxins of type II ETEC are chromosomally encoded with flanking genes that appear phage related. Here, I determined the complete genomic sequence of the locus for the LT-IIa type strain SA53, and show that the LT-IIa genes are encoded by a 51 239 bp lambdoid prophage integrated at the rac locus, the site of a defective prophage in E. coli K12 strains. Of 50 LT-IIa and LT-IIc, 46 prophages also encode one member of two novel two-gene ADP-ribosyltransferase toxin families that are both related to pertussis toxin, which I named eplBA or ealAB, respectively. The eplBA and ealAB genes are syntenic with the Shiga toxin loci in their lambdoid prophages of the enteric pathogen enterohemorrhagic E. coli. These novel AB(5) toxins show pertussis-toxin-like activity on tissue culture cells, and like pertussis toxin bind to sialic acid containing glycoprotein ligands. Type II ETEC are the first mucosal pathogens known to simultaneously produce two ADP-ribosylating toxins predicted to act on and modulate activity of both stimulatory and inhibitory alpha subunits of host cell heterotrimeric G-proteins.

  6. c-Myc-dependent formation of robertsonian translocation chromosomes in mouse cells

    OpenAIRE

    Amanda Guffei; Zelda Lichtensztejn; Amanda Gonçlves {ptdos} Santos Silva; Louis, Sherif F; Andrea Caporali; Sabine Mai

    2007-01-01

    Robertsonian (Rb) translocation chromosomes occur in human and murine cancers and involve the aberrant joining of two acrocentric chromosomes in humans and two telocentric chromosomes in mice. Mechanisms leading to their generation remain elusive, but models for their formation have been proposed. They include breakage of centromeric sequences and their subsequent fusions, centric misdivision, misparing between highly repetitive sequences of p- tel or p- arm repeats, and recombinational joini...

  7. c-Myc-Dependent Formation of Robertsonian Translocation Chromosomes in Mouse Cells12

    OpenAIRE

    Guffei, Amanda; Lichtensztejn, Zelda; Gonçalves dos Santos Silva, Amanda; Louis, Sherif F; Caporali, Andrea; Mai, Sabine

    2007-01-01

    Robertsonian (Rb) translocation chromosomes occur in human and murine cancers and involve the aberrant joining of two acrocentric chromosomes in humans and two telocentric chromosomes in mice. Mechanisms leading to their generation remain elusive, but models for their formation have been proposed. They include breakage of centromeric sequences and their subsequent fusions, centric misdivision, misparing between highly repetitive sequences of p-tel or p-arm repeats, and recombinational joining...

  8. Histone H2AFX Links Meiotic Chromosome Asynapsis to Prophase I Oocyte Loss in Mammals.

    OpenAIRE

    Cloutier, Jeffrey M.; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K.; Elias ElInati; André Nussenzweig; Attila Tóth; James M A Turner

    2015-01-01

    Author Summary Chromosome abnormalities, such as aneuploidies and structural variants (i.e. translocations, inversions), are strikingly common in the human population, causing disorders such as Down syndrome and Turner syndrome. One important consequence of chromosome abnormalities in mammals is errors during meiosis, the specialized cell division that generates sperm and eggs for reproduction. As a result of these meiotic errors, patients with chromosome abnormalities oftentimes suffer from ...

  9. 129例自然妊娠与ART术后妊娠早期流产胎儿绒毛染色体核型分析%Chromosome karyotype analysis for early abortion villi from 129 cases of natural and ART pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭楠; 刘雨生; 周桂香; 何国平; 宋雅娴

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the differences of early spontaneous abortion karyotype analysis between natural pregnancy and assisted reproductive technology ( ART ) group, then to discuss age, the ways of insemination on the impact of genetic factors in spontaneous abortion. Methods Excluding the influence of endocrine, immunity, infection, and anatomical factors on abortion, 48 cases of natural conception( natural conception group ), 81 cases of the ART( ART group ) postoperative spontaneous abortion were included in the study. According to the early spontaneous abortion karyotype analysis between natural pregnancy and ART groups, to compare the differences of abortion embryonic karyotype abnormality rate, furthermore observe the age and ways of insemination impacting on results. Results The incidence of fetal chromosomal abnormalities in natural group and ART group were respectively 43. 75% and 59. 26% , and this difference was not statistically significant in the two groups. The incidence of fetal chromosomal abnormalities had no significant difference above the age of 35 and lower in natural group. But significant difference was found in ART group. Conclusion First trimester abortion after ART is closely related to fetal chromosomal abnormalities, but there was no significant different with natural group. And the incidence was difference with maternal age, and had nothing to do with the ways of insemination.%目的 探讨自然妊娠与辅助生殖技术(ART)术后妊娠早期流产的绒毛染色体核型分析结果差异及年龄、ART受精方式等因素对早期流产中绒毛染色体核型异常率的影响.方法 排除内分泌、免疫、感染、解剖等因素对流产的影响,将48例自然妊娠(自然妊娠组)、81例ART术后妊娠(ART组)早期流产患者纳入研究对象,对自然妊娠组、ART组早期流产绒毛组织进行染色体核型分析,比较流产胚胎的染色体核型异常率的差异及观察年龄、ART受精方式

  10. Positive and purifying selection on the Drosophila Y chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nadia D; Koerich, Leonardo B; Carvalho, Antonio Bernardo; Clark, Andrew G

    2014-10-01

    Y chromosomes, with their reduced effective population size, lack of recombination, and male-limited transmission, present a unique collection of constraints for the operation of natural selection. Male-limited transmission may greatly increase the efficacy of selection for male-beneficial mutations, but the reduced effective size also inflates the role of random genetic drift. Together, these defining features of the Y chromosome are expected to influence rates and patterns of molecular evolution on the Y as compared with X-linked or autosomal loci. Here, we use sequence data from 11 genes in 9 Drosophila species to gain insight into the efficacy of natural selection on the Drosophila Y relative to the rest of the genome. Drosophila is an ideal system for assessing the consequences of Y-linkage for molecular evolution in part because the gene content of Drosophila Y chromosomes is highly dynamic, with orthologous genes being Y-linked in some species whereas autosomal in others. Our results confirm the expectation that the efficacy of natural selection at weakly selected sites is reduced on the Y chromosome. In contrast, purifying selection on the Y chromosome for strongly deleterious mutations does not appear to be compromised. Finally, we find evidence of recurrent positive selection for 4 of the 11 genes studied here. Our results thus highlight the variable nature of the mode and impact of natural selection on the Drosophila Y chromosome. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Chromosome choreography: the meiotic ballet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Scott L; Hawley, R Scott

    2003-08-08

    The separation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis in eukaryotes is the physical basis of Mendelian inheritance. The core of the meiotic process is a specialized nuclear division (meiosis I) in which homologs pair with each other, recombine, and then segregate from each other. The processes of chromosome alignment and pairing allow for homolog recognition. Reciprocal meiotic recombination ensures meiotic chromosome segregation by converting sister chromatid cohesion into mechanisms that hold homologous chromosomes together. Finally, the ability of sister kinetochores to orient to a single pole at metaphase I allows the separation of homologs to two different daughter cells. Failures to properly accomplish this elegant chromosome dance result in aneuploidy, a major cause of miscarriage and birth defects in human beings.

  12. Bacterial chromosome organization and segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Anjana; Le, Tung B K; Laub, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    If fully stretched out, a typical bacterial chromosome would be nearly 1 mm long, approximately 1,000 times the length of a cell. Not only must cells massively compact their genetic material, but they must also organize their DNA in a manner that is compatible with a range of cellular processes, including DNA replication, DNA repair, homologous recombination, and horizontal gene transfer. Recent work, driven in part by technological advances, has begun to reveal the general principles of chromosome organization in bacteria. Here, drawing on studies of many different organisms, we review the emerging picture of how bacterial chromosomes are structured at multiple length scales, highlighting the functions of various DNA-binding proteins and the impact of physical forces. Additionally, we discuss the spatial dynamics of chromosomes, particularly during their segregation to daughter cells. Although there has been tremendous progress, we also highlight gaps that remain in understanding chromosome organization and segregation.

  13. Schizophrenia and chromosomal deletions

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    Lindsay, E.A.; Baldini, A. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Morris, M. A. [Univ. of Geneva School of Medicine, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    Recent genetic linkage analysis studies have suggested the presence of a schizophrenia locus on the chromosomal region 22q11-q13. Schizophrenia has also been frequently observed in patients affected with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS), a disorder frequently associated with deletions within 22q11.1. It has been hypothesized that psychosis in VCFS may be due to deletion of the catechol-o-methyl transferase gene. Prompted by these observations, we screened for 22q11 deletions in a population of 100 schizophrenics selected from the Maryland Epidemiological Sample. Our results show that there are schizophrenic patients carrying a deletion of 22q11.1 and a mild VCFS phenotype that might remain unrecognized. These findings should encourage a search for a schizophrenia-susceptibility gene within the deleted region and alert those in clinical practice to the possible presence of a mild VCFS phenotype associated with schizophrenia. 9 refs.

  14. Design of a method for generation of gas-phase hydroxyl radicals, and use of HPLC with fluorescence detection to assess the antioxidant capacity of natural essential oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezo, D; Salafranca, J; Nerín, C

    2006-08-01

    The use of natural antioxidants is of increasing importance in the human diet, because they are recognised as compounds essential to health which minimize or delay the aging process. Despite apparent simplicity, however, it is very difficult to measure and quantify such properties, for which a robust analytical method is required. Because oxidation usually is caused by the presence of OH* radicals, a new method involving the in-situ, vapour-phase generation of these radicals and their quantification in the presence and absence of potential antioxidant extracts has been developed. The oxidant atmosphere generated from hydrogen peroxide is carried by an air stream through an empty quartz chamber in which UV radiation promotes the formation of radicals by a photochemical reaction. The products then pass through a cartridge containing the essential oil, finally bubbling into an impinger containing an aqueous solution of salicylic acid, at pH 4.5, which reacts with the OH* radicals forming 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid. This solution is quantified by RP-HPLC using UV and fluorescence detectors connected in series. Detection and quantification limits for OH* radicals were approximately 0.01 pg g(-1) air. Description and optimization of the method are discussed, as also is the antioxidant performance of an extract of ginger (Zingiber officinale R.), which reduced the oxidation process by up to 92%.

  15. Validation of SNP allele frequencies determined by pooled next-generation sequencing in natural populations of a non-model plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rellstab, Christian; Zoller, Stefan; Tedder, Andrew; Gugerli, Felix; Fischer, Martin C

    2013-01-01

    Sequencing of pooled samples (Pool-Seq) using next-generation sequencing technologies has become increasingly popular, because it represents a rapid and cost-effective method to determine allele frequencies for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in population pools. Validation of allele frequencies determined by Pool-Seq has been attempted using an individual genotyping approach, but these studies tend to use samples from existing model organism databases or DNA stores, and do not validate a realistic setup for sampling natural populations. Here we used pyrosequencing to validate allele frequencies determined by Pool-Seq in three natural populations of Arabidopsis halleri (Brassicaceae). The allele frequency estimates of the pooled population samples (consisting of 20 individual plant DNA samples) were determined after mapping Illumina reads to (i) the publicly available, high-quality reference genome of a closely related species (Arabidopsis thaliana) and (ii) our own de novo draft genome assembly of A. halleri. We then pyrosequenced nine selected SNPs using the same individuals from each population, resulting in a total of 540 samples. Our results show a highly significant and accurate relationship between pooled and individually determined allele frequencies, irrespective of the reference genome used. Allele frequencies differed on average by less than 4%. There was no tendency that either the Pool-Seq or the individual-based approach resulted in higher or lower estimates of allele frequencies. Moreover, the rather high coverage in the mapping to the two reference genomes, ranging from 55 to 284x, had no significant effect on the accuracy of the Pool-Seq. A resampling analysis showed that only very low coverage values (below 10-20x) would substantially reduce the precision of the method. We therefore conclude that a pooled re-sequencing approach is well suited for analyses of genetic variation in natural populations.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Y chromosome infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Y chromosome infertility Y chromosome infertility Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Y chromosome infertility is a condition that affects the production of ...

  17. Identification of Mitosis-Specific Phosphorylation in Mitotic Chromosome-Associated Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Shinya; Kimura, Michiko; Takagi, Shunsuke; Toramoto, Iyo; Ishihama, Yasushi

    2016-09-01

    During mitosis, phosphorylation of chromosome-associated proteins is a key regulatory mechanism. Mass spectrometry has been successfully applied to determine the complete protein composition of mitotic chromosomes, but not to identify post-translational modifications. Here, we quantitatively compared the phosphoproteome of isolated mitotic chromosomes with that of chromosomes in nonsynchronized cells. We identified 4274 total phosphorylation sites and 350 mitosis-specific phosphorylation sites in mitotic chromosome-associated proteins. Significant mitosis-specific phosphorylation in centromere/kinetochore proteins was detected, although the chromosomal association of these proteins did not change throughout the cell cycle. This mitosis-specific phosphorylation might play a key role in regulation of mitosis. Further analysis revealed strong dependency of phosphorylation dynamics on kinase consensus patterns, thus linking the identified phosphorylation sites to known key mitotic kinases. Remarkably, chromosomal axial proteins such as non-SMC subunits of condensin, TopoIIα, and Kif4A, together with the chromosomal periphery protein Ki67 involved in the establishment of the mitotic chromosomal structure, demonstrated high phosphorylation during mitosis. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for regulation of chromosome restructuring in mitosis via protein phosphorylation. Our study generated a large quantitative database on protein phosphorylation in mitotic and nonmitotic chromosomes, thus providing insights into the dynamics of chromatin protein phosphorylation at mitosis onset.

  18. High frequency of centromere inactivation resulting in stable dicentric chromosomes of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fangpu; Lamb, Jonathan C; Birchler, James A

    2006-02-28

    Somatic chromosome spreads from maize (Zea mays L.) plants containing B-A translocation chromosomes undergoing the chromosome type breakage-fusion-bridge cycle were examined by FISH. The size and type of extra chromosomes varied among cells of the same individual. A collection of minichromosomes derived from the chromosome type breakage-fusion-bridge cycle was examined for the presence of stable dicentric chromosomes. Six of 23 chromosomes in the collection contained two regions with DNA sequences typical of centromeres. Functional analysis and immunolabeling of CENH3, the centromere-specific histone H3 variant, revealed only one functional centromere per chromosome, despite the duplicate centromere sequences. One plant was found with an inactive B centromere that had been translocated to the short arm of chromosome 9. The translocated centromere region appeared identical to that of a normal B chromosome. The inactivation of the centromeres was stable for at least four generations. By using dicentrics from dispensable chromosomes, centromere inactivation was found to be quite common under these circumstances.

  19. Cell-autonomous correction of ring chromosomes in human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershteyn, Marina; Hayashi, Yohei; Desachy, Guillaume; Hsiao, Edward C.; Sami, Salma; Tsang, Kathryn M.; Weiss, Lauren A.; Kriegstein, Arnold R.; Yamanaka, Shinya; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2014-03-01

    Ring chromosomes are structural aberrations commonly associated with birth defects, mental disabilities and growth retardation. Rings form after fusion of the long and short arms of a chromosome, and are sometimes associated with large terminal deletions. Owing to the severity of these large aberrations that can affect multiple contiguous genes, no possible therapeutic strategies for ring chromosome disorders have been proposed. During cell division, ring chromosomes can exhibit unstable behaviour leading to continuous production of aneuploid progeny with low viability and high cellular death rate. The overall consequences of this chromosomal instability have been largely unexplored in experimental model systems. Here we generated human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patient fibroblasts containing ring chromosomes with large deletions and found that reprogrammed cells lost the abnormal chromosome and duplicated the wild-type homologue through the compensatory uniparental disomy (UPD) mechanism. The karyotypically normal iPSCs with isodisomy for the corrected chromosome outgrew co-existing aneuploid populations, enabling rapid and efficient isolation of patient-derived iPSCs devoid of the original chromosomal aberration. Our results suggest a fundamentally different function for cellular reprogramming as a means of `chromosome therapy' to reverse combined loss-of-function across many genes in cells with large-scale aberrations involving ring structures. In addition, our work provides an experimentally tractable human cellular system for studying mechanisms of chromosomal number control, which is of critical relevance to human development and disease.

  20. c-Myc—Dependent Formation of Robertsonian Translocation Chromosomes in Mouse Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Guffei

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Robertsonian (Rb translocation chromosomes occur in human and murine cancers and involve the aberrant joining of two acrocentric chromosomes in humans and two telocentric chromosomes in mice. Mechanisms leading to their generation remain elusive, but models for their formation have been proposed. They include breakage of centromeric sequences and their subsequent fusions, centric misdivision, misparing between highly repetitive sequences of p-tel or p-arm repeats, and recombinational joining of centromeres and/or centromeric fusions. Here, we have investigated the role of the oncoprotein c-Myc in the formation of Rb chromosomes in mouse cells harboring exclusively telocentric chromosomes. In mouse plasmacytoma cells with constitutive c-Myc deregulation and in immortalized mouse lymphocytes with conditional c-Myc expression, we show that positional remodeling of centromeres in interphase nuclei coincides with the formation of Rb chromosomes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that c-Myc deregulation in a myc box II-dependent manner is sufficient to induce Rb translocation chromosomes. Because telomeric signals are present at all joined centromeres of Rb chromosomes, we conclude that c-Myc mediates Rb chromosome formation in mouse cells by telomere fusions at centromeric termini of telocentric chromosomes. Our findings are relevant to the understanding of nuclear chromosome remodeling during the initiation of genomic instability and tumorigenesis.

  1. Chromosomal aberrations and polymorphic evaluation in males with primary infertility from Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kate, Ushang V; Pokale, Yamini S; Jadhav, Ajinkya M; Gangane, Suresh D

    2014-10-01

    The chromosomal abnormalities are one of the important causes of male infertility. In view of the genetic risks for the next generation, the importance of careful evaluation of karyotype is essential. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities in infertile men with primary infertility from Indian population. The 78 infertile men with primary infertility, out of which 26 men were azoospermic, 19 men were oligospermic, 4 men were asthenospermic and 29 men were oligoasthenospermic were studied. Karyoptying was performed on peripheral blood lymphocytes by using the Giemsa trypsin banding (GTG) banding technique. Additional data was collected from published studies in Indian population leading to a total of 1814 cases. Chromosome analysis of 78 infertile males showed major chromosome abnormalities in 10.2%, with 6.4% in autosomal chromosome abnormalities and 3.8% in sex chromosome abnormalities. The incidence of major chromosome abnormalities in oligospermic males were 21% and azoospermic males were 15.4 %. Chromosomal polymorphic variants were identified to be 16.7%. Combining the data from other published studies identified 153/ 1814 (8.4%) infertile men of chromosomal abnormalities; with 10.8% in azoospermia, 7.3% in oligospermia and 7.3% in oligoasthenoteratospermic from India. The overall high prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities in infertile males suggests that the conventional chromosomal analysis is an important investigative tool for male infertility, especially prior to use of any assisted reproductive techniques.

  2. DNA-damage response during mitosis induces whole-chromosome missegregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoum, Samuel F; Kabeche, Lilian; Murnane, John P; Zaki, Bassem I; Compton, Duane A

    2014-11-01

    Many cancers display both structural (s-CIN) and numerical (w-CIN) chromosomal instabilities. Defective chromosome segregation during mitosis has been shown to cause DNA damage that induces structural rearrangements of chromosomes (s-CIN). In contrast, whether DNA damage can disrupt mitotic processes to generate whole chromosomal instability (w-CIN) is unknown. Here, we show that activation of the DNA-damage response (DDR) during mitosis selectively stabilizes kinetochore-microtubule (k-MT) attachments to chromosomes through Aurora-A and PLK1 kinases, thereby increasing the frequency of lagging chromosomes during anaphase. Inhibition of DDR proteins, ATM or CHK2, abolishes the effect of DNA damage on k-MTs and chromosome segregation, whereas activation of the DDR in the absence of DNA damage is sufficient to induce chromosome segregation errors. Finally, inhibiting the DDR during mitosis in cancer cells with persistent DNA damage suppresses inherent chromosome segregation defects. Thus, the DDR during mitosis inappropriately stabilizes k-MTs, creating a link between s-CIN and w-CIN. The genome-protective role of the DDR depends on its ability to delay cell division until damaged DNA can be fully repaired. Here, we show that when DNA damage is induced during mitosis, the DDR unexpectedly induces errors in the segregation of entire chromosomes, thus linking structural and numerical chromosomal instabilities. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Photochemical behavior of carbon nanotubes in natural waters: reactive oxygen species production and effects on •OH generation by Suwannee River fulvic acid, nitrate, and Fe (III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Ya; Wang, Qi; Ferronato, Corinne; Yang, Xi; Chovelon, Jean-Marc

    2016-10-01

    The photochemical activities of three kinds of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were investigated in the present study. Efficient procedures of dispersing the three kinds of carbon nanotubes in water were established, and the quantitative analysis methods were also developed by TOC-absorbance method. High pH value or low ionic strength of the colloidal solutions facilitated the dispersion of CNTs. The suspensions of three kinds of CNTs could generate singlet oxygen ((1)O2) and hydroxyl radical (•OH) under irradiation of simulated sunlight, while superoxide radical (O2 (•-)) was not detected. The steady-state concentrations of (1)O2 and •OH generated by these CNTs were also determined. The presence of CNTs in natural waters can affect the photochemical behavior of water constituents, such as nitrate, dissolved organic matter, and Fe(3+). Specifically, in nitrate solution, the presence of CNTs could inhibit the generation of •OH by nitrate through light screening effect, while the quenching effect of hydroxyl radicals by CNTs was not observed. Besides light screening effect, the three kinds of CNTs used in the experiments also have a strong inhibiting effect on the ability of DOM to produce •OH by binding to the active sites. Moreover, the adsorption of Fe(3+) on MWCNT-OH and MWCNT-COOH could lead to its inactivation of formation of •OH in acidic conditions. However, the presence of the three kinds of CNTs did not affect the ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) reaction of DOM-Fe (III) complex.

  4. Tissue-specific differences in the spatial interposition of X-chromosome and 3R chromosome regions in the malaria mosquito Anopheles messeae Fall.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleb Artemov

    Full Text Available Spatial organization of a chromosome in a nucleus is very important in biology but many aspects of it are still generally unresolved. We focused on tissue-specific features of chromosome architecture in closely related malaria mosquitoes, which have essential inter-specific differences in polytene chromosome attachments in nurse cells. We showed that the region responsible for X-chromosome attachment interacts with nuclear lamina stronger in nurse cells, then in salivary glands cells in Anopheles messeae Fall. The inter-tissue differences were demonstrated more convincingly in an experiment of two distinct chromosomes interposition in the nucleus space of cells from four tissues. Microdissected DNA-probes from nurse cells X-chromosome (2BC and 3R chromosomes (32D attachment regions were hybridized with intact nuclei of nurse cells, salivary gland cells, follicle epithelium cells and imaginal disсs cells in 3D-FISH experiments. We showed that only salivary gland cells and follicle epithelium cells have no statistical differences in the interposition of 2BC and 32D. Generally, the X-chromosome and 3R chromosome are located closer to each other in cells of the somatic system in comparison with nurse cells on average. The imaginal disсs cell nuclei have an intermediate arrangement of chromosome interposition, similar to other somatic cells and nurse cells. In spite of species-specific chromosome attachments there are no differences in interposition of nurse cells chromosomes in An. messeae and An. atroparvus Thiel. Nurse cells have an unusual chromosome arrangement without a chromocenter, which could be due to the special mission of generative system cells in ontogenesis and evolution.

  5. Generative Semantics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagha, Karim Nazari

    2011-01-01

    Generative semantics is (or perhaps was) a research program within linguistics, initiated by the work of George Lakoff, John R. Ross, Paul Postal and later McCawley. The approach developed out of transformational generative grammar in the mid 1960s, but stood largely in opposition to work by Noam Chomsky and his students. The nature and genesis of…

  6. Chromosome evolution in bears: reconstructing phylogenetic relationships by cross-species chromosome painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ying; Nie, Wenhui; Wang, Jinhuan; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Yang, Fengtang

    2004-01-01

    Genome-wide homology maps among dog (Canis familiaris, CFA, 2n = 78), African lion (Panthera leo, PLE, 2n = 38), clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa, NNE, 2n = 38) and Malayan sun bear (Helartos malayanus, HMA, 2n = 74) have been established by chromosome painting using a complete set of dog probes. In total, chromosome-specific painting probes from the 38 dog autosomes reveal 69, 69 and 73 conserved segments in African lion, clouded leopard and Malayan sun bear, respectively. The chromosomal painting results show that the African lion and clouded leopard have an identical karyotype which, in turn, is similar to that previously published for the cat (Felis catus