WorldWideScience

Sample records for generated in-situ hidratacion

  1. In Situ Solid Particle Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agui, Juan H.; Vijayakumar, R.

    2013-01-01

    Particle seeding is a key diagnostic component of filter testing and flow imaging techniques. Typical particle generators rely on pressurized air or gas sources to propel the particles into the flow field. Other techniques involve liquid droplet atomizers. These conventional techniques have drawbacks that include challenging access to the flow field, flow and pressure disturbances to the investigated flow, and they are prohibitive in high-temperature, non-standard, extreme, and closed-system flow conditions and environments. In this concept, the particles are supplied directly within a flow environment. A particle sample cartridge containing the particles is positioned somewhere inside the flow field. The particles are ejected into the flow by mechanical brush/wiper feeding and sieving that takes place within the cartridge chamber. Some aspects of this concept are based on established material handling techniques, but they have not been used previously in the current configuration, in combination with flow seeding concepts, and in the current operational mode. Unlike other particle generation methods, this concept has control over the particle size range ejected, breaks up agglomerates, and is gravity-independent. This makes this device useful for testing in microgravity environments.

  2. Next-generation in-situ science concepts and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muirhead, Brian; Varsi, Giulio

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the concepts of a next-generation in situ science program, named Sample Acquisition, Analysis, and Preservation (SAAP), established by NASA to develop critical technologies for remote identification, acquisition, processing, analysis, and preservation of materials for the in situ science, engineering characterization, and earth return. Special attention is given to the SAAP architecture, system design, remote sensing system, sample acquisition system, and methods for sample analysis. A diagram of the SAAP preliminary system conceptual design is included.

  3. Hydro-fluorination device with 'in situ' HF generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussier, H.; Peron, F.

    2012-01-01

    The reference pyro-chemistry process studied by the DRCP is based on an actinide reductive extraction in fluoride media. At the front end of the process, a hydro-fluorination step is needed in order to convert the oxides present in irradiated fuel into fluorides. This hydro-fluorination is carried out with HF gas at 350-500 degrees C. Very few experimental facilities, hot cells, or glove-boxes are equipped with operational HF gas lines: the building and commissioning of such HF lines is very complicated and expensive. This experimental device offers an alternative, enabling hydro-fluorination of small samples (approximate to 5g) of oxide fission product (FP) elements through a chemical reaction involving 'in situ' HF gas generation. A specific gas line would no longer be required, and the hydro-fluorination reaction could therefore be carried out in conventional hot cells or glove-boxes. Ten inactive runs were carried out without any particular problem; there were no gas leaks and no temperature control issues. More than seventeen FP samples were tested. The reliability of the hydro-fluorination set-up through a chemical reaction involving 'in situ' HF gas generation has been demonstrated, and therefore this set-up could be implemented in a hot cell. (authors)

  4. In situ corrosion monitoring of steam generators. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendig, M W; Isaacs, H S

    1978-06-01

    An ac electrochemical technique which meets the basic requirements for an in situ localized corrosion monitor within the secondary coolant of PWR steam generators has been investigated. The technique uses two electrodes to measure the electrochemical impedance of a surface in an occluded region with high heat flux. The impedance is related to the kinetics of corrosion. Marked decreases indicate the onset of a high corrosion rate. Experiments have demonstrated the ability of the technique to determine the onset of corrosion under conditions of high solution resistance and solution agitation due to local boiling. Experiments have shown the technique operates similarly in pressurized 300/sup 0/C water, 1,400 ppM in Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/.

  5. Special Resins for Stereolithography: In Situ Generation of Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Taormina

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The limited availability of materials with special properties represents one of the main limitations to a wider application of polymer-based additive manufacturing technologies. Filled resins are usually not suitable for vat photo-polymerization techniques such as stereolithography (SLA or digital light processing (DLP due to a strong increment of viscosity derived from the presence of rigid particles within the reactive suspension. In the present paper, the possibility to in situ generate silver nanoparticles (AgNPs starting from a homogeneous liquid system containing a well dispersed silver salt, which is subsequently reduced to metallic silver during stereolithographic process, is reported. The simultaneous photo-induced cross-linking of the acrylic resin produces a filled thermoset resin with thermal-mechanical properties significantly enhanced with respect to the unfilled resin, even at very low AgNPs concentrations. With this approach, the use of silver salts having carbon-carbon double bonds, such as silver acrylate and silver methacrylate, allows the formation of a nanocomposite structure in which the release of by-products is minimized due to the active role of all the reactive components in the three dimensional (3D-printing processes. The synergy, between this nano-technology and the geometrical freedom offered by SLA, could open up a wide spectrum of potential applications for such a material, for example in the field of food packaging and medical and healthcare sectors, considering the well-known antimicrobial effects of silver nanoparticles.

  6. Near-field issues - Investigation of gas generation in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szanto, Zs.; Svingor, E.; Palcsu, L.; Mihaly, M.; Futo, I.

    2001-01-01

    The Puespoekszilagy Radioactive Waste Treatment and Disposal Facility is a typical near-surface engineered repository consisting of concrete vaults and wells for the disposal of spent sources. It has received waste from the Paks Nuclear Power Plant, from various laboratories and medical institutions, and, in particular, has been the site for the disposal of a number of spent sources. The safety of the repository has not been the subject of any comprehensive assessment, and does not have a permanent license. In 15th of March an A-type concrete vault was opened and the work was focused on issues that are critical for safety: characterisation of the behavior of the wastes, the degradation of the packaging, the chemical environment in the vaults, the chemical behavior of relevant radionuclides and the processes determining any migration of any radionuclide from the engineered system. Generic data can be used on rates of steel corrosion but an in situ measurement of head space gas composition and a detailed laboratory analysis give more relevant data. In addition to the radionuclide inventory a general estimate of the type of materials present (metals, halogenated and non-halogenated plastics and rubbers, cellulosic, building materials, organic, biological, flammable liquids, materials that may give rise to the generation of gas, etc.) was made and from these results in respect of radioactive gases, it seemed that the gases to be addressed should be 14 C-labelled methane and carbon dioxide, 3 H-labelled hydrogen, water vapor and methane, and 222 Rn. Before removing the protective lids sampling of the headspace gas of the vaults was performed by a special gas outlet system through the concrete cap. One of the cells (Code: A5) contained unconditioned radioactive waste disposed in polythene bags into the vault, without any backfilling. The other cell (Code: A6) was backfilled with cement, so there was a small gas field between the top of the surface of the backfill and the

  7. Electrosleeve process for in-situ nuclear steam generator repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, R.A. [Ontario Hydro Technologies, Toronto, ON (Canada); Moran, T.E. [Framatome Technologies Inc., Lynchburg, VA (United States); Renaud, E. [Babcock and Wilcox Industries Ltd., Cambridge, ON (Canada)

    1997-07-01

    Degradation of steam generator (SG) tubing by localized corrosion is a widespread problem in the nuclear industry that can lead to costly forced out-ages, unit de-rating, SG replacement or even the permanent shutdown of a reactor. In response to the onset of SG tubing degradation at Ontario Hydro's Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS) Unit 5, and the determined unsuitability of conventional repair methods (mechanically expanded or welded sleeves) for Alloy 400, an alternative repair technology was developed. Electrosleeve is a non-intrusive, low-temperature process that involves the electrodeposition of a nanocrystalline nickel microalloy forming a continuously bonded, structural layer over the internal diameter of the degraded region. This technology is designed to provide a long-term pressure boundary repair, fully restoring the structural integrity of the damaged region to its original state. This paper describes the Electrosleeve process for SG tubing repair and the unique properties of the advanced sleeve material. The successful installation of Electrosleeves that have been in service for more than three years in Alloy 400 SG tubing at the Pickering-5 CANDU unit, the more recent extension of the technology to Alloy 600 and its demonstration in a U.S. pressurized water reactor (PWR), is presented. A number of PWR operators have requested plant operating technical specification changes to permit Electrosleeve SG tube repair. Licensing of the Electrosleeve by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is expected imminently. (author)

  8. In situ generation of the Ohira-Bestmann Reagent from stable sulfonyl azide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Tue Heesgaard; Kristensen, Jesper Langgaard

    2014-01-01

    We report an improved method for in situ generation of the Ohira-Bestmann reagent. Using the recently reported bench stable imidazole-1-sulfonyl azide as diazotransfer reagent, this new method represents a safe and scalable approach for the transformation of aldehydes into terminal alkynes...

  9. In Situ Thermal Generation of Silver Nanoparticles in 3D Printed Polymeric Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Fantino

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Polymer nanocomposites have always attracted the interest of researchers and industry because of their potential combination of properties from both the nanofillers and the hosting matrix. Gathering nanomaterials and 3D printing could offer clear advantages and numerous new opportunities in several application fields. Embedding nanofillers in a polymeric matrix could improve the final material properties but usually the printing process gets more difficult. Considering this drawback, in this paper we propose a method to obtain polymer nanocomposites by in situ generation of nanoparticles after the printing process. 3D structures were fabricated through a Digital Light Processing (DLP system by disolving metal salts in the starting liquid formulation. The 3D fabrication is followed by a thermal treatment in order to induce in situ generation of metal nanoparticles (NPs in the polymer matrix. Comprehensive studies were systematically performed on the thermo-mechanical characteristics, morphology and electrical properties of the 3D printed nanocomposites.

  10. Electrochemical selenium hydride generation with in situ trapping in graphite tube atomizers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šíma, Jan; Rychlovský, P.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 5 (2003), s. 919-930 ISSN 0584-8547 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/98/0754; GA ČR GA203/01/0453 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4031919 Keywords : hydride generation * electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry * In situ trapping Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.361, year: 2003

  11. Impact of in situ polymer coating on particle dispersion into solid laser-generated nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Philipp; Brandes, Gudrun; Schwenke, Andreas; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2011-03-21

    The crucial step in the production of solid nanocomposites is the uniform embedding of nanoparticles into the polymer matrix, since the colloidal properties or specific physical properties are very sensitive to particle dispersion within the nanocomposite. Therefore, we studied a laser-based generation method of a nanocomposite which enables us to control the agglomeration of nanoparticles and to increase the single particle dispersion within polyurethane. For this purpose, we ablated targets of silver and copper inside a polymer-doped solution of tetrahydrofuran by a picosecond laser (using a pulse energy of 125 μJ at 33.3 kHz repetition rate) and hardened the resulting colloids into solid polymers. Electron microscopy of these nanocomposites revealed that primary particle size, agglomerate size and particle dispersion strongly depend on concentration of the polyurethane added before laser ablation. 0.3 wt% polyurethane is the optimal polymer concentration to produce nanocomposites with improved particle dispersion and adequate productivity. Lower polyurethane concentration results in agglomeration whereas higher concentration reduces the production rate significantly. The following evaporation step did not change the distribution of the nanocomposite inside the polyurethane matrix. Hence, the in situ coating of nanoparticles with polyurethane during laser ablation enables simple integration into the structural analogue polymer matrix without additives. Furthermore, it was possible to injection mold these in situ-stabilized nanocomposites without affecting particle dispersion. This clarifies that sufficient in situ stabilization during laser ablation in polymer solution is able to prevent agglomeration even in a hot polymer melt.

  12. Obtention and characterization of chitosan / hydroxyapatite spheres generated in situ; Obtencao e caracterizacao de esferas de quitosana/hidroxiapatita gerada in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dantas, M.J.L.; Fidelis, T.B.; Carrodeguas, R.G.; Fook, M.V.L., E-mail: jucelia.lima@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais

    2016-07-01

    The objective was to produce spheres of chitosan-hydroxyapatite in situ (CS-HA) HA with different contents and evaluate their properties and behavior in vitro. CS levels were obtained containing different amounts of HA low crystallinity (20, 50 and 70% w / w). The HA was generated in situ within the CS spheres. To this precipitate was dissolved in CS CaHPO4 and the resulting suspension was shaped in the form of spheres by dripping in dissolution Na5P3O10 (TPP) at pH 8-9. The precipitated spheres were kept under constant stirring solution of the TPP and then lyophilized. The characterization was carried out by optical microscopy (OM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal gravimetric analysis (TG) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). From the results it was verified that the methodology was applied it was effective in producing the spheres and be able to generate a phase inorganic HA precursor. (author)

  13. Sphingomyelinase D activity in model membranes: structural effects of in situ generation of ceramide-1-phosphate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto P Stock

    Full Text Available The toxicity of Loxosceles spider venom has been attributed to a rare enzyme, sphingomyelinase D, which transforms sphingomyelin to ceramide-1-phosphate. The bases of its inflammatory and dermonecrotic activity, however, remain unclear. In this work the effects of ceramide-1-phosphate on model membranes were studied both by in situ generation of this lipid using a recombinant sphingomyelinase D from the spider Loxosceles laeta and by pre-mixing it with sphingomyelin and cholesterol. The systems of choice were large unilamellar vesicles for bulk studies (enzyme kinetics, fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering and giant unilamellar vesicles for fluorescence microscopy examination using a variety of fluorescent probes. The influence of membrane lateral structure on the kinetics of enzyme activity and the consequences of enzyme activity on the structure of target membranes containing sphingomyelin were examined. The findings indicate that: 1 ceramide-1-phosphate (particularly lauroyl ceramide-1-phosphate can be incorporated into sphingomyelin bilayers in a concentration-dependent manner and generates coexistence of liquid disordered/solid ordered domains, 2 the activity of sphingomyelinase D is clearly influenced by the supramolecular organization of its substrate in membranes and, 3 in situ ceramide-1-phosphate generation by enzymatic activity profoundly alters the lateral structure and morphology of the target membranes.

  14. Sphingomyelinase D activity in model membranes: structural effects of in situ generation of ceramide-1-phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Roberto P; Brewer, Jonathan; Wagner, Kerstin; Ramos-Cerrillo, Blanca; Duelund, Lars; Jernshøj, Kit Drescher; Olsen, Lars Folke; Bagatolli, Luis A

    2012-01-01

    The toxicity of Loxosceles spider venom has been attributed to a rare enzyme, sphingomyelinase D, which transforms sphingomyelin to ceramide-1-phosphate. The bases of its inflammatory and dermonecrotic activity, however, remain unclear. In this work the effects of ceramide-1-phosphate on model membranes were studied both by in situ generation of this lipid using a recombinant sphingomyelinase D from the spider Loxosceles laeta and by pre-mixing it with sphingomyelin and cholesterol. The systems of choice were large unilamellar vesicles for bulk studies (enzyme kinetics, fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering) and giant unilamellar vesicles for fluorescence microscopy examination using a variety of fluorescent probes. The influence of membrane lateral structure on the kinetics of enzyme activity and the consequences of enzyme activity on the structure of target membranes containing sphingomyelin were examined. The findings indicate that: 1) ceramide-1-phosphate (particularly lauroyl ceramide-1-phosphate) can be incorporated into sphingomyelin bilayers in a concentration-dependent manner and generates coexistence of liquid disordered/solid ordered domains, 2) the activity of sphingomyelinase D is clearly influenced by the supramolecular organization of its substrate in membranes and, 3) in situ ceramide-1-phosphate generation by enzymatic activity profoundly alters the lateral structure and morphology of the target membranes.

  15. Mass transfer and oxidation kinetics in an in situ ozone generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, A P; Panda, K K; Ananthi, S; Padmanabhan, K

    2004-01-01

    An in situ ozone generator design based on a novel type of corona discharge tube construction was tested to examine enhancements in mass transfer and ozonation efficiency over conventional systems. In this design, the discharge gap is kept juxtaposed to the tubular pathway through which the treatment fluid is passed. A porous inner electrode tube is employed in the discharge tube, and the generated ozone diffuses through this porous tube and dissolves and reacts with the contaminants in the fluid that is being treated. The inner porous ceramic tube is grounded while the outer glass electrode is positively charged for corona discharge. Oxidation studies conducted on Reactive Blue 19 dye indicate that the time required for 90% color removal is about half that of a conventional ozone generation and bubble diffusion system at the same ozone dosage.

  16. In situ ultrasonic examination of high-strength steam generator support bolts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jusino, A.

    1985-01-01

    Currently employed high-strength steam generator support bolting material (designed prior to ASME Section III Part NF or Component Supports), 38.1 mm in diameter, in combination with high preloads are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking because of the relatively low stress corrosion resistance (K/sub ISCC/) properties. These bolts are part of the pressurized water reactor steam generator supports at the integral support pads (three per steam generator, with each pad housing six, eight, or ten bolts depending on the design). The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission concerns for high-strength bolting were identified in NUREG-0577, ''Potential for Low Fracture Toughness and Laminar Tearing in PWR Steam Generator and Reactor Coolant Pump Supports,'' which was issued for comment on unresolved safety issue A-12. Subsequently, the bolting issues were addressed in generic issue B29. One of the issues deals specifically with high-strength bolting materials, which are vulnerable to stress corrosion cracking. A Westinghouse Owners Group funded program was established to develop in situ ultrasonic examination techniques to determine steam generator support bolting integrity at the head-to-shank and first-thread locations. This program was established in order to determine bolting integrity in place. Ultrasonic techniques were developed for both socket-head and flat-head bolt configurations. As a result of this program, in situ ultrasonic examination techniques were developed for examination of PWR steam generator support bolts. By employing these techniques utilities will be able to ensure the integrity of this in-place bolting without incurring the costs previously experienced during removal for surface examinations

  17. Mitigating hypoxic stress on pancreatic islets via in situ oxygen generating biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronel, Maria M; Geusz, Ryan; Stabler, Cherie L

    2017-06-01

    A major obstacle in the survival and efficacy of tissue engineered transplants is inadequate oxygenation, whereby unsupportive oxygen tensions result in significant cellular dysfunction and death within the implant. In a previous report, we developed an innovative oxygen generating biomaterial, termed OxySite, to provide supportive in situ oxygenation to cells and prevent hypoxia-induced damage. Herein, we explored the capacity of this biomaterial to mitigate hypoxic stress in both rat and nonhuman primate pancreatic islets by decreasing cell death, supporting metabolic activity, sustaining aerobic metabolism, preserving glucose responsiveness, and decreasing the generation of inflammatory cytokines. Further, the impact of supplemental oxygenation on in vivo cell function was explored by the transplantation of islets previously co-cultured with OxySite into a diabetic rat model. Transplant outcomes revealed significant improvement in graft efficacy for OxySite-treated islets, when transplanted within an extrahepatic site. These results demonstrate the potency of the OxySite material to mitigate activation of detrimental hypoxia-induced pathways in islets during culture and highlights the importance of in situ oxygenation on resulting islet transplant outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Preparation of cellulose composites with in situ generated copper nanoparticles using leaf extract and their properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadanand, V; Rajini, N; Varada Rajulu, A; Satyanarayana, B

    2016-10-05

    In the present work, copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) were in situ generated in cellulose matrix using Ocimum sanctum leaf extract as a reducing agent and aq. CuSO4 solution by diffusion process. Some CuNPs were also formed outside the film in the solution which were separated and viewed by Transmission electron microscope and Scanning electron microscope (SEM). The composite films showed good antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli bacteria when the CuNPs were generated using higher concentrated aq. CuSO4 solutions. The cellulose, matrix and the composite films were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and SEM techniques. The tensile strength of the composite films was lower than that of the matrix but still higher than the conventional polymers like polyethylene and polypropylene used for packaging applications. These biodegradable composite films can be considered for packaging and medical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. In situ particle generation during reactive ion etching of SiO sub 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resnick, P J [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Anderson, H M [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering

    1992-01-01

    Particulate contamination during IC fabrication is generally acknowledged as a major contributor to yield loss. In particular, plasma processes have the potential for generating copious quantities of process induced particulates. Ideally, in order to effectively control process generated particulate contamination, a fundamental understanding of the particulate generation and transport is essential. Although a considerable amount of effort has been expended to study particles in laboratory apparatus, only a limited amount of work has been performed in production line equipment with production processes. In these experiments, a Drytek Quad Model 480 single wafer etcher was used to etch blanket thermal SiO{sub 2} films on 150 mm substrates in fluorocarbon discharges. The effects of rf power, reactor pressure, and feed gas composition on particle production rates were evaluated. Particles were measured using an HYT downstream particle flux monitor. Surface particle deposition was measured using a Tencor Surfscan 4500, as well as advanced ex situ techniques. Particle morphology and composition were also determined ex situ. Response surface methodology was utilized to determine the process conditions under which particle generation was most pronounced. The use of in situ and ex situ techniques has provided some insight into the mechanisms involved for particle generation and particle dynamics within the plasma during oxide etching.

  20. Sphingomyelinase D activity in model membranes: structural effects of in situ generation of ceramide-1-phosphate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stock, Roberto; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Wagner, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    The toxicity of Loxosceles spider venom has been attributed to a rare enzyme, sphingomyelinase D, which transforms sphingomyelin to ceramide-1-phosphate. The bases of its inflammatory and dermonecrotic activity, however, remain unclear. In this work the effects of ceramide-1-phosphate on model...... membranes were studied both by in situ generation of this lipid using a recombinant sphingomyelinase D from the spider Loxosceles laeta and by pre-mixing it with sphingomyelin and cholesterol. The systems of choice were large unilamellar vesicles for bulk studies (enzyme kinetics, fluorescence spectroscopy...... and dynamic light scattering) and giant unilamellar vesicles for fluorescence microscopy examination using a variety of fluorescent probes. The influence of membrane lateral structure on the kinetics of enzyme activity and the consequences of enzyme activity on the structure of target membranes containing...

  1. Dibenzothiophene hydrodesulfurization over Ru promoted alumina based catalysts using in situ generated hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, Yaseen; Lu Yingzhou; Shen Chong; Li Chunxi

    2011-01-01

    Catalytic hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT) was carried out in a temperature range of 320-400 o C using in situ generated hydrogen coupled with the effect of selected organic additives for the first time. Four kinds of alumina based catalysts i.e. Co-Mo/Al 2 O 3 , Ni-Mo/Al 2 O 3 , Ru-Co-Mo/Al 2 O 3 and Ru-Ni-Mo/Al 2 O 3 were used for the desulfurization process, which were prepared following incipient impregnation method with fixed metal loadings (wt.%) of Co, Ni, Mo and Ru. The surface area, average pore diameter and pore volume distribution of the fresh and used catalysts were measured by N 2 adsorption using BET method. Catalytic activity was investigated in a batch autoclave reactor in the complete absence of external hydrogen gas. Addition and mutual reaction of specific quantities of water and ethanol provided the necessary in situ hydrogen for the desulfurization reaction. Organic additives like diethylene glycol (DEG), phenol, naphthalene, anthracene, o-xylene, tetralin, decalin and pyridine did impinge the HDS activity of the catalysts in different ways. Liquid samples from reaction products were quantitatively analyzed by HPLC technique while qualitative analyses were made using GC-MS. Both of these techniques showed that Ni-based catalysts were more active than Co-based ones at all conditions. Moreover, incorporation of Ru to both Co and Ni-based catalysts greatly promoted desulfurization activity of these catalysts. DBT conversion of up to 84% was achieved with Ru-Ni-Mo/Al 2 O 3 catalyst at 380 o C temperature for 11 h. Catalyst systems followed the HDS activity order as: Ru-Ni-Mo/Al 2 O 3 > Ni-Mo/Al 2 O 3 > Ru-Co-Mo/Al 2 O 3 > Co-Mo/Al 2 O 3 at all conditions. Cost effectiveness, mild operating conditions and reasonably high catalytic activity using in situ generated hydrogen mechanism proved our process to be useful for HDS of DBT.

  2. Dibenzothiophene hydrodesulfurization over Ru promoted alumina based catalysts using in situ generated hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhammad, Yaseen; Shen, Chong; Li, Chunxi [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); College of Chemical Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Lu, Yingzhou [College of Chemical Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2011-02-15

    Catalytic hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT) was carried out in a temperature range of 320-400 C using in situ generated hydrogen coupled with the effect of selected organic additives for the first time. Four kinds of alumina based catalysts i.e. Co-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ru-Co-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Ru-Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were used for the desulfurization process, which were prepared following incipient impregnation method with fixed metal loadings (wt.%) of Co, Ni, Mo and Ru. The surface area, average pore diameter and pore volume distribution of the fresh and used catalysts were measured by N{sub 2} adsorption using BET method. Catalytic activity was investigated in a batch autoclave reactor in the complete absence of external hydrogen gas. Addition and mutual reaction of specific quantities of water and ethanol provided the necessary in situ hydrogen for the desulfurization reaction. Organic additives like diethylene glycol (DEG), phenol, naphthalene, anthracene, o-xylene, tetralin, decalin and pyridine did impinge the HDS activity of the catalysts in different ways. Liquid samples from reaction products were quantitatively analyzed by HPLC technique while qualitative analyses were made using GC-MS. Both of these techniques showed that Ni-based catalysts were more active than Co-based ones at all conditions. Moreover, incorporation of Ru to both Co and Ni-based catalysts greatly promoted desulfurization activity of these catalysts. DBT conversion of up to 84% was achieved with Ru-Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst at 380 C temperature for 11 h. Catalyst systems followed the HDS activity order as: Ru-Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}> Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}> Ru-Co-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}> Co-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at all conditions. Cost effectiveness, mild operating conditions and reasonably high catalytic activity using in situ generated hydrogen mechanism proved our process to be useful for HDS of DBT. (author)

  3. Shape-and size-controlled Ag nanoparticles stabilized by in situ generated secondary amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramírez-Meneses, E.; Montiel-Palma, V.; Domínguez-Crespo, M.A.; Izaguirre-López, M.G.; Palacios-Gonzalez, E.; Dorantes-Rosales, H.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Ag nanoparticles were generated from Ag amido complexes AgN i Pr 2 and AgN(SiMe 3 ) 2 . • Ag nanoparticles were stabilized by in situ generated HN i Pr 2 or HN(SiMe 3 ) 2 . • 1 or 5 equiv. of ethylenediamine as additional capping agent decreases the average size of the particles. • Ethylenediamine favor the formation of spherical particles. - Abstract: Silver amides such as AgN i Pr 2 and AgN(SiMe 3 ) 2 have been employed successfully as precursors for the yield synthesis of silver nanoparticles under mild conditions of dihydrogen gas reduction (2 atm) in organic media. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the formation of silver nanoparticles with FCC structure, variously sized from 26 to 35 nm for AgN i Pr 2 and from 14 to 86 nm for AgN(SiMe 3 ) 2 , the synthesis could take place in absence of added stabilizers due to the in situ formation of secondary amines from the reaction of dihydrogen gas with the amide ligands of the silver precursor. Indeed, the presence of HNR 2 (R = iPr 2 , N(SiMe 3 ) 2 ) on the surface of the nanoparticle was confirmed by spectroscopic means. Finally, the addition of ethylenediamine as additional capping agent allowed not only the control of the structural characteristics of the resulting Ag nanoparticles (well-dispersed with spherical shape), but that regarding the nanoparticle size as it inhibited overgrowth, limiting it to ca. 25 nm

  4. Investigation and in situ removal of spatter generated during laser ablation of aluminium composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, A.C., E-mail: andrei.popescu@inflpr.ro [Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing, EMPA, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, 3602 Thun (Switzerland); National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Atomistilor 409, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Delval, C.; Shadman, S.; Leparoux, M. [Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing, EMPA, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, 3602 Thun (Switzerland)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Study of spatter generated during laser irradiation of an aluminium nanocomposite. • Number of droplets was 1.5–3 times higher for laser in depth vs surface focused beams. • High speed imaging revealed particles exploding in flight similar to a fireworks effect. • Three methods were selected for droplets removal in situ and the results are analyzed. - Abstract: Spatter generated during laser irradiation of an aluminium alloy nanocomposite (AlMg5 reinforced with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles) was monitored by high speed imaging. Droplets trajectory and speed were assessed by computerized image analysis. The effects of laser peak power and laser focusing on the plume expansion and expulsed droplet speeds were studied in air or under argon flow. It was found that the velocity of visible droplets expulsed laterally or at the end of the plume emission from the metal surface was not dependent on the plasma plume speed. The neighbouring area of irradiation sites was studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Droplets deposited on the surface were classified according to their size and counted using a digital image processing software. It was observed that the number of droplets on surface was 1.5–3 times higher when the laser beam was focused in depth as compared to focused beams, even though the populations average diameter were comparable. Three methods were selected for removing droplets in situ, during plume expansion: an argon gas jet crossing the plasma plume, a fused silica plate collector transparent to the laser wavelength placed parallel to the irradiated surface and a mask placed onto the aluminium composite surface. The argon gas jet was efficient only for low power irradiation conditions, the fused silica plate failed in all tested conditions and the mask was successful for all irradiation regimes.

  5. Shape-and size-controlled Ag nanoparticles stabilized by in situ generated secondary amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramírez-Meneses, E., E-mail: esther.ramirez@ibero.mx [Departamento de Ingeniería y Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Iberoamericana, Prolongación Paseo de la Reforma 880, Lomas de Santa Fe, Distrito Federal C.P. 01219 (Mexico); Montiel-Palma, V. [Centro de Investigaciones Químicas, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001 Col. Chamilpa, Cuernavaca, Morelos C.P. 62209 (Mexico); Domínguez-Crespo, M.A.; Izaguirre-López, M.G. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada-IPN, Unidad Altamira. Km 14.5 Carretera Tampico-Puerto Industrial, 89600 Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Palacios-Gonzalez, E. [Laboratorio de Microscopia de Ultra alta Resolución, Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Eje Central Lázaro Cárdenas No. 152, C.P. 07730 México D.F. (Mexico); Dorantes-Rosales, H. [Departamento de Metalurgia, E.S.I.Q.I.E.-I.P.N., Unidad Profesional Adolfo López Mateos, Zacatenco, Delegación. Gustavo A. Madero, C.P. 07738 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Ag nanoparticles were generated from Ag amido complexes AgN{sup i}Pr{sub 2} and AgN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}. • Ag nanoparticles were stabilized by in situ generated HN{sup i}Pr{sub 2} or HN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}. • 1 or 5 equiv. of ethylenediamine as additional capping agent decreases the average size of the particles. • Ethylenediamine favor the formation of spherical particles. - Abstract: Silver amides such as AgN{sup i}Pr{sub 2} and AgN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2} have been employed successfully as precursors for the yield synthesis of silver nanoparticles under mild conditions of dihydrogen gas reduction (2 atm) in organic media. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the formation of silver nanoparticles with FCC structure, variously sized from 26 to 35 nm for AgN{sup i}Pr{sub 2} and from 14 to 86 nm for AgN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}, the synthesis could take place in absence of added stabilizers due to the in situ formation of secondary amines from the reaction of dihydrogen gas with the amide ligands of the silver precursor. Indeed, the presence of HNR{sub 2} (R = iPr{sub 2}, N(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}) on the surface of the nanoparticle was confirmed by spectroscopic means. Finally, the addition of ethylenediamine as additional capping agent allowed not only the control of the structural characteristics of the resulting Ag nanoparticles (well-dispersed with spherical shape), but that regarding the nanoparticle size as it inhibited overgrowth, limiting it to ca. 25 nm.

  6. Determination of tellurium by hydride generation with in situ trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matusiewicz, H.; Krawczyk, M. [Politechn Poznanska, Poznan (Poland)

    2007-03-15

    The analytical performance of coupled hydride generation - integrated atom trap (HG-IAT) atomizer flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) system was evaluated for determination of Te in reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment), coal fly ash and garlic. Tellurium, using formation of H{sub 2}Te vapors, is atomized in air-acetylene flame-heated IAT. A new design HG-IAT-FAAS hyphenated technique that would exceed the operational capabilities of existing arrangernents (a water-cooled single silica tube, double-slotted quartz tube or an 'integrated trap') was investigated. An improvement in detection limit was achieved compared with using either of the above atom trapping techniques separately. The concentration detection limit, defined as 3 times the blank standard deviation (3{sigma}), was 0.9 ng mL{sup -1} for Te. For a 2 min in situ preconcentration time (sample volume of 2 mL), sensitivity enhancement compared to flame AAS, was 222 fold, using the hydride generation atom trapping technique. The sensitivity can be further improved by increasing the collection time. The precision, expressed as RSD, was 7.0% (n = 6) for Te. The accuracy of the method was verified using a certified reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment) by aqueous standard calibration curves. The measured Te contents of the reference material was in agreement with the information value. The method was successfully applied to the determination of tellurium in coal fly ash and garlic.

  7. Electrochemically Smart Bimetallic Materials Featuring Group 11 Metals: In-situ Conductive Network Generation and Its Impact on Cell Capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Esther [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2016-11-30

    Our results for this program “Electrochemically smart bimetallic materials featuring Group 11 metals: in-situ conductive matrix generation and its impact on battery capacity, power and reversibility” have been highly successful: 1) we demonstrated material structures which generated in-situ conductive networks through electrochemical activation with increases in conductivity up to 10,000 fold, 2) we pioneered in situ analytical methodology to map the cathodes at several stages of discharge through the use of Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction (EDXRD) to elucidate the kinetic dependence of the conductive network formation, and 3) we successfully designed synthetic methodology for direct control of material properties including crystallite size and surface area which showed significant impact on electrochemical behavior.

  8. Technology on In-Situ Gas Generation to Recover Residual Oil Reserves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayavur Bakhtiyarov

    2008-02-29

    the sweep efficiency of the in-situ generated CO{sub 2} gas. A set of core flood experiments were conducted to define effect of surfactant on recovery efficiency. The results demonstrated obvious advantages of the foamy system over the brine solution in order to achieve higher sweep efficiency and recovery coefficient. It is shown that a slug injection is not an efficient method for mixing GY and GF solutions and it can't generate considerable gas inside the slim-tube.

  9. In situ generated D-peptidic nanofibrils as multifaceted apoptotic inducers to target cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xuewen; Zhou, Jie; Wang, Huainin; Shi, Junfeng; Kuang, Yi; Zeng, Wu; Yang, Zhimou; Xu, Bing

    2017-02-16

    Nanofibrils of small molecules, as a new class of biofunctional entities, exhibit emergent properties for controlling cell fates, but the relevant mechanism remains to be elucidated and the in vivo effect has yet to be examined. Here, we show that D-peptide nanofibrils, generated by enzyme-instructed self-assembly (EISA), pleiotropically activate extrinsic death signaling for selectively killing cancer cells. Catalyzed by alkaline phosphatases and formed in situ on cancer cells, D-peptide nanofibrils present autocrine proapoptotic ligands to their cognate receptors in a juxtacrine manner, as well as directly cluster the death receptors. As multifaceted initiators, D-peptide nanofibrils induce apoptosis of cancer cells without harming normal cells in a co-culture, kill multidrug-resistant (MDR) cancer cells, boost the activities of anticancer drugs, and inhibit tumor growth in a murine model. Such a supramolecular cellular biochemical process (consisting of reaction, assembly, and binding) for multi-targeting or modulating protein-protein interaction networks ultimately may lead to new ways for combating cancer drug resistance.

  10. In-Situ Photoexcitation-Induced Suppression of Point Defect Generation in Ion Implanted Silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, C.R.; Rozgonyi, G.A.; Yarykin, N.; Zuhr, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The formation of vacancy-related defects in n-type silicon has been studied immediately after implantation of He, Si, or Ge ions at 85 K using in-situ DLTS. A-center concentrations in He-implanted samples reach a maximum immediately after implantation, whereas, with Si or Ge ion implanted samples they continuously increase during subsequent anneals. It is proposed that defect clusters, which emit vacancies during anneals, are generated in the collision cascades of Si or Ge ions. An illumination-induced suppression of A-center formation is seen immediately after implantation of He ions at 85 K. This effect is also observed with Si or Ge ions, but only after annealing. The suppression of vacancy complex formation via photoexcitation is believed to occur due to an enhanced recombination of defects during ion implantation, and results in reduced number of vacancies remaining in the defect clusters. In p-type silicon, a reduction in K-center formation and an enhanced migration of defects are concurrently observed in the illuminated sample implanted with Si ions. These observations are consistent with a model where the injection of excess carriers modifies the defect charge state and impacts their diffusion

  11. Next generation in-situ optical Raman sensor for seawater investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomijeca, A.; Kwon, Y.-H.; Ahmad, H.; Kronfeldt, H.-D.

    2012-04-01

    We introduce the next generation of optical sensors based on a combination of surfaced enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) suited for investigations of tiny concentrations of pollutions in the seawater. First field measurements were carried out in the Arctic area which is of global interest since it is more affected by global warming caused climatic changes than any other areas of our planet and it is a recipient for many toxic organic pollutants. A significant long-range atmospheric transport of pollutants to Svalbard is mainly originated from industrialized countries in Europe and North America during the last decades. Therefore, the main interest is to investigate the Arctic water column and also the sediments. Standard chemical methods for water/sediment analysis are extremely accurate but complex and time-consuming. The primary objective of our study was to develop a fast response in-situ optical sensor for easy to use and quick analysis. The system comprises several components: a handheld measurement head containing a 671 nm microsystem diode laser and the Raman optical bench, a laser driver electronics board, a custom-designed miniature spectrometer with an optical resolution of 8 cm-1 and a netbook to control the spectrometer as well as for data evaluation. We introduced for the first time the portable Raman sensor system on an Artic sea-trial during a three week cruise on board of the James Clark Ross research vessel in August 2011. Numerous Raman and SERS measurements followed by SERDS evaluations were taken around locations 78° N and 9° E. Different SERS substrates developed for SERS measurements in sea-water were tested for their capability to detect different substances (PAHs) in the water down to very small (nmol/l) concentrations. Stability tests of the substrates were carried out also for the applicability of our system e.g. on a mooring. Details of the in-situ Raman sensor were presented

  12. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH Signal Analysis Using Automated Generated Projection Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingwei Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH tests provide promising molecular imaging biomarkers to more accurately and reliably detect and diagnose cancers and genetic disorders. Since current manual FISH signal analysis is low-efficient and inconsistent, which limits its clinical utility, developing automated FISH image scanning systems and computer-aided detection (CAD schemes has been attracting research interests. To acquire high-resolution FISH images in a multi-spectral scanning mode, a huge amount of image data with the stack of the multiple three-dimensional (3-D image slices is generated from a single specimen. Automated preprocessing these scanned images to eliminate the non-useful and redundant data is important to make the automated FISH tests acceptable in clinical applications. In this study, a dual-detector fluorescence image scanning system was applied to scan four specimen slides with FISH-probed chromosome X. A CAD scheme was developed to detect analyzable interphase cells and map the multiple imaging slices recorded FISH-probed signals into the 2-D projection images. CAD scheme was then applied to each projection image to detect analyzable interphase cells using an adaptive multiple-threshold algorithm, identify FISH-probed signals using a top-hat transform, and compute the ratios between the normal and abnormal cells. To assess CAD performance, the FISH-probed signals were also independently visually detected by an observer. The Kappa coefficients for agreement between CAD and observer ranged from 0.69 to 1.0 in detecting/counting FISH signal spots in four testing samples. The study demonstrated the feasibility of automated FISH signal analysis that applying a CAD scheme to the automated generated 2-D projection images.

  13. In-Situ Generation of Polymer Concrete Construction Materials, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Expanding the capability of human exploration is a primary goal for NASA and the In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) program which focuses on transforming available...

  14. In situ fluorescence spectroscopy correlates ionomer degradation to reactive oxygen species generation in an operating fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Venkateshkumar; Arges, Christopher G; Ramani, Vijay

    2013-11-21

    The rate of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) of an operating proton exchange member fuel cell (PEMFC) was monitored using in situ fluorescence spectroscopy. A modified barrier layer was introduced between the PEM and the electrocatalyst layer to eliminate metal-dye interactions and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) effects during measurements. Standard fuel cell operating parameters (temperature, relative humidity, and electrode potential) were systematically varied to evaluate their influence on the rate of ROS generation during PEMFC operation. Independently, the macroscopic rate of PEM degradation was measured by monitoring the fluoride ion emission rate (FER) in the effluent stream at each operating condition. The ROS generation reaction rate constant (estimated from the in situ fluorescence experiments) correlated perfectly with the measured FER across all conditions, demonstrating unequivocally for the first time that a direct correlation exists between in situ ROS generation and PEM macroscopic degradation. The activation energy for ROS generation within the PEM was estimated to be 12.5 kJ mol(-1).

  15. Laser Based In Situ Techniques: Novel Methods for Generating Extreme Conditions in TEM Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taheri, M; Lagrange, T; Reed, B; Armstrong, M; Campbell, G; DeHope, W; Kim, J; King, W; Masiel, D; Browning, N

    2008-02-25

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) is introduced as a novel tool for in situ processing of materials. Examples of various types of dynamic studies outline the advantages and differences of laser-based heating in the DTEM in comparison to conventional (resistive) heating in situ TEM methods. We demonstrate various unique capabilities of the drive laser, namely, in situ processing of nanoscale materials, rapid and high temperature phase transformations, and controlled thermal activation of materials. These experiments would otherwise be impossible without the use of the DTEM drive laser. Thus, the potential of the DTEM to as a new technique to process and characterize the growth of a myriad of micro and nanostructures is demonstrated.

  16. In-situ generation of chlorine dioxide for surface decontamination of produce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruits and vegetables, particularly fresh-cut products, are frequently contaminated with bacterial pathogens and implicated in foodborne illnesses. The objective of this study was to develop a unique in-situ sequential surface decontamination method for produce using sodium chlorite and acid. The ...

  17. IN SITU neutron diffraction study of stresses generated by shape memory alloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šittner, Petr; Lukáš, Petr; Novák, Václav; Neov, Dimitar; Ceretti, M.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 9, - (2001), s. 143-150 ISSN 1023-8166 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1048107; GA ČR GV202/97/K038 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : IN SITU neutron diffraction * shape memory alloy * martensitic transformation compression - test Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  18. Fabrication of Cheap Optical Transducers (CHOTs) on film carriers for in-situ application and generation of surface acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageeva, V.; Stratoudaki, T.; Clark, M.; Somekh, M. G.

    2015-01-01

    Cheap optical transducers (CHOTs) are patterns on the surface of a component activated by lasers to generate and detect ultrasound. Excited optically, with minimal surface impact, and fully customizable, CHOTs provide a simple alternative to conventional piezoelectric transducers, offering wireless, remote operation. Of particular interest is application of CHOTs for in-situ ultrasonic inspection of hard-to reach and complex-geometry components such as those of aero-engines. A suitable fabrication method has been developed to allow in-situ application of CHOTs onto large size and curved components, as well as those already in service, challenging for current laboratory-based micro-patterning methods. This work describes the fabrication of a transferable g-CHOT for generation of ultrasound. The g- CHOT has been made on an SU8 carrier film using a sacrificial polystyrene layer, allowing the transducer to be transferred from the substrate and subsequently delivered and applied to the surface of the sample in-situ. The functionality of the fabricated transducer is demonstrated by detection of the Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW) generated by the g-CHOT transferred onto glass and aluminium samples.

  19. A cascade synthesis of aminohydantoins using in situ-generated N-substituted isocyanates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent-Rocan, Jean-François; Clavette, Christian; Leckett, Kyle; Beauchemin, André M

    2015-03-02

    Nitrogen-substituted isocyanates are rarely utilized but powerful building blocks for the development of cascade reactions in heterocyclic synthesis. These reactive amphoteric intermediates can be accessed in situ via an equilibrium that allows controlled reactivity in the presence of bifunctional partners such as α-amino esters. A cascade reaction has been carried out that forms 3-aminohydantoin derivatives using simple phenoxycarbonyl derivatives of hydrazides and hydrazones as precursors of N-substituted-isocyanates. This method allows rapid assembly of complex aminohydantoin derivatives, including analogues of medicinally-relevant compounds, using simple reactants. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. as heterogeneous enantioselective epoxidation catalyst using in situ generated dimethyldioxirane as oxidant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Cubillos

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se investigó la actividad catalítica del catalizador de Jacobsen inmovilizado en Al-MCMC-41 y en NH2-Si-MCM-41 en la epoxidación enantioselectiva de tres olefinas proquirales, utilizando dimetildioxirano generado in situ como agente oxidante. Con este agente oxidante, el catalizador no sufrió cambios significativos en su estructura química. El catalizador se reutilizó exitosamente, cuando se inmovilizó por enlace químico covalente a través del ligando de salen.

  1. Ultrashort peptide nanogels release in situ generated silver manoparticles to combat emerging antimicrobial resistance strains

    KAUST Repository

    Seferji, Kholoud

    2017-01-08

    Nanogels made from self-assembling ultrashort peptides (3-6 amino acids in size) are promising biomaterials for various biomedical applications such as tissue engineering, drug delivery, regenerative medicine, microbiology and biosensing.We have developed silver-releasing peptide nanogels with promising wound care applications. The peptide nanogels allow a precise control of in situ syntesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), using soley short UV radiation and no other chemical reducing agent. We propose these silver-releasing nanogels as excellent biomaterial to combat emerging antimicrobial resistant strains.

  2. Construction and biofunctional evaluation of electrospun vascular graft loaded with selenocystamine for in situ catalytic generation of nitric oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Siyuan; An, Jun; Weng, Lei [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials for Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Li, Yandong [Institute of Polymer Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Xu, Han; Wang, Yaping; Ding, Dan; Kong, Deling [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials for Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Wang, Shufang, E-mail: wangshufang@nankai.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials for Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2014-12-01

    Construction and biofunctional evaluation of a novel vascular graft with in situ catalytic generation of nitric oxide were described in this paper. Poly α-lysine and poly (γ-glutamic acid) were deposited alternately onto the surface of an electrospun poly ε-caprolactone matrix via electrostatic layer-by-layer self-assembly, and then selenocystamine was loaded as a catalyst. Measurement of in vitro catalytic generation of nitric oxide demonstrated that this catalyst-loaded material could considerably accelerate the release of nitric oxide from S-nitrosoglutathione. A fibroblast proliferation assay showed that the material possessed satisfactory cellular compatibility. The catalyst-loaded material could inhibit the spread of smooth muscle cells in the presence of nitric oxide donors. In arteriovenous-shunt experiment, the catalyst-loaded graft exhibited good anti-thrombotic property where it could prevent acute thrombosis by decreasing the adhesion and activation of platelets and other blood cells. These data suggest a new method of building vascular grafts with improved hemocompatibility and biological functions. - Highlights: • A porous small-diameter vascular graft was prepared by electrospinning. • Selenocystamine was loaded for in situ catalytic and sustained NO generation. • There was a significant catalytic NO generation on the catalyst-loaded sample. • The spread of smooth muscle cells was inhibited on the catalyst-loaded sample. • The catalyst-loaded sample showed anti-thrombotic property in AV-shunt experiment.

  3. Gold-catalyzed tandem cycloisomerization/functionalization of in situ generated α-oxo gold carbenes in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Cang-Hai; Li, Long; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Shuang; Shu, Chao; Xie, Yun-Er; Yu, Yong-Fei; Ye, Long-Wu

    2014-10-03

    A gold-catalyzed tandem cycloisomerization/functionalization of in situ generated α-oxo gold carbenes in water has been developed, which provides ready access to highly functionalized indole derivatives from o-alkynyl anilines and ynamides. Importantly, gold serves dual catalytic roles to mediate both the cycloisomerization of o-alkynyl anilines and the intermolecular oxidation of ynamides at the same time, thus providing a new type of concurrent tandem catalysis. The use of readily available starting materials, a simple procedure, and mild reaction conditions are other notable features of this method.

  4. Preparation and properties of cellulose nanocomposite films with in situ generated copper nanoparticles using Terminalia catappa leaf extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthulakshmi, L; Rajini, N; Nellaiah, H; Kathiresan, T; Jawaid, M; Rajulu, A Varada

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) were in situ generated inside cellulose matrix using Terminalia catappa leaf extract as a reducing agent. During this process, some CuNPs were also formed outside the matrix. The CuNPs formed outside the matrix were observed with transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Majority of the CuNPs formed outside the matrix were in the size range of 21-30nm. The cellulose/CuNP composite films were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic, X-Ray diffraction and thermogravimetric techniques. The crystallinity of the cellulose/CuNP composite films was found to be lower than that of the matrix indicating rearrangement of cellulose molecules by in situ generated CuNPs. Further, the expanded diffractogram of the composite films indicated the presence of a mixture of Cu, CuO and Cu 2 O nanoparticles. The thermal stability of the composites was found to be lower than that of the composites upto 350°C beyond which a reverse trend was observed. This was attributed to the catalytic behaviour of CuNPs for early degradation of the composites. The composite films possessed sufficient tensile strength which can replace polymer packaging films like polyethylene. Further, the cellulose/CuNP composite films exhibited good antibacterial activity against E.coli bacteria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Hydrodistillation and in situ microwave-generated hydrodistillation of fresh and dried mint leaves: a comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orio, Laura; Cravotto, Giancarlo; Binello, Arianna; Pignata, Giuseppe; Nicola, Silvana; Chemat, Farid

    2012-12-01

    Hydrodistillation (HD) has been used since ancient times for the extraction of essential oils (EO). Despite the intrinsic limitations of this technique, it remains the most common method both in the laboratory and on an industrial scale. The main drawbacks are the long extraction time involved and the risk of thermal degradation. Over the last decade, microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and in situ microwave-generated hydrodistillation (MGH) have been shown to be the most promising techniques in improving plant extraction and hydrodistillation. In this study we compare HD with MGH in the extraction of several mint species cultivated in Piedmont: Mentha spicata L. var. rubra, Mentha spicata L. var. viridis and Mentha piperita L. MGH requires either fresh plant or rehydrated material, it is extremely fast and allows a reduction in energy consumption and overall cost. All the EO have been analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A mechanism of microwave-generated essential oil extraction has been proposed to explain the differences in the composition of the oil obtained from this environmentally friendly technique. The yields and composition percentages of the EO obtained by HD and in situ MGH of fresh and dried mint leaves lie in a relatively narrow range, although MGH is faster. MW polarization effects and the water solubility of the components influence extract composition. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Support effects in catalysis studied by in-situ sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and in-situ x-ray spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, Griffin John [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-04-14

    Here, kinetic measurements are paired with in-situ spectroscopic characterization tools to investigate colloidally based, supported Pt catalytic model systems in order to elucidate the mechanisms by which metal and support work in tandem to dictate activity and selectivity. The results demonstrate oxide support materials, while inactive in absence of Pt nanoparticles, possess unique active sites for the selective conversion of gas phase molecules when paired with an active metal catalyst.

  7. In Situ Generation of Chlorine Dioxide for Surface Decontamination of Produce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Cheng-An; Huang, Lihan; Wu, Vivian Chi-Hua

    2017-04-01

    Fresh fruits and vegetables are frequently contaminated with bacterial pathogens and implicated in foodborne illnesses. The objective of this study was to develop a unique surface decontamination method for produce using sodium chlorite and an acid in a sequential treatment. The surfaces of cantaloupe rinds, peels of cucumbers, stem scars of grape tomatoes, and leaves of baby spinach were inoculated with Salmonella or Listeria monocytogenes at 5 to 6 log CFU/g, submerged in 1.6 to 4% sodium chlorite solutions for 10 or 30 min, dried for 20 min, and then soaked in 6 mM hydrogen chloride (HCl) for 10 or 30 min and dried for 20 min. Control samples were treated with deionized water, sodium chlorite, HCl, or a premixed solution of sodium chlorite and HCl for comparison. The control treatments reduced the levels of both pathogens on the samples by only 0.3 to 2.9 log CFU/g, whereas the sequential treatment caused significantly higher reductions (P decontamination resulting from the sequential treatment was attributed to the in situ formation of chlorine dioxide within the plant tissues under the surface by the reaction between sodium chlorite absorbed by the produce and HCl. These results suggest that the sequential use of sodium chlorite and acid is a potentially effective treatment for elimination of foodborne pathogens on produce.

  8. Electrochemical generation of mercury cold vapor and its in-situ trapping in gold-covered graphite tube atomizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerveny, Vaclav; Rychlovsky, Petr; Netolicka, Jarmila; Sima, Jan

    2007-01-01

    The combination of more efficient flow-through electrochemical mercury cold vapor generation with its in-situ trapping in a graphite tube atomizer is described. This coupled technique has been optimized to attain the maximum sensitivity for Hg determination and to minimize the limits of detection and determination. A laboratory constructed thin-layer flow-through cell with a platinum cathode served as the cold vapor generator. Various cathode arrangements with different active surface areas were tested. Automated sampling equipment for the graphite atomizer with an untreated fused silica capillary was used for the introduction of the mercury vapor. The inner surface of the graphite tube was covered with a gold foil placed against the sampling hole. The results attained for the electrochemical mercury cold vapor generation (an absolute limit of detection of 80 pg; peak absorbance, 3σ criterion) were compared with the traditional vapor generation using NaBH 4 as the reducing agent (an absolute limit of detection of 124 pg; peak absorbance, 3σ criterion). The repeatability at the 5 ng ml -1 level was better than 4.1% (RSD) for electrochemical mercury vapor generation and better than 5.6% for the chemical cold vapor generation. The proposed method was applied to the determination the of Hg contents in a certified reference material and in spiked river water samples

  9. Development of a novel miniature detonation-driven shock tube assembly that uses in situ generated oxyhydrogen mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janardhanraj, S.; Jagadeesh, G.

    2016-01-01

    A novel concept to generate miniature shockwaves in a safe, repeatable, and controllable manner in laboratory confinements using an in situ oxyhydrogen generator has been proposed and demonstrated. This method proves to be more advantageous than existing methods because there is flexibility to vary strength of the shockwave, there is no need for storage of high pressure gases, and there is minimal waste disposal. The required amount of oxyhydrogen mixture is generated using alkaline electrolysis that produces hydrogen and oxygen gases in stoichiometric quantity. The rate of oxyhydrogen mixture production for the newly designed oxyhydrogen generator is found to be around 8 ml/s experimentally. The oxyhydrogen generator is connected to the driver section of a specially designed 10 mm square miniature shock tube assembly. A numerical code that uses CANTERA software package is used to predict the properties of the driver gas in the miniature shock tube. This prediction along with the 1-D shock tube theory is used to calculate the properties of the generated shockwave and matches reasonably well with the experimentally obtained values for oxyhydrogen mixture fill pressures less than 2.5 bars. The miniature shock tube employs a modified tri-clover clamp assembly to facilitate quick changing of diaphragm and replaces the more cumbersome nut and bolt system of fastening components. The versatile nature of oxyhydrogen detonation-driven miniature shock tube opens up new horizons for shockwave-assisted interdisciplinary applications.

  10. Development of a novel miniature detonation-driven shock tube assembly that uses in situ generated oxyhydrogen mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janardhanraj, S.; Jagadeesh, G., E-mail: jaggie@aero.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2016-08-15

    A novel concept to generate miniature shockwaves in a safe, repeatable, and controllable manner in laboratory confinements using an in situ oxyhydrogen generator has been proposed and demonstrated. This method proves to be more advantageous than existing methods because there is flexibility to vary strength of the shockwave, there is no need for storage of high pressure gases, and there is minimal waste disposal. The required amount of oxyhydrogen mixture is generated using alkaline electrolysis that produces hydrogen and oxygen gases in stoichiometric quantity. The rate of oxyhydrogen mixture production for the newly designed oxyhydrogen generator is found to be around 8 ml/s experimentally. The oxyhydrogen generator is connected to the driver section of a specially designed 10 mm square miniature shock tube assembly. A numerical code that uses CANTERA software package is used to predict the properties of the driver gas in the miniature shock tube. This prediction along with the 1-D shock tube theory is used to calculate the properties of the generated shockwave and matches reasonably well with the experimentally obtained values for oxyhydrogen mixture fill pressures less than 2.5 bars. The miniature shock tube employs a modified tri-clover clamp assembly to facilitate quick changing of diaphragm and replaces the more cumbersome nut and bolt system of fastening components. The versatile nature of oxyhydrogen detonation-driven miniature shock tube opens up new horizons for shockwave-assisted interdisciplinary applications.

  11. Generation and decomposition of volatile tin hydrides monitored by in situ quartz crystal microbalances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ugur, D.; Storm, A.J.; Verberk, R.; Brouwer, J.C.; Sloof, W.G.

    2012-01-01

    The generation and decomposition rate of volatile tin hydrides (SnH 4) was determined with two quartz crystal microbalances (QCM). One crystal covered with Sn was exposed to a known flux of atomic hydrogen (H) to generate SnH 4. Another Au coated QCM was placed opposite to the Sn coated surface to

  12. Isospecific propylene polymerization with in situ generated bis(phenoxy-amine)zirconium and hafnium single site catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makio, Haruyuki; Prasad, Aitha Vishwa; Terao, Hiroshi; Saito, Junji; Fujita, Terunori

    2013-07-07

    Bis(phenoxy-imine) Zr and Hf complexes were activated with (i)Bu3Al or (i)Bu2AlH in conjunction with Ph3CB(C6F5)4 and tested as catalysts for propylene polymerization with emphasis on the enantioselectivity of the isospecific species and the single site polymerization characteristics. The isoselective species was identified as the in situ generated bis(phenoxy-amine) complex whose isoselectivity was sensitive to subtle changes in ligand structure. By employing specific substituents at certain key positions the isotacticity reached an extremely high level comparable to high-end commercial isotactic polypropylenes (Tm > 160 °C). Single site polymerization characteristics depended upon the efficiency and selectivity of the in situ imine reduction which is sensitive to the substituent on the imine nitrogen and the reaction conditions. By using (i)Bu2AlH as a reducing agent, quantitative imine reduction can be achieved with a stoichiometric amount of the reducing agent. This lower alkylaluminum loading is beneficial for the catalyst and significantly enhances the polymerization activity and the molecular weight of the resultant polymer.

  13. Combinatorial screening of an in situ generated library of tungsten oxyhalide and imido complexes for olefin metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romer, Duane R; Sussman, Victor J; Burdett, Ken; Chen, Yu; Miller, Kami J

    2014-10-13

    A series of substituted tungsten(VI) halides with general formula WECl4 (E = O or -NR (imido)) were screened via a high throughput study to identify potential new olefin metathesis catalysts. The tungsten species were treated with a series of aluminum alkyl activators and modifier ligands to generate active catalyst species in situ. Ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) of cyclooctene was used as a primary screen to identify potential metathesis catalysts and active catalysts were subjected to a secondary screen to evaluate tolerance toward polar functional groups. Several combinations from the high throughput campaign yielded active metathesis catalysts for the ROMP of cyclooctene. However, none of the catalysts examined in this study exhibited any evidence of significant polar functional group tolerance as determined by the results of the secondary cyclooctene/butyl acetate screen.

  14. A new catalyst layer based on in situ pore generation of sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) for PEMFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Wan-Keun; Sung, Kyung A; Oh, Keun-Hwan; Choo, Min-Ju; Park, Jung-Ki [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and WCU Energy Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea); Cho, Kuk Young [Division of Advanced Materials Engineering, Kongju National University, 275, Budae-dong, Cheonan, Chungnam 303-717 (Korea); Cho, Ki-Yun [Fuel Cell Vehicle Team, Hyundai Motor Company and Kia Motors Corp., 104, Mabuk-Dong, Giheung-Gu, Yongin-Si, Gyunggi-Do 446-912 (Korea)

    2009-08-15

    A new concept of in situ pore generation to reduce water flooding in cathode catalyst layer (CCL) of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is proposed with the introduction of water soluble poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as a porogen to CCL based on sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (sPEEK). In this new type of CCL, PEG is directly removed by water produced during the cathode reaction. The new CCL exhibited much higher cell performance especially in mass transport limitation region compared to the pristine sPEEK-CCL. In addition, the presence of PEG in the new CCL lowered the glass transition temperature of the sPEEK binder, and it could improve the transference of catalyst layer onto the polymer electrolyte membrane. (author)

  15. Zn-Fe-CNTs catalytic in situ generation of H2O2 for Fenton-like degradation of sulfamethoxazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong; Fan, Qin; Wang, Jianlong

    2018-01-15

    A novel Fenton-like catalyst (Zn-Fe-CNTs) capable of converting O 2 to H 2 O 2 and further to OH was prepared through infiltration fusion method followed by chemical replacement in argon atmosphere. The catalyst was characterized by SEM, EDS, TEM, XRD and XPS. The reaction between Zn-Fe-CNTs and O 2 in aqueous solution could generate H 2 O 2 in situ, which was further transferred to OH. The Fenton-like degradation of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) using Zn-Fe-CNTs as catalyst was evaluated. The results indicated that Zn-Fe-CNTs had a coral porous structure with a BET area of 51.67m 2 /g, exhibiting excellent adsorption capacity for SMX, which enhanced its degradation. The particles of Zn 0 and Fe 0 /Fe 2 O 3 were observed on the surface of Zn-Fe-CNTs. The mixture of Zn 0 and CNTs could reduce O 2 into H 2 O 2 by micro-electrolysis and Fe 0 /Fe 2 O 3 could catalyze in-situ generation of H 2 O 2 to produce OH through Fenton-like process. When initial pH=1.5, T=25°C, O 2 flow rate=400mL/min, Zn-Fe-CNTs=0.6g/L, SMX=25mg/L and reaction time=10min, the removal efficiency of SMX and TOC was 100% and 51.3%, respectively. The intermediates were detected and the possible pathway of SMX degradation and the mechanism of Zn-Fe-CNTs/O 2 process were tentatively proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Reinforcement of poly(dimethylsiloxane by sol-gel in situ generated silica and titania particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The usual sol-gel process was applied to precipitate silica or titania particles in a preformed poly(dimethylsiloxane (PDMS network under the presence of dibutyltin diacetate used as a catalyst. The resulting structures of the reinforcing fillers were studied by transmission electron microscopy and small-angle neutron scattering. Stress-strain measurements in elongation and equilibrium swelling experiments revealed distinct behaviors mainly attributed to the nature and the size of the generated particles and to the formation, in the case of titania, of a filler network even at low filler loadings.

  17. Interaction of uranium with in situ anoxically generated magnetite on steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovira, Miquel; El Aamrani, Souad; Duro, Lara; Gimenez, Javier; Pablo, Joan de; Bruno, Jordi

    2007-01-01

    In the high level nuclear waste repository concept, spent nuclear fuel is designed to be encapsulated in steel canisters. Thus, it is necessary to study the influence of the steel and/or its corrosion products on the behaviour of the radionuclides released from the fuel. In this sense, the main objective of this work is to contribute to the knowledge of the influence of the steel and/or its corrosion products on the uranium(VI) retention. To this aim, magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) has been generated by anaerobic steel corrosion in an autoclave reactor at an overpressure of 8 atm of H 2 (g). After characterisation by X-ray diffraction (XRD), the obtained corroded steel coupons were contacted, at two different H 2 (g) pressures (1 atm and 7.6 atm), with a U(VI) solution. The evolution of the uranium concentration in solution is determined and a study of the composition of the coupons at the end of the experiments is carried out. The main conclusion obtained from this work is that magnetite generated on a steel coupon is able not only to retain uranium via sorption, but also to reduce hexavalent to tetravalent uranium in a higher extent than commercial magnetite, thus, providing an effective retardation path to the migration of uranium (and, potentially, other actinides) out of the repository

  18. Unexpected in-situ Free Radical Generation and Catalysis to Ag/Polymer Nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yifan; Wei, Ruixue; Wang, Jintao; Wei, Liuhe; Li, Chunhui

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we discover unexpectedly that simple reaction of AgNO3 with oleic acid (OA) without solvent and surfactant could generate alkyl free radical which can catalyze double-bond polymerization of OA to form 1D polymeric oleic acid (POA) chain. In certain conditions, these POA chains circumvolute tightly each other to form microspheres and micro-plates in which monodisperse 4-5 nm Ag nanoparticles (NPs) were absorbed. It has been revealed that alkyl free radical generated during the redox reaction of carboxyl group of OA with Ag+ at relative low temperature. Then, the alkyl free radical catalyzed the double-bond polymerization of OA when the reaction temperature was further increased. Different from commonly-seen hydrophobic nanoparticles prepared in oleic acid-based microemulsion system, the nanocomposites cannot dispersed in n-hexane and could dispersed in ethanol and THF. The unusual dispersion behavior has been explained in terms of their structure and polarity of POA chain. The method combines the nucleation of Ag nanoparticles and the polymerization of monomer in a facile one-pot reaction, which provides a novel way for metal-polymer microsphere nanocomposite with low-cost, easy-operation and high-yield.

  19. Cellulose nanocomposite films with in situ generated silver nanoparticles using Cassia alata leaf extract as a reducing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaranjana, P; Nagarajan, E R; Rajini, N; Jawaid, M; Rajulu, A Varada

    2017-06-01

    Cotton linters were dissolved in aq. (8% LiOH+15% urea) that was pre-cooled to -12.5°C. Using this solution cellulose gel films were prepared by regeneration method with ethyl alcohol as a coagulant. These wet films were diffused with 10wt% Cassia alata leaf extract that acted as a reducing agent. The leaf extract diffused cellulose wet films were used as the matrix. The wet matrix films were dipped individually in lower concentrated 1-5mM aq.AgNO 3 source solutions in the presence of sunlight and allowed the solutions to react with the diffused leaf extract reducing agent which in situ generated the silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) inside the films as well as in the source solution. The AgNPs formed in the source solution were observed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) while those formed in situ the films were observed by SEM and the particle size distribution was determined. The cellulose/AgNP composite films showed good antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli bacteria. These nanocomposite films were also characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and tensile tests. At temperatures below 300°C, the thermal stability of the nanocomposite films was lower than that of the matrix due to the catalytic effect of AgNPs. The nanocomposite films also possessed good tensile properties. The ecofriendly cellulose/AgNP composite films with good antibacterial activity and tensile properties can be considered for medical applications like dressing materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and the generation of DME in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zonetti, Priscila C.; Gaspar, Alexandre B.; Appel, Lucia G. [Divisao de Catalise e Processos Quimicos, Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia, Av. Venezuela 82/518, CEP 21081-312, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mendes, Fabiana M.T. [Divisao de Metrologia de Materiais (DIMAT), Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Normatizacao e Qualidade Industrial, INMETRO, Av. Nossa Senhora das Gracas 50, CEP 25250-020, Xerem, Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Sobrinho, Eledir V.; Sousa-Aguiar, Eduardo F. [CENPES/Petrobras, Ilha do Fundao, quadra 7, Cidade Universitaria, 21949-900, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2010-05-15

    Ternary physical mixtures comprised a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, a methanol synthesis catalyst and a zeolite employed in the hydrocarbon synthesis from syngas. Two Fe-based catalysts (i.e., one promoted by K and the other by Ru), two HY zeolites with different acidities, a commercial HZSM-5 and Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (methanol synthesis catalyst) were used in these systems. The main products obtained were dimethyl ether, methanol and hydrocarbons. First of all, it was observed that by adding Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst to a binary physical mixture comprised of a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and HZSM-5, the CO conversion increases more than 20 times. Second, during the reaction transient period the dimethyl ether selectivity decreases as the conversion increases. Third, the hydrocarbons synthesized followed the ASF distribution in the C{sub 1}-C{sub 12} range and finally, it was also verified that the Y zeolites and the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst promoted by Ru generated the most active physical mixtures. The results showed that the role of zeolites in the ternary physical mixture is only associated with the dimethyl ether synthesis. The following reaction pathway was suggested: first, methanol is synthesized from syngas using Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst; after that, this alcohol is dehydrated by an acid catalyst generating DME; and lastly, DME initiates Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, which is then propagated by CO. (author)

  1. Next-generation in situ hybridization approaches to define and quantify HIV and SIV reservoirs in tissue microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleage, Claire; Chan, Chi N; Busman-Sahay, Kathleen; Estes, Jacob D

    2018-01-09

    The development of increasingly safe and effective antiretroviral treatments for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) over the past several decades has led to vastly improved patient survival when treatment is available and affordable, an outcome that relies on uninterrupted adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy for life. Looking to the future, the discovery of an elusive 'cure' for HIV will necessitate highly sensitive methods for detecting, understanding, and eliminating viral reservoirs. Next-generation, in situ hybridization (ISH) approaches offer unique and complementary insights into viral reservoirs within their native tissue environments with a high degree of specificity and sensitivity. In this review, we will discuss how modern ISH techniques can be used, either alone or in conjunction with phenotypic characterization, to probe viral reservoir establishment and maintenance. In addition to focusing on how these techniques have already furthered our understanding of HIV reservoirs, we discuss potential avenues for how high-throughput, next-generation ISH may be applied. Finally, we will review how ISH could allow deeper phenotypic and contextual insights into HIV reservoir biology that should prove instrumental in moving the field closer to viral reservoir elimination needed for an 'HIV cure' to be realized.

  2. In situ generation, metabolism and immunomodulatory signaling actions of nitro-conjugated linoleic acid in a murine model of inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Villacorta

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA is a prime substrate for intra-gastric nitration giving rise to the formation of nitro-conjugated linoleic acid (NO2-CLA. Herein, NO2-CLA generation is demonstrated within the context of acute inflammatory responses both in vitro and in vivo. Macrophage activation resulted in dose- and time-dependent CLA nitration and also in the production of secondary electrophilic and non-electrophilic derivatives. Both exogenous NO2-CLA as well as that generated in situ, attenuated NF-κB-dependent gene expression, decreased pro-inflammatory cytokine production and up-regulated Nrf2-regulated proteins. Importantly, both CLA nitration and the corresponding downstream anti-inflammatory actions of NO2-CLA were recapitulated in a mouse peritonitis model where NO2-CLA administration decreased pro-inflammatory cytokines and inhibited leukocyte recruitment. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the formation of NO2-CLA has the potential to function as an adaptive response capable of not only modulating inflammation amplitude but also protecting neighboring tissues via the expression of Nrf2-dependent genes.

  3. Polyhomologation based on in situ generated Boron-thexyl-silaboracyclic initiating sites: a novel strategy towards the synthesis of polyethylene-based complex architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhen

    2015-04-10

    A novel strategy, based on the in situ generated Boron-thexyl-silaboracyclic initiating sites for the polyhomologation of dimethylsulfoxonium methylide, has been developed for the synthesis of complex polyethylene-based architectures. As examples, the synthesis of a 4-arm polyethylene star, three (polystyrene)(polyethylene)2 3-miktoarm stars and a PE-branched double graft copolymers are given.

  4. In situ generation of less accessible Boc-imines from aldehydes: construction of a quaternary carbon by the Mannich reaction or unprecedented aldol reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Taichi; Homma, Chihiro; Maruoka, Keiji

    2017-05-31

    In situ generation of less accessible N-Boc-protected imines from aldehydes and their application to the direct three-component Mannich reaction with β-dicarbonyls were realized. The catalyst-free aldol reaction of ynals with β-dicarbonyls was also developed.

  5. In situ generation of steam and alkaline surfactant for enhanced oil recovery using an exothermic water reactant (EWR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Eric P

    2011-05-24

    A method for oil recovery whereby an exothermic water reactant (EWR) encapsulated in a water soluble coating is placed in water and pumped into one or more oil wells in contact with an oil bearing formation. After the water carries the EWR to the bottom of the injection well, the water soluble coating dissolves and the EWR reacts with the water to produce heat, an alkali solution, and hydrogen. The heat from the EWR reaction generates steam, which is forced into the oil bearing formation where it condenses and transfers heat to the oil, elevating its temperature and decreasing the viscosity of the oil. The aqueous alkali solution mixes with the oil in the oil bearing formation and forms a surfactant that reduces the interfacial tension between the oil and water. The hydrogen may be used to react with the oil at these elevated temperatures to form lighter molecules, thus upgrading to a certain extent the oil in situ. As a result, the oil can flow more efficiently and easily through the oil bearing formation towards and into one or more production wells.

  6. Carbonate-based Janus micromotors moving in ultra-light acidic environment generated by HeLa cells in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guix, Maria; Meyer, Anne K.; Koch, Britta; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2016-02-01

    Novel approaches to develop naturally-induced drug delivery in tumor environments in a deterministic and controlled manner have become of growing interest in recent years. Different polymeric-based microstructures and other biocompatible substances have been studied taking advantage of lactic acidosis phenomena in tumor cells, which decrease the tumor extracellular pH down to 6.8. Micromotors have recently demonstrated a high performance in living systems, revealing autonomous movement in the acidic environment of the stomach or moving inside living cells by using acoustic waves, opening the doors for implementation of such smart microengines into living entities. The need to develop biocompatible motors which are driven by natural fuel sources inherently created in biological systems has thus become of crucial importance. As a proof of principle, we here demonstrate calcium carbonate Janus particles moving in extremely light acidic environments (pH 6.5), whose motion is induced in conditioned acidic medium generated by HeLa cells in situ. Our system not only obviates the need for an external fuel, but also presents a selective activation of the micromotors which promotes their motion and consequent dissolution in presence of a quickly propagating cell source (i.e. tumor cells), therefore inspiring new micromotor configurations for potential drug delivery systems.

  7. In Situ Fluorine Doping of TiO2 Superstructures for Efficient Visible-Light Driven Hydrogen Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Tachikawa, Takashi; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Majima, Tetsuro

    2016-03-21

    With the aid of breakthroughs in nanoscience and nanotechnology, it is imperative to develop metal oxide semiconductors through visible light-driven hydrogen generation. In this study, TiOF2 was incorporated as an n-type F-dopant source to TiO2 mesocrystals (TMCs) with visible-light absorption during the topotactic transformation. The crystal growth, structural change, and dynamic morphological evolution, from the initial intermediate NH4 TiOF3 to HTiOF3, TiOF2, and F-doped TMCs, were verified through in situ temperature-dependent techniques to elucidate the doping mechanism from intermediate TiOF2. The visible-light efficiencies of photocatalytic hydrogen were dependent on the contents of the dopant as compared with the pure TMC and a controled reference. Using femtosecond time-resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, the charge-transfer dynamics were monitored to confirm the improvement of charge separation after doping. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Enzymatic in-situ generation of H2O2 for decolorization of Acid Blue 113 by fenton process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimi Afzal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Decolorization of Acid Blue 113 in an aqueous medium by bio-Fenton process has been investigated in this research. Enzymatic oxidation of glucose was performed to in-situ generation of H2O2 which was employed to react with Fe2+ for producing hydroxyl radicals. The effect of various parameters include concentrations of 113, glucose, and FeSO4, activity of glucose oxidase (GOx and the effect of pH were assessed. The highest decolorization of AB 113 were achieved at Fe2+ concentration of 0.2 mmol/L, pH =4.0, glucose concentration of 0.018 mol/L, and glucose oxidase activity of 2500 U/L in the constant temperature (23 ±0.1ºC and constant shaking rate (160 r/min, while the concentration of 113 was 40 mg/L. In these conditions, 113 decolorization efficiency after 60 min was obtained about 95%.

  9. Efficient destruction of CF4 through in situ generation of alkali metals from heated alkali halide reducing mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung Churl; Choi, Wonyong

    2002-03-15

    Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are the most potent green house gases that are very recalcitrant at destruction. An effective way of converting PFCs using hot solid reagents into safe products has been recently introduced. By investigating the thermal reductive destruction of tetrafluoromethane (CF4) we provided new insight and more physicochemical consideration on this novel process. The complete destruction of CF4was successfully achieved by flowing the gas through a heated reagent bed (400-950 degrees C) that contained powder mixtures of alkali halides, CaO, and Si. The silicon acted as a reducing agent of alkali halides for the in-situ production of alkali metals, and the calcium oxide played the role of a halide ion acceptor. The absence of any single component in this ternary mixture drastically reduced the destruction efficiency of CF4. The CF4 destruction efficiencies with the solid reagent containing the alkali halide, MX, increased in the order of Li approximately Na < K < Cs for alkali cations and I < Br < Cl < F for halide anions. This trend agreed with the endothermicity of the alkali metal generation reaction: the higher the endothermicity, the lower the destruction efficiency. Alkali metal generation was indirectly detected by monitoring H2 production from its reaction with water. The production of alkali metals increased with NaF, KF, and CsF in this order. The CsF/CaO/Si system exhibited the complete destruction of CF4 at as low as 600 degrees C. The solid product analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed the formation of CaF2 and the depletion of Si with black carbon particles formed in the solid reagent residue. No CO/CO2 and toxic HF and SiF4 formation were detected in the exhaust gas.

  10. In situ and ex situ characterization of the ion-irradiation effects in third generation SiC fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguet-Garcia, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The use of third generation SiC fibers, Tyranno SA3 (TSA3) and Hi Nicalon S (HNS), as reinforcement for ceramic composites for nuclear applications requires the characterization of its structural stability and mechanical behavior under irradiation. Regarding the radiation stability, ion-amorphization kinetics of these fibers have been studied and compared to the model material, i.e. 6H-SiC single crystals, with no significant differences. For all samples, full amorphization threshold dose yields ∼0.4 dpa at room temperature and complete amorphization was not achieved for irradiation temperatures over 200 C. Successively, ion-amorphized samples have been thermally annealed. It is reported that thermal annealing at high temperatures not only induces the recrystallization of the ion-amorphized samples but also causes unrecoverable mechanical failure, i.e. cracking and delamination. Cracking is reported to be a thermally driven phenomenon characterized by activation energy of 1.05 eV. Regarding the mechanical irradiation behavior, irradiation creep of TSA3 fibers has been investigated using a tensile device dedicated to in situ tests coupled to two different ion-irradiation lines. It is reported that ion irradiation (12 MeV C 4+ and 92 MeV Xe 23+ ) induces a time-dependent strain under loads where thermal creep is negligible. In addition, irradiation strain is reported to be higher at low irradiation temperatures due to a coupling between irradiation swelling and irradiation creep. At high temperatures, near 1000 C, irradiation swelling is minimized hence allowing the characterization of the irradiation creep. Irradiation creep rate is characterized by a linear correlation between the ion flux and the strain rate and a square root dependence with the applied load. Finally, it has been reported that the higher the electronic energy loss contribution to the stopping regime the higher the irradiation creep of the fiber. (author) [fr

  11. Direct In Situ Mass Specific Absorption Spectra of Biomass Burning Particles Generated from Smoldering Hard and Softwoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radney, James G; You, Rian; Zachariah, Michael R; Zangmeister, Christopher D

    2017-05-16

    Particles from smoldering biomass burning (BB) represent a major source of carbonaceous aerosol in the terrestrial atmosphere. In this study, mass specific absorption spectra of laboratory-generated smoldering wood particles (SWP) from 3 hardwood and 3 softwood species were measured in situ. Absorption data spanning from λ = 500 to 840 nm were collected using a photoacoustic spectrometer coupled to a supercontinuum laser with a tunable wavelength and bandwidth filter. SWP were size- (electrical mobility) and mass-selected prior to optical characterization allowing data to be reported as mass-specific absorption cross sections (MAC). The median measured MAC at λ = 660 nm for smoldering oak particles was 1.1 (0.57/1.8) × 10 -2 m 2 g -1 spanning from 83 femtograms (fg) to 517 fg (500 nm ≤ mobility diameter ≤950 nm), MAC values in parentheses are the 16 th and 84 th percentiles of the measured data (i.e., 1σ). The collection of all six wood species (Oak, Hickory, Mesquite, Western redcedar, Baldcypress, and Blue spruce) had median MAC values ranging from 1.4 × 10 -2 m 2 g -1 to 7.9 × 10 -2 m 2 g -1 at λ = 550 nm with absorption Ångström exponents (AAE) between 3.5 and 6.2. Oak, Western redcedar, and Blue spruce possessed statistically similar (p > 0.05) spectra while the spectra of Hickory, Mesquite, and Baldcypress were distinct (p < 0.01) as calculated from a point-by-point analysis using the Wilcox rank-sum test.

  12. A green, multicomponent, regio- and stereo-selective 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of azides and azomethine ylides generated in situ with bifunctional dipolarophiles using PEG-400.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhu, Jayant; Singh, Harjinder; Khurana, J M

    2014-05-01

    A series of novel dispiropyrrolidine-linked 1,2,3-triazole derivatives have been prepared by one-pot, four-component protocol that employed 5-arylidene-3-(prop-2-ynyl)thiazolidine-2,4-dione, isatin, sarcosine and substituted azides using Cu(I) generated in situ as catalyst in PEG-400 as a highly efficient and green media. This is the first report of a four-component reaction involving a classical Huisgen reaction, in which the two dipolar moieties (substituted azides and in situ generated azomethine ylides) react with acetylenic and olefinic dipolarophiles, respectively. The 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition proceeds in a highly regio- and stereo-selective manner. This methodology can be an ideal tool for the preparation of biologically important five-membered heterocyclic compounds in one pot.

  13. Chemoselective SN2' Allylations of Detrifluoroacetylatively In Situ Generated 3-Fluoroindolin-2-one-Derived Tertiary Enolates with Morita-Baylis-Hillman Carbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yi; Mei, Haibo; Han, Jianlin; Soloshonok, Vadim A; Zhou, Jie; Pan, Yi

    2017-12-15

    The first example of the S N 2' reaction type of the detrifluoroacetylatively in situ generated tertiary fluoro-enolates in the uncatalyzed reactions with Morita-Baylis-Hillman derivatives has been described. The S N 2' substitution takes place in a highly chemoselective manner as no corresponding S N 2 products were observed in the reaction mixtures. Due to the excellent stereochemical outcome, the reactions seem to have an apparent synthetic value for the preparation of structurally new fluorinated oxindoles.

  14. In situ microbial filter used for bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, M. Leslie; Taylor, Robert T.

    2000-01-01

    An improved method for in situ microbial filter bioremediation having increasingly operational longevity of an in situ microbial filter emplaced into an aquifer. A method for generating a microbial filter of sufficient catalytic density and thickness, which has increased replenishment interval, improved bacteria attachment and detachment characteristics and the endogenous stability under in situ conditions. A system for in situ field water remediation.

  15. A Next-Generation Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe Beamline for In Situ Studies of Energy Materials and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maser, Jörg; Lai, Barry; Buonassisi, Tonio; Cai, Zhonghou; Chen, Si; Finney, Lydia; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Jacobsen, Chris; Preissner, Curt; Roehrig, Chris; Rose, Volker; Shu, Deming; Vine, David; Vogt, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source is developing a suite of new X-ray beamlines to study materials and devices across many length scales and under real conditions. One of the flagship beamlines of the APS upgrade is the In Situ Nanoprobe (ISN) beamline, which will provide in situ and operando characterization of advanced energy materials and devices under varying temperatures, gas ambients, and applied fields, at previously unavailable spatial resolution and throughput. Examples of materials systems include inorganic and organic photovoltaic systems, advanced battery systems, fuel cell components, nanoelectronic devices, advanced building materials and other scientifically and technologically relevant systems. To characterize these systems at very high spatial resolution and trace sensitivity, the ISN will use both nanofocusing mirrors and diffractive optics to achieve spots sizes as small as 20 nm. Nanofocusing mirrors in Kirkpatrick-Baez geometry will provide several orders of magnitude increase in photon flux at a spatial resolution of 50 nm. Diffractive optics such as zone plates and/or multilayer Laue lenses will provide a highest spatial resolution of 20 nm. Coherent diffraction methods will be used to study even small specimen features with sub-10 nm relevant length scale. A high-throughput data acquisition system will be employed to significantly increase operations efficiency and usability of the instrument. The ISN will provide full spectroscopy capabilities to study the chemical state of most materials in the periodic table, and enable X-ray fluorescence tomography. In situ electrical characterization will enable operando studies of energy and electronic devices such as photovoltaic systems and batteries. We describe the optical concept for the ISN beamline, the technical design, and the approach for enabling a broad variety of in situ studies. We furthermore discuss the application of hard X-ray microscopy to study defects in multi-crystalline solar cells, one

  16. Lessons learned from the Febex in situ test: geochemical processes associated to the microbial degradation and gas generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, A. M.; Sanchez, D.M.; Melon, A.; Mingarro, M.; Wieczorek, K.

    2012-01-01

    existence of gaps between the bentonite blocks, which favour the development and growth of inactive and dormant cells or spores belonging to the original bentonite. In this work, the observed geochemical and corrosion processes influenced both by organic matter degradation and micro-organisms in the 1:1 scale FEBEX in situ test (Grimsel, Switzerland) are described. This test consists of two heaters, simulating radioactive waste containers, emplaced in a horizontal gallery and surrounded by a highly compacted bentonite barrier. Samples from pore water, gases and bentonite (SHSDI-01: clay in contact with AISI 316L metal; S29 and BSBI-26: clay in contact with carbon steel) have been analysed. The samples were obtained during the test and the dismantling of the heater 1 after six years of experiment. The solid samples were analysed by XRD, SEM, XPS, FTIR, ATD-TG and chemical analysis; the water samples by IC and ICP-OES, and the gases by gas chromatography. Different geochemical processes have been detected as a function of the temperature and water content of the samples. When the water content is high, there are aerobic respiration and fermentation processes, anaerobic respiration with SO 4 2- as electron acceptor, and anaerobic production of methane with CO 2 as electron acceptor. In a first phase, both oxygen consumption and an increase of CH 4 and CO 2 is observed. Afterwards, there is a reduction of sulfates by SRB bacteria, which provokes corrosion processes. As a consequence, a precipitation of sulphurs, iron oxy-hydroxides and carbonates occurs, as well as H 2 generation. There is an increase of the iron content in the smectite and the neo-formation of zeolites. However this alteration is punctual and localized. The redox potential of the bentonite pore water was of -284 mV. When the temperature is high and water content is low, other processes take place

  17. Total aerobic destruction of azo contaminants with nanoscale zero-valent copper at neutral pH: promotion effect of in-situ generated carbon center radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Guohui; Ai, Zhihui; Zhang, Lizhi

    2014-12-01

    In this study, nanoscale zero-valent copper (nZVC) was synthesized with a facile solvothermal method and used for the aerobic removal of azo contaminants at neutral pH for the first time. We found that both Cu(I) and OH generated during the nZVC induced molecular oxygen activation process accounted for the rapid total destruction of azo contaminants in the nZVC/Air system, where nZVC could activate molecular oxygen to produce H2O2, and also release Cu(I) to break the -NN- bond of azo contaminants via the sandmeyer reaction for the generation of carbon center radicals. The in-situ generated carbon center radicals would then react with OH produced by the Cu(I) catalyzed decomposition of H2O2, resulting in the generation of low molecular weight organic acids and their subsequent mineralization. The indispensible role of Cu(I) catalyzed sandmeyer reaction and the promotion effect of in-situ generated carbon center radicals on the rapid total destruction of azo contaminants in the nZVC/Air system were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. This study can deepen our understanding on the degradation of organic pollutant with molecular oxygen activated by zero valent metal, and also provide a new method to remove azo contaminants at neutral pH. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Volume Measurements of Laser-generated Pits for in Situ Geochronology Using KArLE (Potassium-Argon Laser Experiment)

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, R. A.; Cohen, B. A.; Miller, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    KArLE (Potassium-­-Argon Laser Experiment) has been developed for in situ planetary geochronology using the K - Ar (potassium-­-argon) isotope system, where material ablated by LIBS (Laser-­-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) is used to calculate isotope abundances. We are determining the accuracy and precision of volume measurements of these pits using stereo and laser microscope data to better understand the ablation process for isotope abundance calculations. If a characteristic volume can be determined with sufficient accuracy and precision for specific rock types, KArLE will prove to be a useful instrument for future planetary rover missions.

  19. Electricity generation and in situ phosphate recovery from enhanced biological phosphorus removal sludge by electrodialysis membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yi-Kun; Wang, Yunkun; Pan, Xin-Rong; Sheng, Guo-Ping

    2018-01-01

    In this study, a novel electrodialysis membrane bioreactor was used for EBPR sludge treatment for energy and phosphorus resource recovery simultaneously. After 30days stable voltage outputting, the maximum power density reached 0.32W/m 3 . Over 90% of phosphorus in EBPR sludge was released while about 50% of phosphorus was concentrated to 4mmol/L as relatively pure phosphate solution. Nitrogen could be removed from EBPR sludge by desalination and denitrification processes. This study provides an optimized way treating sludge for energy production and in situ phosphorus recovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Fingermark detection based on the in situ growth of luminescent nanoparticles--towards a new generation of multimetal deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becue, Andy; Scoundrianos, Aurèle; Champod, Christophe; Margot, Pierre

    2008-07-18

    The in situ deposition of zinc oxide on gold nanoparticles in aqueous solution has been here successfully applied in the field of fingermark detection on various non-porous surfaces. In this article, we present the improvement of the multimetal deposition, an existing technique limited up to now to non-luminescent results, by obtaining luminescent fingermarks with very good contrast and details. This is seen as a major improvement in the field in terms of selectivity and sensitivity of detection, especially on black surfaces.

  1. Noise canceling in-situ detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, David O.

    2014-08-26

    Technologies applicable to noise canceling in-situ NMR detection and imaging are disclosed. An example noise canceling in-situ NMR detection apparatus may comprise one or more of a static magnetic field generator, an alternating magnetic field generator, an in-situ NMR detection device, an auxiliary noise detection device, and a computer.

  2. In situ non-aqueous nucleation and growth of next generation rare-earth-free permanent magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyojung; Xu, Aoran; Sterbinsky, George E; Arena, Dario A; Wang, Ziying; Stephens, Peter W; Meng, Ying Shirley; Carroll, Kyler J

    2015-01-14

    Using a controllable wet chemical approach, the polyol process, we developed a cobalt carbide nanomagnet consisting of an assembly of Co2C and Co3C nanoparticles as an alternative to rare earth permanent magnets (PMs). The thermodynamically stable mixed phase cobalt carbide nanoparticles are shown to be acicular in morphology. Their exchange-coupled magnetic interaction possessing high maximum energy product of 20.7 kJ m(-3) and room temperature coercivity (2.9 kOe) has been confirmed through vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and first order reversal curves (FORCs). These metastable carbide nanoparticles offer improved magnetic properties compared to their pure bulk form. An understanding of the formation mechanism, using in situ time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy (TR-XAS), and the correlation between phase contributions to the properties are described in detail. Our strategy presents a controllable route to preparing the cobalt carbide nanomagnets, which could be potentially useful in permanent magnet clean energy applications. Additionally, the in situ apparatus offers a promising way to directly explore the effects of reaction variables for high-temperature wet chemical reactions.

  3. Efficient oxidative dissolution of V2O3 by the in situ electro-generated reactive oxygen species on N-doped carbon felt electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Yudong; Wang, Yunting; Zheng, Shili; Sun, Zhi; Zhang, Yi; Jin, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel alkaline electro-Fenton-like was applied for V 2 O 3 oxidative dissolution. • N-doped carbon felt electrode was fabricated for the two-electron ORR. • ROS including ·OH and HO 2 − was in-situ generated from the electrochemical system. • A significant enhancement of V 2 O 3 dissolution was achieved due to the ROS. - Abstract: Oxidative dissolution is a critical step for the efficient remediation of heavy metal oxides in large-scale solid wastes. In the present study, a novel electro-oxidative dissolution process of V 2 O 3 to VO 4 3− is achieved by the in-situ generated reactive oxygen species on the N-doped carbon felt cathode in alkaline media. The electro-catalytic HO 2 − generation and hydrophilic behavior were significantly enhanced by the introduction of nitrogen-containing functional groups. Besides, the mechanism of electrochemical vanadium conversion is systematically illustrated, and a vanadium self-induced electro-Fenton-like reaction is proposed. By employing the radical quenching and ESR measurements, the contributions for V(III) dissolution is determined to be 43.5% by HO 2 − and 56.5% by hydroxyl radicals, respectively. It should be noted that the V 2 O 3 solid particles can be efficiently dissolved via adsorption-reaction scheme on the carbon felt electrode. This novel electrochemical strategy provides a promising solution for the heavy metal oxide treatment and further understanding for the in situ reactive oxygen species.

  4. In-situ second harmonic generation by cancer cell targeting ZnO nanocrystals to effect photodynamic action in subcellular space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Bobo; Pliss, Artem; Kuzmin, Andrey N; Baev, Alexander; Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y; Damasco, Jossana A; Yong, Ken-Tye; Wen, Shuangchun; Prasad, Paras N

    2016-10-01

    This paper introduces the concept of in-situ upconversion of deep penetrating near infrared light via second harmonic generation from ZnO nanocrystals delivered into cells to effect photo activated therapies, such as photodynamic therapy, which usually require activation by visible light with limited penetration through biological tissues. We demonstrated this concept by subcellular activation of a photodynamic therapy drug, Chlorin e6, excited within its strong absorption Soret band by the second harmonic (SH) light, generated at 409 nm by ZnO nanocrystals, which were targeted to cancer cells and internalized through the folate-receptor mediated endocytosis. By a combination of theoretical modeling and experimental measurements, we show that SH light, generated in-situ by ZnO nanocrystals significantly contributes to activation of photosensitizer, leading to cell death through both apoptotic and necrotic pathways initiated in the cytoplasm. This targeted photodynamic action was studied using label-free Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering imaging of the treated cells to monitor changes in the distribution of native cellular proteins and lipids. We found that initiation of photodynamic therapy with upconverted light led to global reduction in the intracellular concentration of macromolecules, likely due to suppression of proteins and lipids synthesis, which could be considered as a real-time indicator of cellular damage from photodynamic treatment. In prospective applications this in-situ photon upconversion could be further extended using ZnO nanocrystals surface functionalized with a specific organelle targeting group, provided a powerful approach to identify and consequently maximize a cellular response to phototherapy, selectively initiated in a specific cellular organelle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A chiral Brønsted acid-catalyzed highly enantioselective Mannich-type reaction of α-diazo esters with in situ generated N-acyl ketimines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unhale, Rajshekhar A; Sadhu, Milon M; Ray, Sumit K; Biswas, Rayhan G; Singh, Vinod K

    2018-04-03

    A chiral phosphoric acid-catalyzed asymmetric Mannich-type reaction of α-diazo esters with in situ generated N-acyl ketimines, derived from 3-hydroxyisoindolinones has been demonstrated in this communication. A variety of isoindolinone-based α-amino diazo esters bearing a quaternary stereogenic center were afforded in high yields (up to 99%) with excellent enantioselectivities (up to 99% ee). Furthermore, the synthetic utility of the products has been depicted by the hydrogenation of the diazo moiety of adducts.

  6. Organocatalytic Asymmetric Mannich Reaction of 3-Hydroxyoxindoles/3-Aminooxindoles with in Situ Generated N-Boc-Protected Aldimines for the Synthesis of Vicinal Oxindole-Diamines/Amino Alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Jing; Cui, Baodong; Wang, Yu; Yang, Chengli; Zhou, Xiaojian; Han, Wenyong; Chen, Yongzheng

    2016-07-01

    A highly efficient asymmetric Mannich reaction of 3-monosubstituted 3-aminooxindoles/3-hydroxyoxindoles with in situ generated N-Boc-protected aldimines catalyzed by the chiral bifunctional thiourea-tertiary amine catalyst has been developed. Under mild reaction conditions, a series of structurally diverse vicinal oxindole-diamines/amino alcohols were smoothly obtained in moderate to high yields (up to 99%) with good to excellent diastereoselectivities and enantioselectivities (up to 95:5 dr and 96% ee). The synthetic application of this protocol was also demonstrated by the versatile transformation of chiral vicinal oxindole-diamine/amino alcohol into spirocyclic oxindoles.

  7. In situ generation of ultrafast transient "acid spikes" in the 10B(n,α)7Li radiolysis of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Muhammad Mainul; Kanike, Vanaja; Meesungnoen, Jintana; Lertnaisat, Phantira; Katsumura, Yosuke; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul

    2018-02-01

    Monte Carlo track chemistry simulations of the 10B(n,α)7Li radiolysis of water show that the in situ formation of H3O+ by the two He and Li recoiling ions renders the native track regions temporarily very acidic. For these irradiating ions, the pH remains near 0 at times less than ∼100 ps after which the system gradually returns to neutral pH at ∼0.1 ms. These 'acid spikes' have never been invoked in water or in a cellular environment exposed to densely ionizing radiations. The question of their implications in boron neutron capture therapy and, more generally, in hadrontherapy, is discussed briefly.

  8. In situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremsin, Anton S; Makowska, Małgorzata G; Perrodin, Didier; Shalapska, Tetiana; Khodyuk, Ivan V; Trtik, Pavel; Boillat, Pierre; Vogel, Sven C; Losko, Adrian S; Strobl, Markus; Kuhn, L Theil; Bizarri, Gregory A; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D

    2016-06-01

    Neutrons are known to be unique probes in situations where other types of radiation fail to penetrate samples and their surrounding structures. In this paper it is demonstrated how thermal and cold neutron radiography can provide time-resolved imaging of materials while they are being processed ( e.g. while growing single crystals). The processing equipment, in this case furnaces, and the scintillator materials are opaque to conventional X-ray interrogation techniques. The distribution of the europium activator within a BaBrCl:Eu scintillator (0.1 and 0.5% nominal doping concentrations per mole) is studied in situ during the melting and solidification processes with a temporal resolution of 5-7 s. The strong tendency of the Eu dopant to segregate during the solidification process is observed in repeated cycles, with Eu forming clusters on multiple length scales (only for clusters larger than ∼50 µm, as limited by the resolution of the present experiments). It is also demonstrated that the dopant concentration can be quantified even for very low concentration levels (∼0.1%) in 10 mm thick samples. The interface between the solid and liquid phases can also be imaged, provided there is a sufficient change in concentration of one of the elements with a sufficient neutron attenuation cross section. Tomographic imaging of the BaBrCl:0.1%Eu sample reveals a strong correlation between crystal fractures and Eu-deficient clusters. The results of these experiments demonstrate the unique capabilities of neutron imaging for in situ diagnostics and the optimization of crystal-growth procedures.

  9. Numerical Simulation and Optimization of Enhanced Oil Recovery by the In Situ Generated CO2 Huff-n-Puff Process with Compound Surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the numerical investigation and optimization of the operating parameters of the in situ generated CO2 Huff-n-Puff method with compound surfactant on the performance of enhanced oil recovery. First, we conducted experiments of in situ generated CO2 and surfactant flooding. Next, we constructed a single-well radial 3D numerical model using a thermal recovery chemical flooding simulator to simulate the process of CO2 Huff-n-Puff. The activation energy and reaction enthalpy were calculated based on the reaction kinetics and thermodynamic models. The interpolation parameters were determined through history matching a series of surfactant core flooding results with the simulation model. The effect of compound surfactant on the Huff-n-Puff CO2 process was demonstrated via a series of sensitivity studies to quantify the effects of a number of operation parameters including the injection volume and mole concentration of the reagent, the injection rate, the well shut-in time, and the oil withdrawal rate. Based on the daily production rate during the period of Huff-n-Puff, a desirable agreement was shown between the field applications and simulated results.

  10. Quantification of the effect of in-situ generated uranium metal on the experimentally determined O/U ratio of a sintered uranium dioxide fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narasimha Murty, B.; Bharati Misra, U.; Yadav, R.B.; Srivastava, R.K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes quantitatively the effect of in-situ generated uranium metal (that could be formed due to the conducive manufacturing conditions) in a sintered uranium dioxide fuel pellet on the experimentally determined O/U ratio using analytical methods involving dissolution of the pellet material. To quantify the effect of in-situ generated uranium metal in the fuel pellet, a mathematical expression is derived for the actual O/U ratio in terms of the O/U ratio as determined by an experiment involving dissolution of the material and the quantity of uranium metal present in the uranium dioxide pellet. The utility of this derived mathematical expression is demonstrated by tabulating the calculated actual O/U ratios for varying amounts of uranium metal (from 5 to 95% in 5% intervals) and different O/U ratio values (from 2.001 to 2.015 in 0.001 intervals). This paper brings out the necessity of care to be exercised while interpreting the experimentally determined O/U ratio and emphasizes the fact that it is always safer to produce the nuclear fuel with oxygen to uranium ratios well below the specified maximum limit of 2.015. (author)

  11. In Situ Planetary Geochronology Technology

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project's purpose was to determine whether a Pulsed Neutron Generator (PNG) could be used in an instrument that could perform in situ age dating of planetary...

  12. [3 + 2]-Cycloaddition of in Situ Generated Nitrile Imines and Acetylene for Assembling of 1,3-Disubstituted Pyrazoles with Quantitative Deuterium Labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, Vladimir V; Ledovskaya, Maria S; Gordeev, Evgeniy G; Rodygin, Konstantin S; Ananikov, Valentine P

    2018-04-06

    A novel synthetic methodology for the preparation of 1,3-disubstituted pyrazoles from in situ generated nitrile imines and acetylene is reported. The reactions are performed in a simple two-chamber reactor. One part of the reactor is loaded with hydrazonoyl chloride precursors of active nitrile imine species and a base. The other part is used to generate acetylene from CaC 2 and water. Partitioning of the reactants improves the yields of desired pyrazoles up to 99% and simplifies their isolation to a simple procedure of solvent evaporation. The approach requires no complex equipment and utilizes inexpensive, safe, and easy to handle calcium carbide as a starting material. A model deuterium incorporation is carried out according to the developed methodology, producing a series of novel 4,5-dideuteropyrazoles with excellent deuterium enrichment. Theoretical calculations on reaction mechanism and characterization of possible intermediate structures were performed.

  13. O-Glycosidation reactions promoted by in situ generated silver N-heterocyclic carbenes in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talisman, Ian Jamie; Kumar, Vineet; Razzaghy, Jacqueline; Malhotra, Sanjay V

    2011-05-15

    We herein report O-glycosidation reactions promoted via silver N-heterocyclic carbene complexes formed in situ in ionic liquids. Seven different room temperature ionic liquids were screened for the glycosidation reaction of 4-nitrophenol with tetra-O-acetyl-α-d-galactopyranosyl bromide. Good to excellent yields were obtained using Ag-NHC complexes derived from imidazolium halide salts to promote the glycosidation reaction, whereas yields considered moderate to low were obtained without use of the silver carbene complex. Anion metathesis of the ionic liquids with inexpensive alkylammonium halides also resulted in silver N-heterocyclic carbene formation and subsequent O-glycosidation in the presence of silver carbonate. Effective utility of this methodology has been demonstrated with biologically relevant acceptors (including flavones and steroids) where O-β-glycoside products were obtained selectively in moderate to good yields. We have also demonstrated that the Ag-NHC complex is a superior promoter to traditionally used silver carbonate for the glycosidation of polyphenolic acceptors. The ionic liquids used in the study could be recycled three times without apparent loss in activity. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. In situ generated CdS nanostructure induced enhanced photoluminescence from Dy{sup 3+} ions doped dielectric nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Chirantan; Karmakar, Basudeb [Glass Science and Technology Section, Glass Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata (India)

    2017-08-15

    We report CdS nanostructure induced enhanced photoluminescence (PL) from Dy{sup +3}:CdS co-doped dielectric-nanocomposites synthesized by the conventional melt-quench technique. CdS nanocrystals (NCs) were synthesized as in situ within the dielectric medium and their growth was controlled by heat treatment duration. Nanoparticles were investigated with absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and Raman spectroscopy. The experimentally obtained sizes of the NCs are found to increase from 5-11 nm to 50-80 nm. Bandgap enhancement for the carrier confinement was found to alter within the range of 0.20-0.38 eV. Phonon confinement effect has been confirmed by blue shifting of Raman peak for CdS NCs at 303 cm{sup -1}. Enhanced highly intense sharp PL peak at 576 nm was detected, and different parameters associated with the PL enhancement including energy transfer from CdS NCs to Dy{sup 3+} ions have been studied. This PL enhancement was steered by varying CdS NC sizes. Enhanced PL of these nanocomposites finds their potential applications as gain medium in the field of solid state lasers. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Generation of volatile copper species after in situ ionic liquid formation dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction prior to atomic absorption spectrometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanisz, Ewa; Zgoła-Grześkowiak, Agnieszka; Matusiewicz, Henryk

    2014-11-01

    The new procedure using in situ synthesis of ionic liquid extractant for dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (in situ IL DLLME) combined with generation of volatile species prior to electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS) for the determination of copper in soil samples was developed. Analytical signals were obtained without the back-extraction of copper from the IL phase prior to its determination. Under optimal conditions, the extraction in 10 mL of sample solution employing 8 μL of 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide (HmimNTf2) (as the extraction solvent) was conducted. The ionic liquid served as two-task reagent: the efficient extractant and enhancement substance for generation step. The chemical generation of volatile species was performed by reduction of acidified copper solution (HCl 0.8 mol L(-1)) with NaBH4 (1.5%). Some essential parameters of the chemical generation such as NaBH4 and HCl concentrations, the kind and concentration of ionic liquid, carrier gas (Ar) flow rate, reaction and trapping time as well as pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were studied. For photogeneration the effect of the parameters such as the kind and concentration of low molecular weight organic acids and ionic liquid, carrier gas (Ar) flow rate, UV irradiation and ultrasonication time on the analytical signals were studied. The detection limit was found as 1.8 ng mL(-1) and the relative standard deviation (RSD) for seven replicate measurements of 100 µg mL(-1) in sample solution was 7%. The accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated by analysis of the certified reference materials. The measured copper contents in the reference materials were in satisfactory agreement with the certified values. The method was successfully applied to analysis of the soil and sediment samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. In situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamlagain, Bhawani; Sugito, Tessa A; Deptula, Paulina; Edelmann, Minnamari; Kariluoto, Susanna; Varmanen, Pekka; Piironen, Vieno

    2018-01-01

    The in situ production of active vitamin B12 was investigated in aqueous cereal-based matrices with three strains of food-grade Propionibacterium freudenreichii . Matrices prepared from malted barley flour (33% w/v; BM), barley flour (6%; BF), and wheat aleurone (15%; AM) were fermented. The effect of cobalt and the lower ligand 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMBI) or its natural precursors (riboflavin and nicotinamide) on active B12 production was evaluated. Active B12 production was confirmed by UHPLC-UV-MS analysis. A B12 content of 12-37 μg·kg -1 was produced in BM; this content increased 10-fold with cobalt and reached 940-1,480 μg·kg -1 with both cobalt and DMBI. With riboflavin and nicotinamide, B12 production in cobalt-supplemented BM increased to 712 μg·kg -1 . Approximately, 10 μg·kg -1 was achieved in BF and AM and was increased to 80 μg·kg -1 in BF and 260 μg·kg -1 in AM with cobalt and DMBI. The UHPLC and microbiological assay (MBA) results agreed when both cobalt and DMBI or riboflavin and nicotinamide were supplemented. However, MBA gave ca. 20%-40% higher results in BM and AM supplemented with cobalt, indicating the presence of human inactive analogues, such as pseudovitamin B12. This study demonstrates that cereal products can be naturally fortified with active B12 to a nutritionally relevant level by fermenting with P. freudenreichii .

  17. New in situ generated acylhydrazidate-coordinated complexes and acylhydrazide molecules: Synthesis, structural characterization and photoluminescence property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Ning; Huo, Qi-Sheng; Zhang, Ping; Yu, Jie-Hui; Xu, Ji-Qing

    2016-10-01

    By utilizing the hydrothermal in situ acylation of organic acids with N2H4, three acylhydrazidate-coordinated compounds [Mn(L1)2(H2O)2] (L1 = 2,3-quinolinedicarboxylhydrazidate; HL1 = 2,3-dihydropyridazino[4,5-b] quinoline-1,4-dione) 1, [Mn2(ox)(L2)2(H2O)6]·2H2O (L2 = benzimidazolate-5,6-dicarboxylhydrazide; HL2 = 6,7-dihydro-1H-imidazo[4,5-g]phthalazine-5,8-dione; ox = oxalate) 2, and [Cd(HL3)(bpy)] (L3 = 4,5-di(3‧-carboxylphenyl)phthalhydrazidate; H3L3 = 6,7-dihydro-1H-imidazo[4,5-g]phthalazine-5,8-dione; bpy = 2,2‧-bipyridine) 3, as well as two acylhydrazide molecules L4 (L4 = oxepino[2,3,4-de:7,6,5-d‧e‧]diphthalazine-4,10(5H,9H)-dione) 4 and L5 (L5 = 4,5-dibromophthalhydrazide; L5 = 6,7-dibromo-2,3-dihydrophthalazine-1,4-dione) 5 were obtained. X-ray single-crystal diffraction analysis reveals that (i) 1 only possesses a mononuclear structure, but it self-assembles into a 2-D supramolecular network via the Nhydrazinesbnd H ⋯ Nhydrazine and Owsbnd H ⋯ Ohydroxylimino interactions; (ii) 2 exhibits a dinuclear structure. Ox acts as the linker, while L2 just serves as a terminal ligand; (iii) In 3, L3 acts as a 3-connected node to propagate the 7-coordinated Cd2 + centers into a 1-D double-chain structure; (iv) 4 is a special acylhydrazide molecule. Two sbnd OH groups for the intermediates 3,3‧-biphthalhydrazide further lose one water molecule to form 4; (v) 5 is a common monoacylhydrazide molecule. Via the Nhydrazinesbnd H ⋯ Ohydrazine, Ohydroxyliminosbnd H ⋯ Oacylamino and the π ⋯ π interactions, it self-assembles into a 2-D supramolecular network. The photoluminescence analysis reveals that 4 emits light with the maxima at 510 nm.

  18. Isotopic Exchange Reaction Assisted with Cu (I) generated ''in situ'' For Synthesis of Ready-to-Use for on-the-spot Formulation of [131 I] Iodobenzyl Derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abudaia, J.A.; Suliman, M.O.

    2007-01-01

    It has been examined that meta-Iodobenzylguanidine (m-IBG), para-Iodoamphetamine (p-IPA) and orth-Iodohippuric acid (o-IHA) are three commonly used Iodobenzyl derivative compounds, and can be formulated as Ready-to-Use Kits for on-the-spot labeling catalyzed with copper ion Cu+ (I) generated ''In Situ''. The labeling procedure efficiently has been established within 30 min of heating using an autoclave, 20 min. and 90 min. using dry heating block respectively. Isotopic exchange reaction with Iodine-131 radioactive of those three Ready-to-Use Kits has led to Radiochemical Purity ''RCP'' equals to 98%, > 98%, and almost 99%, and Radiochemical Yield ''RCY'' > 97%, >93% and > 98% respectively. Attention was paid to the Radiochemical Stability of those three Iodobenzyl derivatives for a period time of preservation at low temperature. As a result, this gave evidence that such Radiopharmaceuticals could be used as Ready-to-Use products at different times of preservations.

  19. Performance evaluation of a green process for microalgal CO2 sequestration in closed photobioreactor using flue gas generated in-situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Geetanjali; Karemore, Ankush; Dash, Sukanta Kumar; Sen, Ramkrishna

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, carbon-dioxide capture from in situ generated flue gas was carried out using Chlorella sp. in bubble column photobioreactors to develop a cost effective process for concomitant carbon sequestration and biomass production. Firstly, a comparative analysis of CO2 sequestration with varying concentrations of CO2 in air-CO2 and air-flue gas mixtures was performed. Chlorella sp. was found to be tolerant to 5% CO2 concentration. Subsequently, inhibitory effect of pure flue gas was minimized using various strategies like use of high initial cell density and photobioreactors in series. The final biofixation efficiency was improved by 54% using the adopted strategies. Further, sequestered microalgal biomass was analyzed for various biochemical constituents for their use in food, feed or biofuel applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. In situ generation of highly dispersed metal nanoparticles on two-dimensional layered SiO2 by topotactic structure conversion and their superior catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Jia, Da-Shuang; Zhou, Yue; Hao, Jiang; Liang, Yu; Cui, Zhi-Min; Song, Wei-Guo

    2018-03-01

    Metal nanoparticles such as Ag, Cu and Fe are effective catalysts for many reactions, whereas a facile method to prepare metal nanoparticles with high uniformed dispersion is still desirable. Herein, the topotactic structure conversion of layered silicate, RUB-15, was utilized to support metal nanoparticles. Through simple ion-exchange and following calcination step, metal nanoparticles were generated in situ inside the interlayer space of layered silica, and the topotactic structure conversion process assured nano-sized and highly uniformed dispersion of metal nanoparticles. The obtained Ag/SiO2 composite showed superior catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) and methylene blue (MB), with a rate constant as high as 0.0607 s-1 and 0.0778 s-1. The simple and universal synthesis method as well as high activity of the product composite endow the strategy good application prospect.

  1. Loose nanofiltration membrane for dye/salt separation through interfacial polymerization with in-situ generated TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qi; Fan, Lin; Yang, Zhen; Zhang, Runnan; Liu, Ya-nan; He, Mingrui [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Su, Yanlei, E-mail: suyanlei@tju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Jiang, Zhongyi [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • A in-situ generated TiO{sub 2} approach was used to fabricate loose nanofiltration membrane. • The membrane contained small channels owing to the interaction between TiO{sub 2} and the polyamide. • The membranes exhibited high water fluxes and separation performance for dye/salt solutions. - Abstract: In this study, a high flux nanofiltration (NF) membrane with hybrid polymer-nanoparticle active layer was fabricated by chemical crosslinking of piperazine (PIP) and 1, 3, 5-benzene tricarbonyl trichloride (TMC). An in-situ generated method was applied to deposit titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles uniformly on the membrane surface, leading to the enhancement of the surface hydrophilicity, roughness and relative surface area of the polyamide (PA) layer. The morphology of the modified membrane was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Atomic force microscopy (AFM), also energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) was used to analyze the distribution of Ti element. Chemical structure was observed by Fourier transmission infrared attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy. Remarkably, the optimal water flux of the loose NF membrane was 65.0 Lm{sup −2} h{sup −1} bar{sup −1} nearly 5 times as much as the pure PA membrane flux. The rejections of the loose NF membranes for dyes were almost all greater than 95.0%, while the rejection for sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) was only about 17.0%, which indicated that the modified membrane had an impressive potential application for dye desalination and purification.

  2. In situ generation of copper cations and complexation with tebuconazole in a hyphenation of electrochemistry with mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jaklová Dytrtová, Jana; Jakl, M.; Schröder, Detlef; Norková, Renáta

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 338, 15 MAR (2013), s. 45-49 ISSN 1387-3806 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-21409P Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : electrochemical ion generation * ESI-MS * coupling * fungicide * tebuconazole * soil solution Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 2.227, year: 2013

  3. Demonstration of multi-generational growth of tungsten nanoparticles in hydrogen plasma using in situ laser extinction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouaras, K.; Lombardi, G.; Hassouni, K.

    2018-03-01

    For the first time, we demonstrate that tungsten (W) nanoparticles (NPs) are created when a tungsten target is exposed to low-pressure, high density hydrogen plasma. The plasma was generated using a novel dual plasma system combining a microwave discharge and a pulsed direct-current (DC) discharge. The tungsten surface originates in the multi-generational formation of a significant population of 30-70 nm diameter particles when the W cathode is biased at ~  -1 kV and submitted to ~1020 m2 s-1 H+/H2+ /H3+ ions flux. The evidenced NPs formation should be taking into account as one of the consequence of the plasma surface interaction outcomes, especially for fusion applications.

  4. A circular dichroism sensor for selective detection of Cd2 + and S2 - based on the in-situ generation of chiral CdS quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sianglam, Pradthana; Kulchat, Sirinan; Tuntulani, Thawatchai; Ngeontae, Wittaya

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate an advance in the fabrication of circular dichroism (CD) sensors for detection of Cd2 + and S2 - based on chiral CdS quantum dots (QDs) generated by a facile in-situ reaction. The chiral quantum dots are generated in solutions composed of Cd2 +, S2 -, cysteamine (CA) and L-penicillamine (L-PA), with the number of the generated particles limited by either the Cd2 + or S2 - concentration. We show that the magnitude of the CD signal produced by the QDs is linearly related to the initial concentration of Cd2 + and S2 -, with excellent selectivity over other ions. Our sensor functions over concentration ranges of 65-200 μM and 7-125 μM with detection limits of 59.7 and 1.6 μM for Cd2 + and S2 -, respectively. The sensor is applied in real water samples with results comparing favorably with those obtained from ICP-OES (for Cd2 +) and HPLC (for S2 -).

  5. Determination of methylmercury by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using headspace single-drop microextraction with in situ hydride generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, Sandra; Fragueiro, Sandra; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    A new method is proposed for preconcentration and matrix separation of methylmercury prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Generation of methylmercury hydride (MeHgH) from a 5-ml solution is carried out in a closed vial and trapped onto an aqueous single drop (3-μl volume) containing Pd(II) or Pt(IV) (50 and 10 mg/l, respectively). The hydrogen evolved in the headspace (HS) after decomposition of sodium tetrahydroborate (III) injected for hydride generation caused the formation of finely dispersed Pd(0) or Pt(0) in the drop, which in turn, were responsible for the sequestration of MeHgH. A preconcentration factor of ca. 40 is achieved with both noble metals used as trapping agents. The limit of detection of methylmercury was 5 and 4 ng/ml (as Hg) with Pd(II) or Pt(IV) as trapping agents, and the precision expressed as relative standard deviation was about 7%. The preconcentration system was fully characterised through optimisation of the following variables: Pd(II) or Pt(IV) concentration in the drop, extraction time, pH of the medium, temperatures of both sample solution and drop, concentration of salt in the sample solution, sodium tetrahydroborate (III) concentration in the drop and stirring rate. The method has been successfully validated against two fish certified reference materials (CRM 464 tuna fish and CRM DORM-2 dogfish muscle) following selective extraction of methylmercury in 2 mol/l HCl medium

  6. Versatile In Situ Generated N-Boc-Imines: Application to Phase-Transfer-Catalyzed Asymmetric Mannich-Type Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Taichi; Kobayashi, Ryohei; Maruoka, Keiji

    2015-07-13

    The efficient construction of nitrogen-containing organic compounds is a major challenge in chemical synthesis. Imines are one of the most important classes of electrophiles for this transformation. However, both the available imines and applicable nucleophiles for them are quite limited given the existing preparative methods. Described herein are imine precursors which generate reactive imines with a wide variety of substituents under mild basic conditions. This approach enables the construction of various nitrogen-containing molecules which cannot be accessed by the traditional approach. The utility of the novel imine precursor was demonstrated in the asymmetric Mannich-type reaction under phase-transfer conditions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. In situ microscopy reveals reversible cell wall swelling in kelp sieve tubes: one mechanism for turgor generation and flow control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoblauch, Jan; Tepler Drobnitch, Sarah; Peters, Winfried S; Knoblauch, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Kelps, brown algae (Phaeophyceae) of the order Laminariales, possess sieve tubes for the symplasmic long-distance transport of photoassimilates that are evolutionarily unrelated but structurally similar to the tubes in the phloem of vascular plants. We visualized sieve tube structure and wound responses in fully functional, intact Bull Kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana [K. Mertens] Postels & Ruprecht 1840). In injured tubes, apparent slime plugs formed but were unlikely to cause sieve tube occlusion as they assembled at the downstream side of sieve plates. Cell walls expanded massively in the radial direction, reducing the volume of the wounded sieve elements by up to 90%. Ultrastructural examination showed that a layer of the immediate cell wall characterized by circumferential cellulose fibrils was responsible for swelling and suggested that alginates, abundant gelatinous polymers of the cell wall matrix, were involved. Wall swelling was rapid, reversible and depended on intracellular pressure, as demonstrated by pressure-injection of silicon oil. Our results revive the concept of turgor generation and buffering by swelling cell walls, which had fallen into oblivion over the last century. Because sieve tube transport is pressure-driven and controlled physically by tube diameter, a regulatory role of wall swelling in photoassimilate distribution is implied in kelps. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Durable antimicrobial cotton textiles coated sonochemically with ZnO nanoparticles embedded in an in-situ enzymatically generated bioadhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salat, Marc; Petkova, Petya; Hoyo, Javier; Perelshtein, Ilana; Gedanken, Aharon; Tzanov, Tzanko

    2018-06-01

    An important preventive measure for providing a bacteria-free environment for the patients is the introduction of highly efficient and durable antibacterial textiles in hospitals. This work describes a single step sono-enzymatic process for coating of cotton medical textiles with antibacterial ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) and gallic acid (GA) to produce biocompatible fabrics with durable antibacterial properties. Cellulose substrates, however, need pre-activation to achieve sufficient stability of the NPs on their surface. Herein, this drawback is overcome by the simultaneous sonochemical deposition of ZnO NPs and the synthesis of a bio-based adhesive generated by the enzymatic cross-linking of GA in which the NPs were embedded. GA possesses the multiple functions of an antibacterial agent, a building block of the cross-linked phenolic network, and as a compound providing the safe contact of the coated materials with human skin. The ZnO NPs-GA coated fabrics maintained above 60% antibacterial efficacy even after 60 washing cycles at 75 °C hospital laundry regime. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Photocatalytic oxidation of the organic monolayers on TiO2 surface investigated by in-situ sum frequency generation spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujin Tong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In-situ vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG spectroscopy has been employed to investigate the photocatalytic oxidation of two types of well-ordered organic monolayers, namely, an arachidic acid (AA monolayer prepared by the Langmuir-Blodgett method and an octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS monolayer prepared by the self-assembling method, on a TiO2 surface under ultraviolet (UV irradiation. The extremely high sensitivity and unique selectivity of the SFG spectroscopy enabled us to directly probe the structural changes in these monolayers during the surface photocatalytic oxidation and further elucidate their reaction mechanisms at a molecular level. It was revealed that the ordering of the monolayers during the photocatalytic reaction is strongly dependent on their interaction with the substrate; the AA monolayer maintains its ordered conformation until the final oxidation stage, while the OTS monolayer shows a large increase in disordering during the initial oxidation stage, indicating a different photocatalytic reaction mechanism of the two monolayers on the TiO2 surface.

  10. Photocatalytic oxidation of the organic monolayers on TiO{sub 2} surface investigated by in-situ sum frequency generation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Yujin; Peng, Qiling; Ma, Tongsen; Nishida, Takuma; Ye, Shen, E-mail: ye@cat.hokudai.ac.jp [Catalysis Research Center, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0811 (Japan)

    2015-10-01

    In-situ vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy has been employed to investigate the photocatalytic oxidation of two types of well-ordered organic monolayers, namely, an arachidic acid (AA) monolayer prepared by the Langmuir-Blodgett method and an octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) monolayer prepared by the self-assembling method, on a TiO{sub 2} surface under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The extremely high sensitivity and unique selectivity of the SFG spectroscopy enabled us to directly probe the structural changes in these monolayers during the surface photocatalytic oxidation and further elucidate their reaction mechanisms at a molecular level. It was revealed that the ordering of the monolayers during the photocatalytic reaction is strongly dependent on their interaction with the substrate; the AA monolayer maintains its ordered conformation until the final oxidation stage, while the OTS monolayer shows a large increase in disordering during the initial oxidation stage, indicating a different photocatalytic reaction mechanism of the two monolayers on the TiO{sub 2} surface.

  11. Investigation of Surface Alkylation Strategy in SOMC: In Situ Generation of a Silica-Supported Tungsten Methyl Catalyst for Cyclooctane Metathesis

    KAUST Repository

    Hamieh, Ali Imad Ali

    2016-07-28

    An efficient and potentially scalable method is described for the synthesis of the silica-supported complexes [(≡Si-O-)WMe5] and [(≡Si-O-)WMe2(≡CH)] obtained by in situ alkylation of the surface-grafted tungsten chloride [(≡Si-O-)WCl5] (1). [(≡Si-O-)WCl5] can be readily prepared by the reaction of commercially available and stable tungsten hexachloride WCl6 with partially dehydroxylated silica at 700 °C (SiO2-700). Further reaction with ZnMe2 at room temperature rapidly forms a mixture of surface-alkylated tungsten complexes. They were fully characterized by microanalysis, FTIR, mass balance, and solid-state NMR (1H, 13C, 1H-13C HETCOR, 1H-1H double quantum and triple quantum) and identified as [(≡Si-O-)WMe5] and another product, [(≡Si-O-)WMe2(≡CH)]. The latter might have been generated by partial decomposition of the tungsten methyl chloride compound, which is formed during the stepwise alkylation of [(≡Si-O-)WCl5]. DFT calculations were carried out to check the relative stability of the tungsten methyl chloride intermediates and the feasibility of the reaction and corroborate the experimental results. This tungsten complex and its derivative were found to be active catalysts for the metathesis of cyclooctane. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  12. Loose nanofiltration membrane for dye/salt separation through interfacial polymerization with in-situ generated TiO2 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Fan, Lin; Yang, Zhen; Zhang, Runnan; Liu, Ya-nan; He, Mingrui; Su, Yanlei; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2017-07-01

    In this study, a high flux nanofiltration (NF) membrane with hybrid polymer-nanoparticle active layer was fabricated by chemical crosslinking of piperazine (PIP) and 1, 3, 5-benzene tricarbonyl trichloride (TMC). An in-situ generated method was applied to deposit titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles uniformly on the membrane surface, leading to the enhancement of the surface hydrophilicity, roughness and relative surface area of the polyamide (PA) layer. The morphology of the modified membrane was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Atomic force microscopy (AFM), also energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) was used to analyze the distribution of Ti element. Chemical structure was observed by Fourier transmission infrared attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy. Remarkably, the optimal water flux of the loose NF membrane was 65.0 Lm-2 h-1 bar-1 nearly 5 times as much as the pure PA membrane flux. The rejections of the loose NF membranes for dyes were almost all greater than 95.0%, while the rejection for sodium sulfate (Na2SO4) was only about 17.0%, which indicated that the modified membrane had an impressive potential application for dye desalination and purification.

  13. Vacancy Generation and Oxygen Uptake in Cu-Doped Pr-CeO2 Materials using Neutron and in Situ X-ray Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Anita M; Webster, Nathan A S; Chaffee, Alan L

    2016-12-19

    The oxygen uptake ability of Pr-CeO 2 -based oxygen carriers, catalysts, and solid oxide fuel cells can be attributed to 3+ cation generation and the presence of vacant oxygen sites. Oxygen occupancies of CeO 2 , Pr-CeO 2 , and 5% Cu-doped Pr-CeO 2 were investigated using neutron diffraction and related to the oxygen uptake as determined using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The presence of vacant tetrahedral oxygen sites at room temperature did not correspond to low-temperature oxygen uptake. The materials did not uptake oxygen at 420 °C, but oxygen uptake was observed at 600 °C, which indicated that a minimum temperature needs to be met to generate sufficient vacancies/3+ cations. Variations in the lattice parameter as a function of temperature were revealed using in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). With increasing temperature the lattice parameter increased linearly due to thermal expansion and was followed by an exponential increase at ∼300-400 °C as cations were reduced. Despite segregation of Cu into CuO at high dopant concentration, at 600 °C a higher O 2 uptake was obtained for Ce 0.65 Pr 0.20 Cu 0.15 O 2-δ (120 μmol g -1 ), in comparison to Ce 0.75 Pr 0.2 Cu 0.05 O 2-δ (92 μmol g -1 ), and was higher than that for Ce 0.8 Pr 0.2 O 2-δ (55 μmol g -1 ). Both Pr and Cu introduce vacancies and promote the O 2 uptake of CeO 2 .

  14. In situ Remediation Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grotenhuis, J.T.C.; Rijnaarts, H.H.M.

    2011-01-01

    A summary of two decades of developments of In Situ remediation is presented in this chapter. The basic principles of In Situ technology application are addressed, such as equilibrium relations between contaminant phases, factors controlling biological and geochemical processes, contaminant

  15. Fenton-like oxidation of 4-chlorophenol using H2O2 in situ generated by Zn-Fe-CNTs composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong; Fan, Qing; Liu, Yanlan; Wang, Jianlong

    2018-05-15

    In this paper, a zinc-iron-carbon nanotubes (Zn-Fe-CNTs) composite was prepared, characterized and used to develop a Fenton-like system of Zn-Fe-CNTs/O 2 for the degradation of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP), in which H 2 O 2 was generated in situ from zinc-carbon galvanic cells and oxygen in aqueous solution was activated by iron attached on the surface of CNTs to produce ·OH radicals for the oxidation of 4-CP. The experimental results showed that the particles of Zn and Fe in Zn-Fe-CNTs composite were adhered to the surface of CNTs, which accelerated the electron transfer process. The BET area of Zn-Fe-CNTs composite was 32.9 m 2 /g. The contents of Zn and Fe (% w) in the composite were 44.7% and 4.2%, respectively. The removal efficiency of 4-CP and TOC in Zn-Fe-CNTs/O 2 system was 90.8% and 52.9%, respectively, with the initial pH of 2.0, O 2 flow rate of 800 mL/min, Zn-Fe-CNTs dosage of 1.0 g/L, 4-CP concentration of 50 mg/L and reaction time of 20 min. Based on the analysis of the degradation intermediate products with LC-MS and IC, a possible degradation pathway of 4-CP in Zn-Fe-CNTs/O 2 system was proposed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Oxidation kinetics of Si and SiGe by dry rapid thermal oxidation, in-situ steam generation oxidation and dry furnace oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozé, Fabien; Gourhant, Olivier; Blanquet, Elisabeth; Bertin, François; Juhel, Marc; Abbate, Francesco; Pribat, Clément; Duru, Romain

    2017-06-01

    The fabrication of ultrathin compressively strained SiGe-On-Insulator layers by the condensation technique is likely a key milestone towards low-power and high performances FD-SOI logic devices. However, the SiGe condensation technique still requires challenges to be solved for an optimized use in an industrial environment. SiGe oxidation kinetics, upon which the condensation technique is founded, has still not reached a consensus in spite of various studies which gave insights into the matter. This paper aims to bridge the gaps between these studies by covering various oxidation processes relevant to today's technological needs with a new and quantitative analysis methodology. We thus address oxidation kinetics of SiGe with three Ge concentrations (0%, 10%, and 30%) by means of dry rapid thermal oxidation, in-situ steam generation oxidation, and dry furnace oxidation. Oxide thicknesses in the 50 Å to 150 Å range grown with oxidation temperatures between 850 and 1100 °C were targeted. The present work shows first that for all investigated processes, oxidation follows a parabolic regime even for thin oxides, which indicates a diffusion-limited oxidation regime. We also observe that, for all investigated processes, the SiGe oxidation rate is systematically higher than that of Si. The amplitude of the variation of oxidation kinetics of SiGe with respect to Si is found to be strongly dependent on the process type. Second, a new quantitative analysis methodology of oxidation kinetics is introduced. This methodology allows us to highlight the dependence of oxidation kinetics on the Ge concentration at the oxidation interface, which is modulated by the pile-up mechanism. Our results show that the oxidation rate increases with the Ge concentration at the oxidation interface.

  17. Potential of EPR spin-trapping to investigate in situ free radicals generation from skin allergens in reconstructed human epidermis: cumene hydroperoxide as proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuresepi, Salen; Vileno, Bertrand; Turek, Philippe; Lepoittevin, Jean-Pierre; Giménez-Arnau, Elena

    2018-02-01

    The first step in the development of skin sensitisation to a chemical, and in the elicitation of further allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), is the binding of the allergen to skin proteins after penetrating into the epidermis. The so-formed antigenic adduct is then recognised by the immune system as foreign to the body. Sensitising organic hydroperoxides derived from autoxidation of natural terpenes are believed to form antigens through radical-mediated mechanisms, although this has not yet been established. So far, in vitro investigations on reactive radical intermediates derived from these skin sensitisers have been conducted in solution, yet with experimental conditions being far away from real-life sensitisation. Herein, we report for the first time, the potential use of EPR spin-trapping to study the in situ generation of free radicals derived from cumene hydroperoxide CumOOH in a 3D reconstructed human epidermis (RHE) model, thus much closer to what may happen in vivo. Among the undesirable effects associated with dermal exposure to CumOOH, it is described to cause allergic and irritant dermatitis, being reported as a significant sensitiser. We considered exploiting the usage of spin-trap DEPMPO as an extensive view of all sort of radicals derived from CumOOH were observed all at once in solution. We showed that in the Episkin TM RHE model, both by incubating in the assay medium and by topical application, carbon radicals are mainly formed by redox reactions suggesting the key role of CumOOH-derived carbon radicals in the antigen formation process.

  18. In Situ Synthesis of Few-Layered g-C3N4with Vertically Aligned MoS2Loading for Boosting Solar-to-Hydrogen Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Hui; Ji, Yujin; Yan, Junqing; Li, Ping; Li, Ling; Li, Youyong; Frank Liu, Shengzhong

    2018-01-01

    In artificial photocatalytic hydrogen evolution, effective incident photon absorption and a high-charge recombination rate are crucial factors influencing the overall efficiency. Herein, a traditional solid-state synthesis is used to obtain, for the first time, novel samples of few-layered g-C 3 N 4 with vertically aligned MoS 2 loading (MoS 2 /C 3 N 4 ). Thiourea and layered MoO 3 are chosen as precursors, as they react under nitrogen atmosphere to in situ produce the products. According to the quasi-Fourier transform infrared reflectance and X-ray diffraction measurements, the detailed reaction process is determined to proceed through the confirmed formation pathway. The two precursor units MoS 2 and C 3 N 4 are linked by MoN bonds, which act as electronic receivers/conductors and hydrogen-generation sites. Density functional theory is also carried out, which determines that the interface sites act as electron-accumulation regions. According to the photoelectrochemical results, MoS 2 /C 3 N 4 can achieve a current of 0.05 mA cm -2 , which is almost ten times higher than that of bare g-C 3 N 4 or the MoS 2 /C 3 N 4 -R reference samples. The findings in the present work pave the way to not only synthesize a series of designated samples but also thoroughly understand the solid-state reaction. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. The majority of lymphocytes in the bone marrow. Thymus and extrathymic T cells in the liver are generated in situ from their own preexisting precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Takao; Sugahara, Satoshi; Oya, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Satoshi; Minagawa, Masahiro; Bannai, Makoto; Hatakeyama, Katsuyoshi; Abo, Toru

    1999-01-01

    Parabiotic pairs of B6.Ly5.1 and B6.Ly5.2 mice were used to investigate how lymphocytes in various organs and various lymphocyte subsets mixed with partner cells. The origin of partner cells was determined by using anti-Ly5.1 mAb in conjunction with immunofluorescence tests. Parabiosis was also produced after the irradiation of B6.Ly5.2 mice at various doses to prepare an immunosuppressive partner. Irrespective of irradiation, lymphocytes and other hematopoietic cells in the bone marrow and lymphocytes in the thymus showed a low mixture of partner cells in comparison with those of all other organs tested. On the other hand, lymphocytes in the blood, spleen, and lymph nodes became a half-and-half mixture of their own cells and partner cell by 14 days after parabiosis. Among lymphocyte subsets, intermediate CD3 cells (i.e., CD3 int cells) and NKT cells (i.e., NK1.1 + subset of CD3 int cells) in the liver also showed a low mixture of partner cells. The present results raise the possibility that lymphocytes in the bone marrow and thymus, and extrathymic T cells in the liver might be in situ generated from their own preexisting precursor cells. Another observation was that, after irradiation, partner cells showed accelerated mixture even if they showed a low mixture under non-irradiated conditions. However, only lymphocyte subsets with the same phenotype as those of preexisting cells entered the corresponding sites. (author)

  20. The majority of lymphocytes in the bone marrow. Thymus and extrathymic T cells in the liver are generated in situ from their own preexisting precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Takao; Sugahara, Satoshi; Oya, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Satoshi; Minagawa, Masahiro; Bannai, Makoto; Hatakeyama, Katsuyoshi; Abo, Toru [Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-06-01

    Parabiotic pairs of B6.Ly5.1 and B6.Ly5.2 mice were used to investigate how lymphocytes in various organs and various lymphocyte subsets mixed with partner cells. The origin of partner cells was determined by using anti-Ly5.1 mAb in conjunction with immunofluorescence tests. Parabiosis was also produced after the irradiation of B6.Ly5.2 mice at various doses to prepare an immunosuppressive partner. Irrespective of irradiation, lymphocytes and other hematopoietic cells in the bone marrow and lymphocytes in the thymus showed a low mixture of partner cells in comparison with those of all other organs tested. On the other hand, lymphocytes in the blood, spleen, and lymph nodes became a half-and-half mixture of their own cells and partner cell by 14 days after parabiosis. Among lymphocyte subsets, intermediate CD3 cells (i.e., CD3{sup int} cells) and NKT cells (i.e., NK1.1{sup +} subset of CD3{sup int} cells) in the liver also showed a low mixture of partner cells. The present results raise the possibility that lymphocytes in the bone marrow and thymus, and extrathymic T cells in the liver might be in situ generated from their own preexisting precursor cells. Another observation was that, after irradiation, partner cells showed accelerated mixture even if they showed a low mixture under non-irradiated conditions. However, only lymphocyte subsets with the same phenotype as those of preexisting cells entered the corresponding sites. (author)

  1. Four Models of In Situ Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musaeus, Peter; Krogh, Kristian; Paltved, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In situ simulation is characterized by being situated in the clinical environment as opposed to the simulation laboratory. But in situ simulation bears a family resemblance to other types of on the job training. We explore a typology of in situ simulation and suggest that there are f...... to team intervention and philosophies informing what good situated learning research is. This study generates system knowledge that might inform scenario development for in situ simulation.......Introduction In situ simulation is characterized by being situated in the clinical environment as opposed to the simulation laboratory. But in situ simulation bears a family resemblance to other types of on the job training. We explore a typology of in situ simulation and suggest...... that there are four fruitful approaches to in situ simulation: (1) In situ simulation informed by reported critical incidents and adverse events from emergency departments (ED) in which team training is about to be conducted to write scenarios. (2) In situ simulation through ethnographic studies at the ED. (3) Using...

  2. Cofortification of ferric pyrophosphate and citric acid/trisodium citrate into extruded rice grains doubles iron bioavailability through in situ generation of soluble ferric pyrophosphate citrate complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackl, Laura; Cercamondi, Colin I; Zeder, Christophe; Wild, Daniela; Adelmann, Horst; Zimmermann, Michael B; Moretti, Diego

    2016-05-01

    Iron fortification of rice is a promising strategy for improving iron nutrition. However, it is technically challenging because rice is consumed as intact grains, and ferric pyrophosphate (FePP), which is usually used for rice fortification, has low bioavailability. We investigated whether the addition of a citric acid/trisodium citrate (CA/TSC) mixture before extrusion increases iron absorption in humans from FePP-fortified extruded rice grains. We conducted an iron absorption study in iron-sufficient young women (n = 20), in which each participant consumed 4 different meals (4 mg Fe/meal): 1) extruded FePP-fortified rice (No CA/TSC); 2) extruded FePP-fortified rice with CA/TSC added before extrusion (CA/TSC extruded); 3) extruded FePP-fortified rice with CA/TSC solution added after cooking and before consumption (CA/TSC solution); and 4) nonextruded rice fortified with a FeSO4 solution added after cooking and before consumption (reference). Iron absorption was calculated from erythrocyte incorporation of stable iron isotopes 14 d after administration. In in vitro experiments, we assessed the soluble and dialyzable iron from rice meals in which CA/TSC was added at different preparation stages and from meals with different iron:CA:TSC ratios. Fractional iron absorption was significantly higher from CA/TSC-extruded meals (3.2%) than from No CA/TSC (1.7%) and CA/TSC solution (1.7%; all P solubility and dialyzability were higher in CA/TSC-extruded rice than in rice with No CA/TSC and CA/TSC solution, and solubility increased with higher amounts of added CA and TSC in extruded rice. Iron bioavailability nearly doubled when CA/TSC was extruded with FePP into fortified rice, resulting in iron bioavailability comparable to that of FeSO4 We attribute this effect to an in situ generation of soluble FePP citrate moieties during extrusion and/or cooking because of the close physical proximity of FePP and CA/TSC in the extruded rice matrix. This trial was registered at

  3. Evaluation of chloride-ion-specific electrodes as in situ chemical sensors for monitoring total chloride concentration in aqueous solutions generated during the recovery of plutonium from molten salts used in plutonium electrorefining operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.H.

    1992-10-01

    Two commercially available chloride-ion-specific electrodes (CLISEs), a solid-state type and a membrane type, were evaluated as potential in situ chemical sensors for determining total chloride ion concentration in mixed sodium chloride/potassium chloride/hydrochloric acid solutions generated during the recovery of plutonium from molten salts used in plutonium electrorefining operations. Because the response of the solid-state CLISE was closer than was the response of the membrane-type CLISE to the theoretical response predicted by the Nernst equation, the solid-state CLISE was selected for further evaluation. A detailed investigation of the characteristics of the chloride system and the corresponding CLISE response to concentration changes suggested four methods by which the CLISE could be used either as a direct, in situ sensor or as an indirect sensor through which an analysis could be performed on-line with a sample extracted from the process solution

  4. Metal Oxide Nanostructures Generated from In Situ Sacrifice of Zinc in Bimetallic Textures as Flexible Ni/Fe Fast Battery Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tianyi; Liu, Zhifang; Zhang, Zitong; Xiao, Bangqing; Jin, Yong

    2017-08-04

    An "in situ sacrifice" process was devised in this work as a room-temperature, all-solution processed electrochemical method to synthesize nanostructured NiO x and FeO x directly on current collectors. After electrodepositing NiZn/FeZn bimetallic textures on a copper net, the zinc component is etched and the remnant nickel/iron are evolved into NiO x and FeO x by the "in situ sacrifice" activation we propose. As-prepared electrodes exhibit high areal capacities of 0.47 mA h cm -2 and 0.32 mA h cm -2 , respectively. By integrating NiO x as the cathode, FeO x as the anode, and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)-KOH gel as the separator/solid-state electrolyte, the assembled quasi-solid-state flexible battery delivers a volumetric capacity of 6.91 mA h cm -3 at 5 mA cm -2 , along with a maximum energy density of 7.40 mWh cm -3 under a power density of 0.27 W cm -3 and a maximum tested power density of 3.13 W cm -3 with a 2.17 mW h cm -3 energy density retention. Our room-temperature synthesis, which only consumes minute electricity, makes it a promising approach for large-scale production. We also emphasize the in situ sacrifice zinc etching process used in this work as a general strategy for metal-based nanostructure growth for high-performance battery materials. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. In situ groundwater bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-02-01

    In situ groundwater bioremediation of hydrocarbons has been used for more than 40 years. Most strategies involve biostimulation; however, recently bioaugmentation have been used for dehalorespiration. Aquifer and contaminant profiles are critical to determining the feasibility and strategy for in situ groundwater bioremediation. Hydraulic conductivity and redox conditions, including concentrations of terminal electron acceptors are critical to determine the feasibility and strategy for potential bioremediation applications. Conceptual models followed by characterization and subsequent numerical models are critical for efficient and cost effective bioremediation. Critical research needs in this area include better modeling and integration of remediation strategies with natural attenuation.

  6. Zn(II) coordination polymer of an in situ generated 4-pyridyl (4Py) attached bis(amido)phosphate ligand, [PO2(NH4Py)2]- showing preferential water uptake over aliphatic alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Arvind K; Nagarkar, Sanjog S; Boomishankar, Ramamoorthy

    2013-08-14

    Two polymorphic 2D-coordination polymers of composition [ZnL(HCO2)]∞ were synthesized from an in situ generated ligand [PO2(NH(4)Py)2](-) (L(-)). The ligand L(-) was generated by a facile metal-assisted P-N bond hydrolysis reaction from the corresponding phosphonium salt 1, [P(NH(4)Py)4]Cl, or from the neutral phosphoric triamide 2, [PO(NH(4)Py)3]. The de-solvated sample of the polymer [ZnL(HCO2)]∞ features polar micropores and shows a type I isotherm for CO2 sorption whereas a type II behaviour was observed for N2. The vapour sorption isotherm of the de-solvated sample of [ZnL(HCO2)]∞ shows preferential adsorption of water vapour over aliphatic alcohols.

  7. In Situ Generation of Poly (Vinylene Carbonate) Based Solid Electrolyte with Interfacial Stability for LiCoO2 Lithium Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Jingchao; Liu, Zhihong; Ma, Jun; Wang, Jia; Liu, Xiaochen; Liu, Haisheng; Zhang, Jianjun; Cui, Guanglei; Chen, Liquan

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays it is extremely urgent to seek high performance solid polymer electrolyte that possesses both interfacial stability toward lithium/graphitic anodes and high voltage cathodes for high energy density solid state batteries. Inspired by the positive interfacial effect of vinylene carbonate additive on solid electrolyte interface, a novel poly (vinylene carbonate) based solid polymer electrolyte is presented via a facile in situ polymerization process in this paper. It is manifested that poly (vinylene carbonate) based solid polymer electrolyte possess a superior electrochemical stability window up to 4.5 V versus Li/Li + and considerable ionic conductivity of 9.82 × 10 -5 S cm -1 at 50 °C. Moreover, it is demonstrated that high voltage LiCoO 2 /Li batteries using this solid polymer electrolyte display stable charge/discharge profiles, considerable rate capability, excellent cycling performance, and decent safety characteristic. It is believed that poly (vinylene carbonate) based electrolyte can be a very promising solid polymer electrolyte candidate for high energy density lithium batteries.

  8. Enhancement of MALDI-MS spectra of C-terminal peptides by the modification of proteins via an active ester generated in situ from an oxazolone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Minoru; Oka, Mutsumi; Nishida, Kimiko; Ishida, Mayu; Hamazaki, Ayako; Kuyama, Hiroki; Ando, Eiji; Okamura, Taka-aki; Ueyama, Norikazu; Norioka, Shigemi; Nishimura, Osamu; Tsunasawa, Susumu; Nakazawa, Takashi

    2006-11-15

    For selective C-terminal derivatization of peptides and proteins, we have devised a method for activating the C-terminal carboxyl group by extending the oxazolone chemistry. A mixture of formic acid and acetic anhydride was found to be effective for the formation of an oxazolone, which was converted to an active ester in situ in the presence of a phenol or an N-hydroxide. In particular, the resulting active ester with pentafluorophenol facilitated the subsequent reaction with an amine and the hydrazine derivative to yield the C-terminal amide and hydrazide, respectively. The peptides thus coupled with arginine methyl ester or 2-hydrazino-2-imidazoline containing the guanidino moiety exhibited the positive-ion peaks in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectra with appreciably enhanced intensities. As expected from the reaction mechanism, the carboxyl groups of aspartic and glutamic acid residues were not modified, while the amino groups that could react with the activated peptides were concomitantly protected by formylation. The MALDI peaks corresponding to the C-terminal peptide fragments of proteins were specifically enhanced, discriminating against those from internal peptides that were not tagged with a positive charge. In favorable cases, the C-terminal peptide fragments were clearly discerned by MALDI-MS after chymotryptic digestion and were identified by their MALDI postsource decay analysis. Based on these results, we suggest a method for C-terminal sequencing of a protein.

  9. Uranium in situ leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    Despite the depressed situation that has affected the uranium industry during the past years, the second Technical Committee Meeting on Uranium In Situ Leaching, organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency and held in Vienna from 5 to 8 October 1992, has attracted a relatively large number of participants. A notable development since the first meeting was that the majority of the contributions came from the actual operators of in situ leaching uranium production. At the present meeting, presentations on operations in the USA were balanced by those of the eastern European and Asian countries. Contributions from Bulgaria, China, Czechoslovakia, Germany (from the operation in the former German Democratic Republic), the Russian Federation and Uzbekistan represent new information not commonly available. In situ leach mining is defined in one of the paper presented as a ''mining method where the ore mineral is preferentially leached from the host rock in place, or in situ, by the use of leach solutions, and the mineral value is recovered. Refs, figs and tabs

  10. Sex in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøgholt, Ida

    2017-01-01

    Sex er en del af vores sociale praksis og centralt for det, vi hver især er. Men bortset fra pornoindustrien, har vi ikke mange muligheder for at få adgang til billeder af sex. Teater Nordkrafts forestilling Sex in situ vil gøre seksuelle billeder til noget, der kan deles, udveksles og tales om, og...

  11. In Situ Cometary Cosmochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, I. P.; Andrews, D. J.; Barber, S. J.; Sheridan, S.; Morgan, G. H.; Morse, A. D.

    2013-09-01

    In 2014 the Rosetta space mission arrives at comet 67P. Herein we describe the ambitions of one of the instruments, Ptolemy, included on the lander. Our aim is to make in situ measurements of isotopic compositions of elements such as H, C, N and O.

  12. An in situ mediator-free route to fabricate Cu2O/g-C3N4 type-II heterojunctions for enhanced visible-light photocatalytic H2 generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cong; Yin, Su-Na; Sun, Shasha; Yang, Shengyang

    2018-03-01

    Cu2O nanoparticles doped g-C3N4 are synthesized via an in situ method and investigated in detail by IR techniques, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet visible diffuse reflection spectroscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The as-prepared Cu2O/g-C3N4 hybrids demonstrate enhanced photocatalytic activity toward hydrogen generation compared to pure bulk g-C3N4, the effect of Cu2O content on the rate of visible light photocatalytic hydrogen evolution reveals the optimal hydrogen evolution rate can reach 33.2 μmol h-1 g-1, which is about 4 times higher that of pure g-C3N4. The enhanced photocatalytic activity can be attributed to the improved separation and transfer of photogenerated electron-hole pairs at the intimate interface between g-C3N4 and Cu2O. A possible photocatalytic mechanism of the Cu2O/g-C3N4 composite is also discussed. This mediator-free in situ chemical doping strategy developed in this work will contribute to the achievement of other multicomponent photocatalysts.

  13. An Effective Method to Detect Volatile Intermediates Generated in the Bioconversion of Coal to Methane by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry after In-Situ Extraction Using Headspace Solid-Phase Micro-Extraction under Strict Anaerobic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianmin; Wang, Baoyu; Tai, Chao; Wu, Li; Zhao, Han; Guan, Jiadong; Chen, Linyong

    2016-01-01

    Bioconversion of coal to methane has gained increased attention in recent decades because of its economic and environmental advantages. However, the mechanism of this process is difficult to study in depth, partly because of difficulties associated with the analysis of intermediates generated in coal bioconversion. In this investigation, we report on an effective method to analyze volatile intermediates generated in the bioconversion of coal under strict anaerobic conditions. We conduct in-situ extraction of intermediates using headspace solid-phase micro-extraction followed by detection by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Bioconversion simulation equipment was modified and combined with a solid-phase micro-extraction device. In-situ extraction could be achieved by using the combined units, to avoid a breakdown in anaerobic conditions and to maintain the experiment continuity. More than 30 intermediates were identified qualitatively in the conversion process, and the variation in trends of some typical intermediates has been discussed. Volatile organic acids (C2-C7) were chosen for a quantitative study of the intermediates because of their importance during coal bioconversion to methane. Fiber coating, extraction time, and solution acidity were optimized in the solid-phase micro-extraction procedure. The pressure was enhanced during the bioconversion process to investigate the influence of headspace pressure on analyte extraction. The detection limits of the method ranged from 0.0006 to 0.02 mmol/L for the volatile organic acids and the relative standard deviations were between 4.6% and 11.5%. The volatile organic acids (C2-C7) generated in the bioconversion process were 0.01-1.15 mmol/L with a recovery range from 80% to 105%. The developed method is useful for further in-depth research on the bioconversion of coal to methane.

  14. In-Situ Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Anders Thais; Slot, Susanne; Paltved, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    offered in situ simulation faculty with a model for integrating reported critical incidents and adverse events with contextual needs analysis and short-term observations. Furthermore the research group is working on detailing the barriers of in situ simulation such as resources for team training despite...... emergencies. It contains 12 questions, which are rated using a five-point scale, and covers four categories; leadership, teamwork and task management, and an overall score on team performance. Results: 16 simulations were conducted with 16 different teams of 10 doctors and 32 nurses. First, this study took...... of handovers. The team performance varied greatly according to how well the team members knew each other professionally as confirmed by video recordings. SAQ, and TEAM observational data are being analyzed by the research group with focus on correlation with teamwork and handovers. In summary, this study...

  15. An efficient Pd–NHC catalyst system in situ generated from Na2PdCl4 and PEG-functionalized imidazolium salts for Mizoroki–Heck reactions in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Sun

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Three PEG-functionalized imidazolium salts L1–L3 were designed and prepared from commercially available materials via a simple method. Their corresponding water soluble Pd–NHC catalysts, in situ generated from the imidazolium salts L1–L3 and Na2PdCl4 in water, showed impressive catalytic activity for aqueous Mizoroki–Heck reactions. The kinetic study revealed that the Pd catalyst derived from the imidazolium salt L1, bearing a pyridine-2-methyl substituent at the N3 atom of the imidazole ring, showed the best catalytic activity. Under the optimal conditions, a wide range of substituted alkenes were achieved in good to excellent yields from various aryl bromides and alkenes with the catalyst TON of up to 10,000.

  16. In Situ Mass Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The In Situ Mass Spectrometer projects focuses on a specific subsystem to leverage advanced research for laser-based in situ mass spectrometer development...

  17. 2D NiFe/CeO2 Basic-Site-Enhanced Catalyst via in-Situ Topotactic Reduction for Selectively Catalyzing the H2 Generation from N2H4·H2O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dandan; Wen, Ming; Gu, Chen; Wu, Qingsheng

    2017-05-17

    An economical catalyst with excellent selectivity and high activity is eagerly desirable for H 2 generation from the decomposition of N 2 H 4 ·H 2 O. Here, a bifunctional two-dimensional NiFe/CeO 2 nanocatalyst with NiFe nanoparticles (∼5 nm) uniformly anchored on CeO 2 nanosheets supports has been successfully synthesized through a dynamic controlling coprecipitation process followed by in-situ topotactic reduction. Even without NaOH as catalyst promoter, as-designed Ni 0.6 Fe 0.4 /CeO 2 nanocatalyst can show high activity for selectively catalyzing H 2 generation (reaction rate (mol N2H4 mol -1 NiFe h -1 ): 5.73 h -1 ). As ceria is easily reducible from CeO 2 to CeO 2-x , the surface of CeO 2 could supply an extremely large amount of Ce 3+ , and the high-density electrons of Ce 3+ can work as Lewis base to facilitate the absorption of N 2 H 4 , which can weaken the N-H bond and promote NiFe active centers to break the N-H bond preferentially, resulting in the high catalytic selectivity (over 99%) and activity for the H 2 generation from N 2 H 4 ·H 2 O.

  18. Malignant mesothelioma in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churg, Andrew; Hwang, Harry; Tan, Larry; Qing, Gefei; Taher, Altaf; Tong, Amy; Bilawich, Ana M; Dacic, Sanja

    2018-05-01

    The existence of malignant mesothelioma in situ (MIS) is often postulated, but there are no accepted morphological criteria for making such a diagnosis. Here we report two cases that appear to be true MIS on the basis of in-situ genomic analysis. In one case the patient had repeated unexplained pleural unilateral effusions. Two thoracoscopies 9 months apart revealed only visually normal pleura. Biopsies from both thoracoscopies showed only a single layer of mildly reactive mesothelial cells. However, these cells had lost BRCA1-associated protein 1 (BAP1) and showed loss of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2 (CDKN2A) (p16) by fluorescence in-situ hybridisation (FISH). NF2 was not deleted by FISH but 28% of the mesothelial cells showed hyperploidy. Six months after the second biopsy the patient has persisting effusions but no evidence of pleural malignancy on imaging. The second patient presented with ascites and minimal omental thickening on imaging, but no visual evidence of tumour at laparoscopy. Omental biopsy showed a single layer of minimally atypical mesothelial cells with rare tiny foci of superficial invasion of fat. BAP1 immunostain showed loss of nuclear BAP1 in all the surface mesothelial cells and the invasive cells. There was CDKN2A deletion, but no deletion of NF2 by FISH. These cases show that morphologically bland single-layered surface mesothelial proliferations with molecular alterations seen previously only in invasive malignant mesotheliomas exist, and presumably represent malignant MIS. More cases are need to understand the frequency of such changes and the time-course over which invasive tumour develops. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Spontaneous Ag-Nanoparticle Growth at Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Defect Sites: A Tool for In Situ Generation of SERS Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Maley

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver nanoparticles were spontaneously formed on pristine and oxidized single-wall nanotubes. Nanoparticles were observed on carbon nanotubes with AFM, and the presence of Ag nanoparticles were confirmed by ESR experiments. Raman spectroscopy of the Ag-treated carbon nanotubes had a 4–10X enhancement of intensity compared to untreated carbon nanotubes. Ag nanoparticles formed at defect sites on the CNT surface, where free electrons located at the defect sites reduced Ag+ to Ag. A mechanism for the propagation of the nanoparticles is through a continual negative charge generation on the nanoparticle by electron transfer from doublet oxygen (O2−.

  20. In situ breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, Luis

    2004-01-01

    In situ breast cancer, particularly the ductal type, is increasing in frequency in the developed countries as well as in Ecuador, most probably. These lesions carry a higher risk of developing a subsequent invasive cancer. Treatment has changed recently due to results of randomized studies, from classical mastectomy to conservative surgery associated to radiotherapy. The Van Nuys Prognostic Index is currently the most usual instrument to guide diagnosis and treatment. Tamoxifen seems to decrease significantly the risk of tumor recurrence after initial treatment. (The author)

  1. Design Games for In-Situ Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Erik

    2013-01-01

    The mobile culture has spawned a host of context-based products, like location-based and tag-based applications. This presents a new challenge for the designer. There is a need of design methods that acknowledge the context and allows it to influence the design ideas. This article focuses...... on a design problem where an in-situ design practice may further the early design process: the case of designing a pervasive game. Pervasive games are computer games, played using the city as a game board and often using mobile phones with GPS. Some contextual design methods exist, but we propose an approach...... that calls for the designer to conceptualise and perform ideas in-situ, that is on the site, where the game is supposed to be played. The problem was to design a creativity method that incorporated in-situ design work and which generated game concepts for pervasive games. The proposed design method, called...

  2. Optimization of a single-drop microextraction method for multielemental determination by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry following in situ vapor generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, Sandra; Loos-Vollebregt, Margaretha T.C. de; Bendicho, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    A headspace single-drop microextraction (HS-SDME) method has been developed in combination with electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) for the simultaneous determination of As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn and Hg in aqueous solutions. Vapor generation is carried out in a 40 mL volume closed-vial containing a solution with the target analytes in hydrochloric acid and potassium ferricyanide medium. Hydrides (As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn) and Hg vapor are trapped onto an aqueous single drop (3 μL volume) containing Pd(II), followed by the subsequent injection in the ETV. Experimental variables such as medium composition, sodium tetrahydroborate (III) volume and concentration, stirring rate, extraction time, sample volume, ascorbic acid concentration and palladium amount in the drop were fully optimized. The limits of detection (LOD) (3σ criterion) of the proposed method for As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn and Hg were 0.2, 0.04, 0.01, 0.07, 0.09 and 0.8 μg/L, respectively. Enrichment factors of 9, 85, 138, 130, 37 and 72 for As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn and Hg, respectively, were achieved in 210 s. The relative standard deviations (N = 5) ranged from 4 to 8%. The proposed HS-SDME-ETV-ICP-MS method has been applied for the determination of As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn and Hg in NWRI TM-28.3 certified reference material.

  3. The mechanical interactions between an American football cleat and playing surfaces in-situ at loads and rates generated by elite athletes: a comparison of playing surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Richard; Forman, Jason L; Crandall, Jeff; Lessley, David

    2015-03-01

    This study quantified the mechanical interactions between an American football cleat and eight surfaces used by professional American football teams. Loading conditions were applied with a custom-built testing apparatus designed to represent play-relevant maneuvers of elite athletes. Two natural grass and six infill artificial surfaces were tested with the cleated portion of a shoe intended for use on either surface type. In translation tests with a 2. 8-kN vertical load, the grass surfaces limited the horizontal force on the cleats by tearing. This tearing was not observed with the artificial surfaces, which allowed less motion and generated greater horizontal force (3.2 kN vs. 4.5 kN, p force on the natural surfaces than on the artificial surfaces (2.4 kN vs. 3.0 kN, p force-limiting mechanism inherent to natural grass surfaces. Future work should consider implications of these findings for performance and injury risk and should evaluate the findings' sensitivity to cleat pattern and playing conditions.

  4. Generation of brain tumours in mice by Cre-mediated recombination of neural progenitors in situ with the tamoxifen metabolite endoxifen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Benedykcinska

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Targeted cell- or region-specific gene recombination is widely used in the functional analysis of genes implicated in development and disease. In the brain, targeted gene recombination has become a mainstream approach to study neurodegeneration or tumorigenesis. The use of the Cre-loxP system to study tumorigenesis in the adult central nervous system (CNS can be limited, when the promoter (such as GFAP is also transiently expressed during development, which can result in the recombination of progenies of different lineages. Engineering of transgenic mice expressing Cre recombinase fused to a mutant of the human oestrogen receptor (ER allows the circumvention of transient developmental Cre expression by inducing recombination in the adult organism. The recombination of loxP sequences occurs only in the presence of tamoxifen. Systemic administration of tamoxifen can, however, exhibit toxicity and might also recombine unwanted cell populations if the promoter driving Cre expression is active at the time of tamoxifen administration. Here, we report that a single site-specific injection of an active derivative of tamoxifen successfully activates Cre recombinase and selectively recombines tumour suppressor genes in neural progenitor cells of the subventricular zone in mice, and we demonstrate its application in a model for the generation of intrinsic brain tumours.

  5. Systematically controlled pore system of ordered mesoporous carbons using phosphoric acid as the in situ generated catalysts for carbonization and activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Xing; Lee, Chang Hyun; Kim, Jin Hoe; You, Dae Jong; Shon, Jeong Kuk; Kim, Ji Man [Dept. of Chemistry, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Pak, Chan Ho [Fuel Cell Group, Corporate R and D Center, Samsung SDI Co. Ltd., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    We report on a facile synthesis of the ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) materials with systematically controlled microporosity and mesoporosity simultaneously through the nano-replication route using phosphoric acid as the acid catalyst and activation agent. The use of phosphoric acid affects the pore structures of OMC materials, such as the formation of numerous micropores by activation of the carbon framework and the enlargement of mesopores by spontaneous phase separation during the carbonization. The mesopore sizes, surface areas, total pore volumes, and micropore volumes of the OMC materials are highly dependent on the phosphoric acid content and can be systematically controlled in the range 3.7–7.5 nm, 1027–2782 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}, 1.12–3.53 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1} and 0.34–0.95 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1}, respectively. OMC materials with systematically controlled pore structures were successfully synthesized using phosphoric acid as the carbonization catalyst and mesoporous silica materials with cubic Ia3d and 2-D hexagonal mesostructures as the templates. The phosphoric acid in the synthesis of ordered mesoporous carbon materials acts as the chemical activating agent for micropore generation of the carbon framework and pore-expanding agent for controlling of mesopore size, in addition to functioning as the acid catalyst. The present synthesis pathway is very useful for preparing OMC materials with tunable mesopore sizes and well-developed microporosities at the same time.

  6. Generation of brain tumours in mice by Cre-mediated recombination of neural progenitors in situ with the tamoxifen metabolite endoxifen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedykcinska, Anna; Ferreira, Andreia; Lau, Joanne; Broni, Jessica; Richard-Loendt, Angela; Henriquez, Nico V; Brandner, Sebastian

    2016-02-01

    Targeted cell- or region-specific gene recombination is widely used in the functional analysis of genes implicated in development and disease. In the brain, targeted gene recombination has become a mainstream approach to study neurodegeneration or tumorigenesis. The use of the Cre-loxP system to study tumorigenesis in the adult central nervous system (CNS) can be limited, when the promoter (such as GFAP) is also transiently expressed during development, which can result in the recombination of progenies of different lineages. Engineering of transgenic mice expressing Cre recombinase fused to a mutant of the human oestrogen receptor (ER) allows the circumvention of transient developmental Cre expression by inducing recombination in the adult organism. The recombination of loxP sequences occurs only in the presence of tamoxifen. Systemic administration of tamoxifen can, however, exhibit toxicity and might also recombine unwanted cell populations if the promoter driving Cre expression is active at the time of tamoxifen administration. Here, we report that a single site-specific injection of an active derivative of tamoxifen successfully activates Cre recombinase and selectively recombines tumour suppressor genes in neural progenitor cells of the subventricular zone in mice, and we demonstrate its application in a model for the generation of intrinsic brain tumours. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Narrowband NIR-Induced In Situ Generation of the High-Energy Trans Conformer of Trichloroacetic Acid Isolated in Solid Nitrogen and its Spontaneous Decay by Tunneling to the Low-Energy Cis Conformer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. G. Apóstolo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The monomeric form of trichloroacetic acid (CCl3COOH; TCA was isolated in a cryogenic nitrogen matrix (15 K and the higher energy trans conformer (O=C–O–H dihedral: 180° was generated in situ by narrowband near-infrared selective excitation the 1st OH stretching overtone of the low-energy cis conformer (O=C–O–H dihedral: 0°. The spontaneous decay, by tunneling, of the generated high-energy conformer into the cis form was then evaluated and compared with those observed previously for the trans conformers of acetic and formic acids in identical experimental conditions. The much faster decay of the high-energy conformer of TCA compared to both formic and acetic acids (by ~35 and ca. 25 times, respectively was found to correlate well with the lower energy barrier for the trans→cis isomerization in the studied compound. The experimental studies received support from quantum chemistry calculations undertaken at the DFT(B3LYP/cc-pVDZ level of approximation, which allowed a detailed characterization of the potential energy surface of the molecule and the detailed assignment of the infrared spectra of the two conformers.

  8. In situ measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, D.E.

    1980-11-24

    A multipurpose in situ underground measurement system comprising a plurality of long electrical resistance elements in the form of rigid reinforcing bars, each having an open loop hairpin configuration of shorter length than the other resistance elements. The resistance elements are arranged in pairs in a unitized structure, and grouted in place in the underground volume. Measurement means are provided for obtaining for each pair the electrical resistance of each element and the difference in electrical resistance of the paired elements, which difference values may be used in analytical methods involving resistance as a function of temperature. A scanner means sequentially connects the resistance-measuring apparatus to each individual pair of elements. A source of heating current is also selectively connectable for heating the elements to an initial predetermined temperature prior to electrical resistance measurements when used as an anemometer.

  9. In situ zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sarah J; Johnson, Jason L

    2010-01-01

    In situ zymography is a unique laboratory technique that enables the localisation of matrix-degrading metalloproteinase (MMP) activity in histological sections. Frozen sections are placed on glass slides coated with fluorescently labelled matrix proteins. After incubation MMP activity can be observed as black holes in the fluorescent background due to proteolysis of the matrix protein. Alternatively frozen sections can be incubated with matrix proteins conjugated to quenched fluorescein. Proteolysis of the substrate by MMPs leads to the release of fluorescence. This technique can be combined with immunohistochemistry to enable co-location of proteins such as cell type markers or other proteins of interest. Additionally, this technique can be adapted for use with cell cultures, permitting precise location of MMP activity within cells, time-lapse analysis of MMP activity and analysis of MMP activity in migrating cells.

  10. In-Situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasayama, Kohki; Hayashi, Tetsushi; Kohno, Hideo

    2018-08-01

    Flattening of a carbon nanotube with a switching of the flattening direction results in the formation of a nanotetrahedron/nanoribbon structure. In this study, behavior of individual carbon nanotetra-hedron/nanoribbon structures under a tensile load is observed by means of in-situ scanning electron microscopy using micro-manipulators. Positions of breakage caused by a tensile load are not necessarily at a nanotetrahedron/nanoribbon junction. The results indicate that the nanotetrahedron/nanoribbon junctions are not mechanical weak points under a tensile load, and the nanotetra-hedron/nanoribbon structures are as strong as simple multi-walled carbon nanotubes. In addition, the nanostructures maintain their shape and do not transformed to a tubular form.

  11. Cytogenetic, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) and agronomic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    F3 generations of a wheat-Psathyrostachys huashanica intergeneric cross. Their agronomic traits were evaluated in the field and their meiotic behaviors and chromosome composition were analyzed by cytogenetic and GISH (genomic in situ ...

  12. Microvolume turbidimetry for rapid and sensitive determination of the acid labile sulfide fraction in waters after headspace single-drop microextraction with in situ generation of volatile hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavilla, I; Pena-Pereira, F; Gil, S; Costas, M; Bendicho, C

    2009-08-04

    In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility of applying headspace single-drop microextraction with in-drop precipitation for the quantitative determination of the acid labile sulfide fraction (H2S, HS-, and S2- (free sulfide), amorphous FeS and some metal sulfide complexes-clusters as ZnS) in aqueous samples by microvolume turbidimetry. The methodology lies in the in situ hydrogen sulfide generation and subsequent sequestration into an alkaline microdrop containing ZnO(2)(2-) and exposed to the headspace above the stirred aqueous sample. The ZnS formed in the drop was then determined by microvolume turbidimetry. The optimum experimental conditions of the proposed method were: 2 microL of a microdrop containing 750 mg L(-1) Zn(II) in 1 mol L(-1) NaOH exposed to the headspace of a 20-mL aqueous sample stirred at 1600 rpm during 80 s after derivatization with 1 mL of 6 mol L(-1) HCl. An enrichment factor of 1710 was achieved in only 80 s. The calibration graph was linear in the range of 5-100 microg L(-1) with a detection limit of 0.5 microg L(-1). The repeatability, expressed as relative standard deviation, was 5.8% (N = 9). Finally, the proposed methodology was successfully applied to the determination of the acid labile sulfide fraction in different natural water samples.

  13. In situ generation of silver nanoparticles in poly(vinyl alcohol)/poly(acrylic acid) polymer membranes in the absence of reducing agent and their effect on pervaporation of a water/acetic acid mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhard, Shvshankar; Kwon, Yong Sung; Moon, MyungJun; Shon, Min Young [Dept. of Industrial Chemistry, Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, You In; Nam, Seung Eun [Center for membranes, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The in situ generation of silver nanoparticles in a poly(vinyl alcohol)/poly(acrylic acid) (PVA/PAA) polymer matrix in the absence of any additional reducing agent is reported and tends to the membrane fabrication using solution-casting. Its effect on the separation of a water/acetic acid mixture by pervaporation is described. The results of UV spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analyses showed that the silver nanoparticles were successfully prepared and well dispersed in the polymer matrix. The increased hydrophilicity of the PVA/PAA membrane due to the presence of silver nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, contact angle measurements, and membrane absorption studies. Pervaporation data for composite membranes showed a three-fold increase in the flux value, while the initially decreased separation factor subsequently showed a constant value. Overall, the pervaporation data suggested that the presence of silver nanoparticles benefited the dehydration process.

  14. Development of Self-Powered Wireless-Ready High Temperature Electrochemical Sensors for In-Situ Corrosion Monitoring for Boiler Tubes in Next Generation Coal-based Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xingbo [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2015-06-30

    The key innovation of this project is the synergy of the high temperature sensor technology based on the science of electrochemical measurement and state-of-the-art wireless communication technology. A novel self-powered wireless high temperature electrochemical sensor system has been developed for coal-fired boilers used for power generation. An initial prototype of the in-situ sensor demonstrated the capability of the wireless communication system in the laboratory and in a pilot plant (Industrial USC Boiler Setting) environment to acquire electrochemical potential and current signals during the corrosion process. Uniform and localized under-coal ash deposit corrosion behavior of Inconel 740 superalloy has been studied at different simulated coal ash hot corrosion environments using the developed sensor. Two typical potential noise patterns were found to correlate with the oxidation and sulfidation stages in the hot coal ash corrosion process. Two characteristic current noise patterns indicate the extent of the corrosion. There was a good correlation between the responses of electrochemical test data and the results from corroded surface analysis. Wireless electrochemical potential and current noise signals from a simulated coal ash hot corrosion process were concurrently transmitted and recorded. The results from the performance evaluation of the sensor confirm a high accuracy in the thermodynamic and kinetic response represented by the electrochemical noise and impedance test data.

  15. In situ generation of silver nanoparticles in poly(vinyl alcohol)/poly(acrylic acid) polymer membranes in the absence of reducing agent and their effect on pervaporation of a water/acetic acid mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhard, Shvshankar; Kwon, Yong Sung; Moon, MyungJun; Shon, Min Young; Park, You In; Nam, Seung Eun

    2016-01-01

    The in situ generation of silver nanoparticles in a poly(vinyl alcohol)/poly(acrylic acid) (PVA/PAA) polymer matrix in the absence of any additional reducing agent is reported and tends to the membrane fabrication using solution-casting. Its effect on the separation of a water/acetic acid mixture by pervaporation is described. The results of UV spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analyses showed that the silver nanoparticles were successfully prepared and well dispersed in the polymer matrix. The increased hydrophilicity of the PVA/PAA membrane due to the presence of silver nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, contact angle measurements, and membrane absorption studies. Pervaporation data for composite membranes showed a three-fold increase in the flux value, while the initially decreased separation factor subsequently showed a constant value. Overall, the pervaporation data suggested that the presence of silver nanoparticles benefited the dehydration process

  16. Modeling in situ vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mecham, D.C.; MacKinnon, R.J.; Murray, P.E.; Johnson, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    In Situ Vitrification (ISV) process is being assessed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to determine its applicability to transuranic and mixed wastes buried at INEL'S Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). This process uses electrical resistance heating to melt waste and contaminated soil in place to produce a durable glasslike material that encapsulates and immobilizes buried wastes. This paper outlines the requirements for the model being developed at the INEL which will provide analytical support for the ISV technology assessment program. The model includes representations of the electric potential field, thermal transport with melting, gas and particulate release, vapor migration, off-gas combustion and process chemistry. The modeling objectives are to help determine the safety of the process by assessing the air and surrounding soil radionuclides and chemical pollution hazards, the nuclear criticality hazard, and the explosion and fire hazards, help determine the suitability of the ISV process for stabilizing the buried wastes involved, and help design laboratory and field tests and interpret results. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  17. Novel in-situ lamella fabrication technique for in-situ TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavan, Megan; Daly, Dermot; Rummel, Andreas; McCarthy, Eoin K; McAuley, Cathal; Nicolosi, Valeria

    2018-03-29

    In-situ transmission electron microscopy is rapidly emerging as the premier technique for characterising materials in a dynamic state on the atomic scale. The most important aspect of in-situ studies is specimen preparation. Specimens must be electron transparent and representative of the material in its operational state, amongst others. Here, a novel fabrication technique for the facile preparation of lamellae for in-situ transmission electron microscopy experimentation using focused ion beam milling is developed. This method involves the use of rotating microgrippers during the lift-out procedure, as opposed to the traditional micromanipulator needle and platinum weld. Using rotating grippers, and a unique adhesive substance, lamellae are mounted onto a MEMS device for in-situ TEM annealing experiments. We demonstrate how this technique can be used to avoid platinum deposition as well as minimising damage to the MEMS device during the thinning process. Our technique is both a cost effective and readily implementable alternative to the current generation of preparation methods for in-situ liquid, electrical, mechanical and thermal experimentation within the TEM as well as traditional cross-sectional lamella preparation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of C2-C4 hydrocarbons on Pt(111) monitored in situ over 13 orders of magnitude in pressure with infrared-visible sum frequency generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremer, Paul Samuel [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of ethylene, propylene, and isobutene were monitored in situ during heterogeneous catalysis over Pt(111) between 10-10 Torr and 1000 Torr with infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG). SFG is a surface specific vibrational spectroscopy capable of achieving submonolayer sensitivity under reaction conditions in the presence of hundreds of Toff of reactants and products. Olefin dehydrogenation experiments were carried out with SFG under ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions on the (111) crystal face of platinum Ethylene chemisorbed on Pt(111) below 230 K in the di-σ bonded conformation (Pt-CH2CH2-Pt). Upon annealing the system to form the dehydrogenation product, ethylidyne (M=CCH3), evidence was found for an ethylidene intermediate (M=CHCH3) from its characteristic vas(CH3) near 2960 cm-1. Hydrogenation of ethylene was carried out between 1 Toff and 700 Torr of H2 while the vibrational spectrum of surface species was monitored with SFG. Simultaneously, gas chromatography was used to obtain the turnover rate for the catalytic reaction, which could be correlated with the adsorbed intermediate concentration to determine the reaction rate per surface intermediate. Di-σ bonded ethylene, π-bonded ethylene, ethyl groups and ethylidyne resided on the surface during reaction. The mechanistic pathway for ethylene hydrogenation involved the stepwise hydrogenation of π-bonded ethylene through an ethyl intermediate to ethane. The hydrogenation of propylene was carried out under the same conditions as ethylene. It was found that propylene hydrogenates from π-bonded propylene through a 2-propyl intermediate to propane on Pt(111). The rate of reaction was approximately 50% slower than that of ethylene hydrogenation. Isobutene, however, was found to hydrogenate almost two order of magnitude slower than propylene on Pt(111).

  19. In situ bioremediation of Hanford groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skeen, R.S.; Roberson, K.R.; Workman, D.J.; Petersen, J.N.; Shouche, M.

    1992-04-01

    Liquid wastes containing radioactive, hazardous, and regulated chemicals have been generated throughout the 40+ years of operations at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. Some of these wastes were discharged to the soil column and many of the waste components, including nitrate, carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ), and several radionuclides, have been detected in the Hanford groundwater. Current DOE policy prohibits the disposal of contaminated liquids directly to the environment, and remediation of existing contaminated groundwaters may be required. In situ bioremediation is one technology currently being developed at Hanford to meet the need for cost effective technologies to clean groundwater contaminated with CCl 4 , nitrate, and other organic and inorganic contaminants. This paper focuses on the latest results of an on going effort to develop effective in situ remediation strategies through the use of predictive simulations

  20. In Situ Activation of Microcapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed are microcapsules comprising a polymer shell enclosing two or more immiscible liquid phases in which a drug, or a prodrug and a drug activator are partitioned into separate phases. or prevented from diffusing out of the microcapsule by a liquid phase in which the drug is poorly soluble. Also disclosed are methods of using the microcapsules for in situ activation of drugs where upon exposure to an appropriate energy source the internal phases mix and the drug is activated in situ.

  1. In situ sampling cart development engineering task plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeFord, D.K.

    1995-01-01

    This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) supports the development for facility use of the next generation in situ sampling system for characterization of tank vapors. In situ sampling refers to placing sample collection devices (primarily sorbent tubes) directly into the tank headspace, then drawing tank gases through the collection devices to obtain samples. The current in situ sampling system is functional but was not designed to provide the accurate flow measurement required by today's data quality objectives (DQOs) for vapor characterization. The new system will incorporate modern instrumentation to achieve much tighter control. The next generation system will be referred to in this ETP as the New In Situ System (NISS) or New System. The report describes the current sampling system and the modifications that are required for more accuracy

  2. In-situ Studies of the Reactions of Bifunctional and Heterocyclic Molecules over Noble Metal Single Crystal and Nanoparticle Catalysts Studied with Kinetics and Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kliewer, Christopher J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2009-06-30

    Sum frequency generation surface vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) in combination with gas chromatography (GC) was used in-situ to monitor surface bound reaction intermediates and reaction selectivities for the hydrogenation reactions of pyrrole, furan, pyridine, acrolein, crotonaldehyde, and prenal over Pt(111), Pt(100), Rh(111), and platinum nanoparticles under Torr reactant pressures and temperatures of 300K to 450K. The focus of this work is the correlation between the SFG-VS observed surface bound reaction intermediates and adsorption modes with the reaction selectivity, and how this is affected by catalyst structure and temperature. Pyrrole hydrogenation was investigated over Pt(111) and Rh(111) single crystals at Torr pressures. It was found that pyrrole adsorbs to Pt(111) perpendicularly by cleaving the N-H bond and binding through the nitrogen. However, over Rh(111) pyrrole adsorbs in a tilted geometry binding through the {pi}-aromatic orbitals. A surface-bound pyrroline reaction intermediate was detected over both surfaces with SFG-VS. It was found that the ring-cracking product butylamine is a reaction poison over both surfaces studied. Furan hydrogenation was studied over Pt(111), Pt(100), 10 nm cubic platinum nanoparticles and 1 nm platinum nanoparticles. The product distribution was observed to be highly structure sensitive and the acquired SFG-VS spectra reflected this sensitivity. Pt(100) exhibited more ring-cracking to form butanol than Pt(111), while the nanoparticles yielded higher selectivities for the partially saturated ring dihydrofuran. Pyridine hydrogenation was investigated over Pt(111) and Pt(100). The α-pyridyl surface adsorption mode was observed with SFG-VS over both surfaces. 1,4-dihydropyridine was seen as a surface intermediate over Pt(100) but not Pt(111). Upon heating the surfaces to 350K, the adsorbed pyridine changes to a flat-lying adsorption mode. No evidence was found for the pyridinium cation. The hydrogenation of the

  3. Triplex in-situ hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresco, Jacques R.; Johnson, Marion D.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are methods for detecting in situ the presence of a target sequence in a substantially double-stranded nucleic acid segment, which comprises: a) contacting in situ under conditions suitable for hybridization a substantially double-stranded nucleic acid segment with a detectable third strand, said third strand being capable of hybridizing to at least a portion of the target sequence to form a triple-stranded structure, if said target sequence is present; and b) detecting whether hybridization between the third strand and the target sequence has occured.

  4. In-Situ Wire Damage Detection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Roberson, Luke B. (Inventor); Tate, Lanetra C. (Inventor); Smith, Trent M. (Inventor); Gibson, Tracy L. (Inventor); Jolley, Scott T. (Inventor); Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An in-situ system for detecting damage in an electrically conductive wire. The system includes a substrate at least partially covered by a layer of electrically conductive material forming a continuous or non-continuous electrically conductive layer connected to an electrical signal generator adapted to delivering electrical signals to the electrically conductive layer. Data is received and processed to identify damage to the substrate or electrically conductive layer. The electrically conductive material may include metalized carbon fibers, a thin metal coating, a conductive polymer, carbon nanotubes, metal nanoparticles or a combination thereof.

  5. Characterization of VPO ammoxidation catalysts by in situ methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A.; Luecke, B.; Brueckner, A.; Steinike, U. [Institut fuer Angewandte Chemie Berlin-Adlershof e.V., Berlin (Germany); Brzezinka, K.W. [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany); Meisel, M. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Chemie

    1998-12-31

    In-situ methods are well known as powerful tools in studying catalyst formation processes, their solid state properties under working conditions and the interaction with the feed, intermediates and products to reveal reaction mechanisms. This paper gives a short overview on results of intense studies using in-situ techniques to reveal VPO catalyst generation processes, interaction of educts, intermediates and products with VPO catalyst surfaces and mechanistic insights. Catalytic data of the ammoxidation of toluene on different VPOs complete these findings. The precursor-catalyst transformation processes were preferently investigated by in-situ XRD, in-situ Raman and in-situ ESR spectroscopy. The interaction of aromatic molecules and intermediates, resp., and VPO solid surfaces was followed by in-situ ESR and in-situ FTIR spectroscopy. Mechanistic information was mainly obtained using in-situ FTIR spectroscopy and the temporal-analysis-of-products (TAP) technique. Catalytic studies were carried out in a fixed-bed microreactor on pure (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}(VO){sub 3}(P{sub 2}O{sub 7}){sub 2}, generated [(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}(VO{sub 3})(P{sub 2}O{sub 7}){sub 2}+V{sub x}O{sub y}] catalysts, having different V{sub x}O{sub y} proportions by use of VOHPO{sub 4} x 1/2H{sub 2}O (V/P=1) and recently studied (VO){sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} x 7 H{sub 2}O (V/P=1.5) precursors; the well-known (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} was used for comparison. (orig.)

  6. In situ one-pot fabrication of g-C3N4 nanosheets/NiS cocatalyst heterojunction with intimate interfaces for efficient visible light photocatalytic H2 generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kelin; Xie, Jun; Li, Mingli; Li, Xin

    2018-02-01

    Constructing high-quality earth-abundant semionconductor/cocatalyst heterojunction remains a grand challenge in the promising fields of photocatalytic solar fuel H2 production. Herein, an intimate g-C3N4 nanosheet/NiS cocatalyst heterojunction is fabricated by in situ one-step calcination of urea, thiourea and nickel acetate. Interestingly, thiourea could act as both the precursor of g-C3N4 and the sulfur source of NiS. The H2-evolution activity of as-obtained photocatalysts was tested in a triethanolamine (TEOA) scavenger solution under visible light irradiation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) mapping analysis clearly demonstrated that the NiS catalyst nanoparticles could be in situ fabricated and homogeneously distributed on the surface of g-C3N4 nanosheets without an obvious aggregation. The maximum H2-production rate of 29.68 μmol h-1 could be achieved, which is nearly comparable to that of 0.5 wt% Pt loaded sample. It is believed that the intimate heterojunction interfaces between NiS nanoparticles and g-C3N4 nanosheets could be in situ constructed by high temperature calcination, which achieved the improved charge separation, the enhanced oxidation ability of TEOA and the accelerated the sluggish H2-evolution kinetics, thus resulting in the remarkably enhanced hydrogen evolution. Therefore, our study provides insights into constructing high-quality robust g-C3N4-based heterojunction material for photocatalytic applications by using a simple one-step in-situ calcination technique.

  7. In Situ TEM Electrical Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canepa, Silvia; Alam, Sardar Bilal; Ngo, Duc-The

    2016-01-01

    influence the sample by external stimuli, e.g. through electrical connections, the TEM becomes a powerful laboratory for performing quantitative real time in situ experiments. Such TEM setups enable the characterization of nanostructures and nanodevices under working conditions, thereby providing a deeper...

  8. In Situ Wetland Restoration Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    applied to the soil (see Figure 5-3). iv. The benthic community was sampled for abundance, taxa richness, Biotic Index, functional feeding groups ...1 Figure 1-2 Freshwater Tidal Wetland...process (Chadwick, 2008). Figure 1-2 Freshwater Tidal Wetland ESTCP Project ER-200825 In Situ Wetland Restoration Demonstration ER-200825 Final

  9. In Situ Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talacua, H

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, the feasibility of in situ TE for vascular and valvular purposes were tested with the use of different materials, and animal models. First, the feasibility of a decellularized biological scaffold (pSIS-ECM) as pulmonary heart valve prosthesis is examined in sheep (Chapter 2). Next,

  10. Polyolefin nanocomposites in situ polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galland, Griselda Barrera; Fim, Fabiana de C.; Milani, Marceo A.; Silva, Silene P. da; Forest, Tadeu; Radaelli, Gislaine; Basso, Nara R.S.; Quijada, Raul

    2011-01-01

    Polyethylene and polypropylene nanocomposites using grapheme nanosheets and treated chrysotile have been synthesized by in situ polymerization using metallocene catalysts. The fillers have been submitted to acid, thermal and/ou ultrasound treatments before to introduce them into the polymerization reactor. A complete characterization of the fillers has been done. The nanocomposites have been characterized by SEM, TEM, DRX and AFM. The thermal, mechanic -dynamic, mechanical and electrical properties of the nanocomposites are discussed. (author)

  11. Oldest biliary endoprosthesis in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolo, Pierluigi; Scalisi, Giuseppe; Crinò, Stefano F; Tortora, Andrea; Giacobbe, Giuseppa; Cintolo, Marcello; Familiari, Luigi; Pallio, Socrate

    2013-07-16

    The advantages of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography over open surgery have made it the predominant method of treating patients with choledocholithiasis. After sphincterotomy, however, 10%-15% of common bile duct stones cannot be removed with a basket or balloon. The methods for managing "irretrievable stones" include surgery, mechanical lithotripsy, intraductal or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and biliary stenting. The case presented was a referred 82-year-old Caucasian woman with a 7-year-old plastic biliary endoprosthesis in situ. To the best of our knowledge the examined endoprosthesis is the oldest endoprosthesis in situ reported in the literature. Endoscopic biliary endoprosthesis placement remains a simple and safe procedure for patients with stones that are difficult to manage by conventional endoscopic methods and for patients who are unfit for surgery or who are high surgical risks. To date no consensus has been reached regarding how long a biliary prosthesis should remain in situ. Long-term biliary stenting may have a role in selected elderly patients if stones extraction has failed because the procedure may prevent stones impaction and cholangitis.

  12. Oldest biliary endoprosthesis in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolo, Pierluigi; Scalisi, Giuseppe; Crinò, Stefano F; Tortora, Andrea; Giacobbe, Giuseppa; Cintolo, Marcello; Familiari, Luigi; Pallio, Socrate

    2013-01-01

    The advantages of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography over open surgery have made it the predominant method of treating patients with choledocholithiasis. After sphincterotomy, however, 10%-15% of common bile duct stones cannot be removed with a basket or balloon. The methods for managing “irretrievable stones” include surgery, mechanical lithotripsy, intraductal or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and biliary stenting. The case presented was a referred 82-year-old Caucasian woman with a 7-year-old plastic biliary endoprosthesis in situ. To the best of our knowledge the examined endoprosthesis is the oldest endoprosthesis in situ reported in the literature. Endoscopic biliary endoprosthesis placement remains a simple and safe procedure for patients with stones that are difficult to manage by conventional endoscopic methods and for patients who are unfit for surgery or who are high surgical risks. To date no consensus has been reached regarding how long a biliary prosthesis should remain in situ. Long-term biliary stenting may have a role in selected elderly patients if stones extraction has failed because the procedure may prevent stones impaction and cholangitis. PMID:23858381

  13. Unintended and in situ amorphisation of pharmaceuticals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Priemel, P A; Grohganz, H; Rades, T

    2016-01-01

    by which in situ amorphisation occurs are often not fully understood. In situ amorphisation can be exploited and performed before administration of the drug or possibly even within the gastrointestinal tract, as can be inferred from in situ amorphisation observed during in vitro lipolysis. The use...... of in situ amorphisation can thus confer the advantages of the amorphous form, such as higher apparent solubility and faster dissolution rate, without the disadvantage of its physical instability....

  14. Repurposing CRISPR/Cas9 for in situ functional assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malina, Abba; Mills, John R; Cencic, Regina; Yan, Yifei; Fraser, James; Schippers, Laura M; Paquet, Marilène; Dostie, Josée; Pelletier, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    RNAi combined with next-generation sequencing has proven to be a powerful and cost-effective genetic screening platform in mammalian cells. Still, this technology has its limitations and is incompatible with in situ mutagenesis screens on a genome-wide scale. Using p53 as a proof-of-principle

  15. Subsurface In Situ Elemental Composition Measurements with PING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Ann; McClanahan, Timothy; Bodnarik, Julia; Evans, Larry; Nowicki, Suzanne; Schweitzer, Jeffrey; Starr, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the Probing In situ with Neutron and Gamma rays (PING) instrument, that can measure the subsurface elemental composition in situ for any rocky body in the solar system without the need for digging into the surface. PING consists of a Pulsed Neutron Generator (PNG), a gamma ray spectrometer and neutron detectors. Subsurface elements are stimulated by high-energy neutrons to emit gamma rays at characteristic energies. This paper will show how the detection of these gamma rays results in a measurement of elemental composition. Examples of the basalt to granite ratios for aluminum and silicon abundance are provided.

  16. In-situ Planetary Subsurface Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W.; Weber, R. C.; Dimech, J. L.; Kedar, S.; Neal, C. R.; Siegler, M.

    2017-12-01

    Geophysical and seismic instruments are considered the most effective tools for studying the detailed global structures of planetary interiors. A planet's interior bears the geochemical markers of its evolutionary history, as well as its present state of activity, which has direct implications to habitability. On Earth, subsurface imaging often involves massive data collection from hundreds to thousands of geophysical sensors (seismic, acoustic, etc) followed by transfer by hard links or wirelessly to a central location for post processing and computing, which will not be possible in planetary environments due to imposed mission constraints on mass, power, and bandwidth. Emerging opportunities for geophysical exploration of the solar system from Venus to the icy Ocean Worlds of Jupiter and Saturn dictate that subsurface imaging of the deep interior will require substantial data reduction and processing in-situ. The Real-time In-situ Subsurface Imaging (RISI) technology is a mesh network that senses and processes geophysical signals. Instead of data collection then post processing, the mesh network performs the distributed data processing and computing in-situ, and generates an evolving 3D subsurface image in real-time that can be transmitted under bandwidth and resource constraints. Seismic imaging algorithms (including traveltime tomography, ambient noise imaging, and microseismic imaging) have been successfully developed and validated using both synthetic and real-world terrestrial seismic data sets. The prototype hardware system has been implemented and can be extended as a general field instrumentation platform tailored specifically for a wide variety of planetary uses, including crustal mapping, ice and ocean structure, and geothermal systems. The team is applying the RISI technology to real off-world seismic datasets. For example, the Lunar Seismic Profiling Experiment (LSPE) deployed during the Apollo 17 Moon mission consisted of four geophone instruments

  17. In situ bypass og diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Leif Panduro; Schroeder, T V; Lorentzen, J E

    1993-01-01

    decreased survival rate was found in diabetics (p treatment of critical ischaemia of the lower limb in diabetic patients. The overall results in diabetic patients, whether insulin-dependent or not, were equal to those in non-diabetic......From 1986 through to 1990 a total of 483 in situ bypass procedures were performed in 444 patients. Preoperative risk-factors were equally distributed among diabetic (DM) and non-diabetic (NDM) patients, except for smoking habits (DM:48%, NDM:64%, p = 0.002) and cardiac disease (DM:45%, NDM:29%, p...... = 0.005). Critical limb-ischaemia was more often present in diabetic than non-diabetic patients (DM:57%, NDM:36%, p = 0.0002). Diabetic patients had a significantly lower distal anastomosis than non-diabetic patients (p = 0.00001). There were no differences among diabetic and non-diabetic patients...

  18. In-situ measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, David E.

    1983-01-01

    A multipurpose in situ underground measurement system comprising a plurality of long electrical resistance elements in the form of rigid reinforcing bars, each having an open loop "hairpin" configuration of shorter length than the other resistance elements. The resistance elements are arranged in pairs in a unitized structure, and grouted in place in the underground volume. The electrical resistance of each element and the difference in electrical resistance of the paired elements are obtained, which difference values may be used in analytical methods involving resistance as a function of temperature. A scanner sequentially connects the resistance-measuring apparatus to each individual pair of elements. A source of heating current is also selectively connectable for heating the elements to an initial predetermined temperature prior to electrical resistance measurements when used as an anemometer.

  19. DOE In Situ Remediation Integrated Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yow, J.L. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISRP) supports and manages a balanced portfolio of applied research and development activities in support of DOE environmental restoration and waste management needs. ISRP technologies are being developed in four areas: containment, chemical and physical treatment, in situ bioremediation, and in situ manipulation (including electrokinetics). the focus of containment is to provide mechanisms to stop contaminant migration through the subsurface. In situ bioremediation and chemical and physical treatment both aim to destroy or eliminate contaminants in groundwater and soils. In situ manipulation (ISM) provides mechanisms to access contaminants or introduce treatment agents into the soil, and includes other technologies necessary to support the implementation of ISR methods. Descriptions of each major program area are provided to set the technical context of the ISM subprogram. Typical ISM needs for major areas of in situ remediation research and development are identified

  20. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy for Electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Arita, Masashi; Hamada, Kouichi; Takahashi, Yasuo; Sueoka, Kazuhisa; Shibayama, Tamaki

    2015-01-01

    Electronic devices are strongly influenced by their microstructures. In situ transmission electron microscopy (in situ TEM) with capability to measure electrical properties is an effective method to dynamically correlate electric properties with microstructures. We have developed tools and in situ TEM experimental procedures for measuring electronic devices, including TEM sample holders and sample preparation methods. The method was used to study metallic nanowire by electromigration, magn...

  1. In Situ Hybridization Pada Kanker Payudara

    OpenAIRE

    Diah Witari, Ni Putu

    2014-01-01

    Kesulitan yang dijumpai pada penanganan kanker payudara adalah terjadinya kekambuhan atau relaps. Deteksi status HER2 pada pasien merupakan salah satu upaya untuk mendeteksi terjadinya relaps dan juga untuk menentukan jenis terapi yang ada diberikan. Ekspresi protein HER2 dapat dideteksi dengan immunohistochemistry (IHC), sedangkan mutasi gen HER2 dapat dideteksi dengan teknik in situ hybridization baik berupa fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) ataupun chromogenic in situ hy...

  2. Training for teamwork through in situ simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Asta; Poehlman, Jon; Bollenbacher, John; Riggan, Scott; Davis, Stan; Miller, Kristi; Ivester, Thomas; Kahwati, Leila

    2015-01-01

    In situ simulations allow healthcare teams to practice teamwork and communication as well as clinical management skills in a team's usual work setting with typically available resources and equipment. The purpose of this video is to demonstrate how to plan and conduct in situ simulation training sessions, with particular emphasis on how such training can be used to improve communication and teamwork. The video features an in situ simulation conducted at a labour and delivery unit in response to postpartum hemorrhage. PMID:26294962

  3. In situ permeability testing of rock salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, E.W.; Lagus, P.L.; Broce, R.D.; Lie, K.

    1981-04-01

    Storage of transuranic (TRU) wastes in bedded salt formations requires a knowledge of the in situ permeability of SENM rock salt. Since assumptions for safety assessments have been made in which these wastes could generate gas pressures on the order of the lithostatic pressure over geologic time scales, the permeability of the surrounding formation becomes an important parameter for determining the manner in which the gases will be contained or dispersed. This report describes the series of tests conducted in the AEC-7 borehole, located near the WIPP site, to determine the in situ gas flow characteristics of the bedded salt. In these tests, compressed air was injected into the borehole and flow into the surrounding formation measured. These measured flow rates were interpreted in terms of formation permeabilities and porosities which were, in turn, used as modeling parameters for the repository response analysis. Two series of field tests were performed. The first series consisted of a number of whole-hole flow tests conducted to provide preliminary design information required for future operation of a guarded straddle packer system capable of measuring permeabilities > or = 0.1 μdarcy. The second series of tests were conducted using the Systems, Science and Software (S-Cubed) designed guarded straddle packer system. In these interval permeability tests, 100-foot lengths of borehole were isolated and the flow characteristics of the surrounding formation examined. In this report, a complete description of the test procedures, instrumentation, and measurement techniques is first given. The analytical/numerical methods used for data interpretation are then presented, followed by results of the interval and permeability tests. (The whole-hole tests are summarized in Appendix A.) Conclusions are presented in the final section

  4. The SENSEI Generic In Situ Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayachit, Utkarsh [Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States); Whitlock, Brad [Intelligent Light, Rutherford, NJ (United States); Wolf, Matthew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Loring, Burlen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Geveci, Berk [Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States); Lonie, David [Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States); Bethel, E. Wes [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-04-11

    The SENSEI generic in situ interface is an API that promotes code portability and reusability. From the simulation view, a developer can instrument their code with the SENSEI API and then make make use of any number of in situ infrastructures. From the method view, a developer can write an in situ method using the SENSEI API, then expect it to run in any number of in situ infrastructures, or be invoked directly from a simulation code, with little or no modification. This paper presents the design principles underlying the SENSEI generic interface, along with some simplified coding examples.

  5. Near-infrared in situ generation of the higher-energy trans conformer of tribromoacetic acid: Observation of a large-scale matrix-site changing mediated by conformational conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apóstolo, Rui F. G.; Bazsó, Gábor; Ogruc-Ildiz, Gulce; Tarczay, György; Fausto, Rui

    2018-01-01

    The first observation of the higher-energy conformer of tribromoacetic acid (trans-TBAA) is reported. The conformer was produced in cryogenic matrices (Ar, Kr, and N2) by in situ selective narrowband near-infrared excitation of the lower-energy cis-TBAA conformer and characterized both structurally and vibrationally. The novel trans-TBAA conformer is shown to spontaneously decay to the most stable cis-TBAA form in all studied matrix media, by tunneling, and the measured decay rates in the different matrices were compared with those of the trans conformers of other carboxylic acids in similar experimental conditions. In the N2 matrix, where trans-TBAA establishes a specific stabilizing intermolecular interaction with the host N2 molecules via its OH group and is about 11 times more stable than in rare gas matrices, the effect of changing the irradiation wavenumber within the 2νOH absorption profile was investigated in detail. An interesting phenomenon of matrix-site changing mediated by conformational conversion was observed in the N2 matrix: vibrational excitation of cis-TBAA in the 2νOH wavenumber range predominantly converts the molecules located in a specific "matrix site" into trans-TBAA; then, relaxation (by tunneling) of the produced higher-energy conformer back to the cis form populates almost exclusively another "matrix site." The experimental studies received support from quantum chemistry calculations, which allowed a detailed characterization of the relevant regions of the potential energy surface of the molecule and the detailed assignment of the infrared spectra of the two conformers in the various matrices.

  6. Near-infrared in situ generation of the higher-energy trans conformer of tribromoacetic acid: Observation of a large-scale matrix-site changing mediated by conformational conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apóstolo, Rui F G; Bazsó, Gábor; Ogruc-Ildiz, Gulce; Tarczay, György; Fausto, Rui

    2018-01-28

    The first observation of the higher-energy conformer of tribromoacetic acid (trans-TBAA) is reported. The conformer was produced in cryogenic matrices (Ar, Kr, and N 2 ) by in situ selective narrowband near-infrared excitation of the lower-energy cis-TBAA conformer and characterized both structurally and vibrationally. The novel trans-TBAA conformer is shown to spontaneously decay to the most stable cis-TBAA form in all studied matrix media, by tunneling, and the measured decay rates in the different matrices were compared with those of the trans conformers of other carboxylic acids in similar experimental conditions. In the N 2 matrix, where trans-TBAA establishes a specific stabilizing intermolecular interaction with the host N 2 molecules via its OH group and is about 11 times more stable than in rare gas matrices, the effect of changing the irradiation wavenumber within the 2νOH absorption profile was investigated in detail. An interesting phenomenon of matrix-site changing mediated by conformational conversion was observed in the N 2 matrix: vibrational excitation of cis-TBAA in the 2νOH wavenumber range predominantly converts the molecules located in a specific "matrix site" into trans-TBAA; then, relaxation (by tunneling) of the produced higher-energy conformer back to the cis form populates almost exclusively another "matrix site." The experimental studies received support from quantum chemistry calculations, which allowed a detailed characterization of the relevant regions of the potential energy surface of the molecule and the detailed assignment of the infrared spectra of the two conformers in the various matrices.

  7. Lab-on-a-Robot Platform for in-situ Planetary Compositional Analysis, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This joint STTR research effort between HJ Science next generation "lab-on-a-robot" (LOAR) - capable of in-situ, high throughput, and simultaneous identification...

  8. Venus Interior Probe Using In-situ Power and Propulsion (VIP-INSPR), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We envision a novel architecture for Venus Interior Probes based on in-situ resources for power generation (VIP-INSPR). Proposed Venus probe is based on the...

  9. Support Routines for In Situ Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deen, Robert G.; Pariser, Oleg; Yeates, Matthew C.; Lee, Hyun H.; Lorre, Jean

    2013-01-01

    This software consists of a set of application programs that support ground-based image processing for in situ missions. These programs represent a collection of utility routines that perform miscellaneous functions in the context of the ground data system. Each one fulfills some specific need as determined via operational experience. The most unique aspect to these programs is that they are integrated into the large, in situ image processing system via the PIG (Planetary Image Geometry) library. They work directly with space in situ data, understanding the appropriate image meta-data fields and updating them properly. The programs themselves are completely multimission; all mission dependencies are handled by PIG. This suite of programs consists of: (1)marscahv: Generates a linearized, epi-polar aligned image given a stereo pair of images. These images are optimized for 1-D stereo correlations, (2) marscheckcm: Compares the camera model in an image label with one derived via kinematics modeling on the ground, (3) marschkovl: Checks the overlaps between a list of images in order to determine which might be stereo pairs. This is useful for non-traditional stereo images like long-baseline or those from an articulating arm camera, (4) marscoordtrans: Translates mosaic coordinates from one form into another, (5) marsdispcompare: Checks a Left Right stereo disparity image against a Right Left disparity image to ensure they are consistent with each other, (6) marsdispwarp: Takes one image of a stereo pair and warps it through a disparity map to create a synthetic opposite- eye image. For example, a right eye image could be transformed to look like it was taken from the left eye via this program, (7) marsfidfinder: Finds fiducial markers in an image by projecting their approximate location and then using correlation to locate the markers to subpixel accuracy. These fiducial markets are small targets attached to the spacecraft surface. This helps verify, or improve, the

  10. Technology assessment of in situ uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of the PNL portion of the Technology Assessment project is to provide a description of the current in situ uranium mining technology; to evaluate, based on available data, the environmental impacts and, in a limited fashion, the health effects; and to explore the impediments to development and deployment of the in situ uranium mining technology

  11. PRINS and in situ PCR protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gosden, John R

    1997-01-01

    ... mapping of DNA sequences on chromosomes and location of gene expression followed the invention and refinement of in situ hybridization. Among the most recent technical developments has been the use of oligonucleotide primers to detect and amplify or extend complementary sequences in situ, and it is to this novel field that PRINS and In S...

  12. In Situ Instrumentation for Sub-Surface Planetary Geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Parsons, A.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2010-01-01

    Novel instrumentation is under development at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, building upon earth-based techniques for hostile environments, to infer geochemical processes important to formation and evolution of solid bodies in our Solar System. A prototype instrument, the Pulsed Neutron Generator Gamma Ray and Neutron Detectors (PNG-GRAND), has a 14 MeV pulsed neutron generator coupled with gamma ray and neutron detectors to measure quantitative elemental concentrations and bulk densities of a number of major, minor and trace elements at or below the surfaces with approximately a meter-sized spatial resolution down to depths of about 50 cm without the need to drill. PNG-GRAND's in situ a meter-scale measurements and adaptability to a variety of extreme space environments will complement orbital kilometer-scale and in-situ millimeter scale elemental and mineralogical measurements to provide a more complete picture of the geochemistry of planets, moons, asteroids and comets.

  13. In situ vitrification: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, L.L.; Fields, D.E.

    1989-11-01

    The in situ vitrification process (ISV) converts contaminated soils and sludges to a glass and crystalline product. The process appears to be ideally suited for on site treatment of both wet and dry wastes. Basically, the system requires four molybdenum electrodes, an electrical power system for vitrifying the soil, a hood to trap gaseous effluents, an off-gas treatment system, an off-gas cooling system, and a process control station. Mounted in three transportable trailers, the ISV process can be moved from site to site. The process has the potential for treating contaminated soils at most 13 m deep. The ISV project has won a number of outstanding achievement awards. The process has also been patented with exclusive worldwide rights being granted to Battelle Memorial Institute for nonradioactive applications. While federal applications still belong to the Department of Energy, Battelle transferred the rights of ISV for non-federal government, chemical hazardous wastes to a separate corporation in 1989 called Geosafe. This report gives a review of the process including current operational behavior and applications

  14. In situ bioremediation in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porta, A. [Battelle Europe, Geneva (CH); Young, J.K.; Molton, P.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (US)

    1993-06-01

    Site remediation activity in Europe is increasing, even if not at the forced pace of the US. Although there is a better understanding of the benefits of bioremediation than of other approaches, especially about in situ bioremediation of contaminated soils, relatively few projects have been carried out full-scale in Europe or in the US. Some engineering companies and large industrial companies in Europe are investigating bioremediation and biotreatment technologies, in some cases to solve their internal waste problems. Technologies related to the application of microorganisms to the soil, release of nutrients into the soil, and enhancement of microbial decontamination are being tested through various additives such as surfactants, ion exchange resins, limestone, or dolomite. New equipment has been developed for crushing and mixing or injecting and sparging the microorganisms, as have new reactor technologies (e.g., rotating aerator reactors, biometal sludge reactors, and special mobile containers for simultaneous storage, transportation, and biodegradation of contaminated soil). Some work has also been done with immobilized enzymes to support and restore enzymatic activities related to partial or total xenobiotic decontamination. Finally, some major programs funded by public and private institutions confirm that increasing numbers of firms have a working interest in bioremediation.

  15. In situ TEM electromechanical testing of nanowires and nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Horacio D; Bernal, Rodrigo A; Filleter, Tobin

    2012-11-05

    The emergence of one-dimensional nanostructures as fundamental constituents of advanced materials and next-generation electronic and electromechanical devices has increased the need for their atomic-scale characterization. Given its spatial and temporal resolution, coupled with analytical capabilities, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been the technique of choice in performing atomic structure and defect characterization. A number of approaches have been recently developed to combine these capabilities with in-situ mechanical deformation and electrical characterization in the emerging field of in-situ TEM electromechanical testing. This has enabled researchers to establish unambiguous synthesis-structure-property relations for one-dimensional nanostructures. In this article, the development and latest advances of several in-situ TEM techniques to carry out mechanical and electromechanical testing of nanowires and nanotubes are reviewed. Through discussion of specific examples, it is shown how the merging of several microsystems and TEM has led to significant insights into the behavior of nanowires and nanotubes, underscoring the significant role in-situ techniques play in the development of novel nanoscale systems and materials. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Environmental TEM in the in situ Toolbox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    Studies of materials using in situ techniques usually involve a compromise of the in situ conditions in order to fulfil the requirements compatible with the instrumentation for characterization. These requirements include sample geometry, temperature, gas environment etc. Environmental TEM depends...... transfer holders have been used to transfer catalyst samples between reactor set-ups and TEM at room temperature in inert atmosphere [3]. To take the full advantage of the complementary in situ techniques transfer under reactions conditions is essential. Here we introduce the in situ transfer concept...... by use of a dedicated TEM transfer holder that is able to enclose the sample in a gaseous environment at temperatures up to approx. 900°C. The holder is compatible with other in situ technique set-ups. Another route for using complementary techniques without compromising the sample conditions is bringing...

  17. Imaging by in situ Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy and its Nanotechnological Perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2002-01-01

    of the tip and working electrode. In collaboration with Danish Micro Engineering A/S, the instrument was constructed and tested in laboratory environments. The system was successfully developed, as to meet international-market requirements. Within the frame of the work, procedures of tip coating...... and bipotentiostat construction were evaluated. After the fulfilment of the instrument manufacturing process followed application of the system to scientific investigations. The generation of an image by in situ STM is founded on the principle of electron tunneling but the application of the instrument to aqueous...... in the interpretation of the imaging procedure. Other methods of in situ Scanning Probe Microscopy (in situ SPM), such as in situ Scanning Force Microscopy (in situ AFM) are considered for the sake of comparison and they are applied to imaging of non-conducting systems. Major results include demonstration of atomic...

  18. On site sodium hypochlorite generation using electro chlorination. Disinfection of potable waste in small communities; Produccion in situ de NaClO, mediante electrocloracion. Aplicaciona la desinfeccion de agua de consumo en pequenas comunidades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valero, F.; Todra, F.; Gomez, J. L.

    2008-07-01

    This works deals with the experience of ATLL in the re chlorination of its distribution system.Besides security problems that present the disinfection using chlorine in local tanks near the houses, in some cases, the irregular consumption leads to new problems related with maintenance and management of the system. To improve the process, ATLL has installed some on site electro chlorination systems to generate sodium hypochlorite (0,8%) from salt, at request. (Author) 8 refs.

  19. IN SITU MEASUREMENT OF BEDROCK EROSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Rieke-Zapp

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available While long term erosion rates of bedrock material may be estimated by dating methods, current day erosion rates are – if at all available – based on rough estimates or on point measurements. Precise quantification of short term erosion rates are required to improve our understanding of short term processes, for input in landscape evolution models, as well as for studying the mechanics and efficiency of different erosion processes in varying geomorphological settings. Typical current day erosion rates in the European Alps range from sub-millimetre to several millimetres per year depending on the dominant erosion processes. The level of surveying accuracy required for recurring sub-millimetre to millimetre measurements in the field is demanding. A novel surveying setup for in-situ measurement of bedrock erosion was tested recently in three different locations in Switzerland. Natural bedrock was investigated in the Gornera gorge close to Zermatt. Further on, bedrock samples were installed in exposed locations in the Erlenbach research watershed close to Einsiedeln, and in the Illgraben debris flow channel, located in the Canton Schwyz and Valais, respectively. A twofold measurement approach was chosen for all locations. For the first setup control points providing an absolute reference frame for recurrent measurements were embedded close to the area of interest. Close range photogrammetry was applied to measure surface changes on the bedrock samples. The precision for surface measurements in the field was 0.1 mm (1 σ and thus suitable for the application. The equipment needed for the surveys can easily be carried to the field. At one field site a structured light scanner was used along with the photogrammetric setup. Although the current generation of structured light scanners appeared less suitable for field application, data acquisition was much faster and checking the data for completeness in the field was straight forward. The latest

  20. In Situ Measurement of Bedrock Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieke-Zapp, D. H.; Beer, A.; Turowski, J. M.; Campana, L.

    2012-07-01

    While long term erosion rates of bedrock material may be estimated by dating methods, current day erosion rates are - if at all available - based on rough estimates or on point measurements. Precise quantification of short term erosion rates are required to improve our understanding of short term processes, for input in landscape evolution models, as well as for studying the mechanics and efficiency of different erosion processes in varying geomorphological settings. Typical current day erosion rates in the European Alps range from sub-millimetre to several millimetres per year depending on the dominant erosion processes. The level of surveying accuracy required for recurring sub-millimetre to millimetre measurements in the field is demanding. A novel surveying setup for in-situ measurement of bedrock erosion was tested recently in three different locations in Switzerland. Natural bedrock was investigated in the Gornera gorge close to Zermatt. Further on, bedrock samples were installed in exposed locations in the Erlenbach research watershed close to Einsiedeln, and in the Illgraben debris flow channel, located in the Canton Schwyz and Valais, respectively. A twofold measurement approach was chosen for all locations. For the first setup control points providing an absolute reference frame for recurrent measurements were embedded close to the area of interest. Close range photogrammetry was applied to measure surface changes on the bedrock samples. The precision for surface measurements in the field was 0.1 mm (1 σ) and thus suitable for the application. The equipment needed for the surveys can easily be carried to the field. At one field site a structured light scanner was used along with the photogrammetric setup. Although the current generation of structured light scanners appeared less suitable for field application, data acquisition was much faster and checking the data for completeness in the field was straight forward. The latest generation of compact

  1. High Throughput In Situ XAFS Screening of Catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapatsaris, Nikolaos; Beesley, Angela M.; Weiher, Norbert; Tatton, Helen; Schroeder, Sven L. M.; Dent, Andy J.; Mosselmans, Frederick J. W.; Tromp, Moniek; Russu, Sergio; Evans, John; Harvey, Ian; Hayama, Shu

    2007-01-01

    We outline and demonstrate the feasibility of high-throughput (HT) in situ XAFS for synchrotron radiation studies. An XAS data acquisition and control system for the analysis of dynamic materials libraries under control of temperature and gaseous environments has been developed. The system is compatible with the 96-well industry standard and coupled to multi-stream quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) analysis of reactor effluents. An automated analytical workflow generates data quickly compared to traditional individual spectrum acquisition and analyses them in quasi-real time using an HT data analysis tool based on IFFEFIT. The system was used for the automated characterization of a library of 91 catalyst precursors containing ternary combinations of Cu, Pt, and Au on γ-Al2O3, and for the in situ characterization of Au catalysts supported on Al2O3 and TiO2

  2. In Situ Aerosol Detector, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is developing new platform systems that have the potential to benefit Earth science research activities, which include in situ instruments for atmospheric...

  3. Development of an in situ fatigue sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    A prototype in situ fatigue sensor has been designed, constructed and evaluated experimentally for its ability to monitor the accumulation of fatigue damage in a cyclically loaded steel structure, e.g., highway bridge. The sensor consists of multiple...

  4. In-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Jose A; Chupas, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Helps researchers develop new catalysts for sustainable fuel and chemical production Reviewing the latest developments in the field, this book explores the in-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts, enabling readers to take full advantage of the sophisticated techniques used to study heterogeneous catalysts and reaction mechanisms. In using these techniques, readers can learn to improve the selectivity and the performance of catalysts and how to prepare catalysts as efficiently as possible, with minimum waste. In-situ Characterization of Heterogeneous Catalysts feat

  5. In situ texture analysis under applied load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brokmeier, H.G.

    2005-01-01

    The in-situ measurement of a crystallographic texture is a special type of a non-destructive measurement, which need special equipments. Due to the high photon flux and the excellent brilliance high energetic synchrotron radiations are a fantastic tool particular in fast experimentation. Moreover, a high penetration power allows the investigation of standard tensile sample of the DIN-norm. A loading device with a power up to 20 kN was installed at the hard wiggler beamline BW5 (HASYLAB-DESY) to perform in-situ strain and in-situ texture analysis. Using 100keV X-rays one gets short wavelength so that a 2D image-plate detector offers a wide range of diffraction pattern within the first 10 degree in 2 theta. Thermal neutron is another radiation with a high penetration power, which is the standard method for global texture analysis of bulk samples. As an example rectangular extruded Mg- Az31 was investigated by an in-situ. tensile experiment. Samples with 0 degree, 45 degree and 90 degree to the extrusion direction were cut. In-situ strain studies show the lattice dependent strains perpendicular and parallel to the loading direction. Moreover, in hexagonal Mg-Az31 a strong influence of the initial texture on the tensile behavior can be explained by the combination of texture simulation with in-situ measurements. (author)

  6. In Situ Adsorption Studies at the Solid/Liquid Interface: Characterization of Biological Surfaces and Interfaces Using Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, D.C.

    2006-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) have been used to study the molecular surface structure, surface topography and mechanical properties, and quantitative adsorbed amount of biological molecules at the solid-liquid interface. The molecular-level behavior of designed peptides adsorbed on hydrophobic polystyrene and hydrophilic silica substrates has been examined as a model of protein adsorption on polymeric biomaterial surfaces. Proteins are such large and complex molecules that it is difficult to identify the features in their structure that lead to adsorption and interaction with solid surfaces. Designed peptides which possess secondary structure provide simple model systems for understanding protein adsorption. Depending on the amino acid sequence of a peptide, different secondary structures (α-helix and β-sheet) can be induced at apolar (air/liquid or air/solid) interfaces. Having a well-defined secondary structure allows experiments to be carried out under controlled conditions, where it is possible to investigate the affects of peptide amino acid sequence and chain length, concentration, buffering effects, etc. on adsorbed peptide structure. The experiments presented in this dissertation demonstrate that SFG vibrational spectroscopy can be used to directly probe the interaction of adsorbing biomolecules with a surface or interface. The use of well designed model systems aided in isolation of the SFG signal of the adsorbing species, and showed that surface functional groups of the substrate are sensitive to surface adsorbates. The complementary techniques of AFM and QCM allowed for deconvolution of the effects of surface topography and coverage from the observed SFG spectra. Initial studies of biologically relevant surfaces are also presented: SFG spectroscopy was used to study the surface composition of common soil bacteria for use in bioremediation of nuclear waste

  7. In Situ Adsorption Studies at the Solid/Liquid Interface:Characterization of Biological Surfaces and Interfaces Using SumFrequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy,and Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Diana Christine [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) have been used to study the molecular surface structure, surface topography and mechanical properties, and quantitative adsorbed amount of biological molecules at the solid-liquid interface. The molecular-level behavior of designed peptides adsorbed on hydrophobic polystyrene and hydrophilic silica substrates has been examined as a model of protein adsorption on polymeric biomaterial surfaces. Proteins are such large and complex molecules that it is difficult to identify the features in their structure that lead to adsorption and interaction with solid surfaces. Designed peptides which possess secondary structure provide simple model systems for understanding protein adsorption. Depending on the amino acid sequence of a peptide, different secondary structures (α-helix and β-sheet) can be induced at apolar (air/liquid or air/solid) interfaces. Having a well-defined secondary structure allows experiments to be carried out under controlled conditions, where it is possible to investigate the affects of peptide amino acid sequence and chain length, concentration, buffering effects, etc. on adsorbed peptide structure. The experiments presented in this dissertation demonstrate that SFG vibrational spectroscopy can be used to directly probe the interaction of adsorbing biomolecules with a surface or interface. The use of well designed model systems aided in isolation of the SFG signal of the adsorbing species, and showed that surface functional groups of the substrate are sensitive to surface adsorbates. The complementary techniques of AFM and QCM allowed for deconvolution of the effects of surface topography and coverage from the observed SFG spectra. Initial studies of biologically relevant surfaces are also presented: SFG spectroscopy was used to study the surface composition of common soil bacteria for use in bioremediation of nuclear waste.

  8. In situ hybridization; principles and applications: review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Nozhat

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In situ hybridization (ISH is a method that uses labeled complementary single strand DNA or RNA to localize specific DNA or RNA sequences in an intact cell or in a fixed tissue section. The main steps of ISH consist of: probe selection, tissue or sample preparation, pre-hybridization treatment, hybridization and washing, detection and control procedure. Probe selection is one of the important aspects of successful hybridization. ISH sensitivity and specificity can be influenced by: probe construct, efficiency of labeling, percentage of GC, probe length and signal detection systems. Different methods such as nick translation, random priming, end tailing and T4 DNA polymerase replacement are used for probe generation. Both radioactive and non-radioactive labels can be used in order to probe labeling. Nucleic acid maintenance in samples, prevention of morphological changes of samples and probe penetration into tissue section are the main aims of sample preparation step. Then, a small amount of solution containing probe, is added on slides containing tissue sections for hybridization process, then slides are incubated overnight. Next day, washes are carried out to remove the probes which are not bound to target DNA or RNA. Finally, in order to be sure that the observed labeling is specific to the target sequence, using several control procedures is very important. Various techniques based on ISH consist of: Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH, comparative genomic hybridization (CGH, spectral karyotyping (SKY and multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (MFISH. One of the most common techniques of ISH is fluorescence in situ hybridization. FISH can be used to: 1 detect small deletions and duplications that are not visible using microscope analysis, 2 detect how many chromosomes of a certain type are present in each cell and 3 confirm rearrangements that are

  9. In situ visualization and data analysis for turbidity currents simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camata, Jose J.; Silva, Vítor; Valduriez, Patrick; Mattoso, Marta; Coutinho, Alvaro L. G. A.

    2018-01-01

    Turbidity currents are underflows responsible for sediment deposits that generate geological formations of interest for the oil and gas industry. LibMesh-sedimentation is an application built upon the libMesh library to simulate turbidity currents. In this work, we present the integration of libMesh-sedimentation with in situ visualization and in transit data analysis tools. DfAnalyzer is a solution based on provenance data to extract and relate strategic simulation data in transit from multiple data for online queries. We integrate libMesh-sedimentation and ParaView Catalyst to perform in situ data analysis and visualization. We present a parallel performance analysis for two turbidity currents simulations showing that the overhead for both in situ visualization and in transit data analysis is negligible. We show that our tools enable monitoring the sediments appearance at runtime and steer the simulation based on the solver convergence and visual information on the sediment deposits, thus enhancing the analytical power of turbidity currents simulations.

  10. In-situ bioremediation via horizontal wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazen, T.C.; Looney, B.B.; Enzien, M.; Franck, M.M.; Fliermans, C.B.; Eddy, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    This project is designed to demonstrate in situ bioremediation of groundwater and sediment contaminated with chlorinated solvents. Indigenous microorganisms were stimulated to degrade TCE, PCE and their daughter products in situ by addition of nutrients to the contaminated zone. In situ biodegradation is a highly attractive technology for remediation because contaminants are destroyed, not simply moved to another location or immobilized, thus decreasing costs, risks, and time, while increasing efficiency and public and regulatory acceptability. Bioremediation has been found to be among the least costly technologies in applications where it will work (Radian 1989). Subsurface soils and water adjacent to an abandoned process sewer line at the SRS have been found to have elevated levels of TCE (Marine and Bledsoe 1984). This area of subsurface and groundwater contamination is the focus of a current integrated demonstration of new remediation technologies utilizing horizontal wells. Bioremediation has the potential to enhance the performance of in situ air stripping as well as offering stand-alone remediation of this and other contaminated sites (Looney et al. 1991). Horizontal wells could also be used to enhance the recovery of groundwater contaminants for bioreactor conversions from deep or inaccessible areas (e.g., under buildings) and to enhance the distribution of nutrient or microbe additions in an in situ bioremediation

  11. ADVANTAGES/DISADVANTAGES FOR ISCO METHODS IN-SITU FENTON OXIDATION IN-SITU PERMANGANATE OXIDATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The advantages and disadvantages of in-situ Fenton oxidation and in-situ permanganate oxidation will be presented. This presentation will provide a brief overview of each technology and a detailed analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of each technology. Included in the ...

  12. In situ macromolecular crystallography using microbeams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L; Aishima, Jun; Foadi, James; Morgan, Ann W; Robinson, James I; Nettleship, Joanne E; Owens, Raymond J; Moraes, Isabel; Fry, Elizabeth E; Grimes, Jonathan M; Harlos, Karl; Kotecha, Abhay; Ren, Jingshan; Sutton, Geoff; Walter, Thomas S; Stuart, David I; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2012-05-01

    Despite significant progress in high-throughput methods in macromolecular crystallography, the production of diffraction-quality crystals remains a major bottleneck. By recording diffraction in situ from crystals in their crystallization plates at room temperature, a number of problems associated with crystal handling and cryoprotection can be side-stepped. Using a dedicated goniometer installed on the microfocus macromolecular crystallography beamline I24 at Diamond Light Source, crystals have been studied in situ with an intense and flexible microfocus beam, allowing weakly diffracting samples to be assessed without a manual crystal-handling step but with good signal to noise, despite the background scatter from the plate. A number of case studies are reported: the structure solution of bovine enterovirus 2, crystallization screening of membrane proteins and complexes, and structure solution from crystallization hits produced via a high-throughput pipeline. These demonstrate the potential for in situ data collection and structure solution with microbeams. © 2012 International Union of Crystallography

  13. In situ vitrification: Application to buried waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callow, R.A.; Thompson, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    Two in situ vitrification field tests were conducted in June and July 1990 at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In situ vitrification is a technology for in-place conversion of contaminated soils into a durable glass and crystalline waste form and is being investigated as a potential remediation technology for buried waste. The overall objective of the two tests was to assess the general suitability of the process to remediate buried waste structures found at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In particular, these tests were designed as part of a treatability study to provide essential information on field performance of the process under conditions of significant combustible and metal wastes, and to test a newly developed electrode feed technology. The tests were successfully completed, and the electrode feed technology provided valuable operational control for successfully processing the high metal content waste. The results indicate that in situ vitrification is a feasible technology for application to buried waste. 2 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  14. In situ structural studies with neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laversenne, L.; Hansen, T.C.

    2015-01-01

    The authors present the features of neutron diffraction in terms of necessary neutron sources, diffusion contrast, penetration and magnetism. In situ diffraction experiments consist in recording the diffraction signal of a sample when this sample undergoes a monitored change in one of the following parameters: temperature (thermo-diffraction), pressure, magnetic or electric field or gaseous atmosphere. Most in situ diffraction experiments are performed on powders and they required a more or less complex equipment according to the parameter that varies. Examples and results of in situ neutron diffraction experiments are detailed in the article: -) the electrochemical loading of electrodes, -) the absorption of hydrogen for energy storage, -) the study of materials under high pressure which has allowed the investigation of phase diagrams when the inter-atomic distance varies, and -) the study of magnetism through thermo-diffraction. (A.C.)

  15. In Situ Electron Microscopy of Lactomicroselenium Particles in Probiotic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabor Nagy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Electron microscopy was used to test whether or not (a in statu nascendi synthesized, and in situ measured, nanoparticle size does not differ significantly from the size of nanoparticles after their purification; and (b the generation of selenium is detrimental to the bacterial strains that produce them. Elemental nano-sized selenium produced by probiotic latic acid bacteria was used as a lactomicroselenium (lactomicroSel inhibitor of cell growth in the presence of lactomicroSel, and was followed by time-lapse microscopy. The size of lactomicroSel produced by probiotic bacteria was measured in situ and after isolation and purification. For these measurements the TESLA BS 540 transmission electron microscope was converted from analog (aTEM to digital processing (dTEM, and further to remote-access internet electron microscopy (iTEM. Lactobacillus acidophilus produced fewer, but larger, lactomicroSel nanoparticles (200–350 nm than Lactobacillus casei (L. casei, which generated many, smaller lactomicroSel particles (85–200 nm and grains as a cloudy, less electrodense material. Streptococcus thermophilus cells generated selenoparticles (60–280 nm in a suicidic manner. The size determined in situ in lactic acid bacteria was significantly lower than those measured by scanning electron microscopy after the isolation of lactomicroSel particles obtained from lactobacilli (100–500 nm, but higher relative to those isolated from Streptococcus thermopilus (50–100 nm. These differences indicate that smaller lactomicroSel particles could be more toxic to the producing bacteria themselves and discrepancies in size could have implications with respect to the applications of selenium nanoparticles as prebiotics.

  16. Nitroxide radicals formed in situ as polymer chain growth regulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolyakina, Elena V; Grishin, Dmitry F [Research Insitute of Chemistry, N.I. Lobachevskii Nizhnii Novgorod State University, Nizhnii Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-30

    Published data on controlled synthesis of macromolecules using nitroxide radicals, formed in situ during polymerization, as polymer chain growth regulators are systematized and generalized. The attention is focused on the mechanism of polymer chain growth control during reversibly inhibited radical homopolymerization and the effect of structure of precursors and regulating additives on the polymerization kinetics of monomers of different nature and the molecular-mass characteristics of the polymers thus formed. The key methods for generation of nitroxide radicals directly during polymerization are considered. The prospects for development and practical use of these approaches for the synthesis of new polymeric materials are evaluated.

  17. In situ synthesis of silver benzene-dithiolate hybrid films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenier, Roger, E-mail: roger.brenier@univ-lyon1.fr [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR 5306, Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, Domaine Scientifique de La Doua, Batiment Kastler, 10 rue Ada Byron, 69622 Villeurbanne, Cedex (France); Piednoir, Agnès, E-mail: agnes.piednoir@univ-lyon1.fr [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR 5306, Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, Domaine Scientifique de La Doua, Batiment Kastler, 10 rue Ada Byron, 69622 Villeurbanne, Cedex (France); Bertorelle, Franck, E-mail: franck.bertorelle@univ-lyon1.fr [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR 5306, Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, Domaine Scientifique de La Doua, Batiment Kastler, 10 rue Ada Byron, 69622 Villeurbanne, Cedex (France); Penuelas, José, E-mail: jose.penuelas@ec-lyon.fr [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, CNRS, UMR 5270, 36 rue Guy de Collongues, F69134 Ecully (France); Grenet, Geneviève, E-mail: genevieve.grenet@ec-lyon.fr [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, CNRS, UMR 5270, 36 rue Guy de Collongues, F69134 Ecully (France)

    2016-02-01

    In this article, a method for in situ synthesis of silver benzene-dithiolate hybrid films is presented. Silver nanoparticles, generated on ZrO{sub 2} films, are transformed into silver benzene 1,4-dithiolate or, partially, into silver benzene 1,2-dithiolate after sample immersion in the corresponding thiol solutions. These transformations occur at room temperature owing to the catalytic action of ZrO{sub 2}. It is also shown that TiO{sub 2} in place of ZrO{sub 2} is very efficient, both for the catalytic generation of silver nanoparticles and for their further transformation in benzene 1,4-dithiolate compound. This latter semiconductor has an optical bandgap of about 3 eV and the film is made of touching nanoparticles in an amorphous state. Our work has potential applications in the electronic and photovoltaic fields. - Highlights: • A method for in situ synthesis of silver benzene-dithiolate hybrid semiconductor films is presented. • Silver nanoparticles are, first, generated on ZrO{sub 2} or on TiO{sub 2} coated silica substrates. • The samples are immersed in benzene dithiol solution for two days at room temperature. • During the immersion, the silver nanoparticles are transformed into silver benzene dithiolate. • The silver benzene dithiolate film is made of amorphous nanoparticles with a banbgap of 3 eV.

  18. High quality protein microarray using in situ protein purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleischmann Robert D

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the postgenomic era, high throughput protein expression and protein microarray technologies have progressed markedly permitting screening of therapeutic reagents and discovery of novel protein functions. Hexa-histidine is one of the most commonly used fusion tags for protein expression due to its small size and convenient purification via immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC. This purification process has been adapted to the protein microarray format, but the quality of in situ His-tagged protein purification on slides has not been systematically evaluated. We established methods to determine the level of purification of such proteins on metal chelate-modified slide surfaces. Optimized in situ purification of His-tagged recombinant proteins has the potential to become the new gold standard for cost-effective generation of high-quality and high-density protein microarrays. Results Two slide surfaces were examined, chelated Cu2+ slides suspended on a polyethylene glycol (PEG coating and chelated Ni2+ slides immobilized on a support without PEG coating. Using PEG-coated chelated Cu2+ slides, consistently higher purities of recombinant proteins were measured. An optimized wash buffer (PBST composed of 10 mM phosphate buffer, 2.7 mM KCl, 140 mM NaCl and 0.05% Tween 20, pH 7.4, further improved protein purity levels. Using Escherichia coli cell lysates expressing 90 recombinant Streptococcus pneumoniae proteins, 73 proteins were successfully immobilized, and 66 proteins were in situ purified with greater than 90% purity. We identified several antigens among the in situ-purified proteins via assays with anti-S. pneumoniae rabbit antibodies and a human patient antiserum, as a demonstration project of large scale microarray-based immunoproteomics profiling. The methodology is compatible with higher throughput formats of in vivo protein expression, eliminates the need for resin-based purification and circumvents

  19. Parallel In Situ Indexing for Data-intensive Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jinoh; Abbasi, Hasan; Chacon, Luis; Docan, Ciprian; Klasky, Scott; Liu, Qing; Podhorszki, Norbert; Shoshani, Arie; Wu, Kesheng

    2011-09-09

    As computing power increases exponentially, vast amount of data is created by many scientific re- search activities. However, the bandwidth for storing the data to disks and reading the data from disks has been improving at a much slower pace. These two trends produce an ever-widening data access gap. Our work brings together two distinct technologies to address this data access issue: indexing and in situ processing. From decades of database research literature, we know that indexing is an effective way to address the data access issue, particularly for accessing relatively small fraction of data records. As data sets increase in sizes, more and more analysts need to use selective data access, which makes indexing an even more important for improving data access. The challenge is that most implementations of in- dexing technology are embedded in large database management systems (DBMS), but most scientific datasets are not managed by any DBMS. In this work, we choose to include indexes with the scientific data instead of requiring the data to be loaded into a DBMS. We use compressed bitmap indexes from the FastBit software which are known to be highly effective for query-intensive workloads common to scientific data analysis. To use the indexes, we need to build them first. The index building procedure needs to access the whole data set and may also require a significant amount of compute time. In this work, we adapt the in situ processing technology to generate the indexes, thus removing the need of read- ing data from disks and to build indexes in parallel. The in situ data processing system used is ADIOS, a middleware for high-performance I/O. Our experimental results show that the indexes can improve the data access time up to 200 times depending on the fraction of data selected, and using in situ data processing system can effectively reduce the time needed to create the indexes, up to 10 times with our in situ technique when using identical parallel settings.

  20. In situ detection of Bartonella henselae cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hercík, Kamil; Melter, O.; Janeček, Jiří; Branny, Pavel

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 16, - (2002), s. 49-56 ISSN 0890-8508 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/98/0417; GA ČR GA204/99/1534 Keywords : bartonella henselae * in situ detection * hydridization Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.269, year: 2002

  1. The Art of in situ Cryocrystallization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 12. The Art of in situ Cryocrystallization ... Institute of Science Education and Research, Bhopal. Assistant Professor Department of Chemistry Academic Building 2 Room No 122 IISER, Bhopal Indore By-Pass Road Bhauri, Bhopal 462 066, India.

  2. Recovering uranium from coal in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, R.C.

    1978-01-01

    An underground carbonaceous deposit containing other mineral values is burned in situ. The underground hot zone is cooled down to temperature below the boiling point of a leachig solution. The leaching solution is percolated through the residial ash, with the pregnant solution recovered for separation of the mineral values in surface facilities

  3. IN SITU LEAD IMMOBILIZATION BY APATITE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lead contamination is of environmental concern due to its effect on human health. The purpose of this study was to develop a technology to immobilize Pb in situ in contaminated soils and wastes using apatite. Hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(O...

  4. Paleozoic in situ spores and pollen. Lycopsida

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bek, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 296, 1/6 (2017), s. 1-111 ISSN 0375-0299 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP210/12/2053 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : in situ spores * reproductive organs * Lycopsida * Paleozoic Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy OBOR OECD: Paleontology Impact factor: 1.333, year: 2016

  5. In Situ Cleanable Alternative HEPA Filter Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, D. J.; Terry, M. T.

    2002-01-01

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company, located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, is currently testing two types of filter media for possible deployment as in situ regenerable/cleanable High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters. The filters are being investigated to replace conventional, disposable, glass-fiber, HEPA filters that require frequent removal, replacement, and disposal. This is not only costly and subjects site personnel to radiation exposure, but adds to the ever-growing waste disposal problem. The types of filter media being tested, as part of a National Energy Technology Laboratory procurement, are sintered nickel metal and ceramic monolith membrane. These media were subjected to a hostile environment to simulate conditions that challenge the high-level waste tank ventilation systems. The environment promoted rapid filter plugging to maximize the number of filter loading/cleaning cycles that would occur in a specified period of time. The filters were challenged using nonradioactive simulated high-level waste materials and atmospheric dust; materials that cause filter pluggage in the field. The filters are cleaned in situ using an aqueous solution. The study found that both filter media were insensitive to high humidity or moisture conditions and were easily cleaned in situ. The filters regenerated to approximately clean filter status even after numerous plugging and in situ cleaning cycles. Air Techniques International is conducting particle retention testing on the filter media at the Oak Ridge Filter Test Facility. The filters are challenged using 0.3-mm di-octyl phthalate particles. Both the ceramic and sintered media have a particle retention efficiency > 99.97%. The sintered metal and ceramic filters not only can be cleaned in situ, but also hold great potential as a long life alternative to conventional HEPA filters. The Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Technical Report, ''HEPA Filters Used in the Department of

  6. Contemporary management of ductal carcinoma in situ and lobular carcinoma in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeng-Gyasi, Samilia; Ong, Cecilia; Hwang, E Shelley

    2016-06-01

    The management of in situ lesions ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) continues to evolve. These diagnoses now comprise a large burden of mammographically diagnosed cancers, and with a global trend towards more population-based screening, the incidence of these lesions will continue to rise. Because outcomes following treatment for DCIS and LCIS are excellent, there is emerging controversy about what extent of treatment is optimal for both diseases. Here we review the current approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of both DCIS and LCIS. In addition, we will consider potential directions for future management of these lesions.

  7. In Situ Observations of Seismic Wave Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Kenneth Stewart

    Instrumented geotechnical field sites are designed to capture the infrequent but critically important in situ case histories of ground response, deformation, and liquefaction during significant earthquakes that generate high intensity ground shaking and large strains. The University of California at Santa Barbara has been monitoring densely instrumented geotechnical array field sites for almost three decades, with continuous recording now for more than a decade. When seismic waves travel into soil with sufficiently large ground motions, the soil behaves nonlinearly meaning the shear modulus of the material decreases from the linear value observed during weak ground motions. The degraded shear modulus can continue to affect a site for a period of time by changing the soil response during smaller ground motions after the large event. Decreased shear modulus is inferred when a decrease of shear wave velocity between two sensors in a vertical downhole array is observed. This velocity is calculated by measuring the difference in shear wave arrival times between the sensors using normalized cross correlation. The trend of decreasing shear wave velocity with increasing peak ground acceleration is observed at multiple geotechnical array field sites. The length of time the decreased velocity remains following stronger shaking is analyzed using more than 450 events over more than a decade at the Wildlife Liquefaction Array (WLA). Using both monthly and yearly velocity averages between sensors, there is evidence that suggests the shear wave velocity remains low over a period of months following larger significant shaking events at the site. In addition, at WLA there is evidence that the decrease in shear wave velocity can be detected at ground motion levels as low as 20 cm/s2. Additionally at the Garner Valley Downhole Array, a permanent cross-hole experiment is used to measure velocity changes in the soil with changing water table height. An underground hammer source swings

  8. In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: Technology summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was instituted out of recognition that in situ remediation could fulfill three important criteria: significant cost reduction of cleanup by eliminating or minimizing excavation, transportation, and disposal of wastes; reduced health impacts on workers and the public by minimizing exposure to wastes during excavation and processing; and remediation of inaccessible sites, including: deep subsurfaces, in, under, and around buildings. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized wastes are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive wastes, volatile and non-volatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials. The ISR IP intends to facilitate development of in situ remediation technologies for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes in soils, groundwater, and storage tanks. Near-term focus is on containment of the wastes, with treatment receiving greater effort in future years. ISR IP is an applied research and development program broadly addressing known DOE environmental restoration needs. Analysis of a sample of 334 representative sites by the Office of Environmental Restoration has shown how many sites are amenable to in situ remediation: containment--243 sites; manipulation--244 sites; bioremediation--154 sites; and physical/chemical methods--236 sites. This needs assessment is focused on near-term restoration problems (FY93--FY99). Many other remediations will be required in the next century. The major focus of the ISR EP is on the long term development of permanent solutions to these problems. Current needs for interim actions to protect human health and the environment are also being addressed.

  9. In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: Technology summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was instituted out of recognition that in situ remediation could fulfill three important criteria: significant cost reduction of cleanup by eliminating or minimizing excavation, transportation, and disposal of wastes; reduced health impacts on workers and the public by minimizing exposure to wastes during excavation and processing; and remediation of inaccessible sites, including: deep subsurfaces, in, under, and around buildings. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized wastes are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive wastes, volatile and non-volatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials. The ISR IP intends to facilitate development of in situ remediation technologies for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes in soils, groundwater, and storage tanks. Near-term focus is on containment of the wastes, with treatment receiving greater effort in future years. ISR IP is an applied research and development program broadly addressing known DOE environmental restoration needs. Analysis of a sample of 334 representative sites by the Office of Environmental Restoration has shown how many sites are amenable to in situ remediation: containment--243 sites; manipulation--244 sites; bioremediation--154 sites; and physical/chemical methods--236 sites. This needs assessment is focused on near-term restoration problems (FY93--FY99). Many other remediations will be required in the next century. The major focus of the ISR EP is on the long term development of permanent solutions to these problems. Current needs for interim actions to protect human health and the environment are also being addressed

  10. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1993-03-04

    Genetic mapping is approached using the techniques of high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This technology and the results of its application are designed to rapidly generate whole genome as tool box of expressed sequence to speed the identification of human disease genes. The results of this study are intended to dovetail with and to link the results of existing technologies for creating backbone YAC and genetic maps. In the first eight months, this approach generated 60--80% of the expressed sequence map, the remainder expected to be derived through more long-term, labor-intensive, regional chromosomal gene searches or sequencing. The laboratory has made significant progress in the set-up phase, in mapping fetal and adult brain and other cDNAs, in testing a model system for directly linking genetic and physical maps using FISH with small fragments, in setting up a database, and in establishing the validity and throughput of the system.

  11. WIPP/SRL in-situ tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamsey, W.G.

    1990-01-01

    The Materials Interface Interactions Test (MIIT) is the only in-situ program involving the burial of simulated high-level waste forms operating in the United States. Fifteen glass and waste form compositions and their proposed package materials, supplied by 7 countries, are interred in salt at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. A joint effort between Sandia National Laboratories and Savannah River Laboratory, MIIT is the largest international cooperative in-situ venture yet undertaken. The objective of the current study is to document the waste form compositions used in the MIIT program and then to examine compositional correlations based on structural considerations, bonding energies, and surface layer formation. These correlations show important similarities between the many different waste glass compositions studied world wide and suggest that these glasses would be expected to perform well and in a similar manner

  12. In Situ TEM Creation of Nanowire Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Sardar Bilal

    ), which has proved to be a powerful method for visualizing the physical processes involved in the growth of nanowires by the vapour liquid solid (VLS) mechanism, was used to study VLS SiNW contact formation process. Electrical characteristics and effects of surface modification on electrical behavior...... from movies recorded during contact events. It is demonstrated that the geometry of the final contact formed between the nanowire and the silicon surface could be controlled by varying the contact surface temperature and the electrical current through the bridging SiNW. By adjusting the contact surface...... ends, base and tip and its electrical properties were probed in situ TEM. Such SiNW bridges clamped between two cantilevers in situ TEM was an interesting platform for studying the effect of surface modification on SiNWs electrical properties. The effect of surface oxidation was studied...

  13. In-situ burning of Orimulsion : small scale burns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M.F.

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the feasibility of burning Orimulsion. In-situ burning has always been a viable method for cleaning oil spills on water because it can effectively reduce the amount of spilled oil and eliminate the need to collect, store, transport and dispose of recovered oil. Orimulsion, however, behaves very differently from conventional oil when it is spilled because of its composition of 70 per cent bitumen in 30 per cent water. In-situ burning of this surfactant-stablized oil-in-water emulsion has never been seriously considered because of the perception that Orimulsion could not be ignited, and if it could, ignition would not be sustained. In this study, burn tests were conducted on 3 scales in a Cleveland Open Cup apparatus of 5 cm, 10 cm and 50 cm diameters. Larger scale burns were conducted in specially built pans. All tests were conducted on salt water which caused the bitumen to separate from the water. The objective was to determine if sufficient vapours could be generated to ignite the Orimulsion. The study also measured if a sustained flame would result in successful combustion. Both objectives were successfully accomplished. Diesel fuel was used to ignite the Orimulsion in the specially designed pan for large scale combustion. Quantitative removal of Orimulsion was achieved in all cases, but in some burns it was necessary to re-ignite the Orimulsion. It was noted that when Orimulsion burns, some trapped water droplets in the bitumen explode with enough force to extinguish a small flame. This did not occur on large-scale burns. It was concluded that the potential for successful in-situ burning increases with size. It was determined that approximately 1 mm in thickness of diesel fuel is needed to ignite a burn. 5 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs

  14. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in situ experimental program for HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecke, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) will be a facility to demonstrate the environmental and operational safety of storing radioactive wastes in a deep geologic bedded salt facility. The WIPP will be located in southeastern New Mexico, approximately 30 miles east of the city of Carlsbad. The major focus of the pilot plant operation involves ERDA defense related low and intermediate-level transuranic wastes. The scope of the project also specifically includes experimentation utilizing commercially generated high-level wastes, or alternatively, spent unreprocessed fuel elements. WIPP HLW experiments are being conducted in an inter-related laboratory, bench-scale, and in situ mode. This presentation focuses on the planned in situ experiments which, depending on the availability of commercially reprocessed waste plus delays in the construction schedule of the WIPP, will begin in approximately 1985. Such experiments are necessary to validate preceding laboratory results and to provide actual, total conditions of geologic storage which cannot be adequately simulated. One set of planned experiments involves emplacing bare HLW fragments into direct contact with the bedded salt environment. A second set utilizes full-size canisters of waste emplaced in the salt in the same manner as planned for a future HLW repository. The bare waste experiments will study in an accelerated manner waste-salt bed-brine interactions including matrix integrity/degradation, brine leaching, system chemistry, and potential radionuclide migration through the salt bed. Utilization of full-size canisters of HLW in situ permits us to demonstrate operational effectiveness and safety. Experiments will evaluate corrosion and compatibility interactions between the waste matrix, canister and overpack materials, getter materials, stored energy, waste buoyancy, etc. Using full size canisters also allows us to demonstrate engineered retrievability of wastes, if necessary, at the end of experimentation

  15. Ductal Carcinoma In Situ: The Whole Truth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Ujas; Chhor, Chloe M; Mercado, Cecilia L

    2018-02-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a noninvasive malignant breast disease traditionally described as a precursor lesion to invasive breast cancer. With screening mammography, DCIS now accounts for approximately 20% of newly diagnosed cancer cases. DCIS is not well understood because of its heterogeneous nature. Studies have aimed to assess prognostic factors to characterize its risk of invasive potential; however, there still remains a lack of uniformity in workup and treatment. We summarize current knowledge of DCIS and the ongoing controversies.

  16. Carcinoma in situ of the larynx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, P J; Flores, A; Douglas, G S

    1977-03-01

    A retrospective study of carcinoma in situ of the larynx at the British Columbia Cancer Institute indicates that radiotherapy, using a tumoricidal dose of Co 60, is the treatment of choice for this condition. Between 1940 and 1972, 43 patients with carcinoma in situ of the vocal cords were seen. A follow-up of five years or more was possible in 28 of these cases. Twenty-two were treated primarily with a tumoricidal dose of radiotherapy. Twenty-one of the 22 were free of disease for at least five years. This study, therefore, shows a five-year cure rate of almost 100 percent for patients treated with radiotherapy. It also brings out two further points regarding carcinoma in situ of the larynx; namely, an apparent increase in its incidence, and the presence of co-existing invasive carcinoma in some cases. We feel that since the incidence of laryngeal carcinoma has not increased, this apparent increase probably represents a greater awareness by both the pathologist and the clinician. We have also achieved more accurate diagnosis since the introduction of routine microlaryngoscopy. The single radiotherapy failure in our series was due to failure to diagnose co-existing invasive carcinoma. This would seem to be the most likely cause of similar failures reported in the literature.

  17. In situ macromolecular crystallography using microbeams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L.; Aishima, Jun; Foadi, James; Morgan, Ann W.; Robinson, James I.; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Owens, Raymond J.; Moraes, Isabel; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Harlos, Karl; Kotecha, Abhay; Ren, Jingshan; Sutton, Geoff; Walter, Thomas S.; Stuart, David I.; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2012-01-01

    A sample environment for mounting crystallization trays has been developed on the microfocus beamline I24 at Diamond Light Source. The technical developments and several case studies are described. Despite significant progress in high-throughput methods in macromolecular crystallography, the production of diffraction-quality crystals remains a major bottleneck. By recording diffraction in situ from crystals in their crystallization plates at room temperature, a number of problems associated with crystal handling and cryoprotection can be side-stepped. Using a dedicated goniometer installed on the microfocus macromolecular crystallography beamline I24 at Diamond Light Source, crystals have been studied in situ with an intense and flexible microfocus beam, allowing weakly diffracting samples to be assessed without a manual crystal-handling step but with good signal to noise, despite the background scatter from the plate. A number of case studies are reported: the structure solution of bovine enterovirus 2, crystallization screening of membrane proteins and complexes, and structure solution from crystallization hits produced via a high-throughput pipeline. These demonstrate the potential for in situ data collection and structure solution with microbeams

  18. In Situ Measurement of Aerosol Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawa, Anthony W.; Castaneda, R.; Owano, T. G.; Bear, D.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Aerosols are important contributors to the radiative forcing in the atmosphere. Much of the uncertainty in our knowledge of climate forcing is due to uncertainties in the radiative forcing due to aerosols as illustrated in the IPCC reports of the last ten years. Improved measurement of aerosol optical properties, therefore, is critical to an improved understanding of atmospheric radiative forcing. Additionally, attempts to reconcile in situ and remote measurements of aerosol radiative properties have generally not been successful. This is due in part to the fact that it has been impossible to measure aerosol extinction in situ in the past. In this presentation we introduce a new instrument that employs the techniques used in cavity ringdown spectroscopy to measure the aerosol extinction and scattering coefficients in situ. A prototype instrument has been designed and tested in the lab and the field. It is capable of measuring aerosol extinction coefficient to 2x10(exp -6) per meter. This prototype instrument is described and results are presented.

  19. A Novel in situ Trigger Combination Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzatu, Adrian; Warburton, Andreas; Krumnack, Nils; Yao, Wei-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Searches for rare physics processes using particle detectors in high-luminosity colliding hadronic beam environments require the use of multi-level trigger systems to reject colossal background rates in real time. In analyses like the search for the Higgs boson, there is a need to maximize the signal acceptance by combining multiple different trigger chains when forming the offline data sample. In such statistically limited searches, datasets are often amassed over periods of several years, during which the trigger characteristics evolve and their performance can vary significantly. Reliable production cross-section measurements and upper limits must take into account a detailed understanding of the effective trigger inefficiency for every selected candidate event. We present as an example the complex situation of three trigger chains, based on missing energy and jet energy, to be combined in the context of the search for the Higgs (H) boson produced in association with a W boson at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). We briefly review the existing techniques for combining triggers, namely the inclusion, division, and exclusion methods. We introduce and describe a novel fourth in situ method whereby, for each candidate event, only the trigger chain with the highest a priori probability of selecting the event is considered. The in situ combination method has advantages of scalability to large numbers of differing trigger chains and of insensitivity to correlations between triggers. We compare the inclusion and in situ methods for signal event yields in the CDF WH search.

  20. Mars Oxygen In-Situ Resource Utilization Experiment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Mars Oxygen In-Situ Resource Utilization Experiment (MOXIE) will be the first in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) technology demonstration on Mars. Competitively...

  1. Instrumented Bit for In-Situ Spectroscopy (IBISS), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to build and critically test the Instrumented Bit for In-Situ Spectroscopy (IBISS), a novel system for in-situ, rapid analyses of planetary subsurface...

  2. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: IN SITU ELECTROKINETIC EXTRACTION SYSTEM - SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has developed an in situ soil remediation system that uses electrokinetic principles to remediate hexavalent chromium-contaminated unsaturated or partially saturated soils. The technology involves the in situ application of direct current to the...

  3. BEATRIX-II: In-situ tritium recovery data correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slagle, O.D.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Kurasawa, T.; Verrall, R.A.

    1993-09-01

    BEATRIX-II was an in-situ tritium recovery experiment in a fast reactor to characterize the irradiation behavior of fusion ceramic breeder materials. Correcting and compiling the in-situ tritium recovery data involved correcting the ion chamber response for the effect of sweep gas composition or amount of hydrogen in the helium sweep gas and for the buildup of background. The effect of sweep gas composition was addressed in the previous workshop. During the operation of Phase I of the experiment the backgrounds of the ion chambers were found to reach significant levels relative to the tritium recovery concentrations in the sweep gas from the specimen canisters. The measured tritium concentrations were corrected for background by comparing the tritium recovery rate during reference conditions with the predicted tritium generation rate. Background increases were found to be associated with tritium recovery peaks and elevated levels of moisture in the sweep gas. These conditions typically occurred when the hydrogen concentration in the sweep gas was increased to 0.1% after extended operation in He or He-0.01% H 2 . Three examples of this increase in ionization chamber background are described. The final corrected BEATRIX-II, Phase I tritium recovery data provide a valuable resource to be used for predicting the performance of Li 2 O in a fusion blanket application

  4. Repurposing CRISPR/Cas9 for in situ functional assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, Abba; Mills, John R; Cencic, Regina; Yan, Yifei; Fraser, James; Schippers, Laura M; Paquet, Marilène; Dostie, Josée; Pelletier, Jerry

    2013-12-01

    RNAi combined with next-generation sequencing has proven to be a powerful and cost-effective genetic screening platform in mammalian cells. Still, this technology has its limitations and is incompatible with in situ mutagenesis screens on a genome-wide scale. Using p53 as a proof-of-principle target, we readapted the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR associated 9) genome-editing system to demonstrate the feasibility of this methodology for targeted gene disruption positive selection assays. By using novel "all-in-one" lentiviral and retroviral delivery vectors heterologously expressing both a codon-optimized Cas9 and its synthetic guide RNA (sgRNA), we show robust selection for the CRISPR-modified Trp53 locus following drug treatment. Furthermore, by linking Cas9 expression to GFP fluorescence, we use an "all-in-one" system to track disrupted Trp53 in chemoresistant lymphomas in the Eμ-myc mouse model. Deep sequencing analysis of the tumor-derived endogenous Cas9-modified Trp53 locus revealed a wide spectrum of mutants that were enriched with seemingly limited off-target effects. Taken together, these results establish Cas9 genome editing as a powerful and practical approach for positive in situ genetic screens.

  5. In situ insights into shock-driven reactive flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattelbaum, Dana

    2017-06-01

    Shock-driven reactions are commonplace. Examples include the detonation of high explosives, shock-driven dissociation of polymers, and transformation of carbon from graphite to diamond phases. The study of shock-driven chemical reactions is important for understanding reaction thresholds, their mechanisms and rates, and associated state sensitivities under the extreme conditions generated by shock compression. Reactions are distinguished by their thermicity - e.g. the volume and enthalpy changes along the reaction coordinate. A survey of the hallmarks of shock-driven reactivity for a variety of simple molecules and polymers will be presented, including benzene, acetylenes and nitriles, and formic acid. Many of the examples will illustrate the nature of the reactive flow through particle velocity wave profiles measured by in situ electromagnetic gauging in gas gun-driven plate impact experiments. General trends will be presented linking molecular moieties, shock temperatures, and reaction state sensitivities. Progress in applying bond-specific diagnostics will also be presented, including time-resolved Raman spectroscopy, and recent results of in situ x-ray diffraction of carbon at the Linac Coherent Light Souce (LCLS) free electron laser.

  6. Chattanooga shale: uranium recovery by in situ processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D.D.

    1977-01-01

    The increasing demand for uranium as reactor fuel requires the addition of sizable new domestic reserves. One of the largest potential sources of low-grade uranium ore is the Chattanooga shale--a formation in Tennessee and neighboring states that has not been mined conventionally because it is expensive and environmentally disadvantageous to do so. An in situ process, on the other hand, might be used to extract uranium from this formation without the attendant problems of conventional mining. We have suggested developing such a process, in which fracturing, retorting, and pressure leaching might be used to extract the uranium. The potential advantages of such a process are that capital investment would be reduced, handling and disposing of the ore would be avoided, and leaching reagents would be self-generated from air and water. If successful, the cost reductions from these factors could make the uranium produced competitive with that from other sources, and substantially increase domestic reserves. A technical program to evaluate the processing problems has been outlined and a conceptual model of the extraction process has been developed. Preliminary cost estimates have been made, although it is recognized that their validity depends on how successfully the various processing steps are carried out. In view of the preliminary nature of this survey (and our growing need for uranium), we have urged a more detailed study on the feasibility of in situ methods for extracting uranium from the Chattanooga shale

  7. In situ structural analysis of the human nuclear pore complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Appen, Alexander; Kosinski, Jan; Sparks, Lenore; Ori, Alessandro; DiGuilio, Amanda L; Vollmer, Benjamin; Mackmull, Marie-Therese; Banterle, Niccolo; Parca, Luca; Kastritis, Panagiotis; Buczak, Katarzyna; Mosalaganti, Shyamal; Hagen, Wim; Andres-Pons, Amparo; Lemke, Edward A; Bork, Peer; Antonin, Wolfram; Glavy, Joseph S; Bui, Khanh Huy; Beck, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear pore complexes are fundamental components of all eukaryotic cells that mediate nucleocytoplasmic exchange. Determining their 110-megadalton structure imposes a formidable challenge and requires in situ structural biology approaches. Of approximately 30 nucleoporins (Nups), 15 are structured and form the Y and inner-ring complexes. These two major scaffolding modules assemble in multiple copies into an eight-fold rotationally symmetric structure that fuses the inner and outer nuclear membranes to form a central channel of ~60 nm in diameter. The scaffold is decorated with transport-channel Nups that often contain phenylalanine-repeat sequences and mediate the interaction with cargo complexes. Although the architectural arrangement of parts of the Y complex has been elucidated, it is unclear how exactly it oligomerizes in situ. Here we combine cryo-electron tomography with mass spectrometry, biochemical analysis, perturbation experiments and structural modelling to generate, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive architectural model of the human nuclear pore complex to date. Our data suggest previously unknown protein interfaces across Y complexes and to inner-ring complex members. We show that the transport-channel Nup358 (also known as Ranbp2) has a previously unanticipated role in Y-complex oligomerization. Our findings blur the established boundaries between scaffold and transport-channel Nups. We conclude that, similar to coated vesicles, several copies of the same structural building block--although compositionally identical--engage in different local sets of interactions and conformations.

  8. Carbonation of stainless steel slag in the context of in situ Brownfield remediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capobianco, O.; Costa, G.; Thuy, L.; Magliocco, E.; Hartog, Niels; Baciocchi, R.

    The main aim of this work was to assess the potential of in situ carbonation as a treatment to modify the properties of alkaline materials such as industrial soil in terms of leaching behaviour and mineralogy and to store the CO2 generated by specific treatments applied in the context of Brownfield

  9. In situ ZnO-PVA nanocomposite coated microfluidic chips for biosensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habouti, S.; Kunstmann-Olsen, C.; Hoyland, J. D.

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic chips with integrated fluid and optical connectors have been generated via a simple PDMS master-mould technique. In situ coating using a Zinc oxide polyvinylalcohol based sol-gel method results in ultrathin nanocomposite layers on the fluid channels, which makes them strongly...

  10. In situ Hearing Tests for the Purpose of a Self-Fit Hearing Aid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boymans, Monique; Dreschler, Wouter A.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the potential and limitations of a self-fit hearing aid. This can be used in the "developing" world or in countries with large distances between the hearing-impaired subjects and the professional. It contains an on-board tone generator for in situ user-controlled, automated

  11. Spontaneous dispersion of PdO onto acid sites of zeolites studied by in situ DXAFS

    CERN Document Server

    Okumura, K; Niwa, M; Yokota, S; Kato, K; Tanida, H; Uruga, T

    2003-01-01

    The generation of highly dispersed PdO over zeolite supports was studied using in situ energy-dispersive XAFS (DXAFS) technique. From the comparison with the Na-ZSM-5, it was found that the oxidation as well as the spontaneous dispersion of Pd was promoted through the interaction between PdO and acid sites of H-form zeolites. (author)

  12. Evaluating Acoustic Emission Signals as an in situ process monitoring technique for Selective Laser Melting (SLM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Karl A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Candy, Jim V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Guss, Gabe [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mathews, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-14

    In situ real-time monitoring of the Selective Laser Melting (SLM) process has significant implications for the AM community. The ability to adjust the SLM process parameters during a build (in real-time) can save time, money and eliminate expensive material waste. Having a feedback loop in the process would allow the system to potentially ‘fix’ problem regions before a next powder layer is added. In this study we have investigated acoustic emission (AE) phenomena generated during the SLM process, and evaluated the results in terms of a single process parameter, of an in situ process monitoring technique.

  13. Use of in situ solid-phase adsorption in microbial natural product fermentation development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Thomas; Chase, Matthew; Wagner, Stephanie; Renzi, Chris; Powell, Marcella; DeAngelo, Joseph; Michels, Peter

    2013-05-01

    It has been half a century since investigators first began experimenting with adding ion exchange resins during the fermentation of microbial natural products. With the development of nonionic polymeric adsorbents in the 1970s, the application of in situ product adsorption in bioprocessing has grown slowly, but steadily. To date, in situ product adsorption strategies have been used in biotransformations, plant cell culture, the production of biofuels, and selected bulk chemicals, such as butanol and lactic acid, as well as in more traditional natural product fermentation within the pharmaceutical industry. Apart from the operational gains in efficiency from the integration of fermentation and primary recovery, the addition of adsorbents during fermentation has repeatedly demonstrated the capacity to significantly increase titers by sequestering the product and preventing or mitigating degradation, feedback inhibition and/or cytotoxic effects. Adoption of in situ product adsorption has been particularly valuable in the early stages of natural product-based drug discovery programs, where quickly and cost-effectively generating multigram quantities of a lead compound can be challenging when using a wild-type strain and fermentation conditions that have not been optimized. While much of the literature involving in situ adsorption describes its application early in the drug development process, this does not imply that the potential for scale-up is limited. To date, commercial-scale processes utilizing in situ product adsorption have reached batch sizes of at least 30,000 l. Here we present examples where in situ product adsorption has been used to improve product titers or alter the ratios among biosynthetically related natural products, examine some of the relevant variables to consider, and discuss the mechanisms by which in situ adsorption may impact the biosynthesis of microbial natural products.

  14. In Situ Electrochemistry of Rechargeable Battery Materials: Status Report and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yijun; Liu, Xizheng; Dai, Zhonghua; Yuan, Fangli; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri; Wang, Xi

    2017-08-01

    The development of rechargeable batteries with high performance is considered to be a feasible way to satisfy the increasing needs of electric vehicles and portable devices. It is of vital importance to design electrodes with high electrochemical performance and to understand the nature of the electrode/electrolyte interfaces during battery operation, which allows a direct observation of the complicated chemical and physical processes within the electrodes and electrolyte, and thus provides real-time information for further design and optimization of the battery performance. Here, the recent progress in in situ techniques employed for the investigations of material structural evolutions is described, including characterization using neutrons, X-ray diffraction, and nuclear magnetic resonance. In situ techniques utilized for in-depth uncovering the electrode/electrolyte phase/interface change mechanisms are then highlighted, including transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The real-time monitoring of lithium dendrite growth and in situ detection of gas evolution during charge/discharge processes are also discussed. Finally, the major challenges and opportunities of in situ characterization techniques are outlined toward new developments of rechargeable batteries, including innovation in the design of compatible in situ cells, applications of dynamic analysis, and in situ electrochemistry under multi-stimuli. A clear and in-depth understanding of in situ technique applications and the mechanisms of structural evolutions, surface/interface changes, and gas generations within rechargeable batteries is given here. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Detection of denitrification genes by in situ rolling circle amplification - fluorescence in situ hybridization (in situ RCA-FISH) to link metabolic potential with identity inside bacterial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoshino, Tatsuhiko; Schramm, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    A target-primed in situ rolling circle amplification (in situ RCA) protocol was developed for detection of single-copy genes inside bacterial cells and optimized with Pseudomonas stutzeri, targeting nitrite and nitrous oxide reductase genes (nirS and nosZ). Two padlock probes were designed per gene...... as Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis by combining in situ RCA-FISH with 16S rRNA-targeted FISH. While not suitable for quantification because of its low detection frequency, in situ RCA-FISH will allow to link metabolic potential with 16S rRNA (gene)-based identification of single microbial cells....

  16. In-situ burning: NIST studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.D.

    1992-01-01

    In-situ burning of spilled oil has distinct advantages over other countermeasures. It offers the potential to convert rapidly large quantities of oil into its primary combustion products, carbon dioxide and water, with a small percentage of other unburned and residue byproducts. Because the oil is converted to gaseous products of combustion by burning, the need for physical collection, storage, and transport of recovered fluids is reduced to the few percent of the original spill volume that remains as residue after burning. Burning oil spills produces a visible smoke plume containing smoke particulate and other products of combustion which may persist for many kilometers from the burn. This fact gives rise to public health concerns, related to the chemical content of the smoke plume and the downwind deposition of particulate, which need to be answered. In 1985, a joint Minerals Management Service (MMS) and Environment Canada (EC) in-situ burning research program was begun at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). This research program was designed to study the burning of large crude oil spills on water and how this burning would affect air quality by quantifying the products of combustion and developing methods to predict the downwind smoke particulate deposition. To understand the important features of in-situ burning, it is necessary to perform both laboratory and mesoscale experiments. Finally, actual burns of spilled oil at sea will be necessary to evaluate the method at the anticipated scale of actual response operations. In this research program there is a continuing interaction between findings from measurements on small fire experiments performed in the controlled laboratory environments of NIST and the Fire Research Institute (FRI) in Japan, and large fire experiments at facilities like the USCG Fire Safety and Test Detachment in Mobile, Alabama where outdoor liquid fuel burns in large pans are possible

  17. The treatment of in situ breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fentiman, I.S. (Guy' s Hospital, London (UK). Clinical Oncology Unit)

    1989-01-01

    Carcinoma in situ is the earliest histologically recognisable form of malignancy and as such provides an opportunity to treat the disease in a curative way. The two major variants, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) will be considered separately as the two conditions have divergent natural histories. DCIS is increasing in incidence since microcalcification may be detected radiologically in the screening of asymptomatic women. The extent of microcalcification may not indicate the extent of disease. It has yet to be determined whether there is a difference in behaviour of the tumour forming and the asymptomatic types of DCIS. After a biopsy has shown DCIS there will be residual DCIS at the biopsy site in one-third of patients, and multifocal DCIS in another third. A coexistent infiltrating carcinoma may be present in up to 16%. Due to sampling problems areas of invasion may be missed. Axillary nodal metastases are found in only 1% of patients with histological DCIS. Radical surgery by total or modified mastectomy is almost curative, but 3% of patients will die of metastases. Taking results of uncontrolled trials, local relapse rates are as follows: excision alone 50%, wide excision 30%, wide excision plus radiotherapy 20%. Two prospective trials are underway run by the EORTC and NSABP in which patients with DCIS are treated by wide excision with or without external radiotherapy. LCIS is usually an incidental finding with a bilateral predisposition to subsequent infiltrating carcinomas. Curative procedures such as bilateral mastectomy with reconstruction may represent overtreatment. A systemic rather than local approach would seem appropriate and a trial is now underway run by the EORTC in which patients with histologically confirmed LCIS are randomised to observation alone or to receive tamoxifen 20 mg daily for 5 years. (orig./MG).

  18. Ekstrauterin graviditet med gestagenspiral in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Mette Schou; Bor, Isil Pinar; Højgaard, Astrid Ditte

    2010-01-01

    The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (IUD) (Mirena) is a frequently used and effective method of contraception, with a Pearl index of 0.1. The ectopic pregnancy rate is 0.02 per 100 woman-years. Special attention is needed in situations where pregnancy is detected with a levonorgestrel......-releasing IUD in situ, because almost two thirds of these pregnancies are ectopic. We describe one of these rare cases of ectopic pregnancy in a woman aged 37 years, who was admitted to hospital with abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding....

  19. In situ rheology of yeast biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugnoni, Lorena I; Tarifa, María C; Lozano, Jorge E; Genovese, Diego

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the in situ rheological behavior of yeast biofilms growing on stainless steel under static and turbulent flow. The species used (Rhodototula mucilaginosa, Candida krusei, Candida kefyr and Candida tropicalis) were isolated from a clarified apple juice industry. The flow conditions impacted biofilm composition over time, with a predominance of C. krusei under static and turbulent flow. Likewise, structural variations occurred, with a tighter appearance under dynamic flow. Under turbulent flow there was an increase of 112 μm in biofilm thickness at 11 weeks (p rheology and contribute to a thin body of knowledge about fungal biofilm formation.

  20. In situ viscometry by optical trapping interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzmán, C.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Köszali, R.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate quantitative in situ viscosity measurements by tracking the thermal fluctuations of an optically trapped microsphere subjected to a small oscillatory flow. The measured power spectral density of the sphere's positions displays a characteristic peak at the driving frequency...... of the flow, which is simply proportional to the viscosity, when measured in units of the thermal power spectral density at the same frequency. Measurements are validated on different water-glycerol mixtures, as well as in a glycerol gradient, where no a priori knowledge of the solution is used to determine...

  1. New horizons of genomic in situ hybridization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marková, Michaela; Vyskot, Boris

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 126, č. 4 (2009), s. 368-375 ISSN 1424-8581 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H002; GA ČR(CZ) GA522/09/0083; GA ČR(CZ) GA521/08/0932; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : evolution * genomic in situ hybridization * phylogenetics Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.729, year: 2009

  2. Computer Aided in situ Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chongtay, Rocio A.; Hansen, John Paulin; Decker, Lone

    This article describes the development of a system intended to aid the treatment of certain phobic conditions by the use of computer telephony integration (CTI).A phobia is an irrational fear to some situations or things and interferes with the functioning of the individual that suffers from it. ...... presented here is being designed in a modular and scalable fashion. The web-based module can be accessed anywhere any time from a PC connected to the internet and can be used alone or as supplement for a location-based module for in situ gradual exposure therapy....

  3. In Situ Preservation of Historic Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, R.; Brooks, R.

    The loss of the Mir space station is shown to symbolize a new consciousness of the value of space artefacts. The reasons why such artefacts as Mir become historic objects worthy of preservation are examined. Preservation of space vehicles in situ is discussed, with particular reference to safety, monitoring and long term costs. An argument is made for a wider definition for World Heritage designations to include material beyond the surface of the Earth, and for international bodies to assess, monitor and oversee these projects. Such heritage sites are seen as an economic driver for the development of space tourism in the 21st century.

  4. PAEDIATRIC URETERIC CALCULI: IN-SITU EXTRACORPOREAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Il navait ni obstruction urétérale ni infection urinaire. De légères hématuries et coliques transitoires ont été observées après la lithotripsie. Conclusion Chez lenfant, la lithotripsie extra-corporelle in situ est une procédure efficace dans le traitement des calculs urétéraux quelque soit le siège. Il ny a aucune morbidité liée à la ...

  5. In Situ Parameter Estimation of Synchronous Machines Using Genetic Algorithm Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopalakrishnan Kalarikovilagam Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an in situ parameter estimation method to determine the equivalent circuit parameters of the Synchronous Machines. The parameters of synchronous generator, both cylindrical rotor and salient pole rotor, are estimated based on the circuit model. Genetic algorithm based parameter estimation technique is adopted where only one set of in-situ measured load test data is used. Conventional methods viz., EMF, MMF, Potier triangle method uses rated voltage and rated current obtained from more than one operating condition to determine the parameters. However, Genetic Algorithm (GA based method uses the working voltage and load current of a single operating point obtained from in-situ measured load test data to estimate the parameters. The test results of the GA based parameter estimation method are found to be closer to direct load test results and better than conventional methods.

  6. Preliminary Results from in Situ Quartz Fiber Neutron Irradiations

    CERN Document Server

    Akchurin, Nural; Ayan, S; Ayan, S; Bencze, Gyorgy; Dumano, I; Fenyvesi, Andras; Hauptman, John M; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Miller, Michael; Önel, Y M; McCliment, Edward; Schwellenbach, D

    1998-01-01

    Optical transmission characteristics of multi-mode synthetic silica-core fibers between 325 nm and 800 nm were studied in situ while irradiated with neutrons. In one case, fiber samples were placed in the core of a 10-kWatt reactor; in the other, fast neutrons generated by p ( 18 MeV) + Be reaction in a cyclotron, irradiated the fibers. The neutron fluence in both studies totaled ~10^15 n/cm2. Both of these initial studies indicate that in the sensitivity region of bialkiline PMTs, the irradiation induced loss is ~1dB/m. These initial experiments are aimed at establishing a fiber testing methodology for assessing the expected degradation of the CMS forward calorimeter at the LHC due to large neutron backgrounds.

  7. Air-coupled acoustic thermography for in-situ evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalameda, Joseph N. (Inventor); Winfree, William P. (Inventor); Yost, William T. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic thermography uses a housing configured for thermal, acoustic and infrared radiation shielding. For in-situ applications, the housing has an open side adapted to be sealingly coupled to a surface region of a structure such that an enclosed chamber filled with air is defined. One or more acoustic sources are positioned to direct acoustic waves through the air in the enclosed chamber and towards the surface region. To activate and control each acoustic source, a pulsed signal is applied thereto. An infrared imager focused on the surface region detects a thermal image of the surface region. A data capture device records the thermal image in synchronicity with each pulse of the pulsed signal such that a time series of thermal images is generated. For enhanced sensitivity and/or repeatability, sound and/or vibrations at the surface region can be used in feedback control of the pulsed signal applied to the acoustic sources.

  8. In-situ fracture mapping using geotomography and brine tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deadrick, F.J.; Ramirez, A.L.; Lytle, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently assessing the capabilities of high resolution geophysical methods to characterize geologic sites for the disposal of high level nuclear waste. A successful experiment has recently been performed in which salt water tracers and high frequency electromagnetic waves were utilized to map rock mass fracture zones in-situ. Multiple cross-borehole EM transmissions were used to generate a tomographic image of the fractured rock region between two boreholes. The tomographs obtained correlate well with conventional wireline geophysical logs which can be used to infer the location of fractured zones in the rock mass. This indirect data suggests that the geotomography and brine tracer technique may have merit in mapping fractured zones between boreholes

  9. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumhansl, James Lee; Beauheim, Richard Louis; Brady, Patrick Vane; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2009-05-01

    Expansion of uranium mining in the United States is a concern to some environmental groups and sovereign Native American Nations. An approach which may alleviate some problems is to develop inherently safe in situ uranium recovery ('ISR') technologies. Current ISR technology relies on chemical extraction of trace levels of uranium from aquifers that, once mined, can still contain dissolved uranium and other trace metals that are a health concern. Existing ISR operations are few in number; however, high uranium prices are driving the industry to consider expanding operations nation-wide. Environmental concerns and enforcement of the new 30 ppb uranium drinking water standard may make opening new mining operations more difficult and costly. Here we propose a technological fix: the development of inherently safe in situ recovery (ISISR) methods. The four central features of an ISISR approach are: (1) New 'green' leachants that break down predictably in the subsurface, leaving uranium, and associated trace metals, in an immobile form; (2) Post-leachant uranium/metals-immobilizing washes that provide a backup decontamination process; (3) An optimized well-field design that increases uranium recovery efficiency and minimizes excursions of contaminated water; and (4) A combined hydrologic/geochemical protocol for designing low-cost post-extraction long-term monitoring. ISISR would bring larger amounts of uranium to the surface, leave fewer toxic metals in the aquifer, and cost less to monitor safely - thus providing a 'win-win-win' solution to all stakeholders.

  10. Enzyme Engineering for In Situ Immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, Fabian B H; Chen, Shuxiong; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2016-10-14

    Enzymes are used as biocatalysts in a vast range of industrial applications. Immobilization of enzymes to solid supports or their self-assembly into insoluble particles enhances their applicability by strongly improving properties such as stability in changing environments, re-usability and applicability in continuous biocatalytic processes. The possibility of co-immobilizing various functionally related enzymes involved in multistep synthesis, conversion or degradation reactions enables the design of multifunctional biocatalyst with enhanced performance compared to their soluble counterparts. This review provides a brief overview of up-to-date in vitro immobilization strategies while focusing on recent advances in enzyme engineering towards in situ self-assembly into insoluble particles. In situ self-assembly approaches include the bioengineering of bacteria to abundantly form enzymatically active inclusion bodies such as enzyme inclusions or enzyme-coated polyhydroxyalkanoate granules. These one-step production strategies for immobilized enzymes avoid prefabrication of the carrier as well as chemical cross-linking or attachment to a support material while the controlled oriented display strongly enhances the fraction of accessible catalytic sites and hence functional enzymes.

  11. In situ SU-8 silver nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren V. Fischer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposite materials containing metal nanoparticles are of considerable interest in photonics and optoelectronics applications. However, device fabrication of such materials always encounters the challenge of incorporation of preformed nanoparticles into photoresist materials. As a solution to this problem, an easy new method of fabricating silver nanocomposites by an in situ reduction of precursors within the epoxy-based photoresist SU-8 has been developed. AgNO3 dissolved in acetonitrile and mixed with the epoxy-based photoresist SU-8 forms silver nanoparticles primarily during the pre- and post-exposure soft bake steps at 95 °C. A further high-temperature treatment at 300 °C resulted in the formation of densely homogeneously distributed silver nanoparticles in the photoresist matrix. No particle growth or agglomeration of nanoparticles is observed at this point. The reported new in situ silver nanocomposite materials can be spin coated as homogeneous thin films and structured by using UV lithography. A resolution of 5 µm is achieved in the lithographic process. The UV exposure time is found to be independent of the nanoparticle concentration. The fabricated silver nanocomposites exhibit high plasmonic responses suitable for the development of new optoelectronic and optical sensing devices.

  12. Molecular cytogenetics using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, J.W.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Lucas, J.; Pinkel, D.; Weier, H-U.; Yu, Loh-Chung.

    1990-12-07

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome-specific probes enables several new areas of cytogenetic investigation by allowing visual determination of the presence and normality of specific genetic sequences in single metaphase or interphase cells. in this approach, termed molecular cytogenetics, the genetic loci to be analyzed are made microscopically visible in single cells using in situ hybridization with nucleic acid probes specific to these loci. To accomplish this, the DNA in the target cells is made single stranded by thermal denaturation and incubated with single-stranded, chemically modified probe under conditions where the probe will anneal only with DNA sequences to which it has high DNA sequence homology. The bound probe is then made visible by treatment with a fluorescent reagent such as fluorescein that binds to the chemical modification carried by the probe. The DNA to which the probe does not bind is made visible by staining with a dye such as propidium iodide that fluoresces at a wavelength different from that of the reagent used for probe visualization. We show in this report that probes are now available that make this technique useful for biological dosimetry, prenatal diagnosis and cancer biology. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Germ cell neoplasia in situ (GCNIS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berney, Daniel M; Looijenga, Leendert H J; Idrees, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    The pre-invasive lesion associated with post-pubertal malignant germ cell tumours of the testis was first recognized in the early 1970s and confirmed by a number of observational and follow-up studies. Until this year, this scientific story has been confused by resistance to the entity and disagr......The pre-invasive lesion associated with post-pubertal malignant germ cell tumours of the testis was first recognized in the early 1970s and confirmed by a number of observational and follow-up studies. Until this year, this scientific story has been confused by resistance to the entity...... and disagreement on its name. Initially termed 'carcinoma in situ' (CIS), it has also been known as 'intratubular germ cell neoplasia, unclassified' (IGCNU) and 'testicular intraepithelial neoplasia' (TIN). In this paper, we review the history of discovery and controversy concerning these names and introduce...... the reasoning for uniting behind a new name, endorsed unanimously at the World Health Organization (WHO) consensus classification 2016: germ cell neoplasia in situ (GCNIS)....

  14. Biophotonic in situ sensor for plant leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conejo, Elian; Frangi, Jean-Pierre; Rosny, Gilles de

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the water concentration of plants can be helpful in several environmental and agricultural domains. There are many methods for the determination of water content in plant leaves; however, most of them give a relative moisture level or an analytical measure after a previous calibration procedure. Even for other biochemical compounds such as dry matter or chlorophyll, the measurement techniques could be destructive. For this reason, a nondestructive method has been developed to measure the biochemical compounds of a plant leaf, using an infrared spectroscopy technique. One important advantage is the simplicity of the device (RAdiometre portatif de Mesure In Situ, RAMIS) and its capability to perform measurements in situ. The prototype is a leaf-clip configuration and is made of LEDs at five wavelengths (656, 721, 843, 937, and 1550 nm), and a silicon/germanium photosensor. To compute the water content of vegetative leaves, the radiative transfer model PROSPECT was implemented. This model can accurately predict spectral transmittances in the 400 nm to 2500 nm spectral region as a function of the principal leaf biochemical contents: water, dry matter, and chlorophyll. Using the transmittance measured by RAMIS into an inversion procedure of PROSPECT: A Model of Leaf Optical Properties Spectra, we are able to compute the values of water contents that show an agreement with the water contents measured directly using dry weight procedures. This method is presented as a possibility to estimate other leaf biochemical compounds using appropriate wavelengths.

  15. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumhansl, James Lee; Beauheim, Richard Louis; Brady, Patrick Vane; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Expansion of uranium mining in the United States is a concern to some environmental groups and sovereign Native American Nations. An approach which may alleviate some problems is to develop inherently safe in situ uranium recovery ('ISR') technologies. Current ISR technology relies on chemical extraction of trace levels of uranium from aquifers that, once mined, can still contain dissolved uranium and other trace metals that are a health concern. Existing ISR operations are few in number; however, high uranium prices are driving the industry to consider expanding operations nation-wide. Environmental concerns and enforcement of the new 30 ppb uranium drinking water standard may make opening new mining operations more difficult and costly. Here we propose a technological fix: the development of inherently safe in situ recovery (ISISR) methods. The four central features of an ISISR approach are: (1) New 'green' leachants that break down predictably in the subsurface, leaving uranium, and associated trace metals, in an immobile form; (2) Post-leachant uranium/metals-immobilizing washes that provide a backup decontamination process; (3) An optimized well-field design that increases uranium recovery efficiency and minimizes excursions of contaminated water; and (4) A combined hydrologic/geochemical protocol for designing low-cost post-extraction long-term monitoring. ISISR would bring larger amounts of uranium to the surface, leave fewer toxic metals in the aquifer, and cost less to monitor safely - thus providing a 'win-win-win' solution to all stakeholders.

  16. Partial Acceptance for Beneficial Use (ABU) for the Type 4 In Situ Vapor Sampler (ISVS) Carts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOGER, R.M.

    2000-05-19

    This document provides the Acceptance for Beneficial Use (ABU) for the Type 4 in-situ vapor sampler (ISVS) system. This document is generated to support the completion of equipment modifications and engineering documentation for the ISVS system that is used for sampling gaseous vapors in the Hanford single shell radioactive waste storage tanks. This ABU documents items for transferring the ISVS system to operations for field use. This document is generated following Characterization Engineering Desk Instruction DI-CE-004-001.

  17. Alternatieve in situ bodemsaneringstechnieken; literatuuronderzoek bij het project "In Situ Biorestauratie" Asten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheuter AJ; LBG

    1997-01-01

    In developing in situ remediation most of the focus used to be on techniques using infiltration water to supply oxygen to the location. Later, techniques were developed in which soil was flushed with air to enhance the oxygen availability to microorganisms. The aim of the study reported here was to

  18. In situ spectroscopy and spectroelectrochemistry of uranium in high-temperature alkali chloride molten salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polovov, Ilya B; Volkovich, Vladimir A; Charnock, John M; Kralj, Brett; Lewin, Robert G; Kinoshita, Hajime; May, Iain; Sharrad, Clint A

    2008-09-01

    Soluble uranium chloride species, in the oxidation states of III+, IV+, V+, and VI+, have been chemically generated in high-temperature alkali chloride melts. These reactions were monitored by in situ electronic absorption spectroscopy. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy of uranium(VI) in a molten LiCl-KCl eutectic was used to determine the immediate coordination environment about the uranium. The dominant species in the melt was [UO 2Cl 4] (2-). Further analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure data and Raman spectroscopy of the melts quenched back to room temperature indicated the possibility of ordering beyond the first coordination sphere of [UO 2Cl 4] (2-). The electrolytic generation of uranium(III) in a molten LiCl-KCl eutectic was also investigated. Anodic dissolution of uranium metal was found to be more efficient at producing uranium(III) in high-temperature melts than the cathodic reduction of uranium(IV). These high-temperature electrolytic processes were studied by in situ electronic absorption spectroelectrochemistry, and we have also developed in situ X-ray absorption spectroelectrochemistry techniques to probe both the uranium oxidation state and the uranium coordination environment in these melts.

  19. Mars in Situ Resource Utilization Technology Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, Anthony C.; Santago-Maldonado, Edgardo

    2012-01-01

    We have examined the technologies required to enable Mars In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) because our understanding of Mars resources has changed significantly in the last five years as a result of recent robotic missions to the red planet. Two major developments, (1) confirmation of the presence of near-surface water in the form of ice in very large amounts at high latitudes by the Phoenix Lander and (2) the likely existence of water at lower latitudes in the form of hydrates or ice in the top one meter of the regolith, have the potential to change ISRU technology selection. A brief technology assessment was performed for the most promising Mars atmospheric gas processing techniques: Reverse Water Gas Shift (RWGS) and Methanation (aka Sabatier), as well as an overview of soil processing technology to extract water from Martian soil.

  20. Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of the Breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS of the breast represents a complex, heterogeneous pathologic condition in which malignant epithelial cells are confined within the ducts of the breast without evidence of invasion. The increased use of screening mammography has led to a significant shift in the diagnosis of DCIS, accounting for approximately 27% of all newly diagnosed cases of breast cancer in 2011, with an overall increase in incidence. As the incidence of DCIS increases, the treatment options continue to evolve. Consistent pathologic evaluation is crucial in optimizing treatment recommendations. Surgical treatment options include breast-conserving surgery (BCS and mastectomy. Postoperative radiation therapy in combination with breast-conserving surgery is considered the standard of care with demonstrated decrease in local recurrence with the addition of radiation therapy. The role of endocrine therapy is currently being evaluated. The optimization of diagnostic imaging, treatment with regard to pathological risk assessment, and the role of partial breast irradiation continue to evolve.

  1. In situ uranium stabilization by microbial metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turick, Charles E.; Knox, Anna S.; Leverette, Chad L.; Kritzas, Yianne G.

    2008-01-01

    Microbial melanin production by autochthonous bacteria was explored in this study as a means to increase U immobilization in U contaminated soil. This article demonstrates the application of bacterial physiology and soil ecology for enhanced U immobilization in order to develop an in situ, U bio-immobilization technology. We have demonstrated microbial production of a metal chelating biopolymer, pyomelanin, in U contaminated soil from the Tims Branch area of the Department of Energy (DOE), Savannah River Site (SRS), South Carolina, as a result of tyrosine amendments. Bacterial densities of pyomelanin producers were >10 6 cells per g wet soil. Pyomelanin demonstrated U complexing and mineral binding capacities at pH 4 and 7. In laboratory studies, in the presence of goethite or illite, pyomelanin enhanced U sequestration by these minerals. Tyrosine amended soils in a field test demonstrated increased U sequestration capacity following pyomelanin production up to 13 months after tyrosine treatments

  2. IN SITU URANIUM STABILIZATION BY MICROBIAL METABOLITES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C; Anna Knox, A; Chad L Leverette,C; Yianne Kritzas, Y

    2006-11-29

    Soil contaminated with U was the focus of this study in order to develop in-situ, U bio-immobilization technology. We have demonstrated microbial production of a metal chelating biopolymer, pyomelanin, in U contaminated soil from the Tims Branch area of the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) as a result of tyrosine amendments. Bacterial densities of pyomelanin producers were >106 cells/g wet soil. Pyomelanin demonstrated U chelating and mineral binding capacities at pH 4 and 7. In laboratory studies, in the presence of goethite or illite, pyomelanin enhanced U sequestration by these minerals. Tyrosine amended soils in field tests demonstrated increased U sequestration capacity following pyomelanin production up to 13 months after tyrosine treatments.

  3. Underground openings for in situ experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollenberg, H.A.; Korbin, G.

    1982-01-01

    In situ tests include a wide variety of heater experiments with single and multiple arrays at full and reduced scale, block tests, heated room and pillar tests, brine and water migration experiments, permeability tests, fracture hydrology and groundwater chemistry studies, instrumentation development and testing, and other investigations. This article describes the identification of underground openings to accommodate such tests and the concept of a coupled hydrologic-thermomechanical experiment. The hydro/thermomechanical experimental program has five stages: 1) design and fabrication; 2) baseline studies; 3) chamber excavation; 4) test chamber experiment; and 5) data analysis and modeling. From the calculations presented, it was concluded that a large volume of rock (approximately 50 times that in the Stripa full-scale heater test) can be influenced within a reasonable time in the hydro/thermomechanical experiment, thereby bridging the gap between laboratory and repository-sized experiments

  4. In situ vitrification of buried waste sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shade, J.W.; Thompson, L.E.; Kindle, C.H.

    1991-04-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is a remedial technology initially developed to treat soils contaminated with a variety of organics, heavy metals, and/or radioactive materials. Recent tests have indicated the feasibility of applying the process to buried wastes including containers, combustibles, and buried metals. In addition, ISV is being considered for application to the emplacement of barriers and to the vitrification of underground tanks. This report provides a review of some of the recent experiences of applying ISV in engineering-scale and pilot-scale tests to wastes containing organics, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic metals buried in sealed containers, and buried ferrous metals, with emphasis on the characteristics of the vitrified product and adjacent soil. 9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  5. In situ erosion of cohesive sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, H.J.; Ockenden, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in tidal power schemes and the effect of a tidal energy barrage on the environment. A large man-made environmental change, such as a barrage, would be expected to have significant effects on the sediment distribution and stability of an estuary and these effects need to be assessed when considering a tidal barrage project. This report describes the development of apparatus for in-situ measurements of cohesive sediment erosion on inter-tidal mudflats. Development of the prototype field erosion bell and field testing was commissioned on behalf of the Department of Trade and Industry by the Energy Technology Support Unit (ETSU). This later work commenced in August 1991 and was completed in September 1992. (Author)

  6. In situ studies of fracture in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, J.; Ohr, S.M.

    1978-01-01

    Electron microscope studies were made of the propagation of microcracks during in situ tensile deformation of stainless steel, molybdenum and magnesium oxide representing ductile, semi-brittle and brittle solids. As the stress is applied, the cracks are initiated at the edge of holes in the thinned foils. The extent of plastic activity around the cracks is measured in terms of the density and the distribution of dislocations and is sensitive to the ductile/brittle nature of the solid. The slip systems of the dislocations are determined by contrast analysis and stereoscopic observation. In stainless steel and magnesium oxide, the dislocations are relatively straight and they lie nearly perpendicular to the direction of the crack propagation, whereas in molybdenum the dislocations are in the form of irregular tangles which are stretched along the direction of the crack propagation. These observations are discussed in terms of the model of Dugdale concerning the formation of plastic zones under uniaxial loading in plane stress conditions

  7. In situ investigations at Avery Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Sambeek, L.L.

    1980-01-01

    Descriptions and representative data are given for the in situ investigations being performed in the Avery Island Mine. Sufficient detail is presented such that investigators can judge whether any of the studies being performed would be valuable for their numerical modeling exercises. The basic investigations being performed include heater tests, brine migration experiments, and flatjack tests. The heater tests consist of the emplacement of single simulated waste canisters with different power levels. The bulk thermal and mechanical response is measured of the salt surrounding the emplacement. The brine migration studies involve the measurement of moisture inflow into heated boreholes. The flatjack studies are an investigation of the deformation of the borehole when subjected to controlled boundary conditions of stress and temperature

  8. In situ chemisorption of radiocesium from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, D.R.; Casso, S.A.

    1984-01-01

    A novel approach to in situ extraction of Cs radionuclides from seawater is described which offers many advantages over previous methods. Cesium (stable and radioactive) is partially stripped from seawater as it passes in series through a tandem cartridge consisting of twin beds of ion exchange resin impregnated with cupric ferrocyanide. It is demonstrated that, when seawater passes through this cartridge at a constant flow-rate, collection efficiencies of each bed are the same, allowing the calculation of the seawater Cs nuclide concentration. The cartridge is made of inexpensive, readily available, PVC pipe fittings and is easily deployed under various field conditions. Procedures are described for resin preparation and desorption and radiochemical purification of the collected Cs. Thousands of liters of seawater can be stripped of Cs in this way, permitting substantial improvement in the sensitivity of measurement of 134 Cs and 137 Cs. (Auth.)

  9. In situ buffer material test, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumata, Masahiro; Muraoka, Susumu; Shimooka, Kenji; Araki, Kunio; Okamoto, Masamichi.

    1987-10-01

    Buffer materials would be placed between a package and wall rock in a disposal pit in a deep geological formation in the concept for geological disposal of high level radioactive wastes. A bentonite powder produced in our country was compacted in a test hole in-situ into 1.27 kg/cm 3 at 380 m below surface and heated with a electric heater about 882 hours. The value of obtained thermal conductivity of the buffer material was slightly larger than those of the laboratory data. The results of the measurements of the moisture of the buffer material using a Neutron Moisture Meter revealed that the buffer material was dried during the heating and groundwater penetrated from fractures of the wall rock into the buffer material after heating was stopped. (author)

  10. Reverse osmosis membrane allows in situ regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonhomme, N.; Menjeaud, C.; Poyet, C.

    1989-01-01

    The use of mineral membranes on metallic supports has provided a novel solution to the problem of filtration by the reverse osmosis process. A new reverse osmosis membrane is described which is capable of resisting high operational temperatures (120 0 C), fluctuations in pH(3 to 12) and high pressure (100 bar), as well as significant chlorine concentrations. In addition, the membrane can be regenerated in-situ on the same porous metal support. Numerous membranes can thus be used over the multi-year life of the porous support. Moreover, accidental damage to the membrane is of no great consequence as the membrane itself can be easily replaced. The life of the installation can thus be extended and the overall cost of filtration reduced. The membrane's various applications include water and effluent treatment in the nuclear power industry. (author)

  11. Unannounced in situ simulation of obstetric emergencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Jette Led; Lottrup, Pernille; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To describe how unannounced in situ simulation (ISS) was perceived by healthcare professionals before and after its implementation, and to describe the organisational impact of ISS. STUDY DESIGN: Ten unannounced ISS involving all staff were scheduled March-August 2007. Questionnaire surveys...... on staff perceptions were conducted before (2003-2006) and after (2007-2008) implementation of unannounced ISS. Information from the debriefing sessions following each ISS constituted a proxy measure of the organisational impact of the ISS. RESULTS: Five out of ten of the unannounced ISS scheduled were...... conducted. Twenty-three members of the staff at work on a scheduled day for ISS were randomly selected to participate. Questionnaires before implementation revealed that 137/196 (70%) of staff members agreed or strongly agreed that ISS was a good idea and 52/199 (26%) thought it likely to be stressful...

  12. In-situ trainable intrusion detection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symons, Christopher T.; Beaver, Justin M.; Gillen, Rob; Potok, Thomas E.

    2016-11-15

    A computer implemented method detects intrusions using a computer by analyzing network traffic. The method includes a semi-supervised learning module connected to a network node. The learning module uses labeled and unlabeled data to train a semi-supervised machine learning sensor. The method records events that include a feature set made up of unauthorized intrusions and benign computer requests. The method identifies at least some of the benign computer requests that occur during the recording of the events while treating the remainder of the data as unlabeled. The method trains the semi-supervised learning module at the network node in-situ, such that the semi-supervised learning modules may identify malicious traffic without relying on specific rules, signatures, or anomaly detection.

  13. In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

  14. Cryogenic in situ microcompression testing of Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupinacci, A.; Kacher, J.; Eilenberg, A.; Shapiro, A.A.; Hosemann, P.; Minor, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing plasticity mechanisms below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature is traditionally difficult to accomplish in a systematic fashion. Here, we use a new experimental setup to perform in situ cryogenic mechanical testing of pure Sn micropillars at room temperature and at −142 °C. Subsequent electron microscopy characterization of the micropillars shows a clear difference in the deformation mechanisms at room temperature and at cryogenic temperatures. At room temperature, the Sn micropillars deformed through dislocation plasticity, while at −142 °C they exhibited both higher strength and deformation twinning. Two different orientations were tested, a symmetric (1 0 0) orientation and a non-symmetric (4 5 ¯ 1) orientation. The deformation mechanisms were found to be the same for both orientations

  15. In situ SU-8 silver nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Søren Vang; Uthuppu, Basil; Jakobsen, Mogens Havsteen

    2015-01-01

    Nanocomposite materials containing metal nanoparticles are of considerable interest in photonics and optoelectronics applications. However, device fabrication of such materials always encounters the challenge of incorporation of preformed nanoparticles into photoresist materials. As a solution...... to this problem, an easy new method of fabricating silver nanocomposites by an in situ reduction of precursors within the epoxy-based photoresist SU-8 has been developed. AgNO3 dissolved in acetonitrile and mixed with the epoxy-based photoresist SU-8 forms silver nanoparticles primarily during the pre- and post...... silver nanocomposite materials can be spin coated as homogeneous thin films and structured by using UV lithography. A resolution of 5 mu m is achieved in the lithographic process. The UV exposure time is found to be independent of the nanoparticle concentration. The fabricated silver nanocomposites...

  16. PERFORMANCE CONFIRMATION IN-SITU INSTRUMENTATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N.T. Raczka

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to identify and analyze the types of in-situ instruments and methods that could be used in support of the data acquisition portion of the Performance Confirmation (PC) program at the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The PC program will require geomechanical , geophysical, thermal, and hydrologic instrumentation of several kinds. This analysis is being prepared to document the technical issues associated with each type of measurement during the PC period. This analysis utilizes the ''Performance Confirmation Input Criteria'' (CRWMS M andO 1999a) as its starting point. The scope of this analysis is primarily on the period after the start of waste package emplacement and before permanent closure of the repository, a period lasting between 15 and 300 years after last package emplacement (Stroupe 2000, Attachment 1, p. 1). The primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Review the design criteria as presented in the ''Performance Confirmation Input Criteria'' (CRWMS M andO 1999a). The scope of this analysis will be limited to the instrumentation related to parameters that require continuous monitoring of the conditions underground. (2) Preliminary identification and listing of the data requirements and parameters as related to the current repository layout in support of PC monitoring. (3) Preliminary identification of methods and instrumentation for the acquisition of the required data. Although the ''Performance Confirmation Input Criteria'' (CRWMS M andO 1999a) defines a broad range of data that must be obtained from a variety of methods, the focus of this analysis is on instrumentation related to the performance of the rock mass and the formation of water in the repository environment, that is obtainable from in-situ observation, testing, and monitoring

  17. In Situ Field Testing of Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This revision updates data and analyses presented in the initial issue of this AMR. This AMR was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' and ''Technical Work Plan for UZ Flow, Transport, and Coupled Processes Process Model Report. These activities were performed to investigate in situ flow and transport processes. The evaluations provide the necessary framework to: (1) refine and confirm the conceptual model of matrix and fracture processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and (2) analyze the impact of excavation (including use of construction water and effect of ventilation) on the UZ flow and transport processes. This AMR is intended to support revisions to ''Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport'' and ''Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Process Model Report''. In general, the results discussed in this AMR are from studies conducted using a combination or a subset of the following three approaches: (1) air-injection tests, (2) liquid-release tests, and (3) moisture monitoring using in-drift sensors or in-borehole sensors, to evaluate the impact of excavation, ventilation, and construction-water usage on the surrounding rocks. The liquid-release tests and air-injection tests provide an evaluation of in situ fracture flow and the competing processes of matrix imbibition. Only the findings from testing and data not covered in the ''Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data'' are analyzed in detail in the AMR

  18. In Situ Field Testing of Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Wang

    2001-12-14

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This revision updates data and analyses presented in the initial issue of this AMR. This AMR was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' and ''Technical Work Plan for UZ Flow, Transport, and Coupled Processes Process Model Report. These activities were performed to investigate in situ flow and transport processes. The evaluations provide the necessary framework to: (1) refine and confirm the conceptual model of matrix and fracture processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and (2) analyze the impact of excavation (including use of construction water and effect of ventilation) on the UZ flow and transport processes. This AMR is intended to support revisions to ''Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport'' and ''Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Process Model Report''. In general, the results discussed in this AMR are from studies conducted using a combination or a subset of the following three approaches: (1) air-injection tests, (2) liquid-release tests, and (3) moisture monitoring using in-drift sensors or in-borehole sensors, to evaluate the impact of excavation, ventilation, and construction-water usage on the surrounding rocks. The liquid-release tests and air-injection tests provide an evaluation of in situ fracture flow and the competing processes of matrix imbibition. Only the findings from testing and data not covered in the ''Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data'' are analyzed in detail in the AMR.

  19. In-situ gelling polymers for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the research involving in situ gelling polymers and can be used as a guidebook for academics, industrialists and postgraduates interested in this area. This work summaries the academic contributions from the top authorities in the field and explore the fundamental principles of in situ gelling polymeric networks, along with examples of their major applications. This book aims to provide an up-to-date resource of in situ gelling polymer research.

  20. DNA/DNA in situ hybridization with enzyme linked probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grillo, S.; Mosher, M.; Charles, P.; Henry, S.; Taub, F.

    1987-05-01

    A non-radioactive in situ nucleic acid hybridization method which requires no antibodies, haptens, avidin or biotin intermediateries is presented. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labeled nucleic acid probes are hybridized in situ for 2 hours or less, followed by brief washing of hybridized cells and the direct detection of in situ hybrids with diaminobenzidine (DAB). Application of this method to the detection of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in human cells is shown.

  1. Solution (in situ leach) mining of uranium: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhaida, A.J. Jr.; Kelly, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    Increases in the demand for and price of uranium have made in-situ mining an attractive alternative to the open-pit and underground U mining methods. Up to 50% of the known ore-bearing sandstone in the western U.S. can be mined using the in-situ mining method. In-situ mining also offers a significant environmental advantage. Restoration of the contaminated groundwater is discussed

  2. In-situ vitrification of radioactively contaminated soils: summary paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buelt, J.L.; Fitzpatrick, V.F.

    1987-01-01

    The in-situ vitrification (ISV) process is a new technology that has been developed from its conceptual phase through selected field-scale application tests during the last six years. In situ vitrification converts contaminated soils and waste inclusions into a durable glass and crystalline waste form by in-place melting. Electrodes are inserted into the soil to be treated and an electrical current is passed through the soil to be treated and an electrical current is passed through the soil to melt it. After cooling, the process fixes (TRU) and fission product radionuclides making them relatively nonleachable, resistant to intrusion, and nondispersible when intentionally disturbed. Another application considered for isolation of radioactively contaminated soils, but not yet developed, is the generation of impermeable barrier walls to prevent ground water seepage into a site. The barrier technique could also be used over the surface of an existing disposal site to deter plant and animal intrusion. The development units have been extensively tested with many types of soils and waste inclusions such as concrete, buried metals, sealed containers, organic chemicals with high boiling points such as polychlorinated biphenyls, and inorganic chemicals, including toxic heavy metals, nitrates, and sulfates. Nitrates and organics are destroyed, while heavy metals and fluorides are retained to a high percentage within the molten soil during processing. At $200 to $300/m 3 for radioactive waste, the process is economically competitive with many alternative remediation processes. The ISV process has been developed to the point where it is ready for large-scale field testing at an actual TRU-contaminated soil site. 5 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  3. The correlation between dual-color chromogenic in situ hybridization and fluorescence in situ hybridization in assessing HER2 gene amplification in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marianne; Rasmussen, Birgitte Bruun

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is regarded as the gold standard method for detecting HER2 gene amplification. Chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) is a promising alternative to FISH because CISH has the advantages of being a method evaluated by bright-field microscopy...... and the generated chromogenic signals are also stable. This study presents a dual color CISH for simultaneous detection of the HER2 gene and chromosome 17. The CISH method performs a chromogenic detection "on top" of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved HER2 FISH pharmDx method, where the fluorochrome......-labeled probes are detected using enzyme-labeled antibodies and visualized by chromogenic enzymatic reactions. The HER2 status (amplified/not amplified and HER2 ratios) was evaluated by the CISH method and compared with results obtained by the FDA-approved FISH method. Of the 72 successfully investigated...

  4. Ion assisted deposition processes: in situ control; Ionengestuetzte Beschichtungsprozesse in situ kontrollieren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehlers, H.; Gross, T.; Lappschies, M.; Ristau, D. [Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (Germany). Abteilung Laserkomponeneten, Gruppe Prozessentwicklung

    2004-12-01

    Ion assisted deposition processes for optical precision components exhibit a high potential, in particular in the near and mid infrared spectral region. The presented results demonstrate the important criterion of a minimized water adsorption in the thin film structures by measurements of the optical losses in the wavelength range around 3 {mu}m as well as by the determination of the spectral stability of the optics. Furthermore, the employment of an in situ monitor, which allows wide-band transmission measurements directly at the product, provides an extensive database for the process analysis and development. Thus, additional information about the growth behavior, the vacuum-to-air-shift, and about layer inhomogeneities is available. The combination of the in situ monitor with the coating plant control results in an automated process system, which allows a precise determination of the layer thickness and represents a basis for the rapid prototyping of complex layer systems. In contrast to standard monitor strategies, test coatings and calibration factors are not necessary. With the presented combination of the stable ion assisted deposition process and the in situ monitor, the production of demanding NIR/MIR multilayer systems with high reproducibility could be automated. (orig.)

  5. IN-SITU TRITIUM BETA DETECTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.W. Berthold; L.A. Jeffers

    1998-04-15

    The objectives of this three-phase project were to design, develop, and demonstrate a monitoring system capable of detecting and quantifying tritium in situ in ground and surface waters, and in water from effluent lines prior to discharge into public waterways. The tritium detection system design is based on measurement of the low energy beta radiation from the radioactive decay of tritium using a special form of scintillating optical fiber directly in contact with the water to be measured. The system consists of the immersible sensor module containing the optical fiber, and an electronics package, connected by an umbilical cable. The system can be permanently installed for routine water monitoring in wells or process or effluent lines, or can be moved from one location to another for survey use. The electronics will read out tritium activity directly in units of pico Curies per liter, with straightforward calibration. In Phase 1 of the project, we characterized the sensitivity of fluor-doped plastic optical fiber to tritium beta radiation. In addition, we characterized the performance of photomultiplier tubes needed for the system. In parallel with this work, we defined the functional requirements, target specifications, and system configuration for an in situ tritium beta detector that would use the fluor-doped fibers as primary sensors of tritium concentration in water. The major conclusions from the characterization work are: A polystyrene optical fiber with fluor dopant concentration of 2% gave best performance. This fiber had the highest dopant concentration of any fibers tested. Stability may be a problem. The fibers exposed to a 22-day soak in 120 F water experienced a 10x reduction in sensitivity. It is not known whether this was due to the build up of a deposit (a potentially reversible effect) or an irreversible process such as leaching of the scintillating dye. Based on the results achieved, it is premature to initiate Phase 2 and commit to a prototype

  6. IN-SITU TRITIUM BETA DETECTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthold, J.W.; Jeffers, L.A.

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of this three-phase project were to design, develop, and demonstrate a monitoring system capable of detecting and quantifying tritium in situ in ground and surface waters, and in water from effluent lines prior to discharge into public waterways. The tritium detection system design is based on measurement of the low energy beta radiation from the radioactive decay of tritium using a special form of scintillating optical fiber directly in contact with the water to be measured. The system consists of the immersible sensor module containing the optical fiber, and an electronics package, connected by an umbilical cable. The system can be permanently installed for routine water monitoring in wells or process or effluent lines, or can be moved from one location to another for survey use. The electronics will read out tritium activity directly in units of pico Curies per liter, with straightforward calibration. In Phase 1 of the project, we characterized the sensitivity of fluor-doped plastic optical fiber to tritium beta radiation. In addition, we characterized the performance of photomultiplier tubes needed for the system. In parallel with this work, we defined the functional requirements, target specifications, and system configuration for an in situ tritium beta detector that would use the fluor-doped fibers as primary sensors of tritium concentration in water. The major conclusions from the characterization work are: A polystyrene optical fiber with fluor dopant concentration of 2% gave best performance. This fiber had the highest dopant concentration of any fibers tested. Stability may be a problem. The fibers exposed to a 22-day soak in 120 F water experienced a 10x reduction in sensitivity. It is not known whether this was due to the build up of a deposit (a potentially reversible effect) or an irreversible process such as leaching of the scintillating dye. Based on the results achieved, it is premature to initiate Phase 2 and commit to a prototype

  7. In situ data analytics and indexing of protein trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Travis; Zhang, Boyu; Liwo, Adam; Crivelli, Silvia; Taufer, Michela

    2017-06-15

    The transition toward exascale computing will be accompanied by a performance dichotomy. Computational peak performance will rapidly increase; I/O performance will either grow slowly or be completely stagnant. Essentially, the rate at which data are generated will grow much faster than the rate at which data can be read from and written to the disk. MD simulations will soon face the I/O problem of efficiently writing to and reading from disk on the next generation of supercomputers. This article targets MD simulations at the exascale and proposes a novel technique for in situ data analysis and indexing of MD trajectories. Our technique maps individual trajectories' substructures (i.e., α-helices, β-strands) to metadata frame by frame. The metadata captures the conformational properties of the substructures. The ensemble of metadata can be used for automatic, strategic analysis within a trajectory or across trajectories, without manually identify those portions of trajectories in which critical changes take place. We demonstrate our technique's effectiveness by applying it to 26.3k helices and 31.2k strands from 9917 PDB proteins and by providing three empirical case studies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. In Situ Guided Wave Structural Health Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, George; Tittmann, Bernhard R.

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft engine rotating equipment operates at high temperatures and stresses. Noninvasive inspection of microcracks in those components poses a challenge for nondestructive evaluation. A low-cost, low-profile, high-temperature ultrasonic guided wave sensor was developed that detects cracks in situ. The transducer design provides nondestructive evaluation of structures and materials. A key feature of the sensor is that it withstands high temperatures and excites strong surface wave energy to inspect surface and subsurface cracks. The sol-gel bismuth titanate-based surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor can generate efficient SAWs for crack inspection. The sensor is very thin (submillimeter) and can generate surface waves up to 540 C. Finite element analysis of the SAW transducer design was performed to predict the sensor behavior, and experimental studies confirmed the results. The sensor can be implemented on structures of various shapes. With a spray-coating process, the sensor can be applied to the surface of large curvatures. It has minimal effect on airflow or rotating equipment imbalance, and provides good sensitivity.

  9. In-Situ Microbial Conversion of Sequestered Greenhouse Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, A R; Mukhopadhyay, M; Balin, D F

    2012-09-06

    The objectives of the project are to use microbiological in situ bioconversion technology to convert sequestered or naturally-occurring greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide, into methane and other useful organic compounds. The key factors affecting coal bioconversion identified in this research include (1) coal properties, (2) thermal maturation and coalification process, (3) microbial population dynamics, (4) hydrodynamics (5) reservoir conditions, and (6) the methodology of getting the nutrients into the coal seams. While nearly all cultures produced methane, we were unable to confirm sustained methane production from the enrichments. We believe that the methane generation may have been derived from readily metabolized organic matter in the coal samples and/or biosoluble organic material in the coal formation water. This raises the intriguing possibility that pretreatment of the coal in the subsurface to bioactivate the coal prior to the injection of microbes and nutrients might be possible. We determined that it would be more cost effective to inject nutrients into coal seams to stimulate indigenous microbes in the coal seams, than to grow microbes in fermentation vats and transport them to the well site. If the coal bioconversion process can be developed on a larger scale, then the cost to generate methane could be less than $1 per Mcf

  10. In-situ soil carbon analysis using inelastic neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    In situ soil carbon analysis using inelastic neutron scattering (INS) is based on the emission of 4.43 MeV gamma rays from carbon nuclei excited by fast neutrons. This in-situ method has excellent potential for easily measuring soil carbon since it does not require soil core sampling and processing ...

  11. Development of an in situ polymeric hydrogel implant of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To prepare and characterize in situ gel-forming implants of methylprednisolone for the treatment of spinal cord injuries. Methods: In situ hydrogels of methylprednisolone were prepared by dispersing polylactide glycolic acid. (PLGA) polymer and methylprednisolone in N-methyl-pyrrolidone solvent, and subsequent ...

  12. An overview of in situ waste treatment technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, S.; Hyde, R.A.; Piper, R.B.; Roy, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    In situ technologies are becoming an attractive remedial alternative for eliminating environmental problems. In situ treatments typically reduce risks and costs associated with retrieving, packaging, and storing or disposing-waste and are generally preferred over ex situ treatments. Each in situ technology has specific applications, and, in order to provide the most economical and practical solution to a waste problem, these applications must be understood. This paper presents an overview of thirty different in situ remedial technologies for buried wastes or contaminated soil areas. The objective of this paper is to familiarize those involved in waste remediation activities with available and emerging in situ technologies so that they may consider these options in the remediation of hazardous and/or radioactive waste sites. Several types of in situ technologies are discussed, including biological treatments, containment technologies, physical/chemical treatments, solidification/stabilization technologies, and thermal treatments. Each category of in situ technology is briefly examined in this paper. Specific treatments belonging to these categories are also reviewed. Much of the information on in situ treatment technologies in this paper was obtained directly from vendors and universities and this information has not been verified

  13. paediatric ureteric calculi: in-situ extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective To evaluate prospectively the efficacy of in-situ extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) in the treatment of ureteric calculi in the paediatric age group. Patients and Methods Twenty children (aged 2.2 16 years) with 22 ureteric stones were evaluated and treated with in-situ ESWL using the Dornier S lithotripter ...

  14. Development of an in situ polymeric hydrogel implant of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To prepare and characterize in situ gel-forming implants of methylprednisolone for the treatment of spinal cord injuries. Methods: In situ hydrogels of methylprednisolone were prepared by dispersing polylactide glycolic acid (PLGA) polymer and methylprednisolone in N-methyl-pyrrolidone solvent, and subsequent ...

  15. CGS and In Situ Measurements in Gävle 1999

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Helle Karina; Korsbech, Uffe C C; Bargholz, Kim

    1999-01-01

    Calibration of CGS-equipment.In situ measuremts with HPGe-detector (and dose rate meter)in Gävle Sweden as part of the Nordic exercise RESUME99.......Calibration of CGS-equipment.In situ measuremts with HPGe-detector (and dose rate meter)in Gävle Sweden as part of the Nordic exercise RESUME99....

  16. Comparison of in situ nutrient disappearance of alternative maize ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two maize milling by-products (maize gluten feed; MGF and maize by-product feed; MBPF) were compared with shelled maize (SM) and soyabean meal (SBM) for their in situ nutrient disappearance. In situ experiments were conducted in two rumen fistulated Holstein cows to evaluate dry matter (DM), crude protein (CP), ...

  17. Some implications of in situ uranium mining technology development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, C.E.; Parkhurst, M.A.; Cole, R.J.; Keller, D.; Mellinger, P.J.; Wallace, R.W.

    1980-09-01

    A technology assessment was initiated in March 1979 of the in-situ uranium mining technology. This report explores the impediments to development and deployment of this technology and evaluates the environmental impacts of a generic in-situ facility. The report is divided into the following sections: introduction, technology description, physical environment, institutional and socioeconomic environment, impact assessment, impediments, and conclusions. (DLC)

  18. Melanoma in situ with in-transit metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Mikkelsen

    2017-03-01

    This case shows what is generally considered impossible – metastasizing melanoma in situ. The finding had severe implications for the patient, and raises the question of whether to intensify follow-up or the extent of surgery in patients with melanoma in situ, especially when regression is present.

  19. Some implications of in situ uranium mining technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, C.E.; Parkhurst, M.A.; Cole, R.J.; Keller, D.; Mellinger, P.J.; Wallace, R.W.

    1980-09-01

    A technology assessment was initiated in March 1979 of the in-situ uranium mining technology. This report explores the impediments to development and deployment of this technology and evaluates the environmental impacts of a generic in-situ facility. The report is divided into the following sections: introduction, technology description, physical environment, institutional and socioeconomic environment, impact assessment, impediments, and conclusions

  20. In Situ Immobilization of Selenium in Sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Robert C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stewart, Thomas Austin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This project focused on the use of a sorbent, carbonated apatite, to immobilize selenium in the environment. It is know that apatite will sorb selenium and based on the mechanism of sorption it is theorized that carbonated apatite will be more effective that pure apatite. Immobilization of selenium in the environment is through the use of a sorbent in a permeable reactive barrier (PRB). A PRB can be constructed by trenching and backfill with the sorbent or in the case of apatite as the sorbent formed in situ using the apatite forming solution of Moore (2003, 2004). There is very little data on selenium sorption by carbonated apatite in the literature. Therefore, in this work, the basic sorptive properties of carbonated apatite were investigated. Carbonated apatite was synthesized by a precipitation method and characterized. Batch selenium kinetic and equilibrium experiments were performed. The results indicate the carbonated apatite contained 9.4% carbonate and uptake of selenium as selenite was rapid; 5 hours for complete uptake of selenium vs. more than 100 hours for pure hydroxyapatite reported in the literature. Additionally, the carbonated apatite exhibited significantly higher distribution coefficients in equilibrium experiments than pure apatite under similar experimental conditions. The next phase of this work will be to seek additional funds to continue the research with the goal of eventually demonstrating the technology in a field application.

  1. Innovative technologies for in-situ remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragaini, R.; Aines, R.; Knapp, R.; Matthews, S.; Yow, J.

    1994-06-01

    LLNL is developing several innovative remediation technologies as long-term improvements to the current pump and treat approaches to cleaning up contaminated soils and groundwater. These technologies include dynamic underground stripping, in-situ microbial filters, and remediation using bremsstrahlung radiation. Concentrated underground organic contaminant plumes are one of the most prevalent groundwater contamination sources. The solvent or fuel can percolate deep into the earth, often into water-bearing regions. Collecting as a separate, liquid organic phase called dense non-aqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs), or light NAPLs (LNAPLs), these contaminants provide a source term that continuously compromises surrounding groundwater. This type of spill is one of the most difficult environmental problems to remediate. Attempts to remove such material requires a huge amount of water which must be washed through the system to clean it, requiring decades. Traditional pump and treat approaches have not been successful. LLNL has developed several innovative technologies to clean up NAPL contamination. Detailed descriptions of these technologies are given

  2. Backfilling of deposition tunnels, in situ alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keto, P.

    2007-04-01

    The backfilling process described in this report is based on in situ compaction of a mixture of bentonite and ballast (30:70) into the deposition tunnel. This method has been tested in practice in various field tests by SKB, most recently in the Prototype repository test performed at Aespoe HRL. The backfill mixture is prepared above ground and transported to the repository level with a tank truck. The material is compacted into layers with an inclination of 35 deg C and a thickness of approximately 20 cm. The compaction is performed with a vibratory plate attached to a boom of an excavator. In order to keep up with the required canister installation rate determined for the Finnish repository, at least 13 layers need to be compacted daily. This means working in 2-3 shifts on the working days that are available for backfilling operations. The dry densities achieved in field tests for the wall/roof section of the backfill have been insufficient compared with the dry density criteria set for the backfill. In theory, it may be possible to reach dry densities that fulfil the criteria, although with a relatively small safety margin. Another open issue is whether the mixture of bentonite and ballast has sufficient self-healing ability to seal-off erosion channels after the tunnels have been closed and the backfill has reached full saturation. (orig.)

  3. Incomplete copolymer degradation of in situ chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdillon, Pierre; Boissenot, Tanguy; Goldwirt, Lauriane; Nicolas, Julien; Apra, Caroline; Carpentier, Alexandre

    2018-02-17

    In situ carmustine wafers containing 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) are commonly used for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma to overcome the brain-blood barrier. In theory, this chemotherapy diffuses into the adjacent parenchyma and the excipient degrades in maximum 8 weeks but no clinical data confirms this evolution, because patients are rarely operated again. A 75-year-old patient was operated twice for recurrent glioblastoma, and a carmustine wafer was implanted during the second surgery. Eleven months later, a third surgery was performed, revealing unexpected incomplete degradation of the wafer. 1H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance was performed to compare this wafer to pure BCNU and to an unused copolymer wafer. In the used wafer, peaks corresponding to hydrophobic units of the excipient were no longer noticeable, whereas peaks of the hydrophilic units and traces of BCNU were still present. These surprising results could be related to the formation of a hydrophobic membrane around the wafer, thus interfering with the expected diffusion and degradation processes. The clinical benefit of carmustine wafers in addition to the standard radio-chemotherapy remains limited, and in vivo behavior of this treatment is not completely elucidated yet. We found that the wafer may remain after several months. Alternative strategies to deal with the blood-brain barrier, such as drug-loaded liposomes or ultrasound-opening, must be explored to offer larger drug diffusion or allow repetitive delivery.

  4. Latrogenic keratectasia following laser in situ keratomileusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadea, Leopoldo; Palmieri, Giampiero; Mosca, Luigi; Fasciani, Romina; Balestrazzi, Emilio

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate keratectasia after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for high myopia. A 49-year-old male patient with myopia of -23.50 D in both eyes underwent LASIK with a Summit Technology Apex Plus excimer laser. A Moria manually-guided MDSC microkeratome was used. Preoperative corneal topography in both eyes did not reveal underlying or fruste form of keratoconus. Four months after LASIK, a progressive keratectasia occurred in right eye and after 12 months, in left eye. Corneal transplantation was performed in both eyes. Histological and ultrastructural examinations were performed on one corneal button. The analysis showed regular stromal morphology and cellularity, with no sign of inflammation. The morphometric analysis showed an overall thickness of 334 microm, with a flap of 262 microm and a stromal residual bed of 72 microm, in the center of the button. A LASIK corneal flap made with a planned 120-microm plate turned out histologically to be approximately 260 microm thick, in an eye with a refractive correction of -23.50 D. The excessive flap thickness and excessive ablation produced progressive keratectasia requiring a penetrating keratoplasty.

  5. Cubesat in-situ degradation detector (CIDD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rievers, Benny; Milke, Alexander; Salden, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    The design of the thermal control and management system (TCS) is a central task in satellite design. In order to evaluate and dimensionize the properties of the TCS, material parameters specifying the conductive and radiative properties of the different TCS components have to be known including their respective variations within the mission lifetime. In particular the thermo-optical properties of the outer surfaces including critical TCS components such as radiators and thermal insulation are subject to degradation caused by interaction with the space environment. The evaluation of these material parameters by means of ground testing is a time-consuming and expensive endeavor. Long-term in-situ measurements on board the ISS or large satellites not only realize a better implementation of the influence of the space environment but also imply high costs. Motivated by this we propose the utilization of low-cost nano-satellite systems to realize material tests within space at a considerably reduced cost. We present a nanosat-scale degradation sensor concept which realizes low power consumption and data rates compatible with nanosat boundaries at UHF radio. By means of a predefined measurement and messaging cycle temperature curves are measured and evaluated on ground to extract the change of absorptivity and emissivity over mission lifetime.

  6. In-situ transmission electron microscopy observation of electromigration in Au thin wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yosuke; Arita, Masashi; Hamada, Kouichi; Takahashi, Yasuo

    2012-11-01

    Electromigration of thin Au wire is studied by the use of in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques from the viewpoint of nanogap formation. We use a relatively wide Au wire as a starting material because the position-dependent structure change in the wire provides information of the thermal effect caused by the current flow. In-situ TEM observation, in which current measurements of the Au wire are simultaneously performed, reveals the process of the growth of voids and grains. Finally the formation of a nanogap by electromigration is observed doing with current measurements. All the results observed by in-situ TEM indicate the fact that the thermal effects or temperature increase in the wire region take an important role for the structure change caused by electromigration of Au in the wire. It is suggested that the position of the nanogap can roughly be arranged by setting the wire structure and current direction even though a relatively wide wire was used. The detailed observation by in-situ TEM also suggests that the control of heat generation in the wire makes the nanogap sharp because of the well-controlled recrystallization of Au nanowires.

  7. Large-scale in situ heater tests for hydrothermal characterization at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscheck, T.A.; Wilder, D.G.; Nitao, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    To safely and permanently store high-level nuclear waste, the potential Yucca Mountain repository site must mitigate the release and transport of radionuclides for tens of thousands of years. In the failure scenario of greatest concern, water would contact a waste package, accelerate its failure rate, and eventually transport radionuclides to the water table. Our analyses indicate that the ambient hydrological system will be dominated by repository-heat-driven hydrothermal flow for tens of thousands of years. In situ heater tests are required to provide an understanding of coupled geomechanical-hydrothermal-geochemical behavior in the engineered and natural barriers under repository thermal loading conditions. In situ heater tests have been included in the Site Characterization Plan in response to regulatory requirements for site characterization and to support the validation of process models required to assess the total systems performance at the site. Because of limited time, some of the in situ tests will have to be accelerated relative to actual thermal loading conditions. We examine the trade-offs between the limited test duration and generating hydrothermal conditions applicable to repository performance during the entire thermal loading cycle, including heating (boiling and dry-out) and cooldown (re-wetting). For in situ heater tests to be applicable to actual repository conditions, a minimum heater test duration of 6-7 yr (including 4 yr of full-power heating) is required

  8. Linear Malignant Melanoma In Situ: Reports and Review of Cutaneous Malignancies Presenting as Linear Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Philip R

    2017-09-18

    Melanomas usually present as oval lesions in which the borders may be irregular. Other morphological features of melanoma include clinical asymmetry, variable color, diameter greater than 6 mm and evolving lesions. Two males whose melanoma in situ presented as linear skin lesions are described and cutaneous malignancies that may appear linear in morphology are summarized in this report. A medical literature search engine, PubMed, was used to search the following terms: cancer, cutaneous, in situ, linear, malignant, malignant melanoma, melanoma in situ, neoplasm, and skin. The 25 papers that were generated by the search and their references, were reviewed; 10 papers were selected for inclusion. The cancer of the skin typically presents as round lesions. However, basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma may arise from primary skin conditions or benign skin neoplasms such as linear epidermal nevus and linear porokeratosis. In addition, linear tumors such as basal cell carcinoma can occur. The development of linear cutaneous neoplasms may occur secondary to skin tension line or embryonal growth patterns (as reflected by the lines of Langer and lines of Blaschko) or exogenous factors such as prior radiation therapy. Cutaneous neoplasms and specifically melanoma in situ can be added to the list of linear skin lesions.

  9. In situ measurement of some soil properties in paddy soil using visible and near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenjun, Ji; Zhou, Shi; Jingyi, Huang; Shuo, Li

    2014-01-01

    In situ measurements with visible and near-infrared spectroscopy (vis-NIR) provide an efficient way for acquiring soil information of paddy soils in the short time gap between the harvest and following rotation. The aim of this study was to evaluate its feasibility to predict a series of soil properties including organic matter (OM), organic carbon (OC), total nitrogen (TN), available nitrogen (AN), available phosphorus (AP), available potassium (AK) and pH of paddy soils in Zhejiang province, China. Firstly, the linear partial least squares regression (PLSR) was performed on the in situ spectra and the predictions were compared to those with laboratory-based recorded spectra. Then, the non-linear least-square support vector machine (LS-SVM) algorithm was carried out aiming to extract more useful information from the in situ spectra and improve predictions. Results show that in terms of OC, OM, TN, AN and pH, (i) the predictions were worse using in situ spectra compared to laboratory-based spectra with PLSR algorithm (ii) the prediction accuracy using LS-SVM (R2>0.75, RPD>1.90) was obviously improved with in situ vis-NIR spectra compared to PLSR algorithm, and comparable or even better than results generated using laboratory-based spectra with PLSR; (iii) in terms of AP and AK, poor predictions were obtained with in situ spectra (R2estimation of soil properties of paddy soils.

  10. In Situ Measurement of Some Soil Properties in Paddy Soil Using Visible and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenjun, Ji; Zhou, Shi; Jingyi, Huang; Shuo, Li

    2014-01-01

    In situ measurements with visible and near-infrared spectroscopy (vis-NIR) provide an efficient way for acquiring soil information of paddy soils in the short time gap between the harvest and following rotation. The aim of this study was to evaluate its feasibility to predict a series of soil properties including organic matter (OM), organic carbon (OC), total nitrogen (TN), available nitrogen (AN), available phosphorus (AP), available potassium (AK) and pH of paddy soils in Zhejiang province, China. Firstly, the linear partial least squares regression (PLSR) was performed on the in situ spectra and the predictions were compared to those with laboratory-based recorded spectra. Then, the non-linear least-square support vector machine (LS-SVM) algorithm was carried out aiming to extract more useful information from the in situ spectra and improve predictions. Results show that in terms of OC, OM, TN, AN and pH, (i) the predictions were worse using in situ spectra compared to laboratory-based spectra with PLSR algorithm (ii) the prediction accuracy using LS-SVM (R2>0.75, RPD>1.90) was obviously improved with in situ vis-NIR spectra compared to PLSR algorithm, and comparable or even better than results generated using laboratory-based spectra with PLSR; (iii) in terms of AP and AK, poor predictions were obtained with in situ spectra (R2soil properties of paddy soils. PMID:25153132

  11. Multicolor in situ hybridization and linkage analysis order Charcot-Marie-Tooth type I (CMTIA) gene-region markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebo, R.V.; Lynch, E.D.; Golbus, M.S. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (United States)); Bird, T.D. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States)); Barker, D.F.; O' Connell, P.; Chance, P.F. (Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States))

    1992-01-01

    This study demonstrates a clear and current role for multicolor in situ hybridization in expediting positional cloning studies of unknown disease genes. Nine polymorphic DNA cosmids have been mapped to eight ordered locations spanning the Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 (CMT1A) disease gene region in distal band 17p11.2, by multicolor in situ hybridization. When used with linkage analysis, these methods have generated a fine physical map and have firmly assigned the CMT1A gene to distal band 17p11.2. Linkage analysis with four CMT1A pedigrees mapped the CMT1A gene with respect to two flanking markers. Additional loci were physically mapped and ordered by in situ hybridization and analysis of phase-known recombinants in CMT1A pedigrees. These data demonstrate the ability of in situ hybridization to resolve loci within 0.5 Mb on early-metaphase chromosomes. Multicolor in situ hybridization also excluded the possibility of pericentric inversions in two unrelated patients with CMT1 and neurofibromatosis type 1. When used with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, multicolor in situ hybridization can establish physical location, order, and distance in closely spaced chromosome loci.

  12. PROSCARA Inc. in-situ burning summary paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    In-situ burning as a viable response tactic in the event of an oil spill, was discussed. Key factors which influence a decision to use burning were enumerated, including a detailed analysis of the environmental effects of in-situ burning on soils. The critical parameters were time, soil heating and extent of oil penetration into the soil. It was noted that on water-saturated and frozen soil in-situ burning had no adverse effects. The advantages and disadvantages of in-situ burning vis-a-vis conventional mechanical recovery were discussed. Factors that do, and factors that do not support decisions in favour of in-situ burning were listed. 4 refs., 2 tabs

  13. Design of Hybrid Steam-In Situ Combustion Bitumen Recovery Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiaomeng; Gates, Ian D.

    2009-01-01

    Given enormous capital costs, operating expenses, flue gas emissions, water treatment and handling costs of thermal in situ bitumen recovery processes, improving the overall efficiency by lowering energy requirements, environmental impact, and costs of these production techniques is a priority. Steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) is the most widely used in situ recovery technique in Athabasca reservoirs. Steam generation is done on surface and consequently, because of heat losses, the energy efficiency of SAGD can never be ideal with respect to the energy delivered to the sandface. An alternative to surface steam generation is in situ combustion (ISC) where heat is generated within the formation through injection of oxygen at a sufficiently high pressure to initiate combustion of bitumen. In this manner, the heat from the combustion reactions can be used directly to mobilize the bitumen. As an alternative, the heat can be used to generate steam within the formation which then is the agent to move heat in the reservoir. In this research, alternative hybrid techniques with simultaneous and sequential steam-oxygen injection processes are examined to maximize the thermal efficiency of the recovery process. These hybrid processes have the advantage that during ISC, steam is generated within the reservoir from injected and formation water and as a product of oxidation. This implies that ex situ steam generation requirements are reduced and if there is in situ storage of combustion gases, that overall gas emissions are reduced. In this research, detailed reservoir simulations are done to examine the dynamics of hybrid processes to enable design of these processes. The results reveal that hybrid processes can lower emitted carbon dioxide-to-oil ratio by about 46%, decrease the consumed natural gas-to-oil ratio by about 73%, reduce the cumulative energy-to-oil ratio by between 40% and 70% compared to conventional SAGD, and drop water consumption per unit oil produced

  14. In situ membrane bending setup for strain-dependent scanning transmission x-ray microscopy investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finizio, S; Wintz, S; Kirk, E; Raabe, J

    2016-12-01

    We present a setup that allows for the in situ generation of tensile strains by bending x-ray transparent Si 3 N 4 membranes with the application of a pressure difference between the two sides of the membrane, enabling the possibility to employ high resolution space- and time-resolved scanning transmission x-ray microscopy for the investigation of the magneto-elastic coupling.

  15. Targeted DNA sequencing and in situ mutation analysis using mobile phone microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühnemund, Malte; Wei, Qingshan; Darai, Evangelia; Wang, Yingjie; Hernández-Neuta, Iván; Yang, Zhao; Tseng, Derek; Ahlford, Annika; Mathot, Lucy; Sjöblom, Tobias; Ozcan, Aydogan; Nilsson, Mats

    2017-01-01

    Molecular diagnostics is typically outsourced to well-equipped centralized laboratories, often far from the patient. We developed molecular assays and portable optical imaging designs that permit on-site diagnostics with a cost-effective mobile-phone-based multimodal microscope. We demonstrate that targeted next-generation DNA sequencing reactions and in situ point mutation detection assays in preserved tumour samples can be imaged and analysed using mobile phone microscopy, achieving a new milestone for tele-medicine technologies.

  16. Fluorescent in situ hybridization employing the conventional NBT/BCIP chromogenic stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Le A; McCutchen, Marshall D; Bonner-Fraser, Marianne; Fraser, Scott E; Bumm, Lloyd A; McCauley, David W

    2007-06-01

    In situ hybridization techniques typically employ chromogenic staining by enzymatic amplification to detect domains of gene expression. We demonstrate the previously unreported near infrared (NIR) fluorescence of the dark purple stain formed from the commonly used chromogens, nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate (BCIP). The solid reaction product has significant fluorescence that enables the use of confocal microscopy to generate high-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of gene expression.

  17. Ductal carcinoma in situ: a challenging disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevilay Altintas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS represents a heterogenous group of lesions with variable malignant potential. Although it is clearly pre-invasive, not all lesions progress to an invasive malignant disease. The significant increase in the frequency of diagnosis is the result of both widespread use of screening mammography and better recognition among pathologists. Treatment is controversial, but for several decades total mastectomy has been considered as the appropriate treatment. The tendency to be less aggressive in terms of surgery has followed the pattern of events observed in the treatment of invasive breast carcinomas. More recently, it has become clear that breastconserving procedures could be applied and selected on the basis of diagnostics and risk factors. When all patients with DCIS are considered, the overall mortality is extremely low, only about 1–2%. On the other hand, breast-conserving surgery is only curative in 75–85%; 50% of the local recurrences have proven to be invasive with a mortality rate of 12–15%. There is no place for axillary node dissection, adjuvant hormonal treatment or chemotherapy in the treatment. Important factors in predicting local recurrence are age, family history, nuclear grade, comedo-type necrosis, tumor size and margin width. With the addition of radiation therapy to excisional surgery, there is a 50% reduction in the overall local recurrence rate. The Van Nuys Prognostic Index (VNPI, recently updated, is a tool that quantifies measurable prognostic factors that can be used in the decision-making process of treatment. Recent data from large cohort studies and randomized trials have emerged to guide treatment. DCIS is now understood to have diverse malignant potential and it is unlikely that there will be a single treatment for this wide range of lesions. Advances in molecular biology and gene expression profiling of human breast tumors have been providing important insights into the relationship

  18. High Fidelity In Situ Shoulder Dystocia Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Pelikan, MD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Audience: Resident physicians, emergency department (ED staff Introduction: Precipitous deliveries are high acuity, low occurrence in most emergency departments. Shoulder dystocia is a rare but potentially fatal complication of labor that can be relieved by specific maneuvers that must be implemented in a timely manner. This simulation is designed to educate resident learners on the critical management steps in a shoulder dystocia presenting to the emergency department. A special aspect of this simulation is the unique utilization of the “Noelle” model with an instructing physician at bedside maneuvering the fetus through the stations of labor and providing subtle adjustments to fetal positioning not possible though a mechanized model. A literature search of “shoulder dystocia simulation” consists primarily of obstetrics and mid-wife journals, many of which utilize various mannequin models. None of the reviewed articles utilized a bedside provider maneuvering the fetus with the Noelle model, making this method unique. While the Noelle model is equipped with a remote-controlled motor that automatically rotates and delivers the baby either to the head or to the shoulders and can produce a turtle sign and which will prevent delivery of the baby until signaled to do so by the instructor, using the bedside instructor method allows this simulation to be reproduced with less mechanistically advanced and lower cost models.1-5 Objectives: At the end of this simulation, learners will: 1 Recognize impending delivery and mobilize appropriate resources (ie, both obstetrics [OB] and NICU/pediatrics; 2 Identify risk factors for shoulder dystocia based on history and physical; 3 Recognize shoulder dystocia during delivery; 4 Demonstrate maneuvers to relieve shoulder dystocia; 5 Communicate with team members and nursing staff during resuscitation of a critically ill patient. Method: High-fidelity simulation. Topics: High fidelity, in situ, Noelle model

  19. Microbial Repopulation Following In Situ STAR Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhard, J.; Overbeeke, G.; Edwards, E.; Lomheim, L.; Grant, G.

    2016-12-01

    STAR (Self-sustaining Treatment for Active Remediation) is an emerging remediation technology that employs a self-sustaining smouldering reaction to destroy nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in the subsurface. The reaction front travels outwards from an ignition well at approximately 0.5 per day and subjects the soil to temperatures of 400°C-1000°C. The objectives of this work were to monitor re-saturation of the soil over time and quantify the microbial repopulation of the treated zone. STAR is currently being applied as a full scale, in situ remedy for coal tar beneath a former creosol manufacturing facility in New Jersey, USA. This study analyzed soil cores taken at regular intervals following STAR treatment, allowing time for groundwater to re-infiltrate and for microbial populations to potentially reestablish. Soil and groundwater were analyzed for total number of microorganisms via quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR), as well as microbial diversity via amplicon sequencing. Results demonstrate that microbes rapidly repopulated over a 2 month period to 106 gene copies/g of soil. However, concentrations in the treated zone did not rise above this concentration over 6 months post-STAR, indicating a low carrying capacity of the treated soil. To examine the system in more detail and consider the effects of bio-stimulation, a bench top column study using site soil and artificial groundwater explored the rate at which STAR-treated soil is repopulated with naturally occurring microorganisms in the presence and absence of lactate and a terminal electron acceptor. Results demonstrated that biostimulation did not increase the carrying capacity of the STAR treated sol, but rather shifted the microbial community to reflect the TEA provided, in this case, promoting sulfate reducers. Overall, the work illustrates that microbial populations in STAR treated soil do recover via groundwater infiltration but robust communities will take time to naturally establish.

  20. In-situ chemical oxidation of MTBE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, K.L.; Marley, M.C.; Sperry, K.L.

    2002-01-01

    In-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) can be a cost-effective method for the destruction of source areas of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE). Several ISCO processes have been tested successfully under laboratory conditions and a few have proven successful when field tested for the destruction of MTBE. This paper reviews the state of the art with respect to MTBE oxidation for several common oxidants and Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs). Four frequently used oxidants are reviewed in this paper: hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), ozone (O 3 ), permanganate (MnO 4 - ), and persulfate (S 2 O 8 2- ). When choosing an oxidant for a specific remediation strategy, trade-offs exist between oxidant strength and stability in the subsurface. Aquifer and water quality parameters such as pH, alkalinity, and soil oxidant demand (SOD) may influence the initiation and effectiveness of the ISCO reaction and may significantly increase the amount of oxidant required to treat the target contaminant. Oxidation end products are an important consideration in the selection of an oxidant, as not all oxidants have proven successful in complete mineralization of MTBE. Tert-butyl formate (TBF) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) are the major intermediate products in the oxidative reactions of MTBE and may pose a greater health hazard than MTBE. Other factors, including regulatory restrictions, need to be considered when choosing an oxidant for a specific application. This paper will highlight the chemistry of the oxidant/MTBE reactions, successes or limitations observed under laboratory and field conditions, and practical design advice when employing the oxidant. (author)

  1. Effect of In-Situ Curing on Compressive Strength of Reactive Powder Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bali Ika

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A development of Reactive Powder Concrete (RPC currently is the use of quartz powder as a stabilizing agent with the content to cement ratio of 30% and steam curing method in an autoclave temperature of 250ºC which produced a high compressive strength of 180 MPa. That RPC can be generated due to one reason for using the technique of steam curing in an autoclave in the laboratory. This study proposes in-situ curing method in order the curing can be applied in the field and with a reasonable compressive strength results of RPC. As the benchmarks in this study are the curing methods in laboratory that are steam curing of 90°C for 8 hours (C1, and water curing for 28 days (C2. For the in-situ curing methods that are covering with tarpaulins and flowed steam of 3 hours per day for 7 days (C3, covering with wet sacks for 28 days (C4, and covering with wet sacks for 28 days for specimen with unwashed sand as fine aggregate (C5. The comparison of compressive strength of the specimens in this study showed compressive strength of RPC with in-situ steam curing (101.64 MPa close to the compressive strength of RPC with steam curing in the laboratory with 8.2% of different. While in-situ wet curing compared with the water curing in laboratory has the different of 3.4%. These results indicated that the proposed in-situ curing methods are reasonable good in term of the compressive strength that can be achieved.

  2. An in situ-satellite blended analysis of global sea surface salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, P.; Boyer, T.; Bayler, E.; Xue, Y.; Byrne, D.; Reagan, J.; Locarnini, R.; Sun, F.; Joyce, R.; Kumar, A.

    2014-09-01

    The blended monthly sea surface salinity (SSS) analysis, called the NOAA "Blended Analysis of Surface Salinity" (BASS), is constructed for the 4 year period from 2010 to 2013. Three data sets are employed as inputs to the blended analysis: in situ SSS measurements aggregated and quality controlled by NOAA/NODC, and passive microwave (PMW) retrievals from both the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Aquarius/SAC-D and the European Space Agency's (ESA) Soil Moisture-Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellites. The blended analysis comprises two steps. First, the biases in the satellite retrievals are removed through probability distribution function (PDF) matching against temporally spatially colocated in situ measurements. The blended analysis is then achieved through optimal interpolation (OI), where the analysis for the previous time step is used as the first guess while the in situ measurements and bias-corrected satellite retrievals are employed as the observations to update the first guess. Cross validations illustrate improved quality of the blended analysis, with reduction in bias and random errors over most of the global oceans as compared to the individual inputs. Large uncertainty, however, remains in high-latitude oceans and coastal regions where the in situ networks are sparse and current-generation satellite retrievals have limitations. Our blended SSS analysis shows good agreements with the NODC in situ-based analysis over most of the tropical and subtropical oceans, but large differences are observed for high-latitude oceans and along coasts. In the tropical oceans, the BASS is shown to have coherent variability with precipitation and evaporation associated with the evolution of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

  3. Synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticle S-ovalbumin protein conjugates by in situ conjugation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Deepti; Soni, R. K.

    2015-05-01

    Pure gold and silver nanoparticle (NP) generation and their conjugation with protein S-ovalbumin using in situ conjugation process have been reported. The in situ conjugation involves nanosecond pulse laser ablation of pure metal target in the protein S-ovalbumin solution. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-Visible absorption results show decrease in mean NP size along with narrow particle size distribution on ablation in S-ovalbumin solution as compared to ablation in water for both Au and Ag NPs. Also, the NP size reduction was found to be dependent on the concentration of S-ovalbumin. For AuNPs, spherical NPs of mean size 4 nm with particle size distribution 2-6 nm were obtained at 300 nM S-ovalbumin concentration. Further, it has been observed that the resultant in situ-conjugated colloid gold and silver NP solutions were quite stable even in the presence of NaCl at physiological salt concentration (0.15 M). On post-laser irradiation (532 nm, 15 mJ) for 20 min, 9 nm red shift in surface plasmon resonance peak (SPR), along with increased broadening towards longer wavelength, was observed in the AuNPs-S-ovalbumin sample. Further increase in the time of irradiation showed shift in AuNPs-S-ovalbumin SPR towards lower wavelength. On laser irradiation (532 nm, 15 mJ) for 20 min, no significant change was observed in the line shape of the plasmon absorption band of the AgNPs-S-ovalbumin conjugate. FTIR spectra revealed that S-ovalbumin peptide backbone and secondary structure remain unchanged on laser irradiation during in situ conjugation process. Thus, integrity of S-ovalbumin does not get affected, and no degradation of S-ovalbumin takes place on laser-induced in situ conjugation. Raman results confirm that both Au and Ag NPs interact with S-ovalbumin via thiol-bearing cysteine residues of the disulfide bond.

  4. The Effects of in Situ-Formed Silver Nanoparticles on the Electrical Properties of Epoxy Resin Filled with Silver Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwang-Seok Song

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for preparing epoxy/silver nanocomposites was developed via the in situ formation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs within the epoxy resin matrix while using silver nanowires (AgNWs as a conductive filler. The silver–imidazole complex was synthesized from silver acetate (AgAc and 1-(2-cyanoethyl-2-ethyl-4-methylimidazole (imidazole. AgNPs were generated in situ during the curing of the epoxy resin through the thermal decomposition of the AgAc–imidazole complex, which was capable of reducing Ag+ to Ag by itself. The released imidazole acted as a catalyst to cure the epoxy. Additionally, after the curing process, the in situ-generated AgNPs were stabilized by the formed epoxy network. Therefore, by using the thermal decomposition method, uniformly dispersed AgNPs of approximately 100 nm were formed in situ in the epoxy matrix filled with AgNWs. It was observed that the nanocomposites containing in situ-formed AgNPs exhibited isotropic electrical properties in the epoxy resins in the presence of AgNWs.

  5. In situ X-ray investigations of oxygen precipitation in semiconductor silicon; In-situ-Roentgenuntersuchungen der Sauerstoffpraezipitation in Halbleitersilizium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grillenberger, Hannes

    2011-03-04

    The precipitation of oxygen in Czochralski grown semiconductor silicon is investigated in situ during thermal treatments up to 1000 C with high energy X-rays. All investigations are performed with a focusing Laue diffractometer. The parameters of the diffraction curve are the relative full width at half maximum (rFHWM) and the enhancement of the integral intensity (EII). A readout software has been developed to extract these automatically from the detector image for the measured 220, -220 and 040 Bragg peaks. The sample thickness is set to 15 mm as this enhances the sensitivity of the method and the samples are processed after the strain-field diffraction (SFD) experiments to wafers for an ex situ characterization demanding wafers. Three experimental series with a total of 21 in situ SFD experiments with different thermal treatments have been performed. The slope of the initial temperature ramp is set to 1 K/min in the first and the third series to generate a high precipitate (Bulk Micro Defect, BMD) density. In the second series the slope is chosen as 10 K/min to generate a lower density in the same silicon material. It is shown with all experiments and with preliminary works that the built up of strain during the heat treatment is caused by BMDs during the high temperature period of the treatment. The detection limit of series 1 is found at 7 nm at a density of 10{sup 13}/cm{sup 3}, of series 2 at 40 nm at a density of 2 x 10{sup 8}/cm{sup 3}, and at 8 nm at a density of 4.8 x 10{sup 12}/cm{sup 3} for series 3. The local maximum of the EII at 450 C, which emerges coincident with a local minimum of the rFWHM in series 2 may be caused by thermal donors (TD). With the experiments is shown that SFD operates in the infrared-laser scattering tomography detection range, but also reaches in a region covered only by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) so far. In contrast to these methods SFD is not limited to low temperatures and in situ experiments can be done. Thus

  6. Advanced Water Purification System for In Situ Resource Utilization Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    A main goal in the field of In Situ Resource Utilization is to develop technologies that produce oxygen from regolith to provide consumables to an extratrrestrial outpost. The processes developed reduce metal oxides in the regolith to produce water, which is then electrolyzed to produce oxygen. Hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids are byproducts of the reduction processes, which must be removed to meet electrolysis purity standards. We previously characterized Nation, a highly water selective polymeric proton-exchange membrane, as a filtrtion material to recover pure water from the contaminated solution. While the membranes successfully removed both acid contaminants, the removal efficiency of and water flow rate through the membranes were not sufficient to produce large volumes of electrolysis-grade water. In the present study, we investigated electrodialysis as a potential acid removable technique. Our studies have show a rapid and significant reduction in chloride and fluoride concentrations in the feed solution, while generating a relatively small volume of concentrated waste water. Electrodialysis has shown significant promise as the primary separation technique in ISRU water purification processes.

  7. In situ infrared (FTIR) study of the borohydride oxidation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Concha, B. Molina; Chatenet, M. [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Physico-chimie, des Materiaux et des Interfaces (LEPMI), UMR 5631 CNRS/Grenoble-INP/UJF, 1130 Rue de la Piscine, BP75, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Coutanceau, C.; Hahn, F. [Laboratoire de Catalyse en Chimie Organique (LACCO), UMR 6503 CNRS, Universite de Poitiers, 40 Av. du, Recteur Pineau, 86000 Poitiers (France)

    2009-01-15

    The direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) is an interesting alternative for the electrochemical power generation at lower temperatures due to its high anode theoretical specific capacity (5 A h g{sup -1}). However, the borohydride oxidation reaction (BOR) is a very complex eight-electron reaction, influenced by the nature of the electrode material (catalytic or not with respect to BH{sub 4}{sup -} hydrolysis), the [BH{sub 4}{sup -}][OH{sup -}] ratio and the temperature. In order to understand the BOR mechanism, we performed in situ infrared reflectance spectroscopy measurements (SPAIRS technique) in 1 M NaOH/1 M NaBH{sub 4} with the aim to study intermediate reactions occurring on a gold electrode (a poor BH{sub 4}{sup -} hydrolysis catalyst). We monitored several bands in B-H (1184 cm{sup -1}) and B-O bond regions (1326 and 1415 cm{sup -1}), appearing sequentially with increasing electrode polarisation. Thanks to these experimental findings, we propose possible initial elementary steps for the BOR. (author)

  8. Well completion for in situ heating oil recovery technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacon, O. [PDVSA Petroleos de Venezuela SA, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). INTEVEP

    2009-07-01

    This paper discussed thermal well completion technologies for use in Venezuela's heavy and extra-heavy oil reservoirs. A review and comparison of thermal well completions was conducted and a specialized software program was used to select appropriate well completion technologies for an oilfield in Venezuela's Orinoco oil belt. The study focused on in situ combustion (ISC) methods that inject air into the reservoir while igniting the oil to generate a combustion front. The method was shown to increase oil mobility and facilitate its displacement towards production wells. Cemented and perforated liners were evaluated in this study along with methods for preparing injection wells. Methods of controlling sand production during ISC were also discussed and steam flooded and ISC well completion techniques were compared. The thermal loads for well completions undergoing ISC processes were analyzed. A tubing stress analysis was also presented. It was concluded that the simulations validated the proposed ISC well completion strategy. 6 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs.

  9. In situ osteoblast mineralization mediates post-injection mechanical properties of osteoconductive material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialorucki, Callan; Subramanian, Gayathri; Elsaadany, Mostafa; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the temporal relationship between in situ generated calcium content (mineralization) and the mechanical properties of an injectable orthobiologic bone-filler material. Murine derived osteoblast progenitor cells were differentiated using osteogenic factors and encapsulated within an injectable polycaprolactone nanofiber-collagen composite scaffold (PN-COL +osteo) to evaluate the effect of mineralization on the mechanical properties of the PN-COL scaffold. A comprehensive study was conducted using both an experimental and a predictive analytical mechanical analysis for mechanical property assessment as well as an extensive in vitro biological analysis for in situ mineralization. Cell proliferation was evaluated using a PicoGreen dsDNA quantification assay and in situ mineralization was analyzed using both an alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay and an Alizarin Red stain-based assay. Mineralized matrix formation was further evaluated using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and visualized using SEM and histological analyses. Compressive mechanical properties of the PN-COL scaffolds were determined using a confined compression stress-relaxation protocol and the obtained data was fit to the standard linear solid viscoelastic material mathematical model to demonstrate a relationship between increased in situ mineralization and the mechanical properties of the PN-COL scaffold. Cell proliferation was constant over the 21 day period. ALP activity and calcium concentration significantly increased at day 14 and 21 as compared to PN-COL -osteo with undifferentiated osteoblast progenitor cells. Furthermore, at day 21 EDS, SEM and von Kossa histological staining confirmed mineralized matrix formation within the PN-COL scaffolds. After 21 days, compressive modulus, peak stress, and equilibrium stress demonstrate significant increases of 3.4-fold, 3.3-fold, and 4.0-fold respectively due to in situ mineralization. Viscoelastic

  10. In situ detection of horizontal transfer of mobile genetic elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Hansen, Susse Kirkelund; Johansen, Tove

    2002-01-01

    promoters (transfer reporters) it was thus possible to detect transfer events in situ and correlate these with either the location of donor and recipient cells or with the growth activity of the cells. In some cases, expression of unstable Gfp from a growth-controlled promoter, rrnB from Escherichia coli......, was used to monitor bacterial growth activity in situ. Differential tagging of mobilizing and mobilizable plasmids with different genes encoding fluorescent proteins with varying emission wavelengths allowed in situ detection of plasmid mobilization and detection of retro-transfer on agar surfaces...

  11. NOVEL IN-SITU METAL AND MINERAL EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn O' Gorman; Hans von Michaelis; Gregory J. Olson

    2004-09-22

    This white paper summarizes the state of art of in-situ leaching of metals and minerals, and describes a new technology concept employing improved fragmentation of ores underground in order to prepare the ore for more efficient in-situ leaching, combined with technology to continuously improve solution flow patterns through the ore during the leaching process. The process parameters and economic benefits of combining the new concept with chemical and biological leaching are described. A summary is provided of the next steps required to demonstrate the technology with the goal of enabling more widespread use of in-situ leaching.

  12. In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) Experiments for Mars Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marone, Matt

    2005-01-01

    In situ resource utilization can best be described as living off the land. In our case the land is the planet Mars. ISRU is based on the idea that some fraction of the consumables, life support and propellant materials do not have to be flown from earth. Rather, they can be manufactured or extracted from resources already present on Mars. The primary resources on Mars are the atmosphere, polar caps and regolith. The atmosphere of Mars is mostly carbon dioxide as shown in the table below. The proportion of oxygen on the other hand is quite small. Still, there is quite a bit of oxygen in the Martian atmosphere, but it is unfortunately tied up with carbon. Thus, one of the goals of ISRU is the separation of breathable oxygen from the carbon dioxide. Several means of separation have been proposed. We have begun experiments on another approach for production of oxygen with carbon monoxide as a useful by product. Our work on a CO2 separator is described later in this report. Regolith melting is another means of obtaining materials. Two materials of interest are iron and silicon. Iron oxide is plentiful on Mars and is of obvious importance for structural components. Silicon is the foundation of solid state devices. Power generation on Mars may be accomplished using silicon solar cells. There is discussion of the feasibility of in situ production of solar cells. This would require a means of extracting silicon from the regolith. We have conducted several experiments concerning melting and glassification of the Mars soil simulant. Other summer faculty fellows have tried various means of processing the stimulant material. These include furnace melting, microwave melting and laser ablation. We have conducted several furnace melting experiments in both air and carbon dioxide environments. We have also carried out experiments to test spark melting in a carbon dioxide atmosphere. These experiments suggest the possibility of using arc melting in a reducing atmosphere. It is

  13. In Situ Measurements of Meteoric Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Aiken, Arthur C.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Extraterrestrial material is the source of metal ions in the Earth's atmosphere, Each year approx. 10(exp 8) kg of material is intercepted by the Earth. The origin of this material is predominantly solar orbiting interplanetary debris from comets or asteroids that crosses the Earth's orbit. It contains a very small amount of interstellar material. On occasion the Earth passes through enhanced amounts of debris associated with the orbit of a decaying comet. This leads to enhanced meteor shower displays for up to several days. The number flux of shower material is typically several times the average sporadic background influx of material. Meteoric material is some of the earliest material formed in the solar system. By studying the relative elemental abundances of atmospheric metal ions, information can be gained on the chemical composition of cometary debris and the chemical makeup of the early solar system. Using in situ sampling with rocket-borne ion mass spectrometers; there have been approximately 50 flights that made measurements of the metal ion abundances at attitudes between 80 and 130 km. It is this altitude range where incoming meteoric particles am ablated, the larger ones giving rise to visible meteor. displays. In several rocket measurements isotopic ratios of different atomic ion mass components and metal molecular ion concentrations have been determined and used to identify unambiguously the measured species and to investigate the processes controlling the metal ion distributions The composition of the Earth's ionosphere was first sampled by an ion mass spectrometer flown an a rocket in 1956. In 1958 a rocket-borne ion spectrometer identified, fbr the first time, a layer of metal ions near 95 km. These data were interpreted as evidence of an extraterrestrial rather than a terrestrial source. Istomin predicted: "It seems probable that with some improvement in the method that analysis of the ion composition in the E-region may be used for determining

  14. satellite and in-situ measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José de Jesús Salas Pérez

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available La distribución espacial y temporal de la circulación superficial de la Bahía de Banderas se obtuvo con el empleo de series temporales de rapidez de viento, temperatura superficial del mar (AVHR radiómetro y un termógrafo, nivel del mar y trazas ascendentes y descendentes del radar altimétrico ERS-2. El período que abarca dichos datos es de cuatro años, ya que comenzó en el verano de 1997 y finalizó en el invierno de 2002. La marea en la Bahía es mixta (F=0.25 con predominio del armónico M2. La bahía no muestra características de resonancia con la marea del mar abierto. Amplitudes promedio de 30 cms., resultan en corrientes de marea de pocos cms./s. Las bajas frecuencias (periodos mayores a tres días parecen ser los principales generadores de la circulación marina en esta área, en la que predomina el periodo estacional sobre los otros periodos. FEOs fueron aplicadas a las componentes de velocidad, calculadas con observaciones de altimetría medidas en la boca de la Bahía, las cuales mostraron dos principales distribuciones espaciales. El primer periodo de distribución, que se extendió desde febrero hasta julio, muestra un flujo de entrada por la porción norte/sur de la bahía, con un flujo de salida por su boca (distribución anticiclónica. El segundo periodo se extiende desde agosto hasta diciembre y es opuesto al primero (distribución ciclónica. Las características de la circulación aquí presentadas son hipotéticas y observaciones de velocidad medidas in-situ deben confirmarlas

  15. In Situ Probe Science at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, D.H.; Lunine, J.I.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Atreya, S. K.; Brinckerhoff, W.; Colaprete, A.; Coustenis, A.; Fletcher, L. N.; Guillot, T.; Lebreton, J.-P.; hide

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental goal of solar system exploration is to understand the origin of the solar sys-tem, the initial stages, conditions, and processes by which the solar system formed, how the formation pro-cess was initiated, and the nature of the interstellar seed material from which the solar system was born. Key to understanding solar system formation and subsequent dynamical and chemical evolution is the origin and evolution of the giant planets and their atmospheres. Several theories have been put forward to explain the process of solar system formation, and the origin and evolution of the giant planets and their atmospheres. Each theory offers quantifiable predictions of the abundances of noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe, and abundances of key isotopic ratios 4He3He, DH, 15N14N, 18O16O, and 13C12C. Detection of certain dis-equilibrium species, diagnostic of deeper internal pro-cesses and dynamics of the atmosphere, would also help discriminate between competing theories. Measurements of the critical abundance profiles of these key constituents into the deeper well-mixed at-mosphere must be complemented by measurements of the profiles of atmospheric structure and dynamics at high vertical resolution and also require in situ explora-tion. The atmospheres of the giant planets can also serve as laboratories to better understand the atmospheric chem-istries, dynamics, processes, and climates on all planets including Earth, and offer a context and provide a ground truth for exoplanets and exoplanetary systems. Additionally, Giant planets have long been thought to play a critical role in the development of potentially habitable planetary systems. In the context of giant planet science provided by the Galileo, Juno, and Cassini missions to Jupiter and Sat-urn, a small, relatively shallow Saturn probe capable of measuring abundances and isotopic ratios of key at-mospheric constituents, and atmospheric structure in-cluding pressures, temperatures, dynamics, and cloud

  16. In situ observation of mechanical damage within a SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saucedo-Mora, L.; Lowe, T.; Zhao, S.; Lee, P.D.; Mummery, P.M.; Marrow, T.J.

    2016-01-01

    SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composites are candidate materials for fuel cladding in Generation IV nuclear fission reactors and as accident tolerant fuel clad in current generation plant. Experimental methods are needed that can detect and quantify the development of mechanical damage, to support modelling and qualification tests for these critical components. In situ observations of damage development have been obtained of tensile and C-ring mechanical test specimens of a braided nuclear grade SiC-SiC ceramic composite tube, using a combination of ex situ and in situ computed X-ray tomography observation and digital volume correlation analysis. The gradual development of damage by matrix cracking and also the influence of non-uniform loading are examined. - Highlights: • X-ray tomography with digital volume correlation measures 3D deformation in situ. • Cracking and damage in the microstructure can be detected using the strain field. • Fracture can initiate from the monolithic coating of a SiC-SiC ceramic composite.

  17. A sapphire tube atomizer for on-line atomization and in situ collection of bismuthine for atomic absorption spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 4 (2013), s. 593-600 ISSN 0267-9477 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : hydride generation * sapphire tube atomizer * in situ collection Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.396, year: 2013

  18. In situ hybridization for the detection of infectious laryngotracheitis virus in sections of trachea from experimentally infected chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O.L.; Handberg, Kurt; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik

    1998-01-01

    with a mixture of 2 biotinylated, polymerase chain reaction-generated DNA fragments. The fragments correspond to sequences of the ILTV glycoprotein C and thymidine kinase genes. In situ hybridization was seen in 7 out of 7 chickens examined on day 3 p.i., 2 out of 2 examined on day 4 p.i. and 3 out of 3 examined...

  19. In situ and Ex situ Annealing Studies of Hydrothermally Synthesized SrFe12O19 Nano Platelets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjørup, Frederik; Saura-Múzquiz, Matilde; Ahlburg, Jakob

    for use in for instance electric motors and generators. Hydrothermally synthesized strontium hexaferrite nanoplatelets are annealed under various condition and characterized using in situ and ex situ Powder X-Ray Diffraction (PXRD). The Scherrer equation is used to obtain apparent crystallite sizes, which...

  20. Thermo-Electric-Magnetic Hydrodynamics in Solidification: In Situ Observations and Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fautrelle, Y.; Wang, J.; Salloum-Abou-Jaoude, G.; Abou-Khalil, L.; Reinhart, G.; Li, X.; Ren, Z. M.; Nguyen-Thi, H.

    2018-02-01

    Solidification of liquid metals contains all the ingredients for the development of the thermo-electric (TE) effect, namely liquid-solid interface and temperature gradients. The combination of TE currents with a superimposed magnetic field gives rise to thermo-electromagnetic (TEM) volume forces acting on both liquid and solid. This results in the generation of fluid flows, which considerably modifies the morphology of the solidification front as well as that of the mushy zone. TEM forces also act on the solid and cause both fragmentation of dendrite branches and a movement of equiaxed grains in suspension. These phenomena have already been unveiled by post-mortem analysis of samples, but they can be analyzed in more detail by using x-ray in situ and real-time observations. Here, we present conclusive evidence of all the aforementioned effects thanks to in situ observations of Al-Cu alloy solidification under static magnetic field.

  1. In situ method for measurements of community clearance rate on shallow water bivalve populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benni W.; Dolmer, Per; Vismann, Bent

    2011-01-01

    with an air lift connected to a SCUBA diver pressure tank generating a continuous and gentle water circulation. This ensures a complete mixture of suspended particles, and thereby, a maximum filtration by the bivalves. An in situ fluorometer was mounted to record plant pigment reduction due to mussel...... clearance in real-time. To calibrate the in situ fluorometer triplicate water samples were obtained initially in each of the bivalve filtration measurements. The water samples were filtrated, extracted, and later analyzed for plant pigment concentration on a laboratory spectrophotometer. The main conclusion......An open-top chamber was designed for measuring ambient community clearance rate on undisturbed bivalve populations in the field. The chamber was pressed 5-10 cm down in the sediment on the mussel bed. It holds approximately 30-40 cm water column equal to a volume of 43-77 L. It was provided...

  2. Planetary Geochemistry Techniques: Probing In-Situ with Neutron and Gamma Rays (PING) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Burger, D.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lin, L.; McClanahan, T.; Nankung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Schweitzer, J.; hide

    2011-01-01

    The Probing In situ with Neutrons and Gamma rays (PING) instrument is a promising planetary science application of the active neutron-gamma ray technology so successfully used in oil field well logging and mineral exploration on Earth. The objective of our technology development program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (NASA/GSFC) Astrochemistry Laboratory is to extend the application of neutron interrogation techniques to landed in situ planetary composition measurements by using a 14 MeV Pulsed Neutron Generator (PNG) combined with neutron and gamma ray detectors, to probe the surface and subsurface of planetary bodies without the need to drill. We are thus working to bring the PING instrument to the point where it can be flown on a variety of surface lander or rover missions to the Moon, Mars, Venus, asteroids, comets and the satellites of the outer planets.

  3. In Situ Stress Measurement Techniques on Li-ion Battery Electrodes: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximing Cheng

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Li-ion batteries experience mechanical stress evolution due in part to Li intercalation into and de-intercalation out of the electrodes, ultimately resulting in performance degradation. In situ measurements of electrode stress can be used to analyze stress generation factors, verify mechanical deformation models, and validate degradation mechanisms. They can also be embedded in Li-ion battery management systems when stress sensors are either implanted in electrodes or attached on battery surfaces. This paper reviews in situ measurement methods of electrode stress based on optical principles, including digital image correlation, curvature measurement, and fiber optical sensors. Their experimental setups, principles, and applications are described and contrasted. This literature review summarizes the current status of these stress measurement methods for battery electrodes and discusses recent developments and trends.

  4. In situ electrostimulation drives a regenerative shift in the zone of infarcted myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadaccio, Cristiano; Rainer, Alberto; De Marco, Federico; Lusini, Mario; Gallo, Paolo; Sedati, Pietro; Muda, Andrea Onetti; De Porcellinis, Stefano; Gregorj, Chiara; Avvisati, Giuseppe; Trombetta, Marcella; Chello, Massimo; Covino, Elvio; Bull, David A; Patel, Amit N; Genovese, Jorge A

    2013-01-01

    Electrostimulation represents a well-known trophic factor for different tissues. In vitro electrostimulation of non-stem and stem cells induces myogenic predifferentiation and may be a powerful tool to generate cells with the capacity to respond to local areas of injury. We evaluated the effects of in vivo electrostimulation on infarcted myocardium using a miniaturized multiparameter implantable stimulator in rats. Parameters of electrostimulation were organized to avoid a direct driving or pacing of native heart rhythm. Electrical stimuli were delivered for 14 days across the scar site. In situ electrostimulation used as a cell-free, cytokine-free stimulation system, improved myocardial function, and increased angiogenesis through endothelial progenitor cell migration and production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In situ electrostimulation represents a novel means to stimulate repair of the heart and other organs, as well as to precondition tissues for treatment with cell-based therapies.

  5. A review of the literature on soot production during in-situ burning of oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, J.; Buist, I.

    1997-01-01

    Available literature on soot production during in-situ burning of oil was reviewed to determine the range of smoke yields generated by in-situ burning of petroleum oils in water, and to determine the effects of the size of fire and the type of oil burned. For crude oil, data sets statistical analysis showed that, with a fairly high degree of confidence, smoke yield increases with fire diameter. Based on a limited number of available data sets for identifiable oil types, it appears that most oils (Arabian crude the only exception) show roughly the same correlation of smoke yield with fire diameter. Pool fires from aromatic hydrocarbons such as toluene appear to produce more soot than similar fires with crude oil. Fires of lower molecular weight non-aromatics produce an order of magnitude less soot than crude oil fires. Predictive equations with correlation coefficients are provided for specific crude oils. 50 refs., 5 tabs., 13 figs

  6. Combining Space-Based and In-Situ Measurements to Track Flooding in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Steve; Doubleday, Joshua; Mclaren, David; Tran, Daniel; Tanpipat, Veerachai; Chitradon, Royal; Boonya-aaroonnet, Surajate; Thanapakpawin, Porranee; Khunboa, Chatchai; Leelapatra, Watis; hide

    2011-01-01

    We describe efforts to integrate in-situ sensing, space-borne sensing, hydrological modeling, active control of sensing, and automatic data product generation to enhance monitoring and management of flooding. In our approach, broad coverage sensors and missions such as MODIS, TRMM, and weather satellite information and in-situ weather and river gauging information are all inputs to track flooding via river basin and sub-basin hydrological models. While these inputs can provide significant information as to the major flooding, targetable space measurements can provide better spatial resolution measurements of flooding extent. In order to leverage such assets we automatically task observations in response to automated analysis indications of major flooding. These new measurements are automatically processed and assimilated with the other flooding data. We describe our ongoing efforts to deploy this system to track major flooding events in Thailand.

  7. A economic evaluation system software on in-situ leaching mining sandstone uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Yixuan; Su Xuebin; Xie Weixing; Que Weimin

    2001-01-01

    The author presents the study results of applying computer technology to evaluate quantitatively the technical-economic feasibility of in-situ leaching mining sandstone uranium deposits. A computer system software have been developed. Under specifying deposit conditions and given production size per year, the application of the software will generate total capital and mine life operating costs as well as solve for the movable and static financial assessment targets through discounted cash flow analysis. According to the characters of two kinds of sandstone uranium deposits, a data bases of economic and technique parameters of in-situ leaching have been designed. Also the system software can be used to study the economic value of deposits and to optimize the key project parameters. Its features, data input method and demand, main functions, structure and operating environments are described

  8. In situ and operando transmission electron microscopy of catalytic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crozier, Peter A.; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic nanomaterials play a major role in chemical conversions and energy transformations. Understanding how materials control and regulate surface reactions is a major objective for fundamental research on heterogeneous catalysts. In situ environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM...

  9. In-Situ Burning of Crude Oil on Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gelderen, Laurens

    in the small scale water basin. Boilovers were also observed during the burning of a heavy crude oil with a substantial light fraction without a water layer, however, which suggests that water is not essential for boilover occurrence. Further studies are required to determine the conditions under which......The fire dynamics and fire chemistry of in-situ burning of crude oil on water was studied in order to improve predictions on the suitability of this oil spill response method. For this purpose, several operational parameters were studied to determine the factors that control the burning efficiency...... of in-situ burning, i.e. the amount of oil (in wt%) removed from the water surface by the burning process. The burning efficiency is the main parameter for expressing the oil removal effectiveness of in-situ burning as response method and is thus relevant for suitability predictions of in-situ burning...

  10. In situ transesterification of highly wet microalgae using hydrochloric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bora; Im, Hanjin; Lee, Jae W

    2015-06-01

    This study addresses in situ transesterification of highly wet microalgae with hydrochloric acid (HCl) as a catalyst. In situ transesterification was performed by heating the mixture of wet algal cells, HCl, methanol, and solvent in one pot, resulting in the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) yield over 90% at 95°C. The effects of reaction variables of temperature, amounts of catalyst, reactant, and solvent, and type of solvents on the yield were investigated. Compared with the catalytic effect of H2SO4, in situ transesterification using HCl has benefits of being less affected by moisture levels that are as high as or above 80%, and requiring less amounts of catalyst and solvent. For an equimolar amount of catalyst, HCl showed 15wt.% higher FAME yield than H2SO4. This in situ transesterification using HCl as a catalyst would help to realize a feasible way to produce biodiesel from wet microalgae. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Modeling In Situ Bioremediation of Perchlorate-Contaminated Groundwater

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Secody, Roland E

    2007-01-01

    .... An innovative technology was recently developed which uses dual-screened treatment wells to mix an electron donor into perchlorate-contaminated groundwater in order to effect in situ bioremediation...

  12. Fathead minnow whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This study demonstrates the potential of whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH), in conjunction with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (QPCR)...

  13. Comparison of Radar and In Situ Measurements of Atmospheric Turbulence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zink, Florian

    2004-01-01

    We compare measurements of refractive index structure constant C (2)(n) and energy dissipation rate e by VHF radar with in situ observations by high-resolution thermosondes during a campaign near Adelaide, Australia, in August 1998...

  14. In Situ Oxygen Production from Lunar and Martian Regolith Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In situ oxygen production is of immense importance to NASA in the support of the NASA initiative to sustain man's permanent presence in space. The oxygen produced...

  15. Planetary Volatiles Extractor for In Situ Resource Utilization, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) or ?living off the land relies on exploiting local resources and in turn reducing burden of transporting supplies. NASA has...

  16. In situ vitrification program treatability investigation progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrenholz, D.A.

    1991-02-01

    This document presents a summary of the efforts conducted under the in situ vitrification treatability study during the period from its initiation in FY-88 until FY-90. In situ vitrification is a thermal treatment process that uses electrical power to convert contaminated soils into a chemically inert and stable glass and crystalline product. Contaminants present in the soil are either incorporated into the product or are pyrolyzed during treatment. The treatability study being conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory by EG ampersand G Idaho is directed at examining the specific applicability of the in situ vitrification process to buried wastes contaminated with transuranic radionuclides and other contaminants found at the Subsurface Disposal Area of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. This treatability study consists of a variety of tasks, including engineering tests, field tests, vitrified product evaluation, and analytical models of the in situ vitrification process. 6 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murdoch, L.

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the use of hydraulic fracturing to increase permeability in geologic formations where in-situ remedial action of contaminant plumes will be performed. Several in-situ treatment strategies are discussed including the use of hydraulic fracturing to create in situ redox zones for treatment of organics and inorganics. Hydraulic fracturing methods offer a mechanism for the in-situ treatment of gently dipping layers of reactive compounds. Specialized methods using real-time monitoring and a high-energy jet during fracturing allow the form of the fracture to be influenced, such as creation of assymmetric fractures beneath potential sources (i.e. tanks, pits, buildings) that should not be penetrated by boring. Some examples of field applications of this technique such as creating fractures filled with zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate halogenated hydrocarbons, and the use of granular activated carbon to adsorb compounds are discussed

  18. In situ Transesterification of Microalgal Oil to Produce Algal Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    This research was to process whole microalgae cells for biodiesel production without first extracting lipids. The ultimate : goal is develop a novel process for algal biodiesel production directly from microalgae cells in a single step, i.e., in situ...

  19. Advanced Water Purification System For In Situ Resource Utilization

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A main goal in the field of In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) is to develop technologies that produce oxygen from regolith to provide consumables to an...

  20. Compact laser for in-situ compositional analysis, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In response to NASA's solicitation for light-weight and power efficient instruments that enable in situ compositional analysis, Q-Peak in partnership with the...

  1. Compact Laser for In-Situ Compositional Analysis, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In response to NASA's solicitation for light-weight and power efficient instruments that enable in situ compositional analysis, Q-Peak in partnership with the...

  2. OceanSITES RAMA daily in-situ data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — OceanSITES daily in-situ data. OceanSITES Global Tropical Moored Buoy Array Research Moored Array for African-Asian-Australian Monsoon Analysis and Prediction (RAMA)...

  3. In situ bioremediation of chlorinated solvent with natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabold, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    A bioremediation system for the removal of chlorinated solvents from ground water and sediments is described. The system involves the the in-situ injection of natural gas (as a microbial nutrient) through an innovative configuration of horizontal wells

  4. In situ quantification of genomic instability in breast cancer progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos; Chin, Koei; Gray, Joe W.; Lockett, Stephen J.

    2003-05-15

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of breast and other solid cancers. Presumably caused by critical telomere reduction, GI is responsible for providing the genetic diversity required in the multi-step progression of the disease. We have used multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization and 3D image analysis to quantify genomic instability cell-by-cell in thick, intact tissue sections of normal breast epithelium, preneoplastic lesions (usual ductal hyperplasia), ductal carcinona is situ or invasive carcinoma of the breast. Our in situ-cell by cell-analysis of genomic instability shows an important increase of genomic instability in the transition from hyperplasia to in situ carcinoma, followed by a reduction of instability in invasive carcinoma. This pattern suggests that the transition from hyperplasia to in situ carcinoma corresponds to telomere crisis and invasive carcinoma is a consequence of telomerase reactivation afertelomere crisis.

  5. Remediation of SRS Basins by In Situ Stabilization/Solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, A.

    1999-01-01

    In the late summer of 1998, the Savannah River Site began remediation of two radiologically contaminated basins using in situ stabilization. These two high-risk, unlined basins contain radiological contaminants, which potentially pose significant risks to human health and the environment. The selected remedy involves in situ stabilization/solidification of the contaminated wastes (basin and pipeline soils, pipelines, vegetation, and other debris) followed by installation of a low permeability soil cover

  6. Matrix diffusion model. In situ tests using natural analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasilainen, K.

    1997-11-01

    Matrix diffusion is an important retarding and dispersing mechanism for substances carried by groundwater in fractured bedrock. Natural analogues provide, unlike laboratory or field experiments, a possibility to test the model of matrix diffusion in situ over long periods of time. This thesis documents quantitative model tests against in situ observations, done to support modelling of matrix diffusion in performance assessments of nuclear waste repositories

  7. Matrix diffusion model. In situ tests using natural analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasilainen, K. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-11-01

    Matrix diffusion is an important retarding and dispersing mechanism for substances carried by groundwater in fractured bedrock. Natural analogues provide, unlike laboratory or field experiments, a possibility to test the model of matrix diffusion in situ over long periods of time. This thesis documents quantitative model tests against in situ observations, done to support modelling of matrix diffusion in performance assessments of nuclear waste repositories. 98 refs. The thesis includes also eight previous publications by author.

  8. Polypropylene/graphite nanocomposites by in situ polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milani, Marceo A.; Galland, Giselda B.; Quijada, Raul

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the synthesis of nanocomposites of polypropylene/graphite by in situ polymerization using metallocene catalyst and graphene nanosheets. Initially was analyzed which of the metallocene catalysts rac-Et(Ind) 2 ZrCl 2 or rac-Me 2 Si(Ind) 2 ZrCl 2 produces polypropylene with mechanical properties more relevant. Then it were performed the in situ polymerization reactions to obtain the nanocomposites. The polymeric materials were characterized by XRD, DSC, GPC and DMTA. (author)

  9. Model and calculation of in situ stresses in anisotropic formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuezhi, W.; Zijun, L.; Lixin, H. [Jianghan Petroleum Institute, (China)

    1997-08-01

    In situ stresses in transversely isotropic material in relation to wellbore stability have been investigated. Equations for three horizontal in- situ stresses and a new formation fracture pressure model were described, and the methodology for determining the elastic parameters of anisotropic rocks in the laboratory was outlined. Results indicate significantly smaller differences between theoretically calculated pressures and actual formation pressures than results obtained by using the isotropic method. Implications for improvements in drilling efficiency were reviewed. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  10. In situ leaching of uranium: Technical, environmental and economic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Within the framework of its activities in nuclear raw materials the International Atomic Energy Agency has convened a series of meetings to discuss various aspects of uranium ore processing technology, recovery of uranium from non-conventional resources and development of projects for the production of uranium concentrates including economic aspects. As part of this continuing effort to discuss and document important aspects of uranium production the IAEA convened a Technical Committee Meeting on Technical, Economic and Environmental Aspects of In-Situ Leaching. Although the use of this technique is limited by geological and economic constraints, it has a significant potential to produce uranium at competitive prices. This is especially important in the current uranium market which is mainly characterised by large inventories, excess production capability and low prices. This situation is not expected to last indefinitely but it is unlikely to change drastically in the next ten years or so. This Technical Committee Meeting was held in Vienna from 3 to 6 November 1987 with the attendance of 24 participants from 12 countries. Eight papers were presented. Technical sessions covered in-situ mining research, environmental and licensing aspects and restoration of leached orebodies; the technological status of in-situ leaching, the current status and future prospects of in-situ leaching of uranium in Member States, general aspects of planning and implementation of in-situ projects and the economics of in-situ leaching. Refs, figs and tabs

  11. In-situ diffusion in granite: results from scoping experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, J.J.; Melynk, T.W.; Miller, H.G.

    1997-03-01

    This report describes the scoping experiments carried out, both in the laboratory and in-situ at a depth of ∼450 m in the Underground Research Laboratory, for the study to determine the diffusion parameters of intact granite/granodiorite under natural high-stress conditions. The study includes four in-situ diffusion experiments (one each in four separate boreholes with experiment times from six months to two years), and supporting laboratory experiments. Tentative conclusions from the first 203-day in-situ experiment in hole DIF4 indicate that the in-situ tortuosity value of granodiorite under high stress conditions may be significantly higher than those obtained from measurements on the same rock under ambient conditions in the laboratory. Because problems were encountered during drilling of the in-situ sample core, potentially adversely affecting the analytical data, further work needs to be carried out to substantiate these tentative conclusions. Tortuosity values obtained in the laboratory for de-stressed rock from the in-situ experiment zones range between 2.4 and 4.6, falling well within the range of tortuosity values reported by Davison et al. (1994) that were used for the assessment modelling of the reference disposal system (Goodwin et al. 1994). The granodiorite samples have lower tortuosity values (between 2.4 and 3.9) compared with that of the single granite sample (4.6). (author)

  12. Design Improvements and ALARA at U.S. Uranium In Situ Recovery Facilities - 16415

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, S.H.

    2009-01-01

    In the last few years, there has been a significant increase in the demand for Uranium as historical inventories have been consumed and new reactor orders are being placed. Numerous mineralized properties around the world are being evaluated for Uranium recovery and new mining / milling projects are being evaluated and developed . Ore bodies which are considered uneconomical to mine by conventional methods such as tunneling or open pits, can be candidates for non-conventional recovery techniques, involving considerably less capital expenditure. Technologies such as Uranium In Situ Leaching / In Situ Recovery (ISL / ISR - also referred to as 'solution mining'), have enabled commercial scale mining and milling of relatively small ore pockets of lower grade, and are expected to make a significant contribution to overall world wide uranium supplies over the next ten years. Commercial size solution mining production facilities have operated in the US since the mid 1970's. However, current designs are expected to result in less radiological wastes and emissions relative to these 'first' generation plants (which were designed, constructed and operated through the 1980's). These early designs typically used alkaline leach chemistries in situ including use of ammonium carbonate which resulted in groundwater restoration challenges, open to air recovery vessels and high temperature calcining systems for final product drying vs the 'zero emission' vacuum dryers as typically used today. Improved containment, automation and instrumentation control and use of vacuum dryers in the design of current generation plants are expected to reduce production of secondary waste byproduct material, reduce Radon emissions and reduce potential for employee exposure to uranium concentrate aerosols at the back end of the milling process. In Situ Recovery in the U.S. typically involves the circulation of groundwater, fortified with oxidizing (gaseous oxygen e.g) and complexing agents (carbon

  13. Development of a Microchannel In Situ Propellant Production System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Rassat, Scot D.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.

    2005-09-01

    An in situ propellant production (ISPP) plant on future Mars robotic missions can produce oxygen (O2) and methane (CH4) that can be used for propellant for the return voyage. By producing propellants from Mars atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen (H2) brought from Earth, the initial mass launched in low Earth orbit can be reduced by 20% to 45%, as compared to carrying all of the propellant for a round-trip mission to the Mars surface from Earth. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory used microchannel architecture to develop a Mars-based In Situ Propellant Production (ISPP) system. This three year research and development effort focused on process intensification and system miniaturization of three primary subsystems: a thermochemical compressor, catalytic reactors, and components for separating gas phases from liquid phases. These systems were designed based on a robotic direct return mission scenario, but can be scaled up to human flight missions by simply numbering up the microchannel devices. The thermochemical compression was developed both using absorption and adsorption. A multichannel adsorption system was designed to meet the full-scale CO2 collection requirements using temperature swing adsorption. Each stage is designed to achieve a 10x compression of CO2. A compression ratio to collect Martian atmospheric CO2 at ~0.8 kPa and compress it to at least 100 kPa can be achieved with two adsorption stages in series. A compressor stage incorporates eight thermally coupled adsorption cells at various stages in the adsorption/desorption cycle to maximize the recuperation of thermal energy and provide a nearly continuous flow of CO2 to the downstream reactors. The thermochemically compressed CO2 is then mixed with hydrogen gas and fed to two reactors: a Sabatier Reaction unit and a Reverse Water/Gas Shift unit. The microchannel architecture allows better heat control than is possible in an adiabatic system, resulting in significantly higher conversion. The

  14. IN SITU FIELD TESTING OF PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.S.Y. YANG

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts and surface-based boreholes through unsaturated zone (UZ) tuff rock units. In situ testing, monitoring, and associated laboratory studies are conducted to directly assess and evaluate the waste emplacement environment and the natural barriers to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report supports and provides data to UZ flow and transport model reports, which in turn contribute to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of Yucca Mountain, an important document for the license application (LA). The objectives of ambient field-testing activities are described in Section 1.1. This report is the third revision (REV 03), which supercedes REV 02. The scientific analysis of data for inputs to model calibration and validation as documented in REV 02 were developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167969]). This revision was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.4) for better integrated, consistent, transparent, traceable, and more complete documentation in this scientific analysis report and associated UZ flow and transport model reports. No additional testing or analyses were performed as part of this revision. The list of relevant acceptance criteria is provided by ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]), Table 3-1. Additional deviations from the TWP regarding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) list are discussed in Section 1.3. Documentation in this report includes descriptions of how, and under what

  15. IN SITU FIELD TESTING OF PROCESSES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    YANG, J.S.Y.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts and surface-based boreholes through unsaturated zone (UZ) tuff rock units. In situ testing, monitoring, and associated laboratory studies are conducted to directly assess and evaluate the waste emplacement environment and the natural barriers to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report supports and provides data to UZ flow and transport model reports, which in turn contribute to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of Yucca Mountain, an important document for the license application (LA). The objectives of ambient field-testing activities are described in Section 1.1. This report is the third revision (REV 03), which supercedes2. The scientific analysis of data for inputs to model calibration and validation as documented in2 were developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167969]). This revision was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.4) for better integrated, consistent, transparent, traceable, and more complete documentation in this scientific analysis report and associated UZ flow and transport model reports. No additional testing or analyses were performed as part of this revision. The list of relevant acceptance criteria is provided by ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]), Table 3-1. Additional deviations from the TWP regarding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) list are discussed in Section 1.3. Documentation in this report includes descriptions of how, and under what conditions, the tests were conducted. The descriptions and analyses

  16. One ligand capable of in situ reaction in a mixed-ligand system with two new different frameworks

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xiaofang

    2017-12-24

    The in situ ligand 2,3-pyrazinedicarboxylic acid (2,3-H2pzdc) mixed with 1,1′-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(benzimidazole) (bbbi) is used to form two coordination polymers ([Cd(2,3-pzdc)(bbbi)] (1) and [Cd2Cl3(2-pzc)(bbbi)2] (2)) under hydrothermal conditions. Complex 1 was obtained in the absence of in situ reaction and 2 was synthesized with 2,3-H2pzdc in situ generating 2-pyrazinecarboxylate (2-pzc−). The structural details reveal that 1 has a 3D framework with dia topology, and 2 is a 2D layer structure and develops a 3D supramolecular structure via strong π⋯π stacking interactions. The ligand effects were compared for the two frameworks. In addition, fluorescence properties and thermal stabilities of 1 and 2 in the solid were studied.

  17. Development of a Scaling Algorithm for Remotely Sensed and In-situ Soil Moisture Data across Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Y.; Mohanty, B. P.

    2012-12-01

    Spatial scaling algorithms have been developed/improved for increasing the availability of remotely sensed (RS) and in-situ soil moisture data for hydrologic applications. Existing approaches have their own drawbacks such as application in complex terrains, complexity of coupling downscaling and upscaling approaches, etc. In this study, we developed joint downscaling and upscaling algorithm for remotely sensed and in-situ soil moisture data. Our newly developed algorithm can downscale RS soil moisture footprints as well as upscale in-situ data simultaneously in complex terrains. This scheme is based on inverse modeling with a genetic algorithm. Normalized digital elevation model (NDEM) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) that represent the heterogeneity of topography and vegetation covers, were used to characterize the variability of land surface. Our approach determined soil hydraulic parameters from RS and in-situ soil moisture at the airborne-/satellite footprint scales. Predicted soil moisture estimates were driven by derived soil hydraulic properties using a hydrological model (Soil-Water-Atmosphere-Plant, SWAP). As model simulated soil moisture predictions were generated for different elevations and NDVI values across complex terrains at a finer-scale (30 m 30 m), downscaled and upscaled soil moisture estimates were obtained. We selected the Little Washita watershed in Oklahoma for validating our proposed methodology at multiple scales. This newly developed joint downscaling and upscaling algorithm performed well across topographically complex regions and improved the availability of RS and in-situ soil moisture at appropriate scales for agriculture and water resources management efficiently.

  18. Quantitative analysis for in situ sintering of 3% yttria-stablized zirconia in the transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Hasti; Holland, Troy B; van Benthem, Klaus

    2015-05-01

    Studying particle-agglomerate systems compared to two-particle systems elucidates different stages of sintering by monitoring both pores and particles. We report on in situ sintering of 3% yttria-stablized zirconia particle agglomerates in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). Real-time TEM observations indicate neck formation and growth, particle coalescence and pore closure. A MATLAB-based image processing tool was developed to calculate the projected area of the agglomerate with and without internal pores during in situ sintering. We demonstrate the first densification curves generated from sequentially acquired TEM images. The in situ sintering onset temperature was then determined to be at 960 °C. Densification curves illustrated that the agglomerate projected area which excludes the internal observed pores also shrinks during in situ sintering. To overcome the common projection problem for TEM analyses, agglomerate mass-thickness maps were obtained from low energy-loss analysis combined with STEM imaging. The decrease in the projected area was directly related to the increase in mass-thickness of the agglomerate, likely caused by hidden pores existing in the direction of the beam. Access to shrinkage curves through in situ TEM analysis provides a new avenue to investigate fundamental mechanisms of sintering through directly correlating microstructural changes during consolidation with mesoscale densification behavior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. In situ management and domestication of plants in Mesoamerica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Alejandro; Otero-Arnaiz, Adriana; Pérez-Negrón, Edgar; Valiente-Banuet, Alfonso

    2007-11-01

    Ethnobotanical studies in Mexico have documented that Mesoamerican peoples practise systems of in situ management of wild and weedy vegetation directed to control availability of useful plants. In situ management includes let standing, encouraging growing and protection of individual plants of useful species during clearance of vegetation, which in some cases may involve artificial selection. The aim of this study was to review, complement and re-analyse information from three case studies which examined patterns of morphological, physiological and genetic effects of artificial selection in plant populations under in situ management in the region. Information on wild and in situ managed populations of the herbaceous weedy plants Anoda cristata and Crotalaria pumila, the tree Leucaena esculenta subsp. esculenta and the columnar cacti Escontria chiotilla, Polaskia chichipe and Stenocereus stellatus from Central Mexico was re-analysed. Analyses compared morphology and frequency of morphological variants, germination patterns, and population genetics parameters between wild and managed in situ populations of the species studied. Species of columnar cacti are under different management intensities and their populations, including cultivated stands of P. chichipe and S. stellatus, were also compared between species. Significant differences in morphology, germination patterns and genetic variation documented between wild, in situ managed and cultivated populations of the species studied are associated with higher frequencies of phenotypes favoured by humans in managed populations. Genetic diversity in managed populations of E. chiotilla and P. chichipe is slightly lower than in wild populations but in managed populations of S. stellatus variation was higher than in the wild. However, genetic distance between populations was generally small and influenced more by geographic distance than by management. Artificial selection operating on in situ managed populations of the

  20. Breeding of in-situ Petroleum Degrading Bacteria in Hangzhou Bay and evaluating for the In-situ repair effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Ru; Lin, Hai; Qiao, Bing; Dong, Yingbo; Zhang, Wei; Chang, Wen

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, the restoration behaviour of the in-situ microorganisms in seawater and sediments to the marine accident oil spill was researched. The experimental study on the breeding of in-situ petroleum-degrading bacteria in the seawater and sediments of Hangzhou Bay and the restoration of oil spill were carried out. Making use of the reinforced microbial flora, combined with physical and chemical methods in field environment, petroleum degrading and restoration experiment were performed, the effect of the breeding of in-situ degrading bacteria was evaluated, and the standard process of in-situ bacteria sampling, laboratory screening, domestication and degradation efficiency testing were formed. This study laid a foundation for further evaluation of the advantages and disadvantages for the petroleum-degrading bacteria of Hangzhou Bay during the process of in-situ restoration. The results showed that in-situ microbes of Hangzhou Bay could reach the growth peak in 5 days with the suitable environmental factors and sufficient nutrient elements, and the degradation efficiency could reach 65.2% (or 74.8% after acclimation). And also the microbes could adapt to the local sea water and environmental conditions, with a certain degree of degradation. The research results could provide parameter support for causal judgment and quantitative assessment of oil spill damage.

  1. In situ vitrification: application analysis for stabilization of transuranic waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oma, K.H.; Farnsworth, R.K.; Rusin, J.M.

    1982-09-01

    The in situ vitrification process builds upon the electric melter technology previously developed for high-level waste immobilization. In situ vitrification converts buried wastes and contaminated soil to an extremely durable glass and crystalline waste form by melting the materials, in place, using joule heating. Once the waste materials have been solidified, the high integrity waste form should not cause future ground subsidence. Environmental transport of the waste due to water or wind erosion, and plant or animal intrusion, is minimized. Environmental studies are currently being conducted to determine whether additional stabilization is required for certain in-ground transuranic waste sites. An applications analysis has been performed to identify several in situ vitrification process limitations which may exist at transuranic waste sites. Based on the process limit analysis, in situ vitrification is well suited for solidification of most in-ground transuranic wastes. The process is best suited for liquid disposal sites. A site-specific performance analysis, based on safety, health, environmental, and economic assessments, will be required to determine for which sites in situ vitrification is an acceptable disposal technique. Process economics of in situ vitrification compare favorably with other in-situ solidification processes and are an order of magnitude less than the costs for exhumation and disposal in a repository. Leachability of the vitrified product compares closely with that of Pyrex glass and is significantly better than granite, marble, or bottle glass. Total release to the environment from a vitrified waste site is estimated to be less than 10/sup -5/ parts per year. 32 figures, 30 tables.

  2. Upper Urinary Tract Carcinoma In Situ: Current Knowledge, Future Direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redrow, Grant P; Guo, Charles C; Brausi, Maurizio A; Coleman, Jonathan A; Fernandez, Mario I; Kassouf, Wassim; Keeley, Francis X; Margulis, Vitaly; Raman, Jay D; Roupret, Morgan; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Spiess, Philippe E; Thalmann, George N; Matin, Surena F

    2017-02-01

    Carcinoma in situ of the urinary tract is a high grade form of nonmuscle invasive urothelial cancer. Our understanding of this entity in the upper tract is poor, and case management remains challenging due to knowledge gaps regarding the definition, diagnosis, treatment options and followup of the disease. We reviewed the available literature for similarities and differences between bladder and upper tract carcinoma in situ, and herein summarize the best available data. We reviewed PubMed® and MEDLINE™ databases from January 1976 through September 2014. The PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) statement was used to screen publications. All authors participated in the development of a consensus definition of disease. A total of 61 publications were found suitable for this review. All studies were retrospective. Compared to bladder carcinoma in situ, upper tract carcinoma in situ appears to have lower progression rates and improved survival. All available studies demonstrate topical therapy to be effective in treating upper tract carcinoma in situ, with decreased recurrence rates compared to bladder carcinoma in situ. Highlighted areas of current knowledge gaps include variable definitions of disease, methods of drug delivery and ideal treatment course. Improving methods for detection may allow easier diagnosis and more effective treatment. Based on the available data, organ preserving therapy with topical agents is an alternative to radical surgery in select patients with upper tract carcinoma in situ, although this method has not been evaluated in prospective trials. A paradigm shift regarding detection and treatment is needed to improve care and allow better renal preservation. A consensus definition of the disease is offered, and several areas of major knowledge gaps and opportunities for future research are identified. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier

  3. In situ vitrification: application analysis for stabilization of transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oma, K.H.; Farnsworth, R.K.; Rusin, J.M.

    1982-09-01

    The in situ vitrification process builds upon the electric melter technology previously developed for high-level waste immobilization. In situ vitrification converts buried wastes and contaminated soil to an extremely durable glass and crystalline waste form by melting the materials, in place, using joule heating. Once the waste materials have been solidified, the high integrity waste form should not cause future ground subsidence. Environmental transport of the waste due to water or wind erosion, and plant or animal intrusion, is minimized. Environmental studies are currently being conducted to determine whether additional stabilization is required for certain in-ground transuranic waste sites. An applications analysis has been performed to identify several in situ vitrification process limitations which may exist at transuranic waste sites. Based on the process limit analysis, in situ vitrification is well suited for solidification of most in-ground transuranic wastes. The process is best suited for liquid disposal sites. A site-specific performance analysis, based on safety, health, environmental, and economic assessments, will be required to determine for which sites in situ vitrification is an acceptable disposal technique. Process economics of in situ vitrification compare favorably with other in-situ solidification processes and are an order of magnitude less than the costs for exhumation and disposal in a repository. Leachability of the vitrified product compares closely with that of Pyrex glass and is significantly better than granite, marble, or bottle glass. Total release to the environment from a vitrified waste site is estimated to be less than 10 -5 parts per year. 32 figures, 30 tables

  4. Dragonfly: In Situ Exploration of Titan's Organic Chemistry and Habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtle, E. P.; Barnes, J. W.; Trainer, M. G.; Lorenz, R. D.

    2017-12-01

    Titan's abundant complex carbon-rich chemistry, interior ocean, and past presence of liquid water on the surface make it an ideal destination to study prebiotic chemical processes and document the habitability of an extraterrestrial environment. Titan exploration is a high science priority due to the level of organic synthesis that it supports. Moreover, opportunities for organics to have interacted with liquid water at the surface (e.g., in impact melt sheets) increase the potential for chemical processes to progress further, providing an unparalleled opportunity to investigate prebiotic chemistry, as well as to search for signatures of potential water-based or even hydrocarbon-based life. The diversity of Titan's surface materials and environments drives the scientific need to be able to sample a variety of locations, thus mobility is key for in situ measurements. Titan's atmosphere is 4 times denser than Earth's reducing the wing/rotor area required to generate a given amount of lift, and the low gravity reduces the required magnitude of lift, making heavier-than-air mobility highly efficient. Dragonfly is a rotorcraft lander mission proposed to NASA's New Frontiers Program to take advantage of Titan's unique natural laboratory to understand how far chemistry can progress in environments that provide key ingredients for life. Measuring the compositions of materials in different environments will reveal how far organic chemistry has progressed. Surface material can be sampled into a mass spectrometer to identify the chemical components available and processes at work to produce biologically relevant compounds. Bulk elemental surface composition can be determined by a neutron-activated gamma-ray spectrometer. Meteorology measurements can characterize Titan's atmosphere and diurnal and spatial variations therein. Geologic features can be characterized via remote-sensing observations, which also provide context for samples. Seismic sensing can probe subsurface

  5. Continuous in situ measurements of stable isotopes in liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbstritt, Barbara; Gralher, Benjamin; Weiler, Markus

    2012-03-01

    We developed a method to measure in situ the isotopic composition of liquid water with minimal supervision and, most important, with a temporal resolution of less than a minute. For this purpose a microporous hydrophobic membrane contactor (Membrana) was combined with an isotope laser spectrometer (Picarro). The contactor, originally designed for degassing liquids, was used with N2 as a carrier gas in order to transform a small fraction of liquid water to water vapor. The generated water vapor was then analyzed continuously by the Picarro analyzer. To prove the membrane's applicability, we determined the specific isotope fractionation factor for the phase change through the contactor's membrane across an extended temperature range (8°C-21°C) and with different waters of known isotopic compositions. This fractionation factor is needed to subsequently derive the liquid water isotope ratio from the measured water vapor isotope ratios. The system was tested with a soil column experiment, where the isotope values derived with the new method corresponded well (R2 = 0.998 for δ18O and R2 = 0.997 for δ2H) with those of liquid water samples taken simultaneously and analyzed with a conventional method (cavity ring-down spectroscopy). The new method supersedes taking liquid samples and employs only relatively cheap and readily available components. This makes it a relatively inexpensive, fast, user-friendly, and easily reproducible method. It can be applied in both the field and laboratory wherever a water vapor isotope analyzer can be run and whenever real-time isotope data of liquid water are required at high temporal resolution.

  6. A mini-microscope for in situ monitoring of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Bok; Koo, Kyo-in; Bae, Hojae; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Hamilton, Geraldine A; Bahinski, Anthony; Kim, Sun Min; Ingber, Donald E; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2012-10-21

    A mini-microscope was developed for in situ monitoring of cells by modifying off-the-shelf components of a commercial webcam. The mini-microscope consists of a CMOS imaging module, a small plastic lens and a white LED illumination source. The CMOS imaging module was connected to a laptop computer through a USB port for image acquisition and analysis. Due to its compact size, 8 × 10 × 9 cm, the present microscope is portable and can easily fit inside a conventional incubator, and enables real-time monitoring of cellular behaviour. Moreover, the mini-microscope can be used for imaging cells in conventional cell culture flasks, such as Petri dishes and multi-well plates. To demonstrate the operation of the mini-microscope, we monitored the cellular migration of mouse 3T3 fibroblasts in a scratch assay in medium containing three different concentrations of fetal bovine serum (5, 10, and 20%) and demonstrated differential responses depending on serum levels. In addition, we seeded embryonic stem cells inside poly(ethylene glycol) microwells and monitored the formation of stem cell aggregates in real time using the mini-microscope. Furthermore, we also combined a lab-on-a-chip microfluidic device for microdroplet generation and analysis with the mini-microscope and observed the formation of droplets under different flow conditions. Given its cost effectiveness, robust imaging and portability, the presented platform may be useful for a range of applications for real-time cellular imaging using lab-on-a-chip devices at low cost.

  7. Passive in-situ chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Jonathan S [Farragut, TN; Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN

    2012-02-14

    A chemical sensor for assessing a chemical of interest. In typical embodiments the chemical sensor includes a first thermocouple and second thermocouple. A reactive component is typically disposed proximal to the second thermal couple, and is selected to react with the chemical of interest and generate a temperature variation that may be detected by a comparison of a temperature sensed by the second thermocouple compared with a concurrent temperature detected by the first thermocouple. Further disclosed is a method for assessing a chemical of interest and a method for identifying a reaction temperature for a chemical of interest in a system.

  8. An instrument for in situ growth rate characterization of mechanically strained crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikic, A. M.; Ristic, R. I.; Sherwood, J. N.

    1998-07-01

    The crystal growth and dissolution characteristics of a certain material can be considerably influenced by the strain present in a growing (dissolving) crystal. Strain can be induced in various ways. One of the most common and always present in industrial processes, where attrition processes are always accompanied by generation of mechanical strain in a newly formed small crystal fragments, is mechanical stressing, in situ, during preparation and handling. To gain deeper insights into some aspects of this phenomenon, a sophisticated equipment is needed for in situ controlled stressing of extremely brittle and fragile crystals. For this purpose, we have developed an apparatus which comprises a specially designed straining cell coupled with a laser Michelson interferometer for growth rate measurements. The straining cell is designed to accommodate crystals that undergo fracture below 200 microstrains. The stress imposed on a crystal is computer controlled with a precision of approximately 5%. Details of the instrument are given together with two examples of straining in situ brittle paracetamol and plastic sodium nitrate crystals. The measured changes in growth rate of a paracetamol crystal, in the quasi linear region 0-70 kPa are estimated to be (-9.4±0.1)×10-11 m/s/kPa.

  9. Analysis of In-Situ Stress During EGS Resource Development at The Geysers, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, O. S.; Dreger, D. S.; Gritto, R.

    2016-12-01

    Creating, identifying, and managing fractures and flow paths are essential tasks during Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) resource development. Successful generation of a fracture network requires a priori knowledge of in-situ stress and natural fracture orientation and spacing. However, because the orientation and magnitude of in-situ stress may not be reliably available, and injecting fluids at high rates and volume may disturb the natural stress state, it is advantageous to monitor in-situ stress during the injection process. In this study we investigate M ≥ 1.3 seismicity in the vicinity of EGS development in the Northwest Geysers Prati 32 (P-32) injection well and Prati State 31 (PS-31) production well to determine moment magnitudes and focal mechanisms of events that occur before and during reservoir stimulation starting October 6, 2011. In general, event rate and magnitude increase as well as variability in focal mechanism during injection operations. We use our focal mechanism catalog of more than 150 events to estimate the stress tensor using the approach outlined in Hardebeck and Michaels (2006). Preliminary results of the stress inversion suggest temporal changes in the orientation of the principal stress axes during the first year of injection. It is found that the tension axis remains stable while the trend and plunge of the intermediate axis varies the most. The variations appear to be well resolved based on the 95% confidence intervals from the bootstrap analysis.

  10. In situ conservation of wild potato germplasm in Argentina: Example and possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos F. Marfil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The potato is the third most important food crop worldwide and in situ conservation of its wild relatives is considered an urgent priority. Although regions of the Americas with high wild potato species richness have been identified, the need to identify specific sites for establishing genetic reserves is still pending. Matching distribution data of Argentinean wild potato species to existing protected areas (PA, two priority sites were identified. The creation of genetic reserves in these two PA would make possible to preserve populations of species that have been successfully incorporated into the crop and are listed in the global priority Crop Wild Relative inventory. While the presence of target species in PA could ensure a passive conservation, in situ conservation programs require to actively intervene in selected areas. From a field study performed on populations of the wild potato Solanum kurtzianum naturally growing in a PA, the Villavicencio Natural Reserve (Mendoza province, a baseline with distribution, biotic interactions, sprouting behavior, population dynamics, AFLP and pollen viability data was established. Based on a systematic work in this Reserve we have generated a working protocol to be implemented at national and regional levels for the in situ conservation of potato wild relatives.

  11. Structure determination of an integral membrane protein at room temperature from crystals in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axford, Danny [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Foadi, James [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Hu, Nien-Jen; Choudhury, Hassanul Ghani [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Iwata, So [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Beis, Konstantinos [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Evans, Gwyndaf, E-mail: gwyndaf.evans@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Alguel, Yilmaz, E-mail: gwyndaf.evans@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-14

    The X-ray structure determination of an integral membrane protein using synchrotron diffraction data measured in situ at room temperature is demonstrated. The structure determination of an integral membrane protein using synchrotron X-ray diffraction data collected at room temperature directly in vapour-diffusion crystallization plates (in situ) is demonstrated. Exposing the crystals in situ eliminates manual sample handling and, since it is performed at room temperature, removes the complication of cryoprotection and potential structural anomalies induced by sample cryocooling. Essential to the method is the ability to limit radiation damage by recording a small amount of data per sample from many samples and subsequently assembling the resulting data sets using specialized software. The validity of this procedure is established by the structure determination of Haemophilus influenza TehA at 2.3 Å resolution. The method presented offers an effective protocol for the fast and efficient determination of membrane-protein structures at room temperature using third-generation synchrotron beamlines.

  12. Structure determination of an integral membrane protein at room temperature from crystals in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axford, Danny; Foadi, James; Hu, Nien-Jen; Choudhury, Hassanul Ghani; Iwata, So; Beis, Konstantinos; Evans, Gwyndaf; Alguel, Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray structure determination of an integral membrane protein using synchrotron diffraction data measured in situ at room temperature is demonstrated. The structure determination of an integral membrane protein using synchrotron X-ray diffraction data collected at room temperature directly in vapour-diffusion crystallization plates (in situ) is demonstrated. Exposing the crystals in situ eliminates manual sample handling and, since it is performed at room temperature, removes the complication of cryoprotection and potential structural anomalies induced by sample cryocooling. Essential to the method is the ability to limit radiation damage by recording a small amount of data per sample from many samples and subsequently assembling the resulting data sets using specialized software. The validity of this procedure is established by the structure determination of Haemophilus influenza TehA at 2.3 Å resolution. The method presented offers an effective protocol for the fast and efficient determination of membrane-protein structures at room temperature using third-generation synchrotron beamlines

  13. An integrated microfluidic analysis microsystems with bacterial capture enrichment and in-situ impedance detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hai-Tao; Wen, Zhi-Yu; Xu, Yi; Shang, Zheng-Guo; Peng, Jin-Lan; Tian, Peng

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, an integrated microfluidic analysis microsystems with bacterial capture enrichment and in-situ impedance detection was purposed based on microfluidic chips dielectrophoresis technique and electrochemical impedance detection principle. The microsystems include microfluidic chip, main control module, and drive and control module, and signal detection and processing modulet and result display unit. The main control module produce the work sequence of impedance detection system parts and achieve data communication functions, the drive and control circuit generate AC signal which amplitude and frequency adjustable, and it was applied on the foodborne pathogens impedance analysis microsystems to realize the capture enrichment and impedance detection. The signal detection and processing circuit translate the current signal into impendence of bacteria, and transfer to computer, the last detection result is displayed on the computer. The experiment sample was prepared by adding Escherichia coli standard sample into chicken sample solution, and the samples were tested on the dielectrophoresis chip capture enrichment and in-situ impedance detection microsystems with micro-array electrode microfluidic chips. The experiments show that the Escherichia coli detection limit of microsystems is 5 × 104 CFU/mL and the detection time is within 6 min in the optimization of voltage detection 10 V and detection frequency 500 KHz operating conditions. The integrated microfluidic analysis microsystems laid the solid foundation for rapid real-time in-situ detection of bacteria.

  14. An Assessment of Three Different In Situ Oxygen Sensors for Monitoring Silage Production and Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Guilin; Sun, Yurui; Li, Menghua; Jungbluth, Kerstin H; Maack, Christian; Buescher, Wolfgang; Schütt, Kai-Benjamin; Boeker, Peter; Lammers, Peter Schulze; Zhou, Haiyang; Cheng, Qiang; Ma, Daokun

    2016-01-14

    Oxygen (O₂) concentration inside the substrate is an important measurement for silage-research and-practical management. In the laboratory gas chromatography is commonly employed for O₂ measurement. Among sensor-based techniques, accurate and reliable in situ measurement is rare because of high levels of carbon dioxide (CO₂) generated by the introduction of O₂ in the silage. The presented study focused on assessing three types of commercial O₂ sensors, including Clark oxygen electrodes (COE), galvanic oxygen cell (GOC) sensors and the Dräger chip measurement system (DCMS). Laboratory cross calibration of O₂ versus CO₂ (each 0-15 vol.%) was made for the COE and the GOC sensors. All calibration results verified that O₂ measurements for both sensors were insensitive to CO₂. For the O₂ in situ measurement in silage, all O₂ sensors were first tested in two sealed barrels (diameter 35.7 cm; height: 60 cm) to monitor the O₂ depletion with respect to the ensiling process (Test-A). The second test (Test-B) simulated the silage unloading process by recording the O₂ penetration dynamics in three additional barrels, two covered by dry ice (0.6 kg or 1.2 kg of each) on the top surface and one without. Based on a general comparison of the experimental data, we conclude that each of these in situ sensor monitoring techniques for O₂ concentration in silage exhibit individual advantages and limitations.

  15. Feasibility of in situ combustion into an Ocarina oil belt reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albornoz, O.; Izarra, N.; Vazquez, D.; Mendoza, A.; Oliveros, D.; Miranda, C.; Sastoque, M.; Hernandez, N. [PDVSA Petroleos de Venezuela SA, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). INTEVEP Exploration and Production

    2009-07-01

    Venezuela's Orinoco oil belt (OOB) is the largest liquid hydrocarbon accumulation in the world, consisting of heavy and extra heavy oil. It contains an estimated 962 million barrels of oil. Since the recovery factor in the OOB is between 5 and 10 per cent, most of the crude oil must be extracted using technologies such as in-situ combustion. This paper presented an experimental study of the in-situ combustion process using oil, water and sand samples from the OOB, at a temperature of 50 degrees Celsius, a pressure of 1000 psig and an injection rate of 0.78 l/min at standard conditions. The obtained results were derived from three experimental tests using dry combustion, which were carried out to establish the feasibility of using this recovery method in the proposed reservoir. It was concluded that the application of in situ combustion technology is a feasible option for improved recovery of extra heavy crude oil from the reservoir studied, because the oil generated enough fuel quantity to keep moving the combustion front, allowing a higher recovery in the experiment. 14 refs., 7 tabs., 5 figs.

  16. In-Situ Visualization Experiments with ParaView Cinema in RAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kares, Robert John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-15

    A previous paper described some numerical experiments performed using the ParaView/Catalyst in-situ visualization infrastructure deployed in the Los Alamos RAGE radiation-hydrodynamics code to produce images from a running large scale 3D ICF simulation. One challenge of the in-situ approach apparent in these experiments was the difficulty of choosing parameters likes isosurface values for the visualizations to be produced from the running simulation without the benefit of prior knowledge of the simulation results and the resultant cost of recomputing in-situ generated images when parameters are chosen suboptimally. A proposed method of addressing this difficulty is to simply render multiple images at runtime with a range of possible parameter values to produce a large database of images and to provide the user with a tool for managing the resulting database of imagery. Recently, ParaView/Catalyst has been extended to include such a capability via the so-called Cinema framework. Here I describe some initial experiments with the first delivery of Cinema and make some recommendations for future extensions of Cinema’s capabilities.

  17. An Assessment of Three Different In Situ Oxygen Sensors for Monitoring Silage Production and Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Guilin; Sun, Yurui; Li, Menghua; Jungbluth, Kerstin H.; Maack, Christian; Buescher, Wolfgang; Schütt, Kai-Benjamin; Boeker, Peter; Schulze Lammers, Peter; Zhou, Haiyang; Cheng, Qiang; Ma, Daokun

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen (O2) concentration inside the substrate is an important measurement for silage-research and-practical management. In the laboratory gas chromatography is commonly employed for O2 measurement. Among sensor-based techniques, accurate and reliable in situ measurement is rare because of high levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) generated by the introduction of O2 in the silage. The presented study focused on assessing three types of commercial O2 sensors, including Clark oxygen electrodes (COE), galvanic oxygen cell (GOC) sensors and the Dräger chip measurement system (DCMS). Laboratory cross calibration of O2 versus CO2 (each 0–15 vol.%) was made for the COE and the GOC sensors. All calibration results verified that O2 measurements for both sensors were insensitive to CO2. For the O2 in situ measurement in silage, all O2 sensors were first tested in two sealed barrels (diameter 35.7 cm; height: 60 cm) to monitor the O2 depletion with respect to the ensiling process (Test-A). The second test (Test-B) simulated the silage unloading process by recording the O2 penetration dynamics in three additional barrels, two covered by dry ice (0.6 kg or 1.2 kg of each) on the top surface and one without. Based on a general comparison of the experimental data, we conclude that each of these in situ sensor monitoring techniques for O2 concentration in silage exhibit individual advantages and limitations. PMID:26784194

  18. Innovative instrumentation for in-situ soil NO3- measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuli, A.; Hopmans, J. W.; Shaw, B. D.; Wei, J.

    2006-12-01

    Among the soil nutrients for plant growth, nitrogen (N) is one of the essential macronutrients for crop production, mostly taken up by plants in the form of nitrate (NO3-). The absence of in-situ instrumentation limits the ability to monitor concentration levels of soil solution nitrate and the evaluation of plant nutrient uptake mechanism for specific environmental and agricultural management practices. Two new in situ measurement techniques are presented that can potentially be applied in the field, with measurements recorded electronically in real time as opposed to extracting soil solutions for laboratory measurements. Both use a stainless steel solution sampler design. The first technique uses the adoption of a NO3- ion selective electrode (ISE) to determine in-situ NO3- concentrations in soil solution. Current laboratory tests confirmed that using a one-point calibration procedure, the NO3- ion selective electrode can measure in situ NO3- concentrations in soil solution. The second technique measures NO3- concentration using ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. This sampler has internal optics that enable a beam of light to be directed through the solution in the sampler. The internal optics are coupled to optical fibers that allow light to be transmitted into and out of the system, enabling analysis with a portable fiber optic spectrometer. This paper describes the evaluation of both innovative measurement approaches for their potential use with in-situ measurements.

  19. In situ Measurements of Phytoplankton Fluorescence Using Low Cost Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana L. Wright

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Chlorophyll a fluorometry has long been used as a method to study phytoplankton in the ocean. In situ fluorometry is used frequently in oceanography to provide depth-resolved estimates of phytoplankton biomass. However, the high price of commercially manufactured in situ fluorometers has made them unavailable to some individuals and institutions. Presented here is an investigation into building an in situ fluorometer using low cost electronics. The goal was to construct an easily reproducible in situ fluorometer from simple and widely available electronic components. The simplicity and modest cost of the sensor makes it valuable to students and professionals alike. Open source sharing of architecture and software will allow students to reconstruct and customize the sensor on a small budget. Research applications that require numerous in situ fluorometers or expendable fluorometers can also benefit from this study. The sensor costs US$150.00 and can be constructed with little to no previous experience. The sensor uses a blue LED to excite chlorophyll a and measures fluorescence using a silicon photodiode. The sensor is controlled by an Arduino microcontroller that also serves as a data logger.

  20. Advanced physical models and monitoring methods for in situ bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, K.; Chalmer, P.

    1996-05-30

    Numerous reports have indicated that contamination at DOE facilities is widespread and pervasive. Existing technology is often too costly or ineffective in remediating these contamination problems. An effective method to address one class of contamination, petroleum hydrocarbons, is in situ bioremediation. This project was designed to provide tools and approaches for increasing the reliability of in situ bioremediation. An example of the recognition within DOE for developing these tools is in the FY-1995 Technology Development Needs Summary of the Office of Technology Development of the US DOE. This document identifies specific needs addressed by this research. For example, Section 3.3 Need Statement IS-3 identifies the need for a {open_quotes}Rapid method to detect in situ biodegradation products.{close_quotes} Also, BW-I identifies the need to recognize boundaries between clean and contaminated materials and soils. Metabolic activity could identify these boundaries. Measuring rates of in situ microbial activity is critical to the fundamental understanding of subsurface microbiology and in selecting natural attenuation as a remediation option. Given the complexity and heterogeneity of subsurface environments, a significant cost incurred during bioremediation is the characterization of microbial activity, in part because so many intermediate end points (biomass, gene frequency, laboratory measurements of activity, etc.) must be used to infer in situ activity. A fast, accurate, real-time, and cost-effective method is needed to determine success of bioremediation at DOE sites.

  1. Feasibility of in situ beta ray measurements in underwater environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye Min; Park, Ki Hyun; Kang, Sung Won; Joo, Koan Sik

    2017-09-01

    We describe an attempt at the development of an in situ detector for beta ray measurements in underwater environment. The prototype of the in situ detector is based on a CaF2: Eu scintillator using crystal light guide and Si photomultiplier. Tests were conducted using various reference sources for evaluating the linearity and stability of the detector in underwater environment. The system is simple and stable for long-term monitoring, and consumes low power. We show here an effective detection distance of 7 mm and a 2.273 MeV end-point energy spectrum of 90 Sr/ 90 Y when using the system underwater. The results demonstrate the feasibility of in situ beta ray measurements in underwater environment and can be applied for designing an in situ detector for radioactivity measurement in underwater environment. The in situ detector can also have other applications such as installation on the marine monitoring platform and quantitative analysis of radionuclides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Nanoparticles laden in situ gel for sustained ocular drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Proper availability of drug on to corneal surface is a challenging task. However, due to ocular physiological barriers, conventional eye drops display poor ocular bioavailability of drugs (< 1%. To improve precorneal residence time and ocular penetration, earlier our group developed and evaluated in situ gel and nanoparticles for ocular delivery. In interest to evaluate the combined effect of in situ gel and nanoparticles on ocular retention, we combined them. We are the first to term this combination as "nanoparticle laden in situ gel", that is, poly lactic co glycolic acid nanoparticle incorporated in chitosan in situ gel for sparfloxacin ophthalmic delivery. The formulation was tested for various physicochemical properties. It showed gelation pH near pH 7.2. The observation of acquired gamma camera images showed good retention over the entire precorneal area for sparfloxacin nanoparticle laden in situ gel (SNG as compared to marketed formulation. SNG formulation cleared at a very slow rate and remained at corneal surface for longer duration as no radioactivity was observed in systemic circulation. The developed formulation was found to be better in combination and can go up to the clinical evaluation and application.

  3. In-situ pyrogenic production of biodiesel from swine fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jechan; Tsang, Yiu Fai; Jung, Jong-Min; Oh, Jeong-Ik; Kim, Hyung-Wook; Kwon, Eilhann E

    2016-11-01

    In-situ production of fatty acid methyl esters from swine fat via thermally induced pseudo-catalytic transesterification on silica was investigated in this study. Instead of methanol, dimethyl carbonate (DMC) was used as acyl acceptor to achieve environmental benefits and economic viability. Thermo-gravimetric analysis of swine fat reveals that swine fat contains 19.57wt.% of water and impurities. Moreover, the fatty acid profiles obtained under various conditions (extracted swine oil+methanol+NaOH, extracted swine oil+DMC+pseudo-catalytic, and swine fat+DMC+pseudo-catalytic) were compared. These profiles were identical, showing that the introduced in-situ transesterification is technically feasible. This also suggests that in-situ pseudo-catalytic transesterification has a high tolerance against impurities. This study also shows that FAME yield via in-situ pseudo-catalytic transesterification of swine fat reached up to 97.2% at 380°C. Therefore, in-situ pseudo-catalytic transesterification can be applicable to biodiesel production of other oil-bearing biomass feedstocks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Management of Adenocarcinoma In Situ of Cervix in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Abidi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Adenocarcinoma in situ is one of the premalignant lesions of the cervix and its incidence is believed to be increasing while the pathogenesis of the disease is not clearly understood. Management of Adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS unlike carcinoma in situ (CIS has not been clearly described in the current literature. Here we describe conservative management and serial colposcopy of two pregnant women with adenocarcinoma in situ of the cervix. Both of the cases were diagnosed initially with abnormal Pap smears and were confirmed by colposcopic directed biopsy. None of the patients agreed with any invasive procedure during pregnancy and both of them were followed with serial colposcopy. None of the lesions showed any evidence of progression. All cases underwent cold knife cone biopsies in their postpartum period. Hysterectomy as the final treatment has been done in both cases with no evidence of progression of the disease during pregnancy. We concluded that adenocarcinoma in situ of the cervix during pregnancy could be managed conservatively with definite treatment postponed till after delivery.

  5. In situ deposition of thallium-containing oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, K.E.

    1996-01-01

    The number and variety of thallium based materials that can be made by in situ methods have grown consistently since the first report of successful thallium cuprate deposition by Face and Nestlerode in 1992. Processes for the deposition of superconductors, normal metals, and insulators have been developed. Most work to date has been done on the Tl-1212 phases, TlBa 2 CaCu 2 O 7 and (Tl,Pb)Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 7 . Recently however, the in situ thallium technique has been extended to other materials. For example, epitaxial thin films of thallium tantalate, an insulator of the pyrochlore structure and a potential buffer layer for thallium cuprate films, have been grown. Multilayers, important in the fabrication of Josephson junctions, have been demonstrated with the thallium lead cuprates. This paper reviews progress in the area of in situ thallium deposition technology which will make more complex thallium cuprate multilayer structures and devices possible

  6. Microstructure analysis of laboratory and in-situ compacted silts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russo Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents and discusses some results of an experimental research aimed at analysing the influence of compaction variables (w and energy and method on the resulting microstructure of a compacted silty soil. In particular, the experimental data here discussed allow to compare the microstructure induced by different dynamic compaction techniques, comparing that characterising specimens obtained by two laboratory methods (Proctor standard and Harvard and that of samples compacted in-situ during the construction of an embankment built for river regimentation purposes. Both undisturbed and disturbed samples have been retrieved from the embankment, the latter one with the purpose of collecting the soil subsequently used for laboratory compaction. Microstructural analyses (SEM, MIP performed on laboratory and in-situ compacted samples evidenced a substantial similarity of the texture induced by the various compaction techniques, highlighting that laboratory compaction is suitable to provide soil samples representative of earth in-situ compacted soil.

  7. Development of portable HPGe spectrometer for in situ measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kail Artjoms

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In situ applications require a very high level of portability of high-resolution spectrometric equipment. Usage of HPGe detectors for radioactivity measurements in the environment or for nuclear safeguard applications, to combat illicit trafficking of nuclear materials or uranium and plutonium monitoring in nuclear wastes, has become a norm in the recent years. Portable HPGe-based radionuclide spectrometer with electrical cooling has lately appeared on the market for in situ applications. At the same time deterioration of energy resolution associated with vibrations produced by cryocooler or high weight of the instrument, short time of autonomous operation and high price of these spectrometers are limiting their usage in many cases. In this paper we present development results of ultra compact hand held all-in-one spectrometer for in situ measurements based on HPGe detector cooled by liquid nitrogen without listing the above disadvantages.

  8. Design, fabrication, and applications of in situ fluid cell TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongsheng; Nielsen, Michael H; De Yoreo, James J

    2013-01-01

    In situ fluid cell TEM is a powerful new tool for understanding dynamic processes during liquid phase chemical reactions, including mineral formation. This technique, which operates in the high vacuum of a TEM chamber, provides information on crystal structure, phase, morphology, size, aggregation/segregation, and crystal growth mechanisms in real time. In situ TEM records both crystal structure and morphology at spatial resolutions down to the atomic level with high temporal resolution of up to 10(-6)s per image, giving it distinct advantages over other in situ techniques such as optical microscopy, AFM, or X-ray scattering or diffraction. This chapter addresses the design, fabrication, and assembly of TEM fluid cells and applications of fluid cell TEM to understanding mechanisms of mineralization. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. In Situ burning of Arctic marine oil spills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritt-Rasmussen, Janne

    Oil spills in ice filled and Arctic waters pose other challenges for oil spill response compared to open and temperate waters. In situ burning has been proven to be an effective oil spill response method for oil spills in ice filled waters. This thesis presents results from laboratory and field...... experiments where the ignitability of oil spill as a function of oil type and weathering conditions (time/ice) was tested. The results show that the composition of the oil and the ice cover is important for the in situ burning time-window. The results were used to develop an algorithm that was implemented...... in a model, so it is possible to predict the operational time-window for in-situ burning....

  10. Applications of in situ hybridization to plant-improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasi, F.M.

    2004-01-01

    In situ hybridization is a powerful method for characteristic alien addition and substitution lines. RFLP analysis can identify the presence of a particular individual chromosome, but whether they are as a pair or as a single chromosome cannot be determined. In situ hybridization has become established as an essential method in cell and molecular biology. It is able to link DNA sequences with their organization and physical position. The rate of technology-development in the field of in situ hybridization has been rapid: radioactive probes are now rarely used, while labeling methods, fluorochromes, chromosomes and tissue-preparation methods, microscope and imaging technology have all useful in functional genomics and localization of transgenes on the chromosomes. (author)

  11. In Situ Atom Probe Deintercalation of Lithium-Manganese-Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Björn; Maier, Johannes; Arlt, Jonas; Nowak, Carsten

    2017-04-01

    Atom probe tomography is routinely used for the characterization of materials microstructures, usually assuming that the microstructure is unaltered by the analysis. When analyzing ionic conductors, however, gradients in the chemical potential and the electric field penetrating dielectric atom probe specimens can cause significant ionic mobility. Although ionic mobility is undesirable when aiming for materials characterization, it offers a strategy to manipulate materials directly in situ in the atom probe. Here, we present experimental results on the analysis of the ionic conductor lithium-manganese-oxide with different atom probe techniques. We demonstrate that, at a temperature of 30 K, characterization of the materials microstructure is possible without measurable Li mobility. Also, we show that at 298 K the material can be deintercalated, in situ in the atom probe, without changing the manganese-oxide host structure. Combining in situ atom probe deintercalation and subsequent conventional characterization, we demonstrate a new methodological approach to study ionic conductors even in early stages of deintercalation.

  12. Particle size alterations of feedstuffs during in situ NDF incubation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krämer, Monika; Nørgaard, P.; Lund, Peter

    2013-01-01

    evaluated in terms of particle size for a broad range of feedstuffs which typically serve as NDF sources in dairy cow rations. Early and late cut grass silages, corn silage, alfalfa silage, rapeseed meal and dried distillers grains were examined. Treatments were I) drying and grinding of forage samples...... determined and image analysis was used to estimate particle size profiles and thereby the risk for particle loss. Particle dimensions changed during NDF determination and in situ rumen incubation and variations depended on feedstuff and treatment. Late cut grass silage varied most in particle area among...... feedstuffs with a decrease of 74 % between 24 h and 288 h in situ rumen incubation. Together with the highest mass proportion (20 %) of particles in the critical zone for escape (smaller than 0.005 mm2 in area) for late cut grass silage after 288 h in situ rumen incubation, this imposes a risk for particle...

  13. Preparing glass slides and coverslips for in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Andras; Gertsenstein, Marina; Vintersten, Kristina; Behringer, Richard

    2007-11-01

    INTRODUCTIONPrecleaned glass slides are of high enough quality for both in situ and immunohistochemical techniques. However, for in situ hybridization, the slides need to be treated with diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEPC) so that any RNase attached to them is destroyed. The slides also need to be coated with 3-triethoxysilylpropylamine (TESPA) or poly-L-lysine so that the sections adhere tightly and do not detach during subsequent extensive washing procedures. This protocol describes techniques for coating slides with TESPA and poly-L-lysine. There are advantages and disadvantages to each coating method. TESPA-treated slides can be stored for a long time, but the sections do not adhere tightly until after drying. Poly-L-lysine-coated slides need to be made fresh, but the sections adhere immediately on contact with the surface. This protocol also describes how to prepare coverslips for in situ hybrization by coating them in a siliconizing solution.

  14. A portable hydrogenator for in-situ neutron scattering measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Xuezhong; Wu Erdong; Guo Xiumei; Du Xiaoming; Chen Bo; Sun Guang'ai

    2007-01-01

    A portable hydrogenator designed for neutron scattering measurements was developed. The factors of performance, operation, maintenance and safety etc. were taken into account in the design. The hydrogenator can be used not only in the conventional p-c-T isotherm measurements, but also in the in-situ neutron diffraction measurements for hydrides (deuterides) during hydrogenation. In order to insure high quality of the data from in-situ measurements, the null-matrix Ti-Zr alloy and the austenitic steel with high Mn content were used in the sample cells, and the cells were designed to be disconnectable from the hydrogenator under pressure seal. Computer control was realized in monitoring the temperature and pressure changes during experiments, and a relevant computer program was developed to correct the temperature and pressure effects, and reduce the bias errors of the system. The hydrogenator was successfully used in the in-situ diffraction experiments on several deuterides. (authors)

  15. Master of Puppets: Cooperative Multitasking for In Situ Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozov, Dmitriy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lukic, Zarija [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Modern scientific and engineering simulations track the time evolution of billions of elements. For such large runs, storing most time steps for later analysis is not a viable strategy. It is far more efficient to analyze the simulation data while it is still in memory. Here, we present a novel design for running multiple codes in situ: using coroutines and position-independent executables we enable cooperative multitasking between simulation and analysis, allowing the same executables to post-process simulation output, as well as to process it on the fly, both in situ and in transit. We present Henson, an implementation of our design, and illustrate its versatility by tackling analysis tasks with different computational requirements. This design differs significantly from the existing frameworks and offers an efficient and robust approach to integrating multiple codes on modern supercomputers. The techniques we present can also be integrated into other in situ frameworks.

  16. In situ measurement of conductivity during nanocomposite film deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blattmann, Christoph O.; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Flame-made nanosilver dynamics are elucidated in the gas-phase & on substrates. • The resistance of freshly depositing nanosilver layers is monitored. • Low T g polymers facilitate rapid synthesis of conductive films. • Conductive nanosilver films form on top of or within the polymer depending on MW. - Abstract: Flexible and electrically conductive nanocomposite films are essential for small, portable and even implantable electronic devices. Typically, such film synthesis and conductivity measurement are carried out sequentially. As a result, optimization of filler loading and size/morphology characteristics with respect to film conductivity is rather tedious and costly. Here, freshly-made Ag nanoparticles (nanosilver) are made by scalable flame aerosol technology and directly deposited onto polymeric (polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate)) films during which the resistance of the resulting nanocomposite is measured in situ. The formation and gas-phase growth of such flame-made nanosilver, just before incorporation onto the polymer film, is measured by thermophoretic sampling and microscopy. Monitoring the nanocomposite resistance in situ reveals the onset of conductive network formation by the deposited nanosilver growth and sinternecking. The in situ measurement is much faster and more accurate than conventional ex situ four-point resistance measurements since an electrically percolating network is detected upon its formation by the in situ technique. Nevertheless, general resistance trends with respect to filler loading and host polymer composition are consistent for both in situ and ex situ measurements. The time lag for the onset of a conductive network (i.e., percolation) depends linearly on the glass transition temperature (T g ) of the host polymer. This is attributed to the increased nanoparticle-polymer interaction with decreasing T g . Proper selection of the host polymer in combination with in situ resistance monitoring

  17. Experimental investigation of in situ cleanable HEPA filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, D.J.

    1999-01-01

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina is currently testing the feasibility of developing an in situ cleanable high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter system. Sintered metal filters are being tested for regenerability or cleanability in simulated conditions found in a high level waste (HLW) tank ventilation system. The filters are being challenged using materials found in HLW tanks. HLW simulated salt, HLW simulated sludge and South Carolina road dust. Various cleaning solutions have been used to clean the filters in situ. The tanks are equipped with a ventilation system to maintain the tank contents at negative pressure to prevent the release of radioactive material to the environment. This system is equipped with conventional disposable glass-fiber HEPA filter cartridges. Removal and disposal of these filters is not only costly, but subjects site personnel to radiation exposure and possible contamination. A test apparatus was designed to simulate the ventilation system of a HLW tank with an in situ cleaning system. Test results indicate that the Mott sintered metal HEPA filter is suitable as an in situ cleanable or regenerable HEPA filter. Data indicates that high humidity or water did not effect the filter performance and the sintered metal HEPA filter was easily cleaned numerous times back to new filter performance by an in situ spray system. The test apparatus allows the cleaning of the soiled HEPA filters to be accomplished without removing the filters from process. This innovative system would eliminate personnel radiation exposure associated with removal of contaminated filters and the high costs of filter replacement and disposal. The results of these investigations indicate that an in situ cleanable HEPA filter system for radioactive and commercial use could be developed and manufactured

  18. In situ measurement of conductivity during nanocomposite film deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blattmann, Christoph O.; Pratsinis, Sotiris E., E-mail: sotiris.pratsinis@ptl.mavt.ethz.ch

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Flame-made nanosilver dynamics are elucidated in the gas-phase & on substrates. • The resistance of freshly depositing nanosilver layers is monitored. • Low T{sub g} polymers facilitate rapid synthesis of conductive films. • Conductive nanosilver films form on top of or within the polymer depending on MW. - Abstract: Flexible and electrically conductive nanocomposite films are essential for small, portable and even implantable electronic devices. Typically, such film synthesis and conductivity measurement are carried out sequentially. As a result, optimization of filler loading and size/morphology characteristics with respect to film conductivity is rather tedious and costly. Here, freshly-made Ag nanoparticles (nanosilver) are made by scalable flame aerosol technology and directly deposited onto polymeric (polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate)) films during which the resistance of the resulting nanocomposite is measured in situ. The formation and gas-phase growth of such flame-made nanosilver, just before incorporation onto the polymer film, is measured by thermophoretic sampling and microscopy. Monitoring the nanocomposite resistance in situ reveals the onset of conductive network formation by the deposited nanosilver growth and sinternecking. The in situ measurement is much faster and more accurate than conventional ex situ four-point resistance measurements since an electrically percolating network is detected upon its formation by the in situ technique. Nevertheless, general resistance trends with respect to filler loading and host polymer composition are consistent for both in situ and ex situ measurements. The time lag for the onset of a conductive network (i.e., percolation) depends linearly on the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) of the host polymer. This is attributed to the increased nanoparticle-polymer interaction with decreasing T{sub g}. Proper selection of the host polymer in combination with in situ resistance

  19. In-situ bioremediation drilling and characterization work plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koegler, K.J.

    1994-01-01

    This work plan describes the design and construction of proposed wells and outlines the characterization activities to be performed in support of the In Situ Bioremediation Task for FY 1994. The purpose of the well-design is to facilitate implementation and monitoring of in situ biodegradation of CCl 4 in ground water. However, the wells will also be used to characterize the geology, hydrology, microbiology, and contaminant distribution, which will all feed into the design of the technology. Implementation and design of this remediation demonstration technology will be described separately in an integrated test plan

  20. In Situ Magnetic Separation for Extracellular Protein Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappler, T.; Cerff, Martin; Ottow, Kim Ekelund

    2009-01-01

    A new approach for in situ product removal from bioreactors is presented in which high-gradient magnetic separation is used. This separation process was used for the adsorptive removal of proteases secreted by Bacillus licheniformis. Small, non-porous bacitracin linked magnetic adsorbents were...... employed directly in the broth during the fermentation, followed by in situ magnetic separation, Proof of the concept was first demonstrated in shake flask culture, then scaled up and applied during a fed batch cultivation ill a 3.7 L bioreactor. It could be demonstrated that growth of B. licheniformis...

  1. In situ remediation integrated program: Success through teamwork

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, M.E.

    1994-08-01

    The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP), managed under the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Technology Development, focuses research and development efforts on the in-place treatment of contaminated environmental media, such as soil and groundwater, and the containment of contaminants to prevent the contaminants from spreading through the environment. As described here, specific ISR IP projects are advancing the application of in situ technologies to the demonstration point, providing developed technologies to customers within DOE. The ISR IP has also taken a lead role in assessing and supporting innovative technologies that may have application to DOE

  2. Cell In Situ Zymography: Imaging Enzyme-Substrate Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Aastha; Rani, Vibha

    2017-01-01

    Zymography has long been used for the detection of substrate-specific enzyme activity. In situ zymography (ISZ), an adaptation from the conventional substrate zymography, is a widely employed technique useful for the detection, localization, and estimation of enzyme-substrate interactions in tissues. Here, we describe a protocol to detect 'in position' matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity in cells utilizing H9c2 cardiomyoblasts as a model. This technique is primarily adopted from the method used for histological sections and is termed as 'Cell in situ Zymography'. It is a simple, sensitive, and quantifiable methodology to assess the functional activity of an enzyme 'on site/in position' in cell culture.

  3. In-situ studies with photons, neutrons and electrons scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannengiesser, Thomas; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Komizo, Yu-ichi; Ramirez, Antonio J.

    2010-01-01

    In-situ scattering and diffraction measurements using synchrotron and neutron beam lines have become a viable tool to look at the non-equilibrium processing of advanced materials. This volume presents the subject from the theoretical and experimental standpoint, in order to provide a closer insight into the different synchrotron and neutron diffraction techniques as well as innovative microscopy techniques. It addresses the following items: - phase detection and quantification - In-situ welding experiments - Stress/strain build-up - model development and Simulation - Analysis tools and programming (orig.)

  4. In situ studies on radiation tolerance of nanotwinned Cu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.; Li, J.; Yu, K.Y.; Wang, H.; Kirk, M.A.; Li, M.; Zhang, X.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the radiation response of nanotwinned Cu by using in situ Kr ion irradiation technique inside a transmission electron microscope. In comparison with coarse grained Cu, nanotwinned Cu exhibits smaller defect size and lower defect density. In situ studies also show that twin boundaries effectively remove a large number of defect clusters. The life time of defect clusters in nanotwinned Cu is very different from that in its coarse grained counterpart. This study provides further evidence on twin-boundary enabled radiation tolerance in nanotwinned metals.

  5. A rat model with an isolated bladder in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulesen, J; Olsen, P S; Grevstad, J U

    1997-01-01

    to the proximal part of the descending colon. The animals were treated with antibiotics, and saline was infused daily into the bladder in order to prevent atrophy. This in situ model is considered to be useful in studies investigating the influence of specific compounds, such as carcinogens, on the bladder......This paper describes our method for producing a rat model with an isolated bladder in situ in which the bladder makes no contact with urine. First, the right kidney was removed, then an external catheter was placed in the right ureter for bladder infusions, and next the left ureter was anatomosed...

  6. In situ monitoring of the electrochemical dissolution of tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krebsz, Melinda [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Combinatorial Oxide Chemistry at ICTAS, Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria); Kollender, Jan Philipp [Institute for Chemical Technology of Inorganic Materials (ICTAS), Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria); Hassel, Achim Walter [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Combinatorial Oxide Chemistry at ICTAS, Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria); Institute for Chemical Technology of Inorganic Materials (ICTAS), Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria)

    2017-09-15

    In the present work, which is aimed to monitor in situ the electrochemical dissolution of tungsten by using a Flow-Type Scanning Droplet Cell Microscope (FT-SDCM) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), novel results are reported. The anodic oxide growth and its dissolution on the surface of W have been monitored in situ. The results of this current study show the importance of coupling electrochemical experiments to ICP-MS. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Location specific in situ TEM straining specimens made using FIB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, R.D.; Papin, P.A.

    2004-01-01

    A method has been devised and demonstrated for producing in situ straining specimens for the transmission electron microscope (TEM) from specific locations in a sample using a dual-beam focused ion beam (FIB) instrument. The specimen is removed from a polished surface in the FIB using normal methods and then attached to a pre-fabricated substrate in the form of a modified TEM tensile specimen. In this manner, specific features of the microstructure of a polished optical mount can be selected for in situ tensile straining. With the use of electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD), this technique could be extended to select specific orientations of the specimen as well

  8. Progress and applications of in situ transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Rongming; Liu Jialong; Song Yuanjun

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in the application of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is briefly reviewed. It is emphasized that the development of advanced in situ TEM techniques makes it possible to investigate the evolution of materials under heat, strain, magnetic field, electric field or chemical reaction environments on the atomic scale. The mechanism of the microstructure evolution under various conditions and the relationship between the atomic structures and their properties can be obtained, which is beneficial for the design of new materials with tailored properties. The clarification of the structure-property relationship will help to develop new materials and solve related basic problems in the field of condensed matter physics. (authors)

  9. Synthesis of new pyrrole–pyridine-based ligands using an in situ Suzuki coupling method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Böttger

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The compounds 6-(pyrrol-2-yl-2,2‘-bipyridine, 2-(pyrrol-2-yl-1,10-phenanthroline and 2-(2-(N-methylbenz[d,e]imidazole-6-(pyrrol-2-yl-pyridine were synthesized by using an in situ generated boronic acid for the Suzuki coupling. Crystals of the products could be grown and exhibited interesting structures by X-ray analysis, one of them showing a chain-like network with the adjacent molecules linked to each other via intermolecular N–H…N hydrogen bonds.

  10. In situ realization of particlelike scattering states in a microwave cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Julian; Brandstötter, Andre; Ambichl, Philipp; Rotter, Stefan; Kuhl, Ulrich

    2018-02-01

    We realize scattering states in a lossy and chaotic two-dimensional microwave cavity which follow bundles of classical particle trajectories. To generate such particlelike scattering states, we measure the system's complex transmission matrix and apply an adapted Wigner-Smith time-delay formalism to it. The necessary shaping of the incident wave is achieved in situ using phase- and amplitude-regulated microwave antennas. Our experimental findings pave the way for establishing spatially confined communication channels that avoid possible intruders or obstacles in wave-based communication systems.

  11. Waste water treatment of CO2+O2 in-situ leaching uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Lechang; Liu Naizhong; Du Zhiming; Wang Hongying

    2012-01-01

    An in-situ leaching uranium mine located in Northern China uses CO 2 +O 2 leaching process to leach uranium. The consumption of industrial reagent and water, and generation and discharge of waste water are minimized by comprehensive waste water treatment technology with process water recycle, reverse osmosis and natural evaporation. The process water of the mine that can be recycled and reused includes barren fluid, solution washing loaded resin, precipitating mother solution and filtered liquor of yellow cake. Solution regenerating barren resin is treated by reverse osmosis. Concentrated water from reverse osmosis and solution washing barren resin are naturally evaporated. (authors)

  12. Analysis of in-situ tritium recovery from solid fusion-reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Clemmer, R.G.; Jankus, V.Z.; Rest, J.

    1980-01-01

    The proposed concept for in-situ tritium recovery from the STARFIRE blanket involves circulation of a low pressure (approx. 0.05 MPa) helium through formed channels in the highly porous solid breeding material. Tritium generated within the grains must diffuse to the grain boundaries, migrate through the grain boundaries to the particle surface and then percolate through the packed bed to the helium purge channel. Highly porous α-LiAlO 2 with a bimodal pore distribution is proposed for the breeding material to facilitate the tritium release

  13. In situ self-polymerization of unsaturated metal methacrylate and its dispersion mechanism in rubber-based composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Shipeng; Zhou, Yao; Yao, Lu; Zhang, Liqun; Chan, Tung W.; Liang, Yongri; Liu, Li

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • In situ self-polymerization of unsaturated metal methacrylate was investigated mainly by the thermal effect. • UMM with low melting point can self-polymerize to a large extent. • The fine dispersion phase is composed of poly(UMM) nanoparticles formed by in situ self-polymerization in the rubber matrix. • The UMM crystals in the presence of peroxide and rubber undergo the processes of melting, diffusion, polymerization, and phase separation in this order. - Abstract: Unsaturated metal methacrylate (UMM) as one kind of functional filler has played an important role in reinforcing rubber materials. The in situ self-polymerization of UMM in UMM/rubber composite leads to the uniform dispersion of poly(UMM) in the rubber matrix, while the crosslinking of rubber and grafting between UMM and rubber chains occur simultaneously, making it difficult to clarify the effect of the in situ polymerization on the dispersion of poly(UMM) in the rubber matrix. In this work, we investigated the dispersion mechanism of UMM without rubber matrix for the first time using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Three types of UMMs including zinc methacrylate (Zn(MA) 2 ), sodium methacrylate (Na(MA)) and samarium methacrylate (Sm(MA) 3 ) were chosen to investigate the in situ self-polymerization of UMM. Based on DSC results, we conclude that the crystals with low melting point tend to self-polymerize first and generate a large amount of heat in the presence of peroxide. The high heat of reaction can melt the crystals with high melting point, and more UMM molecules are dissolved in the rubber matrix, thus increasing the extent of the in situ polymerization. Hence, the UMM with low melting point can self-polymerize to a large extent. Our findings provide in-depth understanding of the dispersion mechanism of UMM in rubber

  14. In situ simulation - fire modeller. :Udfordringer og muligheder i arbejdspladslæring

    OpenAIRE

    Musaeus, Peter; Krogh, Kristian; Paltved, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    IntroductionIn situ simulation is characterized by being situated inthe clinical environment as opposed to the simulationlaboratory. But in situ simulation bears a familyresemblance to other types of on the job training. Weexplore a typology of in situ simulation and suggest thatthere are four fruitful approaches to in situ simulation: (1)In situ simulation informed by reported critical incidentsand adverse events from emergency departments (ED)in which team training is about to be conducted ...

  15. In - situ temperature measurement to determine the machining behavior of different tool coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertens, T.; Engering, G.; Lahres, M.; Pecher, U.; Damm, S.; Doerr, J.; Huehsam, A.

    2001-01-01

    A research project for the development of dry lubricant coatings for the cutting tools of different machining operations demanded the generation of certain experimental techniques to attain knowledge about the coatings behavior. The solution developed compares the coatings by observing their temperature behavior during the machining process. A method of in-situ temperature measurement during turning formed the basis of this solution. The method of measurement was further modified for other operations. In addition to the thermographic recording during dry turning, solutions for dry threading, dry drilling and dry milling were also developed. The experimental set-ups were generated were generated in collaboration with several project partners. For each machining operation investigated, a specific device was developed, which made the in-situ temperature measurement possible using the high resolution thermographic camera. The results were such, that it became possible to attain knowledge about the coating's in-process temperature behavior for each of the processes investigated. Furthermore the individual coatings are compared among themselves and with uncoated tools. The combination of the temperature and wear measurement yields the possibility for optimization and further development of suitable self-lubricant coated tools for dry machining applications. (author)

  16. In-Situ Micromechanical Testing in Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupinacci, Amanda Sofia

    were also utilized to obtain better understanding of the deformation mechanisms in the presence of a preexisting defect, such as a crack. Similar twinning behavior is observed in the Sn96 alloy however, it was also found that grain boundaries and second phase intermetallics can act as sources for dislocation motion and generation. The observations and analysis in this thesis give novel insight into the deformation mechanisms of two materials in extreme environments. In the case of cryogenic testing we have demonstrated the preference for Sn based solders to undergo deformation twinning as a primary deformation mechanism below the DBTT of the alloy. Prior to this study, deformation mechanisms of pure Sn below the DBTT were not well characterized due to a lack of experimental methods for doing so. In this study, we have developed a novel in situ cryogenic apparatus that has made it possible to systematically study plasticity mechanisms down to -142 °C. Through EBSD and TEM characterization of the twinning behavior at cryogenic temperatures, we have gained a greater understanding of the deformation mechanisms that are active below the DBTT. Furthermore, we have extended this technique to a more complex alloy, Sn96 as well as more complex geometries (clamped beam geometry). In the case of ion irradiated stainless steel, which is a surrogate for neutron irradiations, we have correlated the mechanical property response that is associated with various irradiation conditions with the defects induced during irradiation. Due to the fact that ion beam irradaion has a limted penetration depth, nanoindetation and micro compression testing needed to be deployed. Through both nanoindentation and Laue micro diffraction we have shown a direct correlation between the observed radaition induced increase in hardness and the radaition induced increase in FWHM. We found that 10dpa ion beam irradaion is enough to saturate the material in hardening as well as lattice strain which is related

  17. High-pressure cell for neutron diffraction with in situ pressure control at cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Matthew K.; Ridley, Christopher J.; Bocian, Artur; Kirichek, Oleg; Manuel, Pascal; Khalyavin, Dmitry; Azuma, Masaki; Attfield, J. Paul; Kamenev, Konstantin V.

    2014-04-01

    Pressure generation at cryogenic temperatures presents a problem for a wide array of experimental techniques, particularly neutron studies due to the volume of sample required. We present a novel, compact pressure cell with a large sample volume in which load is generated by a bellow. Using a supply of helium gas up to a pressure of 350 bar, a load of up to 78 kN is generated with leak-free operation. In addition, special fiber ports added to the cryogenic center stick allow for in situ pressure determination using the ruby pressure standard. Mechanical stability was assessed using finite element analysis and the dimensions of the cell have been optimized for use with standard cryogenic equipment. Load testing and on-line experiments using NaCl and BiNiO3 have been done at the WISH instrument of the ISIS pulsed neutron source to verify performance.

  18. High-pressure cell for neutron diffraction with in situ pressure control at cryogenic temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Matthew K; Ridley, Christopher J; Bocian, Artur; Kirichek, Oleg; Manuel, Pascal; Khalyavin, Dmitry; Azuma, Masaki; Attfield, J Paul; Kamenev, Konstantin V

    2014-04-01

    Pressure generation at cryogenic temperatures presents a problem for a wide array of experimental techniques, particularly neutron studies due to the volume of sample required. We present a novel, compact pressure cell with a large sample volume in which load is generated by a bellow. Using a supply of helium gas up to a pressure of 350 bar, a load of up to 78 kN is generated with leak-free operation. In addition, special fiber ports added to the cryogenic center stick allow for in situ pressure determination using the ruby pressure standard. Mechanical stability was assessed using finite element analysis and the dimensions of the cell have been optimized for use with standard cryogenic equipment. Load testing and on-line experiments using NaCl and BiNiO3 have been done at the WISH instrument of the ISIS pulsed neutron source to verify performance.

  19. High-pressure cell for neutron diffraction with in situ pressure control at cryogenic temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, Matthew K.; Ridley, Christopher J.; Bocian, Artur; Kamenev, Konstantin V., E-mail: k.kamenev@ed.ac.uk [School of Engineering and CSEC, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Kirichek, Oleg; Manuel, Pascal; Khalyavin, Dmitry [ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford (United Kingdom); Azuma, Masaki [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Attfield, J. Paul [School of Chemistry and CSEC, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15

    Pressure generation at cryogenic temperatures presents a problem for a wide array of experimental techniques, particularly neutron studies due to the volume of sample required. We present a novel, compact pressure cell with a large sample volume in which load is generated by a bellow. Using a supply of helium gas up to a pressure of 350 bar, a load of up to 78 kN is generated with leak-free operation. In addition, special fiber ports added to the cryogenic center stick allow for in situ pressure determination using the ruby pressure standard. Mechanical stability was assessed using finite element analysis and the dimensions of the cell have been optimized for use with standard cryogenic equipment. Load testing and on-line experiments using NaCl and BiNiO{sub 3} have been done at the WISH instrument of the ISIS pulsed neutron source to verify performance.

  20. Diagnosis of In Situ Metabolic State and Rates of Microbial Metabolism During In Situ Uranium Bioremediation with Molecular Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovley, Derek R

    2012-11-28

    The goal of these projects was to develop molecule tools to tract the metabolic activity and physiological status of microorganisms during in situ uranium bioremediation. Such information is important in able to design improved bioremediation strategies. As summarized below, the research was highly successful with new strategies developed for estimating in situ rates of metabolism and diagnosing the physiological status of the predominant subsurface microorganisms. This is a first not only for groundwater bioremediation studies, but also for subsurface microbiology in general. The tools and approaches developed in these studies should be applicable to the study of microbial communities in a diversity of soils and sediments.

  1. Work hardening mechanism in high nitrogen austenitic steel studied by in situ neutron diffraction and in situ electron backscattering diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojima, M.; Adachi, Y.; Tomota, Y.; Ikeda, K.; Kamiyama, T.; Katada, Y.

    2009-01-01

    With a focus on microstructural hierarchy, work hardening behaviour in high nitrogen-bearing austenitic steel (HNS) was investigated mainly by a combined technique of in situ neutron diffraction and in situ electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD). Stress partitioning due to difference in deformability among grains is enhanced in HNS. The larger stress partitioning among [h k l]-oriented family grains seems to realize high work hardening at a small strain. At a larger strain, dislocation density is higher in HNS than in low nitrogen austenitic steel (LNS), which is a possible reason for high work hardening after straining proceeds, resulting in large uniform elongation.

  2. In situ x-ray diffraction and in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy for investigation of intercalation batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy-Clement, C.; Mondoloni, C.; Godart, C.; Cortes, R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents applications of in situ X-ray diffraction and absorption techniques to the study of H + /MnO 2 alkaline batteries. The two complementary in situ techniques are described. Investigation of the electrochemical insertion and deinsertion of H + has been made through its influence on the evolution of the crystallographic structure of γ-MnO 2 , while investigation of the transfer of e - has been undertaken through the variation of the oxidation state of the manganese during the discharging and charging process of a battery. New insights in the understanding of the mechanisms of proton insertion and charge transfer into γ-MnO 2 are discussed

  3. In situ hydrogenation of model compounds and raw bio-oil over Raney Ni catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Ying; Long, Jinxing; Liu, Qiying; Li, Yanbin; Wang, Chenguang; Zhang, Qi; Lv, Wei; Zhang, Xinghua; Qiu, Songbai; Wang, Tiejun; Ma, Longlong

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Over Raney Ni catalyst, the aqueous phase reforming (APR) of methanol could couple with the hydrogenation of the model compounds of bio-oil and the raw bio-oil. The hydrogen product from the APR of methanol could offer hydrogen source for the upgrading of the raw bio-oil. The main products of acetone and phenol were isopropanol and cyclohexanol. At 220 °C and 3 MPa, the conversion of acetone and phenol reached the highest point with 55.76% and 64.65% and the bio-oil was improved not only on the appearance but also on the composition significantly. The contents of ketone/aldehyde and organic acids decreased from 30.36% and 39.89% to 9.32% and 30.25% respectively. The contents of alcohols and esters increased from 8.89% and 4.9% to 16.33% and 20.53%. During the in situ hydrogenation process, hydrogenation and esterification were the main reactions in the bio-oil. - Highlights: • We proposed a novel hydrogenation method in mild condition without adding external hydrogen. • The methanol APR and hydrogenation of model compounds and the raw bio-oil could couple with each other. • The hydrogen generated in situ by the APR of methanol could be used for the hydrogenation of the raw bio oil. • After in situ hydrogenation, the appearance and composition of the bio oil was improved significantly. - Abstract: The conversion of renewable energy is one of the most important research fields. A novel upgrading method of bio-oil produced from fast pyrolysis of biomass was reported in the paper. Methanol, as hydrogenation liquid donor, was used in the hydrogenation process instead of hydrogen gas. The effects on the aqueous phase reforming (APR) of methanol and the in situ hydrogenation of model compounds (acetone and phenol) and bio-oil were investigated. The results showed that over Raney Ni catalyst, the in situ hydrogenation could couple with the APR of methanol. The conversions of acetone and phenol reached the highest point with 55.76% and 64

  4. Synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticle S-ovalbumin protein conjugates by in situ conjugation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Deepti, E-mail: deeptimishrajoshi@gmail.com; Soni, R. K. [Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Physics Department (India)

    2015-05-15

    Pure gold and silver nanoparticle (NP) generation and their conjugation with protein S-ovalbumin using in situ conjugation process have been reported. The in situ conjugation involves nanosecond pulse laser ablation of pure metal target in the protein S-ovalbumin solution. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV–Visible absorption results show decrease in mean NP size along with narrow particle size distribution on ablation in S-ovalbumin solution as compared to ablation in water for both Au and Ag NPs. Also, the NP size reduction was found to be dependent on the concentration of S-ovalbumin. For AuNPs, spherical NPs of mean size 4 nm with particle size distribution 2–6 nm were obtained at 300 nM S-ovalbumin concentration. Further, it has been observed that the resultant in situ-conjugated colloid gold and silver NP solutions were quite stable even in the presence of NaCl at physiological salt concentration (0.15 M). On post-laser irradiation (532 nm, 15 mJ) for 20 min, 9 nm red shift in surface plasmon resonance peak (SPR), along with increased broadening towards longer wavelength, was observed in the AuNPs–S-ovalbumin sample. Further increase in the time of irradiation showed shift in AuNPs–S-ovalbumin SPR towards lower wavelength. On laser irradiation (532 nm, 15 mJ) for 20 min, no significant change was observed in the line shape of the plasmon absorption band of the AgNPs–S-ovalbumin conjugate. FTIR spectra revealed that S-ovalbumin peptide backbone and secondary structure remain unchanged on laser irradiation during in situ conjugation process. Thus, integrity of S-ovalbumin does not get affected, and no degradation of S-ovalbumin takes place on laser-induced in situ conjugation. Raman results confirm that both Au and Ag NPs interact with S-ovalbumin via thiol-bearing cysteine residues of the disulfide bond.

  5. In meso in situ serial X-ray crystallography of soluble and membrane proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chia-Ying [Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland); Olieric, Vincent [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Ma, Pikyee [Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland); Panepucci, Ezequiel [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Diederichs, Kay [Universität Konstanz, M647, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Wang, Meitian, E-mail: meitian.wang@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Caffrey, Martin, E-mail: meitian.wang@psi.ch [Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland)

    2015-05-14

    A method for performing high-throughput in situ serial X-ray crystallography with soluble and membrane proteins in the lipid cubic phase is described. It works with microgram quantities of protein and lipid (and ligand when present) and is compatible with the most demanding sulfur SAD phasing. The lipid cubic phase (LCP) continues to grow in popularity as a medium in which to generate crystals of membrane (and soluble) proteins for high-resolution X-ray crystallographic structure determination. To date, the PDB includes 227 records attributed to the LCP or in meso method. Among the listings are some of the highest profile membrane proteins, including the β{sub 2}-adrenoreceptor–G{sub s} protein complex that figured in the award of the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Lefkowitz and Kobilka. The most successful in meso protocol to date uses glass sandwich crystallization plates. Despite their many advantages, glass plates are challenging to harvest crystals from. However, performing in situ X-ray diffraction measurements with these plates is not practical. Here, an alternative approach is described that provides many of the advantages of glass plates and is compatible with high-throughput in situ measurements. The novel in meso in situ serial crystallography (IMISX) method introduced here has been demonstrated with AlgE and PepT (alginate and peptide transporters, respectively) as model integral membrane proteins and with lysozyme as a test soluble protein. Structures were solved by molecular replacement and by experimental phasing using bromine SAD and native sulfur SAD methods to resolutions ranging from 1.8 to 2.8 Å using single-digit microgram quantities of protein. That sulfur SAD phasing worked is testament to the exceptional quality of the IMISX diffraction data. The IMISX method is compatible with readily available, inexpensive materials and equipment, is simple to implement and is compatible with high-throughput in situ serial data collection at

  6. In-situ deposition of hydroxyapatite on graphene nanosheets

    OpenAIRE

    Neelgund, Gururaj M.; Oki, Aderemi; Luo, Zhiping

    2013-01-01

    Graphene nanosheets were effectively functionalized by in-situ deposition of hydroxyaptite through a facile chemical precipitation method. Prior to grafting of hydroxyapatite, chemically modified graphene nanosheets were obtained by the reduction of graphene oxide in presence of ethylenediamine. The resulting hydroxyapatite functionalized graphene nanosheets were characterized by attenuated total reflection IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, trans...

  7. Injectable In Situ Forming Microparticles: A Novel Drug Delivery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pharmaceutical formulation research has recently been focusing on delivery systems which provide long therapeutic effects and reduced side effects, and involving simplified production stages and facilitated application process. In situ forming microparticle (ISM) systems, one of the latest approach in this field, offer a new ...

  8. Z-DNA, a new in situ marker for transcription

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černá, Adriana; Cuadrado, A.; Jouve, N.; de la Espina, S. M. D.; De la Torre, C.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 1 (2004), s. 49-55 ISSN 1121-760X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS5038351 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : Allium cepa * Z-DNA immunodetection * in situ run-on transcription Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.845, year: 2004

  9. Applied in situ product recovery in ABE fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalander, Carl‐Axel; Lee, Jonathan G. M.; Davies, E. Timothy; Harvey, Adam P.

    2017-01-01

    The production of biobutanol is hindered by the product's toxicity to the bacteria, which limits the productivity of the process. In situ product recovery of butanol can improve the productivity by removing the source of inhibition. This paper reviews in situ product recovery techniques applied to the acetone butanol ethanol fermentation in a stirred tank reactor. Methods of in situ recovery include gas stripping, vacuum fermentation, pervaporation, liquid–liquid extraction, perstraction, and adsorption, all of which have been investigated for the acetone, butanol, and ethanol fermentation. All techniques have shown an improvement in substrate utilization, yield, productivity or both. Different fermentation modes favored different techniques. For batch processing gas stripping and pervaporation were most favorable, but in fed‐batch fermentations gas stripping and adsorption were most promising. During continuous processing perstraction appeared to offer the best improvement. The use of hybrid techniques can increase the final product concentration beyond that of single‐stage techniques. Therefore, the selection of an in situ product recovery technique would require comparable information on the energy demand and economics of the process. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:563–579, 2017 PMID:28188696

  10. In situ rumen degradability characteristics of rice straw, soybean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In situ rumen degradability characteristics of rice straw, soybean curd residue and peppermint (Mentha piperita) in Hanwoo steer (Bos Taurus coreanae). Byong Tae Jeon, KyoungHoon Kim, Sung Jin Kim, Na Yeon Kim, Jae Hyun Park, Dong Hyun Kim, Mi Rae Oh, Sang Ho Moon ...

  11. Applied in situ product recovery in ABE fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outram, Victoria; Lalander, Carl-Axel; Lee, Jonathan G M; Davies, E Timothy; Harvey, Adam P

    2017-05-01

    The production of biobutanol is hindered by the product's toxicity to the bacteria, which limits the productivity of the process. In situ product recovery of butanol can improve the productivity by removing the source of inhibition. This paper reviews in situ product recovery techniques applied to the acetone butanol ethanol fermentation in a stirred tank reactor. Methods of in situ recovery include gas stripping, vacuum fermentation, pervaporation, liquid-liquid extraction, perstraction, and adsorption, all of which have been investigated for the acetone, butanol, and ethanol fermentation. All techniques have shown an improvement in substrate utilization, yield, productivity or both. Different fermentation modes favored different techniques. For batch processing gas stripping and pervaporation were most favorable, but in fed-batch fermentations gas stripping and adsorption were most promising. During continuous processing perstraction appeared to offer the best improvement. The use of hybrid techniques can increase the final product concentration beyond that of single-stage techniques. Therefore, the selection of an in situ product recovery technique would require comparable information on the energy demand and economics of the process. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:563-579, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Biotechnology Progress published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  12. Prenatal detection of aneuploidies using fluorescence in situ ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful molecular cytogenetic technique which allows rapid detection of aneuploidies on interphase cells and metaphase spreads. The aim of the present study was to evaluate FISH as a tool in prenatal diagnosis of aneuploidies in high risk pregnancies in an Indian set up.

  13. In?situ permeability from integrated poroelastic reflection coefficients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dalen, K.N.; Ghose, R.; Drijkoningen, C.G.; Smeulders, D.M.J.

    2010-01-01

    A reliable estimate of the in?situ permeability of a porous layer in the subsurface is extremely difficult to obtain. We have observed that at the field seismic frequency band the poroelastic behavior for different seismic wavetypes can differ in such a way that their combination gives unique

  14. Opportunities for in-situ diffraction studies of advanced materials ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Opportunities for in-situ diffraction studies of advanced materials under extreme conditions at the US spallation neutron source. J P HODGES. Neutron Scattering Sciences Division, Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National. Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, TN 37831-6474, USA. E-mail: hodgesj@ornl.gov. Abstract.

  15. OceanSITES PAPA daily in-situ data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This file contains daily real-time and delayed-mode in-situ data from station Papa at 50N,145W in the North Pacific. This taut-line mooring has been instrumented...

  16. OceanSITES TAO daily in-situ data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This file contains daily real-time and delayed-mode in-situ data from one of the flux reference mooring sites in the tropical oceans. Included in this file are sea...

  17. In situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minor, Andrew M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This dissertation presents the development of the novel mechanical testing technique of in situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). This technique makes it possible to simultaneously observe and quantify the mechanical behavior of nano-scale volumes of solids.

  18. In-situ biogas upgrading process: modeling and simulations aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lovato, Giovanna; Alvarado-Morales, Merlin; Kovalovszki, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Biogas upgrading processes by in-situ hydrogen (H2) injection are still challenging and could benefit from a mathematical model to predict system performance. Therefore, a previous model on anaerobic digestion was updated and expanded to include the effect of H2 injection into the liquid phase of...

  19. Isolation of cancer cells by "in situ" microfluidic biofunctionalization protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Vitis, Stefania; Matarise, Giuseppina; Pardeo, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is the development of a microfluidic immunosensor for the immobilization of cancer cells and their separation from healthy cells by using "in situ" microfluidic biofunctionalization protocols. These protocols allow to link antibodies on microfluidic device surfaces and can be...

  20. Historical perspective of in situ hybridization for the analysis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In situ hybridization involves hybridization of DNA or RNA probes to the cytological preparations. The technique originally used auto-radiographic labeling to map both repetitive and low copy DNA sequences. The problem associated with this technique was its short half life, lack of safety and long exposure time which ...

  1. Effect of method of sample preparation on ruminal in situ ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of method of sample preparation on the degradation kinetics of herbage when applying the in situ technique. Ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum cv. Midmar) was harvested at three and four weeks after cutting and fertilizing with 200 kg nitrogen (N)/ha. Freshly cut herbage ...

  2. Designing in situ simulation in the emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paltved, Charlotte; Bjerregaard, Anders Thais; Krogh, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    Baggrund: Dette interventionsstudie har til formål at forbedre patientsikkerheden gennem design af in situ simulation. Undersøgelsen fandt sted på en akut medicinsk stue i den centrale region i Danmark. Forskning tyder på, at mangelfuld handover kommunikation kan øge sandsynligheden for kritiske ...

  3. Experimental investigation of in situ cleanable HEPA filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, D.J.

    2000-01-01

    Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), High Level Waste Division, Tanks Focus Area, and the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) have been investigating high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters which can be regenerated or cleaned in situ as an alternative to conventional disposable HEPA filters. This technical report documents concerns pertaining to conventional HEPA filters

  4. The IN SITU PRACLAY demonstration and confirmation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernier, F.; Li, X.L.; Verstricht, J.; Bastiaens, W.

    2008-01-01

    The PRACLAY Demonstration and Confirmation Experiments consist in the experimental work and the supporting studies related to the characterisation, the verification, the confirmation and the demonstration of relevant elements of the disposal system for vitrified heat emitting waste in Boom Clay. The programme includes surface and in situ large scale experiments. At this time the PRACLAY Demonstration and Confirmation Experiments are divided in two main parts: PRACLAY IN SITU and PRACLAY SURFACE. This paper describes the achievements and the future works of the IN SITU part of the programme. The achievements are the demonstration of the construction of shafts and galleries at industrial scale and the characterisation of the hydro-mechanical response of the host rock. Many geotechnical measurements have been performed around excavations. Comparison between in-situ measurements and modelling results allowed a continuous improvement of our knowledge on the Boom Clay behaviour. The future works will consist mainly in the realisation of the 'PRACLAY Heater Experiment' a large scale heater test. For this purpose, a blind gallery about 45 m long will be excavated using a tunneling machine. The diameter will be 2.5 m. The design study of the experiment pointed out the importance of the hydromechanical conditions prevailing during the thermal phase. (authors)

  5. Determination of forage escape protein value with in situ and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to compare in situ and in vitro enzyme techniques for determining estimates of forage escape proteins. Eight forages (vetch hay, wheat silage, corn silage, wheat hay, grass hay, lentil straw, triticale hay and alfalfa hay) were used as feed materials. During 70 h, incubation with enzyme method had ...

  6. In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

  7. 3D float tracking: in situ floodplain roughness estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straatsma, M.W.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a novel technique to quantify in situ hydrodynamic roughness of submerged floodplain vegetation: 3D float tracking. This method uses a custom-built floating tripod that is released on the inundated floodplain and tracked from shore by a robotic total station. Simultaneously, an

  8. In situ TEM observation of solid-gas reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishita, K [Material Analysis Department, Material Engineering Division2, Vehicle Engineering Group, Toyota Motor Corporation, 1 Toyota-cho, Toyota 471-8572 (Japan); Kamino, T; Watabe, A [Hitachi High-Technologies Corporation, 11-1 Ishikawa-cho, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-0057 (Japan); Kuroda, K [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Saka, H [HVEM Facility, Ecotopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2008-08-15

    Under a gaseous atmosphere at high temperatures, almost all the materials (metal, catalysts, etc.) change their structures and properties. For the research and development of materials, it is of vital importance to clarify mechanisms of solid-gas and liquid-gas reactions. Recently an in situ TEM system combined with an environmental holder, which has a gas injection nozzle close to a specimen-heating element, has been developed. The gas injection nozzle permits gas to flow around the specimens sitting on the heating element made of a fine W filament. The newly developed in situ TEM has a differential pumping system; therefore, the pressure in the specimen chamber is maintained in the range of higher than 1 Pa, while the pressure in the electron gun chamber can be kept in the range of 10{sup -5} Pa. This system was applied to in situ observation of chemical reactions of metals with gases: Observation of oxidation and reduction under a gas pressure ranging from 10{sup -5} Pa to 1 Pa at high temperatures (room temperature to {approx}1473 K) were successfully carried out on pure metal and rare metal catalysts at near-atomic resolution. This in situ environmental TEM system is promising for clarifying mechanisms of many solid-gas and liquid-gas reactions that take place at high temperatures under a gas atmosphere.

  9. In situ growth rate of Solen cylindraceus (Mollusca: Euheterodonta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth lines of this species are too indistinct and irregular to be of any use. This study, therefore, adopted a more direct method of monitoring the shell length of individuals, by caging them in situ. Shell measurements were taken from the individuals in cages and the surrounding environment at monthly intervals for one year.

  10. Maritime In Situ Sensing Inter-Operable Networks (MISSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    reflective coral reefs , tidal currents, shipping, and impulsive biological noise from snapping shrimp. NUS has developed underwater modems that have...enable analysis of the channel scattering function and link margin. Such in situ measurements are supporting the development of physics-based... diverse environmental conditions exercised U.S. Seaweb technology as the underlying communications network integrating a heterogeneous set of

  11. Boom clay rheology laboratory and in situ tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousset, G.; Bazargan, B.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanical behaviour of Boom clay is characterized by the importance of time dependent effects. Laboratory tests intended to study this behaviour are performed. Viscoplastic solutions are used to model the clay behaviour, 11 parameters entered in the model. The first results of research conducted about the in situ creep behaviour of clays are described. Field tests and laboratory experiment are compared

  12. Characteristics of laser In-situ alloyed titanium aluminides coatings

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tlotleng, Monnamme

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available to study the in-situ alloying of the elemental Ti and Al using laser metal deposition (LMD) process. The effects of laser power on the microstructure evolution, composition and micro-hardness were evaluated on the as-produced TiAl coatings. The results...

  13. In-Situ Investigation of Local Boundary Migration During Recrystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yubin; Godfrey, Andy; Juul Jensen, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    A combination of electron channeling contrast (ECC) and electron backscatter diffraction pattern (EBSP) techniques has been used to follow in situ the migration during annealing at 323 K (50 A degrees C) of a recrystallizing boundary through the deformed matrix of high-purity aluminum rolled to 8...

  14. Supernumerary ring chromosome 20 characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Langen, Irene M.; Otter, Mariëlle A.; Aronson, Daniël C.; Overweg-Plandsoen, W.C.G.; Hennekam, Raoul C.M.; Leschot, Nico J.; Hoovers, Jan M.N.

    1996-01-01

    We report on a boy with mild dysmorphic features and developmental delay, in whom karyotyping showed an additional minute ring chromosome in 60% of metaphases. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a centromere specific probe demonstrated that the ring chromosome contained the centromeric

  15. Charleston Pouch with In-Situ Appendix and Concealed Umbilical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cancer recurrence was recorded in 3 patients at 12, 27 and 32 months. Conclusions: The Charleston pouch with in-situ appendix is an efficient versatile technique for the creation of a catheterizable continent cutaneous urinary reservoir. The umbilical stoma with triangular skin flap provides excellent cosmetic results.

  16. Manual of acid in situ leach uranium mining technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-08-01

    In situ leaching (ISL) technology recovers uranium using two alternative chemical leaching systems - acid and alkaline. This report brings together information from several technical disciplines that are an essential part of ISL technology. They include uranium geology, geohydrology, chemistry as well as reservoir engineering and process engineering. This report provides an extensive description of acid ISL uranium mining technology

  17. In situ quantification of membrane foulant accumulation by reflectometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroen, C. G. P. H.; Roosjen, A.; Norde, W.; Boom, R. M.; Tang, K.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present laser light reflectometry [1] (not to be mistaken with ultrasound reflectometry [2] that uses ultrasound waves) as a tool for quantitative investigation of (the initial stages of) fouling on membrane-like surfaces. Reflectometry allows in situ investigation of adsorption

  18. Intrathecal Delivery of Ketorolac Loaded In Situ Gels for Prolonged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    erosion for prolonged period of time [23]. Moreover, the method used for fabrication of alginate-based in situ gels in the present study was simple and reproducible. Only those formulations were selected that demonstrated satisfactory attributes in terms of gelling capacity in the pre-formulation studies. The initial drug release ...

  19. Oxygen-free in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Ulstrup, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy under full electrochemical potential control (in situ STM) has been used extensively as an efficient method to characterize microstructures at solid/liquid interfaces at the atomic and molecular levels. However, under ambient conditions oxygen may interfere in open...

  20. Simulation of salt behavior using in situ response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, W.T.

    1986-01-01

    The time-dependent nonlinear structural behavior in a salt formation around the openings can be obtained by either performing computational analysis of measuring in situ responses. However, analysis using laboratory test data may often deviate from the actual in situ conditions and geomechanical instruments can provide information only up to the time when the measurements were taken. A method has been suggested for simulating the salt behavior by utilizing the steady-state portion of in situ response history. Governing equations for computational analysis were normalized to the creep constant, the equations were solved, and the analytical response history was then computed in terms of normalized time. By synchronizing the response history obtained from the analysis to the one measured at the site, the creep constant was determined. Then the structural response of the salt was computed. This paper presents an improved method for simulating the salt behavior. In this method, the governing equations are normalized to the creep function, which represents the transient and the steady-state creep behavior. Both the transient and the steady-state portions of in situ response history are used in determining the creep function. Finally, a nonlinear mapping process relating the normalized and real time domains determines the behavior of the salt