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Sample records for generate isoform diversity

  1. Generational diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Linda W

    2010-01-01

    Generational diversity has proven challenges for nurse leaders, and generational values may influence ideas about work and career planning. This article discusses generational gaps, influencing factors and support, and the various generational groups present in today's workplace as well as the consequences of need addressing these issues. The article ends with a discussion of possible solutions.

  2. Functional diversity of human basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor TCF4 isoforms generated by alternative 5' exon usage and splicing.

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    Mari Sepp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcription factor 4 (TCF4 alias ITF2, E2-2, ME2 or SEF2 is a ubiquitous class A basic helix-loop-helix protein that binds to E-box DNA sequences (CANNTG. While involved in the development and functioning of many different cell types, recent studies point to important roles for TCF4 in the nervous system. Specifically, human TCF4 gene is implicated in susceptibility to schizophrenia and TCF4 haploinsufficiency is the cause of the Pitt-Hopkins mental retardation syndrome. However, the structure, expression and coding potential of the human TCF4 gene have not been described in detail. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study we used human tissue samples to characterize human TCF4 gene structure and TCF4 expression at mRNA and protein level. We report that although widely expressed, human TCF4 mRNA expression is particularly high in the brain. We demonstrate that usage of numerous 5' exons of the human TCF4 gene potentially yields in TCF4 protein isoforms with 18 different N-termini. In addition, the diversity of isoforms is increased by alternative splicing of several internal exons. For functional characterization of TCF4 isoforms, we overexpressed individual isoforms in cultured human cells. Our analysis revealed that subcellular distribution of TCF4 isoforms is differentially regulated: Some isoforms contain a bipartite nuclear localization signal and are exclusively nuclear, whereas distribution of other isoforms relies on heterodimerization partners. Furthermore, the ability of different TCF4 isoforms to regulate E-box controlled reporter gene transcription is varied depending on whether one or both of the two TCF4 transcription activation domains are present in the protein. Both TCF4 activation domains are able to activate transcription independently, but act synergistically in combination. CONCLUSIONS: Altogether, in this study we have described the inter-tissue variability of TCF4 expression in human and provided evidence

  3. Diversity and Generation X.

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    Davis, S K

    2001-09-01

    Managing Generation X (1965-1980) to be of better service to patients and organizations is a challenge for nurse managers. This article provides action scenarios that assist in understanding diversity and generations.

  4. 14-3-3 phosphoprotein interaction networks – does isoform diversity present functional interaction specification?

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    Anna-Lisa ePaul

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The 14-3-3 proteins have emerged as major phosphoprotein interaction proteins and thereby constitute a key node in the Arabidopsis Interactome Map, a node through which a large number of important signals pass. Throughout their history of discovery and description, the 14-3-3s have been described as protein families and there has been some evidence that the different 14-3-3 family members within any organisms might carry isoform specific functions. However there has also been evidence for redundancy of 14-3-3 function, suggesting that the perceived 14-3-3 diversity may be the accumulation of neutral mutations over evolutionary time and as some 14-3-3 genes develop tissue or organ specific expression. This situation has led to a currently unresolved question – does 14-3-3 isoform sequence diversity indicate functional diversity at the biochemical or cellular level? We discuss here some of the key observations on both sides of the resulting debate, and present a set of contrastable observations to address the theory that sequence diversity does lead to functional diversity among 14-3-3 isoforms. The resulting model suggests strongly that there are indeed functional specificities in the 14-3-3s of Arabidopsis. The model further suggests that 14-3-3 diversity and specificity should enter into the discussion of 14-3-3 roles in signal transduction and be directly approached in experiments designed to address 14-3-3 functional roles. It is hoped that future studies involving 14-3-3s will continue to address specificity in experimental design and analysis.

  5. IQSeq: integrated isoform quantification analysis based on next-generation sequencing.

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    Jiang Du

    Full Text Available With the recent advances in high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq, biologists are able to measure transcription with unprecedented precision. One problem that can now be tackled is that of isoform quantification: here one tries to reconstruct the abundances of isoforms of a gene. We have developed a statistical solution for this problem, based on analyzing a set of RNA-Seq reads, and a practical implementation, available from archive.gersteinlab.org/proj/rnaseq/IQSeq, in a tool we call IQSeq (Isoform Quantification in next-generation Sequencing. Here, we present theoretical results which IQSeq is based on, and then use both simulated and real datasets to illustrate various applications of the tool. In order to measure the accuracy of an isoform-quantification result, one would try to estimate the average variance of the estimated isoform abundances for each gene (based on resampling the RNA-seq reads, and IQSeq has a particularly fast algorithm (based on the Fisher Information Matrix for calculating this, achieving a speedup of ~ 500 times compared to brute-force resampling. IQSeq also calculates an information theoretic measure of overall transcriptome complexity to describe isoform abundance for a whole experiment. IQSeq has many features that are particularly useful in RNA-Seq experimental design, allowing one to optimally model the integration of different sequencing technologies in a cost-effective way. In particular, the IQSeq formalism integrates the analysis of different sample (i.e. read sets generated from different technologies within the same statistical framework. It also supports a generalized statistical partial-sample-generation function to model the sequencing process. This allows one to have a modular, "plugin-able" read-generation function to support the particularities of the many evolving sequencing technologies.

  6. Generational diversity: teaching and learning approaches.

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    Johnson, Susan A; Romanello, Mary L

    2005-01-01

    Nursing students represent multiple generations--Baby Boomers, Generation X, and now the Millennials. Each generation has its own set of values, ideas, ethics, beliefs, and learning styles. The authors describe the context, characteristics, and learning styles of each generation and provide suggestions for enhanced teaching and learning across multiple generations. Using generational diversity as a teaching tool in the classroom is also discussed.

  7. Seven different genes encode a diverse mixture of isoforms of Bet v 1, the major birch pollen allergen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schenk, M.F.; Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Esselink, G.D.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Pollen of the European white birch (Betula pendula, syn. B. verrucosa) is an important cause of hay fever. The main allergen is Bet v 1, member of the pathogenesis-related class 10 (PR-10) multigene family. To establish the number of PR-10/Bet v 1 genes and the isoform diversity within a

  8. Seven different genes encode a diverse mixture of isoforms of Bet v 1, the major birch pollen allergen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schenk, M.F.; Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Esselink, G.D.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Pollen of the European white birch (Betula pendula, syn. B. verrucosa) is an important cause of hay fever. The main allergen is Bet v 1, member of the pathogenesis-related class 10 (PR-10) multigene family. To establish the number of PR-10/Bet v 1 genes and the isoform diversity within a

  9. Structural diversity and evolution of the N-terminal isoform-specific region of ecdysone receptor-A and -B1 isoforms in insects

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    Kubo Takeo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ecdysone receptor (EcR regulates various cellular responses to ecdysteroids during insect development. Insects have multiple EcR isoforms with different N-terminal A/B domains that contain the isoform-specific activation function (AF-1 region. Although distinct physiologic functions of the EcR isoforms have been characterized in higher holometabolous insects, they remain unclear in basal direct-developing insects, in which only A isoform has been identified. To examine the structural basis of the EcR isoform-specific AF-1 regions, we performed a comprehensive structural comparison of the isoform-specific region of the EcR-A and -B1 isoforms in insects. Results The EcR isoforms were newly identified in 51 species of insects and non-insect arthropods, including direct-developing ametabolous and hemimetabolous insects. The comprehensive structural comparison revealed that the isoform-specific region of each EcR isoform contained evolutionally conserved microdomain structures and insect subgroup-specific structural modifications. The A isoform-specific region generally contained four conserved microdomains, including the SUMOylation motif and the nuclear localization signal, whereas the B1 isoform-specific region contained three conserved microdomains, including an acidic activator domain-like motif. In addition, the EcR-B1 isoform of holometabolous insects had a novel microdomain at the N-terminal end. Conclusions Given that the nuclear receptor AF-1 is involved in cofactor recruitment and transcriptional regulation, the microdomain structures identified in the isoform-specific A/B domains might function as signature motifs and/or as targets for cofactor proteins that play essential roles in the EcR isoform-specific AF-1 regions. Moreover, the novel microdomain in the isoform-specific region of the holometabolous insect EcR-B1 isoform suggests that the holometabolous insect EcR-B1 acquired additional transcriptional

  10. Characterization of polymorphisms and isoforms of the Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C gene (plc) reveals high genetic diversity.

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    Siqueira, Flávia F; Almeida, Marcelle O; Barroca, Tatiana M; Horta, Carolina C R; Carmo, Anderson O; Silva, Rodrigo O S; Pires, Prhiscylla S; Lobato, Francisco C F; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes

    2012-10-12

    Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C (Cp-PLC), also called alpha-toxin, is encoded by the plc gene and has been implicated in several diseases; however, only a few studies have described polymorphisms in this gene. The aim of this study was to analyze polymorphisms in the Cp-PLC nucleotide and amino acid sequences obtained from isolates from different regions and to compare them to Clostridium phospholipase C sequences deposited in the NCBI database. Environmental samples (sediment, poultry feed, sawdust) and stool samples (from poultry, bovine, swine, horse, caprine, bird, dog, rabbit, toucan) were collected from healthy and sick animals. A total of 73 isolates were analyzed with the majority of samples belonging to the toxin type A subtype and possessing the gene encoding for the beta-2 toxin. Comparison of plc gene sequences from respective isolates revealed a high genetic diversity in the nucleotide sequences of mature Cp-PLC. Sequence comparisons identified 30 amino acid substitutions and 34 isoforms including some isoforms with substitutions in amino acids critical to toxin function. Comparison of sequences obtained in this study to Cp-PLC sequences obtained from the NCBI database resulted in the identification of 11 common haplotypes and 22 new isoforms. Phylogenetic analysis of phospholipase C sequences obtained from other Clostridium species identified relationships previously described. This report describes a broad characterization of the genetic diversity in the C. perfringens plc gene resulting in the identification of various isoforms. A better understanding of sequences encoding phospholipase C isoforms may reveal changes associated with protein function and C. perfringens virulence.

  11. Seven different genes encode a diverse mixture of isoforms of Bet v 1, the major birch pollen allergen

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    Gilissen Ludovicus JWJ

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pollen of the European white birch (Betula pendula, syn. B. verrucosa is an important cause of hay fever. The main allergen is Bet v 1, member of the pathogenesis-related class 10 (PR-10 multigene family. To establish the number of PR-10/Bet v 1 genes and the isoform diversity within a single tree, PCR amplification, cloning and sequencing of PR-10 genes was performed on two diploid B. pendula cultivars and one interspecific tetraploid Betula hybrid. Sequences were attributed to putative genes based on sequence identity and intron length. Information on transcription was derived by comparison with homologous cDNA sequences available in GenBank/EMBL/DDJB. PCR-cloning of multigene families is accompanied by a high risk for the occurrence of PCR recombination artifacts. We screened for and excluded these artifacts, and also detected putative artifact sequences among database sequences. Results Forty-four different PR-10 sequences were recovered from B. pendula and assigned to thirteen putative genes. Sequence homology suggests that three genes were transcribed in somatic tissue and seven genes in pollen. The transcription of three other genes remains unknown. In total, fourteen different Bet v 1-type isoforms were identified in the three cultivars, of which nine isoforms were entirely new. Isoforms with high and low IgE-reactivity are encoded by different genes and one birch pollen grain has the genetic background to produce a mixture of isoforms with varying IgE-reactivity. Allergen diversity is even higher in the interspecific tetraploid hybrid, consistent with the presence of two genomes. Conclusion Isoforms of the major birch allergen Bet v 1 are encoded by multiple genes, and we propose to name them accordingly. The present characterization of the Bet v 1 genes provides a framework for the screening of specific Bet v 1 genes among other B. pendula cultivars or Betula species, and for future breeding for trees with a reduced

  12. Functional Diversity of Anti-Lipopolysaccharide Factor Isoforms in Shrimp and Their Characters Related to Antiviral Activity

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    Shihao Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF is a small protein with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, which has potential application in the disease control. Previously, we isolated seven ALF isoforms from the Chinese shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis. In the present study, their distributions in tissues of shrimp were analyzed and the data showed that different isoforms had different expression profiles, which suggested that they might have different functions. Then, the functions of different isoforms were studied by analyzing the antibacterial and antiviral activities of the functional domain of ALFs, the LPS-binding domain (LBD, which were synthesized by chemical methods. Different ALFs showed distinct antibacterial and antiviral activities, which were consistent with their diverse tissue distribution patterns. Sequence analysis on the LBD domain of different isoforms revealed that an identical lysine residue site was specifically conserved in peptides with anti-WSSV activity. In order to confirm whether this lysine residue is critical to the antiviral activity of the peptide, new peptides were synthesized by changing residues at this site. Changing the lysine residue at the specific site to other amino acid residue, the antiviral activity of the peptide apparently decreased. While replacing other residue with a lysine residue at this site in LBD peptide without anti-WSSV activity, the peptide will obtain the antiviral activity to WSSV. These results not only showed us a comprehensive understanding on the function of ALFs from F. chinensis, but also provided clues for the development of ALFs as potential therapeutic drugs to WSSV.

  13. Functional diversity of anti-lipopolysaccharide factor isoforms in shrimp and their characters related to antiviral activity.

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    Li, Shihao; Guo, Shuyue; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai

    2015-04-27

    Anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) is a small protein with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, which has potential application in the disease control. Previously, we isolated seven ALF isoforms from the Chinese shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis. In the present study, their distributions in tissues of shrimp were analyzed and the data showed that different isoforms had different expression profiles, which suggested that they might have different functions. Then, the functions of different isoforms were studied by analyzing the antibacterial and antiviral activities of the functional domain of ALFs, the LPS-binding domain (LBD), which were synthesized by chemical methods. Different ALFs showed distinct antibacterial and antiviral activities, which were consistent with their diverse tissue distribution patterns. Sequence analysis on the LBD domain of different isoforms revealed that an identical lysine residue site was specifically conserved in peptides with anti-WSSV activity. In order to confirm whether this lysine residue is critical to the antiviral activity of the peptide, new peptides were synthesized by changing residues at this site. Changing the lysine residue at the specific site to other amino acid residue, the antiviral activity of the peptide apparently decreased. While replacing other residue with a lysine residue at this site in LBD peptide without anti-WSSV activity, the peptide will obtain the antiviral activity to WSSV. These results not only showed us a comprehensive understanding on the function of ALFs from F. chinensis, but also provided clues for the development of ALFs as potential therapeutic drugs to WSSV.

  14. Identification of novel chicken estrogen receptor-alpha messenger ribonucleic acid isoforms generated by alternative splicing and promoter usage.

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    Griffin, C; Flouriot, G; Sonntag-Buck, V; Nestor, P; Gannon, F

    1998-11-01

    Using the rapid amplification of complementary DNA ends (RACE) methodology we have identified three new chicken estrogen receptor-alpha (cER alpha) messenger RNA (mRNA) variants in addition to the previously described form (isoform A). Whereas one of the new variants (isoform B) presents a 5'-extremity contiguous to the 5'-end of isoform A, the two other forms (isoforms C and D) are generated by alternative splicing of upstream exons (C and D) to a common site situated 70 nucleotides upstream of the translation start site in the previously assigned exon 1 (A). The 3'-end of exon 1C has been located at position -1334 upstream of the transcription start site of the A isoform (+1). Whereas the genomic location of exon 1D is unknown, 700 bp 5' to this exon were isolated by genomic walking, and their sequence was determined. The transcription start sites of the cER alpha mRNA isoforms were defined. In transfection experiments, the regions immediately upstream of the A-D cER alpha mRNA isoforms were shown to possess cell-specific promoter activities. Three of these promoters were down-regulated in the presence of estradiol and ER alpha protein. It is concluded, therefore, that the expression of the four different cER alpha mRNA isoforms is under the control of four different promoters. Finally, RT-PCR, S1 nuclease mapping, and primer extension analysis of these different cER alpha mRNA isoforms revealed a differential pattern of expression of the cER alpha gene in chicken tissues. Together, the results suggest that alternative 5'-splicing and promoter usage may be mechanisms used to modulate the levels of expression of the chicken ER alpha gene in a tissue-specific and/or developmental stage-specific manner.

  15. Two isoforms of TALDO1 generated by alternative translational initiation show differential nucleocytoplasmic distribution to regulate the global metabolic network

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    Moriyama, Tetsuji; Tanaka, Shu; Nakayama, Yasumune; Fukumoto, Masahiro; Tsujimura, Kenji; Yamada, Kohji; Bamba, Takeshi; Yoneda, Yoshihiro; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Oka, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Transaldolase 1 (TALDO1) is a rate-limiting enzyme involved in the pentose phosphate pathway, which is traditionally thought to occur in the cytoplasm. In this study, we found that the gene TALDO1 has two translational initiation sites, generating two isoforms that differ by the presence of the first 10 N-terminal amino acids. Notably, the long and short isoforms were differentially localised to the cell nucleus and cytoplasm, respectively. Pull-down and in vitro transport assays showed that the long isoform, unlike the short one, binds to importin α and is actively transported into the nucleus in an importin α/β-dependent manner, demonstrating that the 10 N-terminal amino acids are essential for its nuclear localisation. Additionally, we found that these two isoforms can form homo- and/or hetero-dimers with different localisation dynamics. A metabolite analysis revealed that the subcellular localisation of TALDO1 is not crucial for its activity in the pentose phosphate pathway. However, the expression of these two isoforms differentially affected the levels of various metabolites, including components of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, nucleotides, and sugars. These results demonstrate that the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of TALDO1, modulated via alternative translational initiation and dimer formation, plays an important role in a wide range of metabolic networks. PMID:27703206

  16. [Isoforms of the human histamine H3 receptor: Generation, expression in the central nervous system and functional implications].

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    García-Gálvez, Ana Maricela; Arias-Montaño, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Histamine plays a significant role as a neuromodulator in the human central nervous system. Histamine-releasing neurons are exclusively located in the tuberomammillary nucleus of the hypothalamus, project to all major areas of the brain, and participate in functions such as the regulation of sleep/wakefulness, locomotor activity, feeding and drinking, analgesia, learning, and memory. The functional effects of histamine are exerted through the activation of four G protein-coupled receptors (H1, H2, H3 and H4), and in the central nervous system the first three receptors are widely expressed. The H3 receptor (H3R) is found exclusively in neuronal cells, where it functions as auto- and hetero-receptor. One remarkable characteristic of the H3R is the existence of isoforms, generated by alternative splicing of the messenger RNA. For the human H3R, 20 isoforms have been reported; although a significant number lack those regions required for agonist binding or receptor signaling, at least five isoforms appear functional upon heterologous expression. In this work we review the evidence for the generation of human H3R isoforms, their expression, and the available information regarding the functionality of such receptors.

  17. Alternative mRNA Splicing from the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) Gene Generates Isoforms with Distinct Subcellular mRNA Localization Patterns in Astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rune; Daugaard, Tina Fuglsang; Holm, Ida E;

    2013-01-01

    The intermediate filament network of astrocytes includes Glial fibrillary acidic protein (Gfap) as a major component. Gfap mRNA is alternatively spliced resulting in generation of different protein isoforms where Gfapa is the most predominant isoform. The Gfapd isoform is expressed in proliferating......RNA localization patterns were dependent on the different 39-exon sequences included in Gfapd and Gfapa mRNA. The presented results show that alternative Gfap mRNA splicing results in isoform-specific mRNA localization patterns with resulting different local mRNA concentration ratios which have potential...

  18. A second isoform of the ferredoxin:NADP oxidoreductase generated by an in-frame initiation of translation.

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    Thomas, Jean-Claude; Ughy, Bettina; Lagoutte, Bernard; Ajlani, Ghada

    2006-11-28

    Ferredoxin:NADP oxidoreductases (FNRs) constitute a family of flavoenzymes that catalyze the exchange of reducing equivalents between one-electron carriers and the two-electron-carrying NADP(H). The main role of FNRs in cyanobacteria and leaf plastids is to provide the NADPH for photoautotrophic metabolism. In root plastids, a distinct FNR isoform is found that has been postulated to function in the opposite direction, providing electrons for nitrogen assimilation at the expense of NADPH generated by heterotrophic metabolism. A multiple gene family encodes FNR isoenzymes in plants, whereas there is only one FNR gene (petH) in cyanobacteria. Nevertheless, we detected two FNR isoforms in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803. One of them (FNR(S) approximately 34 kDa) is similar in size to the plastid FNR and specifically accumulates under heterotrophic conditions, whereas the other one (FNR(L) approximately 46 kDa) contains an extra N-terminal domain that allows its association with the phycobilisome. Site-directed mutants allowed us to conclude that the smaller isoform, FNR(S), is produced from an internal ribosome entry site within the petH ORF. Thus we have uncovered a mechanism by which two isoforms are produced from a single gene, which is, to our knowledge, novel in photosynthetic bacteria. Our results strongly suggest that FNR(L) is an NADP(+) reductase, whereas FNR(S) is an NADPH oxidase.

  19. Expression of Neuronal and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Isoforms and Generation of Protein Nitrotyrosine in Rat Brain Following Hypobaric Hypoxia

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    2001-06-01

    compilation report: ADPO11059 thru ADP011100 UNCLASSIFIED 38- 1 Expression of Neuronal and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Isoforms and Generation of Protein...cloned, both from chondrocytes (Charles et al., 1993) and hepatocytes (Geller et al., 1993). The neurotoxic effects of NO is mediated by formation of...injection at multiple sites on the back. Four boosts of 1 /6 of the conjugate emulsified in Freund’s incomplete adjuvant were given by subcutaneous injection

  20. Microbial Diversity of Impact-Generated Habitats

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    Pontefract, Alexandra; Osinski, Gordon R.; Cockell, Charles S.; Southam, Gordon; McCausland, Phil J. A.; Umoh, Joseph; Holdsworth, David W.

    2016-10-01

    Impact-generated lithologies have recently been identified as viable and important microbial habitats, especially within cold and arid regions such as the polar deserts on Earth. These unique habitats provide protection from environmental stressors, such as freeze-thaw events, desiccation, and UV radiation, and act to trap aerially deposited detritus within the fissures and pore spaces, providing necessary nutrients for endoliths. This study provides the first culture-independent analysis of the microbial community structure within impact-generated lithologies in a Mars analog environment, involving the analysis of 44,534 16S rRNA sequences from an assemblage of 21 rock samples that comprises three shock metamorphism categories. We find that species diversity increases (H = 2.4-4.6) with exposure to higher shock pressures, which leads to the development of three distinct populations. In each population, Actinobacteria were the most abundant (41%, 65%, and 59%), and the dominant phototrophic taxa came from the Chloroflexi. Calculated porosity (a function of shock metamorphism) for these samples correlates (R2 = 0.62) with inverse Simpson indices, accounting for overlap in populations in the higher shock levels. The results of our study show that microbial diversity is tied to the amount of porosity in the target substrate (as a function of shock metamorphism), resulting in the formation of distinct microbial populations.

  1. Sparse linear modeling of next-generation mRNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) data for isoform discovery and abundance estimation.

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    Li, Jingyi Jessica; Jiang, Ci-Ren; Brown, James B; Huang, Haiyan; Bickel, Peter J

    2011-12-13

    Since the inception of next-generation mRNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology, various attempts have been made to utilize RNA-Seq data in assembling full-length mRNA isoforms de novo and estimating abundance of isoforms. However, for genes with more than a few exons, the problem tends to be challenging and often involves identifiability issues in statistical modeling. We have developed a statistical method called "sparse linear modeling of RNA-Seq data for isoform discovery and abundance estimation" (SLIDE) that takes exon boundaries and RNA-Seq data as input to discern the set of mRNA isoforms that are most likely to present in an RNA-Seq sample. SLIDE is based on a linear model with a design matrix that models the sampling probability of RNA-Seq reads from different mRNA isoforms. To tackle the model unidentifiability issue, SLIDE uses a modified Lasso procedure for parameter estimation. Compared with deterministic isoform assembly algorithms (e.g., Cufflinks), SLIDE considers the stochastic aspects of RNA-Seq reads in exons from different isoforms and thus has increased power in detecting more novel isoforms. Another advantage of SLIDE is its flexibility of incorporating other transcriptomic data such as RACE, CAGE, and EST into its model to further increase isoform discovery accuracy. SLIDE can also work downstream of other RNA-Seq assembly algorithms to integrate newly discovered genes and exons. Besides isoform discovery, SLIDE sequentially uses the same linear model to estimate the abundance of discovered isoforms. Simulation and real data studies show that SLIDE performs as well as or better than major competitors in both isoform discovery and abundance estimation. The SLIDE software package is available at https://sites.google.com/site/jingyijli/SLIDE.zip.

  2. Generating Isoform-Specific Antibodies : Lessons from Nucleocytoplasmic Glycoprotein Skp1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    West, Christopher M.; Van Der Wel, Hanke; Chinoy, Zoiesha; Boons, Geert Jan; Gauthier, Ted J.; Taylor, Carol M.; Xu, Yuechi

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies that discriminate protein isoforms differing by modifications at specific amino acids have revolutionized studies of their functions. Skp1 is a novel nucleocytoplasmic glycoprotein that is hydroxylated at proline-143 and then O-glycosylated by a pentasaccharide attached via a GlcNAcα1, 4(

  3. Seed Dormancy in Arabidopsis Requires Self-Binding Ability of DOG1 Protein and the Presence of Multiple Isoforms Generated by Alternative Splicing.

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    Kazumi Nakabayashi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Arabidopsis protein DELAY OF GERMINATION 1 (DOG1 is a key regulator of seed dormancy, which is a life history trait that determines the timing of seedling emergence. The amount of DOG1 protein in freshly harvested seeds determines their dormancy level. DOG1 has been identified as a major dormancy QTL and variation in DOG1 transcript levels between accessions contributes to natural variation for seed dormancy. The DOG1 gene is alternatively spliced. Alternative splicing increases the transcriptome and proteome diversity in higher eukaryotes by producing transcripts that encode for proteins with altered or lost function. It can also generate tissue specific transcripts or affect mRNA stability. Here we suggest a different role for alternative splicing of the DOG1 gene. DOG1 produces five transcript variants encoding three protein isoforms. Transgenic dog1 mutant seeds expressing single DOG1 transcript variants from the endogenous DOG1 promoter did not complement because they were non-dormant and lacked DOG1 protein. However, transgenic plants overexpressing single DOG1 variants from the 35S promoter could accumulate protein and showed complementation. Simultaneous expression of two or more DOG1 transcript variants from the endogenous DOG1 promoter also led to increased dormancy levels and accumulation of DOG1 protein. This suggests that single isoforms are functional, but require the presence of additional isoforms to prevent protein degradation. Subsequently, we found that the DOG1 protein can bind to itself and that this binding is required for DOG1 function but not for protein accumulation. Natural variation for DOG1 binding efficiency was observed among Arabidopsis accessions and contributes to variation in seed dormancy.

  4. Alternative Splicing Generates Different Parkin Protein Isoforms: Evidences in Human, Rat, and Mouse Brain

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    Soraya Scuderi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson protein 2, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase (PARK2 gene mutations are the most frequent causes of autosomal recessive early onset Parkinson’s disease and juvenile Parkinson disease. Parkin deficiency has also been linked to other human pathologies, for example, sporadic Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease, autism, and cancer. PARK2 primary transcript undergoes an extensive alternative splicing, which enhances transcriptomic diversification. To date several PARK2 splice variants have been identified; however, the expression and distribution of parkin isoforms have not been deeply investigated yet. Here, the currently known PARK2 gene transcripts and relative predicted encoded proteins in human, rat, and mouse are reviewed. By analyzing the literature, we highlight the existing data showing the presence of multiple parkin isoforms in the brain. Their expression emerges from conflicting results regarding the electrophoretic mobility of the protein, but it is also assumed from discrepant observations on the cellular and tissue distribution of parkin. Although the characterization of each predicted isoforms is complex, since they often diverge only for few amino acids, analysis of their expression patterns in the brain might account for the different pathogenetic effects linked to PARK2 gene mutations.

  5. Alternative splicing of Arabidopsis IBR5 pre-mRNA generates two IBR5 isoforms with distinct and overlapping functions.

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    Thilanka Jayaweera

    Full Text Available The INDOLE-3-BUTYRIC ACID RESPONSE5 (IBR5 gene encodes a dual specificity phosphatase that regulates plant auxin responses. IBR5 has been predicted to generate two transcripts through alternative splicing, but alternative splicing of IBR5 has not been confirmed experimentally. The previously characterized ibr5-1 null mutant exhibits many auxin related defects such as auxin insensitive primary root growth, defective vascular development, short stature and reduced lateral root development. However, whether all these defects are caused by the lack of phosphatase activity is not clear. Here we describe two new auxin insensitive IBR5 alleles, ibr5-4, a catalytic site mutant, and ibr5-5, a splice site mutant. Characterization of these new mutants indicates that IBR5 is post-transcriptionally regulated to generate two transcripts, AT2G04550.1 and AT2G04550.3, and consequently two IBR5 isoforms, IBR5.1 and IBR5.3. The IBR5.1 isoform exhibits phosphatase catalytic activity that is required for both proper degradation of Aux/IAA proteins and auxin-induced gene expression. These two processes are independently regulated by IBR5.1. Comparison of new mutant alleles with ibr5-1 indicates that all three mutant alleles share many phenotypes. However, each allele also confers distinct defects implicating IBR5 isoform specific functions. Some of these functions are independent of IBR5.1 catalytic activity. Additionally, analysis of these new mutant alleles suggests that IBR5 may link ABP1 and SCF(TIR1/AFBs auxin signaling pathways.

  6. In vivo generation of neurotoxic prion protein: role for hsp70 in accumulation of misfolded isoforms.

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    Pedro Fernandez-Funez

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are incurable neurodegenerative disorders in which the normal cellular prion protein (PrP(C converts into a misfolded isoform (PrP(Sc with unique biochemical and structural properties that correlate with disease. In humans, prion disorders, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, present typically with a sporadic origin, where unknown mechanisms lead to the spontaneous misfolding and deposition of wild type PrP. To shed light on how wild-type PrP undergoes conformational changes and which are the cellular components involved in this process, we analyzed the dynamics of wild-type PrP from hamster in transgenic flies. In young flies, PrP demonstrates properties of the benign PrP(C; in older flies, PrP misfolds, acquires biochemical and structural properties of PrP(Sc, and induces spongiform degeneration of brain neurons. Aged flies accumulate insoluble PrP that resists high concentrations of denaturing agents and contains PrP(Sc-specific conformational epitopes. In contrast to PrP(Sc from mammals, PrP is proteinase-sensitive in flies. Thus, wild-type PrP rapidly converts in vivo into a neurotoxic, protease-sensitive isoform distinct from prototypical PrP(Sc. Next, we investigated the role of molecular chaperones in PrP misfolding in vivo. Remarkably, Hsp70 prevents the accumulation of PrP(Sc-like conformers and protects against PrP-dependent neurodegeneration. This protective activity involves the direct interaction between Hsp70 and PrP, which may occur in active membrane microdomains such as lipid rafts, where we detected Hsp70. These results highlight the ability of wild-type PrP to spontaneously convert in vivo into a protease-sensitive isoform that is neurotoxic, supporting the idea that protease-resistant PrP(Sc is not required for pathology. Moreover, we identify a new role for Hsp70 in the accumulation of misfolded PrP. Overall, we provide new insight into the mechanisms of spontaneous accumulation of neurotoxic PrP and uncover

  7. Translational readthrough generates new astrocyte AQP4 isoforms that modulate supramolecular clustering, glial endfeet localization, and water transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bellis, Manuela; Pisani, Francesco; Mola, Maria Grazia; Rosito, Stefania; Simone, Laura; Buccoliero, Cinzia; Trojano, Maria; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Svelto, Maria; Frigeri, Antonio

    2017-05-01

    Regulation of water homeostasis is a central feature of central nervous system pathophysiology. In this context, several lines of evidence suggest a crucial role for the water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and its plasma membrane supramolecular organization as the key element. Here, we demonstrate the expression in tissues of additional isoforms of AQP4 characterized by a C-terminal extension generated by programmed translational readthrough. These extended isoforms (AQP4ex) display a perivascular polarization and expression in dystrophin-dependent pools. AQP4ex reduces supramolecular clustering tendency and allows AQP4 interactions with syntrophin. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis of two serines in the extended C-terminus of AQP4ex showed potential regulation of water permeability by phosphorylation. Finally, AQP4ex expression can be positively modulated by gentamicin treatment, demonstrating the possibility of regulating the AQP4 translational readthrough frequency. This novel regulatory mechanism could have important pathophysiological implications for conditions in which alternations have been reported in AQP4 structure. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The highly conserved human cytomegalovirus UL136 ORF generates multiple Golgi-localizing protein isoforms through differential translation initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Huanan; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Kondo, Rikita; Katata, Marei; Imadome, Ken-Ichi; Miyado, Kenji; Inoue, Naoki; Fujiwara, Shigeyoshi; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-22

    The UL133-UL138 locus in the unique long b' (ULb') region of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genome is considered to play certain roles in viral replication, dissemination and latency in a host cell type-dependent manner. Here we characterized the proteins encoded by UL136, one of the open reading frames (ORFs) in the locus. Comparative sequence analysis of UL136 among clinical isolates and laboratory strains indicates that its predicted amino-acid sequence is highly conserved. A polyclonal antibody against UL136 proteins (pUL136s) was raised against its carboxy-terminal region and this antibody specifically recognized at least five UL136-encoded protein isoforms of 29-17 kDa both in HCMV-infected cells and in cells transfected with a construct expressing pUL136. Immunofluorescence analysis with this antibody revealed localization of pUL136 in the Golgi apparatus. Analysis of several pUL136 mutants indicated that the putative transmembrane domain of pUL136 is required for its Golgi localization. Mutational analysis of multiple AUG codons in UL136 demonstrated that translation initiation from these AUG codons contributes in the generation of pUL136 isoforms.

  9. Functional Diversity of Anti-Lipopolysaccharide Factor Isoforms in Shrimp and Their Characters Related to Antiviral Activity

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) is a small protein with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, which has potential application in the disease control. Previously, we isolated seven ALF isoforms from the Chinese shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis. In the present study, their distributions in tissues of shrimp were analyzed and the data showed that different isoforms had different expression profiles, which suggested that they might have different functions. Then, the functions of different...

  10. Diversity Generation in Evolving Microbial Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Trine

    in relation to chronic infection is a major concern as high population diversity has been predicted to result in survival and persistence of the infecting microbe. Therefore, understanding within-host dynamics and population diversification is necessary for optimal diagnosis and therapeutic treatment. Chronic...... diversity has been documented in contemporary respiratory specimens, it is less clear to what extent within-patient diversity contributes to the overall population structure and whether the population is geographically or homogeneously distributed throughout the airways. The focus of this thesis has been...... to get a better understanding of how bacterial populations adapt to new, complex and heterogeneous environments with multiple selective pressures over long periods, and to analyse diversification during this adaptation. Using the P. aeruginosa chronic infection as a model system, and by combining...

  11. Identification of four alternatively spliced isoforms of chicken casein kinase I alpha that are all expressed in diverse cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, C L; Bennett, G S

    1998-08-17

    Casein kinase I (CKI) is a family of widely expressed protein kinases. It is previously shown in mammalian tissues that CKIalpha exists as two or three alternatively spliced isoforms (Rowles et al.,1991; Zhang et al., 1996; Kuret et al., 1997). We now report that four alternatively spliced isoforms of CKIalpha are expressed in many chicken cells and tissues. A partial cDNA clone was isolated from a chicken brain library, using a probe derived from a bovine CKIalpha cDNA. The translated sequence of this clone was 100% identical to the bovine homolog containing the 'L' insert, with the addition of 12 amino acids just before the C terminus that had previously been reported in human and Xenopus CKIalpa. After completing the missing portion of the coding sequence by 5' RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends), full-length cDNA was PCR amplified from chicken brain cDNA, yielding four different products. These were cloned and sequenced and found to correspond to the four CKIalpha isoforms: CKIalpha, CKIalphaL, CKIalphaS and CKILalphaLS, where 'S' is the insert consisting of the 12 human/Xenopus C-terminal amino acids. Using reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (Rt-PCR), it was shown that the four isoforms are all expressed in neurons, fibroblasts and several tissues. This represents the first demonstration that four splice variants exist and are all expressed in a single type of cell.

  12. The effects of salt stress cause a diversion of basal metabolism in barley roots: possible different roles for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardi, Manuela; Castiglia, Daniela; Ferrara, Myriam; Guerriero, Gea; Chiurazzi, Maurizio; Esposito, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    In this study the effects of salt stress and nitrogen assimilation have been investigated in roots of hydroponically-grown barley plants exposed to 150 mM NaCl, in presence or absence of ammonium as the sole nitrogen source. Salt stress determines a diversion of root metabolism towards the synthesis of osmolytes, such as glycine betaine and proline, and increased levels of reduced glutathione. The metabolic changes triggered by salt stress result in a decrease in both activities and protein abundance of key enzymes, namely GOGAT and PEP carboxylase, and in a slight increase in HSP70. These variations would enhance the requirement for reductants supplied by the OPPP, consistently with the observed increase in total G6PDH activity. The involvement and occurrence of the different G6PDH isoforms have been investigated, and the kinetic properties of partially purified cytosolic and plastidial G6PDHs determined. Bioinformatic analyses examining co-expression profiles of G6PDHs in Arabidopsis and barley corroborate the data presented. Moreover, the gene coding for the root P2-G6PDH isoform was fully sequenced; the biochemical properties of the corresponding protein were examined experimentally. The results are discussed in the light of the possible distinct roles and regulation of the different G6PDH isoforms during salt stress in barley roots.

  13. Generational diversity: what nurse managers need to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Joyce M; Cope, Vicki C

    2013-03-01

    This article presents a discussion of generational differences and their impact on the nursing workforce and how this impact affects the work environment. The global nursing workforce represents four generations of nurses. This generational diversity frames attitudes, beliefs, work habits and expectations associated with the role of the nurse in the provision of care and in the way the nurse manages their day-to-day activities. An electronic search of MEDLINE, PubMed and Cinahl databases was performed using the words generational diversity, nurse managers and workforce. The search was limited to 2000-2012. Generational differences present challenges to contemporary nurse managers working in a healthcare environment which is complex and dynamic, in terms of managing nurses who think and behave in a different way because of disparate core personal and generational values, namely, the three Cs of communication, commitment and compensation. An acceptance of generational diversity in the workplace allows a richer scope for practice as the experiences and knowledge of each generation in the nursing environment creates an environment of acceptance and harmony facilitating retention of nurses. Acknowledgement of generational characteristics provides the nurse manager with strategies which focus on mentoring and motivation; communication, the increased use of technology and the ethics of nursing, to bridge the gap between generations of nurses and to increase nursing workforce cohesion. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Novel P2 promoter-derived HNF4{alpha} isoforms with different N-terminus generated by alternate exon insertion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jianmin, E-mail: jmhuang@partners.org [Pediatric Endocrine Unit, MassGeneral Hospital for Children and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, 02114-2696 (United States); Levitsky, Lynne L. [Pediatric Endocrine Unit, MassGeneral Hospital for Children and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, 02114-2696 (United States); Rhoads, David B., E-mail: rhoads@helix.mgh.harvard.edu [Pediatric Endocrine Unit, MassGeneral Hospital for Children and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, 02114-2696 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4{alpha} (HNF4{alpha}) is a critical transcription factor for pancreas and liver development and functions in islet {beta} cells to maintain glucose homeostasis. Mutations in the human HNF4A gene lead to maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY1) and polymorphisms are associated with increased risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Expression of six HNF4{alpha} variants, three each from two developmentally regulated promoters, has been firmly established. We have now detected a new set of HNF4{alpha} variants designated HNF4{alpha}10-12 expressed from distal promoter P2. These variants, generated by inclusion of previously undetected exon 1E (human = 222 nt, rodent = 136 nt) following exon 1D have an altered N-terminus but identical remaining reading frame. HNF4{alpha}10-{alpha}12 are expressed in pancreatic islets (and liver) and exhibit transactivation potentials similar to the corresponding {alpha}7-{alpha}9 isoforms. DNA-binding analyses implied much higher protein levels of HNF4{alpha}10-{alpha}12 in liver than expected from the RT-PCR data. Our results provide evidence for a more complex expression pattern of HNF4{alpha} than previously appreciated. We recommend inclusion of exon 1E and nearby DNA sequences in screening for HNF4{alpha} mutations and polymorphisms in genetic analyses of MODY1 and T2DM.

  15. Advances in generating functional diversity for directed protein evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivange, Amol V; Marienhagen, Jan; Mundhada, Hemanshu; Schenk, Alexander; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2009-02-01

    Despite advances in screening technologies, only a very small fraction of theoretical protein sequence can be sampled in directed evolution experiments. At the current state of random mutagenesis technologies mutation frequencies have often been adjusted to values that cause a limited number of amino acid changes (often one to four amino acid changes per protein). For harvesting the power of directed evolution algorithms it is therefore important that generated mutant libraries are rich in diversity and enriched in active population. Insufficient knowledge about protein traits, mutational robustness of protein folds and technological limitations in diversity generating methods are main challenges for managing the complexity of protein sequence space. This review covers computational and experimental advances for high quality mutant library generation that have been achieved in the past two years.

  16. Novel exons in the tbx5 gene locus generate protein isoforms with distinct expression domains and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamak, Abir; Georges, Romain O; Sheikh-Hassani, Massomeh; Morin, Martin; Komati, Hiba; Nemer, Mona

    2015-03-13

    TBX5 is the gene mutated in Holt-Oram syndrome, an autosomal dominant disorder with complex heart and limb deformities. Its protein product is a member of the T-box family of transcription factors and an evolutionarily conserved dosage-sensitive regulator of heart and limb development. Understanding TBX5 regulation is therefore of paramount importance. Here we uncover the existence of novel exons and provide evidence that TBX5 activity may be extensively regulated through alternative splicing to produce protein isoforms with differing N- and C-terminal domains. These isoforms are also present in human heart, indicative of an evolutionarily conserved regulatory mechanism. The newly identified isoforms have different transcriptional properties and can antagonize TBX5a target gene activation. Droplet Digital PCR as well as immunohistochemistry with isoform-specific antibodies reveal differential as well as overlapping expression domains. In particular, we find that the predominant isoform in skeletal myoblasts is Tbx5c, and we show that it is dramatically up-regulated in differentiating myotubes and is essential for myotube formation. Mechanistically, TBX5c antagonizes TBX5a activation of pro-proliferative signals such as IGF-1, FGF-10, and BMP4. The results provide new insight into Tbx5 regulation and function that will further our understanding of its role in health and disease. The finding of new exons in the Tbx5 locus may also be relevant to mutational screening especially in the 30% of Holt-Oram syndrome patients with no mutations in the known TBX5a exons.

  17. Antigenic characterization of an abnormal isoform of prion protein using a new diverse panel of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chan-Lan; Umetani, Atsushi; Matsui, Toshio; Ishiguro, Naotaka; Shinagawa, Morikazu; Horiuchi, Motohiro

    2004-03-01

    We established a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against prion protein (PrP) by immunizing PrP gene-ablated mice with the pathogenic isoform of prion protein (PrPSc) or recombinant prion protein (rPrP). The mAbs could be divided into at least 10 groups by fine epitope analyses using mutant rPrPs and pepspot analysis. Seven linear epitopes, lying within residues 56-90, 119-127, 137-143, 143-149, 147-151, 163-169, and 219-229, were defined by seven groups of mAbs, although the remaining three groups of mAbs recognized discontinuous epitopes. We attempted to examine whether any of these epitopes are located on the accessible surface of PrPSc. However, no mAbs reacted with protease-treated PrPSc purified from scrapie-affected mice, even when PrPSc was dispersed into a detergent-lipid protein complex, to reduce the size of PrPSc aggregates. In contrast, denaturation of PrPSc by guanidine hydrochloride efficiently exposed all of the epitopes. This suggests that any epitope recognized by this panel of mAbs is buried within the PrPSc aggregates. Alternatively, if the corresponding region(s) are on the surface of PrPSc, the region(s) may be folded into conformations to which the mAbs cannot bind. The reactivity of a panel of mAb also showed that the state of PrPSc aggregation influenced the denaturation process, and the sensitivity to denaturation appeared to vary between epitopes. Our results demonstrate that this new panel of well-characterized mAbs will be valuable for studying the biochemistry and biophysics of PrP molecules as well as for the immuno-diagnosis of prion diseases.

  18. Duality and Topological Mass Generation in Diverse Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Wotzasek, C

    2004-01-01

    We shall discuss issues of duality and topological mass generation in diverse dimensions. Particular emphasis will be given to the mass generation mechanism from interference between self and anti self-dual components, as disclosed by the soldering formalism. This is a gauge embedding procedure derived from an old algorithm of second-class constraint conversion used by the author to approach anomalous gauge theories. The problem of classification of the electromagnetic duality groups, both massless and massive, that is closely related will be discussed. Particular attention will be paid to a new approach to duality based on the soldering embedding to tackle the problem of mass generation by topological mechanisms in arbitrary dimensions including the couplings to dynamical matter, nonlinear cases and nonabelian symmetries.

  19. Alternative polyadenylation in a family of paralogous EPB41 genes generates protein 4.1 diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Laura; Lospitao, Eva; Ruiz-Sáenz, Ana; Alonso, Miguel A; Correas, Isabel

    2017-02-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is a step in mRNA 3'-end processing that contributes to the complexity of the transcriptome by generating isoforms that differ in either their coding sequence or their 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs). The EPB41 genes, EPB41, EPB41L2, EPB41L3 and EPB41L1, encode an impressively complex array of structural adaptor proteins (designated 4.1R, 4.1G, 4.1B and 4.1N, respectively) by using alternative transcriptional promoters and tissue-specific alternative pre-mRNA splicing. The great variety of 4.1 proteins mainly results from 5'-end and internal processing of the EPB41 pre-mRNAs. Thus, 4.1 proteins can vary in their N-terminal extensions but all contain a highly homologous C-terminal domain (CTD). Here we study a new group of EPB41-related mRNAs that originate by APA and lack the exons encoding the CTD characteristic of prototypical 4.1 proteins, thereby encoding a new type of 4.1 protein. For the EPB41 gene, this type of processing was observed in all 11 human tissues analyzed. Comparative genomic analysis of EPB41 indicates that APA is conserved in various mammals. In addition, we show that APA also functions for the EPB41L2, EPB41L3 and EPB41L1 genes, but in a more restricted manner in the case of the latter 2 than it does for the EPB41 and EPB41L2 genes. Our study shows alternative polyadenylation to be an additional mechanism for the generation of 4.1 protein diversity in the already complex EPB41-related genes. Understanding the diversity of EPB41 RNA processing is essential for a full appreciation of the many 4.1 proteins expressed in normal and pathological tissues.

  20. Antisense oligonucleotide-induced alternative splicing of the APOB mRNA generates a novel isoform of APOB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chew Shern L

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apolipoprotein B (APOB is an integral part of the LDL, VLDL, IDL, Lp(a and chylomicron lipoprotein particles. The APOB pre-mRNA consists of 29 constitutively-spliced exons. APOB exists as two natural isoforms: the full-length APOB100 isoform, assembled into LDL, VLDL, IDL and Lp(a and secreted by the liver in humans; and the C-terminally truncated APOB48, assembled into chylomicrons and secreted by the intestine in humans. Down-regulation of APOB100 is a potential therapy to lower circulating LDL and cholesterol levels. Results We investigated the ability of 2'O-methyl RNA antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs to induce the skipping of exon 27 in endogenous APOB mRNA in HepG2 cells. These ASOs are directed towards the 5' and 3' splice-sites of exon 27, the branch-point sequence (BPS of intron 26–27 and several predicted exonic splicing enhancers within exon 27. ASOs targeting either the 5' or 3' splice-site, in combination with the BPS, are the most effective. The splicing of other alternatively spliced genes are not influenced by these ASOs, suggesting that the effects seen are not due to non-specific changes in alternative splicing. The skip 27 mRNA is translated into a truncated isoform, APOB87SKIP27. Conclusion The induction of APOB87SKIP27 expression in vivo should lead to decreased LDL and cholesterol levels, by analogy to patients with hypobetalipoproteinemia. As intestinal APOB mRNA editing and APOB48 expression rely on sequences within exon 26, exon 27 skipping should not affect APOB48 expression unlike other methods of down-regulating APOB100 expression which also down-regulate APOB48.

  1. Generation and characterization of polyclonal antibodies specific to N-terminal extension of p85 isoform of ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (p85 S6K1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savinska L. O.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Generation of polyclonal antibodies specific to the ribosomal protein S6 kinase isoform – p85S6K1 and directed to the N-terminal (1–23 aa extension of p85S6K1. Methods. Animal immunization with synthetic (1–23 aa peptide, ELISA, Western blot, Immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescent analysis. Results. Polyclonal antibodies have been generated, which specifically recognize only p85 but not p70 isoform of S6K1 in western blot, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence analysis. Conclusions. The obtained antibodies can be recommended for studies on the p85S6K1 and other S6K1 isoforms possessing the N-terminal extension – the identification of binding protein partners, analysis of subcellular localization under different physiological conditions, elucidation of the signal transduction pathways involving different S6K1 isoforms.

  2. Next generation sequencing reveals the hidden diversity of zooplankton assemblages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope K Lindeque

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Zooplankton play an important role in our oceans, in biogeochemical cycling and providing a food source for commercially important fish larvae. However, difficulties in correctly identifying zooplankton hinder our understanding of their roles in marine ecosystem functioning, and can prevent detection of long term changes in their community structure. The advent of massively parallel next generation sequencing technology allows DNA sequence data to be recovered directly from whole community samples. Here we assess the ability of such sequencing to quantify richness and diversity of a mixed zooplankton assemblage from a productive time series site in the Western English Channel. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Plankton net hauls (200 µm were taken at the Western Channel Observatory station L4 in September 2010 and January 2011. These samples were analysed by microscopy and metagenetic analysis of the 18S nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene using the 454 pyrosequencing platform. Following quality control a total of 419,041 sequences were obtained for all samples. The sequences clustered into 205 operational taxonomic units using a 97% similarity cut-off. Allocation of taxonomy by comparison with the National Centre for Biotechnology Information database identified 135 OTUs to species level, 11 to genus level and 1 to order, <2.5% of sequences were classified as unknowns. By comparison a skilled microscopic analyst was able to routinely enumerate only 58 taxonomic groups. CONCLUSIONS: Metagenetics reveals a previously hidden taxonomic richness, especially for Copepoda and hard-to-identify meroplankton such as Bivalvia, Gastropoda and Polychaeta. It also reveals rare species and parasites. We conclude that Next Generation Sequencing of 18S amplicons is a powerful tool for elucidating the true diversity and species richness of zooplankton communities. While this approach allows for broad diversity assessments of plankton it may

  3. Generation of diversity in Streptococcus mutans genes demonstrated by MLST.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuy Do

    Full Text Available Streptococcus mutans, consisting of serotypes c, e, f and k, is an oral aciduric organism associated with the initiation and progression of dental caries. A total of 135 independent Streptococcus mutans strains from caries-free and caries-active subjects isolated from various geographical locations were examined in two versions of an MLST scheme consisting of either 6 housekeeping genes [accC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase biotin carboxylase subunit, gki (glucokinase, lepA (GTP-binding protein, recP (transketolase, sodA (superoxide dismutase, and tyrS (tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase] or the housekeeping genes supplemented with 2 extracellular putative virulence genes [gtfB (glucosyltransferase B and spaP (surface protein antigen I/II] to increase sequence type diversity. The number of alleles found varied between 20 (lepA and 37 (spaP. Overall, 121 sequence types (STs were defined using the housekeeping genes alone and 122 with all genes. However pi, nucleotide diversity per site, was low for all loci being in the range 0.019-0.007. The virulence genes exhibited the greatest nucleotide diversity and the recombination/mutation ratio was 0.67 [95% confidence interval 0.3-1.15] compared to 8.3 [95% confidence interval 5.0-14.5] for the 6 concatenated housekeeping genes alone. The ML trees generated for individual MLST loci were significantly incongruent and not significantly different from random trees. Analysis using ClonalFrame indicated that the majority of isolates were singletons and no evidence for a clonal structure or evidence to support serotype c strains as the ancestral S. mutans strain was apparent. There was also no evidence of a geographical distribution of individual isolates or that particular isolate clusters were associated with caries. The overall low sequence diversity suggests that S. mutans is a newly emerged species which has not accumulated large numbers of mutations but those that have occurred have been shuffled as a consequence of

  4. Generation of diversity in Streptococcus mutans genes demonstrated by MLST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Thuy; Gilbert, Steven C; Clark, Douglas; Ali, Farida; Fatturi Parolo, Clarissa C; Maltz, Marisa; Russell, Roy R; Holbrook, Peter; Wade, William G; Beighton, David

    2010-02-05

    Streptococcus mutans, consisting of serotypes c, e, f and k, is an oral aciduric organism associated with the initiation and progression of dental caries. A total of 135 independent Streptococcus mutans strains from caries-free and caries-active subjects isolated from various geographical locations were examined in two versions of an MLST scheme consisting of either 6 housekeeping genes [accC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase biotin carboxylase subunit), gki (glucokinase), lepA (GTP-binding protein), recP (transketolase), sodA (superoxide dismutase), and tyrS (tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase)] or the housekeeping genes supplemented with 2 extracellular putative virulence genes [gtfB (glucosyltransferase B) and spaP (surface protein antigen I/II)] to increase sequence type diversity. The number of alleles found varied between 20 (lepA) and 37 (spaP). Overall, 121 sequence types (STs) were defined using the housekeeping genes alone and 122 with all genes. However pi, nucleotide diversity per site, was low for all loci being in the range 0.019-0.007. The virulence genes exhibited the greatest nucleotide diversity and the recombination/mutation ratio was 0.67 [95% confidence interval 0.3-1.15] compared to 8.3 [95% confidence interval 5.0-14.5] for the 6 concatenated housekeeping genes alone. The ML trees generated for individual MLST loci were significantly incongruent and not significantly different from random trees. Analysis using ClonalFrame indicated that the majority of isolates were singletons and no evidence for a clonal structure or evidence to support serotype c strains as the ancestral S. mutans strain was apparent. There was also no evidence of a geographical distribution of individual isolates or that particular isolate clusters were associated with caries. The overall low sequence diversity suggests that S. mutans is a newly emerged species which has not accumulated large numbers of mutations but those that have occurred have been shuffled as a consequence of intra

  5. Generation of diverse neural cell types through direct conversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gayle; F; Petersen; Padraig; M; Strappe

    2016-01-01

    A characteristic of neurological disorders is the loss of critical populations of cells that the body is unable to replace,thus there has been much interest in identifying methods of generating clinically relevant numbers of cells to replace those that have been damaged or lost.The process of neural direct conversion,in which cells of one lineage are converted into cells of a neural lineage without first inducing pluripotency,shows great potential,with evidence of the generation of a range of functional neural cell types both in vitro and in vivo,through viral and non-viral delivery of exogenous factors,as well as chemical induction methods.Induced neural cells have been proposed as an attractive alternative to neural cells derived from embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells,with prospective roles in the investigation of neurological disorders,including neurodegenerative disease modelling,drug screening,and cellular replacement for regenerative medicine applications,however further investigations into improving the efficacy and safety of these methods need to be performed before neural direct conversion becomes a clinically viable option.In this review,we describe the generation of diverse neural cell types via direct conversion of somatic cells,with comparison against stem cell-based approaches,as well as discussion of their potential research and clinical applications.

  6. Wavelength-Dependent Second Harmonic Generation Circular Dichroism for Differentiation of Col I and Col III Isoforms in Stromal Models of Ovarian Cancer Based on Intrinsic Chirality Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kirby R; Campagnola, Paul J

    2017-03-02

    Extensive remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) occurs in many epithelial cancers. For example, in ovarian cancer, upregulation of collagen isoform type III has been linked to invasive forms of the disease, and this change may be a potential biomarker. To examine this possibility, we implemented wavelength-dependent second harmonic generation circular dichroism (SHG-CD) imaging microscopy to quantitatively determine changes in chirality in ECM models comprised of different Col I/Col III composition. In these models, Col III was varied between 0 and 40%, and we found increasing Col III results in reduced net chirality, consistent with structural biology studies of Col I and III in tissues where the isoforms comingle in the same fibrils. We further examined the wavelength dependence of the SHG-CD to both optimize the response and gain insight into the underlying mechanism. We found using shorter SHG excitation wavelengths resulted in increased SHG-CD sensitivity, where this is consistent with the electric-dipole-coupled oscillator model suggested previously for the nonlinear chirality response from thin films. Moreover, the sensitivity is further consistent with the wavelength dependency of SHG intensity fit to a two-state model of the two-photon absorption in collagen. We also provide experimental calibration protocols to implement the SHG-CD modality on a laser scanning microscope. We last suggest that the technique has broad applicability in probing a wide range of diseased states with changes in collagen molecular structure.

  7. Diversity of proton pumps in osteoclasts: V-ATPase with a3 and d2 isoforms is a major form in osteoclasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Naomi; Daido, Shun; Sun-Wada, Ge-Hong; Wada, Yoh; Futai, Masamitsu; Nakanishi-Matsui, Mayumi

    2014-06-01

    Osteoclasts acidify bone resorption lacunae through proton translocation by plasma membrane V-ATPase (vacuolar-type ATPase) which has an a3 isoform, one of the four isoforms of the trans-membrane a subunit (Toyomura et al., J. Biol. Chem., 278, 22023-22030, 2003). d2, a kidney- and epididymis-specific isoform of the d subunit, was also induced in osteoclast-like cells derived from the RAW264.7 line, and formed V-ATPase with a3. The amount of d2 in osteoclasts was 4-fold higher than that of d1, a ubiquitous isoform. These results indicate that V-ATPase with d2/a3 is a major osteoclast proton pump. Essentially the same results were obtained with osteoclasts derived from mouse spleen macrophages. Macrophages from a3-knock-out mice could differentiate into multi-nuclear cells with osteoclast-specific enzymes. In these cells, the d2 isoform was also induced and assembled in V-ATPase with the a1 or a2 isoform. However, they did not absorb calcium phosphate, indicating that V-ATPase with d2/a1 or d2/a2 could not perform the function of that with d2/a3.

  8. Functional diversity among seed dispersal kernels generated by carnivorous mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Varo, Juan P; López-Bao, José V; Guitián, José

    2013-05-01

    1. Knowledge of the spatial scale of the dispersal service provided by important seed dispersers (i.e. common and/or keystone species) is essential to our understanding of their role on plant ecology, ecosystem functioning and, ultimately, biodiversity conservation. 2. Carnivores are the main mammalian frugivores and seed dispersers in temperate climate regions. However, information on the seed dispersal distances they generate is still very limited. We focused on two common temperate carnivores differing in body size and spatial ecology - red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and European pine marten (Martes martes) - for evaluating possible functional diversity in their seed dispersal kernels. 3. We measured dispersal distances using colour-coded seed mimics embedded in experimental fruits that were offered to the carnivores in feeding stations (simulating source trees). The exclusive colour code of each simulated tree allowed us to assign the exact origin of seed mimics found later in carnivore faeces. We further designed an explicit sampling strategy aiming to detect the longest dispersal events; as far we know, the most robust sampling scheme followed for tracking carnivore-dispersed seeds. 4. We found a marked functional heterogeneity among both species in their seed dispersal kernels according to their home range size: multimodality and long-distance dispersal in the case of the fox and unimodality and short-distance dispersal in the case of the marten (maximum distances = 2846 and 1233 m, respectively). As a consequence, emergent kernels at the guild level (overall and in two different years) were highly dependent on the relative contribution of each carnivore species. 5. Our results provide the first empirical evidence of functional diversity among seed dispersal kernels generated by carnivorous mammals. Moreover, they illustrate for the first time how seed dispersal kernels strongly depend on the relative contribution of different disperser species, thus on the

  9. Differentiation of Col I and Col III isoforms in stromal models of ovarian cancer by analysis of second harmonic generation polarization and emission directionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilbury, Karissa; Lien, Chi-Hsiang; Chen, Shean-Jen; Campagnola, Paul J

    2014-01-21

    A profound remodeling of the extracellular matrix occurs in many epithelial cancers. In ovarian cancer, the minor collagen isoform of Col III becomes upregulated in invasive disease. Here we use second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging microscopy to probe structural differences in fibrillar models of the ovarian stroma comprised of mixtures of Col I and III. The SHG intensity and forward-backward ratios decrease with increasing Col III content, consistent with decreased phasematching due to more randomized structures. We further probe the net collagen α-helix pitch angle within the gel mixtures using what is believed to be a new pixel-based polarization-resolved approach that combines and extends previous analyses. The extracted pitch angles are consistent with those of peptide models and the method has sufficient sensitivity to differentiate Col I from the Col I/Col III mixtures. We further developed the pixel-based approach to extract the SHG signal polarization anisotropy from the same polarization-resolved image matrix. Using this approach, we found that increased Col III results in decreased alignment of the dipole moments within the focal volume. Collectively, the SHG measurements and analysis all indicate that incorporation of Col III results in decreased organization across several levels of collagen organization. Furthermore, the findings suggest that the collagen isoforms comingle within the same fibrils, in good agreement with ultrastructural data. The pixel-based polarization analyses (both excitation and emission) afford determination of structural properties without the previous requirement of having well-aligned fibers, and the approaches should be generally applicable in tissue.

  10. Genomic variability and alternative splicing generate multiple PML/RAR alpha transcripts that encode aberrant PML proteins and PML/RAR alpha isoforms in acute promyelocytic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandolfi, P P; Alcalay, M; Fagioli, M; Zangrilli, D; Mencarelli, A; Diverio, D; Biondi, A; Lo Coco, F; Rambaldi, A; Grignani, F

    1992-01-01

    The acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) 15;17 translocation generates a PML/RAR alpha chimeric gene which is transcribed as a fusion PML/RAR alpha mRNA. Molecular studies on a large series of APLs revealed great heterogeneity of the PML/RAR alpha transcripts due to: (i) variable breaking of chromosome 15 within three PML breakpoint cluster regions (bcr1, bcr2 and bcr3), (ii) alternative splicings of the PML portion and (iii) alternative usage of two RAR alpha polyadenylation sites. Nucleotide sequence analysis predicted two types of proteins: multiple PML/RAR alpha and aberrant PML. The PML/RAR alpha proteins varied among bcr1, 2 and 3 APL cases and within single cases. The fusion proteins contained variable portions of the PML N terminus joined to the B-F RAR alpha domains; the only PML region retained was the putative DNA binding domain. The aberrant PML proteins lacked the C terminus, which had been replaced by from two to ten amino acid residues from the RAR alpha sequence. Multiple PML/RAR alpha isoforms and aberrant PML proteins were found to coexist in all APLs. These findings indicate that two potential oncogenic proteins are generated by the t(15;17) and suggest that the PML activation pathway is altered in APLs. Images PMID:1314166

  11. Research resource: new and diverse substrates for the insulin receptor isoform a revealed by quantitative proteomics after stimulation with igf-ii or insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morcavallo, Alaide; Gaspari, Marco; Pandini, Giuseppe;

    2011-01-01

    The isoform A of the insulin receptor (IR) (IR-A) is a bifunctional receptor, because it binds both insulin and IGF-II. IR-A activation by IGF-II plays a role in development, but its physiological role in adults is unknown. IGF-II signaling through IR-A is deregulated in cancer and favors tumor p...

  12. Functional characterization of flax fatty acid desaturase FAD2 and FAD3 isoforms expressed in yeast reveals a broad diversity in activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovanovic, Natasa; Thambugala, Dinushika; Duguid, Scott; Loewen, Evelyn; Cloutier, Sylvie

    2014-07-01

    With 45 % or more oil content that contains more than 55 % alpha linolenic (LIN) acid, linseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) is one of the richest plant sources of this essential fatty acid. Fatty acid desaturases 2 (FAD2) and 3 (FAD3) are the main enzymes responsible for the Δ12 and Δ15 desaturation in planta. In linseed, the oilseed morphotype of flax, two paralogous copies, and several alleles exist for each gene. Here, we cloned three alleles of FAD2A, four of FAD2B, six of FAD3A, and seven of FAD3B into a pYES vector and transformed all 20 constructs and an empty construct in yeast. The transformants were induced in the presence of oleic (OLE) acid substrate for FAD2 constructs and linoleic (LIO) acid for FAD3. Conversion rates of OLE acid into LIO acid and LIO acid into LIN acid were measured by gas chromatography. Conversion rate of FAD2 exceeded that of FAD3 enzymes with FAD2B having a conversion rate approximately 10 % higher than FAD2A. All FAD2 isoforms were active, but significant differences existed between isoforms of both FAD2 enzymes. Two FAD3A and three FAD3B isoforms were not functional. Some nonfunctional enzymes resulted from the presence of nonsense mutations causing premature stop codons, but FAD3B-C and FAD3B-F seem to be associated with single amino acid changes. The activity of FAD3A-C was more than fivefold greater than the most common isoform FAD3A-A, while FAD3A-F was fourfold greater. Such isoforms could be incorporated into breeding lines to possibly further increase the proportion of LIN acid in linseed.

  13. Low Diversity in the Mitogenome of Sperm Whales Revealed by Next-Generation Sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander, Alana; Steel, Debbie; Slikas, Beth; Hoekzema, Kendra; Carraher, Colm; Parks, Matthew; Cronn, Richard; Baker, C. Scott

    2012-01-01

    Large population sizes and global distributions generally associate with high mitochondrial DNA control region (CR) diversity. The sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) is an exception, showing low CR diversity relative to other cetaceans; however, diversity levels throughout the remainder of the sperm whale mitogenome are unknown. We sequenced 20 mitogenomes from 17 sperm whales representative of worldwide diversity using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies (Illumina GAIIx, Roche 45...

  14. Expression and identification of 10 sarcomeric MyHC isoforms in human skeletal muscles of different embryological origin. Diversity and similarity in mammalian species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarello, Francesco; Toniolo, Luana; Cancellara, Pasqua; Reggiani, Carlo; Maccatrozzo, Lisa

    2016-09-01

    In the mammalian genome, among myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms a family can be identified as sarcomeric based on their molecular structure which allows thick filament formation. In this study we aimed to assess the expression of the 10 sarcomeric isoforms in human skeletal muscles, adopting this species as a reference for comparison with all other mammalian species. To this aim, we set up the condition for quantitative Real Time PCR assay to detect and quantify MyHC mRNA expression in a wide variety of human muscles from somitic, presomitic and preotic origin. Specific patterns of expression of the following genes MYH1, MYH2, MYH3, MYH4, MYH6, MYH7, MYH8, MYH13, MYH14/7b and MYH15 were demonstrated in various muscle samples. On the same muscle samples which were analysed for mRNA expression, the corresponding MyHC proteins were studied with SDS PAGE and Western blot. The mRNA-protein comparison allowed the identification of 10 distinct proteins based on the electrophoretic migration rate. Three groups were formed based on the migration rate: fast migrating comprising beta/slow/1, alpha cardiac and fast 2B, slow migrating comprising fast 2X, fast 2A and two developmental isoforms (NEO and EMB), intermediate migrating comprising EO MyHC, slow B (product of MYH15), slow tonic (product of MYH14/7b). Of special interest was the demonstration of a protein band corresponding to 2B-MyHC in laryngeal muscles and the finding that all 10 isoforms are expressed in extraocular muscles. These latter muscles are the unique localization for extraocular, slow B (product of MYH15) and slow tonic (product of MYH14/7b).

  15. COMPETENCY MODELS AND THE GENERATIONAL DIVERSITY OF A COMPANY WORKFORCE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Malgorzata Baran; Monika Klos

    2014-01-01

      This paper aims to present an analysis of employee competencies across different generations, placing emphasis on their attitudes towards the labour market and future perspective concerning work...

  16. Structural insights into FGFR kinase isoform selectivity: diverse binding modes of AZD4547 and ponatinib in complex with FGFR1 and FGFR4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Julie A; Klein, Tobias; Breed, Jason; Breeze, Alexander L; Overman, Ross; Phillips, Chris; Norman, Richard A

    2014-12-02

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) family of receptor tyrosine kinases has been implicated in a wide variety of cancers. Despite a high level of sequence homology in the ATP-binding site, the majority of reported inhibitors are selective for the FGFR1-3 isoforms and display much reduced potency toward FGFR4, an exception being the Bcr-Abl inhibitor ponatinib. Here we present the crystal structure of the FGFR4 kinase domain and show that both FGFR1 and FGFR4 kinase domains in complex with ponatinib adopt a DFG-out activation loop conformation. Comparison with the structure of FGFR1 in complex with the candidate drug AZD4547, combined with kinetic characterization of the binding of ponatinib and AZD4547 to FGFR1 and FGFR4, sheds light on the observed differences in selectivity profiles and provides a rationale for developing FGFR4-selective inhibitors.

  17. Differential expression of two distinct functional isoforms of melanopsin (Opn4) in the mammalian retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Susana S; Hughes, Steven; Turton, Michael; Melyan, Zare; Peirson, Stuart N; Zheng, Lei; Kosmaoglou, Maria; Bellingham, James; Cheetham, Michael E; Lucas, Robert J; Foster, Russell G; Hankins, Mark W; Halford, Stephanie

    2009-09-30

    Melanopsin is the photopigment that confers photosensitivity to a subset of retinal ganglion cells (pRGCs) that regulate many non-image-forming tasks such as the detection of light for circadian entrainment. Recent studies have begun to subdivide the pRGCs on the basis of morphology and function, but the origin of these differences is not yet fully understood. Here we report the identification of two isoforms of melanopsin from the mouse Opn4 locus, a previously described long isoform (Opn4L) and a novel short isoform (Opn4S) that more closely resembles the sequence and structure of rat and human melanopsins. Both isoforms, Opn4L and Opn4S, are expressed in the ganglion cell layer of the retina, traffic to the plasma membrane and form a functional photopigment in vitro. Quantitative PCR revealed that Opn4S is 40 times more abundant than Opn4L. The two variants encode predicted proteins of 521 and 466 aa and only differ in the length of their C-terminal tails. Antibodies raised to isoform-specific epitopes identified two discrete populations of melanopsin-expressing RGCs, those that coexpress Opn4L and Opn4S and those that express Opn4L only. Recent evidence suggests that pRGCs show a range of anatomical subtypes, which may reflect the functional diversity reported for mouse Opn4-mediated light responses. The distinct isoforms of Opn4 described in this study provide a potential molecular basis for generating this diversity, and it seems likely that their differential expression plays a role in generating the variety of pRGC light responses found in the mammalian retina.

  18. Activity of the acyl-CoA synthetase ACSL6 isoforms: role of the fatty acid Gate-domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siliakus Melvin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of fatty acids by acyl-CoA synthetase enzymes is required for de novo lipid synthesis, fatty acid catabolism, and remodeling of biological membranes. Human long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase member 6, ASCL6, is a form present in the plasma membrane of cells. Splicing events affecting the amino-terminus and alternative motifs near the ATP-binding site generate different isoforms of ACSL6. Results Isoforms with different fatty acid Gate-domain motifs have different activity and the form lacking this domain, isoform 3, showed no detectable activity. Enzymes truncated of the first 40 residues generate acyl-CoAs at a faster rate than the full-length protein. The gating residue, which prevents entry of the fatty acid substrate unless one molecule of ATP has already accessed the catalytic site, was identified as a tyrosine for isoform 1 and a phenylalanine for isoform 2 at position 319. All isoforms, with or without a fatty acid Gate-domain, as well as recombinant protein truncated of the N-terminus, can interact to form enzymatic complexes with identical or different isoforms. Conclusion The alternative fatty acid Gate-domain motifs are essential determinants for the activity of the human ACSL6 isoforms, which appear to act as homodimeric enzyme as well as in complex with other spliced forms. These findings provide evidence that the diversity of these enzyme species could produce the variety of acyl-CoA synthetase activities that are necessary to generate and repair the hundreds of lipid species present in membranes.

  19. In vivo recombination as a tool to generate molecular diversity in phage antibody libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sblattero, D; Lou, J; Marzari, R; Bradbury, A

    2001-06-01

    The creation of diversity in populations of polypeptides has become an important tool in the derivation of polypeptides with useful characteristics. This requires efficient methods to create diversity coupled with methods to select polypeptides with desired properties. In this review we describe the use of in vivo recombination as a powerful way to generate diversity. The novel principles for the recombination process and several applications of this process for the creation of phage antibody libraries are described. The advantage and disadvantages are discussed and possible future exploitation presented.

  20. Challenges and opportunities in estimating viral genetic diversity from next-generation sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niko eBeerenwinkel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Many viruses, including the clinically relevant RNA viruses HIV and HCV, exist in large populations and display high genetic heterogeneity within and between infected hosts. Assessing intra-patient viral genetic diversity is essential for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of viruses, for designing effective vaccines, and for the success of antiviral therapy. Next-generation sequencing technologies allow the rapid and cost-effective acquisition of thousands to millions of short DNA sequences from a single sample. However, this approach entails several challenges in experimental design and computational data analysis. Here, we review the entire process of inferring viral diversity from sample collection to computing measures of genetic diversity. We discuss sample preparation, including reverse transcription and amplification, and the effect of experimental conditions on diversity estimates due to in vitro base substitutions, insertions, deletions, and recombination. The use of different next-generation sequencing platforms and their sequencing error profiles are compared in the context of various applications of diversity estimation, ranging from the detection of single nucleotide variants to the reconstruction of whole-genome haplotypes. We describe the statistical and computational challenges arising from these technical artifacts, and we review existing approaches, including available software, for their solution. Finally, we discuss open problems, and highlight successful biomedical applications and potential future clinical use of next-generation sequencing to estimate viral diversity.

  1. Understanding Generational Diversity: Strategic Human Resource Management and Development across the Generational "Divide"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amayah, Angela Titi; Gedro, Julie

    2014-01-01

    There are more generations in today's workforce than ever before, which has the possibility to create challenges for Human Resource professionals. The purpose of this article is to interrogate existing stereotypes and generalities about the characteristics of different generations with respect to the workplace, and to offer suggestions for…

  2. Understanding Generational Diversity: Strategic Human Resource Management and Development across the Generational "Divide"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amayah, Angela Titi; Gedro, Julie

    2014-01-01

    There are more generations in today's workforce than ever before, which has the possibility to create challenges for Human Resource professionals. The purpose of this article is to interrogate existing stereotypes and generalities about the characteristics of different generations with respect to the workplace, and to offer suggestions for…

  3. Low diversity in the mitogenome of sperm whales revealed by next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Alana; Steel, Debbie; Slikas, Beth; Hoekzema, Kendra; Carraher, Colm; Parks, Matthew; Cronn, Richard; Baker, C Scott

    2013-01-01

    Large population sizes and global distributions generally associate with high mitochondrial DNA control region (CR) diversity. The sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) is an exception, showing low CR diversity relative to other cetaceans; however, diversity levels throughout the remainder of the sperm whale mitogenome are unknown. We sequenced 20 mitogenomes from 17 sperm whales representative of worldwide diversity using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies (Illumina GAIIx, Roche 454 GS Junior). Resequencing of three individuals with both NGS platforms and partial Sanger sequencing showed low discrepancy rates (454-Illumina: 0.0071%; Sanger-Illumina: 0.0034%; and Sanger-454: 0.0023%) confirming suitability of both NGS platforms for investigating low mitogenomic diversity. Using the 17 sperm whale mitogenomes in a phylogenetic reconstruction with 41 other species, including 11 new dolphin mitogenomes, we tested two hypotheses for the low CR diversity. First, the hypothesis that CR-specific constraints have reduced diversity solely in the CR was rejected as diversity was low throughout the mitogenome, not just in the CR (overall diversity π = 0.096%; protein-coding 3rd codon = 0.22%; CR = 0.35%), and CR phylogenetic signal was congruent with protein-coding regions. Second, the hypothesis that slow substitution rates reduced diversity throughout the sperm whale mitogenome was rejected as sperm whales had significantly higher rates of CR evolution and no evidence of slow coding region evolution relative to other cetaceans. The estimated time to most recent common ancestor for sperm whale mitogenomes was 72,800 to 137,400 years ago (95% highest probability density interval), consistent with previous hypotheses of a bottleneck or selective sweep as likely causes of low mitogenome diversity.

  4. Tau protein assembles into isoform- and disulfide-dependent polymorphic fibrils with distinct structural properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Kaneko, Kumi; Nukina, Nobuyuki

    2011-08-05

    Tauopathies are neurodegenerative diseases in which insoluble fibrillar aggregates of a microtubule-binding protein, Tau, are abnormally accumulated. Pathological Tau fibrils often exhibit structural polymorphisms that differ among phenotypically distinct tauopathies; however, a molecular mechanism to generate polymorphic Tau fibrils remains obscure. Here, we note the formation of a disulfide bond in isoforms of full-length Tau and show that the thiol-disulfide status as well as the isoform composition determines structural and morphological properties of Tau fibrils in vitro. Mainly two regions in a Tau primary sequence are found to act as structural blocks for building a protease-resistant core of Tau fibrils. Interactions among those two blocks for building a core structure depend upon the thiol-disulfide status in each isoform of Tau, which results in the formation of polymorphic fibrils with distinct structural properties. Furthermore, we have found that more diverse structures of Tau fibrils emerge through a cross-seeded fibrillation between heterologous pairs of Tau isoforms. We thus propose that isoform- and disulfide-dependent combinatorial interactions among multiple regions in a Tau sequence endow Tau fibrils with various structures, i.e. polymorphism.

  5. Tau Protein Assembles into Isoform- and Disulfide-dependent Polymorphic Fibrils with Distinct Structural Properties*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Kaneko, Kumi; Nukina, Nobuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Tauopathies are neurodegenerative diseases in which insoluble fibrillar aggregates of a microtubule-binding protein, Tau, are abnormally accumulated. Pathological Tau fibrils often exhibit structural polymorphisms that differ among phenotypically distinct tauopathies; however, a molecular mechanism to generate polymorphic Tau fibrils remains obscure. Here, we note the formation of a disulfide bond in isoforms of full-length Tau and show that the thiol-disulfide status as well as the isoform composition determines structural and morphological properties of Tau fibrils in vitro. Mainly two regions in a Tau primary sequence are found to act as structural blocks for building a protease-resistant core of Tau fibrils. Interactions among those two blocks for building a core structure depend upon the thiol-disulfide status in each isoform of Tau, which results in the formation of polymorphic fibrils with distinct structural properties. Furthermore, we have found that more diverse structures of Tau fibrils emerge through a cross-seeded fibrillation between heterologous pairs of Tau isoforms. We thus propose that isoform- and disulfide-dependent combinatorial interactions among multiple regions in a Tau sequence endow Tau fibrils with various structures, i.e. polymorphism. PMID:21659525

  6. Human Nav1.6 Channels Generate Larger Resurgent Currents than Human Nav1.1 Channels, but the Navβ4 Peptide Does Not Protect Either Isoform from Use-Dependent Reduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reesha R Patel

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels are responsible for the initiation and propagation of action potentials (APs. Two brain isoforms, Nav1.1 and Nav1.6, have very distinct cellular and subcellular expression. Specifically, Nav1.1 is predominantly expressed in the soma and proximal axon initial segment of fast-spiking GABAergic neurons, while Nav1.6 is found at the distal axon initial segment and nodes of Ranvier of both fast-spiking GABAergic and excitatory neurons. Interestingly, an auxiliary voltage-gated sodium channel subunit, Navβ4, is also enriched in the axon initial segment of fast-spiking GABAergic neurons. The C-terminal tail of Navβ4 is thought to mediate resurgent sodium current, an atypical current that occurs immediately following the action potential and is predicted to enhance excitability. To better understand the contribution of Nav1.1, Nav1.6 and Navβ4 to high frequency firing, we compared the properties of these two channel isoforms in the presence and absence of a peptide corresponding to part of the C-terminal tail of Navβ4. We used whole-cell patch clamp recordings to examine the biophysical properties of these two channel isoforms in HEK293T cells and found several differences between human Nav1.1 and Nav1.6 currents. Nav1.1 channels exhibited slower closed-state inactivation but faster open-state inactivation than Nav1.6 channels. We also observed a greater propensity of Nav1.6 to generate resurgent currents, most likely due to its slower kinetics of open-state inactivation, compared to Nav1.1. These two isoforms also showed differential responses to slow and fast AP waveforms, which were altered by the Navβ4 peptide. Although the Navβ4 peptide substantially increased the rate of recovery from apparent inactivation, Navβ4 peptide did not protect either channel isoform from undergoing use-dependent reduction with 10 Hz step-pulse stimulation or trains of slow or fast AP waveforms. Overall, these two channels have

  7. Measuring the diversity of the human microbiota with targeted next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finotello, Francesca; Mastrorilli, Eleonora; Di Camillo, Barbara

    2016-12-26

    The human microbiota is a complex ecological community of commensal, symbiotic and pathogenic microorganisms harboured by the human body. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, in particular targeted amplicon sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S-seq), are enabling the identification and quantification of human-resident microorganisms at unprecedented resolution, providing novel insights into the role of the microbiota in health and disease. Once microbial abundances are quantified through NGS data analysis, diversity indices provide valuable mathematical tools to describe the ecological complexity of a single sample or to detect species differences between samples. However, diversity is not a determined physical quantity for which a consensus definition and unit of measure have been established, and several diversity indices are currently available. Furthermore, they were originally developed for macroecology and their robustness to the possible bias introduced by sequencing has not been characterized so far. To assist the reader with the selection and interpretation of diversity measures, we review a panel of broadly used indices, describing their mathematical formulations, purposes and properties, and characterize their behaviour and criticalities in dependence of the data features using simulated data as ground truth. In addition, we make available an R package, DiversitySeq, which implements in a unified framework the full panel of diversity indices and a simulator of 16S-seq data, and thus represents a valuable resource for the analysis of diversity from NGS count data and for the benchmarking of computational methods for 16S-seq.

  8. Cheating in Business Schools, the Millennial Generation, Gender and Racial Diversity: Has the Paradigm Shifted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathison, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Cheating in college is not new. In 1960 over 50 percent of students admitted they cheated. In the second decade of the 21st century has anything changed? This research project looked at three possible new variables, the Millennial Generation, Gender, and Diversity. Results suggest the amount of reported cheating remains the same even with current…

  9. Isoform-specific monobody inhibitors of small ubiquitin-related modifiers engineered using structure-guided library design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreth, Ryan N; Truong, Khue; Madu, Ikenna; Koide, Akiko; Wojcik, John B; Li, Nan-Sheng; Piccirilli, Joseph A; Chen, Yuan; Koide, Shohei

    2011-05-10

    Discriminating closely related molecules remains a major challenge in the engineering of binding proteins and inhibitors. Here we report the development of highly selective inhibitors of small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) family proteins. SUMOylation is involved in the regulation of diverse cellular processes. Functional differences between two major SUMO isoforms in humans, SUMO1 and SUMO2/3, are thought to arise from distinct interactions mediated by each isoform with other proteins containing SUMO-interacting motifs (SIMs). However, the roles of such isoform-specific interactions are largely uncharacterized due in part to the difficulty in generating high-affinity, isoform-specific inhibitors of SUMO/SIM interactions. We first determined the crystal structure of a "monobody," a designed binding protein based on the fibronectin type III scaffold, bound to the yeast homolog of SUMO. This structure illustrated a mechanism by which monobodies bind to the highly conserved SIM-binding site while discriminating individual SUMO isoforms. Based on this structure, we designed a SUMO-targeted library from which we obtained monobodies that bound to the SIM-binding site of human SUMO1 with K(d) values of approximately 100 nM but bound to SUMO2 400 times more weakly. The monobodies inhibited SUMO1/SIM interactions and, unexpectedly, also inhibited SUMO1 conjugation. These high-affinity and isoform-specific inhibitors will enhance mechanistic and cellular investigations of SUMO biology.

  10. Isoform-specific monobody inhibitors of small ubiquitin-related modifiers engineered using structure-guided library design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbreth, Ryan N.; Truong, Khue; Madu, Ikenna; Koide, Akiko; Wojcik, John B.; Li, Nan-Sheng; Piccirilli, Joseph A.; Chen, Yuan; Koide, Shohei (UC); (CHNMC)

    2011-07-25

    Discriminating closely related molecules remains a major challenge in the engineering of binding proteins and inhibitors. Here we report the development of highly selective inhibitors of small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) family proteins. SUMOylation is involved in the regulation of diverse cellular processes. Functional differences between two major SUMO isoforms in humans, SUMO1 and SUMO2/3, are thought to arise from distinct interactions mediated by each isoform with other proteins containing SUMO-interacting motifs (SIMs). However, the roles of such isoform-specific interactions are largely uncharacterized due in part to the difficulty in generating high-affinity, isoform-specific inhibitors of SUMO/SIM interactions. We first determined the crystal structure of a 'monobody,' a designed binding protein based on the fibronectin type III scaffold, bound to the yeast homolog of SUMO. This structure illustrated a mechanism by which monobodies bind to the highly conserved SIM-binding site while discriminating individual SUMO isoforms. Based on this structure, we designed a SUMO-targeted library from which we obtained monobodies that bound to the SIM-binding site of human SUMO1 with K{sub d} values of approximately 100 nM but bound to SUMO2 400 times more weakly. The monobodies inhibited SUMO1/SIM interactions and, unexpectedly, also inhibited SUMO1 conjugation. These high-affinity and isoform-specific inhibitors will enhance mechanistic and cellular investigations of SUMO biology.

  11. Differential domain evolution and complex RNA processing in a family of paralogous EPB41 (protein 4.1) genes facilitates expression of diverse tissue-specific isoforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry; Chan, Nadine; Ryaboy, Dmitriy; Dubchak, Inna; Narla, Mohandas; Gascard, Philippe D.; Conboy, John G.

    2004-07-15

    The EPB41 (protein 4.1) genes epitomize the resourcefulness of the mammalian genome to encode a complex proteome from a small number of genes. By utilizing alternative transcriptional promoters and tissue-specific alternative pre-mRNA splicing, EPB41, EPB41L2, EPB41L3, and EPB41L1 encode a diverse array of structural adapter proteins. Comparative genomic and transcript analysis of these 140kb-240kb genes indicates several unusual features: differential evolution of highly conserved exons encoding known functional domains, interspersed with unique exons whose size and sequence variations contribute substantially to intergenic diversity: alternative first exons, most of which map far upstream of the coding regions; and complex tissue-specific alternative pre-mRNA splicing that facilitates synthesis of functionally different complements of 4.1 proteins in various cells. Understanding the splicing regulatory networks that control protein 4.1 expression will be critical to a full appreciation of the many roles of 4.1 proteins in normal cell biology and their proposed roles in human cancer.

  12. Generation of topologically diverse acoustic vortex beams using a compact metamaterial aperture

    CERN Document Server

    Naify, Christina J; Martin, Theodore P; Nicholas, Michael; Guild, Matthew D; Orris, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Vortex waves, which carry orbital angular momentum, have found use in a range of fields from quantum communications to particle manipulation. Due to their widespread influence, significant attention has been paid to the methods by which vortex waves are generated. For example, active phased arrays generate diverse vortex modes at the cost of electronic complexity and power consumption. Conversely, analog apertures, such as spiral phase plates, metasurfaces, and gratings require separate apertures to generate each mode. Here we present a new class of metamaterial-based acoustic vortex generators, which are both geometrically and electronically simple, and topologically tunable. Our metamaterial approach generates vortex waves by wrapping an acoustic leaky wave antenna back upon itself. Exploiting the antennas frequency-varying refractive index, we demonstrate experimentally and analytically that this analog structure generates both integer, and non-integer vortex modes. The metamaterial design makes the apertu...

  13. In the time of significant generational diversity - surgical leadership must step up!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Money, Samuel R; O'Donnell, Mark E; Gray, Richard J

    2014-02-01

    The diverse attitudes and motivations of surgeons and surgical trainees within different age groups present an important challenge for surgical leaders and educators. These challenges to surgical leadership are not unique, and other industries have likewise needed to grapple with how best to manage these various age groups. The authors will herein explore management and leadership for surgeons in a time of age diversity, define generational variations within "Baby-Boomer", "Generation X" and "Generation Y" populations, and identify work ethos concepts amongst these three groups. The surgical community must understand and embrace these concepts in order to continue to attract a stellar pool of applicants from medical school. By not accepting the changing attitudes and motivations of young trainees and medical students, we may disenfranchise a high percentage of potential future surgeons. Surgical training programs will fill, but will they contain the highest quality trainees?

  14. Processing of Snake Venom Metalloproteinases: Generation of Toxin Diversity and Enzyme Inactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. Moura-da-Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs are abundant in the venoms of vipers and rattlesnakes, playing important roles for the snake adaptation to different environments, and are related to most of the pathological effects of these venoms in human victims. The effectiveness of SVMPs is greatly due to their functional diversity, targeting important physiological proteins or receptors in different tissues and in the coagulation system. Functional diversity is often related to the genetic diversification of the snake venom. In this review, we discuss some published evidence that posit that processing and post-translational modifications are great contributors for the generation of functional diversity and for maintaining latency or inactivation of enzymes belonging to this relevant family of venom toxins.

  15. Overcoming viral escape with vaccines that generate and display antigen diversity in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Quintanilla Albert

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viral diversity is a key problem for the design of effective and universal vaccines. Virtually, a vaccine candidate including most of the diversity for a given epitope would force the virus to create escape mutants above the viability threshold or with a high fitness cost. Presentation of the hypothesis Therefore, I hypothesize that priming the immune system with polyvalent vaccines where each single vehicle generates and displays multiple antigen variants in vivo, will elicit a broad and long-lasting immune response able to avoid viral escape. Testing the hypothesis To this purpose, I propose the use of yeasts that carry virus-like particles designed to pack the antigen-coding RNA inside and replicate it via RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. This would produce diversity in vivo limited to the target of interest and without killing the vaccine vehicle. Implications of the hypothesis This approach is in contrast with peptide cocktails synthesized in vitro and polyvalent strategies where every cell or vector displays a single or definite number of mutants; but similarly to all them, it should be able to overcome original antigenic sin, avoid major histocompatibility complex restriction, and elicit broad cross-reactive immune responses. Here I discuss additional advantages such as minimal global antagonism or those derived from using a yeast vehicle, and potential drawbacks like autoimmunity. Diversity generated by this method could be monitored both genotypically and phenotypically, and therefore selected or discarded before use if needed.

  16. Comparing CDRH3 diversity captured from secondary lymphoid organs for the generation of recombinant human antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venet, Sophie; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie; Fischer, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The plasticity of natural immunoglobulin repertoires can be exploited for the generation of phage display libraries. Secondary lymphoid organs, such as the spleen and the lymph nodes, constitute interesting sources of diversity because they are rich in B cells, part of which can be affinity matured. These organs, however, differ in their anatomical structure, reflecting the different fluids they drain, which affects the B cell repertoires. The CDRH3 repertoires from these organs, extracted from naïve or immunized mice, were compared in the context of phage display libraries using human antibody framework families. Deep sequencing analysis revealed that all libraries displayed different CDRH3 repertoires, but the one derived from lymph nodes of naïve mice was the most diverse. Library performance was assessed by in vitro selection. For both organs, immunization increased substantially the frequency of molecules able to bind to the immunogen. The library derived from lymph nodes from naïve mice, however, was the most effective in generating diverse and high affinity candidates. These results illustrate that the use of a biased CDRH3 repertoire increases the performance of libraries, but reduces the clonal diversity, which may be detrimental for certain strategies.

  17. Isoforms of receptors of fibroblast growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Siew-Ging

    2014-12-01

    The breadth and scope of Fibroblast Growth Factor signaling is immense, with documentation of its role in almost every organism and system studied so far. FGF ligands signal through a family of four distinct tyrosine kinase receptors, the FGF receptors (FGFRs). One contribution to the diversity of function and signaling of FGFs and their receptors arises from the numerous alternative splicing variants that have been documented in the FGFR literature. The present review discusses the types and roles of alternatively spliced variants of the FGFR family members and the significant impact of alternative splicing on the physiological functions of five broad classes of FGFR isoforms. Some characterized known regulatory mechanisms of alternative splicing and future directions in studies of FGFR alternative splicing are also discussed. Presence, absence, and/or the combination of specific exons within each FGFR protein impart upon each individual isoform its unique function and expression pattern during normal function and in diseased states (e.g., in cancers and birth defects). A better understanding of the diversity of FGF signaling in different developmental contexts and diseased states can be achieved through increased knowledge of the presence of specific FGFR isoforms and their impact on downstream signaling and functions. Modern high-throughput techniques afford an opportunity to explore the distribution and function of isoforms of FGFR during development and in diseases.

  18. Immigrant Generation and Sexual Initiation Among a Diverse Racial/Ethnic Group of Urban Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman-Minahan, Kate; Chavez, Marisol; Bull, Sheana

    2016-04-21

    Foreign-born youth have a lower risk of sexual initiation than native born youth, yet most research has focused on Latinos. An ethnically diverse sample of 200, 14-21 year-old youth were surveyed in Denver in 2014. We used logistic regression models to predict the odds of intentions to have sex and sexual experience, adding covariates that could account for differences in outcomes by immigrant generation. First generation youth were less likely to intend to have sex and to have sexual experience than third generation youth after controlling for racial/ethnic group, suggesting that first generation immigrants of multiple racial/ethnic groups, not just Latinos alone, have a lower risk for sexual initiation. Having a supportive community reduced the odds of sexual intentions and sexual experience. Our findings support future research using a larger sample of black, white, and Asian immigrant youth to corroborate and to explore reasons behind these associations.

  19. The retinal projectome reveals brain-area-specific visual representations generated by ganglion cell diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Estuardo; Laurell, Eva; Baier, Herwig

    2014-09-22

    Visual information is transmitted to the vertebrate brain exclusively via the axons of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The functional diversity of RGCs generates multiple representations of the visual environment that are transmitted to several brain areas. However, in no vertebrate species has a complete wiring diagram of RGC axonal projections been constructed. We employed sparse genetic labeling and in vivo imaging of the larval zebrafish to generate a cellular-resolution map of projections from the retina to the brain. Our data define 20 stereotyped axonal projection patterns, the majority of which innervate multiple brain areas. Morphometric analysis of pre- and postsynaptic RGC structure revealed more than 50 structural RGC types with unique combinations of dendritic and axonal morphologies, exceeding current estimates of RGC diversity in vertebrates. These single-cell projection mapping data indicate that specific projection patterns are nonuniformly specified in the retina to generate retinotopically biased visual maps throughout the brain. The retinal projectome also successfully predicted a functional subdivision of the pretectum. Our data indicate that RGC projection patterns are precisely coordinated to generate brain-area-specific visual representations originating from RGCs with distinct dendritic morphologies and topographic distributions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ikaros isoforms:The saga continues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laura; A; Perez-Casellas; Aleksandar; Savic; Sinisa; Dovat

    2011-01-01

    Through alternate splicing,the Ikaros gene produces multiple proteins.Ikaros is essential for normal hematopoiesis and possesses tumor suppressor activity.Ikaros isoforms interact to form dimers and potentially multimeric complexes.Diverse Ikaros complexes produced by the presence of different Ikaros isoforms are hypothesized to confer distinct functions.Small dominantnegative Ikaros isoforms have been shown to inhibit the tumor suppressor activity of full-length Ikaros.Here,we describe how Ikaros activity is regulated by the coordinated expression of the largest Ikaros isoforms IK-1 and IK-H.Although IK-1 is described as full-length Ikaros,IK-H is the longest Ikaros isoform.IK-H,which includes residues coded by exon 3B (60 bp that lie between exons 3 and 4),is abundant in human but not murine hematopoietic cells.Specific residues that lie within the 20 amino acids encoded by exon 3B give IK-H DNA-binding characteristics that are distinct from those of IK-1.Moreover,IK-H can potentiate or inhibit the ability of IK-1 to bind DNA.IK-H binds to the regulatory regions of genes that are upregulated by Ikaros,but not genes that are repressed by Ikaros.Although IK-1 localizes to pericentromeric heterochromatin,IK-H can be found in both pericentromeric and non-pericentromeric locations.Anti-silencing activity of gamma satellite DNA has been shown to depend on the binding of IK-H,but not other Ikaros isoforms.The unique features of IK-H,its influence on Ikaros activity,and the lack of IK-H expression in mice suggest that Ikaros function in humans may be more complex and possibly distinct from that in mice.

  1. A comparative overview of immunoglobulin genes and the generation of their diversity in tetrapods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Wei, Zhiguo; Li, Ning; Zhao, Yaofeng

    2013-01-01

    In the past several decades, immunoglobulin (Ig) genes have been extensively characterized in many tetrapod species. This review focuses on the expressed Ig isotypes and the diversity of Ig genes in mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians. With regard to heavy chains, five Ig isotypes - IgM, IgD, IgG, IgA, and IgE - have been reported in mammals. Among these isotypes, IgM, IgD, and IgA (or its analog, IgX) are also found in non-mammalian tetrapods. Birds, reptiles, and amphibians express IgY, which is considered the precursor of IgG and IgE. Some species have developed unique isotypes of Ig, such as IgO in the platypus, IgF in Xenopus, and IgY (ΔFc) in ducks and turtles. The κ and λ light chains are both utilized in tetrapods, but the usage frequencies of κ and λ chains differ greatly among species. The diversity of Ig genes depends on several factors, including the germline repertoire and recombinatorial and post-recombinatorial diversity, and different species have evolved distinct mechanisms to generate antibody diversity.

  2. Isoforms of Melanopsin Mediate Different Behavioral Responses to Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannath, Aarti; Hughes, Steven; Abdelgany, Amr; Pothecary, Carina A.; Di Pretoro, Simona; Pires, Susana S.; Vachtsevanos, Athanasios; Pilorz, Violetta; Brown, Laurence A.; Hossbach, Markus; MacLaren, Robert E.; Halford, Stephanie; Gatti, Silvia; Hankins, Mark W.; Wood, Matthew J.A.; Foster, Russell G.; Peirson, Stuart N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Melanopsin (OPN4) is a retinal photopigment that mediates a wide range of non-image-forming (NIF) responses to light [1, 2] including circadian entrainment [3], sleep induction [4], the pupillary light response (PLR) [5], and negative masking of locomotor behavior (the acute suppression of activity in response to light) [6]. How these diverse NIF responses can all be mediated by a single photopigment has remained a mystery. We reasoned that the alternative splicing of melanopsin could provide the basis for functionally distinct photopigments arising from a single gene. The murine melanopsin gene is indeed alternatively spliced, producing two distinct isoforms, a short (OPN4S) and a long (OPN4L) isoform, which differ only in their C terminus tails [7]. Significantly, both isoforms form fully functional photopigments [7]. Here, we show that different isoforms of OPN4 mediate different behavioral responses to light. By using RNAi-mediated silencing of each isoform in vivo, we demonstrated that the short isoform (OPN4S) mediates light-induced pupillary constriction, the long isoform (OPN4L) regulates negative masking, and both isoforms contribute to phase-shifting circadian rhythms of locomotor behavior and light-mediated sleep induction. These findings demonstrate that splice variants of a single receptor gene can regulate strikingly different behaviors. PMID:26320947

  3. p53 Family: Role of Protein Isoforms in Human Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxiong Wei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available TP53, TP63, and TP73 genes comprise the p53 family. Each gene produces protein isoforms through multiple mechanisms including extensive alternative mRNA splicing. Accumulating evidence shows that these isoforms play a critical role in the regulation of many biological processes in normal cells. Their abnormal expression contributes to tumorigenesis and has a profound effect on tumor response to curative therapy. This paper is an overview of isoform diversity in the p53 family and its role in cancer.

  4. Human-specific protein isoforms produced by novel splice sites in the human genome after the human-chimpanzee divergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Dong Seon

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolution of splice sites is a well-known phenomenon that results in transcript diversity during human evolution. Many novel splice sites are derived from repetitive elements and may not contribute to protein products. Here, we analyzed annotated human protein-coding exons and identified human-specific splice sites that arose after the human-chimpanzee divergence. Results We analyzed multiple alignments of the annotated human protein-coding exons and their respective orthologous mammalian genome sequences to identify 85 novel splice sites (50 splice acceptors and 35 donors in the human genome. The novel protein-coding exons, which are expressed either constitutively or alternatively, produce novel protein isoforms by insertion, deletion, or frameshift. We found three cases in which the human-specific isoform conferred novel molecular function in the human cells: the human-specific IMUP protein isoform induces apoptosis of the trophoblast and is implicated in pre-eclampsia; the intronization of a part of SMOX gene exon produces inactive spermine oxidase; the human-specific NUB1 isoform shows reduced interaction with ubiquitin-like proteins, possibly affecting ubiquitin pathways. Conclusions Although the generation of novel protein isoforms does not equate to adaptive evolution, we propose that these cases are useful candidates for a molecular functional study to identify proteomic changes that might bring about novel phenotypes during human evolution.

  5. Next-generation sequencing reveals significant bacterial diversity of botrytized wine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A Bokulich

    Full Text Available While wine fermentation has long been known to involve complex microbial communities, the composition and role of bacteria other than a select set of lactic acid bacteria (LAB has often been assumed either negligible or detrimental. This study served as a pilot study for using barcoded amplicon next-generation sequencing to profile bacterial community structure in wines and grape musts, comparing the taxonomic depth achieved by sequencing two different domains of prokaryotic 16S rDNA (V4 and V5. This study was designed to serve two goals: 1 to empirically determine the most taxonomically informative 16S rDNA target region for barcoded amplicon sequencing of wine, comparing V4 and V5 domains of bacterial 16S rDNA to terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP of LAB communities; and 2 to explore the bacterial communities of wine fermentation to better understand the biodiversity of wine at a depth previously unattainable using other techniques. Analysis of amplicons from the V4 and V5 provided similar views of the bacterial communities of botrytized wine fermentations, revealing a broad diversity of low-abundance taxa not traditionally associated with wine, as well as atypical LAB communities initially detected by TRFLP. The V4 domain was determined as the more suitable read for wine ecology studies, as it provided greater taxonomic depth for profiling LAB communities. In addition, targeted enrichment was used to isolate two species of Alphaproteobacteria from a finished fermentation. Significant differences in diversity between inoculated and uninoculated samples suggest that Saccharomyces inoculation exerts selective pressure on bacterial diversity in these fermentations, most notably suppressing abundance of acetic acid bacteria. These results determine the bacterial diversity of botrytized wines to be far higher than previously realized, providing further insight into the fermentation dynamics of these wines, and demonstrate the

  6. A crustin isoform from black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon exhibits broad spectrum anti-bacterial activity

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    Debashis Banerjee

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Crustaceans have a powerful non-specific immune mechanism that responds to pathogen invasion and together with cellular responses, generates powerful humoral factors such as antimicrobial peptides. Crustins are a diverse class of antimicrobial peptides that are expressed by the circulating haemocytes of crustaceans. Several isoforms of this molecule are reported and in this study, one isoform from the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli SG 13009. The purified recombinant crustin peptide had a molecular weight of 22 kDa and exhibited potent anti-bacterial activity in vitro against several Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria that included pathogens of aquatic animals and humans. The recombinant crustin showed a minimal inhibitory concentration of 0.5 μg ml−1 against the vibrio pathogens of shrimp, which suggests its promise for application in aquaculture.

  7. Exploring the potential of second-generation sequencing in diverse biological contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fordyce, Sarah Louise

    Second generation sequencing (SGS) has revolutionized the study of DNA, allowing massive parallel sequencing of nucleic acids with unprecedented depths of coverage. The research undertaken in this thesis occurred in parallel with the increased accessibility of SGS platforms for routine genetic...... H1N1 influenza A virus genomes. The results of these studies demonstrate the power of SGS for gaining insight into the genetic variation of diverse biological samples and highlight the importance of using optimized protocols for sequencing non-conventional samples....

  8. Generation of topologically diverse acoustic vortex beams using a compact metamaterial aperture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naify, Christina J., E-mail: christina.naify@nrl.navy.mil; Rohde, Charles A.; Martin, Theodore P.; Nicholas, Michael [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7165, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Guild, Matthew D. [National Research Council Research Associateship Program, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Orris, Gregory J. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7160, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States)

    2016-05-30

    Here, we present a class of metamaterial-based acoustic vortex generators which are both geometrically simple and broadly tunable. The aperture overcomes the significant limitations of both active phasing systems and existing passive coded apertures. The metamaterial approach generates topologically diverse acoustic vortex waves motivated by recent advances in leaky wave antennas by wrapping the antenna back upon itself to produce an acoustic vortex wave antenna. We demonstrate both experimentally and analytically that this single analog structure is capable of creating multiple orthogonal orbital angular momentum modes using only a single transducer. The metamaterial design makes the aperture compact, with a diameter nearly equal to the excitation wavelength and can thus be easily integrated into high-density systems. Applications range from acoustic communications for high bit-rate multiplexing to biomedical devices such as microfluidic mixers.

  9. Different next generation sequencing platforms produce different microbial profiles and diversity in cystic fibrosis sputum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Andrea; Sanyal, Amit; Perez, Geovanny F; Colberg-Poley, Anamaris M; Campos, Joseph; Rose, Mary C; Pérez-Losada, Marcos

    2016-11-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by recurrent lung infections. Studies of the lung microbiome have shown an association between decreasing diversity and progressive disease. 454 pyrosequencing has frequently been used to study the lung microbiome in CF, but will no longer be supported. We sought to identify the benefits and drawbacks of using two state-of-the-art next generation sequencing (NGS) platforms, MiSeq and PacBio RSII, to characterize the CF lung microbiome. Each has its advantages and limitations. Twelve samples of extracted bacterial DNA were sequenced on both MiSeq and PacBio NGS platforms. DNA was amplified for the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene and libraries were sequenced on the MiSeq sequencing platform, while the full 16S rRNA gene was sequenced on the PacBio RSII sequencing platform. Raw FASTQ files generated by the MiSeq and PacBio platforms were processed in mothur v1.35.1. There was extreme discordance in alpha-diversity of the CF lung microbiome when using the two platforms. Because of its depth of coverage, sequencing of the 16S rRNA V4 gene region using MiSeq allowed for the observation of many more operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and higher Chao1 and Shannon indices than the PacBio RSII. Interestingly, several patients in our cohort had Escherichia, an unusual pathogen in CF. Also, likely because of its coverage of the complete 16S rRNA gene, only PacBio RSII was able to identify Burkholderia, an important CF pathogen. When comparing microbiome diversity in clinical samples from CF patients using 16S sequences, MiSeq and PacBio NGS platforms may generate different results in microbial community composition and structure. It may be necessary to use different platforms when trying to correctly identify dominant pathogens versus measuring alpha-diversity estimates, and it would be important to use the same platform for comparisons to minimize errors in interpretation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All

  10. Genomic and Metagenomic Analysis of Diversity-Generating Retroelements Associated with Treponema denticola

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    Sutichot eNimkulrat

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs are genetic cassettes that can produce massive protein sequence variation in prokaryotes. Presumably DGRs confer selective advantages to their hosts (bacteria or viruses by generating variants of target genes—typically resulting in target proteins with altered ligand-binding specificity—through a specialized error-prone reverse transcription process. The only extensively studied DGR system is from the Bordetella phage BPP-1, although DGRs are predicted to exist in other species. Using bioinformatics analysis, we discovered that the DGR system associated with the Treponema denticola species (a human oral-associated periopathogen is dynamic (with gains/losses of the system found in the isolates and diverse (with multiple types found in isolated genomes and the human microbiota. The T. denticola DGR is found in only nine of the 17 sequenced T. denticola strains. Analysis of the DGR-associated template regions and reverse transcriptase gene sequences revealed two types of DGR systems in T. denticola: the ATCC35405-type shared by seven isolates including ATCC35405; and the SP32-type shared by two isolates (SP32 and SP33, suggesting multiple DGR acquisitions. We detected additional variants of the T. denticola DGR systems in the human microbiomes, and found that the SP32-type DGR is more abundant than the ATCC35405-type in the healthy human oral microbiome, although the latter is found in more sequenced isolates. This is the first comprehensive study to characterize the DGRs associated with T. denticola in individual genomes as well as human microbiomes, demonstrating the importance of utilizing both individual genomes and metagenomes for characterizing the elements, and for analyzing their diversity and distribution in human populations.

  11. Evidence for leptin receptor isoforms heteromerization at the cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacart, Johan; Leloire, Audrey; Levoye, Angélique; Froguel, Philippe; Jockers, Ralf; Couturier, Cyril

    2010-06-01

    Leptin mediates its metabolic effects through several leptin receptor (LEP-R) isoforms. In humans, long (LEPRb) and short (LEPRa,c,d) isoforms are generated by alternative splicing. Most of leptin's effects are believed to be mediated by the OB-Rb isoform. However, the role of short LEPR isoforms and the possible existence of heteromers between different isoforms are poorly understood. Using BRET1 and optimized co-immunoprecipitation, we observed LEPRa/b and LEPRb/c heteromers located at the plasma membrane and stabilized by leptin. Given the widespread coexpression of LEPRa and LEPRb, our results suggest that LEPRa/b heteromers may represent a major receptor species in most tissues.

  12. Zinc-induced modulation of SRSF6 activity alters Bim splicing to promote generation of the most potent apoptotic isoform BimS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Hirokazu; Takeda, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Nozomi; Furuya, Keisuke; Hirose, Kazuya; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Adachi, Tetsuo

    2013-07-01

    Bim is a member of the pro-apoptotic BH3-only Bcl-2 family of proteins. Bim gene undergoes alternative splicing to produce three predominant splicing variants (BimEL, BimL and BimS). The smallest variant BimS is the most potent inducer of apoptosis. Zinc (Zn(2+)) has been reported to stimulate apoptosis in various cell types. In this study, we examined whether Zn(2+) affects the expression of Bim in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Zn(2+) triggered alterations in Bim splicing and induced preferential generation of BimS, but not BimEL and BimL, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Other metals (cadmium, cobalt and copper) and stresses (oxidative, endoplasmic reticulum and genotoxic stresses) had little or no effect on the expression of BimS. To address the mechanism of Zn(2+)-induced preferential generation of BimS, which lacks exon 4, we developed a Bim mini-gene construct. Deletion analysis using the Bim mini-gene revealed that predicted binding sites of the SR protein SRSF6, also known as SRp55, are located in the intronic region adjacent to exon 4. We also found that mutations in the predicted SRSF6-binding sites abolished generation of BimS mRNA from the mutated Bim mini-gene. In addition, a UV cross-linking assay followed by Western blotting showed that SRSF6 directly bound to the predicted binding site and Zn(2+) suppressed this binding. Moreover, Zn(2+) stimulated SRSF6 hyper-phosphorylation. TG003, a cdc2-like kinase inhibitor, partially prevented Zn(2+)-induced generation of BimS and SRSF6 hyper-phosphorylation. Taken together, our findings suggest that Zn(2+) inhibits the activity of SRSF6 and promotes elimination of exon 4, leading to preferential generation of BimS.

  13. Generation of antigenic diversity in Plasmodium falciparum by structured rearrangement of Var genes during mitosis.

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    Antoine Claessens

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The most polymorphic gene family in P. falciparum is the ∼60 var genes distributed across parasite chromosomes, both in the subtelomeres and in internal regions. They encode hypervariable surface proteins known as P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1 that are critical for pathogenesis and immune evasion in Plasmodium falciparum. How var gene sequence diversity is generated is not currently completely understood. To address this, we constructed large clone trees and performed whole genome sequence analysis to study the generation of novel var gene sequences in asexually replicating parasites. While single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were scattered across the genome, structural variants (deletions, duplications, translocations were focused in and around var genes, with considerable variation in frequency between strains. Analysis of more than 100 recombination events involving var exon 1 revealed that the average nucleotide sequence identity of two recombining exons was only 63% (range: 52.7-72.4% yet the crossovers were error-free and occurred in such a way that the resulting sequence was in frame and domain architecture was preserved. Var exon 1, which encodes the immunologically exposed part of the protein, recombined in up to 0.2% of infected erythrocytes in vitro per life cycle. The high rate of var exon 1 recombination indicates that millions of new antigenic structures could potentially be generated each day in a single infected individual. We propose a model whereby var gene sequence polymorphism is mainly generated during the asexual part of the life cycle.

  14. Temporal patterns of broad isoform expression during the development of neuronal lineages in Drosophila

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    Williams Darren W

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the development of the central nervous system (CNS of Drosophila, neuronal stem cells, the neuroblasts (NBs, first generate a set of highly diverse neurons, the primary neurons that mature to control larval behavior, and then more homogeneous sets of neurons that show delayed maturation and are primarily used in the adult. These latter, 'secondary' neurons show a complex pattern of expression of broad, which encodes a transcription factor usually associated with metamorphosis, where it acts as a key regulator in the transitions from larva and pupa. Results The Broad-Z3 (Br-Z3 isoform appears transiently in most central neurons during embryogenesis, but persists in a subset of these cells through most of larval growth. Some of the latter are embryonic-born secondary neurons, whose development is arrested until the start of metamorphosis. However, the vast bulk of the secondary neurons are generated during larval growth and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation shows that they begin expressing Br-Z3 about 7 hours after their birth, approximately the time that they have finished outgrowth to their initial targets. By the start of metamorphosis, the oldest secondary neurons have turned off Br-Z3 expression, while the remainder, with the exception of the very youngest, maintain Br-Z3 while they are interacting with potential partners in preparation for neurite elaboration. That Br-Z3 may be involved in early sprouting is suggested by ectopically expressing this isoform in remodeling primary neurons, which do not normally express Br-Z3. These cells now sprout into ectopic locations. The expression of Br-Z3 is transient and seen in all interneurons, but two other isoforms, Br-Z4 and Br-Z1, show a more selective expression. Analysis of MARCM clones shows that the Br-Z4 isoform is expressed by neurons in virtually all lineages, but only in those cells born during a window during the transition from the second to the third larval

  15. Systematically differentiating functions for alternatively spliced isoforms through integrating RNA-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eksi, Ridvan; Li, Hong-Dong; Menon, Rajasree; Wen, Yuchen; Omenn, Gilbert S; Kretzler, Matthias; Guan, Yuanfang

    2013-01-01

    Integrating large-scale functional genomic data has significantly accelerated our understanding of gene functions. However, no algorithm has been developed to differentiate functions for isoforms of the same gene using high-throughput genomic data. This is because standard supervised learning requires 'ground-truth' functional annotations, which are lacking at the isoform level. To address this challenge, we developed a generic framework that interrogates public RNA-seq data at the transcript level to differentiate functions for alternatively spliced isoforms. For a specific function, our algorithm identifies the 'responsible' isoform(s) of a gene and generates classifying models at the isoform level instead of at the gene level. Through cross-validation, we demonstrated that our algorithm is effective in assigning functions to genes, especially the ones with multiple isoforms, and robust to gene expression levels and removal of homologous gene pairs. We identified genes in the mouse whose isoforms are predicted to have disparate functionalities and experimentally validated the 'responsible' isoforms using data from mammary tissue. With protein structure modeling and experimental evidence, we further validated the predicted isoform functional differences for the genes Cdkn2a and Anxa6. Our generic framework is the first to predict and differentiate functions for alternatively spliced isoforms, instead of genes, using genomic data. It is extendable to any base machine learner and other species with alternatively spliced isoforms, and shifts the current gene-centered function prediction to isoform-level predictions.

  16. Systematically differentiating functions for alternatively spliced isoforms through integrating RNA-seq data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridvan Eksi

    Full Text Available Integrating large-scale functional genomic data has significantly accelerated our understanding of gene functions. However, no algorithm has been developed to differentiate functions for isoforms of the same gene using high-throughput genomic data. This is because standard supervised learning requires 'ground-truth' functional annotations, which are lacking at the isoform level. To address this challenge, we developed a generic framework that interrogates public RNA-seq data at the transcript level to differentiate functions for alternatively spliced isoforms. For a specific function, our algorithm identifies the 'responsible' isoform(s of a gene and generates classifying models at the isoform level instead of at the gene level. Through cross-validation, we demonstrated that our algorithm is effective in assigning functions to genes, especially the ones with multiple isoforms, and robust to gene expression levels and removal of homologous gene pairs. We identified genes in the mouse whose isoforms are predicted to have disparate functionalities and experimentally validated the 'responsible' isoforms using data from mammary tissue. With protein structure modeling and experimental evidence, we further validated the predicted isoform functional differences for the genes Cdkn2a and Anxa6. Our generic framework is the first to predict and differentiate functions for alternatively spliced isoforms, instead of genes, using genomic data. It is extendable to any base machine learner and other species with alternatively spliced isoforms, and shifts the current gene-centered function prediction to isoform-level predictions.

  17. Assessment of antibody library diversity through next generation sequencing and technical error compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisi, Simonetta; Chirichella, Michele; Arisi, Ivan; Goracci, Martina; Cremisi, Federico; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2017-01-01

    Antibody libraries are important resources to derive antibodies to be used for a wide range of applications, from structural and functional studies to intracellular protein interference studies to developing new diagnostics and therapeutics. Whatever the goal, the key parameter for an antibody library is its complexity (also known as diversity), i.e. the number of distinct elements in the collection, which directly reflects the probability of finding in the library an antibody against a given antigen, of sufficiently high affinity. Quantitative evaluation of antibody library complexity and quality has been for a long time inadequately addressed, due to the high similarity and length of the sequences of the library. Complexity was usually inferred by the transformation efficiency and tested either by fingerprinting and/or sequencing of a few hundred random library elements. Inferring complexity from such a small sampling is, however, very rudimental and gives limited information about the real diversity, because complexity does not scale linearly with sample size. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has opened new ways to tackle the antibody library complexity quality assessment. However, much remains to be done to fully exploit the potential of NGS for the quantitative analysis of antibody repertoires and to overcome current limitations. To obtain a more reliable antibody library complexity estimate here we show a new, PCR-free, NGS approach to sequence antibody libraries on Illumina platform, coupled to a new bioinformatic analysis and software (Diversity Estimator of Antibody Library, DEAL) that allows to reliably estimate the complexity, taking in consideration the sequencing error. PMID:28505201

  18. Determination of Microbial Diversity and Nitrogen Cycling from Kizildere Geothermal Field with Next Generation Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulecal, Y.; Dilek, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The deep terrestrial subsurface biosphere represents an emerging frontier for studies of biodiversity, the physiological limits to life, microbial mechanisms of adaptation, and potentially analogous environments for extraterrestrial life (1). Last decade, researches of deep boreholes in the United States, Finland, Sweden, Japan and South Africa, using molecular tools, have shown an an active biosphere composed of diverse groups of microorganisms. The microbial communities reported from different subsurface communities vary widely; such differences are due to different host rock types and varied water origins and chemistry, as well as geography. Furthermore, nitrogen cycling is studied intensely in hot springs for instance in situ nifH expression in Yellowstone National Park, is a new upper temperature limit for nitrogen fixation in alkaline, terrestrial hydrothermal environments (2). This study explores the genetic diversity of microbial communities and genes of nitrogen cycling in Kizildere Geothermal Field, Turkey. The Kizildere thermal waters are located in the northern part of the Büyük Menderes rift zone. The hydrothermal alteration includes phyllic, argillic, silicic,hematitized, and carbonatized alteration zones. The surface temperatures of Kizildere thermal waters in drill holes range from 95 to100°C and pH 9.0-9.5. Microbial communities were examined using culture independent methods, next generation sequencing. Nitrogen fixation, the diversity of nifH, ammonia oxidation (amoA), narG, nosZ genes are investigated in deeply-sourced fluids. We present field observations and interpret new data, establishing a geobiological baseline for previously undescribed sitres of subsurface ecosystems. (1)Fredrickson et al. 2006. Geomicrobial processes and biodiversity in the deep terrestrial subsurface. Geomicrobiology J. 23:345-356. (2) Loiacono et al. 2012. Evidence for high-temperature in situ nifH transcription in an alkaline hot spring of Lower Geyser Basin

  19. Proteomic Validation of Transcript Isoforms, Including Those Assembled from RNA-Seq Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tay, Aidan P; Pang, Chi Nam Ignatius; Twine, Natalie a;

    2015-01-01

    data, and proteomic analysis of the same sample, can identify protein isoforms. RNA-seq data from human mesenchymal (hMSC) stem cells were analyzed with our new TranscriptCoder tool to generate a database of protein isoform sequences. MS/MS data from matching hMSC samples were then matched against...... the TranscriptCoder-derived database, along with Ensembl and the neXtProt database. Querying the TranscriptCoder-derived or Ensembl database could unambiguously identify ∼450 protein isoforms, with isoform-specific proteotypic peptides, including candidate hMSC-specific isoforms for the genes DPYSL2 and FXR1...

  20. Targeted recovery of novel phylogenetic diversity from next-generation sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Michael D J; Bartram, Andrea K; Neufeld, Josh D

    2012-11-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have led to recognition of a so-called 'rare biosphere'. These microbial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) are defined by low relative abundance and may be specifically adapted to maintaining low population sizes. We hypothesized that mining of low-abundance next-generation 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene data would lead to the discovery of novel phylogenetic diversity, reflecting microorganisms not yet discovered by previous sampling efforts. Here, we test this hypothesis by combining molecular and bioinformatic approaches for targeted retrieval of phylogenetic novelty within rare biosphere OTUs. We combined BLASTN network analysis, phylogenetics and targeted primer design to amplify 16S rRNA gene sequences from unique potential bacterial lineages, comprising part of the rare biosphere from a multi-million sequence data set from an Arctic tundra soil sample. Demonstrating the feasibility of the protocol developed here, three of seven recovered phylogenetic lineages represented extremely divergent taxonomic entities. These divergent target sequences correspond to (a) a previously unknown lineage within the BRC1 candidate phylum, (b) a sister group to the early diverging and currently recognized monospecific Cyanobacteria Gloeobacter, a genus containing multiple plesiomorphic traits and (c) a highly divergent lineage phylogenetically resolved within mitochondria. A comparison to twelve next-generation data sets from additional soils suggested persistent low-abundance distributions of these novel 16S rRNA genes. The results demonstrate this sequence analysis and retrieval pipeline as applicable for exploring underrepresented phylogenetic novelty and recovering taxa that may represent significant steps in bacterial evolution.

  1. Next generation sequencing to define prokaryotic and fungal diversity in the bovine rumen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derrick E Fouts

    Full Text Available A combination of Sanger and 454 sequences of small subunit rRNA loci were used to interrogate microbial diversity in the bovine rumen of 12 cows consuming a forage diet. Observed bacterial species richness, based on the V1-V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene, was between 1,903 to 2,432 species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs when 5,520 reads were sampled per animal. Eighty percent of species-level OTUs were dominated by members of the order Clostridiales, Bacteroidales, Erysipelotrichales and unclassified TM7. Abundance of Prevotella species varied widely among the 12 animals. Archaeal species richness, also based on 16S rRNA, was between 8 and 13 OTUs, representing 5 genera. The majority of archaeal OTUs (84% found in this study were previously observed in public databases with only two new OTUs discovered. Observed rumen fungal species richness, based on the 18S rRNA gene, was between 21 and 40 OTUs with 98.4-99.9% of OTUs represented by more than one read, using Good's coverage. Examination of the fungal community identified numerous novel groups. Prevotella and Tannerella were overrepresented in the liquid fraction of the rumen while Butyrivibrio and Blautia were significantly overrepresented in the solid fraction of the rumen. No statistical difference was observed between the liquid and solid fractions in biodiversity of archaea and fungi. The survey of microbial communities and analysis of cross-domain correlations suggested there is a far greater extent of microbial diversity in the bovine rumen than previously appreciated, and that next generation sequencing technologies promise to reveal novel species, interactions and pathways that can be studied further in order to better understand how rumen microbial community structure and function affects ruminant feed efficiency, biofuel production, and environmental impact.

  2. RET Aberrations in Diverse Cancers: Next-Generation Sequencing of 4,871 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shumei; Subbiah, Vivek; Marchlik, Erica; Elkin, Sheryl K; Carter, Jennifer L; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2017-04-15

    Purpose: Aberrations in genetic sequences encoding the tyrosine kinase receptor RET lead to oncogenic signaling that is targetable with anti-RET multikinase inhibitors. Understanding the comprehensive genomic landscape of RET aberrations across multiple cancers may facilitate clinical trial development targeting RETExperimental Design: We interrogated the molecular portfolio of 4,871 patients with diverse malignancies for the presence of RET aberrations using Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-certified targeted next-generation sequencing of 182 or 236 gene panels.Results: Among diverse cancers, RET aberrations were identified in 88 cases [1.8% (88/4, 871)], with mutations being the most common alteration [38.6% (34/88)], followed by fusions [30.7% (27/88), including a novel SQSTM1-RET] and amplifications [25% (22/88)]. Most patients had coexisting aberrations in addition to RET anomalies [81.8% (72/88)], with the most common being in TP53-associated genes [59.1% (52/88)], cell cycle-associated genes [39.8% (35/88)], the PI3K signaling pathway [30.7% (27/88)], MAPK effectors [22.7% (20/88)], or other tyrosine kinase families [21.6% (19/88)]. RET fusions were mutually exclusive with MAPK signaling pathway alterations. All 72 patients harboring coaberrations had distinct genomic portfolios, and most [98.6% (71/72)] had potentially targetable coaberrations with either an FDA-approved or an investigational agent. Two cases with lung (KIF5B-RET) and medullary thyroid carcinoma (RET M918T) that responded to a vandetanib (multikinase RET inhibitor)-containing regimen are shown.Conclusions:RET aberrations were seen in 1.8% of diverse cancers, with most cases harboring actionable, albeit distinct, coexisting alterations. The current report suggests that optimal targeting of patients with RET anomalies will require customized combination strategies. Clin Cancer Res; 23(8); 1988-97. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Low diversity in the mitogenome of sperm whales revealed by next-generation sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alana Alexander; Debbie Steel; Beth Slikas; Kendra Hoekzema; Colm Carraher; Matthew Parks; Richard Cronn; C. Scott Baker

    2012-01-01

    Large population sizes and global distributions generally associate with high mitochondrial DNA control region (CR) diversity. The sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) is an exception, showing low CR diversity relative to other cetaceans; however, diversity levels throughout the remainder of the sperm whale mitogenome are unknown. We sequenced 20...

  4. The diverse heterogeneity of molecular alterations in prostate cancer identified through next-generation sequencing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexander W Wyatt; Fan Mo; Yuzhuo Wang; Colin C Collins

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of global cancer-related death but attempts to improve diagnoses and develop novel therapies have been confounded by significant patient heterogeneity.In recent years,the application of next-generation sequencing to hundreds of prostate tumours has defined novel molecular subtypes and characterized extensive genomic aberration underlying disease initiation and progression.It is now clear that the heterogeneity observed in the clinic is underpinned by a molecular landscape rife with complexity,where genomic rearrangements and rare mutations combine to amplify transcriptomic diversity.This review dissects our current understanding of prostate cancer ‘omics',including the sentinel role of copy number variation,the growing spectrum of oncogenic fusion genes,the potential influence of chromothripsis,and breakthroughs in defining mutation-associated subtypes.Increasing evidence suggests that genomic lesions frequently converge on specific cellular functions and signalling pathways,yet recurrent gene aberration appears rare.Therefore,it is critical that we continue to define individual tumour genomes,especially in the context of their expressed transcriptome.Only through improved characterisation of tumour to tumour variability can we advance to an age of precision therapy and personalized oncology.

  5. An Idea for Generating Diversity Conversations: Physics Jeopardy and the Future Faces of Physics Kit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Kendra; White, Gary

    2008-10-01

    Is there a way to engage typical physics undergraduates in a conversation about under-represented groups in physics that doesn't result in rolled-eyes or fingers-in-the-ears? The Society of Physics Students (SPS) has begun an experiment using a jeopardy-like game at physics meetings in an attempt to generate conversations about diversity. The physics jeopardy game is part of a "Future Faces of Physics" kit that includes a variety of materials that are of interest to those wanting to address under-represented audiences in physics, such as video clips exhibiting common physics words in sign language, tactile representations of the lunar surface for blind students, guidelines regarding lab procedures for the wheel-chair bound, and the book, Einstein on Race and Racism with a challenge letter directed at SPS chapters from the authors. While attempts to assess the impact of the game are modest, we report anecdotally some of the qualitative features seen in the discussions when the game is played. We also strive to indulge in a few physics jeopardy game moments to give a sense of how the game works. If you are hosting a meeting, large or small, and would like to receive this kit for use at your meeting, notify Kendra Rand, SPS Program Coordinator at krand@aip.org.

  6. Non-Canonical Processing of Arabidopsis pri-miR319a/b/c Generates Additional microRNAs to Target One RAP2.12 mRNA Isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobkowiak, Lukasz; Karlowski, Wojciech; Jarmolowski, Artur; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia

    2012-01-01

    Arabidopsis miR319a/b/c primary transcripts are unusual due to the presence of a long stem and loop structure containing functional miR319a/b/c molecules. In our experiments carried out using high throughput sequencing (HTS), we have shown that additional microRNAs (miRNAs), miR319a.2/b.2/c.2 are generated from the upper part of the same hairpin structure. We have also found cognate miRNAa.2*/b.2*/c.2* to be present in the HTS results with a considerably lower number of reads. Northern hybridization revealed that miR319b.2 is mainly expressed in 35-day-old plant rosette leaves, as well as in stem and inflorescences of 42- and 53-day-old plants. Moreover, it carries multiple signatures of a functional miRNA, including as follows: (i) its biogenesis is HYL1-dependent; (ii) it is incorporated in a substantial amount into RISC complexes containing AGO1, AGO2, or AGO4 protein; (iii) 24 nt-long species of miR319b.2 have been found in inflorescences to be more abundant than 21 nt miR319b.2 species; (iv) it is present in various ratios to miR319b during plant development, which suggests the existence of a regulatory mechanism responsible for its biogenesis/processing; (v) there is an observed cross-species conservation of the miR319a/b/c stem nucleotide sequence extending beyond mature miRNA region; and (vi) all evidence suggests that intron-containing RAP2.12 mRNA isoform is the target for miR319b.2. All these features prompt us to claim miR319b.2 as a functional miRNA molecule.

  7. Use of Long-Term E. Coli Cultures: To Study Generation of Genetic Diversity & Teach General Microbiology Laboratory Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Angela; Finkel, Steven E.; Erbe, Jarrod

    2005-01-01

    A novel method of studying the generation of genetic diversity in an undergraduate microbiology laboratory is described. The basis of this approach is the accumulation of mutations that confer a competitive advantage, or growth advantage in stationary phase (GASP) phenotype, to E. coli grown in stationary phase for extended periods of time.

  8. A Study of Two Generations of Culturally Diverse Community College Students Views on Leader Attributes in Self and Others

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodkowski, Paula Jeanine

    2011-01-01

    One community college mission is preparing students for the expectations and opportunities of the workplace including roles as collaborators and leaders. Increasingly, representatives from "cultures" of generation, gender, and diverse ethnicities are gaining an education in community colleges. Research supports that cultural aspects and…

  9. Use of Long-Term E. Coli Cultures: To Study Generation of Genetic Diversity & Teach General Microbiology Laboratory Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Angela; Finkel, Steven E.; Erbe, Jarrod

    2005-01-01

    A novel method of studying the generation of genetic diversity in an undergraduate microbiology laboratory is described. The basis of this approach is the accumulation of mutations that confer a competitive advantage, or growth advantage in stationary phase (GASP) phenotype, to E. coli grown in stationary phase for extended periods of time.

  10. A human polymorphism affects NEDD4L subcellular targeting by leading to two isoforms that contain or lack a C2 domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalouel Jean-Marc

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ubiquitination serves multiple cellular functions, including proteasomal degradation and the control of stability, function, and intracellular localization of a wide variety of proteins. NEDD4L is a member of the HECT class of E3 ubiquitin ligases. A defining feature of NEDD4L protein isoforms is the presence or absence of an amino-terminal C2 domain, a class of subcellular, calcium-dependent targeting domains. We previously identified a common variant in human NEDD4L that generates isoforms that contain or lack a C2 domain. Results To address the potential functional significance of the NEDD4L common variant on NEDD4L subcellular localization, NEDD4L isoforms that either contained or lacked a C2 domain were tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein, transfected into Xenopus laevis kidney epithelial cells, and imaged by performing confocal microscopy on live cells. We report that the presence or absence of this C2 domain exerts differential effects on the subcellular distribution of NEDD4L, the ability of C2 containing and lacking NEDD4L isoforms to mobilize in response to a calcium stimulus, and the intracellular transport of subunits of the NEDD4L substrate, ENaC. Furthermore, the ability of the C2-containing isoform to influence β-ENaC mobilization from intracellular pools involves the NEDD4L active site for ubiquitination. We propose a model to account for the potential impact of this common genetic variant on protein function at the cellular level. Conclusion NEDD4L isoforms that contain or lack a C2 domain target different intracellular locations. Additionally, whereas the C2-containing NEDD4L isoform is capable of shuttling between the plasma membrane and intracellular compartments in response to calcium stimulus the C2-lacking isoform can not. The C2-containing isoform differentially affects the mobilization of ENaC subunits from intracellular pools and this trafficking step requires NEDD4L ubiquitin ligase

  11. Porphyromonas gingivalis Uses Specific Domain Rearrangements and Allelic Exchange to Generate Diversity in Surface Virulence Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashper, Stuart G.; Mitchell, Helen L.; Seers, Christine A.; Gladman, Simon L.; Seemann, Torsten; Bulach, Dieter M.; Chandry, P. Scott; Cross, Keith J.; Cleal, Steven M.; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2017-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone pathogen of chronic periodontitis. The virulence of P. gingivalis is reported to be strain related and there are currently a number of strain typing schemes based on variation in capsular polysaccharide, the major and minor fimbriae and adhesin domains of Lys-gingipain (Kgp), amongst other surface proteins. P. gingivalis can exchange chromosomal DNA between strains by natural competence and conjugation. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic variability of P. gingivalis strains sourced from international locations over a 25-year period and to determine if variability in surface virulence factors has a phylogenetic basis. Whole genome sequencing was performed on 13 strains and comparison made to 10 previously sequenced strains. A single nucleotide polymorphism-based phylogenetic analysis demonstrated a shallow tri-lobed phylogeny. There was a high level of reticulation in the phylogenetic network, demonstrating extensive horizontal gene transfer between the strains. Two highly conserved variants of the catalytic domain of the major virulence factor the Kgp proteinase (KgpcatI and KgpcatII) were found. There were three variants of the fourth Kgp C-terminal cleaved adhesin domain. Specific variants of the cell surface proteins FimA, FimCDE, MfaI, RagAB, Tpr, and PrtT were also identified. The occurrence of all these variants in the P. gingivalis strains formed a mosaic that was not related to the SNP-based phylogeny. In conclusion P. gingivalis uses domain rearrangements and genetic exchange to generate diversity in specific surface virulence factors. PMID:28184216

  12. CD44 variant isoforms in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma : a new independent prognostic factor

    OpenAIRE

    Stauder, R.; Eisterer, W.; Thaler, J; Günthert, U

    1995-01-01

    Isoforms of the transmembrane glycoprotein CD44, generated by alternative RNA splicing, have been correlated to tumor dissemination. For evaluation of the potential role of CD44 variant isoforms in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), the presence of CD44 isoforms was analyzed in a large panel of reactive and neoplastic lymphoid tissues by immunohistochemical staining, as well as detection of CD44 variant RNAs by the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Whereas the CD44 standard or hemat...

  13. Next-generation DNA sequencing reveals that low fungal diversity in house dust is associated with childhood asthma development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannemiller, K C; Mendell, M J; Macher, J M; Kumagai, K; Bradman, A; Holland, N; Harley, K; Eskenazi, B; Peccia, J

    2014-06-01

    Dampness and visible mold in homes are associated with asthma development, but causal mechanisms remain unclear. The goal of this research was to explore associations among measured dampness, fungal exposure, and childhood asthma development without the bias of culture-based microbial analysis. In the low-income, Latino CHAMACOS birth cohort, house dust was collected at age 12 months, and asthma status was determined at age 7 years.The current analysis included 13 asthma cases and 28 controls. Next-generation DNA sequencing methods quantified fungal taxa and diversity. Lower fungal diversity (number of fungal operational taxonomic units) was significantly associated with increased risk of asthma development: unadjusted odds ratio(OR) 4.80 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04–22.1). Control for potential confounders strengthened this relationship. Decreased diversity within the genus Cryptococcus was significantly associated with increased asthma risk (OR 21.0, 95% CI 2.16–204). No fungal taxon (species, genus, class) was significantly positively associated with asthma development, and one was significantly negatively associated. Elevated moisture was associated with increased fungal diversity, and moisture/mold indicators were associated with four fungal taxa. Next-generation DNA sequencing provided comprehensive estimates of fungal identity and diversity, demonstrating significant associations between low fungal diversity and childhood asthma development in this community. Early life exposure to low fungal diversity in house dust was associated with increased risk for later asthma developmen tin this low-income, immigrant community. No individual fungal taxon (species, genus, or class) was associated with asthma development, although exposure to low diversity within the genus Cryptococcus was associated with asthma development. Future asthma development studies should incorporate fungal diversity measurements, in addition to measuring individual fungal taxa

  14. Proteogenomic Analysis Identifies a Novel Human SHANK3 Isoform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Benthani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations of the SHANK3 gene have been associated with autism spectrum disorder. Individuals harboring different SHANK3 mutations display considerable heterogeneity in their cognitive impairment, likely due to the high SHANK3 transcriptional diversity. In this study, we report a novel interaction between the Mutated in colorectal cancer (MCC protein and a newly identified SHANK3 protein isoform in human colon cancer cells and mouse brain tissue. Hence, our proteogenomic analysis identifies a new human long isoform of the key synaptic protein SHANK3 that was not predicted by the human reference genome. Taken together, our findings describe a potential new role for MCC in neurons, a new human SHANK3 long isoform and, importantly, highlight the use of proteomic data towards the re-annotation of GC-rich genomic regions.

  15. Analysis of fish diversion efficiency and survivorship in the fish return system at San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station

    OpenAIRE

    Love, Milton S.; Sandhu, Meenu; Stein, Jeffrey; Herbinson, Kevin T.; Moore, Robert H; Mullin, Michael; Stephens, John S.

    1989-01-01

    This study examined the efficiency of fish diversion and survivorship of diverted fishes in the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station Fish Return System in 1984 and 1985. Generally, fishes were diverted back to the ocean with high frequency, particularly in 1984. Most species were diverted at rates of 80% or more. Over 90% of the most abundant species, Engraulis mordax, were diverted. The system worked particularly well for strong-swimming forms such as Paralobrax clothratus, Atherinopsis cal...

  16. Unisexual and heterosexual meiotic reproduction generate aneuploidy and phenotypic diversity de novo in the yeast Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Ni

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aneuploidy is known to be deleterious and underlies several common human diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders such as trisomy 21 in Down's syndrome. In contrast, aneuploidy can also be advantageous and in fungi confers antifungal drug resistance and enables rapid adaptive evolution. We report here that sexual reproduction generates phenotypic and genotypic diversity in the human pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans, which is globally distributed and commonly infects individuals with compromised immunity, such as HIV/AIDS patients, causing life-threatening meningoencephalitis. C. neoformans has a defined a-α opposite sexual cycle; however, >99% of isolates are of the α mating type. Interestingly, α cells can undergo α-α unisexual reproduction, even involving genotypically identical cells. A central question is: Why would cells mate with themselves given that sex is costly and typically serves to admix preexisting genetic diversity from genetically divergent parents? In this study, we demonstrate that α-α unisexual reproduction frequently generates phenotypic diversity, and the majority of these variant progeny are aneuploid. Aneuploidy is responsible for the observed phenotypic changes, as chromosome loss restoring euploidy results in a wild-type phenotype. Other genetic changes, including diploidization, chromosome length polymorphisms, SNPs, and indels, were also generated. Phenotypic/genotypic changes were not observed following asexual mitotic reproduction. Aneuploidy was also detected in progeny from a-α opposite-sex congenic mating; thus, both homothallic and heterothallic sexual reproduction can generate phenotypic diversity de novo. Our study suggests that the ability to undergo unisexual reproduction may be an evolutionary strategy for eukaryotic microbial pathogens, enabling de novo genotypic and phenotypic plasticity and facilitating rapid adaptation to novel environments.

  17. Histamine H3-receptor isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, R A

    2004-10-01

    Increasing evidence supports a role for HA as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator in various brain functions, including emotion, cognition, and feeding. The recent cloning of the histamine H3 receptor allowed for the subsequent cloning of a variety of H3 receptor isoforms from different species as well as the H4 receptor. As a result a wide variety of H3-receptor isoforms are now known that display differential brain expression patterns and signalling properties. These recent discoveries are discussed in view of the growing interest of the H3 receptor as a target for the development of potential therapeutics.

  18. European Socio-cultural Change and Generational Diversity in the Post-Soviet Workforce.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madara APSALONE

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In times of increased retirement age and senior employees staying in workforce longer, successfully managing generational differences in the workforce forms an increasingly important challenge for modern day management. In many ways, generations may vary in attitudes and approaches, reflecting deeper differences in their core values. This might be particularly true for the Post-Soviet countries, where earlier generations were educated and started their careers within a completely different socio-economic system. In this study we explore differences in approaches towards values and attitudes amongst four generations of retail sector employees – starting from those, who were still to great extent exposed to pre-Soviet values, continuing with employees, who started their careers during the Soviet times, and ending with those, who were educated and entered the workforce after the collapse of the Soviet Union. 208 Latvian service employees were surveyed to assess their personal values and likelihood of dishonest and unethical behavior from four generations currently active in the workforce - Post-War generation, Early Gen X, Transition generation and Millennials. We confirmed that despite dual morality and ambiguous ethics in the Soviet Union, older generations reported higher likelihood of honest behavior than younger generations. And Post-War and Early Generation X also rated honesty and responsibility higher as their personal values. We also found significant differences between Early Generation X and the Transition generation in a post-Soviet context.

  19. Generational Diversity in Associate Degree Nursing Students: Teaching Styles and Preferences in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitko, Jennifer V.

    2011-01-01

    Nursing educators face the challenge of meeting the needs of a multi-generational classroom. The reality of having members from the Veteran and Baby Boomer generations in a classroom with Generation X and Y students provides an immediate need for faculty to examine students' teaching method preferences as well as their own use of teaching methods.…

  20. The diversity-generating benefits of a prokaryotic adaptive immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Houte, Stineke; Ekroth, Alice K E; Broniewski, Jenny M; Chabas, Hélène; Ashby, Ben; Bondy-Denomy, Joseph; Gandon, Sylvain; Boots, Mike; Paterson, Steve; Buckling, Angus; Westra, Edze R

    2016-04-21

    Prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas adaptive immune systems insert spacers derived from viruses and other parasitic DNA elements into CRISPR loci to provide sequence-specific immunity. This frequently results in high within-population spacer diversity, but it is unclear if and why this is important. Here we show that, as a result of this spacer diversity, viruses can no longer evolve to overcome CRISPR-Cas by point mutation, which results in rapid virus extinction. This effect arises from synergy between spacer diversity and the high specificity of infection, which greatly increases overall population resistance. We propose that the resulting short-lived nature of CRISPR-dependent bacteria-virus coevolution has provided strong selection for the evolution of sophisticated virus-encoded anti-CRISPR mechanisms.

  1. Diversity of fuel sources for electricity generation in an evolving U.S. power sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLuccia, Janelle G.

    Policymakers increasingly have shown interest in options to boost the relative share of renewable or clean electricity generating sources in order to reduce negative environmental externalities from fossil fuels, guard against possible resource constraints, and capture economic advantages from developing new technologies and industries. Electric utilities and non-utility generators make decisions regarding their generation mix based on a number of different factors that may or may not align with societal goals. This paper examines the makeup of the electric power sector to determine how the type of generator and the presence (or lack) of competition in electricity markets at the state level may relate to the types of fuel sources used for generation. Using state-level electricity generation data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration from 1990 through 2010, this paper employs state and time fixed-effects regression modeling to attempt to isolate the impacts of state-level restructuring policies and the emergence of non-utility generators on states' generation from coal, from fossil fuel and from renewable sources. While the analysis has significant limitations, I do find that state-level electricity restructuring has a small but significant association with lowering electricity generation from coal specifically and fossil fuels more generally. Further research into the relationship between competition and fuel sources would aid policymakers considering legislative options to influence the generation mix.

  2. Identification and characterization of novel NuMA isoforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jin, E-mail: petersdu2112@hotmail.com [Key Laboratory for Cell Proliferation and Regulation of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing (China); Xu, Zhe [Department of Clinical Laboratory Diagnosis, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Core Laboratory for Clinical Medical Research, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); He, Dacheng [Key Laboratory for Cell Proliferation and Regulation of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing (China); Lu, Guanting, E-mail: guantlv@126.com [Beijing DnaLead Science and Technology Co., LTD, Beijing (China)

    2014-11-21

    Highlights: • Seven NuMA isoforms generated by alternative splicing were categorized into 3 groups: long, middle and short. • Both exons 15 and 16 in long NuMA were “hotspot” for alternative splicing. • Lower expression of short NuMA was observed in cancer cells compared with nonneoplastic controls. • Distinct localization pattern of short isoforms indicated different function from that of long and middle NuMA. - Abstract: The large nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) has been investigated for over 30 years with functions related to the formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles during mitosis. However, the existence and functions of NuMA isoforms generated by alternative splicing remains unclear. In the present work, we show that at least seven NuMA isoforms (categorized into long, middle and short groups) generated by alternative splicing from a common NuMA mRNA precursor were discovered in HeLa cells and these isoforms differ mainly at the carboxyl terminus and the coiled-coil domains. Two “hotspot” exons with molecular mass of 3366-nt and 42-nt tend to be spliced during alternative splicing in long and middle groups. Furthermore, full-length coding sequences of long and middle NuMA obtained by using fusion PCR were constructed into GFP-tagged vector to illustrate their cellular localization. Long NuMA mainly localized in the nucleus with absence from nucleoli during interphase and translocated to the spindle poles in mitosis. Middle NuMA displayed the similar cell cycle-dependent distribution pattern as long NuMA. However, expression of NuMA short isoforms revealed a distinct subcellular localization. Short NuMA were present in the cytosol during the whole cycle, without colocalization with mitotic apparatus. These results have allowed us tentatively to explore a new research direction for NuMA’s various functions.

  3. Plate-based diversity subset screening generation 2: an improved paradigm for high-throughput screening of large compound files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Andrew S; Bradley, Joseph; Everett, Jeremy R; Loesel, Jens; McLoughlin, David; Mills, James; Peakman, Marie-Claire; Sharp, Robert E; Williams, Christine; Zhu, Hongyao

    2016-11-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) is an effective method for lead and probe discovery that is widely used in industry and academia to identify novel chemical matter and to initiate the drug discovery process. However, HTS can be time consuming and costly and the use of subsets as an efficient alternative to screening entire compound collections has been investigated. Subsets may be selected on the basis of chemical diversity, molecular properties, biological activity diversity or biological target focus. Previously, we described a novel form of subset screening: plate-based diversity subset (PBDS) screening, in which the screening subset is constructed by plate selection (rather than individual compound cherry-picking), using algorithms that select for compound quality and chemical diversity on a plate basis. In this paper, we describe a second-generation approach to the construction of an updated subset: PBDS2, using both plate and individual compound selection, that has an improved coverage of the chemical space of the screening file, whilst only selecting the same number of plates for screening. We describe the validation of PBDS2 and its successful use in hit and lead discovery. PBDS2 screening became the default mode of singleton (one compound per well) HTS for lead discovery in Pfizer.

  4. Propionibacterium acnes: disease-causing agent or common contaminant? Detection in diverse patient samples by next generation sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Sarah; Friis-Nielsen, Jens; Vinner, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is the most abundant bacterium on human skin, particularly in sebaceous areas. P. acnes is suggested to be an opportunistic pathogen involved in the development of diverse medical conditions, but is also a proven contaminant of human samples and surgical wounds. Its...... significance as a pathogen is consequently a matter of debate.In the present study we investigated the presence of P. acnes DNA in 250 next generation sequencing datasets generated from 180 samples of 20 different sample types, mostly of cancerous origin. The samples were either subjected to microbial...... reads were detected in most samples analysed, though the proportions in most shotgun-sequenced samples were low.Our results show that P. acnes can be detected in practically all sample types when employing molecular methods such as next generation sequencing. The possibility of contamination from...

  5. Convergent evolution as a generator of phenotypic diversity in threespine stickleback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Matthew D; Wainwright, Peter C

    2013-04-01

    Convergent evolution, in which populations produce similar phenotypes in response to similar selection pressure, is strong evidence for the role of natural selection in shaping biological diversity. In some cases, closely related populations can produce functionally similar but phenotypically divergence forms in response to selection. Functional convergence with morphological divergence has been observed in laboratory selection experiments and computer simulations, but while potentially common, is rarely recognized in nature. Here, we present data from the North Pacific threespine stickleback radiation showing that ecologically and functionally similar, but morphologically divergent phenotypes rapidly evolved when an ancestral population colonized freshwater benthic habitats in parallel. In addition, we show that in this system, functional convergence substantially increases morphospace occupation relative to ancestral phenotypes, which suggests that convergent evolution may, paradoxically, be an important and previously underappreciated source of morphological diversity. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution© 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  6. Generational diversity in associate degree nursing students: Teaching styles and preferences in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitko, Jennifer V.

    2011-12-01

    Nursing educators face the challenge of meeting the needs of a multi-generational classroom. The reality of having members from the Veteran and Baby Boomer generations in a classroom with Generation X and Y students provides an immediate need for faculty to examine students' teaching method preferences as well as their own use of teaching methods. Most importantly, faculty must facilitate an effective multi-generational learning environment. Research has shown that the generation to which a person belongs is likely to affect the ways in which he/she learns (Hammill, 2005). Characterized by its own attitudes, behaviors, beliefs, and motivational needs, each generation also has distinct educational expectations. It is imperative, therefore, that nurse educators be aware of these differences and develop skills through which to communicate with the different generations, thereby reducing teaching/learning problems in the classroom. This is a quantitative, descriptive study that compared the teaching methods preferred by different generations of associate degree nursing students with the teaching methods that the instructors actually use. The research study included 289 participants; 244 nursing student participants and 45 nursing faculty participants from four nursing departments in colleges in Pennsylvania. Overall, the results of the study found many statistically significant findings. The results of the ANOVA test revealed eight statistically significant findings among Generation Y, Generation X and Baby boomers. The preferred teaching methods included: lecture, self-directed learning, web-based course with no class meetings, important for faculty to know my name, classroom structure, know why I am learning what I am learning, learning for the sake of learning and grade is all that matters. Lecture was found to be the most frequently used teaching method by faculty as well as the most preferred teaching methods by students. Overall, the support for a variety of

  7. Expression of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C isoforms in native endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine M Béziau

    Full Text Available Phospholipase C (PLC comprises a superfamily of enzymes that play a key role in a wide array of intracellular signalling pathways, including protein kinase C and intracellular calcium. Thirteen different mammalian PLC isoforms have been identified and classified into 6 families (PLC-β, γ, δ, ε, ζ and η based on their biochemical properties. Although the expression of PLC isoforms is tissue-specific, concomitant expression of different PLC has been reported, suggesting that PLC family is involved in multiple cellular functions. Despite their critical role, the PLC isoforms expressed in native endothelial cells (ECs remains undetermined. A conventional PCR approach was initially used to elucidate the mRNA expression pattern of PLC isoforms in 3 distinct murine vascular beds: mesenteric (MA, pulmonary (PA and middle cerebral arteries (MCA. mRNA encoding for most PLC isoforms was detected in MA, MCA and PA with the exception of η2 and β2 (only expressed in PA, δ4 (only expressed in MCA, η1 (expressed in all but MA and ζ (not detected in any vascular beds tested. The endothelial-specific PLC expression was then sought in freshly isolated ECs. Interestingly, the PLC expression profile appears to differ across the investigated arterial beds. While mRNA for 8 of the 13 PLC isoforms was detected in ECs from MA, two additional PLC isoforms were detected in ECs from PA and MCA. Co-expression of multiple PLC isoforms in ECs suggests an elaborate network of signalling pathways: PLC isoforms may contribute to the complexity or diversity of signalling by their selective localization in cellular microdomains. However in situ immunofluorescence revealed a homogeneous distribution for all PLC isoforms probed (β3, γ2 and δ1 in intact endothelium. Although PLC isoforms play a crucial role in endothelial signal transduction, subcellular localization alone does not appear to be sufficient to determine the role of PLC in the signalling microdomains found

  8. Single-neuron diversity generated by Protocadherin-β cluster in mouse central and peripheral nervous systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keizo eHirano

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The generation of complex neural circuits depends on the correct wiring of neurons with diverse individual characteristics. To understand the complexity of the nervous system, the molecular mechanisms for specifying the identity and diversity of individual neurons must be elucidated. The clustered protocadherins (Pcdh in mammals consist of approximately 50 Pcdh genes (Pcdh-α, Pcdh-β, and Pcdh-γ that encode cadherin-family cell surface adhesion proteins. Individual neurons express a random combination of Pcdh-α and Pcdh-γ, whereas the expression patterns for the Pcdh-β genes, 22 one-exon genes in mouse, are not fully understood. Here we show that the Pcdh-β genes are expressed in a 3’-polyadenylated form in mouse brain. In situ hybridization using a pan-Pcdh-β probe against a conserved Pcdh-β sequence showed widespread labeling in the brain, with prominent signals in the olfactory bulb, hippocampus, and cerebellum. In situ hybridization with specific probes for individual Pcdh-β genes showed their expression to be scattered in Purkinje cells from P10 to P150. The scattered expression patterns were confirmed by performing a newly developed single-cell 3’-RACE analysis of Purkinje cells, which clearly demonstrated that the Pcdh-β genes are expressed monoallelically and combinatorially in individual Purkinje cells. Scattered expression patterns of individual Pcdh-β genes were also observed in pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex, neurons in the trigeminal and dorsal root ganglion, GABAergic interneurons, and cholinergic neurons. Our results extend previous observations of diversity at the single-neuron level generated by Pcdh expression and suggest that the Pcdh-β cluster genes contribute to specifying the identity and diversity of individual neurons.

  9. Genetic diversity and genetic structure of consecutive breeding generations of golden mandarin fish (Siniperca scherzeri Steindachner) using microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, X N; Yang, M; Liang, X F; Jin, K; Lv, L Y; Tian, C X; Yuan, Y C; Sun, J

    2015-09-25

    In this study, 12 polymorphic microsatellites were inves-tigated to determine the genetic diversity and structure of 5 consecu-tive selected populations of golden mandarin fish (Siniperca scherzeri Steindachner). The total numbers of alleles, average heterozyosity, and average polymorphism information content showed that the genetic diversity of these breeding populations was decreasing. Additionally, pairwise fixation index FST values among populations and Da values in-creased from F1 generation to subsequent generations (FST values from 0.0221-0.1408; Da values from 0.0608-0.1951). Analysis of molecular variance indicated that most genetic variations arise from individuals within populations (about 92.05%), while variation among populations accounted for only 7.95%. The allele frequency of the loci SC75-220 and SC101-222 bp changed regularly in the 5 breeding generations. Their frequencies were gradually increased and showed an enrichment trend, indicating that there may be genetic correlations between these 2 loci and breeding traits. Our study indicated that microsatellite markers are effective for assessing the genetic variability in the golden mandarin fish breeding program.

  10. Diversity and Inclusion in Information Technology from an Age Perspective: Motivating and Managing Information Technology Professionals across Multiple Generations in the Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenan-Smalls, Yottie Marie

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to investigate diversity and inclusion from an age perspective among information technology (IT) professionals that were categorized as 4 different generations in the workforce today: Traditionalists, Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y. At the same time, this study sought to examine motivational…

  11. Diversity and Inclusion in Information Technology from an Age Perspective: Motivating and Managing Information Technology Professionals across Multiple Generations in the Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenan-Smalls, Yottie Marie

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to investigate diversity and inclusion from an age perspective among information technology (IT) professionals that were categorized as 4 different generations in the workforce today: Traditionalists, Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y. At the same time, this study sought to examine motivational…

  12. The role of climatic and geological events in generating diversity in Ethiopian grass frogs (genus Ptychadena).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Megan L; Noonan, Brice P; Colston, Timothy J

    2017-08-01

    Ethiopia is a world biodiversity hotspot and harbours levels of biotic endemism unmatched in the Horn of Africa, largely due to topographic-and thus habitat-complexity, which results from a very active geological and climatic history. Among Ethiopian vertebrate fauna, amphibians harbour the highest levels of endemism, making amphibians a compelling system for the exploration of the impacts of Ethiopia's complex abiotic history on biotic diversification. Grass frogs of the genus Ptychadena are notably diverse in Ethiopia, where they have undergone an evolutionary radiation. We used molecular data and expanded taxon sampling to test for cryptic diversity and to explore diversification patterns in both the highland radiation and two widespread lowland Ptychadena. Species delimitation results support the presence of nine highland species and four lowland species in our dataset, and divergence dating suggests that both geologic events and climatic fluctuations played a complex and confounded role in the diversification of Ptychadena in Ethiopia. We rectify the taxonomy of the endemic P. neumanni species complex, elevating one formally synonymized name and describing three novel taxa. Finally, we describe two novel lowland Ptychadena species that occur in Ethiopia and may be more broadly distributed.

  13. Propionibacterium acnes: disease-causing agent or common contaminant? Detection in diverse patient samples by next generation sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Sarah; Friis-Nielsen, Jens; Vinner, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is the most abundant bacterium on human skin, particularly in sebaceous areas. P. acnes is suggested to be an opportunistic pathogen involved in the development of diverse medical conditions, but is also a proven contaminant of human samples and surgical wounds. Its...... significance as a pathogen is consequently a matter of debate.In the present study we investigated the presence of P. acnes DNA in 250 next generation sequencing datasets generated from 180 samples of 20 different sample types, mostly of cancerous origin. The samples were either subjected to microbial...... enrichment, involving nuclease treatment to reduce the amount of host nucleic acids, or shotgun-sequenced.We detected high proportions of P. acnes in enriched samples, particularly skin derived and other tissue samples, with levels being higher in enriched compared to shotgun-sequenced samples. P. acnes...

  14. Next-generation sequencing reveals cryptic mtDNA diversity of Plasmodium relictum in the Hawaiian Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvi, S.I.; Farias, M.E.; Lapointe, D.A.; Belcaid, M.; Atkinson, C.T.

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation 454 sequencing techniques were used to re-examine diversity of mitochondrial cytochrome b lineages of avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum) in Hawaii. We document a minimum of 23 variant lineages of the parasite based on single nucleotide transitional changes, in addition to the previously reported single lineage (GRW4). A new, publicly available portal (Integroomer) was developed for initial parsing of 454 datasets. Mean variant prevalence and frequency was higher in low elevation Hawaii Amakihi (Hemignathus virens) with Avipoxvirus-like lesions (P = 0·001), suggesting that the variants may be biologically distinct. By contrast, variant prevalence and frequency did not differ significantly among mid-elevation Apapane (Himatione sanguinea) with or without lesions (P = 0·691). The low frequency and the lack of detection of variants independent of GRW4 suggest that multiple independent introductions of P. relictum to Hawaii are unlikely. Multiple variants may have been introduced in heteroplasmy with GRW4 or exist within the tandem repeat structure of the mitochondrial genome. The discovery of multiple mitochondrial lineages of P. relictum in Hawaii provides a measure of genetic diversity within a geographically isolated population of this parasite and suggests the origins and evolution of parasite diversity may be more complicated than previously recognized.

  15. Effect of ovine luteinizing hormone (oLH) charge isoforms on VEGF and cAMP production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Pardo, Arnulfo; Diaz, Daniel; Olivares, Aleida; González-Padilla, Everardo; Murcia, Clara; Gómez-Chavarín, Margarita; Gutiérrez-Ospina, Gabriel; Perera-Marín, Gerardo

    2015-12-01

    Although an increase in VEGF expression and synthesis in association with LH has been established; it is unknown if all LH isoforms act similarly. This study evaluated the production of cAMP and VEGF among LH isoforms in two in vitro bioassays. The LH was obtained from hypophyses and the group of isoforms was isolated by chromatofocusing. cAMP production was assessed using the in vitro bioassay of HEK-293 cells and VEGF production was evaluated in granulosa cells. Immunological activity was measured with a homologous RIA. Immunoactivity and bioactivity for each isoform were compared against a standard, by estimating the IC50 and the EC50. The basic isoforms were more immunoactive than the standard. The neutral and the moderately acidic had an immunological activity similar to the standard. The acidic isoform was the least immunoreactive. cAMP production at the EC50 dose was similar among the basic isoforms, the moderately acidic and the standard; for the neutral and the acidic, the EC50 dose was higher. It was observed that compared with the control, VEGF production at the lowest LH dose was no different in the standard and each isoform. In the intermediate dose, a positive response was caused in the standard and the neutral and basic isoforms. Although the acidic isoform showed a dose-dependent response, it was not significant relative to the control. In conclusion, the basic isoform generated the greatest cAMP and VEGF production, similar to the reference standard, and the acidic the smallest.

  16. Second generation sequencing for elucidating the diversity of bacteria and plasmids in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmsgaard, Peter Nikolai

    and amplicon pyrosequencing and briefly the related bioinformatics. This is followed by six papers of which one is published and five are manuscripts. In the first paper, amplicon pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was use to investigate the bias in cell extraction from soil imposed by Nycodenz density......, paper microcosms with material from a pre-adapted biopurification system (BPS) were spiked with the herbicide linuron and the effect on the bacterial and plasmid community was studied. The genus Variovorax previously shown to degrade linuron was found to be one of the main positive responders...... and plasmid diversity in different soil environments while papers I and VI use different molecular methods to study the bias imposed on bacterial community studies by different techniques....

  17. Partial promoter substitutions generating transcriptional sentinels of diverse signaling pathways in embryonic stem cells and mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serup, Palle; Gustavsen, Carsten; Klein, Tino; Potter, Leah A.; Lin, Robert; Mullapudi, Nandita; Wandzioch, Ewa; Hines, Angela; Davis, Ashley; Bruun, Christine; Engberg, Nina; Petersen, Dorthe R.; Peterslund, Janny M. L.; MacDonald, Raymond J.; Grapin-Botton, Anne; Magnuson, Mark A.; Zaret, Kenneth S.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Extracellular signals in development, physiology, homeostasis and disease often act by regulating transcription. Herein we describe a general method and specific resources for determining where and when such signaling occurs in live animals and for systematically comparing the timing and extent of different signals in different cellular contexts. We used recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) to test the effect of successively deleting conserved genomic regions of the ubiquitously active Rosa26 promoter and substituting the deleted regions for regulatory sequences that respond to diverse extracellular signals. We thereby created an allelic series of embryonic stem cells and mice, each containing a signal-responsive sentinel with different fluorescent reporters that respond with sensitivity and specificity to retinoic acids, bone morphogenic proteins, activin A, Wnts or Notch, and that can be adapted to any pathway that acts via DNA elements. PMID:22888097

  18. Sexuality Generates Diversity in the Aflatoxin Gene Cluster: Evidence on a Global Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Geromy G.; Elliott, Jacalyn L.; Singh, Rakhi; Horn, Bruce W.; Dorner, Joe W.; Stone, Eric A.; Chulze, Sofia N.; Barros, German G.; Naik, Manjunath K.; Wright, Graeme C.; Hell, Kerstin; Carbone, Ignazio

    2013-01-01

    Aflatoxins are produced by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus in oil-rich seed and grain crops and are a serious problem in agriculture, with aflatoxin B1 being the most carcinogenic natural compound known. Sexual reproduction in these species occurs between individuals belonging to different vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs). We examined natural genetic variation in 758 isolates of A. flavus, A. parasiticus and A. minisclerotigenes sampled from single peanut fields in the United States (Georgia), Africa (Benin), Argentina (Córdoba), Australia (Queensland) and India (Karnataka). Analysis of DNA sequence variation across multiple intergenic regions in the aflatoxin gene clusters of A. flavus, A. parasiticus and A. minisclerotigenes revealed significant linkage disequilibrium (LD) organized into distinct blocks that are conserved across different localities, suggesting that genetic recombination is nonrandom and a global occurrence. To assess the contributions of asexual and sexual reproduction to fixation and maintenance of toxin chemotype diversity in populations from each locality/species, we tested the null hypothesis of an equal number of MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 mating-type individuals, which is indicative of a sexually recombining population. All samples were clone-corrected using multi-locus sequence typing which associates closely with VCG. For both A. flavus and A. parasiticus, when the proportions of MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 were significantly different, there was more extensive LD in the aflatoxin cluster and populations were fixed for specific toxin chemotype classes, either the non-aflatoxigenic class in A. flavus or the B1-dominant and G1-dominant classes in A. parasiticus. A mating type ratio close to 1∶1 in A. flavus, A. parasiticus and A. minisclerotigenes was associated with higher recombination rates in the aflatoxin cluster and less pronounced chemotype differences in populations. This work shows that the reproductive nature of the population (more

  19. Sexuality generates diversity in the aflatoxin gene cluster: evidence on a global scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geromy G Moore

    Full Text Available Aflatoxins are produced by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus in oil-rich seed and grain crops and are a serious problem in agriculture, with aflatoxin B₁ being the most carcinogenic natural compound known. Sexual reproduction in these species occurs between individuals belonging to different vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs. We examined natural genetic variation in 758 isolates of A. flavus, A. parasiticus and A. minisclerotigenes sampled from single peanut fields in the United States (Georgia, Africa (Benin, Argentina (Córdoba, Australia (Queensland and India (Karnataka. Analysis of DNA sequence variation across multiple intergenic regions in the aflatoxin gene clusters of A. flavus, A. parasiticus and A. minisclerotigenes revealed significant linkage disequilibrium (LD organized into distinct blocks that are conserved across different localities, suggesting that genetic recombination is nonrandom and a global occurrence. To assess the contributions of asexual and sexual reproduction to fixation and maintenance of toxin chemotype diversity in populations from each locality/species, we tested the null hypothesis of an equal number of MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 mating-type individuals, which is indicative of a sexually recombining population. All samples were clone-corrected using multi-locus sequence typing which associates closely with VCG. For both A. flavus and A. parasiticus, when the proportions of MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 were significantly different, there was more extensive LD in the aflatoxin cluster and populations were fixed for specific toxin chemotype classes, either the non-aflatoxigenic class in A. flavus or the B₁-dominant and G₁-dominant classes in A. parasiticus. A mating type ratio close to 1∶1 in A. flavus, A. parasiticus and A. minisclerotigenes was associated with higher recombination rates in the aflatoxin cluster and less pronounced chemotype differences in populations. This work shows that the reproductive nature of

  20. Bacteria-Induced Dscam Isoforms of the Crustacean, Pacifastacus leniusculus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apiruck Watthanasurorot

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule, also known as Dscam, is a member of the immunoglobulin super family. Dscam plays an essential function in neuronal wiring and appears to be involved in innate immune reactions in insects. The deduced amino acid sequence of Dscam in the crustacean Pacifastacus leniusculus (PlDscam, encodes 9(Ig-4(FNIII-(Ig-2(FNIII-TM and it has variable regions in the N-terminal half of Ig2 and Ig3 and the complete Ig7 and in the transmembrane domain. The cytoplasmic tail can generate multiple isoforms. PlDscam can generate more than 22,000 different unique isoforms. Bacteria and LPS injection enhanced the expression of PlDscam, but no response in expression occurred after a white spot syndrome virus (WSSV infection or injection with peptidoglycans. Furthermore, PlDscam silencing did not have any effect on the replication of the WSSV. Bacterial specific isoforms of PlDscam were shown to have a specific binding property to each tested bacteria, E. coli or S. aureus. The bacteria specific isoforms of PlDscam were shown to be associated with bacterial clearance and phagocytosis in crayfish.

  1. Next-Generation Sequencing Assessment of Eukaryotic Diversity in Oil Sands Tailings Ponds Sediments and Surface Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Maria; Richardson, Elisabeth; Tan, BoonFei; Walker, Giselle; Dunfield, Peter F; Bass, David; Nesbø, Camilla; Foght, Julia; Dacks, Joel B

    2016-11-01

    Tailings ponds in the Athabasca oil sands (Canada) contain fluid wastes, generated by the extraction of bitumen from oil sands ores. Although the autochthonous prokaryotic communities have been relatively well characterized, almost nothing is known about microbial eukaryotes living in the anoxic soft sediments of tailings ponds or in the thin oxic layer of water that covers them. We carried out the first next-generation sequencing study of microbial eukaryotic diversity in oil sands tailings ponds. In metagenomes prepared from tailings sediment and surface water, we detected very low numbers of sequences encoding eukaryotic small subunit ribosomal RNA representing seven major taxonomic groups of protists. We also produced and analysed three amplicon-based 18S rRNA libraries prepared from sediment samples. These revealed a more diverse set of taxa, 169 different OTUs encompassing up to eleven higher order groups of eukaryotes, according to detailed classification using homology searching and phylogenetic methods. The 10 most abundant OTUs accounted for > 90% of the total of reads, vs. large numbers of rare OTUs (tailings ponds harbour complex communities of microbial eukaryotes indicating that these organisms should be taken into account when studying the microbiology of the oil sands. © 2016 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2016 International Society of Protistologists.

  2. GENETIC STRUCTURE AND ALLEL DIVERSITY OF THREE BALINESE GENERATIONS BASED ON FIVE AUTOSOMAL MICROSATELLITE DNA LOCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayu Saka Laksmita

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This research was aimed to find out the genetic structures of three generations of Balinese population, in order to determine the best loci used for paternity testing among this population, and observed the mutation rate of these loci. The DNA samples were taken from the epithelium cell of 25 families which were collected from the children, father, mother, grandfather and grandmother of the children, from both mother and father sides (family with three generations. The DNA was extracted in Phenol-Chloroform method with modifications. DNA amplification was conducted in PCR method using pairs of primer 5, namely: FGA, D18S51, D2S1338, TPOX, and D16S539, and its products were electrophoresed and visualized in 10% of PAGE, stained in silver nitrate. The genetic structures of the three family generations showed 30 variants with different frequencies in each locus. The highest heterozygosity value was detected in FGA (8 alleles, then followed by D18S51 (7 alleles, TPOX (6 alleles, D16S539 (5 alleles, and the lowest was in D2S1338 (4 alleles. The highest value of heterozigosity and Power of Discrimination were found in FGA, followed by TPOX, D18S51, D2S1338, and the lowest was in D16S539. Therefore, it can be concluded that out of five loci tested, 4 of them can be recommended to be used for paternity testing of Balinese population, except D16S539

  3. Inference of Isoforms from Short Sequence Reads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jianxing; Li, Wei; Jiang, Tao

    Due to alternative splicing events in eukaryotic species, the identification of mRNA isoforms (or splicing variants) is a difficult problem. Traditional experimental methods for this purpose are time consuming and cost ineffective. The emerging RNA-Seq technology provides a possible effective method to address this problem. Although the advantages of RNA-Seq over traditional methods in transcriptome analysis have been confirmed by many studies, the inference of isoforms from millions of short sequence reads (e.g., Illumina/Solexa reads) has remained computationally challenging. In this work, we propose a method to calculate the expression levels of isoforms and infer isoforms from short RNA-Seq reads using exon-intron boundary, transcription start site (TSS) and poly-A site (PAS) information. We first formulate the relationship among exons, isoforms, and single-end reads as a convex quadratic program, and then use an efficient algorithm (called IsoInfer) to search for isoforms. IsoInfer can calculate the expression levels of isoforms accurately if all the isoforms are known and infer novel isoforms from scratch. Our experimental tests on known mouse isoforms with both simulated expression levels and reads demonstrate that IsoInfer is able to calculate the expression levels of isoforms with an accuracy comparable to the state-of-the-art statistical method and a 60 times faster speed. Moreover, our tests on both simulated and real reads show that it achieves a good precision and sensitivity in inferring isoforms when given accurate exon-intron boundary, TSS and PAS information, especially for isoforms whose expression levels are significantly high.

  4. Non-heme iron oxygenases generate natural structural diversity in carbapenem antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodner, Micah J; Phelan, Ryan M; Freeman, Michael F; Li, Rongfeng; Townsend, Craig A

    2010-01-13

    Carbapenems are a clinically important antibiotic family. More than 50 naturally occurring carbapenam/ems are known and are distinguished primarily by their C-2/C-6 side chains where many are only differentiated by the oxidation states of these substituents. With a limited palette of variations the carbapenem family comprises a natural combinatorial library, and C-2/C-6 oxidation is associated with increased efficacy. We demonstrate that ThnG and ThnQ encoded by the thienamycin gene cluster in Streptomyces cattleya oxidize the C-2 and C-6 moieties of carbapenems, respectively. ThnQ stereospecifically hydroxylates PS-5 (5) giving N-acetyl thienamycin (2). ThnG catalyzes sequential desaturation and sulfoxidation of PS-5 (5), giving PS-7 (7) and its sulfoxide (9). The enzymes are relatively substrate selective but are proposed to give rise to the oxidative diversity of carbapenems produced by S. cattleya, and orthologues likely function similarly in allied streptomyces. Elucidating the roles of ThnG and ThnQ will focus further investigations of carbapenem antibiotic biosynthesis.

  5. Imprinting in plants as a mechanism to generate seed phenotypic diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mark eSettles

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal plant development requires epigenetic regulation to enforce changes in developmental fate. Genomic imprinting is a type of epigenetic regulation in which identical alleles of genes are expressed in a parent-of-origin dependent manner. Deep sequencing of transcriptomes has identified hundreds of imprinted genes with scarce evidence for the developmental importance of individual imprinted loci. Imprinting is regulated through global DNA demethylation in the central cell prior to fertilization and directed repression of individual loci with the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2. There is significant evidence for transposable elements and repeat sequences near genes acting as cis-elements to determine imprinting status of a gene, implying that imprinted gene expression patterns may evolve randomly and at high frequency. Detailed genetic analysis of a few imprinted loci suggests an imprinted pattern of gene expression is often dispensable for seed development. Few genes show conserved imprinted expression within or between plant species. These data are not fully explained by current models for the evolution of imprinting in plant seeds. We suggest that imprinting may have evolved to provide a mechanism for rapid neofunctionalization of genes during seed development to increase phenotypic diversity of seeds.

  6. Automatic generation control of multi-area power systems with diverse energy sources using Teaching Learning Based Optimization algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabindra Kumar Sahu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and analysis of Proportional-Integral-Double Derivative (PIDD controller for Automatic Generation Control (AGC of multi-area power systems with diverse energy sources using Teaching Learning Based Optimization (TLBO algorithm. At first, a two-area reheat thermal power system with appropriate Generation Rate Constraint (GRC is considered. The design problem is formulated as an optimization problem and TLBO is employed to optimize the parameters of the PIDD controller. The superiority of the proposed TLBO based PIDD controller has been demonstrated by comparing the results with recently published optimization technique such as hybrid Firefly Algorithm and Pattern Search (hFA-PS, Firefly Algorithm (FA, Bacteria Foraging Optimization Algorithm (BFOA, Genetic Algorithm (GA and conventional Ziegler Nichols (ZN for the same interconnected power system. Also, the proposed approach has been extended to two-area power system with diverse sources of generation like thermal, hydro, wind and diesel units. The system model includes boiler dynamics, GRC and Governor Dead Band (GDB non-linearity. It is observed from simulation results that the performance of the proposed approach provides better dynamic responses by comparing the results with recently published in the literature. Further, the study is extended to a three unequal-area thermal power system with different controllers in each area and the results are compared with published FA optimized PID controller for the same system under study. Finally, sensitivity analysis is performed by varying the system parameters and operating load conditions in the range of ±25% from their nominal values to test the robustness.

  7. Simulating Flying Insects Using Dynamics and Data-Driven Noise Modeling to Generate Diverse Collective Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jiaping; Wang, Xinjie; Jin, Xiaogang; Manocha, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    We present a biologically plausible dynamics model to simulate swarms of flying insects. Our formulation, which is based on biological conclusions and experimental observations, is designed to simulate large insect swarms of varying densities. We use a force-based model that captures different interactions between the insects and the environment and computes collision-free trajectories for each individual insect. Furthermore, we model the noise as a constructive force at the collective level and present a technique to generate noise-induced insect movements in a large swarm that are similar to those observed in real-world trajectories. We use a data-driven formulation that is based on pre-recorded insect trajectories. We also present a novel evaluation metric and a statistical validation approach that takes into account various characteristics of insect motions. In practice, the combination of Curl noise function with our dynamics model is used to generate realistic swarm simulations and emergent behaviors. We highlight its performance for simulating large flying swarms of midges, fruit fly, locusts and moths and demonstrate many collective behaviors, including aggregation, migration, phase transition, and escape responses.

  8. Roles of the troponin isoforms during indirect flight muscle development in Drosophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Salam Herojeet Singh; Prabodh Kumar; Nallur B. Ramachandra; Upendra Nongthomba

    2014-08-01

    Troponin proteins in cooperative interaction with tropomyosin are responsible for controlling the contraction of the striated muscles in response to changes in the intracellular calcium concentration. Contractility of the muscle is determined by the constituent protein isoforms, and the isoforms can switch over from one form to another depending on physiological demands and pathological conditions. In Drosophila, amajority of themyofibrillar proteins in the indirect flight muscles (IFMs) undergo post-transcriptional and post-translational isoform changes during pupal to adult metamorphosis to meet the high energy and mechanical demands of flight. Using a newly generated Gal4 strain (UH3-Gal4) which is expressed exclusively in the IFMs, during later stages of development, we have looked at the developmental and functional importance of each of the troponin subunits (troponin-I, troponin-T and troponin-C) and their isoforms. We show that all the troponin subunits are required for normal myofibril assembly and flight, except for the troponin-C isoform 1 (TnC1). Moreover, rescue experiments conducted with troponin-I embryonic isoform in the IFMs, where flies were rendered flightless, show developmental and functional differences of TnI isoforms and importance of maintaining the right isoform.

  9. Roles of the troponin isoforms during indirect flight muscle development in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Salam Herojeet; Kumar, Prabodh; Ramachandra, Nallur B; Nongthomba, Upendra

    2014-08-01

    Troponin proteins in cooperative interaction with tropomyosin are responsible for controlling the contraction of the striated muscles in response to changes in the intracellular calcium concentration. Contractility of the muscle is determined by the constituent protein isoforms, and the isoforms can switch over from one form to another depending on physiological demands and pathological conditions. In Drosophila, amajority of themyofibrillar proteins in the indirect flight muscles (IFMs) undergo post-transcriptional and post-translational isoform changes during pupal to adult metamorphosis to meet the high energy and mechanical demands of flight. Using a newly generated Gal4 strain (UH3-Gal4) which is expressed exclusively in the IFMs, during later stages of development, we have looked at the developmental and functional importance of each of the troponin subunits (troponin-I, troponin-T and troponin-C) and their isoforms. We show that all the troponin subunits are required for normal myofibril assembly and flight, except for the troponin-C isoform 1 (TnC1). Moreover, rescue experiments conducted with troponin-I embryonic isoform in the IFMs, where flies were rendered flightless, show developmental and functional differences of TnI isoforms and importance of maintaining the right isoform.

  10. Characterization of four hemocyanin isoforms in Litopenaeus vannamei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jingxiang; RUAN Lingwei; LI Zhen; YU Xiaoman; LI Sedong; SHI Hong; XU Xun

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the gene encoding hemocyanin subunit L, LvHcL, was cloned from Litopenaeus vannamei and the genomic organization was characterized. This gene was diverse with many SNPs and also had at least four isoforms, while one of them (LvHcL4) only had two exons and the exon2 was missed. Transcription analysis showed that these isoforms of LvHcL were up-regulated after WSSV challenge in WSSV-resistant shrimp, while the transcriptions were decreased constantly in WSSV-susceptible shrimp. It is suggested that the hemocyanin had rich polymorphism and was involved in the antiviral response. These results could extend our previous findings and provide insights into the immune feature of hemocyanin, which would be helpful for further studies aimed at antiviral mechanism in inver-tebrate.

  11. Student-generated reading questions: diagnosing student thinking with diverse formative assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offerdahl, Erika G; Montplaisir, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Formative assessment has long been identified as a critical element to teaching for conceptual development in science. It is therefore important for university instructors to have an arsenal of formative assessment tools at their disposal which enable them to effectively uncover and diagnose all students' thinking, not just the most vocal or assertive. We illustrate the utility of one type of formative assessment prompt (reading question assignment) in producing high-quality evidence of student thinking (student-generated reading questions). Specifically, we characterized student assessment data using three distinct analytic frames to exemplify their effectiveness in diagnosing student learning in relationship to three sample learning outcomes. Our data will be useful for university faculty, particularly those engaged in teaching upper-level biochemistry courses and their prerequisites, as they provide an alternative mechanism for uncovering and diagnosing student understanding.

  12. Propionibacterium acnes: Disease-Causing Agent or Common Contaminant? Detection in Diverse Patient Samples by Next-Generation Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis-Nielsen, Jens; Vinner, Lasse; Hansen, Thomas Arn; Richter, Stine Raith; Fridholm, Helena; Herrera, Jose Alejandro Romero; Lund, Ole; Brunak, Søren; Izarzugaza, Jose M. G.; Mourier, Tobias; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is the most abundant bacterium on human skin, particularly in sebaceous areas. P. acnes is suggested to be an opportunistic pathogen involved in the development of diverse medical conditions but is also a proven contaminant of human clinical samples and surgical wounds. Its significance as a pathogen is consequently a matter of debate. In the present study, we investigated the presence of P. acnes DNA in 250 next-generation sequencing data sets generated from 180 samples of 20 different sample types, mostly of cancerous origin. The samples were subjected to either microbial enrichment, involving nuclease treatment to reduce the amount of host nucleic acids, or shotgun sequencing. We detected high proportions of P. acnes DNA in enriched samples, particularly skin tissue-derived and other tissue samples, with the levels being higher in enriched samples than in shotgun-sequenced samples. P. acnes reads were detected in most samples analyzed, though the proportions in most shotgun-sequenced samples were low. Our results show that P. acnes can be detected in practically all sample types when molecular methods, such as next-generation sequencing, are employed. The possibility of contamination from the patient or other sources, including laboratory reagents or environment, should therefore always be considered carefully when P. acnes is detected in clinical samples. We advocate that detection of P. acnes always be accompanied by experiments validating the association between this bacterium and any clinical condition. PMID:26818667

  13. Distinct and shared transcriptomes are regulated by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor isoforms in mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahlaee, Amir H; Brandal, Stephanie; Lee, Youl-Nam; Jie, Chunfa; Takemoto, Clifford M

    2007-01-01

    The Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mitf) is an essential basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper transcription factor for mast cell development. Mice deficient in Mitf harbor a severe mast cell deficiency, and Mitf-mutant mast cells cultured ex vivo display a number of functional defects. Therefore, an understanding of the genetic program regulated by Mitf may provide important insights into mast cell differentiation. Multiple, distinct isoforms of Mitf have been identified in a variety of cell types; we found that Mitf-a, Mitf-e, and Mitf-mc were the major isoforms expressed in mast cells. To determine the physiologic function of Mitf in mast cells, we restored expression of these isoforms in primary mast cells from Mitf(-/-) mice. We found that these isoforms restored granular morphology and integrin-mediated migration. By microarray analysis, proteases, signaling molecules, cell surface receptor, and transporters comprised the largest groups of genes up-regulated by all isoforms. Furthermore, we found that isoforms also regulated distinct genes sets, suggesting separable biological activities. This work defines the transcriptome regulated by Mitf in mast cells and supports its role as master regulator of mast cell differentiation. Expression of multiple isoforms of this transcription factor may provide for redundancy of biological activities while also allowing diversity of function.

  14. VEGF-A isoforms program differential VEGFR2 signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnley, Gareth W.; Smith, Gina A.; Abdul-Zani, Izma; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Mughal, Nadeem A.; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Kearney, Mark T.; Zachary, Ian C.; Tomlinson, Darren C.; Harrison, Michael A.; Wheatcroft, Stephen B.; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR2 triggers multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate endothelial cell responses that control vascular development. Multiple isoforms of VEGF-A can elicit differential signal transduction and endothelial responses. However, it is unclear how such cellular responses are controlled by isoform-specific VEGF-A–VEGFR2 complexes. Increasingly, there is the realization that the membrane trafficking of receptor–ligand complexes influences signal transduction and protein turnover. By building on these concepts, our study shows for the first time that three different VEGF-A isoforms (VEGF-A165, VEGF-A121 and VEGF-A145) promote distinct patterns of VEGFR2 endocytosis for delivery into early endosomes. This differential VEGFR2 endocytosis and trafficking is linked to VEGF-A isoform-specific signal transduction events. Disruption of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked VEGF-A isoform-specific VEGFR2 activation, signal transduction and caused substantial depletion in membrane-bound VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 levels. Furthermore, such VEGF-A isoforms promoted differential patterns of VEGFR2 ubiquitylation, proteolysis and terminal degradation. Our study now provides novel insights into how different VEGF-A isoforms can bind the same receptor tyrosine kinase and elicit diverse cellular outcomes. PMID:27044325

  15. VEGF-A isoforms program differential VEGFR2 signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth W. Fearnley

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR2 triggers multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate endothelial cell responses that control vascular development. Multiple isoforms of VEGF-A can elicit differential signal transduction and endothelial responses. However, it is unclear how such cellular responses are controlled by isoform-specific VEGF-A–VEGFR2 complexes. Increasingly, there is the realization that the membrane trafficking of receptor–ligand complexes influences signal transduction and protein turnover. By building on these concepts, our study shows for the first time that three different VEGF-A isoforms (VEGF-A165, VEGF-A121 and VEGF-A145 promote distinct patterns of VEGFR2 endocytosis for delivery into early endosomes. This differential VEGFR2 endocytosis and trafficking is linked to VEGF-A isoform-specific signal transduction events. Disruption of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked VEGF-A isoform-specific VEGFR2 activation, signal transduction and caused substantial depletion in membrane-bound VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 levels. Furthermore, such VEGF-A isoforms promoted differential patterns of VEGFR2 ubiquitylation, proteolysis and terminal degradation. Our study now provides novel insights into how different VEGF-A isoforms can bind the same receptor tyrosine kinase and elicit diverse cellular outcomes.

  16. Revisiting the identification of canonical splice isoforms through integration of functional genomics and proteomics evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Dong; Menon, Rajasree; Omenn, Gilbert S; Guan, Yuanfang

    2014-12-01

    Canonical isoforms in different databases have been defined as the most prevalent, most conserved, most expressed, longest, or the one with the clearest description of domains or posttranslational modifications. In this article, we revisit these definitions of canonical isoforms based on functional genomics and proteomics evidence, focusing on mouse data. We report a novel functional relationship network-based approach for identifying the highest connected isoforms (HCIs). We show that 46% of these HCIs are not the longest transcripts. In addition, this approach revealed many genes that have more than one highly connected isoforms. Averaged across 175 RNA-seq datasets covering diverse tissues and conditions, 65% of the HCIs show higher expression levels than nonhighest connected isoforms at the transcript level. At the protein level, these HCIs highly overlap with the expressed splice variants, based on proteomic data from eight different normal tissues. These results suggest that a more confident definition of canonical isoforms can be made through integration of multiple lines of evidence, including HCIs defined by biological processes and pathways, expression prevalence at the transcript level, and relative or absolute abundance at the protein level. This integrative proteogenomics approach can successfully identify principal isoforms that are responsible for the canonical functions of genes. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Generating phenotypic diversity in a fungal biocatalyst to investigate alcohol stress tolerance encountered during microbial cellulosic biofuel production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna C Hennessy

    Full Text Available Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP of lignocellulosic biomass offers an alternative route to renewable energy. The crop pathogen Fusarium oxysporum is a promising fungal biocatalyst because of its broad host range and innate ability to co-saccharify and ferment lignocellulose to bioethanol. A major challenge for cellulolytic CBP-enabling microbes is alcohol inhibition. This research tested the hypothesis that Agrobacterium tumefaciens--mediated transformation (ATMT could be exploited as a tool to generate phenotypic diversity in F. oxysporum to investigate alcohol stress tolerance encountered during CBP. A random mutagenesis library of gene disruption transformants (n=1,563 was constructed and screened for alcohol tolerance in order to isolate alcohol sensitive or tolerant phenotypes. Following three rounds of screening, exposure of select transformants to 6% ethanol and 0.75% n-butanol resulted respectively in increased (≥ 11.74% and decreased (≤ 43.01% growth compared to the wild -type (WT. Principal component analysis (PCA quantified the level of phenotypic diversity across the population of genetically transformed individuals and isolated candidate strains for analysis. Characterisation of one strain, Tr. 259, ascertained a reduced growth phenotype under alcohol stress relative to WT and indicated the disruption of a coding region homologous to a putative sugar transporter (FOXG_09625. Quantitative PCR (RT-PCR showed FOXG_09625 was differentially expressed in Tr. 259 compared to WT during alcohol-induced stress (P<0.05. Phylogenetic analysis of putative sugar transporters suggests diverse functional roles in F. oxysporum and other filamentous fungi compared to yeast for which sugar transporters form part of a relatively conserved family. This study has confirmed the potential of ATMT coupled with a phenotypic screening program to select for genetic variation induced in response to alcohol stress. This research represents a first step in the

  18. Expanded therapeutic potential in activity space of next-generation 5-nitroimidazole antimicrobials with broad structural diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yukiko; Kalisiak, Jaroslaw; Korthals, Keith; Lauwaet, Tineke; Cheung, Dae Young; Lozano, Ricardo; Cobo, Eduardo R; Upcroft, Peter; Upcroft, Jacqueline A; Berg, Douglas E; Gillin, Frances D; Fokin, Valery V; Sharpless, K Barry; Eckmann, Lars

    2013-10-22

    Metronidazole and other 5-nitroimidazoles (5-NI) are among the most effective antimicrobials available against many important anaerobic pathogens, but evolving resistance is threatening their long-term clinical utility. The common 5-NIs were developed decades ago, yet little 5-NI drug development has since taken place, leaving the true potential of this important drug class unexplored. Here we report on a unique approach to the modular synthesis of diversified 5-NIs for broad exploration of their antimicrobial potential. Many of the more than 650 synthesized compounds, carrying structurally diverse functional groups, have vastly improved activity against a range of microbes, including the pathogenic protozoa Giardia lamblia and Trichomonas vaginalis, and the bacterial pathogens Helicobacter pylori, Clostridium difficile, and Bacteroides fragilis. Furthermore, they can overcome different forms of drug resistance, and are active and nontoxic in animal infection models. These findings provide impetus to the development of structurally diverse, next-generation 5-NI drugs as agents in the antimicrobial armamentarium, thus ensuring their future viability as primary therapeutic agents against many clinically important infections.

  19. Spatial regulation of a common precursor from two distinct genes generates metabolite diversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Chun-Jun; Sun, Wei-Wen; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Oakley, Berl R.; Keller, Nancy P.; Wang, Clay C.

    2015-07-13

    In secondary metabolite biosynthesis, core synthetic genes such as polyketide synthase genes or non-ribosomal peptide synthase genes usually encode proteins that generate various backbone precursors. These precursors are modified by other tailoring enzymes to yield a large variety of different secondary metabolites. The number of core synthesis genes in a given species correlates, therefore, with the number of types of secondary metabolites the organism can produce. In our study, heterologous expression of all the A. terreus NRPS-like genes showed that two NRPS-like proteins, encoded by atmelA and apvA, release the same natural product, aspulvinone E. More interestingly, further experiments revealed that the aspulvinone E produced by two different genes accumulates in different fungal compartments. And this spatial control of aspulvinone E production is likely to be regulated by their own specific promoters. Comparative genomics indicates that atmelA and apvA might share a same ancestral gene and the gene apvA is inserted in a highly conserved region in Aspergillus species that contains genes coding for life-essential proteins. The study also identified one trans-prenyltransferase AbpB which is capable of prenylating two different substrates aspulvinones and butyrolactones. In total, our study shows the first example in which the locally distribution of the same natural product could lead to its incorporation into different SM pathways.

  20. Myosin heavy chain isoform composition and stretch activation kinetics in single fibres of Xenopus laevis iliofibularis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andruchova, Olena; Stephenson, Gabriela M M; Andruchov, Oleg; Stephenson, D George; Galler, Stefan

    2006-07-01

    Skeletal muscle is composed of specialized fibre types that enable it to fulfil complex and variable functional needs. Muscle fibres of Xenopus laevis, a frog formerly classified as a toad, were the first to be typed based on a combination of physiological, morphological, histochemical and biochemical characteristics. Currently the most widely accepted criterion for muscle fibre typing is the myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform composition because it is assumed that variations of this protein are the most important contributors to functional diversity. Yet this criterion has not been used for classification of Xenopus fibres due to the lack of an effective protocol for MHC isoform analysis. In the present study we aimed to resolve and visualize electrophoretically the MHC isoforms expressed in the iliofibularis muscle of Xenopus laevis, to define their functional identity and to classify the fibres based on their MHC isoform composition. Using a SDS-PAGE protocol that proved successful with mammalian muscle MHC isoforms, we were able to detect five MHC isoforms in Xenopus iliofibularis muscle. The kinetics of stretch-induced force transients (stretch activation) produced by a fibre was strongly correlated with its MHC isoform content indicating that the five MHC isoforms confer different kinetics characteristics. Hybrid fibre types containing two MHC isoforms exhibited stretch activation kinetics parameters that were intermediate between those of the corresponding pure fibre types. These results clearly show that the MHC isoforms expressed in Xenopus muscle are functionally different thereby validating the idea that MHC isoform composition is the most reliable criterion for vertebrate skeletal muscle fibre type classification. Thus, our results lay the foundation for the unequivocal classification of the muscle fibres in the Xenopus iliofibularis muscle and for gaining further insights into skeletal muscle fibre diversity.

  1. Atypical beta(s) haplotypes are generated by diverse genetic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, M A; Silva, W A; Dalle, B; Gualandro, S; Hutz, M H; Lapoumeroulie, C; Tavella, M H; Araujo, A G; Krieger, J E; Elion, J; Krishnamoorthy, R

    2000-02-01

    The majority of the chromosomes with the beta(S) gene have one of the five common haplotypes, designated as Benin, Bantu, Senegal, Cameroon, and Arab-Indian haplotypes. However, in every large series of sickle cell patients, 5-10% of the chromosomes have less common haplotypes, usually referred to as "atypical" haplotypes. In order to explore the genetic mechanisms that could generate these atypical haplotypes, we extended our analysis to other rarely studied polymorphic markers of the beta(S)-gene cluster, in a total of 40 chromosomes with uncommon haplotypes from Brazil and Cameroon. The following polymorphisms were examined: seven restriction site polymorphisms of the epsilongammadeltabeta-cluster, the pre-(G)gamma framework sequence including the 6-bp deletion/insertion pattern, HS-2 LCR (AT)xR(AT)y and pre-beta (AT)xTy repeat motifs, the GC/TT polymorphism at -1105-1106 of (G)gamma-globin gene, the C/T polymorphism at -551 of the beta-globin gene, and the intragenic beta-globin gene framework. Among the Brazilian subjects, the most common atypical structure (7/16) was a Bantu 3'-subhaplotype associated with different 5'-sequences, while in two chromosomes a Benin 3'-subhaplotype was associated with two different 5'-subhaplotypes. A hybrid Benin/Bantu configuration was also observed. In three chromosomes, the atypical haplotype differed from the typical one by the change of a single restriction site. In 2/134 chromosomes identified as having a typical Bantu RFLP-haplotype, a discrepant LCR repeat sequence was observed, probably owing to a crossover 5' to the epsilon-gene. Among 80 beta(S) chromosomes from Cameroon, 22 were associated with an atypical haplotype. The most common structure was represented by a Benin haplotype (from the LCR to the beta-gene) with a non-Benin segment 3' to the beta-globin gene. In two cases a Bantu LCR was associated with a Benin haplotype and a non-Benin segment 3' to the beta-globin gene. In three other cases, a more complex

  2. Sensitive Next-Generation Sequencing Method Reveals Deep Genetic Diversity of HIV-1 in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Eduan; Vallari, Ana; McArthur, Carole; Sthreshley, Larry; Brennan, Catherine A.; Cloherty, Gavin; de Oliveira, Tulio

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT As the epidemiological epicenter of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pandemic, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is a reservoir of circulating HIV strains exhibiting high levels of diversity and recombination. In this study, we characterized HIV specimens collected in two rural areas of the DRC between 2001 and 2003 to identify rare strains of HIV. The env gp41 region was sequenced and characterized for 172 HIV-positive specimens. The env sequences were predominantly subtype A (43.02%), but 7 other subtypes (33.14%), 20 circulating recombinant forms (CRFs; 11.63%), and 20 unclassified (11.63%) sequences were also found. Of the rare and unclassified subtypes, 18 specimens were selected for next-generation sequencing (NGS) by a modified HIV-switching mechanism at the 5′ end of the RNA template (SMART) method to obtain full-genome sequences. NGS produced 14 new complete genomes, which included pure subtype C (n = 2), D (n = 1), F1 (n = 1), H (n = 3), and J (n = 1) genomes. The two subtype C genomes and one of the subtype H genomes branched basal to their respective subtype branches but had no evidence of recombination. The remaining 6 genomes were complex recombinants of 2 or more subtypes, including subtypes A1, F, G, H, J, and K and unclassified fragments, including one subtype CRF25 isolate, which branched basal to all CRF25 references. Notably, all recombinant subtype H fragments branched basal to the H clade. Spatial-geographical analysis indicated that the diverse sequences identified here did not expand globally. The full-genome and subgenomic sequences identified in our study population significantly increase the documented diversity of the strains involved in the continually evolving HIV-1 pandemic. IMPORTANCE Very little is known about the ancestral HIV-1 strains that founded the global pandemic, and very few complete genome sequences are available from patients in the Congo Basin, where HIV-1 expanded early in the global pandemic

  3. DNA barcoding, microarrays and next generation sequencing: recent tools for genetic diversity estimation and authentication of medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwat, Maryam; Yamdagni, Manu Mayank

    2016-01-01

    DNA barcoding, microarray technology and next generation sequencing have emerged as promising tools for the elucidation of plant genetic diversity and its conservation. They are proving to be immensely helpful in authenticating the useful medicinal plants for herbal drug preparations. These newer versions of molecular markers utilize short genetic markers in the genome to characterize the organism to a particular species. This has the potential not only to classify the known and yet unknown species but also has a promising future to link the medicinally important plants according to their properties. The newer trends being followed in DNA chips and barcoding pave the way for a future with many different possibilities. Several of these possibilities might be: characterization of unknown species in a considerably less time than usual, identification of newer medicinal properties possessed by the species and also updating the data of the already existing but unnoticed properties. This can assist us to cure many different diseases and will also generate novel opportunities in medicinal drug delivery and targeting.

  4. Regulation of cell proliferation by nucleocytoplasmic dynamics of postnatal and embryonic exon-II-containing MBP isoforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozgen, Hande; Kahya, Nicoletta; de Jonge, Jenny C.; Smith, Graham S. T.; Harauz, George; Hoekstra, Dick; Baron, Wia

    2014-01-01

    The only known structural protein required for formation of myelin, produced by oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system, is myelin basic protein (MBP). This peripheral membrane protein has different developmentally-regulated isoforms, generated by alternative splicing. The isoforms are target

  5. Isolation and characterization of patatin isoforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pots, A.M.; Gruppen, H.; Hessing, M.; Boekel, M.A.J.S. van; Voragen, A.G.J.

    1999-01-01

    Patatin has, so far, been considered a homogeneous group of proteins. A comparison of the isoforms in terms of structural properties or stability has not been reported. A method to obtain various isoform fractions as well as a comparison of the physicochemical properties of these pools is presented.

  6. Diversification and coevolution in brood pollination mutualisms: Windows into the role of biotic interactions in generating biological diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hembry, David H; Althoff, David M

    2016-10-01

    Brood pollination mutualisms-interactions in which specialized insects are both the pollinators (as adults) and seed predators (as larvae) of their host plants-have been influential study systems for coevolutionary biology. These mutualisms include those between figs and fig wasps, yuccas and yucca moths, leafflowers and leafflower moths, globeflowers and globeflower flies, Silene plants and Hadena and Perizoma moths, saxifrages and Greya moths, and senita cacti and senita moths. The high reciprocal diversity and species-specificity of some of these mutualisms have been cited as evidence that coevolution between plants and pollinators drives their mutual diversification. However, the mechanisms by which these mutualisms diversify have received less attention. In this paper, we review key hypotheses about how these mutualisms diversify and what role coevolution between plants and pollinators may play in this process. We find that most species-rich brood pollination mutualisms show significant phylogenetic congruence at high taxonomic scales, but there is limited evidence for the processes of both cospeciation and duplication, and there are no unambiguous examples known of strict-sense contemporaneous cospeciation. Allopatric speciation appears important across multiple systems, particularly in the insects. Host-shifts appear to be common, and widespread host-shifts by pollinators may displace other pollinator lineages. There is relatively little evidence for a "coevolution through cospeciation" model or that coevolution promotes speciation in these systems. Although we have made great progress in understanding the mechanisms by which brood pollination mutualisms diversify, many opportunities remain to use these intriguing symbioses to understand the role of biotic interactions in generating biological diversity. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  7. Channel properties of the splicing isoforms of the olfactory calcium-activated chloride channel Anoctamin 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponissery Saidu, Samsudeen; Stephan, Aaron B; Talaga, Anna K; Zhao, Haiqing; Reisert, Johannes

    2013-06-01

    Anoctamin (ANO)2 (or TMEM16B) forms a cell membrane Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel that is present in cilia of olfactory receptor neurons, vomeronasal microvilli, and photoreceptor synaptic terminals. Alternative splicing of Ano2 transcripts generates multiple variants with the olfactory variants skipping exon 14 and having alternative splicing of exon 4. In the present study, 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends analysis was conducted to characterize the 5' end of olfactory Ano2 transcripts, which showed that the most abundant Ano2 transcripts in the olfactory epithelium contain a novel starting exon that encodes a translation initiation site, whereas transcripts of the publically available sequence variant, which has an alternative and longer 5' end, were present in lower abundance. With two alternative starting exons and alternative splicing of exon 4, four olfactory ANO2 isoforms are thus possible. Patch-clamp experiments in transfected HEK293T cells expressing these isoforms showed that N-terminal sequences affect Ca(2+) sensitivity and that the exon 4-encoded sequence is required to form functional channels. Coexpression of the two predominant isoforms, one with and one without the exon 4 sequence, as well as coexpression of the two rarer isoforms showed alterations in channel properties, indicating that different isoforms interact with each other. Furthermore, channel properties observed from the coexpression of the predominant isoforms better recapitulated the native channel properties, suggesting that the native channel may be composed of two or more splicing isoforms acting as subunits that together shape the channel properties.

  8. Differential subcellular distribution of four phospholipase C isoforms and secretion of GPI-PLC activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudt, Emanuel; Ramasamy, Pathmanaban; Plattner, Helmut; Simon, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) is an important enzyme of signal transduction pathways by generation of second messengers from membrane lipids. PLCs are also indicated to cleave glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchors of surface proteins thus releasing these into the environment. However, it remains unknown whether this enzymatic activity on the surface is due to distinct PLC isoforms in higher eukaryotes. Ciliates have, in contrast to other unicellular eukaryotes, multiple PLC isoforms as mammals do. Thus, Paramecium represents a perfect model to study subcellular distribution and potential surface activity of PLC isoforms. We have identified distinct subcellular localizations of four PLC isoforms indicating functional specialization. The association with different calcium release channels (CRCs) argues for distinct subcellular functions. They may serve as PI-PLCs in microdomains for local second messenger responses rather than free floating IP3. In addition, all isoforms can be found on the cell surface and they are found together with GPI-cleaved surface proteins in salt/ethanol washes of cells. We can moreover show them in medium supernatants of living cells where they have access to GPI-anchored surface proteins. Among the isoforms we cannot assign GPI-PLC activity to specific PLC isoforms; rather each PLC is potentially responsible for the release of GPI-anchored proteins from the surface. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Robust algorithm to generate a diverse class of dense disordered and ordered sphere packings via linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torquato, S; Jiao, Y

    2010-12-01

    We have formulated the problem of generating dense packings of nonoverlapping, nontiling nonspherical particles within an adaptive fundamental cell subject to periodic boundary conditions as an optimization problem called the adaptive-shrinking cell (ASC) formulation [S. Torquato and Y. Jiao, Phys. Rev. E 80, 041104 (2009)]. Because the objective function and impenetrability constraints can be exactly linearized for sphere packings with a size distribution in d-dimensional Euclidean space R(d), it is most suitable and natural to solve the corresponding ASC optimization problem using sequential-linear-programming (SLP) techniques. We implement an SLP solution to produce robustly a wide spectrum of jammed sphere packings in R(d) for d=2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 with a diversity of disorder and densities up to the respective maximal densities. A novel feature of this deterministic algorithm is that it can produce a broad range of inherent structures (locally maximally dense and mechanically stable packings), besides the usual disordered ones (such as the maximally random jammed state), with very small computational cost compared to that of the best known packing algorithms by tuning the radius of the influence sphere. For example, in three dimensions, we show that it can produce with high probability a variety of strictly jammed packings with a packing density anywhere in the wide range [0.6, 0.7408...], where π/√18 = 0.7408... corresponds to the density of the densest packing. We also apply the algorithm to generate various disordered packings as well as the maximally dense packings for d=2, 4, 5, and 6. Our jammed sphere packings are characterized and compared to the corresponding packings generated by the well-known Lubachevsky-Stillinger (LS) molecular-dynamics packing algorithm. Compared to the LS procedure, our SLP protocol is able to ensure that the final packings are truly jammed, produces disordered jammed packings with anomalously low densities, and is appreciably

  10. Disulfide isoforms of recombinant glia maturation factor beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaheer, A; Lim, R

    1990-09-14

    Recombinant human glia maturation factor beta (r-hGMF-beta) is a single-chain polypeptide (141 amino acid residues) containing three cysteines, at positions 7, 86 and 95. Nascent r-hGMF-beta exists in the reduced state and has no biological activity. The protein can be activated through oxidative refolding by incubation with a mixture of reduced and oxidized glutathione. Reverse-phase HPLC analysis of the refolded r-hGMF-beta shows the presence of four peaks, corresponding to the reduced form plus three newly generated intrachain disulfide-containing isoforms predicted from the number of cysteine residues. Only one isoform shows biological activity when tested for growth suppression on C6 glioma cells. We infer from the HPLC elution pattern that the active form contains the disulfide bridge Cys86-Cys95.

  11. Genomic organization and the tissue distribution of alternatively spliced isoforms of the mouse Spatial gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattei Marie-Geneviève

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The stromal component of the thymic microenvironment is critical for T lymphocyte generation. Thymocyte differentiation involves a cascade of coordinated stromal genes controlling thymocyte survival, lineage commitment and selection. The "Stromal Protein Associated with Thymii And Lymph-node" (Spatial gene encodes a putative transcription factor which may be involved in T-cell development. In the testis, the Spatial gene is also expressed by round spermatids during spermatogenesis. Results The Spatial gene maps to the B3-B4 region of murine chromosome 10 corresponding to the human syntenic region 10q22.1. The mouse Spatial genomic DNA is organised into 10 exons and is alternatively spliced to generate two short isoforms (Spatial-α and -γ and two other long isoforms (Spatial-δ and -ε comprising 5 additional exons on the 3' site. Here, we report the cloning of a new short isoform, Spatial-β, which differs from other isoforms by an additional alternative exon of 69 bases. This new exon encodes an interesting proline-rich signature that could confer to the 34 kDa Spatial-β protein a particular function. By quantitative TaqMan RT-PCR, we have shown that the short isoforms are highly expressed in the thymus while the long isoforms are highly expressed in the testis. We further examined the inter-species conservation of Spatial between several mammals and identified that the protein which is rich in proline and positive amino acids, is highly conserved. Conclusions The Spatial gene generates at least five alternative spliced variants: three short isoforms (Spatial-α, -β and -γ highly expressed in the thymus and two long isoforms (Spatial-δ and -ε highly expressed in the testis. These alternative spliced variants could have a tissue specific function.

  12. Molecular cloning and characterization of six novel isoforms of human Bim, a member of the proapoptotic Bcl-2 family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    U, M; Miyashita, T; Shikama, Y; Tadokoro, K; Yamada, M

    2001-11-30

    Bim protein is one of the BH3-only proteins, members of the Bcl-2 family that have only one of the Bcl-2 homology regions, BH3. BH3-only proteins are essential initiators of apoptotic cell death. Thus far, three isoforms of Bim have been reported, i.e. Bim(EL), Bim(L) and Bim(S). Here we report the cloning and characterization of six novel isoforms of human Bim, designated as Bimalpha1, alpha2, and beta1-beta4, which are generated by alternative splicing. Unlike the three known isoforms, none of these novel isoforms contained a C-terminal hydrophobic region. Among the novel isoforms, only Bimalpha1 and alpha2 contained a BH3 domain and were proapoptotic, although less potent than the classical isoforms. These two isoforms localized, at least in part, in mitochondria when transiently expressed in HeLa cells as a green fluorescent protein-fused form. These results suggest that the BH3 domain is necessary for induction of apoptosis and mitochondrial localization but not sufficient for the full proapoptotic activity. While the classical isoforms were always predominantly expressed in transformed cells, expression profiles of bim isoforms were highly variable among normal tissues at least in humans, suggesting a tissue-specific transcriptional regulation of bim.

  13. Detection of VEGF-A(xxx)b isoforms in human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, David O; Mavrou, Athina; Qiu, Yan; Carter, James G; Hamdollah-Zadeh, Maryam; Barratt, Shaney; Gammons, Melissa V; Millar, Ann B; Salmon, Andrew H J; Oltean, Sebastian; Harper, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A (VEGF-A) can be generated as multiple isoforms by alternative splicing. Two families of isoforms have been described in humans, pro-angiogenic isoforms typified by VEGF-A165a, and anti-angiogenic isoforms typified by VEGF-A165b. The practical determination of expression levels of alternative isoforms of the same gene may be complicated by experimental protocols that favour one isoform over another, and the use of specific positive and negative controls is essential for the interpretation of findings on expression of the isoforms. Here we address some of the difficulties in experimental design when investigating alternative splicing of VEGF isoforms, and discuss the use of appropriate control paradigms. We demonstrate why use of specific control experiments can prevent assumptions that VEGF-A165b is not present, when in fact it is. We reiterate, and confirm previously published experimental design protocols that demonstrate the importance of using positive controls. These include using known target sequences to show that the experimental conditions are suitable for PCR amplification of VEGF-A165b mRNA for both q-PCR and RT-PCR and to ensure that mispriming does not occur. We also provide evidence that demonstrates that detection of VEGF-A165b protein in mice needs to be tightly controlled to prevent detection of mouse IgG by a secondary antibody. We also show that human VEGF165b protein can be immunoprecipitated from cultured human cells and that immunoprecipitating VEGF-A results in protein that is detected by VEGF-A165b antibody. These findings support the conclusion that more information on the biology of VEGF-A165b isoforms is required, and confirm the importance of the experimental design in such investigations, including the use of specific positive and negative controls.

  14. Assessing Symbiodinium diversity in scleractinian corals via next-generation sequencing-based genotyping of the ITS2 rDNA region

    KAUST Repository

    Arif, Chatchanit

    2014-09-01

    The persistence of coral reef ecosystems relies on the symbiotic relationship between scleractinian corals and intracellular, photosynthetic dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium. Genetic evidence indicates that these symbionts are biologically diverse and exhibit discrete patterns of environmental and host distribution. This makes the assessment of Symbiodinium diversity critical to understanding the symbiosis ecology of corals. Here, we applied pyrosequencing to the elucidation of Symbiodinium diversity via analysis of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region, a multicopy genetic marker commonly used to analyse Symbiodinium diversity. Replicated data generated from isoclonal Symbiodinium cultures showed that all genomes contained numerous, yet mostly rare, ITS2 sequence variants. Pyrosequencing data were consistent with more traditional denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) approaches to the screening of ITS2 PCR amplifications, where the most common sequences appeared as the most intense bands. Further, we developed an operational taxonomic unit (OTU)-based pipeline for Symbiodinium ITS2 diversity typing to provisionally resolve ecologically discrete entities from intragenomic variation. A genetic distance cut-off of 0.03 collapsed intragenomic ITS2 variants of isoclonal cultures into single OTUs. When applied to the analysis of field-collected coral samples, our analyses confirm that much of the commonly observed Symbiodinium ITS2 diversity can be attributed to intragenomic variation. We conclude that by analysing Symbiodinium populations in an OTU-based framework, we can improve objectivity, comparability and simplicity when assessing ITS2 diversity in field-based studies.

  15. Oxygenation properties and isoform diversity of snake hemoglobins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storz, Jay F.; Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Moriyama, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    platura (Elapidae). We analyzed allosteric properties of snake Hbs in terms of the Monod-Wyman-Changeux model and Adair four-step thermodynamic model. Hbs from each of the three species exhibited high intrinsic O2 affinities, low cooperativities, small Bohr factors in the absence of phosphates, and high...

  16. FSH isoform pattern in classic galactosemia

    OpenAIRE

    Gubbels, C.S.; Thomas, C. M.; Wodzig, K.W.H.; Olthaar, A. J.; Jaeken, J.; Sweep, F.C.; Rubio-Gozalbo, M.E.

    2010-01-01

    Female classic galactosemia patients suffer from primary ovarian insufficiency (POI). The cause for this long-term complication is not fully understood. One of the proposed mechanisms is that hypoglycosylation of complex molecules, a known secondary phenomenon of galactosemia, leads to FSH dysfunction. An earlier study showed less acidic isoforms of FSH in serum samples of two classic galactosemia patients compared to controls, indicating hypoglycosylation. In this study, FSH isoform patterns...

  17. Sample displacement chromatography of plasmid DNA isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Černigoj, Urh; Martinuč, Urška; Cardoso, Sara; Sekirnik, Rok; Krajnc, Nika Lendero; Štrancar, Aleš

    2015-10-02

    Sample displacement chromatography (SDC) is a chromatographic technique that utilises different relative binding affinities of components in a sample mixture and has been widely studied in the context of peptide and protein purification. Here, we report a use of SDC to separate plasmid DNA (pDNA) isoforms under overloading conditions, where supercoiled (sc) isoform acts as a displacer of open circular (oc) or linear isoform. Since displacement is more efficient when mass transfer between stationary and mobile chromatographic phases is not limited by diffusion, we investigated convective interaction media (CIM) monoliths as stationary phases for pDNA isoform separation. CIM monoliths with different hydrophobicities and thus different binding affinities for pDNA (CIM C4 HLD, CIM-histamine and CIM-pyridine) were tested under hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) conditions. SD efficiency for pDNA isoform separation was shown to be dependent on column selectivity for individual isoform, column efficiency and on ammonium sulfate (AS) concentration in loading buffer (binding strength). SD and negative mode elution often operate in parallel, therefore negative mode elution additionally influences the efficiency of the overall purification process. Optimisation of chromatographic conditions achieved 98% sc pDNA homogeneity and a dynamic binding capacity of over 1mg/mL at a relatively low concentration of AS. SDC was successfully implemented for the enrichment of sc pDNA for plasmid vectors of different sizes, and for separation of linear and and sc isoforms, independently of oc:sc isoform ratio, and flow-rate used. This study therefore identifies SDC as a promising new approach to large-scale pDNA purification, which is compatible with continuous, multicolumn chromatography systems, and could therefore be used to increase productivity of pDNA production in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The endogenous anti-angiogenic VEGF isoform, VEGF165b inhibits human tumour growth in mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rennel, E.; Waine, E.; Guan, H.; Schuler, Y.; Leenders, W.P.J.; Woolard, J.; Sugiono, M.; Gillatt, D.; Kleinerman, E.; Bates, D.; Harper, S.

    2008-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor-A is widely regarded as the principal stimulator of angiogenesis required for tumour growth. VEGF is generated as multiple isoforms of two families, the pro-angiogenic family generated by proximal splice site selection in the terminal exon, termed VEGFxxx, and the

  19. From "junk" to gene: curriculum vitae of a primate receptor isoform gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Silke S; Männel, Daniela N; Hehlgans, Thomas; Brosius, Jürgen; Schmitz, Jürgen

    2004-08-20

    Exonization of Alu retroposons awakens public opinion, particularly when causing genetic diseases. However, often neglected, alternative "Alu-exons" also carry the potential to greatly enhance genetic diversity by increasing the transcriptome of primates chiefly via alternative splicing.Here, we report a 5' exon generated from one of the two alternative transcripts in human tumor necrosis factor receptor gene type 2 (p75TNFR) that contains an ancient Alu-SINE, which provides an alternative N-terminal protein-coding domain. We follow the primate evolution over the past 63 million years to reconstruct the key events that gave rise to a novel receptor isoform. The Alu integration and start codon formation occurred between 58 and 40 million years ago (MYA) in the common ancestor of anthropoid primates. Yet a functional gene product could not be generated until a novel splice site and an open reading frame were introduced between 40 and 25 MYA on the catarrhine lineage (Old World monkeys including apes).

  20. Divergent roles for thyroid hormone receptor β isoforms in the endocrine axis and auditory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, E. Dale; Boers, Mary-Ellen; Pazos-Moura, Carmen; Moura, Egberto; Kaulbach, Helen; Zakaria, Marjorie; Lowell, Bradford; Radovick, Sally; Liberman, M. Charles; Wondisford, Fredric

    1999-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) modulate various physiological functions in many organ systems. The TRα and TRβ isoforms are products of 2 distinct genes, and the β1 and β2 isoforms are splice variants of the same gene. Whereas TRα1 and TRβ1 are widely expressed, expression of the TRβ2 isoform is mainly limited to the pituitary, triiodothyronine-responsive TRH neurons, the developing inner ear, and the retina. Mice with targeted disruption of the entire TRβ locus (TRβ-null) exhibit elevated thyroid hormone levels as a result of abnormal central regulation of thyrotropin, and also develop profound hearing loss. To clarify the contribution of the TRβ2 isoform to the function of the endocrine and auditory systems in vivo, we have generated mice with targeted disruption of the TRβ2 isoform. TRβ2-null mice have preserved expression of the TRα and TRβ1 isoforms. They develop a similar degree of central resistance to thyroid hormone as TRβ-null mice, indicating the important role of TRβ2 in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. Growth hormone gene expression is marginally reduced. In contrast, TRβ2-null mice exhibit no evidence of hearing impairment, indicating that TRβ1 and TRβ2 subserve divergent roles in the regulation of auditory function. PMID:10430610

  1. Modulation of estrogen receptor-beta isoforms by phytoestrogens in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelletti, Vera; Miodini, Patrizia; Di Fronzo, Giovanni; Daidone, Maria Grazia

    2006-05-01

    High consumption of phytoestrogen-rich food correlates with reduced incidence of breast cancer. However, the effect of phytoestrogens on growth of pre-existing breast tumors presents concerns when planning the use of phytoestrogens as chemoprevention st rategy. Genistein, the active phytoestrogen in soy, displays weak estrogenic activity mediated by estrogen receptor (ER) with a preferential binding for the ER-beta species. However, no information is at present available on the interaction between phytoestrogens and the various isoforms generated by alternative splicing. In two human breast cancer cell lines, T47D and BT20, which express variable levels of ER-beta, the effect of genistein and quercetin was evaluated singly and in comparison with 17beta-estradiol, on mRNA expression of estrogen receptor-beta (ER-beta) isoforms evaluated by a triple primer RT-PCR assay. In T47D cells estradiol caused a 6-fold up-regulation of total ER-beta, and modified the relative expression pattern of the various isoforms, up-regulating the beta2 and down-regulating the beta5 isoform. Genistein up-regulated ER-beta2 and ER-beta1 in T47D cells, and after treatment the ER-beta2 isoform became prevalent, while in BT20 cells it almost doubled the percent contribution of ER-beta1 and ER-beta2 to total ER-beta. Quercetin did not alter the total levels nor the percent distribution of ER-beta isoforms in either cell line. Genistein, through the modulation of ER-beta isoform RNA expression inhibited estrogen-promoted cell growth, without interfering on estrogen-regulated transcription. ER-beta and its ER-beta mRNA isoforms may be involved in a self-limiting mechanism of estrogenic stimulation promoted either by the natural hormone or by weaker estrogen agonists like genistein.

  2. RNA-Sequencing data supports the existence of novel VEGFA splicing events but not of VEGFAxxxb isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgett, Stephen; Dellett, Margaret; Simpson, David A

    2017-12-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGFA), a pivotal regulator of angiogenesis and valuable therapeutic target, is characterised by alternative splicing which generates three principal isoforms, VEGFA121, VEGFA165 and VEGFA189. A second set of anti-angiogenic isoforms termed VEGFAxxxb that utilise an alternative splice site in the final exon have been widely reported, with mRNA detection based principally upon RT-PCR assays. We sought confirmation of the existence of the VEGFAxxxb isoforms within the abundant RNA sequencing data available publicly. Whilst sequences derived specifically from each of the canonical VEGFA isoforms were present in many tissues, there were no sequences derived from VEGFAxxxb isoforms. Sequencing of approximately 50,000 RT-PCR products spanning the exon 7-8 junction in 10 tissues did not identify any VEGFAxxxb transcripts. The absence or extremely low expression of these transcripts in vivo indicates that VEGFAxxxb isoforms are unlikely to play a role in normal physiology. Our analyses also revealed multiple novel splicing events supported by more reads than previously reported for VEGFA145 and VEGFA148 isoforms, including three from novel first exons consistent with existing transcription start site data. These novel VEGFA isoforms may play significant roles in specific cell types.

  3. Differential CARM1 Isoform Expression in Subcellular Compartments and among Malignant and Benign Breast Tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Shlensky

    Full Text Available Coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1 is a coactivator for ERα and cancer-relevant transcription factors, and can methylate diverse cellular targets including histones. CARM1 is expressed in one of two alternative splice isoforms, full-length CARM1 (CARM1FL and truncated CARM1 (CARM1ΔE15. CARM1FL and CARM1ΔE15 function differently in transcriptional regulation, protein methylation, and mediation of pre-mRNA splicing in cellular models.To investigate the functional roles and the prognosis potential of CARM1 alternative spliced isoforms in breast cancer, we used recently developed antibodies to detect differential CARM1 isoform expression in subcellular compartments and among malignant and benign breast tumors.Immunofluorescence in MDA-MB-231 and BG-1 cell lines demonstrated that CARM1ΔE15 is the dominant isoform expressed in the cytoplasm, and CARM1FL is more nuclear localized. CARM1ΔE15 was found to be more sensitive to Hsp90 inhibition than CARM1FL, indicating that the truncated isoform may be the oncogenic form. Clinical cancer samples did not have significantly higher expression of CARM1FL or CARM1ΔE15 than benign breast samples at the level of mRNA or histology. Furthermore neither CARM1FL nor CARM1ΔE15 expression correlated with breast cancer molecular subtypes, tumor size, or lymph node involvement.The analysis presented here lends new insights into the possible oncogenic role of CARM1ΔE15. This study also demonstrates no obvious association of CARM1 isoform expression and clinical correlates in breast cancer. Recent studies, however, have shown that CARM1 expression correlates with poor prognosis, indicating a need for further studies of both CARM1 isoforms in a large cohort of breast cancer specimens.

  4. Enhanced expression of two discrete isoforms of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in experimental and human diabetic nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sun Sik; Lee, Min Young; Rhee, Harin; Kim, Il Young; Seong, Eun Young; Lee, Dong Won; Lee, Soo Bong; Kwak, Ihm Soo; Lovett, David H.

    2017-01-01

    Background We recently reported on the enhanced expression of two isoforms of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) in human renal transplantation delayed graft function. These consist of the conventional secreted, full length MMP-2 isoform (FL-MMP-2) and a novel intracellular N-Terminal Truncated isoform (NTT-MMP-2) generated by oxidative stress-mediated activation of an alternate promoter in the MMP-2 first intron. Here we evaluated the effect of hyperglycemia and diabetes mellitus on the in vitro and in vivo expression of the two MMP-2 isoforms. Methods We quantified the abundance of the FL-MMP-2 and NTT-MMP-2 transcripts by qPCR in HK2 cells cultured in high glucose or 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal (HHE) and tested the effects of the NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC). The streptozotocin (STZ) murine model of Type I diabetes mellitus and renal biopsies of human diabetic nephropathy were used in this study. Results Both isoforms of MMP-2 in HK2 cells were upregulated by culture in high glucose or with HHE. PDTC treatment did not suppress high glucose-mediated FL-MMP-2 expression but potently inhibited NTT-MMP-2 expression. With STZ-treated mice, renal cortical expression of both isoforms was increased (FL-MMP-2, 1.8-fold; NTT-MMP-2, greater than 7-fold). Isoform-specific immunohistochemical staining revealed low, but detectable levels of the FL-MMP-2 isoform in controls, while NTT-MMP-2 was not detected. While there was a modest increase in tubular epithelial cell staining for FL-MMP-2 in STZ-treated mice, NTT-MMP-2 was intensely expressed in a basolateral pattern. FL-MMP-2 and NTT-MMP-2 isoform expression as quantified by qPCR were both significantly elevated in renal biopsies of human diabetic nephropathy (12-fold and 3-fold, respectively). Conclusions The expression of both isoforms of MMP-2 was enhanced in an experimental model of diabetic nephropathy and in human diabetic nephropathy. Selective MMP-2 isoform inhibition could offer a novel approach for

  5. Generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession.

  6. Antiangiogenic VEGF Isoform in Inflammatory Myopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nila Volpi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF antiangiogenic isoform A-165b on human muscle in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM and to compare distribution of angiogenic/antiangiogenic VEGFs, as isoforms shifts are described in other autoimmune disorders. Subjects and Methods. We analyzed VEGF-A165b and VEGF-A by western blot and immunohistochemistry on skeletal muscle biopsies from 21 patients affected with IIM (polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and inclusion body myositis and 6 control muscle samples. TGF-β, a prominent VEGF inductor, was analogously evaluated. Intergroup differences of western blot bands density were statistically examined. Endomysial vascularization, inflammatory score, and muscle regeneration, as pathological parameters of IIM, were quantitatively determined and their levels were confronted with VEGF expression. Results. VEGF-A165b was significantly upregulated in IIM, as well as TGF-β. VEGF-A was diffusely expressed on unaffected myofibers, whereas regenerating/atrophic myofibres strongly reacted for both VEGF-A isoforms. Most inflammatory cells and endomysial vessels expressed both isoforms. VEGF-A165b levels were in positive correlation to inflammatory score, endomysial vascularization, and TGF-β. Conclusions. Our findings indicate skeletal muscle expression of antiangiogenic VEGF-A165b and preferential upregulation in IIM, suggesting that modulation of VEGF-A isoforms may occur in myositides.

  7. An embryonic myosin isoform enables stretch activation and cyclical power in Drosophila jump muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Cuiping; Swank, Douglas M

    2013-06-18

    The mechanism behind stretch activation (SA), a mechanical property that increases muscle force and oscillatory power generation, is not known. We used Drosophila transgenic techniques and our new muscle preparation, the jump muscle, to determine if myosin heavy chain isoforms influence the magnitude and rate of SA force generation. We found that Drosophila jump muscles show very low SA force and cannot produce positive power under oscillatory conditions at pCa 5.0. However, we transformed the jump muscle to be moderately stretch-activatable by replacing its myosin isoform with an embryonic isoform (EMB). Expressing EMB, jump muscle SA force increased by 163% and it generated net positive power. The rate of SA force development decreased by 58% with EMB expression. Power generation is Pi dependent as >4 mM Pi was required for positive power from EMB. Pi increased EMB SA force, but not wild-type SA force. Our data suggest that when muscle expressing EMB is stretched, EMB is more easily driven backward to a weakly bound state than wild-type jump muscle. This increases the number of myosin heads available to rapidly bind to actin and contribute to SA force generation. We conclude that myosin heavy chain isoforms influence both SA kinetics and SA force, which can determine if a muscle is capable of generating oscillatory power at a fixed calcium concentration. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Extraction of transcript diversity from scientific literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parantu K Shah

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcript diversity generated by alternative splicing and associated mechanisms contributes heavily to the functional complexity of biological systems. The numerous examples of the mechanisms and functional implications of these events are scattered throughout the scientific literature. Thus, it is crucial to have a tool that can automatically extract the relevant facts and collect them in a knowledge base that can aid the interpretation of data from high-throughput methods. We have developed and applied a composite text-mining method for extracting information on transcript diversity from the entire MEDLINE database in order to create a database of genes with alternative transcripts. It contains information on tissue specificity, number of isoforms, causative mechanisms, functional implications, and experimental methods used for detection. We have mined this resource to identify 959 instances of tissue-specific splicing. Our results in combination with those from EST-based methods suggest that alternative splicing is the preferred mechanism for generating transcript diversity in the nervous system. We provide new annotations for 1,860 genes with the potential for generating transcript diversity. We assign the MeSH term "alternative splicing" to 1,536 additional abstracts in the MEDLINE database and suggest new MeSH terms for other events. We have successfully extracted information about transcript diversity and semiautomatically generated a database, LSAT, that can provide a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms behind tissue-specific gene expression. LSAT (Literature Support for Alternative Transcripts is publicly available at http://www.bork.embl.de/LSAT/.

  9. Beyond generational differences: a literature review of the impact of relational diversity on nurses' attitudes and work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Angela C; Ratner, Pamela A; Robinson, Sandra L; Oliffe, John L; Hall, Linda McGillis

    2010-11-01

    Based on a review of the empirical literature, we examine the influence of selected diversity attributes on nurses' work-related attitudes and behaviour. The nursing workforce has become increasingly heterogeneous in its age, educational attainment, and ethnicity/race distributions. There is considerable speculation, in the literature, that the work values of recent nursing graduates are discordant with more experienced nurses. A review of studies published between 1980 and 2009 in nursing, healthcare, psychology, and organizational behaviour led to the inclusion of 19 peer-reviewed research articles, from which our analyses are drawn. The findings indicate that age diversity leads to negative behaviour toward others in the workgroup (e.g. poor collegial relationships) whereas perceived work-values diversity is negatively associated with individuals' own attitudes and behaviour toward their work as well as toward other members of their workgroup. There is inconclusive evidence about the attributes that most significantly influence nurses' attitudes and work; however, preliminary evidence supports the salience of work values. Irrespective of the actual diversity within workgroups, how nurses see one another can have a significant impact on members of their workgroups and their functioning. Broader conceptualizations of diversity are necessary. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Mammalian SEPT9 isoforms direct microtubule-dependent arrangements of septin core heteromers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellin, Mikael E; Stenmark, Sonja; Gullberg, Martin

    2012-11-01

    Septin-family proteins assemble into rod-shaped heteromeric complexes that form higher-order arrangements at the cell cortex, where they serve apparently conserved functions as diffusion barriers and molecular scaffolds. There are 13 confirmed septin paralogues in mammals, which may be ubiquitous or tissue specific. Septin hetero-oligomerization appears homology subgroup directed, which in turn determines the subunit arrangement of six- to eight-subunit core heteromers. Here we address functional properties of human SEPT9, which, due to variable mRNA splicing, exists as multiple isoforms that differ between tissues. Myeloid K562 cells express three SEPT9 isoforms, all of which have an equal propensity to hetero-oligomerize with SEPT7-containing hexamers to generate octameric heteromers. However, due to limiting amounts of SEPT9, K562 cells contain both hexameric and octameric heteromers. To generate cell lines with controllable hexamer-to-octamer ratios and that express single SEPT9 isoforms, we developed a gene product replacement strategy. By this means we identified SEPT9 isoform-specific properties that either facilitate septin heteromer polymerization along microtubules or modulate the size range of submembranous septin disks-a prevalent septin structure in nonadhered cells. Our findings show that the SEPT9 expression level directs the hexamer-to-octamer ratio, and that the isoform composition and expression level together determine higher-order arrangements of septins.

  11. Altered α-synuclein, parkin, and synphilin isoform levels in multiple system atrophy brains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brudek, Tomasz; Winge, Kristian; Rasmussen, Nadja Bredo

    2016-01-01

    Together with Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a member of a diverse group of neurodegenerative disorders termed α-synucleinopathies. Previously, it has been shown that α-synuclein, parkin, and synphilin-1 display disease-specific transcript......Together with Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a member of a diverse group of neurodegenerative disorders termed α-synucleinopathies. Previously, it has been shown that α-synuclein, parkin, and synphilin-1 display disease......-specific transcription patterns in frontal cortex in PD, dementia with Lewy bodies, and MSA, and thus may mediate the development of α-synucleinopathies. In this study, the differential expression of α-synuclein isoforms on transcriptional and translational levels was ascertained in MSA patients in comparison with PD...... for parkin and synphilin-1 isoforms. In MSA brains, α-synuclein140 and α-synuclein 112 isoform levels were significantly increased, whereas levels of the α-synuclein 126 isoform were decreased in the substantia nigra, striatum, cerebellar cortex, and nucleus dentatus versus controls. Moreover, in MSA cases...

  12. Deepening Understanding of Prior Knowledge: What Diverse First-Generation College Students in the U.S. Can Teach Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Montoya, Milagros

    2017-01-01

    Educational research indicates that teachers revealing and utilizing students' prior knowledge supports students' academic learning. Yet, the variation in students' prior knowledge is not fully known. To better understand students' prior knowledge, I drew on sociocultural learning theories to examine racially and ethnically diverse college…

  13. New isoforms of rat Aquaporin-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moe, Svein Erik; Sorbo, Jan Gunnar; Søgaard, Rikke;

    2008-01-01

    an intracellular localization when expressed in cell lines and do not transport water when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. In contrast, the largest of the new isoforms, AQP4e, which contains a novel N-terminal domain, is localized at the plasma membrane in cell lines and functions as a water transporter in Xenopus...

  14. p53 isoforms change p53 paradigm

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Although p53 defines cellular responses to cancer treatment it is not clear how p53 can be used to control cell fate outcome. Data demonstrate that so-called p53 does not exist as a single protein, but is in fact a group of p53 protein isoforms whose expression can be manipulated to control the cellular response to treatment.

  15. Absolute quantitation of protein posttranslational modification isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhu; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied in characterization and quantification of proteins from complex biological samples. Because the numbers of absolute amounts of proteins are needed in construction of mathematical models for molecular systems of various biological phenotypes and phenomena, a number of quantitative proteomic methods have been adopted to measure absolute quantities of proteins using mass spectrometry. The liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) coupled with internal peptide standards, i.e., the stable isotope-coded peptide dilution series, which was originated from the field of analytical chemistry, becomes a widely applied method in absolute quantitative proteomics research. This approach provides more and more absolute protein quantitation results of high confidence. As quantitative study of posttranslational modification (PTM) that modulates the biological activity of proteins is crucial for biological science and each isoform may contribute a unique biological function, degradation, and/or subcellular location, the absolute quantitation of protein PTM isoforms has become more relevant to its biological significance. In order to obtain the absolute cellular amount of a PTM isoform of a protein accurately, impacts of protein fractionation, protein enrichment, and proteolytic digestion yield should be taken into consideration and those effects before differentially stable isotope-coded PTM peptide standards are spiked into sample peptides have to be corrected. Assisted with stable isotope-labeled peptide standards, the absolute quantitation of isoforms of posttranslationally modified protein (AQUIP) method takes all these factors into account and determines the absolute amount of a protein PTM isoform from the absolute amount of the protein of interest and the PTM occupancy at the site of the protein. The absolute amount of the protein of interest is inferred by quantifying both the absolute amounts of a few PTM

  16. Integrated, Marginal, and Resilient: Race, Class, and the Diverse Experiences of White First-Generation College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuber, Jenny Marie

    2011-01-01

    While first-generation college students are "at risk", the majority "do" persist. Using in-depth interviews with 28 white college students I ask: How do white, first-generation, working-class students understand their college experiences, especially in terms of their academic, social, and cultural adjustment? Moreover, what kinds of factors seem…

  17. Apolipoprotein (A) Isoform Distribution and Plasma Lipoprotein (a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Apolipoprotein (A) Isoform Distribution and Plasma Lipoprotein (a) Levels In Nigerian Subjects With and Without Coronary Heart Disease. ... Plasma lipoprotein (a) Concentrations and apo(a) isoforms were determined in 101 ... Article Metrics.

  18. Identification of an alternative splicing isoform of chicken Lmbr1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanqun; Chen, Wen; Li, Ning; Deng, Xuemei; Kang, Xiangtao; Liu, Xiaojun

    2011-10-01

    Lmbr1 is the key candidate gene for limb development. Until now, at least five and four alternative splicing isoforms of Lmbr1 gene have been found in human and mouse, respectively. However, only two alternative splicing isoforms of this homologous gene have been reported in chicken. In the present study, one novel chicken Lmbr1 transcript variant (designated Lmbr1-1) was identified by 5' RACE and RT-PCR. Chicken Lmbr1-1 possesses one novel transcription start site different from Lmbr1-N, and was predicted to encode one 192 amino acid protein with length variation in comparison with chicken LMBR1-N protein, which was produced by 5' spliced site variation of chicken Lmbr1-N exon 10. Comparing with Lmbr1-N transcript, chicken Lmbr1-1 exhibited restricted tissue distribution of the expression. Comparative sequence analysis revealed a highly conservative intron element between chicken and mammalians from the intron 9 of chicken Lmbr1-N, indicating their possible importance as intronic elements in the regulation of alternative splicing of Lmbr1 in vertebrates. By direct PCR sequencing the exon 10 and its flanking sequences in chicken Lmbr1-N, four variation sites/haplotypes were identified from six chicken breeds. One 797A/G nonsynonymous mutation (266Arg/Gln) locating in exon 10 of chicken Lmbr1-N was predicted to affect the exon splice enhancer motif for serine/arginine-rich protein recognition. These data demonstrated that chicken Lmbr1 was alternatively spliced to generate multiple splice forms, as was the case in mammals and each of the alternative splicing isoforms might function differentially.

  19. Rapid Mutation of Spirulina platensis by a New Mutagenesis System of Atmospheric and Room Temperature Plasmas (ARTP) and Generation of a Mutant Library with Diverse Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chong; Tan, Yinyee; Jiang, Peixia; Ge, Nan; Heping Li; Xing, Xinhui

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we aimed to improve the carbohydrate productivity of Spirulina platensis by generating mutants with increased carbohydrate content and growth rate. ARTP was used as a new mutagenesis tool to generate a mutant library of S. platensis with diverse phenotypes. Protocol for rapid mutation of S. platensis by 60 s treatment with helium driven ARTP and high throughput screening method of the mutants using the 96-well microplate and microplate reader was established. A mutant library of 62 mutants was then constructed and ideal mutants were selected out. The characteristics of the mutants after the mutagenesis inclined to be stable after around 9th subculture, where the total mutation frequency and positive mutation frequency in terms of specific growth rate reached 45% and 25%, respectively. The mutants in mutant library showed diverse phenotypes in terms of cell growth rate, carbohydrate content and flocculation intensity. The positive mutation frequency in terms of cellular carbohydrate content with the increase by more than 20% percent than the wild strain was 32.3%. Compared with the wild strain, the representative mutants 3-A10 and 3-B2 showed 40.3% and 78.0% increase in carbohydrate content, respectively, while the mutant 4-B3 showed 10.5% increase in specific growth rate. The carbohydrate contents of the representative mutants were stable during different subcultures, indicating high genetic stability. ARTP was demonstrated to be an effective and non-GMO mutagenesis tool to generate the mutant library for multicellular microalgae. PMID:24319517

  20. Rapid mutation of Spirulina platensis by a new mutagenesis system of atmospheric and room temperature plasmas (ARTP and generation of a mutant library with diverse phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyue Fang

    Full Text Available In this paper, we aimed to improve the carbohydrate productivity of Spirulina platensis by generating mutants with increased carbohydrate content and growth rate. ARTP was used as a new mutagenesis tool to generate a mutant library of S. platensis with diverse phenotypes. Protocol for rapid mutation of S. platensis by 60 s treatment with helium driven ARTP and high throughput screening method of the mutants using the 96-well microplate and microplate reader was established. A mutant library of 62 mutants was then constructed and ideal mutants were selected out. The characteristics of the mutants after the mutagenesis inclined to be stable after around 9(th subculture, where the total mutation frequency and positive mutation frequency in terms of specific growth rate reached 45% and 25%, respectively. The mutants in mutant library showed diverse phenotypes in terms of cell growth rate, carbohydrate content and flocculation intensity. The positive mutation frequency in terms of cellular carbohydrate content with the increase by more than 20% percent than the wild strain was 32.3%. Compared with the wild strain, the representative mutants 3-A10 and 3-B2 showed 40.3% and 78.0% increase in carbohydrate content, respectively, while the mutant 4-B3 showed 10.5% increase in specific growth rate. The carbohydrate contents of the representative mutants were stable during different subcultures, indicating high genetic stability. ARTP was demonstrated to be an effective and non-GMO mutagenesis tool to generate the mutant library for multicellular microalgae.

  1. Visually representing the generation of older consumers as a diverse audience: Towards a multidimensional market segmentation typology

    OpenAIRE

    Loos, Eugène; Ekström, M

    2014-01-01

    Television commercials and advertising often represent the generation of older consumers as eternally youthful, active and rich. Representations of senior citizens as fragile people needing services and products to help them to survive are also used, but less frequently. As individual differences between senior citizens increase as they grow older, it is important to avoid one-dimensional stereotyping images. In this essay we first discuss the notion of generations and literature related to t...

  2. The FU gene and its possible protein isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nöthen Markus M

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background FU is the human homologue of the Drosophila gene fused whose product fused is a positive regulator of the transcription factor Cubitus interruptus (Ci. Thus, FU may act as a regulator of the human counterparts of Ci, the GLI transcription factors. Since Ci and GLI are targets of Hedgehog signaling in development and morphogenesis, it is expected that FU plays an important role in Sonic, Desert and/or Indian Hedgehog induced cellular signaling. Results The FU gene was identified on chromosome 2q35 at 217.56 Mb and its exon-intron organization determined. The human developmental disorder Syndactyly type 1 (SD1 maps to this region on chromosome 2 and the FU coding region was sequenced using genomic DNA from an affected individual in a linked family. While no FU mutations were found, three single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified. The expression pattern of FU was thoroughly investigated and all examined tissues express FU. It is also clear that different tissues express transcripts of different sizes and some tissues express more than one transcript. By means of nested PCR of specific regions in RT/PCR generated cDNA, it was possible to verify two alternative splicing events. This also suggests the existence of at least two additional protein isoforms besides the FU protein that has previously been described. This long FU and a much shorter isoform were compared for the ability to regulate GLI1 and GLI2. None of the FU isoforms showed any effects on GLI1 induced transcription but the long form can enhance GLI2 activity. Apparently FU did not have any effect on SUFU induced inhibition of GLI. Conclusions The FU gene and its genomic structure was identified. FU is a candidate gene for SD1, but we have not identified a pathogenic mutation in the FU coding region in a family with SD1. The sequence information and expression analyses show that transcripts of different sizes are expressed and subjected to alternative splicing

  3. VEGF121b and VEGF165b are weakly angiogenic isoforms of VEGF-A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pio Ruben

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Different isoforms of VEGF-A (mainly VEGF121, VEGF165 and VEGF189 have been shown to display particular angiogenic properties in the generation of a functional tumor vasculature. Recently, a novel class of VEGF-A isoforms, designated as VEGFxxxb, generated through alternative splicing, have been described. Previous studies have suggested that these isoforms may inhibit angiogenesis. In the present work we have produced recombinant VEGF121/165b proteins in the yeast Pichia pastoris and constructed vectors to overexpress these isoforms and assess their angiogenic potential. Results Recombinant VEGF121/165b proteins generated either in yeasts or mammalian cells activated VEGFR2 and its downstream effector ERK1/2, although to a lesser extent than VEGF165. Furthermore, treatment of endothelial cells with VEGF121/165b increased cell proliferation compared to untreated cells, although such stimulation was lower than that induced by VEGF165. Moreover, in vivo angiogenesis assays confirmed angiogenesis stimulation by VEGF121/165b isoforms. A549 and PC-3 cells overexpressing VEGF121b or VEGF165b (or carrying the PCDNA3.1 empty vector, as control and xenotransplanted into nude mice showed increased tumor volume and angiogenesis compared to controls. To assess whether the VEGFxxxb isoforms are differentially expressed in tumors compared to healthy tissues, immunohistochemical analysis was conducted on a breast cancer tissue microarray. A significant increase (p xxxb and total VEGF-A protein expression in infiltrating ductal carcinomas compared to normal breasts was observed. A positive significant correlation (r = 0.404, p = 0.033 between VEGFxxxb and total VEGF-A was found. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that VEGF121/165b are not anti-angiogenic, but weakly angiogenic isoforms of VEGF-A. In addition, VEGFxxxb isoforms are up-regulated in breast cancer in comparison with non malignant breast tissues. These results are to be taken

  4. Oxygen Sensing in Drosophila: Multiple Isoforms of the Prolyl Hydroxylase Fatiga Have Different Capacity to Regulate HIFα/Sima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekanty, Andrés; Wappner, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    Background The Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF) mediates cellular adaptations to low oxygen. Prolyl-4-hydroxylases are oxygen sensors that hydroxylate the HIF alpha-subunit, promoting its proteasomal degradation in normoxia. Three HIF-prolyl hydroxylases, encoded by independent genes, PHD1, PHD2, and PHD3, occur in mammals. PHD2, the longest PHD isoform includes a MYND domain, whose biochemical function is unclear. PHD2 and PHD3 genes are induced in hypoxia to shut down HIF dependent transcription upon reoxygenation, while expression of PHD1 is oxygen-independent. The physiologic significance of the diversity of the PHD oxygen sensors is intriguing. Methodology and Principal Findings We have analyzed the Drosophila PHD locus, fatiga, which encodes 3 isoforms, FgaA, FgaB and FgaC that are originated through a combination of alternative initiation of transcription and alternative splicing. FgaA includes a MYND domain and is homologous to PHD2, while FgaB and FgaC are shorter isoforms most similar to PHD3. Through a combination of genetic experiments in vivo and molecular analyses in cell culture, we show that fgaB but not fgaA is induced in hypoxia, in a Sima-dependent manner, through a HIF-Responsive Element localized in the first intron of fgaA. The regulatory capacity of FgaB is stronger than that of FgaA, as complete reversion of fga loss-of-function phenotypes is observed upon transgenic expression of the former, and only partial rescue occurs after expression of the latter. Conclusions and Significance Diversity of PHD isoforms is a conserved feature in evolution. As in mammals, there are hypoxia-inducible and non-inducible Drosophila PHDs, and a fly isoform including a MYND domain co-exists with isoforms lacking this domain. Our results suggest that the isoform devoid of a MYND domain has stronger regulatory capacity than that including this domain. PMID:20811646

  5. Isoforms of murine and human serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Mads; Hackler, R; Kold, B

    1998-01-01

    Isoelectric focusing (IEF) and immunofixation of murine serum amyloid P component (SAP), purified and in serum, showed a distinct and strain-dependent isoform pattern with up to seven bands (pI 5.1-5.7). Neuraminidase treatment caused a shift of the isoforms to more basic pI values, but did...... of isoforms of human SAP required the presence of urea and higher SAP concentrations. TEF and immunofixation of SAP monomers showed five to eight isoforms, ranging from pI 4.7-5.7. IEF of SAP in human serum resulted in a less distinct pattern and more acidic isoforms. As with murine SAP, neuraminidase...

  6. Isoform-specific anti-MeCP2 antibodies confirm that expression of the e1 isoform strongly predominates in the brain [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1mg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Kaddoum

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome is a neurological disorder caused by mutations in the MECP2 gene.  MeCP2 transcripts are alternatively spliced to generate two protein isoforms (MeCP2_e1 and MeCP2_e2 that differ at their N-termini. Whilst mRNAs for both forms are expressed ubiquitously, the one for MeCP2_e1 is more abundant than for MeCP2_e2 in the central nervous system. In transfected cells, both protein isoforms are nuclear and colocalize with densely methylated heterochromatic foci. With a view to understanding the physiological contribution of each isoform, and their respective roles in the pathogenesis of Rett syndrome, we set out to generate isoform-specific anti-MeCP2 antibodies. To this end, we immunized rabbits against the peptides corresponding to the short amino-terminal portions that are different between the two isoforms. The polyclonal antibodies thus obtained specifically detected their respective isoforms of MeCP2 in Neuro2a (N2A cells transfected to express either form. Both antisera showed comparable sensitivities when used for Western blot or immunofluorescence, and were highly specific for their respective isoform. When those antibodies were used on mouse tissues, specific signals were easily detected for Mecp2_e1, whilst Mecp2_e2 was very difficult to detect by Western blot, and even more so by immunofluorescence. Our results thus suggest that brain cells express low amounts of the Mecp2-e2 isoform. Our findings are compatible with recent reports showing that MeCP2_e2 is dispensable for healthy brain function, and that it may be involved in the regulation of neuronal apoptosis and embryonic development.

  7. Functional studies of sodium pump isoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Michael Jakob

    The Na+,K+-ATPase is an essential ion pump found in all animal cells. It uses the energy from ATP hydrolysis to export three Na+ and import two K+, both against their chemical gradients and for Na+ also against the electrical potential. Mammals require four Na+,K+-ATPase isoforms that each have u...... synthesized cohorts of pumps from the Golgi apparatus to the plasma membrane....

  8. Visually representing the generation of older consumers as a diverse audience: towards a multidimensional market segmentation typology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loos, E.; Ekström, M.

    2014-01-01

    Television commercials and advertising often represent the generation of older consumers as eternally youthful, active and rich. Representations of senior citizens as fragile people needing services and products to help them to survive are also used, but less frequently. As individual differences be

  9. What about a Dimension of Engagement, Equity, and Diversity Practices? A Critique of the Next Generation Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Alberto J.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I offer a critique of "A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas" (NRC, 2012) and of the "Next Generation Science Standards" (Achieve, 2013). While the new version of the science education standards and the arguments put forward to support them are an improvement…

  10. Visually representing the generation of older consumers as a diverse audience: Towards a multidimensional market segmentation typology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loos, Eugène; Ekström, M.

    2014-01-01

    Television commercials and advertising often represent the generation of older consumers as eternally youthful, active and rich. Representations of senior citizens as fragile people needing services and products to help them to survive are also used, but less frequently. As individual differences be

  11. Visually representing the generation of older consumers as a diverse audience: towards a multidimensional market segmentation typology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loos, E.; Ekström, M.

    2014-01-01

    Television commercials and advertising often represent the generation of older consumers as eternally youthful, active and rich. Representations of senior citizens as fragile people needing services and products to help them to survive are also used, but less frequently. As individual differences be

  12. FSH isoform pattern in classic galactosemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubbels, Cynthia S; Thomas, Chris M G; Wodzig, Will K W H; Olthaar, André J; Jaeken, Jaak; Sweep, Fred C G J; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela

    2011-04-01

    Female classic galactosemia patients suffer from primary ovarian insufficiency (POI). The cause for this long-term complication is not fully understood. One of the proposed mechanisms is that hypoglycosylation of complex molecules, a known secondary phenomenon of galactosemia, leads to FSH dysfunction. An earlier study showed less acidic isoforms of FSH in serum samples of two classic galactosemia patients compared to controls, indicating hypoglycosylation. In this study, FSH isoform patterns of five classic galactosemia patients with POI were compared to the pattern obtained in two patients with a primary glycosylation disorder (phosphomannomutase-2-deficient congenital disorders of glycosylation, PMM2-CDG) and POI, and in five postmenopausal women as controls. We used FPLC chromatofocussing with measurement of FSH concentration per fraction, and discovered that there were no significant differences between galactosemia patients, PMM2-CDG patients and postmenopausal controls. Our results do not support that FSH dysfunction due to a less acidic isoform pattern because of hypoglycosylation is a key mechanism of POI in this disease.

  13. Microbial diversity at the moderate acidic stage in three different sulfidic mine tailings dumps generating acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korehi, Hananeh; Blöthe, Marco; Schippers, Axel

    2014-11-01

    In freshly deposited sulfidic mine tailings the pH is alkaline or circumneutral. Due to pyrite or pyrrhotite oxidation the pH is dropping over time to pH values tailings are only scarcely studied. Here we investigated the microbial diversity via 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis in eight samples (pH range 3.2-6.5) from three different sulfidic mine tailings dumps in Botswana, Germany and Sweden. In total 701 partial 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed a divergent microbial community between the three sites and at different tailings depths. Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were overall the most abundant phyla in the clone libraries. Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Nitrospira occurred less frequently. The found microbial communities were completely different to microbial communities in tailings at

  14. Differential appearance of isoforms and cultivar variation in protein temporal profiles revealed in the maturing barley grain proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnie, Christine; Bak-Jensen, K.S.; Laugesen, Sabrina

    2006-01-01

    identified in spots with individual appearance profiles, indicating differential expression of isoforms. Three isoforms of beta-1,3 endoglucanase, including one not previously observed, each had a different temporal appearance pattern probably reflecting involvement in diverse processes such as cell wall......-grown barley. Appearance profiles are described for 105 proteins identified in 185 2D-gel spots in the overlapping pI ranges 4-7 and 6-11. Grouping of proteins according to appearance across functional categories revealed instances of differential regulation of protein forms. Thus, a single 1-cys...

  15. Chromatofocusing fails to separate hFSH isoforms on the basis of glycan structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousfield, George R; Butnev, Vladimir Y; Bidart, Jean-Michel; Dalpathado, Dilusha; Irungu, Janet; Desaire, Heather

    2008-02-12

    Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) glycosylation is regulated by feedback from the gonads, resulting in an array of glycans associated with FSH preparations derived from pools of pituitary or urine extracts. FSH glycosylation varies due to inhibition of FSHbeta N-glycosylation, elaboration of 1-4 branches possessed by mature N-glycans, and the number and linkage of terminal sialic acid residues. To characterize FSH glycosylation, FSH isoforms in pituitary gland extracts and a variety of physiological fluids are commonly separated by chromatofocusing. Variations in the ratios of immunological and biological activities in the resulting FSH isoform preparations are generally attributed to changes in glycosylation, which are most often defined in terms of sialic acid content. Using Western blotting to assess human FSHbeta glycosylation inhibition revealed 30-47% nonglycosylated hFSHbeta associated with four of six hFSH isoform preparations derived by chromatofocusing. Glycopeptide mass spectrometry assessment of glycan branching in these isoforms extensively characterized two N-glycosylation sites, one at alphaAsn52, the critical glycan for FSH function, and the other at betaAsn24. With two to four N-glycans per FSH molecule, many combinations of charges distributed over these sites can provide the same isoelectric point. Indeed, several glycans were common to all isoform fractions that were analyzed. There was no trend showing predominantly monoantennary glycans associated with the high-pI fractions, nor were predominantly tri- and tetra-antennary glycans associated with low-pI fractions. Thus, differences in receptor binding activity could not be associated with any specific glycan type or location in the hormone. FSH aggregation was associated with reduced receptor binding activity but did not affect immunological activity. However, as gel filtration indicated sufficient heterodimer was present in each isoform preparation to generate complete inhibition curves, the

  16. Comparative proteomics reveals a significant bias toward alternative protein isoforms with conserved structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezkurdia, Iakes; del Pozo, Angela; Frankish, Adam; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Harrow, Jennifer; Ashman, Keith; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L

    2012-09-01

    Advances in high-throughput mass spectrometry are making proteomics an increasingly important tool in genome annotation projects. Peptides detected in mass spectrometry experiments can be used to validate gene models and verify the translation of putative coding sequences (CDSs). Here, we have identified peptides that cover 35% of the genes annotated by the GENCODE consortium for the human genome as part of a comprehensive analysis of experimental spectra from two large publicly available mass spectrometry databases. We detected the translation to protein of "novel" and "putative" protein-coding transcripts as well as transcripts annotated as pseudogenes and nonsense-mediated decay targets. We provide a detailed overview of the population of alternatively spliced protein isoforms that are detectable by peptide identification methods. We found that 150 genes expressed multiple alternative protein isoforms. This constitutes the largest set of reliably confirmed alternatively spliced proteins yet discovered. Three groups of genes were highly overrepresented. We detected alternative isoforms for 10 of the 25 possible heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins, proteins with a key role in the splicing process. Alternative isoforms generated from interchangeable homologous exons and from short indels were also significantly enriched, both in human experiments and in parallel analyses of mouse and Drosophila proteomics experiments. Our results show that a surprisingly high proportion (almost 25%) of the detected alternative isoforms are only subtly different from their constitutive counterparts. Many of the alternative splicing events that give rise to these alternative isoforms are conserved in mouse. It was striking that very few of these conserved splicing events broke Pfam functional domains or would damage globular protein structures. This evidence of a strong bias toward subtle differences in CDS and likely conserved cellular function and structure is remarkable and

  17. Diversity of CD2 subfamily receptors in cyprinid fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sameshima, Shiro; Nakao, Miki; Somamoto, Tomonori

    2012-01-01

    CD2 family receptor (CD2f) is evolutionarily conserved and is widely expressed by various types of leukocytes. To elucidate the phylogenetic diversity of the CD2f, we characterized CD2f in teleosts using ginbuna crucian carp and zebrafish. The identified CD2f isoforms of the ginbuna carp (caauCD2f) exhibited high sequence similarity to the mammalian CD2 subsets CD48, CD244, and CD319, but it was difficult to classify them into their respective mammalian CD2f based on sequence similarity, the presence of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based switch motif (ITSM), and phylogenetic tree analysis. Although the four caauCD2f isoforms share an extracellular domain with quite high identity (83-94% identity at the nucleic acid level), they differ in the number of ITSM motifs in their cytoplasmic tail. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization analyses showed that the caauCD2f isoforms are expressed by different cell populations, suggesting that they, like mammalian CD2f, have diverse roles. Interestingly, immunoglobulin (Ig) domain-like sequences with high identity to caauCD2fs are clustered close together within 0.6 Mbp on zebrafish chromosomes 1 and 2 (at least 8 and 35 sequences, respectively), and many pairs of the Ig domains share more than 90% identity at the amino acid level. Therefore, the teleost CD2fs with considerably high identity have been probably generated from a common ancestral Ig-domain gene by a very recent gene duplication event. These findings suggest that the identified CD2f acquired functional diversification through successive duplications together with the acquisition of ITSM.

  18. Simultaneous bioelectricity generation and decolorization of methyl orange in a two-chambered microbial fuel cell and bacterial diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Feng, Jinglan; Song, Hong; Sun, Jianhui

    2014-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the simultaneous bioelectricity generation and decolorization of methyl orange (MO) in the anode chamber of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) in a wide concentration range (from 50 to 800 mg L(-1)) and to reveal the microbial communities on the anode after the MFC was operated continuously for more than 6 months using MO-glucose mixtures as fuel. Interestingly, the added MO played an active role in the production of electricity. The maximum voltage outputs were 565, 658, 640, 629, 617, and 605 mV for the 1 g L(-1) glucose with 0, 50, 100, 200, 300, and 500 mg L(-1) of MO, respectively. The results of three groups of comparison experiments showed that accelerated decolorization of methyl orange (MO) was achieved in the MFC as compared to MFC in open circuit mode and MFC without extra carbon sources. The decolorization efficiency decreased with an increase of MO concentration in the studied concentration range for the dye load increased. A 454 high-throughput pyrosequencing revealed the microbial communities. Geobacter genus known to generate electricity was detected. Bacteroidia class, Desulfovibrio, and Trichococcus genus, which were most likely responsible for degrading methyl orange, were also detected.

  19. Multiple, but Concerted Cellular Activities of the Human Protein Hap46/BAG-1M and Isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Gehring

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The closely related human and murine proteins Hap46/BAG-1M and BAG-1, respectively, were discovered more than a decade ago by molecular cloning techniques. These and the larger isoform Hap50/BAG-1L, as well as shorter isoforms, have the ability to interact with a seemingly unlimited array of proteins of completely unrelated structures. This problem was partially resolved when it was realized that molecular chaperones of the hsp70 heat shock protein family are major primary association partners, binding being mediated by the carboxy terminal BAG-domain and the ATP-binding domain of hsp70 chaperones. The latter, in turn, can associate with an almost unlimited variety of proteins through their substrate-binding domains, so that ternary complexes may result. The protein folding activity of hsp70 chaperones is affected by interactions with Hap46/BAG-1M or isoforms. However, there also exist several proteins which bind to Hap46/BAG-1M and isoforms independent of hsp70 mediation. Moreover, Hap46/BAG-1M and Hap50/BAG-1L, but not the shorter isoforms, can bind to DNA in a sequence-independent manner by making use of positively charged regions close to their amino terminal ends. This is the molecular basis for their effects on transcription which are of major physiological relevance, as discussed here in terms of a model. The related proteins Hap50/BAG-1L and Hap46/BAG-1M may thus serve as molecular links between such diverse bioactivities as regulation of gene expression and protein quality control. These activities are coordinated and synergize in helping cells to cope with conditions of external stress. Moreover, they recently became markers for the aggressiveness of several cancer types.

  20. Expression of Contractile Protein Isoforms in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Page A. W.

    1996-01-01

    The general objective of this experiment is to determine the effect of space flight parameters, including microgravity, on ontogenesis and embryogenesis of Japanese quail. Nine U.S. and two Russian investigators are cooperating in this study. Specific objectives of the participating scientists include assessing the gross and microscopic morphological and histological development of the embryo, as well as the temporal and spacial development of specific cells, tissues, and organs. Temporally regulated production of specific proteins is also being investigated. Our objective is to determine the effects of microgravity on developmentally programmed expression of Troponin T and I isoforms known to regulate cardiac and skeletal muscle contraction.

  1. Myosin heavy chain isoform expression in human extraocular muscles: longitudinal variation and patterns of expression in global and orbital layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung-Ah; Lim, Jeonghee; Sohn, Seongsoo; Oh, Sei Yeul

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the distribution of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms along the length of the global and orbital layers of human extraocular muscles (EOMs). Whole muscle tissue extracts of human EOMs were cross-sectioned consecutively and separated into orbital and global layers. The extracts from these layers were subjected to electrophoretic analysis, followed by quantification with scanning densitometry. MyHC isoforms displayed different distributions along the lengths of EOMs. In the orbital and global layers of all EOMs except for the superior oblique muscle, MyHCeom was enriched in the central regions. MyHCIIa and MyHCI were most abundant in the proximal and distal ends. A variation in MyHC isoform expression was apparent along the lengths of human EOMs. These results provide a basis for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the functional diversity of EOMs. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Altered expression of pectoral myosin heavy chain isoforms corresponds to migration status in the white-crowned sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Kenneth C.; Ramenofsky, Marilyn

    2016-01-01

    Birds undergo numerous changes as they progress through life-history stages, yet relatively few studies have examined how birds adapt to both the dynamic energetic and mechanical demands associated with such transitions. Myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression, often linked with muscle fibre type, is strongly correlated with a muscle's mechanical power-generating capability, thus we examined several morphological properties, including MyHC expression of the pectoralis, in a long-distance migrant, the white-crowned sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii) throughout the progression from winter, spring departure and arrival on breeding grounds. White-crowned sparrows demonstrated significant phenotypic flexibility throughout the seasonal transition, including changes in prealternate moult status, lipid fuelling, body condition and flight muscle morphology. Pectoral MyHC expression also varied significantly over the course of the study. Wintering birds expressed a single, newly classified adult fast 2 isoform. At spring departure, pectoral isoform expression included two MyHC isoforms: the adult fast 2 isoform along with a smaller proportion of a newly present adult fast 1 isoform. By spring arrival, both adult fast isoforms present at departure remained, yet expression had shifted to a greater relative proportion of the adult fast 1 isoform. Altering pectoral MyHC isoform expression in preparation for and during spring migration may represent an adaptation to modulate muscle mechanical output to support long-distance flight. PMID:28018664

  3. Functional diversity of laminins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domogatskaya, Anna; Rodin, Sergey; Tryggvason, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Laminins are a large family of conserved, multidomain trimeric basement membrane proteins that contribute to the structure of extracellular matrix and influence the behavior of associated cells, such as adhesion, differentiation, migration, phenotype stability, and resistance to anoikis. In lower organisms such as Hydra there is only one isoform of laminin, but higher organisms have at least 16 trimeric isoforms with varying degrees of cell/tissue specificity. In vitro protein and cell culture studies, gene manipulation in animals, and laminin gene mutations in human diseases have provided insight into the specific functions of some laminins, but the biological roles of many isoforms are still largely unexplored, mainly owing to difficulties in isolating them in pure form from tissues or cells. In this review, we elucidate the evolution of laminins, describe their molecular complexity, and explore the current knowledge of their diversity and functional aspects, including laminin-mediated signaling via membrane receptors, in vitro cell biology, and involvement in various tissues gained from animal model and human disease studies. The potential use of laminins in cell biology research and biotechnology is discussed.

  4. Numerous isoforms of Fgf8 reflect its multiple roles in the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunmonu, N Abimbola; Li, Kairong; Li, James Y H

    2011-07-01

    Soluble growth factors play an important role in the coordination and integration of cell proliferation, differentiation, fate determination, and morphogenesis during development of multicellular organisms. Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are a large family of polypeptide growth factors that are present in organisms ranging from nematodes to humans. RNA alternative splicing of FGFs and their receptors further enhances the complexity of this ligand-receptor system. The mouse Fgf8 gene produces eight splice variants, which encode isoform proteins with different N-termini and distinct receptor-binding affinity and biological activity. In this article, we review the roles of Fgf8 in vertebrate development and summarize the recent findings on the in vivo function of different Fgf8 splice variants. We propose that multiple Fgf8 isoform proteins act in concert to regulate the overall function of Fgf8 and account for the diverse and essential role of Fgf8 during vertebrate development.

  5. Use of respondent driven sampling (RDS generates a very diverse sample of men who have sex with men (MSM in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

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    Alex Carballo-Diéguez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prior research focusing on men who have sex with men (MSM conducted in Buenos Aires, Argentina, used convenience samples that included mainly gay identified men. To increase MSM sample representativeness, we used Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS for the first time in Argentina. Using RDS, under certain specified conditions, the observed estimates for the percentage of the population with a specific trait are asymptotically unbiased. We describe, the diversity of the recruited sample, from the point of view of sexual orientation, and contrast the different subgroups in terms of their HIV sexual risk behavior. METHODOLOGY: 500 MSM were recruited using RDS. Behavioral data were collected through face-to-face interviews and Web-based CASI. CONCLUSION: In contrast with prior studies, RDS generated a very diverse sample of MSM from a sexual identity perspective. Only 24.5% of participants identified as gay; 36.2% identified as bisexual, 21.9% as heterosexual, and 17.4% were grouped as "other." Gay and non-gay identified MSM differed significantly in their sexual behavior, the former having higher numbers of partners, more frequent sexual contacts and less frequency of condom use. One third of the men (gay, 3%; bisexual, 34%, heterosexual, 51%; other, 49% reported having had sex with men, women and transvestites in the two months prior to the interview. This population requires further study and, potentially, HIV prevention strategies tailored to such diversity of partnerships. Our results highlight the potential effectiveness of using RDS to reach non-gay identified MSM. They also present lessons learned in the implementation of RDS to recruit MSM concerning both the importance and limitations of formative work, the need to tailor incentives to circumstances of the less affluent potential participants, the need to prevent masking, and the challenge of assessing network size.

  6. Toxin diversity revealed by a transcriptomic study of Ornithoctonus huwena.

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    Yiya Zhang

    Full Text Available Spider venom comprises a mixture of compounds with diverse biological activities, which are used to capture prey and defend against predators. The peptide components bind a broad range of cellular targets with high affinity and selectivity, and appear to have remarkable structural diversity. Although spider venoms have been intensively investigated over the past few decades, venomic strategies to date have generally focused on high-abundance peptides. In addition, the lack of complete spider genomes or representative cDNA libraries has presented significant limitations for researchers interested in molecular diversity and understanding the genetic mechanisms of toxin evolution. In the present study, second-generation sequencing technologies, combined with proteomic analysis, were applied to determine the diverse peptide toxins in venom of the Chinese bird spider Ornithoctonus huwena. In total, 626 toxin precursor sequences were retrieved from transcriptomic data. All toxin precursors clustered into 16 gene superfamilies, which included six novel superfamilies and six novel cysteine patterns. A surprisingly high number of hypermutations and fragment insertions/deletions were detected, which accounted for the majority of toxin gene sequences with low-level expression. These mutations contribute to the formation of diverse cysteine patterns and highly variable isoforms. Furthermore, intraspecific venom variability, in combination with variable transcripts and peptide processing, contributes to the hypervariability of toxins in venoms, and associated rapid and adaptive evolution of toxins for prey capture and defense.

  7. Two p90 ribosomal S6 kinase isoforms are involved in the regulation of mitotic and meiotic arrest in Artemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Ru-Bing; Zhang, Li; Chen, Dian-Fu; Yang, Fan; Yang, Jin-Shu; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2014-06-06

    There are multiple isoforms of p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK), which regulate diverse cellular functions such as cell growth, proliferation, maturation, and motility. However, the relationship between the structures and functions of RSK isoforms remains undetermined. Artemia is a useful model in which to study cell cycle arrest because these animals undergo prolonged diapauses, a state of obligate dormancy. A novel RSK isoform was identified in Artemia, which was termed Ar-Rsk2. This isoform was compared with an RSK isoform that we previously identified in Artemia, termed Ar-Rsk1. Ar-Rsk2 has an ERK-docking motif, whereas Ar-Rsk1 does not. Western blot analysis revealed that Ar-Rsk1 was activated by phosphorylation, which blocked meiosis in oocytes. Knockdown of Ar-Rsk1 reduced the level of phosphorylated cdc2 and thereby suppressed cytostatic factor activity. This indicates that Ar-Rsk1 regulates the cytostatic factor in meiosis. Expression of Ar-Rsk2 was down-regulated in Artemia cysts in which mitosis was arrested. Knockdown of Ar-Rsk2 resulted in decreased levels of cyclin D3 and phosphorylated histone H3, and the production of pseudo-diapause cysts. This indicates that Ar-Rsk2 regulates mitotic arrest. PLK and ERK RNAi showed that Ar-Rsk2, but not Ar-Rsk1, could be activated by PLK-ERK in Artemia. This is the first study to report that RSK isoforms with and without an ERK-docking motif regulate mitosis and meiosis, respectively. This study provides insight into the relationship between the structures and functions of RSK isoforms.

  8. Androgen receptor isoforms in human and rat prostate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-JieXIA; Gang-YaoHAO; Xiao-DaTANG

    2000-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the androgen receptor (AR) isoforms and its variability of expression in human and rat prostatic tissues. Methods: Human benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostatic cancer tissues were obtained from patients undergoing prostatectomy, and rat ventral prostate was incised 3 days after castration. Forty-one AR-positive BPH specimens, 3 prostatic cancer specimens, and 6 rat prostates were used. After processing at 4℃, the tissues were examined by means of high resolution isoelectric focusing (IEF) technique to determine their AR isoforms. Results:From the prostatic specimens, 3 types of AR isoforms were detected with pI values at 6.5, 6.0, and 5.3. In human BPH tissues, 15/41 (36.6%) specimens showed all the three types of isoforms, while 19/41 (46.3%) showed 2 isoforms at various combinations and 7/41(17.1%), 1 isoform. For the 3 prostatic cancer specimens, one showed 3 isoforms, one, 2 isoforms, and the other failed to show any isoform. All rat prostatic tissues showed 2 isoforms at different combinations. Binding of 3H-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) to the isoforms was inhibited by the addition of 100-fold excess of DHT or testosterone, but not progesterone, oestradiol or diethylstilboestrol. Conclusion: AR isoforms are different in different patients. Although their genesis is not clear, the therapeutic implication of the present observation appears to be interesting, that may help clarifying the individual differences in the response to hormonal therapy.(Asian J Androl 2000 Dec;2:307-310)

  9. A Rich Morphological Diversity of Biosaline Drying Patterns Is Generated by Different Bacterial Species, Different Salts and Concentrations: Astrobiological Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Gómez, José María; Medina, Jesús; Rull, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    Biosaline formations (BSFs) are complex self-organized biomineral patterns formed by "hibernating" bacteria as the biofilm that contains them dries out. They were initially described in drying biofilms of Escherichia coli cells + NaCl. Due to their intricate 3-D morphology and anhydrobiosis, these biomineralogical structures are of great interest in astrobiology. Here we report experimental data obtained with various alkali halide salts (NaF, NaCl, NaBr, LiCl, KCl, CsCl) on BSF formation with E. coli and Bacillus subtilis bacteria at two saline concentrations: 9 and 18 mg/mL. Our results indicate that, except for LiCl, which is inactive, all the salts assayed are active during BSF formation and capable of promoting the generation of distinctive drying patterns at each salt concentration. Remarkably, the BSFs produced by these two bacterial species produce characteristic architectural hallmarks as the BSF dries. The potential biogenicity of these biosaline drying patterns is studied, and the astrobiological implications of these findings are discussed.

  10. The landscape of isoform switches in human cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitting-Seerup, Kristoffer; Sandelin, Albin Gustav

    2017-01-01

    developed methods for identification and visualization of isoform switches with predicted functional consequences. Using these methods, we characterized isoform switching in RNA-seq data from >5,500 cancer patients covering 12 solid cancer types. Isoform switches with potential functional consequences were...... highly predictive of patient survival independent of cancer types. Our data constitute an important resource for cancer researchers, available through interactive web tools. Moreover, our methods, available as an R package, enable systematic analysis of isoform switches from other RNA-seq datasets...

  11. Novel Kidins220/ARMS Splice Isoforms: Potential Specific Regulators of Neuronal and Cardiovascular Development.

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    Nathalie Schmieg

    Full Text Available Kidins220/ARMS is a transmembrane protein playing a crucial role in neuronal and cardiovascular development. Kidins220/ARMS is a downstream target of neurotrophin receptors and interacts with several signalling and trafficking factors. Through computational modelling, we found two potential sites for alternative splicing of Kidins220/ARMS. The first is located between exon 24 and exon 29, while the second site replaces exon 32 by a short alternative terminal exon 33. Here we describe the conserved occurrence of several Kidins220/ARMS splice isoforms at RNA and protein levels. Kidins220/ARMS splice isoforms display spatio-temporal regulation during development with distinct patterns in different neuronal populations. Neurotrophin receptor stimulation in cortical and hippocampal neurons and neuroendocrine cells induces specific Kidins220/ARMS splice isoforms and alters the appearance kinetics of the full-length transcript. Remarkably, alternative terminal exon splicing generates Kidins220/ARMS variants with distinct cellular localisation: Kidins220/ARMS containing exon 32 is targeted to the plasma membrane and neurite tips, whereas Kidins220/ARMS without exon 33 mainly clusters the full-length protein in a perinuclear intracellular compartment in PC12 cells and primary neurons, leading to a change in neurotrophin receptor expression. Overall, this study demonstrates the existence of novel Kidins220/ARMS splice isoforms with unique properties, revealing additional complexity in the functional regulation of neurotrophin receptors, and potentially other signalling pathways involved in neuronal and cardiovascular development.

  12. Cloning, Sequencing, and the Expression of the Elusive Sarcomeric TPM4α Isoform in Humans

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    Dipak K. Dube

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, tropomyosin is encoded by four known TPM genes (TPM1, TPM2, TPM3, and TPM4 each of which can generate a number of TPM isoforms via alternative splicing and/or using alternate promoters. In humans, the sarcomeric isoform(s of each of the TPM genes, except for the TPM4, have been known for a long time. Recently, on the basis of computational analyses of the human genome sequence, the predicted sequence of TPM4α has been posted in GenBank. We designed primer-pairs for RT-PCR and showed the expression of the transcripts of TPM4α and a novel isoform TPM4δ in human heart and skeletal muscle. qRT-PCR shows that the relative expression of TPM4α and TPM4δ is higher in human cardiac muscle. Western blot analyses using CH1 monoclonal antibodies show the absence of the expression of TPM4δ protein (~28 kDa in human heart muscle. 2D western blot analyses with the same antibody show the expression of at least nine distinct tropomyosin molecules with a mass ~32 kD and above in adult heart. By Mass spectrometry, we determined the amino acid sequences of the extracted proteins from these spots. Spot “G” reveals the putative expression of TPM4α along with TPM1α protein in human adult heart.

  13. Functional analysis of Arabidopsis V-ATPase subunit VHA-E isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, Jan; Liu, Tzu-Yin; Schumacher, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Acidification of endomembrane compartments by the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) is an important mechanism to generate microenvironments suitable for various cellular functions. Differential assembly of subunit isoforms provides the potential to flexibly adapt the proton-pumping V-ATPase complex to changing physiological conditions and cell type-specific requirements. In Arabidopsis, the regulatory V-ATPase subunit E (VHA-E) is encoded by three genes with distinct expression patterns. We show here that VHA-E2, which belongs to a clade of pollen-specific VHA-E isoforms present in all higher plants, has a specialized but non-essential function during gametophyte development. Similarly, loss of the epidermis-specific isoform VHA-E3, which we show here to be transcriptionally regulated by the phytohormone jasmonic acid, does not cause obvious phenotypic changes. Furthermore, when expressed ubiquitously, VHA-E3, in contrast to VHA-E2, is able to complement loss of the essential subunit VHA-E1 indicating different degrees of functional specialization among the Arabidopsis VHA-E isoforms. Copyright 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Cloning, Sequencing, and the Expression of the Elusive Sarcomeric TPM4α Isoform in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Lynn; Alshiekh-Nasany, Ruham; Mitschow, Charles

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, tropomyosin is encoded by four known TPM genes (TPM1, TPM2, TPM3, and TPM4) each of which can generate a number of TPM isoforms via alternative splicing and/or using alternate promoters. In humans, the sarcomeric isoform(s) of each of the TPM genes, except for the TPM4, have been known for a long time. Recently, on the basis of computational analyses of the human genome sequence, the predicted sequence of TPM4α has been posted in GenBank. We designed primer-pairs for RT-PCR and showed the expression of the transcripts of TPM4α and a novel isoform TPM4δ in human heart and skeletal muscle. qRT-PCR shows that the relative expression of TPM4α and TPM4δ is higher in human cardiac muscle. Western blot analyses using CH1 monoclonal antibodies show the absence of the expression of TPM4δ protein (~28 kDa) in human heart muscle. 2D western blot analyses with the same antibody show the expression of at least nine distinct tropomyosin molecules with a mass ~32 kD and above in adult heart. By Mass spectrometry, we determined the amino acid sequences of the extracted proteins from these spots. Spot “G” reveals the putative expression of TPM4α along with TPM1α protein in human adult heart. PMID:27703814

  15. Plectin isoform 1b mediates mitochondrion-intermediate filament network linkage and controls organelle shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Lilli; Abrahamsberg, Christina; Wiche, Gerhard

    2008-06-16

    Plectin is a versatile intermediate filament (IF)-bound cytolinker protein with a variety of differentially spliced isoforms accounting for its multiple functions. One particular isoform, plectin 1b (P1b), remains associated with mitochondria after biochemical fractionation of fibroblasts and cells expressing exogenous P1b. Here, we determined that P1b is inserted into the outer mitochondrial membrane with the exon 1b-encoded N-terminal sequence serving as a mitochondrial targeting and anchoring signal. To study P1b-related mitochondrial functions, we generated mice that selectively lack this isoform but express all others. In primary fibroblasts and myoblasts derived from these mice, we observe a substantial elongation of mitochondrial networks, whereas other mitochondrial properties remain largely unaffected. Normal morphology of mitochondria could be restored by isoform-specific overexpression of P1b in P1b-deficient as well as plectin-null cells. We propose a model where P1b both forms a mitochondrial signaling platform and affects organelle shape and network formation by tethering mitochondria to IFs.

  16. Tubulin evolution in insects: gene duplication and subfunctionalization provide specialized isoforms in a functionally constrained gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadagkar Sudhindra R

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The completion of 19 insect genome sequencing projects spanning six insect orders provides the opportunity to investigate the evolution of important gene families, here tubulins. Tubulins are a family of eukaryotic structural genes that form microtubules, fundamental components of the cytoskeleton that mediate cell division, shape, motility, and intracellular trafficking. Previous in vivo studies in Drosophila find a stringent relationship between tubulin structure and function; small, biochemically similar changes in the major alpha 1 or testis-specific beta 2 tubulin protein render each unable to generate a motile spermtail axoneme. This has evolutionary implications, not a single non-synonymous substitution is found in beta 2 among 17 species of Drosophila and Hirtodrosophila flies spanning 60 Myr of evolution. This raises an important question, How do tubulins evolve while maintaining their function? To answer, we use molecular evolutionary analyses to characterize the evolution of insect tubulins. Results Sixty-six alpha tubulins and eighty-six beta tubulin gene copies were retrieved and subjected to molecular evolutionary analyses. Four ancient clades of alpha and beta tubulins are found in insects, a major isoform clade (alpha 1, beta 1 and three minor, tissue-specific clades (alpha 2-4, beta 2-4. Based on a Homarus americanus (lobster outgroup, these were generated through gene duplication events on major beta and alpha tubulin ancestors, followed by subfunctionalization in expression domain. Strong purifying selection acts on all tubulins, yet maximum pairwise amino acid distances between tubulin paralogs are large (0.464 substitutions/site beta tubulins, 0.707 alpha tubulins. Conversely orthologs, with the exception of reproductive tissue isoforms, show little sequence variation except in the last 15 carboxy terminus tail (CTT residues, which serve as sites for post-translational modifications (PTMs and interactions

  17. Flexible long-range loops in the VH gene region of the Igh locus facilitate the generation of a diverse antibody repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedovic, Jasna; Ebert, Anja; Tagoh, Hiromi; Tamir, Ido M; Schwickert, Tanja A; Novatchkova, Maria; Sun, Qiong; Huis In 't Veld, Pim J; Guo, Chunguang; Yoon, Hye Suk; Denizot, Yves; Holwerda, Sjoerd J B; de Laat, Wouter; Cogné, Michel; Shi, Yang; Alt, Frederick W; Busslinger, Meinrad

    2013-08-22

    The immunoglobulin heavy-chain (Igh) locus undergoes large-scale contraction in pro-B cells, which facilitates VH-DJH recombination by juxtaposing distal VH genes next to the DJH-rearranged gene segment in the 3' proximal Igh domain. By using high-resolution mapping of long-range interactions, we demonstrate that local interaction domains established the three-dimensional structure of the extended Igh locus in lymphoid progenitors. In pro-B cells, these local domains engaged in long-range interactions across the Igh locus, which depend on the regulators Pax5, YY1, and CTCF. The large VH gene cluster underwent flexible long-range interactions with the more rigidly structured proximal domain, which probably ensures similar participation of all VH genes in VH-DJH recombination to generate a diverse antibody repertoire. These long-range interactions appear to be an intrinsic feature of the VH gene cluster, because they are still generated upon mutation of the Eμ enhancer, IGCR1 insulator, or 3' regulatory region in the proximal Igh domain.

  18. Muscle Specific Fragile X Related Protein 1 Isoforms are Sequestered in the Nucleus of Undifferentiated Myoblast

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    Khandjian Edouard W

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The family of Fragile X Mental Retardation Proteins is composed of three members: Fragile Mental Retardation 1, Fragile X Related 1 and X Related 2 proteins. These proteins are associated with mRNPs within translating ribosomes and have the capacity to shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Great attention has been given to FMRP due to its implication in human hereditary mental retardation while FXR1P and FXR2P have only recently been studied. Results Using antibodies directed against several epitopes of FXR1P, we have detected protein isoforms generated by small peptides pocket inserts. Four isoforms of MW 70, 74, 78, 80 kDa are widely distributed in mouse organs, while in striated muscles these isoforms are replaced by proteins of 82 and 84 kDa containing an extra pocket of 27 aa. Expression of these muscle isoforms is an early event during in vitro differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes and correlates with the activation of muscle-specific genes. However, while FXR1P82,84 are associated with cytoplasmic mRNPs in myotubes, they are sequestered in the nuclei of undifferentiated myoblasts. These observations suggest that, in addition to a cytoplasmic function yet to be defined, FXR1P82,84 may play a nuclear role in pre-mRNA metabolism. Conclusions The pattern of subcellular partitioning of FXR1P isoforms during myogenesis is unique among the family of the FXR proteins. The model system described here should be considered as a powerful tool for ongoing attempts to unravel structure-function relationships of the different FMR family members since the potential role(s of FXR1P as a compensatory factor in Fragile X syndrome is still elusive.

  19. Bronchial Epithelial Cells from Asthmatic Patients Display Less Functional HLA-G Isoform Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlini, Federico; Picard, Christophe; Garulli, Céline; Piquemal, David; Roubertoux, Pierre; Chiaroni, Jacques; Chanez, Pascal; Gras, Delphine; Di Cristofaro, Julie

    2017-01-01

    Not all asthmatic patients adequately respond to current available treatments, such as inhaled corticosteroids or omalizumab(®). New treatments will aim to target the bronchial epithelium-immune response interaction using different pathways. HLA-G is involved in immunomodulation and may promote epithelial cell differentiation and proliferation. HLA-G protein has several isoforms generated by alternative splicing that might have differential functionalities. HLA-G protein expression and genetic polymorphisms have been reported to be associated with asthma. Our hypothesis is that bronchial epithelium from asthmatic patients displays less functional HLA-G isoforms. HLA-G transcriptional isoforms were quantified by real-time PCR in human bronchial epithelium cells (HBEC) grown in air-liquid interface culture obtained from five healthy controls (HC), seven patients with mild asthma (MA), and seven patients with severe asthma (SA). They were re-differentiated, and IL-13 exposure was used as a proxy for a pro-inflammatory cytokine. HLA-G protein expression was assessed by western blot analysis. HLA-G allele was typed by direct sequencing. Our results showed that both MA and SA display less functional HLA-G isoforms than HC (p G*01:06 frequency in MA and SA was significantly higher than in the healthy population (p = 0.03 and p G expression. Our results support that an impaired expression of HLA-G isoforms in asthmatic patients could contribute to the loss of inflammation control and epithelium structural remodeling. Therefore, HLA-G might be an interesting alternative target for asthmatic patients not adequately responding to current drugs.

  20. Tocopherol isoforms in parenteral lipid emulsions and neutrophil activation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanten, G.J.A.; Beunk, J.; Naber, A.H.J.; Swinkels, D.W.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Tocopherol is a lipid-soluble anti-oxidant that exists in several isoforms. Patients on total parenteral nutrition depend on lipid emulsions for their tocopherol intake. In the present study, we analysed the content of tocopherol isoforms in various lipid emulsions. We also

  1. Localization and functional characterization of the human NKCC2 isoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carota, I; Theilig, F; Oppermann, M;

    2010-01-01

    AIM: Salt reabsorption across the apical membrane of cells in the thick ascending limb (TAL) of Henle is primarily mediated by the bumetanide-sensitive Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter NKCC2. Three full-length splice variants of NKCC2 (NKCC2B, NKCC2A and NKCC2F) have been described. The NKCC2...... isoforms have specific localizations and transport characteristics, as assessed for rabbit, rat and mouse. In the present study, we aimed to address the localization and transport characteristics of the human NKCC2 isoforms. METHODS: RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and uptake studies in Xenopus oocytes were...... performed to characterize human NKCC2 isoforms. RESULTS: All three classical NKCC2 isoforms were detected in the human kidney; in addition, we found splice variants with tandem duplicates of the variable exon 4. Contrary to rodents, in which NKCC2F is the most abundant NKCC2 isoform, NKCC2A was the dominant...

  2. Cell elasticity is regulated by the tropomyosin isoform composition of the actin cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Iman; Heu, Celine; Cheng, Hong; Freittag, Hannah; Desouza, Melissa; Stehn, Justine R; Bryce, Nicole S; Whan, Renee M; Hardeman, Edna C; Fath, Thomas; Schevzov, Galina; Gunning, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is the primary polymer system within cells responsible for regulating cellular stiffness. While various actin binding proteins regulate the organization and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton, the proteins responsible for regulating the mechanical properties of cells are still not fully understood. In the present study, we have addressed the significance of the actin associated protein, tropomyosin (Tpm), in influencing the mechanical properties of cells. Tpms belong to a multi-gene family that form a co-polymer with actin filaments and differentially regulate actin filament stability, function and organization. Tpm isoform expression is highly regulated and together with the ability to sort to specific intracellular sites, result in the generation of distinct Tpm isoform-containing actin filament populations. Nanomechanical measurements conducted with an Atomic Force Microscope using indentation in Peak Force Tapping in indentation/ramping mode, demonstrated that Tpm impacts on cell stiffness and the observed effect occurred in a Tpm isoform-specific manner. Quantitative analysis of the cellular filamentous actin (F-actin) pool conducted both biochemically and with the use of a linear detection algorithm to evaluate actin structures revealed that an altered F-actin pool does not absolutely predict changes in cell stiffness. Inhibition of non-muscle myosin II revealed that intracellular tension generated by myosin II is required for the observed increase in cell stiffness. Lastly, we show that the observed increase in cell stiffness is partially recapitulated in vivo as detected in epididymal fat pads isolated from a Tpm3.1 transgenic mouse line. Together these data are consistent with a role for Tpm in regulating cell stiffness via the generation of specific populations of Tpm isoform-containing actin filaments.

  3. Probing polypeptide GalNAc-transferase isoform substrate specificities by in vitro analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yun; Joshi, Hiren J; Schjoldager, Katrine Ter-Borch Gram; Madsen, Thomas Daugbjerg; Gerken, Thomas A; Vester-Christensen, Malene B; Wandall, Hans H; Bennett, Eric Paul; Levery, Steven B; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y; Clausen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (GalNAc)-type (mucin-type) O-glycosylation is an abundant and highly diverse modification of proteins. This type of O-glycosylation is initiated in the Golgi by a large family of up to 20 homologous polypeptide GalNAc-T isoenzymes that transfer GalNAc to Ser, Thr and possibly Tyr residues. These GalNAc residues are then further elongated by a large set of glycosyltransferases to build a variety of complex O-glycan structures. What determines O-glycan site occupancy is still poorly understood, although it is clear that the substrate specificities of individual isoenzymes and the repertoire of GalNAc-Ts in cells are key parameters. The GalNAc-T isoenzymes are differentially expressed in cells and tissues in principle allowing cells to produce unique O-glycoproteomes dependent on the specific subset of isoforms present. In vitro analysis of acceptor peptide substrate specificities using recombinant expressed GalNAc-Ts has been the method of choice for probing activities of individual isoforms, but these studies have been hampered by biological validation of actual O-glycosylation sites in proteins and number of substrate testable. Here, we present a systematic analysis of the activity of 10 human GalNAc-T isoenzymes with 195 peptide substrates covering known O-glycosylation sites and provide a comprehensive dataset for evaluating isoform-specific contributions to the O-glycoproteome.

  4. Alternative splicing during Arabidopsis flower development results in constitutive and stage-regulated isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng eWang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing (AS is a process in eukaryotic gene expression, in which the primary transcript of a multi-exon gene is spliced into two or more different mature transcripts, thereby increasing proteome diversity. AS is often regulated differentially between different tissues or developmental stages. Recent studies suggested that up to 60% of intron-containing genes in Arabidopsis thaliana undergo AS. Yet little is known about this complicated and important process during floral development. To investigate the preferential expression of different isoforms of individual alternatively spliced genes, we used high throughput RNA-Seq technology to explore the transcriptomes of three floral development stages of Arabidopsis thaliana and obtained information of various alternative splicing events. We identified approximately 24,000 genes that were expressed at one or more of these stages, and found that nearly 25% of multi-exon genes had two or more spliced variants. This is less frequent than the previously reported 40%~60% for multiple organs and stages of A. thaliana, indicating that many genes expressed in floral development function with a single predominant isoform. On the other hand, 1,716 isoforms were differentially expressed between the three stages, suggesting that AS might still play important roles in stage transition during floral development. Moreover, 337 novel transcribed regions were identified and most of them have a single exon. In addition, our analyses provide a comprehensive survey of alternative splicing in floral development and facilitate further genomic and genetic studies.

  5. Energy-optimised pharmacophore approach to identify potential hotspots during inhibition of Class II HDAC isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganai, Shabir Ahmad; Shanmugam, Karthi; Mahadevan, Vijayalakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are conjugated enzymes that modulate chromatin architecture by deacetylating lysine residues on the histone tails leading to transcriptional repression. Pharmacological interventions of these enzymes with small molecule inhibitors called Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have shown enhanced acetylation of the genome and are hence emerging as potential targets at the clinic. Type-specific inhibition of Class II HDACs has shown enhanced therapeutic benefits against developmental and neurodegenerative disorders. However, the structural identity of class-specific isoforms limits the potential of their inhibitors in precise targeting of their enzymes. Diverse strategies have been implemented to recognise the features in HDAC enzymes which may help in identifying isoform specificity factors. This work attempts a computational approach that combines in silico docking and energy-optimised pharmacophore (E-pharmacophore) mapping of 18 known HDAC inhibitors and has identified structural variations that regulate their interactions against the six Class II HDAC enzymes considered for the study. This combined approach establishes that inhibitors possessing higher number of aromatic rings in different structural regions might function as potent inhibitors, while inhibitors with scarce ring structures might point to compromised potency. This would aid the rationale for chemical optimisation and design of isoform selective HDAC inhibitors with enhanced affinity and therapeutic efficiency.

  6. Tumour cells expressing single VEGF isoforms display distinct growth, survival and migration characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chryso Kanthou

    kinase receptor activation. VEGF isoforms are emerging as potential biomarkers for anti-VEGF therapies. Our results reveal novel roles of individual isoforms associated with cancer growth and metastasis and highlight the importance of understanding their diverse actions.

  7. Development and characterization of human monoclonal antibodies that neutralize multiple TGFβ isoforms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bedinger, Daniel; Lao, Llewelyn; Khan, Shireen; Lee, Steve; Takeuchi, Toshihiko; Mirza, Amer M

    .... There are 3 main isoforms, TGFβ1, 2, and 3. As multiple TGFβ isoforms are involved in disease processes, maximal therapeutic efficacy may require neutralization of 2 or more of the TGFβ isoforms...

  8. Engineering of insulin receptor isoform-selective insulin analogues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tine Glendorf

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The insulin receptor (IR exists in two isoforms, A and B, and the isoform expression pattern is tissue-specific. The C-terminus of the insulin B chain is important for receptor binding and has been shown to contact the IR just adjacent to the region where the A and B isoforms differ. The aim of this study was to investigate the importance of the C-terminus of the B chain in IR isoform binding in order to explore the possibility of engineering tissue-specific/liver-specific insulin analogues. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Insulin analogue libraries were constructed by total amino acid scanning mutagenesis. The relative binding affinities for the A and B isoform of the IR were determined by competition assays using scintillation proximity assay technology. Structural information was obtained by X-ray crystallography. Introduction of B25A or B25N mutations resulted in analogues with a 2-fold preference for the B compared to the A isoform, whereas the opposite was observed with a B25Y substitution. An acidic amino acid residue at position B27 caused an additional 2-fold selective increase in affinity for the receptor B isoform for analogues bearing a B25N mutation. Furthermore, the combination of B25H with either B27D or B27E also resulted in B isoform-preferential analogues (2-fold preference even though the corresponding single mutation analogues displayed no differences in relative isoform binding affinity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have discovered a new class of IR isoform-selective insulin analogues with 2-4-fold differences in relative binding affinities for either the A or the B isoform of the IR compared to human insulin. Our results demonstrate that a mutation at position B25 alone or in combination with a mutation at position B27 in the insulin molecule confers IR isoform selectivity. Isoform-preferential analogues may provide new opportunities for developing insulin analogues with improved clinical benefits.

  9. Quantitative evaluation of alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms by label-free real-time plasmonic sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, César S; Carrascosa, L G; Bonnal, S; Valcárcel, J; Lechuga, L M

    2016-04-15

    Alternative splicing of mRNA precursors enables cells to generate different protein outputs from the same gene depending on their developmental or homeostatic status. Its deregulation is strongly linked to disease onset and progression. Current methodologies for monitoring alternative splicing demand elaborate procedures and often present difficulties in discerning between closely related isoforms, e.g. due to cross-hybridization during their detection. Herein, we report a general methodology using a Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) biosensor for label-free monitoring of alternative splicing events in real-time, without any cDNA synthesis or PCR amplification requirements. We applied this methodology to RNA isolated from HeLa cells for the quantification of alternatively spliced isoforms of the Fas gene, involved in cancer progression through regulation of programmed cell death. We demonstrate that our methodology is isoform-specific, with virtually no cross-hybridization, achieving limits of detection (LODs) in the picoMolar (pM) range. Similar results were obtained for the detection of the BCL-X gene mRNA isoforms. The results were independently validated by RT-qPCR, with excellent concordance in the determination of isoform ratios. The simplicity and robustness of this biosensor technology can greatly facilitate the exploration of alternative splicing biomarkers in disease diagnosis and therapy.

  10. Adiponectin isoforms: a potential therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommer, Klaus W; Schäffler, Andreas; Büchler, Christa; Steinmeyer, Jürgen; Rickert, Markus; Rehart, Stefan; Brentano, Fabia; Gay, Steffen; Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Neumann, Elena

    2012-10-01

    Several clinical studies have suggested the adipocytokine adiponectin is involved in the progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). From this point of view, adiponectin might present a new therapeutic target. However, as adiponectin also exerts beneficial effects in the human organism, a strategy that would allow its detrimental effects to be abolished while maintaining the positive effects would be highly favourable. To elucidate such a strategy, the authors analysed whether the different adiponectin isoforms induce diverging effects, especially with regard to rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts (RASF), a central cell type in RA pathogenesis capable of invading into and destroying cartilage. Affymetrix microarrays were used to screen for changes in gene expression of RASF. Messenger RNA levels were quantified by real-time PCR, protein levels by immunoassay. The migration of RASF and primary human lymphocytes was analysed using a two-chamber migration assay. In RASF, the individual adiponectin isoforms induced numerous genes/proteins relevant in RA pathogenesis to clearly different extents. In general, the most potent isoforms were the high molecular weight/middle molecular weight isoforms and the globular isoform, while the least potent isoform was the adiponectin trimer. The chemokines secreted by RASF upon adiponectin stimulation resulted in an increased migration of RASF and lymphocytes. The results clearly suggest a pro-inflammatory and joint-destructive role of all adiponectin isoforms in RA pathophysiology, indicating that in chronic inflammatory joint diseases the detrimental effects outweigh the beneficial effects of adiponectin.

  11. Nonmuscle myosin II isoforms coassemble in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Jordan R; Shao, Lin; Remmert, Kirsten; Li, Dong; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A

    2014-05-19

    Nonmuscle myosin II (NM II) powers myriad developmental and cellular processes, including embryogenesis, cell migration, and cytokinesis [1]. To exert its functions, monomers of NM II assemble into bipolar filaments that produce a contractile force on the actin cytoskeleton. Mammalian cells express up to three isoforms of NM II (NM IIA, IIB, and IIC), each of which possesses distinct biophysical properties and supports unique as well as redundant cellular functions [2-8]. Despite previous efforts [9-13], it remains unclear whether NM II isoforms assemble in living cells to produce mixed (heterotypic) bipolar filaments or whether filaments consist entirely of a single isoform (homotypic). We addressed this question using fluorescently tagged versions of NM IIA, IIB, and IIC, isoform-specific immunostaining of the endogenous proteins, and two-color total internal reflection fluorescence structured-illumination microscopy, or TIRF-SIM, to visualize individual myosin II bipolar filaments inside cells. We show that NM II isoforms coassemble into heterotypic filaments in a variety of settings, including various types of stress fibers, individual filaments throughout the cell, and the contractile ring. We also show that the differential distribution of NM IIA and NM IIB typically seen in confocal micrographs of well-polarized cells is reflected in the composition of individual bipolar filaments. Interestingly, this differential distribution is less pronounced in freshly spread cells, arguing for the existence of a sorting mechanism acting over time. Together, our work argues that individual NM II isoforms are potentially performing both isoform-specific and isoform-redundant functions while coassembled with other NM II isoforms.

  12. Alternative splicing in the fiddler crab cognate ecdysteroid receptor: variation in receptor isoform expression and DNA binding properties in response to hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durica, David S; Das, Sunetra; Najar, Fares; Roe, Bruce; Phillips, Barret; Kappalli, Sudha; Anilkumar, Gopinathan

    2014-09-15

    RXR cDNA cloning from three Uca species led to the identification of 4 conserved isoforms, indicative of alternative splicing in the hinge and ligand binding domains (LBD). Sequencing of overlapping clones from a Ucapugilator genomic library identified EcR isoforms matching previously identified cDNA variants; in addition, a cryptic exon in the LBD was detected and evidence for expression of this new isoform was obtained from next-generation sequencing. RNA-seq analysis also identified a new amino terminal EcR variant. EcR and RXR transcript abundance increases throughout ovarian maturation in U. pugilator, while cognate receptor transcript abundance remains constant in a related Indo-Pacific species with a different reproductive strategy. To examine if crab RXR LBD isoforms have different physical properties in vitro, electromobility shift assays were performed with different EcR isoforms. The cognate crab and fruit fly receptors differ in their responses to hormone. Ecdysteroids did not increase DNA binding for the crab heterodimers, while ecdysteroids stimulate binding for Drosophilamelanogaster EcR/USP heterodimers. In swapping experiments, UpEcR/USP heterodimers did not show ligand-responsive differences in DNA binding; both crab RXR LBD isoforms, however, conferred ligand-responsive increases in DNA binding with DmEcRs. These data indicate that both UpRXR LBD isoforms can heterodimerize with the heterologous DmEcR receptors and promote ligand and DNA binding. Unresponsiveness of the cognate receptors to ecdysteroid, however, suggest additional factors may be required to mediate endogenous, perhaps isoform-specific, differences in EcR conformation, consistent with previously reported effects of UpRXR isoforms on UpEcR ligand-binding affinities.

  13. Increased genetic diversity and prevalence of co-infection with Trypanosoma spp. in koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) and their ticks identified using next-generation sequencing (NGS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Amanda D; Gofton, Alexander W; Paparini, Andrea; Codello, Annachiara; Greay, Telleasha; Gillett, Amber; Warren, Kristin; Irwin, Peter; Ryan, Una

    2017-01-01

    Infections with Trypanosoma spp. have been associated with poor health and decreased survival of koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus), particularly in the presence of concurrent pathogens such as Chlamydia and koala retrovirus. The present study describes the application of a next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based assay to characterise the prevalence and genetic diversity of trypanosome communities in koalas and two native species of ticks (Ixodes holocyclus and I. tasmani) removed from koala hosts. Among 168 koalas tested, 32.2% (95% CI: 25.2-39.8%) were positive for at least one Trypanosoma sp. Previously described Trypanosoma spp. from koalas were identified, including T. irwini (32.1%, 95% CI: 25.2-39.8%), T. gilletti (25%, 95% CI: 18.7-32.3%), T. copemani (27.4%, 95% CI: 20.8-34.8%) and T. vegrandis (10.1%, 95% CI: 6.0-15.7%). Trypanosoma noyesi was detected for the first time in koalas, although at a low prevalence (0.6% 95% CI: 0-3.3%), and a novel species (Trypanosoma sp. AB-2017) was identified at a prevalence of 4.8% (95% CI: 2.1-9.2%). Mixed infections with up to five species were present in 27.4% (95% CI: 21-35%) of the koalas, which was significantly higher than the prevalence of single infections 4.8% (95% CI: 2-9%). Overall, a considerably higher proportion (79.7%) of the Trypanosoma sequences isolated from koala blood samples were identified as T. irwini, suggesting this is the dominant species. Co-infections involving T. gilletti, T. irwini, T. copemani, T. vegrandis and Trypanosoma sp. AB-2017 were also detected in ticks, with T. gilletti and T. copemani being the dominant species within the invertebrate hosts. Direct Sanger sequencing of Trypanosoma 18S rRNA gene amplicons was also performed and results revealed that this method was only able to identify the genotypes with greater amount of reads (according to NGS) within koala samples, which highlights the advantages of NGS in detecting mixed infections. The present study provides new insights on the

  14. Parallel subfunctionalisation of PsbO protein isoforms in angiosperms revealed by phylogenetic analysis and mapping of sequence variability onto protein structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchoslav, Miloš; Fischer, Lukáš

    2015-06-09

    PsbO, the manganese-stabilising protein, is an indispensable extrinsic subunit of photosystem II. It plays a crucial role in the stabilisation of the water-splitting Mn4CaO5 cluster, which catalyses the oxidation of water to molecular oxygen by using light energy. PsbO was also demonstrated to have a weak GTPase activity that could be involved in regulation of D1 protein turnover. Our analysis of psbO sequences showed that many angiosperm species express two psbO paralogs, but the pairs of isoforms in one species were not orthologous to pairs of isoforms in distant species. Phylogenetic analysis of 91 psbO sequences from 49 land plant species revealed that psbO duplication occurred many times independently, generally at the roots of modern angiosperm families. In spite of this, the level of isoform divergence was similar in different species. Moreover, mapping of the differences on the protein tertiary structure showed that the isoforms in individual species differ from each other on similar positions, mostly on the luminally exposed end of the β-barrel structure. Comparison of these differences with the location of differences between PsbOs from diverse angiosperm families indicated various selection pressures in PsbO evolution and potential interaction surfaces on the PsbO structure. The analyses suggest that similar subfunctionalisation of PsbO isoforms occurred parallelly in various lineages. We speculate that the presence of two PsbO isoforms helps the plants to finely adjust the photosynthetic apparatus in response to variable conditions. This might be mediated by diverse GTPase activity, since the isoform differences predominate near the predicted GTP-binding site.

  15. Targeted Proteomics Enables Simultaneous Quantification of Folate Receptor Isoforms and Potential Isoform-based Diagnosis in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ting; Xu, Feifei; Fang, Danjun; Chen, Yun

    2015-11-17

    The distinct roles of protein isoforms in cancer are becoming increasingly evident. FRα and FRβ, two major isoforms of the folate receptor family, generally have different cellular distribution and tissue specificity. However, the presence of FRβ in breast tumors, where FRα is normally expressed, complicates this situation. Prior to applying any FR isoform-based diagnosis and therapeutics, it is essential to monitor the expression profile of FR isoforms in a more accurate manner. An LC-MS/MS-based targeted proteomics assay was developed and validated in this study because of the lack of suitable methodology for the simultaneous and specific measurement of highly homologous isoforms occurring at low concentrations. FRα and FRβ monitoring was achieved by measuring their surrogate isoform-specific peptides. Five human breast cell lines, isolated macrophages and 60 matched pairs of breast tissue samples were subjected to the analysis. The results indicated that FRβ was overexpressed in tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) but not epithelial cells, in addition to an enhanced level of FRα in breast cancer cells and tissue samples. Moreover, the levels of the FR isoforms were evaluated according to the histology, histopathological features and molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Several positive associations with PR/ER and HER2 status and metastasis were revealed.

  16. IgE recognition of chimeric isoforms of the honeybee (Apis mellifera) venom allergen Api m 10 evaluated by protein array technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vaerenbergh, Matthias; De Smet, Lina; Rafei-Shamsabadi, David; Blank, Simon; Spillner, Edzard; Ebo, Didier G; Devreese, Bart; Jakob, Thilo; de Graaf, Dirk C

    2015-02-01

    Api m 10 has recently been established as novel major allergen that is recognized by more than 60% of honeybee venom (HBV) allergic patients. Previous studies suggest Api m 10 protein heterogeneity which may have implications for diagnosis and immunotherapy of HBV allergy. In the present study, RT-PCR revealed the expression of at least nine additional Api m 10 transcript isoforms by the venom glands. Two distinct mechanisms are responsible for the generation of these isoforms: while the previously known variant 2 is produced by an alternative splicing event, novel identified isoforms are intragenic chimeric transcripts. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the identification of chimeric transcripts generated by the honeybee. By a retrospective proteomic analysis we found evidence for the presence of several of these isoforms in the venom proteome. Additionally, we analyzed IgE reactivity to different isoforms by protein array technology using sera from HBV allergic patients, which revealed that IgE recognition of Api m 10 is both isoform- and patient-specific. While it was previously demonstrated that the majority of HBV allergic patients display IgE reactivity to variant 2, our study also shows that some patients lacking IgE antibodies for variant 2 display IgE reactivity to two of the novel identified Api m 10 variants, i.e. variants 3 and 4.

  17. Evaluation of selected static methods used to estimate element mobility, acid-generating and acid-neutralizing potentials associated with geologically diverse mining wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hageman, Philip L.; Seal, Robert R.; Diehl, Sharon F.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Lowers, Heather

    2015-01-01

    A comparison study of selected static leaching and acid–base accounting (ABA) methods using a mineralogically diverse set of 12 modern-style, metal mine waste samples was undertaken to understand the relative performance of the various tests. To complement this study, in-depth mineralogical studies were conducted in order to elucidate the relationships between sample mineralogy, weathering features, and leachate and ABA characteristics. In part one of the study, splits of the samples were leached using six commonly used leaching tests including paste pH, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Field Leach Test (FLT) (both 5-min and 18-h agitation), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Method 1312 SPLP (both leachate pH 4.2 and leachate pH 5.0), and the USEPA Method 1311 TCLP (leachate pH 4.9). Leachate geochemical trends were compared in order to assess differences, if any, produced by the various leaching procedures. Results showed that the FLT (5-min agitation) was just as effective as the 18-h leaching tests in revealing the leachate geochemical characteristics of the samples. Leaching results also showed that the TCLP leaching test produces inconsistent results when compared to results produced from the other leaching tests. In part two of the study, the ABA was determined on splits of the samples using both well-established traditional static testing methods and a relatively quick, simplified net acid–base accounting (NABA) procedure. Results showed that the traditional methods, while time consuming, provide the most in-depth data on both the acid generating, and acid neutralizing tendencies of the samples. However, the simplified NABA method provided a relatively fast, effective estimation of the net acid–base account of the samples. Overall, this study showed that while most of the well-established methods are useful and effective, the use of a simplified leaching test and the NABA acid–base accounting method provide investigators fast

  18. Isoform-specific targeting of ROCK proteins in immune cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Flynn, Ryan; Waksal, Samuel D.; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rho-associated kinase 1 (ROCK1) and ROCK2 are activated by Rho GTPase and control cytoskeleton rearrangement through modulating the phosphorylation of their down-stream effector molecules. Although these 2 isoforms share more than 90% homology within their kinase domain the question of whether ROCK proteins function identically in different cell types is not clear. By using both pharmacological inhibition and genetic knockdown approaches recent studies suggest that the ROCK2 isoform ...

  19. Neuronal profilin isoforms are addressed by different signalling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Murk

    Full Text Available Profilins are prominent regulators of actin dynamics. While most mammalian cells express only one profilin, two isoforms, PFN1 and PFN2a are present in the CNS. To challenge the hypothesis that the expression of two profilin isoforms is linked to the complex shape of neurons and to the activity-dependent structural plasticity, we analysed how PFN1 and PFN2a respond to changes of neuronal activity. Simultaneous labelling of rodent embryonic neurons with isoform-specific monoclonal antibodies revealed both isoforms in the same synapse. Immunoelectron microscopy on brain sections demonstrated both profilins in synapses of the mature rodent cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum. Both isoforms were significantly more abundant in postsynaptic than in presynaptic structures. Immunofluorescence showed PFN2a associated with gephyrin clusters of the postsynaptic active zone in inhibitory synapses of embryonic neurons. When cultures were stimulated in order to change their activity level, active synapses that were identified by the uptake of synaptotagmin antibodies, displayed significantly higher amounts of both isoforms than non-stimulated controls. Specific inhibition of NMDA receptors by the antagonist APV in cultured rat hippocampal neurons resulted in a decrease of PFN2a but left PFN1 unaffected. Stimulation by the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, on the other hand, led to a significant increase in both synaptic PFN1 and PFN2a. Analogous results were obtained for neuronal nuclei: both isoforms were localized in the same nucleus, and their levels rose significantly in response to KCl stimulation, whereas BDNF caused here a higher increase in PFN1 than in PFN2a. Our results strongly support the notion of an isoform specific role for profilins as regulators of actin dynamics in different signalling pathways, in excitatory as well as in inhibitory synapses. Furthermore, they suggest a functional role for both profilins in neuronal nuclei.

  20. Effect of silencing the two major tomato fruit pectin methylesterase isoforms on cell wall pectin metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, B; Ström, A; Tasker, A; West, G; Tucker, G A

    2013-11-01

    Post-harvest storage is largely limited by fruit softening, a result of cell wall degradation. Pectin methylesterase (PE) (EC 3.1.1.11) is a major hydrolase responsible for pectin de-esterification in the cell wall, a response to fruit ripening. Two major PE isoforms, PE1 and PE2, have been isolated from tomato (Solanum lycopersicon) pericarp tissue and both have previously been down-regulated using antisense suppression. In this paper, PE1 and PE2 double antisense tomato plants were successfully generated through crossing the two single antisense lines. In the double antisense fruit, approximately 10% of normal PE activity remained and ripening associated pectin de-esterification was almost completely blocked. However, double antisense fruit softened normally during ripening. In tomato fruit, the PE1 isoform was found to contribute little to total PE activity and have little effect on the degree of esterification of pectin. In contrast, the other dominant fruit isoform, PE2, has a major impact on de-esterification of total pectin. PE2 appears to act on non-CDTA-soluble pectin during ripening and on CDTA-soluble pectin before the start of ripening in a potentially block-wise fashion.

  1. Differential expression of two activating transcription factor 5 isoforms in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicari, Luisa; La Rosa, Cristina; Forte, Stefano; Calabrese, Giovanna; Colarossi, Cristina; Aiello, Eleonora; Salluzzo, Salvatore; Memeo, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Background Activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5) is a member of the activating transcription/cAMP response element-binding protein family of basic leucine zipper proteins that plays an important role in cell survival, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. The ATF5 gene generates two transcripts: ATF5 isoform 1 and ATF5 isoform 2. A number of studies indicate that ATF5 could be an attractive target for therapeutic intervention in several tumor types; however, so far, the role of ATF5 has not been investigated in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). Methods Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immuno-histochemical staining were used to study ATF5 mRNA and protein expression in PTC. Results We report here that ATF5 is expressed more in PTC tissue than in normal thyroid tissue. Furthermore, this is the first study that describes the presence of both ATF5 isoforms in PTC. Conclusion These findings could provide potential applications in PTC cancer treatment.

  2. The transmembrane isoform of Plasmodium falciparum MAEBL is essential for the invasion of Anopheles salivary glands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian E Saenz

    Full Text Available Malaria transmission depends on infective stages in the mosquito salivary glands. Plasmodium sporozoites that mature in midgut oocysts must traverse the hemocoel and invade the mosquito salivary glands in a process thought to be mediated by parasite ligands. MAEBL, a homologue of the transmembrane EBP ligands essential in merozoite invasion, is expressed abundantly in midgut sporozoites. Alternative splicing generates different MAEBL isoforms and so it is unclear what form is functionally essential. To identify the MAEBL isoform required for P. falciparum (NF54 sporozoite invasion of salivary glands, we created knockout and allelic replacements each carrying CDS of a single MAEBL isoform. Only the transmembrane form of MAEBL is essential and is the first P. falciparum ligand validated as essential for invasion of Anopheles salivary glands. MAEBL is the first P. falciparum ligand experimentally determined to be essential for this important step in the life cycle where the vector becomes infectious for transmitting sporozoites to people. With an increasing emphasis on advancing vector-based transgenic methods for suppression of malaria, it is important that this type of study, using modern molecular genetic tools, is done with the agent of the human disease. Understanding what P. falciparum sporozoite ligands are critical for mosquito transmission will help validate targets for vector-based transmission-blocking strategies.

  3. A regulated switch of chick neurofascin isoforms modulates ligand recognition and neurite extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruss, Thomas; Kranz, Eva Ursula; Niere, Marc; Volkmer, Hansjürgen

    2006-02-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecule neurofascin regulates the induction of neurite outgrowth, the establishment of synaptic connectivity and myelination. Neurofascin isoforms are generated by spatially and temporally controlled alternative splicing. Isoform NF166 is predominantly expressed in dorsal root ganglia from embryonal day 5 (E5) to E8, and a further neurofascin isoform NF185 appears at E9. Expression of neurofascin and its binding partner axonin-1 on sensory fibers implies functional interactions for neurite outgrowth. E7 sensory neurons require NF166-axonin-1 interactions for neurite extension, accordingly. The contribution of NF166-axonin-1 interaction for neurite outgrowth decreases in parallel with the appearance of NF185 on sensory neurons at E9. This finding may be explained by (1) alleviated intrinsic capability to use axonin-1 as a cellular receptor and (2) reduced binding of axonin-1 to NF185. Finally, NF166, but not NF185, serves as a cellular receptor for neurite induction via homophilic interactions with a neurofascin substrate.

  4. Mechanisms controlling Pax6 isoform expression in the retina have been conserved between teleosts and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakowski, Jörn; Majumder, Anirban; Lauderdale, James D

    2007-07-15

    The Pax6 gene plays several roles in retinal development, including control of cell proliferation, maintenance of the retinogenic potential of progenitor cells, and cell fate specification. Emerging evidence suggests that these different aspects of Pax6 gene function are mediated by different isoforms of the Pax6 protein; however, relatively little is known about the spatiotemporal expression of Pax6 isoforms in the vertebrate retina. Using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technology, we modified a zebrafish Pax6a BAC such that we could distinguish paired-containing Pax6a transcripts from paired-less Pax6a transcripts. In the zebrafish, the spatial and temporal onset of expression of these transcripts suggests that the paired-less isoform is involved in the cell fate decision leading to the generation of amacrine cells; however, because of limitations associated with transient transgenic analysis, it was not feasible to establish whether this promoter was active in all amacrine cells or in a specific population of amacrine cells. By making mice transgenic for the zebrafish Pax6a BAC reporter transgene, we were able to show that paired-containing and paired-less Pax6a transcripts were differentially expressed in amacrine subpopulations. Our study also directly demonstrates the functional conservation of the regulatory mechanisms governing Pax6 transcription in teleosts and mammals.

  5. Cell-specific expression of TLR9 isoforms in inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, Kelly J; Highton, John; Hessian, Paul A

    2011-02-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key pattern recognition receptors during an immune response. With five isoforms of human TLR9 described, we hypothesised that differential expression of TLR9 isoforms in different cell types would result in variable contributions to the overall input from TLR9 during inflammation. We assessed the molecular expression of the TLR9 isoforms, TLR9-A, -C and -D. In normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells, B-lymphocytes express ∼100-fold more TLR9-A transcript than monocytes or T-lymphocytes, which predominantly express the TLR9-C transcript. Switches in isoform predominance accompany B-lymphocyte development. TLR9 protein expression in rheumatoid inflammatory lesions reflected the TLR9 isoform expression by immune cells. Herein we suggest that B-lymphocytes and plasmacytoid dendritic cells contribute the ∼3-fold higher TLR9-A transcript levels observed in inflamed synovium when compared to subcutaneous rheumatoid nodules. In contrast, macrophages and T-lymphocytes contribute the ∼4-fold higher TLR9-C transcript levels seen in nodules, compared to synovia. From protein sequence, predictions of subcellular localisation suggest TLR9-B may locate to the mitochondria, whereas TLR9-D adopts an opposing orientation in the endoplasmic reticulum. Consistent with this, structure models raise the possibility of alternative ligands for the TLR9-B and TLR9-D variants. Our results highlight differences in the expression of human TLR9 isoforms in normal and inflamed tissues, with differing contributions to inflammation.

  6. Yeast ADP/ATP Carrier Isoform 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clémençon, Benjamin; Rey, Martial; Trézéguet, Véronique; Forest, Eric; Pelosi, Ludovic

    2011-01-01

    The mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier, or Ancp, is a member of the mitochondrial carrier family responsible for exchanging ADP and ATP across the mitochondrial inner membrane. ADP/ATP transport involves Ancp switching between two conformational states. These can be analyzed using specific inhibitors, carboxyatractyloside (CATR) and bongkrekic acid (BA). The high resolution three-dimensional structure of bovine Anc1p (bAnc1p), as a CATR-carrier complex, has been solved. However, because the structure of the BA-carrier complex has not yet been determined, the detailed mechanism of transport remains unknown. Recently, sample processing for hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments coupled to mass spectrometry was improved, providing novel insights into bAnc1p conformational transitions due to inhibitor binding. In this work we performed both hydrogen/deuterium exchange-mass spectrometry experiments and genetic manipulations. Because these are very difficult to apply with bovine Anc1p, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae Anc isoform 2 (ScAnc2p). Significant differences in solvent accessibility were observed throughout the amino acid sequence for ScAnc2p complexed to either CATR or BA. Interestingly, in detergent solution, the conformational dynamics of ScAnc2p were dissimilar to those of bAnc1p, in particular for the upper half of the cavity, toward the intermembrane space, and the m2 loop, which is thought to be easily accessible to the solvent from the matrix in bAnc1p. Our study then focused on the methionyl residues of the Ancp signature sequence, RRRMMM. All our results indicate that the methionine cluster is involved in the ADP/ATP transport mechanism and confirm that the Ancp cavity is a highly dynamic structure. PMID:21868387

  7. Selective eicosanoid-generating capacity of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Bryan P; Pirzai, Waheed; Mumy, Karen L; Gronert, Karsten; McCormick, Beth A

    2011-02-01

    Airway neutrophil infiltration is a pathological hallmark observed in multiple lung diseases including pneumonia and cystic fibrosis. Bacterial pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa instigate neutrophil recruitment to the air space. Excessive accumulation of neutrophils in the lung often contributes to tissue destruction. Previous studies have unveiled hepoxilin A(3) as the key molecular signal driving neutrophils across epithelial barriers. The eicosanoid hepoxilin A(3) is a potent neutrophil chemoattractant produced by epithelial cells in response to infection with P. aeruginosa. The enzyme phospholipase A(2) liberates arachidonic acid from membrane phospholipids, the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of all eicosanoids, including hepoxilin A(3). Once generated, aracidonic acid is acted upon by multiple cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases producing an array of functionally diverse eicosanoids. Although there are numerous phospholipase A(2) isoforms capable of generating arachidonic acid, the isoform most often associated with eicosanoid generation is cytoplasmic phospholipase A(2)α. In the current study, we observed that the cytoplasmic phospholipase A(2)α isoform is required for mediating P. aeruginosa-induced production of certain eicosanoids such as prostaglandin E(2). However, we found that neutrophil transepithelial migration induced by P. aeruginosa does not require cytoplasmic phospholipase A(2)α. Furthermore, P. aeruginosa-induced hepoxilin A(3) production persists despite cytoplasmic phospholipase A(2)α suppression and generation of the 12-lipoxygenase metabolite 12-HETE is actually enhanced in this context. These results suggest that alterative phospholipase A(2) isoforms are utilized to synthesize 12-lipoxygenase metabolites. The therapeutic implications of these findings are significant when considering anti-inflammatory therapies based on targeting eicosanoid synthesis pathways.

  8. Human invariant chain isoform p35 restores thymic selection and antigen presentation in CD74-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genève, Laetitia; Chemali, Magali; Desjardins, Michel; Labrecque, Nathalie; Thibodeau, Jacques

    2012-10-01

    The invariant chain (Ii) has pleiotropic functions and is a key factor in antigen presentation. Ii associates with major histocompatibility complex class II molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and targets the complex in the endocytic pathway to allow antigenic peptide loading. The human Iip35 isoform includes a cytoplasmic extension containing a di-arginine motif causing ER retention. This minor isoform does not exist in mice and its function in humans has not been thoroughly investigated. We have recently generated transgenic mice expressing Iip35 and these were crossed with Ii-deficient mice to generate animals (Tgp35/mIiKO) expressing exclusively the human isoform. In these mice, we show that Iip35 is expressed in antigen presenting cells and is inducible by interferon gamma (IFN-γ). Despite the low constitutive expression of the protein and some minor differences in the Vβ repertoire of Tgp35/mIiKO mice, Iip35 restored thymic selection of CD4(+) T cells and of invariant natural killer T cells. In vitro functional assays using purified primary macrophages treated with IFN-γ showed that Iip35 allows presentation of an Ii-dependent ovalbumin T-cell epitope. Altogether, our results suggest that Iip35 is functional and does not require co-expression of other isoforms for antigen presentation.

  9. Recombinant erythropoietin in humans has a prolonged effect on circulating erythropoietin isoform distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob; Just Christensen, Søren; Lisbjerg, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-assisted isoform immunoassay (MAIIA) quantitates erythropoietin (EPO) isoforms as percentages of migrated isoforms (PMI). We evaluated the effect of recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) on the distribution of EPO isoforms in plasma in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, cross...

  10. Development of a new model system to dissect isoform specific Akt signalling in adipocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajno, Esi; McGraw, Timothy E.; Gonzalez, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase B (Akt) kinases are critical signal transducers mediating insulin action. Genetic studies revealed that Akt1 and Akt2 signalling differentially contribute to sustain lipid and glucose homoeostasis; however Akt isoform-specific effectors remain elusive due to the lack of a suitable model system to mechanistically interrogate Akt isoform-specific signalling. To overcome those technical limitations we developed a novel model system that provides acute and specific control of signalling by Akt isoforms. We generated mutants of Akt1 and Akt2 resistant to the allosteric Akt inhibitor MK-2206. We then developed adipocyte cell lines, in which endogenous Akt1 or Akt2 has been replaced by their corresponding drug-resistant Akt mutant. Treatment of those cells with MK-2206 allowed for acute and specific control of either Akt1 or Akt2 function. Our data showed that Akt1W80A and Akt2W80A mutants are resistant to MK-2206, dynamically regulated by insulin and able to signal to Akt downstream effectors. Analyses of insulin action in this cellular system showed that Akt1 and Akt2 are both able to mediate insulin regulation of the transcription factor forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) and the glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), revealing a redundant role for these Akt kinases in the control of glucose transport into fat cells. In contrast, Akt1 signalling is uniquely required for adipogenesis, by controlling the mitotic clonal expansion (MCE) of pre-adipocytes that precedes white adipose cell differentiation. Our data provide new insights into the role of Akt kinases in glucose transport and adipogenesis and support our model system as a valuable tool for the biochemical characterization of signalling by specific Akt isoforms. PMID:25856301

  11. VEGF111b, a new member of VEGFxxxb isoforms and induced by mitomycin C, inhibits angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Fang; Li, Xiuli [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing (China); Kong, Jian [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Pan, Bing [The Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences of Education Ministry, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Molecular Biology and Regulatory Peptides of Health Ministry, Beijing (China); Institute of Systems Biomedicine, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences of Education Ministry, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Molecular Biology and Regulatory Peptides of Health Ministry, Beijing (China); Sun, Min [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xian (China); Zheng, Lemin, E-mail: zhengl@bjmu.edu.cn [The Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences of Education Ministry, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Molecular Biology and Regulatory Peptides of Health Ministry, Beijing (China); Institute of Systems Biomedicine, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences of Education Ministry, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Molecular Biology and Regulatory Peptides of Health Ministry, Beijing (China); Yao, Yuanqing, E-mail: yqyao@126.com [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •We discovered a new member of VEGFxxxb family-VEGF111b. •We found VEGF111b mRNA and protein can be induced by mitomycin C. •We confirmed VEGF111b over-expression inhibits angiogenesis. •VEGF111b inhibits angiogenesis through inhibiting VEGF-R2/PI3K/Akt and VEGF-R2/ERK1/2 phosphorylation. -- Abstract: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A) stimulating angiogenesis is required for tumor growth and progression. The conventional VEGF-A isoforms have been considered as pro-angiogenic factors. Another family of VEGF-A isoforms generated by alternative splicing, termed VEGFxxxb isoforms, has anti-angiogenic property, exemplified by VEGF165b. Here, we identify a new number of VEGFxxx family-VEGF111b induced by mitomycin C, although not detected in mitomycin C-unexposed ovarian cancer cells. SKOV3 cells were transfected with pcDNA{sub 3.1} empty vector, pcDNA{sub 3.1}-VEGF111b or pcDNA{sub 3.1}-VEGF165b to collect conditioned mediums respectively. VEGF111b overexpression inhibits proliferation, migration and tube formation of endothelial cell by inhibiting VEGF-R2 phosphorylation and its downstream signaling, similar to VEGF165b but slightly lower than VEGF165b. The anti-angiogenic property depends on the six amino acids of exon 8b of the VEGFxxxb isoforms. Our results show that VEGF111b is a novel potent anti-angiogenic agent that can target the VEGF-R2 and its signaling pathway to inhibit ovarian tumor growth.

  12. Multiple isoform recovery (MIR)-PCR: a simple method for the isolation of related mRNA isoforms.

    OpenAIRE

    Fagotti, A; Gabbiani, G.; Pascolini, R; Neuville, P

    1998-01-01

    We present a rapid and efficient method for the detection of related transcripts with different expression levels. This approach combines the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method with a cDNA subtractive technique. The strategy is based on successive subtractions of prevalent isoforms resulting in enrichment of less expressed transcripts. For each subtraction, a biotinylated primer specific for the prevalent isoform is hybridized on the total cDNA and the hybrid is retained on a stre...

  13. Distinct functional interactions between actin isoforms and nonsarcomeric myosins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Müller

    Full Text Available Despite their near sequence identity, actin isoforms cannot completely replace each other in vivo and show marked differences in their tissue-specific and subcellular localization. Little is known about isoform-specific differences in their interactions with myosin motors and other actin-binding proteins. Mammalian cytoplasmic β- and γ-actin interact with nonsarcomeric conventional myosins such as the members of the nonmuscle myosin-2 family and myosin-7A. These interactions support a wide range of cellular processes including cytokinesis, maintenance of cell polarity, cell adhesion, migration, and mechano-electrical transduction. To elucidate differences in the ability of isoactins to bind and stimulate the enzymatic activity of individual myosin isoforms, we characterized the interactions of human skeletal muscle α-actin, cytoplasmic β-actin, and cytoplasmic γ-actin with human myosin-7A and nonmuscle myosins-2A, -2B and -2C1. In the case of nonmuscle myosins-2A and -2B, the interaction with either cytoplasmic actin isoform results in 4-fold greater stimulation of myosin ATPase activity than was observed in the presence of α-skeletal muscle actin. Nonmuscle myosin-2C1 is most potently activated by β-actin and myosin-7A by γ-actin. Our results indicate that β- and γ-actin isoforms contribute to the modulation of nonmuscle myosin-2 and myosin-7A activity and thereby to the spatial and temporal regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. FRET-based analyses show efficient copolymerization abilities for the actin isoforms in vitro. Experiments with hybrid actin filaments show that the extent of actomyosin coupling efficiency can be regulated by the isoform composition of actin filaments.

  14. Differential activities of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper protein isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soundararajan, Rama; Wang, Jian; Melters, Daniël; Pearce, David

    2007-12-14

    Glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper protein (GILZ) is expressed in both epithelial and immune tissues and modulates a variety of cellular functions, including proliferation and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) activity. A number of reports have described various GILZ activities, focusing on a single isoform with molecular mass of approximately 17 kDa, now termed GILZ1. In GILZ immunoblots using a newly developed antiserum, we detected multiple species in extracts from cultured kidney cells. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed that one of these represented a previously uncharacterized distinct isoform of GILZ, GILZ2. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends was used to clone cDNAs corresponding to four isoforms, which, in addition to GILZ1 and GILZ2, included new isoforms GILZ3 and GILZ4. Heterologous expression of these four GILZ isoforms in cultured cells revealed striking functional differences. Notably, GILZ1 was the only isoform that significantly stimulated ENaC-mediated Na+ current in a kidney collecting duct cell line, although GILZ2 and GILZ3 also stimulated ENaC surface expression in HEK 293 cells. GILZ1 and GILZ3, and to a lesser extent GILZ2, inhibited ERK phosphorylation. Interestingly, GILZ4, which had no effect on either ENaC or ERK, potently suppressed cellular proliferation, as did GILZ1, but not GILZ2 or GILZ3. Finally, rat and mouse tissues all expressed multiple GILZ species but varied in the relative abundance of each. These data suggest that multiple GILZ isoforms are expressed in most cells and tissues and that these play distinct roles in regulating key cellular functions, including proliferation and ion transport. Furthermore, GILZ inhibition of ERK appears to play an essential role in stimulation of cell surface ENaC but not in inhibition of proliferation.

  15. Secreted and Transmembrane αKlotho Isoforms Have Different Spatio-Temporal Profiles in the Brain during Aging and Alzheimer's Disease Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massó, Anna; Sánchez, Angela; Gimenez-Llort, Lydia; Lizcano, Jose Miguel; Cañete, Manuel; García, Belen; Torres-Lista, Virginia; Puig, Meritxell; Bosch, Assumpció; Chillon, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The Klotho protein is a β-glucuronidase, and its overexpression is associated with life extension. Its mechanism of action is not fully understood, although it has been recently reported that αKlotho improves synaptic and cognitive functions, and it may also influence a variety of structures and functions during CNS maturation and aging. The αKlotho gene has two transcripts, one encoding a transmembrane isoform (m-KL), and the other a putative secreted isoform (s-KL). Unfortunately, little is known about the secreted αKlotho isoform, since available antibodies cannot discriminate s-KL from the KL1 domain cleaved from the transmembrane isoform. This study shows, for the first time, that the klotho transcript produced by alternative splicing generates a stable protein (70 kDa), and that in contrast to the transmembrane Klotho isoform, it is ten times more abundant in the brain than in the kidney suggesting that the two isoforms may have different functions. We also studied whether klotho expression in the CNS was influenced by aging, Alzheimer's disease (AD), or a healthy lifestyle, such as voluntary moderate continuous exercise. We observed a strong correlation between high expression levels of the two klotho transcripts and the healthy status of the animals. Expression of Klotho in brain areas decayed more rapidly in the 3xTg-AD model of AD than in healthy animals, whilst moderate continuous exercise in adulthood prevents the decline in expression of both klotho transcripts. PMID:26599613

  16. Secreted and Transmembrane αKlotho Isoforms Have Different Spatio-Temporal Profiles in the Brain during Aging and Alzheimer's Disease Progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Massó

    Full Text Available The Klotho protein is a β-glucuronidase, and its overexpression is associated with life extension. Its mechanism of action is not fully understood, although it has been recently reported that αKlotho improves synaptic and cognitive functions, and it may also influence a variety of structures and functions during CNS maturation and aging. The αKlotho gene has two transcripts, one encoding a transmembrane isoform (m-KL, and the other a putative secreted isoform (s-KL. Unfortunately, little is known about the secreted αKlotho isoform, since available antibodies cannot discriminate s-KL from the KL1 domain cleaved from the transmembrane isoform. This study shows, for the first time, that the klotho transcript produced by alternative splicing generates a stable protein (70 kDa, and that in contrast to the transmembrane Klotho isoform, it is ten times more abundant in the brain than in the kidney suggesting that the two isoforms may have different functions. We also studied whether klotho expression in the CNS was influenced by aging, Alzheimer's disease (AD, or a healthy lifestyle, such as voluntary moderate continuous exercise. We observed a strong correlation between high expression levels of the two klotho transcripts and the healthy status of the animals. Expression of Klotho in brain areas decayed more rapidly in the 3xTg-AD model of AD than in healthy animals, whilst moderate continuous exercise in adulthood prevents the decline in expression of both klotho transcripts.

  17. N-terminal isoforms of the large-conductance Ca²⁺-activated K⁺ channel are differentially modulated by the auxiliary β1-subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorca, Ramón A; Stamnes, Susan J; Pillai, Meghan K; Hsiao, Jordy J; Wright, Michael E; England, Sarah K

    2014-04-04

    The large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK(Ca)) channel is essential for maintaining the membrane in a hyperpolarized state, thereby regulating neuronal excitability, smooth muscle contraction, and secretion. The BK(Ca) α-subunit has three predicted initiation codons that generate proteins with N-terminal ends starting with the amino acid sequences MANG, MSSN, or MDAL. Because the N-terminal region and first transmembrane domain of the α-subunit are required for modulation by auxiliary β1-subunits, we examined whether β1 differentially modulates the N-terminal BK(Ca) α-subunit isoforms. In the absence of β1, all isoforms had similar single-channel conductances and voltage-dependent activation. However, whereas β1 did not modulate the voltage-activation curve of MSSN, β1 induced a significant leftward shift of the voltage activation curves of both the MDAL and MANG isoforms. These shifts, of which the MDAL was larger, occurred at both 10 μM and 100 μM Ca(2+). The β1-subunit increased the open dwell times of all three isoforms and decreased the closed dwell times of MANG and MDAL but increased the closed dwell times of MSSN. The distinct modulation of voltage activation by the β1-subunit may be due to the differential effect of β1 on burst duration and interburst intervals observed among these isoforms. Additionally, we observed that the related β2-subunit induced comparable leftward shifts in the voltage-activation curves of all three isoforms, indicating that the differential modulation of these isoforms was specific to β1. These findings suggest that the relative expression of the N-terminal isoforms can fine-tune BK(Ca) channel activity in cells, highlighting a novel mechanism of BK(Ca) channel regulation.

  18. The crystal structure of the non-liganded 14-3-3σ protein: insights into determinants of isoform specific ligand binding and dimerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anne BENZINGER; Grzegorz M. POPOWICZ; Joma K. JOY; Sudipta MAJUMDAR; Tad A. HOLAK; Heiko HERMEKING

    2005-01-01

    Seven different, but highly conserved 14-3-3 proteins are involved in diverse signaling pathways in human cells. It is unclear how the 14-3-3σ isoform, a transcriptional target of p53, exerts its inhibitory effect on the cell cycle in the presence of other 14-3-3 isoforms, which are constitutively expressed at high levels. In order to identify structural differences between the 14-3-3 isoforms, we solved the crystal structure of the human 14-3-3σ protein at a resolution of 2.8 A and compared it to the known structures of 14-3-3ζ and 14-3-3τ. The global architecture of the 14-3-3σ fold is similar to the previously determined structures of 14-3-3ζ and 14-3-3τ: two 14-3-3σ molecules form a cup-shaped dimer. Significant differences between these 14-3-3 isoforms were detected adjacent to the amphipathic groove, which mediates the binding to phosphorylated consensus motifs in 14-3-3-1igands. Another specificity determining region is localized between amino-acids 203 to 215. These differences presumably select for the interaction with specific ligands,which may explain the different biological functions of the respective 14-3-3 isoforms. Furthermore, the two 14-3-3σ molecules forming a dimer differ by the spatial position of the ninth helix, which is shifted to the inside of the ligand interaction surface, thus indicating adaptability of this part of the molecule. In addition, 5 non-conserved residues are located at the interface between two 14-3-3σ proteins forming a dimer and represent candidate determinants of homoand hetero-dimerization specificity. The structural differences among the 14-3-3 isoforms described here presumably contribute to isoform-specific interactions and functions.

  19. Structure- and isoform-specific glucuronidation of six curcumin analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Danyi; Liu, Hui; Ye, Wencai; Wang, Ying; Wu, Baojian

    2017-04-01

    1. In the present study, we aimed to characterize the glucuronidation of six curcumin analogs (i.e. RAO-3, RAO-8, RAO-9, RAO-18, RAO-19, and RAO-23) derived from galangal using human liver microsomes (HLM) and twelve expressed UGT enzymes. 2. Formation of glucuronide was confirmed using high-resolution mass spectrometry. Single glucuronide metabolite was generated from each of six curcumin analogs. The fragmentation patterns were analyzed and were found to differ significantly between alcoholic and phenolic glucuronides. 3. All six curcumin analogs except one (RAO-23) underwent significant glucuronidation in HLM and expressed UGT enzymes. In general, the methoxy group (close to the phenolic hydroxyl group) enhanced the glucuronidation liability of the curcumin analogs. 4. UGT1A9 and UGT2B7 were primarily responsible for the glucuronidation of two alcoholic analogs (RAO-3 and RAO-18). By contrast, UGT1A9 and four UGT2Bs (UGT2B4, 2B7, 2B15 and 2B17) played important roles in conjugating three phenolic analogs (RAO-8, RAO-9, and RAO-19). Interestingly, the conjugated double bonds system (in the aliphatic chain) was crucial to the substrate selectivity of gastrointestinal UGTs (i.e. UGT1A7, 1A8 and 1A10). 5. In conclusion, glucuronidation of six curcumin analogs from galangal were structure- and isoform-specific. The knowledge should be useful in identifying a curcumin analog with improved metabolic property.

  20. Chemical origins of isoform selectivity in histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Kyle V; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2008-01-01

    Histones undergo extensive posttranslational modifications that affect gene expression. Acetylation is a key histone modification that is primarily regulated by two enzymes, one of which is histone deacetylase (HDAC). The activity of HDAC causes transcriptional silencing of DNA. Eleven distinct zinc-dependent histone deacetylase isoforms have been identified in humans. Each isoform has a unique structure and function, and regulates a unique set of genes. HDAC is responsible for the regulation of many genes involved in cancer cell proliferation, and it has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurological conditions. HDAC inhibitors are known to be very effective anti-cancer agents, and research has shown them to be potential treatments for many other conditions. Histone deacetylase inhibitors modify the expression of many genes, and it is possible that inhibition of one isoform could cause epigenetic changes that are beneficial to treatment of a disease, while inhibition of another isoform could cause contradictory changes. Selective HDAC inhibitors will be better able to avoid these types of situations than non-specific inhibitors, and may also be less toxic than pan-HDAC inhibitors. Many potent pan-HDAC inhibitors have already been developed, leaving the development of selective inhibitors at the forefront of HDAC drug development. Certain structural moieties may be added to HDAC inhibitors to give isoform selectivity, and these will be discussed in this review. This review will focus on the applications of selective HDAC inhibitors, inhibitors reported to show selectivity, and the relationship between inhibitor structure and selectivity.

  1. Isoform-targeted regulation of cardiac adenylyl cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2003-01-01

    Numerous attempts have been made to develop strategies for regulating the intracellular cyclic AMP signal pharmacologically, with an intention to establish either new medical therapeutic methods or experimental tools. In the past decades, many pharmacological reagents have been identified that regulate this pathway at the level of the receptor. G protein, adenylyl cyclase, cyclic AMP, protein kinase A and phosphodiesterase. Since the cloning of adenylyl cyclase isoforms during the 1990s, investigators including ourselves have tried to find reagents that regulate the activity of this enzyme directly in an isoform-dependent manner. The ultimate goal of developing such reagents would be to regulate the cyclic AMP signal in an organ-dependent manner. Ourselves and other workers have reported that such reagents may vary from a simple cation to kinases. In a more recent study, using the results from crystallographic studies and computer-assisted drug design programs, we have identified subtype-selective regulators of adenylyl cyclase. Such regulators are mostly based upon forskolin, a diterpene compound obtained from Coleus forskolii, that acts directly on adenylyl cyclase to increase the intracellular levels of cyclic AMP. Similarly, novel reagents have been identified that inhibit a specific adenylyl cyclase isoform (e.g. type 5 adenylyl cyclase). Such reagents would potentially provide a new therapeutic strategy to treat hypertension, for example, as well as methods to selectively stimulate or inhibit this adenylyl cyclase isoform, which may be reminiscent of overexpression or knocking out of the cardiac adenylyl cyclase isoform by the use of a pharmacological method.

  2. p53 isoform profiling in glioblastoma and injured brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, R; Giannini, C; Sarkaria, J N; Schroeder, M; Rogers, J; Mastroeni, D; Scrable, H

    2013-06-27

    The tumor suppressor p53 has been found to be the most commonly mutated gene in human cancers; however, the frequency of p53 mutations varies from 10 to 70% across different cancer types. This variability can partly be explained by inactivating mechanisms aside from direct genomic polymorphisms. The p53 gene encodes 12 isoforms, some of which can modulate full-length p53 activity in cancer. In this study, we characterized p53 isoform expression patterns in glioblastoma, gliosis, non-tumor brain and neural progenitor cells by SDS-PAGE, immunoblot, mass spectrometry and reverse transcription-PCR. We found that the most consistently expressed isoform in glioblastoma, Δ40p53, was uniquely expressed in regenerative processes, such as those involving neural progenitor cells and gliosis compared with tumor samples. Isoform profiling of glioblastoma tissues revealed the presence of both Δ40p53 and full-length p53, neither of which were detected in non-tumor cerebral cortex. Upon xenograft propagation of tumors, p53 levels increased. The variability of overall p53 expression and relative levels of isoforms suggest fluctuations in subpopulations of cells with greater or lesser capacity for proliferation, which can change as the tumor evolves under different growth conditions.

  3. Myelin management by the 18.5-kDa and 21.5-kDa classic myelin basic protein isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harauz, George; Boggs, Joan M

    2013-05-01

    The classic myelin basic protein (MBP) splice isoforms range in nominal molecular mass from 14 to 21.5 kDa, and arise from the gene in the oligodendrocyte lineage (Golli) in maturing oligodendrocytes. The 18.5-kDa isoform that predominates in adult myelin adheres the cytosolic surfaces of oligodendrocyte membranes together, and forms a two-dimensional molecular sieve restricting protein diffusion into compact myelin. However, this protein has additional roles including cytoskeletal assembly and membrane extension, binding to SH3-domains, participation in Fyn-mediated signaling pathways, sequestration of phosphoinositides, and maintenance of calcium homeostasis. Of the diverse post-translational modifications of this isoform, phosphorylation is the most dynamic, and modulates 18.5-kDa MBP's protein-membrane and protein-protein interactions, indicative of a rich repertoire of functions. In developing and mature myelin, phosphorylation can result in microdomain or even nuclear targeting of the protein, supporting the conclusion that 18.5-kDa MBP has significant roles beyond membrane adhesion. The full-length, early-developmental 21.5-kDa splice isoform is predominantly karyophilic due to a non-traditional P-Y nuclear localization signal, with effects such as promotion of oligodendrocyte proliferation. We discuss in vitro and recent in vivo evidence for multifunctionality of these classic basic proteins of myelin, and argue for a systematic evaluation of the temporal and spatial distributions of these protein isoforms, and their modified variants, during oligodendrocyte differentiation.

  4. Murine fibroblast growth factor receptor 1alpha isoforms mediate node regression and are essential for posterior mesoderm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X; Li, C; Takahashi, K; Slavkin, H C; Shum, L; Deng, C X

    1999-04-15

    Alternative splicing in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (Fgfr1) locus generates a variety of splicing isoforms, including FGFR1alpha isoforms, which contain three immunoglobulin-like loops in the extracellular domain of the receptor. It has been previously shown that embryos carrying targeted disruptions of all major isoforms die during gastrulation, displaying severe growth retardation and defective mesodermal structures. Here we selectively disrupted the FGFR1alpha isoforms and found that they play an essential role in posterior mesoderm formation during gastrulation. We show that the mutant embryos lack caudal somites, develop spina bifida, and die at 9.5-12.5 days of embryonic development because they are unable to establish embryonic circulation. The primary defect is a failure of axial mesoderm cell migration toward the posterior portions of the embryos during gastrulation, as revealed by regional marker analysis and DiI labeling. In contrast, the anterior migration of the notochord is unaffected and the embryonic structures rostral to the forelimb are relatively normal. These data demonstrate that FGF/FGFR1alpha signals are posteriorizing factors that control node regression and posterior embryonic development.

  5. Design Diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dankl, Kathrina

    2014-01-01

    The publication 'Design Diversity', an exhibition catalogue, focuses on aging and design – a product culture in transformation that aims to help change conventional notions of the later years of life. Age is positioned as a generational issue that has the same relevance for all age groups...... courageous projects for "best agers" and "golden agers" never get beyond the prototype stage, products that paint a more "beige" picture of everyday life can be found in large numbers. This fact raises some key questions: Does the existing product culture reflect today's views on old age? Do contemporary...... awareness of the fact that material culture shapes our view of aging, and therefore is also capable of changing it....

  6. Laminin isoforms in endothelial and perivascular basement membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Lema F; Di Russo, Jacopo; Sorokin, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    Laminins, one of the major functional components of basement membranes, are found underlying endothelium, and encasing pericytes and smooth muscle cells in the vessel wall. Depending on the type of blood vessel (capillary, venule, postcapillary venule, vein or artery) and their maturation state, both the endothelial and mural cell phenotype vary, with associated changes in laminin isoform expression. Laminins containing the α4 and α5 chains are the major isoforms found in the vessel wall, with the added contribution of laminin α2 in larger vessels. We here summarize current data on the precise localization of these laminin isoforms and their receptors in the different layers of the vessel wall, and their potential contribution to vascular homeostasis.

  7. Autocrine VEGF isoforms differentially regulate endothelial cell behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Yamamoto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF is involved in all the essential biology of endothelial cells, from proliferation to vessel function, by mediating intercellular interactions and monolayer integrity. It is expressed as three major alternative spliced variants. In mice, these are VEGF120, VEGF164, and VEGF188, each with different affinities for extracellular matrices and cell surfaces, depending on the inclusion of heparin-binding sites, encoded by exons 6 and 7. To determine the role of each VEGF isoform in endothelial homeostasis, we compared phenotypes of primary endothelial cells isolated from lungs of mice expressing single VEGF isoforms in normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The differential expression and distribution of VEGF isoforms affect endothelial cell functions, such as proliferation, adhesion, migration and integrity, which are dependent on the stability of and affinity to VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2. We found a correlation between autocrine VEGF164 and VEGFR2 stability, which is also associated with increased expression of proteins involved in cell adhesion. Endothelial cells expressing only VEGF188, which localizes to extracellular matrices or cell surfaces, presented a mesenchymal morphology and weakened monolayer integrity. Cells expressing only VEGF120 lacked stable VEGFR2 and dysfunctional downstream processes, rendering the cells unviable. Endothelial cells expressing these different isoforms in isolation also had differing rates of apoptosis, proliferation, and signaling via nitric oxide (NO synthesis. These data indicate that autocrine signaling of each VEGF isoform has unique functions on endothelial homeostasis and response to hypoxia, due to both distinct VEGF distribution and VEGFR2 stability, which appears to be, at least partly, affected by differential NO production. This study demonstrates that each autocrine VEGF isoform has a distinct effect on downstream functions, namely VEGFR2-regulated endothelial cell

  8. Human Tau Isoforms Assemble into Ribbon-like Fibrils That Display Polymorphic Structure and Stability*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegmann, Susanne; Jung, Yu Jin; Chinnathambi, Subashchandrabose; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Muller, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Fibrous aggregates of Tau protein are characteristic features of Alzheimer disease. We applied high resolution atomic force and EM microscopy to study fibrils assembled from different human Tau isoforms and domains. All fibrils reveal structural polymorphism; the “thin twisted” and “thin smooth” fibrils resemble flat ribbons (cross-section ∼10 × 15 nm) with diverse twist periodicities. “Thick fibrils” show periodicities of ∼65–70 nm and thicknesses of ∼9–18 nm such as routinely reported for “paired helical filaments” but structurally resemble heavily twisted ribbons. Therefore, thin and thick fibrils assembled from different human Tau isoforms challenge current structural models of paired helical filaments. Furthermore, all Tau fibrils reveal axial subperiodicities of ∼17–19 nm and, upon exposure to mechanical stress or hydrophobic surfaces, disassemble into uniform fragments that remain connected by thin thread-like structures (∼2 nm). This hydrophobically induced disassembly is inhibited at enhanced electrolyte concentrations, indicating that the fragments resemble structural building blocks and the fibril integrity depends largely on hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Because full-length Tau and repeat domain constructs assemble into fibrils of similar thickness, the “fuzzy coat” of Tau protein termini surrounding the fibril axis is nearly invisible for atomic force microscopy and EM, presumably because of its high flexibility. PMID:20566652

  9. Human Tau isoforms assemble into ribbon-like fibrils that display polymorphic structure and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegmann, Susanne; Jung, Yu Jin; Chinnathambi, Subashchandrabose; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Muller, Daniel J

    2010-08-27

    Fibrous aggregates of Tau protein are characteristic features of Alzheimer disease. We applied high resolution atomic force and EM microscopy to study fibrils assembled from different human Tau isoforms and domains. All fibrils reveal structural polymorphism; the "thin twisted" and "thin smooth" fibrils resemble flat ribbons (cross-section approximately 10 x 15 nm) with diverse twist periodicities. "Thick fibrils" show periodicities of approximately 65-70 nm and thicknesses of approximately 9-18 nm such as routinely reported for "paired helical filaments" but structurally resemble heavily twisted ribbons. Therefore, thin and thick fibrils assembled from different human Tau isoforms challenge current structural models of paired helical filaments. Furthermore, all Tau fibrils reveal axial subperiodicities of approximately 17-19 nm and, upon exposure to mechanical stress or hydrophobic surfaces, disassemble into uniform fragments that remain connected by thin thread-like structures ( approximately 2 nm). This hydrophobically induced disassembly is inhibited at enhanced electrolyte concentrations, indicating that the fragments resemble structural building blocks and the fibril integrity depends largely on hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Because full-length Tau and repeat domain constructs assemble into fibrils of similar thickness, the "fuzzy coat" of Tau protein termini surrounding the fibril axis is nearly invisible for atomic force microscopy and EM, presumably because of its high flexibility.

  10. Truncated DNMT3B isoform DNMT3B7 suppresses growth, induces differentiation, and alters DNA methylation in human neuroblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ostler, Kelly R.; Yang, Qiwei; Looney, Timothy J.; Li ZHANG; Vasanthakumar, Aparna; Tian, Yufeng; Kocherginsky, Masha; Stacey L. Raimondi; DeMaio, Jessica G.; Salwen, Helen R.; Gu, Song; Chlenski, Alexandre; Naranjo, Arlene; Gill, Amy; Peddinti, Radhika

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic changes in pediatric neuroblastoma may contribute to the aggressive pathophysiology of this disease, but little is known about the basis for such changes. In this study, we examined a role for the DNA methyltransferase DNMT3B, in particular, the truncated isoform DNMT3B7 which is generated frequently in cancer. To investigate if aberrant DNMT3B transcripts alter DNA methylation, gene expression, and phenotypic character in neuroblastoma, we measured DNMT3B expression in primary tum...

  11. Soluble human leukocyte antigen-G isoforms in maternal plasma in early and late pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzo, Roberta; Andersen, Anita Sylvest; Lassen, Michael Rud

    2009-01-01

    published studies that a high, detectable soluble HLA-G concentration in maternal plasma or serum is not mandatory for a successful pregnancy. However, complications during pregnancy, such as (severe) pre-eclampsia, spontaneous abortion, IUGR, and premature birth, are associated with a low or undetectable...... was to investigate the levels of different soluble HLA-G isoforms in maternal plasma in early and late pregnancy. METHOD OF STUDY: Soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) can be detected in maternal blood, and in this study, two different isoforms of sHLA-G, namely sHLA-G1 generated by shedding of membrane-bound HLA-G1 and HLA......-G generated by specific HLA-G transcripts, have been investigated early [median of 16.4 weeks of gestation (GW)] and late (median: 38.9 GW) in pregnancy in an original cohort of 580 pregnant Caucasian women. RESULTS: Lower concentrations of sHLA-G1 were found late in pregnancy (>32 GW) in a group of women...

  12. ApoE isoform-dependent changes in hippocampal synaptic function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sullivan Patrick M

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The lipoprotein receptor system in the hippocampus is intimately involved in the modulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity. The association of specific apoE isoform expression with human neurodegenerative disorders has focused attention on the role of these apoE isoforms in lipoprotein receptor-dependent synaptic modulation. In the present study, we used the apoE2, apoE3 and apoE4 targeted replacement (TR mice along with recombinant human apoE isoforms to determine the role of apoE isoforms in hippocampus area CA1 synaptic function. While synaptic transmission is unaffected by apoE isoform, long-term potentiation (LTP is significantly enhanced in apoE4 TR mice versus apoE2 TR mice. ApoE isoform-dependent differences in LTP induction require NMDA-receptor function, and apoE isoform expression alters activation of both ERK and JNK signal transduction. Acute application of specific apoE isoforms also alters LTP induction while decreasing NMDA-receptor mediated field potentials. Furthermore, acute apoE isoform application does not have the same effects on ERK and JNK activation. These findings demonstrate specific, isoform-dependent effects of human apoE isoforms on adult hippocampus synaptic plasticity and highlight mechanistic differences between chronic apoE isoform expression and acute apoE isoform exposure.

  13. Probing polypeptide GalNAc-transferase isoform substrate specificities by in vitro analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kong, Yun; Joshi, Hiren J; Schjoldager, Katrine Ter-Borch Gram;

    2015-01-01

    N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (GalNAc)-type (mucin-type) O-glycosylation is an abundant and highly diverse modification of proteins. This type of O-glycosylation is initiated in the Golgi by a large family of up to 20 homologous polypeptide GalNAc-T isoenzymes that transfer GalNAc to Ser, Thr...... and possibly Tyr residues. These GalNAc residues are then further elongated by a large set of glycosyltransferases to build a variety of complex O-glycan structures. What determines O-glycan site occupancy is still poorly understood, although it is clear that the substrate specificities of individual...... isoenzymes and the repertoire of GalNAc-Ts in cells are key parameters. The GalNAc-T isoenzymes are differentially expressed in cells and tissues in principle allowing cells to produce unique O-glycoproteomes dependent on the specific subset of isoforms present. In vitro analysis of acceptor peptide...

  14. ROCK in CNS: Different Roles of Isoforms and Therapeutic Target for Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Cheong-Meng; Ai, Nana; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen

    2017-01-01

    Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) is a serine-threonine kinase originally identified as a crucial regulator of actin cytoskeleton. Recent studies have defined new functions of ROCK as a critical component of diverse signaling pathways in neurons. In addition, inhibition of ROCK causes several biological events such as increase of neurite outgrowth, axonal regeneration, and activation of prosurvival Akt. Thus, it has attracted scientist's strong attentions and considered ROCK as a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington';s disease, multiple sclerosis, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However, ROCK has two highly homologous isoforms, ROCK1 and ROCK2. Accumulated evidences indicate that ROCK1 and ROCK2 might involve in distinct cellular functions in central nervous system (CNS) and neurodegenerative processes. This review summarizes recent updates regarding ROCK isoformspecific functions in CNS and the progress of ROCK inhibitors in preclinical studies for neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Counternarrating Racialized Expectations at School: The Diverse Enactments of "Non-Dominant" Identities among 1.5-Generation Japanese Immigrant Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, R.

    2016-01-01

    This study adds to the research on the education of Asian immigrant adolescents by situating how generation, language, nationality, and race complexly impacted how a group of 1.5-generation Japanese youth have made sense of their multiple "non-dominant" identities as immigrant Americans and transnational students within an urban high…

  16. Counternarrating Racialized Expectations at School: The Diverse Enactments of "Non-Dominant" Identities among 1.5-Generation Japanese Immigrant Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, R.

    2016-01-01

    This study adds to the research on the education of Asian immigrant adolescents by situating how generation, language, nationality, and race complexly impacted how a group of 1.5-generation Japanese youth have made sense of their multiple "non-dominant" identities as immigrant Americans and transnational students within an urban high…

  17. Sequence diversity patterns suggesting balancing selection in partially sex-linked genes of the plant Silene latifolia are not generated by demographic history or gene flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirao-Rico, Sara; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Charlesworth, Deborah

    2017-03-01

    DNA sequence diversity in genes in the partially sex-linked pseudoautosomal region (PAR) of the sex chromosomes of the plant Silene latifolia is higher than expected from within-species diversity of other genes. This could be the footprint of sexually antagonistic (SA) alleles that are maintained by balancing selection in a PAR gene (or genes) and affect polymorphism in linked genome regions. SA selection is predicted to occur during sex chromosome evolution, but it is important to test whether the unexpectedly high sequence polymorphism could be explained without it, purely by the combined effects of partial linkage with the sex-determining region and the population's demographic history, including possible introgression from Silene dioica. To test this, we applied approximate Bayesian computation-based model choice to autosomal sequence diversity data, to find the most plausible scenario for the recent history of S. latifolia and then to estimate the posterior density of the most relevant parameters. We then used these densities to simulate variation to be expected at PAR genes. We conclude that an excess of variants at high frequencies at PAR genes should arise in S. latifolia populations only for genes with strong associations with fully sex-linked genes, which requires closer linkage with the fully sex-linked region than that estimated for the PAR genes where apparent deviations from neutrality were observed. These results support the need to invoke selection to explain the S. latifolia PAR gene diversity, and encourage further work to test the possibility of balancing selection due to sexual antagonism. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Conformational Flexibility Differentiates Naturally Occurring Bet v 1 Isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grutsch, Sarina; Fuchs, Julian E; Ahammer, Linda; Kamenik, Anna S; Liedl, Klaus R; Tollinger, Martin

    2017-06-03

    The protein Bet v 1 represents the main cause for allergic reactions to birch pollen in Europe and North America. Structurally homologous isoforms of Bet v 1 can have different properties regarding allergic sensitization and Th2 polarization, most likely due to differential susceptibility to proteolytic cleavage. Using NMR relaxation experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate that the initial proteolytic cleavage sites in two naturally occurring Bet v 1 isoforms, Bet v 1.0101 (Bet v 1a) and Bet v 1.0102 (Bet v 1d), are conformationally flexible. Inaccessible cleavage sites in helices and strands are highly flexible on the microsecond-millisecond time scale, whereas those located in loops display faster nanosecond-microsecond flexibility. The data consistently show that Bet v 1.0102 is more flexible and conformationally heterogeneous than Bet v 1.0101. Moreover, NMR hydrogen-deuterium exchange measurements reveal that the backbone amides in Bet v 1.0102 are significantly more solvent exposed, in agreement with this isoform's higher susceptibility to proteolytic cleavage. The differential conformational flexibility of Bet v 1 isoforms, along with the transient exposure of inaccessible sites to the protein surface, may be linked to proteolytic susceptibility, representing a potential structure-based rationale for the observed differences in Th2 polarization and allergic sensitization.

  19. Protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPRR isoforms in cellular signaling and trafficking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dilaver, Gönül

    2005-01-01

    Previous work has revealed the existence of two Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in mouse, PTPBR7 and PTP-SL, that were in part identical, suggesting that they originated from the same gene, termed Ptprr (1,5,6). In this thesis, I report on the characterization of the various PTPRR isoforms in neuronal

  20. Murine Sirt3 protein isoforms have variable half-lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirt3 is a NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase mainly localized in mitochondria. Recent studies indicate that the murine Sirt3 gene expresses different transcript variants resulting in three possible Sirt3 protein isoforms with variable lengths at the N-terminus: M1 (aa 1-334), M2 (aa 15-334), and M3...

  1. Isoforms of transferrin in psoriasis patients abusing alcohol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Hoefkens (Peter); E.M. Higgins; R.J. Ward (Roberta); H.G. van Eijk (Henk)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe different isoforms of transferrin have been quantified by isoelectric focusing in the sera of psoriasis patients with and without a history of abusing alcohol. In both male and female psoriasis subjects abusing alcohol, there were significant increases in the 2-sial

  2. Differential water permeability and regulation of three aquaporin 4 isoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenton, Robert A.; Moeller, Hanne B; Zelenina, Marina

    2010-01-01

    Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) is expressed in the perivascular glial endfeet and is an important pathway for water during formation and resolution of brain edema. In this study, we examined the functional properties and relative unit water permeability of three functional isoforms of AQP4 expressed in the b...

  3. Distinct Functions of Endophilin Isoforms in Synaptic Vesicle Endocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jifeng Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endophilin isoforms perform distinct characteristics in their interactions with N-type Ca2+ channels and dynamin. However, precise functional differences for the endophilin isoforms on synaptic vesicle (SV endocytosis remain unknown. By coupling RNA interference and electrophysiological recording techniques in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, we investigated the functional differences of three isoforms of endophilin in SV endocytosis. The results showed that the amplitude of normalized evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents in endophilin1 knockdown neurons decreased significantly for both single train and multiple train stimulations. Similar results were found using endophilin2 knockdown neurons, whereas endophilin3 siRNA exhibited no change compared with control neurons. Endophilin1 and endophilin2 affected SV endocytosis, but the effect of endophilin1 and endophilin2 double knockdown was not different from that of either knockdown alone. This result suggested that endophilin1 and endophilin2 functioned together but not independently during SV endocytosis. Taken together, our results indicate that SV endocytosis is sustained by endophilin1 and endophilin2 isoforms, but not by endophilin3, in primary cultured hippocampal neurons.

  4. Identification and characterization of a novel isoform of hepatopoietin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Lu; Wang-Xiang Xu; Yi-Qun Zhan; Xiao-Lin Cui; Wei-Min Cai; Fu-Chu He; Xiao-Ming Yang

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To isolate a novel isoform of human HPO (HPO-205)human fetal liver Marathon-reedy cDNA andcharacterize its primary biological function.METHODS: 5'-RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA 5' ends)was used to isolate a novel isoform of hHPO in this paperThe constructed pcDNAHPO-205, pcDNAHPO and pcDNA eukaryotic expression vectors were respectively transfectedby lipofectamine method and the stimulation of DNAsynthesis was observed by 3H-TdR incorporation assay.Proteins extracted from different cells were analyzed byWestern blot.RESULTS: A novel isoform of hHPO (HPO-205) encoding a205 amino acid ORF corresponding to a translatedproduction of 23 kDa was isolated and distinguished fromthe previous HPO that lacked the N-terminal 80 amino acids.The dnse-dspendent stimulation of DNA synthesis of HepG2hepatoma cells by HPO-205 demonstrated its similarbiological activity with HPO in vitro. The level of MAPK(Mitogen-activated protein kinase) phnsphorylarion byWestern blot analysis revealed that HPO-205 might have thestronger activity of stimulating hepatic cell proliferation thanthat of HPO.CONCLUSION: A novel isoform of hHPO (HPO-205) wasisolated from hepatic-derived cells. The comparison of HPO-205 and HPO will lead to a new insight into the structure andfunction of hHPO, and provide the new way of thinking todeeply elucidate the biological roles of HPO/ALR.

  5. Contrasting land uses in Mediterranean agro-silvo-pastoral systems generated patchy diversity patterns of vascular plants and below-ground microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagella, Simonetta; Filigheddu, Rossella; Caria, Maria Carmela; Girlanda, Mariangela; Roggero, Pier Paolo

    2014-12-01

    The aims of this paper were (i) to define how contrasting land uses affected plant biodiversity in Mediterranean agro-silvo-pastoral-systems across a gradient of disturbance regimes: cork oak forests, secondary grasslands, hay crops, grass covered vineyards, tilled vineyards; (ii) to determine whether these patterns mirrored those of below-ground microorganisms and whether the components of γ-diversity followed a similar model. The disturbance regimes affected plant assemblage composition. Species richness decreased with increasing land use intensity, the Shannon index showed the highest values in grasslands and hay crops. Plant assemblage composition patterns mirrored those of Basidiomycota and Ascomycota. Richness in Basidiomycota, denitrifying bacteria and microbial biomass showed the same trend as that observed for vascular plant richness. The Shannon index pattern of below-ground microorganisms was different from that of plants. The plant γ-diversity component model weakly mirrored those of Ascomycota. Patchy diversity patterns suggest that the maintenance of contrasting land uses associated with different productions typical of agro-silvo-pastoral-systems can guarantee the conservation of biodiversity.

  6. Cloning, expression and alternative splicing of the novel isoform of hTCP11 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Yong-xin; Zhang, Si-zhong; Wu, Qia-qing;

    2003-01-01

    To identify a novel isoform of hTCP11 gene and investigate its expression and alternative splicing.......To identify a novel isoform of hTCP11 gene and investigate its expression and alternative splicing....

  7. Mast cells express novel functional IL-15 receptor alpha isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanova, Elena; Budagian, Vadim; Orinska, Zane; Krause, Hans; Paus, Ralf; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2003-05-15

    Mast cells previously have been reported to be regulated by IL-15 and to express a distinct IL-15R, termed IL-15RX. To further examine IL-15 binding and signaling in mast cells, we have studied the nature of the IL-15R and some of its biological activities in these cells. In this study, we report the existence of three novel isoforms of the IL-15R alpha chain in murine bone marrow-derived mast cells as a result of an alternative exon-splicing mechanism within the IL-15R alpha gene. These correspond to new mRNA transcripts lacking exon 4; exons 3 and 4; or exons 3, 4, and 5 (IL-15R alpha Delta 4, IL-15R alpha Delta 3,4, IL-15R alpha Delta 3,4,5). After transient transfection in COS-7 cells, all IL-15R alpha isoforms associate with the Golgi apparatus, the endoplasmic reticulum, the perinuclear space, and the cell membrane. Analysis of glycosylation pattern demonstrates the usage of a single N-glycosylation site, while no O-glycosylation is observed. Importantly, IL-15 binds with high affinity to, and promotes the survival of, murine BA/F3 cells stably transfected with the IL-15R alpha isoforms. Furthermore, we report that signaling mediated by IL-15 binding to the newly identified IL-15R alpha isoforms involves the phosphorylation of STAT3, STAT5, STAT6, Janus kinase 2, and Syk kinase. Taken together, our data indicate that murine mast cells express novel, fully functional IL-15R alpha isoforms, which can explain the selective regulatory effects of IL-15 on these cells.

  8. Growth hormone isoforms in a girl with gigantism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, L L; Chasalow, F I; Escobar, O; Blethen, S L

    1999-01-01

    Several previous investigations have suggested that there may be different growth hormone isoforms in patients with acromegaly. We used three different site-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to investigate growth hormone (GH) isoforms in serum from an 8 year-old girl with a GH and prolactin secreting adenoma. The pattern of GH-immunoreactivity was dependent on the circumstances of collection. Serum obtained after oral glucose had very little cross reactivity with MAb 352 although concentrations of up to 15 micrograms/l were found with two other MAbs, 033 and 665. MAb 352 does not recognize the 20,000 dalton isoform of GH (20K) while both MAb 033 and 665 do. The same pattern of GH immunoreactivity (low MAb 352, equal and higher MAb 033 and 665) was seen in other baseline samples. In contrast, samples obtained after TRH/GnRH showed immunoreactivity patterns expected for a mixture of 22,000 dalton isoform of GH (22K) with only a small amount of 20K. GH samples obtained during sleep showed both patterns with episodic peaks with equal immunoreactivity superimposed on the basal pattern (decreased activity with MAb 352). Affinity chromatography of basal samples showed that a portion of the GH immunoreactivity was neither 22K nor 20K, although in stimulated samples, over 70% of GH was 22K or 20K GH. In conclusion, the nature of GH isoforms present in serum varies with GH concentration. These differences may contribute to the known difficulty in correlating disease activity and random GH measurements in patients with GH secreting adenomas.

  9. Selective Deletion of the Brain-Specific Isoform of Renin Causes Neurogenic Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Keisuke; Liu, Xuebo; Morgan, Donald A; Davis, Deborah R; Sequeira-Lopez, Maria Luisa S; Cassell, Martin D; Grobe, Justin L; Rahmouni, Kamal; Sigmund, Curt D

    2016-12-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the brain is a critical determinant of blood pressure, but the mechanisms regulating RAS activity in the brain remain unclear. Expression of brain renin (renin-b) occurs from an alternative promoter-first exon. The predicted translation product is a nonsecreted enzymatically active renin whose function is unknown. We generated a unique mouse model by selectively ablating the brain-specific isoform of renin (renin-b) while preserving the expression and function of the classical isoform expressed in the kidney (renin-a). Preservation of renal renin was confirmed by measurements of renin gene expression and immunohistochemistry. Surprisingly, renin-b-deficient mice exhibited hypertension, increased sympathetic nerve activity to the kidney and heart, and impaired baroreflex sensitivity. Whereas these mice displayed decreased circulating RAS activity, there was a paradoxical increase in brain RAS activity. Physiologically, renin-b-deficient mice exhibited an exaggerated depressor response to intracerebroventricular administration of losartan, captopril, or aliskiren. At the molecular level, renin-b-deficient mice exhibited increased expression of angiotensin-II type 1 receptor in the paraventricular nucleus, which correlated with an increased renal sympathetic nerve response to leptin, which was dependent on angiotensin-II type 1 receptor activity. Interestingly, despite an ablation of renin-b expression, expression of renin-a was significantly increased in rostral ventrolateral medulla. These data support a new paradigm for the genetic control of RAS activity in the brain by a coordinated regulation of the renin isoforms, with expression of renin-b tonically inhibiting expression of renin-a under baseline conditions. Impairment of this control mechanism causes neurogenic hypertension. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Somatodendritic and excitatory postsynaptic distribution of neuron-type dystrophin isoform, Dp40, in hippocampal neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Takahiro; Itoh, Kyoko, E-mail: kxi14@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji

    2014-09-12

    Highlights: • Identification of dystrophin (Dp) shortest isoform, Dp40, is a neuron-type Dp. • Dp40 expression is temporally and differentially regulated in comparison to Dp71. • Somatodendritic and nuclear localization of Dp40. • Dp40 is localized to excitatory postsynapses. • Dp40 might play roles in dendritic and synaptic functions. - Abstract: The Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene produces multiple dystrophin (Dp) products due to the presence of several promoters. We previously reported the existence of a novel short isoform of Dp, Dp40, in adult mouse brain. However, the exact biochemical expression profile and cytological distribution of the Dp40 protein remain unknown. In this study, we generated a polyclonal antibody against the NH{sub 2}-terminal region of the Dp40 and identified the expression profile of Dp40 in the mouse brain. Through an analysis using embryonic and postnatal mouse cerebrums, we found that Dp40 emerged from the early neonatal stages until adulthood, whereas Dp71, an another Dp short isoform, was highly detected in both prenatal and postnatal cerebrums. Intriguingly, relative expressions of Dp40 and Dp71 were prominent in cultured dissociated neurons and non-neuronal cells derived from mouse hippocampus, respectively. Furthermore, the immunocytological distribution of Dp40 was analyzed in dissociated cultured neurons, revealing that Dp40 is detected in the soma and its dendrites, but not in the axon. It is worthy to note that Dp40 is localized along the subplasmalemmal region of the dendritic shafts, as well as at excitatory postsynaptic sites. Thus, Dp40 was identified as a neuron-type Dp possibly involving dendritic and synaptic functions.

  11. Functional characterization of two secreted SEL1L isoforms capable of exporting unassembled substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Monica; Lotti, Lavinia Vittoria; Martino, Simone; Cardano, Marina; Orlandi, Rosaria; Mariani-Costantini, Renato; Biunno, Ida

    2009-04-24

    SEL1L-A, a transmembrane glycoprotein residing in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), is a component of the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. Alternative splicing generates two smaller SEL1L isoforms, -B and -C, that lack the SEL1L-A membrane-spanning region but retain some sel-1-like repeats, known to be involved in multi-protein interactions and signal transduction. In this study the functional characteristics of SEL1L-B and -C were investigated in human cell models. We show that these two isoforms are induced upon ER stress and activation of the unfolded protein response, together with SEL1L-A. Using transient transfection experiments (based on wild-type and mutant SEL1L constructs) combined with several biochemical tests we show that SEL1L-B and, more prominently, SEL1L-C are secreted glycoproteins. Although SEL1L-C is in monomeric form, SEL1L-B is engaged in intramolecular/intermolecular disulfide bonds. Both isoforms localize in secretory and degradative cellular compartments and in areas of cell-cell contact. However, whereas SEL1L-B is mainly associated with membranes, SEL1L-C shows the typical intralumenal localization of soluble proteins and is present in intercellular spaces. Furthermore, because of its peroxisomal domain, SEL1L-C localizes to peroxisomes. Both SEL1L-B and -C are involved in sorting and exporting unassembled Ig-mu(s) but do not affect two other ERAD substrates, the null Hong Kong variant of alpha(1)-antitrypsin, and mutant alpha(1)-AT Z. Overall these findings suggest that SEL1L-B and -C participate to novel molecular pathways that, in parallel with ERAD, contribute to the disposure of misfolded/unfolded or orphan proteins through degradation or secretion.

  12. Two isoforms of ferredoxin:NADP(+) oxidoreductase from wheat leaves: purification and initial biochemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzyb, Joanna; Malec, Przemysław; Rumak, Izabela; Garstka, Maciej; Strzałka, Kazimierz

    2008-04-01

    Ferredoxin:NADP(+) oxidoreductase is an enzyme associated with the stromal side of the thylakoid membrane in the chloroplast. It is involved in photosynthetic linear electron transport to produce NADPH and is supposed to play a role in cyclic electron transfer, generating a transmembrane pH gradient allowing ATP production, if photosystem II is non-functional or no NADP(+) is available for reduction. Different FNR isoforms have been described in non-photosynthetic tissues, where the enzyme catalyses the NADPH-dependent reduction of ferredoxin (Fd), necessary for some biosynthetic pathways. Here, we report the isolation and purification of two FNR isoproteins from wheat leaves, called FNR-A and FNR-B. These forms of the enzyme were identified as products of two different genes, as confirmed by mass spectrometry. The molecular masses of FNR-A and FNR-B were 34.3 kDa and 35.5 kDa, respectively. The isoelectric point of both FNR-A and FNR-B was about 5, but FNR-B appeared more acidic (of about 0.2 pH unit) than FNR-A. Both isoenzymes were able to catalyse a NADPH-dependent reduction of dibromothymoquinone and the mixture of isoforms catalysed reduction of cytochrome c in the presence of Fd. For the first time, the pH- and ionic strength dependent oligomerization of FNRs is observed. No other protein was necessary for complex formation. The putative role of the two FNR isoforms in photosynthesis is discussed based on current knowledge of electron transport in chloroplasts.

  13. Functional Characterization of Two Secreted SEL1L Isoforms Capable of Exporting Unassembled Substrate*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Monica; Lotti, Lavinia Vittoria; Martino, Simone; Cardano, Marina; Orlandi, Rosaria; Mariani-Costantini, Renato; Biunno, Ida

    2009-01-01

    SEL1L-A, a transmembrane glycoprotein residing in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), is a component of the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. Alternative splicing generates two smaller SEL1L isoforms, -B and -C, that lack the SEL1L-A membrane-spanning region but retain some sel-1-like repeats, known to be involved in multi-protein interactions and signal transduction. In this study the functional characteristics of SEL1L-B and -C were investigated in human cell models. We show that these two isoforms are induced upon ER stress and activation of the unfolded protein response, together with SEL1L-A. Using transient transfection experiments (based on wild-type and mutant SEL1L constructs) combined with several biochemical tests we show that SEL1L-B and, more prominently, SEL1L-C are secreted glycoproteins. Although SEL1L-C is in monomeric form, SEL1L-B is engaged in intramolecular/intermolecular disulfide bonds. Both isoforms localize in secretory and degradative cellular compartments and in areas of cell-cell contact. However, whereas SEL1L-B is mainly associated with membranes, SEL1L-C shows the typical intralumenal localization of soluble proteins and is present in intercellular spaces. Furthermore, because of its peroxisomal domain, SEL1L-C localizes to peroxisomes. Both SEL1L-B and -C are involved in sorting and exporting unassembled Ig-μs but do not affect two other ERAD substrates, the null Hong Kong variant of α1-antitrypsin, and mutant α1-AT Z. Overall these findings suggest that SEL1L-B and -C participate to novel molecular pathways that, in parallel with ERAD, contribute to the disposure of misfolded/unfolded or orphan proteins through degradation or secretion. PMID:19204006

  14. N-linked glycosylation of a subunit isoforms is critical for vertebrate vacuolar H(+) -ATPase (V-ATPase) biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmail, Sally; Kartner, Norbert; Yao, Yeqi; Kim, Joo Wan; Reithmeier, Reinhart A F; Manolson, Morris F

    2017-06-29

    The a subunit of the V0 membrane-integrated sector of human V-ATPase has four isoforms, a1-a4, with diverse and crucial functions in health and disease. They are encoded by four conserved paralogous genes, and their vertebrate orthologs have positionally conserved N-glycosylation sequons within the second extracellular loop, EL2, of the a subunit membrane domain. Previously, we have shown directly that the predicted sequon for the a4 isoform is indeed N-glycosylated. Here we extend our investigation to the other isoforms by transiently transfecting HEK 293 cells to express cDNA constructs of epitope-tagged human a1-a3 subunits, with or without mutations that convert Asn to Gln at putative N-glycosylation sites. Expression and N-glycosylation were characterized by immunoblotting and mobility shifts after enzymatic deglycosylation, and intracellular localization was determined using immunofluorescence microscopy. All unglycosylated mutants, where predicted N-glycosylation sites had been eliminated by sequon mutagenesis, showed increased relative mobility on immunoblots, identical to what was seen for wild-type a subunits after enzymatic deglycosylation. Cycloheximide-chase experiments showed that unglycosylated subunits were turned over at a higher rate than N-glycosylated forms by degradation in the proteasomal pathway. Immunofluorescence colocalization analysis showed that unglycosylated a subunits were retained in the ER, and co-immunoprecipitation studies showed that they were unable to associate with the V-ATPase assembly chaperone, VMA21. Taken together with our previous a4 subunit studies, these observations show that N-glycosylation is crucial in all four human V-ATPase a subunit isoforms for protein stability and ultimately for functional incorporation into V-ATPase complexes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Determination of the class and isoform selectivity of small-molecule histone deacetylase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, N.; Jeffers, M.; Kumar, S.;

    2008-01-01

    ) against a panel of rhHDAC (recombinant human HDAC) isoforms. Eight rhHDACs were expressed using a baculoviral system, and a Fluor de Lystrade mark (Biomol International) HDAC assay was optimized for each purified isoform. The potency and selectivity of ten HDACs on class I isoforms (rhHDAC1, rhHDAC2, rh...

  16. Identification of cardiac myofilament protein isoforms using multiple mass spectrometry based approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, V.; Venkatraman, V.; Kirk, J.A.; Ubaida-Mohien, C.; Graham, D.R.; Faber, M.J.; Eyk, J.E. Van

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The identification of protein isoforms in complex biological samples is challenging. We, therefore, used an MS approach to unambiguously identify cardiac myofilament protein isoforms based on the observation of a tryptic peptide consisting of a sequence unique to a particular isoform. EXPER

  17. Expression, purification and enzymatic characterization of the catalytic domains of human tryptophan hydroxylase isoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windahl, Michael Skovbo; Boesen, Jane; Karlsen, Pernille Efferbach;

    2009-01-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase exists in two isoforms: Isoform 1 catalyses the first and rate-limiting step in the synthesis of serotonin in the peripheral parts of the body while isoform 2 catalyses this step in the brain. The catalytic domains of human tryptophan hydroxylase 1 and 2 have been expressed...

  18. Feedback Induction of a Photoreceptor-specific Isoform of Retinoid-related Orphan Nuclear Receptor β by the Rod Transcription Factor NRL*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yulong; Liu, Hong; Ng, Lily; Kim, Jung-Woong; Hao, Hong; Swaroop, Anand; Forrest, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Vision requires the generation of cone and rod photoreceptors that function in daylight and dim light, respectively. The neural retina leucine zipper factor (NRL) transcription factor critically controls photoreceptor fates as it stimulates rod differentiation and suppresses cone differentiation. However, the controls over NRL induction that balance rod and cone fates remain unclear. We have reported previously that the retinoid-related orphan receptor β gene (Rorb) is required for Nrl expression and other retinal functions. We show that Rorb differentially expresses two isoforms: RORβ2 in photoreceptors and RORβ1 in photoreceptors, progenitor cells, and other cell types. Deletion of RORβ2 or RORβ1 increased the cone:rod ratio ∼2-fold, whereas deletion of both isoforms in Rorb−/− mice produced almost exclusively cone-like cells at the expense of rods, suggesting that both isoforms induce Nrl. Electroporation of either RORβ isoform into retinal explants from Rorb−/− neonates reactivated Nrl and rod genes but, in Nrl−/− explants, failed to reactivate rod genes, indicating that NRL is the effector for both RORβ isoforms in rod differentiation. Unexpectedly, RORβ2 expression was lost in Nrl−/− mice. Moreover, NRL activated the RORβ2-specific promoter of Rorb, indicating that NRL activates Rorb, its own inducer gene. We suggest that feedback activation between Nrl and Rorb genes reinforces the commitment to rod differentiation. PMID:25296752

  19. Feedback induction of a photoreceptor-specific isoform of retinoid-related orphan nuclear receptor β by the rod transcription factor NRL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yulong; Liu, Hong; Ng, Lily; Kim, Jung-Woong; Hao, Hong; Swaroop, Anand; Forrest, Douglas

    2014-11-21

    Vision requires the generation of cone and rod photoreceptors that function in daylight and dim light, respectively. The neural retina leucine zipper factor (NRL) transcription factor critically controls photoreceptor fates as it stimulates rod differentiation and suppresses cone differentiation. However, the controls over NRL induction that balance rod and cone fates remain unclear. We have reported previously that the retinoid-related orphan receptor β gene (Rorb) is required for Nrl expression and other retinal functions. We show that Rorb differentially expresses two isoforms: RORβ2 in photoreceptors and RORβ1 in photoreceptors, progenitor cells, and other cell types. Deletion of RORβ2 or RORβ1 increased the cone:rod ratio ∼2-fold, whereas deletion of both isoforms in Rorb(-/-) mice produced almost exclusively cone-like cells at the expense of rods, suggesting that both isoforms induce Nrl. Electroporation of either RORβ isoform into retinal explants from Rorb(-/-) neonates reactivated Nrl and rod genes but, in Nrl(-/-) explants, failed to reactivate rod genes, indicating that NRL is the effector for both RORβ isoforms in rod differentiation. Unexpectedly, RORβ2 expression was lost in Nrl(-/-) mice. Moreover, NRL activated the RORβ2-specific promoter of Rorb, indicating that NRL activates Rorb, its own inducer gene. We suggest that feedback activation between Nrl and Rorb genes reinforces the commitment to rod differentiation. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Identity, Diversity and Diversity Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Lotte; Muhr, Sara Louise; Villeseche, Florence

    2016-01-01

    – The work can encourage policy makers, diversity and HR managers to question their own practices and assumptions leading to more theoretical informed diversity management practices. Originality/value – The theoretical connections between identity and diversity literature have so far not been reviewed...... systematically. The work foregrounds how important it is for diversity scholars to consider identity underpinnings of diversity research to help further develop the field within and beyond the three streams the authors discuss.......The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between the identity and diversity literatures and discuss how a better understanding of the theoretical connections between the two informs both diversity research and diversity management practices. Design/methodology/approach – Literature...

  1. The Role of Nuclear Power in Reducing Risk of the Fossil Fuel Prices and Diversity of Electricity Generation in Tunisia: A Portfolio Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhamid, Mohamed Ben; Aloui, Chaker; Chaton, Corinne; Souissi, Jomâa

    2010-04-01

    This paper applies real options and mean-variance portfolio theories to analyze the electricity generation planning into presence of nuclear power plant for the Tunisian case. First, we analyze the choice between fossil fuel and nuclear production. A dynamic model is presented to illustrate the impact of fossil fuel cost uncertainty on the optimal timing to switch from gas to nuclear. Next, we use the portfolio theory to manage risk of the electricity generation portfolio and to determine the optimal fuel mix with the nuclear alternative. Based on portfolio theory, the results show that there is other optimal mix than the mix fixed for the Tunisian mix for the horizon 2010-2020, with lower cost for the same risk degree. In the presence of nuclear technology, we found that the optimal generating portfolio must include 13% of nuclear power technology share.

  2. Diverse levels of an inwardly rectifying potassium conductance generate heterogeneous neuronal behavior in a population of dorsal cochlear nucleus pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leao, Ricardo M; Li, Shuang; Doiron, Brent; Tzounopoulos, Thanos

    2012-06-01

    Homeostatic mechanisms maintain homogeneous neuronal behavior among neurons that exhibit substantial variability in the expression levels of their ionic conductances. In contrast, the mechanisms, which generate heterogeneous neuronal behavior across a neuronal population, remain poorly understood. We addressed this problem in the dorsal cochlear nucleus, where principal neurons exist in two qualitatively distinct states: spontaneously active or not spontaneously active. Our studies reveal that distinct activity states are generated by the differential levels of a Ba(2+)-sensitive, inwardly rectifying potassium conductance (K(ir)). Variability in K(ir) maximal conductance causes variations in the resting membrane potential (RMP). Low K(ir) conductance depolarizes RMP to voltages above the threshold for activating subthreshold-persistent sodium channels (Na(p)). Once Na(p) channels are activated, the RMP becomes unstable, and spontaneous firing is triggered. Our results provide a biophysical mechanism for generating neural heterogeneity, which may play a role in the encoding of sensory information.

  3. EGFR soluble isoforms and their transcripts are expressed in meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaudeau, Angélique; Durand, Karine; Bessette, Barbara; Chaunavel, Alain; Pommepuy, Isabelle; Projetti, Fabrice; Robert, Sandrine; Caire, François; Rabinovitch-Chable, Hélène; Labrousse, François

    2012-01-01

    The EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) is involved in the oncogenesis of many tumors. In addition to the full-length EGFR (isoform a), normal and tumor cells produce soluble EGFR isoforms (sEGFR) that lack the intracellular domain. sEGFR isoforms b, c and d are encoded by EGFR variants 2 (v2), 3 (v3) and 4 (v4) mRNA resulting from gene alternative splicing. Accordingly, the results of EGFR protein expression analysis depend on the domain targeted by the antibodies. In meningiomas, EGFR expression investigations mainly focused on EGFR isoform a. sEGFR and EGFRvIII mutant, that encodes a constitutively active truncated receptor, have not been studied. In a 69 meningiomas series, protein expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry using extracellular domain targeted antibody (ECD-Ab) and intracellular domain targeted antibody (ICD-Ab). EGFRv1 to v4 and EGFRvIII mRNAs were quantified by RT-PCR and EGFR amplification revealed by MLPA. Results were analyzed with respect to clinical data, tumor resection (Simpson grade), histological type, tumor grade, and patient outcome.Immunochemical staining was stronger with ECD-Ab than with ICD-Ab. Meningiomas expressed EGFRv1 to -v4 mRNAs but not EGFRvIII mutant. Intermediate or high ECD-Ab staining and high EGFRv1 to v4 mRNA levels were associated to a better progression free survival (PFS). PFS was also improved in women, when tumor resection was evaluated as Simpson 1 or 2, in grade I vs. grade II and III meningiomas and when Ki67 labeling index was lower than 10%. Our results suggest that, EGFR protein isoforms without ICD and their corresponding mRNA variants are expressed in meningiomas in addition to the whole isoform a. EGFRvIII was not expressed. High expression levels seem to be related to a better prognosis. These results indicate that the oncogenetic mechanisms involving the EGFR pathway in meningiomas could be different from other tumor types.

  4. EGFR soluble isoforms and their transcripts are expressed in meningiomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélique Guillaudeau

    Full Text Available The EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor is involved in the oncogenesis of many tumors. In addition to the full-length EGFR (isoform a, normal and tumor cells produce soluble EGFR isoforms (sEGFR that lack the intracellular domain. sEGFR isoforms b, c and d are encoded by EGFR variants 2 (v2, 3 (v3 and 4 (v4 mRNA resulting from gene alternative splicing. Accordingly, the results of EGFR protein expression analysis depend on the domain targeted by the antibodies. In meningiomas, EGFR expression investigations mainly focused on EGFR isoform a. sEGFR and EGFRvIII mutant, that encodes a constitutively active truncated receptor, have not been studied. In a 69 meningiomas series, protein expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry using extracellular domain targeted antibody (ECD-Ab and intracellular domain targeted antibody (ICD-Ab. EGFRv1 to v4 and EGFRvIII mRNAs were quantified by RT-PCR and EGFR amplification revealed by MLPA. Results were analyzed with respect to clinical data, tumor resection (Simpson grade, histological type, tumor grade, and patient outcome.Immunochemical staining was stronger with ECD-Ab than with ICD-Ab. Meningiomas expressed EGFRv1 to -v4 mRNAs but not EGFRvIII mutant. Intermediate or high ECD-Ab staining and high EGFRv1 to v4 mRNA levels were associated to a better progression free survival (PFS. PFS was also improved in women, when tumor resection was evaluated as Simpson 1 or 2, in grade I vs. grade II and III meningiomas and when Ki67 labeling index was lower than 10%. Our results suggest that, EGFR protein isoforms without ICD and their corresponding mRNA variants are expressed in meningiomas in addition to the whole isoform a. EGFRvIII was not expressed. High expression levels seem to be related to a better prognosis. These results indicate that the oncogenetic mechanisms involving the EGFR pathway in meningiomas could be different from other tumor types.

  5. Mitochondrial Sulfide Detoxification Requires a Functional Isoform O-Acetylserine(thiol)lyase C in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Consolación (A)lvarez; Irene García; Luis C.Romero; Cecilia Gotor

    2012-01-01

    In non-cyanogenic species,the main source of cyanide derives from ethylene and camalexin biosyntheses.In mitochondria,cyanide is a potent inhibitor of the cytochrome c oxidase and is metabolized bythe β-cyanoalanine synthase CYS-C1,catalyzing the conversion of cysteine and cyanide to hydrogen sulfide and β-cyanoalanine.The hydrogen sulfide released also inhibits the cytochrome c oxidase and needs to be detoxified by the O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase mitochondrial isoform,OAS-C,which catalyzes the incorporation of sulfide to O-acetylserine to produce cysteine,thus generating a cyclic pathway in the mitochondria.The loss of functional OAS-C isoforms causes phenotypic characteristics very similar to the loss of the CYS-C1 enzyme,showing defects in root hair formation.Genetic complementation with the OAS-C gene rescues the impairment of root hair elongation,restoring the wild-type phenotype.The mitochondria compromise their capacity to properly detoxify cyanide and the resulting sulfide because the latter cannot re-assimilate into cysteine in the oas-c null mutant.Consequently,we observe an accumulation of sulfide and cyanide and of the alternative oxidase,which is unable to prevent the production of reactive oxygen species probably due to the accumulation of both toxic molecules.Our results allow us to suggest that the significance of OAS-C is related to its role in the proper sulfide and cyanide detoxification in mitochondria.

  6. Distinct Functions of Different scl Isoforms in Zebrafish Definitive Hematopoietic Stem Cell Initiation and Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yahui

    2011-07-01

    The establishment of entire blood system relies on the multi-potent hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), thus identifying the molecular mechanism in HSC generation is of importance for not only complementing the fundamental knowledge in stem cell biology, but also providing insights to the regenerative therapies. Recent researches have documented the formation of nascent HSCs through a direct transition from ventral aortic endothelium, named as endothelial hematopoietic transition (EHT) process. However, the precise genetic program engaged in this process remains largely elusive. The transcription factor scl plays pivotal and conserved roles in embryonic and adult hematopoiesis from teleosts to mammals. Our lab have previously identified a new truncated scl isoform, scl-beta, which is indispensible for the specification of HSCs in the ventral wall of dorsal aorta (VDA), the zebrafish equivalent of mammalian fetal hematopoietic organ. Here we observe that, by combining time-lapse confocal imaging of transgenic zebrafish and genetic epistasis analysis, scl-beta is expressed in a subset of ventral aortic endothelial cells and critical for their forthcoming transformation to hemogenic endothelium; in contrast, runx1 is required downstream to govern the successful egress of the hemogenic endothelial cells to become naive HSCs. In addition, the traditional known full-length scl-alpha isoform is firstly evidenced to be required for the maintenance or survival of newly formed HSCs in VDA. Collectively our data has established the genetic hierarchy controlling discrete steps in the consecutive process of HSC formation from endothelial cells and further development in VDA.

  7. Design and synthesis of benzodiazepine analogs as isoform-selective human lysine deacetylase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, D Rajasekhar; Ballante, Flavio; Zhou, Nancy J; Marshall, Garland R

    2017-02-15

    A comprehensive investigation was performed to identify new benzodiazepine (BZD) derivatives as potent and selective human lysine deacetylase inhibitors (hKDACis). A total of 108 BZD compounds were designed, synthesized and from that 104 compounds were biologically evaluated against human lysine deacetylases (hKDACs) 1, 3 and 8 (class I) and 6 (class IIb). The most active compounds showed mid-nanomolar potencies against hKDACs 1, 3 and 6 and micromolar activity against hKDAC8, while a promising compound (6q) showed selectivity towards hKDAC3 among the different enzyme isoforms. An hKDAC6 homology model, refined by molecular dynamics simulation was generated, and molecular docking studies performed to rationalize the dominant ligand-residue interactions as well as to define structure-activity-relationships. Experimental results confirmed the usefulness of the benzodiazepine moiety as capping group when pursuing hKDAC isoform-selectivity inhibition, suggesting its continued use when designing new hKDACis.

  8. Somatodendritic and excitatory postsynaptic distribution of neuron-type dystrophin isoform, Dp40, in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Takahiro; Itoh, Kyoko; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji

    2014-09-12

    The Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene produces multiple dystrophin (Dp) products due to the presence of several promoters. We previously reported the existence of a novel short isoform of Dp, Dp40, in adult mouse brain. However, the exact biochemical expression profile and cytological distribution of the Dp40 protein remain unknown. In this study, we generated a polyclonal antibody against the NH2-terminal region of the Dp40 and identified the expression profile of Dp40 in the mouse brain. Through an analysis using embryonic and postnatal mouse cerebrums, we found that Dp40 emerged from the early neonatal stages until adulthood, whereas Dp71, an another Dp short isoform, was highly detected in both prenatal and postnatal cerebrums. Intriguingly, relative expressions of Dp40 and Dp71 were prominent in cultured dissociated neurons and non-neuronal cells derived from mouse hippocampus, respectively. Furthermore, the immunocytological distribution of Dp40 was analyzed in dissociated cultured neurons, revealing that Dp40 is detected in the soma and its dendrites, but not in the axon. It is worthy to note that Dp40 is localized along the subplasmalemmal region of the dendritic shafts, as well as at excitatory postsynaptic sites. Thus, Dp40 was identified as a neuron-type Dp possibly involving dendritic and synaptic functions.

  9. The Gut Microbiotassay: a high-throughput qPCR approach combinable with next generation sequencing to study gut microbial diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann-Bank, Marie Louise; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Stockmarr, Anders

    2013-01-01

    ®) followed by next generation sequencing. Primers were designed if necessary and all primer sets were screened against DNA extracted from pure cultures of 15 representative bacterial species. Subsequently the setup was tested on DNA extracted from small and large intestinal content from piglets...

  10. Stoichiometric differences in DNA molecules containing the atpA gene suggest mechanisms for the generation of mitochondrial genome diversity in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, I D; Isaac, P G; Leaver, C J

    1987-04-01

    Four genomic arrangements of the maize mitochondrial atpA gene (encoding the alpha subunit of the F(1) ATPase), have been characterized. Most N (fertile) and S (male-sterile) cytoplasms contain two atpA arrangements of equal abundance. Prolonged exposure of blots of maize mitochondrial DNA probed with atpA-specific sequences show that cytoplasms previously reported to lack one of the atpA arrangements do contain the second arrangement but at low levels. Similarly, restriction fragments containing the atpA gene previously thought unique to male-sterile S and T cytoplasms are present in low abundance in fertile cytoplasms. These observations suggest that fertile and male-sterile cytoplasms of maize may be more closely related than previously thought, and suggest possible mechanisms to explain the observed mitochondrial genome diversity.

  11. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Inhibition of the human cytosolic isoforms I and II and transmembrane, tumor-associated isoforms IX and XII with boronic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winum, Jean-Yves; Innocenti, Alessio; Scozzafava, Andrea; Montero, Jean-Louis; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2009-05-15

    A series of aromatic, arylalkenyl- and arylalkyl boronic acids were assayed as inhibitors of four physiologically relevant carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoforms, the cytosolic human (h) hCA I and II, and the transmembrane, tumor-associated hCA IX and XII. The best hCA I and II inhibitor was biphenyl boronic acid with, a K(I) of 3.7-4.5 microM, whereas the remaining derivatives showed inhibition constants in the range of 6.0-1560 microM for hCA I and of 6.0-1050 microM for hCA II, respectively. hCA IX and XII were effectively inhibited by most of the aromatic boronic acids (K(I)s of 7.6-12.3 microM) whereas the arylalkenyl and aryl-alkyl derivatives generally showed weaker inhibitory properties (K(I)s of 34-531 microM). The nature of the moiety substituting the boronic acid group strongly influenced the CA inhibitory activity, with inhibitors possessing low micromolar to millimolar activity being detected in this small series of investigated compounds. This study proves that the B(OH)(2) moiety represents a new zinc-binding group for the generation of effective CA inhibitors targeting isoforms with medicinal chemistry applications. The boronic acids probably bind to the Zn(II) ion within the CA active site leading to a tetrahedral geometry of the metal ion and of the B(III) derivative.

  12. RecJ, ExoI and RecG are required for genome maintenance but not for generation of genetic diversity by repeat-mediated phase variation in Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Gaurav A.; Woodhall, Mark R.; Hood, Derek W.; Moxon, E. Richard [Molecular Infectious Diseases Group, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom); Bayliss, Christopher D. [Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: cdb12@le.ac.uk

    2008-04-02

    High levels of genetic diversity are generated in Haemophilus influenzae populations through DNA repeat-mediated phase variation and recombination with DNA fragments acquired by uptake from the external milieu. Conversely, multiple pathways for maintenance of the genome sequence are encoded in H. influenzae genomes. In Escherichia coli, mutations in single-stranded-DNA exonucleases destabilise tandem DNA repeats whilst inactivation of recG can stabilise repeat tracts. These enzymes also have varying effects on recombination. Deletion mutations were constructed in H. influenzae genes encoding homologs of ExoI, RecJ and RecG whilst ExoVII was refractory to mutation. Inactivation of RecJ and RecG, but not ExoI, increased sensitivity to irradiation with ultraviolet light. An increase in spontaneous mutation rate was not observed in single mutants but only when both RecJ and ExoI were mutated. None of the single- or double-mutations increased or decreased the rates of slippage in tetranucleotide repeat tracts. Furthermore, the exonuclease mutants did not exhibit significant defects in horizontal gene transfer. We conclude that RecJ, ExoI and RecG are required for maintenance of the H. influenzae genome but none of these enzymes influence the generation of genetic diversity through mutations in the tetranucleotide repeat tracts of this species.

  13. Method for analysing glycoprotein isoforms by capillary electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Frutos, Mercedes de; Díez-Masa, José Carlos; Morales-Cid, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    [EN] The present invention relates to a new method for the purification, concentration, separation and determination of the isoforms of alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) in human blood serum samples using capillary electrophoresis. The new method is based on the immunocapture and preconcentration of the sample within the separation capillary by using an immunoadsorbent phase magnetically immobilized within the electrophoresis capillary and the subsequent desorption and separation of the glycopr...

  14. Functional differences between L- and T-plastin isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpin, M; Friederich, E; Algrain, M; Vernel, F; Louvard, D

    1994-12-01

    Fimbrins/plastins are a family of highly conserved actin-bundling proteins. They are present in all eukaryotic cells including yeast, but each isoform displays a remarkable tissue specificity. T-plastin is normally found in epithelial and mesenchymal cells while L-plastin is present in hematopoietic cells. However, L-plastin has been also found in tumor cells of non-hematopoietic origin (Lin, C.-S., R. H. Aebersold, S. B. Kent, M. Varma, and J. Leavitt. 1988. Mol. Cell. Biol. 8:4659-4668; Lin, C.-S., R. H. Aebersold, and J. Leavitt. 1990. Mol. Cell. Biol. 10: 1818-1821). To learn more about the biological significance of their tissue specificity, we have overproduced the T- and L-plastin isoforms in a fibroblast-like cell line, CV-1, and in a polarized epithelial cell line, LLC-PK1. In CV-1 cells, overproduction of T- and L-plastins induces cell rounding and a concomitant reorganization of actin stress fibers into geodesic structures. L-plastin remains associated with microfilaments while T-plastin is almost completely extracted after treatment of the cells with non-ionic detergent. In LLC-PK1 cells, T-plastin induces shape changes in microvilli and remains associated with microvillar actin filaments after detergent extraction while L-plastin has no effect on these structures and is completely extracted. The effect of T-plastin on the organization of microvilli differs from that of villin, another actin-bundling protein. Our experiments indicate that these two isoforms play differing roles in actin filament organization, and do so in a cell type-specific fashion. Thus it is likely that these plastin isoforms play fundamentally different roles in cell function.

  15. [Clinical relevance of myosin isoforms in the diaphragm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayan-Ramirez, G; Decramer, M

    2000-06-01

    The diaphragm as a striated muscle is characterized by the repetition of a single element arranged in series: the sarcomere containing two kinds of myofilaments: a thick one constituted by the myosin, and a thin one primarily composed of actin. The myosin molecule consists of two heads where two myosin heavy chains (MHC) are fixed, a flexible hinge with two light (MLC) chains, and long rod-shaped tails. The diaphragm contains 4 MHC isoforms (MHC-slow, MHC-2A, MHC-2B, MHC-2X) and 6 MLC isoforms (MLC-1f, MLC-3f, MLC-1sa, MLC-1sb, MLC-2f, MLC-2s/v). In humans, the diaphragm contains mainly fibers expressing the isoforms MHC-slow, MHC-2A, and MLC-2f, MLC-2s et MLC-1f. For the mechanical properties of the different isoforms, there is a gradient from the MHC-slow to the MHC-2A, MHC-2B and MHC-2X/2B. According to the circumstances, the diaphragm will adapt towards a slow profile (COPD, cardiac failure and in animals: Duchenne muscular dystrophy, denervation-1 week, age-female, corticosteroids, chronic stimulation), or a fast profile (in animals: chronic hypoxia, denervation-2 weeks, age-males) or a more oxidative profile (in animals: cachexia, obesity). The reasons why the diaphragm adapts towards a slower or a faster muscle are not known. In fact, for a given pathological situation, several factors are able to influence the fiber composition of the diaphragm. Therefore, the net result of the influence of these different factors in terms of MHC and MLC diaphragm adaptation is difficult to predict.

  16. Characterization of the Human LPIN1-encoded Phosphatidate Phosphatase Isoforms*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M.

    2010-01-01

    The human LPIN1 gene encodes the protein lipin 1, which possesses phosphatidate (PA) phosphatase (3-sn-phosphatidate phosphohydrolase; EC 3.1.3.4) activity (Han, G.-S., Wu, W.-I., and Carman, G. M. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 9210–9218). In this work, we characterized human lipin 1 α, β, and γ isoforms that were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to near homogeneity. PA phosphatase activities of the α, β, and γ isoforms were dependent on Mg2+ or Mn2+ ions at pH 7.5 at 37 °C. The activities were inhibited by concentrations of Mg2+ and Mn2+ above their optimums and by Ca2+, Zn2+, N-ethylmaleimide, propranolol, and the sphingoid bases sphingosine and sphinganine. The activities were thermally labile at temperatures above 40 °C. The α, β, and γ activities followed saturation kinetics with respect to the molar concentration of PA (Km values of 0.35, 0.24, and 0.11 mm, respectively) but followed positive cooperative (Hill number ∼2) kinetics with respect to the surface concentration of PA (Km values of 4.2, 4.5, and 4.3 mol %, respectively) in Triton X-100/PA-mixed micelles. The turnover numbers (kcat) for the α, β, and γ isoforms were 68.8 ± 3.5, 42.8 ± 2.5, and 5.7 ± 0.2 s−1, respectively, whereas their energy of activation values were 14.2, 15.5, and 18.5 kcal/mol, respectively. The isoform activities were dependent on PA as a substrate and required at least one unsaturated fatty acyl moiety for maximum activity. PMID:20231281

  17. Regulation of NADPH oxidase 5 by protein kinase C isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Chen

    Full Text Available NADPH oxidase5 (Nox5 is a novel Nox isoform which has recently been recognized as having important roles in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease, acute myocardial infarction, fetal ventricular septal defect and cancer. The activity of Nox5 and production of reactive oxygen species is regulated by intracellular calcium levels and phosphorylation. However, the kinases that phosphorylate Nox5 remain poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that the phosphorylation of Nox5 is PKC dependent, but this contention was based on the use of pharmacological inhibitors and the isoforms of PKC involved remain unknown. Thus, the major goals of this study were to determine whether PKC can directly regulate Nox5 phosphorylation and activity, to identify which isoforms are involved in the process, and to understand the functional significance of this pathway in disease. We found that a relatively specific PKCα inhibitor, Ro-32-0432, dose-dependently inhibited PMA-induced superoxide production from Nox5. PMA-stimulated Nox5 activity was significantly reduced in cells with genetic silencing of PKCα and PKCε, enhanced by loss of PKCδ and the silencing of PKCθ expression was without effect. A constitutively active form of PKCα robustly increased basal and PMA-stimulated Nox5 activity and promoted the phosphorylation of Nox5 on Ser490, Thr494, and Ser498. In contrast, constitutively active PKCε potently inhibited both basal and PMA-dependent Nox5 activity. Co-IP and in vitro kinase assay experiments demonstrated that PKCα directly binds to Nox5 and modifies Nox5 phosphorylation and activity. Exposure of endothelial cells to high glucose significantly increased PKCα activation, and enhanced Nox5 derived superoxide in a manner that was in prevented by a PKCα inhibitor, Go 6976. In summary, our study reveals that PKCα is the primary isoform mediating the activation of Nox5 and this maybe of significance in our understanding of the vascular

  18. Diversified expression of NG2/CSPG4 isoforms in glioblastoma and human foetal brain identifies pericyte subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolamo, Francesco; Dallatomasina, Alice; Rizzi, Marco; Errede, Mariella; Wälchli, Thomas; Mucignat, Maria Teresa; Frei, Karl; Roncali, Luisa; Perris, Roberto; Virgintino, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    NG2/CSPG4 is a complex surface-associated proteoglycan (PG) recognized to be a widely expressed membrane component of glioblastoma (WHO grade IV) cells and angiogenic pericytes. To determine the precise expression pattern of NG2/CSPG4 on glioblastoma cells and pericytes, we generated a panel of >60 mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against the ectodomain of human NG2/CSPG4, partially characterized the mAbs, and performed a high-resolution distributional mapping of the PG in human foetal, adult and glioblastoma-affected brains. The reactivity pattern initially observed on reference tumour cell lines indicated that the mAbs recognized 48 immunologically distinct NG2/CSPG4 isoforms, and a total of 14 mAbs was found to identify NG2/CSPG4 isoforms in foetal and neoplastic cerebral sections. These were consistently absent in the adult brain, but exhibited a complementary expression pattern in angiogenic vessels of both tumour and foetal tissues. Considering the extreme pleomorphism of tumour areas, and with the aim of subsequently analysing the distributional pattern of the NG2/CSPG4 isoforms on similar histological vessel typologies, a preliminary study was carried out with endothelial cell and pericyte markers, and with selected vascular basement membrane (VBM) components. On both tumour areas characterized by 'glomeruloid' and 'garland vessels', which showed a remarkably similar cellular and molecular organization, and on developing brain vessels, spatially separated, phenotypically diversified pericyte subsets with a polarized expression of key surface components, including NG2/CSPG4, were disclosed. Interestingly, the majority of the immunolocalized NG2/CSPG4 isoforms present in glioblastoma tissue were present in foetal brain, except for one isoform that seemed to be exclusive of tumour cells, being absent in foetal brain. The results highlight an unprecedented, complex pattern of NG2/CSPG4 isoform expression in foetal and neoplastic CNS, discriminating

  19. Diversified expression of NG2/CSPG4 isoforms in glioblastoma and human foetal brain identifies pericyte subsets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Girolamo

    Full Text Available NG2/CSPG4 is a complex surface-associated proteoglycan (PG recognized to be a widely expressed membrane component of glioblastoma (WHO grade IV cells and angiogenic pericytes. To determine the precise expression pattern of NG2/CSPG4 on glioblastoma cells and pericytes, we generated a panel of >60 mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs directed against the ectodomain of human NG2/CSPG4, partially characterized the mAbs, and performed a high-resolution distributional mapping of the PG in human foetal, adult and glioblastoma-affected brains. The reactivity pattern initially observed on reference tumour cell lines indicated that the mAbs recognized 48 immunologically distinct NG2/CSPG4 isoforms, and a total of 14 mAbs was found to identify NG2/CSPG4 isoforms in foetal and neoplastic cerebral sections. These were consistently absent in the adult brain, but exhibited a complementary expression pattern in angiogenic vessels of both tumour and foetal tissues. Considering the extreme pleomorphism of tumour areas, and with the aim of subsequently analysing the distributional pattern of the NG2/CSPG4 isoforms on similar histological vessel typologies, a preliminary study was carried out with endothelial cell and pericyte markers, and with selected vascular basement membrane (VBM components. On both tumour areas characterized by 'glomeruloid' and 'garland vessels', which showed a remarkably similar cellular and molecular organization, and on developing brain vessels, spatially separated, phenotypically diversified pericyte subsets with a polarized expression of key surface components, including NG2/CSPG4, were disclosed. Interestingly, the majority of the immunolocalized NG2/CSPG4 isoforms present in glioblastoma tissue were present in foetal brain, except for one isoform that seemed to be exclusive of tumour cells, being absent in foetal brain. The results highlight an unprecedented, complex pattern of NG2/CSPG4 isoform expression in foetal and neoplastic CNS

  20. Apolipoprotein E isoforms 3/3 and 3/4 differentially interact with circulating stearic, palmitic, and oleic fatty acids and lipid levels in Alaskan Natives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos-Tapia, Lyssia; López-Alvarenga, Juan Carlos; Ebbesson, Sven O E; Ebbesson, Lars O E; Tejero, M Elizabeth

    2015-04-01

    Lifestyle changes in Alaskan Natives have been related to the increase of cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome in the last decades. Variation of the apolipoprotein E (Apo E) genotype may contribute to the diverse response to diet in lipid metabolism and influence the association between fatty acids in plasma and risk factors for cardiovascular disease. The aim of this investigation was to analyze the interaction between Apo E isoforms and plasma fatty acids, influencing phenotypes related to metabolic diseases in Alaskan Natives. A sample of 427 adult Siberian Yupik Alaskan Natives was included. Fasting glucose, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, Apo A1, and Apo B plasma concentrations were measured using reference methods. Concentrations of 13 fatty acids in fasting plasma were analyzed by gas chromatography, and Apo E variants were identified. Analyses of covariance were conducted to identify Apo E isoform and fatty acid main effects and multiplicative interactions. The means for body mass index and age were 26 ± 5.2 and 47 ± 1.5, respectively. Significant main effects were observed for variation in Apo E and different fatty acids influencing Apo B levels, triglycerides, and total cholesterol. Significant interactions were found between Apo E isoform and selected fatty acids influencing total cholesterol, triglycerides, and Apo B concentrations. In summary, Apo E3/3 and 3/4 isoforms had significant interactions with circulating levels of stearic, palmitic, oleic fatty acids, and phenotypes of lipid metabolism in Alaskan Natives.

  1. Isoform expression in the multiple soluble malate dehydrogenase of Hoplias malabaricus (Erythrinidae, Characiformes

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    M. R. Aquino-Silva

    Full Text Available Kinetic properties and thermal stabilities of Hoplias malabaricus liver and skeletal muscle unfractionated malate dehydrogenase (MDH, EC 1.1.1.37 and its isolated isoforms were analyzed to further study the possible sMDH-A* locus duplication evolved from a recent tandem duplication. Both A (A1 and A2 and B isoforms had similar optima pH (7.5-8.0. While Hoplias A isoform could not be characterized as thermostable, B could as thermolabile. A isoforms differed from B isoform in having higher Km values for oxaloacetate. The possibly duplicated A2 isoform showed higher substrate affinity than the A1. Hoplias duplicated A isoforms may influence the direction of carbon flow between glycolisis and gluconeogenesis.

  2. Isoform expression in the multiple soluble malate dehydrogenase of Hoplias malabaricus (Erythrinidae, Characiformes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aquino-Silva M. R.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic properties and thermal stabilities of Hoplias malabaricus liver and skeletal muscle unfractionated malate dehydrogenase (MDH, EC 1.1.1.37 and its isolated isoforms were analyzed to further study the possible sMDH-A* locus duplication evolved from a recent tandem duplication. Both A (A1 and A2 and B isoforms had similar optima pH (7.5-8.0. While Hoplias A isoform could not be characterized as thermostable, B could as thermolabile. A isoforms differed from B isoform in having higher Km values for oxaloacetate. The possibly duplicated A2 isoform showed higher substrate affinity than the A1. Hoplias duplicated A isoforms may influence the direction of carbon flow between glycolisis and gluconeogenesis.

  3. Characterisation of CDKL5 Transcript Isoforms in Human and Mouse.

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    Ralph D Hector

    Full Text Available Mutations in the X-linked Cyclin-Dependent Kinase-Like 5 gene (CDKL5 cause early onset infantile spasms and subsequent severe developmental delay in affected children. Deleterious mutations have been reported to occur throughout the CDKL5 coding region. Several studies point to a complex CDKL5 gene structure in terms of exon usage and transcript expression. Improvements in molecular diagnosis and more extensive research into the neurobiology of CDKL5 and pathophysiology of CDKL5 disorders necessitate an updated analysis of the gene. In this study, we have analysed human and mouse CDKL5 transcript patterns both bioinformatically and experimentally. We have characterised the predominant brain isoform of CDKL5, a 9.7 kb transcript comprised of 18 exons with a large 6.6 kb 3'-untranslated region (UTR, which we name hCDKL5_1. In addition we describe new exonic regions and a range of novel splice and UTR isoforms. This has enabled the description of an updated gene model in both species and a standardised nomenclature system for CDKL5 transcripts. Profiling revealed tissue- and brain development stage-specific differences in expression between transcript isoforms. These findings provide an essential backdrop for the diagnosis of CDKL5-related disorders, for investigations into the basic biology of this gene and its protein products, and for the rational design of gene-based and molecular therapies for these disorders.

  4. Characterisation of CDKL5 Transcript Isoforms in Human and Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hector, Ralph D; Dando, Owen; Landsberger, Nicoletta; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Kind, Peter C; Bailey, Mark E S; Cobb, Stuart R

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the X-linked Cyclin-Dependent Kinase-Like 5 gene (CDKL5) cause early onset infantile spasms and subsequent severe developmental delay in affected children. Deleterious mutations have been reported to occur throughout the CDKL5 coding region. Several studies point to a complex CDKL5 gene structure in terms of exon usage and transcript expression. Improvements in molecular diagnosis and more extensive research into the neurobiology of CDKL5 and pathophysiology of CDKL5 disorders necessitate an updated analysis of the gene. In this study, we have analysed human and mouse CDKL5 transcript patterns both bioinformatically and experimentally. We have characterised the predominant brain isoform of CDKL5, a 9.7 kb transcript comprised of 18 exons with a large 6.6 kb 3'-untranslated region (UTR), which we name hCDKL5_1. In addition we describe new exonic regions and a range of novel splice and UTR isoforms. This has enabled the description of an updated gene model in both species and a standardised nomenclature system for CDKL5 transcripts. Profiling revealed tissue- and brain development stage-specific differences in expression between transcript isoforms. These findings provide an essential backdrop for the diagnosis of CDKL5-related disorders, for investigations into the basic biology of this gene and its protein products, and for the rational design of gene-based and molecular therapies for these disorders.

  5. Differential expression of syndecan isoforms during mouse incisor amelogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Taro; Miyoshi, Keiko; Munesue, Seiichi; Nakada, Hiroshi; Okayama, Minoru; Matsuo, Takashi; Noma, Takafumi

    2007-08-01

    Syndecans are transmembranous heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) with covalently attached glycosaminoglycan side-chains located on the cell surface. The mammalian syndecan family is composed of four types of syndecans (syndecan-1 to -4). Syndecans interact with the intracellular cytoskeleton through the cytoplasmic domains of their core proteins and membrane proteins, extracellular enzymes, growth factors, and matrix components, through their heparan-sulfate chains, to regulate developmental processes.Here, as a first step to assess the possible roles of syndecan proteins in amelogenesis, we examined the expression patterns of all syndecan isoforms in continuously growing mouse incisors, in which we can overview major differentiation stages of amelogenesis at a glance. Understanding the expression domain of each syndecan isoform during specific developmental stages seems useful for investigating their physiological roles in amelogenesis. Immunohistochemical analysis of syndecan core proteins in the lower incisors from postnatal day 1 mice revealed spatially and temporally specific expression patterns, with syndecan-1 expressed in undifferentiated epithelial and mesenchymal cells, and syndecan-2, -3, and -4 in more differentiated cells. These findings suggest that each syndecan isoform functions distinctly during the amelogenesis of the incisors of mice.

  6. Antagonistic functions of two stardust isoforms in Drosophila photoreceptor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgakova, Natalia A; Rentsch, Michaela; Knust, Elisabeth

    2010-11-15

    Membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs) are scaffolding proteins that organize supramolecular protein complexes, thereby partitioning the plasma membrane into spatially and functionally distinct subdomains. Their modular organization is ideally suited to organize protein complexes with cell type- or stage-specific composition, or both. Often more than one MAGUK isoform is expressed by one gene in the same cell, yet very little is known about their individual in vivo functions. Here, we show that two isoforms of Drosophila stardust, Sdt-H (formerly called Sdt-B2) and Sdt-D, which differ in their N terminus, are expressed in adult photoreceptors. Both isoforms associate with Crumbs and PATJ, constituents of the conserved Crumbs-Stardust complex. However, they form distinct complexes, localized at the stalk, a restricted region of the apical plasma membrane. Strikingly, Sdt-H and Sdt-D have antagonistic functions. While Sdt-H overexpression increases stalk membrane length and prevents light-dependent retinal degeneration, Sdt-D overexpression reduces stalk length and enhances light-dependent retinal degeneration. These results suggest that a fine-tuned balance of different Crumbs complexes regulates photoreceptor homeostasis.

  7. Cultural diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Raghavan, Raghu

    2011-01-01

    The concept of cultural diversity has emerged as an influential one having impact on multiple policy and legal instruments especially following the adoption of the UNESCO Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions in 2005. The discussions on its appropriate implementation are however profoundly fragmented and often laden with political considerations. The present brief paper offers some thoughts on the meaning of cultural diversity and its implementati...

  8. The generation of a diverse suite of Late Pleistocene and Holocene basalt through dacite lavas from the northern Cascade arc at Mount Baker, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggerman, Troy David; Debari, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    Mt. Baker is a dominantly andesitic stratovolcano in the northern Cascade arc. In this study, we show that the andesites are not all derived from similar sources, and that open-system processes were dominant during their petrogenesis. To this end, we discuss petrographic observations, mineral chemistry, and whole rock major and trace element chemistry for three of Mt. Baker's late Pleistocene to Holocene lava flow units. These include the basalt and basaltic andesite of Sulphur Creek (SC) (51.4-55.8 wt% SiO2, Mg# 57-58), the Mg-rich andesite of Glacier Creek (GC) (58.3-58.7 wt% SiO2, Mg# 63-64), and the andesite and dacite of Boulder Glacier (BG) (60.2-64.2 wt% SiO2, Mg# 50-57). Phenocryst populations in all units display varying degrees of reaction and disequilibrium textures along with complicated zoning patterns indicative of open-system processes. All lavas are medium-K and calc-alkaline, but each unit displays distinctive trace element and REE characteristics that do not correlate with the average SiO2 content of the unit. The mafic lavas of SC have relatively elevated REE abundances with the lowest (La/Yb)N (~4.5). The intermediate GC andesites (Mg- and Ni-rich) have the lowest REE abundances and the highest (La/Yb)N (~6.7) with strongly depleted HREE. The more felsic BG lavas have intermediate REE abundances and (La/Yb)N (~6.4). The high-Mg character of the GC andesites can be explained by addition of 4% of a xenocrystic olivine component. However, their depleted REE patterns are similar to other high-Mg andesites reported from Mt. Baker and require a distinct mantle source. The two dominantly andesitic units (GC and BG) are different enough from each other that they could not have been derived from the same parent basalt. Nor could either of them have been derived from the SC basalt by crystal fractionation processes. Crystal fractionation also cannot explain the compositional diversity within each unit. Compositional diversity within the SC unit (basalt to

  9. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Alternatively Spliced Isoform Negatively Regulates TLR9 Signaling in Teleost Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nai-Yu; Nagarajan, Govindarajulu; Chiou, Pinwen Peter

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) recognizes and binds unmethylated CpG motifs in DNA, which are found in the genomes of bacteria and DNA viruses. In fish, Tlr9 is highly diverse, with the number of introns ranging from 0 to 4. A fish Tlr9 gene containing two introns has been reported to express two alternatively spliced isoforms, namely gTLR9A (full-length) and gTLR9B (with a truncated Cʹ-terminal signal transducing domain), whose regulation and function remain unclear. Here, we report a unique regulatory mechanism of gTLR9 signaling in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides), whose gTlr9 sequence also contains two introns. We demonstrated that the grouper gTlr9 gene indeed has the capacity to produce two gTLR9 isoforms via alternative RNA splicing. We found that gTLR9B could function as a negative regulator to suppress gTLR9 signaling as demonstrated by the suppression of downstream gene expression. Following stimulation with CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN), gTLR9A and gTLR9B were observed to translocate into endosomes and co-localize with ODN and the adaptor protein gMyD88. Both gTLR9A and gTLR9B could interact with gMyD88; however, gTLR9B could not interact with downstream IRAK4 and TRAF6. Further analysis of the expression profile of gTlr9A and gTlr9B upon immune-stimulation revealed that the two isoforms were differentially regulated in a time-dependent manner. Overall, these data suggest that fish TLR9B functions as a negative regulator, and that its temporal expression is mediated by alternative RNA splicing. This has not been observed in mammalian TLR9s and might have been acquired relatively recently in the evolution of fish. PMID:25955250

  10. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Alternatively Spliced Isoform Negatively Regulates TLR9 Signaling in Teleost Fish.

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    Frank Fang-Yao Lee

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9 recognizes and binds unmethylated CpG motifs in DNA, which are found in the genomes of bacteria and DNA viruses. In fish, Tlr9 is highly diverse, with the number of introns ranging from 0 to 4. A fish Tlr9 gene containing two introns has been reported to express two alternatively spliced isoforms, namely gTLR9A (full-length and gTLR9B (with a truncated C'-terminal signal transducing domain, whose regulation and function remain unclear. Here, we report a unique regulatory mechanism of gTLR9 signaling in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides, whose gTlr9 sequence also contains two introns. We demonstrated that the grouper gTlr9 gene indeed has the capacity to produce two gTLR9 isoforms via alternative RNA splicing. We found that gTLR9B could function as a negative regulator to suppress gTLR9 signaling as demonstrated by the suppression of downstream gene expression. Following stimulation with CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN, gTLR9A and gTLR9B were observed to translocate into endosomes and co-localize with ODN and the adaptor protein gMyD88. Both gTLR9A and gTLR9B could interact with gMyD88; however, gTLR9B could not interact with downstream IRAK4 and TRAF6. Further analysis of the expression profile of gTlr9A and gTlr9B upon immune-stimulation revealed that the two isoforms were differentially regulated in a time-dependent manner. Overall, these data suggest that fish TLR9B functions as a negative regulator, and that its temporal expression is mediated by alternative RNA splicing. This has not been observed in mammalian TLR9s and might have been acquired relatively recently in the evolution of fish.

  11. Loss of glycogen synthase kinase 3 isoforms during murine oocyte growth induces offspring cardiac dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro da Rocha, André; Ding, Jun; Slawny, Nicole; Wolf, Amber M; Smith, Gary D

    2015-05-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) is a constitutively active serine threonine kinase with 1) two isoforms (GSK3A and GSK3B) that have unique and overlapping functions, 2) multiple molecular intracellular mechanisms that involve phosphorylation of diverse substrates, and 3) implications in pathogenesis of many diseases. Insulin causes phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK3 and mammalian oocytes have a functional insulin-signaling pathway whereby prolonged elevated insulin during follicle/oocyte development causes GSK3 hyperphosphorylation, reduced GSK3 activity, and altered oocyte chromatin remodeling. Periconceptional diabetes and chronic hyperinsulinemia are associated with congenital malformations and onset of adult diseases of cardiovascular origin. Objectives were to produce transgenic mice with individual or concomitant loss of GSK3A and/or GSK3B and investigate the in vivo role of oocyte GSK3 on fertility, fetal development, and offspring health. Wild-type males bred to females with individual or concomitant loss of oocyte GSK3 isoforms did not have reduced fertility. However, concomitant loss of GSK3A and GSK3B in the oocyte significantly increased neonatal death rate due to congestive heart failure secondary to ventricular hyperplasia. Individual loss of oocyte GSK3A or GSK3B did not induce this lethal phenotype. In conclusion, absence of oocyte GSK3 in the periconceptional period does not alter fertility yet causes offspring cardiac hyperplasia, cardiovascular defects, and significant neonatal death. These results support a developmental mechanism by which periconceptional hyperinsulinemia associated with maternal metabolic syndrome, obesity, and/or diabetes can act on the oocyte and affect offspring cardiovascular development, function, and congenital heart malformation.

  12. Structure and Dynamics of Single-isoform Recombinant Neuronal Human Tubulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemu, Annapurna; Atherton, Joseph; Spector, Jeffrey O; Szyk, Agnieszka; Moores, Carolyn A; Roll-Mecak, Antonina

    2016-06-17

    Microtubules are polymers that cycle stochastically between polymerization and depolymerization, i.e. they exhibit "dynamic instability." This behavior is crucial for cell division, motility, and differentiation. Although studies in the last decade have made fundamental breakthroughs in our understanding of how cellular effectors modulate microtubule dynamics, analysis of the relationship between tubulin sequence, structure, and dynamics has been held back by a lack of dynamics measurements with and structural characterization of homogeneous isotypically pure engineered tubulin. Here, we report for the first time the cryo-EM structure and in vitro dynamics parameters of recombinant isotypically pure human tubulin. α1A/βIII is a purely neuronal tubulin isoform. The 4.2-Å structure of post-translationally unmodified human α1A/βIII microtubules shows overall similarity to that of heterogeneous brain microtubules, but it is distinguished by subtle differences at polymerization interfaces, which are hot spots for sequence divergence between tubulin isoforms. In vitro dynamics assays show that, like mosaic brain microtubules, recombinant homogeneous microtubules undergo dynamic instability, but they polymerize slower and have fewer catastrophes. Interestingly, we find that epitaxial growth of α1A/βIII microtubules from heterogeneous brain seeds is inefficient but can be fully rescued by incorporating as little as 5% of brain tubulin into the homogeneous α1A/βIII lattice. Our study establishes a system to examine the structure and dynamics of mammalian microtubules with well defined tubulin species and is a first and necessary step toward uncovering how tubulin genetic and chemical diversity is exploited to modulate intrinsic microtubule dynamics.

  13. Evolution of the plasma and tissue kallikreins, and their alternative splicing isoforms.

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    Vassiliki Lila Koumandou

    Full Text Available Kallikreins are secreted serine proteases with important roles in human physiology. Human plasma kallikrein, encoded by the KLKB1 gene on locus 4q34-35, functions in the blood coagulation pathway, and in regulating blood pressure. The human tissue kallikrein and kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs have diverse expression patterns and physiological roles, including cancer-related processes such as cell growth regulation, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA, the product of the KLK3 gene, is the most widely used biomarker in clinical practice today. A total of 15 KLKs are encoded by the largest contiguous cluster of protease genes in the human genome (19q13.3-13.4, which makes them ideal for evolutionary analysis of gene duplication events. Previous studies on the evolution of KLKs have traced mammalian homologs as well as a probable early origin of the family in aves, amphibia and reptilia. The aim of this study was to address the evolutionary and functional relationships between tissue KLKs and plasma kallikrein, and to examine the evolution of alternative splicing isoforms. Sequences of plasma and tissue kallikreins and their alternative transcripts were collected from the NCBI and Ensembl databases, and comprehensive phylogenetic analysis was performed by Bayesian as well as maximum likelihood methods. Plasma and tissue kallikreins exhibit high sequence similarity in the trypsin domain (>50%. Phylogenetic analysis indicates an early divergence of KLKB1, which groups closely with plasminogen, chymotrypsin, and complement factor D (CFD, in a monophyletic group distinct from trypsin and the tissue KLKs. Reconstruction of the earliest events leading to the diversification of the tissue KLKs is not well resolved, indicating rapid expansion in mammals. Alternative transcripts of each KLK gene show species-specific divergence, while examination of sequence conservation indicates that many annotated human KLK isoforms

  14. Molecular characterization and expression profiles of four transformer-2 isoforms in the Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Danli; Liu, Yuan; Hui, Min; Song, Chengwen; Liu, Hourong; Cui, Zhaoxia

    2017-07-01

    The transformer-2 ( tra-2) gene plays a key role in the regulatory hierarchy of sexual differentiation in somatic tissues and in the germline of Drosophila melanogaster. In this study, sequences and expression profiles of tra-2 in the Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis were characterized. Four tra-2 isoforms, designated as Estra-2a, Estra-2b, Estra-2c, and Estra-2d, were isolated. They all contained an RNA-recognition motif (RRM) and a linker region, which shared high similarity with other reported tra-2s. Sequence analysis revealed that Estra-2a, Estra-2b and Estra-2c are encoded by the same genomic locus and are generated by alternative splicing of the pre-mRNA. Compared with the other three isoforms, Estra-2d lacks the RS2 domain. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that all four isoforms were highly expressed in the fertilized egg, and in the 2-4 cell and blastula stages compared with larval stages ( P≤0.01), suggesting their maternal origin in early embryonic developmental stages. Notably, Estra-2a was highly expressed in male somatic tissues, while Estra-2c was significantly highly expressed in the ovary. These results suggest that Estra-2c is involved in sexual differentiation of the Chinese mitten crab. Our findings provide basic information for further functional studies of the tra-2 gene/protein in this species.

  15. Prickle/spiny-legs isoforms control the polarity of the apical microtubule network in planar cell polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, Jessica; Sharp, Katherine A; Matis, Maja; Cho, Bomsoo; Axelrod, Jeffrey D

    2014-07-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are substrates upon which plus- and minus-end directed motors control the directional movement of cargos that are essential for generating cell polarity. Although centrosomal MTs are organized with plus-ends away from the MT organizing center, the regulation of non-centrosomal MT polarity is poorly understood. Increasing evidence supports the model that directional information for planar polarization is derived from the alignment of a parallel apical network of MTs and the directional MT-dependent trafficking of downstream signaling components. The Fat/Dachsous/Four-jointed (Ft/Ds/Fj) signaling system contributes to orienting those MTs. In addition to previously defined functions in promoting asymmetric subcellular localization of 'core' planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins, we find that alternative Prickle (Pk-Sple) protein isoforms control the polarity of this MT network. This function allows the isoforms of Pk-Sple to differentially determine the direction in which asymmetry is established and therefore, ultimately, the direction of tissue polarity. Oppositely oriented signals that are encoded by oppositely oriented Fj and Ds gradients produce the same polarity outcome in different tissues or compartments, and the tissue-specific activity of alternative Pk-Sple protein isoforms has been observed to rectify the interpretation of opposite upstream directional signals. The control of MT polarity, and thus the directionality of apical vesicle traffic, by Pk-Sple provides a mechanism for this rectification.

  16. Molecular characterization and expression profiles of four transformer-2 isoforms in the Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Danli; Liu, Yuan; Hui, Min; Song, Chengwen; Liu, Hourong; Cui, Zhaoxia

    2016-09-01

    The transformer-2 (tra-2) gene plays a key role in the regulatory hierarchy of sexual differentiation in somatic tissues and in the germline of Drosophila melanogaster. In this study, sequences and expression profiles of tra-2 in the Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis were characterized. Four tra-2 isoforms, designated as Estra-2a, Estra-2b, Estra-2c and Estra-2d, were isolated. They all contained an RNA-recognition motif (RRM) and a linker region, which shared high similarity with other reported tra-2s. Sequence analysis revealed that Estra-2a, Estra-2b and Estra-2c are encoded by the same genomic locus and are generated by alternative splicing of the pre-mRNA. Compared with the other three isoforms, Estra-2d lacks the RS2 domain. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that all four isoforms were highly expressed in the fertilized egg, and in the 2-4 cell and blastula stages compared with larval stages (P≤ 0.01), suggesting their maternal origin in early embryonic developmental stages. Notably, Estra-2a was highly expressed in male somatic tissues, while Estra-2c was significantly highly expressed in the ovary. These results suggest that Estra-2c is involved in sexual differentiation of the Chinese mitten crab. Our findings provide basic information for further functional studies of the tra-2 gene/protein in this species.

  17. Human CB1 Receptor Isoforms, present in Hepatocytes and β-cells, are Involved in Regulating Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Mariscal, Isabel; Krzysik-Walker, Susan M.; Doyle, Máire E.; Liu, Qing-Rong; Cimbro, Raffaello; Santa-Cruz Calvo, Sara; Ghosh, Soumita; Cieśla, Łukasz; Moaddel, Ruin; Carlson, Olga D.; Witek, Rafal P.; O’Connell, Jennifer F.; Egan, Josephine M.

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutics aimed at blocking the cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor for treatment of obesity resulted in significant improvements in liver function, glucose uptake and pancreatic β-cell function independent of weight loss or CB1 receptor blockade in the brain, suggesting that peripherally-acting only CB1 receptor blockers may be useful therapeutic agents. Neuropsychiatric side effects and lack of tissue specificity precluded clinical use of first-generation, centrally acting CB1 receptor blockers. In this study we specifically analyzed the potential relevance to diabetes of human CB1 receptor isoforms in extraneural tissues involved in glucose metabolism. We identified an isoform of the human CB1 receptor (CB1b) that is highly expressed in β-cells and hepatocytes but not in the brain. Importantly, CB1b shows stronger affinity for the inverse agonist JD-5037 than for rimonabant compared to CB1 full length. Most relevant to the field, CB1b is a potent regulator of adenylyl cyclase activity in peripheral metabolic tissues. CB1b blockade by JD-5037 results in stronger adenylyl cyclase activation compared to rimonabant and it is a better enhancer of insulin secretion in β-cells. We propose this isoform as a principal pharmacological target for the treatment of metabolic disorders involving glucose metabolism. PMID:27641999

  18. Human CB1 Receptor Isoforms, present in Hepatocytes and β-cells, are Involved in Regulating Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Mariscal, Isabel; Krzysik-Walker, Susan M; Doyle, Máire E; Liu, Qing-Rong; Cimbro, Raffaello; Santa-Cruz Calvo, Sara; Ghosh, Soumita; Cieśla, Łukasz; Moaddel, Ruin; Carlson, Olga D; Witek, Rafal P; O'Connell, Jennifer F; Egan, Josephine M

    2016-09-19

    Therapeutics aimed at blocking the cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor for treatment of obesity resulted in significant improvements in liver function, glucose uptake and pancreatic β-cell function independent of weight loss or CB1 receptor blockade in the brain, suggesting that peripherally-acting only CB1 receptor blockers may be useful therapeutic agents. Neuropsychiatric side effects and lack of tissue specificity precluded clinical use of first-generation, centrally acting CB1 receptor blockers. In this study we specifically analyzed the potential relevance to diabetes of human CB1 receptor isoforms in extraneural tissues involved in glucose metabolism. We identified an isoform of the human CB1 receptor (CB1b) that is highly expressed in β-cells and hepatocytes but not in the brain. Importantly, CB1b shows stronger affinity for the inverse agonist JD-5037 than for rimonabant compared to CB1 full length. Most relevant to the field, CB1b is a potent regulator of adenylyl cyclase activity in peripheral metabolic tissues. CB1b blockade by JD-5037 results in stronger adenylyl cyclase activation compared to rimonabant and it is a better enhancer of insulin secretion in β-cells. We propose this isoform as a principal pharmacological target for the treatment of metabolic disorders involving glucose metabolism.

  19. Local IGF-1 isoform protects cardiomyocytes from hypertrophic and oxidative stresses via SirT1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinciguerra, Manlio; Santini, Maria Paola; Claycomb, William C; Ladurner, Andreas G; Rosenthal, Nadia

    2009-12-10

    Oxidative and hypertrophic stresses contribute to the pathogenesis of heart failure. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is a peptide hormone with a complex post-transcriptional regulation, generating distinct isoforms. Locally acting IGF-1 isoform (mIGF-1) helps the heart to recover from toxic injury and from infarct. In the murine heart, moderate overexpression of the NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase SirT1 was reported to mitigate oxidative stress. SirT1 is known to promote lifespan extension and to protect from metabolic challenges. Circulating IGF-1 and SirT1 play antagonizing biological roles and share molecular targets in the heart, in turn affecting cardiomyocyte physiology. However, how different IGF-1 isoforms may impact SirT1 and affect cardiomyocyte function is unknown. Here we show that locally acting mIGF-1 increases SirT1 expression/activity, whereas circulating IGF-1 isoform does not affect it, in cultured HL-1 and neonatal cardiomyocytes. mIGF-1-induced SirT1 activity exerts protection against angiotensin II (Ang II)-triggered hypertrophy and against paraquat (PQ) and Ang II-induced oxidative stress. Conversely, circulating IGF-1 triggered itself oxidative stress and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Interestingly, potent cardio-protective genes (adiponectin, UCP-1 and MT-2) were increased specifically in mIGF-1-overexpressing cardiomyocytes, in a SirT1-dependent fashion. Thus, mIGF-1 protects cardiomyocytes from oxidative and hypertrophic stresses via SirT1 activity, and may represent a promising cardiac therapeutic.

  20. Nonmetabolic functions of pyruvate kinase isoform M2 in controlling cell cycle progression and tumorigenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhimin Lu

    2012-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase catalyzes the rate-limiting final step of glycolysis,generating adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and pyruvate.The M2 tumor-specific isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) promotes glucose uptake and lactate production in the presence of oxygen,known as aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect.As recently reported in Nature,PKM2,besides its metabolic function,has a nonmetabolic function in the direct control of cell cycle progression by activating β-catenin and inducing expression of the β-catenin downstream gene CCND1 (encoding for cyclin D1).This nonmetabolic function of PKM2 is essential for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation-induced tumorigenesis.

  1. Rab5 Isoforms Specifically Regulate Different Modes of Endocytosis in Leishmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Ruchir; Verma, Jitender Kumar; Kapoor, Anjali; Langsley, Gordon; Mukhopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-07-08

    Differential functions of Rab5 isoforms in endocytosis are not well characterized. Here, we cloned, expressed, and characterized Rab5a and Rab5b from Leishmania and found that both of them are localized in the early endosome. To understand the role of LdRab5 isoforms in different modes of endocytosis in Leishmania, we generated transgenic parasites overexpressing LdRab5a, LdRab5b, or their dominant-positive (LdRab5a:Q93L and LdRab5b:Q80L) or dominant-negative mutants (LdRab5a:N146I and LdRab5b:N133I). Using LdRab5a or its mutants overexpressing parasites, we found that LdRab5a specifically regulates the fluid-phase endocytosis of horseradish peroxidase and also specifically induced the transport of dextran-Texas Red to the lysosomes. In contrast, cells overexpressing LdRab5b or its mutants showed that LdRab5b explicitly controls receptor-mediated endocytosis of hemoglobin, and overexpression of LdRab5b:WT enhanced the transport of internalized Hb to the lysosomes in comparison with control cells. To unequivocally demonstrate the role of Rab5 isoforms in endocytosis in Leishmania, we tried to generate null-mutants of LdRab5a and LdRab5b parasites, but both were lethal indicating their essential functions in parasites. Therefore, we used heterozygous LdRab5a(+/-) and LdRab5b(+/-) cells. LdRab5a(+/-) Leishmania showed 50% inhibition of HRP uptake, but hemoglobin endocytosis was uninterrupted. In contrast, about 50% inhibition of Hb endocytosis was observed in LdRab5b(+/-) cells without any significant effect on HRP uptake. Finally, we tried to identify putative LdRab5a and LdRab5b effectors. We found that LdRab5b interacts with clathrin heavy chain and hemoglobin receptor. However, LdRab5a failed to interact with the clathrin heavy chain, and interaction with hemoglobin receptor was significantly less. Thus, our results showed that LdRab5a and LdRab5b differentially regulate fluid phase and receptor-mediated endocytosis in Leishmania.

  2. Diversity Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravazzani, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    This entry provides an overview of diversity management which, in the context of organizations, consists in the strategic process of harnessing the potential of all employees to create an inclusive environment and, at the same time, contribute to meeting organizational goals. The entry first...... describes the complex construct of diversity that has been variously conceptualized in the literature, embracing multiple social and informational diversity dimensions such as gender, age, culture, values, and workstyle. This is followed by illustration of the historical development of diversity-management...... discourse and practice, and possible overarching approaches guiding organizations. It goes on to elucidate elements linked to the implementation of diversity management: positive and negative outcomes, most spread practices including communication, and contingency factors shaping the understanding...

  3. Everyday Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Ho

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Cosmopolitan Civil Societies Journal has been an important forum for discussing issues around cultural diversity. Articles on cultural diversity have been present in virtually every issue of the journal. These have ranged from conceptual pieces on cosmopolitanism, identity, dialogue, prejudice, pluralism, cultural and social capital and social inclusion, to articles embedded in empirical research on ethnic precincts and segregation in cities, experiences of religious minorities, immigrant entrepreneurs, and more. Over its five year history, the journal has also had themed editions on cultural diversity issues, including one on embracing diversity in sport, and another on the Chinese in Australian politics. The scope of this work has been wide, and authors have brought a range of disciplinary and methodological approaches to the journal.   The purpose of this paper is to draw together some of the work that has been published around cultural diversity, particularly relating to everyday experiences of cosmopolitanism and racism. Focusing on everyday social relations has been an important part of recent scholarship on cultural diversity in Australia (e.g. Wise and Velayutham 2009. In contrast to research framed around multicultural policy or mediated representations of diversity, the scholarship of the ‘everyday’ aims to explore people’s lived experiences and daily interactions with others.

  4. Analysis of the functional interaction of Arabidopsis starch synthase and branching enzyme isoforms reveals that the cooperative action of SSI and BEs results in glucans with polymodal chain length distribution similar to amylopectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brust, Henrike; Lehmann, Tanja; D'Hulst, Christophe; Fettke, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    Starch synthase (SS) and branching enzyme (BE) establish the two glycosidic linkages existing in starch. Both enzymes exist as several isoforms. Enzymes derived from several species were studied extensively both in vivo and in vitro over the last years, however, analyses of a functional interaction of SS and BE isoforms are missing so far. Here, we present data from in vitro studies including both interaction of leaf derived and heterologously expressed SS and BE isoforms. We found that SSI activity in native PAGE without addition of glucans was dependent on at least one of the two BE isoforms active in Arabidopsis leaves. This interaction is most likely not based on a physical association of the enzymes, as demonstrated by immunodetection and native PAGE mobility analysis of SSI, BE2, and BE3. The glucans formed by the action of SSI/BEs were analysed using leaf protein extracts from wild type and be single mutants (Atbe2 and Atbe3 mutant lines) and by different combinations of recombinant proteins. Chain length distribution (CLD) patterns of the formed glucans were irrespective of SSI and BE isoforms origin and still independent of assay conditions. Furthermore, we show that all SS isoforms (SSI-SSIV) were able to interact with BEs and form branched glucans. However, only SSI/BEs generated a polymodal distribution of glucans which was similar to CLD pattern detected in amylopectin of Arabidopsis leaf starch. We discuss the impact of the SSI/BEs interplay for the CLD pattern of amylopectin.

  5. PSA Isoforms' Velocities for Early Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidegger, Isabel; Klocker, Helmut; Pichler, Renate; Horninger, Wolfgang; Bektic, Jasmin

    2015-06-01

    Free prostate-specific antigen (fPSA) and its molecular isoforms are suggested for enhancement of PSA testing in prostate cancer (PCa). In the present study we evaluated whether PSA isoforms' velocities might serve as a tool to improve early PCa diagnosis. Our study population included 381 men who had undergone at least one ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy whose pathologic examination yielded PCa or showed no evidence of prostatic malignancy. Serial PSA, fPSA, and proPSA measurements were performed on serum samples covering 7 years prior to biopsy using Beckmann Coulter Access immunoassays. Afterwards, velocities of PSA (PSAV), fPSA% (fPSA%V), proPSA% (proPSA%V) and the ratio proPSA/PSA/V were calculated and their ability to discriminate cancer from benign disease was evaluated. Among 381 men included in the study, 202 (53%) were diagnosed with PCa and underwent radical prostatectomy at our Department. PSAV, fPSA%V, proPSA%V as well as proPSA/PSA/V were able to differentiate significantly between PCa and non-cancerous prostate. The highest discriminatory power between cancer and benign disease has been observed two and one year prior to diagnosis with all measured parameters. Among all measured parameters, fPSA%V showed the best cancer specificity of 45.3% with 90% of sensitivity. In summary, our results highlight the value of PSA isoforms' velocity for early detection of PCa. Especially fPSA%V should be used in the clinical setting to increase cancer detection specificity.

  6. The role of wild type RAS isoforms in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bingying; Der, Channing J; Cox, Adrienne D

    2016-10-01

    Mutationally activated RAS proteins are critical oncogenic drivers in nearly 30% of all human cancers. As with mutant RAS, the role of wild type RAS proteins in oncogenesis, tumour maintenance and metastasis is context-dependent. Complexity is introduced by the existence of multiple RAS genes (HRAS, KRAS, NRAS) and protein "isoforms" (KRAS4A, KRAS4B), by the ever more complicated network of RAS signaling, and by the increasing identification of numerous genetic aberrations in cancers that do and do not harbour mutant RAS. Numerous mouse model carcinogenesis studies and examination of patient tumours reveal that, in RAS-mutant cancers, wild type RAS proteins are likely to serve as tumour suppressors when the mutant RAS is of the same isoform. This evidence is particularly robust in KRAS mutant cancers, which often display suppression or loss of wild type KRAS, but is not as strong for NRAS. In contrast, although not yet fully elucidated, the preponderance of evidence indicates that wild type RAS proteins play a tumour promoting role when the mutant RAS is of a different isoform. In non-RAS mutant cancers, wild type RAS is recognized as a mediator of oncogenic signaling due to chronic activation of upstream receptor tyrosine kinases that feed through RAS. Additionally, in the absence of mutant RAS, activation of wild type RAS may drive cancer upon the loss of negative RAS regulators such as NF1 GAP or SPRY proteins. Here we explore the current state of knowledge with respect to the roles of wild type RAS proteins in human cancers.

  7. Modulation of Progesterone Receptor Isoform Expression in Pregnant Human Myometrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Ilicic

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Regulation of myometrial progesterone receptor (PR expression is an unresolved issue central to understanding the mechanism of functional progesterone withdrawal and initiation of labor in women. Objectives. To determine whether pregnant human myometrium undergoes culture-induced changes in PR isoform expression ex situ and, further, to determine if conditions approaching the in vivo environment stabilise PR isoform expression in culture. Methods. Term nonlaboring human myometrial tissues were cultured under specific conditions: serum supplementation, steroids, stretch, cAMP, PMA, PGF2α, NF-κB inhibitors, or TSA. Following 48 h culture, PR-T, PR-A, and PR-B mRNA levels were determined using qRT-PCR. PR-A/PR-B ratios were calculated. Results. PR-T and PR-A expression and the PR-A/PR-B ratio significantly increased in culture. Steroids prevented the culture-induced increase in PR-T and PR-A expression. Stretch blocked the effects of steroids on PR-T and PR-A expression. PMA further increased the PR-A/PR-B ratio, while TSA blocked culture-induced increases of PR-A expression and the PR-A/PR-B ratio. Conclusion. Human myometrial tissue in culture undergoes changes in PR gene expression consistent with transition toward a laboring phenotype. TSA maintained the nonlaboring PR isoform expression pattern. This suggests that preserving histone and/or nonhistone protein acetylation is critical for maintaining the progesterone dependent quiescent phenotype of human myometrium in culture.

  8. Modulation of Progesterone Receptor Isoform Expression in Pregnant Human Myometrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background. Regulation of myometrial progesterone receptor (PR) expression is an unresolved issue central to understanding the mechanism of functional progesterone withdrawal and initiation of labor in women. Objectives. To determine whether pregnant human myometrium undergoes culture-induced changes in PR isoform expression ex situ and, further, to determine if conditions approaching the in vivo environment stabilise PR isoform expression in culture. Methods. Term nonlaboring human myometrial tissues were cultured under specific conditions: serum supplementation, steroids, stretch, cAMP, PMA, PGF2α, NF-κB inhibitors, or TSA. Following 48 h culture, PR-T, PR-A, and PR-B mRNA levels were determined using qRT-PCR. PR-A/PR-B ratios were calculated. Results. PR-T and PR-A expression and the PR-A/PR-B ratio significantly increased in culture. Steroids prevented the culture-induced increase in PR-T and PR-A expression. Stretch blocked the effects of steroids on PR-T and PR-A expression. PMA further increased the PR-A/PR-B ratio, while TSA blocked culture-induced increases of PR-A expression and the PR-A/PR-B ratio. Conclusion. Human myometrial tissue in culture undergoes changes in PR gene expression consistent with transition toward a laboring phenotype. TSA maintained the nonlaboring PR isoform expression pattern. This suggests that preserving histone and/or nonhistone protein acetylation is critical for maintaining the progesterone dependent quiescent phenotype of human myometrium in culture. PMID:28540297

  9. PKC isoforms interact with and phosphorylate DNMT1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradhan Sriharsa

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1 has been shown to be phosphorylated on multiple serine and threonine residues, based on cell type and physiological conditions. Although recent studies have suggested that protein kinase C (PKC may be involved, the individual contribution of PKC isoforms in their ability to phosphorylate DNMT1 remains unknown. The PKC family consists of at least 12 isoforms that possess distinct differences in structure, substrate requirement, expression and localization. Results Here we show that PKCα, βI, βII, δ, γ, η, ζ and μ preferentially phosphorylate the N-terminal domain of human DNMT1. No such phosphorylation of DNMT1 was observed with PKCε. Using PKCζ as a prototype model, we also found that PKC physically interacts with and phosphorylates DNMT1. In vitro phosphorylation assays conducted with recombinant fragments of DNMT1 showed that PKCζ preferentially phosphorylated the N-terminal region of DNMT1. The interaction of PKCζ with DNMT1 was confirmed by GST pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation experiments. Co-localization experiments by fluorescent microscopy further showed that endogenous PKCζ and DNMT1 were present in the same molecular complex. Endogenous PKCζ activity was also detected when DNMT1 was immunoprecipitated from HEK-293 cells. Overexpression of both PKCζ and DNMT1 in HEK-293 cells, but not of either alone, reduced the methylation status of genes distributed across the genome. Moreover, in vitro phosphorylation of DNMT1 by PKCζ reduced its methytransferase activity. Conclusions Our results indicate that phosphorylation of human DNMT1 by PKC is isoform-specific and provides the first evidence of cooperation between PKCζ and DNMT1 in the control of the DNA methylation patterns of the genome.

  10. Understanding Diversity in Millennial Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broido, Ellen M.

    2004-01-01

    The Millennial generation of college students has demographics and attitudes toward diversity issues different from their predecessors; this chapter explores those differences and their implications for student affairs work.

  11. Understanding Diversity in Millennial Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broido, Ellen M.

    2004-01-01

    The Millennial generation of college students has demographics and attitudes toward diversity issues different from their predecessors; this chapter explores those differences and their implications for student affairs work.

  12. Investigating the diversity of the 18S SSU rRNA hyper-variable region of Theileria in cattle and Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer) from southern Africa using a next generation sequencing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mans, Ben J; Pienaar, Ronel; Ratabane, John; Pule, Boitumelo; Latif, Abdalla A

    2016-07-01

    Molecular classification and systematics of the Theileria is based on the analysis of the 18S rRNA gene. Reverse line blot or conventional sequencing approaches have disadvantages in the study of 18S rRNA diversity and a next-generation 454 sequencing approach was investigated. The 18S rRNA gene was amplified using RLB primers coupled to 96 unique sequence identifiers (MIDs). Theileria positive samples from African buffalo (672) and cattle (480) from southern Africa were combined in batches of 96 and sequenced using the GS Junior 454 sequencer to produce 825711 informative sequences. Sequences were extracted based on MIDs and analysed to identify Theileria genotypes. Genotypes observed in buffalo and cattle were confirmed in the current study, while no new genotypes were discovered. Genotypes showed specific geographic distributions, most probably linked with vector distributions. Host specificity of buffalo and cattle specific genotypes were confirmed and prevalence data as well as relative parasitemia trends indicate preference for different hosts. Mixed infections are common with African buffalo carrying more genotypes compared to cattle. Associative or exclusion co-infection profiles were observed between genotypes that may have implications for speciation and systematics: specifically that more Theileria species may exist in cattle and buffalo than currently recognized. Analysis of primers used for Theileria parva diagnostics indicate that no new genotypes will be amplified by the current primer sets confirming their specificity. T. parva SNP variants that occur in the 18S rRNA hypervariable region were confirmed. A next generation sequencing approach is useful in obtaining comprehensive knowledge regarding 18S rRNA diversity and prevalence for the Theileria, allowing for the assessment of systematics and diagnostic assays based on the 18S gene.

  13. Soluble malate dehydrogenase of Geophagus brasiliensis (Cichlidae, Perciformes: isolated isoforms and kinetics properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Regina de Aquino-Silva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic properties and thermal stabilities of Geophagus brasiliensis skeletal muscle unfractionated malate dehydrogenase (MDH, EC 1.1.1.37 and its isolated isoforms were analyzed to examine a possible sMDH-B* locus duplication in a fixation process influenced by genetic drift. Two optimal pHs were detected: 7.5 for AB1 unfractionated muscle phenotype and its B1 isoform, and 8.0 for AB1B2 unfractionated muscle phenotype, A and B2 isoforms. While G. brasiliensis A isoform could be characterized as thermostable, the duplicated B isoform cannot be assumed as thermolabile. Km values for isolated B2 isoforms were 1.6 times lower than for B1. A duplication event in progress best explains the electrophoretic six-band pattern detected in G. brasiliensis, which would be caused by genetic drift.

  14. Isoform-specific regulation of adenylyl cyclase: a potential target in future pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwatsubo, Kousaku; Tsunematsu, Takashi; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2003-06-01

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC) is a target enzyme of multiple G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In the past decade, the cloning, structure and biochemical properties of nine AC isoforms were reported, and each isoform of AC shows distinct patterns of tissue distribution and biochemical/pharmacological properties. In addition to the conventional regulators of this enzyme, such as calmodulin (CaM) or PKC, novel regulators, for example, caveolin, have been identified. Most importantly, these regulators work on AC in an isoform dependent manner. Recent studies have demonstrated that certain classic AC inhibitors, i.e., P-site inhibitors, show an isoform-dependent inhibition of AC. The side chain modifications of forskolin, a diterpene extract from Coleus forskolii, markedly enhance its isoform selectivity. When taken together, these findings suggest that it is feasible to develop new pharmacotherapeutic agents that target AC isoforms to regulate various neurohormonal signals in a highly tissue-/organ-specific manner.

  15. Separation of arginase isoforms by capillary zone electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing in density gradient column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrosa, M M; Legaz, M E

    1995-04-01

    Four major arginase isoforms, I, II, III and IV, have been detected in Evernia prunastri thallus. They differ in terms of both physical and biochemical properties. The isoelectric point (pI) of these proteins has been determined by both isoelectric focusing in density gradient column and high-performance capillary electrophoresis (HPCE). Isoelectric focusing revealed charge microheterogeneity for isoforms II and IV whereas arginases I and II had the same pI value of 5.8. HPCE separation confirmed this charge microheterogeneity for isoform IV but not for isoform III, and provided evidence of microheterogeneity for isoforms I and II. The effect of various electrolyte buffers and running conditions on the HPCE separation of arginase isoform were investigated. Addition of 0.5 mM spermidine (SPD) to the running buffer reduced the electroosmotic flow (EOF) and permitted discriminating between the native proteins and protein fragments.

  16. HEME OXYGENASE: ENZYME WITH FUNCTIONAL DIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shekhawat G. S.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years role of Heme oxygenase (HO has been considered in nearly all living system including plants, animals and other organisms. The common role of heme oxygenase is the degradation of heme, although there is a diversity of additional role of HO in organisms including iron acquisition, cellular signaling, defense against stress and biosynthesis during metabolism. Likewise, the function of HO is to provide cofactors for the photosynthetic apparatus in cyanobacteria. Heme concentration is variable in different plant species and found maximum in leguminous plant root nodules. Moreover HO has diverse isoforms in plant and animal systems. The review addressed important function of HO and focused on its functional diversity.

  17. Validation of Next-Generation Sequencing of Entire Mitochondrial Genomes and the Diversity of Mitochondrial DNA Mutations in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Kloss-Brandstätter

    Full Text Available Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC is mainly caused by smoking and alcohol abuse and shows a five-year survival rate of ~50%. We aimed to explore the variation of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations in primary oral tumors, recurrences and metastases.We performed an in-depth validation of mtDNA next-generation sequencing (NGS on an Illumina HiSeq 2500 platform for its application to cancer tissues, with the goal to detect low-level heteroplasmies and to avoid artifacts. Therefore we genotyped the mitochondrial genome (16.6 kb from 85 tissue samples (tumors, recurrences, resection edges, metastases and blood collected from 28 prospectively recruited OSCC patients applying both Sanger sequencing and high-coverage NGS (~35,000 reads per base.We observed a strong correlation between Sanger sequencing and NGS in estimating the mixture ratio of heteroplasmies (r = 0.99; p10% were predominant. Four out of six patients who developed a local tumor recurrence showed mutations in the recurrence that had also been observed in the primary tumor. Three out of five patients, who had tumor metastases in the lymph nodes of their necks, shared mtDNA mutations between primary tumors and lymph node metastases. The percentage of mutation heteroplasmy increased from the primary tumor to lymph node metastases.We conclude that Sanger sequencing is valid for heteroplasmy quantification for heteroplasmies ≥10% and that NGS is capable of reliably detecting and quantifying heteroplasmies down to the 1%-level. The finding of shared mutations between primary tumors, recurrences and metastasis indicates a clonal origin of malignant cells in oral cancer.

  18. Metabolic and growth characteristics of novel diverse microbes isolated from deep cores collected at the Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE)-Arctic site in Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, R.; Pettenato, A.; Tas, N.; Hubbard, S. S.; Jansson, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Arctic is characterized by vast amounts of carbon stored in permafrost and is an important focal point for the study of climate change as increasing temperature may accelerate microbially mediated release of Carbon stored in permafrost into the atmosphere as CO2 and CH4. Yet surprisingly, very little is known about the vulnerability of permafrost and response of microorganisms in the permafrost to their changing environment. This deficiency is largely due to the difficulty in study of largely uncultivated and unknown permafrost microbes. As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE) in the Arctic, we collected permafrost cores in an effort to isolate resident microbes. The cores were from the Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO), located at the northern most location on the Alaskan Arctic Coastal Plain near Barrow, AK, and up to 3m in depth. In this location, permafrost starts from 0.5m in depth and is characterized by variable water content and higher pH than surface soils. Enrichments for heterotrophic bacteria were initiated at 4°C and 1°C in the dark in several different media types, under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Positive enrichments were identified by an increase in optical density and cell counts after incubation period ranging from two to four weeks. After serial transfers into fresh media, individual colonies were obtained on agar surface. Several strains were isolated that include Firmicutes such as Bacillus, Clostridium, Sporosarcina, and Paenibacillus species and Iron-reducing Betaproteobacteria such as Rhodoferax species. In addition, methanogenic enrichments continue to grow and produce methane gas at 2°C. In this study, we present the characterization, carbon substrate utilization, pH, temperature and osmotic tolerance, as well as the effect of increasing climate change parameters on the growth rate and respiratory gas production from these permafrost isolates.

  19. Understanding Diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.L. van Knippenberg (Daan)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractDaan van Knippenberg is Professor of Organizational Behavior at RSM Erasmus University, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands. His research interests include work group performance, especially work group diversity and group decision making, leadership, in particular the roles of

  20. Gender Diversities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agustin, Lise Rolandsen; Siim, Birte

    2014-01-01

    The article analyses the European Year for Combating Poverty and Social Exclusion (2010) (EY 2010) with the aim of identifying the nature of gender diversities in EU policies. We argue that the EU handles issues related to gender and diversity in particular ways; this approach is characterized...... by non-citizen/citizen and redistribution/recognition divisions. Employing intersectionality as the methodological approach to gender diversities, the article shows how gender and ethnicity are articulated in the policy-making process which led to the adoption of EY 201, the activities undertaken during...... the EY 2010, and the evaluation of EY 2010. The case study is suitable for developing a dynamic multi-level model for analysing gendered diversities at the transnationmal level: It illustrates how the EU policy frame interacts with particular national contexts in promoting or hundering the advancement...

  1. Understanding Diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.L. van Knippenberg (Daan)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractDaan van Knippenberg is Professor of Organizational Behavior at RSM Erasmus University, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands. His research interests include work group performance, especially work group diversity and group decision making, leadership, in particular the roles of

  2. Identification of signals that facilitate isoform specific nucleolar localization of myosin IC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwab, Ryan S.; Ihnatovych, Ivanna; Yunus, Sharifah Z.S.A.; Domaradzki, Tera [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University at Buffalo—State University of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States); Hofmann, Wilma A., E-mail: whofmann@buffalo.edu [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University at Buffalo—State University of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily that localizes to the cytoplasm and the nucleus, where it is involved in transcription by RNA polymerases I and II, intranuclear transport, and nuclear export. In mammalian cells, three isoforms of myosin IC are expressed that differ only in the addition of short isoform-specific N-terminal peptides. Despite the high sequence homology, the isoforms show differences in cellular distribution, in localization to nuclear substructures, and in their interaction with nuclear proteins through yet unknown mechanisms. In this study, we used EGFP-fusion constructs that express truncated or mutated versions of myosin IC isoforms to detect regions that are involved in isoform-specific localization. We identified two nucleolar localization signals (NoLS). One NoLS is located in the myosin IC isoform B specific N-terminal peptide, the second NoLS is located upstream of the neck region within the head domain. We demonstrate that both NoLS are functional and necessary for nucleolar localization of specifically myosin IC isoform B. Our data provide a first mechanistic explanation for the observed functional differences between the myosin IC isoforms and are an important step toward our understanding of the underlying mechanisms that regulate the various and distinct functions of myosin IC isoforms. - Highlights: ► Two NoLS have been identified in the myosin IC isoform B sequence. ► Both NoLS are necessary for myosin IC isoform B specific nucleolar localization. ► First mechanistic explanation of functional differences between the isoforms.

  3. Amyloid-beta Isoform Metabolism Quantitation by Stable Isotope Labeled Kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Mawuenyega, Kwasi G.; Kasten, Tom; Sigurdson, Wendy; Bateman, Randall J.

    2013-01-01

    Abundant evidence suggests a central role for the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. Production and clearance of different Aβ isoforms have been established as targets of proposed disease-modifying therapeutic treatments of AD. However, previous studies used multiple sequential purification steps to isolate the isoforms individually and quantitate them based on a common mid-domain peptide. We created a method to simultaneously purify Aβ isoforms and quantitate th...

  4. The Role of a Novel Myosin Isoform in Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    specific N-terminal peptides. Despite the high sequence homology , the isoforms show differences in cellular distribution, in localization to nuclear...Interestingly, despite the sequence homology between the isoforms and the commonality of the NLS, the isoforms show differences in their nucleus to cytoplasm...Goeres J, Sixt KM, Bekes M, Zhang XD, Salvesen GS, Matunis MJ (2009). Protection from isopeptidase-mediated deconjugation regulates paralog -selective

  5. Generative Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyles, Dan Allen

    Educational research has identified how science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) practice and education have underperforming metrics in racial and gender diversity, despite decades of intervention. These disparities are part of the construction of a culture of science that is alienating to these populations. Recent studies in a social science framework described as "Generative Justice" have suggested that the context of social and scientific practice might be modified to bring about more just and equitable relations among the disenfranchised by circulating the value they and their non-human allies create back to them in unalienated forms. What is not known are the underlying principles of social and material space that makes a system more or less generative. I employ an autoethnographic method at four sites: a high school science class; a farm committed to "Black and Brown liberation"; a summer program geared towards youth environmental mapping; and a summer workshop for Harlem middle school students. My findings suggest that by identifying instances where material affinity, participatory voice, and creative solidarity are mutually reinforcing, it is possible to create educational contexts that generate unalienated value, and circulate it back to the producers themselves. This cycle of generation may help explain how to create systems of justice that strengthen and grow themselves through successive iterations. The problem of lack of diversity in STEM may be addressed not merely by recruiting the best and the brightest from underrepresented populations, but by changing the context of STEM education to provide tools for its own systematic restructuring.

  6. Nuclear progesterone receptor isoforms and their functions in the female reproductive tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekawiecki, R; Kowalik, M K; Kotwica, J

    2011-01-01

    Progesterone (P4), which is produced by the corpus luteum (CL), creates proper conditions for the embryo implantation, its development, and ensures proper conditions for the duration of pregnancy. Besides the non-genomic activity of P4 on target cells, its main physiological effect is caused through genomic action by the progesterone nuclear receptor (PGR). This nuclear progesterone receptor occurs in two specific isoforms, PGRA and PGRB. PGRA isoform acts as an inhibitor of transcriptional action of PGRB. The inactive receptor is connected with chaperone proteins and attachment of P4 causes disconnection of chaperones and unveiling of DNA binding domain (DBD). After receptor dimerization in the cells' nucleus and interaction with hormone response element (HRE), the receptor coactivators are connected and transcription is initiated. The ratio of these isoforms changes during the estrous cycle and reflects the different levels of P4 effect on the reproductive system. Both isoforms, PGRA and PGRB, also show a different response to the P4 receptor antagonist activity. Connection of the antagonist to PGRA can block PGRB, but acting through the PGRB isoform, P4 receptor antagonist may undergo conversion to a strongly receptor agonist. A third isoform, PGRC, has also been revealed. This isoform is the shortest and does not have transcriptional activity. Alternative splicing and insertion of additional exons may lead to the formation of different PGR isoforms. This paper summarizes the available data on the progesterone receptor isoforms and its regulatory action within the female reproductive system.

  7. Identification of signals that facilitate isoform specific nucleolar localization of myosin IC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Ryan S; Ihnatovych, Ivanna; Yunus, Sharifah Z S A; Domaradzki, Tera; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2013-05-01

    Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily that localizes to the cytoplasm and the nucleus, where it is involved in transcription by RNA polymerases I and II, intranuclear transport, and nuclear export. In mammalian cells, three isoforms of myosin IC are expressed that differ only in the addition of short isoform-specific N-terminal peptides. Despite the high sequence homology, the isoforms show differences in cellular distribution, in localization to nuclear substructures, and in their interaction with nuclear proteins through yet unknown mechanisms. In this study, we used EGFP-fusion constructs that express truncated or mutated versions of myosin IC isoforms to detect regions that are involved in isoform-specific localization. We identified two nucleolar localization signals (NoLS). One NoLS is located in the myosin IC isoform B specific N-terminal peptide, the second NoLS is located upstream of the neck region within the head domain. We demonstrate that both NoLS are functional and necessary for nucleolar localization of specifically myosin IC isoform B. Our data provide a first mechanistic explanation for the observed functional differences between the myosin IC isoforms and are an important step toward our understanding of the underlying mechanisms that regulate the various and distinct functions of myosin IC isoforms.

  8. Ensemble One-class Classifiers Based on Hybrid Diversity Generation and Pruning%基于混合多样性生成与修剪的集成单类分类算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘家辰; 苗启广; 曹莹; 宋建锋; 权义宁

    2015-01-01

    针对传统集成学习方法直接应用于单类分类器效果不理想的问题,该文首先证明了集成学习方法能够提升单类分类器的性能,同时证明了若基分类器集不经选择会导致集成后性能下降;接着指出了经典集成方法直接应用于单类分类器集成时存在基分类器多样性严重不足的问题,并提出了一种能够提高多样性的基单类分类器混合生成策略;最后从集成损失构成的角度拆分集成单类分类器的损失函数,针对性地构造了集成单类分类器修剪策略并提出一种基于混合多样性生成和修剪的单类分类器集成算法,简称为PHD-EOC。在UCI标准数据集和恶意程序行为检测数据集上的实验结果表明,PHD-EOC算法兼顾多样性与单类分类性能,在各种单类分类器评价指标上均较经典集成学习方法有更好的表现,并降低了决策阶段的时间复杂度。%Combining one-class classifiers using the classical ensemble methods is not satisfactory. To address this problem, this paper first proves that though one-class classification performance can be improved by a classifier ensemble, it can also degrade if the set of base classifiers are not selected carefully. On this basis, this study further analyzes that the lacking of diversity heavily accounts for performance degradation. Therefore, a hybrid method for generating diverse base classifiers is proposed. Secondly, in the combining phase, to find the most useful diversity, the one-class ensemble loss is split and analyzed theoretically to propose a diversity based pruning method. Finally, by combining these two steps, a novel ensemble one-class classifier named Pruned Hybrid Diverse Ensemble One-class Classifier (PHD-EOC) is proposed. The experimental results on the UCI datasets and a malicious software detection dataset show that the PHD-EOC strikes a better balance between the diverse base classifiers and classification

  9. GABAB(1) receptor subunit isoforms differentially regulate stress resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Leary, Olivia F.; Felice, Daniela; Galimberti, Stefano; Savignac, Hélène M.; Bravo, Javier A.; Crowley, Tadhg; El Yacoubi, Malika; Vaugeois, Jean-Marie; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard; Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Stressful life events increase the susceptibility to developing psychiatric disorders such as depression; however, many individuals are resilient to such negative effects of stress. Determining the neurobiology underlying this resilience is instrumental to the development of novel and more effective treatments for stress-related psychiatric disorders. GABAB receptors are emerging therapeutic targets for the treatment of stress-related disorders such as depression. These receptors are predominantly expressed as heterodimers of a GABAB(2) subunit with either a GABAB(1a) or a GABAB(1b) subunit. Here we show that mice lacking the GABAB(1b) receptor isoform are more resilient to both early-life stress and chronic psychosocial stress in adulthood, whereas mice lacking GABAB(1a) receptors are more susceptible to stress-induced anhedonia and social avoidance compared with wild-type mice. In addition, increased hippocampal expression of the GABAB(1b) receptor subunit is associated with a depression-like phenotype in the helpless H/Rouen genetic mouse model of depression. Stress resilience in GABAB(1b)−/− mice is coupled with increased proliferation and survival of newly born cells in the adult ventral hippocampus and increased stress-induced c-Fos activation in the hippocampus following early-life stress. Taken together, the data suggest that GABAB(1) receptor subunit isoforms differentially regulate the deleterious effects of stress and, thus, may be important therapeutic targets for the treatment of depression. PMID:25288769

  10. Entropy-based model for miRNA isoform analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengqin Wang

    Full Text Available MiRNAs have been widely studied due to their important post-transcriptional regulatory roles in gene expression. Many reports have demonstrated the evidence of miRNA isoform products (isomiRs in high-throughput small RNA sequencing data. However, the biological function involved in these molecules is still not well investigated. Here, we developed a Shannon entropy-based model to estimate isomiR expression profiles of high-throughput small RNA sequencing data extracted from miRBase webserver. By using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistical test (KS test, we demonstrated that the 5p and 3p miRNAs present more variants than the single arm miRNAs. We also found that the isomiR variant, except the 3' isomiR variant, is strongly correlated with Minimum Free Energy (MFE of pre-miRNA, suggesting the intrinsic feature of pre-miRNA should be one of the important factors for the miRNA regulation. The functional enrichment analysis showed that the miRNAs with high variation, particularly the 5' end variation, are enriched in a set of critical functions, supporting these molecules should not be randomly produced. Our results provide a probabilistic framework for miRNA isoforms analysis, and give functional insights into pre-miRNA processing.

  11. Expression of aquaporin isoforms during human and mouse tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felszeghy, S; Módis, L; Németh, P; Nagy, G; Zelles, T; Agre, P; Laurikkala, J; Fejerskov, O; Thesleff, I; Nielsen, S

    2004-04-01

    Previously, we described the development of hyaluronan (HA) deposition in human tooth germ tissues that are consistent with water transport in different stages of tooth development. The aquaporins (AQP) constitute a family of membrane water channels that are expressed in many organs. However, there are no data available about the expression pattern of aquaporin water channels in dental structures. In the present study we have characterised the expression of six different aquaporin isoforms (AQP1-5, AQP-9) in developing human and mouse tooth germs by immunohistochemistry using isoform specific antibodies. In the "bell stage" AQP1 was expressed in endothelial cells of small vessels whereas no other structures of the tooth primordial were labeled. AQP2, AQP3 and AQP9 immunoreactivity was not observed in tooth germs, whereas strong AQP4 and AQP5 expression was observed in dental lamina, inner enamel epithelium, stratum intermedium, stellate reticulum and the outer enamel epithelium. Oral epithelium also exhibited AQP4 and AQP5 immunolabeling. During development of the matrices of the dental hard tissues AQP4 and AQP5 immunostaining was observed in the odontoblasts and their processes, as well as in the secretory ameloblast and their apical processes. Immunolabeling controls were negative. In conclusion, AQP4 and AQP5 are expressed in tooth germ tissues in early development in cells that previously have been shown to express HA and/or CD44, indicating that AQP water channels may play a role for ECM hydration during tooth development.

  12. A Review of Metallothionein Isoforms and their Role in Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil kumar M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Metallothionein (MT is a protein which has several interesting biological effects and has been demonstrated increase focus on the role of MT in various biological systems in the past three decades. The studies on the role of MT were limited with few areas like apoptosis and antioxidants in selected organs even fifty years after its discovery. Now acknowledge the exploration of various isoforms of MT such as MT-I, MT-II, MT-III and MT-IV and other isoforms in various biological systems. Strong evidence exists that MT modulates complex diseases and the immune system in the body but the primary function of MT still remains unknown. This review's main objective is to explore the capability to specifically manipulate MT levels in cells and in animals to provide answers regarding how MT could impact those complex disease scenarios. The experimental result mentioned in this review related among MT, zinc, cadmium, diabetic, heart disease, bone retardation, neuro toxicity, kidney dysfunction, cancer, and brain suggest novel method for exploration and contribute significantly to the growing scientist to research further in this field.

  13. Structures of alternatively spliced isoforms of human ketohexokinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Chi H; Asipu, Aruna; Bonthron, David T; Phillips, Simon E V

    2009-03-01

    A molecular understanding of the unique aspects of dietary fructose metabolism may be the key to understanding and controlling the current epidemic of fructose-related obesity, diabetes and related adverse metabolic states in Western populations. Fructose catabolism is initiated by its phosphorylation to fructose 1-phosphate, which is performed by ketohexokinase (KHK). Here, the crystal structures of the two alternatively spliced isoforms of human ketohexokinase, hepatic KHK-C and the peripheral isoform KHK-A, and of the ternary complex of KHK-A with the substrate fructose and AMP-PNP are reported. The structure of the KHK-A ternary complex revealed an active site with both the substrate fructose and the ATP analogue in positions ready for phosphorylation following a reaction mechanism similar to that of the pfkB family of carbohydrate kinases. Hepatic KHK deficiency causes the benign disorder essential fructosuria. The effects of the disease-causing mutations (Gly40Arg and Ala43Thr) have been modelled in the context of the KHK structure.

  14. BDNF isoforms: a round trip ticket between neurogenesis and serotonin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltran, Rocío Beatriz; Diaz, Silvina Laura

    2016-07-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor, BDNF, was discovered more than 30 years ago and, like other members of the neurotrophin family, this neuropeptide is synthetized as a proneurotrophin, the pro-BDNF, which is further cleaved to yield mature BDNF. The myriad of actions of these two BDNF isoforms in the central nervous system is constantly increasing and requires the development of sophisticated tools and animal models to refine our understanding. This review is focused on BDNF isoforms, their participation in the process of neurogenesis taking place in the hippocampus of adult mammals, and the modulation of their expression by serotonergic agents. Interestingly, around this triumvirate of BDNF, serotonin, and neurogenesis, a series of recent research has emerged with apparently counterintuitive results. This calls for an exhaustive analysis of the data published so far and encourages thorough work in the quest for new hypotheses in the field. BDNF is synthetized as a pre-proneurotrophin. After removal of the pre-region, proBDNF can be cleaved by intracellular or extracellular proteases. Mature BDNF can bind TrkB receptors, promoting their homodimerization and intracellular phosphorylation. Phosphorylated-TrkB can activate three different signaling pathways. Whereas G-protein-coupled receptors can transactivate TrkB receptors, truncated forms can inhibit mBDNF signaling. Pro-BDNF binds p75(NTR) by its mature domain, whereas the pro-region binds co-receptors. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  15. A naturally occurring isoform inhibits parathyroid hormone receptor trafficking and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Verónica; Ardura, Juan A; Wang, Bin; Sneddon, W Bruce; Friedman, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) regulates calcium homeostasis and bone remodeling through its cognitive receptor (PTHR). We describe here a PTHR isoform harboring an in-frame 42-bp deletion of exon 14 (Δe14-PTHR) that encodes transmembrane domain 7. Δe14-PTHR was detected in human kidney and buccal epithelial cells. We characterized its topology, cellular localization, and signaling, as well as its interactions with PTHR. The C-terminus of the Δe14-PTHR is extracellular, and cell surface expression is strikingly reduced compared with the PTHR. Δe14-PTHR displayed impaired trafficking and accumulated in endoplasmic reticulum. Signaling and activation of cAMP and ERK by Δe14-PTHR was decreased significantly compared with PTHR. Δe14-PTHR acts as a functional dominant-negative by suppressing the action of PTHR. Cells cotransfected with both receptors exhibit markedly reduced PTHR cell membrane expression, colocalization with Δe14-PTHR in endoplasmic reticulum, and diminished cAMP activation and ERK phosphorylation in response to challenge with PTH. Δe14-PTHR forms heterodimers with PTHR, which may account for cytoplasmic retention of PTHR in the presence of Δe14-PTHR. Analysis of the PTHR heteronuclear RNA suggests that base-pair complementarity in introns surrounding exon 14 causes exon skipping and accounts for generation of the Δe14-PTHR isoform. Thus Δe14-PTHR is a poorly functional receptor that acts as a dominant-negative of PTHR trafficking and signaling and may contribute to PTH resistance. © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  16. Inhibition of adenylyl and guanylyl cyclase isoforms by the antiviral drug foscarnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudlacek, O; Mitterauer, T; Nanoff, C; Hohenegger, M; Tang, W J; Freissmuth, M; Kleuss, C

    2001-02-02

    The pyrophosphate (PP(i)) analog foscarnet inhibits viral DNA-polymerases and is used to treat cytomegalovirus and human immunodeficiency vius infections. Nucleotide cyclases and DNA-polymerases catalyze analogous reactions, i.e. a phosphodiester bond formation, and have similar topologies in their active sites. Inhibition by foscarnet of adenylyl cyclase isoforms was therefore tested with (i) purified catalytic domains C1 and C2 of types I and VII (IC1 and VIIC1) and of type II (IIC2) and (ii) membrane-bound holoenzymes (from mammalian tissues and types I, II, and V heterologously expressed in Sf9 cell membranes). Foscarnet was more potent than PP(i) in suppressing forskolin-stimulated catalysis by both, IC1/IIC2 and VIIC1/IIC2. Stimulation of VIIC1/IIC2 by Galpha(s) relieved the inhibition by foscarnet but not that by PP(i). The IC(50) of foscarnet on membrane-bound adenylyl cyclases also depended on their mode of regulation. These findings predict that receptor-dependent cAMP formation is sensitive to inhibition by foscarnet in some, but not all, cells. This was verified with two cell lines; foscarnet blocked cAMP accumulation after A(2A)-adenosine receptor stimulation in PC12 but not in HEK-A(2A) cells. Foscarnet also inhibited soluble and, to a lesser extent, particulate guanylyl cylase. Thus, foscarnet interferes with the generation of cyclic nucleotides, an effect which may give rise to clinical side effects. The extent of inhibition varies with the enzyme isoform and with the regulatory input.

  17. NFAT1 and NFAT3 cooperate with HDAC4 during regulation of alternative splicing of PMCA isoforms in PC12 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalina Kosiorek

    Full Text Available The bulk of human genes undergo alternative splicing (AS upon response to physiological stimuli. AS is a great source of protein diversity and biological processes and is associated with the development of many diseases. Pheochromocytoma is a neuroendocrine tumor, characterized by an excessive Ca2+-dependent secretion of catecholamines. This underlines the importance of balanced control of calcium transport via regulation of gene expression pattern, including different calcium transport systems, such as plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPases (PMCAs, abundantly expressed in pheochromocytoma chromaffin cells (PC12 cells. PMCAs are encoded by four genes (Atp2b1, Atp2b2, Atp2b3, Atp2b4, whose transcript products undergo alternative splicing giving almost 30 variants.In this scientific report, we propose a novel mechanism of regulation of PMCA alternative splicing in PC12 cells through cooperation of the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT and histone deacetylases (HDACs. Luciferase assays showed increased activity of NFAT in PC12 cells, which was associated with altered expression of PMCA. RT-PCR experiments suggested that inhibition of the transcriptional activity of NFAT might result in the rearrangement of PMCA splicing variants in PC12 cells. NFAT inhibition led to dominant expression of 2x/c, 3x/a and 4x/a PMCA variants, while in untreated cells the 2w,z/b, 3z,x/b,c,e,f, and 4x/b variants were found as well. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments showed that NFAT1-HDAC4 or NFAT3-HDAC4 complexes might be involved in regulation of PMCA2x splicing variant generation.We suggest that the influence of NFAT/HDAC on PMCA isoform composition might be important for altered dopamine secretion by PC12 cells.

  18. Absorptive Capacity and Diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristinsson, Kári

    overlooked area of research. Although research based on Cohen and Levinthal‘s work has made considerable impact, there is scarcity of research on certain fundamental points argued by Cohen and Levinthal. Among these is the importance of employee diversity as well as the type and nature of interaction between...... that contribute to the neo-Schumpeterian economics literature and hopefully inspires further research into this area. The main findings of the dissertation can be divided into four distinct parts. First, diversity of individuals within firms is associated with firm innovative performance. This is in line...... with the arguments put forth by Cohen and Levinthal and subsequent researchers, but has not been verified empirically before. Second, the relationship between the diversity of individuals and innovative performance and idea generation is moderated by adherence to goals. This result might help to explain...

  19. An Algorithmic Diversity Diet?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jannick Kirk; Schmidt, Jan-Hinrik

    2016-01-01

    With the growing influence of personalized algorithmic recommender systems on the exposure of media content to users, the relevance of discussing the diversity of recommendations increases, particularly as far as public service media (PSM) is concerned. An imagined implementation of a diversity...... diet system however triggers not only the classic discussion of the reach – distinctiveness balance for PSM, but also shows that ‘diversity’ is understood very differently in algorithmic recommender system communities than it is editorially and politically in the context of PSM. The design...... of a diversity diet system generates questions not just about editorial power, personal freedom and techno-paternalism, but also about the embedded politics of recommender systems as well as the human skills affiliated with PSM editorial work and the nature of PSM content....

  20. Differential sensitivity of rat voltage-sensitive sodium channel isoforms to pyrazoline-type insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Kristopher S; Soderlund, David M

    2006-07-15

    Pyrazoline-type insecticides are potent inhibitors of insect and mammalian voltage-sensitive sodium channels. In mammals, there are nine sodium channel alpha subunit isoforms that have unique distributions and pharmacological properties, but no published data exist that compare the relative sensitivity of these different mammalian sodium channel isoforms to inhibition by pyrazoline-type insecticides. This study employed the Xenopus oocyte expression system to examine the relative sensitivity of rat Na(v)1.2a, Na(v)1.4, Na(v)1.5, and Na(v)1.8 sodium channel alpha subunit isoforms to the pyrazoline-type insecticides indoxacarb, DCJW, and RH 3421. Additionally, we assessed the effect of coexpression with the rat beta1 auxiliary subunit on the sensitivity of the Na(v)1.2a and Na(v)1.4 isoforms to these compounds. The relative sensitivity of the four sodium channel alpha subunits differed for each of the three compounds we examined. With DCJW, the order of sensitivity was Na(v)1.4 > Na(v)1.2a > Na(v)1.5 > Na(v)1.8. In contrast, the relative sensitivity of these isoforms to indoxacarb differed from that to DCJW: the Na(v)1.8 isoform was most sensitive, the Na(v)1.4 isoform was completely insensitive, and the sensitivities of the Na(v)1.5 and Na(v)1.2a isoforms were intermediate between these two extremes. Moreover, the pattern of sensitivity to RH 3421 among these four isoforms was different from that for either indoxacarb or DCJW: the Na(v)1.4 isoform was most sensitive to RH 3421, whereas the sensitivities of the remaining three isoforms were substantially less than that of the Na(v)1.4 isoform and were approximately equivalent. The only statistically significant effect of coexpression of either the Na(v)1.2a or Na(v)1.4 isoforms with the beta1 subunit was the modest reduction in the sensitivity of the Na(v)1.2a isoform to RH 3421. These results demonstrate that mammalian sodium channel isoforms differ in their sensitivities to pyrazoline-type insecticides.

  1. Nesprins: tissue-specific expression of epsilon and other short isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Thuy Duong

    Full Text Available Nesprin-1-giant and nesprin-2-giant regulate nuclear positioning by the interaction of their C-terminal KASH domains with nuclear membrane SUN proteins and their N-terminal calponin-homology domains with cytoskeletal actin. A number of short isoforms lacking the actin-binding domains are produced by internal promotion. We have evaluated the significance of these shorter isoforms using quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting with site-specific monoclonal antibodies. Within a complete map of nesprin isoforms, we describe two novel nesprin-2 epsilon isoforms for the first time. Epsilon isoforms are similar in size and structure to nesprin-1-alpha. Expression of nesprin isoforms was highly tissue-dependent. Nesprin-2-epsilon-1 was found in early embryonic cells, while nesprin-2-epsilon-2 was present in heart and other adult tissues, but not skeletal muscle. Some cell lines lack shorter isoforms and express only one of the two nesprin genes, suggesting that either of the giant nesprins is sufficient for basic cell functions. For the first time, localisation of endogenous nesprin away from the nuclear membrane was shown in cells where removal of the KASH domain by alternative splicing occurs. By distinguishing between degradation products and true isoforms on western blots, it was found that previously-described beta and gamma isoforms are expressed either at only low levels or with a limited tissue distribution. Two of the shortest alpha isoforms, nesprin-1-alpha-2 and nesprin-2-alpha-1, were found almost exclusively in cardiac and skeletal muscle and a highly conserved and alternatively-spliced exon, available in both nesprin genes, was always included in these tissues. These "muscle-specific" isoforms are thought to form a complex with emerin and lamin A/C at the inner nuclear membrane and mutations in all three proteins cause Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy and/or inherited dilated cardiomyopathy, disorders in which only skeletal muscle and

  2. Reanalysis of RNA-sequencing data reveals several additional fusion genes with multiple isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Kangaspeska

    Full Text Available RNA-sequencing and tailored bioinformatic methodologies have paved the way for identification of expressed fusion genes from the chaotic genomes of solid tumors. We have recently successfully exploited RNA-sequencing for the discovery of 24 novel fusion genes in breast cancer. Here, we demonstrate the importance of continuous optimization of the bioinformatic methodology for this purpose, and report the discovery and experimental validation of 13 additional fusion genes from the same samples. Integration of copy number profiling with the RNA-sequencing results revealed that the majority of the gene fusions were promoter-donating events that occurred at copy number transition points or involved high-level DNA-amplifications. Sequencing of genomic fusion break points confirmed that DNA-level rearrangements underlie selected fusion transcripts. Furthermore, a significant portion (>60% of the fusion genes were alternatively spliced. This illustrates the importance of reanalyzing sequencing data as gene definitions change and bioinformatic methods improve, and highlights the previously unforeseen isoform diversity among fusion transcripts.

  3. A small RNA activates CFA synthase by isoform-specific mRNA stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Kathrin Sophie; Papenfort, Kai; Fekete, Agnes; Vogel, Jörg

    2013-11-13

    Small RNAs use a diversity of well-characterized mechanisms to repress mRNAs, but how they activate gene expression at the mRNA level remains not well understood. The predominant activation mechanism of Hfq-associated small RNAs has been translational control whereby base pairing with the target prevents the formation of an intrinsic inhibitory structure in the mRNA and promotes translation initiation. Here, we report a translation-independent mechanism whereby the small RNA RydC selectively activates the longer of two isoforms of cfa mRNA (encoding cyclopropane fatty acid synthase) in Salmonella enterica. Target activation is achieved through seed pairing of the pseudoknot-exposed, conserved 5' end of RydC to an upstream region of the cfa mRNA. The seed pairing stabilizes the messenger, likely by interfering directly with RNase E-mediated decay in the 5' untranslated region. Intriguingly, this mechanism is generic such that the activation is equally achieved by seed pairing of unrelated small RNAs, suggesting that this mechanism may be utilized in the design of RNA-controlled synthetic circuits. Physiologically, RydC is the first small RNA known to regulate membrane stability.

  4. Different phosphoinositide 3-kinase isoforms mediate carrageenan nociception and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Rory A; Falk, Lovissa; Larsson, Mathilda; Leinders, Mathias; Sorkin, Linda S

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) participate in signal transduction cascades that can directly activate and sensitize nociceptors and enhance pain transmission. They also play essential roles in chemotaxis and immune cell infiltration leading to inflammation. We wished to determine which PI3K isoforms were involved in each of these processes. Lightly anesthetized rats (isoflurane) were injected subcutaneously with carrageenan in their hind paws. This was preceded by a local injection of 1% DMSO vehicle or an isoform-specific antagonist to PI3K-α (compound 15-e), -β (TGX221), -δ (Cal-101), or -γ (AS252424). We measured changes in the mechanical pain threshold and spinal c-Fos expression (4 hours after injection) as indices of nociception. Paw volume, plasma extravasation (Evans blue, 0.3 hours after injection), and neutrophil (myeloperoxidase; 1 hour after injection) and macrophage (CD11b+; 4 hour after injection) infiltration into paw tissue were the measured inflammation endpoints. Only PI3K-γ antagonist before treatment reduced the carrageenan-induced pain behavior and spinal expression of c-Fos (P ≤ 0.01). In contrast, pretreatment with PI3K-α, -δ, and-γ antagonists reduced early indices of inflammation. Plasma extravasation PI3K-α (P ≤ 0.05), -δ (P ≤ 0.05), and -γ (P ≤ 0.01), early (0-2 hour) edema -α (P ≤ 0.05), -δ (P ≤ 0.001), and -γ (P ≤ 0.05), and neutrophil infiltration (all P ≤ 0.001) were all reduced compared to vehicle pretreatment. Later (2-4 hour), edema and macrophage infiltration (P ≤ 0.05) were reduced by only the PI3K-δ and -γ isoform antagonists, with the PI3K-δ antagonist having a greater effect on edema. PI3K-β antagonism was ineffective in all paradigms. These data indicate that pain and clinical inflammation are pharmacologically separable and may help to explain clinical conditions in which inflammation naturally wanes or goes into remission, but pain continues unabated.

  5. Impact of HIV-1 genetic diversity on plasma HIV-1 RNA Quantification: usefulness of the Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le SIDA second-generation long terminal repeat-based real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouet, François; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Nerrienet, Eric; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Burgard, Marianne; Peeters, Martine; Damond, Florence; Ekouevi, Didier Koumavi; Msellati, Philippe; Ferradini, Laurent; Rukobo, Sandra; Maréchal, Valérie; Schvachsa, Nilda; Wakrim, Lahcen; Rafalimanana, Christian; Rakotoambinina, Benjamin; Viard, Jean-Paul; Seigneurin, Jean-Marie; Rouzioux, Christine

    2007-08-01

    The high genetic diversity of HIV-1 has a major impact on the quantification of plasma HIV-1 RNA, representing an increasingly difficult challenge. A total of 898 plasma specimens positive for HIV-1 RNA by commercial assays (Amplicor v1.5; Roche Diagnostic Systems, Alameda, CA or Versant v3.0; Bayer Diagnostics, Emeryville, CA) were tested using the Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le SIDA second-generation (G2) real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test: 518 samples containing HIV-1 of known subtype, including 88 from 2 subtype panels and 430 harboring B (n = 266) and non-B (n = 164) group M HIV-1 subtypes from patients followed up in 2002 through 2005 at Necker Hospital (Paris, France), and 380 samples from 10 different countries (Argentina, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, France, Ivory Coast, Madagascar, Morocco, Thailand, and Zimbabwe). HIV-1 RNA values obtained by G2 real-time PCR were highly correlated with those obtained by the Amplicor v1.5 for B and non-B subtypes (R = 0.892 and 0.892, respectively) and for samples from diverse countries (R = 0.867 and 0.893 for real-time PCR vs. Amplicor v1.5 and real-time PCR vs. Versant v3.0, respectively). Approximately 30% of specimens harboring non-B subtypes were underquantified by at least -0.51 log10 in Amplicor v1.5 versus 5% underquantified in G2 real-time PCR. Discrepant results were also obtained with subtype B samples (14% underquantified by Amplicor v1.5 vs. 7% by G2 real-time PCR). Similar percentages were observed when comparing results obtained with the G2 real-time PCR assay with those obtained using the Versant assay. Addressing HIV-1 diversity, continual monitoring of HIV-1 RNA assays, together with molecular epidemiology studies, is required to improve the accuracy of all HIV RNA assays.

  6. CD99 isoforms regulate CD1a expression in human monocyte-derived DCs through ATF-2/CREB-1 phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahiddine, Karim; Mallavialle, Aude; Bziouech, Hanen; Larbret, Frédéric; Bernard, Alain; Bernard, Ghislaine

    2016-06-01

    CD1a expression is considered one of the major characteristics qualifying in vitro human dendritic cells (DCs) during their generation process. Here, we report that CD1A transcription is regulated by a mechanism involving the long and short isoforms of CD99. Using a lentiviral construct encoding for a CD99 short hairpin RNA, we were able to inhibit CD99 expression in human primary DCs. In such cells, CD1a membrane expression increased and CD1A transcripts were much higher in abundance compared to cells expressing CD99 long form (CD99LF). We also show that CD1A transcription is accompanied by a switch in expression from CD99LF to expression at comparable levels of both CD99 isoforms during immature DCs generation in vitro. We demonstrate that CD99LF maintains a lower level of CD1A transcription by up-regulating the phosphorylated form of the ATF-2 transcription factor and that CD99 short form (SF) is required to counteract this regulatory mechanism. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms related to CD99 alternative splicing will be very helpful to better understand the transcriptional regulatory mechanism of CD1a molecules during DCs differentiation and its involvement in the immune response. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. The OsCYP19-4 Gene Is Expressed as Multiple Alternatively Spliced Transcripts Encoding Isoforms with Distinct Cellular Localizations and PPIase Activities under Cold Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areum Lee

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing (AS is an important molecular mechanism by which single genes can generate multiple mRNA isoforms. We reported previously that, in Oryza sativa, the cyclophilin 19-4 (OsCYP19-4.1 transcript was significantly upregulated in response to cold stress, and that transgenic plants were cold tolerant. Here we show that, under cold stress, OsCYP19-4 produces eight transcript variants by intron retention and exon skipping, resulting in production of four distinct protein isoforms. The OsCYP19-4 AS isoforms exhibited different cellular localizations in the epidermal cells: in contrast to OsCYP19-4.1, the OsCYP19-4.2 and OsCYP19-4.3 proteins were primarily targeted to guard and subsidiary cells, whereas OsCYP19-4.5, which consists largely of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER targeting signal, was co-localized with the RFP-BiP marker in the ER. In OsCYP19-4.2, the key residues of the PPIase domain are altered; consistent with this, recombinant OsCYP19-4.2 had significantly lower PPIase activity than OsCYP19-4.1 in vitro. Specific protein-protein interactions between OsCYP19-4.2/3 and AtRCN1 were verified in yeast two-hybrid (Y2H and bimolecular fluoresence complementation (BiFC assays, although the OsCYP19-4 isoforms could not bind each other. Based on these results, we propose that two OsCYP19-4 AS isoforms, OsCYP19-4.2 and OsCYP19-4.3, play roles linking auxin transport and cold stress via interactions with RCN1.

  8. The novel CXCL12gamma isoform encodes an unstructured cationic domain which regulates bioactivity and interaction with both glycosaminoglycans and CXCR4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric Laguri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CXCL12alpha, a chemokine that importantly promotes the oriented cell migration and tissue homing of many cell types, regulates key homeostatic functions and pathological processes through interactions with its cognate receptor (CXCR4 and heparan sulfate (HS. The alternative splicing of the cxcl12 gene generates a recently identified isoform, CXCL12gamma, which structure/function relationships remain unexplored. The high occurrence of basic residues that characterize this isoform suggests however that it could feature specific regulation by HS. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using surface plasmon resonance and NMR spectroscopy, as well as chemically and recombinantly produced chemokines, we show here that CXCL12gamma first 68 amino acids adopt a structure closely related to the well described alpha isoform, followed by an unfolded C-terminal extension of 30 amino acids. Remarkably, 60% of these residues are either lysine or arginine, and most of them are clustered in typical HS binding sites. This provides the chemokine with the highest affinity for HP ever observed (Kd = 0.9 nM, and ensures a strong retention of the chemokine at the cell surface. This was due to the unique combination of two cooperative binding sites, one strictly required, found in the structured domain of the protein, the other one being the C-terminus which essentially functions by enhancing the half life of the complexes. Importantly, this peculiar C-terminus also regulates the balance between HS and CXCR4 binding, and consequently the biological activity of the chemokine. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together these data describe an unusual binding process that gives rise to an unprecedented high affinity between a chemokine and HS. This shows that the gamma isoform of CXCL12, which features unique structural and functional properties, is optimized to ensure its strong retention at the cell surface. Thus, depending on the chemokine isoform to which it binds, HS

  9. Insulin receptor isoforms : an integrated view focused on gestational diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westermeier, F.; Sáez, T.; Arroyo, P.; Toledo, F.; Gutierrez, J.; Sanhueza, C.; Pardo, F.; Leiva, A.; Sobrevia, L.

    2016-01-01

    The human insulin receptor (IR) exists in two isoforms that differ by the absence (IR-A) or the presence (IR-B) of a 12-amino acid segment encoded by exon 11. Both isoforms are functionally distinct regarding their binding affinities and intracellular signalling. However, the underlying mechanisms r

  10. Glial fibrillary acidic protein isoform expression in plaque related astrogliosis in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphuis, Willem; Middeldorp, Jinte; Kooijman, Lieneke; Sluijs, Jacqueline A; Kooi, Evert-Jan; Moeton, Martina; Freriks, Michel; Mizee, Mark R; Hol, Elly M

    2014-03-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyloid plaques are surrounded by reactive astrocytes with an increased expression of intermediate filaments including glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Different GFAP isoforms have been identified that are differentially expressed by specific subpopulations of astrocytes and that impose different properties to the intermediate filament network. We studied transcript levels and protein expression patterns of all known GFAP isoforms in human hippocampal AD tissue at different stages of the disease. Ten different transcripts for GFAP isoforms were detected at different abundancies. Transcript levels of most isoforms increased with AD progression. GFAPδ-immunopositive astrocytes were observed in subgranular zone, hilus, and stratum-lacunosum-moleculare. GFAPδ-positive cells also stained for GFAPα. In AD donors, astrocytes near plaques displayed increased staining of both GFAPα and GFAPδ. The reading-frame-shifted isoform, GFAP(+1), staining was confined to a subset of astrocytes with long processes, and their number increased in the course of AD. In conclusion, the various GFAP isoforms show differential transcript levels and are upregulated in a concerted manner in AD. The GFAP(+1) isoform defines a unique subset of astrocytes, with numbers increasing with AD progression. These data indicate the need for future exploration of underlying mechanisms concerning the functions of GFAPδ and GFAP(+1) isoforms in astrocytes and their possible role in AD pathology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular cloning and pharmacology of functionally distinct isoforms of the human histamine H(3) receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Goodman, M W; Burstein, E S

    2002-01-01

    The pharmacology of histamine H(3) receptors suggests the presence of distinct receptor isoforms or subtypes. We herein describe multiple, functionally distinct, alternatively spliced isoforms of the human H(3) receptor. Combinatorial splicing at three different sites creates at least six distinc...

  12. Development of isoform-specific sensors of polypeptide GalNAc-transferase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Lina; Bachert, Collin; Schjoldager, Katrine T

    2014-01-01

    Humans express up to 20 isoforms of GalNAc-transferase (herein T1-T20) that localize to the Golgi apparatus and initiate O-glycosylation. Regulation of this enzyme family affects a vast array of proteins transiting the secretory pathway and diseases arise upon misregulation of specific isoforms...

  13. Mitochondrial localization of the OAS1 p46 isoform associated with a common single nucleotide polymorphism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Karina Hansen; Pahus, Jytte; Hansen, Mariann Fagernæs

    2014-01-01

    vacuoles/lysosomes. By using recombinantly expressed OAS1 mutant proteins, we found that the OAS1 SNP rs1131454 (former rs3741981) did not affect the enzymatic OAS1 activity. Conclusions: The SNP rs10774671 determines differential expression of the OAS1 isoforms. In Daudi and HT1080 cells the p46 isoform...

  14. Comprehensive analysis of tropomyosin isoforms in skeletal muscles by top-down proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yutong; Peng, Ying; Lin, Ziqing; Chen, Yi-Chen; Wei, Liming; Hacker, Timothy A; Larsson, Lars; Ge, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscles are heterogeneous in nature and are capable of performing various functions. Tropomyosin (Tpm) is a major component of the thin filament in skeletal muscles and plays an important role in controlling muscle contraction and relaxation. Tpm is known to consist of multiple isoforms resulting from different encoding genes and alternative splicing, along with post-translational modifications. However, a systematic characterization of Tpm isoforms in skeletal muscles is still lacking. Therefore, we employed top-down mass spectrometry (MS) to identify and characterize Tpm isoforms present in different skeletal muscles from multiple species, including swine, rat, and human. Our study revealed that Tpm1.1 and Tpm2.2 are the two major Tpm isoforms in swine and rat skeletal muscles, whereas Tpm1.1, Tpm2.2, and Tpm3.12 are present in human skeletal muscles. Tandem MS was utilized to identify the sequences of the major Tpm isoforms. Furthermore, quantitative analysis revealed muscle-type specific differences in the abundance of un-modified and modified Tpm isoforms in rat and human skeletal muscles. This study represents the first systematic investigation of Tpm isoforms in skeletal muscles, which not only demonstrates the capabilities of top-down MS for the comprehensive characterization of skeletal myofilament proteins but also provides the basis for further studies on these Tpm isoforms in muscle-related diseases.

  15. Translational control of C/EBPalpha and C/EBPbeta isoform expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calkhoven, C F; Müller, C; Leutz, A

    2000-01-01

    Transcription factors derived from CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP)alpha and C/EBPbeta genes control differentiation and proliferation in a number of cell types. Various C/EBP isoforms arise from unique C/EBPbeta and C/EBPalpha mRNAs by differential initiation of translation. These isoforms re

  16. Diversity's Calling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Kenneth J.

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses how a Harvard-educated scholar of English and poetry, Dr. M. Lee Pelton puts a prominent face on changes that are underway at Boston's Emerson College. Faced with a public controversy over its limited faculty diversity, Emerson College has responded with a spate of hirings and promotions of minorities, capped by the…

  17. Exposing diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørtoft, Kamilla; Nordentoft, Helle Merete

    in the homes of older people and in pedagogical institutions targeting older people. In the paper we look at the potentials and challenges in working with ethnographic video narratives as a pedagogical tool. Our findings indicate that the use of video narratives has the potential to expose the diversity...

  18. Cloning and characterization of the neural isoforms of human dystonin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, A.; Dalpe, G.; Mathieu, M.; Kothary, R. [Univ. of Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1995-10-10

    Dystonia musculorum (dt) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disease in mice that leads to a sensory ataxia. We have identified and cloned a gene encoded at the dt locus. The product of the dt gene, dystonin, is a neural isoform of a hemidesmosomal protein bullous pemphigoid antigen 1 (bpag1). To investigate the potential role of dystonin in human neuropathies, we have cloned the neural-specific 5{prime} exons of the human DT gene that together with the previously cloned BPAG1 sequences comprise human dystonin. The mouse and human dystonin genes demonstrate the same spectrum of alternatively spliced products, and the amino acid sequences of the neural-specific exons in the mouse and human genes are over 96% identical. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Differences in expression, actions and cocaine regulation of two isoforms for the brain transcriptional regulator NAC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korutla, L; Wang, P J; Lewis, D M; Neustadter, J H; Stromberg, M F; Mackler, S A

    2002-01-01

    BTB/POZ proteins can influence the cell cycle and contribute to oncogenesis. Many family members are present in the mammalian CNS. Previous work demonstrated elevated NAC1 mRNA levels in the rat nucleus accumbens in response to cocaine. NAC1 acts like other BTB/POZ proteins that regulate transcription but is unusual because of the absence of identifiable DNA binding domains. cDNAs were isolated encoding two NAC1 isoforms differing by only 27 amino acids (the longer isoform contains 514 amino acids). The mRNAs for both isoforms were simultaneously expressed throughout the rat brain and peripheral tissues. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that the mRNA of the longer isoform was more abundant than the mRNA of the shorter isoform. Western blot analysis demonstrated a similar unequal distribution between the isoforms in the CNS. The longer isoform was the more abundant of the two NAC1 proteins and the ratio between them differed throughout the rat brain. The shorter isoform was not detected in most of the examined peripheral tissues, suggesting differences from the CNS in post-transcriptional processing. Both isoforms repressed transcription in H293T cells using a Gal4-luciferase reporter system. However, the shorter isoform did not repress transcription as effectively as the longer isoform. Transfection of different ratios for both isoforms, in order to replicate the relative amounts observed throughout the CNS, supported an interaction between the isoforms. The net effect on transcriptional repression was determined by the ratio of the two NAC1 isoforms. Each isoform exhibited the subnuclear localization that is characteristic of many BTB/POZ proteins. A rapid and transient increase in the level of the shorter isoform occurred in the nucleus accumbens 2 h following a single i.p. cocaine injection. We conclude that the two isoforms of NAC1 may differentially affect neuronal functions, including the regulation of

  20. BALB/c and C57BL/6 Mice Differ in Polyreactive IgA Abundance, which Impacts the Generation of Antigen-Specific IgA and Microbiota Diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, Floris; Zagato, Elena; Mazzini, Elisa; Fosso, Bruno; Manzari, Caterina; El Aidy, Sahar; Chiavelli, Andrea; D'Erchia, Anna Maria; Sethi, Maya K; Pabst, Oliver; Marzano, Marinella; Moretti, Silvia; Romani, Luigina; Penna, Giuseppe; Pesole, Graziano; Rescigno, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The interrelationship between IgAs and microbiota diversity is still unclear. Here we show that BALB/c mice had higher abundance and diversity of IgAs than C57BL/6 mice and that this correlated with increased microbiota diversity. We show that polyreactive IgAs mediated the entrance of non-invasive

  1. Troponin T isoform expression is modulated during Atlantic Halibut metamorphosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Llewellyn Lynda

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flatfish metamorphosis is a thyroid hormone (TH driven process which leads to a dramatic change from a symmetrical larva to an asymmetrical juvenile. The effect of THs on muscle and in particular muscle sarcomer protein genes is largely unexplored in fish. The change in Troponin T (TnT, a pivotal protein in the assembly of skeletal muscles sarcomeres and a modulator of calcium driven muscle contraction, during flatfish metamophosis is studied. Results In the present study five cDNAs for halibut TnT genes were cloned; three were splice variants arising from a single fast TnT (fTnT gene; a fourth encoded a novel teleost specific fTnT-like cDNA (AfTnT expressed exclusively in slow muscle and the fifth encoded the teleost specific sTnT2. THs modified the expression of halibut fTnT isoforms which changed from predominantly basic to acidic isoforms during natural and T4 induced metamorphosis. In contrast, expression of red muscle specific genes, AfTnT and sTnT2, did not change during natural metamorphosis or after T4 treatment. Prior to and after metamorphosis no change in the dorso-ventral symmetry or temporal-spatial expression pattern of TnT genes and muscle fibre organization occurred in halibut musculature. Conclusion Muscle organisation in halibut remains symmetrical even after metamorphosis suggesting TH driven changes are associated with molecular adaptations. We hypothesize that species specific differences in TnT gene expression in teleosts underlies different larval muscle developmental programs which better adapts them to the specific ecological constraints.

  2. Functional Cooperativity between ABCG4 and ABCG1 Isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltán Hegyi

    Full Text Available ABCG4 belongs to the ABCG subfamily, the members of which are half transporters composed of a single transmembrane and a single nucleotide-binding domain. ABCG proteins have a reverse domain topology as compared to other mammalian ABC transporters, and have to form functional dimers, since the catalytic sites for ATP binding and hydrolysis, as well as the transmembrane domains are composed of distinct parts of the monomers. Here we demonstrate that ABCG4 can form homodimers, but also heterodimers with its closest relative, ABCG1. Both the full-length and the short isoforms of ABCG1 can dimerize with ABCG4, whereas the ABCG2 multidrug transporter is unable to form a heterodimer with ABCG4. We also show that contrary to that reported in some previous studies, ABCG4 is predominantly localized to the plasma membrane. While both ABCG1 and ABCG4 have been suggested to be involved in lipid transport or regulation, in accordance with our previous results regarding the long version of ABCG1, here we document that the expression of both the short isoform of ABCG1 as well as ABCG4 induce apoptosis in various cell types. This apoptotic effect, as a functional read-out, allowed us to demonstrate that the dimerization between these half transporters is not only a physical interaction but functional cooperativity. Given that ABCG4 is predominantly expressed in microglial-like cells and endothelial cells in the brain, our finding of ABCG4-induced apoptosis may implicate a new role for this protein in the clearance mechanisms within the central nervous system.

  3. Cellular expression, trafficking, and function of two isoforms of human ULBP5/RAET1G.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Eagle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The activating immunoreceptor NKG2D is expressed on Natural Killer (NK cells and subsets of T cells. NKG2D contributes to anti-tumour and anti-viral immune responses in vitro and in vivo. The ligands for NKG2D in humans are diverse proteins of the MIC and ULBP/RAET families that are upregulated on the surface of virally infected cells and tumours. Two splicing variants of ULBP5/RAET1G have been cloned previously, but not extensively characterised. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We pursue a number of approaches to characterise the expression, trafficking, and function of the two isoforms of ULBP5/RAET1G. We show that both transcripts are frequently expressed in cell lines derived from epithelial cancers, and in primary breast cancers. The full-length transcript, RAET1G1, is predicted to encode a molecule with transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains that are unique amongst NKG2D ligands. Using specific anti-RAET1G1 antiserum to stain tissue microarrays we show that RAET1G1 expression is highly restricted in normal tissues. RAET1G1 was expressed at a low level in normal gastrointestinal epithelial cells in a similar pattern to MICA. Both RAET1G1 and MICA showed increased expression in the gut of patients with celiac disease. In contrast to healthy tissues the RAET1G1 antiserum stained a wide variety or different primary tumour sections. Both endogenously expressed and transfected RAET1G1 was mainly found inside the cell, with a minority of the protein reaching the cell surface. Conversely the truncated splicing variant of RAET1G2 was shown to encode a soluble molecule that could be secreted from cells. Secreted RAET1G2 was shown to downregulate NKG2D receptor expression on NK cells and hence may represent a novel tumour immune evasion strategy. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate that the expression patterns of ULBP5RAET1G are very similar to the well-characterised NKG2D ligand, MICA. However the two isoforms of ULBP5/RAET1G have

  4. Serine protease isoforms in Gloydius intermedius venom: Full sequences, molecular phylogeny and evolutionary implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhang-Min; Yu, Hui; Liu, Zhen-Zhen; Pei, Jian-Zhu; Yang, Yu-E; Yan, Su-Xian; Zhang, Cui; Zhao, Wen-Long; Wang, Zhe-Zhi; Wang, Ying-Ming; Tsai, Inn-Ho

    2017-07-05

    Nine distinct venom serine proteases (vSPs) of Gloydius intermedius were studied by transcriptomic, sub-proteomic and phylogenetic analyses. Their complete amino acid sequences were deduced after Expression Sequence Tag (EST) analyses followed by cDNA cloning and sequencing. These vSPs appear to be paralogs and contain the catalytic triads and 1-4 potential N-glycosylation sites. Their relative expression levels evaluated by qPCR were grossly consistent with their EST hit-numbers. The major vSPs were purified by HPLC and their N-terminal sequences matched well to the deduced sequences, while fragments of the minor vSPs were detected by LC-MS/MS identification. Specific amidolytic activities of the fractions from HPLC and anion exchange separation were assayed using four chromogenic substrates, respectively. Molecular phylogenetic tree based on the sequences of these vSPs and their orthologs revealed six major clusters, one of them covered four lineages of plasminogen activator like vSPs. N-glycosylation patterns and variations for the vSPs are discussed. The high sequence similarities between G. intermedius vSPs and their respective orthologs from American pitvipers suggest that most of the isoforms evolved before Asian pitvipers migrated to the New World. Our results also indicate that the neurotoxic venoms contain more kallikrein-like vSPs and hypotensive components than the hemorrhagic venoms. Full sequences and expression levels of nine paralogous serine proteases (designated as GiSPs) of Gloydius intermedius venom have been studied. A kallikrein-like enzyme is most abundant and four isoforms homologous to venom plasminogen-activators are also expressed in this venom. Taken together, the present and previous data demonstrate that the neurotoxic G. intermedius venoms contain more hypotensive vSPs relative to other hemorrhagic pitviper venoms and the pitviper vSPs are highly versatile and diverse. Their structure-function relationships remain to be explored and

  5. The Crumbs_C isoform of Drosophila shows tissue- and stage-specific expression and prevents light-dependent retinal degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Spannl

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila Crumbs (Crb is a key regulator of epithelial polarity and fulfils a plethora of other functions, such as growth regulation, morphogenesis of photoreceptor cells and prevention of retinal degeneration. This raises the question how a single gene regulates such diverse functions, which in mammals are controlled by three different paralogs. Here, we show that in Drosophila different Crb protein isoforms are differentially expressed as a result of alternative splicing. All isoforms are transmembrane proteins that differ by just one EGF-like repeat in their extracellular portion. Unlike Crb_A, which is expressed in most embryonic epithelia from early stages onward, Crb_C is expressed later and only in a subset of embryonic epithelia. Flies specifically lacking Crb_C are homozygous viable and fertile. Strikingly, these flies undergo light-dependent photoreceptor degeneration despite the fact that the other isoforms are expressed and properly localised at the stalk membrane. This allele now provides an ideal possibility to further unravel the molecular mechanisms by which Drosophila crb protects photoreceptor cells from the detrimental consequences of light-induced cell stress.

  6. Identification of two metallo- thionein isoforms by molecu-lar cloning of their cDNAs infresh-water fish, crucian carp(Carassius-cuvieri)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Generally, there are two major isoforms of me- tallothionein (MT)in mammals. In this study two cDNAs of metallothionein, MT-A and MT-B, in a fresh-water fish, crucian carp (Carassius cuvieri), were cloned by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The homology of their reading frame is about 92.3%. The sequence analysis of both cDNAs gave the structures of coding regions corresponding to 60 amino acid residues, and the structures of complete 3′-untranslated regions in which a significant difference in the size of their 3′-untranslated regions (130 bp for MT-A and 280 bp for MT-B) exists. The results of amino acid sequenc-ing of both MT-1 and MT-2 purified by HPLC are identical to those deduced from MT cDNA genes, indicating that MT-1 is from MT-A gene and MT-2 is from MT-B gene respec-tively. No blocking in the N-terminal of MT-2 isoform was the first case found in vertebrates, most of which were block-ed by acetylation. These results suggest that there were dif-ferential controls at the transcription level and after transla-tion of these two MT isoforms. And this gives a clue to un-derstand the diversities of their functions.

  7. Characterization of ductal and lobular breast carcinomas using novel prolactin receptor isoform specific antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heger Christopher D

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prolactin is a polypeptide hormone responsible for proliferation and differentiation of the mammary gland. More recently, prolactin's role in mammary carcinogenesis has been studied with greater interest. Studies from our laboratory and from others have demonstrated that three specific isoforms of the prolactin receptor (PRLR are expressed in both normal and cancerous breast cells and tissues. Until now, reliable isoform specific antibodies have been lacking. We have prepared and characterized polyclonal antibodies against each of the human PRLR isoforms that can effectively be used to characterize human breast cancers. Methods Rabbits were immunized with synthetic peptides of isoform unique regions and immune sera affinity purified prior to validation by Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. Sections of ductal and lobular carcinomas were stained with each affinity purified isoform specific antibody to determine expression patterns in breast cancer subclasses. Results We show that the rabbit antibodies have high titer and could specifically recognize each isoform of PRLR. Differences in PRLR isoform expression levels were observed and quantified using histosections from xenografts of established human breast cancer cells lines, and ductal and lobular carcinoma human biopsy specimens. In addition, these results were verified by real-time PCR with isoform specific primers. While nearly all tumors contained LF and SF1b, the majority (76% of ductal carcinoma biopsies expressed SF1a while the majority of lobular carcinomas lacked SF1a staining (72% and 27% had only low levels of expression. Conclusions Differences in the receptor isoform expression profiles may be critical to understanding the role of PRL in mammary tumorigenesis. Since these antibodies are specifically directed against each PRLR isoform, they are valuable tools for the evaluation of breast cancer PRLR content and have potential clinical importance in

  8. Mutational epitope analysis and cross-reactivity of two isoforms of Api g 1, the major celery allergen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangorsch, Andrea; Ballmer-Weber, Barbara K; Rösch, Paul; Holzhauser, Thomas; Vieths, Stefan

    2007-04-01

    For better understanding the cross-reactivity between the major birch pollen and celery allergens, Bet v 1 and Api g 1, respectively, putative epitope areas and structurally important positions for IgE-binding of the isoforms Api g 1.01 and Api g 1.02 were point mutated. The IgE binding capacities were measured in ELISA, the IgE cross-reactivity between the isoforms, mutants and Bet v 1 investigated by ELISA-inhibition experiments with serum pools from patients with confirmed celery allergy (DBPCFC). Api g 1.01 displayed a clearly higher frequency and capacity of IgE binding than Api g 1.02. In Api g 1.01, substitution of lysine against glutamic acid at amino acid position 44, a key residue of the Bet v 1 "P-loop", increased the IgE-binding properties. Structural instability due to proline insertion at position 111/112 resulted in loss of IgE binding of Api g 1.01, but not of Api g 1.02. Between Api g 1.01 and Api g 1.02 only partial cross-reactivity was seen. The data suggest that the IgE epitopes of the two isoforms are distinct and that in contrast to Api g 1.01, the "P-loop" region plays an important role for IgE binding of celery allergic subjects to Api g 1.02. Understanding and investigation of the molecular mechanisms in celery allergy is an important step to generate hypoallergenic proteins for safe and efficacious immunotherapy of food allergy.

  9. Molecular diversity of phospholipase D in angiosperms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvrčková Fatima

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phospholipase D (PLD family has been identified in plants by recent molecular studies, fostered by the emerging importance of plant PLDs in stress physiology and signal transduction. However, the presence of multiple isoforms limits the power of conventional biochemical and pharmacological approaches, and calls for a wider application of genetic methodology. Results Taking advantage of sequence data available in public databases, we attempted to provide a prerequisite for such an approach. We made a complete inventory of the Arabidopsis thaliana PLD family, which was found to comprise 12 distinct genes. The current nomenclature of Arabidopsis PLDs was refined and expanded to include five newly described genes. To assess the degree of plant PLD diversity beyond Arabidopsis we explored data from rice (including the genome draft by Monsanto as well as cDNA and EST sequences from several other plants. Our analysis revealed two major PLD subfamilies in plants. The first, designated C2-PLD, is characterised by presence of the C2 domain and comprises previously known plant PLDs as well as new isoforms with possibly unusual features-catalytically inactive or independent on Ca2+. The second subfamily (denoted PXPH-PLD is novel in plants but is related to animal and fungal enzymes possessing the PX and PH domains. Conclusions The evolutionary dynamics, and inter-specific diversity, of plant PLDs inferred from our phylogenetic analysis, call for more plant species to be employed in PLD research. This will enable us to obtain generally valid conclusions.

  10. Troubling Diversity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jæger, Kirsten; Jensen, Annie Aarup

    2009-01-01

    Focussing on the cultural encounter between nurses and ethnic minority patients in Danish hospitals, this paper presents the results of a comprehensive analysis of nursing discourses on cultural difference and intercultural contact. Articles from the Danish professional journal ‘The Nurse......', published in the period from 2000 to 2008, pertaining to cultural contact and intercultural understanding have been analyzed in order to uncover nurses' experience of ethnic and cultural diversity and the ways, in which these experiences challenge their cultural and professional expertise. Results...... are related to recent contributions to diversity management theory and intercultural communication theory, calling for a strengthened focus on the historical, political, and social dimensions of intercultural contact. In continuation of these trends, an alternative, theoretical framework...

  11. Doing Diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Just, Sine Nørholm; Christiansen, Tanja Juul

    2012-01-01

    Questions of agency in text–audience relations are less studied than other aspects of rhetorical agency. We suggest conceptualizing and analyzing the relationship between texts and audiences from the perspective of performativity, as it has been developed by Judith Butler. Thus, we argue that tex...... demonstrate the explanatory potential of the performative framework. Subsequently, we discuss how the concept of personae may provide a basis for alternatives to the restrictive positioning that currently dominates diversity management rhetoric....

  12. Teaching Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Kay Young McChesney

    2015-01-01

    This article is targeted to faculty teaching race and ethnicity, racism, diversity, and multicultural courses. Many students equate race with skin color. The premise of this article is that to teach students about the social construction of race, teachers must first know enough science to teach students that race is not biological. This article examines the biology of race by showing how advances in DNA sequencing led ...

  13. Dystrophin Dp71 Isoforms Are Differentially Expressed in the Mouse Brain and Retina: Report of New Alternative Splicing and a Novel Nomenclature for Dp71 Isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragón, Jorge; González-Reyes, Mayram; Romo-Yáñez, José; Vacca, Ophélie; Aguilar-González, Guadalupe; Rendón, Alvaro; Vaillend, Cyrille; Montañez, Cecilia

    2017-01-27

    Multiple dystrophin Dp71 isoforms have been identified in rats, mice, and humans and in several cell line models. These Dp71 isoforms are produced by the alternative splicing of exons 71 to 74 and 78 and intron 77. Three main groups of Dp71 proteins are defined based on their C-terminal specificities: Dp71d, Dp71f, and Dp71e. Dp71 is highly expressed in the brain and retina; however, the specific isoforms present in these tissues have not been determined to date. In this work, we explored the expression of Dp71 isoforms in the mouse brain and retina using RT-PCR assays followed by the cloning of PCR products into the pGEM-T Easy vector, which was used to transform DH5α cells. Dp71-positive colonies were later analyzed by PCR multiplex and DNA sequencing to determine the alternative splicing. We thus demonstrated the expression of Dp71 transcripts corresponding to Dp71, Dp71a, Dp71c, Dp71b, Dp71ab, Dp71 Δ110, and novel Dp71 isoforms spliced in exon 74; 71 and 74; 71, 73 and 74; and 74 and 78, which we named Dp71d Δ74 , Dp71d Δ71,74 , Dp71d Δ71,73-74 , and Dp71f Δ74 , respectively. Additionally, we demonstrated that the Dp71d group of isoforms is highly expressed in the brain, while the Dp71f group predominates in the retina, at both the cDNA and protein levels. These findings suggest that distinct Dp71 isoforms may play different roles in the brain and retina.

  14. Stress inducible proteinase inhibitor diversity in Capsicum annuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra Manasi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wound-inducible Pin-II Proteinase inhibitors (PIs are one of the important plant serine PIs which have been studied extensively for their structural and functional diversity and relevance in plant defense against insect pests. To explore the functional specialization of an array of Capsicum annuum (L. proteinase inhibitor (CanPIs genes, we studied their expression, processing and tissue-specific distribution under steady-state and induced conditions. Inductions were performed by subjecting C. annuum leaves to various treatments, namely aphid infestation or mechanical wounding followed by treatment with either oral secretion (OS of Helicoverpa armigera or water. Results The elicitation treatments regulated the accumulation of CanPIs corresponding to 4-, 3-, and 2-inhibitory repeat domains (IRDs. Fourty seven different CanPI genes composed of 28 unique IRDs were identified in total along with those reported earlier. The CanPI gene pool either from uninduced or induced leaves was dominated by 3-IRD PIs and trypsin inhibitory domains. Also a major contribution by 4-IRD CanPI genes possessing trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitor domains was specifically revealed in wounded leaves treated with OS. Wounding displayed the highest number of unique CanPIs while wounding with OS treatment resulted in the high accumulation of specifically CanPI-4, -7 and −10. Characterization of the PI protein activity through two dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed tissue and induction specific patterns. Consistent with transcript abundance, wound plus OS or water treated C. annuum leaves exhibited significantly higher PI activity and isoform diversity contributed by 3- and 4-IRD CanPIs. CanPI accumulation and activity was weakly elicited by aphid infestation yet resulted in the higher expression of CanPI-26, -41 and −43. Conclusions Plants can differentially perceive various kinds of insect attacks and respond appropriately through activating

  15. Serum amyloid A isoforms in serum and synovial fluid from spontaneously diseased dogs with joint diseases or other conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads Jens; Christensen, Michelle B.; Lee, Marcel Huisung

    2007-01-01

    with systemic inflammatory activity, and up to four major isoforms with apparent isoelectric points between 6.1 and 7.9 were identified. In synovial fluid from inflamed joints one or more highly alkaline SAA isoforms (with apparent isoelectric points above 9.3) were identified, with data suggesting local...... production of these isoforms in the canine inflamed joint....

  16. Merlin Isoforms 1 and 2 Both Act as Tumour Suppressors and Are Required for Optimal Sperm Maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansgar Zoch

    Full Text Available The tumour suppressor Merlin, encoded by the gene NF2, is frequently mutated in the autosomal dominant disorder neurofibromatosis type II, characterised primarily by the development of schwannoma and other glial cell tumours. However, NF2 is expressed in virtually all analysed human and rodent organs, and its deletion in mice causes early embryonic lethality. Additionally, NF2 encodes for two major isoforms of Merlin of unknown functionality. Specifically, the tumour suppressor potential of isoform 2 remains controversial. In this study, we used Nf2 isoform-specific knockout mouse models to analyse the function of each isoform during development and organ homeostasis. We found that both isoforms carry full tumour suppressor functionality and can completely compensate the loss of the other isoform during development and in most adult organs. Surprisingly, we discovered that spermatogenesis is strictly dependent on the presence of both isoforms. While the testis primarily expresses isoform 1, we noticed an enrichment of isoform 2 in spermatogonial stem cells. Deletion of either isoform was found to cause decreased sperm quality as observed by maturation defects and head/midpiece abnormalities. These defects led to impaired sperm functionality as assessed by decreased sperm capacitation. Thus, we describe spermatogenesis as a new Nf2-dependent process. Additionally, we provide for the first time in vivo evidence for equal tumour suppressor potentials of Merlin isoform 1 and isoform 2.

  17. Role of nuclear progesterone receptor isoforms in uterine pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Bansari; Elguero, Sonia; Thakore, Suruchi; Dahoud, Wissam; Bedaiwy, Mohamed; Mesiano, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Progesterone is a key hormonal regulator of the female reproductive system. It plays a major role to prepare the uterus for implantation and in the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. Actions of progesterone on the uterine tissues (endometrium, myometrium and cervix) are mediated by the combined effects of two progesterone receptor (PR) isoforms, designated PR-A and PR-B. Both receptors function primarily as ligand-activated transcription factors. Progesterone action on the uterine tissues is qualitatively and quantitatively determined by the relative levels and transcriptional activities of PR-A and PR-B. The transcriptional activity of the PR isoforms is affected by specific transcriptional coregulators and by PR post-translational modifications that affect gene promoter targeting. In this context, appropriate temporal and cell-specific expression and function of PR-A and PR-B are critical for normal uterine function. Relevant studies describing the role of PRs in uterine physiology and pathology (endometriosis, uterine leiomyoma, endometrial cancer, cervical cancer and recurrent pregnancy loss) were comprehensively searched using PubMed, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and Google Scholar and critically reviewed. Progesterone, acting through PR-A and PR-B, regulates the development and function of the endometrium and induces changes in cells essential for implantation and the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. During pregnancy, progesterone via the PRs promotes myometrial relaxation and cervical closure. Withdrawal of PR-mediated progesterone signaling triggers menstruation and parturition. PR-mediated progesterone signaling is anti-mitogenic in endometrial epithelial cells, and as such, mitigates the tropic effects of estrogen on eutopic normal endometrium, and on ectopic implants in endometriosis. Similarly, ligand-activated PRs function as tumor suppressors in endometrial cancer cells through inhibition of key cellular signaling pathways

  18. Dynamic expression and localization of c-MET isoforms in the developing rat pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yulong; Cheng, Mei; Shi, Zhen; Feng, Zhenqing; Guan, Xiaohong

    2014-01-01

    Pancreata from Sprague Dawley rats of different developmental stages were studied to determine the expression and cellular localization of different c-MET isoforms in the developing rat pancreas. Pancreatic mRNA and protein expression levels of c-MET at different developmental stages from embryo to adult were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and by western blotting. To identify the cellular localization of c-MET protein in the developing rat pancreas, double immunofluorescent staining was performed using antibodies for cell type-specific markers and for c-MET. The expression of two isoforms of c-MET (190 kDa and 170 kDa) coincided with the development of the pancreas. The 190 kDa isoform of c-MET is expressed during embryonic stages, and its expression is replaced by the expression of the 170 kDa isoform as the pancreas develops. Only the 170 kDa isoform is expressed in the adult rat pancreas. Throughout all stages of pancreatic development, c-MET is expressed by vimentin-positive cells. In contrast, c-MET staining was stronger in rat pancreata from newborn to adult stages and overlapped with insulin-positive beta-cells. The dynamic expression and localization of different c-MET isoforms in the rat pancreas during different developmental stages indicates that distinct c-MET isoform might be involved in different aspects of pancreatic development.

  19. Estrogen and progesterone receptor isoforms expression in the stomach of Mongolian gerbils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milena Saqui-Salces; Teresa Neri-Gómez; Armando Gamboa-Dominguez; Guillermo Ruiz-Palacios; Ignacio Camacho-Arroyo

    2008-01-01

    AIM:We studied the estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) isoforms expression in gastric antrum and corpus of female gerbils and their regulation by estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4).METHODS: Ovariectomized adult female gerbils were subcutaneously treated with E2,and E2 + P4.Uteri and stomachs were removed,the latter were cut along the greater curvature,and antrum and corpus were excised.Proteins were immunoblotted using antibodies that recognize ER-alpha,ER-beta,and PR-A and PR-B receptor isoforms.Tissues from rats treated in the same way were used as controls.RESULTS: Specific bands were detected for ER-alpha (68 KDa),and PR isoforms (85 and 120 KDa for PR-A and PR-B isoforrns,respectively) in uteri,gastric antrum and corpus.We could not detect ER-beta isoform.PR isoforms were not regulated by E2 or P4 in uterus and gastric tissues of gerbils.ER-alpha isoform content was significantly down-regulated by E2 in the corpus,but not affected by hormones in uterus and gastric antrum.CONCLUSION: The presence of ER-alpha and PR isoforms in gerbils stomach suggests that E2 and P4 actions in this organ are in part mediated by their nuclear receptors.

  20. Identification and evolutionary analysis of tissue-specific isoforms of mitochondrial complex I subunit NDUFV3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Cabrera-Orefice, Alfredo; Huynen, Martijn A; Arnold, Susanne

    2017-03-01

    Mitochondrial complex I is the largest respiratory chain complex. Despite the enormous progress made studying its structure and function in recent years, potential regulatory roles of its accessory subunits remained largely unresolved. Complex I gene NDUFV3, which occurs in metazoa, contains an extra exon that is only present in vertebrates and thereby evolutionary even younger than the rest of the gene. Alternative splicing of this extra exon gives rise to a short NDUFV3-S and a long NDUFV3-L protein isoform. Complexome profiling revealed that the two NDUFV3 isoforms are constituents of the multi-subunit complex I. Further mass spectrometric analyses of complex I from different murine and bovine tissues showed a tissue-specific expression pattern of NDUFV3-S and NDUFV3-L. Hence, NDUFV3-S was identified as the only isoform in heart and skeletal muscle, whereas in liver, brain, and lung NDUFV3-L was expressed as the dominant isoform, together with NDUFV3-S present in all tissues analyzed. Thus, we identified NDUFV3 as the first out of 30 accessory subunits of complex I present in vertebrate- and tissue-specific isoforms. Interestingly, the tissue-specific expression pattern of NDUFV3-S and NDUFV3-L isoforms was paralleled by changes in kinetic parameters, especially the substrate affinity of complex I. This may indicate a regulatory role of the NDUFV3 isoforms in different vertebrate tissues.

  1. Androgen receptor isoforms in human prostatic cancer tissue and LNCaP cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Jie XIA; Xiao-Da TANG; Qing-Zheng MA

    2001-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the androgen receptor (AR) isoform expressions in human prostatic cancer tissue and LNCaP cell line. Methods: With high resolution isoelectric focusing (IEF) method we demonstrated the different expressions of AR isoforms in human prostatic cancer tissues and LNCaP cell line. Results: Data were obtained from three prostatic cancer specimens and the LNCaP cell line. Three types of AR isoforms were detected with pI values at 6.5,6.0, and 5.3. For the 3 prostatic cancer specimens, 1 sample showed all the three types of AR isoforms, the second specimen expressed at 6.5 and 6.0, and the third failed to show any type of isoforms. The LNCaP cell line expressed all the three AR isoforms. Binding of 3H-dihydrotestosterone (3H-DHT) to these three isoforms was inhibited by the addition ofl00-fold excess of DHT or testosterone, while not by progesterone, oestradiol and diethylstilboestrol. Conclusion: The expression of AR isofonns is different in different prostate cancer tissues, which may be related to the difference in the effect of anti-androgen therapy in different patients.

  2. Inulin isoforms differ by repeated additions of one crystal unit cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Peter D; Barclay, Thomas G; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Gerson, Andrea R; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2014-03-15

    Inulin isoforms, especially delta inulin, are important biologically as immune activators and clinically as vaccine adjuvants. In exploring action mechanisms, we previously found regular increments in thermal properties of the seven-member inulin isoform series that suggested regular additions of some energetic structural unit. Because the previous isolates carried additional longer chains that masked defining ranges, these were contrasted with new isoform isolates comprising only inulin chain lengths defining that isoform. The new series began with 19 fructose units per chain (alpha-1 inulin), increasing regularly by 6 fructose units per isoform. Thus the 'energetic unit' equates to 6 fructose residues per chain. All isoforms showed indistinguishable X-ray diffraction patterns that were also identical with known inulin crystals. We conclude that an 'energetic unit' equates to one helix turn of 6 fructose units per chain as found in one unit cell of the inulin crystal. Each isoform chain comprised progressively more helix turns plus one additional fructose and glucose residues per chain.

  3. Distinctive effects of rat fibroblast growth factor-2 isoforms on PC12 and Schwann cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Ostermeyer, F; Claus, P; Grothe, C

    2001-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) is an important modulator of cell growth and differentiation and stimulates cell survival of various cells including neurons. Rat FGF-2 occurs in three isoforms, a low molecular weight 18 kD and two high molecular weight forms (21, 23 kD), representing alternative translation products from a single mRNA. The 18 kD isoform shows mainly cytoplasmatic localization, whereas the 21/23 kD FGF-2 are localized in the nucleus. In addition, the FGF-2 isoforms are differentially regulated in the sensory ganglia and peripheral nerve following nerve injury and in the adrenal medulla during post-natal development and after hormonal stimuli. The distinct intracellular distribution and differential regulation of the different FGF-2 isoforms indicate that they have unique biological roles, however, little is known about the biological effects of the high molecular weight FGF-2 isoforms. Immortalized Schwann cells and PC12 cells, which stably overexpress the different FGF-2 isoforms, showed that the different endogenous-overexpressed FGF-2 isoforms lead to dramatic modifications in cell proliferation and survival, when tested in serum-free and serum-containing medium. In contrast, application of recombinant FGF-2 isoforms on normal PC12 and immortalized Schwann cells results in similar biological effects on the proliferation and survival of the cells. Furthermore, we investigated the potential regulatory effects of endogenous-overexpressed and exogenous-applied FGF-2 isoforms on the mRNA level of the FGF-2 receptors and, additionally, on the tyrosin hydroxylase mRNA expression in PC12 cells.

  4. Non-muscle Myosin II Isoforms Co-assemble in Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Jordan R.; Shao, Lin; Remmert, Kirsten; Li, Dong; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Non-muscle myosin II (NM II) powers myriad developmental and cellular processes, including embryogenesis, cell migration, and cytokinesis [1]. To exert its functions, monomers of NM II assemble into bipolar filaments that produce a contractile force on the actin cytoskeleton. Mammalian cells express up to three isoforms of NM II (NM IIA, IIB and IIC), each of which possesses distinct biophysical properties and supports unique, as well as redundant, cellular functions [2-8]. Despite previous efforts [9-13], it remains unclear if NM II isoforms assemble in living cells to produce mixed (heterotypic) bipolar filaments, or if filaments consist entirely of a single isoform (homotypic). We addressed this question using fluorescently-tagged versions of NM IIA, IIB and IIC, isoform-specific immunostaining of the endogenous proteins, and two-color total internal reflection fluorescence structured-illumination microscopy, or TIRF-SIM, to visualize individual myosin II bipolar filaments inside cells. We show that NM II isoforms co-assemble into heterotypic filaments in a variety of settings, including various types of stress fibers, individual filaments throughout the cell, and the contractile ring. We also show that the differential distribution of NM IIA and NM IIB typically seen in confocal micrographs of well-polarized cells is reflected in the composition of individual bipolar filaments. Interestingly, this differential distribution is less pronounced in freshly-spread cells, arguing for the existence of sorting mechanism acting over time. Together, our work argues that individual NM II isoforms are potentially performing both isoform-specific and isoform-redundant functions while co-assembled with other NM II isoforms. PMID:24814144

  5. Profilin isoforms modulate astrocytic morphology and the motility of astrocytic processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie K Schweinhuber

    Full Text Available The morphology of astrocytic processes determines their close structural association with synapses referred to as the 'tripartite synapse'. Concerted morphological plasticity processes at tripartite synapses are supposed to shape neuronal communication. Morphological changes in astrocytes as well as the motility of astrocytic processes require remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Among the regulators of fast timescale actin-based motility, the actin binding protein profilin 1 has recently been shown to control the activity-dependent outgrowth of astrocytic processes. Here, we demonstrate that cultured murine astrocytes in addition to the ubiquitous profilin 1 also express the neuronal isoform profilin 2a. To analyze the cellular function of both profilins in astrocytes, we took advantage of a shRNA mediated isoform-specific downregulation. Interestingly, consistent with earlier results in neurons, we found redundant as well as isoform-specific functions of both profilins in modulating cellular physiology. The knockdown of either profilin 1 or profilin 2a led to a significant decrease in cell spreading of astrocytes. In contrast, solely the knockdown of profilin 2a resulted in a significantly reduced morphological complexity of astrocytes in both dissociated and slice culture astrocytes. Moreover, both isoforms proved to be crucial for forskolin-induced astrocytic stellation. Furthermore, forskolin treatment resulted in isoform-specific changes in the phosphorylation level of profilin 1 and profilin 2a, leading to a PKA-dependent phosphorylation of profilin 2a. In addition, transwell assays revealed an involvement of both isoforms in the motility of astrocytic processes, while FRAP analysis displayed an isoform-specific role of profilin 1 in the regulation of actin dynamics in peripheral astrocytic processes. Taken together, we suggest profilin isoforms to be important modulators of astrocytic morphology and motility with overlapping as well as

  6. Learning-dependent gene expression of CREB1 isoforms in the molluscan brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisayo Sadamoto

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein1 (CREB1 has multiple functions in gene regulation. Various studies have reported that CREB1-dependent gene induction is necessary for memory formation and long-lasting behavioral changes in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In the present study, we characterized Lymnaea CREB1 (LymCREB1 mRNA isoforms of spliced variants in the central nervous system (CNS of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Among these spliced variants, the three isoforms that code a whole LymCREB1 protein are considered to be the activators for gene regulation. The other four isoforms, which code truncated LymCREB1 proteins with no kinase inducible domain, are the repressors. For a better understanding of the possible roles of different LymCREB1 isoforms, the expression level of these isoform mRNAs was investigated by a real-time quantitative RT-PCR method. Further, we examined the changes in gene expression for all the isoforms in the CNS after conditioned taste aversion (CTA learning or backward conditioning as a control. The results showed that CTA learning increased LymCREB1 gene expression, but it did not change the activator/repressor ratio. Our findings showed that the repressor isoforms, as well as the activator ones, are expressed in large amounts in the CNS, and the gene expression of CREB1 isoforms appeared to be specific for the given stimulus. This was the first quantitative analysis of the expression patterns of CREB1 isoforms at the mRNA level and their association with learning behavior.

  7. The polysaccharide inulin is characterized by an extensive series of periodic isoforms with varying biological actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Peter D; Barclay, Thomas G; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2013-10-01

    In studying the molecular basis for the potent immune activity of previously described gamma and delta inulin particles and to assist in production of inulin adjuvants under Good Manufacturing Practice, we identified five new inulin isoforms, bringing the total to seven plus the amorphous form. These isoforms comprise the step-wise inulin developmental series amorphous → alpha-1 (AI-1) → alpha-2 (AI-2) → gamma (GI) → delta (DI) → zeta (ZI) → epsilon (EI) → omega (OI) in which each higher isoform can be made either by precipitating dissolved inulin or by direct conversion from its precursor, both cases using regularly increasing temperatures. At higher temperatures, the shorter inulin polymer chains are released from the particle and so the key difference between isoforms is that each higher isoform comprises longer polymer chains than its precursor. An increasing trend of degree of polymerization is confirmed by end-group analysis using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Inulin isoforms were characterized by the critical temperatures of abrupt phase-shifts (solubilizations or precipitations) in water suspensions. Such (aqueous) "melting" or "freezing" points are diagnostic and occur in strikingly periodic steps reflecting quantal increases in noncovalent bonding strength and increments in average polymer lengths. The (dry) melting points as measured by modulated differential scanning calorimetry similarly increase in regular steps. We conclude that the isoforms differ in repeated increments of a precisely repeating structural element. Each isoform has a different spectrum of biological activities and we show the higher inulin isoforms to be more potent alternative complement pathway activators.

  8. Strength in diversity

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Diversity has always been science’s big secret, yet it’s a secret we’ve always been keen to share. CERN was founded on the basis of bringing a diverse mix of people together to pursue common aims, and it’s one of the things that’s driven this Organization’s success over the decades.   Now, we are launching a new diversity programme aimed at strengthening our tradition of inclusiveness. This programme is being launched with a range of key goals in mind for the 2012-2014 timeframe. We’ll be striving to achieve a fair gender balance across all professional categories, and to provide strong gender role models across the Organization. We’ll be improving our career development processes to allow people to progress through both technical and managerial pathways, and we’ll be re-launching workshops that bring people from diverse professions and generations together to share their experience on key aspects of lif...

  9. When Generations Collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogg, Piper

    2008-01-01

    When four generations converge in the academic workplace, it can create serious culture clashes. It is happening across college campuses--in offices as diverse as admissions, student affairs, legal affairs, and technology. It is especially striking in the faculty ranks, where generational challenges have extra significance amid recruiting efforts,…

  10. Exposing diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørtoft, Kamilla; Nordentoft, Helle Merete

    . A prominent research theme in health care studies is, therefore, to explicate the gap between theory and practice. The question this paper addresses is how a learning environment can be designed to bridge this theory-practice gap, expose the differences in situated interactions and qualify health...... in the homes of older people and in pedagogical institutions targeting older people. In the paper we look at the potentials and challenges in working with ethnographic video narratives as a pedagogical tool. Our findings indicate that the use of video narratives has the potential to expose the diversity...

  11. Specific roles of the p110alpha isoform of phosphatidylinsositol 3-kinase in hepatic insulin signaling and metabolic regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopasakis, Victoria Rotter; Liu, Pixu; Suzuki, Ryo; Kondo, Tatsuya; Winnay, Jonathon; Tran, Thien T; Asano, Tomoichiro; Smyth, Graham; Sajan, Mini P; Farese, Robert V; Kahn, C Ronald; Zhao, Jean J

    2010-03-03

    The class I(A) phosphatidylinsositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks) form a critical node in the insulin metabolic pathway; however, the precise roles of the different isoforms of this enzyme remain elusive. Using tissue-specific gene inactivation, we demonstrate that p110alpha catalytic subunit of PI3K is a key mediator of insulin metabolic actions in the liver. Thus, deletion of p110alpha in liver results in markedly blunted insulin signaling with decreased generation of PIP(3) and loss of insulin activation of Akt, defects that could not be rescued by overexpression of p110beta. As a result, mice with hepatic knockout of p110alpha display reduced insulin sensitivity, impaired glucose tolerance, and increased gluconeogenesis, hypolipidemia, and hyperleptinemia. The diabetic syndrome induced by loss of p110alpha in liver did not respond to metformin treatment. Together, these data indicate that the p110alpha isoform of PI3K plays a fundamental role in insulin signaling and control of hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Comprehensive identification of cytochrome p450 isoforms from solubility-based fractionated rat liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Hidenori; Takeyoshi, Masahiro; Minobe, Yasushi; Yakabe, Yoshikuni; Takatsuki, Mineo; Sato, Hisaya

    2007-12-01

    Cytochrome P450 isoforms from male rat liver microsomes were comprehensively identified using nano liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS). The enrichment of P450, an endomembrane-anchored heme protein, was achieved by solubility-based protein fractionation, and greatly improved the total number of identified P450 isoforms. LC-MS/MS analysis of fractions resulted in the identification of total 36 P450 isoforms. The combination of proteomic analysis and the solubility-based fractionation would provide powerful tool for the expression analysis of the superfamily proteins having great similarities between the amino acids sequences.

  13. Purification and Characterization of Two Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel Isoforms from Plant Seeds1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrecht, Helge; Wattiez, Ruddy; Ruysschaert, Jean-Marie; Homblé, Fabrice

    2000-01-01

    Mitochondria were isolated from imbibed seeds of lentil (Lens culinaris) and Phaseolus vulgaris. We copurified two voltage-dependent anion channel from detergent solubilized mitochondria in a single purification step using hydroxyapatite. The two isoforms from P. vulgaris were separated by chromatofocusing chromatography in 4 m urea without any loss of channel activity. Channel activity of each isoform was characterized upon reconstitution into diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine planar lipid bilayers. Both isoforms form large conductance channels that are slightly anion selective and display cation selective substates. PMID:11080295

  14. Differential susceptibility of RAE-1 isoforms to mouse cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arapovic, Jurica; Lenac, Tihana; Antulov, Ronald; Polic, Bojan; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Carayannopoulos, Leonidas N; Koszinowski, Ulrich H; Krmpotic, Astrid; Jonjic, Stipan

    2009-08-01

    The NKG2D receptor is one of the most potent activating natural killer cell receptors involved in antiviral responses. The mouse NKG2D ligands MULT-1, RAE-1, and H60 are regulated by murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) proteins m145, m152, and m155, respectively. In addition, the m138 protein interferes with the expression of both MULT-1 and H60. We show here that one of five RAE-1 isoforms, RAE-1delta, is resistant to downregulation by MCMV and that this escape has functional importance in vivo. Although m152 retained newly synthesized RAE-1delta and RAE-1gamma in the endoplasmic reticulum, no viral regulator was able to affect the mature RAE-1delta form which remains expressed on the surfaces of infected cells. This differential susceptibility to downregulation by MCMV is not a consequence of faster maturation of RAE-1delta compared to RAE-1gamma but rather an intrinsic property of the mature surface-resident protein. This difference can be attributed to the absence of a PLWY motif from RAE-1delta. Altogether, these findings provide evidence for a novel mechanism of host escape from viral immunoevasion of NKG2D-dependent control.

  15. Differential targeting of VDAC3 mRNA isoforms influences mitochondria morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Morgane; Ubrig, Elodie; Filleur, Sophie; Erhardt, Mathieu; Ephritikhine, Geneviève; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence; Duchêne, Anne-Marie

    2014-06-17

    Intracellular targeting of mRNAs has recently emerged as a prevalent mechanism to control protein localization. For mitochondria, a cotranslational model of protein import is now proposed in parallel to the conventional posttranslational model, and mitochondrial targeting of mRNAs has been demonstrated in various organisms. Voltage-dependent anion channels (VDACs) are the most abundant proteins in the outer mitochondrial membrane and the major transport pathway for numerous metabolites. Four nucleus-encoded VDACs have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. Alternative cleavage and polyadenylation generate two VDAC3 mRNA isoforms differing by their 3' UTR. By using quantitative RT-PCR and in vivo mRNA visualization approaches, the two mRNA variants were shown differentially associated with mitochondria. The longest mRNA presents a 3' extension named alternative UTR (aUTR) that is necessary and sufficient to target VDAC3 mRNA to the mitochondrial surface. Moreover, aUTR is sufficient for the mitochondrial targeting of a reporter transcript, and can be used as a tool to target an unrelated mRNA to the mitochondrial surface. Finally, VDAC3-aUTR mRNA variant impacts mitochondria morphology and size, demonstrating the role of mRNA targeting in mitochondria biogenesis.

  16. Identification and expression analysis of alternatively spliced new transcript isoform of Bax gene in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Mohammed Amir; Ishqi, Hassan Mubarak; Sarwar, Tarique; Rehman, Sayeed Ur; Tabish, Mohammad

    2017-07-20

    Bax, a pro-apoptotic member of Bcl-2 family regulates apoptosis through homodimerization/heterodimerization with Bcl-2. Bax-α is the only product of the Bax gene that has been extensively studied. Bax-α exists in inactive form and several conformational changes are required during apoptosis to activate it. Here, we have identified a novel transcript variant of Bax gene in mouse which contains alternatively spliced new first exon that is different from the first exon of previously reported transcript. Conceptual translation of new transcript encodes a protein (Bax-α1), having different N-terminus. The existence of the new transcript variant was confirmed by reverse transcriptase-PCR, semi-nested PCR using primers designed for the newly identified transcript variant. The identity of PCR product obtained after semi-nested PCR was confirmed by DNA sequencing. Relative expression of new transcript variant with respect to reported transcript was also studied with the help of real time PCR. The existence of new transcript variant was further supported by the presence of clusters of overlapping ESTs from the database. Bax-α1 possibly displays heterogeneous properties as predicted by post-translational modification analysis tools. The differences in post-translational modifications might play important roles in divergent function of the new isoform. The three dimensional structure was generated by homology modelling to visualize the differences at N termini of known and newly identified variant. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. An activation-induced IL-15 isoform is a natural antagonist for IL-15 function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Hu, Bo; Zhang, Yinsheng; Song, Yuan; Lin, Dandan; Liu, Yonghao; Mei, Yu; Sandikin, Dedy; Sun, Weiping; Zhuang, Min; Liu, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin 15 (IL-15) expression induces the secretion of inflammatory cytokines, inhibits the apoptosis of activated T cells and prolongs the survival of CD8+ memory T cells. Here we identified an IL-15 isoform lacking exon-6, IL-15ΔE6, generated by alternative splicing events of activated immune cells, including macrophages and B cells. In vitro study showed that IL-15ΔE6 could antagonize IL-15-mediated T cell proliferation. The receptor binding assay revealed that IL-15ΔE6 could bind to IL-15Rα and interfere with the binding between IL-15 and IL-15Rα. Over-expression of IL-15ΔE6 in the murine EAE model ameliorated the EAE symptoms of the mice. The clinical scores were significantly lower in the mice expressing IL-15ΔE6 than the control mice and the mice expressing IL-15. The inflammation and demyelination of the EAE mice expressing IL-15ΔE6 were less severe than the control group. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that IL-15ΔE6 expression reduced the percentages of inflammatory T cells in the spleen and spinal cord, and inhibited the infiltration of macrophages to the CNS. Our results demonstrated that IL-15ΔE6 could be induced during immune activation and function as a negative feedback mechanism to dampen IL-15-mediated inflammatory events. PMID:27166125

  18. Differential effects of heme oxygenase isoforms on heme mediation of endothelial intracellular adhesion molecule 1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, F A; da Silva, J L; Farley, T; de Witte, T; Kappas, A; Abraham, N G

    1999-10-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO), by catabolizing heme to bile pigments, down-regulates cellular hemoprotein, hemoglobin, and heme; the latter generates pro-oxidant products, including free radicals. Two HO isozymes, the products of distinct genes, have been described; HO-1 is the inducible isoform, whereas HO-2 is suggested to be constitutively expressed. We studied the inducing effect of several metal compounds (CoCl(2), stannic mesoporphyrin, and heme) on HO activity. Additionally, we studied HO-1 expression in experimental models of adhesion molecule expression produced by heme in endothelial cells, and the relationship of HO-1 expression to the induced adhesion molecules. Flow cytometry analysis showed that heme induces intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) expression in a concentration (10-100 microM)- and time (1-24 h)-dependent fashion in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Pretreatment with stannic mesoporphyrin, an inhibitor of HO activity, caused a 2-fold increase in heme-induced ICAM-1 expression. In contrast, HO induction by CoCl(2) decreased heme-induced ICAM-1 expression by 33%. To examine the contribution of HO-1 and HO-2 to endothelial HO activity, specific antisense oligonucleotides (ODNs) of each isoform were tested for their specificity to inhibit HO activity in cells exposed to heme. Endothelial cells exposed to heme elicited increased HO activity, which was prevented (70%) by HO-1 antisense ODNs. HO-2 antisense ODN inhibited heme-induced HO activity by 21%. Addition of HO-1 antisense ODNs prevented heme degradation and resulted in elevation of microsomal heme. Western blot analysis showed that HO-1 antisense ODNs selectively inhibited HO-1 protein and failed to inhibit HO-2 protein. Incubation of endothelial cells with HO-1 antisense enhanced heme-dependent increase of ICAM-1. In contrast, addition of HO-2 antisense to endothelial cells failed to increase adhesion molecules. The role of glutathione, an important antioxidant, was examined on heme

  19. Detection of isoform-specific fibroblast growth factor receptors by whole-mount in situ hybridization in early chick embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishita, Junko; Ohta, Sho; Bleyl, Steven B; Schoenwolf, Gary C

    2011-06-01

    We have developed "b" and "c" isoform-specific chicken fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor 1-3 probes for in situ hybridization. We rigorously demonstrate the specificity of these probes by using both dot blot hybridization and whole-mount in situ hybridization during neurulation and early postneurulation stages, and we compare expression patterns of each of the three isoform-specific probes to one another and to generic probes to each of the three (non-isoform-specific) FGF receptors. We show that the expression pattern of each receptor is represented by the collective expression of each of its two isoforms, with the expression of each FGF receptor being most similar to that of its "c" isoform at two of the three stages studied, and that tissue and stage differences exist in the patterns of expression of the six isoforms. We demonstrate the usefulness of these probes for defining the differential tissue expression of FGF receptor 1-3 isoforms.

  20. VAMP/synaptobrevin isoforms 1 and 2 are widely and differentially expressed in nonneuronal tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    VAMP/synaptobrevin is part of the synaptic vesicle docking and fusion complex and plays a central role in neuroexocytosis. Two VAMP (vesicle- associated membrane protein) isoforms are expressed in the nervous system and are differently distributed among the specialized parts of the tissue. Here, VAMP-1 and -2 are shown to be present in all rat tissues tested, including kidney, adrenal gland, liver, pancreas, thyroid, heart, and smooth muscle. The two isoforms are differentially expressed in various tissues and their level may depend on differentiation. VAMP-1 is restricted to exocrine pancreas and to kidney tubular cells, whereas VAMP-2 is the predominant isoform present in Langerhans islets and in glomerular cells. Both isoforms show a patchy vesicular intracellular distribution in confocal microscopy. The present results provide evidence for the importance of neuronal VAMP proteins in the physiology of all cells. PMID:8567721

  1. [Mechanism of malate dehydrogenase isoform formation in Sphaerotilus natans D-507 under different cultivation conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eprintsev, A T; Falaleeva, M I; Arabtseva, M A; Lavrinenko, I A; Parfenova, I V; Grechkina, M V; Abud, F S

    2011-01-01

    Electrophoretically homogenous preparations of malate dehydrogenase (MDH) isoforms of the bacteria Sphaerotilus natans D-507 with specific activity 7.46 U/mg and 5.74 U/mg with respect to protein concentration have been obtained. The dimeric isoform of the enzyme was shown to function under organotrophic growth conditions, whereas the tetrameric isoform was induced under mixotrophic cultivation conditions. PCR-analysis revealed a single gene encoding the malate dehydrogenase molecule. The topography of the MDH isoform surface was studied by atomic-force microscopy, and a 3D-structure of the enzyme was obtained. Spectraphotometric analysis data allowed us to suggest that stabilization of the tetrameric form of MDH is due to additional bounds implicated in the quaternary structure formation.

  2. Sensitivity of small myosin II ensembles from different isoforms to mechanical load and ATP concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Thorsten; Bartelheimer, Kathrin; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2016-11-01

    Based on a detailed crossbridge model for individual myosin II motors, we systematically study the influence of mechanical load and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration on small myosin II ensembles made from different isoforms. For skeletal and smooth muscle myosin II, which are often used in actomyosin gels that reconstitute cell contractility, fast forward movement is restricted to a small region of phase space with low mechanical load and high ATP concentration, which is also characterized by frequent ensemble detachment. At high load, these ensembles are stalled or move backwards, but forward motion can be restored by decreasing ATP concentration. In contrast, small ensembles of nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, which are found in the cytoskeleton of nonmuscle cells, are hardly affected by ATP concentration due to the slow kinetics of the bound states. For all isoforms, the thermodynamic efficiency of ensemble movement increases with decreasing ATP concentration, but this effect is weaker for the nonmuscle myosin II isoforms.

  3. Neuronal and intestinal protein kinase d isoforms mediate Na+ (salt taste)-induced learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ya; Ren, Min; Feng, Hui; Chen, Lu; Altun, Zeynep F; Rubin, Charles S

    2009-08-11

    Ubiquitously expressed protein kinase D (PKD) isoforms are poised to disseminate signals carried by diacylglycerol (DAG). However, the in vivo regulation and functions of PKDs are poorly understood. We show that the Caenorhabditis elegans gene, dkf-2, encodes not just DKF-2A, but also a second previously unknown isoform, DKF-2B. Whereas DKF-2A is present mainly in intestine, we show that DKF-2B is found in neurons. Characterization of dkf-2 null mutants and transgenic animals expressing DKF-2B, DKF-2A, or both isoforms revealed that PKDs couple DAG signals to regulation of sodium ion (Na+)-induced learning. EGL-8 (a phospholipase Cbeta4 homolog) and TPA-1 (a protein kinase Cdelta homolog) are upstream regulators of DKF-2 isoforms in vivo. Thus, pathways containing EGL-8-TPA-1-DKF-2 enable learning and behavioral plasticity by receiving, transmitting, and cooperatively integrating environmental signals targeted to both neurons and intestine.

  4. Glial fibrillary acidic protein isoform expression in plaque related astrogliosis in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, W.; Middeldorp, Jinte; Kooijman, Lieneke; Sluijs, Jacqueline A; Kooi, Evert-Jan; Moeton, Martina; Freriks, Michel; Mizee, Mark R; Hol, Elly M

    2014-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyloid plaques are surrounded by reactive astrocytes with an increased expression of intermediate filaments including glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Different GFAP isoforms have been identified that are differentially expressed by specific subpopulations of ast

  5. Receptor-isoform-selective insulin analogues give tissue-preferential effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vienberg, Sara Gry; Bouman, Stephan D; Sørensen, Heidi

    2011-01-01

    The relative expression patterns of the two IR (insulin receptor) isoforms, +/- exon 11 (IR-B/IR-A respectively), are tissue-dependent. Therefore we have developed insulin analogues with different binding affinities for the two isoforms to test whether tissue-preferential biological effects can...... be attained. In rats and mice, IR-B is the most prominent isoform in the liver (> 95%) and fat (> 90%), whereas in muscles IR-A is the dominant isoform (> 95%). As a consequence, the insulin analogue INS-A, which has a higher relative affinity for human IR-A, had a higher relative potency [compared with HI...... (human insulin)] for glycogen synthesis in rat muscle strips (26%) than for glycogen accumulation in rat hepatocytes (5%) and for lipogenesis in rat adipocytes (4%). In contrast, the INS-B analogue, which has an increased affinity for human IR-B, had higher relative potencies (compared with HI...

  6. Altered β-Amyloid Precursor Protein Isoforms in Mexican Alzheimer’s Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. J. Sánchez-González

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the β-amyloid precursor protein (βAPP isoforms ratio as a risk factor for Alzheimer’s Disease and to assess its relationship with demographic and genetic variables of the disease.

  7. Diversity Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MSc. Mentor Ademaj

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diversity measures are a type of non-criminal measures foreseen in the Chapter IV of the Code of Juvenile Justice, which may be imposed on juvenile perpetrators of criminal acts. These measures can be applied in cases of minor offenses, for which is foreseen the criminal sanction with a fine or imprisonment up to three years or for criminal offenses committed by negligence for which is foreseen the sentence up to five years of imprisonment, except those cases that result in death. With the imposition of these measures is intended to prevent criminal proceedings against juveniles whenever is possible, rehabilitation and reintegration of juvenile in his/her community and the prevention of recidivist behaviour. Competent authority to impose them is the public prosecutor, the juvenile judge and juvenile court. And they are executed by the Kosovo Correctional Service.

  8. Kinetic evaluation of cell membrane hydrolysis during apoptosis by human isoforms of secretory phospholipase A2.

    OpenAIRE

    Olson, Erin D.; Nelson, Jennifer; Griffith, Katalyn; Nguyen, Thaothanh; Streeter, Michael; Wilson-Ashworth, Heather A.; Michael H Gelb; Judd, Allan M.; Bell, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Some isoforms of secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) distinguish between healthy and damaged or apoptotic cells. This distinction reflects differences in membrane physical properties. Because various sPLA2 isoforms respond differently to properties of artificial membranes such as surface charge, they should also behave differently as these properties evolve during a dynamic physiological process such as apoptosis. To test this idea, S49 lymphoma cell death was induced by glucocorticoid (6–48 h...

  9. Role of ROCK Isoforms in Regulation of Stiffness Induced Myofibroblast Differentiation in Lung Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Htwe, Su S; Cha, Byung H; Yue, Kan; Khademhosseini, Ali; Knox, Alan J; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M

    2017-02-22

    Fibrosis is a major cause of progressive organ dysfunction in several chronic pulmonary diseases. Rho associated coiled-coil forming kinase (ROCK) has shown to be involved in myofibroblast differentiation driven by altered matrix stiffness in fibrotic state. There are two known ROCK isoforms in human, ROCK1 (ROKβ) and ROCK2 (ROKα), but specific role of each isoform in myofibroblast differentiation in lung fibrosis remains unknown. To study this, we developed a Gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA) hydrogel based culture system with different stiffness levels relevant to healthy and fibrotic lungs. We have shown that stiff matrix and not soft matrix, can induce myofibroblast differentiation with high αSMA expression. Furthermore, our data confirm that the inhibition of ROCK signalling by a pharmacological inhibitor (i.e. Y27632) attenuates stiffness induced αSMA expression and fibre assembly in myofibroblasts. To assess the role of ROCK isoforms in this process we used siRNA to knock down the expression of each isoform. Our data showed that knocking down either ROCK1 or ROCK2 did not result in a reduction in αSMA expression in myofibroblasts on stiff matrix as opposed to soft matrix where αSMA expression was reduced significantly. Paradoxically, on stiff matrix, the absence of one isoform (particularly ROCK2) exaggerated αSMA expression and led to thick fibre assembly. Moreover complete loss of αSMA fibre assembly was seen only in the absence of both ROCK isoforms suggesting that both isoforms are implicated in this process. Overall our results indicate the differential role of ROCK isoforms in myofibroblast differentiation on soft and stiff matrices.

  10. Recombinant erythropoietin in humans has a prolonged effect on circulating erythropoietin isoform distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Jacob Aachmann-Andersen

    Full Text Available The membrane-assisted isoform immunoassay (MAIIA quantitates erythropoietin (EPO isoforms as percentages of migrated isoforms (PMI. We evaluated the effect of recombinant human EPO (rhEPO on the distribution of EPO isoforms in plasma in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, cross-over study. 16 healthy subjects received either low-dose Epoetin beta (5000 IU on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and 13; high-dose Epoetin beta (30.000 IU on days 1, 2 and 3 and placebo on days 5, 7, 9, 11 and 13; or placebo on all days. PMI on days 4, 11 and 25 was determined by interaction of N-acetyl glucosamine with the glycosylation dependent desorption of EPO isoforms. At day 25, plasma-EPO in both rhEPO groups had returned to values not different from the placebo group. PMI with placebo, reflecting the endogenous EPO isoforms, averaged 82.5 (10.3 % (mean (SD. High-dose Epoetin beta decreased PMI on days 4 and 11 to 31.0 (4.2% (p<0.00001 and 45.2 (7.3% (p<0.00001. Low-dose Epoetin beta decreased PMI on days 4 and 11 to 46.0 (12.8% (p<0.00001 and 46.1 (10.4% (p<0.00001. In both rhEPO groups, PMI on day 25 was still decreased (high-dose Epoetin beta: 72.9 (19.4% (p=0.029; low-dose Epoetin beta: 73.1 (17.8% (p=0.039. In conclusion, Epoetin beta leaves a footprint in the plasma-EPO isoform pattern. MAIIA can detect changes in EPO isoform distribution up til at least three weeks after administration of Epoetin beta even though the total EPO concentration has returned to normal.

  11. Robust stratification of breast cancer subtypes using differential patterns of transcript isoform expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas P Stricker

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death of women worldwide, is a heterogenous disease with multiple different subtypes. These subtypes carry important implications for prognosis and therapy. Interestingly, it is known that these different subtypes not only have different biological behaviors, but also have distinct gene expression profiles. However, it has not been rigorously explored whether particular transcriptional isoforms are also differentially expressed among breast cancer subtypes, or whether transcript isoforms from the same sets of genes can be used to differentiate subtypes. To address these questions, we analyzed the patterns of transcript isoform expression using a small set of RNA-sequencing data for eleven Estrogen Receptor positive (ER+ subtype and fourteen triple negative (TN subtype tumors. We identified specific sets of isoforms that distinguish these tumor subtypes with higher fidelity than standard mRNA expression profiles. We found that alternate promoter usage, alternative splicing, and alternate 3'UTR usage are differentially regulated in breast cancer subtypes. Profiling of isoform expression in a second, independent cohort of 68 tumors confirmed that expression of splice isoforms differentiates breast cancer subtypes. Furthermore, analysis of RNAseq data from 594 cases from the TCGA cohort confirmed the ability of isoform usage to distinguish breast cancer subtypes. Also using our expression data, we identified several RNA processing factors that were differentially expressed between tumor subtypes and/or regulated by estrogen receptor, including YBX1, YBX2, MAGOH, MAGOHB, and PCBP2. RNAi knock-down of these RNA processing factors in MCF7 cells altered isoform expression. These results indicate that global dysregulation of splicing in breast cancer occurs in a subtype-specific and reproducible manner and is driven by specific differentially expressed RNA processing factors.

  12. Kinetics of local and systemic isoforms of serum amyloid A in bovine mastitic milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine; Niewold, T.A.; Kornalijnslijper, E.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterise the serum amyloid A (SAA) response to intramammary inoculation of Escherichia coli and to examine the distribution of hepatically and extrahepatically pruduced SAA isoforms in plasma and milk fra cows with mastitis.......The aim of the present study was to characterise the serum amyloid A (SAA) response to intramammary inoculation of Escherichia coli and to examine the distribution of hepatically and extrahepatically pruduced SAA isoforms in plasma and milk fra cows with mastitis....

  13. Differential Regulation of Human Thymosin Beta 15 Isoforms by Transforming Growth Factor Beta 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyard, Jacqueline; Barrows, Courtney; Zetter, Bruce R.

    2009-01-01

    We recently identified an additional isoform of human thymosin beta 15 (also known as NB-thymosin beta, gene name TMSB15A) transcribed from an independent gene, and designated TMSB15B. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether these isoforms were differentially expressed and functional. Our data show that the TMSB15A and TMSB15B isoforms have distinct expression patterns in different tumor cell lines and tissues. TMSB15A was expressed at higher levels in HCT116, DU145, LNCaP and LNCaP-LN3 cancer cells. In MCF-7, SKOV-3, HT1080 and PC-3MLN4 cells, TMSB15A and TMSB15B showed approximately equivalent levels of expression, while TMSB15B was the predominant isoform expressed in PC-3, MDA-MB-231, NCI-H322 and Caco-2 cancer cells. In normal human prostate and prostate cancer tissues, TMSB15A was the predominant isoform expressed. In contrast, normal colon and colon cancer tissue expressed predominantly TMSB15B. The two gene isoforms are also subject to different transcriptional regulation. Treatment of MCF-7 breast cancer cells with transforming growth factor beta 1 repressed TMSB15A expression but had no effect on TMSB15B. siRNA specific to the TMSB15B isoform suppressed cell migration of prostate cancer cells to epidermal growth factor, suggesting a functional role for this second isoform. In summary, our data reveal different expression patterns and regulation of a new thymosin beta 15 gene paralog. This may have important consequences in both tumor and neuronal cell motility. PMID:19296525

  14. Myosin heavy-chain isoforms in the flight and leg muscles of hummingbirds and zebra finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velten, Brandy P; Welch, Kenneth C

    2014-06-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform complement is intimately related to a muscle's contractile properties, yet relatively little is known about avian MHC isoforms or how they may vary with fiber type and/or the contractile properties of a muscle. The rapid shortening of muscles necessary to power flight at the high wingbeat frequencies of ruby-throated hummingbirds and zebra finches (25-60 Hz), along with the varied morphology and use of the hummingbird hindlimb, provides a unique opportunity to understand how contractile and morphological properties of avian muscle may be reflected in MHC expression. Isoforms of the hummingbird and zebra finch flight and hindlimb muscles were electrophoretically separated and compared with those of other avian species representing different contractile properties and fiber types. The flight muscles of the study species operate at drastically different contraction rates and are composed of different histochemically defined fiber types, yet each exhibited the same, single MHC isoform corresponding to the chicken adult fast isoform. Thus, despite quantitative differences in the contractile demands of flight muscles across species, this isoform appears necessary for meeting the performance demands of avian powered flight. Variation in flight muscle contractile performance across species may be due to differences in the structural composition of this conserved isoform and/or variation within other mechanically linked proteins. The leg muscles were more varied in their MHC isoform composition across both muscles and species. The disparity in hindlimb MHC expression between hummingbirds and the other species highlights previously observed differences in fiber type composition and thrust production during take-off. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Recombinant erythropoietin in humans has a prolonged effect on circulating erythropoietin isoform distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob; Just Christensen, Søren; Lisbjerg, Kristian; Oturai, Peter; Meinild-Lundby, Anne-Kristine; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Lundby, Carsten; Vidiendal Olsen, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-assisted isoform immunoassay (MAIIA) quantitates erythropoietin (EPO) isoforms as percentages of migrated isoforms (PMI). We evaluated the effect of recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) on the distribution of EPO isoforms in plasma in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, cross-over study. 16 healthy subjects received either low-dose Epoetin beta (5000 IU on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and 13); high-dose Epoetin beta (30.000 IU on days 1, 2 and 3 and placebo on days 5, 7, 9, 11 and 13); or placebo on all days. PMI on days 4, 11 and 25 was determined by interaction of N-acetyl glucosamine with the glycosylation dependent desorption of EPO isoforms. At day 25, plasma-EPO in both rhEPO groups had returned to values not different from the placebo group. PMI with placebo, reflecting the endogenous EPO isoforms, averaged 82.5 (10.3) % (mean (SD)). High-dose Epoetin beta decreased PMI on days 4 and 11 to 31.0 (4.2)% (p<0.00001) and 45.2 (7.3)% (p<0.00001). Low-dose Epoetin beta decreased PMI on days 4 and 11 to 46.0 (12.8)% (p<0.00001) and 46.1 (10.4)% (p<0.00001). In both rhEPO groups, PMI on day 25 was still decreased (high-dose Epoetin beta: 72.9 (19.4)% (p=0.029); low-dose Epoetin beta: 73.1 (17.8)% (p=0.039)). In conclusion, Epoetin beta leaves a footprint in the plasma-EPO isoform pattern. MAIIA can detect changes in EPO isoform distribution up til at least three weeks after administration of Epoetin beta even though the total EPO concentration has returned to normal.

  16. Biological Effects of TMPRSS2/ERG Fusion Isoforms in Human Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    TITLE: Biological Effects of TMPRSS2/ERG Fusion Isoforms in Human Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jianghua Wang, M.D...6 JAN 2009 / / /4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Biological Effects of TMPRSS2/ERG Fusion Isoforms in Human Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH...quantitative RT-PCR arrays we have identified can