WorldWideScience

Sample records for generalized social trust

  1. From the general to the specific: How social trust motivates relational trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Blaine G

    2016-01-01

    When people form beliefs about the trustworthiness of others with respect to particular matters (i.e., when individuals trust), theory suggests that they rely on preexistent cognitive schemas regarding the general cooperativeness of individuals and organizations (i.e., social trust). In spite of prior work, the impact of social trust on relational trust-or what Russell Hardin (2002) calls trust as a three-part relation where actor A trusts actor B with reference to matter Y-is not well established. Four vignette experiments were administered to Amazon.com Mechanical Turk workers (N = 1388 and N = 1419) and to public university undergraduate students (N = 995 and N = 956) in order to investigate the relationship between social trust and relational trust. Measures of general social trust and particular social trust produced statistically equivalent effects that were positively associated with relational trust. Political trust, however, was statistically unrelated to relational trust. These results support the idea that people rely on schemas and stereotypes concerned with the general cooperativeness and helpfulness of others when forming beliefs about another person's trustworthiness with respect to a particular matter at hand. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Does generalized social trust lead to associational membership? Unraveling a bowl of well-tossed spaghetti

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    2011-01-01

    Within the social capital literature it is often assumed that membership of voluntary associations causes generalized social trust and not the other way around. This study challenges this assumption by investigating if generalized social trust causes membership in a novel design that yields valid...... provide rare individual level evidence for a connection between generalized social trust and collective action in that generalized social trust in particular increases membership of associations producing public goods....

  3. Does generalized social trust lead to associational membership? Unraveling a bowl of well-tossed spaghetti

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    Within the social capital literature it is often assumed that membership of voluntary associations causes generalized social trust and not the other way around. This study challenges this assumption by investigating if generalized social trust causes membership in a novel design that yields valid....... Moreover, the study provide rare individual level evidence for a connection between generalized social trust and collective action in that generalized social trust in particular increases membership of associations producing public goods....

  4. Explaining Large-N Cooperation: Generalized Social Trust and the Social Exchange Heuristic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a new argument that links generalized social trust and collective action in situations with a large number of actors, who do not have specific information on each other. Generalized social trust enhances large-N cooperation through the social exchange heuristic, which stimul...... hypothesized, there is scant micro level evidence as it has mainly been tested at the macro level. The results show that people holding generalized social trust cooperate more readily in large-N dilemmas, and that they most likely do so because of the social exchange heuristic.......This article presents a new argument that links generalized social trust and collective action in situations with a large number of actors, who do not have specific information on each other. Generalized social trust enhances large-N cooperation through the social exchange heuristic, which...... stimulate conditional cooperation in social dilemmas. Using data from a survey in four countries and recycling behavior as an indicator of collective action, this explanation is tested with individual level data. While the relationship between generalized social trust and large-N collective action is often...

  5. Making Cooperation Work: Generalized Social Trust and Large-N Collective Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    with high levels of generalized social trust more readily undertake pro-environmental behavior like recycling or supporting environmental associations. These results are sustained at the national level; countries with trusting citizens have higher recycling rates and more members of environmental......It has often been argued that generalized social trust, the belief that most people are trustworthy, enhances cooperation in large-N collective action dilemmas. Large-N dilemmas are situations where an actor has to decide whether to contribute to the provision of public goods that benefit a large...... on survey and national level data from several countries is used to investigate if, how, and when generalized social trust leads to collective action. Specifically, citizens' behavior in relation to the environment is used as the indicator of voluntary public good provision. This indicator affords excellent...

  6. Personal trust increases cooperation beyond general trust

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Acedo-Carmona, Cristina; Gomila, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    ..., according to whether or not players personally trust each other. The design thus goes beyond standard approaches to the role of trust in fostering cooperation, which is restricted to general trust...

  7. Social Trust and Fractionalization:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    2008-01-01

    This paper takes a closer look at the importance of fractionalization for the creation of social trust. It first argues that the determinants of trust can be divided into two categories: those affecting individuals' trust radii and those affecting social polarization. A series of estimates using...... a much larger country sample than in previous literature confirms that fractionalization in the form of income inequality and political diversity adversely affects social trust while ethnic diversity does not. However, these effects differ systematically across countries, questioning standard...... interpretations of the influence of fractionalization on trust....

  8. Voluntary Association Membership and Social Cleavages: A Micro-Macro Link in Generalized Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan-ung; Subramanian, S. V.

    2012-01-01

    Generalized trust varies across individuals and countries. Past studies on trust have demonstrated that voluntary association membership, inequality and ethnic homogeneity at country level are important. However, those studies examined either individual-level or country-level factors separately. In this paper, we conceptualized the emergence of…

  9. Education and Social Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskarsson, Sven; Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Dawes, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    -experiment of twinning. By looking at the relationship between education and social trust within monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs, we are able to avoid potential confounders rooted in genetic factors and common environmental influences because the monozygotic twins share both. The results suggest that when controlling......One of the clearest results in previous studies on social trust is the robust positive relationship with educational attainment. The most common interpretation is that education has a causal effect on social trust. The theoretical argument and empirical results in this article suggest a different...... interpretation. We argue that common preadult factors such as cognitive abilities and personality traits rooted in genes and early-life family environment may confound the relationship between educational attainment and social trust. We provide new evidence on this question by utilizing the quasi...

  10. Trust and Social Commerce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Y. Lee

    2016-01-01

    The Article focuses on the rise of “social commerce,” a socio-economic phenomenon centered on the use of social media and other modes of social connection in electronic commerce. It identifies three mechanisms that are central to the development of trust in social commerce: communication and voluntary disclosure; barriers to entry; and community policing. These mechanisms simulate the characteristics of closely-knit environments, creating conditions conducive to trust. The Article describes these mechanisms in four new commercial settings: the sharing economy; next generation electronic commerce; online escort services; and online black markets in credit cards and controlled substances.

  11. Distrust as a Disease-Avoidance Strategy:Individual Differences in Disgust Sensitivity Regulate Generalized Social Trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lene Aarøe

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Throughout human evolutionary history, cooperative contact with others has been fundamental for human survival. At the same time, social contact has been a source of threats. In this article, we focus on one particular viable threat, communicable disease, and investigate how motivations to avoid pathogens influence people's propensity to interact and cooperate with others, as measured by individual differences in generalized social trust. While extant studies on pathogen avoidance have argued that such motivations should prompt people to avoid interactions with outgroups specifically, we argue that these motivations should prompt people to avoid others more broadly. Empirically, we utilise two convenience samples and a large nationally representative sample of US citizens to demonstrate the existence of a robust and replicable effect of individual differences in pathogen disgust sensitivity on generalized social trust. We furthermore compare the effects of pathogen disgust sensitivity on generalised social trust and outgroup prejudice and explore whether generalised social trust to some extent constitutes a pathway between pathogen avoidance motivations and prejudice.

  12. Does Variation in the Extent of Generalized Trust, Does Variation in the Extent of Generalized Trust, Individual Education and Extensiveness of Social Security Policies Matter for Maximization of Subjective Well-Being?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeeva, Rania F.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I examine whether generalized trust and education, as well as social security policies of welfare state institutions matter for cross-national differences in subjective well-being (SWB), because knowledge on this issue is still lacking. For this purpose I integrated the insights of two sociological theories: Social Function…

  13. Does Education Lead to Higher Generalized Trust?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charron, Nicholas; Rothstein, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Generalized trust has become a prominent concept at the nexus of several disciplines, and the wide differences in trust between different societies continue to puzzle the social sciences. In this study, we explore the effects of micro and macro level factors in explaining an individual's propensity...... to ‘trust others'. We hypothesize that higher levels of education will lead to higher social trust in individuals, given that the context (country or regions within countries) in which they reside has a sufficiently impartial and non-corrupt institutional setting. However, the positive effect of education...

  14. Trusting Facebook in Crisis Situations: The Role of General Use and General Trust Toward Facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymczak, Hermann; Kücükbalaban, Pinar; Lemanski, Sandra; Knuth, Daniela; Schmidt, Silke

    2016-01-01

    An important concept that has been rather neglected in research on social media is the concept of trust. Although there is a considerable amount of research on online trust in general, little has been done in the area of social media. As a situation of risk is necessary for trust, the perceived trustworthiness of Facebook in crisis situations was examined in this study. A sample of 340 European Facebook users were questioned as part of a large European study about social media in the context of emergency situations. We found that participants' general trust toward Facebook as a medium predicted to a significant degree how much they would trust Facebook in a crisis situation. General use of Facebook and dispositional trust were also significantly associated with trust toward Facebook in a crisis situation.

  15. Trust transitivity in social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Richters, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Non-centralized recommendation-based decision making is a central feature of several social and technological processes, such as market dynamics, peer-to-peer file-sharing and the web of trust of digital certification. We investigate the properties of trust propagation on networks, based on a simple metric of trust transitivity. We investigate analytically the percolation properties of trust transitivity in random networks with arbitrary degree distribution, and compare with numerical realizations. We find that the existence of a non-zero fraction of absolute trust (i.e. entirely confident trust) is a requirement for the viability of global trust propagation in large systems: The average pair-wise trust is marked by a discontinuous transition at a specific fraction of absolute trust, below which it vanishes. Furthermore, we perform an extensive analysis of the Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) web of trust, in view of the concepts introduced. We compare different scenarios of trust distribution: community- and author...

  16. The Volatile Nature of Social Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærsgård, Andreas Pihl; Anhøj, Anne Iversen

    by the development of public sentiment in a given context. The development of social trust in Croatia and Slovenia thus correlate with factors as the sense of trust and corruption among politicians, public officials and public institutions, the general economic and social development in the country as well...

  17. Does Religiosity Promote or Discourage Social Trust?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berggren, Niclas; Bjørnskov, Christian

    We look at the effect of religiosity on social trust, defined as the share of a population that thinks that people in general can be trusted. This is important since social trust is related to many desired outcomes, such as growth, education, democratic stability and subjective well...... countries and the U.S. states, measuring religiosity by the share of the population that answers yes to the question "Is religion an important part of your daily life?". Our empirical results, making use of regression analysis whereby we control for other possible determinants of social trust and, by using...

  18. Constitutional Verbosity and Social Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian; Voigt, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    A common argument in the trust literature is that high-trust cultures allow efficient commercial contracts to be shorter, covering fewer contingencies. We take this idea to the topic of social contracts. Specifically, we ask whether social trust affects the length and detail of constitutions. Cross......-country estimates suggest that national trust levels are indeed robustly and negatively associated with the length of countries’ constitutions....

  19. How Does Social Trust Affect Economic Growth?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    Social capital in the form of generalized trust has been shown to be a determinant of economic growth in a number of studies. Other studies have explored other consequences of trust, such as its effects on governance, corruption, education and investment. This paper connects the two strands...

  20. Predicting Social Trust with Binary Logistic Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adwere-Boamah, Joseph; Hufstedler, Shirley

    2015-01-01

    This study used binary logistic regression to predict social trust with five demographic variables from a national sample of adult individuals who participated in The General Social Survey (GSS) in 2012. The five predictor variables were respondents' highest degree earned, race, sex, general happiness and the importance of personally assisting…

  1. Ethnic Diversity and Social Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    2017-01-01

    Due to its wide-ranging implications for social cohesion in diversifying Western countries, the question of the potential negative consequences of ethnic diversity for social trust is arguably the most contentious question in the literature on social trust. In this chapter we critically review...... the empirical evidence for a negative relationship between contextual ethnic diversity (measured locally within countries) and social trust. We cautiously conclude that there are indications of a negative relationship, although with important variations across study characteristics including national setting......, context unit analyzed, and conditioning on moderating influences. Building on the review, we highlight a number of paths for theoretical and methodological advances, which we argue would advance the literature on the relationship between ethnic diversity and social trust....

  2. Ethnic Diversity and Social Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we argue that residential exposure to ethnic diversity reduces social trust. Previous within-country analyses of the relationship between contextual ethnic diversity and trust have been conducted at higher levels of aggregation, concealing substantial variation in actual exposure...... to ethnic diversity. In contrast, we analyze how ethnic diversity of the immediate micro-context – where interethnic exposure is inevitable – affects trust. We do this using Danish survey data linked with register-based data, which enables us to obtain precise measures of the ethnic diversity of each......, while the effect vanishes in larger contextual units. This supports the conjecture that interethnic exposure underlies the negative relationship between ethnic diversity in residential contexts and social trust....

  3. Ethnic Diversity and Social Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    2015-01-01

    We argue that residential exposure to ethnic diversity reduces social trust. Previous within-country analyses of the relationship between contextual ethnic diversity and trust have been conducted at higher levels of aggregation, thus ignoring substantial variation in actual exposure to ethnic......, whereas the effect vanishes in larger contextual units. This supports the conjecture that interethnic exposure underlies the negative relationship between ethnic diversity in residential contexts and social trust....... diversity. In contrast, we analyze how ethnic diversity of the immediate micro-context—where interethnic exposure is inevitable—affects trust. We do this using Danish survey data linked with register-based data, which enables us to obtain precise measures of the ethnic diversity of each individual...

  4. Ethnic Diversity and Social Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we argue that residential exposure to ethnic diversity reduces social trust. Previous within-country analyses of the relationship between contextual ethnic diversity and trust have been conducted at higher levels of aggregation, concealing substantial variation in actual exposure...... to ethnic diversity. In contrast, we analyze how ethnic diversity of the immediate micro-context – where interethnic exposure is inevitable – affects trust. We do this using Danish survey data linked with register-based data, which enables us to obtain precise measures of the ethnic diversity of each...... individual’s residential surroundings. We focus on contextual diversity within a radius of 80 meters of a given individual, but compare the effect in the micro-context to the impact of diversity in more aggregate contexts. The results show that ethnic diversity in the micro-context affects trust negatively...

  5. Distrust As a Disease Avoidance Strategy: Individual Differences in Disgust Sensitivity Regulate Generalized Social Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarøe, Lene; Osmundsen, Mathias; Petersen, Michael Bang

    2016-01-01

    that these motivations should prompt people to avoid others more broadly. Empirically, we utilize two convenience samples and a large nationally representative sample of US citizens to demonstrate the existence of a robust and replicable effect of individual differences in pathogen disgust sensitivity on generalized...

  6. Social Capital. Trust and Ideology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek TITTENBRUN

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper offers a critical analysis of the central concept around which the popular construct of social capital is organised, i.e. trust. To this end the views of Fukuyama, the leading exponent of the said concept are considered. As a result, the concept in question is found to be ideologically charged and substantively weak in many respects.

  7. Generalized Trust and Trust in Institutions in Confucian Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Soo Jiuan; Tambyah, Siok Kuan

    2011-01-01

    This study examines generalized trust and trust in institutions in Confucian Asia, covering six countries namely, China, Japan, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan and Vietnam, and one dependent region, Hong Kong. Using data from the 2006 AsiaBarometer Survey, our study affirms the reliability and validity of using a two-item scale to measure…

  8. Representing Trust in Cognitive Social Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Shawn S.; Alt, Jonathan K.; Darken, Christian J.

    Trust plays a critical role in communications, strength of relationships, and information processing at the individual and group level. Cognitive social simulations show promise in providing an experimental platform for the examination of social phenomena such as trust formation. This paper describes the initial attempts at representation of trust in a cognitive social simulation using reinforcement learning algorithms centered around a cooperative Public Commodity game within a dynamic social network.

  9. Social Reconnection Revisited: The Effects of Social Exclusion Risk on Reciprocity, Trust, and General Risk-Taking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derfler-Rozin, Rellie; Pillutla, Madan; Thau, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesize that people at risk of exclusion from groups will engage in actions that can socially reconnect them with others and test the hypothesis in four studies. We show that participants at risk of exclusion reciprocated the behavior of an unknown person (Study 1a) and a potential excluder (Study 1b) more compared to two control groups…

  10. Social Reconnection Revisited: The Effects of Social Exclusion Risk on Reciprocity, Trust, and General Risk-Taking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derfler-Rozin, Rellie; Pillutla, Madan; Thau, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesize that people at risk of exclusion from groups will engage in actions that can socially reconnect them with others and test the hypothesis in four studies. We show that participants at risk of exclusion reciprocated the behavior of an unknown person (Study 1a) and a potential excluder (Study 1b) more compared to two control groups…

  11. MULTI-FACET TRUST MODEL FOR ONLINE SOCIAL NETWORK ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Ban Chieng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Online Social Network (OSN has become the most popular platform on the Internet that can provide an interesting and creative ways to communicate, sharing and meets with peoples. As OSNs mature, issues regarding proper use of OSNs are also growing. In this research, the challenges of online social networks have been investigated. The current issues in some of the Social Network Sites are being studied and compared. Cyber criminals, malware attacks, physical threat, security and usability and some privacy issues have been recognized as the challenges of the current social networking sites. Trust concerns have been raised and the trustworthiness of social networking sites has been questioned. Currently, the trust in social networks is using the single- faceted approach, which is not well personalized, and doesn’t account for the subjective views of trust, according to each user, but only the general trust believes of a group of population. The trust level towards a person cannot be calculated and trust is lack of personalization. From our initial survey, we had found that most people can share their information without any doubts on OSN but they normally do not trust all their friends equally and think there is a need of trust management. We had found mixed opinions in relation to the proposed rating feature in OSNs too. By adopting the idea of multi-faceted trust model, a user-centric model that can personalize the comments/photos in social network with user’s customized traits of trust is proposed. This model can probably solve many of the trust issues towards the social networking sites with personalized trust features, in order to keep the postings on social sites confidential and integrity.

  12. Explaining the emergence of social trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gunnar Lind Haase; Tinggaard Svendsen, Gert; Graeff, Peter

    2012-01-01

    How does social trust emerge in a country? By comparing the cases of Denmark and Germany through six historical phases, we suggest that a plausible explanation is long run political stability. In Denmark, social trust was arguably allowed to accumulate slowly over time and was probably not destro...... not destroyed up till the universal welfare state of the 20th century. In Germany, however, political instability since the first German state building hampered the emergence and maintenance of social trust, which is why social trust was never allowed to grow in this country.......How does social trust emerge in a country? By comparing the cases of Denmark and Germany through six historical phases, we suggest that a plausible explanation is long run political stability. In Denmark, social trust was arguably allowed to accumulate slowly over time and was probably...

  13. Generalized trust and intelligence in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, Noah; Billari, Francesco C

    2014-01-01

    Generalized trust refers to trust in other members of society; it may be distinguished from particularized trust, which corresponds to trust in the family and close friends. An extensive empirical literature has established that generalized trust is an important aspect of civic culture. It has been linked to a variety of positive outcomes at the individual level, such as entrepreneurship, volunteering, self-rated health, and happiness. However, two recent studies have found that it is highly correlated with intelligence, which raises the possibility that the other relationships in which it has been implicated may be spurious. Here we replicate the association between intelligence and generalized trust in a large, nationally representative sample of U.S. adults. We also show that, after adjusting for intelligence, generalized trust continues to be strongly associated with both self-rated health and happiness. In the context of substantial variation across countries, these results bolster the view that generalized trust is a valuable social resource, not only for the individual but for the wider society as well.

  14. Generalized trust and intelligence in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Carl

    Full Text Available Generalized trust refers to trust in other members of society; it may be distinguished from particularized trust, which corresponds to trust in the family and close friends. An extensive empirical literature has established that generalized trust is an important aspect of civic culture. It has been linked to a variety of positive outcomes at the individual level, such as entrepreneurship, volunteering, self-rated health, and happiness. However, two recent studies have found that it is highly correlated with intelligence, which raises the possibility that the other relationships in which it has been implicated may be spurious. Here we replicate the association between intelligence and generalized trust in a large, nationally representative sample of U.S. adults. We also show that, after adjusting for intelligence, generalized trust continues to be strongly associated with both self-rated health and happiness. In the context of substantial variation across countries, these results bolster the view that generalized trust is a valuable social resource, not only for the individual but for the wider society as well.

  15. Explaining the emergence of social trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gunnar Lind Haase; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard; Graeff, Peter

    2012-01-01

    How does social trust emerge in a country? By comparing the cases of Denmark and Germany through six historical phases, we suggest that a plausible explanation is long run political stability. In Denmark, social trust was arguably allowed to accumulate slowly over time and was probably...... not destroyed up till the universal welfare state of the 20th century. In Germany, however, political instability since the first German state building hampered the emergence and maintenance of social trust, which is why social trust was never allowed to grow in this country....

  16. Social Diversity, Institutions and Trust: A Cross-National Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Chang; Laczko, Leslie; Bjornskov, Christian

    2011-01-01

    This cross-national investigation examines hypotheses derived from two major alternative perspectives on the determinants of trust in contemporary societies. Is a society's level of generalized trust a function of its ethnic composition, or of its type of governance and political system? The argument that social diversity (ethnic, linguistic, and…

  17. Questions of trust in health research on social capital: what aspects of personal network social capital do they measure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpiano, Richard M; Fitterer, Lisa M

    2014-09-01

    Health research on personal social capital has often utilized measures of respondents' perceived trust of others as either a proxy for one's social capital in the absence of more focused measures or as a subjective component of social capital. Little empirical work has evaluated the validity of such practices. We test the construct validity of two trust measures used commonly in health research on social capital-generalized trust and trust of neighbors-with respect to measures of people's general network-, organization-, family-, friend-, and neighborhood-based social capital and the extent to which these two trust measures are associated with self-rated general health and mental health when social capital measures are included in the same models. Analyses of 2008 Canadian General Social Survey data (response rate 57.3%) indicate that generalized trust and trust of neighbors are both positively-yet modestly-associated with measures of several domains of network-based social capital. Both trust measures are positively associated with general and mental health, but these associations remain robust after adjusting for social capital measures. Our findings suggest that (a) trust is conceptually distinct from social capital, (b) trust measures are inadequate proxies for actual personal social networks, and (c) trust measures may only be capturing psychological aspects relevant to-but not indicative of-social capital. Though links between perceived trust and health deserve study, health research on social capital needs to utilize measures of respondents' actual social networks and their inherent resources.

  18. New Superintendents: Trust, Networking, and Social Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, Joan; Mitchell, Roxanne M.; Richman, John A.

    2013-01-01

    This instrumental case study explored how five newly appointed superintendents identified key stakeholders and built trust and social capital with stakeholders in their districts. Stakeholder, trust, and social capital theory were the lenses that guided this study. We utilized a pragmatic research design and thematic data analysis to interpret our…

  19. New Superintendents: Trust, Networking, and Social Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, Joan; Mitchell, Roxanne M.; Richman, John A.

    2013-01-01

    This instrumental case study explored how five newly appointed superintendents identified key stakeholders and built trust and social capital with stakeholders in their districts. Stakeholder, trust, and social capital theory were the lenses that guided this study. We utilized a pragmatic research design and thematic data analysis to interpret our…

  20. Social capital and trust in providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Melissa M; Hendryx, Michael S

    2003-10-01

    Trust in providers has been in decline in recent decades. This study attempts to identify sources of trust in characteristics of health care systems and the wider community. The design is cross-sectional. Data are from (1) the 1996 Household Survey of the Community Tracking Study, drawn from 24 Metropolitan Statistical Areas; (2) a 1996 multi-city broadcast media marketing database including key social capital indicators; (3) Interstudy; (4) the American Hospital Association; and (5) the American Medical Association. Independent variables include individual socio-demographic variables, HMO enrollment, community-level health sector variables, and social capital. The dependent variable is self-reported trust in physicians. Data are merged from the various sources and analyzed using SUDAAN. Subjects include adults in the Household Survey who responded to the items on trust in physicians (N=17,653). Trust in physicians is independently predicted by community social capital (p<0.001). Trust is also negatively related to HMO enrollment and to many individual characteristics. The effect of HMOs is not uniform across all communities. Social capital plays a role in how health care is perceived by citizens, and how health care is delivered by providers. Efforts to build trust and collaboration in a community may improve trust in physicians, health care quality, access, and preserve local health care control.

  1. Social Trust and the Growth of Schooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    The paper develops a simple model to exemplify how social trust might affect the growth of schooling through lowering transaction costs. In a sample of 52 countries, the paper thereafter provides empirical evidence that trust has indeed led to faster growth of schooling in the period 1960...

  2. Mining Trust Relationships from Online Social Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Zhang; Tong Yu

    2012-01-01

    With the growing popularity of online social network,trust plays a more and more important role in connecting people to each other.We rely on our personal trust to accept recommendations,to make purchase decisions and to select transaction partners in the online community.Therefore,how to obtain trust relationships through mining online social networks becomes an important research topic.There are several shortcomings of existing trust mining methods.First,trust is category-dependent.However,most of the methods overlook the category attribute of trust relationships,which leads to low accuracy in trust calculation.Second,since the data in online social networks cannot be understood and processed by machines directly,traditional mining methods require much human effort and are not easily applied to other applications.To solve the above problems,we propose a semantic-based trust reasoning mechanism to mine trust relationships from online social networks automatically.We emphasize the category attribute of pairwise relationships and utilize Semantic Web technologies to build a domain ontology for data communication and knowledge sharing.We exploit role-based and behavior-based reasoning functions to infer implicit trust relationships and category-specific trust relationships.We make use of path expressions to extend reasoning rules so that the mining process can be done directly without much human effort.We perform experiments on real-life data extracted from Epinions.The experimental results verify the effectiveness and wide application use of our proposed method.

  3. Regulatory focus and generalized trust: the impact of prevention-focused self-regulation on trusting others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Johannes; Mayo, Ruth; Greifeneder, Rainer; Pfattheicher, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The current research suggests that taking self-regulatory mechanisms into account provides insights regarding individuals' responses to threats in social interactions. In general, based on the notion that a prevention-focused orientation of self-regulation is associated with a need for security and a vigilant tendency to avoid losses and other types of negative events we advocate that a prevention-focused orientation, both as a disposition as well as a situationally induced state, lowers generalized trust, thus hindering cooperation within social interactions that entail threats. Specifically, we found that the more individuals' habitual self-regulatory orientation is dominated by a prevention focus, the less likely they are to score high on a self-report measure of generalized trust (Study 1), and to express trust in a trust game paradigm as manifested in lower sums of transferred money (Studies 2 and 3). Similar findings were found when prevention focus was situationally manipulated (Study 4). Finally, one possible factor underlying the impact of prevention-focused self-regulation on generalized trust was demonstrated as individuals with a special sensitivity to negative information were significantly affected by a subtle prevention focus manipulation (versus control condition) in that they reacted with reduced trust in the trust game (Study 5). In sum, the current findings document the crucial relevance of self-regulatory orientations as conceptualized in regulatory focus theory regarding generalized trust and responses to threats within a social interaction. The theoretical and applied implications of the findings are discussed.

  4. Social trust aspects of rural electrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-10-01

    This report is a contribution to a growing body of work which acknowledges the importance of social considerations in the electricity industry, and provides an electricity industry perspective on the role of social trust, which is closely related to concepts such as social responsibility, corporate governance and corporate stewardship. The report provides a full explanation of the concept of social trust, defines its components (competence, commitment, consistency, fairness, respect, caring and empathy) and makes suggestions as to how each of these components could be implemented in a variety of settings and situations such as facility planning, construction and operation, risk management and customer relations.

  5. Social Trust, Quality of Government and Ethnic Diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charron, Nicholas; Rothstein, Bo

    , the quanti-tative field has focused overwhelmingly at the national level of analysis, mostly ignoring sub-national variation in trust, or focusing on single countries. We fill that gap in this study, which of-fers the largest and most comprehensive sub-national assessment of this salient question to date......, including 206 regions in 24 European countries using data from an original survey of over 85,000 respondents conducted in 2013. Upon mapping national and regional levels of social trust based on our novel data, we find strong variation in levels of generalized trust within many countries, a phe...

  6. Trust in social actors and attitudes towards genetically modified organisms in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmen Erjavec

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article tries to fulfil the research gap left by the fact that no study to date has examined how trust in social actors affects attitudes towards genetically modified organisms (GMOs. Therefore, two key hypotheses were posited: a trust in social actors is a more important factor of attitudes towards GMOs than knowledge about GMOs; and b trust in certain social actors is a more important factor than trust in other social actors. Telephone survey data of adult Slovenians were used. The analyses show that: a general trust in social actors has a positive effect on attitudes towards GMOs; b trust in various social actors has different effects; and c trust in social actors has a stronger effect on attitudes towards GMOs than knowledge about GMOs.

  7. Social Trust and the Growth of Schooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The paper develops a simple model to examine how social trust might affect the growth of schooling through lowering transaction costs associated with employing educated individuals. In a sample of 52 countries, the paper thereafter provides empirical evidence that trust has led to faster growth...... of schooling in the period 1960-2000. The findings are robust to the inclusion of a set of control variables and being estimated using an instrumental variables approach....

  8. Modelling Users` Trust in Online Social Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iacob Cătoiu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies (McKnight, Lankton and Tripp, 2011; Liao, Lui and Chen, 2011 have shown the crucial role of trust when choosing to disclose sensitive information online. This is the case of online social networks users, who must disclose a certain amount of personal data in order to gain access to these online services. Taking into account privacy calculus model and the risk/benefit ratio, we propose a model of users’ trust in online social networks with four variables. We have adapted metrics for the purpose of our study and we have assessed their reliability and validity. We use a Partial Least Squares (PLS based structural equation modelling analysis, which validated all our initial assumptions, indicating that our three predictors (privacy concerns, perceived benefits and perceived risks explain 48% of the variation of users’ trust in online social networks, the resulting variable of our study. We also discuss the implications and further research opportunities of our study.

  9. Do Institutions or Culture Determine the Level of Social Trust?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nannestad, Peter; Svendsen, Gert Tinggard; Dinesen, Peter Thisted;

    2014-01-01

    hand, the migrants' level of social trust is determined by their culture, it should not be affected by a different institutional setting. Furthermore, culturally diverse immigrant groups should have different levels of social trust in the same host country. Analysing migration from several non......Do institutions or culture determine levels of social trust in society? If quality of institutions determines levels of social trust, migrants from countries with lower-quality institutions should enhance their level of social trust in countries with higher-quality institutions. If, on the other......-western countries to Denmark, this paper demonstrates that institutions rather than culture matter for social trust....

  10. Capturing Trust in Social Web Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donovan, John

    The Social Web constitutes a shift in information flow from the traditional Web. Previously, content was provided by the owners of a website, for consumption by the end-user. Nowadays, these websites are being replaced by Social Web applications which are frameworks for the publication of user-provided content. Traditionally, Web content could be `trusted' to some extent based on the site it originated from. Algorithms such as Google's PageRank were (and still are) used to compute the importance of a website, based on analysis of underlying link topology. In the Social Web, analysis of link topology merely tells us about the importance of the information framework which hosts the content. Consumers of information still need to know about the importance/reliability of the content they are reading, and therefore about the reliability of the producers of that content. Research into trust and reputation of the producers of information in the Social Web is still very much in its infancy. Every day, people are forced to make trusting decisions about strangers on the Web based on a very limited amount of information. For example, purchasing a product from an eBay seller with a `reputation' of 99%, downloading a file from a peer-to-peer application such as Bit-Torrent, or allowing Amazon.com tell you what products you will like. Even something as simple as reading comments on a Web-blog requires the consumer to make a trusting decision about the quality of that information. In all of these example cases, and indeed throughout the Social Web, there is a pressing demand for increased information upon which we can make trusting decisions. This chapter examines the diversity of sources from which trust information can be harnessed within Social Web applications and discusses a high level classification of those sources. Three different techniques for harnessing and using trust from a range of sources are presented. These techniques are deployed in two sample Social Web

  11. Social Trust Aware Item Recommendation for Implicit Feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭磊; 马军; 姜浩然; 陈竹敏; 邢长明

    2015-01-01

    Social trust aware recommender systems have been well studied in recent years. However, most of existing methods focus on the recommendation scenarios where users can provide explicit feedback to items. But in most cases, the feedback is not explicit but implicit. Moreover, most of trust aware methods assume the trust relationships among users are single and homogeneous, whereas trust as a social concept is intrinsically multi-faceted and heterogeneous. Simply exploiting the raw values of trust relations cannot get satisfactory results. Based on the above observations, we propose to learn a trust aware personalized ranking method with multi-faceted trust relations for implicit feedback. Specifically, we first introduce the social trust assumption — a user’s taste is close to the neighbors he/she trusts — into the Bayesian Personalized Ranking model. To explore the impact of users’ multi-faceted trust relations, we further propose a category-sensitive random walk method CRWR to infer the true trust value on each trust link. Finally, we arrive at our trust strength aware item recommendation method SocialBPRCRWR by replacing the raw binary trust matrix with the derived real-valued trust strength. Data analysis and experimental results on two real-world datasets demonstrate the existence of social trust influence and the effectiveness of our social based ranking method SocialBPRCRWR in terms of AUC (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve).

  12. Parenting Practices and the Development of Adolescents' Social Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray-Lake, Laura; Flanagan, Constance A.

    2012-01-01

    Social trust (ST) (i.e., beliefs that people are generally fair and trustworthy) is a critical disposition for democratic governance. Yet there has been scant research on its developmental foundations. We assess factors related to ST in 11-18 year olds with survey data collected over two years from 1150 U.S. adolescents and their mothers.…

  13. Trust Model for Social Network using Singular Value Decomposition

    OpenAIRE

    Davis Bundi Ntwiga; Patrick Weke; Michael Kiura Kirumbu

    2016-01-01

    For effective interactions to take place in a social network, trust is important. We model trust of agents using the peer to peer reputation ratings in the network that forms a real valued matrix. Singular value decomposition discounts the reputation ratings to estimate the trust levels as trust is the subjective probability of future expectations based on current reputation ratings. Reputation and trust are closely related and singular value decomposition can estimate trust using the...

  14. Immigrants, Trust, and Social Traps

    OpenAIRE

    Marini, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    The paper estimates a social interactions model to study the impact of culture on US immigrants' decisions. The paper contributes to the literature as follows. It first estimates a social interactions model of peer effects that models both group formation and the formation of social interactions. In addition, because it is an observational learning model, policy suggestions may be drawn to favor integration of immigrants. Finally, it provides a new empirical strategy to study the impact of bo...

  15. An Analysis of the Relationship between Media Consumption and Level of Social Trust among Students of the University of Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyad Javad Emamjomehzadeh

    2014-05-01

    The results of the study show that there is a positive and meaningful correlation between media consumption and social trust, in the sense that social media and social trust are 0/74 % correlated at the significant level of 0/50. Our findings indicate that there is not a significant correlation between basic, interpersonal and generalized trust with electronic media consumption. But the use of electronic media and other dimensions of social trust, namely, political trust, and trust in general are meaningfully correlated. The relationship between other forms of median namely, printed, visual, and audio media with social trust is also meaningful. Finally, the results indicate that the higher the level of media consumption among the student, the higher the level of social trust among them.

  16. Managing Trust in Online Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiyan, Touhid; Josang, Audun; Xu, Yue

    In recent years, there is a dramatic growth in number and popularity of online social networks. There are many networks available with more than 100 million registered users such as Facebook, MySpace, QZone, Windows Live Spaces etc. People may connect, discover and share by using these online social networks. The exponential growth of online communities in the area of social networks attracts the attention of the researchers about the importance of managing trust in online environment. Users of the online social networks may share their experiences and opinions within the networks about an item which may be a product or service. The user faces the problem of evaluating trust in a service or service provider before making a choice. Recommendations may be received through a chain of friends network, so the problem for the user is to be able to evaluate various types of trust opinions and recommendations. This opinion or recommendation has a great influence to choose to use or enjoy the item by the other user of the community. Collaborative filtering system is the most popular method in recommender system. The task in collaborative filtering is to predict the utility of items to a particular user based on a database of user rates from a sample or population of other users. Because of the different taste of different people, they rate differently according to their subjective taste. If two people rate a set of items similarly, they share similar tastes. In the recommender system, this information is used to recommend items that one participant likes, to other persons in the same cluster. But the collaborative filtering system performs poor when there is insufficient previous common rating available between users; commonly known as cost start problem. To overcome the cold start problem and with the dramatic growth of online social networks, trust based approach to recommendation has emerged. This approach assumes a trust network among users and makes recommendations

  17. A context-sensitive trust model for online social networking

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Danny, MN

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In Social Networking Sites (SNSs), users tend to accept friend requests and share their personal information based on intuitive trust levels. Mistakenly trusting and sharing private information with malicious users may lead to a wide variety...

  18. Does Religiosity Promote or Discourage Social Trust? Evidence from Cross-Country and Cross-State Comparisons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian; Berggren, Niclas

    We look at the effect of religiosity on social trust, defined as the share of a population that thinks that people in general can be trusted. This is important since social trust is related to many desired outcomes, such as growth, education, democratic stability and subjective well-being...

  19. TRUST AND DISTRUST: TWO NECESSARY FACTORS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SOCIAL TRUST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RODRIGO YÁÑEZ GALLARDO

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent investigations argue that distrust is the absence of trust and it would be assumed that bothattitudes are independent; that would allow to distinguish between the naïve attitude and the wise attitudein the trust. It has been built a scale to measure the disposition to trust and the relationship has beenexamined among naïve and wise attitude when trusting. The sample was constituted by 575 universitystudents of both sexes, of four faculties and of different years of study. Through a factorial analysis itwas found that trust and distrust correspond to different factors. It was discussed the importance ofincrease an optimal trust in order to develop social abilities and to stimulate the social participation. Itwas questioned the validity of traditional surveys that measure the social trust.

  20. Do Reputation Systems Undermine Trust? Divergent Effects of Enforcement Type on Generalized Trust and Trustworthiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Ko

    2015-03-01

    Research shows that enforcing cooperation using contracts or tangible sanctions can backfire, undermining people's intrinsic motivation to cooperate: when the enforcement is removed, people are less trusting or trustworthy than when there is no enforcement to begin with. The author examines whether reputation systems have similar consequences for generalized trust and trustworthiness. Using a web-based experiment simulating online market transactions (studies 1 and 2), he shows that reputation systems can reinforce generalized trust and trustworthiness, unlike contractual enforcement or relational enforcement based on repeated interactions. In a survey experiment (study 3), he finds that recalling their eBay feedback scores made participants more trusting and trustworthy. These results are predicated on the diffuse nature of reputational enforcement to reinforce perceptions of trust and trustworthiness. These results have implications for understanding how different forms of governance affect generalized trust and trustworthiness.

  1. USER-CENTRIC PERSONALIZED MULTIFACET MODEL TRUST IN ONLINE SOCIAL NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Ban Chieng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Online Social Network (OSN has become the most popular platform on the Internet that can provide an interesting and creative ways to communicate, sharing and meets with peoples. As OSNs mature, issues regarding proper use of OSNs are also growing. In this research, the challenges of online social networks have been investigated. The current issues in some of the Social Network Sites are being studied and compared. Cyber criminals, malware attacks, physical threat, security and usability and some privacy issues have been recognized as the challenges of the current social networking sites. Trust concerns have been raised and the trustworthiness of social networking sites has been questioned. Currently, the trust in social networks is using the single- faceted approach, which is not well personalized, and doesn’t account for the subjective views of trust, according to each user, but only the general trust believes of a group of population. The trust level towards a person cannot be calculated and trust is lack of personalization. From our initial survey, we had found that most people can share their information without any doubts on OSN but they normally do not trust all their friends equally and think there is a need of trust management. We had found mixed opinions in relation to the proposed rating feature in OSNs too. By adopting the idea of multi-faceted trust model, a user-centric model that can personalize the comments/photos in social network with user’s customized traits of trust is proposed. This model can probably solve many of the trust issues towards the social networking sites with personalized trust features, in order to keep the postings on social sites confidential and integrity.

  2. Collective Trust: A Social Indicator of Instructional Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Curt M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to test the validity of using collective trust as a social indicator of instructional capacity. Design/methodology/approach: A hypothesized model was advanced for the empirical investigation. Collective trust was specified as a latent construct with observable indicators being principal trust in faculty (PTF),…

  3. Implicit vs. Explicit Trust in Social Matrix Factorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fazeli, Soude; Loni, Babak; Bellogin, Alejandro; Drachsler, Hendrik; Sloep, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Incorporating social trust in Matrix Factorization (MF) methods demonstrably improves accuracy of rating prediction. Such approaches mainly use the trust scores explicitly expressed by users. However, it is often challenging to have users provide explicit trust scores of each other. There exist quit

  4. Trust in Nanotechnology? On Trust as Analytical Tool in Social Research on Emerging Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Am, Trond Grønli

    2011-04-01

    Trust has become an important aspect of evaluating the relationship between lay public and technology implementation. Experiences have shown that a focus on trust provides a richer understanding of reasons for backlashes of technology in society than a mere focus of public understanding of risks and science communication. Therefore, trust is also widely used as a key concept for understanding and predicting trust or distrust in emerging technologies. But whereas trust broadens the scope for understanding established technologies with well-defined questions and controversies, it easily fails to do so with emerging technologies, where there are no shared questions, a lack of public familiarity with the technology in question, and a restricted understanding amongst social researchers as to where distrust is likely to arise and how and under which form the technology will actually be implemented. Rather contrary, 'trust' might sometimes even direct social research into fixed structures that makes it even more difficult for social research to provide socially robust knowledge. This article therefore suggests that if trust is to maintain its important role in evaluating emerging technologies, the approach has to be widened and initially focus not on people's motivations for trust, but rather the object of trust it self, as to predicting how and where distrust might appear, how the object is established as an object of trust, and how it is established in relation with the public.

  5. How do we trust strangers? The neural correlates of decision making and outcome evaluation of generalized trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiwen; Zhang, Zhen; Jing, Yiming; Valadez, Emilio A; Simons, Robert F

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates the brain correlates of decision making and outcome evaluation of generalized trust (i.e. trust in unfamiliar social agents)-a core component of social capital which facilitates civic cooperation and economic exchange. We measured 18 (9 male) Chinese participants' event-related potentials while they played the role of the trustor in a one-shot trust game with unspecified social agents (trustees) allegedly selected from a large representative sample. At the decision-making phase, greater N2 amplitudes were found for trustors' distrusting decisions compared to trusting decisions, which may reflect greater cognitive control exerted to distrust. Source localization identified the precentral gyrus as one possible neuronal generator of this N2 component. At the outcome evaluation phase, principal components analysis revealed that the so called feedback-related negativity was in fact driven by a reward positivity, which was greater in response to gain feedback compared to loss feedback. This reduced reward positivity following loss feedback may indicate that the absence of reward for trusting decisions was unexpected by the trustor. In addition, we found preliminary evidence suggesting that the decision-making processes may differ between high trustors and low trustors. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Toward a Trust Evaluation Mechanism in the Social Internet of Things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Nguyen Binh; Lee, Hyunwoo; Askwith, Bob; Lee, Gyu Myoung

    2017-06-09

    In the blooming era of the Internet of Things (IoT), trust has been accepted as a vital factor for provisioning secure, reliable, seamless communications and services. However, a large number of challenges still remain unsolved due to the ambiguity of the concept of trust as well as the variety of divergent trust models in different contexts. In this research, we augment the trust concept, the trust definition and provide a general conceptual model in the context of the Social IoT (SIoT) environment by breaking down all attributes influencing trust. Then, we propose a trust evaluation model called REK, comprised of the triad of trust indicators (TIs) Reputation, Experience and Knowledge. The REK model covers multi-dimensional aspects of trust by incorporating heterogeneous information from direct observation (as Knowledge TI), personal experiences (as Experience TI) to global opinions (as Reputation TI). The associated evaluation models for the three TIs are also proposed and provisioned. We then come up with an aggregation mechanism for deriving trust values as the final outcome of the REK evaluation model. We believe this article offers better understandings on trust as well as provides several prospective approaches for the trust evaluation in the SIoT environment.

  7. Toward a Trust Evaluation Mechanism in the Social Internet of Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Binh Truong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the blooming era of the Internet of Things (IoT, trust has been accepted as a vital factor for provisioning secure, reliable, seamless communications and services. However, a large number of challenges still remain unsolved due to the ambiguity of the concept of trust as well as the variety of divergent trust models in different contexts. In this research, we augment the trust concept, the trust definition and provide a general conceptual model in the context of the Social IoT (SIoT environment by breaking down all attributes influencing trust. Then, we propose a trust evaluation model called REK, comprised of the triad of trust indicators (TIs Reputation, Experience and Knowledge. The REK model covers multi-dimensional aspects of trust by incorporating heterogeneous information from direct observation (as Knowledge TI, personal experiences (as Experience TI to global opinions (as Reputation TI. The associated evaluation models for the three TIs are also proposed and provisioned. We then come up with an aggregation mechanism for deriving trust values as the final outcome of the REK evaluation model. We believe this article offers better understandings on trust as well as provides several prospective approaches for the trust evaluation in the SIoT environment.

  8. Toward a Trust Evaluation Mechanism in the Social Internet of Things

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Nguyen Binh; Lee, Hyunwoo; Askwith, Bob; Lee, Gyu Myoung

    2017-01-01

    In the blooming era of the Internet of Things (IoT), trust has been accepted as a vital factor for provisioning secure, reliable, seamless communications and services. However, a large number of challenges still remain unsolved due to the ambiguity of the concept of trust as well as the variety of divergent trust models in different contexts. In this research, we augment the trust concept, the trust definition and provide a general conceptual model in the context of the Social IoT (SIoT) environment by breaking down all attributes influencing trust. Then, we propose a trust evaluation model called REK, comprised of the triad of trust indicators (TIs) Reputation, Experience and Knowledge. The REK model covers multi-dimensional aspects of trust by incorporating heterogeneous information from direct observation (as Knowledge TI), personal experiences (as Experience TI) to global opinions (as Reputation TI). The associated evaluation models for the three TIs are also proposed and provisioned. We then come up with an aggregation mechanism for deriving trust values as the final outcome of the REK evaluation model. We believe this article offers better understandings on trust as well as provides several prospective approaches for the trust evaluation in the SIoT environment. PMID:28598401

  9. A ROBUST TRUST REGION ALGORITHM FOR SOLVING GENERAL NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-wei Liu; Ya-xiang Yuan

    2001-01-01

    The trust region approach has been extended to solving nonlinear constrained optimization. Most of these extensions consider only equality constraints and require strong global regularity assumptions. In this paper, a trust region algorithm for solving general nonlinear programming is presented, which solves an unconstrained piecewise quadratic trust region subproblem and a quadratic programming trust region subproblem at each iteration. A new technique for updating the penalty parameter is introduced. Under very mild conditions, the global convergence results are proved. Some local convergence results are also proved. Preliminary numerical results are also reported.

  10. How Does Social Trust Lead to Better Governance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    2010-01-01

    and bureaucrats. After outlining some simple theory, the findings suggest that the association reflects a causal influence of both types of trust on institutions of economic-judicial governance while electoral institutions are not associated with social trust. Assessed at the sample mean, the value of social......This paper explores questions related to the association between social trust and governance. In particular, the paper explores whether the trust-governance association is mainly a reflection of political responsiveness to the demands of the electorate or of the supply of honest politicians...

  11. Getting to know you: a longitudinal examination of trust cues and trust development during socialization

    OpenAIRE

    van der Werff, Lisa; Buckley, Finian

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent theoretical advances, the pattern of trust development between coworkers has yet to receive focused longitudinal attention. Furthermore, current theory suggests that employees attend to an array of independent trust cues in any given situation but fails to identify which cues are important when. In a four wave longitudinal field study we demonstrate how new coworker intentions to engage in trust behaviors (reliance and disclosure) evolve during employee socialization, and exami...

  12. Trying to trust: Brain activity during interpersonal social attitude change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filkowski, Megan M; Anderson, Ian W; Haas, Brian W

    2016-04-01

    Interpersonal trust and distrust are important components of human social interaction. Although several studies have shown that brain function is associated with either trusting or distrusting others, very little is known regarding brain function during the control of social attitudes, including trust and distrust. This study was designed to investigate the neural mechanisms involved when people attempt to control their attitudes of trust or distrust toward another person. We used a novel control-of-attitudes fMRI task, which involved explicit instructions to control attitudes of interpersonal trust and distrust. Control of trust or distrust was operationally defined as changes in trustworthiness evaluations of neutral faces before and after the control-of-attitudes fMRI task. Overall, participants (n = 60) evaluated faces paired with the distrust instruction as being less trustworthy than faces paired with the trust instruction following the control-of-distrust task. Within the brain, both the control-of-trust and control-of-distrust conditions were associated with increased temporoparietal junction, precuneus (PrC), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), and medial prefrontal cortex activity. Individual differences in the control of trust were associated with PrC activity, and individual differences in the control of distrust were associated with IFG activity. Together, these findings identify a brain network involved in the explicit control of distrust and trust and indicate that the PrC and IFG may serve to consolidate interpersonal social attitudes.

  13. Fostering interpersonal trust on social media: physicians' perspectives and experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panahi, Sirous; Watson, Jason; Partridge, Helen

    2016-02-01

    The problem of developing and sustaining mutual trust is one of the main barriers to knowledge sharing on social media platforms such as blogs, wikis, micro-blogs and social networking websites. While many studies argue that mutual trust is necessary for online communication and knowledge sharing, few have actually explored and demonstrated how physicians can establish and sustain trusted relationships on social media. To identify approaches through which physicians establish interpersonal trust on social media. Twenty-four physicians, who were active users of social media, were interviewed using a semi-structured approach between 2013 and 2014. Snowball sampling was employed for participant recruitment. The data were analysed using a thematic analysis approach. Physicians trust their peers on social media in a slightly different way than in face-to-face communication. The study found that the majority of participants established trust on social media mainly through previous personal interaction, authenticity and relevancy of voice, professional standing, consistency of communication, peer recommendation, and non-anonymous and moderated sites. Healthcare professionals need to approach social media carefully when using it for knowledge sharing, networking and developing trusted relations with like-minded peers. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. Do Corruption and Social Trust affect Economic Growth? A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serritzlew, Søren; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2014-01-01

    Two separate literatures suggest that corruption and social trust, respectively, are related to economic growth, although the strengths of the relationships, and the direction of causality, are still debated. In this paper, we review these literatures and evaluate the evidence for causal effects...... of corruption and trust on economic growth, and discuss how corruption and trust are interrelated. The reviews show that absence of corruption and high levels of social trust foster economic growth. The literatures also indicate that corruption has a causal effect on social trust, while the opposite effect...... is more uncertain. In the conclusion, we offer the suggestion that fighting corruption may yield a “double dividend”, as reduced corruption is likely to have both direct and indirect effects on growth....

  15. Do Corruption and Social Trust affect Economic Growth? A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serritzlew, Søren; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2014-01-01

    Two separate literatures suggest that corruption and social trust, respectively, are related to economic growth, although the strengths of the relationships, and the direction of causality, are still debated. In this paper, we review these literatures and evaluate the evidence for causal effects...... of corruption and trust on economic growth, and discuss how corruption and trust are interrelated. The reviews show that absence of corruption and high levels of social trust foster economic growth. The literatures also indicate that corruption has a causal effect on social trust, while the opposite effect...... is more uncertain. In the conclusion, we offer the suggestion that fighting corruption may yield a “double dividend”, as reduced corruption is likely to have both direct and indirect effects on growth....

  16. On Propagating Interpersonal Trust in Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Cai-Nicolas

    The age of information glut has fostered the proliferation of data and documents on the Web, created by man and machine alike. Hence, there is an enormous wealth of minable knowledge that is yet to be extracted, in particular, on the Semantic Web. However, besides understanding information stated by subjects, knowing about their credibility becomes equally crucial. Hence, trust and trust metrics, conceived as computational means to evaluate trust relationships between individuals, come into play. Our major contribution to Semantic Web trust management through this work is twofold. First, we introduce a classification scheme for trust metrics along various axes and discuss advantages and drawbacks of existing approaches for Semantic Web scenarios. Hereby, we devise an advocacy for local group trust metrics, guiding us to the second part, which presents Appleseed, our novel proposal for local group trust computation. Compelling in its simplicity, Appleseed borrows many ideas from spreading activation models in psychology and relates their concepts to trust evaluation in an intuitive fashion. Moreover, we provide extensions for the Appleseed nucleus that make our trust metric handle distrust statements.

  17. Social identity patterns and trust in demographically diverse work teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, Karen; Vos, Menno; Luijters, Kyra

    The article presents a model that links trust in a demographically diverse work context to three different social-identity patterns. Trust is considered to be beneficial for interpersonal relationships and work outcomes in diverse teams as well as for a healthy work relationship between minority

  18. Social identity patterns and trust in demographically diverse work teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, Karen; Vos, Menno; Luijters, Kyra

    2009-01-01

    The article presents a model that links trust in a demographically diverse work context to three different social-identity patterns. Trust is considered to be beneficial for interpersonal relationships and work outcomes in diverse teams as well as for a healthy work relationship between minority mem

  19. Historical Roots of Generalized Trust in Polish Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borowiecki Łukasz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses how historical events shape generalized trust in contemporary Polish society. The analysis consists of a set of logistic regression models. The impact of historical variables is controlled for age, sex, education and the size of the municipality. This is the first quantitative study on Poland that links historical events with the current levels of trust among Polish citizens. The common knowledge is that the Partitions of Poland had negative impact on trust. Literature on the topic hints that historical demo? graphics should play a role too. The findings suggest that Partitions had little impact with only Greater Poland and Pomerania having lower levels of generalized trust. Historical literacy rate and the presence of Ukrainian or Belarusian population are negatively associated with generalized trust while the abrupt migrations after the World War I are positively associated. The rapid character of migration is supposed to positively impact generalized trust by forcing individuals to cooperate and rely on people with whom they have no personal ties.

  20. IRLT: Integrating Reputation and Local Trust for Trustworthy Service Recommendation in Service-Oriented Social Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiquan Liu

    Full Text Available With the prevalence of Social Networks (SNs and services, plenty of trust models for Trustworthy Service Recommendation (TSR in Service-oriented SNs (S-SNs have been proposed. The reputation-based schemes usually do not contain user preferences and are vulnerable to unfair rating attacks. Meanwhile, the local trust-based schemes generally have low reliability or even fail to work when the trust path is too long or does not exist. Thus it is beneficial to integrate them for TSR in S-SNs. This work improves the state-of-the-art Combining Global and Local Trust (CGLT scheme and proposes a novel Integrating Reputation and Local Trust (IRLT model which mainly includes four modules, namely Service Recommendation Interface (SRI module, Local Trust-based Trust Evaluation (LTTE module, Reputation-based Trust Evaluation (RTE module and Aggregation Trust Evaluation (ATE module. Besides, a synthetic S-SN based on the famous Advogato dataset is deployed and the well-known Discount Cumulative Gain (DCG metric is employed to measure the service recommendation performance of our IRLT model with comparing to that of the excellent CGLT model. The results illustrate that our IRLT model is slightly superior to the CGLT model in honest environment and significantly outperforms the CGLT model in terms of the robustness against unfair rating attacks.

  1. Ethnic diversity and generalized trust in Europe: a cross-national multilevel study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Hooghe; T. Reeskens; D. Stolle; A. Trappers

    2009-01-01

    While most current research documents a negative relation between ethnic diversity and generalized trust, it has to be acknowledged that these results often originate from one-country analyses in North America. In this article, attitudinal measurements from the European Social Survey are combined wi

  2. Social Cultural Dynamics of Trust, Influence and Persuasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-06

    behavioral, social , political, anthropological and computer sciences. Further search using online tools including Google Scholar and Web of Science provided...globally distributed researchers from across the behavioral, social , political, anthropological and computer sciences. Further search using online...Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 28-May-2014 to 27-Nov-14 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE (144083) Social Cultural Dynamics of Trust, Influence and

  3. Functional neuroimaging of mentalizing during the trust game in social anxiety disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripada, Chandra Sehkar; Angstadt, Mike; Banks, Sarah; Nathan, Pradeep J.; Liberzon, Israel; Luan Phan, K.

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with generalized social anxiety disorder tend to make overly negative and distorted predictions about social events, which enhance perceptions of threat and contribute to excessive anxiety in social situations. Here, we coupled functional magnetic resonance imaging and a multiround economic exchange game (‘trust game’) to probe mentalizing, the social-cognitive ability to attribute mental states to others. Relative to interactions with a computer, those with human partners (‘mentalizing’) elicited less activation of medial prefrontal cortex in generalized social anxiety patients compared with matched healthy control participants. Diminished medial prefrontal cortex function may play a role in the social-cognitive pathophysiology of social anxiety. PMID:19521264

  4. Relationship between Trust and Social Consensus among Citizens of 20 Years Old and Above in Gonbadekavoos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Khoshfar

    2014-05-01

    The results of the descriptive findings shows that social consensus average is 3.07 in a 0-5 scale, which means it is average to up, and trust average is 2.70, a little bit below the average point (3. Different dimensions of trust, including personal, generalized and institutional each have the averages of 3.20, 2.10 and 2.89 respectively, and the average for mediating variable, national identity, is 3.53. 59% of the sample are men and 70% of them are in the age group of 20-39 years old. More than two third of the sample are born in city areas and about 75% them are married. More than two third of the participants are working and about 68% of them own a house. About 43% of the sample are Fars, about 41% are Turkmen and the rest are Turk (9/1%, Sistani (2/9%, Baluch (1/8 % and 1/5% belonged to other ethnic backgrounds. The analysis indicates that there is a significant relationship between trust and social consensus and this is a moderate relationship (R=0/41. With regard to the amount of k-Square coefficient, the trust variable can predict about 17% of the changes of the dependent variable, social consensus. Institutional trust has the most impact alone on social consensus. It alone predicted 17% of the changes of social consensus and generalized trust explained only 0/7% of these changes. National identity as a mediating variable predicted about 40% of the changes of social consensus. The results of multiple regression analysis shows that a moderate correlation (R2=0/248 exists between independent and dependent variables. The results showed that relationship between trust and social consensus among the Fars is stronger compared to other ethnic groups.

  5. Computational intelligent methods for trusting in social networks

    OpenAIRE

    Nuñez González, José David

    2016-01-01

    104 p. This Thesis covers three research lines of Social Networks. The first proposed reseach line is related with Trust. Different ways of feature extraction are proposed for Trust Prediction comparing results with classic methods. The problem of bad balanced datasets is covered in this work. The second proposed reseach line is related with Recommendation Systems. Two experiments are proposed in this work. The first experiment is about recipe generation with a bread machine. The second ex...

  6. Institutional and social trust: Is there a causal relationship?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    for the same individuals surveyed at multiple points in time over a long time-span (up to 18 years) to address the potentially endogenous and/or spurious relationship. Using individual fixed effects and cross-lagged panel models (i.e. models including lagged dependent and lagged independent variables...... as regressors), the results provide strong evidence of trust in state institutions exercising an impact on social trust whereas the evidence for a reverse relationship is mixed....

  7. Trust, cooperation, and equality: a psychological analysis of the formation of social capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzolino, Philip J

    2011-06-01

    Research suggests that in modern Western culture there is a positive relationship between the equality of resources and the formation of trust and cooperation, two psychological components of social capital. Two studies elucidate the psychological processes underlying that relationship. Study 1 experimentally tested the influence of resource distributions on the formation of trust and intentions to cooperate; individuals receiving a deficit of resources and a surplus of resources evidenced lower levels of social capital (i.e., trust and cooperation) than did individuals receiving equal amounts. Analyses revealed the process was affective for deficit participants and cognitive for surplus participants. Study 2 provided suggestive support for the affective-model of equality and social capital using proxy variables in the 1996 General Social Survey data set. Results suggest support for a causal path of unequal resource distributions generating affective experiences and cognitive concerns of justice, which mediate disengagement and distrust of others.

  8. Trust, but verify: social media models for disaster management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Amisha M; Bruns, Axel; Newton, Judith

    2017-07-01

    A lack of trust in the information exchanged via social media may significantly hinder decisionmaking by community members and emergency services during disasters. The need for timely information at such times, though, challenges traditional ways of establishing trust. This paper, building on a multi-year research project that combined social media data analysis and participant observation within an emergency management organisation and in-depth engagement with stakeholders across the sector, pinpoints and examines assumptions governing trust and trusting relationships in social media disaster management. It assesses three models for using social media in disaster management-information gathering, quasi-journalistic verification, and crowdsourcing-in relation to the guardianship of trust to highlight the verification process for content and source and to identify the role of power and responsibilities. The conclusions contain important implications for emergency management organisations seeking to enhance their mechanisms for incorporating user-generated information from social media sources in their disaster response efforts. © 2017 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2017.

  9. The Puzzle of the Scandinavian Welfare State and Social Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gunnar Lind Haase; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2015-01-01

    The Scandinavian welfare model is a puzzle to economists: It works economically, even though free-riding should prevail with its explosive cocktail of high taxation and high social benefits. One overlooked solution to the puzzle could be the unique stock of social trust present in Scandinavia. Here...

  10. Does social trust at school affect students' smoking and drinking behavior in Japan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, Minoru

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the individual and contextual effects of cognitive social capital at school on cigarette smoking and alcohol drinking in Japanese high school students. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to 3248 students in grades 10-12 (aged 15-18 years) at 29 public high schools across Okinawa, Japan in 2008. The individual-level cognitive social capital studied was generalized trust. Using multi-level logistic regression models, the effects of individual- and contextual-level cognitive social capital on smoking and drinking were analyzed. Contextual-level cognitive social capital was measured on the basis of aggregated individual responses to the trust question at school level. After adjustment for the covariates, individual-level trust was negatively associated with smoking and drinking among boys and girls. Similarly, after adjustment for the covariates, school-level trust showed an inverse association with smoking for girls. A similar but not statistically significant association was observed for boys. On the other hand, school-level trust was not associated with drinking among boys or girls. After adjustment for individual-level trust and the covariates, these findings were in the same direction, but the school-level trust for girls no longer had a significant contextual effect on smoking. The findings suggest evidence of the individual effect of cognitive social capital on adolescents' smoking and drinking, and that the contextual effect of social capital on smoking was inconclusive. In addition, no association of contextual-level social capital with drinking was observed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Developmental Patterns of Social Trust between Early and Late Adolescence: Age and School Climate Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Constance A.; Stout, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Social trust (i.e., belief that people are generally fair and trustworthy) is important to the functioning of democracies, and trend studies show it has declined. We test hypotheses concerning the development of these beliefs in adolescence. Based on surveys of 1,535 adolescents collected over 2 years, we find that middle and late adolescents had…

  12. Ethnic diversity of the micro-context and generalized trust: Evidence from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    to scrutinize how the relationship varies according to the contextual unit in which ethnic diversity is measured. We analyze the question about the impact of ethnic diversity on trust using Danish data from the European Social Survey, which are linked with data from the national Danish registers. The latter......The question about how ethnic diversity affects generalized trust has been a hot topic in recent years. To this point, within-country analyses of this question have been limited by only having data on contextual ethnic diversity at relatively high levels of aggregation. Consequently, the previous...... analyses suffer from the problem that aggregate contextual diversity likely conceals substantial variation in the ethnic diversity actually experienced at the micro-level in which people live and interact, thereby rendering the estimate of ethnic diversity on trust both imprecise and potentially biased...

  13. Ethnic diversity of the micro-context and generalized trust: Evidence from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    to scrutinize how the relationship varies according to the contextual unit in which ethnic diversity is measured. We analyze the question about the impact of ethnic diversity on trust using Danish data from the European Social Survey, which are linked with data from the national Danish registers. The latter......The question about how ethnic diversity affects generalized trust has been a hot topic in recent years. To this point, within-country analyses of this question have been limited by only having data on contextual ethnic diversity at relatively high levels of aggregation. Consequently, the previous...... analyses suffer from the problem that aggregate contextual diversity likely conceals substantial variation in the ethnic diversity actually experienced at the micro-level in which people live and interact, thereby rendering the estimate of ethnic diversity on trust both imprecise and potentially biased...

  14. Trust, Social Capital and the Scandinavian Welfare State

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gunnar Lind Haase; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    personality is characterized both by cooperation in everyday life and the numerous ‘hard-riders’ who make extraordinary contributions. Applying Bourdieuconomics, the authors focus on contemporary case studies to explain how social capital and trust are used to counteract free-riding and enable the flight...

  15. The Survival of the Nordic Welfare State and Social Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Urs Steiner; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2010-01-01

    Why does free riding not escalate in the universal Nordic welfare state? How is it possible to maintain such a cooperative equilibrium where most people tend to cooperate? Our model suggests that the "missing link" is the accumulated stock of cooperation norms in terms of social trust. Arguably...

  16. Social Trust, Safety and the Choice of Tourist Destination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Susanne; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2016-01-01

    Does social trust influence safety and tourists’ destination choice? Our claim is that the roots of safety may take two forms: either formal institutions or informal institutions. Formal institutions concern how society can build up control mechanisms through the legal system, police authority...

  17. The Survival of the Nordic Welfare State and Social Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Urs Steiner; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2010-01-01

    Why does free riding not escalate in the universal Nordic welfare state? How is it possible to maintain such a cooperative equilibrium where most people tend to cooperate? Our model suggests that the "missing link" is the accumulated stock of cooperation norms in terms of social trust. Arguably...

  18. A Trust-based Social Recommender for Teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fazeli, Soude; Drachsler, Hendrik; Brouns, Francis; Sloep, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Fazeli, S., Drachsler, H., Brouns, F., & Sloep, P. B. (2012, 18-19 September). A Trust-based Social Recommender for Teachers. Presentation at the workshop on RecSysTEL in conjunction with the 7th European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning (EC-TEL 2012), Saarbrucken, Germany.

  19. A trust-based social recommender for teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fazeli, Soude; Drachsler, Hendrik; Brouns, Francis; Sloep, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Fazeli, S., Drachsler, H., Brouns, F., & Sloep, P. B. (2012). A trust-based social recommender for teachers. In N. Manouselis, H. Drachsler, K. Verbert, & O. C. Santos (Eds.), 2nd Workshop on Recommender Systems for Technology Enhanced Learning (RecSysTEL 2012) in conjunction with the 7th European C

  20. A trust-based social recommender for teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fazeli, Soude; Drachsler, Hendrik; Brouns, Francis; Sloep, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Fazeli, S., Drachsler, H., Brouns, F., & Sloep, P. B. (2012, 18-19 September). A trust-based social recommender for teachers. Paper presented at Doctoral Consortium at the 7th European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning (EC-TEL 2012), Saarbrücken, Germany.

  1. Generating private recommendations in a social trust network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkin, Z.; Veugen, P.J.M.; Lagendijk, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    Recommender systems have become increasingly important in e-commerce as they can guide customers with finding personalized services and products. A variant of recommender systems that generates recommendations from a set of trusted people is recently getting more attention in social networks. Howeve

  2. Simulated trust: a cheap social learning strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderelst, Dieter; Ahn, René M C; Barakova, Emilia I

    2009-11-01

    Animals use heuristic strategies to determine from which conspecifics to learn socially. This leads to directed social learning. Directed social learning protects them from copying non-adaptive information. So far, the strategies of animals, leading to directed social learning, are assumed to rely on (possibly indirect) inferences about the demonstrator's success. As an alternative to this assumption, we propose a strategy that only uses self-established estimates of the pay-offs of behavior. We evaluate the strategy in a number of agent-based simulations. Critically, the strategy's success is warranted by the inclusion of an incremental learning mechanism. Our findings point out new theoretical opportunities to regulate social learning for animals. More broadly, our simulations emphasize the need to include a realistic learning mechanism in game-theoretic studies of social learning strategies, and call for re-evaluation of previous findings.

  3. Critical trust : social movements and democracy in times of crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Della Porta, Donatella

    2012-01-01

    The recent financial crisis and, especially, anti-austerity policies, reflects and, at the same time, contribute to a crisis of representative democracy. In this article, I discuss which different conceptions of trust (and relations to democracy) have been debated in the social sciences, and in public debates in recent time. The financial crisis has in fact stimulated a hot debate on “whose trust” is relevant for “whose democracy”. After locating the role of trust in democratic theory, I cont...

  4. Measurement of social support, community and trust in dentistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Hanne; Pejtersen, Jan Hyld; Söderfeldt, Björn

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Relationships among people at work have previously been found to contribute to the perception of having a good work. The aim of the present paper was to develop scales measuring aspects of social support, trust, and community among dentists, and to evaluate psychometric......-rated health and a range of work satisfaction outcomes. RESULTS: The percentage of missing values on the items was low (range 0.7%-3.8%). Two scales (range 0-100) were established to measure 'Community with Trust'(nine items, mean = 79.2 [SD = 13.4], Cronbach's alpha = 0.89) and 'Collegial Support'(five items...

  5. Security and trust in online social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Carminati, Barbara; Viviani, Marco; Viviani, Marco; Carminati, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The enormous success and diffusion that online social networks (OSNs) are encountering nowadays is vastly apparent. Users' social interactions now occur using online social media as communication channels; personal information and activities are easily exchanged both for recreational and business purposes in order to obtain social or economic advantages. In this scenario, OSNs are considered critical applications with respect to the security of users and their resources, for their characteristics alone: the large amount of personal information they manage, big economic upturn connected to thei

  6. College Education and Social Trust: An Evidence-Based Study on the Causal Mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Jian |a Jian Huang; den Brink, Henrieette Maassen |a Henrieette Maassen den Brink; Groot, Wim |a Wim Groot

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the influence of college education on social trust at the individual level. Based on the literature of trust and social trust, we hypothesize that life experience/development since adulthood and perceptions of cultural/social structures are two primary channels in the causal link

  7. Trust in social computing. The case of peer-to-peer file sharing networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Xu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Social computing and online communities are changing the fundamental way people share information and communicate with each other. Social computing focuses on how users may have more autonomy to express their ideas and participate in social exchanges in various ways, one of which may be peer-to-peer (P2P file sharing. Given the greater risk of opportunistic behavior by malicious or criminal communities in P2P networks, it is crucial to understand the factors that affect individual’s use of P2P file sharing software. In this paper, we develop and empirically test a research model that includes trust beliefs and perceived risks as two major antecedent beliefs to the usage intention. Six trust antecedents are assessed including knowledge-based trust, cognitive trust, and both organizational and peer-network factors of institutional trust. Our preliminary results show general support for the model and offer some important implications for software vendors in P2P sharing industry and regulatory bodies.

  8. Improved Recommendations Based on Trust Relationships in Social Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Tian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to alleviate the pressure of information overload and enhance consumer satisfaction, personalization recommendation has become increasingly popular in recent years. As a result, various approaches for recommendation have been proposed in the past few years. However, traditional recommendation methods are still troubled with typical issues such as cold start, sparsity, and low accuracy. To address these problems, this paper proposed an improved recommendation method based on trust relationships in social networks to improve the performance of recommendations. In particular, we define trust relationship afresh and consider several representative factors in the formalization of trust relationships. To verify the proposed approach comprehensively, this paper conducted experiments in three ways. The experimental results show that our proposed approach leads to a substantial increase in prediction accuracy and is very helpful in dealing with cold start and sparsity.

  9. African migrant patients' trust in Chinese physicians: a social ecological approach to understanding patient-physician trust.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan M McLaughlin

    Full Text Available Patient trust in physicians is a critical determinant of health seeking behaviors, medication adherence, and health outcomes. A crisis of interpersonal trust exists in China, extending throughout multiple social spheres, including the healthcare system. At the same time, with increased migration from Africa to China in the last two decades, Chinese physicians must establish mutual trust with an increasingly diverse patient population. We undertook a qualitative study to identify factors affecting African migrants' trust in Chinese physicians and to identify potential mechanisms for promoting trust.We conducted semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 40 African migrants in Guangzhou, China. A modified version of the social ecological model was used as a theoretical framework. At the patient-physician level, interpersonal treatment, technical competence, perceived commitment and motive, and language concordance were associated with enhanced trust. At the health system level, two primary factors influenced African migrants' trust in their physicians: the fee-for-service payment system and lack of continuity with any one physician. Patients' social networks and the broader socio-cultural context of interactions between African migrants and Chinese locals also influenced patients' trust of their physicians.These findings demonstrate the importance of factors beyond the immediate patient-physician interaction and suggest opportunities to promote trust through health system interventions.

  10. The Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility Information Richness on Trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafeah Mat Saat

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR is a concept that describes the relationship between company  and society. The way a company portrays corporate ethics and social initiatives can evoke strong positive reactions among consumers. The emergence of Internet creates a new communicating culture and gives an idea for a company to deliver their CSR message. Applying Media Richness Theory (MRT in CSR message is believed could facilitate trust among consumer. Thus, this study aims to examine the impact of different level of CSR information richness with consumers trust towards the company. This study divides trust into three components that are competence, benevolence and integrity. An experimental design consisting of different levels of CSR information is selected (rich CSR information, lean CSR information and no CSR information as a control condition. The finding shows that rich CSR information has impacted on competence and integrity but not on benevolence. Result from this study is believed can assist companies in setting up their CSR communicating strategy in engaging consumers’ trust.

  11. Estimating the social trust and influencing factors on it in the centers of cities of Chaharmahal-va-Bachtyari province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Ketabi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract   In this study, considering the most important viewpoints of classic and Social trust is considered as the most important component of social capital and of the most important concepts in sociology. Varying social structure and general changes in various social, economical, and political domains of modern society and resulted problems has made this concept very attracted, but this doesn’t mean that the classic thinkers haven’t paid attention to it. By gaining importance in modern society, the social trust took a special place for policy makers, planners, and authorities so that it was paid attention in the economical, social project of development of the country to estimating the social capital and in turn social trust. Accordingly, knowing trust rate and its most influencing and relevant factors in Chaharmahal-va-Bachtyari province this study was performed to answer this question: at what rate is the social trust in the centers of the province? And what are its most influencing and relevant factors? contemporary theoreticians such as Durkhim, Weber, Toonis, Putnam, Bourdieu, Fukuyama, Giddens, Erickson, Offe, and indoors and outdoor researches, it was separated various trust such as interpersonal, institutional, public, organizational, political and trust to jobs and stands as subdivisions of social trust and they were estimated by survey method with a sample of 612 individuals in 6 cities of the province, then it was case-studied their relations with the varriables of security feeling, religious beliefs, government performance, legalism, assumption of religiosity and piety, and ethical values. The sample volume was selected by Cochran formula after preliminary test and calculating p,q and sampled by stratified method and then the data was gathered. The results showed that the trust rate is at the middle and lower than that in all above mentioned subdivisions, unless the interpersonal and institutional trust. And the varriables

  12. A Study of the Relationship between Feeling of Security and Social Trust among Citizens of Kermanshah City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Yari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionFeeling of security is an important and essential concept for social welfare. In other words, welfare is meaningless without feeling of security. It contributes to a strong potential for growth and excellence at both individual and national levels. Also, feeling of security is influenced by several factors, one of which is social trust. The necessity of forming social bonds among individuals and therefor in their interactions bespeaks of the importance of social trust among individuals. Trust is a central concept in classical sociological theory and modern theories of social capital. It is considered to be the main axis of social interactions and relationships. Since social trust is the precondition of any effective social interaction and can lead to decrease in abnormal behavior, it brings peace and mental security. In such circumstances, community members will be encouraged to work for community’s well-being, including economic development, political and social participation. Feeling of security is provided when trust exists in security agencies, government, schools, the economy, the family, network of friends, etc. Thus making trust in others is seen as a good element to provide feeling of security. According to what was said, this study intends to examine the relationship between social trust and feeling of security among citizens of Kermanshah. Materials and MethodsThis is a survey research. Social trust is considered to have three dimensions: interpersonal trust, generalized trust and institutional trust. Likewise, feeling of security is considered to have four dimensions including, feeling of public safety, feeling of economic security, feeling of justice security, and feeling of political security. We used a standard questionnaire, Mac Ellis (1995, with some modifications to suit it with the conditions of our research population in order to assess interpersonal trust. A researcher- made questionnaire was used to collect

  13. Representing Trust in Cognitive Social Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    that are not linear. Real communications within social networks transmit by taking multiple routes and therefore it is likely that important pieces...Grooming, gossip , and the evolution of language. London, UK: Faber Limited. Dutt, V. (2011). Explaining human behavior in dynamic tasks through

  14. E-Voting and the Creation of Trust for the Socially Marginalized Citizens in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Rodrigues Filho

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs have been implemented in a quite intensive way in both developed and developing countries. In the discourse of the New Public Management (NPM, the principal role of ICT is to improve the delivery of public services to citizens and the distrust of public administration. In responding to distrust and the challenges facing the simplistic technological determinism discourse of ICTs in general and ICT for development in particular, building on areas of trust associated with economic development seems to have been emphasized. On the other hand, despite the influence of institutions in the design and use of ICTs as a compelling enabler of change mentioned in the theory of social shaping and the ideas of citizens’ orientation, where technological artifacts are social constructions, it seems to be evident that these institutions can reinforce the same technological determinism and trust. In this paper an attempt is made to show that the use of a technology like e-voting in Brazil has not contributed to improve political participation and the delivery of public services, despite the attempt to promote and create trust in e-voting. With a more critical view of trust, an attempt is made to show how institutions and technology are enmeshed in a structure of vested interests in the public sector in such a way that a fabricated trust is created smoothly.

  15. E-Voting and the Creation of Trust for the Socially Marginalized Citizens in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Rodrigues Filho

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs have been implemented in a quite intensive way in both developed and developing countries. In the discourse of the New Public Management (NPM, the principal role of ICT is to improve the delivery of public services to citizens and the distrust of public administration. In responding to distrust and the challenges facing the simplistic technological determinism discourse of ICTs in general and ICT for development in particular, building on areas of trust associated with economic development seems to have been emphasized. On the other hand, despite the influence of institutions in the design and use of ICTs as a compelling enabler of change mentioned in the theory of social shaping and the ideas of citizens’ orientation, where technological artifacts are social constructions, it seems to be evident that these institutions can reinforce the same technological determinism and trust. In this paper an attempt is made to show that the use of a technology like e-voting in Brazil has not contributed to improve political participation and the delivery of public services, despite the attempt to promote and create trust in e-voting. With a more critical view of trust, an attempt is made to show how institutions and technology are enmeshed in a structure of vested interests in the public sector in such a way that a fabricated trust is created smoothly.

  16. Moral dilemmas in professions of public trust and the assumptions of ethics of social consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubiel-Zielińska Paulina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to show the possibility of applying assumptions from ethics of social consequences when making decisions about actions, as well as in situations of moral dilemmas, by persons performing occupations of public trust on a daily basis. Reasoning in the article is analytical and synthetic. Article begins with an explanation of the basic concepts of “profession” and “the profession of public trust” and a manifestation of the difference between these terms. This is followed by a general description of professions of public trust. The area and definition of moral dilemmas is emphasized. Furthermore, representatives of professions belonging to them are listed. After a brief characterization of axiological foundations and the main assumptions of ethics of social consequences, actions according to Vasil Gluchman and Włodzimierz Galewicz are discussed and actions in line with ethics of social consequences are transferred to the practical domain. The article points out that actions in professional life are obligatory, impermissible, permissible, supererogatory and unmarked in the moral dimension. In the final part of the article an afterthought is included on how to solve moral dilemmas when in the position of a representative of the profession of public trust. The article concludes with a summary report containing the conclusions that stem from ethics of social consequences for professions of public trust, followed by short examples.

  17. A Geographic Information System (GIS-Based Analysis of Social Capital Data: Landscape Factors That Correlate with Trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Rahimi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The field of community sociology has yielded rich insights on how neighborhoods and individuals foster social capital and reap the benefits of interpersonal relationships and institutions alike. Traditionally, institutions and cultural factors have been lauded as catalysts of community social life and cohesion. Yet, the built environment and configuration of the landscape, including infrastructure, amenities and population density, may also contribute to community social capital. In this article, we embedded zip code-level responses from Harvard University’s Saguaro Seminar’s 2006 Social Capital Community Benchmark Survey with a geographic information system. Specifically, we correlated responses on residents’ general trust, trust of one’s neighbors, and trust of members of other racial groups with local urban environmental factors and infrastructural indicators such as housing and street conditions, land use, city form, amenity access (e.g., libraries and schools, home vacancy rates, and home value. We conducted these tests at the national level and for Rochester, NY, due to its many survey responses. We found that housing vacancies drive down levels of social trust, as captured by homeownership rates and tenure, yielding higher levels of social trust, and that certain urban facilities correlate with high trust among neighbors. Results can inform urban planners on the amenities that support sustainable community ties.

  18. ENLACE Social Inclusion Trust Fund: Social Inclusion Survey: Staff Perceptions on Social Inclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Mary S. Thompson

    2007-01-01

    This paper is intended to contribute to the promotion of social inclusion as a cross-cutting priority in the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), a key issue in the Bank's Renewed Strategic Framework, as a key approach to reducing poverty and inequality in Latin America. It is based upon a staff opinion survey, designed and implemented under the framework of the IDB-UK ENLACE Social Inclusion Trust Fund, to assess how staff view social inclusion as an operational approach. The results of th...

  19. ENLACE Social Inclusion Trust Fund: Social Inclusion Survey: Staff Perceptions on Social Inclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Mary S. Thompson

    2007-01-01

    This paper is intended to contribute to the promotion of social inclusion as a cross-cutting priority in the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), a key issue in the Bank's Renewed Strategic Framework, as a key approach to reducing poverty and inequality in Latin America. It is based upon a staff opinion survey, designed and implemented under the framework of the IDB-UK ENLACE Social Inclusion Trust Fund, to assess how staff view social inclusion as an operational approach. The results of th...

  20. Bridge the Gap: Measuring and Analyzing Technical Data for Social Trust between Smartphones

    CERN Document Server

    Trapp, Sebastian; Schiller, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Mobiles are nowadays the most relevant communication devices in terms of quantity and flexibility. Like in most MANETs ad-hoc communication between two mobile phones requires mutual trust between the devices. A new way of establishing this trust conducts social trust from technically measurable data (e.g., interaction logs). To explore the relation between social and technical trust, we conduct a large-scale survey with more than 217 Android users and analyze their anonymized call and message logs. We show that a reliable a priori trust value for a mobile system can be derived from common social communication metrics.

  1. The impact of generalized and institutional trust on donating to activist, leisure, and interest organizations: Individual and contextual effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, A.B.; Gesthuizen, M.J.W.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we answer the question as to what extent donating to activist, interest, and leisure organizations is affected by both individual and national levels of generalized and institutional trust. We use the European Social Survey 2002 to estimate multilevel random intercept models, based on

  2. AN ANALYZING OF SOCIAL TRUST IN THE TABRIZ METROPOLITAN AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Zali

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The social capital consists of two fundamental components. Relations and links, norms and trust that facilitate group activities, relations and social networks as components of social capital has been evaluated in Tabriz city. This research has been conducted with descriptive and analytical approach in survey. The statistical society of this research was citizens of Tabriz city and the information has been gathered via face to face referring to homes by cluster sampling. In this research four components like accumulating social relations, symmetrical relations, supporting relations and mediation relations as main components of quality of social relations and structure of relations has been analyzed. The results of this study show that the relational stable degree is low in Tabriz city and accumulating the social relation as one of indices of relational stability has got better status in comparison to other indices. Also based on results of this research the social relations in Tabriz city have got very low adaptability degree. At the end of article according to importance of social capital in social development it has been referred to its role in advancement of programs of social development.

  3. AN ANALYZING OF SOCIAL TRUST IN THE TABRIZ METROPOLITAN AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Zali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The social capital consists of two fundamental components. Relations and links, norms and trust that facilitate group activities, relations and social networks as components of social capital has been evaluated in Tabriz city. This research has been conducted with descriptive and analytical approach in survey. The statistical society of this research was citizens of Tabriz city and the information has been gathered via face to face referring to homes by cluster sampling. In this research four components like accumulating social relations, symmetrical relations, supporting relations and mediation relations as main components of quality of social relations and structure of relations has been analyzed. The results of this study show that the relational stable degree is low in Tabriz city and accumulating the social relation as one of indices of relational stability has got better status in comparison to other indices. Also based on results of this research the social relations in Tabriz city have got very low adaptability degree. At the end of article according to importance of social capital in social development it has been referred to its role in advancement of programs of social development.

  4. Utopia Providing Trusted Social Network Relationships within an Un-trusted Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauvin, William; Liu, Benyuan; Fu, Xinwen; Wang, Jie

    This paper introduces an unobtrusive method and distributed solution set to aid users of on-line social networking sites, by creating a trusted environment in which every member has the ability to identify each other within their private social network by name, gender, age, location, and the specific usage patterns adopted by the group. Utopia protects members by understanding how the social network is created and the specific aspects of the group that make it unique and identifiable. The main focus of Utopia is the protection of the group, and their privacy within a social network from predators and spammers that characteristically do not fit within the well defined usage boundaries of the social network as a whole. The solution set provides defensive, as well as offensive tools to identify these threats. Once identified, client desktop tools are used to prevent these predators from further interaction within the group. In addition, offensive tools are used to determine the origin of the predator to allow actions to be taken by automated tools and law enforcement to alleviate the threat.

  5. Trust and Mindreading in Adolescents: The Moderating Role of Social Value Orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey eDerks

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In adolescence, aspects of cognition that are required to deal with complex cooperation situations, such as mentalising and social value orientation, are still in development. In the Trust Game, cooperation may lead to better outcomes for both players, but can also lead to exploitation by the trustee. In the present study, we explore how mindreading, a crucial aspect of mentalising, and social value orientation (whether someone is prosocial or proself are related to trust. In a group of 217 students (51% girls, Mage = 15.1 social value orientation, mindreading and trust (using the Trust Game were measured. The result show that social value orientation moderates the relation between mindreading and trust. In the group of prosocials, we find no correlation between mindreading and trust. In the group of proselfs, mindreading is negatively correlated to trust, indicating that proselfs use their mentalising skills to assess that the trustee is likely to exploit them.

  6. Networking for conservation: social capital and perceptions of organizational success among land trust boards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana B. Ruseva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available As an important component in collaborative natural resource management and nonprofit governance, social capital is expected to be related to variations in the performance of land trusts. Land trusts are charitable organizations that work to conserve private land locally, regionally, or nationally. The purpose of this paper is to identify the level of structural and cognitive social capital among local land trusts, and how these two types of social capital relate to the perceived success of land trusts. The analysis integrates data for land trusts operating in the U.S. south-central Appalachian region, which includes western North Carolina, southwest Virginia, and east Tennessee. We use factor analysis to elicit different dimensions of cognitive social capital, including cooperation among board members, shared values, common norms, and communication effectiveness. Measures of structural social capital include the size and diversity of organizational networks of both land trusts and their board members. Finally, a hierarchical linear regression model is employed to estimate how cognitive and structural social capital measures, along with other organizational and individual-level attributes, relate to perceptions of land trust success, defined here as achievement of the land trusts' mission, conservation, and financial goals. Results show that the diversity of organizational partnerships, cooperation, and shared values among land trust board members are associated with higher levels of perceived success. Organizational capacity, land trust accreditation, volunteerism, and financial support are also important factors influencing perceptions of success among local, nonprofit land trusts.

  7. Is Trust Really Social Capital? Knowledge Sharing in Product Development Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Marloes; Leenders, Roger Th. A. J.; Gabbay, Shaul M.; Kratzer, Jan; Van Engelen, Jo M. L.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to focus on the role of trust in knowledge sharing. Social capital researchers have put forward trust as an important force behind the sharing of knowledge. This study aims to investigate whether trust indeed explains knowledge sharing relationships, or whether there are in fact much more important drivers…

  8. From Subjective Trust to Objective Trustworthiness in On-line Social Networks: Overview and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Zejda

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays dozens of people share their content in the current Web 2.0 space, talk with friends in social networking sites such as Facebook and live on the Net in many other ways. They do all this quite naturally, forgetting the healthy cautiousness sometimes. In real life we rely on trusted people. Do we know how to reflect real-world trust mechanisms into on-line social software? In the article we focused to bring overview on state of the art in main ideas behind a trust processing in online social networking systems. What are common sources of subjective trust, how the trust emerges and what are the sources of trust dynamics? How can be trust captured into the systems, how can be explicit trust processed to infer indirect trust, the trust between users who do not know each other? And what are the ways to infer objective metrics of trust, the reputation or trustworthiness? Finally, we point out selected challenges related to the trust in current highly dynamic social networks.

  9. A blessing and a curse? Political institutions in the growth and decay of generalized trust: a cross-national panel analysis, 1980-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Blaine G

    2012-01-01

    Despite decades of research on social capital, studies that explore the relationship between political institutions and generalized trust-a key element of social capital-across time are sparse. To address this issue, we use various cross-national public-opinion data sets including the World Values Survey and employ pooled time-series OLS regression and fixed- and random-effects estimation techniques on an unbalanced panel of 74 countries and 248 observations spread over a 29-year time period. With these data and methods, we investigate the impact of five political-institutional factors-legal property rights, market regulations, labor market regulations, universality of socioeconomic provisions, and power-sharing capacity-on generalized trust. We find that generalized trust increases monotonically with the quality of property rights institutions, that labor market regulations increase generalized trust, and that power-sharing capacity of the state decreases generalized trust. While generalized trust increases as the government regulation of credit, business, and economic markets decreases and as the universality of socioeconomic provisions increases, both effects appear to be more sensitive to the countries included and the modeling techniques employed than the other political-institutional factors. In short, we find that political institutions simultaneously promote and undermine generalized trust.

  10. Trust, social capital and democracy: a complex joint for development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Ganga Contreras

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Lately, it has been seen progress in Latin America, mainly from an economic perspective. Currently, it has been conducted research aimed at sustaining the growth, but focused on the country's development, which can be converted into social capital. Democracy becomes a key factor on this challenge and thus confidence in individuals and institutions. In this sense, the central purpose of this paper is to analyze the most relevant aspects of trust, social capital and its impact on democracy and development. To achieve these objectives, it is primarily used secondary sources of information, which involved review of articles addressing this issue. The conclusion is that a society that aspires the development should coordinate institutions to solve the society’s problems and demands, so that society responds with appropriate confidence levels.

  11. Cooperation makes beliefs: Weather variation and sources of social trust in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Anh Duc Dang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, I investigate the origins of social trust within Vietnam. By combining a unique contemporary survey of households with historical data on weather variation, I show that individuals who are heavily threatened by negative weather fluctuation exhibit more trust in neighbours and others within their close group. The evidence indicates that the effects of weather variation on social trust are transmitted through strengthening the cooperation among village peasants as they cope with ...

  12. Evolution of trust and trustworthiness: social awareness favours personality differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, John M; Stephens, Philip A; Dall, Sasha R X; Houston, Alasdair I

    2009-02-22

    Interest in the evolution and maintenance of personality is burgeoning. Individuals of diverse animal species differ in their aggressiveness, fearfulness, sociability and activity. Strong trade-offs, mutation-selection balance, spatio-temporal fluctuations in selection, frequency dependence and good-genes mate choice are invoked to explain heritable personality variation, yet for continuous behavioural traits, it remains unclear which selective force is likely to maintain distinct polymorphisms. Using a model of trust and cooperation, we show how allowing individuals to monitor each other's cooperative tendencies, at a cost, can select for heritable polymorphisms in trustworthiness. This variation, in turn, favours costly 'social awareness' in some individuals. Feedback of this sort can explain the individual differences in trust and trustworthiness so often documented by economists in experimental public goods games across a range of cultures. Our work adds to growing evidence that evolutionary game theorists can no longer afford to ignore the importance of real world inter-individual variation in their models.

  13. Talking about the boss : effects of generalized and interpersonal trust on workplace gossip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellwardt, L.; Wittek, R.P.M.; Wielers, R.J.J.

    2012-01-01

    This study developed and tested a relational theory of positive and negative gossip about managers. It is argued that spreading information about managers depends on trust in organizations, more specifically the employees' generalized and interpersonal trust in managers and colleagues. Hypotheses we

  14. Trust in Legal Institutions: an Empirical Approach from a Social Capital Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Zuleta Ferrari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, there is a growing public perception that some of the democratic institutions and frameworks, which were once taken for granted, are now showing their flaws, inefficiencies, increasingly struggling to keep up with society’s demands and expectations. This has led to a generalized feeling of uncertainty and disappointment, resulting in a lack of trust institutions. The implications of these circumstances on legal theory cannot be overlooked; this article aims to address the problem from an innovative perspective. A unique tool is presented in this article, which proposes a methodological agenda for approaching trust in legal institutions, from the perspective of the social capital theory. To this end, different variables and social capital dynamics will be identified and discussed in relation to trust in legal institutions. The aim is to, on one hand, provide an innovative methodological contribution to better understand the trust crisis, and in particular, the public perception towards legal institutions, and on the other, expand the analysis of social capital dimensions. Durante las últimas décadas, ha sido posible observar una creciente percepción general de que instituciones y estructuras democráticas que años atrás eran dadas por sentadas, presentan, hoy en día, fallas e ineficiencias que dificultan su capacidad de acompañar las demandas y expectativas de la sociedad. Ello ha llevado a un estado generalizado de incertidumbre y decepción, que resulta en la falta de confianza en las instituciones. Las implicancias de estas circumstancias para la teoría legal no pueden ser subestimadas. Este artículo aborda el problema desde una pespectiva innovadora. Presenta una herramienta única que propone una agenda metodológica para aproximarse a la temática de la confianza en las instituciones legales, desde la perspectiva de la teoría del capital social. A este fin, distintas variables y dinámicas del capital

  15. Social capital, political trust and self-reported psychological health: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, Martin; Mohseni, Mohabbat

    2009-02-01

    This study investigates the association between political trust (an aspect of institutional trust) in the Riksdag (the national parliament in Sweden) and self-reported psychological health, taking generalized (horizontal) trust in other people into account. The 2004 public health survey in Skåne in Southern Sweden is a cross-sectional postal questionnaire study that was answered by 27,757 respondents aged 18-80 yielding a 59% response rate. A logistic regression model was used to investigate the associations between political trust and self-reported psychological health adjusting for possible confounders (age, country of origin, education, economic stress and generalized trust in other people i.e. horizontal trust). We found that 13.0% of the men and 18.9% of the women reported poor psychological health. A total of 17.3% and 11.6% of the male and female respondents, respectively, reported that they had no trust at all in the national parliament, and another 38.2% and 36.2%, respectively, reported that their political trust was not particularly high. Respondents in younger age groups, born abroad, with high education, high levels of economic stress, low horizontal trust and low political trust had significantly higher levels of self-reported poor psychological health. There was a significant association between low political trust and low horizontal trust. After adjustments for age, country of origin, education and economic stress, the inclusion of horizontal trust reduced the odds ratios of self-reported poor psychological health in the "no political trust at all" category compared to the "very high political trust" category from 1.6 to 1.4 among men and from 1.7 to 1.4 among women. It is concluded that low political trust in the Riksdag seems to be significantly and positively associated with poor mental health.

  16. Different goods, different effects: Exploring the roles of generalized trust in public goods provision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderskov, Kim

    This paper tests the hypothesis that generalized trust helps solve large-n collective action problems in a rationalistic framework. A rigors test is employed in that the hypothesis is tested in two different choice situations; a pure public good situation (whether to recycle or not) and a joint...... week positive effect on organic food consumption. Hence, generalized trust only affects public good provision when a collective action problem is present. The analyses thus sustain the hypothesis. It is furthermore concluded that the effect of generalized trust is due to strategic behavior...

  17. Characterizing Economic and Social Properties of Trust and Reputation Systems in P2P Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Feng Wang; Yoshiaki Hori; Kouichi Sakurai

    2008-01-01

    Considering the fact that P2P (Peer-to-Peer) systems are self-organized and autonomous, social-control mechanism (like trust and reputation) is essential to evaluate the trustworthiness of participating peers and to combat the selfish, dishonest and malicious peer behaviors. So, naturally, we advocate that P2P systems that gradually act as an important information infrastructure should be multi-disciplinary research topic, and reflect certain features of our society. So, from economic and social perspective, this paper designs the incentive-compatible reputation feedback scheme based on well-known economic model, and characterizes the social features of trust network in terms of efficiency and cost. Specifically, our framework has two distinctive purposes: first, from high-level perspective, we argue trust system is a special kind of social network, and an accurate characterization of the structural properties of the network can be of fundamental importance to understand the dynamics of the system. Thus, inspired by the concept of weighted small-world, this paper proposes new measurements to characterize the social properties of trust system, that is, highg lobal and local efficiency, and low cost; then, from relative low-level perspective, we argue that reputation feedback is a special kind of information, and it is not free. So, based on economic model, VCG (Vickrey-Clarke-Grove)-like reputation remuneration mechanism is proposed to stimulate rational peers not only to provide reputation feedback, but truthfully offer feedback. Furthermore, considering that trust and reputation is subjective, we classify the trust into functional trust and referral trust, and extend the referral trust to include two factors: similarity and truthfulness, which can efficiently reduce the trust inference error. The preliminary simulation results show the benefits of our proposal and the emergence of certain social properties in trust network.

  18. Social Interaction Behavior in ADHD in Adults in a Virtual Trust Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis, Stefanie; Baer, Nina; Franzen, Nele; Hagenhoff, Meike; Gerlach, Maika; Koppe, Georgia; Sammer, Gebhard; Gallhofer, Bernd; Kirsch, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Social cognitive functions in adults with ADHD were investigated in a virtual social exchange game. The sample consisted of 40 participants (20 adult ADHD participants, 20 healthy controls). Participants played a multiround trust game with virtual trustees who differed in regard to fairness and presence of emotional facial cues. Investments were higher in ADHD participants than in healthy participants except for partners who played fair with constant neutral expressions. ADHD patients did not adapt their behavior to the fairness of the trustee. In the presence of emotional facial cues, ADHD and healthy participants transferred more monetary units to happy rather than angry-looking trustees. Differences in investment behavior were not linked to deficits in emotion-recognition abilities or cognitive dysfunctions. Alterations in interaction behavior and in the formation of a general attitude toward social partners could be shown in adults with ADHD. © The Author(s) 2013.

  19. The social aspects of safety management: trust and safety climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, Gil

    2010-07-01

    This study tested the contribution of trust between leaders and subordinates to safety. It is suggested that leaders who create a relationship of trust with their subordinates are more likely to create a safe working environment, and to achieve higher and stronger safety-climate perceptions among their subordinates. Hence, trust should be negatively related to injuries and positively related to safety climate. Questionnaires distributed among 2524 soldiers in three army brigades tested for trust and safety-climate variables and were then crossed with injury rate according to medical records at the platoon level of analysis (N=105). Trust was found to be negatively related to injuries and positively related both to level and strength of safety climate. Furthermore, safety-climate level was found to mediate the relationship between trust and injury rates. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The impact of social media based brand communities on brand trust in tourism industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Khanlari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Building and maintaining brand trust has long been a major concern for marketers. One of the latest marketing concepts is social media based marketing. With the widespread use of social media, a group of marketers decided to make a linkage between social media and brand communities. In order to take advantage of both brand communities and social media, many firms are utilizing social media to develop brand communities. While offline brand communities had been sufficiently studied, few researches have been done about online brand communities, particularly the new phenomenon of “social media based brand community”. As brand communities are growing in popularity, both marketers and researchers must gain more insight on this phenomenon. This paper aims to determine the impact of social media based brand community on brand trust in tourism industry. For this purpose, we investigated Setareh Almas Hali Tour and Travel Agency as our case study. This is an applied research using descriptive-correlational survey method and structural equation modeling. From among the statistical population consisting of 100,000 people, 384 people were selected using Morgan table. Since some of the questionnaires were likely to be not completed, the total sample was 410. To perform the opinion poll, the questionnaire was placed in various social media within a specified time period. As the research model was supposed to be examined in social media, the data were collected through an online opinion poll in social media. Data collection tool was a multiple-choice questionnaire which enabled to assess the research variables. In general, the required data were collected using library and questionnaire methods. The validity and reliability of the questionnaire were established by Cronbach’s alpha coefficient method. According to the results, total validity for 27 items of the questionnaire was 90%. After collecting the questionnaires, we analyzed the data using LISREL

  1. A Cloud Theory-Based Trust Computing Model in Social Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengming Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available How to develop a trust management model and then to efficiently control and manage nodes is an important issue in the scope of social network security. In this paper, a trust management model based on a cloud model is proposed. The cloud model uses a specific computation operator to achieve the transformation from qualitative concepts to quantitative computation. Additionally, this can also be used to effectively express the fuzziness, randomness and the relationship between them of the subjective trust. The node trust is divided into reputation trust and transaction trust. In addition, evaluation methods are designed, respectively. Firstly, the two-dimension trust cloud evaluation model is designed based on node’s comprehensive and trading experience to determine the reputation trust. The expected value reflects the average trust status of nodes. Then, entropy and hyper-entropy are used to describe the uncertainty of trust. Secondly, the calculation methods of the proposed direct transaction trust and the recommendation transaction trust involve comprehensively computation of the transaction trust of each node. Then, the choosing strategies were designed for node to trade based on trust cloud. Finally, the results of a simulation experiment in P2P network file sharing on an experimental platform directly reflect the objectivity, accuracy and robustness of the proposed model, and could also effectively identify the malicious or unreliable service nodes in the system. In addition, this can be used to promote the service reliability of the nodes with high credibility, by which the stability of the whole network is improved.

  2. Social comparison-based thoughts in groups : Their associations with interpersonal trust and learning outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molleman, Eric; Nauta, Aukje; Buunk, Bram P.

    This study relates thoughts derived from 4 types of social comparison to trust and individual learning. Our study (N = 362 students) showed that upward identification (i.e., believing one is just as good as a better performing teammate) was positively related to trust and individual learning. Upward

  3. Towards a social media-based model of trust and its application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boertjes, E.M.; Gerrits, B.M.; Kooij, R.E.; Maanen, P.P. van; Raaijmakers, S.A.; Wit, J.J. de

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe the development of a model for measuring consumer trust in certain topics on the basis of social media. Specifically, we propose a model for trust that takes into account both textually expressed sentiment and source authority, and illustrate it on a specific case: the iClo

  4. Routes for Civic Engagement in Market Society:Relationlism-Espoused Trust or Generalized Trust%市场社会中社会参与的路径问题 关系信任还是普遍信任

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈福平

    2012-01-01

    已有研究多数认为市场经济、社会参与有助于普遍信任的建立,"关系"则阻碍这种信任的形成。基于CGSS2005数据,本文应用结构方程模型和多层次线性模型分析了市场经济、社会参与和关系信任对普遍信任的多重影响。研究表明:以亲属信任为核心的关系信任对普遍信任具有消极影响;当社会组织成员间信任仍是一种关系信任时,社会参与对普遍信任也呈现出消极作用;市场经济发展能够提高普遍信任,但同时推动了"关系"的使用,从而使得当代中国的市场经济与普遍信任间存在着相反的双向影响。因此,在经济建设中必须进一步推动社会参与。社会参与不仅仅要关注于组织的增长,也需要在制度层面上给予"跨关系"成员交往更多的支持。%In most studies,market economy and civic engagement are often considered helpful to the building of generalized trust,while"Guanxi" hinders trust formation.In contemporary China,when the development of the market economy is promoting the utilization of"Guanxi" and social participation is still expanding along relational routes,can such social participation produce generalized trust?With the CGSS2005 data,I used the structural equation modeling and multilevel linear modeling to analyze how multilevel interactions of market economy,civic engagement,and relationism-espoused trust impacted generalized trust.The core variables were operationalized as follows:Market economy was measured by the provincial marketization index and civic engagement was measured by the residents'participation frequencies in sports and exercising,cultural entertainment,social outings and education,and charity events.Relationism-espoused trust included three types:kinship-based trust,proximity-based trust(e.g.,trust for neighborhood),and people-based trust(e.g.,trust for fellow students,colleagues,and friends).The analysis yielded the

  5. Collective Student Trust: A Social Resource for Urban Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Curt M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if collective student trust functions as a resource for urban elementary students. Methods: Data from 1,646 students nested in 56 elementary schools in an urban school district were used to test the hypothesized effect of collective student trust on school identification, self-regulated…

  6. Adolescent trust and trustworthiness: role of gender and social value orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derks, Jeffrey; Lee, Nikki C; Krabbendam, Lydia

    2014-12-01

    Trusting others is an essential feature of adolescent development. The aim of this study was to investigate gender differences in trusting behavior using an experimental game and relate these to the underlying social preferences. 206 adolescents (Mage = 15.1 years, 51% girls) performed a series of one-shot Trust Games to measure their levels of trust and trustworthiness. Social value orientation, or the preference to maximize one's own outcomes (proself) or both the outcomes of self and other (prosocial) was assessed using the Triple Dominance Measure. Boys were more trusting than girls, but no gender differences on trustworthiness were found. Prosocials were more trusting and trustworthy than proselfs. In addition, gender and social value orientation were independent predictors of trust (but not trustworthiness). These findings show that the higher levels of trust in boys are not the result of a gender difference in prosocial orientation. Copyright © 2014 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of social media marketing on brand trust and brand loyalty for hotels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tatar, Şahika Burçin; Eren-Erdoğmuş, İrem

    2016-01-01

    .... Hotels, in this case, have made many efforts on branding to gain brand loyalty and brand trust from their customers and recently they have carried their efforts to social media to survive in online environment as well...

  8. Can we trust robots?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coeckelbergh, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Can we trust robots? Responding to the literature on trust and e-trust, this paper asks if the question of trust is applicable to robots, discusses different approaches to trust, and analyses some preconditions for trust. In the course of the paper a phenomenological-social approach to trust is arti

  9. Trust and social capital in the design and evolution of institutions for collective action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Six

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at developing an original account of trust in the framework of large scale, international collective action institutions. Our research question focuses on the desired structures and mechanisms that are necessary to sustain the trust needed to uphold the effective operation of institutions for collective action. Our theoretical framework for studying trust is based on the social capital theory. Social capital is defined as the features of social organization, such as trust, networks and norms that facilitate coordination and cooperation for mutual benefit. We claim that in different sectors and contexts stakeholders encounter difficulties in collaborating in setting up experimental institutions for collective action. In order to generate more collaboration, stakeholders need to create structures that incite actors to find the optimal way to sustain trust, to organizationally acknowledge and learn that process, and to nourish it with the precise normative idea behind the institutional apparatus. In the areas of plant genetic resources and biomedicine, stakeholders have encountered these difficulties while experimenting with different coordination mechanisms for dealing with the increased appropriation of knowledge through patents. Our two case studies in plant genetic resources and biomedicine reflect the idea that institutions must be understood as complex pragmatic connectors of trust, i.e. social matrices of collective action that sustain individual commitment, where routine and reflexivity drive trust-based coordination mechanisms in interaction with their environment. From this theoretical framework we derive some recommendations that could be useful in deciding on how to implement this idea.

  10. Inferring Trust Relationships in Web-Based Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    message is not distinguishable from other not-so-important mail in the inbox . This scenario is exactly the type of situation that TrustMail improves upon...client that uses variations on these algorithms to score email messages in the user’s inbox based on the user’s participation and ratings in a trust...can simply add a direct rating for that sender , downgrading the trust. That will not override anyone else’s direct ratings, but will be factored into

  11. How trust in institutions and organizations builds general consumer confidence in the safety of food: a decomposition of effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, J; van Trijp, J C M; van der Lans, I A; Renes, R J; Frewer, L J

    2008-09-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between general consumer confidence in the safety of food and consumer trust in institutions and organizations. More specifically, using a decompositional regression analysis approach, the extent to which the strength of the relationship between trust and general confidence is dependent upon a particular food chain actor (for example, food manufacturers) is assessed. In addition, the impact of specific subdimensions of trust, such as openness, on consumer confidence are analyzed, as well as interaction effects of actors and subdimensions of trust. The results confirm previous findings, which indicate that a higher level of trust is associated with a higher level of confidence. However, the results from the current study extend on previous findings by disentangling the effects that determine the strength of this relationship into specific components associated with the different actors, the different trust dimensions, and specific combinations of actors and trust dimensions. The results show that trust in food manufacturers influences general confidence more than trust in other food chain actors, and that care is the most important trust dimension. However, the contribution of a particular trust dimension in enhancing general confidence is actor-specific, suggesting that different actors should focus on different trust dimensions when the purpose is to enhance consumer confidence in food safety. Implications for the development of communication strategies that are designed to regain or maintain consumer confidence in the safety of food are discussed.

  12. Does Generalized (Dis)trust Travel? Examining the Impact of Cultural Heritage and Destination Country Environment on Trust of Immigrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Peter Thisted

    2012-01-01

    perspective predicts that trust of immigrants will change according to the environment of the destination country. This article examines how first-generation immigrants from three low-trust countries of origin (Turkey, Poland, and Italy) are affected by migrating to high-trust countries in Northern Europe......, which hold qualities conducive to trust. In contrast to earlier studies examining trust of immigrants, I build on one data set containing data on both migrants and nonmigrants from the same country of origin as well as on a wide range of relevant covariates of trust. Using the method of matching......, the results of the analysis lend most support to the experiential perspective on trust as the destination-country context has a massive impact on trust of immigrants, who display significantly higher levels of trust than comparable respondents in their country of origin. The results are robust to limiting...

  13. The Trust Project - Symbiotic Human Machine Teams: Social Cueing for Trust and Reliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-30

    Lee and Moray (1992) refer to somewhat analogous concepts of depth and surface cues, respectively. It is recognized, however, that increasingly...socioemotional instantiations (e.g., non- verbal cues, tone of voice, anthropomorphism, socioemotional dialog) in a novel HMT training paradigm. 10...Uses and Boundaries of the Analogy to Interpersonal Trust. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, 56: 303. DOI: 10.1177

  14. 26 CFR 1.661(a)-1 - Estates and trusts accumulating income or distributing corpus; general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... distributing corpus; general. 1.661(a)-1 Section 1.661(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Accumulate Income Or Which Distribute Corpus § 1.661(a)-1 Estates and trusts accumulating income or distributing corpus; general. Subpart C, part I, subchapter J, chapter 1 of the Code, is applicable to...

  15. Cooperation of general practitioners and occupational physicians: Identity, trust and responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, Noks; Grumbkow, Jasper von

    2009-01-01

    Our study shows that different social psychological mechanisms have a profound effect on the quality of the cooperation of GPs and OPs. Especially we found significant differences between the two professions in professional identity, relative position, dependency, trust and responsibility. There is

  16. Rumor Spreading Model with Trust Mechanism in Complex Social Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ya-Qi; YANG Xiao-Yuan; HAN Yi-Liang; WANG Xu-An

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,to study rumor spreading,we propose a novel susceptible-infected-removed (SIR) model by introducing the trust mechanism.We derive mean-field equations that describe the dynamics of the SIR model on homogeneous networks and inhomogeneous networks.Then a steady-state analysis is conducted to investigate the critical threshold and the final size of the rumor spreading.We show that the introduction of trust mechanism reduces the final rumor size and the velocity of rumor spreading,but increases the critical thresholds on both networks.Moreover,the trust mechanism not only greatly reduces the maximum rumor influence,but also postpones the rumor terminal time,which provides us with more time to take measures to control the rumor spreading.The theoretical results are confirmed by sufficient numerical simulations.

  17. Rethinking Diplomatic Transformation Through Social Theories of Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keating, Vincent Charles

    In the 2012 Martin Wight Memorial Lecture, Nicholas Wheeler explored how trust might be built between political leaders, drawing primarily on how the interpersonal relationship between Reagan and Gorbachev changed the diplomatic relationship between the United States and the Soviet Union....... This paper engages the theoretical and empirical claims made in this article, arguing that the focus on the interpersonal relationship obscures more potentially important dynamics of trust-building between states. It seeks to show how focusing on the interpersonal relationships alone not only cannot account...... for long-term trust building, but also how the focus on the interpersonal relationship creates a highly simplified narrative that fails to account for important structural conditions that transformed the diplomatic relationship. Contrary to the claim that 'trustworthiness belong[s] to the individual...

  18. A Sentiment Delivering Estimate Scheme Based on Trust Chain in Mobile Social Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meizi Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available User sentiment analysis has become a flourishing frontier in data mining mobile social network platform since the mobile social network plays a significant role in users’ daily communication and sentiment interaction. This study studies the scheme of sentiment estimate by using the users’ trustworthy relationships for evaluating sentiment delivering. First, we address an overview of sentiment delivering estimate scheme and propose its related definitions, that is, trust chain among users, sentiment semantics, and sentiment ontology. Second, this study proposes the trust chain model and its evaluation method, which is composed of evaluation of atomic, serial, parallel, and combined trust chains. Then, we propose sentiment modeling method by presenting its modeling rules. Further, we propose the sentiment delivering estimate scheme from two aspects: explicit and implicit sentiment delivering estimate schemes, based on trust chain and sentiment modeling method. Finally, examinations and results are given to further explain effectiveness and feasibility of our scheme.

  19. Modeling cascading failures with the crisis of trust in social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chengqi; Bao, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Jingchi; Xue, Yibo

    2015-10-01

    In social networks, some friends often post or disseminate malicious information, such as advertising messages, informal overseas purchasing messages, illegal messages, or rumors. Too much malicious information may cause a feeling of intense annoyance. When the feeling exceeds a certain threshold, it will lead social network users to distrust these friends, which we call the crisis of trust. The crisis of trust in social networks has already become a universal concern and an urgent unsolved problem. As a result of the crisis of trust, users will cut off their relationships with some of their untrustworthy friends. Once a few of these relationships are made unavailable, it is likely that other friends will decline trust, and a large portion of the social network will be influenced. The phenomenon in which the unavailability of a few relationships will trigger the failure of successive relationships is known as cascading failure dynamics. To our best knowledge, no one has formally proposed cascading failures dynamics with the crisis of trust in social networks. In this paper, we address this potential issue, quantify the trust between two users based on user similarity, and model the minimum tolerance with a nonlinear equation. Furthermore, we construct the processes of cascading failures dynamics by considering the unique features of social networks. Based on real social network datasets (Sina Weibo, Facebook and Twitter), we adopt two attack strategies (the highest trust attack (HT) and the lowest trust attack (LT)) to evaluate the proposed dynamics and to further analyze the changes of the topology, connectivity, cascading time and cascade effect under the above attacks. We numerically find that the sparse and inhomogeneous network structure in our cascading model can better improve the robustness of social networks than the dense and homogeneous structure. However, the network structure that seems like ripples is more vulnerable than the other two network

  20. Effects of mediated social touch on affective experiences and trust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, S.M.; Toet, A.; Erp, J.B.F. van

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether communication via mediated hand pressure during a remotely shared experience (watching an amusing video) can (1) enhance recovery from sadness, (2) enhance the affective quality of the experience, and (3) increase trust towards the communication partner. Thereto parti

  1. "A Gentleman's Handshake": The Role of Social Capital and Trust in Transforming Information into Usable Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Rhiannon

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the role of various social ties in building trust and providing opportunities for information acquisition and knowledge exchange (IAKE). Social capital is used as a vehicle to explore the relationships between farmers and their advisors using bovine tuberculosis (bTB), a major disease facing the English cattle industry, as a…

  2. Cambodian Parental Involvement: The Role of Parental Beliefs, Social Networks, and Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Sothy; Szmodis, Whitney; Mulsow, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    The role of social capital (parental beliefs, social networks, and trust) as a predictor of parental involvement in Cambodian children's education was examined, controlling for human capital (family socioeconomic status). Parents of elementary students (n = 273) were interviewed face to face in Cambodia. Teacher contact scored highest, followed by…

  3. Mechanizing Social Trust-Aware Recommenders with T-Index Augmented Trustworthiness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fazeli, Soude; Zarghami, Alireza; Dokoohaki, Nima; Matskin, Mihhail

    2010-01-01

    Social Networks have dominated growth and popularity of the Web to an extent which has never been witnessed before. Such popularity puts forward issue of trust to the participants of Social Networks. Collaborative Filtering Recommenders have been among many systems which have begun taking full advan

  4. Mapping the Social Side of Pre-Service Teachers: Connecting Closeness, Trust, and Efficacy with Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Yi-Hwa; Daly, Alan J.; Canrinus, Esther T.; Forbes, Cheryl A.; Moolenaar, Nienke M.; Cornelissen, Frank; Van Lare, Michelle; Hsiao, Joyce

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory study foregrounds the important, but often understudied social side of pre-service teacher development and its relation to teaching performance in one university-based teacher preparation program in the US. We examine the extent to which pre-service elementary teachers' social relationships and perceptions of peer trust and…

  5. Tax authorities' interaction with taxpayers: A conception of compliance in social dilemmas by power and trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangl, Katharina; Hofmann, Eva; Kirchler, Erich

    2015-02-01

    Tax compliance represents a social dilemma in which the short-term self-interest to minimize tax payments is at odds with the collective long-term interest to provide sufficient tax funds for public goods. According to the Slippery Slope Framework, the social dilemma can be solved and tax compliance can be guaranteed by power of tax authorities and trust in tax authorities. The framework, however, remains silent on the dynamics between power and trust. The aim of the present theoretical paper is to conceptualize the dynamics between power and trust by differentiating coercive and legitimate power and reason-based and implicit trust. Insights into this dynamic are derived from an integration of a wide range of literature such as on organizational behavior and social influence. Conclusions on the effect of the dynamics between power and trust on the interaction climate between authorities and individuals and subsequent individual motivation of cooperation in social dilemmas such as tax contributions are drawn. Practically, the assumptions on the dynamics can be utilized by authorities to increase cooperation and to change the interaction climate from an antagonistic climate to a service and confidence climate.

  6. USER RECOMMENDATION ALGORITHM IN SOCIAL TAGGING SYSTEM BASED ON HYBRID USER TRUST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norwati Mustapha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid growth of web 2.0 technologies, tagging become much more important today to facilitate personal organization and also provide a possibility for users to search information or discover new things with Collaborative Tagging Systems. However, the simplistic and user-centered design of this kind of systems cause the task of finding personally interesting users is becoming quite out of reach for the common user. Collaborative Filtering (CF seems to be the most popular technique in recommender systems to deal with information overload issue but CF suffers from accuracy limitation. This is because CF always been at-tack by malicious users that will make it suffers in finding the truly interesting users. With this problem in mind, this study proposes a hybrid User Trust method to enhance CF in order to increase accuracy of user recommendation in social tagging system. This method is a combination of developing trust network based on user interest similarity and trust network from social network analysis. The user interest similarity is de-rived from personalized user tagging information. The hybrid User Trust method is able to find the most trusted users and selected as neighbours to generate recommendations. Experimental results show that the hybrid method outperforms the traditional CF algorithm. In addition, it indicated that the hybrid method give more accurate recommendation than the existing CF based on user trust.

  7. Trust versus paranoia: abnormal response to social reward in psychotic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromann, Paula M; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Fett, Anne-Kathrin; Joyce, Dan W; Shergill, Sukhi S; Krabbendam, Lydia

    2013-06-01

    Psychosis is characterized by an elementary lack of trust in others. Trust is an inherently rewarding aspect of successful social interactions and can be examined using neuroeconomic paradigms. This study was aimed at investigating the underlying neural basis of diminished trust in psychosis. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired from 20 patients with psychosis and 20 healthy control subjects during two multiple-round trust games; one with a cooperative and the other with a deceptive counterpart. An a priori region of interest analysis of the right caudate nucleus, right temporo-parietal junction and medial prefrontal cortex was performed focusing on the repayment phase of the games. For regions with group differences, correlations were calculated between the haemodynamic signal change, behavioural outcomes and patients' symptoms. Patients demonstrated reduced levels of baseline trust, indicated by smaller initial investments. For the caudate nucleus, there was a significant game × group interaction, with controls showing stronger activation for the cooperative game than patients, and no differences for the deceptive game. The temporo-parietal junction was significantly more activated in control subjects than in patients during cooperative and deceptive repayments. There were no significant group differences for the medial prefrontal cortex. Patients' reduced activation within the caudate nucleus correlated negatively with paranoia scores. The temporo-parietal junction signal was positively correlated with positive symptom scores during deceptive repayments. Reduced sensitivity to social reward may explain the basic loss of trust in psychosis, mediated by aberrant activation of the caudate nucleus and the temporo-parietal junction.

  8. Ethnic Diversity and Social Trust: The Role of Exposure in the Micro-Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    In this paper we argue that residential exposure to ethnic diversity reduces social trust. Previous within-country analyses of the relationship between contextual ethnic diversity and trust have been conducted at higher levels of aggregation, concealing substantial variation in actual exposure...... to ethnic diversity. In contrast, we analyze how ethnic diversity of the immediate micro-context – where interethnic exposure is inevitable – affects trust. We do this using Danish survey data linked with register-based data, which enables us to obtain precise measures of the ethnic diversity of each...... individual’s residential surroundings. We focus on contextual diversity within a radius of 80 meters of a given individual, but compare the effect in the micro-context to the impact of diversity in more aggregate contexts. The results show that ethnic diversity in the micro-context affects trust negatively...

  9. Cultural persistence or experiential adaptation? A review of research examining the roots of social trust based on immigrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    2016-01-01

    Studying social trust of immigrants and descendants of immigrants provides leverage for testing key theories of the foundations of trust; specifically, whether trust is primarily a persistent cultural trait or, rather, a trait formed and updated by contemporary experiences. The analytical leverage...... comes from the fact that immigrants were born in (or, in the case of descendants, have ties with) one country, while residing in another country. If trust is a cultural trait, immigrants’ trust should continue to reflect trust in their ancestral country, whereas their trust should be aligned with trust...... in the US primarily pointing towards cultural influence, while studies from other destination countries suggesting the primacy of experiential adaptation. Second, we critically discuss these previous studies and pinpoint a number of theoretical, methodological and substantive shortcomings as well as avenues...

  10. IMPROVING TRUST THROUGH ETHICAL LEADERSHIP: MOVING BEYOND THE SOCIAL LEARNING THEORY TO A HISTORICAL LEARNING APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omoregie Charles Osifo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The complex nature of trust and its evolving relative concepts require a more idealistic and simpler review. Ethical leadership is related to trust, honesty, transparency, compassion, empathy, results-orientedness, and many other behavioral attributes. Ethical leadership and good leadership are the same, because they represent practicing what one preaches or showing a way to the accomplishment of set goals. The outcomes and findings of many research papers on trust and ethical leadership report positive correlations between ethical leadership and trust. Improving trust from different rational standpoints requires moving and looking beyond the popular theoretical framework through which most results are derived in order to create a new thinking perspective. Social learning theory strongly emphasizes modelling while the new historical learning approach, proposed by the author, is defined as an approach that creates unique historical awareness among individuals, groups, institutions, societies, and nations to use previous experience(s or occurrence(s as a guide in developing positive opinion(s and framework(s in order to tackle the problems and issues of today and tomorrow. Social learning theory is seen as limited from the perspectives of balancing the equation between leadership and trust, the non-compatibility of the values of different generations at work, and other approaches and methods that support the historical approach. This paper is argumentative, adopts a writer´s perspective, and employs a logical analysis of the literature. The main contention is that a historical learning approach can inform an independent-learning to improve trust and its relatives (e.g. motivation and performance, because independent learning can positively shape the value of integrity, which is an integral part of ethical leadership. Historical learning can positively shape leadership in every perspective, because good leadership can develop based on history and

  11. Isolated and skeptical: social engagement and trust in information sources among smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, Lila J Finney; Blake, Kelly; Hesse, Bradford W; Ackerson, Leland K

    2011-09-01

    Our study compared indicators of social engagement and trust among current, former, and never smokers. Multinomial regression analyses of data from the 2005 U.S. Health Information National Trends Survey (n = 5586) were conducted to identify independent associations between social engagement, trust in health information sources, and smoking status. Never smokers (odds ratio (OR) = 2.08) and former smokers (OR = 2.48) were significantly more likely to belong to community organizations than current smokers. Never (OR = 4.59) and former smokers (OR = 1.96) were more likely than current smokers to attend religious services. Never smokers (OR = 1.38) were significantly more likely than current smokers to use the Internet. Former smokers (OR = 1.41) were more likely than current smokers to be married. Compared to current smokers, never smokers were significantly more likely to trust health care professionals (OR = 1.52) and less likely to trust the Internet (OR=0.59) for health information. Current smokers are less socially engaged and less trusting of information resources than non-smokers.

  12. 26 CFR 1.665(b)-1 - Accumulation distributions of trusts other than certain foreign trusts; in general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) do not exceed the income of the trust during the taxable year, an accumulation distribution may... distribution of $5,000 computed as follows: Total distribution $20,000 Less: Income required to be distributed... income 5,000 Accumulation distribution 5,000 Example 2. Under the terms of the trust instrument,...

  13. A Study of Social Factors Related to Social Trust among High-School Teachers of Marand’s Department of Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadbagher alizadeh Aghdam

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Social trust is one of the most important concepts of the social sciences whose presence facilitates social communication. It is essential for organizational performance as well. The present study aimed to investigate social trust among high-school teachers of Marand. Our theoretical framework is inspired by rational choice theory, reasoned action theory, and ideas of Giddens, Bourdieu, Colman, Erikson and so on.The measurement instrument is questionnaire. The sample is composed of 280 individuals, who were selected from a population of 1285 (all high-school teachers in Marand using stratified random sampling. The data was analyzed by SPSS, using statistical techniques such as T test, ANOVA, and correlation coefficients. The main result of this study is that respondents’ social trust is at a high level. Also, variables such as profit expectation, traditionalism and religious beliefs are in a direct relationship with social trust, but social alienation is in a reverse relationship with social trust.

  14. Dynamic Trust Models between Users over Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-30

    model, we consider introducing some trust discount factors. The simplest one is an exponential discount factor defined by ρ(Δt; λ) = exp(−λΔt), where...the Cosmetics review dataset. The other one is composed of review records collected from “anikore”, a ranking and review site for anime , which is...referred to as the Anime review dataset. In both the datasets, each record has 4-triple (u, i, s, t), which means user u gives a score s to item i at

  15. Young Children's Trust Beliefs in Peers: Relations to Social Competence and Interactive Behaviors in a Peer Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jui-Chih

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: The aim of this study was to explore the relations between children's trust beliefs and social competence as well as social preference. In addition, this study examined how children with different trust belief profiles may differ in their peer interactive behaviors. A total of 47 children ages 5 to 6 participated in this study.…

  16. Social anxiety and the Big Five personality traits: the interactive relationship of trust and openness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Simona C; Levinson, Cheri A; Rodebaugh, Thomas L; Menatti, Andrew; Weeks, Justin W

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that social anxiety (SA) has a positive relationship with neuroticism and a negative relationship with extraversion. However, findings on the relationships between SA and agreeableness, conscientiousness, and openness to experience are mixed. In regard to facet-level personality traits, SA is negatively correlated with trust (a facet of agreeableness) and self-efficacy (a facet of conscientiousness). No research has examined interactions among the Big Five personality traits (e.g., extraversion) and facet levels of personality in relation to SA. In two studies using undergraduate samples (N = 502; N = 698), we examined the relationships between trust, self-efficacy, the Big Five, and SA. SA correlated positively with neuroticism, negatively with extraversion, and had weaker relationships with agreeableness, openness, and trust. In linear regression predicting SA, there was a significant interaction between trust and openness over and above gender. In addition to supporting previous research on SA and the Big Five, we found that openness is related to SA for individuals low in trust. Our results suggest that high openness may protect against the higher SA levels associated with low trust.

  17. Which Type of Social Capital Matters for Building Trust in Government? Looking for a New Type of Social Capital in the Governance Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seunghwan Myeong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available When the level of trust in government is low, government cannot effectively provide services, since the policy goals and the process of implementations are not fully understood by the people. This study hypothesizes that the level of trust in government may increase if the level of social capital increases. It also hypothesizes that the impact of social capital on the level of trust in government may differ depending on the type of social capital. The study examined the relationship between the level of trust in government and types of social capital, including bonding social capital and bridging social capital. The result of multiple regression analysis showed that bonding social capital shows a negative relationship with the level of trust in government, while a bridging social capital has a positive relationship with the level of trust in government. In addition, the study examined the variances of the perceptions of each group based on the degree of social cohesion on the level of trust in government by employing ANOVA. It showed that there are no significant differences in bonding social groups, while bridging social capital groups showed variances in their perception of the level of trust in government.

  18. The relationship between higher social trust and lower late HIV diagnosis and mortality differs by race/ethnicity: results from a state-level analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransome, Yusuf; Batson, Ashley; Galea, Sandro; Kawachi, Ichiro; Nash, Denis; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2017-04-06

    Black men who have sex with men (MSM) continue to suffer a disproportionate burden of new HIV diagnoses and mortality. To better understand some of the reasons for these profound disparities, we examined whether the association between social trust and late HIV diagnosis and mortality differed by race/ethnicity, and investigated potential indirect effects of any observed differences. We performed generalized structural equation modelling to assess main and interaction associations between trust among one's neighbours in 2009 (i.e. social trust) and race/ethnicity (Black, White, and Hispanic) predicting late HIV diagnosis (a CD4 count ≤200 cell/µL within three months of a new HIV diagnosis) rates and all-cause mortality rates of persons ever diagnosed late with HIV, across 47 American states for the years 2009-2013. We examined potential indirect effects of state-level HIV testing between social trust and late HIV diagnosis. Social trust data were from the Gallup Healthways Survey, HIV data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and HIV testing from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Covariates included state-level structural, healthcare, and socio-demographic factors including income inequality, healthcare access, and population density. We stratified analysis by transmission group (male-to-male, heterosexual, and injection drug use (IDU)). States with higher levels of social trust had lower late HIV diagnosis rates: Adjusted Rate Ratio [aRR] were consistent across risk groups (0.57; 95%CI 0.53-0.62, male-to-male), (aRR 0.58; 95%CI 0.54-0.62, heterosexual) and (aRR 0.64; 95%CI 0.60-0.69, IDU). Those associations differed by race/ethnicity (all p social trust and late HIV diagnosis across transmission group but for Blacks relative to Whites only. Social trust was associated with lower all-cause mortality rates and that association varied by race/ethnicity within the male-to-male and IDU transmission groups only. Social trust may

  19. In brains we trust: How neuroeconomists stylize trust, the brain, and the social world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, P.

    2014-01-01

    The last decade saw the rise of neuroeconomics. This novel science exemplifies the widespread phenomenon of neuroscientists expanding their work sphere. In neuroeconomics, economists and psychologists join forces with neuroscientists to grapple with the nature of economic and social decision making.

  20. Effects of direct social experience on trust decisions and neural reward circuitry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic S. Fareri

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The human striatum is integral for reward-processing and supports learning by linking experienced outcomes with prior expectations. Recent endeavors implicate the striatum in processing outcomes of social interactions, such as social approval/rejection, as well as in learning reputations of others. Interestingly, social impressions often influence our behavior with others during interactions. Information about an interaction partner’s moral character acquired from biographical information hinders updating of expectations after interactions via top down modulation of reward circuitry. An outstanding question is whether initial impressions formed through experience similarly modulate the ability to update social impressions at the behavioral and neural level. We investigated the role of experienced social information on trust behavior and reward-related BOLD activity. Participants played a computerized ball tossing game with three fictional partners manipulated to be perceived as good, bad or neutral. Participants then played an iterated trust game as investors with these same partners while undergoing fMRI. Unbeknownst to participants, partner behavior in the trust game was random and unrelated to their ball-tossing behavior. Participants’ trust decisions were influenced by their prior experience in the ball tossing game, investing less often with the bad partner compared to the good and neutral. Reinforcement learning models revealed that participants were more sensitive to updating their beliefs about good and bad partners when experiencing outcomes consistent with initial experience. Increased striatal and anterior cingulate BOLD activity for positive versus negative trust game outcomes emerged, which further correlated with model-derived prediction-error (PE learning signals. These results suggest that initial impressions formed from direct social experience can be continually shaped by consistent information through reward learning

  1. Put your money where your mouth is : Reciprocity, social preferences, trust and contributions to public goods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    It is argued that trust and positive social preferences promote public goods production. However, public goods produced by any in-group may have favourable or unfavourable consequences for out-groups (called benign' and malignant' public goods, respectively). I develop a theoretical model of heterog

  2. Trust and Deception in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Social Learning Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yiying; Tian, Yuan; Fang, Jing; Lu, Haoyang; Wei, Kunlin; Yi, Li

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated abnormal trust and deception behaviors in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), and we aimed to examine whether these abnormalities were primarily due to their specific deficits in social learning. We tested 42 high-functioning children with ASD and 38 age- and ability-matched typically developing (TD)…

  3. Social Trust and Types of Classroom Activities: Predictors of Language Learning Motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Khodabakhshzadeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the role of social trust and types of classroom activities as some probable significant predictors of language learning motivation on a sample of 200 Iranian EFL upper-intermediate learners who have been selected randomly. Consequently, the participants completed three questionnaires, Language Learning Motivation Inventory, Classroom and school Community Inventory, and Classroom Activities Inventory, the reliability and validity of each have been checked previously. After running Multiple Regression through SPSS Software, the results revealed that social trust and types of classroom activities accounted for 16.7% of the variance in language learning motivation. Although each of them had a unique impact on language learning motivation, "Deep Language Use" as one of the types of classroom activities had a greater contribution to English as a foreign language learning motivation (002< .05, outweighing social trust as a more important predictor, (.005 < .05. Finally, pedagogical implications along with suggestions for further studies are discussed. Keywords: Types of classroom activities, Social trust, Language learning motivation, EFL learners

  4. Social motives and trust in integrative negotiation : The disruptive effects of punitive capability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Dreu, C.K.W.; Giebels, E.; Van de Vliert, E.

    1998-01-01

    Two studies tested the effects of negotiators' social motive (cooperative vs. individualistic) and punitive capability (high vs. low) on trust, negotiation behavior, and joint outcomes. On the basis of structural goal-expectation theory (T. Yamagishi, 1986), it was predicted that in the case of a co

  5. Dynamic Effects of Trust and Cognitive Social Structures on Information Transfer Relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J. Dekker (David); D. Krackhardt (David); Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractChanges in relationships are due to human actions. We assume that these human actions are functions of perceptions of a focal individual, but also the perceptions of other individuals who are part of the organizational and social environment. We hypothesize that perceptions based trust a

  6. Trust and social representations of the management of threatened and endangered species

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Cvetkovich; Patricia L. Winter

    2003-01-01

    Using quantitative analysis of questionnaire responses, observations during focus group discussions, and qualitative assessment of discussion statements, the present study examined trust and social representations of the U.S. Forest Service's management of Southern California national forests for the protection of endangered species. Supporting expectations based...

  7. Institutional Trust and Communication in the Perception and Social Construction of Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Vallejos Romero

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study's objective, in general, is to offer a conceptual discussion on the perception and construction of risk and, in particular, on the observation and criticism of interventions that are implemented in relation to environmental risk expressed in Chile and Latin America. The proposal, framed in the perspective of social theory and the sociology of risk, suggests some theoretical-methodological lines to approach socioenvironmental problems, particular to modernity, that are expressed through constructions and perceptions that local actors (common and key develop and which studies evidence as a negative externality for the health and quality of life of the population. Specifically, this articles attempts to observe, from a different perspective, the problematization of social perception of risk and to work with two variables that the literature shows as relevant at the time of explaining risks in our localities: trust and risk communication, which we believe are also necessary to take into account when thinking of models of environmental intervention which can improve public policies and instruments of management regarding socioenvironmental risks.

  8. Effects of mediated social touch on affective experiences and trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erk, Stefanie M; Toet, Alexander; Van Erp, Jan B F

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether communication via mediated hand pressure during a remotely shared experience (watching an amusing video) can (1) enhance recovery from sadness, (2) enhance the affective quality of the experience, and (3) increase trust towards the communication partner. Thereto participants first watched a sad movie clip to elicit sadness, followed by a funny one to stimulate recovery from sadness. While watching the funny clip they signaled a hypothetical fellow participant every time they felt amused. In the experimental condition the participants responded by pressing a hand-held two-way mediated touch device (a Frebble), which also provided haptic feedback via simulated hand squeezes. In the control condition they responded by pressing a button and they received abstract visual feedback. Objective (heart rate, galvanic skin conductance, number and duration of joystick or Frebble presses) and subjective (questionnaires) data were collected to assess the emotional reactions of the participants. The subjective measurements confirmed that the sad movie successfully induced sadness while the funny movie indeed evoked more positive feelings. Although their ranking agreed with the subjective measurements, the physiological measurements confirmed this conclusion only for the funny movie. The results show that recovery from movie induced sadness, the affective experience of the amusing movie, and trust towards the communication partner did not differ between both experimental conditions. Hence, feedback via mediated hand touching did not enhance either of these factors compared to visual feedback. Further analysis of the data showed that participants scoring low on Extraversion (i.e., persons that are more introvert) or low on Touch Receptivity (i.e., persons who do not like to be touched by others) felt better understood by their communication partner when receiving mediated touch feedback instead of visual feedback, while the opposite was found for

  9. Effects of mediated social touch on affective experiences and trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie M. Erk

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated whether communication via mediated hand pressure during a remotely shared experience (watching an amusing video can (1 enhance recovery from sadness, (2 enhance the affective quality of the experience, and (3 increase trust towards the communication partner. Thereto participants first watched a sad movie clip to elicit sadness, followed by a funny one to stimulate recovery from sadness. While watching the funny clip they signaled a hypothetical fellow participant every time they felt amused. In the experimental condition the participants responded by pressing a hand-held two-way mediated touch device (a Frebble, which also provided haptic feedback via simulated hand squeezes. In the control condition they responded by pressing a button and they received abstract visual feedback. Objective (heart rate, galvanic skin conductance, number and duration of joystick or Frebble presses and subjective (questionnaires data were collected to assess the emotional reactions of the participants. The subjective measurements confirmed that the sad movie successfully induced sadness while the funny movie indeed evoked more positive feelings. Although their ranking agreed with the subjective measurements, the physiological measurements confirmed this conclusion only for the funny movie. The results show that recovery from movie induced sadness, the affective experience of the amusing movie, and trust towards the communication partner did not differ between both experimental conditions. Hence, feedback via mediated hand touching did not enhance either of these factors compared to visual feedback. Further analysis of the data showed that participants scoring low on Extraversion (i.e., persons that are more introvert or low on Touch Receptivity (i.e., persons who do not like to be touched by others felt better understood by their communication partner when receiving mediated touch feedback instead of visual feedback, while the opposite was

  10. A NONMONOTONE TRUST REGION ALGORITHM FOR NONLINEAR OPTIMIZATION SUBJECT TO GENERAL CONSTRAINTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongchao Zhang

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present a nonmonotone trust region algorithm for general nonlinear constrained optimization problems. The main idea of this paper is to combine Yuan's technique[1] with a nonmonotone method similar to Ke and Han [2]. This new algorithm may not only keep the robust properties of the algorithm given by Yuan, but also have some advantages led by the nonmonotone technique. Under very mild conditions, global convergence for the algorithm is given. Numerical experiments demonstrate the efficiency of the algorithm.

  11. Adolescents' Experiences of Victimization: The Role of Attribution Style and Generalized Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Lucy R.; Houston, James E.; Steer, Oonagh L.; Gardner, Sarah E.

    2017-01-01

    Positive attribution style, negative attribution style, and generalized peer trust beliefs were examined as mediators in the relationship between adolescents' peer victimization experiences and psychosocial and school adjustment. A total of 280 (150 female and 130 males, M[subscript age] = 13 years 4 months, SD[subscript age] = 1 year 1 month)…

  12. Social Security: The Trust Fund Reserve Accumulation, the Economy, and the Federal Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-19

    Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, commonly called the Gramm- Rudman-Hollings ( GRH ) law. Current GRH targets are set to...Total GRH Budget Deflt GRH Target [ Amount of Social Security Trust Fund Surplus Source: Congressional Budget Office, January 4, 1989. with other major...Restructuring the GRH targets, which now focus only on reduc- ing the total deficit (including the social security surpluses) would sup- port the goal of

  13. Do economic equality and generalized trust inhibit academic dishonesty? Evidence from state-level search-engine queries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Lukas

    2012-04-01

    What effect does economic inequality have on academic integrity? Using data from search-engine queries made between 2003 and 2011 on Google and state-level measures of income inequality and generalized trust, I found that academically dishonest searches (queries seeking term-paper mills and help with cheating) were more likely to come from states with higher income inequality and lower levels of generalized trust. These relations persisted even when controlling for contextual variables, such as average income and the number of colleges per capita. The relation between income inequality and academic dishonesty was fully mediated by generalized trust. When there is higher economic inequality, people are less likely to view one another as trustworthy. This lower generalized trust, in turn, is associated with a greater prevalence of academic dishonesty. These results might explain previous findings on the effectiveness of honor codes.

  14. Closer to Learning: Social Networks, Trust, and Professional Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Yi-Hwa; Daly, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers, educators, and policymakers suggest the use of professional learning communities as one important approach to the improvement of teaching and learning. However, relatively little research examines the interplay of professional interactions (structural social capital) around instructional practices and key elements of professional…

  15. The impact of social deprivation on paranoia, hallucinations, mania and depression: the role of discrimination social support, stress and trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, Sophie; Taylor, Peter; Shevlin, Mark; Bentall, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    The negative implications of living in a socially unequal society are now well documented. However, there is poor understanding of the pathways from specific environmental risk to symptoms. Here we examine the associations between social deprivation, depression, and psychotic symptoms using the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey, a cross-sectional dataset including 7,353 individuals. In addition we looked at the mediating role of stress, discrimination, trust and lack of social support. We found that the participants' neighbourhood index of multiple deprivation (IMD) significantly predicted psychosis and depression. On inspection of specific psychotic symptoms, IMD predicted paranoia, but not hallucinations or hypomania. Stress and trust partially mediated the relationship between IMD and paranoid ideation. Stress, trust and a lack of social support fully mediated the relationship between IMD and depression. Future research should focus on the role deprivation and social inequalities plays in specific manifestations of psychopathology and investigate mechanisms to explain those associations that occur. Targeting the mediating mechanisms through appropriate psychological intervention may go some way to dampen the negative consequences of living in an unjust society; ameliorating economic injustice may improve population mental health.

  16. The impact of social deprivation on paranoia, hallucinations, mania and depression: the role of discrimination social support, stress and trust.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Wickham

    Full Text Available The negative implications of living in a socially unequal society are now well documented. However, there is poor understanding of the pathways from specific environmental risk to symptoms. Here we examine the associations between social deprivation, depression, and psychotic symptoms using the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey, a cross-sectional dataset including 7,353 individuals. In addition we looked at the mediating role of stress, discrimination, trust and lack of social support. We found that the participants' neighbourhood index of multiple deprivation (IMD significantly predicted psychosis and depression. On inspection of specific psychotic symptoms, IMD predicted paranoia, but not hallucinations or hypomania. Stress and trust partially mediated the relationship between IMD and paranoid ideation. Stress, trust and a lack of social support fully mediated the relationship between IMD and depression. Future research should focus on the role deprivation and social inequalities plays in specific manifestations of psychopathology and investigate mechanisms to explain those associations that occur. Targeting the mediating mechanisms through appropriate psychological intervention may go some way to dampen the negative consequences of living in an unjust society; ameliorating economic injustice may improve population mental health.

  17. Does Religion Breed Trust? A Cross-National Study of the Effects of Religious Involvement, Religious Faith, and Religious Context on Social Trust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dingemans, Ellen; van Ingen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Many previous studies have linked religiosity to social trust. Yet much of this relation remains insufficiently understood, which is partly due to the fact that religiosity is a multidimensional phenomenon. In this article, we identify several of those dimensions, including the integration in religi

  18. Corporate social responsibility and competitive advantage: Overcoming the trust barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Shuili; C. B. Bhattacharya; Sen, Sankar

    2010-01-01

    This research builds on the complementary corporate social responsibility (CSR) literatures in strategy and marketing to provide insight into the efficacy of CSR as a challenger's competitive weapon against a market leader. Through an investigation of a real-world CSR initiative, we show that the challenger can reap superior business returns (i.e., more positive attitudinal and behavioral outcomes) among consumers who had participated in its CSR initiative, relative to those who were merely a...

  19. Consumer Trust in and Emotional Response to Advertisements on Social Media and their Influence on Brand Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanete Schneider Hahn

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Social media is becoming an important part of an organization's media strategy. This study examines the effects of trust and consumer emotional response to advertisements on brand evaluation in an online social media context. The study used a survey method, and the studied population consisted of 927 Brazilian social media users (Facebook subscribers. The results showed the following: (1 the emotional response to advertising on social media had a positive influence on brand evaluation; and (2 consumer trust had a positive influence on brand evaluation and emotional response to advertisements on social media. It is possible to conclude that consumer trust is the key variable to a positive emotional response to advertisements on social media and to a positive brand evaluation. Finally, this study demonstrates that companies must measure the emotional response to advertising in their social media activities as a way of enhancing brand evaluation.

  20. Combined and Relative Effect Levels of Perceived Risk, Knowledge, Optimism, Pessimism, and Social Trust on Anxiety among Inhabitants Concerning Living on Heavy Metal Contaminated Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhongjun; Guo, Zengli; Zhou, Li; Xue, Shengguo; Zhu, Qinfeng; Zhu, Huike

    2016-11-02

    This research aims at combined and relative effect levels on anxiety of: (1) perceived risk, knowledge, optimism, pessimism, and social trust; and (2) four sub-variables of social trust among inhabitants concerning living on heavy metal contaminated soil. On the basis of survey data from 499 Chinese respondents, results suggest that perceived risk, pessimism, optimism, and social trust have individual, significant, and direct effects on anxiety, while knowledge does not. Knowledge has significant, combined, and interactive effects on anxiety together with social trust and pessimism, respectively, but does not with perceived risk and optimism. Social trust, perceived risk, pessimism, knowledge, and optimism have significantly combined effects on anxiety; the five variables as a whole have stronger predictive values than each one individually. Anxiety is influenced firstly by social trust and secondly by perceived risk, pessimism, knowledge, and optimism. Each of four sub-variables of social trust has an individual, significant, and negative effect on anxiety. When introducing four sub-variables into one model, trust in social organizations and in the government have significantly combined effects on anxiety, while trust in experts and in friends and relatives do not; anxiety is influenced firstly by trust in social organization, and secondly by trust in the government.

  1. Rethinking trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Roderick M

    2009-06-01

    Will we ever learn? We'd barely recovered from Enron and WorldCom before we faced the subprime mortgage meltdown and more scandals that shook our trust in businesspeople. Which raises the question: Do we trust too much? In this article, Stanford professor and social psychologist Kramer explores the reasons we trust so easily--and, often, so unwisely. He explains that genetics and childhood learning make us predisposed to trust and that it's been a good survival mechanism. That said, our willingness to trust makes us vulnerable. Our sense of trust kicks in on remarkably simple cues, such as when people look like us or are part of our social group. We also rely on third parties to verify the character of others, sometimes to our detriment (as the victims of Bernard Madoff learned). Add in our illusions of invulnerability and our tendencies to see what we want to see and to overestimate our own judgment, and the bottom line is that we're often easily fooled. We need to develop tempered trust. For those who trust too much, that means reading cues better; for the distrustful, it means developing more receptive behaviors. Everyone should start with small acts of trust that encourage reciprocity and build up. Having a hedge against potential abuses also helps. Hollywood scriptwriters, for instance, register their treatments with the Writers Guild of America to prevent their ideas from being stolen by the executives they pitch. To attract the right relationships, people must strongly signal their own honesty, proactively allay concerns, and, if their trust is abused, retaliate. Trusting individuals in certain roles, which essentially means trusting the system that selects and trains them, also works but isn't foolproof. And don't count on due diligence alone for protection; constant vigilance is needed to make sure the landscape hasn't changed.

  2. A TRUST REGION ALGORITHM VIA BILEVEL LINEAR PROGRAMMING FOR SOLVING THE GENERAL MULTICOMMODITY MINIMAL COST FLOW PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhuDetong

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a nonmonotonic backtracking trust region algorithm via bilevel linear programming for solving the general multicommodity minimal cost flow problems. Using the duality theory of the linear programming and convex theory, the generalized directional derivative of the general multicommodity minimal cost flow problems is derived. The global convergence and superlinear convergence rate of the proposed algorithm are established under some mild conditions.

  3. The roles of human values and generalized trust on stated preferences when food is labeled with environmental footprints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grebitus, Carola; Steiner, Bodo; Veeman, Michele

    2015-01-01

    This study explores stated preferences for food labeled with environmental footprints, concentrating on human values (Rokeach 1973) and trust attitudes (Uslaner 2002). An online survey, conducted in Germany during 2011 (n = 1579), collected data on human values using the Rokeach Value Survey (Rok...... that accounting for consumers’ value system and generalized trust attitudes – as well as traditional socio-demographics – adds value when trying to understand choices and identify new target markets for footprint-labeled food products....

  4. Trusting the state, trusting each other?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar; Dinesen, Peter Thisted

    2016-01-01

    Trust in state institutions is a prominent explanation of social trust. However, previous—mainly cross-sectional—analyses provide limited causal evidence regarding the relationship between institutional trust and social trust and it is thus essentially unknown whether an observed relationship...... reflects reverse causality (social trust forming institutional trust), or both forms of trust reflecting deep-seated dispositions (common confounding). Against the backdrop of the shortcomings of previous cross-sectional analyses, this paper utilizes two Danish panel surveys containing measures of both...... types of trust for the same individuals surveyed at multiple points in time over a long time-span (up to 18 years) to address the potentially reverse and/or spurious relationship. Using individual fixed effects and cross-lagged panel models, the results provide strong evidence of trust in state...

  5. Turkish “politics of intentions” as a pathological case: Low social trust in Turkey and its political consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Ekmekci

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I analyze social polarization in Turkey and offer suggestions as to how to ameliorate it. I first review the literature on the relationship between social trust and democracy and then draw the current picture of social and political trust in Turkey using data from the World Values Survey. Then I explain political distrust and polarization in Turkey utilizing the concept of 'politics of intentions' and elaborate on the negative consequences of this type of politics, which is very much dominant in contemporary Turkish politics. Finally, I evaluate the options and tools available to Turkish people and politicians for fighting high social distrust and polarization in Turkey.

  6. Languages, communication potential and generalized trust in Sub-Saharan Africa: evidence based on the Afrobarometer Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzasi, Katalin

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate whether speaking other than home languages in Sub-Saharan Africa promotes generalized trust. Based on various psychological and economic theories, a simple model is provided to illustrate how languages might shape trust through various channels. Relying on data from the Afrobarometer Project, which provides information on home and additional languages, the Index of Communication Potential (ICP) is introduced to capture the linguistic situation in the 20 sample countries. The ICP, which can be computed at any desired level of aggregation, refers to the probability that an individual can communicate with a randomly selected person in the society based on common languages. The estimated two-level hierarchical models show that, however, individual level communication potential does not seem to impact trust formation, but living in an area with higher average communication potential increases the chance of exhibiting higher trust toward unknown people.

  7. An Evaluation of Shared Mental Models and Mutual Trust on General Medical Units: Implications for Collaboration, Teamwork, and Patient Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComb, Sara A; Lemaster, Matthew; Henneman, Elizabeth A; Hinchey, Kevin T

    2015-02-24

    This study examines nurse-physician teamwork and collaboration, a critical component in the delivery of safe patient care, on general medical units. To that end, we assess shared mental models and mutual trust, 2 coordinating mechanisms that help facilitate teamwork, among nurses and physicians working on general medical units. Data were collected from 37 nurses and 42 physicians at an urban teaching medical center in the Northeastern United States. Shared mental model questionnaire items were iteratively developed with experts' input to ensure content validity. Mutual trust items were adapted from an existing scale; items were reliable. Data were analyzed using χ and independent 2-tailed t tests. Physicians and nurses reported significant differences in their perceptions of the professional responsible for a variety of roles (e.g., advocating for the patient [P = 0.0007], identifying a near miss/error [P = 0.003]). Medication reconciliation is only role for which nurses perceive less responsibility than physicians perceive nurses have. Regarding mutual trust, both groups reported significantly more trust within their own professions; both groups reported similar levels of trust in physicians, with physicians reporting significantly less trust in their nursing colleagues than nurses perceive (P collaboration, more work is needed. To that end, we propose increasing knowledge about their respective roles, providing opportunities for nurse and physician collaboration through rounding or committee work and enhancing the preparedness and professionalism of interactions.

  8. Trust-Based Cooperative Social System Applied to a Carpooling Platform for Smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Gil, Cándido; Caballero-Gil, Pino; Molina-Gil, Jezabel; Martín-Fernández, Francisco; Loia, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    One of the worst traffic problems today is the existence of huge traffic jams in almost any big city, produced by the large number of commuters using private cars. This problem has led to an increase in research on the optimization of vehicle occupancy in urban areas as this would help to solve the problem that most cars are occupied by single passengers. The solution of sharing the available seats in cars, known as carpooling, is already available in major cities around the world. However, carpooling is still not considered a safe and reliable solution for many users. With the widespread use of mobile technology and social networks, it is possible to create a trust-based platform to promote carpooling through a convenient, fast and secure system. The main objective of this work is the design and implementation of a carpool system that improves some important aspects of previous systems, focusing on trust between users, and on the security of the system. The proposed system guarantees user privacy and measures trust levels through a new reputation algorithm. In addition to this, the proposal has been developed as a mobile application for devices using the Android Open Source Project. PMID:28134803

  9. Trust-Based Cooperative Social System Applied to a Carpooling Platform for Smartphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Gil, Cándido; Caballero-Gil, Pino; Molina-Gil, Jezabel; Martín-Fernández, Francisco; Loia, Vincenzo

    2017-01-27

    One of the worst traffic problems today is the existence of huge traffic jams in almost any big city, produced by the large number of commuters using private cars. This problem has led to an increase in research on the optimization of vehicle occupancy in urban areas as this would help to solve the problem that most cars are occupied by single passengers. The solution of sharing the available seats in cars, known as carpooling, is already available in major cities around the world. However, carpooling is still not considered a safe and reliable solution for many users. With the widespread use of mobile technology and social networks, it is possible to create a trust-based platform to promote carpooling through a convenient, fast and secure system. The main objective of this work is the design and implementation of a carpool system that improves some important aspects of previous systems, focusing on trust between users, and on the security of the system. The proposed system guarantees user privacy and measures trust levels through a new reputation algorithm. In addition to this, the proposal has been developed as a mobile application for devices using the Android Open Source Project.

  10. Trust-Based Cooperative Social System Applied to a Carpooling Platform for Smartphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cándido Caballero-Gil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the worst traffic problems today is the existence of huge traffic jams in almost any big city, produced by the large number of commuters using private cars. This problem has led to an increase in research on the optimization of vehicle occupancy in urban areas as this would help to solve the problem that most cars are occupied by single passengers. The solution of sharing the available seats in cars, known as carpooling, is already available in major cities around the world. However, carpooling is still not considered a safe and reliable solution for many users. With the widespread use of mobile technology and social networks, it is possible to create a trust-based platform to promote carpooling through a convenient, fast and secure system. The main objective of this work is the design and implementation of a carpool system that improves some important aspects of previous systems, focusing on trust between users, and on the security of the system. The proposed system guarantees user privacy and measures trust levels through a new reputation algorithm. In addition to this, the proposal has been developed as a mobile application for devices using the Android Open Source Project.

  11. Ethnic diversity of the micro-context and social trust: Evidence from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    imprecise and downward biased (due to attenuation bias). In the present paper we add to the literature by analyzing, as the first study ever, how ethnic diversity of the immediate micro-context affects people’s trust in others. In addition, we compare the effect in the micro context to the impact of ethnic...... with data from the national Danish registers. The latter data contain detailed information about the ethnic background and the address of everyone living in Denmark. This enables us to obtain precise measures of ethnic diversity of the immediate surroundings in which each respondent lives. In the analysis...... we include measures of ethnic diversity in contextual units ranging from a radius of 80 meters up to 2750 meters within the address of a given respondent. In line with our expectations, the results show that increased ethnic diversity in the immediate surroundings affects generalized trust negatively...

  12. Social Engineering a General Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerica GREAVU-SERBAN

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Social engineering is considered to be a taboo subject in nowadays society. It involves the use of social skills or to obtain usernames, passwords, credit card data, or to compromise or altering the information and systems of an entity. Social engineering methods are numerous and people using it are extremely ingenious and adaptable. This technique takes advantage of the intrinsic nature of mankind, to manipulate and obtain sensitive information, persuading people into divulge it, using exceptional communication skills. Thus, five models of persuasion were identified, based on: simplicity, interest, incongruity, confidence and empathy, exploiting key factors which predispose people to fall victim to attacks of social engineering such as greed, self-interest, guilt or ignorance. It is well known fact that security is as strong as the weakest link in its chain (individuals therefore, beyond technical measures, staff training is the key to success in defending against such attacks.

  13. Roles, trust, and reputation in social media knowledge markets theory and methods

    CERN Document Server

    Matei, Sorin

    2015-01-01

    This title discusses the emerging trends in defining, measuring, and operationalizing reputation as a new and essential component of the knowledge that is generated and consumed online. The book also proposes a future research agenda related to these issues—with the ultimate goal of shaping the next generation of theoretical and analytic strategies needed for understanding how knowledge markets are influenced by social interactions and reputations built around functional roles. Roles, Trust, and Reputation in Social Media Knowledge Markets exposes issues that have not been satisfactorily dealt with in the current literature. In a broader sense, the volume aims to change the way in which knowledge generation in social media spaces is understood and utilized. The tools, theories, and methodologies proposed here offer concrete avenues for developing the next generation of research strategies and applications that will help: tomorrow’s information consumers make smarter choices, developers to create new tools...

  14. Who Deserves My Trust? Cue-Elicited Feedback Negativity Tracks Reputation Learning in Repeated Social Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Diandian; Meng, Liang; Ma, Qingguo

    2017-01-01

    Trust and trustworthiness contribute to reciprocal behavior and social relationship development. To make better decisions, people need to evaluate others’ trustworthiness. They often assess this kind of reputation by learning through repeated social interactions. The present event-related potential (ERP) study explored the reputation learning process in a repeated trust game where subjects made multi-round decisions of investment to different partners. We found that subjects gradually learned to discriminate trustworthy partners from untrustworthy ones based on how often their partners reciprocated the investment, which was indicated by their own investment decisions. Besides, electrophysiological data showed that the faces of the untrustworthy partners induced larger feedback negativity (FN) amplitude than those of the trustworthy partners, but only in the late phase of the game. The ERP results corresponded with the behavioral pattern and revealed that the learned trustworthiness differentiation was coded by the cue-elicited FN component. Consistent with previous research, our findings suggest that the anterior cue-elicited FN reflects the reputation appraisal and tracks the reputation learning process in social interactions. PMID:28663727

  15. Trust and Partner Selection in Social Networks: An Experimentally Grounded Model

    CERN Document Server

    Boero, Riccardo; Squazzoni, Flaminio

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an experimentally grounded model on the relevance of partner selection for the emergence of trust and cooperation among individuals. By combining experimental evidence and network simulation, our model investigates the link of interaction outcome and social structure formation and shows that dynamic networks lead to positive outcomes when cooperators have the capability of creating more links and isolating free-riders. By emphasizing the self-reinforcing dynamics of interaction outcome and structure formation, our results cast the argument about the relevance of interaction continuity for cooperation in new light and provide insights to guide the design of new lab experiments.

  16. Aberrant Reward Center Response to Partner Reputation During a Social Exchange Game in Generalized Social Phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripada, Chandra; Angstadt, Michael; Liberzon, Israel; McCabe, Kevin; Phan, K. Luan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Generalized social anxiety disorder (GSAD) is characterized by excessive fear of public scrutiny and reticence in social engagement. Previous studies have probed the neural basis of GSAD often using static, non-interactive stimuli (e.g., face photographs) and have identified dysfunction in fear circuitry. We sought to investigate brain-based dysfunction in GSAD during more real-world, dynamic social interactions, focusing on the role of reward-related regions that are implicated in social decision-making. Methods Thirty-six healthy individuals (HC) and 36 individuals with GSAD underwent fMRI scanning while participating in a behavioral economic game (‘Trust Game’) involving iterative exchanges with fictive partners who acquire differential reputations for reciprocity. We investigated brain responses to reciprocation of trust in one’s social partner, and how these brain responses are modulated by partner reputation for repayment. Results In both HC and GSAD, receipt of reciprocity robustly engaged ventral striatum, a region implicated in reward. In HC, striatal responses to reciprocity were specific to partners who have consistently returned the investment (‘cooperative partners’), and were absent for partners who lack a cooperative reputation. In GSAD, modulation of striatal responses by partner reputation was absent. Social anxiety severity predicted diminished responses to cooperative partners. Conclusion These results suggest abnormalities in GSAD in reward-related striatal mechanisms that may be important for the initiation, valuation, and maintenance of cooperative social relationships. Moreover, this study demonstrates that dynamic, interactive task paradigms derived from economics can help illuminate novel mechanisms of pathology in psychiatric illnesses in which social dysfunction is a cardinal feature. PMID:23576237

  17. Increasing interpersonal trust through divergent thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta eSellaro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal trust is an essential ingredient of many social relationships but how stable is it actually, and how is it controlled? There is evidence that the degree of trust into others might be rather volatile and can be affected by manipulations like drawing attention to personal interdependence or independence. Here we investigated whether the degree of interpersonal trust can be biased by inducing either a more integrative or a more cognitive-control mode by means of a creativity task requiring divergent or convergent thinking, respectively. Participants then performed the Trust Game, which provides an index of interpersonal trust by assessing the money units one participant (the trustor transfers to another participant (the trustee. As expected, participants transferred significantly more money to the trustee after engaging in divergent thinking as compared to convergent thinking. This observation provides support for the idea that interpersonal trust is controlled by domain-general (i.e., not socially dedicated cognitive states.

  18. Adaptación y validación del ITQ (Interpersonal Trust Questionnaire. Una nueva medida del apoyo social

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Sojo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo muestra los resultados de la adaptación al español y validación del Cuestionario de Confi anza Interpersonal (Interpersonal Trust Questionnaire – ITQ, Forbes y Roger, 1999 conducida con una población de estudiantes universitarios venezolanos. La escala original de cuarenta y ocho ítems mide la capacidad de los individuos para utilizar con efi ciencia el apoyo social, a través de sus tres dimensiones: miedo a la revelación (MR, afrontamiento social (AS e intimidad social (IS. La escala fue administrada junto con otros cuestionarios de personalidad a una muestra de doscientos noventa y dos estudiantes universitarios de tres universidades de Caracas, Venezuela. Los resultados del análisis factorial replicaron solo dos de las tres dimensiones del cuestionario, agrupando a cuarenta y seis ítems con altas consistencias internas para cada factor. El estudio de validez concurrente mostró que las dimensiones se relacionan con otros indicadores en la forma esperada, mientras que el estudio de validez predictiva conducido con una muestra diferente de personas desempleadas indicó que el miedo a la revelación se correlaciona positivamente con una pobre salud general, a la vez que el afrontamiento social parece proteger la salud psicológica de los individuos

  19. Adaptación y validación del ITQ (Interpersonal Trust Questionnaire. Una nueva medida del apoyo social

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Guarino

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo muestra los resultados de la adaptación al español y validación del Cuestionario de Confianza Interpersonal (Interpersonal Trust Questionnaire– ITQ, Forbes y Roger, 1999 conducida con una población de estudiantes universitarios venezolanos. La escala original de cuarenta y ocho ítems mide la capacidad de los individuos para utilizar con efi ciencia el apoyo social, a través de sus tres dimensiones: miedo a la revelación (MR, afrontamiento social (AS e intimidad social (IS. La escala fue administrada junto con otros cuestionarios de personalidad a una muestra de doscientos noventa y dos estudiantes universitarios de tres universidades de Caracas, Venezuela. Los resultados del análisis factorial replicaron solo dos de las tres dimensiones del cuestionario, agrupando a cuarenta y seis ítems con altas consistencias internas para cada factor. El estudio de validez concurrente mostró que las dimensiones se relacionan con otros indicadores en la forma esperada, mientras que el estudio de validez predictiva conducido con una muestra diferente de personas desempleadas indicó que el miedo a la revelación se correlaciona positivamente con una pobre salud general, a la vez que el afrontamiento social parece proteger la salud psicológica de los individuos.

  20. The Effect of Social Trust on Citizens’ Health Risk Perception in the Context of a Petrochemical Industrial Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Navarro, Miguel Ángel; Llorens-Monzonís, Jaume; Tortosa-Edo, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Perceived risk of environmental threats often translates into psychological stress with a wide range of effects on health and well-being. Petrochemical industrial complexes constitute one of the sites that can cause considerable pollution and health problems. The uncertainty around emissions results in a perception of risk for citizens residing in neighboring areas, which translates into anxiety and physiological stress. In this context, social trust is a key factor in managing the perceived risk. In the case of industrial risks, it is essential to distinguish between trust in the companies that make up the industry, and trust in public institutions. In the context of a petrochemical industrial complex located in the port of Castellón (Spain), this paper primarily discusses how trust—both in the companies located in the petrochemical complex and in the public institutions—affects citizens’ health risk perception. The research findings confirm that while the trust in companies negatively affects citizens’ health risk perception, trust in public institutions does not exert a direct and significant effect. Analysis also revealed that trust in public institutions and health risk perception are essentially linked indirectly (through trust in companies). PMID:23337129

  1. Continuous use of social commerce: Its conceptual relation with E-WOM, commitment and trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sami, Atyaf; Hashim, Kamarul Faizal; Yusof, Shafiz Affendi Mohd

    2016-08-01

    The popularity of social media has changed the way of doing business and introduces a new type of commerce known later as social commerce (s-commerce). Within s-commerce, consumer's loyalty and returning to use have reduced mainly because it is a high competitive environment, which is simply presented by products that proposed and announced rapidly to the market. S-commerce has a magic power called Electronic Word-of-Mouth (E-WOM). E-WOM enables consumers to make a collaboration decision as well as it enable business to reach up their consumers and their network in low cost and short time. Yet, to date, there is limited research that conducted the effect of E-WOM on consumer's continuous use behavior. Therefore, this study is an attempt to propose a value conceptual model that explains the relationship between e-WOM and continuous use behavior. This study serves not only to clarify the relationship between e-WOM and continuous use, but also to explain the mediating role of trust and commitment in this relationship; a theory known as Commitment-Trust theory is adopted. Additionally, drawing upon flow theory, this study examines flow experience determinants as predictors for promoting e-WOM among s-commerce consumers.

  2. Social Networks and Health Among Older Adults in Lebanon: The Mediating Role of Support and Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonucci, Toni C.; Ajrouch, Kristine J.; Abdulrahim, Sawsan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Despite a growing body of literature documenting the influence of social networks on health, less is known in other parts of the world. The current study investigates this link by clustering characteristics of network members nominated by older adults in Lebanon. We then identify the degree to which various types of people exist within the networks. This study further examines how network composition as measured by the proportion of each type (i.e., type proportions) is related to health; and the mediating role of positive support and trust in this process. Method. Data are from the Family Ties and Aging Study (2009). Respondents aged ≥60 were selected (N = 195) for analysis. Results. Three types of people within the networks were identified: Geographically Distant Male Youth, Geographically Close/Emotionally Distant Family, and Close Family. Having more Geographically Distant Male Youth in one’s network was associated with health limitations, whereas more Close Family was associated with no health limitations. Positive support mediated the link between type proportions and health limitations, whereas trust mediated the link between type proportions and depressive symptoms. Discussion. Results document links between the social networks and health of older adults in Lebanon within the context of ongoing demographic transitions. PMID:25324295

  3. Construction and standardization of administrative corruption perception questionnaire and its relationship with social trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Saffarinia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to design and normalize corruption perception questionnaire and its relation with social trust among the people in Tehran city in 2015. In this study 600 people were selected clusteringly and to collect questionnaire data, 28 questions have been set by the researcher based on Theory and definitions of corruption. To determine the factors and validity of the questionnaire, exploratory factor analysis and to determine the reliability of the questionnaire, the Test – Retest method were used. The results show that questionnaire Cronbach's alpha coefficient which indicates its reliability and internal consistency, is desirable (0/86. Questionnaire validity which is obtained through factor analysis in the area of construct validity, is also acceptable. KMO measure of sampling adequacy is (0/86. Chi-square coefficient of Bartlett's test is equal to 0. 0001, which indicates the external validity of the questionnaire. In addition, through exploratory factor analysis using varimax, eventually a questionnaire including 27 questions with 4 components (rente & nepotism, cash for access, embezzlement & fraud and corruption in procurement and contract was obtained. Finally, the relation between corruption perception and social trust was confirmed through 120 questionnaires that were obtained from sample society and Pearson correlation and stepwise regression analysis methods.

  4. The roles of human values and generalized trust on stated preferences when food is labeled with environmental footprints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grebitus, Carola; Steiner, Bodo; Veeman, Michele

    2015-01-01

    This study explores stated preferences for food labeled with environmental footprints, concentrating on human values (Rokeach 1973) and trust attitudes (Uslaner 2002). An online survey, conducted in Germany during 2011 (n = 1579), collected data on human values using the Rokeach Value Survey (Rok...... that accounting for consumers’ value system and generalized trust attitudes – as well as traditional socio-demographics – adds value when trying to understand choices and identify new target markets for footprint-labeled food products.......This study explores stated preferences for food labeled with environmental footprints, concentrating on human values (Rokeach 1973) and trust attitudes (Uslaner 2002). An online survey, conducted in Germany during 2011 (n = 1579), collected data on human values using the Rokeach Value Survey...

  5. Blindness and social trust: The effect of early visual deprivation on judgments of trustworthiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, C; Vecchi, T; Merabet, L B; Cattaneo, Z

    2017-09-01

    Investigating the impact of early visual deprivation on evaluations related to social trust has received little attention to date. This is despite consistent evidence suggesting that early onset blindness may interfere with the normal development of social skills. In this study, we investigated whether early blindness affects judgments of trustworthiness regarding the actions of an agent, with trustworthiness representing the fundamental dimension in the social evaluation. Specifically, we compared performance between a group of early blind individuals with that of sighted controls in their evaluation of trustworthiness of an agent after hearing a pair of two positive or two negative social behaviors (impression formation). Participants then repeated the same evaluation following the presentation of a third (consistent or inconsistent) behavior regarding the same agent (impression updating). Overall, blind individuals tended to give similar evaluations compared to their sighted counterparts. However, they also valued positive behaviors significantly more than sighted controls when forming their impression of an agent's trustworthiness. Moreover, when inconsistent information was provided, blind individuals were more prone to revise their initial evaluation compared to controls. These results suggest that early visual deprivation may have a dramatic effect on the evaluation of social factors such as trustworthiness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Defending the social value of knowledge as a safeguard for public trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Felicitas S

    2017-09-01

    The 'socially valuable knowledge' (SVK) principle has been widely acknowledged as one of the most important guiding principles for biomedical research involving human subjects. The principle states that the potential of producing socially valuable knowledge is a necessary requirement, although not sufficient, for the ethical conduct of research projects. This is due to the assumption that the social value of knowledge avoids exploitation of research subjects and justifies the use of health resources. However, more recently, several authors have started interrogating the validity of SVK in research and offered various lines of argument against the SVK principle as a necessary constraint to research. In this article, I will reconstruct the main arguments of this discussion between defenders and debunkers of the SVK principle and offer a third way to consider the social value of knowledge in research studies. I will argue that the social value of knowledge can be supported by an independent justification. This justification of the SVK principle addresses the rationality and common interest of researchers. Thus, I will introduce the SVK principle as a safeguarding principle for public trust based on a conceptual framework by Alex John London. My approach justifies keeping the principle as a precautionary and rational requirement for human health research that all rational stakeholders can agree upon. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Testing knowledge sharing effectiveness: trust, motivation, leadership style, workplace spirituality and social network embedded model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Muhammad Sabbir

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this inquiry is to investigate the relationships among the antecedents of knowledge sharing effectiveness under the position of non-academic staff of higher learning institutions through an empirical test of a conceptual model consisting of trust, extrinsic and intrinsic motivation, leadership style, workplace spirituality and online social network. This study used the respondents from the non-academic staff of higher learning institutions in Malaysia (n = 200, utilizing a self-administered survey questionnaire. The structural equation modeling approach was used to test the proposed hypotheses. The outcomes indicate that all the antecedents play a substantial function in knowledge sharing effectiveness. In addition, perceived risk plays a mediating role between trust and knowledge sharing effectiveness. On the other hand, this research also proved the communication skill also plays a mediating role between leadership style and knowledge sharing effectiveness. This study contributes to pioneering empirical findings on knowledge sharing literature under the scope of the non-academic staff perspective.

  8. The effect of listening to others remember on subsequent memory: The roles of expertise and trust in socially shared retrieval-induced forgetting and social contagion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koppel, Jonathan Mark; Wohl, Dana; Meksin, Robert;

    2014-01-01

    found (1) that speakers who were perceived as experts induced greater levels of social contagion and lower levels of SS-RIF than non-expert speakers, and (2) that, likewise, trust in the speaker had similar mnemonic consequences, in that neutral speakers induced more social contagion and less SS...

  9. When is selective self-presentation effective? An investigation of the moderation effects of "self-esteem" and "social trust".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoonkyung; Baek, Young Min

    2014-11-01

    This study investigates the relationship between selective self-presentation and online life satisfaction, and how this relationship is influenced by respondents' perceptions of "self" (operationalized by "self-esteem") and "others" (operationalized by "social trust"). Relying on survey data from 712 Korean online users, two important findings were detected in our study. First, the positive relationship between selective self-presentation and online life satisfaction becomes more prominent among people with low self-esteem compared to those with high self-esteem, and second, this positive relationship is enhanced among people with high levels of social trust compared to those with low trust levels. Theoretical and practical implications of our findings as well as potential limitations are discussed.

  10. Social Support, Trust in Health Information, and Health Information-Seeking Behaviors (HISBs): A Study Using the 2012 Annenberg National Health Communication Survey (ANHCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qinghua; Chen, Yixin; Wendorf Muhamad, Jessica

    2017-09-01

    We proposed a conceptual model to predict health information-seeking behaviors (HISBs) from three different sources (family, the Internet, doctors). To test the model, a structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis was conducted using data from the 2012 Annenberg National Health Communication Survey (ANHCS) (N = 3,285). Findings suggest higher social support from family predicts higher trust in health information from family members (abbreviated as trust in this article). Trust is positively related to HISBs from all three sources, with the path linking trust to HISB from family being the strongest. The effect of social support on HISB from family is partially mediated by trust, while effect of social support on HISBs from the Internet/doctors is fully mediated by trust. Implications of the study are discussed.

  11. Relationship between trusting behaviors and psychometrics associated with social network and depression among young generation: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoki Watabe

    Full Text Available Maladaptive social interaction and its related psychopathology have been highlighted in psychiatry especially among younger generations. In Japan, novel expressive forms of psychiatric phenomena such as "modern-type depression" and "hikikomori" (a syndrome of severe social withdrawal lasting for at least six months have been reported especially among young people. Economic games such as the trust game have been utilized to evaluate real-world interpersonal relationships as a novel candidate for psychiatric evaluations. To investigate the relationship between trusting behaviors and various psychometric scales, we conducted a trust game experiment with eighty-one Japanese university students as a pilot study. Participants made a risky financial decision about whether to trust each of 40 photographed partners. Participants then answered a set of questionnaires with seven scales including the Lubben Social Network Scale (LSNS-6 and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9. Consistent with previous research, male participants trusted partners more than female participants. Regression analysis revealed that LSNS-family (perceived support from family for male participants, and item 8 of PHQ-9 (subjective agitation and/or retardation for female participants were associated with participants' trusting behaviors. Consistent with claims by social scientists, our data suggest that, for males, support from family was negatively associated with cooperative behavior toward non-family members. Females with higher subjective agitation (and/or retardation gave less money toward males and high attractive females, but not toward low attractive females in interpersonal relationships. We believe that our data indicate the possible impact of economic games in psychiatric research and clinical practice, and validation in clinical samples including modern-type depression and hikikomori should be investigated.

  12. The Study of the Components of Urban Social Capital in Central Cities of East Azerbaijan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Ostad Rahimi

    2013-07-01

    This kinds of social capital has various positive and negative effects. Thus general trust of people to the country should be increased. Also reliability of people should be increased by increasing their general trust and the strengthening of social capital.

  13. 从信任人格、信任关系到信任文化--信任:发展与和谐的社会资本%From Trust Personality and Trust Relationship to Trust Culture---Trust:the Social Capital of Development and Harmony

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    豆宏健

    2015-01-01

    信任是现代社会的一个中心问题,是经济与社会持续、和谐发展的重要社会资源;信任的生成表现为一个从信任人格、信任关系到信任文化的不断扩大的同心圆;信任能促进经济发展和政治建设,有利于社会认同和文化包容,能增进个体人格完善和人际合作。%Trust is a central issue in modern society.It is the essential social resource of the sustained and harmonious development of economy and politics.The formation of trust shows us an extending concentric circle from trusting personality and trusting relationship to trusting culture.Trust can promote the econom-ic development and political construction.It can help form social agreement and cultural containment.It can also help improve individual personality and interpersonal cooperation.

  14. 26 CFR 1.662(a)-1 - Inclusion of amounts in gross income of beneficiaries of estates and complex trusts; general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inclusion of amounts in gross income of beneficiaries of estates and complex trusts; general. 1.662(a)-1 Section 1.662(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL... Trusts Which May Accumulate Income Or Which Distribute Corpus § 1.662(a)-1 Inclusion of amounts in gross...

  15. A perspective on emerging law, consumer trust and social responsibility in China's food sector: the "bleaching" case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Michael T

    2011-01-01

    Trust underpins the Chinese social system, and yet it is lacking from a Chinese food system that is riddled with safety disasters and disgruntled consumers. Government and industry play a major role in rehabilitating consumer trust in China. To this end, food safety and quality laws have been constructed to foster this process; however, safety scandals continue even in the face of stricter regulations and increased enforcement. A potential toll to abate food-safety problems and to build trust is the implementation of Corporate Social Responsibility ("CSR"). Mandates by the government promote CSR in enterprise activity, including Article 3 of the 2009 China Food Safety Law. Officials have also recently touted the need for "moral education" of operators in the food industry. Regardless of government activity or whether CSR is employed by food enterprises, it is imperative that the food industry recognizes how critical it is to establish trust with Chinese consumers, who increasingly expect safe, quality food. The case study with pistachios highlights this evolving consumer expectation and the principles of social responsibility in the framework of the relationship between government and industry and consumers, while demonstrating the benefits of doing the right thing for food companies doing business in China.

  16. Trust Management V

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    from 42 submissions. The papers feature both theoretical research and real-world case studies from academia, business and government focusing on areas such as: trust models, social and behavioral aspects of trust, trust in networks, mobile systems and cloud computation, privacy, reputation systems...

  17. Trust Management V

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    from 42 submissions. The papers feature both theoretical research and real-world case studies from academia, business and government focusing on areas such as: trust models, social and behavioral aspects of trust, trust in networks, mobile systems and cloud computation, privacy, reputation systems......, and identity management....

  18. Calculativeness and trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Williamson’s characterisation of calculativeness as inimical to trust contradicts most sociological trust research. However, a similar argument is found within trust phenomenology. This paper re-investigates Williamson’s argument from the perspective of Løgstrup’s phenomenological theory of trust....... Contrary to Williamson, however, Løgstrup’s contention is that trust, not calculativeness, is the default attitude and only when suspicion is awoken does trust falter. The paper argues that while Williamson’s distinction between calculativeness and trust is supported by phenomenology, the analysis needs...... to take actual subjective experience into consideration. It points out that, first, Løgstrup places trust alongside calculativeness as a different mode of engaging in social interaction, rather conceiving of trust as a state or the outcome of a decision-making process. Secondly, the analysis must take...

  19. An Exploration to Brand Trust Through Microblogging Corporate Social Responsibility : A Sample of Three Business Users of Weibo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Gu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the author tries to explore the effect of buiding brand trust through microblogging Corporate Social Responsibility. The author samples three business users of microblogging CSR from Weibo.cn, among which are: @dellcsr, @zlgoodlife, @ditan100. Then two corpuses are built by collecting: a the texts blogged by the business users during six consecutive months in 2012; b the texts blogged by other Weibo users as feedback to business users (comment, forward, mention@ during the same period. With assistance of corpus linguistic tool Concordance 3.3, the author conducting qualitative context analysis to both corpuses. The result shows that the more corporate microblogs offline CSR activities, the more brand trust online stakeholders (Weibo users express. However, this online brand trust would most likely be harmed by followers’ unpleasant product experience.

  20. Ideological Bases of Institutional Trust in Eastern and Western Europe and the Effect of Motivated Social Cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márton Hadarics

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Our study investigates the assumption that citizens expect the democratic institutional system to operate in accordance with values and norms that are deeply embedded in public thinking of their country. As individual-level trust towards the institutional system is built mainly on these norms and values, our results show that differences between Eastern and Western European public thinking lead to asymmetries regarding the bases of institutional trust. Specifically, degree of income inequalities and perceived quality of welfare services seem to be more important factors in the postsocialist region in comparison with Western Europe. Furthermore, in accordance with the approach of motivated social cognition, we could also confirm that those with a higher level of conventionality motivation lean on normative ideological elements to a greater extent when they are indicating their personal level of institutional trust.

  1. The productivity of trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian; Méon, Pierre-Guillaume

    This paper returns to one of the early questions of the literature on social trust, whether trust affects total factor productivity (TFP). Using both development and growth accounting, we find strong evidence of a causal effect of trust on the level and growth of TFP. Using a three-stage least......-squares procedure, we moreover observe that the effect of trust on TFP runs entirely through property-rights institutions and not political institutions. Those findings resist a series of robustness checks....

  2. Danish Exceptionalism: Explaining the Unique Increase in Social Trust over the Past 30 Years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar; Dinesen, Peter Thisted

    2014-01-01

    has been a permanent feature of these societies, i.e., an enduring cultural trait, or primarily been shaped by more contemporary experiential forces. This article examines the roots of the present Nordic trust exceptionalism by means of analysing the development of trust in Denmark over the past three...... decades. The analysis shows that trust in Denmark has increased remarkably from 1979 to 2009, thus documenting that the high levels of trust found today are a relatively new phenomenon. This contradicts the cultural perspective and instead vindicates the experiential perspective on trust. Subsequent...... analyses based on longitudinal data at the aggregate level as well as individual-level cross-sectional and panel data indicate that the increase in trust in Denmark can be attributed to generational replacement, increasing levels of education, improved quality of state institutions, and a concomitant...

  3. Danish Exceptionalism: Explaining the Unique Increase in Social Trust over the Past 30 Years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar; Dinesen, Peter Thisted

    has been a permanent feature of these societies, i.e. an enduring cultural trait, or primarily been shaped by more contemporaneous experiential forces. This paper examines the roots of the present Nordic trust exceptionalism by means of analyzing the development of trust in Denmark over the last three...... decades. The analysis shows that trust in Denmark has increased remarkably from 1979 to 2009 thus documenting that the very high levels of trust found today are a relatively new phenomenon. This result contradicts the cultural perspective and instead vindicates the experiential perspective on trust....... Subsequent analyses based on longitudinal data at the aggregate level as well as individual-level cross-sectional and panel data indicate that the increase in trust in Denmark can be attributed to generational replacement, increasing levels of education, improved quality of state institutions...

  4. Schumpeter's general theory of social evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Esben Sloth

    The recent neo-Schumpeterian and evolutionary economics appears to cover a much smaller range of topics than Joseph Schumpeter confronted. Thus, it has hardly been recognised that Schumpeter wanted to develop a general theory that served the analysis of evolution in any sector of social life as w...

  5. Social Status, Cognitive Ability, and Educational Attainment as Predictors of Liberal Social Attitudes and Political Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoon, Ingrid; Cheng, Helen; Gale, Catharine R.; Batty, G. David; Deary, Ian J.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the prospective associations between family socio-economic background, childhood intelligence ("g") at age 11, educational and occupational attainment, and social attitudes at age 33 in a large (N = 8804), representative sample of the British population born in 1958. Structural equation Modeling identified a latent trait of…

  6. A General Agent Model of Emotion and Trust using the BDI Structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Höhle, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    To endow virtual agents with more human-like behaviour, the current project proposes a new model for decision making based on emotions and trust. The project focuses first on the conceptual design of the model, then on the implementation of this model. To try to reproduce human decision making, the

  7. Automated Intelligent Agents: Are They Trusted Members of Military Teams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Engineering Mangagement, 50(3), 262- 274. Rempel , J. K., Holmes, J.G., and Zanna, M.P. (1985). Trust in close relationships . Journal of Personality...competency of the automation (Dassonville, 1996). Another sociologist, Rempel (1985), explains trust in three dimensions: predictability...differences between them. Trust between people is generally part of a social exchange relationship resulting from repeated interactions between people

  8. Modeling Trusted Computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shuyi; WEN Yingyou; ZHAO Hong

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a formal approach based on predicate logic is proposed for representing and reasoning of trusted computing models. Predicates are defined to represent the characteristics of the objects and the relationship among these objects in a trusted system according to trusted computing specifications. Inference rules of trusted relation are given too. With the semantics proposed, some trusted computing models are formalized and verified, which shows that Predicate calculus logic provides a general and effective method for modeling and reasoning trusted computing systems.

  9. Schumpeter's general theory of social evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Esben Sloth

    The recent neo-Schumpeterian and evolutionary economics appears to cover a much smaller range of topics than Joseph Schumpeter confronted. Thus, it has hardly been recognised that Schumpeter wanted to develop a general theory that served the analysis of evolution in any sector of social life...... as well as the analysis of the evolution of social life as a whole. This paper demonstrates this ambition by studying his first two books (from 1908 and 1912, partly available in recent English translations). Schumpeter's starting point was the Walrasian System, which he generalised for the study of any...

  10. Trust Drives Internet Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljunge, Jan Martin

    This paper estimates the effect of trust on internet use by studying the general population as well as second generation immigrants in 29 European countries with ancestry in 87 nations. There is a significant positive effect of trust on internet use. The positive trust effect is not universal...

  11. Trust Drives Internet Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljunge, Jan Martin

    This paper estimates the effect of trust on internet use by studying the general population as well as second generation immigrants in 29 European countries with ancestry in 87 nations. There is a significant positive effect of trust on internet use. The positive trust effect is not universal...

  12. The Handicap Principle for Trust in Computer Security, the Semantic Web and Social Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhanshan (Sam); Krings, Axel W.; Hung, Chih-Cheng

    Communication is a fundamental function of life, and it exists in almost all living things: from single-cell bacteria to human beings. Communication, together with competition and cooperation,arethree fundamental processes in nature. Computer scientists are familiar with the study of competition or 'struggle for life' through Darwin's evolutionary theory, or even evolutionary computing. They may be equally familiar with the study of cooperation or altruism through the Prisoner's Dilemma (PD) game. However, they are likely to be less familiar with the theory of animal communication. The objective of this article is three-fold: (i) To suggest that the study of animal communication, especially the honesty (reliability) of animal communication, in which some significant advances in behavioral biology have been achieved in the last three decades, should be on the verge to spawn important cross-disciplinary research similar to that generated by the study of cooperation with the PD game. One of the far-reaching advances in the field is marked by the publication of "The Handicap Principle: a Missing Piece of Darwin's Puzzle" by Zahavi (1997). The 'Handicap' principle [34][35], which states that communication signals must be costly in some proper way to be reliable (honest), is best elucidated with evolutionary games, e.g., Sir Philip Sidney (SPS) game [23]. Accordingly, we suggest that the Handicap principle may serve as a fundamental paradigm for trust research in computer science. (ii) To suggest to computer scientists that their expertise in modeling computer networks may help behavioral biologists in their study of the reliability of animal communication networks. This is largely due to the historical reason that, until the last decade, animal communication was studied with the dyadic paradigm (sender-receiver) rather than with the network paradigm. (iii) To pose several open questions, the answers to which may bear some refreshing insights to trust research in

  13. The meanings of 'culture' in health and social care: a case study of the combined Trust in Somerset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, E; Towell, D; Gulliver, P

    2001-11-01

    On the 1st of April 1999 Somerset Health Authority and Somerset County Council established a Joint Commissioning Board (JCB) to commission mental health services. Simultaneously, the Somerset Partnerships Health and Social Care NHS Trust was set-up as a combined health and social care services provider; for the first time in England, the majority of social services mental health staff transferred their employment to this Trust. The JCB commissioned an evaluation of the impact of these innovations on users and carers, staff and senior officers and members in the organisations concerned. In the course of the research, one concept frequently recurred as a source of both optimism and concern: 'culture'. However, the meanings attributed to this term varied significantly between stakeholders. After summarising the methodology and the results to date of the evaluation, this paper briefly reviews the conceptions of culture in the literature on organisations, and introduces a taxonomy for discussing culture. That taxonomy is then deployed to explore the ways in which the notion of 'culture' is being applied to and within the combined Trust in Somerset, and the implications of those applications for local practice and national policy around partnership.

  14. A Topic Space Oriented User Group Discovering Scheme in Social Network: A Trust Chain Based Interest Measuring Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Dong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, user group has become an effective platform for information sharing and communicating among users in social network sites. In present work, we propose a single topic user group discovering scheme, which includes three phases: topic impact evaluation, interest degree measurement, and trust chain based discovering, to enable selecting influential topic and discovering users into a topic oriented group. Our main works include (1 an overview of proposed scheme and its related definitions; (2 topic space construction method based on topic relatedness clustering and its impact (influence degree and popularity degree evaluation; (3 a trust chain model to take user relation network topological information into account with a strength classification perspective; (4 an interest degree (user explicit and implicit interest degree evaluation method based on trust chain among users; and (5 a topic space oriented user group discovering method to group core users according to their explicit interest degrees and to predict ordinary users under implicit interest and user trust chain. Finally, experimental results are given to explain effectiveness and feasibility of our scheme.

  15. Genetic influences are virtually absent for trust.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A M Van Lange

    Full Text Available Over the past decades, numerous twin studies have revealed moderate to high heritability estimates for individual differences in a wide range of human traits, including cognitive ability, psychiatric disorders, and personality traits. Even factors that are generally believed to be environmental in nature have been shown to be under genetic control, albeit modest. Is such heritability also present in social traits that are conceptualized as causes and consequences of social interactions or in other ways strongly shaped by behavior of other people? Here we examine a population-based sample of 1,012 twins and relatives. We show that the genetic influence on generalized trust in other people (trust-in-others: h2 = 5%, ns, and beliefs regarding other people's trust in the self (trust-in-self: h2 = 13%, ns, is virtually absent. As test-retest reliability for both scales were found to be moderate or high (r = .76 and r = .53, respectively in an independent sample, we conclude that all variance in trust is likely to be accounted for by non-shared environmental influences. We show that, relative to cognitive abilities, psychiatric disorders, and classic personality variables, genetic influences are smaller for trust, and propose that experiences with or observations of the behavior of other people shape trust more strongly than other traits.

  16. Trust in Internet Election

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Randi; Ronquillo, Lorena; Schürmann, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the Decryption and Counting Ceremony held in conjunction with the internet voting trial on election day in the Ministry of Local Government and Regional Development of Norway in 2013. We examine the organizers' ambition of making the decryption and counting of electronic votes...... public in order to sustain trust in internet voting. We introduce a pragmatic approach to trust that emphasises the inseparability of truth from witnessing it. Based on this and on a description of how the event was made observable and how the complexities in the counting process were disclosed, we...... discuss what we term economy of truth from the perspective of the IT community involved in the ceremony. We claim that broadening the economy of truth by including more explicitly social and political perspectives in the ceremony, and in internet elections in general, and how witnessing is brought about...

  17. Trusted dynamic level scheduling based on Bayes trust model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; ZENG GuoSun

    2007-01-01

    A kind of trust mechanism-based task scheduling model was presented. Referring to the trust relationship models of social persons, trust relationship is built among Grid nodes, and the trustworthiness of nodes is evaluated by utilizing the Bayes method. Integrating the trustworthiness of nodes into a Dynamic Level Scheduling (DLS) algorithm, the Trust-Dynamic Level Scheduling (Trust-DLS) algorithm is proposed. Theoretical analysis and simulations prove that the Trust-DLS algorithm can efficiently meet the requirement of Grid tasks in trust, sacrificing fewer time costs, and assuring the execution of tasks in a security way in Grid environment.

  18. Two dimensions of trust in physicians in OECD-countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarinen, Arttu Olavi; Räsänen, Pekka; Kouvo, Antti

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse citizens' trust in physicians in 22 OECD countries. The authors measure trust in physicians using items on generalised and particularised trust. Individual-level data are received from the ISSP Research Group (2011). The authors also utilise macro variables drawn from different data banks. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and xtlogit regression models. The main micro-level hypothesis is that low self-reported health is strongly associated with lower trust in physicians. The second micro-level hypothesis is that frequent meetings with physicians result in higher trust. The third micro-level hypothesis assumes that males, and older and better educated respondents, express higher trust compared to others. The first macro-level hypothesis is that lower income inequality leads to higher trust in physicians. The second macro-level hypothesis is that greater physician density leads to higher trust in physicians. The authors found that the influence of individual and macro-level characteristics varies between trust types. Results indicate that both trust types are clearly associated with individual-level determinants. However, only general trust in physicians has weak associations with macro-level indicators (mainly physician density) and therefore on institutional cross-country differences. It seems that particularised trust in a physician's skills is more restricted to the individuals' health and their own experiences meeting doctors, whereas general trust likely reflects attitudes towards the prevalent profession in the country. The findings hold significance for healthcare systems research and for research concerning social trust generally.

  19. Moral opinion polarization and the erosion of trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Carolin

    2016-07-01

    Since Puntam's seminal work on declining levels of social capital, the question of how social trust is formed has reached unprecedented heights of critical enquiry. While most of the current research concentrates on ethnic diversity and income inequality as the main influences driving down generalized trust, we focus on opinion polarization as another potential impact factor on trust. In more detail, we investigate the extent to which polarization over morally charged issues such as homsexuality, abortion and euthanasia affects individuals' likelihood to trust others. We hypothesize that moral issues have a natural tendency to divide societies' opinions into opposing poles and, thus, to challenge social cohesion in modern civil societies. Based on hierarchical analyses of the fifth wave of the World Values Survey (WVS) - comprising a sample of 39 countries - our results reveal that individuals living in countries characterized by more opinion polarization tend to have less trust in other people.

  20. The Influences of Social Self-Efficacy on Social Trust and Social Capital--A Case Study of Facebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sheng-Yi; Wang, Shih-Ting; Liu, Feng; Hu, Da-Chain; Hwang, Wu-Yuin

    2012-01-01

    Facebook is currently the most popular social networking service in the world. With such tremendous influence on community networks, Facebook has been attracting considerable attention both from the media and academia. A review of the literature indicates that most researchers are concerned primarily with the influence of personal traits on online…

  1. On Tradeoffs between Trust Accuracy and Resource Consumption in Communications and Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-11

    in mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs). We study this tradeoff in a framework that balances the accuracy of evaluated trust with resource consumption...Jøsang, Proc. Network and Distributed Systems Security (NDSS’99) Symp., 1999. [3] M. Ruddy, 12th Int’l Command and Control Research and Technology

  2. Freedom Compromised. Habituation and Magical Sociality as Constitutive Variants in Non-Fundamental Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liisberg, Sune

    of inspiration in phenomenological philosophers, namely Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Jean-Paul Sartre. As an intermezzo I reflect upon the experience of a compromised personal freedom, which I consider in relation to the examples that I give and to our conference theme, ‘trusting the new', as well....

  3. Determinants of public trust in complementary and alternative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groenewegen Peter P

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Netherlands, public trust in conventional medicine is relatively high. There is reason to believe that public trust in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is rated lower. The aim of this study is to gain insight into public trust in CAM and the determinants that lie at the root of it. We hypothesized that public trust in CAM is related to (perceived institutional guarantees, media information on CAM, information from people's social network, personal experiences, the role of general practitioners (GPs and trust in conventional medicine. Methods A postal questionnaire on public trust in CAM was mailed to 1358 members of the Health Care Consumer Panel. 65% of the questionnaires were returned. Data were analysed using frequencies, ANOVA, post hoc testing and linear regression analyses. Results In the total sample, the level of public trust in CAM was a 5.05 on average on a scale of 1-10. 40.7% was CAM user (current or past and displayed significantly higher levels of trust toward CAM than CAM non users. In the total sample, public trust in CAM was related to institutional guarantees, negative media information, positive and negative information reported by their social network and people's personal experiences with CAM. For non users, trust is mostly associated with institutional guarantees. For users, personal experiences are most important. For both users and non users, trust levels in CAM are affected by negative media information. Public trust in CAM is for CAM users related to positive information and for non users to negative information from their network. Conclusions In the Netherlands, CAM is trusted less than conventional medicine. The hypotheses on institutional guarantees, media information, information from the network and people's personal experiences are confirmed by our study for the total sample, CAM non users and users. The other hypotheses are rejected.

  4. Evaluation of social interaction, task management, and trust among dental hygiene students in a collaborative learning environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylor, Catherine D; Keselyak, Nancy T; Simmer-Beck, Melanie; Tira, Daniel

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of collaborative learning on the development of social interaction, task management, and trust in dental hygiene students. These three traits were assessed with the Teamwork Assessment Scale in two different learning environments (traditional lecture/lab and collaborative learning environment). A convenience sample of fifty-six entry-level dental hygiene students taking an introductory/preclinic course at two metropolitan area dental hygiene programs provided comparable experimental and control groups. Factor scores were computed for the three traits, and comparisons were conducted using the Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsh multiple comparison procedure among specific cell comparisons generated from a two-factor repeated measures ANOVA. The results indicate that the collaborative learning environment influenced dental hygiene students positively regarding the traits of social interaction, task management, and trust. However, comparing dental hygiene students to undergraduate students overall indicates that dental hygiene students already possess somewhat higher levels of these traits. Future studies on active learning strategies should examine factors such as student achievement and explore other possible active learning methodologies.

  5. Computationally modeling interpersonal trust

    OpenAIRE

    Jin Joo eLee; Brad eKnox; Jolie eBaumann; Cynthia eBreazeal; David eDeSteno

    2013-01-01

    We present a computational model capable of predicting—above human accuracy—the degree of trust a person has toward their novel partner by observing the trust-related nonverbal cues expressed in their social interaction. We summarize our prior work, in which we identify nonverbal cues that signal untrustworthy behavior and also demonstrate the human mind’s readiness to interpret those cues to assess the trustworthiness of a social robot. We demonstrate that domain knowledge gained from our pr...

  6. Chimpanzees Trust Their Friends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, Jan M; Herrmann, Esther

    2016-01-25

    The identification and recruitment of trustworthy partners represents an important adaptive challenge for any species that relies heavily on cooperation [1, 2]. From an evolutionary perspective, trust is difficult to account for as it involves, by definition, a risk of non-reciprocation and defection by cheaters [3, 4]. One solution for this problem is to form close emotional bonds, i.e., friendships, which enable trust even in contexts where cheating would be profitable [5]. Little is known about the evolutionary origins of the human tendency to form close social bonds to overcome the trust problem. Studying chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), one of our closest living relatives, is one way of identifying these origins. While a growing body of research indicates that at least some of the properties of close human relationships find parallels in the social bonds of chimpanzees [6-10] and that chimpanzees extend favors preferentially toward selected individuals [11-14], it is unclear whether such interactions are based on trust. To fill this gap in knowledge, we observed the social interactions of a group of chimpanzees and established dyadic friendship relations. We then presented chimpanzees with a modified, non-verbal version of the human trust game and found that chimpanzees trust their friends significantly more frequently than their non-friends. These results suggest that trust within closely bonded dyads is not unique to humans but rather has its evolutionary roots in the social relationships of our closest primate relatives.

  7. Trusting Social Media as a Source of Health Information: Online Surveys Comparing the United States, Korea, and Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hayeon; Omori, Kikuko; Kim, Jihyun; Tenzek, Kelly E; Morey Hawkins, Jennifer; Lin, Wan-Ying; Kim, Yong-Chan; Jung, Joo-Young

    2016-03-14

    The Internet has increasingly become a popular source of health information by connecting individuals with health content, experts, and support. More and more, individuals turn to social media and Internet sites to share health information and experiences. Although online health information seeking occurs worldwide, limited empirical studies exist examining cross-cultural differences in perceptions about user-generated, experience-based information compared to expertise-based information sources. To investigate if cultural variations exist in patterns of online health information seeking, specifically in perceptions of online health information sources. It was hypothesized that Koreans and Hongkongers, compared to Americans, would be more likely to trust and use experience-based knowledge shared in social Internet sites, such as social media and online support groups. Conversely, Americans, compared to Koreans and Hongkongers, would value expertise-based knowledge prepared and approved by doctors or professional health providers more. Survey questionnaires were developed in English first and then translated into Korean and Chinese. The back-translation method ensured the standardization of questions. Surveys were administered using a standardized recruitment strategy and data collection methods. A total of 826 participants living in metropolitan areas from the United States (n=301), Korea (n=179), and Hong Kong (n=337) participated in the study. We found significant cultural differences in information processing preferences for online health information. A planned contrast test revealed that Koreans and Hongkongers showed more trust in experience-based health information sources (blogs: t451.50=11.21, Ponline support group: t455.71=9.30, Ponline health information. Further discussion is included regarding effective communication strategies in providing quality health information.

  8. Does trust pay off?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. de Bliek (Ruben)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIt is believed that a society's level of trust in strangers, also known as generalized or interpersonal trust, is an accurate reflection of the quality of civil society and of the success of its accompanying economy. Two unresolved issues remain. The first issue concerns the generalizabi

  9. Theoretical interpretation of the concept of trust in sociology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Kuzmuk

    2015-03-01

    In this article the theoretical interpretation of the phenomenon of «trust» to a comprehensive study of the concept and a clear statement on social trust. Signs of social trust can be considered in future studies as indicators of social phenomenon of trust and fixed in empirical social research.

  10. Referrals from general practitioners to a social services department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, M G

    1983-01-01

    One year's referrals from general practitioners to a social services department were studied. There was a low referral rate and a bias towards women, the elderly and the less affluent. The referrals were predominantly made for practical help with problems of ill health. A high proportion of clients were allocated to non-social work staff, and the social service intervention, generally of short duration, showed a sympathetic response to the practical requests of general practitioners. The limited use of social workers by doctors is considered to be the result of ignorance or scepticism about psychodynamic social work skills. Closer liaison between general practitioners and social workers, and a clearer presentation by social workers of their professional skills, are suggested solutions to this problem.

  11. SQTrust: Social and QoS Trust Management and Its Application to Mission-Oriented Mobile Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-15

    evaluating trust of mobile nodes in mobile ad hoc network ( MANET ) environments. We develop a novel model-based approach to identify the best...composite trust metric as a basis for evaluating trust of mobile nodes in mobile ad hoc network ( MANET ) environments. We develop a novel model-based...credentials, and relationships." Trust manage- ment in mobile ad hoc networks ( MANETs ) is needed when participating nodes, without any previous in

  12. Social Capital and the Role of Trust in Aspirations for Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Carol

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers the role of social capital in the aspirations for higher education of a group of socially disadvantaged girls. Drawing on data from a longitudinal, ethnographic case study of an underperforming secondary school, the paper considers current conceptualisations of social capital and its role in educational ambitions. The paper…

  13. Social Capital and the Role of Trust in Aspirations for Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Carol

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers the role of social capital in the aspirations for higher education of a group of socially disadvantaged girls. Drawing on data from a longitudinal, ethnographic case study of an underperforming secondary school, the paper considers current conceptualisations of social capital and its role in educational ambitions. The paper…

  14. Predictors of trust in low-income, minority neighborhoods in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzini, Luisa

    2008-11-01

    Given the importance of trust to population health, it is also important to understand individual and neighborhood predictors of trust among residents of low-income and minority communities. In this paper, we investigate predictors of trust among residents of 98 low-income and minority neighborhoods in Texas. Census data and survey data on 1,966 residents provided information on individual and neighborhood characteristics. Predictors of trust were modeled using multi-level probit models. We found that linguistic heterogeneities, but not racial/ethnic diversity nor income inequality, were associated with general trust. More detailed analyses indicated that people tend to trust people in the neighborhood more than those who belong to the same racial/ethnic group. Interventions in diverse communities should focus on increasing social integration among residents in order to reach higher levels of trust, contributing to positive health outcomes.

  15. It's better to give than to receive: the role of social support, trust, and participation on health-related social networking sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hether, Heather J; Murphy, Sheila T; Valente, Thomas W

    2014-12-01

    Nearly 60% of American adults and 80% of Internet users have sought health information online. Moreover, Internet users are no longer solely passive consumers of online health content; they are active producers as well. Social media, such as social networking sites, are increasingly being used as online venues for the exchange of health-related information and advice. However, little is known about how participation on health-related social networking sites affects users. Research has shown that women participate more on social networking sites and social networks are more influential among same-sex members. Therefore, this study examined how participation on a social networking site about pregnancy influenced members' health-related attitudes and behaviors. The authors surveyed 114 pregnant members of 8 popular pregnancy-related sites. Analyses revealed that time spent on the sites was less predictive of health-related outcomes than more qualitative assessments such as trust in the sites. Furthermore, providing support was associated with the most outcomes, including seeking more information from additional sources and following recommendations posted on the sites. The implications of these findings, as well as directions for future research, are discussed.

  16. Facial resemblance enhances trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBruine, Lisa M

    2002-07-07

    Organisms are expected to be sensitive to cues of genetic relatedness when making decisions about social behaviour. Relatedness can be assessed in several ways, one of which is phenotype matching: the assessment of similarity between others' traits and either one's own traits or those of known relatives. One candidate cue of relatedness in humans is facial resemblance. Here, I report the effects of an experimental manipulation of facial resemblance in a two-person sequential trust game. Subjects were shown faces of ostensible playing partners manipulated to resemble either themselves or an unknown person. Resemblance to the subject's own face raised the incidence of trusting a partner, but had no effect on the incidence of selfish betrayals of the partner's trust. Control subjects playing with identical pictures failed to show such an effect. In a second experiment, resemblance of the playing partner to a familiar (famous) person had no effect on either trusting or betrayals of trust.

  17. General systems theory and scientific interpretation of social reality

    OpenAIRE

    Kaluzhsky, Mikhail

    2001-01-01

    An article about the use of the methodology of general systems theory and the theory of self-organization as a methodological basis of scientific interpretation of social reality. The author analyzes the role of ideology and propaganda in the different concepts of interpretation of social reality (social Darwinism, Marxism, etc.). The main conclusion of the paper is the need deideologization scientific knowledge.

  18. The transformation of trust in China's alternative food networks: disruption, reconstruction, and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Yu. Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Food safety issues in China have received much scholarly attention, yet few studies systematically examined this matter through the lens of trust. More importantly, little is known about the transformation of different types of trust in the dynamic process of food production, provision, and consumption. We consider trust as an evolving interdependent relationship between different actors. We used the Beijing County Fair, a prominent ecological farmers' market in China, as an example to examine the transformation of trust in China's alternative food networks. We argue that although there has been a disruption of institutional trust among the general public since 2008 when the melamine-tainted milk scandal broke out, reconstruction of individual trust and development of organizational trust have been observed, along with the emergence and increasing popularity of alternative food networks. Based on more than six months of fieldwork on the emerging ecological agriculture sector in 13 provinces across China as well as monitoring of online discussions and posts, we analyze how various social factors - including but not limited to direct and indirect reciprocity, information, endogenous institutions, and altruism - have simultaneously contributed to the transformation of trust in China's alternative food networks. The findings not only complement current social theories of trust, but also highlight an important yet understudied phenomenon whereby informal social mechanisms have been partially substituting for formal institutions and gradually have been building trust against the backdrop of the food safety crisis in China.

  19. Modeling trust context in networks

    CERN Document Server

    Adali, Sibel

    2013-01-01

    We make complex decisions every day, requiring trust in many different entities for different reasons. These decisions are not made by combining many isolated trust evaluations. Many interlocking factors play a role, each dynamically impacting the others.? In this brief, 'trust context' is defined as the system level description of how the trust evaluation process unfolds.Networks today are part of almost all human activity, supporting and shaping it. Applications increasingly incorporate new interdependencies and new trust contexts. Social networks connect people and organizations throughout

  20. Towards Trust Engineering for Opportunistic Cloud Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuada, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The systematic review methodology has been employed to review trust related studies in cloud computing. It was observed that trusted computing technologies and reputation based approaches are the main approaches to trust engineering in cloud computing. Also, trusted third party approaches...... and the deployment model play a significant role in enhancing trust between service providers and consumers. It was observed that the concept of trust is used loosely without any formal specification in cloud computing discussions and trust engineering in general. As a first step towards addressing this problem, we...... have contextualized the formal trust specification in multi-agent environments for cloud computing....

  1. Economic Strain and Perceptions of Social Cohesion in Europe: Does Institutional Trust Matter? (forthcoming)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Andrews (Rhys); S.R. Jilke (Sebastian); S.G.J. Van de Walle (Steven)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The degree to which different social groups get along is a key indicator of the cohesiveness of a society. This study examines perceptions of social cohesion amongst Europeans and explains variations in those perceptions by considering the separate and combined effects

  2. Mapping the social side of pre-service teachers : Connecting closeness, trust, and efficacy with performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liou, Y.-H.; Daly, A.J.; Canrinus, E.T.; Forbes, C.A.; Moolenaar, N.M.; Cornelissen, F.; Van Lare, M.; Hsiao, J.

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory study foregrounds the important, but often understudied social side of pre-service teacher development and its relation to teaching performance in one university-based teacher preparation program in the US. We examine the extent to which pre-service elementary teachers’ social

  3. Trust vs. Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Mogensen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The three social phenomena -- norms, trust, and crisis -- are in this paper combined into one model that illustrates their function and relationship. Crisis is seen as a reaction to serious violations of expectations that leave people disoriented, insecure about situational norms, and unable to judge whom to trust. One logical solution to a crisis is to rebuild a shared understanding of the norms involved in any given context. Banking is used as a case. Central concepts are borrowed from Niklas Luhmann Trust (1968, Alf Ross Directives and Norms (1967, and Arthur G. Neal National Trauma & Collective Memory (1998.

  4. Governance, Trust and Taxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weihe, Guri; Joensen, E. Juanna Schröter

    This paper examines the role of social capital (trust) vis-à-vis the propensity of a country to be a tax haven. The empirical analysis corroborates that better governed countries have a higher ceteris paribus probability to be tax havens. However, social capital counteracts the effect of governance...... quality. This effect is so strong that the partial effect of governance quality is reversed for countries with the trust index in the top quartile – making these high trust countries less likely to be tax havens – even as governance quality is increased. Thus it is crucial to consider the interaction...... between institutions and social capital, since the same governance institutions have a different impact on the tax haven propensity for countries with different social capital....

  5. Patient care: Is interpersonal trust missing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A Bourne

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Health statistics and studies in the Caribbean have omitted interpersonal trust in their investigations. Aims : This study will examine the effect of interpersonal trust and other conditions on psychosocial subjective wellbeing and self-reported health, in order to assess the significance of interpersonal trust, as well as other socio-demographic factors on health. Materials and Method : The current study utilized primary data commissioned by the Centre of Leadership and Governance, Department of Government, the University of West Indies, Mona, Jamaica, between July and August 2006. It was a nationally representative probability sampling survey. A sample of 1,338 respondents was interviewed with a detailed 166-item questionnaire. Results : Generally, the psychosocial subjective wellbeing of Jamaicans was high (mean = 6.8 ΁ 1.8, and self-reported health was moderately high (mean = 6.3 ΁ 2.6. The current study has revealed that income, political system, subjective social class, employment status, and interpersonal trust determine psychosocial subjective wellbeing as well as self-reported health. Interpersonal trust accounted for between 9.4 to 10.4% of the explanatory power of the wellbeing and self-reported health of Jamaicans. Conclusion : The current study highlights that the determinants of health include interpersonal trust. It is critical to point out here that trust must be taken into consideration in any evaluation of health statistics, as it is a factor of subjective wellbeing and health. It is within this context that clinicians need to incorporate interpersonal trust along with other conditions, as it is a part of the psychosocial determinants of health, subjective wellbeing, and health treatment.

  6. Trust and Involvement in Tourism Social Media and Web-Based Travel Information Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munar, Ana Maria; KR. Steen Jacobsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    .0 information sources and scrutinises influence of electronic social media on holidaymakers' information sharing, based on a summer season survey in the mature and well-known destination of Mallorca, Spain. Empirical evidence is presented on perceived trustworthiness of social media platforms and other Internet......While utilisation of electronic social media is increasingly relevant as tourism practices, there is still a deficiency of empirical research on tourists' creation and use of various types of online content. This study maps and explores Scandinavian tourists' perceptions of Web 1.0 and Web 2...... intensity, hedonic aspects and utilitarian values of tourist information in relation to interaction aspects of social media, in a context of holiday choices and online booking....

  7. Social environment and frequent attendance in Danish general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsted, Peter; Olesen, Frede

    2005-01-01

    inequalities in health or whether social factors in themselves determine the use of general practice. AIM: To examine if social factors are associated with frequent attendance in general practice after adjusting for physical and psychological health variables. DESIGN OF STUDY: Population-based cross...... during the period November 1997-October 1998. A questionnaire about physical, psychological and social factors was sent to the patients. The associations between social factors and frequent attendance were adjusted for physical and psychological health and tendency towards somatisation. RESULTS: A total...

  8. Psychodynamic group treatment for generalized social phobia

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Zippin Knijnik; Flávio Kapczinski; Eduardo Chachamovich; Regina Margis; Claudio Laks Eizirik

    2004-01-01

    OBJETIVOS: O objetivo deste estudo é verificar a efetividade do tratamento psicodinâmico em grupo de pacientes com fobia social generalizada. MÉTODOS: 30 pacientes foram incluídos em um estudo randomizado, simples-cego, comparando Terapia Psicodinâmica de Grupo (TPG) com um Grupo de Controle Placebo com Credibilidade (CPC). A TPG foi conduzida em 12 sessões de terapia de orientação psicodinâmica em grupo. Os pacientes do grupo controle receberam um pacote de aulas-discussões e tratamento de a...

  9. An Investigation of Children's Peer Trust across Culture: Is the Composition of Peer Trust Universal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Lucy R.; Rotenberg, Ken J.; Petrocchi, Serena; Lecciso, Flavia; Sakai, Atsushi; Maeshiro, Kazumi; Judson, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The components of children's trust in same-gender peers (trust beliefs, ascribed trustworthiness, and dyadic reciprocal trust) were examined in samples of 8-11-year-olds from the UK, Italy, and Japan. Trust was assessed by children's ratings of the extent to which same-gender classmates kept promises and kept secrets. Social relations analyses…

  10. Contacts-based Trust Calculating Algorithm in Mobile Social Networks%MSNS中基于手机通讯录的信任度计算方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘凯; 金光; 何加铭; 王千

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of mobile social networks, people are increasingly concerned about security issues. Therefore,the research on the users�trust for security in MSNS is very significant. By making full use of phone contacts and improving the existing contacts,this paper presents a trust calculating algorithm according to mobile phone contacts in MSNS. It will be helpful for mobile phone users to reduce threats. This method divides the user trust among the MSNS users into two parts:one is in phone contacts and the other is out of phone contacts. Initially we will rate the trust value for users in the phone contacts,and then we can calculate the trust value of those users who are not in the phone contacts by the recommendation information provided by the trusted users. This method can renew the users�trust value immediately according to the users�different social behavior. Finally,the simulation results show that the trust calculating algorithm is reasonable and effective.%随着手机移动社交的飞速发展,安全问题越来越受到人们的关注。因此,研究用户间的信任度对于移动社交网络的安全具有重要意义。充分利用并改进现有的手机通讯录,提出了移动社交网络中一种基于手机通讯录的信任度计算方法,帮助手机用户减少面临的威胁。该方法将移动社交网络中用户之间的信任度分为直接信任度与间接信任度。初始时对手机通讯录中的联系人进行信任度评分,由可信联系人的推荐信息来计算不在通讯录中联系人的信任度。根据用户在社交活动中不同的社交行为,对通讯录中的联系人信任度进行实时更新。最后,通过仿真实验验证了该方法的合理性与有效性。

  11. Study of Public Trust of Enterprises and Corporate Social Responsibility%企业公信力与企业社会责任研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周晓唯; 杨静

    2013-01-01

    随着国内外企业社会责任思想体系的成熟,其内涵和界定边缘也在不断地外延。而越来越多的企业信用丑闻曝出,让企业的公信力已经成为影响企业社会责任的一个重要因素。企业公信力和企业社会责任相辅相成,但企业公信力更易于标准化建设,因此有必要构建企业公信力,以促进企业社会责任更好地发展。%With the maturity of ideological thoughts of corporate social responsibility home and abroad ,its connotation and the edge of definition are expanding .While more and more corporate credit scandals are exposed ,so public trust of enterprises has become an important factor that damage corporate social re-sponsibility .Public trust of enterprises and corporate social responsibility complement each other ,but the former’s construction can be easily standardized .Therefore ,it is necessary to put forward the construc-tion of public trust of enterprises to promote better development of corporate social responsibility .

  12. Impact of social prescribing on general practice workload and polypharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, A M; McCauley, F; McCarron, M O

    2017-07-01

    Social prescribing has emerged as a useful tool for helping patients overcome some of the social and behavioural determinants of poor health. There has been little research on the impact of social prescribing on use of primary healthcare resources. This study sought to determine whether social prescribing activities influenced patient-general practitioner (GP) contacts and polypharmacy. Quality-improvement design with social prescribing activity interventions from an urban general practice in Northern Ireland. Patients over 65 years of age with a chronic condition who attended their GP frequently or had multiple medications were offered a social prescribing activity. Participants' contacts with GP and the new repeat prescriptions before and during the social prescribing activity were measured. The total number of repeat prescriptions per patient was compared at the time of referral and 6-12 months later. Indications for referral, primary diagnoses and reasons for declining participation in a social prescribing activity after referral were prospectively recorded. Sixty-eight patients agreed to participate but only 28 (41%) engaged in a prescribed social activity. There was no statistically significant difference in GP contacts (visits to GP, home visits or telephone calls) or number of new repeat prescriptions between referral and completion of 12 weeks of social prescribing activity. Similarly there was no statistically significant difference in the total number of repeat prescriptions between referral and 6-12 months after social prescribing activity in either intention to treat or per protocol analyses. Social prescribing participants had similar demographic factors. Mental health issues (anxiety and/or depression) were more common among participants than those who were referred but declined participation in a social prescribing activity (P = 0.022). While social prescribing may help patients' self-esteem and well-being, it may not decrease GP workload. Further

  13. Restoring stakeholders’ trust in multinationals’ tax planning practices with corporate social responsibility (CSR)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jallai, Ave-Geidi; Peeters, Bruno; Gribnau, Hans; Badisco, Jo

    2017-01-01

    This contribution discusses the tax planning behaviour of big corporations and investigates Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as a tool to battle the issue. It will be argued that certain legal tax planning strategies of multinationals are not acceptable to local communities and the public in

  14. The primacy of trust in the social networks and livelihoods of women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and livelihoods of rural Tanzanian women engaged in agro-entrepreneurial activity. ... and their perceptions of the characteristics of women business leaders and ... Three data collection techniques were employed: (1) a Personal Digital ... of employing this technology to create value by harnessing social capital and ...

  15. In Preparation for Adulthood: Exploring Civic Participation and Social Trust among Young Minorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Diann Cameron

    2009-01-01

    The inclusion of minorities in the civic affairs of society is critical. Research indicates many of today's youth are less likely to engage in meaningful civic activities and more likely to experience social exclusion because of disparities in educational settings, economic disadvantages, and health disparities. This phenomenon is more likely to…

  16. Restoring stakeholders’ trust in multinationals’ tax planning practices with corporate social responsibility (CSR)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jallai, Ave-Geidi; Peeters, Bruno; Gribnau, Hans; Badisco, Jo

    2017-01-01

    This contribution discusses the tax planning behaviour of big corporations and investigates Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as a tool to battle the issue. It will be argued that certain legal tax planning strategies of multinationals are not acceptable to local communities and the public in ge

  17. Self-Monitoring as a Means to Generalize Social Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Social skills are important for success in school as well as in life. Social skills training (SST) has been effective in teaching students required skills within the context of the training site, but often these have not generalized to additional settings (DuPaul & Eckert, 1994). This study researches the effect of adding self-management to an…

  18. Computationally Modeling Interpersonal Trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Joo eLee

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a computational model capable of predicting—above human accuracy—the degree of trust a person has toward their novel partner by observing the trust-related nonverbal cues expressed in their social interaction. We summarize our prior work, in which we identify nonverbal cues that signal untrustworthy behavior and also demonstrate the human mind’s readiness to interpret those cues to assess the trustworthiness of a social robot. We demonstrate that domain knowledge gained from our prior work using human-subjects experiments, when incorporated into the feature engineering process, permits a computational model to outperform both human predictions and a baseline model built in naivete' of this domain knowledge. We then present the construction of hidden Markov models to incorporate temporal relationships among the trust-related nonverbal cues. By interpreting the resulting learned structure, we observe that models built to emulate different levels of trust exhibit different sequences of nonverbal cues. From this observation, we derived sequence-based temporal features that further improve the accuracy of our computational model. Our multi-step research process presented in this paper combines the strength of experimental manipulation and machine learning to not only design a computational trust model but also to further our understanding of the dynamics of interpersonal trust.

  19. Computationally modeling interpersonal trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Joo; Knox, W Bradley; Wormwood, Jolie B; Breazeal, Cynthia; Desteno, David

    2013-01-01

    We present a computational model capable of predicting-above human accuracy-the degree of trust a person has toward their novel partner by observing the trust-related nonverbal cues expressed in their social interaction. We summarize our prior work, in which we identify nonverbal cues that signal untrustworthy behavior and also demonstrate the human mind's readiness to interpret those cues to assess the trustworthiness of a social robot. We demonstrate that domain knowledge gained from our prior work using human-subjects experiments, when incorporated into the feature engineering process, permits a computational model to outperform both human predictions and a baseline model built in naiveté of this domain knowledge. We then present the construction of hidden Markov models to investigate temporal relationships among the trust-related nonverbal cues. By interpreting the resulting learned structure, we observe that models built to emulate different levels of trust exhibit different sequences of nonverbal cues. From this observation, we derived sequence-based temporal features that further improve the accuracy of our computational model. Our multi-step research process presented in this paper combines the strength of experimental manipulation and machine learning to not only design a computational trust model but also to further our understanding of the dynamics of interpersonal trust.

  20. Influence of Cultural Cognition, Social Aspect of Culture, and Personality on Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-31

    imposition of cognition load (password-like characters recall) impacted the deliberative controlled information processing (i.e., effortful utilitarian ...their study of business ethics and ethnicity, noted that the business trends of Malay and Indian businesses are slowly adopting the business trends...language, and schooling, it is important to establish differences in cognition, social and personality of interest in this study. Malaysia‟s ethic

  1. In God we trust? Neural measures reveal lower social conformity among non-religious individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiruchselvam, Ravi; Gopi, Yashoda; Kilekwang, Leonard; Harper, Jessica; Gross, James J

    2017-02-21

    Even in predominantly religious societies, there are substantial individual differences in religious commitment. Why is this? One possibility is that differences in social conformity (i.e., the tendency to think and behave as others do) underlie inclination towards religiosity. However, the link between religiosity and conformity has not yet been directly examined. In this study, we tested the notion that non-religious individuals show dampened social conformity, using both self-reported and neural (EEG-based ERPs) measures of sensitivity to others' influence. Non-religious versus religious undergraduate subjects completed an experimental task that assessed levels of conformity in a domain unrelated to religion (i.e., in judgments of facial attractiveness). Findings showed that, although both groups yielded to conformity pressures at the self-report level, non-religious individuals did not yield to such pressures in their neural responses. These findings highlight a novel link between religiosity and social conformity, and hold implications for prominent theories about the psychological functions of religion.

  2. Neural correlates of speech anticipatory anxiety in generalized social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorberbaum, Jeffrey P; Kose, Samet; Johnson, Michael R; Arana, George W; Sullivan, Lindsay K; Hamner, Mark B; Ballenger, James C; Lydiard, R Bruce; Brodrick, Peter S; Bohning, Daryl E; George, Mark S

    2004-12-22

    Patients with generalized social phobia fear embarrassment in most social situations. Little is known about its functional neuroanatomy. We studied BOLD-fMRI brain activity while generalized social phobics and healthy controls anticipated making public speeches. With anticipation minus rest, 8 phobics compared to 6 controls showed greater subcortical, limbic, and lateral paralimbic activity (pons, striatum, amygdala/uncus/anterior parahippocampus, insula, temporal pole)--regions important in automatic emotional processing--and less cortical activity (dorsal anterior cingulate/prefrontal cortex)--regions important in cognitive processing. Phobics may become so anxious, they cannot think clearly or vice versa.

  3. The Meanings of "Culture" in Health and Social Care: A Case Study of the Combined Trust in Somerset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Edward; Towell, David; Gulliver, Pauline

    2001-01-01

    Evaluated how British health and local authorities integrated mental health services into general health and social services. Stakeholder interviews and surveys showed that the recurrent theme of culture meant different things to different people. Shared culture was widely believed to lead to seamless service and collaboration, but low staff…

  4. Beyond the United States and Japan: Testing Yamagishi's Emancipation Theory of Trust across 31 Nations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghiu, Mirona A.; Vignoles, Vivian L.; Smith, Peter B.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the relationship between Individualism/Collectivism and generalized social trust across 31 European nations participating in the European Social Survey. Using multilevel regression analyses, the current study provides the first empirical investigation of the effects of cultural norms of Individualism/Collectivism on generalized social…

  5. CEO and Businesses are Losing Trust: Comparison of EU, USA, Czech and Slovak Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denisa Kasl Kollmannová

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an in-depth study based on open-source data analysis (Edelman Trust Barometer and EuropeanCommunication Monitor concerning the general loss of trust, which both commercial companies, governments and,on a minor scale, also NGOs have been experiencing since the Global Financial Crisis in 2008. Trust is an essentialline of corporate communications, public relations and reputation management of companies and it is personalizedby the CEOs and top management. According to the data, the trust of CEOs saw the biggest decline in the U.S.while in Slovakia the trust is still quite high; on the contrary, in the E.U. in general, the level of trust of CEOs reacheda historical minimum of 30%. The overall shift from trusting the traditional authorities, such as government, CEOsand offi cial representatives to academics, stakeholders, employees and general “vox populi” can be seen globally.The aim of this article is to defi ne trust and the social and communications context of building trust as a key factorin a company´s reputation. Finally, clear managerial implications on reputation management focusing on Czech andSlovak CEOs and businesses will be given.

  6. 信任、治理策略与合资企业社会困境%Trust, Governance Strategies and Social Dilemma of Joint Ventures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛晋洁; 史本山

    2016-01-01

    Although joint ventures have become a universally recognized organization form in business activities, it is reported that a considerable part of them dissolve far rapidly than assumed.For joint venture management, a primary challenge is how to settle the social dilemma.Social dilemma management capability directly affects joint ventures′effective operation.Social dilemma of joint ventures embodies the self-interest rational choice of joint venture partners lead to long-term failure of a joint venture. Therefore, it is important for researchers and practitioners to explore the influencing factors and governance strategies of social di-lemma in joint ventures and take advantages of these factors and governance strategies to improve mutual cooperation, decrease partner opportunism and settle social dilemma in Chinese society. Based on the social dilemma theory, transaction cost theory and relational exchange theory, the model of impact of trust on contract governance, relational governance and behavior of joint ventures is established.This paper employs data collected from 242 joint ventures and adopts structure equation model to examine effects of trust on two governance strategies, cooperation and partner opportunism.Meanwhile, trust is divided into two types-high and low level of trust-for investigating how trust as the moderator variable affects trust, two kinds of governance mechanism and joint venture partner′s behavior. The results of structural equation indicate that in a transactional environment of whether high or low level of trust, the influ-ence of trust on relational governance is higher than that of contract governance.Trust has a more positive effect on cooperation when trust is high than that of when trust is low.Similarly, relational governance increases cooperation more when trust is high than that of when trust is low.Unlike the previous results, the influence of contract governance on cooperation is significantly less when trust is high than

  7. Trust as a Critical Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordum, Anders

    2004-01-01

    In this articlei I will argue that trust is a fundamental and critical concept because trust is the direct or transcendental constitutive ground of most social phenomena, as well as applicable as an operational method in critical theory. There are two different but overlapping positions on trust I...... address in this article. One is the standpoint we find in business strategy, that trust is naïve to show, and control or contracts are presumed better. In the strategy game the idealistic good guys seems to lose (Arrow 1974), (Williamson 1975). The other position is the position taken by systems theory...

  8. Consumer Trust in Information Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad Love

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Trust is essential to understanding public reaction to innovative issues. This research focuses on trust in information sources by explicating the construct of trust and testing a comprehensive model on several information sources about genetically modified foods. Results from a survey of 369 participants reveal the significance of projecting competence and the role of the environment in which a target public receives information. Perceptions of regulatory, social, business, and technical environments affect how likely individuals are to follow advice from institutions like the Food and Drug Administration and the news media. Future research should incorporate knowledge levels and personal relevance as variables likely to influence trusting relationships.

  9. Online identity: constructing interpersonal trust and openness through participating in hospitality social networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Ronzhyn

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present article describes the results of research on online identity construction during the participation in the hospitality social networks. Specifically the user references are analysed to understand patterns that form the image of a member. CouchSurfing service (couchsurfing.org allows users to leave short texts where the experience of hosting/being hosted by a CS member is described, is an evaluation of the CS members of each other’s personal traits, skills and common experience. Therefore references can become a good instrument for portraying a CouchSurfing member and understanding his or her particular traits. References form an important part of a user’s virtual identity in the network. Using a sample of references of Spanish CouchSurfing users, the research established main characteristics of the references, which are the openness, readiness to share ideas and experiences and trustworthiness. These concepts illustrate the typical traits associated with a user of the network and also shed light on the activities common during offl ine CS meetings

  10. TRUST IN MONO-ETHNIC AND MIXED-ETHNIC ASSOCIATIONS IN PENANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K. Campbell

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation into trust has become a topical issue in current socialscience research. This is, in large part, a result of a perception that trust in institutions has declined markedly in the past two decades. This paper investigates trust in some of Penang’s civil associations as a way of measuring the health of social capital in Penang. It focuses on issues of trust and diversity since both are critical issues in Malaysian society in general and civil associations in particular. We began our analysis expecting higher forms of trust among members in the mono-ethnic associations, based on the power of bonding. However, findings from this study tend to suggest that rather than leading to lesser trust and infectiveness, involvement in mixed-ethnic associations have in fact generated higher trust among their members. These findings reveal an interesting corrective to more pessimistic view on the relationshipbetween trust and diversity. Data from this study also provide important insight into how bridging between different people in associations marked by diversity can accentuate trust over and above the levels found in associations were bonding between like types is the dominant characteristic. The data also indicate that for both, mono-ethnic and mixed-ethnic associations, it is the extent of members’ involvements in their associations that form trust and not vice versa.

  11. 社会资本理论及其信任观%The Social Capital Theory and its View on Trust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李时敏

    2011-01-01

    该文阐述了皮埃尔.布尔迪厄、詹姆斯.科尔曼、罗伯特.普特南、福山、林南等代表性学者的社会资本理论及其信任观,指出他们从个体层次或从群体层次提出的关于社会资本与信任的概念及两者之间的关系的看法,为研究企业信任提供了一种分析思路。%The paper explains the social capital theory and its view on trust from the representative scholars such as Pierre bourdieu,James Coleman,Robert Putnam,Francis Fukuyama,Lin Nan,who put forward concerning the theory of the social capital and concept of trust.And it points out the view of the relationship between the two concept from individual level to groups level,and an analysis method is provided to research business trust.

  12. Relationship between social participation and general health among the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbasali Yazdani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health promoting behaviors in the elderly can potentially improve their health and reduce health care costs. This study was aimed to investigate the relationship of social participation with general health among the elderly people. Methods: The research population in this correlational study included all elderly people (aged 60 and older in district 5 of Tehran. A total of 80 persons were selected by convenience sampling method. In order to collect data, a researcher-made social participation questionnaire and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28 were used. Kolmogorov–Smirnov test, Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficient, U-Mann-Whitney test and simple linear regression were applied to analyze the data. Results: The findings showed no statistically significant correlation between social participation and general health and its dimensions (P>0.05. Among demographic variables, only age was negatively correlated with social participation (P<0/05. Conclusions: Absence of relationship between social participation and health may be attributed to the effect of peripheral factors like social, economical and political situation during which the research was performed. A similar study in a more stable time or other places may contribute to the generalizability of the findings.

  13. Animal Behaviour: Friendship Enhances Trust in Chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joan

    2016-01-25

    Individuals that participate in exchanges with delayed rewards can be exploited if their partners don't reciprocate. In humans, friendships are built on trust, and trust enhances cooperation. New evidence suggests that close social bonds also enhance trust in chimpanzees.

  14. A Strategic Model of Trust Management in Web Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junqing; Sun, Zhaohao; Li, Yuanzhe; Zhao, Shuliang

    This article examines trust and trust management in web services and proposes a multiagent model of trust relationship in web services. It looks at the hierarchical structure of trust management in web services and proposes a strategic model of trust management in web services. The proposed approach in this article will facilitate research and development of trust management in e-commerce, web services and social networking.

  15. Public knowledge and public trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham-Burley, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    As health care applications derived from human genetics research are likely to move increasingly from 'clinic to community', there is growing interest not just in how patients understand and take up health-related genetic information but also in the views of the wider population, as well as a range of professional groups. In this paper, issues relating public knowledge and public trust are raised and discussed in an attempt to move forward debates about public involvement in genomic research and the role of sociologists within interdisciplinary teams. As the field of public understanding of science has developed, we have seen a shift from a focus on the lack of scientific literacy as problem to a recognition of the range of different knowledges that people have and use as they confront science and technology in their everyday lives. As a mood for dialogue pervades many institutions in their relations with 'publics', attention must now be paid to the way in which knowledge and expertise is expressed, heard and acted upon in dialogic encounters. There is increasing concern about public trust in science and calls to increase public confidence, particularly through more open engagement with a range of publics. However, lack of trust or loss of confidence may be constructed as problems rather than reflecting empirical reality, where more complex relationships and attitudes prevail. Lack of trust is often privatized, deeply rooted in lived experience and routinely managed. Trust relations are generally characterized by ambivalence, uncertainty and risk, and are always provisional. Drawing on selected literature and empirical research to review and illustrate this field, this paper argues that scepticism or ambivalence on the part of publics are not necessarily problems to be overcome in the interest of scientific progress, but rather should be mobilized to enhance open and public debates about the nature and direction of genomics research, medicine, and the related

  16. 基于社会网络与声誉信任机制的移动多Agent系统信任模型%A MOBILE MULTI-AGENT SYSTEM TRUST MODEL BASED ON SOCIAL NETWORK AND REPUTATION TRUST MECHANISM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭泽洲

    2012-01-01

    基于信任机制的移动多Agent系统中,代理Agent一般通过直接信誉值和推荐信誉值来判断对于另一个Agent的信任程度.由于系统相对巨大,直接信誉值通常难以获得,判断的正确性很大程度上依赖于推荐信誉值的准确性和可靠性.通过对整个多Agent系统进行社会网络的挖掘,用以得到与代理Agent存在潜在社会关系的一组Agent.对这组Agent提供的推荐信息充分信任,并优先使用这些Agent提供的信息进行推荐信誉值的计算.最后通过双方直接交易的多寡判断综合信任值中直接信誉值与推荐信誉值的权重.通过实验验证了该模型的有效性.%In trust mechanism-based mobile multi-Agent system, proxy Agent usually judges the trust degree of another Agent by the values of direct reputation and recommended reputation. Because of the relative large of the system, direct reputation is often difficult to obtain, so the correctness of the judgment depends on to a great extent the accuracy and reliability of the recommended reputation. In the paper, by mining the whole social network for entire multi-Agent system, a group of Agent which have potential community relationship with the proxy Agent is gotten. The recommendation information provided by this group is thoroughly trusted, and the information offered by these Agents is employed in prior to calculate the recommended reputation value. At last, the weight of the values of direct reputation and recommended reputation in composite trust value are calculated through the amount of direct transaction between both sides. The validity of the model has been verified by the experiment.

  17. Trust matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Lise Rosendal

    2015-01-01

    of this article trust is defined as a voluntary course of action, which involves the optimistic expectation that the trustee will do no harm to the trustor and is increasingly perceived as an important influence on health system functioning. The article looks at trust issues in interpersonal, intergroup...... and institutional situations. The findings of the review point to four elements that are important for trust to develop in health sector relationships: the sensitive use of discretionary power by health workers, perceived empathy by patients of the health workers, the quality of medical care and workplace...

  18. Trust and its Relationship to Demographic Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Mirfardi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Social trust is the main theme in the social life. Trust is “the expectation that arises within a community of regular, honest and cooperative behavior, based on commonly shared norms”. Development, social trust and security are intertwined categories and have interaction to each other. Social trust, as a main factor in social capital, provide social context for developmental programs. This study, examine the affect of Demographic factors on the social trust to others. As social trust is a key factor in social relationship, this study is needed to evaluate such factor according to demographic factors. Approach: This study has been done on existing data about Iranian values and attitudes. Some factors such as gender, age, education level, job situation, marital situation have been studied in this study. Some of these variables such as education, correspondence to development level, especially in social development. This study is done via documental method (archive and Documental data about mentioned themes and second analysis of The Iranian National Values and attitudes Survey (2000. Results: Findings of this study indicated that there is significant relationship between all of independent variables (Gender, age, education level, job situation, marital situation and social trust to families and relatives, there is significant relationship between variables such as gender, education level, job situation, marital situation (independent variables and social trust to friends. Analyzing the data showed that, the residents of less and more developed cities have different situation in trust. Conclusion/Recommendations: This study introduces three types of trust upon the development level of societies. Trust in Iran is an example of trust structure in developing societies.

  19. Oxytocin in General Anxiety and Social Fear: A Translational Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Inga D; Slattery, David A

    2016-02-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) has been revealed as a profound anxiolytic and antistress factor of the brain, besides its many prosocial and reproductive effects. Therefore, there is substantial scientific and medical interest in its potential therapeutic use for the treatment of psychopathologies associated with anxiety, fear, and social dysfunctions, such as generalized anxiety disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and social anxiety disorder, as well as autism and schizophrenia, among others. Focusing on preclinical studies, we review the existing evidence for the regulatory capacity of OXT to fine-tune general and social anxiety-related behaviors, as well as cued and social fear conditioning from a translational perspective. The available evidence from animal and human studies substantiates the hypothesis of an imbalance of the endogenous brain OXT system in the etiology of anxiety disorders, particularly those with a social component such as social anxiety disorder. In addition, such an imbalance of the OXT system is also likely to be the consequence of chronic OXT treatment resulting in a dose-dependent reduction in OXT receptor availability and increased anxiety.

  20. The cyclical social choice of primary vs. general election candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurrild-Klitgaard, Peter

    The manner in which US presidential elections are organized make them ripe for empirical manifestations of the “voting paradoxes” identified by social choice theorists. This note illustrates the general point with polling data involving the two leading Democrats and the three leading Republicans ...

  1. Free Riding or Trust?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard; Nilsson, Jerker

    2011-01-01

    It is often observed that members have little interest in monitoring their cooperatives. One explanation is that the members are free-riders, hoping that others will perform the task. Another explanation is that the weak member interest is a consequence of members having trust in the leadership....... These competing explanations refer to the theory of collective action and the social capital paradigm, respectively, and may be linked to the classical Gesellschaft and Gemeinschaft concepts. Hence, one may expect free-rider behavior when conditions of Gesellschaft exist and trustful behavior when Gemeinschaft...

  2. Trust and Financial Crisis Experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Cruijsen, Carin; de Haan, Jakob; Jansen, David-Jan

    2016-01-01

    Using eight annual household surveys for the Netherlands between 2006 and 2013, we find that respondents' personal adverse financial crisis experiences do not only reduce their trust in banks, but also have an immediate negative effect on generalized trust. Respondents who were customers of a bank t

  3. Trust in media information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miquel Rodrigo

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available For Miquel Rodrigo, cultural diversity places informative discourse in a crisis because it needs new categories to explain reality, and these categories are not always shared by journalists and by those who receive the information. Instead of gaining an easy trust drawnfrom stereotypes, he proposes, as a better way of overcoming the crisis, fostering the existence of sceptical readers. The media interprets social phenomena with its personal and professional limitations. The sceptical reader is one who knows why the media says what it says and understands that its truths are not absolute, since all ways of seeing are ways of concealing. The relationship between scepticism and trust is that which opposes a blind, acrylic and capitulating trust.

  4. Social Cohesion and Voluntary Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuser, Brian L.

    2005-01-01

    Voluntary organizations exert great influence over how social norms and ethical codes are guided into action. As such, they have a significant impact on societal levels of social cohesion. Although social capital involves generalized trust becoming manifest as spontaneous sociability, social cohesion is determined by how that sociability is…

  5. Relationship between Trust and Acculturation Attitudes (With Ukrainians in Russia and Russians in Latvia as an Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatarko A.N.,

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This research focuses on the relationship between various types of trust and acculturation strategies (according to J. Berry’s model in ethnic minorities and migrants. Trust is a major resource both of an individual and society. On the individual level it is considered as a component of the social psychological capital of personality, and on the societal level — as a core part of the social capital of the society. This study aimed to test the assumption that generalized trust in migrants or minorities is related to their preferred acculturation strategies and that this relationship is mediated by more particular types of trust, such as trust in representa- tives of own ethnic group and trust in representatives of other ethnic groups. The study involved Russians living in Riga, Latvia (N=336 and Ukrainian migrants who have been living in Moscow for approximately 1,5 years (N=80. The outcomes show that generalized trust and trust in representative of non-ethnic groups correlate with the choice of acculturation strategies aimed at integration with the society. Trust in representatives of own ethnic group correlates positively with the choice of the “Separation” strategy.

  6. Trust and Corruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graeff, Peter; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2013-01-01

    Why are the Scandinavian countries in the European Union significantly richer than South-ern/Eastern European countries? We try to answer this question from an empirical social capital perspective. In particular, we are interested in the interplay of social trust as a positive and corruption...... capital by applying a path model that accounts for Granger-like causal effects. Our empirical results, referring to a sample of up to 25 EU countries, show that corruption might harm poor European countries but is not able to affect social trust. However, corruption in itself means that resources end up...... in the wrong places and not in socioeconomically optimal investments. There is, therefore, a direct damaging effect of corruption on wealth. This implies that economic actors have to invest higher transaction and control costs which will bind resources to non-productive purposes and thus destroy economic...

  7. Trust and Corruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graeff, Peter; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2013-01-01

    Why are the Scandinavian countries in the European Union significantly richer than South-ern/Eastern European countries? We try to answer this question from an empirical social capital perspective. In particular, we are interested in the interplay of social trust as a positive and corruption...... capital by applying a path model that accounts for Granger-like causal effects. Our empirical results, referring to a sample of up to 25 EU countries, show that corruption might harm poor European countries but is not able to affect social trust. However, corruption in itself means that resources end up...... in the wrong places and not in socioeconomically optimal investments. There is, therefore, a direct damaging effect of corruption on wealth. This implies that economic actors have to invest higher transaction and control costs which will bind resources to non-productive purposes and thus destroy economic...

  8. Trust in Digital Repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Yakel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ISO 16363:2012, Space Data and Information Transfer Systems - Audit and Certification of Trustworthy Digital Repositories (ISO TRAC, outlines actions a repository can take to be considered trustworthy, but research examining whether the repository’s designated community of users associates such actions with trustworthiness has been limited. Drawing from this ISO document and the management and information systems literatures, this paper discusses findings from interviews with 66 archaeologists and quantitative social scientists. We found similarities and differences across the disciplines and among the social scientists. Both disciplinary communities associated trust with a repository’s transparency. However, archaeologists mentioned guarantees of preservation and sustainability more frequently than the social scientists, who talked about institutional reputation. Repository processes were also linked to trust, with archaeologists more frequently citing metadata issues and social scientists discussing data selection and cleaning processes. Among the social scientists, novices mentioned the influence of colleagues on their trust in repositories almost twice as much as the experts. We discuss the implications our findings have for identifying trustworthy repositories and how they extend the models presented in the management and information systems literatures.

  9. A social skills training program for preschoolers with developmental delays. Generalization and social validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, L A; Matson, J L

    1995-04-01

    This investigation was designed to assess a social skills training program with 32 developmentally delayed preschoolers. Subjects were evaluated in an unstructured play session, matched for levels of appropriate and inappropriate social behaviors, and assigned to either a treatment or control condition. The treatment group (N = 16) was presented with a 6-week protocol involving positive reinforcement, modeling, rehearsal, feedback, and time out. Controls (N = 16) received no instruction beyond regular classroom activities during the 6 weeks. The two groups were reevaluated in a posttest session and again in a generalization setting where two peers with developmental delays (not included in either experimental condition) were included. Prosocial behaviors were successfully taught and maintained in generalization settings. Efforts to reduce inappropriate behaviors were less successful. A test of social validity via teachers' ratings of videotapes of pretest and posttest assessments was also conducted. Implications for generalization and social validity research are discussed.

  10. Trust Building via Risk Taking: A Cross-Societal Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Karen S.; Yamagishi, Toshio; Cheshire, Coye; Cooper, Robin; Matsuda, Masafumi; Mashima, Rie

    2005-01-01

    The role of risk taking in building trust relations has largely been overlooked in the burgeoning literature on trust in the social sciences; yet it is central to understanding how trust develops. We argue that a series of risk-taking behaviors is indispensable to building a trust relation. We conducted experiments in Japan and the United States…

  11. Trust in a Time of Increasing Diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examine the impact of ethnic diversity in Danish municipalities on citizens’ social trust over the last three decades. During this period, Danish society has grown increasingly ethnically diverse, and this begs the question whether this has influenced trust in others negatively....... Existing evidence from the Anglo-Saxon countries would suggest that this is the case, whereas evidence from the European continent mainly suggests that no link exists between ethnic diversity and social trust. The empirical analysis uses individual-level data on social trust from several surveys in Denmark...... in the period from 1979 to 2009 coupled with diversity at the municipality level. Individual-level measures of trust over time enable us to estimate the impact on social trust of changes in ethnic diversity within municipalities and, we argue, thereby obtain a more precise estimate of the effect of ethnic...

  12. Factors predicting trust between GPs and OPs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P. Nauta; J. von Grumbkow (Jasper)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: To study possible differences in trust between general practitioners (GPs) and occupational physicians (OPs) and the explanatory factors for trust. Insight into the factors predicting trust can improve programmes for stimulating the co-operation of GPs and OPs.

  13. Trust me, I am Robot!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoyanova, Angelina; Drefeld, Jonas; Tanev, Stoyan

    of the emerging trust relationship is a key component of the use value of the robotic system and of the value proposition of the robotic system producers. The study is based on a qualitative research approach combining the phenomenological research paradigm with a grounded theory building approach based...... on multiple case studies. The investigation so far suggests that it will be necessary to conceptualize three types of trust – interpersonal, social trust and trust in automation. This knowledge is incorporated in a descriptive model that could be used by technology and application designers....../developers to further refine their product design. The paper will conclude with a more detailed conceptual analysis of interpersonal trust in human-technology interactions. The personalization of technological artifacts or assigning personality to active objects has been considered as natural to human beings (Gombrich...

  14. Risk Reduction Technologies in General Practice and Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devin Rexvid

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available General practitioners (GPs and social workers (SWs are professions whose professional autonomy and discretion have changed in the so-called risk and audit society. The aim of this article is to compare GPs’ and SWs’ responses to Evidence-Based and Organizational Risk Reduction Technologies (ERRT and ORRT. It is based on a content analysis of 54 peer-reviewed empirical articles. The results show that both professions held ambivalent positions towards ERRT. The response towards ORRT differed in that GPs were sceptical whilst SWs took a more pragmatic view. Furthermore the results suggest that SWs might experience professional benefits by adopting an adherent approach to the increased dissemination of risk reduction technologies (RRT. GPs, however, did not seem to experience such benefits. Keywords: Profession, risk, social worker, general practitioner, risk reduction technologies, evidence-based practice/medicine 

  15. The evolution of generalized reciprocity in social interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkl, Bernhard

    2015-09-01

    Generalized reciprocity has been proposed as a mechanism for enabling continued cooperation between unrelated individuals. It can be described by the simple rule "help somebody if you received help from someone", and as it does not require individual recognition, complex cognition or extended memory capacities, it has the potential to explain cooperation in a large number of organisms. In a panmictic population this mechanism is vulnerable to defection by individuals who readily accept help but do not help themselves. Here, I investigate to what extent the limitation of social interactions to a social neighborhood can lead to conditions that favor generalized reciprocity in the absence of population structuring. It can be shown that cooperation is likely to evolve if one assumes certain sparse interaction graphs, if strategies are discrete, and if spontaneous helping and reciprocating are independently inherited.

  16. Factors affecting trust in police in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekir Çakar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Law enforcement administrators generally evaluate their performance using statistics related to crime control. These statistics are important indicators for measuring performance, but it is also crucial to measure of public opinions toward the police. This study examines the determinants of public trust in the police. Using data from the European Social Survey (ESS Round 4, for the analysis, a total sample of 2,416 persons is selected from respondents from Turkey. The study provides a snapshot of citizens’ perceptions toward law enforcement. Overall, the results of this study regarding the demographic variables, including age, gender, marital status, and education, were consistent with previous research and proved to be significantly related to trust in the police. Surprisingly, perceived victimization failed to show a significant relationship. However, important predictors included perceived fear of crime and trust in the political system, which had significant impacts on public trust in the police. Especially, fear of crime was a significant predictor of satisfaction with police. Effective crime control and lowering crime rates are considered the core functions of law enforcement by citizens. Therefore, perceived effectiveness in fighting crime can lower individual fear of crime and thus increase satisfaction with law enforcement.

  17. The cyclical social choice of primary vs. general election candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurrild-Klitgaard, Peter

    The manner in which US presidential elections are organized make them ripe for empirical manifestations of the “voting paradoxes” identified by social choice theorists. This note illustrates the general point with polling data involving the two leading Democrats and the three leading Republicans...... at the beginning of the 2016 presidential primaries, suggesting that all five candidates may be alternatives in one or more cyclical majorities, i.e., where no candidate cannot be beaten by at least one other...

  18. Risk reduction technologies in general practice and social work

    OpenAIRE

    Rexvid, Devin; Blom, Björn; Evertsson, Lars; Forssén, Annika

    2012-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) and social workers (SWs) are professions whose professional autonomy and discretion have changed in the so-called risk and audit society. The aim of this article is to compare GPs’ and SWs’ responses to Evidence-Based and Organizational Risk Reduction Technologies (ERRT and ORRT). It is based on a content analysis of 54 peer-reviewed empirical articles. The results show that both professions held ambivalent positions towards ERRT. The response towards ORRT differed...

  19. Risk Reduction Technologies in General Practice and Social Work

    OpenAIRE

    Devin Rexvid; Björn Blom; Lars Evertsson; Annika Forssén

    2012-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) and social workers (SWs) are professions whose professional autonomy and discretion have changed in the so-called risk and audit society. The aim of this article is to compare GPs’ and SWs’ responses to Evidence-Based and Organizational Risk Reduction Technologies (ERRT and ORRT). It is based on a content analysis of 54 peer-reviewed empirical articles. The results show that both professions held ambivalent positions towards ERRT. The response towards ORRT differed...

  20. The evolution of generalized reciprocity on social interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doorn, Gerrit Sander; Taborsky, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Generalized reciprocity (help anyone, if helped by someone) is a minimal strategy capable of supporting cooperation between unrelated individuals. Its simplicity makes it an attractive model to explain the evolution of reciprocal altruism in animals that lack the information or cognitive skills needed for other types of reciprocity. Yet, generalized reciprocity is anonymous and thus defenseless against exploitation by defectors. Recognizing that animals hardly ever interact randomly, we investigate whether social network structure can mitigate this vulnerability. Our results show that heterogeneous interaction patterns strongly support the evolution of generalized reciprocity. The future probability of being rewarded for an altruistic act is inversely proportional to the average connectivity of the social network when cooperators are rare. Accordingly, sparse networks are conducive to the invasion of reciprocal altruism. Moreover, the evolutionary stability of cooperation is enhanced by a modular network structure. Communities of reciprocal altruists are protected against exploitation, because modularity increases the mean access time, that is, the average number of steps that it takes for a random walk on the network to reach a defector. Sparseness and community structure are characteristic properties of vertebrate social interaction patterns, as illustrated by network data from natural populations ranging from fish to primates.

  1. SOCIAL AUDIT OF THE MUNICIPAL SYSTEM OF GENERAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Zerchaninova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the theory and practice of social audit of the municipal system of general education. The authors have developed a conceptual model of social audit to accurately identify both the short- and long-term development prospects of the given system. The paper describes the social audit procedures in Berezovsky municipal district of Sverdlovsk region including four stages: the content analysis of municipal documents concerning the development strategy of the general education system, diagnosis of the current conditions and problems, effectiveness evaluation of the municipal system of general education, and practical  recommendations for improving the education quality. The above mentioned audit demonstrates that the indices of education development are unsystematically tracked, obstructing therefore the adjustment process. To solve the given problems the following measures are recommended: personnel policy development, creating the regional managerial reserve and organizing management workshops, informing the teachers about the modern educational tools, and updating the municipal program of the «Educational System Development of Berezovsky Municipal District for 20011–20015». However, the above suggestions target only the current problems disregarding the challenges of tomorrow which require the advancing strategy. In authors’ opinion, the main emphasis should be re-placed on the quality improvement of the municipal educational services instead of the infrastructure reinforcement. 

  2. SOCIAL AUDIT OF THE MUNICIPAL SYSTEM OF GENERAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Zerchaninova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the theory and practice of social audit of the municipal system of general education. The authors have developed a conceptual model of social audit to accurately identify both the short- and long-term development prospects of the given system. The paper describes the social audit procedures in Berezovsky municipal district of Sverdlovsk region including four stages: the content analysis of municipal documents concerning the development strategy of the general education system, diagnosis of the current conditions and problems, effectiveness evaluation of the municipal system of general education, and practical  recommendations for improving the education quality. The above mentioned audit demonstrates that the indices of education development are unsystematically tracked, obstructing therefore the adjustment process. To solve the given problems the following measures are recommended: personnel policy development, creating the regional managerial reserve and organizing management workshops, informing the teachers about the modern educational tools, and updating the municipal program of the «Educational System Development of Berezovsky Municipal District for 20011–20015». However, the above suggestions target only the current problems disregarding the challenges of tomorrow which require the advancing strategy. In authors’ opinion, the main emphasis should be re-placed on the quality improvement of the municipal educational services instead of the infrastructure reinforcement. 

  3. A preliminary mixed-method investigation of trust and hidden signals in medical consultations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Riva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several factors influence patients' trust, and trust influences the doctor-patient relationship. Recent literature has investigated the quality of the personal relationship and its dynamics by considering the role of communication and the elements that influence trust giving in the frame of general practitioner (GP consultations. OBJECTIVE: We analysed certain aspects of the interaction between patients and GPs to understand trust formation and maintenance by focusing on communication channels. The impact of socio-demographic variables in trust relationships was also evaluated. METHOD: A cross-sectional design using concurrent mixed qualitative and quantitative research methods was employed. One hundred adults were involved in a semi-structured interview composed of both qualitative and quantitative items for descriptive and exploratory purposes. The study was conducted in six community-based departments adjacent to primary care clinics in Trento, Italy. RESULTS: The findings revealed that patients trusted their GP to a high extent by relying on simple signals that were based on the quality of the one-to-one communication and on behavioural and relational patterns. Patients inferred the ability of their GP by adopting simple heuristics based mainly on the so-called social "honest signals" rather than on content-dependent features. Furthermore, socio-demographic variables affected trust: less literate and elderly people tended to trust more. CONCLUSIONS: This study is unique in attempting to explore the role of simple signals in trust relationships within medical consultation: people shape trust and give meaning to their relationships through a powerful channel of communication that orbits not around words but around social relations. The findings have implications for both clinicians and researchers. For doctors, these results suggest a way of thinking about encounters with patients. For researchers, the findings underline the

  4. Trust in Transactional and Relationship Marketing: Implications in a Post-CrisisWorld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Starr-Glass

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The financial crisis, which began in America in mid-2007, developedinto a deep and protracted recession with associated negative socialdimensions. One of the causalities has been trust, specific and generalized,in marketplace transactions. This theoretical paper considersinstrumental and symbolic value associated with social exchange. Itexamines the nature and creation of trust, reciprocity, and wariness.Marketing practice is now understood to take place within a pluralisticmarketplace in which both transactional and relational perspectiveshave assumed greater strategic clarity. This paper considers the likelyimpacts of a decrease in trust on buyer and seller expectations andthe consequences for transactional and relational marketing dynamics.Suggested reconsiderations and realignments of strategic marketing areconsidered.

  5. A group cohesive enabled trust model in Web-based social networks%Web社会网络中引入群体凝聚度的信任模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白云璐; 翟玉庆

    2015-01-01

    根据社会网络中人们的行动决策会受到周围人群影响的特征,在Web社会网络环境中提出了一个引入群体凝聚度的信任模型GC-Trust.模型首先对节点进行凝聚群的划分,其次从两个层面研究信任度,一是凝聚群之间的信任度,二是凝聚群与单个节点之间的信任度,再利用节点所在凝聚群内的群凝聚度以及节点在自身凝聚群中的影响力作为不同信任度之间的权重将他们进行综合,从而综合形成节点的凝聚信任度,以便选择合适的对象.实验表明GC-Trust模型与Tidal Trust模型以及基于同质度的信任模型相比,在凝聚群规模相对平衡且凝聚度高的环境中具有更高信任预测准确度.%Learning from the social networks,in which people influenced by the crowd around before acting and decision-making,a trust model of making use of group cohesion degree called group cohesive(GC) trust is proposed in the Web-based social networks.The first step of GC-trust is to divide the nodes into cohesive groups; secondly,to analyze trust from two levels,one is trust between groups and the other is trust between a group and a node; then to combine different trust to form the final cohesive trust by use of the cohesion of the groups and the node's influence as weights.The experimental results show that the model has high accuracy on trust reasoning comparing with tidal trust and affinity based group trust model.

  6. Trusted Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Theis Solberg; Torbensen, Rune

    2012-01-01

    that enables secure end-to-end communication with home automation devices, and it supports device revocations as well as a structure of intersecting sets of nodes for scalability. Devices in the Trusted Domain are registered in a list that is distributed using a robust epidemic protocol optimized...

  7. Recommended Trust Computation Method Between Individuals in Social Network Site%一种社交网络中的个体间推荐信任度计算方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张波; 向阳; 黄震华

    2013-01-01

    推荐是社交网络中人们分享传递信息的重要途径.本文针对信息推荐所带来的可靠性评估难题,给出一种推荐信任度计算方法.首先给出社交网络(Social nework site,SNS)个体之间主观信任和个体自身客观信誉的计算方法,继而从3个方面给出SNS中推荐信任的定义以及计算方法:复杂路径组成的推荐信任计算方法、推荐的客观符合度、以及推荐的可选择程度.最后给出SNS推荐信任计算架构(SNS recommended trust computation framework,SRTCF)以及其示例和实验分析.%Nowadays,recommendation has been one of the most important ways for information sharing and transmitting in social network site (SNS).A recommended trust computation method is addressed to confirm reliabilities of recommendations among users.Firstly,computation methods of trust values are defined as belief and reputation to represent subjective trustable relationship among users and objective creditable view of users in SNS.Then,recommended trust computation method is presented based on the above mentioned two kinds of trusts.Recommended trust computation is divided into three aspects:recommended trust computation with different route composition,recommendation objective coincidence and recommendation optional degree.Further,SNS recommended trust computation framework (SRTCF) is proposed.Finally,an example and examinations are given to explain the efficiency and feasibility of our mechanism.

  8. Lack of neuropsychological deficits in generalized social phobia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott R Sutterby

    Full Text Available There are relatively few existing studies examining neuropsychological functioning in social phobia (SP, which collectively yield mixed results. Interpretation of results is further complicated by a number of methodological inconsistencies across studies, including the examination of neuropsychological domains in relative isolation from one another. The present study utilized a broader collection of neuropsychological tests to assess nine domains of functioning in 25 individuals diagnosed with generalized SP and 25 nonpsychiatric controls (NC. A mixed ANOVA revealed neither a significant group by domain interaction, nor a significant main effect of group. Furthermore, no significant group differences emerged between the SP and NC groups within each specific neuropsychological domain. These findings suggest that underlying neuropsychological deficits are not likely to account for the information processing biases observed in the empirical literature, and appear to be consistent with current theoretical models which argue for the specificity of these biases to social information.

  9. Inferring Trust Based on Similarity with TILLIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakolifard, Mozhgan; Herrmann, Peter; Knapskog, Svein J.

    A network of people having established trust relations and a model for propagation of related trust scores are fundamental building blocks in many of today’s most successful e-commerce and recommendation systems. However, the web of trust is often too sparse to predict trust values between non-familiar people with high accuracy. Trust inferences are transitive associations among users in the context of an underlying social network and may provide additional information to alleviate the consequences of the sparsity and possible cold-start problems. Such approaches are helpful, provided that a complete trust path exists between the two users. An alternative approach to the problem is advocated in this paper. Based on collaborative filtering one can exploit the like-mindedness resp. similarity of individuals to infer trust to yet unknown parties which increases the trust relations in the web. For instance, if one knows that with respect to a specific property, two parties are trusted alike by a large number of different trusters, one can assume that they are similar. Thus, if one has a certain degree of trust to the one party, one can safely assume a very similar trustworthiness of the other one. In an attempt to provide high quality recommendations and proper initial trust values even when no complete trust propagation path or user profile exists, we propose TILLIT — a model based on combination of trust inferences and user similarity. The similarity is derived from the structure of the trust graph and users’ trust behavior as opposed to other collaborative-filtering based approaches which use ratings of items or user’s profile. We describe an algorithm realizing the approach based on a combination of trust inferences and user similarity, and validate the algorithm using a real large-scale data-set.

  10. Interpersonal trust and empathy in nurse-nurse relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northouse, P G

    1979-01-01

    The specific purpose of a study that examined interpersonal communication in ongoing nurse-nurse dyads was to ascertain the nature of the relationship between interpersonal trust and empathy in nurse-nurse interaction. Analysis of questionnaire data collected from a sample of 36 diploma school nursing instructors indicated slight correlations between specific trust and general trust and between general trust and empathy. A strong negative correlation was found between specific trust and empathy. Discussion centered on an explanation for the inverse relationship between specific trust and empathy and a proposed model for how trust functions in ongoing nurse-nurse dyads.

  11. Guide to the Administration of Charitable Remainder Trusts. Third Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David W.; And Others

    This is the third edition of a workbook prepared as a kind of primer for those responsible for the administration of charitable remainder trusts in accordance with the Tax Reform Act of 1969. The topics covered include: trust administration in general; pooled income fund; unitrust; annuity trust; gift annuity; short term income (lead) trust; gift…

  12. 24 CFR 92.500 - The HOME Investment Trust Fund.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false The HOME Investment Trust Fund. 92... Investment Trust Fund. (a) General. A HOME Investment Trust Fund consists of the accounts described in this... Investment Trust Fund United States Treasury account for each participating jurisdiction. Each...

  13. 49 CFR 1013.2 - The irrevocability of the trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false The irrevocability of the trust. 1013.2 Section... BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS GUIDELINES FOR THE PROPER USE OF VOTING TRUSTS § 1013.2 The irrevocability of the trust. (a) The trust and the nomination of the trustee...

  14. From social capital to health - and back

    OpenAIRE

    Rocco, L; F. Elena; Suhrcke, M

    2011-01-01

    We assess the causal relationship between health and social capital, measured by generalized trust, both at the individual and the community level. The paper contributes to the literature in two ways: it tackles the problems of endogeneity and reverse causation between social capital and health by estimating a simultaneous equation model, and it explicitly accounts for mis-reporting in self reported trust. The relationship is tested using data from the first four waves of the European Social ...

  15. Study for the co-relationship of interpersonal trust and social support for mentally illness%精神病患者人际信任与社会支持相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祝勇花

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the co-relationship interpersonal trust and social support among mental illness. Method 218 mental illness were investigated with questionnaire by interpersonal trust scale and the social support scale respectively. The results were statistically analyzed. Result Overall score of mental illness's interpersonal trust is lower> and interpersonal trust is lows overall score of social support was at a lowest level, social support has certain influence on interpersonal trust, interpersonal trust and social support were positively correlated (r=0. 28,P<0. 001). Conclusion Social support system has effect on the person's interpersonal trust. Nursing staff have establish reasonable and complete social support system for patients for improving their interpersonal trust and reducing the distrust from medical care.%目的 探讨精神疾病患者人际信任与社会支持的相关性.方法 采用描述性相关研究,分别用人际信任量表和社会支持量表,对218例精神疾病患者进行问卷调查,同时对结果进行统计学分析.结果 精神疾病患者人际信任状况总体得分偏低,人际信任度低;社会支持总体得分处于较低支持水平,社会支持对人际信任有一定影响,人际信任与社会支持呈正相关(γ=0.28,P<0.001).结论 社会支持系统会影响患者的人际信任度,护理人员合理地为患者建立完整的社会支持系统,能提升患者的人际信任度,从而降低患者对医护治疗护理的不信任.

  16. Going global: Trust research and international relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruzicka, Jan; Keating, Vincent Charles

    2015-01-01

    relations – rationalist, social and psychological. We not only note the contributions these have made to understanding the role of trust internationally, but also highlight areas where more research is needed. Particularly, we argue that this includes theorising processes of trust......In this review article we explore the growing body of literature on the subject of trust in the field of international relations. We argue that the international level represents a unique challenge for trust research. This is so because some of the most pressing problems facing the world today...... require the development of trusting relationships internationally. In addition, the international environment is structurally different from domestic or personal relations on which much of the trust literature has focused so far. We identify three main strands of trust literature in international...

  17. Trust dynamics in a large system implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlichter, Bjarne Rerup; Rose, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    A large information systems implementation (such as Enterprise Resource Planning systems) relies on the trust of its stakeholders to succeed. Such projects impact diverse groups of stakeholders, each with their legitimate interests and expectations. Levels of stakeholder trust can be expected...... outcomes, but largely ignored the dynamics of trust relations. Giddens, as part of his study of modernity, theorises trust dynamics in relation to abstract social systems, though without focusing on information systems. We use Giddens’ concepts to investigate evolving trust relationships in a longitudinal...... to vary in large-scale implementations (which can take several years), and cannot be taken for granted. Previous studies have largely focused on the taxonomic deconstruction of the trust construct, through point-in-time variance studies. They have identified the relationship between trust and project...

  18. Going global: Trust research and international relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruzicka, Jan; Keating, Vincent Charles

    2015-01-01

    In this review article we explore the growing body of literature on the subject of trust in the field of international relations. We argue that the international level represents a unique challenge for trust research. This is so because some of the most pressing problems facing the world today...... require the development of trusting relationships internationally. In addition, the international environment is structurally different from domestic or personal relations on which much of the trust literature has focused so far. We identify three main strands of trust literature in international...... relations – rationalist, social and psychological. We not only note the contributions these have made to understanding the role of trust internationally, but also highlight areas where more research is needed. Particularly, we argue that this includes theorising processes of trust...

  19. Trusted Objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CAMPBELL,PHILIP L.; PIERSON,LYNDON G.; WITZKE,EDWARD L.

    1999-10-27

    In the world of computers a trusted object is a collection of possibly-sensitive data and programs that can be allowed to reside and execute on a computer, even on an adversary's machine. Beyond the scope of one computer we believe that network-based agents in high-consequence and highly reliable applications will depend on this approach, and that the basis for such objects is what we call ''faithful execution.''

  20. Monitoring the level of government trust, risk perception and intention of the general public to adopt protective measures during the influenza A (H1N1 pandemic in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oudhoff Jurriaan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the course of an influenza pandemic, governments know relatively little about the possibly changing influence of government trust, risk perception, and receipt of information on the public's intention to adopt protective measures or on the acceptance of vaccination. This study aims to identify and describe possible changes in and factors associated with public's intentions during the 2009 influenza A (H1N1 pandemic in the Netherlands. Methods Sixteen cross-sectional telephone surveys were conducted (N = 8060 between April - November 2009. From these repeated measurements three consecutive periods were categorized based on crucial events during the influenza A (H1N1 pandemic. Time trends in government trust, risk perception, intention to adopt protective measures, and the acceptance of vaccination were analysed. Factors associated with an intention to adopt protective measures or vaccination were identified. Results Trust in the government was high, but decreased over time. During the course of the pandemic, perceived vulnerability and an intention to adopt protective measures increased. Trust and vulnerability were associated with an intention to adopt protective measures in general only during period one. Higher levels of intention to receive vaccination were associated with increased government trust, fear/worry, and perceived vulnerability. In periods two and three receipt of information was positively associated with an intention to adopt protective measures. Most respondents wanted to receive information about infection prevention from municipal health services, health care providers, and the media. Conclusions The Dutch response to the H1N1 virus was relatively muted. Higher levels of trust in the government, fear/worry, and perceived vulnerability were all positively related to an intention to accept vaccination. Only fear/worry was positively linked to an intention to adopt protective measures during the entire

  1. Research Stakeholders' Views on Benefits and Challenges for Public Health Research Data Sharing in Kenya: The Importance of Trust and Social Relations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Jao

    Full Text Available There is increasing recognition of the importance of sharing research data within the international scientific community, but also of the ethical and social challenges this presents, particularly in the context of structural inequities and varied capacity in international research. Public involvement is essential to building locally responsive research policies, including on data sharing, but little research has involved stakeholders from low-to-middle income countries.Between January and June 2014, a qualitative study was conducted in Kenya involving sixty stakeholders with varying experiences of research in a deliberative process to explore views on benefits and challenges in research data sharing. In-depth interviews and extended small group discussions based on information sharing and facilitated debate were used to collect data. Data were analysed using Framework Analysis, and charting flow and dynamics in debates.The findings highlight both the opportunities and challenges of communicating about this complex and relatively novel topic for many stakeholders. For more and less research-experienced stakeholders, ethical research data sharing is likely to rest on the development and implementation of appropriate trust-building processes, linked to local perceptions of benefits and challenges. The central nature of trust is underpinned by uncertainties around who might request what data, for what purpose and when. Key benefits perceived in this consultation were concerned with the promotion of public health through science, with legitimate beneficiaries defined differently by different groups. Important challenges were risks to the interests of study participants, communities and originating researchers through stigmatisation, loss of privacy, impacting autonomy and unfair competition, including through forms of intentional and unintentional 'misuse' of data. Risks were also seen for science.Given background structural inequities in much

  2. 无可信中心的基于身份的广义签密%ID-based Generalized Signcryption without Trusted Party

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周才学

    2013-01-01

    GSC(Generalized signcryption) can realize encryption, signature and signcryption with only one algorithm. The formal definitions of identity based generalized signcryption without trusted party and the complete security model were proposed. A concrete scheme was presented by using the bilinear pairings. Its confidentiality and unforgeability were proved in ROM under BDH assumption and CDH assumption. Compared with other ID-based GSC schemes, the new scheme is also efficient.%广义签密可以只用一个算法实现加密、签名和签密3种功能.提出了无可信中心的基于身份的广义签密体制的形式化定义,并定义了其较为全面的安全模型,进而利用双线性对提出一个具体方案.在BDH和CDH困难问题假设下,证明了方案在随机预言机模型下的安全性.效率比较表明,方案是高效的.

  3. Family Generated and Delivered Social Story Intervention: Acquisition, Maintenance, and Generalization of Social Skills in Youths with ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olcay-Gül, Seray; Tekin-Iftar, Elif

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether (a) family members were able to learn to write a social story and deliver social story intervention to teach social skills to their children (age 12 to 16) with ASD, (b) youths with ASD acquired and maintained the targeted social skills and generalized these skills across novel situations. Multiple…

  4. Repeated Strains, Social Control, Social Learning, and Delinquency: Testing an Integrated Model of General Strain Theory in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Wan-Ning; Haas, Ain; Chen, Xiaojin; Pi, Yijun

    2014-01-01

    In Agnew's general strain theory, repeated strains can generate crime and delinquency by reducing social control and fostering social learning of crime. Using a sample of 615 middle-and high-school students in China, this study examines how social control and social learning variables mediate the effect of repeated strains in school and at home on…

  5. Trust and Trustworthiness in an Economy with Heterogeneous Individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Katuscak; Joel Slemrod

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the determinants of trust and trustworthiness in a matching equilibrium when agents have heterogeneous predispositions towards trusting and trustworthy behavior, there is transmission of information via both individual and collective reputations, and successful matches may persist. In new matches, more social trustworthiness breeds more individual trust. However, whether more social trust breeds more or less individual trustworthiness depends on the observability of individual hist...

  6. [Trust and reliability in surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, T F; Hanisch, E; Buia, A; Hessler, C

    2017-03-01

    Social interactions are hardly possible without trust. Medical and in particular surgical actions can change the lives of people directly and indirectly existentially. Thus, the relationship between doctor and patient is a special form of social interaction, and will be hard to find anywhere else. The nature of the doctor-patient relationship also determines the success of a treatment. The core and the importance of trust, as a central part of this relationship, will be reconstructed in the present paper. The increasing possibilities of information acquisition in modern societies, and the ever-present need for transparency, impact more and more on the doctor-patient relationship. At first glance, concepts of trust seem to be of secondary importance. The current developments regarding the remuneration of services in the medical system likewise bear the risk to increasingly determine the importance of trust in the doctor-patient relationship. However, it is necessary to delineate reliability from trust. Due to the conditions which are constitutive for the operational disciplines, a climate of trust, even in a modern information society, is more necessary than ever.

  7. The relationship between trust in mass media and the healthcare system and individual health: evidence from the AsiaBarometer Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokuda Yasuharu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vertical and horizontal trust, as dimensions of social capital, may be important determinants of health. As mass media campaigns have been used extensively to promote healthy lifestyles and convey health-related information, high levels of individual trust in the media may facilitate the success of such campaigns and, hence, have a positive influence on health. However, few studies have investigated the relationship between trust levels in mass media, an aspect of vertical trust, and health. Methods Based on cross-sectional data of the general population from the AsiaBarometer Survey (2003–2006, we analyzed the relationship between self-rated health and trust in mass media, using a multilevel logistic model, adjusted for age, gender, marital status, income, education, occupation, horizontal trust, and trust in the healthcare system. Results In a total of 39082 participants (mean age 38; 49% male, 26808 (69% were classified as in good health. By the levels of trust in mass media, there were 6399 (16% who reported that they trust a lot, 16327 (42% reporting trust to a degree, 9838 (25% who do not really trust, 3307 (9% who do not trust at all, and 191 (0.5% who have not thought about it. In the multilevel model, trust in mass media was associated with good health (do not trust at all as the base group: the odds ratios (OR of 1.16 (95% confidence interval (CI = 1.05–1.27 for do not really trust; OR of 1.35 (95% CI = 1.23–1.49 for trust to a degree, and 1.57 (95% CI = 1.36–1.81 for trust a lot. Horizontal trust and trust in the healthcare system were also associated with health. Conclusion Vertical trust in mass media is associated with better health in Asian people. Since mass media is likely an important arena for public health, media trust should be enhanced to make people healthier.

  8. Increasing interpersonal trust through divergent thinking

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta eSellaro; Bernhard eHommel; de Kwaadsteniet, Erik W.; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2014-01-01

    Interpersonal trust is an essential ingredient of many social relationships but how stable is it actually, and how is it controlled? There is evidence that the degree of trust into others might be rather volatile and can be affected by manipulations like drawing attention to personal interdependence or independence. Here we investigated whether the degree of interpersonal trust can be biased by inducing either a more integrative or a more focused/exclusive cognitive control mode by means of a...

  9. Political Trust and Sophistication: Taking Measurement Seriously.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turper, Sedef; Aarts, Kees

    2017-01-01

    Political trust is an important indicator of political legitimacy. Hence, seemingly decreasing levels of political trust in Western democracies have stimulated a growing body of research on the causes and consequences of political trust. However, the neglect of potential measurement problems of political trust raises doubts about the findings of earlier studies. The current study revisits the measurement of political trust and re-examines the relationship between political trust and sophistication in the Netherlands by utilizing European Social Survey (ESS) data across five time points and four-wave panel data from the Panel Component of ESS. Our findings illustrate that high and low political sophistication groups display different levels of political trust even when measurement characteristics of political trust are taken into consideration. However, the relationship between political sophistication and political trust is weaker than it is often suggested by earlier research. Our findings also provide partial support for the argument that the gap between sophistication groups is widening over time. Furthermore, we demonstrate that, although the between-method differences between the latent means and the composite score means of political trust for high- and low sophistication groups are relatively minor, it is important to analyze the measurement characteristics of the political trust construct.

  10. Learning to Trust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nooteboom, B.

    2005-01-01

    Trust is full of puzzle and paradox.Trust is both rational and emotional. Trust can go beyond calculative self-interest, but has its limits.People may want to trust, while they may also feel threatened by it.If trust is not in place prior to a relationship, on the basis of institutions, prior experi

  11. Losing Wallets, Retaining Trust? The Relationship Between Ethnic Heterogeneity and Trusting Coethnic and Non-coethnic Neighbours and Non-neighbours to Return a Lost Wallet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolsma, J; van der Meer, T W G

    2017-01-01

    The constrict claim that ethnic heterogeneity drives down social trust has been empirically tested across the globe. Meta-analyses suggest that neighbourhood ethnic heterogeneity generally undermines ties within the neighbourhood (such as trust in neighbours), but concurrently has an inconsistent or even positive effect on interethnic ties (such as outgroup trust). While the composition of the living environment thus often seems to matter, when and where remain unclear. We contribute to the literature by: (1) scrutinizing the extent to which ethnic heterogeneity drives down trust in coethnic neighbours, non-coethnic neighbours, unknown neighbours and unknown non-neighbours similarly; (2) comparing effects of heterogeneity aggregated to geographical areas that vary in scale and type of boundary; and (3) assessing whether the impact of heterogeneity of the local area depends on the wider geographic context. We test our hypotheses on the Religion in Dutch Society 2011-2012 dataset, supplemented with uniquely detailed GIS-data of Statistics Netherlands. Our dependent variables are four different so-called wallet-items, which we model through spatial and multilevel regression techniques. We demonstrate that both trust in non-coethnic and coethnic neighbours are lower in heterogeneous environments. Trust in people outside the neighbourhood is not affected by local heterogeneity. Measures of heterogeneity aggregated to relatively large scales, such as, administrative municipalities and egohoods with a 4000 m radius, demonstrate the strongest negative relationships with our trust indicators.

  12. Model of Trust Management in Open Network Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹元大; 宁宇鹏

    2003-01-01

    To keep open network more efficacious and secure, it is necessary that a nice trust model and method of trust management must be developed. The reason why traditional trust models are incomplete in their function to manage trust is explained, and a general model based on hybrid trust model and introducer protocol is provided. The hybrid model is more flexible and efficacious to manage trust compared with hierarchy model and Web model. The introducer protocol is a better solution to build, maintain and refresh the trust relationship in open network environment.

  13. Architecture of Trusted PC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Shuhua; ZHU Yuefei

    2006-01-01

    This paper, focusing on the trusted computing group's standards, explained the key concept of trusted computing and provided the architecture of trusted PC. It built trust bottom-up by starting with trusted hardware and adding layers of trusted software. It is a system-level solution available to all applications running on the member platforms. This solution reduces the security burden on applications and thus simplifies application programming.

  14. Trust and Online Reputation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Ming; Ramachandran, Deepak

    Web 2.0 technologies provide organizations with unprecedented opportunities to expand and solidify relationships with their customers, partners, and employees—while empowering firms to define entirely new business models focused on sharing information in online collaborative environments. Yet, in and of themselves, these technologies cannot ensure productive online interactions. Leading enterprises that are experimenting with social networks and online communities are already discovering this fact and along with it, the importance of establishing trust as the foundation for online collaboration and transactions. Just as today's consumers must feel secure to bank, exchange personal information and purchase products and services online; participants in Web 2.0 initiatives will only accept the higher levels of risk and exposure inherent in e-commerce and Web collaboration in an environment of trust. Indeed, only by attending to the need to cultivate online trust with customers, partners and employees will enterprises ever fully exploit the expanded business potential posed by Web 2.0. But developing online trust is no easy feat. While various preliminary attempts have occurred, no definitive model for establishing or measuring it has yet been established. To that end, nGenera has identified three, distinct dimensions of online trust: reputation (quantitative-based); relationship (qualitative-based) and process (system-based). When considered together, they form a valuable model for understanding online trust and a toolbox for cultivating it to support Web 2.0 initiatives.

  15. Perceptions of Justice after Recovery Efforts in Internet Purchasing: the Impact on Consumer Trust and Loyalty toward Retailing Sites and Online Shopping in General

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Pizzutti dos Santos

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is to extend the traditional theoretical model of service recovery to the online purchasing environment by investigating the impact of perceptions of justice after recovery efforts toward unsatisfactory Internet purchasing on customer trust and loyalty. The authors develop a theoretical model focusing on interrelationships among complaint handling evaluations, quality of prior experience, familiarity, trust, perceived value and loyalty. To test this model, 3,339 customers from all over Brazil who had been engaged in complaint processes about online purchases within the past 6 months answered an online questionnaire. Findings indicate that interpersonal treatment by the e-retailer improves consumer perceptions of the online recovery process. Consumer trust in the firm's website is strongly influenced by satisfaction with complaint handling, familiarity and the quality of prior experiences with the website, while consumer trust in Internet shopping is mainly affected by familiarity and the quality of prior experiences with Internet purchasing. These two dimensions of trust are distinct and represent discrete facets, as they do not impact each other. Moreover, repurchase intentions and word-of-mouth communication are influenced by consumer trust.

  16. A Trust Calculating Algorithm Based on Social Networking Service Users' Context%社交网络服务中一种基于用户上下文的信任度计算方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔秀全; 杨春; 李晓峰; 陈俊亮

    2011-01-01

    Trust is a significant problem in e-commerce. As the social networking sites are becoming more and more popular in recent years, its real social network and trust relationship attract people's attentions. The e-commerce based on the social networking sites has become a new trend. Therefore, the research on the users' trust for e-commerce based on SNS is very significant. By learning the trust generation principle in the psychology, this paper presents a trust calculating algorithm according to the SNS users' context. This method divides the user trust among the different SNS users into two parts-, one is generated by familiarity and the other one is generated by similarity. At the same time, according to the importance of the role, the similarity part is divided into internal similarity and external similarity. And also the specific trust calculation method proposed by this paper is illustrated. Finally, the simulation results verify that the trust calculating algorithm based on the SNS users' context is reasonable and effective.%电子商务中的信任问题一直备受关注.随着近些年社交网络的流行,其真实的社交网络及信任关系开始受到关注,基于社交网络开展各种电子商务活动逐渐成为一种新的发展趋势.因此,研究用户间的信任度对基于社交网络的电子商务具有重要意义.文中通过借鉴社会心理学中人与人之间的信任产生原理,提出了社交网络中基于用户上下文的信任度计算方法.该方法将社交网络中用户之间的信任度分为熟悉性产生的信任度和相似性产生的信任度;同时又根据所起作用的重要程度不同,把相似性划分为内部相似性和外部相似性,并给出了信任度计算的具体方法.最后,仿真实验验证了该方法的合理性和有效性.

  17. Trust Measuring Model Based on Social Factors of Users and their Behavior%基于用户及其行为社会属性的信任测度模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆悠; 华泽; 盛浩; 奚雪峰

    2013-01-01

    Trust measure is the basis of trust mechanism. Now the trust mechanism is facing the threat that malicious users manipulate the reputation. The trust measure model based on the social factors of users and their behavior expands the traditional trust mechanism. It describes and analyses the characters of malicious users and their behavior by the social factor,which reflects the essential of user and behavior. This model also adds the audit process in order to correct the reputation under the attack,so it can guarantee the credibility of trust measure in distributed Environment. Simulation experiments show that this model can effectively react to the reputation manipulation attack by the malicious users.%信任测度是信任机制的核心和基础,现有的信任机制面临着恶意用户操纵信誉的安全威胁.基于用户及其行为社会属性的信任测度模型对传统的信任机制进行了扩充,引入用户及其行为所映射的本质特性即社会属性来描述和分析恶意用户及其行为的特征,在信任测度过程中增加信誉评审过程来修正对信任测度的攻击,从而保证了分布式环境中的信任测度的可信性.模拟实验表明,该信任测度模型能有效地应对恶意用户对信誉的操纵攻击.

  18. 15 Años del Sistema General de Seguridad Social

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Félix Patiño Restrepo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available

    (Documento modificado de la presentación ante el “1er Congreso Internacional Medicina y Salud”, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México, DF, abril 23-24 de 2009

    La Comisión de Salud de la Academia Nacional de Medicina de Colombia desarrolla un análisis continuo y un estudio permanente de la profunda reforma de la seguridad social en salud de corte neoliberal que implantó la Ley 100 de diciembre 23 de 1993 mediante la creación del Sistema General de Seguridad Social en Salud (SGSSS.(1,2

    La reforma produjo una honda crisis en el sector y dio como resultado la privatización del sistema de salud, la desaparición del Instituto Colombiano de Seguros Sociales y una posición dominante oligopólica de las corporaciones intermediarias aseguradoras con efectos muy negativos sobre la medicina como profesión y como ciencia.

    Aunque motivo de controversia según quien informa, los indicadores de salud pública no mejoraron, y algunos se han deteriorado. Las tasas de mortalidad por SIDA siguen aumentando; el índice anual parasitario de malaria asciende. Tenemos ahora problema con enfermedades reemergentes. Los indicadores de salud materna, las tasas de complicaciones perinatales no muestran cambios significativos durante los últimos años; la tasa de embarazo en adolescentes es muy alta. Los programas de vacunación, que en una época dieron a Colombia una posición destacada en el continente, se deterioraron, y solo hasta ahora comienzan a repuntar.

    Sin embargo, algunos informes sí muestran mejoría en los indicadores de salud, tales como mortalidad materna, mortalidad infantil o mortalidad por enfermedad diarreica aguda; la tasa de mortalidad por tuberculosis no muestra mejoría significativa.(3

  19. Bounded prospection in dilemmas of trust and reciprocity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, A.M.; Krueger, J.I.

    2016-01-01

    Knowing when to trust others is an important social skill, but recent findings suggest that humans struggle with this dilemma—trusting strangers more than they should. Although trust decisions often do not meet the standards of rationality, they appear to be boundedly rational. We present a model of

  20. Self-Management of Social Initiations by Kindergarten Students with Disabilities in the General Education Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Brooke M.; Gast, David L.; Luscre, Deanna

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of a self-management intervention on social interaction behaviors was evaluated for students with disabilities and social deficits. Four students enrolled in a general education kindergarten classroom were taught to self-monitor social initiations during nonstructured social time via a digital wrist counter. The number of social…

  1. Beyond Rule; Trust and Power as Capacities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffnsøe, Sverre

    2013-01-01

    Taking an approach that avoids comprehending power and trust as entities to be studied apart, the article insists on elucidating trust and power as they are enacted in their intimate and delicate relationship to each other and to other human and social phenomena of similar importance, such as kno......Taking an approach that avoids comprehending power and trust as entities to be studied apart, the article insists on elucidating trust and power as they are enacted in their intimate and delicate relationship to each other and to other human and social phenomena of similar importance......, such as knowledge and experience, gift-giving, hope, freedom and agency. To permit us to understand power and trust as interdependent dimensions, the article confronts the notions of power as command, coercion, control and calculation and develops a conception of power as a capacity. This permits us to consider...

  2. Trust to mass-media: micro- and macrolevel

    OpenAIRE

    A. S. Kavyerina

    2014-01-01

    Trust is the basic element of civil society.For the last decades Ukrainian social institutions, including mass media, suffering of the crisis of trust. Public informing, socialization, formation of public opinion are the main functions of mass media. Mass media takes part in a lot of social processes and spheres of society. Accuracy of the information, compliance with standards,objectivity and trust of the audience are very important because of the influence of the mass media. The paper d...

  3. From transformative learning to social change? Using action research to explore and improve informal complaints management in an NHS trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anki Odelius

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The number of complaints from patients and/or carers concerning aspects of care has increased over time. Yet, in spite of a growing body of national and international literature on healthcare complaints, there is a lack of knowledge around how nurses and midwives manage informal complaints at ward level, or staff needs in relation to this. Aim: Using an action research approach with mixed methods, four phases and four cycles, the aim was to explore informal complaints management by nurses and midwives at ward level. We discuss the action research process primarily in connection with learning and service change, drawing from the qualitative data in this paper. Findings: The analysis of the collected qualitative data resulted in three main themes, related to the complexities of complaints and complaints management, staff support needs and the existing ambiguous complaints systems, which are hard for staff and service users to negotiate. The action research approach facilitated learning and change in participants in relation to complaints management, in the collaborating trust. Conclusions: The extant body of research on complaints does not sufficiently recognise the complexity of complaints and informal complaints management, or the complaints systems that are in place. Needs-based staff training can help support staff to manage informal complaints more effectively. Implications for practice: • There needs to be recognition of the complexities involved in complaints management • Complaints systems need to be clearer for the benefit of service users and staff • Staff need training and support that is tailored to their needs to improve their response to complaints, leading to a better patient experience • Limited interventions, informed by staff needs, can lead to change and act as a catalyst for a wider change in informal complaints management

  4. Partnership as a Product of Trust: Parent-Teacher Relational Trust in a Low-Income Urban School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Heather Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Trust is an important factor affecting parent-teacher relationships. In urban schools, the lack of trust between parents and teachers is exacerbated by racial and social class differences (Bryk and Schneider, 2002). This paper examines how relational trust was both fostered and inhibited between low-income parents and their children's…

  5. 医学生人际信任与领悟社会支持状况分析%Analysis on relationship between medical students'interpersonal trust and comprehending social support

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭成

    2015-01-01

    目的:了解医学生人际信任与领悟社会支持状况,探讨社会支持与人际信任的关系,为高校大学生心理健康教育工作的开展提供依据。方法采用领悟社会支持量表( PSSS )、人际信任量表( ITS)为调查工具,通过整群抽样,对安徽省某医学院校617名医学生进行调查。结果医学生的人际信任(77.75±8.03)处中等水平。领悟社会支持(65.54±9.24)处于中等偏上水平。领悟社会支持与人际信任呈负相关。结论医学生的人际信任、领悟社会支持受性别、年级、身体状况、成绩等因素的影响,领悟社会支持是影响医学生人际信任的个体内部心理因素。%Objective To comprehend the medico interpersonal trust and perceived social support status , to discuss the relationship between social support and interpersonal trust , so as to provide the basis for developing mental health education of College students .Methods PSSS and ITS were employed in the research , and 617 medico of a medical school in Anhui province sampled as the research objects .Results Medical interpersonal trust were in the medium level (77.75 ±8.03), while their perception of social support were above the medium level(65.54 ±9.24).Perception of social support was negatively correlated with interpersonal trust .Conclusions Medical interpersonal trust and perception of social support are influenced by factors of gender , grade, grades in class, physical condition etc .Perception of social support is an inner factor in influencing medico interpersonal trust.

  6. LA REFORMA DEL SISTEMA GENERAL DE SEGURIDAD SOCIAL EN SALUD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Malagón Londoño

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    La Academia Nacional de Medicina de Colombia en repetidas ocasiones, desde el año 1998, ha denunciado las notables defi ciencias del Sistema General de Seguridad Social en Salud (SGSSS que implantó la Ley 100 de diciembre 23 de 1993. 

    El SGSSS, que debiera ser sistema de aseguramiento con propósito social, se ha convertido en negocio donde priman los intereses económicos con descuido en la calidad de los servicios; hizo profunda crisis, principalmente por causa de los excesivos costos que conlleva el modelo de intermediación comercial. Se ha creado una inaceptable posición oligopólica dominante de los aseguradores, que parece haber suplantado al estado en la defi nición de las políticas y en la orientación del SGSSS e interfiere la buena prestación de los servicios. Manifestación prominente de esto es la creciente y descontrolada integración vertical. 

    El sistema colombiano de intermediación comercial es costoso, inequitativo, ineficiente y va contra los principios constitucionales que definen la salud como derecho humano, en detrimento del bien común.

    El SGSSS, a los 18 años de su implantación, aún no cuenta con un sistema de información y las bases de datos existentes en las EPS, y también en el FOSYGA, distan de ser confiables. Se reconoce que un sistema de salud es en esencia un sistema de información. Los hospitales y clínicas de Colombia, especialmente las instituciones de carácter público, tienen una cartera que, se estima, es cinco o seis veces mayor que la cartera reclamada por las EPS, buena parte de la cual ya es de difícil cobro. Sin embargo, la prioridad ha sido resolver el problema económico de las EPS, no el de los hospitales.

    Son muchas las voces que claman por un riguroso control de la manera como las EPS invierten los recursos de la salud, de carácter público por ser recursos parafiscales. Las EPS muestran un grande y rápido crecimiento patrimonial y han

  7. Conceptual Approach to the Organizational Trust Building in Commitment Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Emre CİVELEK

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Trust is a psychological factor that is the premise of social relations. The trust level in a country is connected with the culture and forms the social capital. Organizational trust may be defined that the employees don’t require protecting themselves against the policies of organization which would affect them. Organizational commitment is defined that the employees internalize the organization values and creating the will of staying in the organization. The trust is considered as the most important premise of commitment. In this study the conceptual approach is developed how the organizational trust would be built in the commitment perspective.

  8. Trust and Leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordum, Anders

    2005-01-01

    The concept and phenomenon of trust and its relation to leadership has recently come into focus. What role does trust play? Can trust be created strategically? Questions like these are often raised. How we conceive of and conceptualize trust is not as often discussed. Among those conceptualizations...... flexibility of form for example, the idea that one with leadership tools can consciously bring forth trust. In the conclusion, the question about trust communication is addressed. In this section I argue that trust is positively value-laden, becausesincerity is a functional and pragmatic condition...

  9. Balancing Trust and Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagd, Søren

    This paper focuses on the leadership challenge of balancing trust and control. The relation between trust and control has for a long time been a puzzling issue for management researchers. In the paper I first show that there has been a dramatic change in the way the relation between trust...... and control has been conceptualized in trust research. While the relation between trust and control earlier was conceptualized as a more or less stable balance between trust and control, more recent research conceptualizes the relation between trust and control more as a dynamical process that involves...... an ongoing process of balancing the relation between trust and control. Second, taking the departure in the recent conceptualization of the balance between trust and control as an interactive process I discuss the challenges for management in handling this more subtle balancing of trust and control...

  10. A general approach-avoidance hypothesis of oxytocin: accounting for social and non-social effects of oxytocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harari-Dahan, Osnat; Bernstein, Amit

    2014-11-01

    We critically reexamine extant theory and empirical study of Oxytocin. We question whether OT is, in fact, a "social neuropeptide" as argued in dominant theories of OT. We critically review human and animal research on the social and non-social effects of Oxytocin, including behavioral, psychophysiological, neurobiological, and neuroimaging studies. We find that extant (social) theories of Oxytocin do not account for well-documented non-social effects of Oxytocin. Furthermore, we find a range of evidence that social and non-social effects of Oxytocin may be mediated by core approach-avoidance motivational processes. We propose a General Approach-avoidance Hypothesis of Oxytocin (GAAO). We argue that the GAAO may provide a parsimonious account of established social and non-social effects of Oxytocin. We thus re-conceptualize the basic function(s) and mechanism(s) of action of Oxytocin. Finally, we highlight implications of the GAAO for basic and clinical research in humans

  11. Institutional design of agri-environmental contracts in the European Union: the role of trust and social capital.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polman, N.B.P.; Slangen, L.H.G.

    2008-01-01

    Assessing potential uptake of agri-environmental schemes based on farm and farmer characteristics only results in an incomplete analysis because it neglects the effects of motivational issues of the institutional design of contracts, as set up by the government, and of social capital. In this paper

  12. Trust, conflict, and cooperation: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balliet, Daniel; Van Lange, Paul A M

    2013-09-01

    Many theories of trust emphasize that trust is most relevant to behavior in situations involving a conflict of interests. However, it is not clear how trust relates to behavior across situations that differ in the degree of conflicting interest: Does trust matter more when the conflict of interest is small or large? According to an interdependence perspective, trust becomes an especially important determinant of behavior in situations involving larger, compared to smaller, degrees of conflicting interests. To examine this perspective, we conducted a meta-analysis involving 212 effect sizes on the relation between trust (both state and dispositional trust in others) and cooperation in social dilemmas-situations that involve varying degrees of conflict between self-interest and collective interest. Results revealed that the positive relation between trust and cooperation is stronger when there is a larger, compared to smaller, degree of conflict. We also examined several other possible moderators of the relation between trust and cooperation. The relation between trust and cooperation was stronger during individual, compared to intergroup, interactions but did not vary as a function of the situation being either a one-shot or repeated interaction. We also find differences across countries in the extent that people condition their own cooperation based on their trust in others. We discuss how the results support an emerging consensus about trust being limited to situations of conflict and address some theoretical and societal implications for our understanding of how and why trust is so important to social interactions and relationships.

  13. TrustMAS: Trusted Communication Platform for Multi-Agent Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Szczypiorski, Krzysztof; Mazurczyk, Wojciech; Cabaj, Krzysztof; Radziszewski, Pawel

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents TrustMAS - Trusted Communication Platform for Multi-Agent Systems, which provides trust and anonymity for mobile agents. The platform includes anonymous technique based on random-walk algorithm for providing general purpose anonymous communication for agents. All agents, which take part in the proposed platform, benefit from trust and anonymity that is provided for their interactions. Moreover, in TrustMAS there are StegAgents (SA) that are able to perform various steganographic communication. To achieve that goal, SAs may use methods in different layers of TCP/IP model or specialized middleware enabling steganography that allows hidden communication through all layers of mentioned model. In TrustMAS steganographic channels are used to exchange routing tables between StegAgents. Thus all StegAgents in TrustMAS with their ability to exchange information by using hidden channels form distributed steganographic router (Stegrouter).

  14. Social Desirability, Environmental Attitudes, and General Ecological Behaviour in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oerke, Britta; Bogner, Franz X.

    2013-01-01

    Socially desirable responses have been widely discussed as potentially biasing self-reported measures of environmental attitude and behaviour assessment. The direct and moderating effect of social desirability on children has not been analysed before. By applying a Lie scale together with a two-factor environmental attitude set measure and a scale…

  15. Is the Web Marketing Mix Sustainable in China? The Mediation Effect of Dynamic Trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongrok Choi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Trust plays an important role between companies and customers in the online shopping environment because of the anonymous transaction environment and the advantage of virtual property. The most rapidly developing trend in Chinese e-business may come from Guanxi, a Chinese term for social trust. In this study, we define Guanxi as the dynamic trust process in the social decisions or activities of the Chinese. With increasing global attention on the outstanding development of Chinese e-business, it would be worthwhile to analyze the dynamic trust process of social e-commerce customers in close combination with the social network. The statistical results obtained using structural equation modeling (SEM show the importance of trust in a social e-commerce context. The direct positive relationship between the components of the web marketing mix and purchase intention is partially mediated by initial trust and ongoing trust, while initial trust only partially affects purchase intention through ongoing trust.

  16. Towards understanding citizens trust in local government authorities in social service provision: A case of education service in Maswa district Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Makorere

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper stresses on understanding citizens’ trust to local government authorities in the provision of social services, the case of education service in Maswa district. The paper discloses that majority of respondents of 82.2% of total respondents were not involved in full council meetings, although the meetings are supposed to be open to the public and all information that is presented there is public information which includes proposed plans and budgets as well as quarterly progress reports. This shows that there are problems in primary education. Moreover, due to various problems that still exist in primary education in the area under study, they created a sense of distrust between citizens to local government and local leaders to be specific including Village Executive Officers, Ward Executive Officers and councilors since majority of the respondents revealed that they are lazy harass people. This makes people to be reluctant to participate in development activities include refusing to contribute financially in various development initiatives since they do not see importance of their local leaders so they decide to take their own decisions.

  17. Wireless next generation networks a virtue-based trust model

    CERN Document Server

    Harvey, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief proposes a trust model motivated by virtue epistemology, addressing the need for a more efficient and flexible trust model for wireless next generation networks. This theory of trust simplifies the computation and communication overhead of strictly cognitive-computational models of trust. Both the advantages and the challenges of virtue-based trust models are discussed. This brief offers new research and a general theory of rationality that enables users to interpret trust and reason as complementary mechanisms that guide our rational conduct at two different epistemic level

  18. Testosterone inhibits trust but promotes reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boksem, Maarten A S; Mehta, Pranjal H; Van den Bergh, Bram; van Son, Veerle; Trautmann, Stefan T; Roelofs, Karin; Smidts, Ale; Sanfey, Alan G

    2013-11-01

    The steroid hormone testosterone has been associated with behavior intended to obtain or maintain high social status. Although such behavior is typically characterized as aggressive and competitive, it is clear that high social status is achieved and maintained not only through antisocial behavior but also through prosocial behavior. In the present experiment, we investigated the impact of testosterone administration on trust and reciprocity using a double-blind randomized control design. We found that a single dose of 0.5 mg of testosterone decreased trust but increased generosity when repaying trust. These findings suggest that testosterone may mediate different types of status-seeking behavior. It may increase competitive, potentially aggressive, and antisocial behavior when social challenges and threats (i.e., abuse of trust and betrayal) need to be considered; however, it may promote prosocial behavior in the absence of these threats, when high status and good reputation may be best served by prosocial behavior.

  19. A Collaborative Filtering Recommendation Algorithm Based on Multiple Social Trusts%一种基于多元社交信任的协同过滤推荐算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王瑞琴; 蒋云良; 李一啸; 楼俊钢

    2016-01-01

    协同过滤推荐是当前最成功的个性化推荐技术之一,但是传统的协同过滤推荐算法普遍存在推荐性能低和抗攻击能力弱的问题.针对以上问题,提出了一种基于多元化社交信任的协同过滤推荐算法CF‐CRIS (collaborative filtering based on credibility ,reliability ,intimacy and self‐orientation).1)借鉴社会心理学中的信任产生原理,提出基于多个信任要素(可信度、可靠度、亲密度、自我意识导向)的信任度计算方法;2)深入研究社交网络环境中各信任要素的识别、提取和量化方法;3)基于用户间的综合信任度选取可信邻居,完成对目标用户的个性化推荐.基于通用测试数据集的实验研究结果表明:该算法不但可以极大地提高推荐系统的精确度和召回率,而且表现出良好的抗攻击能力.%Collaborative filtering (CF) is one of the most successful recommendation technologies in the personalized recommendation systems .It can recommend products or information for target user according to the preference information of similar users .However the traditional collaborative filtering algorithms have the disadvantages of low recommendation efficiency and weak capacity of attack ‐resistance .In order to solve the above problems ,a novel collaborative filtering algorithm based on social trusts is proposed .Firstly ,referring to the trust generation principle in social psychology ,a social trust computation method based on multiple trust elements is presented .In social networking environment , trust elements mainly include credibility , reliability , intimacy and self‐orientation . Then specific methods of identifying ,extraction and quantification of the trust elements are studied in depth .Finally ,the trustworthy neighbors of target user are selected in accordance with the social trust ,so as to make trust‐based collaborative recommendation .Using the FilmTrust and

  20. Understandig trust : longitudinal studies on trust dynamics in governance interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Trust is generally perceived as an important concept in governance processes where people cooperate, as it enables people to take risks and deal with uncertainties, and it facilitates cooperation. These characteristics are seen as important in new and alternative ways of implementing public

  1. Computing Distrust in Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Negative Links, Predicting Distrust, Signed Social Networks , Understanding distrust REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S... social networks (or net- works with positive and negative links). 6.3.1 NCSSN for Node Classification in Signed Social Networks Similar to evaluation of...can be generalized from trust/distrust networks to signed social networks (or networks with positive and negative links). 92 Chapter 7

  2. Effects of social capital on general health status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Ayano

    2014-02-14

    This paper discusses the concept of social capital as a potential factor in understanding the controversial relationship between income inequality and individual health status, arguing a positive, important role for social capital. Most of the health research literature focuses on individual health status and reveals that social capital increases individual health. However, the difficulty in measuring social capital, together with what may be the nearly impossible task of attributing causality, should relegate the concept to a more theoretical role in health research. Nonetheless, social capital receives academic attention as a potentially important factor in health research. This paper finds that the mixed results of empirical research on income inequality and health status remain a problem in the context of defining a stable relationship between socioeconomic status and health status. Clearly, further research is needed to elaborate on the income inequality and health relationship. In addition, focused, rigorous examination of social capital in a health context is needed before health researchers can comfortably introduce it as a concept of influence or significance.

  3. Looking for Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøge, Ask Risom; Lauritsen, Peter

    Trust and surveillance are often seen as opposites. Trust is regularly characterized as the glue that holds society together, while surveillance is seen as corrosive. However, in Scandinavia high levels of trust and surveillance coexist. It is therefore interesting to investigate if there is a co......Trust and surveillance are often seen as opposites. Trust is regularly characterized as the glue that holds society together, while surveillance is seen as corrosive. However, in Scandinavia high levels of trust and surveillance coexist. It is therefore interesting to investigate...

  4. 26 CFR 1.851-7 - Certain unit investment trusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certain unit investment trusts. 1.851-7 Section... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Regulated Investment Companies and Real Estate Investment Trusts § 1.851-7 Certain unit investment trusts. (a) In general. For purposes of the Internal Revenue Code, a unit...

  5. 7 CFR 795.9 - Estate or trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Estate or trust. 795.9 Section 795.9 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.9 Estate or trust. (a) An estate or irrevocable trust shall be considered as one person except that, where two or more estates...

  6. The Relationship between Loneliness and Interpersonal Trust during Middle Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotenberg, Ken J.; MacDonald, Keltie J.; King, Emily V.

    2004-01-01

    The authors administered measures of loneliness, generalized trust beliefs in peers, and trust beliefs in specific familiar peers (i.e., opposite-gender peers, same-gender peers, close same-gender peers) to a sample of 63 children (33 girls, 30 boys) from 4th and 5th grades (M age = 10 years, 6 months). They assessed children's trusting behavior…

  7. Script Fading for Children with Autism: Generalization of Social Initiation Skills from School to Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichnick, Alison Marie

    2013-01-01

    A critical component of teaching social skills to people with autism is the generalization of behavior change across a variety of untrained situations during which social skills are appropriate. The script-fading procedure is an effective technology for teaching social skills to people with autism, but few researchers have established cues in the…

  8. Trusting the other or taking a chance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Morten; Heinskou, Marie Bruvik

    2016-01-01

    Theories of modernity and risk society argue that increasing levels of risk fun- damentally alter or lower the level of trust in society. In this article we argue that this assumption is based in a fallacious theoretical link between trust and risk. Rather than calculative assessment of risk......, respectively, reside. Secondly, the issue of temporality is traced in Luhmann’s work on trust and it is demon- strated how his dichotomous treatment of social time conflates markedly dif- ferent temporal experiences. As a solution to this, the article presents the notion of a third temporal mode of the process...... present from Deleuze’s concept of becoming. This is theoretically reconnected to the process present to trust theory, arguing that the uncertainty trust deals with, is connected to process experience rather than expectations of the future. Finally, we discuss the the- oretical and empirical consequences...

  9. The Effects of General Social Support and Social Support for Racial Discrimination on African American Women's Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seawell, Asani H; Cutrona, Carolyn E; Russell, Daniel W

    2014-02-01

    The present longitudinal study examined the role of general and tailored social support in mitigating the deleterious impact of racial discrimination on depressive symptoms and optimism in a large sample of African American women. Participants were 590 African American women who completed measures assessing racial discrimination, general social support, tailored social support for racial discrimination, depressive symptoms, and optimism at two time points (2001-2002 and 2003-2004). Our results indicated that higher levels of general and tailored social support predicted optimism one year later; changes in both types of support also predicted changes in optimism over time. Although initial levels of neither measure of social support predicted depressive symptoms over time, changes in tailored support predicted changes in depressive symptoms. We also sought to determine whether general and tailored social support "buffer" or diminish the negative effects of racial discrimination on depressive symptoms and optimism. Our results revealed a classic buffering effect of tailored social support, but not general support on depressive symptoms for women experiencing high levels of discrimination.

  10. IT and Activity Displacement: Behavioral Evidence from the U.S. General Social Survey (GSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, John P.; Martin, Steven

    2009-01-01

    In order to track social change during a period of the rapid advances brought about by new information technologies (IT), a targeted module of IT-relevant and Internet questions was added to the 2000, 2002 and 2004 samples of the General Social Survey (GSS). The general issue inherent in and guiding the questions asked (as well as the analyses…

  11. Differences in social relations between persons with type 2 diabetes and the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempler, Nana Folmann; Ekholm, Ola; Willaing, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Poor social support and lack of social network are well-established risk factors for morbidity and mortality in general populations. Good social relations, such as social support and network contacts, are associated with better self-management and fewer psychosocial problems in persons...... with type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether persons with type 2 diabetes have poorer social relations than the general population. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey in three settings: a specialist diabetes clinic (SDC) (n = 1084), a web panel (WP) consisting...... of persons with type 2 diabetes (n = 1491) and a sample from the 2010 Danish Health and Morbidity Survey, representative of the general population (n = 15,165). We compared social relations using multivariate logistic regression. Results: Compared to the general population, persons with type 2 diabetes more...

  12. Modelling trading networks and the role of trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio, Rafael A.; Govezensky, Tzipe; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Élfego; Kaski, Kimmo K.

    2017-04-01

    We present a simple dynamical model for describing trading interactions between agents in a social network by considering only two dynamical variables, namely money and goods or services, that are assumed conserved over the whole time span of the agents' trading transactions. A key feature of the model is that agent-to-agent transactions are governed by the price in units of money per goods, which is dynamically changing, and by a trust variable, which is related to the trading history of each agent. All agents are able to sell or buy, and the decision to do either has to do with the level of trust the buyer has in the seller, the price of the goods and the amount of money and goods at the disposal of the buyer. Here we show the results of extensive numerical calculations under various initial conditions in a random network of agents and compare the results with the available related data. In most cases the agreement between the model results and real data turns out to be fairly good, which allow us to draw some general conclusions as how different trading strategies could affect the distribution of wealth in different kinds of societies. Our calculations reveal the striking effects of trust in commercial relations, namely that trust makes trading links more robust and the wealth distribution more even as well as allows for the existence of a healthy middle class.

  13. Adjusting Role of Offline Familiarity in Social Network Trust%线下熟悉度在社交网络信任中的调节作用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张爱华; 赵国龙

    2015-01-01

    网络信任是促成在线购买行为的关键影响因素。借鉴网络在线信任的相关研究,通过结构方程模型探索社交网络信任的影响因素并验证线下熟悉度对它们之间关系的调节作用。研究结果表明,除感知相似性之外,其他自变量如声誉、互动关系强度、信息质量、互惠性交互、满意度和共同价值观均对社交网络信任具有积极的影响作用,其中信息质量是最主要的影响因素;线下熟悉度对信息质量、互惠性、声誉、共同价值观与社交网络信任之间关系存在显著的调节作用,这对于企业制定有效的社交网络营销策略具有重要意义。%Online trust is a key factor contributing to online purchasing behavior.Referring to literature of online trust, several factors of social media trust are explored and the adjusting role of offline familiarity on their rela-tionship is verified by using structural equation model.The results show that independent variables such as repu-tation, the strength of social interaction, information quality, reciprocity, satisfaction and shared values have a positive effect on social network trust except the variables of perceived similarity, and information quality is the most important factor.Offline familiarity significantly adjusts the relationships between information quality, reci-procity, reputation, shared values and social media trust, which is important for companies to develop an effec-tive social network marketing strategy.

  14. Trusted information sources used during and after Superstorm Sandy: TV and radio were used more often than social media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn; Donio, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Health and safety professionals, and the public, are interested in the best methods of providing timely information about disasters. The objective of this study was to examine information sources used for Superstorm Sandy with respect to the storm, evacuation routes, shelters, safety, and health issues. Respondents in Central New Jersey and Jersey Shore communities were differentially impacted by the storm. Jersey shore respondents had higher evacuation rates (47 % vs 13 %), higher flood waters in homes, longer power outages (average 23 vs 6 days), and longer periods without internet (29 vs 6 days). Electricity outages disrupted both sources and receivers of communication. Both groups obtained most of their information regarding safety from television, radio, friends and web/email. Information sources on health varied by location, with central Jersey respondents using mainly TV and the web, and Jersey shore respondents obtaining health information from the radio, and TV (before the storm). For information on evacuation routes, Jersey shore respondents obtained information from many sources, while central Jersey respondents obtained it from TV. Information on mold was largely obtained from friends and the web, since mold issues were dealt with several weeks after Sandy. The reliance on traditional sources of information (TV, radio, friends) found in this study suggests that the extreme power outages rendered web, cell phones, and social media on cell phones less usable, and suggests the need for an integrated communication strategy with redundancies that takes into account prolonged power outages over large geographical areas. PMID:24279815

  15. Trusted information sources used during and after Superstorm Sandy: TV and radio were used more often than social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn; Donio, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Health and safety professionals and the public are interested in the best methods of providing timely information about disasters. The objective of this study was to examine information sources used for Superstorm Sandy with respect to the storm, evacuation routes, shelters, safety, and health issues. Respondents in central New Jersey and Jersey shore communities were differentially impacted by the storm. Jersey shore respondents had higher evacuation rates (47% vs. 13%), higher flood waters in homes, longer power outages (average 23 vs. 6 d), and longer periods without Internet (29 vs. 6 d). Electricity outages disrupted both sources and receivers of communication. Both groups obtained most of their information regarding safety from television, radio, friends, and Web/e-mail. Information sources on health varied by location, with central Jersey respondents using mainly TV and the Web, and Jersey shore respondents obtaining health information from the radio and TV (before the storm). For information on evacuation routes, Jersey shore respondents obtained information from many sources, while central Jersey respondents obtained it from TV. Information on mold was largely obtained from friends and the Web, since mold issues were dealt with several weeks after Sandy. The reliance on traditional sources of information (TV, radio, friends) found in this study suggests that the extreme power outages rendered Web, cell phones, and social media on cell phones less usable, and suggests the need for an integrated communication strategy with redundancies that takes into account prolonged power outages over large geographical areas.

  16. Employees' Political Skill and Voice Behavior--The Role of Organizational Trust and General Self-efficiency%员工政治技能对建言行为的影响--组织信任、一般自我效能感的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘永仁; 尹奎

    2013-01-01

      政治技能是员工在组织中生存与发展的必要条件,鲜有研究探讨员工政治技能与个体行为倾向的关系。以华东与华北地区26家企业203名员工为被试,综合计划行为理论、印象管理理论、社会交换理论,采用多元回归统计方法探讨员工政治技能对建言行为的作用机制。结果表明:员工政治技能对组织信任、一般自我效能、建言行为有显著正向影响;组织信任、一般自我效能感对建言行为有显著正向影响;组织信任在员工政治技能与建言行为关系中起到中介作用;尽管一般自我效能感与政治技能与建言行为都显著相关,但并未在政治技能与建言行为中表现出所期望的中介效应。%  Political skill is required for employees to survive and develop in their organizations, however, few researches have discussed the relationship between political skill and individual behavioral tendency. Blending the theoretical frames of impression management, planned behavior and social exchange, this study aims to explore how employees' political skill affect voice behavior. Data were gathered from 203 employees of 26 enterprises in the east and north region of China. The result shows that employees' political skill is positively related to voice behavior; in addition, organizational trust consisting of colleague trust and superior trust completely mediates the above relationship; although strong support is shown for the relationship between political skill and general self-efficiency, general self-efficiency does not play a significant mediating role as organizational trust plays.

  17. Corporate Social Responsibility, Company′s Reaction Way to Crisis and Consumer Trust%企业社会责任、危机反应方式与消费者信任

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李海廷

    2013-01-01

    当企业危机发生后,企业最关心的是消费者的信任问题。本研究对危机反应方式与消费者信任之间的关系,以及危机发生前企业社会责任对二者关系的影响机制进行分析,发现危机发生后企业社会责任对消费者信任起到很大影响,当企业社会责任表现积极时,消费者信任水平明显提高,并且上述关系并不受企业危机反应方式的影响;危机发生后企业“明确承担责任”并不是一个坏选择,甚至是一个最好的选择。%Consumer trust is the most important issue that the company is concerned about after a crisis .In this study , the relationship between company′s reaction way to crisis and consumer trust and how the corporate social responsibility ( CSR) before the crisis influences the relationship are analyzed , finding that CSR has great impact on consumer trust af-ter crisis.When CSR is positive , the level of trust is high .And the relationship between CSR and consumer trust is not influenced by the company′s reaction way .We find “clear responsibility” reaction way isn′t a bad choice , even a best selection .

  18. Trust and controlling

    OpenAIRE

    Bieńkowska Agnieszka; Zabłocka-Kluczka Anna

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to discuss the trust within and towards an organisation in the context of implementation of controlling therein. In this context the essence of trust and its importance in organisation management was presented, as well as trust in the contemporary management methods and concepts. Controlling as a trust-building factor inside an organisation was pointed out. Especially controlling and control were described. Moreover management by considering deviations in controll...

  19. Reliable Design Versus Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Melanie; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation focuses on reliability and trust for the users portion of the FPGA design flow. It is assumed that the manufacturer prior to hand-off to the user tests FPGA internal components. The objective is to present the challenges of creating reliable and trusted designs. The following will be addressed: What makes a design vulnerable to functional flaws (reliability) or attackers (trust)? What are the challenges for verifying a reliable design versus a trusted design?

  20. Trust and controlling

    OpenAIRE

    Bieńkowska Agnieszka; Zabłocka-Kluczka Anna

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to discuss the trust within and towards an organisation in the context of implementation of controlling therein. In this context the essence of trust and its importance in organisation management was presented, as well as trust in the contemporary management methods and concepts. Controlling as a trust-building factor inside an organisation was pointed out. Especially controlling and control were described. Moreover management by considering deviations in controll...

  1. Trust in Consumer Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kursawe, Klaus; Katzenbeisser, Stefan

    While Trusted Computing is getting increasing attention in the PC world, consumer electronics devices have limited benefit from the Trusted Computing solutions currently under development. In this paper we outline the different requirements of consumer electronics devices, when compared to the PC world, and point out the technical consequences for standards like the Trusted Computing Group. In addition, we will touch on economic aspects that may inhibit or support Trusted Computing in this domain.

  2. Type D personality is associated with social anxiety in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupper, Nina; Denollet, Johan

    2014-06-01

    Research on the emotional processes associated with Type D personality is important for its further conceptualization. We examined the associations of Type D personality with social and general anxiety symptoms in a large community sample. The aim of the current study was to disentangle the associations of Type D personality and its components with social anxiety and general anxiety in a large sample from the general population. A random sample of 2,475 adults from the general population filled out questionnaires to assess Type D personality (DS-14), social anxiety (SIAS(10), SPS(11), BFNE-II), and general anxiety (HADS-A, GAD-7). Type D individuals were characterized by increased levels of both social and general anxiety. The social inhibition (SI) component of Type D personality was most strongly associated with social interaction anxiety (r = .63), while negative affectivity (NA) was strongly associated with general anxiety (GAD-7: r = .70; HADS-A: r = .66). Within social anxiety, SI was more strongly associated with facets of social interaction anxiety than with social phobia. Multiple regression analysis showed that the synergistic interaction of NA and SI was a predictor of social anxiety (SIAS(10): β = .32, p interaction was not a significant predictor of general anxiety. Logistic regression using the dichotomous Type D classification demonstrated a 9.1-fold (95%CI, 7.0-11.8) increased odds of a score in the highest quartile of social interaction anxiety and a 7.6-fold (95%CI, 5.8-9.8) increased odds of high social phobia. Odds ratios for clinically relevant levels of general anxiety were 8.3 (95%CI, 5.5-12.5) for GAD-7 and 6.5 (95%CI, 3.4-12.6) for HADS-A. In the general population, Type D individuals were characterized by both social and general anxiety. The SI component of Type D is strongly associated with social interaction anxiety and the synergistic interaction of NA and SI was associated with high social anxiety, above and beyond the main NA and

  3. The Business of Trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisse, Mark E

    2016-04-01

    New mobile devices, social networks, analytics, and communications technologies are emerging at an unparalleled rate. As a result, academic health centers will face both new opportunities and formidable challenges. Unlike previous transitions from paper-based systems to networked computer systems, these new technologies are the product of new entrepreneurial and commercial interests driven by consumers. As these new commercial products and services are more widely adopted, the likelihood grows that data will be used in unanticipated ways inconsistent with societal norms. Academic health centers will have to understand the implications of these technologies and engage more actively in processes governing the collection, aggregation, and use of health data produced in a new era of consumer-driven health care technology. Maintaining public trust should be a paramount concern.

  4. Trust and Credit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harste, Gorm

    The present paper is an answer to the question, how did trust and credit emerge. The systems of trust and credit reduce the environmental and contextual complexities in which trust and credit are embedded. The paper analyses the forms of this reduction in a number of stages in the evolution...

  5. A Trust Enhanced Web Services Selection Model Based on Social Network%基于社会网络分析的 Web服务信任增强选择模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱先远; 尤科本

    2014-01-01

    针对海量Web服务资源的可信判断和优质可信服务的选择问题,提出了一种基于社会网络的Web服务信任增强选择模型EMBST。该模型依据提供相同功能的不同 Web 服务具有不同的社会网络属性的思想,利用检索出的Web服务资源发现并拓展该资源潜在的社会网络;将信任等级指标添加到关系网络中实现社会网络中具有不同信任等级的Web资源的选择,增加了对节点可信性的考虑;最后在该模型的基础上,提出了基于信任度的谱分割算子。仿真结果表明该选择模型为Web资源可信选择问题提供了有效解决方案。%Aiming at how to select the best suitable service resources from the massive Web resources and making a judgment on trusted resources, a new trusted Web resource selection method is proposed based on social network.This method is based on different Web educational resources to provide the same functionality with the thought of a different social network properties .By re-trieving web resource, we discover and extend the potential resource of the social network , Indicators enhance the level of trust by making the automatic choice of Web resources with different level of trust in the social network and considering the credibility of the node, Finally, by analyzing the model proposed the spectrum segmentation algorithm based on trust.Simulation results show that this method provides an effective solution for Web resource selection .

  6. Trust in Co-sourced Software Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlichter, Bjarne Rerup; Persson, John Stouby

    2014-01-01

    . We present a case study of how the co-sourcing relationship between a certified CMMI-level 5 Danish software company and an offshoring supplier can be conceptualized as an Abstract System. An Abstract System is a dis-embedded social system (such as banking) that is trusted despite lack of detailed...... understanding or personal trust relations. The paper suggest how certain work practices among developers and managers can be explained using a dynamic trust lens based on Abstract Systems, especially dis- and re-embedding mechanisms....

  7. The Process of Trust Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagd, Søren; Højland, Jeppe

    by high trust and co-operation? In this paper we explore the process of trust development during an organisational change project in a Danish SME by looking at two kinds of trust relations: employee trust in management and trust relations among employees. We find substantial differences in trust...

  8. Measuring quality, reputation and trust in online communities

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Hao

    2012-01-01

    In the Internet era the information overload and the challenge to detect quality content has raised the issue of how to rank both resources and users in online communities. In this paper we develop a general ranking method that can simultaneously evaluate users' reputation and objects' quality in an iterative procedure, and that exploits the trust relationships and social acquaintances of users as an additional source of information. We test our method on two real online communities, the EconoPhysics forum and the Last.fm music catalogue, and determine how different variants of the algorithm influence the resultant ranking. We show the benefits of considering trust relationships, and define the form of the algorithm better apt to common situations.

  9. Enhancing Generalization of Social Skills: Making Social Skills Curricula Effective after the Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh Kent; MacKay, Leslie D.

    2008-01-01

    Sometimes educators are puzzled by how students can demonstrate a social skill perfectly during a practice session in a social skills curriculum but fail to use the same skill in real-life situations. Students with a lack of social skills are more likely to experience teacher and peer rejection, and are more at risk for negative life outcomes,…

  10. Social relations and loneliness among older patients consulting their general practitioner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Tina Drud; Sandholdt, Håkon; Waldorff, Frans Boch

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Social relations are important for people and affect their quality of life, morbidity and mortality. This holds true especially for older persons. General practitioners (GPs) are in a unique position to address social relations and loneliness; however, no GP population-based studies...... have assessed older patients' social relations and loneliness. The aim of this study was to analyse the social relations and loneliness of patients aged 65 years and above consulting their GP. METHODS: This survey counted the participation of 12 general practices in the Capital Region of Denmark...

  11. Social relations and loneliness among older patients consulting their general practitioner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Tina Drud; Sandholdt, Håkon; Waldorff, Frans Boch

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Social relations are important for people and affect their quality of life, morbidity and mortality. This holds true especially for older persons. General practitioners (GPs) are in a unique position to address social relations and loneliness; however, no GP population-based studies...... have assessed older patients’ social relations and loneliness. The aim of this study was to analyse the social relations and loneliness of patients aged 65 years and above consulting their GP. Methods: This survey counted the participation of 12 general practices in the Capital Region of Denmark...

  12. Neither bridging nor bonding: A test of socialization effects by ethnically diverse voluntary associations on participants' inter-ethnic tolerance, inter-ethnic trust and intra-ethnic belonging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The distinction between bridging and bonding associations is a cornerstone of social capital research. Nevertheless, this study is the first to provide a direct test of the socialization mechanism that supposedly causes ethnically mixed (bridging) associations to generate interethnic tolerance and trust, and homogenous (bonding) associations to cement self-affirming identities. This multilevel analysis of the Citizenship, Involvement & Democracy (CID) 1999/2000 survey data on Mannheim (Germany), Enschede (the Netherlands), and Aberdeen (Scotland) covers 3166 active participants in 645 associations. The CID includes objective, exogenous measures of each association's composition and aim. Socialization and self-selection effects are pulled apart through interactions with detailed measures of associational involvement. The results display no evidence for (diverse and homogenous) associations as socializing agents. Although inter-ethnic tolerance is higher in ethnically diverse associations, this should be attributed to self-selection effects.

  13. Trust Based Pervasive Computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shiqun; Shane Balfe; ZHOU Jianying; CHEN Kefei

    2006-01-01

    Pervasive computing environment is a distributed and mobile space. Trust relationship must be established and ensured between devices and the systems in the pervasive computing environment. The trusted computing (TC) technology introduced by trusted computing group is a distributed-system-wide approach to the provisions of integrity protection of resources. The TC' notion of trust and security can be described as conformed system behaviors of a platform environment such that the conformation can be attested to a remote challenger. In this paper the trust requirements in a pervasive/ubiquitous environment are analyzed. Then security schemes for the pervasive computing are proposed using primitives offered by TC technology.

  14. Research on Trust Prediction from a Sociological Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王英; 王鑫; 左万利

    2015-01-01

    Trust, as a major part of human interactions, plays an important role in helping users collect reliable infor-mation and make decisions. However, in reality, user-specified trust relations are often very sparse and follow a power law distribution; hence inferring unknown trust relations attracts increasing attention in recent years. Social theories are frameworks of empirical evidence used to study and interpret social phenomena from a sociological perspective, while social networks reflect the correlations of users in real world; hence, making the principle, rules, ideas and methods of social theories into the analysis of social networks brings new opportunities for trust prediction. In this paper, we investigate how to exploit homophily and social status in trust prediction by modeling social theories. We first give several methods to compute homophily coefficient and status coefficient, then provide a principled way to model trust prediction mathe-matically, and propose a novel framework, hsTrust, which incorporates homophily theory and status theory. Experimental results on real-world datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework. Further experiments are conducted to understand the importance of homophily theory and status theory in trust prediction.

  15. What we have changed our minds about: Part 2. Borderline personality disorder, epistemic trust and the developmental significance of social communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonagy, Peter; Luyten, Patrick; Allison, Elizabeth; Campbell, Chloe

    2017-01-01

    In Part 1 of this paper, we discussed emerging evidence suggesting that a general psychopathology or 'p' factor underlying the various forms of psychopathology should be conceptualized in terms of the absence of resilience, that is, the absence of positive reappraisal mechanisms when faced with adversity. These impairments in the capacity for positive reappraisal seem to provide a comprehensive explanation for the association between the p factor and comorbidity, future caseness, and the 'hard-to-reach' character of many patients with severe personality pathology, most notably borderline personality disorder (BPD). In this, the second part of the paper, we trace the development of the absence of resilience to disruptions in the emergence of human social communication, based on recent evolutionary and developmental psychopathology accounts. We argue that BPD and related disorders may be reconceptualized as a form of social understanding in which epistemic hypervigilance, distrust or outright epistemic freezing is an adaptive consequence of the social learning environment. Negative appraisal mechanisms become overriding, particularly in situations of attachment stress. This constitutes a shift towards a more socially oriented perspective on personality psychopathology in which the absence of psychological resilience is seen as a learned response to the transmission of social knowledge. This shift in our views has also forced us to reconsider the role of attachment in BPD. The implications for prevention and intervention of this novel approach are discussed.

  16. The evolution of generalized reciprocity on social interaction networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, Gerrit Sander; Taborsky, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Generalized reciprocity (help anyone, if helped by someone) is a minimal strategy capable of supporting cooperation between unrelated individuals. Its simplicity makes it an attractive model to explain the evolution of reciprocal altruism in animals that lack the information or cognitive skills need

  17. Building Trust in High-Performing Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aki Soudunsaari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Facilitation of growth is more about good, trustworthy contacts than capital. Trust is a driving force for business creation, and to create a global business you need to build a team that is capable of meeting the challenge. Trust is a key factor in team building and a needed enabler for cooperation. In general, trust building is a slow process, but it can be accelerated with open interaction and good communication skills. The fast-growing and ever-changing nature of global business sets demands for cooperation and team building, especially for startup companies. Trust building needs personal knowledge and regular face-to-face interaction, but it also requires empathy, respect, and genuine listening. Trust increases communication, and rich and open communication is essential for the building of high-performing teams. Other building materials are a shared vision, clear roles and responsibilities, willingness for cooperation, and supporting and encouraging leadership. This study focuses on trust in high-performing teams. It asks whether it is possible to manage trust and which tools and operation models should be used to speed up the building of trust. In this article, preliminary results from the authors’ research are presented to highlight the importance of sharing critical information and having a high level of communication through constant interaction.

  18. The Impact of Social Capital on Rural Migrant Workers' Trust in Local Government%社会资本对农民工信任流入地政府的影响研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘茜; 杜海峰

    2012-01-01

    Rural migrant workers, playing an important role in urban construction and economic development, are hard to gain a decent access of public service and effective government management due to the household registration system and urban - rural dual economy, thus their trust in government is extremely low. Using survey data of rural migrant workers in Xi' an City in December 2008, this paper analyzes the current situation and effects of social capital on rural migrant workers' trust in govern- ment of migrant places. The results show that : ( 1 ) the rural migrant workers with higher quahty and younger age maintain lower trust in the governments of their migrant places; (2) the more social capital rural migrant workers have, the more the government of migrant places they trust; (3) the stronger willingness of political activities and the higher social status rural migrant workers have, the lower the government of migrant places they trust.%农民工已然成为我国城市建设和经济发展的中坚力量,但由于户籍制度和城乡二元体制的影响,他们无法得到城市、农村两地政府的有效服务和管理,导致他们对政府的信任感偏低。本文利用西安交通大学人口与发展研究所2008年12月在陕西省X市LH区对农民工进行实地调查所获得的数据,以政府信任理论和社会资本理论作为理论基础,对西部农民工信任流入地政府现状及影响因素进行研究。研究结果发现,高素质、年轻一代的农民工对流入地政府的信任感低;社会资本越丰富的农民工越信任流入地政府;政治活动参与意愿越强、社会经济地位越高的农民工则越不信任流入地政府。

  19. 26 CFR 1.856-1 - Definition of real estate investment trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of real estate investment trust. 1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Real Estate Investment Trusts § 1.856-1 Definition of real estate investment trust. (a) In general. The term “real estate investment trust” means a corporation, trust, or...

  20. 26 CFR 1.641(c)-1 - Electing small business trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electing small business trust. 1.641(c)-1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Estates, Trusts, and Beneficiaries § 1.641(c)-1 Electing small business trust. (a) In general. An electing small business trust (ESBT) within the meaning of section...

  1. Making sense of institutional trust in organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Lars; Jagd, Søren

    2015-01-01

    and inter-organizational level. We suggest, however, that the actor-dimension of institutional-based trust is an underexplored issue in the literature. Quoting Fligstein, institutional theory needs to explain how ‘some social actors are better at producing desired social outcomes than are others’ (Fligstein...

  2. Trust and Tolerance across the Middle East and North Africa: A Comparative Perspective on the Impact of the Arab Uprisings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Spierings

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The protests that swept the Arab Middle East and North Africa (MENA are expected to have influenced two key civic attitudes fundamental to well-functioning democracies: trust and tolerance. However, systematic comparative assessments of the general patterns and particularities in this region are rare. This contribution theorizes the uprisings’ impact and presents new society-level measurements of trust and tolerance for the MENA, synchronizing over 40 Arab Barometer and World Values Survey surveys on Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Tunisia, and Yemen, from before and after the uprisings. The analyses firstly show political-institutional trust falling in the uprisings’ aftermath in countries that went through democratic reform or regime change. It appears that politicians misbehaving and reforms not resolving social problems hurt people’s trust in politics. Secondly, in democratic transition countries Egypt and Tunisia, a decrease in social trust reflected the pattern of political-institutional trust indicating a spill-over effect. Thirdly, ethno-religious tolerance dropped region-wide after the uprisings, indicating that the aftermath of religious conflict impacted the entire Arab region. These results support rational-choice institutionalist theories, while at the same time refining them for the MENA context.

  3. A TRUST REGION ALGORITHM VIA BILEVEL LINEAR PROGRAMMING FOR SOLVING THE GENERAL MULTICOMMODITY MINIMAL COST FLOW PROBLEMS%双水平线性规划的信赖域算法解广义多品种最小费用流问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱德通

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a nonmonotonic backtracking trust region algorithm via bilevel linear programming for solving the general multicommodity minimal cost flow problems. Using the duality theory of the linear programming and convex theory, the generalized directional derivative of the general multicommodity minimal cost flow problems is derived. The global convergence and superlinear convergence rate of the proposed algorithm are established under some mild conditions.

  4. Relationships Between Self-esteem,Rejection Sensitivity,Interpersonal Trust and Social Anxiety of Undergraduates%大学生自尊、拒绝敏感性、人际信任与社会焦虑的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙晓玲; 吴明证

    2011-01-01

    目的:了解自尊、拒绝敏感性、人际信任和社会焦虑的关系.方法:采用Rosenberg自尊问卷、拒绝敏感性问卷、信任问卷和交往焦虑问卷测量了411名大学生.结果:自尊与人际信任呈正相关(r=0.147,P=0.003),与拒绝敏感性(r=-0.238,P<0.001)和社会焦虑(r=-0.170,P<0.001)呈负相关;人际信任与拒绝敏感性(r=-0.206,P<0.001)和社会焦虑呈负相关(r=-0.224,P<0.001);拒绝敏感性与社会焦虑呈正相关(r=0.223,P<0.001).分层回归分析表明,当拒绝敏感性进人回归方程时,自尊对人际信任的预测效应从0.147降为0.104,自尊对社会焦虑的预测效应从-0.170降为-0.124.结论:自尊以拒绝敏感性为部分中介影响着人际信任和社会焦虑.%Objective: To explore the relationships between self-esteem, rejection sensitivity, interpersonal trust and social anxiety. Methods: 411 undergraduates were investigated by Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, Rejection Sensitivity Scale,Trust Scale and Interpersonal Anxiety Scale. Results: Self-esteem was positively related to interpersonal trust(r=0.147, P= 0.003) and negatively related to rejection sensitivity(r=-0.238, P<0.001) and social anxiety(r=-0.170, P<0.001). Interpersonal trust was negatively related to rejection sensitivity(r=-0.206, P<0.001) and social anxiety(r=-0.224, P<0.001). Rejection sensitivity was positively related to social anxiety(r=0.223, P<0.001). Hierarchical multiple regression analyses showed that the predictive effect of self-esteem on the interpersonal trust dropped from 0.147 to 0.104 and the predictive effect of self-esteem on the social anxiety dropped from -0.170 to -0.124 when rejection sensitivity entered in the regression equations as a predictor. Conclusion: Rejection sensitivity partially mediated the effects of self-esteem on interpersonal trust and social anxiety.

  5. Social relations and loneliness among older patients consulting their general practitioner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Tina Drud; Waldorff, Frans Boch

    2017-01-01

    have assessed older patients' social relations and loneliness. The aim of this study was to analyse the social relations and loneliness of patients aged 65 years and above consulting their GP. METHODS: This survey counted the participation of 12 general practices in the Capital Region of Denmark...

  6. The Social Mechanisms of Trust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrera, Davide

    2008-01-01

    In the 1990s, when I was an undergraduate student, in front of the main building of the University of Turin there was a big parking lot, which was always completely full. Two guys were looking after the parking lot every day from early in the morning till very late in the afternoon. They were

  7. The Social Mechanisms of Trust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrera, Davide

    2008-01-01

    In the 1990s, when I was an undergraduate student, in front of the main building of the University of Turin there was a big parking lot, which was always completely full. Two guys were looking after the parking lot every day from early in the morning till very late in the afternoon. They were neithe

  8. Use of video modeling to increase generalization of social play by children with autism

    OpenAIRE

    Nikopoulos, C K

    2007-01-01

    The use of video modeling to increase generalization of social play skills in children with autism is discussed. The possible reasons that have made this procedure so favorable among researchers and practitioners are explored. Two studies are described in which video modeling increased the generalization of social play in 6 children, and critical features of procedure are emphasized. Suggestions regarding the potential mechanisms responsible for the effectiveness of this procedure are discuss...

  9. Interpersonal Trust and its Influencing Factors of Contemporary Youth%当代青年的人际信任及其影响因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张云武

    2012-01-01

    According to survey data of 2006 in Xiamen City, the paper explored the contemporary young people's trust and its influencing factors. It showed that contemporary young people's trust was composed of four parts which were the family relationship trust, the general relationship trust, the ran- dom relationship trust and the functional relationship trust. The degree of the family relationship trust was the highest, followed by the functional relationship trust and the general relationship trust, the de- gree of the random relationship was the lowest. The personal and social characteristics of the contempo- rary youth basically did not have impacts on their trust, while their community participation, relation- ship network and their concern on social public affairs contributed to the generation of trust. There- fore, in order to enhance the contemporary youth' interpersonal trust, it should cultivate more social groups, and make the majority of young people actively involve in community groups, form a rich rela- tionship network, thus enhance their concern on social public.%根据2006年厦门市调查的数据,探讨当代青年的信任结构及其影响因素。分析表明,当代青年的信任由亲情关系信任、一般关系信任、随机关系信任和工作关系信任四个部分构成。其中,对于亲情关系的信任度最高,其次是对于工作关系和一般关系的信任,而对于随机关系的信任度最低。当代青年的个人社会特征基本上对于信任不产生影响,但是社团参与、关系网络和对于社会公共事务的关心却有助于信任的产生。因此,为了增强当代青年的人际信任,应该培育更多的社会团体,并使得广大青年积极地参与社会团体,形成丰富的关系网络,进而增强对于社会公共事务的关心。

  10. Hypermentalizing, attachment, and epistemic trust in adolescent BPD: Clinical illustrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bo, Sune; Sharp, Carla; Fonagy, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) has been shown to be a valid and reliable diagnosis in adolescents and associated with a decrease in both general and social functioning. With evidence linking BPD in adolescents to poor prognosis, it is important to develop a better understanding of factors......, with recent extensions of the theory that focuses on hypermentalizing and epistemic trust. We then provide clinical case vignettes to illustrate this extended theoretical model of BPD. Furthermore, we suggest a treatment approach to BPD in adolescents that focuses on the reduction of hypermentalizing...

  11. 基于用户信任和张量分解的社会网络推荐∗%Social Recommendations Based on User Trust and Tensor Factorization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹本友; 李翠平; 谭力文; 陈红; 王绍卿

    2014-01-01

    In social networks, recommender systems can help users to deal with information overload and provide personalized recommendations to them. The trust relationship of users is used in the social networks’ recommender systems. But the state-of-art algorithms only use the single trust relationship which cannot capture the trust to user’s friends when looking for different items. This paper proposes a topic-based trust recommendation algorithm using tensor factorization model. As the social information changes rapidly, the state-of-art algorithms often need redo factorization. To address the issue, the paper also presents an effective incremental method to adaptively update its previous factorized components rather than re-computing them on the whole dataset when the data changes. Experiments show that the proposed method can achieve better performance and the incremental method is suitable for the rapid changes in the social networks.%社会化网络中的推荐系统可以在浩瀚的数据海洋中给用户推荐相关的信息。社会网络中用户之间的信任关系已经被用于推荐算法中,但是目前的基于信任的推荐算法都是单一的信任模型。提出了一种基于主题的张量分解的用户信任推荐算法,用来挖掘用户在不同的物品选取的时候对不同朋友的信任程度。由于社交网络更新速度快,鉴于目前的基于信任算法大都是静态算法,提出了一种增量更新的张量分解算法用于用户信任的推荐算法。实验结果表明:所提出的基于主题的用户信任推荐算法比现有算法具有更好的准确性,并且增量更新的推荐算法可以大幅度提高推荐算法在训练数据增加后的模型训练效率,适合更新速度快的社会化网络中的推荐任务。

  12. Towards a Theory of Trust in Networks of Humans and Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    trusted service, such as eBay , which enables reputation systems to work; or a common social network, which might enable recommendations systems to work...contrast, the trust model of eBay follows a well-established, traditional human trust example: it establishes trust relations based on reputation, and to...formation of trustworthiness beliefs can illustrated by reputation protocols, such as the ones used by eBay . Hence, creating network and social

  13. Balancing Trust and Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagd, Søren

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show that conceptualizing trust and control as interactively related processes, as opposed to more static conceptualizations of the two concepts and the relations between them, adds importantly towards understanding the challenges involved in balancing of trust...... and control in organizations. The paper examines recent literature on the conceptualization of the relation between trust and control in and between organizations. The literature review shows that trust and control has been conceptualized as either substituting or complementing each other. Further......, it is found that the complementary/substitution debate calls for an explicit conceptualization of the relation between trust and control as an interactive process, in contrast to earlier conceptualizations of trust and control as two relatively static and isolated concepts. While the static perspective...

  14. Trust Ownership of the Tata Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Steen

    The Indian Tata Group is one of the largest and most admired business groups in the world. It has 28 listed subsidiaries and more than 80 operating businesses. It has shown strong financial performance and social responsibility for decades. Interestingly, it has a unique ownership structure......: the main holding company Tata Sons Limited is majority-owned by charitable trusts. We examine the governance of this remarkable entity. The Trusts own 66% of Tata Sons, the main holding company of the Group, while members of the founding Tata family are very small minority shareholders. The governance...... structure is characterized by managerial distance between trusts and Group companies. The Trusts are almost exclusively concerned with philanthropy, and according to the Articles of Association of Tata Sons Limited, their governance role is limited to nominating two members to the Selection Committee which...

  15. Trust in Co-sourced Software Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlichter, Bjarne Rerup; Persson, John Stouby

    2014-01-01

    Software development projects are increasingly geographical distributed with offshoring. Co-sourcing is a highly integrative and cohesive approach, seen successful, to software development offshoring. However, research of how dynamic aspects of trust are shaped in co-sourcing activities is limited....... We present a case study of how the co-sourcing relationship between a certified CMMI-level 5 Danish software company and an offshoring supplier can be conceptualized as an Abstract System. An Abstract System is a dis-embedded social system (such as banking) that is trusted despite lack of detailed...... understanding or personal trust relations. The paper suggests how certain work practices among developers and managers can be explained using a dynamic trust lens based on Abstract Systems, especially dis- and re-embedding mechanisms...

  16. Inequality and Trust: Testing a Mediating Relationship for Environmental Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Kemp-Benedict

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Instrumental arguments linking inequality to environmental sustainability often suppose a negative relationship between inequality and social cohesion. While social cohesion is difficult to measure, there are measures of a narrower concept, social trust, and empirical studies have shown that social trust is negatively related to inequality. In this paper we test whether at least part of the observed relationship may be explained by income level, rather than income distribution. We use individual response data from the World Values Survey at the income decile level, and find evidence that income level is indeed important in explaining differences in levels of social trust, but it is insufficient to explain all of the dependence. In the sample used for the study, we find that both income level and income distribution help explain differences in social trust between countries.

  17. Social safety, general health and physical activity: changes in neighbourhood safety and the role of social cohesion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijsbroek, A.; Droomers, M.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Hardyns, W.; Stronks, K.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether changes over time in reported area crime and perceived area safety were related to self-rated general health and physical activity (PA), in order to provide support for a causal relationship between social safety and health. Additionally, we investigated

  18. Social safety, general health and physical activity: changes in neighbourhood safety and the role of social cohesion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijsbroek, A.; Droomers, M.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Hardyns, W.; Stronks, K.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether changes over time in reported area crime and perceived area safety were related to self-rated general health and physical activity (PA), in order to provide support for a causal relationship between social safety and health. Additionally, we investigated

  19. Young Children's Inductive Generalizations about Social Categories: When Is Gender Essential?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillow, Bradford H.; Pearson, RaeAnne M.; Allen, Cara

    2015-01-01

    Two experiments investigated 3- to 5-year-olds' inductive generalizations about social categories. In Experiment 1, participants were shown pictures of children contrasting in appearance and either gender or classmate status, and were asked to generalize either biological properties or behaviors. Contrary to expectations, performance did not…

  20. When Volunteering Breeds Trust – and When it Does Not A Panel Study of the Volunteering – Trust Relationship

    OpenAIRE

    Bekkers, René

    2006-01-01

    It is a common belief that participation in voluntary associations makes citizens more trusting of others. This paper reports longitudinal analyses of volunteering and trust on the Giving in the Netherlands Panel Study (2002-2004; n=1246) refuting this belief. I find that volunteering has little positive impact on trust because social experiences of volunteers in organizations are not always positive. A second reason is that values are relatively stable over the life course. Finally, there ar...

  1. Trust and Distrust as Cultural Frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Kevin Anthony

    2016-01-01

    One view on trust that has largely gone unexamined in the literature is the process perspective. The process perspective advances the view that trust develops over time in the local context through a history of interaction between knowledgeable social actors. The term ‘knowledgeable social actor......’ implies that individuals respond actively to unfolding events in the context and modify their responses to meet changes in circumstances. Within a process perspective, this chapter looks closely at the relationships between a group of young men with minority ethnic backgrounds, a team of youth workers...

  2. Self-reported social skills impairment explains elevated autistic traits in individuals with generalized social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonge, Natasha A; Rodebaugh, Thomas L; Fernandez, Katya C; Lim, Michelle H

    2016-03-01

    Screening for autism in individuals with generalized social anxiety disorder (GSAD) is complicated by symptom overlap between GSAD and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We examined the prevalence of self-reported autistic traits within a sample of participants with a diagnosis of GSAD (n=37) compared to individuals without a GSAD diagnosis (NOSAD; n=26). Of the GSAD sample participants, 70.84% self-reported autistic traits above a cut-off of 65 on the Autism Quotient-Short (AQ-S) and reported significantly more autistic traits on 3 of 5 AQ-S subscales compared to the NOSAD group. Diagnosis uniquely predicted variation in the social skills subscale above and beyond the other subscales and other predictors. Furthermore, variation in the social skills subscale largely explained group differences on the other subscales. Our results suggest caution in utilizing measures like the AQ-S with clinical populations characterized by social difficulties such as individuals with a GSAD diagnosis.

  3. Effects of cognitive load on trusting behavior--an experiment using the trust game.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Samson

    Full Text Available Last decades have witnessed a progressing decline of social trust, which has been predominantly linked to worsening economic conditions and increasing social inequality. In the present research we propose a different type of explanation for the observed decline - cognitive load related to technological development and the accelerating pace of modern life. In an experimental study participants played the trust game while performing one of two different secondary tasks - listening to a disturbing noise or memorizing a sequence of characters - or with no additional task in the control condition. Results show that in both cognitive load conditions participants expressed significantly less trust in the trust game than in case of no cognitive load. Additionally, when cognitive resources were limited, participants' behavior was more impulsive than when their resources were fully available.

  4. Effects of cognitive load on trusting behavior--an experiment using the trust game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Katarzyna; Kostyszyn, Patrycjusz

    2015-01-01

    Last decades have witnessed a progressing decline of social trust, which has been predominantly linked to worsening economic conditions and increasing social inequality. In the present research we propose a different type of explanation for the observed decline - cognitive load related to technological development and the accelerating pace of modern life. In an experimental study participants played the trust game while performing one of two different secondary tasks - listening to a disturbing noise or memorizing a sequence of characters - or with no additional task in the control condition. Results show that in both cognitive load conditions participants expressed significantly less trust in the trust game than in case of no cognitive load. Additionally, when cognitive resources were limited, participants' behavior was more impulsive than when their resources were fully available.

  5. Oxytocin receptor genetic variation promotes human trust behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eKrueger

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Given that human trust behavior is heritable and intranasal administration of oxytocin enhances trust, the oxytocin receptor (OXTR gene is an excellent candidate to investigate genetic contributions to individual variations in trust behavior. Although a single-nucleotide polymorphism involving an adenine (A/ guanine (G transition (rs53576 has been associated with socio-emotional phenotypes, its link to trust behavior is unclear. We combined genotyping of healthy male students with the administration of a trust game experiment. Our results show that a naturally occurring genetic variation (rs53576 in the OXTR gene is reliably associated with trust behavior rather than a general increase in trustworthy or risk behaviors. Individuals homozygous for the G allele (GG showed higher trust behavior than individuals with A allele carriers (AA/AG. Although the molecular functionality of this polymorphism is still unknown, future research should clarify how the OXTR gene interacts with other genes and the environment in promoting socio-emotional behaviors.

  6. Association between Level of Emotional Intelligence and Severity of Anxiety in Generalized Social Phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Madeline; Snow, Joseph; Geraci, Marilla; Vythilingam, Meena; Blair, R.J.R.; Charney, Dennis S.; Pine, Daniel S.; Blair, Karina S.

    2008-01-01

    Generalized Social Phobia (GSP) is characterized by a marked fear of most social situations. It is associated with an anomalous neural response to emotional stimuli, and individuals with the disorder frequently show interpretation bias in social situations. From this it might be suggested that GSP involves difficulty in accurately perceiving, using, understanding and managing emotions. Here we applied the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) to medication-free GSP (n=28) and no pathology (n=21) individuals. Patients with GSP performed within the normal range on the measure however severity of social anxiety significantly correlated with emotional intelligence (EI). Specifically, there was a negative correlation between social anxiety severity and Experiential (basic-level emotional processing) EI. In contrast, there was no significant correlation between social anxiety severity and Strategic (higher-level conscious emotional processing) EI. These results suggest that EI may index emotional processing systems that mitigate the impact of systems causally implicated in GSP. PMID:18439799

  7. Association between level of emotional intelligence and severity of anxiety in generalized social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Madeline; Snow, Joseph; Geraci, Marilla; Vythilingam, Meena; Blair, R J R; Charney, Dennis S; Pine, Daniel S; Blair, Karina S

    2008-12-01

    Generalized social phobia (GSP) is characterized by a marked fear of most social situations. It is associated with an anomalous neural response to emotional stimuli, and individuals with the disorder frequently show interpretation bias in social situations. From this it might be suggested that GSP involves difficulty in accurately perceiving, using, understanding and managing emotions. Here we applied the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) to medication-free GSP (n=28) and no pathology (n=21) individuals. Patients with GSP performed within the normal range on the measure however severity of social anxiety significantly correlated with emotional intelligence (EI). Specifically, there was a negative correlation between social anxiety severity and Experiential (basic-level emotional processing) EI. In contrast, there was no significant correlation between social anxiety severity and Strategic (higher-level conscious emotional processing) EI. These results suggest that EI may index emotional processing systems that mitigate the impact of systems causally implicated in GSP.

  8. Transparency, Privacy and Trust – Technology for Tracking and Controlling My Data Disclosures: Does This Work?

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer-Hübner, Simone; Angulo, Julio; Karegar, Farzaneh; Pulls, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Part 1: Willam Winsborough Award Invited Paper; International audience; Transparency is a basic privacy principle and social trust factor. However, in the age of cloud computing and big data, providing transparency becomes increasingly a challenge.This paper discusses privacy requirements of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) for providing ex-post transparency and presents how the transparency-enhancing tool Data Track can help to technically enforce those principles. Open research...

  9. Investigating Public trust in Expert Knowledge: Narrative, Ethics, and Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporesi, Silvia; Vaccarella, Maria; Davis, Mark

    2017-03-01

    "Public Trust in Expert Knowledge: Narrative, Ethics, and Engagement" examines the social, cultural, and ethical ramifications of changing public trust in the expert biomedical knowledge systems of emergent and complex global societies. This symposium was conceived as an interdisciplinary project, drawing on bioethics, the social sciences, and the medical humanities. We settled on public trust as a topic for our work together because its problematization cuts across our fields and substantive research interests. For us, trust is simultaneously a matter of ethics, social relations, and the cultural organization of meaning. We share a commitment to narrative inquiry across our fields of expertise in the bioethics of transformative health technologies, public communications on health threats, and narrative medicine. The contributions to this symposium have applied, in different ways and with different effects, this interdisciplinary mode of inquiry, supplying new reflections on public trust, expertise, and biomedical knowledge.

  10. The trust formula: Trust = fairness + leadership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovenheim, R. [Regulatory and Legislative Consultants, Inc., Rochester, NY (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Many state and compact LLW siting processes have been characterized by slippage and failure. The paper focuses on two major {open_quotes}lessons learned{close_quotes} regarding public interaction and trust, and how these lessons are being applied to current siting efforts. The relationship of environmental idealism and trust will be explored further in this paper. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer concludes his 1994 book, Breaking the Vicious Circle by stating: {open_quotes}Finally, this book also reflects a belief that trust in institutions arises not simply as a result of openness in government, responses to local interest groups, or priorities emphasized in the press -- though these attitudes and actions play an important role -- but also from those institutions doing a difficult job well.{close_quotes}

  11. Trust vs. Crisis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    to judge whom to trust. One logical solution to a crisis is to rebuild a shared understanding of the norms involved in any given context. Banking is used as a case. Central concepts are borrowed from Niklas Luhmann Trust (1968), Alf Ross Directives and Norms (1967), and Arthur G. Neal National Trauma...... & Collective Memory (1998)....

  12. Dimensions of trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    in scope and mode influenced by the intersecting dimensions of relations, objects and situations. Furthermore, trust exists between an outer threshold of expected deceit and an inner threshold of confident reliance. The findings from the qualitative study contribute new knowledge on the diversity of trust...

  13. Trust in Strategic Alliances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bo

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the dynamic and multi-dimensional nature of trust in strategic alliances. Adopting a co-evolutionary approach, I developed a framework to show how trust, conceptualised in different forms, plays distinct roles at various evolutionary stages of the alliance relationship...

  14. Trust repertoires for collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Lars

    little about how such processes develop and how trust, understood as “confident positive expectations” (Lewicki et al. 1998) to collaborative activities, arises out of collaboration. The paper contributes by showing how trust and collaboration are intertwined. The main finding is that a facilitator can...

  15. Trust and controlling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bieńkowska Agnieszka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to discuss the trust within and towards an organisation in the context of implementation of controlling therein. In this context the essence of trust and its importance in organisation management was presented, as well as trust in the contemporary management methods and concepts. Controlling as a trust-building factor inside an organisation was pointed out. Especially controlling and control were described. Moreover management by considering deviations in controlling and the teamwork in controlling were described. The role of controlling in process of trust-building to an organisation was presented. Establishing relations with the environment and systems of measurement of organisation’s achievements were presented, too.

  16. Trust, Innovation and Prosperity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Szabo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Economic development and its determinants, esp. trust or innovation are subjects of several scientific studies. Several authors claim the importance of innovation for economic development. Some studies identified that one of the most crucial factor for economic growth and prosperity is the trust between people. Within the research in this paper we have tried to identify the role of interpersonal trust within the innovation vs. prosperity relation. For this purpose and for causality analysis, we have applied decision tree models. Through our analysis of country based data (involved in trust related WVS surveys in opposition to current studies, we have identified, that interpersonal trust is more significant determinant of innovation development as prosperity.

  17. Generalization Effects in Evaluative Conditioning: Evidence for Attitude Transfer Effects from Single Exemplars to Social Categories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Tina; Kuchenbrandt, Dieta

    2017-01-01

    The present research investigated whether evaluatively conditioned attitudes toward members of a social category (CSs) generalize to other stimuli belonging to the same category as the CSs (generalization at the stimulus level) and to the category itself (generalization at the category level). In four experiments, USs were paired with schematic or naturalistic CSs belonging to certain fictitious groups. Afterward, attitudes toward the CSs, toward non-presented exemplars of the CS category, and toward the CS category were assessed. Results revealed evidence for generalization effects in EC on both the stimulus and the category level. Transfer effects were greater when participants’ awareness of the CS–US contingency (CA) was high. Moreover, we found differences in generalization between the stimulus and category level, indicating that different processes might contribute to the effects. Theoretical and practical implications such as using EC as a tool for changing attitudes toward social groups will be discussed. PMID:28197118

  18. Spirituality and Religion among the General Public: Implications for Social Work Discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, David R

    2015-07-01

    Conceptualizations play a central role in social work discourse, shaping actions in the areas of practice, research, and education. Although many formulations of spirituality and religion have been advanced by social work scholars, the views of members of the general public have been largely absent from the professional conversation. The present article adds to the profession's evolving discussion on spirituality and religion by describing common understandings of spirituality and religion among the general population and by discussing the implication of these views for social work discourse on spirituality and religion. By understanding common views among the public, the social work profession is better positioned to provide ethical and professional services that respect clients' spiritual beliefs and values.

  19. Money and trust among strangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camera, Gabriele; Casari, Marco; Bigoni, Maria

    2013-09-10

    What makes money essential for the functioning of modern society? Through an experiment, we present evidence for the existence of a relevant behavioral dimension in addition to the standard theoretical arguments. Subjects faced repeated opportunities to help an anonymous counterpart who changed over time. Cooperation required trusting that help given to a stranger today would be returned by a stranger in the future. Cooperation levels declined when going from small to large groups of strangers, even if monitoring and payoffs from cooperation were invariant to group size. We then introduced intrinsically worthless tokens. Tokens endogenously became money: subjects took to reward help with a token and to demand a token in exchange for help. Subjects trusted that strangers would return help for a token. Cooperation levels remained stable as the groups grew larger. In all conditions, full cooperation was possible through a social norm of decentralized enforcement, without using tokens. This turned out to be especially demanding in large groups. Lack of trust among strangers thus made money behaviorally essential. To explain these results, we developed an evolutionary model. When behavior in society is heterogeneous, cooperation collapses without tokens. In contrast, the use of tokens makes cooperation evolutionarily stable.

  20. IT based social media impacts on Indonesian general legislative elections 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Abdillah, Leon Andretti

    2014-01-01

    The information technology applications in cyberspace (the internet) are currently dominated by social media. The author investigates and explores the advantages of social media implementation of any political party in Indonesian general legislative elections 2014. There are twelve national political parties participating in the election as contestants plus three local political parties in Aceh. In this research, author focus on national political parties only. The author visited, analyzed, a...

  1. Domain-specific and domain-general processes in social perception--A complementary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, John; D'Ausilio, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    In this brief discussion, we explicate and evaluate Heyes and colleagues' deflationary approach to interpreting apparent evidence of domain-specific processes for social perception. We argue that the deflationary approach sheds important light on how functionally specific processes in social perception can be subserved at least in part by domain-general processes. On the other hand, we also argue that the fruitfulness of this approach has been unnecessarily hampered by a contrastive conception of the relationship between domain-general and domain-specific processes. As an alternative, we propose a complementary conception: the identification of domain-general processes that are engaged in instances of social perception can play a positive, structuring role by adding additional constraints to be accounted for in modelling the domain-specific processes that are also involved in such instances. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Influence of General Discrimination and Social Context on Young Urban Expecting Couples' Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Derrick M; Campbell, Christina; Washington, Keahnan; Albritton, Tashuna; Divney, Anna; Magriples, Urania; Kershaw, Trace

    2016-04-01

    Young expecting parents face a great deal of challenges as they transition into parenthood. This paper sought to identify racial and gender differences in the relationship between general discrimination, neighborhood problems, neighborhood cohesion, and social support on the depressive and stress symptoms among young expecting couples. Results indicated perceived general discrimination and less social support was associated with increased stress and depression. More neighborhood problems were related to increased depression and more neighborhood cohesion was related to less stress. Moderator analyses showed that the influence of general discrimination and stress was stronger for women than men. In addition, neighborhood cohesion was protective on stress for Blacks and Whites but not for Hispanics. These results indicate the need to address the broader social context for young expectant couples.

  3. Social Capital and Happiness in the United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores the association between social capital and average happiness in the United States. Social capital is measured as a multidimensional concept consisting of social trust and two different indicators of sociability. In order to employ the variation both over time and across states......, the data are organized in either a panel of nine US Census regions over the period 1983-1998 or in averages over this period in a cross-section of 48 states. The results show that social trust is positively associated with happiness while the potential effects of informal sociability at the level...... of society only appear significant in the regional estimates. The findings document the importance of social trust for average happiness but also hold more general implications for social capital theory....

  4. Social Capital and Happiness in the United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores the association between social capital and average happiness in the United States. Social capital is measured as a multidimensional concept consisting of social trust and two different indicators of sociability. In order to employ the variation both over time and across states......, the data are organized in either a panel of nine US Census regions over the period 1983-1998 or in averages over this period in a cross-section of 48 states. The results show that social trust is positively associated with happiness while the potential effects of informal sociability at the level...... of society only appear significant in the regional estimates. The findings document the importance of social trust for average happiness but also hold more general implications for social capital theory....

  5. Corticolimbic Brain Reactivity to Social Signals of Threat Before and After Sertraline Treatment in Generalized Social Phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, K. Luan; Coccaro, Emil F.; Angstadt, Mike; Kreger, K. Jane; Mayberg, Helen S.; Liberzon, Israel; Stein, Murray B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Generalized social phobia (gSP), also known as generalized social anxiety disorder, is characterized by excessive fear of scrutiny by others and pervasive avoidance of social interactions. Pathophysiological models of gSP implicate exaggerated reactivity of the amygdala and insula in response to social evaluative threat, making them plausible targets for treatment. Although selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment is known to be an effective treatment, little is known about the mechanism by which these agents exert their anxiolytic effects at a brain level in gSP. Method We acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data of brain response to social signals of threat (fearful/angry faces) in twenty-one GSAD patients before and after they completed 12 weeks of open label treatment with the SSRI sertraline. For comparison, nineteen healthy control (HC) subjects also underwent two fMRI scans, 12 weeks apart. Results Whole-brain voxel-wise analysis of variance revealed significant Group×Time interactions in the amygdala and the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Follow up analyses showed that treatment in gSP subjects: 1) reduced amygdala reactivity to fearful faces (which was exaggerated relative to HCs prior to treatment); and 2) enhanced vmPFC activation to angry faces (which was attenuated relative to HCs prior to treatment). However, these brain changes were not significantly related to social anxiety symptom improvement. Conclusions SSRI treatment response in gSP is associated with changes in a discrete limbic-paralimbic brain network, representing a neural mechanism by which SSRIs may exert their actions. PMID:23164370

  6. SOCIAL NETWORK RECOMMENDATION MODEL BASED ON USER TRUST AND RECOMMENDATION FEEDBACK MECHANISM%基于用户信任及推荐反馈机制的社会网络推荐模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟鹤; 刘柏嵩

    2016-01-01

    社会网络包括以兴趣为核心的兴趣网络和以信任为核心的信任网络。如何利用社会网络中用户信任与兴趣相似的好友的项目数据来扩展用户本身的项目数据集,缓解用户数据稀疏性,利用目标用户的好友的项目评分数据为其产生推荐,是研究的重点。和传统的推荐方法相比,提出一种改进模型 SIMTM(Similar and Trust Model)来提供用户更加高效的推荐体验。该模型融合用户兴趣度和信任度作为初始亲密程度,根据融合后的好友网络进行推荐,同时根据推荐反馈,来不断地优化用户的项目评分数据集,使得亲密的用户好友更加亲密,过滤掉用户的普通好友,优化用户之间的兴趣和信任关联;并重新计算用户之间的亲密程度形成融合用户与其好友的融合网络,直至前后两次根据亲密程度得到的推荐结果相近,根据得到的最优的亲密程度构建融合网络来进行推荐。实验结果表明,该模型在数据稀疏的情况下,能有效提高用户推荐的准确率和覆盖率。%Social networks include the interest network taking the interest as core and the trust network taking the trust as core.The research focus of this paper is that how to use the projects data of the friends in social networks with similar trust and interest to expand the project dataset of user’s own,to alleviate the sparsity of user data,and to use the data of project rating score of target user’s friends to generate recommendation for it.Compared with traditional recommendation methods,the paper presents an improved SIMTM(Similar and Trust Model),which can provide more efficient recommendation experience.The model fuses interest and confidence as the initial intimacy, and makes recommendation according to the fused networks of friends,at the same time it constantly optimises the project rating score dataset according to the recommended feedbacks,this makes

  7. 29 CFR 2550.403a-1 - Establishment of trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Establishment of trust. 2550.403a-1 Section 2550.403a-1... REGULATIONS FOR FIDUCIARY RESPONSIBILITY § 2550.403a-1 Establishment of trust. (a) In general. Except as otherwise provided in § 403b-1, all assets of an employee benefit plan shall be held in trust by one or...

  8. Feasibility of Multi-agent Simulation for the Trust and Tracing Game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, S.A.; Verwaart, D.

    2005-01-01

    Trust is an important issue in trade. For instance in food trade, market actors have to rely on their trade partner's quality statements. The roles of trust and deception in supply networks in various cultural and organisational settings are subject of reserach in social sciences. The Trust And Trac

  9. Unknown is unloved? Diversity and inter-population trust in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, D.L.; Lubbers, M.

    2010-01-01

    With more than 400,000 trust evaluations, we examine inter-population trust in the European Union. We focus on social capital theory explanations in a context where European inhabitants from 20 countries rate trust in the populations of 27 other European countries and in their own national populatio

  10. Specifics of interpersonal trust among people with different gender identities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury P. Zinchenko

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study addresses a current problem relating to trust and the identification of gender differences in trust/mistrust manifestation. Gender identity is associated with cultural stereotypes and social roles, which facilitate the formation of trust in people. It acts as a significant integral meaning-based component of an individual’s “I”- conception, which contributes to the formation of trust in himself and the world around him. Objective. To study features of trust/mistrust towards others in young people with different gender identities. Design. The cross-gender-typical sample consisted of 179 representatives, 83 males and 96 females, ages 17 to 23 (M = 19.34 and SD = 1.79. The techniques for collecting data included the MMPI, the Sex-Role Inventory by S. Bem, and the Trust/Mistrust towards Others questionnaire by A. Kupreychenko. The results were processed via the Mann-Whitney U Test, the Kruskal-Wallis H criterion, and cluster analysis. Results. Criteria of trust/mistrust among the youth with different gender identities were identified, and basic types of trust — categoric, irrational–emotional, ambivalent– contradictory, and non-differentiated — were singled out. Irrespective of biological sex, bearers of different gender identities do not exhibit the same criteria to determine trust/ mistrust. Conclusion. This study makes it possible to enrich our understanding of the role of social gender in the formation of interpersonal trust and differences in the foundations of trust toward others, in people with different gender identities. The empirical typology of trust in youth with different gender identities allows for using the typology in organizing psychological diagnostics, and for support and improvement of their interpersonal relations.

  11. General practitioners’ assessment practices of patients' need for lifestyle intervention. A vignette study on the impact of social distance on general practitioners’ patient assessments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilsvard, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    In Denmark, as in other welfare countries, the general practitioner is the first point of contact in the health services, which stresses the general practitioners’ role as gatekeeper and mediator of the health services. General practitioners’ work is characterized by a relatively extensive...... discretion, especially in preventive contexts with no clear-cut guidelines. However, despite its potential influence, few studies have focused on whether social distance has an impact on general practitioners’ assessment practices of patients, which thus seems to be a blind spot in the literature. To study...... the mechanisms facilitating the process of social distance systematically, I apply the vignette method. Drawing on Bourdieu’s theoretical framework of social distance, I examine how general practitioners assess different socially positioned patients as needy for preventive lifestyle intervention. I expect social...

  12. The King's Ring: A Matter of Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sterrett, Joseph William

    2017-01-01

    This essay examines the material and social effects of an exchange of trust between a king, Henry VIII, and his counsellor, Thomas Cranmer in Shakespeare and Fletcher’s All is True. The ring that the King gives Cranmer is both nothing and everything: nothing in that it could be anything, any ring...

  13. Collaborative Trust Networks in Engineering Design Adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkinson, Simon Reay; Maier, Anja; Caldwell, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    ); applying the Change Prediction Method (CPM) tool. It posits the idea of the ‘Networks-in-Being’ with varying individual and collective characteristics. [Social] networks are considered to facilitate information exchange between actors. At the same time, networks failing to provide trusted-information can...

  14. Do Higher Education Institutes Communicate Trust Well?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Paul; Dean, Aftab

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between trust and information sources for new purchasers of higher education is discussed. A range of sources is evaluated by potential entrants into UK higher education, and indicates that universities tend to be regarded as the most trustworthy when information is directly associated with them and social networks, and friends…

  15. Income inequality, distributive fairness and political trust in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmerli, Sonja; Castillo, Juan Carlos

    2015-07-01

    In the wake of rising levels of income inequality during the past two decades, widespread concerns emerged about the social and political consequences of the widening gap between the poor and the rich that can be observed in many established democracies. Several empirical studies substantiate the link between macro-level income inequality and political attitudes and behavior, pointing at its broad and negative implications for political equality. Accordingly, these implications are expected to be accentuated in contexts of high inequality, as is the case in Latin America. Despite these general concerns about the consequences of income inequality, few studies have accounted for the importance of individual perceptions of distributive fairness in regard to trust in political institutions. Even less is known about the extent to which distributive fairness perceptions co-vary with objective indicators of inequality. Moreover, the research in this area has traditionally focused on OECD countries, which have lower indexes of inequality than the rest of the world. This study aims at filling this gap by focusing on the relevance of distributive fairness perceptions and macro-level inequality for political trust and on how these two levels interact in Latin American countries. The analyses are based on the Latinobarometer survey 2011, which consists of 18 countries. Multilevel estimations suggest that both dimensions of inequality are negatively associated with political trust but that higher levels of macro-level inequality attenuate rather than increase the strength of the negative association between distributive fairness perceptions and political trust. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 组织间信任、社会互动、知识获取对组织创新绩效的影响研究——以浙江企业为例%Impact of Inter-organizational Trust, Social Interaction and Knowledge Acquisition on Organizational Innovation Performance——Samples from Zhejiang Enterprises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾宇容; 杨静

    2013-01-01

    依赖组织间的合作提高创新绩效,不能忽略信任的重要作用.东方文化背景下组织间的信任关系比较复杂.以社会互动为中介,通过实证数据探讨组织间信任通过社会互动和知识获取对企业创新绩效产生影响的作用机制.研究以浙江省高新制造企业为样本,采用结构方程方法,得到的主要结论有:组织间信任通过社会互动才能对知识获取产生影响;组织间不同的信任类型对创新绩效的影响不同,关系型信任较计算型信任对互动强度和质量更具影响性.%The important role of trust can't be ignored when depending on the cooperation between enterprises in improving the innovation performance.The eastern culture inter-organizational trust is more complicated.Taking social interaction as a mediator,the paper explores the mechanism of inter-organizational trust and innovation performance by empirical data.The study investigates high-tech manufacture enterprises in Zhejiang province,adopts structure equation,and concluds that:the inter-organizational trust affects the knowledge acquisition through social interaction; the different kinds of inter -organizational trust has different effect on enterprise's innovation performance,and the relational trust has a greater impact on social interaction than the calculation of interaction-based trust.

  17. From social capital to health--and back

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rocco, Lorenzo; Fumagalli, Elena; Suhrcke, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We assess the causal relationship between health and social capital, measured by generalized trust, both at the individual and the community level. The paper contributes to the literature in two ways: it tackles the problems of endogeneity and reverse causation between social capital and health by e

  18. From social capital to health--and back

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rocco, Lorenzo; Fumagalli, Elena; Suhrcke, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We assess the causal relationship between health and social capital, measured by generalized trust, both at the individual and the community level. The paper contributes to the literature in two ways: it tackles the problems of endogeneity and reverse causation between social capital and health by e

  19. Social Capital and School Performance: A Local-Level Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plagens, Gregory K.

    Scholars theorize that social contacts affect the productivity of individuals and groups. Robert Putnam claims to have found support for this theory in his studies of Italy and the United States. In each case he concludes that the presence of social capital generalized norms of trust and reciprocity is sufficient to predict progress on a variety…

  20. The Trust Imperative

    OpenAIRE

    Urban, Glen L.

    2003-01-01

    Nearly 70% of Americans agree with the statement, "I don't know whom to trust anymore," according to a February 2002 Golin/Harris Poll1. Although trust in society and corporations seems to be at an all time low, now is a good time for businesses to embark on a trust-based marketing strategy. Increasing customer power will drive a new paradigm for marketing, a paradigm based on advocating for the customer by providing open, honest information and advice. At the same time, this customer power i...