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Sample records for generalized social phobia

  1. Social Phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Social Phobia KidsHealth > For Teens > Social Phobia Print A A ... anxiety condition called social phobia. What Is Social Phobia? Social phobia (also called social anxiety ) is a ...

  2. Neural correlates of speech anticipatory anxiety in generalized social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorberbaum, Jeffrey P; Kose, Samet; Johnson, Michael R; Arana, George W; Sullivan, Lindsay K; Hamner, Mark B; Ballenger, James C; Lydiard, R Bruce; Brodrick, Peter S; Bohning, Daryl E; George, Mark S

    2004-12-22

    Patients with generalized social phobia fear embarrassment in most social situations. Little is known about its functional neuroanatomy. We studied BOLD-fMRI brain activity while generalized social phobics and healthy controls anticipated making public speeches. With anticipation minus rest, 8 phobics compared to 6 controls showed greater subcortical, limbic, and lateral paralimbic activity (pons, striatum, amygdala/uncus/anterior parahippocampus, insula, temporal pole)--regions important in automatic emotional processing--and less cortical activity (dorsal anterior cingulate/prefrontal cortex)--regions important in cognitive processing. Phobics may become so anxious, they cannot think clearly or vice versa.

  3. Psychodynamic group treatment for generalized social phobia

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Zippin Knijnik; Flávio Kapczinski; Eduardo Chachamovich; Regina Margis; Claudio Laks Eizirik

    2004-01-01

    OBJETIVOS: O objetivo deste estudo é verificar a efetividade do tratamento psicodinâmico em grupo de pacientes com fobia social generalizada. MÉTODOS: 30 pacientes foram incluídos em um estudo randomizado, simples-cego, comparando Terapia Psicodinâmica de Grupo (TPG) com um Grupo de Controle Placebo com Credibilidade (CPC). A TPG foi conduzida em 12 sessões de terapia de orientação psicodinâmica em grupo. Os pacientes do grupo controle receberam um pacote de aulas-discussões e tratamento de a...

  4. Lack of neuropsychological deficits in generalized social phobia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott R Sutterby

    Full Text Available There are relatively few existing studies examining neuropsychological functioning in social phobia (SP, which collectively yield mixed results. Interpretation of results is further complicated by a number of methodological inconsistencies across studies, including the examination of neuropsychological domains in relative isolation from one another. The present study utilized a broader collection of neuropsychological tests to assess nine domains of functioning in 25 individuals diagnosed with generalized SP and 25 nonpsychiatric controls (NC. A mixed ANOVA revealed neither a significant group by domain interaction, nor a significant main effect of group. Furthermore, no significant group differences emerged between the SP and NC groups within each specific neuropsychological domain. These findings suggest that underlying neuropsychological deficits are not likely to account for the information processing biases observed in the empirical literature, and appear to be consistent with current theoretical models which argue for the specificity of these biases to social information.

  5. SOCIAL PHOBIA

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    Prabu Supramaniam

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Social Phobia is a condition characterized by a marked and persistent fear of social or performance situations in which embarrassment may occur. Exposure to the social or performance situation almost invariably provokes an immediate anxiety response. Although adolescents and adults with this disorder recognize that their fear is excessive or unreasonable, this may not be the case in children. Most often, the social or performance situation is avoided, although it is sometimes endured with dread. In individuals younger than 18, symptoms must have persisted for at least 6 months before is disorder is diagnosed. This diagnosis should not be given if the fear is reasonable given the context of the stimuli (e.g., fear of being called on in class when unprepared. The disturbance must cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. This disorder is not due to a medical condition, medication, or abused substance. It is not better accounted for by another mental disorder.    

  6. Social Anxiety Disorder (Social Phobia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social anxiety disorder (social phobia) Overview It's normal to feel nervous in some social situations. For example, going on ... of butterflies in your stomach. But in social anxiety disorder, also called social phobia, everyday interactions cause ...

  7. Treatment of generalized social phobia : Results at long-term follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholing, A; Emmelkamp, PMG

    1996-01-01

    This study investigated the long-term follow-up effectiveness-of (cognitive-)behavioural group and individual treatments for generalized social phobia. Patients were reassessed 18 months after they had finished one of the following treatment packages: (1) exposure in vivo; (2) cognitive therapy foll

  8. Association between Level of Emotional Intelligence and Severity of Anxiety in Generalized Social Phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Madeline; Snow, Joseph; Geraci, Marilla; Vythilingam, Meena; Blair, R.J.R.; Charney, Dennis S.; Pine, Daniel S.; Blair, Karina S.

    2008-01-01

    Generalized Social Phobia (GSP) is characterized by a marked fear of most social situations. It is associated with an anomalous neural response to emotional stimuli, and individuals with the disorder frequently show interpretation bias in social situations. From this it might be suggested that GSP involves difficulty in accurately perceiving, using, understanding and managing emotions. Here we applied the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) to medication-free GSP (n=28) and no pathology (n=21) individuals. Patients with GSP performed within the normal range on the measure however severity of social anxiety significantly correlated with emotional intelligence (EI). Specifically, there was a negative correlation between social anxiety severity and Experiential (basic-level emotional processing) EI. In contrast, there was no significant correlation between social anxiety severity and Strategic (higher-level conscious emotional processing) EI. These results suggest that EI may index emotional processing systems that mitigate the impact of systems causally implicated in GSP. PMID:18439799

  9. Association between level of emotional intelligence and severity of anxiety in generalized social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Madeline; Snow, Joseph; Geraci, Marilla; Vythilingam, Meena; Blair, R J R; Charney, Dennis S; Pine, Daniel S; Blair, Karina S

    2008-12-01

    Generalized social phobia (GSP) is characterized by a marked fear of most social situations. It is associated with an anomalous neural response to emotional stimuli, and individuals with the disorder frequently show interpretation bias in social situations. From this it might be suggested that GSP involves difficulty in accurately perceiving, using, understanding and managing emotions. Here we applied the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) to medication-free GSP (n=28) and no pathology (n=21) individuals. Patients with GSP performed within the normal range on the measure however severity of social anxiety significantly correlated with emotional intelligence (EI). Specifically, there was a negative correlation between social anxiety severity and Experiential (basic-level emotional processing) EI. In contrast, there was no significant correlation between social anxiety severity and Strategic (higher-level conscious emotional processing) EI. These results suggest that EI may index emotional processing systems that mitigate the impact of systems causally implicated in GSP.

  10. Quality of Life Impairment in Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Social Phobia, and Panic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Terri L.; Norton, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Interest in the assessment of quality of life in the anxiety disorders is growing. The present study examined quality of life impairments in individuals with Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), Social Phobia, and Panic Disorder. Results showed that individuals with these disorders reported less satisfaction with their quality of life than non-anxious adults in the community. However, the degree of quality of life impairment is similar across these three disorders. Additionally, comorbid depression, but not anxiety, was found to negatively impact quality of life in these individuals. Finally, diagnostic symptom severity was not found to influence quality of life, indicating that subjective measures of quality of life offer unique information on the effects of anxiety disorders. PMID:19640675

  11. Aberrant Reward Center Response to Partner Reputation During a Social Exchange Game in Generalized Social Phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripada, Chandra; Angstadt, Michael; Liberzon, Israel; McCabe, Kevin; Phan, K. Luan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Generalized social anxiety disorder (GSAD) is characterized by excessive fear of public scrutiny and reticence in social engagement. Previous studies have probed the neural basis of GSAD often using static, non-interactive stimuli (e.g., face photographs) and have identified dysfunction in fear circuitry. We sought to investigate brain-based dysfunction in GSAD during more real-world, dynamic social interactions, focusing on the role of reward-related regions that are implicated in social decision-making. Methods Thirty-six healthy individuals (HC) and 36 individuals with GSAD underwent fMRI scanning while participating in a behavioral economic game (‘Trust Game’) involving iterative exchanges with fictive partners who acquire differential reputations for reciprocity. We investigated brain responses to reciprocation of trust in one’s social partner, and how these brain responses are modulated by partner reputation for repayment. Results In both HC and GSAD, receipt of reciprocity robustly engaged ventral striatum, a region implicated in reward. In HC, striatal responses to reciprocity were specific to partners who have consistently returned the investment (‘cooperative partners’), and were absent for partners who lack a cooperative reputation. In GSAD, modulation of striatal responses by partner reputation was absent. Social anxiety severity predicted diminished responses to cooperative partners. Conclusion These results suggest abnormalities in GSAD in reward-related striatal mechanisms that may be important for the initiation, valuation, and maintenance of cooperative social relationships. Moreover, this study demonstrates that dynamic, interactive task paradigms derived from economics can help illuminate novel mechanisms of pathology in psychiatric illnesses in which social dysfunction is a cardinal feature. PMID:23576237

  12. Corticolimbic Brain Reactivity to Social Signals of Threat Before and After Sertraline Treatment in Generalized Social Phobia

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    Phan, K. Luan; Coccaro, Emil F.; Angstadt, Mike; Kreger, K. Jane; Mayberg, Helen S.; Liberzon, Israel; Stein, Murray B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Generalized social phobia (gSP), also known as generalized social anxiety disorder, is characterized by excessive fear of scrutiny by others and pervasive avoidance of social interactions. Pathophysiological models of gSP implicate exaggerated reactivity of the amygdala and insula in response to social evaluative threat, making them plausible targets for treatment. Although selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment is known to be an effective treatment, little is known about the mechanism by which these agents exert their anxiolytic effects at a brain level in gSP. Method We acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data of brain response to social signals of threat (fearful/angry faces) in twenty-one GSAD patients before and after they completed 12 weeks of open label treatment with the SSRI sertraline. For comparison, nineteen healthy control (HC) subjects also underwent two fMRI scans, 12 weeks apart. Results Whole-brain voxel-wise analysis of variance revealed significant Group×Time interactions in the amygdala and the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Follow up analyses showed that treatment in gSP subjects: 1) reduced amygdala reactivity to fearful faces (which was exaggerated relative to HCs prior to treatment); and 2) enhanced vmPFC activation to angry faces (which was attenuated relative to HCs prior to treatment). However, these brain changes were not significantly related to social anxiety symptom improvement. Conclusions SSRI treatment response in gSP is associated with changes in a discrete limbic-paralimbic brain network, representing a neural mechanism by which SSRIs may exert their actions. PMID:23164370

  13. SOCIAL PHOBIA PREVALENCE IN YOUNGS

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    AHMAD REZA ZAMANI

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The most common psychiatric disorder of new communities are the anxiety disorders. In this survey Isfahans' high school students' social phobia were assessed as an important part of anxiety disorders. Methods & Materials: In this cross sectional study, 500 high school students (250 male, 250 female whom selected by multi-stage cluster and simple random sampling, were enrolled into study. Data collection performed by multiple choice question are and analysis were done by SPSS software with 0.05 significance level. Results: 11 percents of selected students with mean age about 16 Yrs, have had Social Phobia (male=56.4%, female=43.6 % . Parents' education of affected group were higher than non-affected, and birth rank had significant relation with Social Phobia (P = 0.043. Conclusions: Unfortunately in spite of high prevalence of social phobia, It's remain unknown and affected students would have numerous educational and communicational problems because of this disorder, therefore for complications' prevention and on time treatment, its need to inform people and physicians about this disorder and its' diagnose.

  14. Psicoterapia psicodinâmica em grupo para fobia social generalizada Psychodynamic group treatment for generalized social phobia

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    Daniela Zippin Knijnik

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: O objetivo deste estudo é verificar a efetividade do tratamento psicodinâmico em grupo de pacientes com fobia social generalizada. MÉTODOS: 30 pacientes foram incluídos em um estudo randomizado, simples-cego, comparando Terapia Psicodinâmica de Grupo (TPG com um Grupo de Controle Placebo com Credibilidade (CPC. A TPG foi conduzida em 12 sessões de terapia de orientação psicodinâmica em grupo. Os pacientes do grupo controle receberam um pacote de aulas-discussões e tratamento de apoio por 12 semanas, que foi comparado à TPG. Todos os participantes preencheram a Escala de Liebowitz para Ansiedade Social (LSAS, a Escala Hamilton de Ansiedade (HAM-A e a Escala de Impressão Clínica Global (CGI, na entrevista inicial e na 12ª semana de tratamento. Os dados foram analisados com uma ANOVA de medidas repetidas. Pacientes em vigência de tratamento farmacológico ou psicoterápico foram excluídos. RESULTADOS: Ambos os grupos apresentaram melhora na maioria das medidas. Na LSAS, os pacientes da TPG obtiveram melhora superior aos do grupo controle, ao cabo de 12 semanas (F1,28=4.84, p=0.036. Nas medidas basais dos sujeitos que completaram o estudo, não houve diferença entre os grupos em variáveis demográficas e de desfecho. CONCLUSÃO: Neste estudo, a TPG foi superior ao tratamento placebo com credibilidade no tratamento da fobia social generalizada, em um ensaio clínico randomizado, simples-cego, de 12 semanas.OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of psychodynamic group therapy in patients with generalized social phobia. METHODS: Thirty patients were included in a randomized single-blind clinical trial comparing psychodynamic group treatment (PGT with a credible placebo control group (CPC. PGT was carried out within a 12-session psychodynamically-oriented group psychotherapy. Control patients received a treatment package of lecture-discussion and support group for 12 weeks which was compared to PGT

  15. Specific and social phobias in ICD-11

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmelkamp, P.M.G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the current status of research with respect to specific phobias and social phobia as defined in the ICD-10 and DSM-IV, and to provide op- tions for their classification in the ICD-11. Both ICD-10 and DSM-IV identify three main classes of phobias: specific

  16. Specific and social phobias in ICD-11

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmelkamp, P.M.G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the current status of research with respect to specific phobias and social phobia as defined in the ICD-10 and DSM-IV, and to provide op- tions for their classification in the ICD-11. Both ICD-10 and DSM-IV identify three main classes of phobias: specific ph

  17. Social phobia with sudden onset-Post-panic social phobia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ann Suhl; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Mors, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Overlap between social phobia (SP) and panic disorder (PD) has been observed in epidemiological, family, and challenge studies. One possible explanation is that some cases of SP develop as a consequence of a panic attack in a social situation. By definition, these cases of SP have sudden onset....... It is hypothesized that patients with SP with sudden onset are more similar to patients with comorbid SP and PD than to patients with SP without sudden onset regarding age of onset, extraversion, and prevalence of anxiety symptoms. One hundred and eighty-two patients with a lifetime diagnosis of PD and/or SP were...

  18. Quality of Life Impairments among Adults with Social Phobia: The Impact of Subtype

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    Wong, Nina; Sarver, Dustin E.; Beidel, Deborah C.

    2011-01-01

    Social phobia is characterized by extreme fear in social or performance situations in which the individual may be exposed to embarrassment or scrutiny by others, which creates occupational, social and academic impairment. To date, there are few data examining the relationship of social phobia impairments to quality of life. In this investigation, we examined how demographic characteristics, comorbidity, and social competence are related to quality of life among patients with social phobia and normal controls. In addition, we examined the impact of social phobia subtype. Results indicated that individuals with generalized social phobia had significantly impaired quality of life when compared to individuals with no disorder or individuals with nongeneralized social phobia. Comorbid disorders decreased quality of life only for patients with nongeneralized social phobia. Hierarchical linear regression revealed that a diagnosis of social phobia and observer ratings of social effectiveness exerted strong and independent effects on quality of life scores. Results are discussed in terms of the role of social anxiety, social competence, and comorbidity on the quality of life for adults with social phobia. PMID:21964285

  19. Processing of emotional faces in social phobia

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    Nicole Kristjansen Rosenberg

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has found that individuals with social phobia differ from controls in their processing of emotional faces. For instance, people with social phobia show increased attention to briefly presented threatening faces. However, when exposure times are increased, the direction of this attentional bias is more unclear. Studies investigating eye movements have found both increased as well as decreased attention to threatening faces in socially anxious participants. The current study investigated eye movements to emotional faces in eight patients with social phobia and 34 controls. Three different tasks with different exposure durations were used, which allowed for an investigation of the time course of attention. At the early time interval, patients showed a complex pattern of both vigilance and avoidance of threatening faces. At the longest time interval, patients avoided the eyes of sad, disgust, and neutral faces more than controls, whereas there were no group differences for angry faces.

  20. Measurement Invariance of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory

    OpenAIRE

    Bunnell, Brian E.; Joseph, Dana L.; Beidel,Deborah C.

    2012-01-01

    The Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI) is a commonly used self-report measure of social phobia that has demonstrated adequate reliability, convergent validity, discriminant validity, and criterion-related validity. However, research has yet to address whether this measure functions equivalently in (a) individuals with and without a diagnosis of social phobia and (b) males and females. Evaluating measurement equivalence is necessary in order to determine that the construct of social an...

  1. Current status of psychotherapeutic interventions for social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimberg, R G

    2001-01-01

    Psychotherapeutic interventions, especially the cognitive-behavioral psychotherapies, have been well studied as treatments for social phobia. The purposes of this article are to (1) enumerate and describe the varieties of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) that have been applied to the treatment of social phobia, (2) provide a meta-analytic overview of the efficacy of these approaches, (3) examine the relative utility of CBT versus that of pharmacotherapy for social phobia, (4) examine the potential utility of multidisciplinary approaches to treatment, and (5) discuss possible future directions in the development of psychotherapeutic strategies for the treatment of social phobia, including the use of computers as adjunctive tools.

  2. [A psychological content of social phobia syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagalakova, O A; Truevtsev, D V; Stoyanova, I Ya

    2017-01-01

    To perform a psychological analysis of social phobia syndrome. The subject area of research is the structure of mental activity and behavior in social activity. The study included 32 patients with symptoms of social phobia (ICD-10 F40.1) and 29 healthy people (controls). A complex of psychological methods (questionnaires; pathopsychological experiment) was used. Early maladaptive schemes and a tendency to mental rigidity can be a premorbid basis of the syndrome. Primary violation is in organizational target component by type of distortion of goal-setting regulation. The mechanism is a reduction in the mediation of emotions and behavior (an influence of emotions on the process of activity, excess metacognitive anxiety control leading to multi-task and exhaustion of resources of voluntary activity). Fear of negative evaluation leads to the fact that a wide class of situations is interpreted as threatening. Secondary are changes in the system of goals and motives of activity (technically performing components of social behavior act as a focus of attention, along with the target, the target replaces the suprasituational meaning). Along with a strong motivation to succeed, the motive of avoiding failure is formed, which leads to a decrease in social activity. Tertiary symptoms of syndrome dynamics (ways to cope with maladaptation) are destructive forms of decompensation (substance abuse, learned helplessness and hopelessness, suicidal behavior, etc.), repeatedly reinforcing the primary and secondary disturbances.

  3. Terapia cognitivo-comportamental da fobia social Cognitive-behavioral therapy in social phobia

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    Lígia M Ito

    2008-10-01

    .3%. The main techniques used in cognitive-behavioral therapy for social phobia are described and exemplified in a case report. CONCLUSIONS: There is a general consensus in the literature that cognitive-behavioral therapy is efficacious in the treatment of youth and adults with social phobia. Because of the early onset associated with social phobia, the identification of children at high risk for the development of social phobia should be prioritized in future investigations.

  4. The impact of personality disorders on behavioral treatment outcome for social phobia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velzen, C.J.M.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.; Scholing, A.

    1997-01-01

    The impact of personality disorders (PDs) on exposure in pipe treatment for social phobia was investigated in three groups of social phobics: social phobia without any PD (n = 30), social phobia with a single diagnosis of avoidant PD (n = 18) and social phobia with multiple PDs (n = 13). We hypothes

  5. The impact of personality disorders on behavioral treatment outcome for social phobia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velzen, C.J.M.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.; Scholing, A.

    1997-01-01

    The impact of personality disorders (PDs) on exposure in pipe treatment for social phobia was investigated in three groups of social phobics: social phobia without any PD (n = 30), social phobia with a single diagnosis of avoidant PD (n = 18) and social phobia with multiple PDs (n = 13). We hypothes

  6. Attentional mechanisms of social perception are biased in social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boll, Sabrina; Bartholomaeus, Marie; Peter, Ulrike; Lupke, Ulrike; Gamer, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies of social phobia have reported an increased vigilance to social threat cues but also an avoidance of socially relevant stimuli such as eye gaze. The primary aim of this study was to examine attentional mechanisms relevant for perceiving social cues by means of abnormalities in scanning of facial features in patients with social phobia. In two novel experimental paradigms, patients with social phobia and healthy controls matched on age, gender and education were compared regarding their gazing behavior towards facial cues. The first experiment was an emotion classification paradigm which allowed for differentiating reflexive attentional shifts from sustained attention towards diagnostically relevant facial features. In the second experiment, attentional orienting by gaze direction was assessed in a gaze-cueing paradigm in which non-predictive gaze cues shifted attention towards or away from subsequently presented targets. We found that patients as compared to controls reflexively oriented their attention more frequently towards the eyes of emotional faces in the emotion classification paradigm. This initial hypervigilance for the eye region was observed at very early attentional stages when faces were presented for 150ms, and persisted when facial stimuli were shown for 3s. Moreover, a delayed attentional orienting into the direction of eye gaze was observed in individuals with social phobia suggesting a differential time course of eye gaze processing in patients and controls. Our findings suggest that basic mechanisms of early attentional exploration of social cues are biased in social phobia and might contribute to the development and maintenance of the disorder. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Phobias

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or no real danger. There are many specific phobias. Acrophobia is a fear of heights. Agoraphobia is a fear of public ... If they cannot, they may experience Panic and fear Rapid heartbeat Shortness of breath Trembling A strong desire to get away Phobias usually start in children or teens, and continue ...

  8. Phobias

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staff Specific phobias are an overwhelming and unreasonable fear of objects or situations that pose little real danger but provoke anxiety and avoidance. Unlike the brief anxiety you may feel when giving a speech or taking a test, specific phobias are long ...

  9. Tratamento da fobia social circunscrita por exposição ao vivo e reestruturação cognitiva Treatment of the non-generalized social phobia by in vivo exposure and cognitive restructuring

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    Gustavo J. Fonseca D'el Rey

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available A fobia social é um grave transtorno de ansiedade que traz incapacitação e sofrimento. Apresentamos um relato de caso de uma mulher de 26 anos com diagnóstico de fobia social circunscrita (medo severo de assinar seu nome em público com três anos de duração, que foi tratada em oito semanas, usando-se a exposição ao vivo e a reestruturação cognitiva. O progresso do tratamento foi mantido em diversas áreas de sua vida e no follow-up de seis meses.Social phobia is a severe anxiety disorder that brings disability and distress. We present a case report of a 26 year-old woman with a diagnosis of non-generalized social phobia (severe fear of signing her name in public with 3 years of duration. She was treated in 8 weeks with in vivo exposure and cognitive restructuring. The treatment progress was maintained in all measures at the 6-month follow-up.

  10. Social skills and social phobia: an investigation of DSM-IV subtypes.

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    Beidel, Deborah C; Rao, Patricia A; Scharfstein, Lindsay; Wong, Nina; Alfano, Candice A

    2010-10-01

    Social phobia is characterized as pervasive social timidity in social settings. Although much is known about this disorder, aspects of its clinical presentation remain unexplored, in particular characteristics that distinguish the generalized and non-generalized subtypes. For example, it remains unclear whether patients with the non-generalized subtype display social skills deficits in social interactions, and if so, are these deficits clinically, as well as statistically, significant? In this study, adults with either the non-generalized (NGSP; n=60) or generalized (GSP; n=119) subtype of social phobia and adults with no psychological disorder (n=200) completed an extensive behavioral assessment of social skill and social anxiety. As expected, adults with NGSP and GSP reported equal distress and displayed similar rates of avoidance during an Impromptu Speech Task when compared to adults with no disorder. In contrast, the three groups were distinctly different when interacting with another person in various social situations. Adults with NGSP displayed social skill deficits when compared to individuals with no disorder, but they had fewer deficits than the GSP subtype. However, the identified skill deficits were clinically as well as statistically significant only for the GSP subtype. The results are discussed in terms of the contribution of skill deficits to the conceptualization and treatment of social phobia.

  11. [Social phobia in anorexia nervosa: evolution during the care].

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    Coulon, N; Jeammet, P; Godart, N

    2009-12-01

    The links between anorexia nervosa (AN) and anxiety disorders, and particularly social phobia, are little known. However, social phobia occurs frequently in AN. Some studies have shown reduction in anxious and depressive symptomatology in AN with re-nutrition. But, to our knowledge, no work has examined the evolution of social phobia symptoms during re-nutrition in AN. To specify the links between AN, nutritional state, and social phobia. The population consisted of 2 samples and the analysis was conducted using the SPSS11.5. Sample 1 (N=24 AN) was evaluated on admission and on leaving the hospital. Our evaluation used the body mass index (BMI), the Liebowitz scale, the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI), and the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale for Eating Disorders scale (Y-BOCS-ED) respectively to evaluate or diagnose the state of malnutrition, social anxiety symptomatology, social phobia in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-4 (DSM-IV) and anorexic symptomatology. Sample 2 (N=60) was assessed at the end of the hospitalization and then 6, 12 and 18 months later. We used the BMI, Liebowitz scale, MINI, and Eating Disorders Inventory (EDI) to assess anorexic symptomatology. In addition, the Morgan-Russell outcome assessment schedule (MR schedule) was used to assess the total clinical state of the patients. Social anxiety symptomatology and actual diagnosis decreased throughout the treatment. However, regardless of the point at which the patient received care, there was no correlation between social phobia and nutritional state, as indicated by BMI. A correlation existed between social phobia and AN symptomatology, and between social phobia and total clinical state, during the out-patient care. A component of AN-social phobia comorbidity is still questionable. Is it linked to the clinical state of the subjects (question of an additional effect of under nutrition and cognition), or even to AN? Others indicators of under nutrition are of interest

  12. Cognitive Correlates of Social Phobia among Children and Adolescents

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    Alfano, Candice A.; Beidel, Deborah C.; Turner, Samuel M.

    2006-01-01

    We examined different cognitive phenomena in relation to social phobia among children (aged 7 to 11) and adolescents (aged 12-16) separately. Fifty socially phobic youths were compared to 30 normal control children on measures of social anxiety, social expectation as well as self-and observer-rated performance during two social tasks involving a…

  13. A pilot study on sensitivity of outcome measures for treatments of generalized social phobia in Spanish adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Joaquín García-López

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available La traducción y adaptación al español de los instrumentos desarrollados en otros países para la medida de la ansiedad social requiere que se verifiquen sus propiedades psicométricas para la población a la que se va destinar su uso. El propósito de este estudio piloto es aportar indicios empíricos sobre la potencial sensibilidad, a los cambios generados por el tratamiento en una muestra de adolescentes españoles, de seis instrumentos de evaluación que han sido traducidos y adaptados para evaluar la ansiedad social en esta población. La muestra estuvo integrada por 44 adolescentes que cumplían los criterios para el diagnóstico del trastorno de ansiedad social de tipo generalizado. Los sujetos fueron asignados a tres condiciones experimentales, cada una de las cuales recibió un tratamiento cognitivo-conductual distinto. Fueron evaluados antes, después y en una medida de seguimiento realizada un año después de haber finalizado el tratamiento. Los resultados muestran que todas las escalas fueron sensibles al cambio terapéutico, lo que da apoyo empírico provisional a su utilidad para medir los cambios generados por los tratamientos en los adolescentes españoles con fobia social generalizada.

  14. Nonverbal expressive behaviour in schizophrenia and social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del-Monte, Jonathan; Raffard, Stéphane; Salesse, Robin N; Marin, Ludovic; Schmidt, Richard C; Varlet, Manuel; Bardy, Benoît G; Philippe Boulenger, Jean; Christine Gély-Nargeot, Marie; Capdevielle, Delphine

    2013-11-30

    Expressive behaviour plays a crucial role in the success of social interactions. Abnormality of expressive behaviour has been reported in interpersonal interactions of patients suffering from schizophrenia and social phobia, two debilitating mental disorders with important social deficits. However, no study has compared the expressive behaviour in these two disorders. Thirty schizophrenia patients, 21 social phobia patients and 30 healthy controls were evaluated and compared on expressive, cognitive and clinical dimensions. Expressive behaviour was assessed using the Motor Affective subscale of the Motor-Affective-Social-Scale (MASS). Covariables include the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), the anxiety level Liebowitz-Social-Anxiety-Scale (LSAS) and cognitive tasks. After controlling for depression, schizophrenia and social phobia patients both exhibited significantly fewer expressive behaviours compared to healthy controls. Moreover, our results showed specific signatures: schizophrenia patients performed fewer spontaneous gestures (hand gestures and smiles) whereas social phobia patients had an impaired ability to produce voluntary smiles in comparison to healthy controls. Interestingly, poor social functioning was significantly correlated with a decrease of expressive behaviour for schizophrenia patients. Expressive behaviour is impaired in different ways in social phobia and schizophrenia and is associated in schizophrenia with poorer social functioning. The Motor Affective subscale of the MASS is an interesting tool for assessing the dysfunction of interpersonal expressive behaviour in mental disorders.

  15. Social phobia in Parkinson’s disease: Prevalence and risk factors

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    Gultekin BK

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bulent Kadri Gultekin,1 Betul Ozdilek,2 Engin Emrem Bestepe1 1Department of Psychiatry, 2Department of Neurology, Erenkoy Research and Training Hospital for Neurologic and Psychiatric Disorders, Istanbul, Turkey Objective: We aimed to investigate the frequency of social phobia in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD. In addition, we explored the relationship between social phobia and the clinical characteristics of PD, and the frequency of comorbid psychiatric disorders in PD patients. Methods: This study included 80 consecutive patients with PD admitted to the Parkinson’s disease and Movement Disorders Clinic at the Erenkoy Research and Training Hospital for Neurologic and Psychiatric Disorders, Istanbul, Turkey and used demographic and clinical data. The PD patients were evaluated during the “on state”, using the Hoehn and Yahr scale, the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale, and the Schwab England Activities of Daily Living Scale. Psychiatric evaluations were conducted using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition structured clinical interview, the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS, and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Results: Social phobia was diagnosed in 42.5% of PD patients. Social phobia was comorbid with depression in 20 patients (58.8%, generalized anxiety disorder in 18 patients (52.9%, and panic disorder in six patients (17.6%. Social phobia was more frequent in males, early-onset PD, patients with a long duration of disease, the presence of postural instability, and with the use of a high Levodopa equivalent daily dose. A logistic regression analysis revealed the predictive factors of social phobia to be the sex of the patient (more frequent in males and the presence of postural instability. There was a statistically significantly negative correlation between the LSAS score and the age of disease onset (r=–0.503; P=0.002 and a positive correlation between LSAS score and the

  16. Subliminal Cues Bias Perception of Facial Affect in Patients with Generalized Social Phobia: Evidence for Enhanced Unconscious Threat Processing

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    Aiste eJusyte

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractSocially anxious individuals have been shown to exhibit altered processing of facial affect, especially expressions signalling threat. Enhanced unaware processing has been suggested an important mechanism which may give rise to anxious conscious cognition and behavior. This study investigated whether individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD are perceptually more vulnerable to the biasing effects of subliminal threat cues compared to healthy controls. In a perceptual judgment task, 23 SAD and 23 matched control participants were asked to rate the affective valence of parametrically manipulated affective expressions ranging from neutral to angry. Each trial was preceded by subliminal presentation of an angry/ neutral cue. The SAD group tended to rate target faces as angry when the preceding subliminal stimulus was angry vs. neutral, while healthy participants were not biased by the subliminal stimulus presentation. The perceptual bias in SAD was also associated with higher reaction time latencies in the subliminal angry cue condition. The results provide further support for enhanced unconscious threat processing in SAD individuals. The implications for etiology, maintenance and treatment of SAD are discussed.

  17. Measurement Invariance of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnell, Brian E.; Joseph, Dana L.; Beidel, Deborah C.

    2012-01-01

    The Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI) is a commonly used self-report measure of social phobia that has demonstrated adequate reliability, convergent validity, discriminant validity, and criterion-related validity. However, research has yet to address whether this measure functions equivalently in (a) individuals with and without a diagnosis of social phobia and (b) males and females. Evaluating measurement equivalence is necessary in order to determine that the construct of social anxiety is conceptually understood invariantly across these populations. The results of the current investigation, using a series of nested factorial models proposed by Vandenberg and Lance (2000), provide evidence for strong equivalence across 420 individuals with and without diagnoses of social anxiety disorder and across male and female samples. Accordingly, these results provide psychometric justification for comparison of SPAI scores across the symptom continuum and sexes. PMID:23247204

  18. Time-course of attention biases in social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Casey A; Inhoff, Albrecht W; Coles, Meredith E

    2013-10-01

    Theoretical models of social phobia implicate preferential attention to social threat in the maintenance of anxiety symptoms, though there has been limited work characterizing the nature of these biases over time. The current study utilized eye-movement data to examine the time-course of visual attention over 1500ms trials of a probe detection task. Nineteen participants with a primary diagnosis of social phobia based on DSM-IV criteria and 20 non-clinical controls completed this task with angry, fearful, and happy face trials. Overt visual attention to the emotional and neutral faces was measured in 50ms segments across the trial. Over time, participants with social phobia attend less to emotional faces and specifically less to happy faces compared to controls. Further, attention to emotional relative to neutral expressions did not vary notably by emotion for participants with social phobia, but control participants showed a pattern after 1000ms in which over time they preferentially attended to happy expressions and avoided negative expressions. Findings highlight the importance of considering attention biases to positive stimuli as well as the pattern of attention between groups. These results suggest that attention "bias" in social phobia may be driven by a relative lack of the biases seen in non-anxious participants.

  19. Social Phobia in Youth: The Diagnostic Utility of Feared Social Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puliafico, Anthony C.; Comer, Jonathan S.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2007-01-01

    The present study evaluated the utility of parent- and child-reported social fears for reaching a diagnosis of social phobia in youth. The diagnostic utility of (a) the number of fears and (b) specific feared social situations was examined. The sample included 140 youth and their parents: youth diagnosed with social phobia (n = 50), youth…

  20. Social phobia : diagnosis and epidemiology, neurobiology and pharmacology, comorbidity and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunello, N; den Boer, JA; Judd, LL; Kasper, S; Kelsey, JE; Lader, M; Lecrubier, Y; Lepine, JP; Lydiard, RB; Mendlewicz, J; Montgomery, SA; Racagni, G; Stein, MB; Wittchen, HU

    2000-01-01

    Social phobia is a common disorder associated with significant psychosocial impairment, representing a substantial public health problem largely determined by the high prevalence, and the lifelong chronicity. Social phobia starts in early childhood or adolescence and is often comorbid with

  1. Differential Effect of Mirror Manipulation on Self-Perception in Social Phobia Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Stefan G; Heinrichs, Nina

    2003-04-01

    This study employed mirror manipulation to examine differences in self-perception between the DSM-IV subtypes of social phobia (social anxiety disorder). We asked 82 consecutively admitted patients with social phobia to record three positive and three negative characteristics about themselves. Sixty-three percent of them met criteria for a generalized subtype of social phobia (GSP). A random half of the total sample sat in front of a mirror before and during this task. Participants' responses were classified into either positive or negative self-statements concerning their bodily appearance, competence, and socially relevant or non-socially relevant personality characteristics. The mirror manipulation had a differential effect on self-perception in social phobia subtypes. The presence of a mirror led to more positive and negative self statements about bodily appearance, and to fewer negative self-statements about socially-relevant personality characteristics in participants with GSP. In contrast, participants not meeting criteria for GSP responded to mirror exposure only with fewer negative self-statements about non-socially relevant personality characteristics. These results suggest that mirror exposure leads to fewer negative self-statements about private aspects of the self, concerning social situations, while it enhances public self-consciousness in individuals with GSP.

  2. Differentiating High-Functioning Autism and Social Phobia

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    Tyson, Katherine E.; Cruess, Dean G.

    2012-01-01

    Both high-functioning autism (HFA) and social phobia (SP) involve profound social interaction deficits. Although these disorders share some similar symptoms, they are conceptualized as distinct. Because both HFA and SP are defined behaviorally, the degree of overlap between the two disorders may result in misinterpretation of symptoms. However,…

  3. Imagery Rescripting of Early Traumatic Memories in Social Phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Jennifer; Clark, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Negative self-images appear to play a role in the maintenance of social phobia and research suggests they are often linked to earlier memories of socially traumatic events. Imagery rescripting is a clinical intervention that aims to update such unpleasant or traumatic memories, and is increasingly being incorporated in cognitive behavioral therapy…

  4. Solution-Focused Therapy: Strength-Based Counseling for Children with Social Phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Cindy M.

    2008-01-01

    Solution-focused therapy is proposed as an effective strength-based model for children with social phobia. Social phobia is described along with the etiology and prevailing treatment approaches. A case illustration demonstrates the application of solution-focused therapy with a child who experienced social phobia. Implications for counseling and…

  5. Solution-Focused Therapy: Strength-Based Counseling for Children with Social Phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Cindy M.

    2008-01-01

    Solution-focused therapy is proposed as an effective strength-based model for children with social phobia. Social phobia is described along with the etiology and prevailing treatment approaches. A case illustration demonstrates the application of solution-focused therapy with a child who experienced social phobia. Implications for counseling and…

  6. Description of the case of a female with panic disorder with agoraphobia and elements of social phobia. The effectiveness of an intervention cognitive psychotherapy from the psychological sector of a general hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koinis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anxiety disorders are not a single disease but a group of disorders characterized by persistent highgrade feelings of anxiety and extreme discomfort and tension. Research has shown that cognitive psychotherapy combined with medication are the most entrenched in efficiency and more specific interventions proven to treat anxiety disorders generally and specifically. Aim: The purpose of this study is to show the effectiveness of cognitive psychotherapy in conjunction with medication, in treating anxiety panic disorder with agoraphobia and elements of social phobia. The specifics in applying cognitive psychotherapy in the treatment of anxiety disorders. Case Report: A 32 year old female presented as an emergency at the hospital's Emergency Department with intense panic disorder symptoms. The medical history of the family environment reveals that the patient had a strong sense of fear of "madness." Within the framework of liaison psychiatry the patient was referred by attending physicians for psychological observation and evaluation. The patient followed a course of recognized psychotherapeutic treatment for a duration of 30 sessions, administration of questionnaires at the beginning and end of treatment and adjustment of medication. Comment: This clinical case treated with the medication and cognitive psychotherapy. The differential diagnosis was generalized anxiety disorder and depressive disorder according to the system of mental disorders DSM-IV-TR classification of mental and behavioural disorders. Conclusions: Recognized psychotherapeutic interventions in combination with medication constitute a suitable approach for the treatment of anxiety panic disorder, agoraphobia and social phobia.

  7. Screening for ADHD in an Adult Social Phobia Sample

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    Mortberg, Ewa; Tilfors, Kerstin; Bejerot, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Recent studies have suggested a link between a primary anxiety disorder and ADHD. Method: A total of 39 participants with a primary diagnosis of social phobia were compared with 178 patients with ADHD and 88 patients with other psychiatric disorders on measures for childhood and adult ADHD (the Wender Utah Rating Scale and the Adult…

  8. Treatment of Social Phobia in Rezidual Schizophrenic Patients

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    Elif SIMSEK KAYGUSUZ

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Having negative symptoms is the basic feature of residual-type schizophrenia and there is a direct proportion between the neurocognitive impairments associated with negative symptoms. Among the approaches used for the treatment of patients with schizophrenia, cognitive behaviour therapy is the one with the most evidence of efficacy. Cognitive behaviour therapy is considered to be beneficial for the residual symptoms after drug treatment. The social phobia leads among the anxiety disorders accompanying schizophrenia. According to the cognitive model, the impairment of social performance increases the severity of social phobia. The leading factor of this vicious circle is that the patients pay attention selectively to such cases in order to find evidence for their thoughts and beliefs that they are going to be evaluated negatively. In this paper, the cognitive behavioural therapy and formulation carried out with a patient, who has been followed for a long time with the diagnosis of residual-type schizophrenia and social phobia is reported. The purpose of the treatment is to interfere with the impaired functionality of the patient through cognitive and behavioural techniques by dealing with the medical treatment-resistant symptoms. To this end, firstly coping mechanisms are examined through the identification of avoidance and security providers, and then, the patient’s automatic thoughts and false beliefs are discussed depending on the cognitive perspective. The main part of the treatment has been completed by carrying out various investigations in order to increase the patients’ social performance via applying behavioural techniques. As a result, false beliefs are the indicators of the relationship between cognitive inability and negative symptoms and related to social functioning. By addressing these beliefs through cognitive behavioural therapy, the necessity of increasing the patient’s social activities and the relationship between social

  9. Group cohesion in cognitive-behavioral group therapy for social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taube-Schiff, Marlene; Suvak, Michael K; Antony, Martin M; Bieling, Peter J; McCabe, Randi E

    2007-04-01

    Cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) for Social Phobia is effective in both group and individual formats. However, the impact of group processes on treatment efficacy remains relatively unexplored. In this study we examined group cohesion ratings made by individuals at the midpoint and endpoint of CBT groups for social phobia. Symptom measures were also completed at the beginning and end of treatment. We found that cohesion ratings significantly increased over the course of the group and were associated with improvement over time in social anxiety symptoms, as well as improvement on measures of general anxiety, depression, and functional impairment. In conclusion, findings are consistent with the idea that changes in group cohesion are related to social anxiety symptom reduction and, therefore, speak to the importance of nonspecific therapeutic factors in treatment outcome.

  10. Prediction of treatment outcome in social phobia: a cross-validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholing, A; Emmelkamp, P M

    1999-07-01

    This study was a replication of a study on the prediction of treatment outcome in social phobic patients [Chambless, D. L., Tran, G. Q. Glass, C.R. (1997). Predictors of response to cognitive-behavioral group therapy for social phobia. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 11 221-240]. Results at the posttest and the 18-months follow-up were analyzed for DSM-III-R social phobic patients, with either a generalized social phobia (n = 50) or a nongeneralized fear, i.e. fear of blushing, trembling or sweating in social situations (n = 26). Predictors were pretreatment depression, personality disorder traits, clinician rated severity of impairment and frequency of negative self-statements during social interactions. The criterium variable was (the residual gain score of) self-reported avoidance of social situations. In line with Chambless et al., pretreatment depression showed some predictive value, but smaller and only at the posttest. Change in the frequency of negative self-statements paralleled, but did not predict, change in social phobia symptoms. In contrast with Chambless et al., clinician rated severity was (slightly) predictive for treatment outcome, whereas avoidant personality traits had reverse correlations with outcome in both subgroups. The results are discussed and directions for further research are given.

  11. A virtual reality dialogue system for the treatment of social phobia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, W.P.; Hartanto, D.; Kang, N.; Vliegher, D. de; Kampmann, I.L.; Morina, N.; Emmelkamp, P.G.M.; Neerincx, M.

    2012-01-01

    People with social phobia have a severe fear of everyday social situations. In this paper we describe a virtual reality exposure therapy system specifically designed to expose patients with social phobia to various social situations. Patients can engage in a free speech dialogue with avatars while

  12. A virtual reality dialogue system for the treatment of social phobia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, W.P.; Hartanto, D.; Kang, N.; Vliegher, D. de; Kampmann, I.L.; Morina, N.; Emmelkamp, P.G.M.; Neerincx, M.

    2012-01-01

    People with social phobia have a severe fear of everyday social situations. In this paper we describe a virtual reality exposure therapy system specifically designed to expose patients with social phobia to various social situations. Patients can engage in a free speech dialogue with avatars while b

  13. Social Phobia and Difficulties in Occupational Adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruch, Monroe A.; Fallon, Melissa; Heimberg, Richard G.

    2003-01-01

    Examines whether social phobics differ from nonanxious controls in occupational adjustment. Results indicated that social phobics were underemployed and believed that their supervisor would rate them as less dependable. Social phobics were more anxious when starting their current job but did not differ in job satisfaction. Discusses results…

  14. Social fear and social phobia types among community youth: differential clinical features and vulnerability factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knappe, Susanne; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Fehm, Lydia; Stein, Murray B; Lieb, Roselind; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    To compare different social fears and social phobia subtypes with regard to clinical (age of onset, avoidance, impairment, comorbidities) and vulnerability factors (behavioural inhibition (BI), parental psychopathology and parental rearing) among community youth. Fears of 6 social situations and Social Phobia (SP), along with their clinical features, were assessed using the Munich-Composite International Diagnostic Interview (DIA-X/M-CIDI) in a population-based sample of N = 3021 14-24 year olds that were followed up for 10 years. BI and parental rearing were assessed using self-report questionnaires. Parental psychopathology was assessed directly in parents via DIA-X/M-CIDI, supplemented by offsprings' family history reports. In the total sample, 20.0%, 11.6%, 11.7% reported fear of 1, 2, 3 or more social situations, respectively; rates were 24.2%, 18.7%, and 57.1% in SP-cases (6.6% of the total sample). Exploring the factorial structure indicated rather unidimensionality of social fears than mutual distinction of social fears by interaction vs. performance situations. Except for fear of taking tests and public speaking, social fears rarely occurred in isolation. Social fears of both interaction and performance situations were associated with severe avoidance (vs. fear of either situation; Odds Ratios, OR = 1.5, 95%CI: 1.1-1.9) and impairment (OR = 3.6, 95%CI: 2.6-4.9), and more comorbid anxiety and depressive disorders (OR range 3.2-5.8, p > .001). Fear of interaction situations was associated with higher BI (vs. performance-related fears, OR range 1.2-2.1, p fear of interaction situations (vs. performance-related fears). Interactions with time indicated an earlier onset of SP for higher BI, but not for parental psychopathology or unfavourable parental rearing. Interaction-related social fears differ in their clinical and vulnerability factors from performance-related social fears. The current DSM-IV specifier of "generalized" SP may fall short of

  15. Performance Anxiety among African-American College Students: Racial Bias as a Factor in Social Phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Aleta Bok

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the etiology of social phobia, and proposes that the sensitivity to self-scrutiny common to social phobics can be exacerbated by the effects of longstanding racial bias. The impact of racism on identity and the importance of context are explored as salient factors in the onset of a case of social phobia for an…

  16. Rescripting Early Memories Linked to Negative Images in Social Phobia: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Jennifer; Hackmann, Ann; Clark, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Negative self-images are a maintaining factor in social phobia. A retrospective study (Hackmann, A., Clark, D.M., McManus, F. (2000). Recurrent images and early memories in social phobia. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 38, 601-610) suggested that the images may be linked to early memories of unpleasant social experiences. This preliminary study…

  17. Virtual reality exposure in the treatment of social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Evelyne; Légeron, Patrick; Roy, Stéphane; Chemin, Isabelle; Lauer, Françoise; Nugues, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Social phobia is one of the most frequent psychiatric disorders and is accessible to two forms of scientifically validated treatments: anti-depressant drugs and cognitive-behavioral therapies. Graded exposure to feared social situations (either in vivo or by imagining the situations) is fundamental to obtain an improvement of the anxious symptoms. Virtual reality (VR) may be an alternative to these standard exposure techniques and seems to bring significant advantages by allowing exposures to numerous and varied situations. Moreover studies have shown that human subjects are appropriately sensitive to virtual environments. This chapter reports the definition of a VR-based clinical protocol and a study to treat social phobia using virtual reality techniques. The virtual environments used in the treatment reproduce four situations that social phobics feel the most threatening: performance, intimacy, scrutiny and assertiveness. With the help of the therapist, the patient learns adapted cognitions and behaviors when coping with social situations, with the aim of reducing her or his anxiety in the corresponding real life situations. Some studies have been carried out using virtual reality in the treatment of fear of public speaking, which is only a small part of the symptomatology of most of social phobic patients. The novelty of our work is to address a larger group of situations that the phobic patients experience with high anxiety. In our protocol, the efficacy of the virtual reality treatment is compared to well established and well validated group cognitive-behavioral treatment.

  18. Optimal treatment of social phobia: systematic review and meta-analysis

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    Scott KM

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available John Canton, Kate M Scott, Paul GlueDepartment of Psychological Medicine, Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin, New ZealandAbstract: This article proposes a number of recommendations for the treatment of generalized social phobia, based on a systematic literature review and meta-analysis. An optimal treatment regimen would include a combination of medication and psychotherapy, along with an assertive clinical management program. For medications, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and dual serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are first-line choices based on their efficacy and tolerability profiles. The nonselective monoamine oxidase inhibitor, phenelzine, may be more potent than these two drug classes, but because of its food and drug interaction liabilities, its use should be restricted to patients not responding to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. There are other medication classes with demonstrated efficacy in social phobia (benzodiazepines, antipsychotics, alpha-2-delta ligands, but due to limited published clinical trial data and the potential for dependence and withdrawal issues with benzodiazepines, it is unclear how best to incorporate these drugs into treatment regimens. There are very few clinical trials on the use of combined medications. Cognitive behavior therapy appears to be more effective than other evidence-based psychological techniques, and its effects appear to be more enduring than those of pharmacotherapy. There is some evidence, albeit limited to certain drug classes, that the combination of medication and cognitive behavior therapy may be more effective than either strategy used alone. Generalized social phobia is a chronic disorder, and many patients will require long-term support and treatment.Keywords: social phobia, social anxiety disorder, psychotherapy, cognitive behavior therapy, antidepressant

  19. Competencia social y autoestima en adolescentes con fobia social (Social Competence and Self-Esteem in Adolescents with Social Phobia

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    Antonio Vallés Arándiga

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: El presente trabajo se enmarca en un proyecto para la detección e intervención temprana de adolescentes con fobia social en el contexto comunitario, que ha mostrado reiteradamente ser eficaz en la reducción y eliminación de este problema en la población de adolescentes que cursan estudios de Educación Secundaria Obligatoria (ESO y postobligatoria. Se presentan los resultados de la investigación realizada con alumnos de 3º de ESO con fobia social generalizada en varios Institutos de Educación Secundaria de Alicante. Según Olivares y García-López (1998, la eficacia terapéutica del paquete de tratamiento Intervención en Adolescentes con Fobia Social (IAFS mostró el incremento de la competencia social y la mejora de la autoestima en adolescentes que fueron diagnosticados con el referido trastorno, frente a un grupo de control pasivo (sin tratamiento y un grupo de control activo (tratamiento con un programa de estrategias de aprendizaje que incluía contenidos de exposición a situaciones sociales. Todos los tratamientos fueron desarrollados en los centros educativos. Los resultados obtenidos a favor del grupo de tratamiento IAFS en las variables de competencia social (informados por el tutor y por los padres y de autoestima se mantuvieron en el seguimiento luego de 6 meses. ABSTRACT:This study is part of a project for the detection and early intervention of adolescents with social phobia in the community context that it has shown repeatedly to be effective in the reduction and elimination of this problem in the population of teenagers who are studying in a Compulsory Secondary Education (ESO and post-compulsory. It shows the results of the research conducted with students of 3rd of ESO with social phobia, generalized in several Secondary Education Institutes (IES of Alicante. According to Olivares and Garcia-Lopez (1998, the therapeutic efficacy of the treatment package Intervention in Adolescents with Social Phobia (IAFS

  20. Examination of the Correlation Between Internet Addiction and Social Phobia in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yayan, Emriye Hilal; Arikan, Duygu; Saban, Fatma; Gürarslan Baş, Nazan; Özel Özcan, Özlem

    2017-09-01

    This was a descriptive and cross-sectional study conducted with adolescents to examine the correlation between Internet addiction and social phobia. The population of the study consisted of 24,260 students aged between 11 and 15 years. Sampling method was used from population with known number, and 1,450 students were calculated as sample of the study. In this study, 13.7% of the adolescents had an Internet addiction, and 4.2% spent more than 5 hr on the computer every day. There was a positive correlation between Internet addiction and social phobia. The form of time spent on Internet was examined in terms of addiction and social phobia; although Internet addiction was related to games, dating sites, and web surfing, social phobia was related to homework, games, and web surfing. It was hypothesized that adolescents with social phobia were Internet addicts, and the participants used the Internet to spend time rather than socialize.

  1. Clinical effects of buspirone in social phobia : A double-blind placebo-controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    denBoer, JA; Westenberg, HGM; Pian, KLH

    1997-01-01

    Background: The results of open pilot studies suggest that the serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) receptor agonist buspirone might be effective in social phobia. Method: In the present study, the efficacy of buspirone was investigated in patients with social phobia using a 12-week double-blind placebo-controlled

  2. The Treatment of Social Phobia in a Young Boy with Asperger's Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleismann, Kelly D.; Gillis, Jennifer M.

    2011-01-01

    Anxiety disorders, including social phobia, occur often in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD; Gillott, Furniss, & Walter, 2001; Leyfer et al., 2006; Simonoff et al., 2008); however, little is known about the conceptualization and treatment of social phobia in this population. The current study presents the case of "James," a 6-year-old…

  3. Social phobia : diagnosis and epidemiology, neurobiology and pharmacology, comorbidity and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunello, N; den Boer, JA; Judd, LL; Kasper, S; Kelsey, JE; Lader, M; Lecrubier, Y; Lepine, JP; Lydiard, RB; Mendlewicz, J; Montgomery, SA; Racagni, G; Stein, MB; Wittchen, HU

    2000-01-01

    Social phobia is a common disorder associated with significant psychosocial impairment, representing a substantial public health problem largely determined by the high prevalence, and the lifelong chronicity. Social phobia starts in early childhood or adolescence and is often comorbid with depressio

  4. Testing the Efficacy of Theoretically Derived Improvements in the Treatment of Social Phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapee, Ronald M.; Gaston, Jonathan E.; Abbott, Maree J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent theoretical models of social phobia suggest that targeting several specific cognitive factors in treatment should enhance treatment efficacy over that of more traditional skills-based treatment programs. In the current study, 195 people with social phobia were randomly allocated to 1 of 3 treatments: standard cognitive restructuring plus in…

  5. Differentiating among singular and comorbid obsessive-compulsive disorder and social phobia symptomology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudy, Brittany M; May, Anna C; Whiting, Sara E; Davis, Thompson E; Jenkins, Whitney S; Reuther, Erin T

    2014-01-01

    Social phobia is a frequent co-occurring diagnosis with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD); however, co-occurring OCD in those with social phobia is less common. Genetic, environmental, and cognitive traits are common risk factors for anxiety disorders broadly. It is plausible that shared variables related to OCD and/or social phobia could provide insight into the co-occurrence of these two disorders. The current study explored differences in fear of negative evaluation (FNE) and perfectionism among four groups: those with (1) elevated social phobia symptoms, (2) elevated OCD symptoms, (3) elevated symptoms of OCD and social phobia, and those who were (4) asymptomatic as a control group. A non-clinical sample of 196 participants completed several online questionnaires about social phobia and OCD symptomology. Results identified three cognitive variables (i.e., FNE, total perfectionism, and concern over mistakes) as differential variables in comorbid symptom presentation of OCD and social phobia. A fourth variable (i.e., doubts about actions) was identified as a potential dual risk factor, and four subsequent variables (i.e., parental criticism, personal standards, parental expectations, and organization) were not implicated in differential symptom presentation. Given the different rates of OCD and social phobia co-occurrence, identification of differentiating variables could aid in better understanding of potential risk factors, which may enhance preventative and therapeutic techniques. Study implications, limitations, and future recommendations are discussed.

  6. What Is the Core Fear in Social Phobia? A New Model to Facilitate Individualized Case Conceptualization and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscovitch, David A.

    2009-01-01

    What, exactly, do individuals with social phobia fear? Whereas fear of anxiety-related bodily sensations characterizes and defines panic disorder, is there a fundamental focus of anxiety that unifies individuals under the diagnostic category of social phobia? Current conceptualizations of social phobia suggest several possible candidates,…

  7. What Is the Core Fear in Social Phobia? A New Model to Facilitate Individualized Case Conceptualization and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscovitch, David A.

    2009-01-01

    What, exactly, do individuals with social phobia fear? Whereas fear of anxiety-related bodily sensations characterizes and defines panic disorder, is there a fundamental focus of anxiety that unifies individuals under the diagnostic category of social phobia? Current conceptualizations of social phobia suggest several possible candidates,…

  8. Over-representation of Myers Briggs Type Indicator introversion in social phobia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowsky, D S; Morter, S; Tancer, M

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to profile the personalities of patients with social phobia. Sixteen patients with social phobia were compared with a normative population of 55,971, and with 24 hospitalized Major Depressive Disorder inpatients, using the Myers Briggs Type Indicator. The Myers Briggs Type Indicator, a popular personality survey, divides individuals into eight categories: Extroverts versus Introverts, Sensors versus Intuitives, Thinkers versus Feelers, and Judgers versus Perceivers. Social phobia patients were significantly more often Introverts (93.7%) than were subjects in the normative population (46.2%). In addition, using continuous scores, the social phobia patients scored as significantly more introverted than did the patients with Major Depressive Disorder, who also scored as Introverted. Introversion is a major component of social phobia, and this observation may have both etiological and therapeutic significance.

  9. Social Phobia as a Predictor of Social Competence Perceived by Teenagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Bünyamin

    2016-01-01

    In this research, it was analyzed to what extent the variables of social avoidance, concern for being criticized and sense of individual worthlessness as sub-dimensions of social phobia predicted the perceived social competence levels of teenagers. The study group of this study included totally 648 students including 301 (46.5%) female and 347…

  10. The moderating role of avoidance behavior on anxiety over time: Is there a difference between social anxiety disorder and specific phobia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudaz, Myriam; Ledermann, Thomas; Margraf, Jürgen; Becker, Eni S.; Craske, Michelle G.

    2017-01-01

    Theories of anxiety disorders and phobias have ascribed a critical role to avoidance behavior in explaining the persistence of fear and anxiety, but knowledge about the role of avoidance behavior in the maintenance of anxiety in social anxiety disorder relative to specific phobia is lacking. This study examined the extent to which avoidance behavior moderates the relationship between general anxiety at baseline and 18 months later in women with a diagnosed social anxiety disorder (n = 91) and women with a diagnosed specific phobia (n = 130) at baseline. Circumscribed avoidance of social and specific situations were clinician-rated using the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule-Lifetime (ADIS-IV-L), and general anxiety was measured using the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). Moderated regression analyses revealed that (a) general anxiety at baseline predicted general anxiety at follow-up in both women with a specific phobia and women with a social anxiety disorder and (b) avoidance behavior moderated this relationship in women with a specific phobia but not in women with a social anxiety disorder. Specifically, high avoidance behavior was found to amplify the effect between general anxiety at baseline and follow-up in specific phobia. Reasons for the absence of a similar moderating effect of avoidance behavior within social anxiety disorder are discussed. PMID:28671977

  11. O tratamento farmacológico da fobia social Pharmacologic treatment of social phobia

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    Antonio Egidio Nardi

    1999-12-01

    . There are two specifiers for social phobia: the circumscribed, for those who just fear one situation; and generalized, for those who fear almost all social situations. The clinical features of social phobia are the anticipatory anxiety, the physical symptoms, the avoidance and the low self-esteem. Depending on diagnostic criteria, it is reported a lifetime prevalence ranging from 5% to 13% of the population resulting in different degrees of occupational and social limitations. The ideal treatment should use antidepressant drug and cognitive-behavior therapy. Beta-blocking drugs (atenolol, propranolol, monoamino oxidase inhibitors - MAOI (fenelzine, tanilcipromine, reversible monoamino oxidase-A inhibitors (moclobemide, brofaromine, benzodiazepines (clonazepam, bromazepam, alprazolam and serotonin selective recaptors inhibitors - SSRI (paroxetine, sertraline, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine and some other drugs (venlafaxine, nefazodone, gabapentin, clonidine have been shown efficacy in several studies with different methodology. The tricyclic antidepressants ( imipramine, clomipramine, valproic acid and buspirone have shown negative results. Paroxetine is the most studied substance in double-blind trials with good results and well tolerated. Nowadays the individuals with social phobia can have a efficacious treatment to get an assertive behavior in social situations.

  12. Modelling relationships between cognitive variables during and following public speaking in participants with social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapee, Ronald M; Abbott, Maree J

    2007-12-01

    Cognitive models of social phobia predict that several cognitive processes will mediate the relationship between trait levels of social anxiety and the extent of anxiety experienced in a specific social-evaluative situation. The current study aimed to provide a test of these relationships. Over 200 clinical participants with social phobia completed measures of their general social anxiety and a week later performed a brief impromptu speech. They completed a measure of state anxiety in response to the speech as well as questionnaires assessing several cognitive constructs including focus of perceived attention, perceived performance, and probability and cost of negative evaluation. A week later, they completed measures of negative rumination experienced over the week, as well as a measure of the recollection of their perceived performance. Path analysis provided support for a model in which the cognitive factors mediated between general social anxiety and the degree of anxiety experienced in response to the speech. A second model supported the theory that negative rumination mediated between characteristic social anxiety and negative bias in the recollection of performance.

  13. Emotional imagery in simple and social phobia: fear versus anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, D W; Vrana, S R; Melamed, B G; Cuthbert, B N; Lang, P J

    1993-05-01

    In a first study, phobic volunteer subjects (N = 60) reacted psychophysiologically with greater vigor to imagery of their own phobic content than to other fearful or nonaffective images. Imagery heart rate responses were largest in subjects with multiple phobias. For simple (dental) phobics, cardiac reactivity was positively correlated with reports of imagery vividness and concordant with reports of affective distress; these relationships were not observed for social (speech) phobics. In a second study, these phobic volunteers were shown to be similar on most measures to an outpatient clinically phobic sample. In an analysis of the combined samples, fearful and socially anxious subtypes were defined by questionnaires. Only the fearful subtype showed a significant covariation among physiological responses, imagery vividness, and severity of phobic disorder. This fearful-anxious distinction seems to cut across diagnostic categories, providing a heuristic perspective from which to view anxiety disorders.

  14. Quality of Life in College Students with and without Social Phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaedi, Gholam Hossein; Tavoli, Azadeh; Bakhtiari, Maryam; Melyani, Mahdieh; Sahragard, Mahdi

    2010-01-01

    Prior studies demonstrating quality of life impairment in phobia and anxiety disorders have relied upon epidemiological samples or clinical data. Using the same quality of life scale, the Short Form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36), in Iranian college students allowed us to study the impact of social phobia (SP) on quality of life among the college…

  15. Fobia social em uma amostra de adolescentes Social phobia in a sample of adolescents

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    Gustavo J. Fonseca D'El Rey

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo relata a prevalência e o impacto na escolaridade da fobia social em uma amostra de adolescentes da cidade de São Paulo, SP, Brasil. O Inventário de Fobia Social (SPIN foi administrado em 116 estudantes adolescentes de 5ª, 6ª, 7ª e 8ª séries de ambos os sexos. A prevalência da fobia social foi de 7,8% na amostra de adolescentes, com maior incidência entre estudantes do sexo feminino, com idade entre 12 e 15. O impacto negativo na escolaridade foi grande, aproximadamente 89% dos adolescentes com fobia social repetiram o ano na escola ao menos uma vez.This study reports the prevalence and the impact in the education of social phobia in a sample of adolescents of the city of São Paulo, SP, Brazil. The Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN was administrated to 116 students of 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th grades of both sexes. The prevalence of the social phobia was 7.8% in the sample of adolescents, with higher incidence among female students, between 12 and 15 years old. The negative impact on the education was great, approximately 89% of the adolescents with social phobia repeated the year in the school at least one time.

  16. Combined Case of Blood-Injury-Injection Phobia and Social Phobia: Behavior Therapy Management and Effectiveness through Tilt Test

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    Fotini Ferenidou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of behavior therapy based mainly on real-life exposure situations as well as applied tension was examined for a combined case of blood-injury-injection (BII phobia and social anxiety disorder. Treatment involved 28 behavior therapy sessions, while applied tension technique was also described and practiced. The specific contribution of social skills techniques, fantasy, and real-life situations exposure was examined in a single case design. The subject was a 39-year-old male with anxiety symptoms when confronting an audience, as well as symptoms of the autonomic nervous system (bradycardia and syncope, which were better explained by BII. All self-report measures regarding fear, social phobia, and anxiety were reduced after behavior therapy and remained maintained at followup, while BII decreased further after applied tension techniques. The contribution of behavior therapy to the overall outcome of the case is considered significant for many reasons that are discussed in the pape.

  17. [Self-esteem: a comparison study between eating disorders and social phobia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiber, R; Vera, L; Mirabel-Sarron, C; Guelfi, J-D

    2003-01-01

    Eating disorder patients evidenced very often a low self-esteem. Self-esteem in eating disorder patients is excessively based on body dissatisfaction. In eating disorders there seems to be a link between body image dissatisfaction and social anxiety. We hypothesised: self-esteem would be as low in eating disorder patients as in social phobia patients; self-esteem would be lower in eating disorder patients with social phobia than in patients with social phobia alone; self-esteem would be lower in eating disorder patients with depressive cognitions than in social phobia patients with depressive cognitions; self-esteem could have different characteristics in the two disorders; self-esteem would be as low in anorexia as in bulimia; 103 eating disorder patients (33 restrictive anorectics, 34 anorectics-bulimics, 36 bulimics) and 26 social phobia patients diagnosed according to DSM IV and ICD-10 criteria have been investigated by the Self-Esteem Inventory of Coopersmith, the Assertiveness Schedule of Rathus, the Fear Survey Schedule of Wolpe (FSS III) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Patients were free of medication and presented no episode of major depression according to DSM IV criteria. Evaluations took place before any psychotherapy. Self-esteem in eating disorder patients is reduced at the same level as in social phobia patients; 86.1% of the total sample and 84.5% of the eating disorder patients have a very low self-esteem (score 33 in the SEI). Eating disorder patients have significantly higher scores in the Social (p=0.016) and Professional (p=0.0225) sub-scales of the SEI than social phobia patients. Eating disorder patients show higher scores on the Assertiveness Schedule of Rathus (p=0.0013) than social phobia patients. Eating disorder patients disclose higher scores on the BDI (p=0.0003) but eating disorder patients with depressive cognitions do not differ from social phobia patients with depressive cognitions in the level of self-esteem. The FSS III

  18. Self-disclosure, emotional expression and intimacy within romantic relationships of people with social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrevohn, Roslyn M; Rapee, Ronald M

    2009-12-01

    The current study examined aspects of communication and intimacy between people with social phobia and their romantic partners. Forty-eight individuals with social phobia and 58 community controls completed a series of questionnaires to measure self-disclosure, emotional expression and levels of intimacy within their romantic relationships. Participants with social phobia reported less emotional expression, self-disclosure and intimacy than controls, even after controlling for a diagnosis of mood disorder. The group differences did not differ significantly by gender. A continuous measure of social anxiety also correlated significantly with the three relationship measures and these associations held for emotional expression and self-disclosure after controlling for levels of dysphoria. People with social phobia report reduced quality within their romantic relationships, which may have implications for impairment, social support and ultimately maintenance of the disorder.

  19. Assessment of Childhood Social Phobia: Construct, Convergent and Discriminative Validity of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children (SPAI-C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beidel, Deborah C.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The convergent validity of the SPAI-C was studied by comparing scores to daily diary ratings of social distress for 10 elementary school children with social phobia, 3 of whom had overanxious disorder, and 10 controls. Results support the ability of the SPAI-C to distinguish social phobic children. (SLD)

  20. Cortisol levels in response to starting school in children at increased risk for social phobia

    OpenAIRE

    Russ, Stephanie Jane; Herbert, J.; Cooper, Peter; Gunnar, M. R.; Goodyear, I.; Croudace, T.; Murray, Lynne

    2012-01-01

    Background: Research on depression has identified hyperactivity of the HPA axis as a\\ud potential contributory factor to the intergenerational transmission of affective symptoms. However,\\ud this has not yet been examined in the context of social phobia. The current study compared HPA axis\\ud activity in response to a universal social stressor (starting school) in children of 2 groups of women:\\ud one with social phobia and one with no history of anxiety (comparison group). To determine speci...

  1. The Effectiveness of Acceptance and Commitment Group Therapy in Social Phobia of Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Pourfaraj Omran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acceptance and commitment therapy is a third generation behavior therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment group therapy in social phobia of students. Methods: This investigation is an experimental study. Twenty students with social phobia were selected based on clinical interview and social phobia and anxiety inventory from Shomal University of Amol and were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. Acceptance and commitment group therapy was administered to the experimental group in ten 90- minute sessions and control group did not receive any therapy. Pretest, posttest and one-month fallow up scores of the two groups were analyzed by multiple analyses of variance and independent t-test.Results: The result of analyses showed that in final of treatment social anxiety score of experimental group significantly decreased (P0.05.Conclusion: Acceptance and commitment group therapy is effective in the treatment of social phobia of students.

  2. High social phobia frequency and related disability in patients with acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bez, Yasin; Yesilova, Yavuz; Kaya, Mehmet Cemal; Sir, Aytekin

    2011-01-01

    Acne is an easily recognizable abnormality which may cause some adverse psychosocial consequences. We aimed to determine the social phobia frequency, social anxiety level, and disease related disability in a group of acne vulgaris patients. One-hundred and forty acne vulgaris patients and 98 healthy control subjects were included in the study. Acne severity was determined by the Global Acne Grading System (GAGS). A psychiatrist interviewed each participant and the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS) was administered to all participants, who also completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS). Social phobia was diagnosed in 45.7% of acne vulgaris patients and in 18.4% of control subjects. Acne vulgaris patients demonstrated higher performance avoidance and total avoidance scores in LSAS than controls. Acne vulgaris patients without social phobia had higher scores in HADS and LSAS than the acne vulgaris patients with social phobia. They were more disabled in their occupational, social, and familial lives. Social phobia diagnosis predicted disability at work, whereas education level predicted the disability in family life of acne vulgaris patients. Social phobia seems to be a common psychiatric comorbidity which may give rise to some additional disability among acne vulgaris patients.

  3. Social phobia: the Anxiety Disorders Associated of America helps raise the veil of ignorance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, J

    1991-11-01

    Social phobias affect some 2.4 million American adults, and more than 5 million can expect to develop a social phobia during their lifetime. Despite their prevalence, social phobias have been virtually ignored until this past decade. The Anxiety Disorders Association of America (ADAA) was founded in 1980 to promote awareness among professionals and the public of anxiety disorders. This paper outlines the objectives of ADAA and its programs, including the Self-Help Group Network, helpful publications, and its partnership with psychiatrists and patients. The benefits of self-help programs to persons with social phobias are illustrated, including the role played by the clinician in evaluation and referral. The ADAA program for the 1990s focuses on the education of all health professionals and the creation of awareness of economic costs of undiagnosed anxiety disorders.

  4. Social phobia and self-concept: a correlational study with physical activity practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christi Noriko Sonoo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze social phobia in teenagers aged 14 to 20 years and its possiblerelationship with regular practice of physical activity and their self-concept. This study enrolled 191 students from privateand public schools and the measurement instruments used were a test of social phobia, a test of self-concept and a physicalactivity questionnaire. The results indicate that students from private schools are shyer than students from public schools. Inrelation to self-concept, there were significant differences in security factor for boys and moral factor for girls. This indicatesthat boys are more stable, brave and secure, while girls are more influenced by moral and ethical rules. These resultsdemonstrate that no relationship was detected between social phobia and physical activity, but it was possible to observea relationship between social phobia and some of the self-concept factors, and a relationship between physical activityand some of the self-concept factors. It is therefore concluded that the negative influence of high levels of social phobia onthe receptivity and security factors of men and women suggests a need for further studies in the area, which could help inthe prevention and treatment of social phobia, which could worsen over the years and compromise these young people’sability to socialize.

  5. Behavioral treatment of psychogenic vomiting in the context of social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stravynski, A

    1983-07-01

    A case of psychogenic vomiting in the context of social phobia was treated by a combination of exposure in vivo, social skills training, and cognitive modification. The intervention was not directly aimed at the vomiting, but at aspects of the patient's behavior hypothesized to be instrumental in maintaining it; deficits in prosocial behaviors and associated anxiety. Change was assessed on the basis of patient's records of daily frequency of: vomiting; performance of treated behaviors; and associated anxiety within a single-case multiple baseline design. Change occurred only with the introduction of treatment and not before it, ruling out effects of time or mere contact. Clinically, the vomiting was virtually eliminated after 7 weeks, and the anxiety was substantially reduced in most previously feared (and avoided) social situations; except for a 2-week depressive spell, this outcome has been maintained for an available 2-year follow-up. A general improvement in the patient's personal, social, and vocational life has also occurred.

  6. The dutch social interaction anxiety scale and the social phobia scale: reliability, validity, and clinical utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beurs, Edwin; Tielen, Deirdre; Wollmann, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The social interaction anxiety scale (SIAS) and the social phobia scale (SPS) assess anxiety in social interactions and fear of scrutiny by others. This study examines the psychometric properties of the Dutch versions of the SIAS and SPS using data from a large group of patients with social phobia and a community-based sample. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the SIAS is unidimensional, whereas the SPS is comprised of three subscales. The internal consistency of the scales and subscales was good. The concurrent and discriminant validity was supported and the scales were well able to discriminate between patients and community-based respondents. Cut-off values with excellent sensitivity and specificity are presented. Of all self-report measures included, the SPS was the most sensitive for treatment effects. Normative data are provided which can be used to assess whether clinically significant change has occurred in individual patients.

  7. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Combined Social Phobia Scale and Social Interaction Anxiety Scale: Support for a Bifactor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Rapson; Watson, Shaun D.

    2017-01-01

    For the Social Phobia Scale (SPS) and the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS) together, this study examined support for a bifactor model, and also the internal consistency reliability and external validity of the factors in this model. Participants (N = 526) were adults from the general community who completed the SPS and SIAS. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of their ratings indicated good support for the bifactor model. For this model, the loadings for all but six items were higher on the general factor than the specific factors. The three positively worded items had negligible loadings on the general factor. The general factor explained most of the common variance in the SPS and SIAS, and demonstrated good model-based internal consistency reliability (omega hierarchical) and a strong association with fear of negative evaluation and extraversion. The practical implications of the findings for the utilization of the SPS and SIAS, and the theoretical and clinical implications for social anxiety are discussed. PMID:28210232

  8. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Combined Social Phobia Scale and Social Interaction Anxiety Scale: Support for a Bifactor Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Rapson; Watson, Shaun D

    2017-01-01

    For the Social Phobia Scale (SPS) and the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS) together, this study examined support for a bifactor model, and also the internal consistency reliability and external validity of the factors in this model. Participants (N = 526) were adults from the general community who completed the SPS and SIAS. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of their ratings indicated good support for the bifactor model. For this model, the loadings for all but six items were higher on the general factor than the specific factors. The three positively worded items had negligible loadings on the general factor. The general factor explained most of the common variance in the SPS and SIAS, and demonstrated good model-based internal consistency reliability (omega hierarchical) and a strong association with fear of negative evaluation and extraversion. The practical implications of the findings for the utilization of the SPS and SIAS, and the theoretical and clinical implications for social anxiety are discussed.

  9. [Prevalence of Alcohol Abuse and Dependence in Adults With Social Phobia in Medellin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Salas, Gabriel Felipe; Bareño, José; Berbesi Fernández, Dedsy Yajaira; Gaviria, Silvia L

    2014-01-01

    Having a social phobia may lead to consuming alcohol for greater social assertiveness, running the risk of leading to an abuse disorder or alcohol dependence. The aim of the study was to estimate prevalence of pathological comorbidity between social phobia and alcohol consumption in adults of the city of Medellin, and the behavior of comorbidity by gender, age, presence of a father figure in childhood, and education. Secondary analysis of the database of the first Mental Health Population Survey conducted in the city of Medellin in 2011 and 2012 based on the methodology of the World Mental Health Survey guidelines and coordinated by WHO-HARVARD. The lifetime prevalence of abuse and dependence in people with social phobia was 24.1% and 11.2%, respectively. For people with social phobia the prevalence was 13% for abuse and 4.4% for dependence (OR=2.11 for abuse, OR=2.46 for dependence). Annual prevalence of people with social phobia who abused or were dependent on alcohol was 7.8% and 5.9%, respectively, compared to those who do not suffer from this disorder, with a prevalence of 3.4% and 1.7%, respectively (OR=2.39 for abuse and OR=3.57 for dependence). There was significant correlation in the annual and lifetime prevalence between social phobia and the pathological consumption of alcohol. Statistically significant relationships were found for the variables associated with social phobia, however, more work is needed to confirm or refute these associations. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  10. Comorbidity of schizophrenia and social phobia – impact on quality of life, hope, and personality traits: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vrbova K

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Kristyna Vrbova,1 Jan Prasko,1 Marie Ociskova,1 Michaela Holubova1,2 1Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc, University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic; 2Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Liberec, Liberec, Czech Republic Objective: The purpose of the study was to explore whether the comorbidity of social phobia affects symptoms severity, positive and negative symptoms, self-stigma, hope, and quality of life in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study in which all participants completed the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness (ISMI scale, Adult Dispositional Hope Scale (ADHS, Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS, Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire (Q-LES-Q, Temperament and Character Inventory – Revised (TCI-R, and the demographic questionnaire. The disorder severity was assessed both by a psychiatrist (Clinical Global Impression Severity – the objective version [objCGI-S] scale and by the patients (Clinical Global Impression Severity – the subjective version [subjCGI-S] scale. The patients were in a stabilized state that did not require changes in the treatment. Diagnosis of schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or delusional disorder was determined according to the International Classification of Diseases 10th Revision (ICD-10 research criteria. A structured interview by Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview was used to confirm the diagnosis. Results: The study included 61 patients of both genders. Clinically, the patients with comorbid social phobia had the earlier onset of the illness, more severe current psychopathology, more intense anxiety (general and social, and higher severity of depressive symptoms. The patients with comorbid social phobia showed the significantly lower quality

  11. Somatic symptoms in social phobia: a treatment method based on rational emotive therapy and paradoxical interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mersch, P P; Hildebrand, M; Lavy, E H; Wessel, I; van Hout, W J

    1992-09-01

    Social phobia is often accompanied by somatic symptoms such as trembling, blushing, and sweating. In cases where these symptoms are predominant and, rather than the social situation, represent the feared stimulus, their unpredictable occurrence may reduce the effectiveness of an otherwise successful treatment, such as exposure in vivo. In this study, a paradoxical treatment approach, combined with rational emotive therapy, is employed with three social phobic patients with fears of blushing, trembling, and sweating, respectively. Results indicate that a paradoxical treatment may be an effective strategy in reducing somatic symptoms in social phobia.

  12. Have we met before? Neural correlates of emotional learning in women with social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laeger, Inga; Keuper, Kati; Heitmann, Carina; Kugel, Harald; Dobel, Christian; Eden, Annuschka; Arolt, Volker; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Dannlowski, Udo; Zwanzger, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Altered memory processes are thought to be a key mechanism in the etiology of anxiety disorders, but little is known about the neural correlates of fear learning and memory biases in patients with social phobia. The present study therefore examined whether patients with social phobia exhibit different patterns of neural activation when confronted with recently acquired emotional stimuli. Patients with social phobia and a group of healthy controls learned to associate pseudonames with pictures of persons displaying either a fearful or a neutral expression. The next day, participants read the pseudonames in the magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Afterwards, 2 memory tests were carried out. We enrolled 21 patients and 21 controls in our study. There were no group differences for learning performance, and results of the memory tests were mixed. On a neural level, patients showed weaker amygdala activation than controls for the contrast of names previously associated with fearful versus neutral faces. Social phobia severity was negatively related to amygdala activation. Moreover, a detailed psychophysiological interaction analysis revealed an inverse correlation between disorder severity and frontolimbic connectivity for the emotional > neutral pseudonames contrast. Our sample included only women. Our results support the theory of a disturbed cortico limbic interplay, even for recently learned emotional stimuli. We discuss the findings with regard to the vigilance-avoidance theory and contrast them to results indicating an oversensitive limbic system in patients with social phobia.

  13. ¿Trastorno de personalidad por evitación o fobia social generalizada? Un estudio piloto con población adolescente española (Personality Disorder by Avoidance or Generalized Social Phobia? A Pilot Study with Spanish Teenager Population

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    Pablo J. Olivares-Olivares

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumen Este estudio planteó como objetivo analizar en qué medida se presentan diferencias cualitativas y cuantitativas entre adolescentes con diagnóstico de Fobia social generalizada y los que cumplen los criterios para el diagnóstico de fobia social generalizada más Trastorno de personalidad por evitación, de acuerdo a los requisitos del Manual Diagnóstico y Estadístico de los Trastornos Mentales (DSM-IV-TR. La muestra estuvo integrada por 29 adolescentes españoles con una edad media de 15.22 años (DT = 1.08; rango = 14-17, en su mayoría del género femenino (66.7%. Los resultados muestran diferencias estadísticamente significativas solo en una de las nueve variables cuantitativas continuas medidas: el número de situaciones sociales temidas/evitadas. El diseño del estudio realizado fue correlacional y transversal. No se hallaron diferencias intergrupo en cuanto a comorbilidad excepto en la variable Trastorno obsesivo-compulsivo. Los resultados obtenidos avalan la posición que el trastorno de personalidad por evitación no debería ser considerado una entidad diagnóstica independiente, sino que debería formar parte del gradiente Ansiedad social situándose en el extremo de mayor gravedad del continuo. Abstract The objective of this study was to analyze to what extent are qualitative and quantitative differences among teenager with Generalized Social Phobia diagnosis and those, which meet the criteria for the diagnosis of generalized social phobia plus Personality Disorder by Avoidance, in accordance with the requirements of the Diagnostic, and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders DSM-IV-TR. The sample consisted of 29 Spanish teenagers with an average age of 15.22 (TD = 1.08; range = 14-17, most of them were female (66.7%. The results show statistically significant differences in only one of the nine quantitative variables continuous measures: the number of social situations Feared/Avoided. The design of the study was

  14. Virtual reality exposure using three-dimensional images for the treatment of social phobia

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    Cristiane M. Gebara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To test a potential treatment for social phobia, which provides exposure to phobia-inducing situations via computer-generated, three-dimensional images, using an open clinical trial design.Methods:Twenty-one patients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of social phobia took part in the trial. Treatment consisted of up to 12 sessions of exposure to relevant images, each session lasting 50 minutes.Results:Improvements in social anxiety were seen in all scales and instruments used, including at follow-up 6 months after the end of treatment. The average number of sessions was seven, as the participants habituated rapidly to the process. Only one participant dropped out.Conclusion:This study provides evidence that exposure to computer-generated three-dimensional images is relatively inexpensive, leads to greater treatment adherence, and can reduce social anxiety. Further studies are needed to corroborate these findings.

  15. [Symptoms of social phobia and their relationship to interpersonal characteristics in a sample of German medical students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldauf, Matthias; Thomas, Andrea; Strauß, Bernhard

    2014-02-01

    The study aimed to detect the frequency of social phobia symptoms in a sample of German medical students and to compare students with and without these symptoms related to interpersonal characteristics. 525 students filled out a battery of self-report questionnaires consisting of the LSAS (Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale), the SPAI (Social Phobia Anxiety Inventory), the IIP-32 (Inventar of interpersonal problems) and the IIM (Inventar of interpersonal motives). Relevant social phobia symptoms were found in 12.2%. Students with symptoms of social phobia differed significantly in subscales of the IIP and the IIM. Students with symptoms of social phobia also had higher scores for interpersonal problems especially related to the main issue of being too "socially avoidant".

  16. Somatic symptoms in social phobia : A treatment method based on rational emotive therapy and paradoxical interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MERSCH, PPA; HILDEBRAND, M; LAVY, EH; WESSEL, Ineke; VANHOUT, WJPJ

    1992-01-01

    Social phobia is often accompanied by somatic symptoms such as trembling, blushing, and sweating. In cases where these symptoms are predominant and, rather than the social situation, represent the feared stimulus, their unpredictable occurrence may reduce the effectiveness of an otherwise successful

  17. Facial Emotion Recognition in Children with High Functioning Autism and Children with Social Phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Nina; Beidel, Deborah C.; Sarver, Dustin E.; Sims, Valerie

    2012-01-01

    Recognizing facial affect is essential for effective social functioning. This study examines emotion recognition abilities in children aged 7-13 years with High Functioning Autism (HFA = 19), Social Phobia (SP = 17), or typical development (TD = 21). Findings indicate that all children identified certain emotions more quickly (e.g., happy [less…

  18. Facial Emotion Recognition in Children with High Functioning Autism and Children with Social Phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Nina; Beidel, Deborah C.; Sarver, Dustin E.; Sims, Valerie

    2012-01-01

    Recognizing facial affect is essential for effective social functioning. This study examines emotion recognition abilities in children aged 7-13 years with High Functioning Autism (HFA = 19), Social Phobia (SP = 17), or typical development (TD = 21). Findings indicate that all children identified certain emotions more quickly (e.g., happy [less…

  19. Social Skills Deficits and Vocal Characteristics of Children with Social Phobia or Asperger's Disorder: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfstein, Lindsay A.; Beidel, Deborah C.; Sims, Valerie K.; Finnell, Laura Rendon

    2011-01-01

    Social skills deficits are commonly reported among children with social phobia (SP) and children with Asperger's Disorder (AD); however, a lack of direct comparison makes it unclear whether these groups, both of which endorse the presence of social anxiety, have similar or unique skills deficits. In this investigation, the social behaviors of…

  20. Virtual reality therapy versus cognitive behavior therapy for social phobia: a preliminary controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, E; Bouchard, S; Légeron, P; Roy, S; Lauer, F; Chemin, I; Nugues, P

    2005-02-01

    Social phobia is one of the most frequent mental disorders and is accessible to two forms of scientifically validated treatments: anti-depressant drugs and cognitive behavior therapies (CBT). In this last case, graded exposure to feared social situations is one of the fundamental therapeutic ingredients. Virtual reality technologies are an interesting alternative to the standard exposure in social phobia, especially since studies have shown its usefulness for the fear of public speaking. This paper reports a preliminary study in which a virtual reality therapy (VRT), based on exposure to virtual environments, was used to treat social phobia. The sample consisted of 36 participants diagnosed with social phobia assigned to either VRT or a group-CBT (control condition). The virtual environments used in the treatment recreate four situations dealing with social anxiety: performance, intimacy, scrutiny, and assertiveness. With the help of the therapist, the patient learns adapted cognitions and behaviors in order to reduce anxiety in the corresponding real situations. Both treatments lasted 12 weeks, and sessions were delivered according to a treatment manual. Results showed statistically and clinically significant improvement in both conditions. The effect-sizes comparing the efficacy of VRT to the control traditional group-CBT revealed that the differences between the two treatments are trivial.

  1. Tratamento cognitivo-comportamental de grupo na fobia social: resultados de 12 semanas Cognitive-behavioral group treatment in social phobia: 12-week outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo J. Fonseca D'El Rey

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: A fobia social é um dos transtornos mentais mais prevalentes na população geral. A terapia cognitivo-comportamental é o modelo não-farmacológico mais estudado nesse transtorno de ansiedade. OBJETIVOS: Este estudo teve como objetivo verificar a efetividade da terapia cognitivo-comportamental de grupo em pacientes com fobia social generalizada. MÉTODOS: Trinta e um pacientes com diagnóstico de fobia social generalizada foram randomicamente distribuídos em dois grupos: um de terapia cognitivo-comportamental de grupo - TCCG (n = 15 e um grupo-controle na Lista de Espera - LE (n = 16. Os pacientes preencheram quatro escalas de avaliação (Inventário de Fobia Social, Escala de Medo de Avaliação Negativa, Inventário de Ansiedade Beck e Escala de Impressão Clínica Global na semana 1 de tratamento e na semana 12. RESULTADOS: Em todas as medidas de avaliações, ao final de 12 semanas, os pacientes que receberam TCCG apresentaram melhoras superiores aos da LE. CONCLUSÕES: Neste ensaio clínico randomizado, simples-cego, a terapia cognitivo-comportamental de grupo foi superior à Lista de Espera no tratamento da fobia social generalizada.BACKGROUND: Social phobia is a widespread mental disorder in the general population. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is the most thoroughly studied nonpharmacologic approach in this anxiety disorder. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral group therapy in patients with generalized social phobia. METHODS: Thirty one patients with diagnosis of generalized social phobia were randomly allocated in two groups. One group of cognitive-behavioral group therapy - CBGT (n = 15 and one Waiting List control group - WL (n = 16. The patients completed four rating scales (Social Phobia Inventory, Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale, Beck Anxiety Inventory and Clinical Global Impression Scale in the weeks 1 and 12. RESULTS: In all rating scales in the week 12 of

  2. Specific and social fears in children and adolescents: separating normative fears from problem indicators and phobias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporte, Paola P; Pan, Pedro M; Hoffmann, Mauricio S; Wakschlag, Lauren S; Rohde, Luis A; Miguel, Euripedes C; Pine, Daniel S; Manfro, Gisele G; Salum, Giovanni A

    2017-01-01

    To distinguish normative fears from problematic fears and phobias. We investigated 2,512 children and adolescents from a large community school-based study, the High Risk Study for Psychiatric Disorders. Parent reports of 18 fears and psychiatric diagnosis were investigated. We used two analytical approaches: confirmatory factor analysis (CFA)/item response theory (IRT) and nonparametric receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. According to IRT and ROC analyses, social fears are more likely to indicate problems and phobias than specific fears. Most specific fears were normative when mild; all specific fears indicate problems when pervasive. In addition, the situational fear of toilets and people who look unusual were highly indicative of specific phobia. Among social fears, those not restricted to performance and fear of writing in front of others indicate problems when mild. All social fears indicate problems and are highly indicative of social phobia when pervasive. These preliminary findings provide guidance for clinicians and researchers to determine the boundaries that separate normative fears from problem indicators in children and adolescents, and indicate a differential severity threshold for specific and social fears.

  3. Social Phobia and Subtypes in the National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement: Prevalence, Correlates, and Comorbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstein, Marcy; He, Jian-Ping; Kattan, Gabriela; Albano, Anne Marie; Avenevoli, Shelli; Merikangas, Kathleen R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Social phobia typically develops during the adolescent years, yet no nationally representative studies in the United States have examined the rates and features of this condition among youth in this age range. The objectives of this investigation were to: (1) present the lifetime prevalence, sociodemographic and clinical correlates, and…

  4. SOCIAL PHOBIA AND PERSONALITY-DISORDER - SEVERITY OF COMPLAINT AND TREATMENT EFFECTIVENESS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MERSCH, PPA; JANSEN, MA; ARNTZ, A

    1995-01-01

    Thirty-four patients meeting the DSM-III-R criteria for social phobia participated in a study on the relationship between personality disorder, symptom pattern, and treatment outcome. Eight patients (23.5%) were diagnosed with a personality disorder; 26 patients did not receive an Axis II diagnosis.

  5. Social Phobia and Subtypes in the National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement: Prevalence, Correlates, and Comorbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstein, Marcy; He, Jian-Ping; Kattan, Gabriela; Albano, Anne Marie; Avenevoli, Shelli; Merikangas, Kathleen R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Social phobia typically develops during the adolescent years, yet no nationally representative studies in the United States have examined the rates and features of this condition among youth in this age range. The objectives of this investigation were to: (1) present the lifetime prevalence, sociodemographic and clinical correlates, and…

  6. Evidence Based Clinical Assessment of Child and Adolescent Social Phobia: A Critical Review of Rating Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulbure, Bogdan T.; Szentagotai, Aurora; Dobrean, Anca; David, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Investigating the empirical support of various assessment instruments, the evidence based assessment approach expands the scientific basis of psychotherapy. Starting from Hunsley and Mash's evaluative framework, we critically reviewed the rating scales designed to measure social anxiety or phobia in youth. Thirteen of the most researched social…

  7. Evaluation of Children with Selective Mutism and Social Phobia: A Comparison of Psychological and Psychophysiological Arousal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Brennan J.; Bunnell, Brian E.; Beidel, Deborah C.

    2012-01-01

    Although children with social phobia (SP) and selective mutism (SM) present similarly in a clinical setting, it remains unclear whether children with SM are unable to speak due to overwhelming anxiety, or whether withholding speech functions as an avoidance mechanism. A total of 35 children (ages 5-12 years) with either SM (n = 10), SP (n = 11),…

  8. Processing bias in children with separation anxiety disorder, social phobia and generalised anxiety disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kindt, M.; Bögels, S.M.; Morren, M.

    2003-01-01

    The present study examined processing bias in children suffering from anxiety disorders. Processing bias was assessed using of the emotional Stroop task in clinically referred children with separation anxiety disorder (SAD), social phobia (SP), and/or generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) and normal co

  9. [SOPHO-NET - a research network on psychotherapy for social phobia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichsenring, Falk; Salzer, Simone; Beutel, Manfred E; von Consbruch, Katrin; Herpertz, Stephan; Hiller, Wolfgang; Hoyer, Jürgen; Hüsing, Johannes; Irle, Eva; Joraschky, Peter; Konnopka, Alexander; König, Hans-Helmut; de Liz, Therese; Nolting, Björn; Pöhlmann, Karin; Ruhleder, Mirjana; Schauenburg, Henning; Stangier, Ulrich; Strauss, Bernhard; Subic-Wrana, Claudia; Vormfelde, Stefan V; Weniger, Godehard; Willutzki, Ulrike; Wiltink, Jörg; Leibing, Eric

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the Social Phobia Psychotherapy Research Network (SOPHO-NET). SOPHO-NET is among the five research networks on psychotherapy funded by "Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung". The research program encompasses a coordinated group of studies of social phobia. In the central project (Study A), a multi-center randomized controlled trial, refined models of manualized cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and manualized short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP) are compared in the treatment of social phobia. A sample of n=512 outpatients will be randomized to either CBT, STPP or wait list. For quality assurance and treatment integrity, a specific project has been established (Project Q). Study A is complemented by four interrelated projects focusing on attachment style (Study B1), cost-effectiveness (Study B2), polymorphisms in the serotonin transporter gene (Study C1) and on structural and functional deviations of hippocampus and amygdala (Study C2). Thus, the SOPHO-NET program allows for a highly interdisciplinary research of psychotherapy in social phobia.

  10. Specific fears and phobias in the general population: results from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study (NEMESIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depla, Marja F I A; ten Have, Margreet L; van Balkom, Anton J L M; de Graaf, Ron

    2008-03-01

    To examine the prevalence rate, impairment, comorbidity, course of illness and determinants of eight specific phobia variants: animals (animal subtype); heights, water, storms (natural environment subtype); flying, enclosed spaces, being alone (situational subtype); and blood/injury (blood/injury subtype). Data were obtained from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study, a prospective study in the Dutch general population aged 18-65 (N = 7,076). The most prevalent condition was specific phobia with a fear of heights (4.9%). On all parameters except duration, specific phobia with a fear of being alone emerged as the most severe condition. Phobias with fear of enclosed spaces and phobias with fear of blood showed a slightly greater likelihood of impairment, comorbidity and personality problems than phobias with fear of animals, heights, water or storms. The situational and blood/injury phobia subtypes appear to be a more significant index for impairments and for comorbid psychiatric disorders than the animal and natural environment phobia subtypes.

  11. Resistência ao tratamento nos transtornos de ansiedade: fobia social, transtorno de ansiedade generalizada e transtorno do pânico Treatment-resistant anxiety disorders: social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder and panic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Bezerra de Menezes

    2007-10-01

    , and finally, some strategies to deal with anxiety disorders (including social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder and panic disorder that do not respond to standard therapeutic interventions. CONCLUSION: Treatment resistance in anxiety disorders remains a challenge to clinical practice going from non standardized concepts of response and resistance to a paucity of controlled studies concerning therapeutic strategies.

  12. Self-help cognitive-behavioral therapy with minimal therapist contact for social phobia: a controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowitz, Jonathan S; Moore, Elizabeth L; Braddock, Autumn E; Harrington, Diana L

    2009-03-01

    Due to treatment accessibility and cost issues, interest in self-help programs (e.g., bibliotherapy, telehealth) for common psychological disorders is growing. Research supporting the efficacy of such a program for social anxiety, however, is limited. The present study examined the efficacy of an 8-week self-directed cognitive behavioral treatment with minimal therapist involvement for social phobia based on a widely available self-help book. Twenty-one adults with social phobia initially received either treatment (i.e. assigned readings in the workbook with limited therapist contact) or were wait-listed. Wait-listed patients eventually received the same self-directed treatment. Results revealed that the self-help/minimal therapist contact treatment was superior to wait-list on most outcome measures. Across the entire sample, reductions in social anxiety, global severity, general anxiety, and depression were observed at posttest and 3-month follow-up. These findings provide preliminary support for using this self-help workbook for individuals with mild to moderate social anxiety in conjunction with infrequent therapist visits to reinforce the treatment principles. Study limitations and future directions are discussed.

  13. Research of Social Phobia%社交恐怖症的研究综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨芳芳

    2012-01-01

    社交恐怖症非常普通,会带来严重后果。社交恐怖症是以明显紧张和避免一个或多个社交或表演场合为特征的焦虑障碍。本篇文章详细阐述此疾病的病因学与临床表现、分类与诊断等方面的研究。%Social phobia is very common, it will bring serious consequences. Social phobia is obvious tension and to avoid one or more social or performance situations characterized by anxiety disorders. This article elaborates the study of the etiology of this disease with clinical manifestations, classification and diagnosis, etc.

  14. Specific Phobias

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mental Health This information in Spanish ( en español ) Specific phobias Treatment More information on specific phobias A specific ... targeted psychotherapy. Return to top More information on Specific phobias Explore other publications and websites Phobias (Copyright © American ...

  15. Perfectionism, Emotion Regulation and Their Relationship to Negative Affect in Patients with Social Phobia

    OpenAIRE

    Systla Rukmini; Sudhir, Paulomi M.; Suresh Bada Math

    2014-01-01

    Context: Research on the perfectionism and emotion regulation strategies in anxiety disorders has gained increased attention. These have an important implication for formulation of therapies. Aims: We examined perfectionism, emotion regulation were examined in 30 patients with social phobia (SP) and 30 community participants. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional design using a clinical and a community control sample was adopted in this exploratory study. Materials and Methods: Participants ...

  16. BODY DYSMORPHIC DISORDER AND SOCIAL PHOBIA: CROSS-SECTIONAL AND PROSPECTIVE DATA

    OpenAIRE

    Coles, Meredith E.; Phillips, Katharine A.; Menard, William; Pagano, Maria E.; Fay, Christina; Weisberg, Risa B.; Stout, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    Much attention has been paid to the relationship between body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) and obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD). However, to our knowledge, no published study has focused directly on the relationship between BDD and social phobia (SP). This is striking given similar clinical features of the two disorders, data showing elevated comorbidity between them, and Eastern conceptualizations of BDD as a form of SP. In this study, 39.3% of 178 individuals with current BDD had comorbid l...

  17. The Neuroanatomical Basis of Panic Disorder and Social Phobia in Schizophrenia: A Voxel Based Morphometric Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picado, Marisol; Carmona, Susanna; Hoekzema, Elseline; Pailhez, Guillem; Bergé, Daniel; Mané, Anna; Fauquet, Jordi; Hilferty, Joseph; Moreno, Ana; Cortizo, Romina; Vilarroya, Oscar; Bulbena, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    Objective It is known that there is a high prevalence of certain anxiety disorders among schizophrenic patients, especially panic disorder and social phobia. However, the neural underpinnings of the comorbidity of such anxiety disorders and schizophrenia remain unclear. Our study aims to determine the neuroanatomical basis of the co-occurrence of schizophrenia with panic disorder and social phobia. Methods Voxel-based morphometry was used in order to examine brain structure and to measure between-group differences, comparing magnetic resonance images of 20 anxious patients, 20 schizophrenic patients, 20 schizophrenic patients with comorbid anxiety, and 20 healthy control subjects. Results Compared to the schizophrenic patients, we observed smaller grey-matter volume (GMV) decreases in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and precentral gyrus in the schizophrenic-anxiety group. Additionally, the schizophrenic group showed significantly reduced GMV in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, precentral gyrus, orbitofrontal cortex, temporal gyrus and angular/inferior parietal gyrus when compared to the control group. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the comorbidity of schizophrenia with panic disorder and social phobia might be characterized by specific neuroanatomical and clinical alterations that may be related to maladaptive emotion regulation related to anxiety. Even thought our findings need to be replicated, our study suggests that the identification of neural abnormalities involved in anxiety, schizophrenia and schizophrenia-anxiety may lead to an improved diagnosis and management of these conditions. PMID:25774979

  18. Associations between body weight and depression, social phobia, insomnia, and self-esteem among Taiwanese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jia-In; Yen, Cheng-Fang

    2014-12-01

    The aims of this cross-sectional study were to examine the associations between body weight and mental health indicators including depression, social phobia, insomnia, and self-esteem among Taiwanese adolescents in Grades 7-12. The body mass index (BMI) of 5254 adolescents was calculated based on self-reported weight and height measurements. Body weight status was determined by the age- and gender-specific International Obesity Task Force reference tables. By using participants of average weight as the reference group, the association between body weight status (underweight, overweight, and obesity) and mental health indicators (depression, social phobia, insomnia, and self-esteem) were examined by using multiple regression analysis. The possible moderating effects of sociodemographic characteristics on the association were also examined. After controlling for the effects of sociodemographic characteristics, both overweight (p adolescents (p self-esteem than did those of average weight; however, no significant differences in depression, social phobia, or insomnia were found between those who were overweight/obese and those of average weight. No significant differences in the four mental health indicators were found between those who were underweight and those of average weight. Sociodemographic characteristics had no moderating effect on the association between body weight and mental health indicators. In conclusion, mental health and school professionals must take the association between overweight/obesity and self-esteem into consideration when approaching the issue of mental health among adolescents.

  19. The neuroanatomical basis of panic disorder and social phobia in schizophrenia: a voxel based morphometric study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisol Picado

    Full Text Available It is known that there is a high prevalence of certain anxiety disorders among schizophrenic patients, especially panic disorder and social phobia. However, the neural underpinnings of the comorbidity of such anxiety disorders and schizophrenia remain unclear. Our study aims to determine the neuroanatomical basis of the co-occurrence of schizophrenia with panic disorder and social phobia.Voxel-based morphometry was used in order to examine brain structure and to measure between-group differences, comparing magnetic resonance images of 20 anxious patients, 20 schizophrenic patients, 20 schizophrenic patients with comorbid anxiety, and 20 healthy control subjects.Compared to the schizophrenic patients, we observed smaller grey-matter volume (GMV decreases in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and precentral gyrus in the schizophrenic-anxiety group. Additionally, the schizophrenic group showed significantly reduced GMV in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, precentral gyrus, orbitofrontal cortex, temporal gyrus and angular/inferior parietal gyrus when compared to the control group.Our findings suggest that the comorbidity of schizophrenia with panic disorder and social phobia might be characterized by specific neuroanatomical and clinical alterations that may be related to maladaptive emotion regulation related to anxiety. Even thought our findings need to be replicated, our study suggests that the identification of neural abnormalities involved in anxiety, schizophrenia and schizophrenia-anxiety may lead to an improved diagnosis and management of these conditions.

  20. The reaction to social stress in social phobia: discordance between physiological and subjective parameters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Klumbies

    Full Text Available Research on the biopsychological background of social phobia (SP is scarce and inconsistent. We investigated endocrine and autonomic markers along with subjective responses to a standardized stress situation (Trier Social Stress Test, TSST in SP patients and healthy controls (HC.We examined 88 patients with the primary diagnosis of SP as well as 78 age and sex comparable HCs with the TSST. Blood and saliva samples were obtained before and after the TSST for the assessment of salivary cortisol, plasma cortisol, salivary alpha-amylase (sAA, and prolactin. Heart rate (HR and heart rate variability (HRV were recorded continuously. Scalp-near hair samples were collected for the assessment of long-term cortisol secretion. The self-reported stress response was measured with different state and trait scales.While self-reported anxiety was elevated in SP before, during, immediately after, and one week after the TSST, no significant differences in biological stress responses were observed between SP and HC. There was a trend for SP to show higher baseline stress markers. Also long-term cortisol deposition in hair remained unaltered.Our results suggest that the excessive self-reported stress in SP is not reflected by a respective biological stress response. Patients with SP apparently show neither an extreme form of focused fear reactivity nor excessive defensive impairment.

  1. Definition of a VR-based protocol to treat social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, S; Klinger, E; Légeron, P; Lauer, F; Chemin, I; Nugues, P

    2003-08-01

    Social phobia is an anxiety disorder that is accessible to two forms of treatment yielding scientifically validated results: drugs and cognitive-behavioral therapies. Graded exposure to feared social situations is fundamental to obtain an improvement of the anxious symptoms. Traditionally, exposure therapies are done either in vivo or by imagining the situations. In vivo exposure is sometimes difficult to control and many patients have some difficulties in using imagination. Virtual reality (VR) seems to bring significant advantages. It allows exposures to numerous and varied situations. This paper reports the definition of a clinical protocol whose purpose is to assess the efficiency of a VR therapy compared to a CBT and to the absence of treatment for social phobic patients. It explains the illness' diagnosis and its usual treatments. It exposes all the architecture of the study, the assessment tools, the content and unfold of the therapy sessions. It finally reports first results of a clinical trial in a between-group design in 10 patients suffering from social phobia. The virtual environments used in the treatment reproduce four situations that social phobics feel the most threatening: performance, intimacy, scrutiny and assertiveness. With the help of the therapist, the patient learns adapted cognitions and behaviors with the aim of reducing her or his anxiety in the corresponding real situations. The novelty of our work is to address a group of situations that the phobic patient is most likely to experience and to treat patients according to a precise protocol.

  2. The Effectiveness of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Based on Reducing Anxiety and Depression in Students with Social Phobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Molavi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives : Social phobia is one of the common anxiety disorders characterized by fear of social situations, shame and embarrassment in communicating with unfamiliar people. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy in reducing anxiety and depression in students with social phobia .   Methods: An experimental pretest-posttest with control group design was used to conduct the study. The population consists of all female students in Ardabil city, 2013-2014 academic years. Using a multiple-stage cluster sampling method, a representative sample consists of 400 students was selected for the study. Then, among the students those with social phobia (based on the cut-off point, 34 participants were randomly selected and divided into two groups of 17 people (one experimental group and one control group . The participants in experimental group received acceptance and commitment therapy for 10 sessions of 90 minutes. The control group did not receive any intervention. Anxiety, depression and social phobia questionnaires were administered to the two groups before and after the intervention. Descriptive statistics and multivariate ANOVA (MANOVA were used for data analysis.   Results: The results of data analysis showed that treatment based on acceptance and commitment therapy reduces anxiety, depression and social phobia of students in the experimental group compared with the control group (p<0.001 .   Conclusion: The present study showed that acceptance and commitment therapy for students with social phobia can be used as a psychological intervention along with other intervention mechanisms.

  3. Perception of Threat in Children with Social Phobia: Comparison to Nonsocially Anxious Children before and after Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederlund, Rio; Ost, Lars-Goran

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated interpretation bias and reduced evidence for danger (RED) bias in 49 children with social phobia and 49 nonsocially anxious children between the ages of 8 and 14 years, using an ambiguous stories task. A posttreatment and follow-up measure was included for 26 of the socially phobic children to examine whether there…

  4. Temperament and character dimensions in patients with social phobia: patterns of change following treatments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mörtberg, Ewa; Bejerot, Susanne; Aberg Wistedt, Anna

    2007-07-30

    The aim of this study was to examine Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) profiles in patients with social phobia (DSM-IV) and to outline patterns of change following intensive group cognitive therapy (IGCT), individual cognitive therapy (ICT) and treatment as usual (TAU). One hundred patients recruited by advertisements in local papers were randomized to IGCT, ICT and TAU. Patients (n=59) who completed diagnostic evaluation and TCI assessments at baseline and 1-year follow-up were examined in this study. Patients differed from healthy controls in novelty seeking (NS), harm avoidance (HA), self-directedness (SD), cooperativeness (C), and self-transcendence (ST). Treatments overall were associated with decrease in HA, while increase in SD was observed after psychotherapy only. Reduced social anxiety was correlated with decrease in HA and increase in SD. High HA at baseline was related to poor treatment outcome in all treatments. To conclude, patients with social phobia show a temperamental vulnerability for developing anxiety and character traits associated with personality disorders. Successful treatment is related to decrease in HA and increase in SD. High HA at baseline may suggest a need for extensive treatment in order to achieve remission.

  5. The context specificity of anxiety responses induced by chronic psychosocial stress in rats: a shift from anxiety to social phobia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsy, Boglárka; Leveleki, Csilla; Zelena, Dóra; Haller, József

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the anxiety-increasing effects of chronic psychosocial stress generalize to non-social (i.e. heterotypic) stressful situations. To investigate this issue, we repeatedly exposed rats to predictable or unpredictable psychosocial stress for 5 or 12 days and examined their anxiety in two markedly different contexts: the elevated plus maze and social interaction tests. Psychosocial stress and the social interaction test were administered under highly similar conditions, i.e. the two situations were homotypic. Psychosocial stress did not affect anxiety in the elevated plus-maze under any condition, but markedly increased anxiety in the social interaction test. In contrast, repeated restraint-a non-social stressor heterotypic to both the elevated plus maze and social interaction tests-increased plus-maze anxiety, demonstrating that anxiety in this test was sensitive to repeated restraint, and the effects were manifested in heterotypic situations. Thus, the anxiety-related effects of chronic psychosocial stress-unlike those of the chronic non-social stressor-were context-dependent. This is reminiscent of phobic anxiety, which manifests in specific situations only. In addition, behavior in the social interaction test showed changes that went beyond simple anxiogenesis. Socially stressed rats spent nearly 40% of total time in aggressive interactions. Based on recent data showing that social phobics are prone to violence under social pressure, and also based on the situation-dependent effects of the social stressor, we suggest that chronic psychosocial stress leads to a behavioral profile akin to social phobia.

  6. Latent Growth Curve Analysis of Fear during a Speech Task before and after Treatment for Social Phobia

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Matthew; Anderson, Page L.

    2011-01-01

    Models of social phobia highlight the importance of anticipatory anxiety in the experience of fear during a social situation. Anticipatory anxiety has been shown to be highly correlated with performance anxiety for a variety of social situations. A few studies show that average ratings of anxiety during the anticipation and performance phases of a social situation decline following treatment. Evidence also suggests that the point of confrontation with the feared stimulus is the peak level of ...

  7. The association between online gaming, social phobia, and depression: an internet survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Han-Ting

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Online gaming technology has developed rapidly within the past decade, and its related problems have received increasing attention. However, there are few studies on the psychiatric symptoms associated with excessive use of online games. The aim of this study is to investigate the characteristics of online gamers, and the association between online gaming hours, social phobia, and depression using an internet survey. Methods An online questionnaire was designed and posted on a popular online game websites, inviting the online gamers to participate the survey. The content of the questionnaire included demographic data, profiles of internet usage and online gaming, and self-rating scales of Depression and Somatic Symptoms Scale (DSSS, Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN, and Chen Internet Addiction Scale (CIAS. Results A total of 722 online gamers with a mean age of 21.8 ± 4.9 years completed the online survey within one month. 601 (83.2% participants were male, and 121 (16.8% were female. The mean weekly online gaming time was 28.2 ± 19.7 hours, which positively associated with history of online gaming (r = 0.245, p  Conclusion The online gamers with longer weekly gaming hours tended to have a longer history of online gaming, and more severe depressive, social phobic, and internet addiction symptoms. Female online gamers had fewer weekly online gaming hours and a shorter previous online gaming history, but tended to have more severe somatic, pain, and social phobic symptoms. The predictors for depression were higher social phobic symptom, higher internet addiction symptoms, longer online gaming hours, and female gender.

  8. The association between online gaming, social phobia, and depression: an internet survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Online gaming technology has developed rapidly within the past decade, and its related problems have received increasing attention. However, there are few studies on the psychiatric symptoms associated with excessive use of online games. The aim of this study is to investigate the characteristics of online gamers, and the association between online gaming hours, social phobia, and depression using an internet survey. Methods An online questionnaire was designed and posted on a popular online game websites, inviting the online gamers to participate the survey. The content of the questionnaire included demographic data, profiles of internet usage and online gaming, and self-rating scales of Depression and Somatic Symptoms Scale (DSSS), Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN), and Chen Internet Addiction Scale (CIAS). Results A total of 722 online gamers with a mean age of 21.8 ± 4.9 years completed the online survey within one month. 601 (83.2%) participants were male, and 121 (16.8%) were female. The mean weekly online gaming time was 28.2 ± 19.7 hours, which positively associated with history of online gaming (r = 0.245, p gamers with longer weekly gaming hours tended to have a longer history of online gaming, and more severe depressive, social phobic, and internet addiction symptoms. Female online gamers had fewer weekly online gaming hours and a shorter previous online gaming history, but tended to have more severe somatic, pain, and social phobic symptoms. The predictors for depression were higher social phobic symptom, higher internet addiction symptoms, longer online gaming hours, and female gender. PMID:22839747

  9. The moderating role of avoidance behavior on anxiety over time: Is there a difference between social anxiety disorder and specific phobia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudaz, M.; Ledermann, T.; Margraf, J.; Becker, E.S.; Craske, M.G.

    2017-01-01

    Theories of anxiety disorders and phobias have ascribed a critical role to avoidance behavior in explaining the persistence of fear and anxiety, but knowledge about the role of avoidance behavior in the maintenance of anxiety in social anxiety disorder relative to specific phobia is lacking. This

  10. The moderating role of avoidance behavior on anxiety over time: Is there a difference between social anxiety disorder and specific phobia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudaz, M.; Ledermann, T.; Margraf, J.; Becker, E.S.; Craske, M.G.

    2017-01-01

    Theories of anxiety disorders and phobias have ascribed a critical role to avoidance behavior in explaining the persistence of fear and anxiety, but knowledge about the role of avoidance behavior in the maintenance of anxiety in social anxiety disorder relative to specific phobia is lacking. This st

  11. A New Model to Facilitate Individualized Case Conceptualization and Treatment of Social Phobia: An Examination and Reaction to Moscovitch's Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimberg, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    Moscovitch's (2009) model of social phobia is put forth as an integration and extension of previous cognitive-behavioral models. The author asserts that his approach overcomes a number of shortcomings of previous models and will serve to better guide case conceptualization, treatment planning, and intervention implementation for clients with…

  12. Development of an Abbreviated Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI) Using Item Response Theory: The SPAI-23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson-Nay, Roxann; Strong, David R.; Nay, William T.; Beidel, Deborah C.; Turner, Samuel M.

    2007-01-01

    An abbreviated version of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI) was developed using methods based in nonparametric item response theory. Participants included a nonclinical sample of 1,482 undergraduates (52% female, mean age = 19.4 years) as well as a clinical sample of 105 individuals (56% female, mean age = 36.4 years) diagnosed with…

  13. Self-Esteem, Social Phobia and Depression Status in Patients with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    KUTLU, Ayşe; GÖKÇE, Gökçen; BÜYÜKBURGAZ, Ülkü; SELEKLER, Macit; KOMŞUOğLU, Sezer

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The increased risk for psychiatric disorders in epilepsy can be related to a number of clinical, psychosocial and biological factors. Due to the unpredictability of seizures and the possibility that they may occur at any time and in any place, patients with epilepsy may develop social phobia and may have feelings of worthlessness and stigma. These factors decrease their psychosocial function, self-efficacy, and quality of life and even increase the suicide rate. Considering the above-mentioned scientific data, the present study was designed to investigate phobia, self-esteem and depression status in patients with epilepsy. Methods One hundred thirty-two patients (aged 21–52 years) and age- and gender-matched control group of 61 subjects (aged 25–60 years) were included in this study. All patients in both groups were administered the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS), Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory (CSEI), and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Results The mean ages of the patient group and the healthy controls were 29.66±11.3 and 32.16±7.99, respectively. There was no statistical significance between the two groups in terms of age and sex (p>0.05). BDI, LSAS and CSEI scores in the patient group were statistically significantly different than in the control group (pself-esteem and depression are important comorbid conditions in epileptic patients. Psychiatric disorders are usually underrecognized and undertreated in patients with epilepsy. Therefore, it is very important to identify and treat the psychiatric comorbid conditions in epilepsy because of their significant burden on patients’ quality of life.

  14. Social phobia and number of social fears, and their association with comorbidity, health related quality of life and help seeking: a population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acarturk, C.; Graaf, de R.; Straten, van A.; Have, M. ten; Cuijpers, P.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Community based data were used to examine the association between social phobia and comorbidity, quality of life and service utilization. In addition, the correlations of the number of social fears with these domains were studied. Method Data are from the Netherlands Mental Healt

  15. Social Phobia in an Italian region: do Italian studies show lower frequencies than community surveys conducted in other European countries?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dell'Osso Liliana

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lifetime prevalence of Social Phobia (SP in European countries other than Italy has been estimated to range from 3.5% to 16.0%. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of SP in Sardinia (Italy in order to verify the evidence of a lower frequency of SP in Italy observed in previous studies (from 1.0% to 3.1%. Methods A randomised cross sample of 1040 subjects, living in Cagliari, in rural areas, and in a mining district in Sardinia were interviewed using a Simplified version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDIS. Diagnoses were made according to the 10th International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10. Results Lifetime prevalence of SP was 2.2% (males: 1.5%, females: 2.8% whereas 6-month prevalence resulted in 1.5% (males: 0.9%, females: 2.1%. Mean age at onset was 16.2 ± 9.3 years. A statistically significant association was found with Depressive Episode, Dysthymia and Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Conclusions The study is consistent with findings reported in several previous studies of a lower prevalence of SP in Italy. Furthermore, the results confirm the fact that SP, due to its early onset, might constitute an ideal target for early treatment aimed at preventing both the accumulation of social disabilities and impairments caused by anxiety and avoidance behaviour, as well as the onset of more serious, associated complications in later stages of the illness.

  16. Avaliação de traços de personalidade em pacientes com fobia social Evaluation of personality traits in social phobia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariângela Gentil Savoia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: Os sintomas de transtornos de personalidade (Eixo II comumente encontrados em pacientes com fobia social se sobrepõem com os sintomas que descrevem o transtorno pelo Eixo I. OBJETIVO: O presente estudo teve por objetivo avaliar traços de personalidade em pacientes com diagnóstico de fobia social. MÉTODO: Cento e oito sujeitos com idade entre 18 e 65 anos foram avaliados pelo Inventário de Temperamento e Caráter de Cloninger. RESULTADO: Os pacientes com fobia social diferiram dos dados normativos nos seguintes traços de personalidade: Busca à Novidade, Fuga de Danos, Persistência, Autodirecionamento e Autotranscendência. CONCLUSÃO: Esses achados apontam para uma sobreposição entre a descrição dos traços de personalidade citados por Cloninger e a descrição dos sintomas de fobia social do DSM-IV, Eixo I.BACKGROUND: The symptoms of personality disorders (Axis II commonly found in social phobia patients overlap highly with the symptoms that typify the Axis I disorder and are thus linked to diagnostic process in symptomatic patients. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to evaluate personality traits of social phobia patients. METHOD: One hundred and eight subjects were selected, from 18 to 65 years of age, who fulfilled the criteria of social phobia. The Cloninger's Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI was applied. RESULTS: Social phobia patients differed in normalized data in the following personality traits: Novelty Seeking, Harm Avoidance, Persistence, Self Directedness, and Self-Transcendence. DISCUSSION: These findings point to a high overlap between Cloninger's description of the observed predominant personality traits and DSM-IV Axis I symptoms description for social phobia.

  17. The Prevalence and Comorbidity of Specific Phobias in College Students and Their Interest in Receiving Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, Richard W.; Spates, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    While the prevalence of specific phobias and social phobias is believed to be high in the general adult population, little data exists regarding the prevalence of these fears among college students. This paper describes an epidemiological study that surveyed 813 college students regarding the severity of fears experienced toward 12 objects and…

  18. The Prevalence and Comorbidity of Specific Phobias in College Students and Their Interest in Receiving Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, Richard W.; Spates, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    While the prevalence of specific phobias and social phobias is believed to be high in the general adult population, little data exists regarding the prevalence of these fears among college students. This paper describes an epidemiological study that surveyed 813 college students regarding the severity of fears experienced toward 12 objects and…

  19. A cognitive-behavior therapy applied to a social anxiety disorder and a specific phobia, case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George D. Tsitsas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available George, a 23-year-old Greek student, was referred by a psychiatrist for treatment to a University Counseling Centre in Athens. He was diagnosed with social anxiety disorder and specific phobia situational type. He was complaining of panic attacks and severe symptoms of anxiety. These symptoms were triggered when in certain social situations and also when travelling by plane, driving a car and visiting tall buildings or high places. His symptoms lead him to avoid finding himself in such situations, to the point that it had affected his daily life. George was diagnosed with social anxiety disorder and with specific phobia, situational type (in this case acrophobia and was given 20 individual sessions of cognitive-behavior therapy. Following therapy, and follow-up occurring one month post treatment, George no longer met the criteria for social phobia and symptoms leading to acrophobia were reduced. He demonstrated improvements in many areas including driving a car in and out of Athens and visiting tall buildings.

  20. Associations in the Longitudinal Course of Body Dysmorphic Disorder with Major Depression, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, and Social Phobia

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Katharine A.; Stout, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is an impairing and relatively common disorder that has high comorbidity with certain Axis I disorders. However, the longitudinal associations between BDD and comorbid disorders have not previously been examined. Such information may shed light on the nature of BDD’s relationship to putative “near-neighbor” disorders, such as major depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and social phobia. This study examined time-varying associations between BDD and th...

  1. Scared to lose control? General and health locus of control in females with a phobia of vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Angela L; Boyle, Christopher; Lauchlan, Fraser

    2008-01-01

    The term emetophobia (i.e., a fear of vomiting) exists as rather an elusive predicament, often eluding conventional treatment. The present study involved 149 participants, consisting of 51 emetophobics, 48 phobic controls (i.e. those who suffered from a different phobia), and 50 nonphobic controls. Participants were administered the Rotter (1966) Locus of Control Scale and the Health Locus of Control Scale by B.S. Wallston, Wallston, Kaplan, and Maides (1976). Significant differences were found among the three groups; specifically, that emetophobics had a significantly higher internal Locus of Control Scale score with regard to both general and health-related issues than did the two control groups. It is suggested that vomiting phobics may have a fear of losing control, and that their vomiting phobia is reflective of this alternative, underlying problem. More research is required to explore the association between emetophobia and issues surrounding control; however, the current study suggests that it may be helpful for therapists to consider this aspect when treating a patient with vomiting phobia.

  2. Controlled-release fluvoxamine in obsessive-compulsive disorder and social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Richard T

    2008-12-01

    Specific serotonin reuptake inhibitors are currently recommended as first-line treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and social phobia or social anxiety disorder (SAD). Fluvoxamine has demonstrated efficacy in both these conditions and has recently been marketed in a controlled-release (CR) formulation in the United States for treatement of OCD and SAD. Three 12-week double-blind, multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled studies were conducted with this formulation - two in SAD and one in OCD. All three studies showed a robust effect on the key symptoms of OCD and SAD and had broadly comparable efficacy to studies conducted with immediate-release (IR) fluvoxamine. The beneficial effects of fluvoxamine CR were maintained in a 12-week double-blind, randomized extension to one SAD trial. The CR formulation, when compared to its IR counterpart, offers less daily fluctuation in fluvoxamine levels and a more rapid titration schedule; in addition, a more rapid onset of effect may result from these features. Overall, the benefits of the CR formulation, among them the convenience of oncedaily dosing, were achieved without an increased adverse event burden versus the IR form.

  3. Factor solutions of the Social Phobia Scale (SPS) and the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS) in a Swedish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mörtberg, Ewa; Reuterskiöld, Lena; Tillfors, Maria; Furmark, Tomas; Öst, Lars-Göran

    2017-06-01

    Culturally validated rating scales for social anxiety disorder (SAD) are of significant importance when screening for the disorder, as well as for evaluating treatment efficacy. This study examined construct validity and additional psychometric properties of two commonly used scales, the Social Phobia Scale and the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale, in a clinical SAD population (n = 180) and in a normal population (n = 614) in Sweden. Confirmatory factor analyses of previously reported factor solutions were tested but did not reveal acceptable fit. Exploratory factor analyses (EFA) of the joint structure of the scales in the total population yielded a two-factor model (performance anxiety and social interaction anxiety), whereas EFA in the clinical sample revealed a three-factor solution, a social interaction anxiety factor and two performance anxiety factors. The SPS and SIAS showed good to excellent internal consistency, and discriminated well between patients with SAD and a normal population sample. Both scales showed good convergent validity with an established measure of SAD, whereas the discriminant validity of symptoms of social anxiety and depression could not be confirmed. The optimal cut-off score for SPS and SIAS were 18 and 22 points, respectively. It is concluded that the factor structure and the additional psychometric properties of SPS and SIAS support the use of the scales for assessment in a Swedish population.

  4. The Social Interaction Phobia Scale: Continued support for the psychometric validity of the SIPS using clinical and non-clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menatti, Alison R; Weeks, Justin W; Carleton, R Nicholas; Morrison, Amanda S; Heimberg, Richard G; Hope, Debra A; Blanco, Carlos; Schneier, Franklin R; Liebowitz, Michael R

    2015-05-01

    The present study sought to extend findings supporting the psychometric validity of a promising measure of social anxiety (SA) symptoms, the Social Interaction Phobia Scale (SIPS; Carleton et al., 2009). Analyses were conducted using three samples: social anxiety disorder (SAD) patients, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) patients, and healthy controls. SIPS scores of SAD patients demonstrated internal consistency and construct validity, and the previously demonstrated three-factor structure of the SIPS was replicated. Further, the SIPS total score uniquely predicted SA symptoms, and SIPS scores were significantly higher for SAD patients than GAD patients or controls. Two cut-off scores that discriminated SAD patients from GAD patients and from healthy controls were identified. The current study is the first to replicate the SIPS three-factor model in a large, treatment-seeking sample of SAD patients and establish a cut-off score discriminating SAD from GAD patients. Findings support the SIPS as a valid, SAD-specific assessment instrument.

  5. Attentional bias and emotional reactivity as predictors and moderators of behavioral treatment for social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Andrea N; Mesri, Bita; Burklund, Lisa J; Lieberman, Matthew D; Craske, Michelle G

    2013-10-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a well-established treatment for anxiety disorders, and evidence is accruing for the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT). Little is known about factors that relate to treatment outcome overall (predictors), or who will thrive in each treatment (moderators). The goal of the current project was to test attentional bias and negative emotional reactivity as moderators and predictors of treatment outcome in a randomized controlled trial comparing CBT and ACT for social phobia. Forty-six patients received 12 sessions of CBT or ACT and were assessed for self-reported and clinician-rated symptoms at baseline, post treatment, 6, and 12 months. Attentional bias significantly moderated the relationship between treatment group and outcome with patients slow to disengage from threatening stimuli showing greater clinician-rated symptom reduction in CBT than in ACT. Negative emotional reactivity, but not positive emotional reactivity, was a significant overall predictor with patients high in negative emotional reactivity showing the greatest self-reported symptom reduction.

  6. Does engagement with exposure yield better outcomes? Components of presence as a predictor of treatment response for virtual reality exposure therapy for social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Matthew; Mehta, Natasha; Tone, Erin B; Anderson, Page L

    2011-08-01

    Virtual reality exposure (VRE) has been shown to be effective for treating a variety of anxiety disorders, including social phobia. Presence, or the level of connection an individual feels with the virtual environment, is widely discussed as a critical construct both for the experience of anxiety within a virtual environment and for a successful response to VRE. Two published studies show that whereas generalized presence relates to fear ratings during VRE, it does not relate to treatment response. However, presence has been conceptualized as multidimensional, with three primary factors (spatial presence, involvement, and realness). These factors can be linked to other research on the facilitation of fear during exposure, inhibitors of treatment response (e.g., distraction), and more recent theoretical discussions of the mechanisms of exposure therapy, such as Bouton's description of expectancy violation. As such, one or more of these components of presence may be more strongly associated with the experience of fear during VRE and treatment response than the overarching construct. The current study (N=41) evaluated relations between three theorized components of presence, fear ratings during VRE, and treatment response for VRE for social phobia. Results suggest that total presence and realness subscale scores were related to in-session peak fear ratings. However, only scores on the involvement subscale significantly predicted treatment response. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  7. Parental rearing styles and self acceptance of patients with social phobia disorder%社交恐怖障碍患者的父母养育方式和自我接纳

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘军; 周云; 古田

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨社交恐怖障碍患者的父母养育方式和自我接纳的特点. 方法:对49例社交恐怖障碍患者和49例正常对照者进行一般社会人口学资料、父母养育方式评价量表(EMBU)和自我接纳问卷(SAQ)测评. 结果:与正常对照组相比,社交恐怖障碍患者父母更少情感温暖、理解(P<0.01),母亲更多拒绝、否认和更少偏爱被试(P<0.05);逐步判别分析显示,母亲的温暖、理解具有统计学判别意义(P<0.01);社交恐怖障碍患者的自我接纳和自我评价显著低于正常组(P<0.01). 结论:社交恐怖障碍患者自我接纳程度低,父母养育方式中较少情感温暖、理解;母亲的情感温暖、理解可能与社交恐怖障碍有关.%Objective:To explore the characteristics of parental rearing styles and self-acceptance of patients with social phobia disorder. Method:49 patients with social phobia disorder and 49 normal control subjects performed general social demographic data sheet, Egma Minnen av Bardndosnauppforstran (EMBU) and self acceptance questionnaire (SAQ) evaluation. Results: Compared with the normal control group,parents of patients with social phobia used less emotional warmth or understanding (P < 0.01) , their mothers had more refuse,deny and less preference for subjects (P<0.0S) ;stepwise discriminant analysis revealed a mother s warmth and understanding with statistically discriminating significance (P <0.01) ;self acceptance and self e-valuation were significantly lower in social phobia patients than the normal group (P <0. 01). Conclusion: Patients with social phobia disorder show low self acceptance and their parents demonstrate less emotional warmth or understanding. A mothers warmth and understanding may be associated with social phobia disorder.

  8. Perfectionism, emotion regulation and their relationship to negative affect in patients with social phobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Systla Rukmini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Research on the perfectionism and emotion regulation strategies in anxiety disorders has gained increased attention. These have an important implication for formulation of therapies. Aims: We examined perfectionism, emotion regulation were examined in 30 patients with social phobia (SP and 30 community participants. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional design using a clinical and a community control sample was adopted in this exploratory study. Materials and Methods: Participants were assessed on The Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, Frost′s-Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, Ruminative Response Scale of the response style questionnaire, cognitive emotion regulation questionnaire, Social Interaction Anxiety Scale and the Beck′s Depression Inventory. Statistical Analysis: Data was analyzed using independents samples t-test and Pearson′s Product moment correlations and step-wise linear regression. Results: Individuals with SP had higher perfectionism (mean = 100.30, SD = ±17.73, t = 7.29, P < 0.001, rumination (mean = 61.47, SD = ±11.96, t = 6.71, P < 0.001 and lower levels of positive reappraisal (mean = 11.53, SD = ±3.85, t = 4.90, P < 0.001. Perfectionism was correlated with social anxiety (r = 0.44, P < 0.05 and rumination (r = 0.43, P < 0.05, but not with depression. Rumination was positively correlated with both social anxiety (r = 0.513, P < 0.01 and depression (r = 0.485, P < 0.01.Positive reappraisal was negatively correlated with depression (r = -0.396, P < 0.05 and anxiety (r = -0.335, P < 0.05. Acceptance was found to be significantly correlated only to the reflective pondering subscale of rumination. Parental criticism was a significant predictor of social anxiety (F = 11.11, P < 0.01 and brooding predicted depression (F = 10.49, P < 0.01. Conclusions: This study highlights the role of perfectionism as a maintaining factor in SP and the importance of adaptive forms of emotion regulation that need to

  9. Fobia social: estudo da prevalência em duas escolas em Porto Alegre Social phobia: a study of the prevalence in two schools in Porto Alegre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielly Cruvinel Fernandes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A fobia social é freqüente entre adolescentes, sendo importante a sua identificação e a determinação de potenciais prejuízos. OBJETIVOS: Relatar a prevalência e o impacto na escolaridade da fobia social em uma amostra de adolescentes. MÉTODOS: O inventário de fobia social (SPIN foi administrado em 525 alunos dos ensinos fundamental e médio, de ambos os sexos, em uma escola pública e em uma particular, na cidade de Porto Alegre, Brasil, porquanto 32 foram excluídos por respostas incompletas. Foi aplicado também um questionário para identificação das características sociodemográficas da amostra. RESULTADOS: De acordo com o SPIN, 114 dos 493 alunos (23,12% obtiveram escores iguais ou superiores a 19 pontos no referido inventário, indicando a presença de sintomas compatíveis com o diagnóstico de fobia social. As meninas tenderam a apresentar maior freqüência de transtorno de ansiedade social em relação aos meninos (p = 0,053. Não foi encontrada associação significativa entre repetência e fobia social. CONCLUSÕES: Os sintomas compatíveis com o diagnóstico de fobia social são prevalentes em adolescentes e, em virtude de seu curso crônico, podem causar sérios prejuízos nestes indivíduos. Neste estudo, não foi possível correlacionar fobia social com repetência escolar. No entanto, é de fundamental importância a identificação e o tratamento precoce deste transtorno de ansiedade.Social phobia is frequent among adolescents, and its identification and determination of potential impairments are of great importance. OBJECTIVES: To report the prevalence and impact of social phobia on education in a sample of adolescents. METHODS: The Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN was administered to 525 students of primary and high school, of both genders, in one public and one private school in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil, but 32 students were excluded from the study due to incomplete answers. A sociodemographic questionnaire

  10. Evaluation of the psychometric properties of a modified version of the Social Phobia Screening Questionnaire for use in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svedin Carl

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Social phobia (social anxiety disorder - SAD is a rather common but often undetected and undertreated psychiatric condition in youths. Screening of SAD in young individuals in community samples is thus important in preventing negative outcomes. The present study is the first report on the psychometric properties of the Social Phobia Screening Questionnaire for Children and adolescents (SPSQ-C. Methods The SPSQ-C was administered to a community sample of high-school students. Test-retest reliability over three weeks was evaluated (n = 127 and internal consistency was calculated for items measuring level of fear in eight social situations. To measure concurrent validity, subjects who reported SAD on at least one occasion and randomly selected non-cases were blindly interviewed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis-I disorders (SCID-I, as gold standard (n = 51. Results A moderate test-retest reliability, r = .60 (P Conclusion The SPSQ-C is a short and psychometrically sound questionnaire for screening of SAD in adolescents, with the advantage of being based on the DSM-IV criteria.

  11. The etiology of specific phobias : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merckelbach, H; de Jong, Peter; Muris, P; vandenHout, MA

    1996-01-01

    The present article summarizes theory and data about symptomatology, epidemiology, and etiology of specific phobias. Additionally, the cognitive mechanisms involved in specific Phobias are briefly discussed By and large, the general pattern behind the development of specific phobias can be summarize

  12. Treating phobias or treating people of acronyms and the social context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P Fourie

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Phobias are some of the most common disorders brought to the attention of treatment agents. Opsomming Fobies is van die mees algemene versteurings wat onder die aandag van terapeute en dokters kom. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

  13. 中学生社交恐怖症的分析及对策%Analysis and Countermeasures of Middle School Students' Social Phobia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郎藤锦

    2014-01-01

    社交恐怖症的发病年龄大多为青少年时期。为了加强中学生对社交恐怖症的了解,预防及自我治疗,对四川某中学637名学生采用社交恐怖症自我测试和CCMD-3进行社交恐怖症的调查。72.5%的学生说自己曾经有过社交恐惧,经常有这种情况的占12.5%,其中女生比男生多,高中生比初中生多。有1.8%的被初步诊断为社交恐怖症。%Social phobia is mostly suffered in a person's adoles-cence. In order to strengthen middle school students' under-standing, prevention and self-treatment of social phobia, this pa-per adopted social phobia self-test and CCMD-3 to investigate the social phobia of 637 students from a certain middle school in Sichuan. 72.5%of the students said that they had suffered from social phobia and 12.5%of them have encountered the situation frequently, among whom, there are more female students than male students, and more high school students than junior school students. 1.8% of the students have been diagnosed with social phobia preliminarily.

  14. Phobia - simple/specific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anxiety disorder - phobia ... Specific phobias are a type of anxiety disorder in which a person may feel extremely anxious or has a ... when exposed to the object of fear. Specific phobias are a common mental disorder. Common phobias include ...

  15. Fears and Phobias

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Fears and Phobias KidsHealth > For Teens > Fears and Phobias Print A ... help and support to overcome them. previous continue Phobias A phobia is an intense fear reaction to ...

  16. O tratamento farmacológico da fobia social Pharmacologic treatment of social phobia

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Egidio Nardi

    1999-01-01

    A fobia social é o medo acentuado e persistente de comer, beber, tremer, enrubescer, falar, escrever, enfim, de agir de forma ridícula ou inadequada na presença de outras pessoas. A fobia social apresenta-se em dois tipos básicos: a circunscrita, restrita a apenas um tipo de situação social, e a generalizada, caracterizada pelo temor a todas ou quase todas situações sociais. As características clínicas da fobia social são a ansiedade antecipatória, os sintomas físicos, a esquiva e a baixa aut...

  17. Dreams In Jungian Psychology: The use of Dreams as an Instrument For Research, Diagnosis and Treatment of Social Phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodarahimi, Siamak

    2009-01-01

    Background: The significance of dreams has been explained in psychoanalysis, depth psychology and gestalt therapy. There are many guidelines in analytic psychology for dream interpretation and integration in clinical practice. The present study, based on the Jungian analytic model, incorporated dreams as an instrument for assessment of aetiology, the psychotherapy process and the outcome of treatment for social phobia within a clinical case study. Method: This case study describes the use of dream analysis in treating a female youth with social phobia. Results: The present findings supported the three stage paradigm efficiency in the Jungian model for dream working within a clinical setting, i.e. written details, reassembly with amplification and assimilation. It was indicated that childhood and infantile traumatic events, psychosexual development malfunctions, and inefficient coping skills for solving current life events were expressed in the patient’s dreams. Conclusion: Dreams can reflect a patient’s aetiology, needs, illness prognosis and psychotherapy outcome. Dreams are an instrument for the diagnosis, research and treatment of mental disturbances in a clinical setting. PMID:22135511

  18. Dreams In Jungian Psychology: The use of Dreams as an Instrument For Research, Diagnosis and Treatment of Social Phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodarahimi, Siamak

    2009-10-01

    The significance of dreams has been explained in psychoanalysis, depth psychology and gestalt therapy. There are many guidelines in analytic psychology for dream interpretation and integration in clinical practice. The present study, based on the Jungian analytic model, incorporated dreams as an instrument for assessment of aetiology, the psychotherapy process and the outcome of treatment for social phobia within a clinical case study. This case study describes the use of dream analysis in treating a female youth with social phobia. The present findings supported the three stage paradigm efficiency in the Jungian model for dream working within a clinical setting, i.e. written details, reassembly with amplification and assimilation. It was indicated that childhood and infantile traumatic events, psychosexual development malfunctions, and inefficient coping skills for solving current life events were expressed in the patient's dreams. Dreams can reflect a patient's aetiology, needs, illness prognosis and psychotherapy outcome. Dreams are an instrument for the diagnosis, research and treatment of mental disturbances in a clinical setting.

  19. Specific and social fears in children and adolescents: separating normative fears from problem indicators and phobias

    OpenAIRE

    Laporte,Paola P.; Pan,Pedro M.; Hoffmann,Mauricio S.; Wakschlag, Lauren S.; Rohde, Luis A.; MIGUEL, Euripedes C.; Pine, Daniel S.; Manfro,Gisele G.; Giovanni A. Salum

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To distinguish normative fears from problematic fears and phobias. Methods: We investigated 2,512 children and adolescents from a large community school-based study, the High Risk Study for Psychiatric Disorders. Parent reports of 18 fears and psychiatric diagnosis were investigated. We used two analytical approaches: confirmatory factor analysis (CFA)/item response theory (IRT) and nonparametric receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Results: According to IRT and ROC ana...

  20. Speech disturbances and gaze behavior during public speaking in subtypes of social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, S G; Gerlach, A L; Wender, A; Roth, W T

    1997-01-01

    Twenty-four social phobics with public speaking anxiety and 25 nonphobic individuals (controls) gave a speech in front of two people. Subjective anxiety, gaze behavior, and speech disturbances were assessed. Based on subjects' fear ratings of social situations, phobics and controls were divided into the generalized and nongeneralized subtype. Results showed that generalized phobics reported the most, and nongeneralized controls the least anxiety during public speaking. All subjects had longer and more frequent eye contact when delivering a speech than when talking with an experimenter or sitting in front of an audience. Phobics showed more filled pauses, had longer silent pauses, paused more frequently, and spent more time pausing than controls when giving a speech. Generalized phobics spent more time pausing during their speech than the other subgroups (nongeneralized controls, generalized controls, and nongeneralized phobics). These results suggest that generalized phobics tended to shift attentional resources from speech production to other cognitive tasks.

  1. Dysfunctional attitudes and anxiety sensitivity in the manifestation and first onset of social anxiety disorder versus specific phobia and healthy: A prospective longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudaz, M.; Becker, E.S.; Margraf, J.; Ledermann, T.; Meyer, A.H.; Craske, M.G.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the role of two cognitive vulnerability factors, anxiety sensitivity and dysfunctional attitudes, in the prediction of the manifestation and onset of social anxiety disorder relative to specific phobia and relative to healthy controls. Women, aged between 18 and 24 years, were s

  2. The Utility of the PAI and the MMPI-2 for Discriminating PTSD, Depression, and Social Phobia in Trauma-Exposed College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt-Murphy, Meghan E.; Weathers, Frank W.; Flood, Amanda M.; Eakin, David E.; Benson, Trisha A.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Revised (MMPI-2; Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegen, & Kaemmer, 1989) and the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI; Morey, 1991) with regard to each instrument's utility for discriminating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from depression and social phobia in a…

  3. Dysfunctional attitudes and anxiety sensitivity in the manifestation and first onset of social anxiety disorder versus specific phobia and healthy: A prospective longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudaz, M.; Becker, E.S.; Margraf, J.; Ledermann, T.; Meyer, A.H.; Craske, M.G.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the role of two cognitive vulnerability factors, anxiety sensitivity and dysfunctional attitudes, in the prediction of the manifestation and onset of social anxiety disorder relative to specific phobia and relative to healthy controls. Women, aged between 18 and 24 years, were s

  4. An Analysis of the Counseling Case on Social Phobia%社交恐惧症的咨询案例分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶意

    2012-01-01

    This paper adopts such comprehensive approaches as cognitive therapy,relaxation training and systematic desensitization therapy to treat social phobia.%本文是运用认知疗法、放松训练、系统脱敏疗法等综合性方法来治疗社交恐惧症的案例。

  5. The Utility of the PAI and the MMPI-2 for Discriminating PTSD, Depression, and Social Phobia in Trauma-Exposed College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt-Murphy, Meghan E.; Weathers, Frank W.; Flood, Amanda M.; Eakin, David E.; Benson, Trisha A.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Revised (MMPI-2; Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegen, & Kaemmer, 1989) and the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI; Morey, 1991) with regard to each instrument's utility for discriminating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from depression and social phobia in a…

  6. Evaluating the Efficacy of Endoscopic Thoracic Sympathectomy for Generalized Social Anxiety Disorder with Blushing Complaints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Súarez, Claudio; Palacios, Estela; Palacios, Fernanda; Matus, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Objective: No study has yet compared the efficacy of endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy for treating facial blushing with other treatment or no treatment. We conducted a prospective, observational, open-label, clinical study to compare endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy for blushing with generalized social anxiety disorder versus sertraline treatment and no treatment. Method: Three-hundred and thirty consecutive patients seeking treatment for their blushing were assessed by psychiatric interview and patient-rated scales. The Brief Social Phobia Scale was the primary outcome measure. Patients meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for generalized social anxiety disorder, scoring 20 points or more in the Brief Social Phobia Scale and 19 points or more in the Social Phobia Inventory were considered eligible and followed up for a mean of 11 months (range 1–64) after endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy or initiation of sertraline. Results: At baseline, 97 percent of the endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy-treated group, 87 percent of the sertraline-treated group, and 78 percent of the nontreated group rated their blushing as being “severe” or “extreme.” At follow up, 16 percent of endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy-treated patients, 32 percent of sertraline-treated patients, and 57 percent of untreated patients reported this degree of blushing. At endpoint, Brief Social Phobia Scale total scores exhibited a greater decline with either treatment than with no treatment. Nonetheless, in comparison to no treatment, only the results obtained with endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy achieved statistical significance (p=0.003). Compensatory sweating occurred in 99 percent of patients who underwent endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy. High degrees of satisfaction with treatment were reported by 89 percent of patients undergoing endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy and by 59 percent of patients taking medication. Conclusion

  7. The SPAI-18, a brief version of the social phobia and anxiety inventory: reliability and validity in clinically referred and non-referred samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vente, Wieke; Majdandžić, Mirjana; Voncken, Marisol J; Beidel, Deborah C; Bögels, Susan M

    2014-03-01

    We developed a new version of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI) in order to have a brief instrument for measuring social anxiety and social anxiety disorder (SAD) with a strong conceptual foundation. In the construction phase, a set of items representing 5 core aspects of social anxiety was selected by a panel of social anxiety experts. The selected item pool was validated using factor analysis, reliability analysis, and diagnostic analysis in a sample of healthy participants (N = 188) and a sample of clinically referred participants diagnosed with SAD (N = 98). This procedure resulted in an abbreviated version of the Social Phobia Subscale of the SPAI consisting of 18 items (i.e. the SPAI-18), which correlated strongly with the Social Phobia Subscale of the original SPAI (both groups r = .98). Internal consistency and diagnostic characteristics using a clinical cut-off score > 48 were good to excellent (Cronbach's alpha healthy group = .93; patient group = .91; sensitivity: .94; specificity: .88). The SPAI-18 was further validated in a community sample of parents-to-be without SAD (N = 237) and with SAD (N = 65). Internal consistency was again excellent (both groups Cronbach's alpha = .93) and a screening cut-off of > 36 proved to result in good sensitivity and specificity. The SPAI-18 also correlated strongly with other social anxiety instruments, supporting convergent validity. In sum, the SPAI-18 is a psychometrically sound instrument with good screening capacity for social anxiety disorder in clinical as well as community samples.

  8. School Phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrrell, Maureen

    2005-01-01

    School phobia is a serious disorder affecting up to 5% of elementary and middle school children. Long-term consequences include academic failure, diminished peer relationships, parental conflict, and development of additional psychiatric disorders. Hiding behind such common physical symptoms as headaches, stomachaches, and fatigue, school phobia…

  9. Randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioral therapy and acceptance and commitment therapy for social phobia: outcomes and moderators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craske, Michelle G; Niles, Andrea N; Burklund, Lisa J; Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate B; Vilardaga, Jennifer C Plumb; Arch, Joanna J; Saxbe, Darby E; Lieberman, Matthew D

    2014-12-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an empirically supported treatment for social phobia. However, not all individuals respond to treatment and many who show improvement do not maintain their gains over the long-term. Thus, alternative treatments are needed. The current study (N = 87) was a 3-arm randomized clinical trial comparing CBT, acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), and a wait-list control group (WL) in participants with a diagnosis of social phobia based on criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; American Psychiatric Association, 1994). Participants completed 12 sessions of CBT or ACT or a 12-week waiting period. All participants completed assessments at baseline and posttreatment, and participants assigned to CBT and ACT also completed assessments 6 and 12 months following baseline. Assessments consisted of self-report measures, a public-speaking task, and clinician ratings. Multilevel modeling was used to examine between-group differences on outcomes measures. Both treatment groups outperformed WL, with no differences observed between CBT and ACT on self-report, independent clinician, or public-speaking outcomes. Lower self-reported psychological flexibility at baseline was associated with greater improvement by the 12-month follow-up in CBT compared with ACT. Self-reported fear of negative evaluation significantly moderated outcomes as well, with trends for both extremes to be associated with superior outcomes from CBT and inferior outcomes from ACT. Across treatment groups, higher perceived control and extraversion were associated with greater improvement, whereas comorbid depression was associated with poorer outcomes. Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed.

  10. Randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioral therapy and acceptance and commitment therapy for social phobia: outcomes and moderators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craske, Michelle G; Niles, Andrea N.; Burklund, Lisa J.; Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate B.; Vilardaga, Jennifer C. Plumb; Arch, Joanna J.; Saxbe, Darby E.; Lieberman, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an empirically supported treatment for social phobia. However, not all individuals respond to treatment and many who show improvement do not maintain their gains over the long-term. Thus, alternative treatments are needed. Method The current study (N=87) was a 3-arm randomized clinical trial comparing CBT, Acceptance and Commitment therapy (ACT), and a waitlist control group (WL) in participants with a DSM-IV diagnosis of social phobia. Participants completed 12 sessions of CBT or ACT or a 12-week waiting period. All participants completed assessments at baseline and post-treatment, and participants assigned to CBT and ACT also completed assessments at 6 and 12 months following baseline. Assessments consisted of self-report measures, a public speaking task, and clinician ratings. Results Multilevel modeling was used to examine between-group differences on outcomes measures. Both treatment groups outperformed WL, with no differences observed between CBT and ACT on self-report, independent clinician, or public speaking outcomes. Lower self-reported psychological flexibility at baseline was associated with greater improvement by the 12-mo follow-up in CBT compared to ACT. Self-reported fear of negative evaluation significantly moderated outcomes as well, with trends for both extremes to be associated with superior outcomes from CBT and inferior outcomes from ACT. Across treatment groups, higher perceived control, and extraversion were associated with greater improvement, whereas comorbid depression was associated with poorer outcomes. Conclusions Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed. PMID:24999670

  11. Latent growth curve analysis of fear during a speech task before and after treatment for social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Matthew; Anderson, Page L

    2011-11-01

    Models of social phobia highlight the importance of anticipatory anxiety in the experience of fear during a social situation. Anticipatory anxiety has been shown to be highly correlated with performance anxiety for a variety of social situations. A few studies show that average ratings of anxiety during the anticipation and performance phases of a social situation decline following treatment. Evidence also suggests that the point of confrontation with the feared stimulus is the peak level of fear. No study to date has evaluated the pattern of anxious responding across the anticipation, confrontation, and performance phases before and after treatment, which is the focus of the current study. Socially phobic individuals (N = 51) completed a behavioral avoidance task before and after two types of manualized cognitive behavioral therapy, and gave ratings of fear during the anticipation and performance phases. Results from latent growth curve analysis were the same for the two treatments and suggested that before treatment, anxiety sharply increased during the anticipation phase, was highly elevated at the confrontation, and gradually increased during the performance phase. After treatment, anxiety increased during the anticipation phase, although at a much slower rate than at pretreatment, peaked at confrontation, and declined during the performance phase. The findings suggest that anticipatory experiences are critical to the experience of fear for public speaking and should be incorporated into exposures.

  12. Is Social Phobia a mis-communication disorder? Brain functional connectivity during face perception differs between patients with Social Phobia and healthy control subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Danti

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a differential recruitment of brain areas throughout the distributed neural system for face perception has been found in social phobic patients as compared to healthy control subjects. These functional abnormalities in social phobic patients extend beyond emotion-related brain areas, such as the amygdala, to include cortical networks that modulate attention and process other facial features, and they are also associated with an alteration of the task-related activation/deactivation trade-off. Functional connectivity is becoming a powerful tool to examine how components of large-scale distributed neural systems are coupled together while performing a specific function. This study was designed to determine whether functional connectivity networks among brain regions within the distributed system for face perception also would differ between social phobic patients and healthy controls. Data were obtained from eight social phobic patients and seven healthy controls by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Our findings indicated that social phobic patients and healthy controls have different patterns of functional connectivity across brain regions within both the core and the extended systems for face perception and the default mode network (DMN. To our knowledge, this is the first study that shows that functional connectivity during brain response to socially relevant stimuli differs between social phobic patients and healthy controls. These results expand our previous findings and indicate that brain functional changes in social phobic patients are not restricted to a single specific brain structure, but rather involve a mis-communication among different sensory and emotional processing brain areas.

  13. Validade e fidedignidade da escala de comportamento de segurança na ansiedade social Validity and reliability of the social phobia safety behaviour scale in social anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Regina Soares da Silva Burato

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: A utilização dos comportamentos de segurança acentua a falha no processamento cognitivo e tende a distorcer a avaliação de experiências interpessoais. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a fidedignidade e a validade da escala autoaplicável Social Phobia Safety Behaviours Scale (ECSAS, visando a verificar a associação do transtorno de ansiedade social (TAS a processos cognitivos e a comportamentos de segurança. MÉTODO: Participou deste estudo uma amostra de 155 universitários, de ambos os sexos, sem história prévia de tratamento psiquiátrico, distribuídos em dois grupos (80 casos de TAS e 75 não casos, avaliados sistematicamente pelo Inventário de Fobia Social (SPIN e pela Entrevista Clínica Estruturada para o DSM-IV (SCID-IV, como recurso de confirmação diagnóstica e exclusão de outros transtornos psiquiátricos. RESULTADOS: A ECSAS apresentou consistência interna, medida pelo alfa de Cronbach, de 0,92, e, com base no método de teste e reteste, com um intervalo de duas semanas, atingiu níveis satisfatórios de estabilidade temporal, com Kappa ponderado de 0,73. Quanto à validade discriminante, apresentou valores de sensibilidade de 0,963 e de especificidade de 1. Na validade convergente apresentou correlação (r de 0,60. CONCLUSÃO: A ECSAS apresentou boas características psicométricas, contribuindo para a avaliação sistemática dos padrões de comportamentos de segurança e evitação associados ao TAS.CONTEXT: The use of safety behaviours stresses the cognitive failure and tends to distort the evaluation of interpersonal experiences. OBJECTIVE: To assess the reliability of the self-administered Social Phobia Safety Behaviors Scale (ECSAS in the Portuguese acronym in order to determine the association of social anxiety disorder (SAD with processes related to safety behaviors. METHOD: A total of 155 university students of both genders with no previous history of psychiatric treatment, divided into two groups (80 cases and

  14. The association between number of social fears, and health-related quality of life, comorbidity, and help-seeking in subjects with social phobia: A population-based study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acarturk, C.; Graaf, de R.; Straten, van A.; Have, M. ten; Cuijpers, P.

    2008-01-01

    Community based data were used to examine the association between social phobia and comorbidity, quality of life and service utilization. In addition, the correlations of the number of social fears with these domains were studied. Data are from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Stud

  15. Transfer of manualized CBT for social phobia into clinical practice (SOPHO-PRAX: a study protocol for a cluster-randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crawcour Stephen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT is generally known to be efficacious in the treatment of social phobia when applied in RCTs, namely when the treatment manual is based on the Clark-Wells approach. However, little is known about the efficacy of manualized treatments in routine clinical practice (Phase IV of psychotherapy research. The present study (SOPHO-PRAX is a continuation of a large multicenter randomized clinical trial (SOPHO-NET and analyzes the extent to which additional training practitioners in manualized procedures enhances treatment effect. Methods/design Thirty-six private practitioners will be included in three treatment centers and randomly designated to either training in manualized CBT or no specific training. The treatment effects of the therapies conducted by both groups of therapists will be compared. A total of 162 patients (n = 116 completers; n = 58 per condition will be enrolled. Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS will serve as primary outcome measure. Remission from social phobia is defined as LSAS total ≤30 points. Data will be collected at treatment begin, after 8, 15, and 25 sessions (50 min each, at treatment completion, as well at 6 and 12 months post-treatment. Discussion The present CBT trial combines elements of randomized controlled trials and naturalistic studies in an innovative way. It will directly inform about the incremental effects of procedures established in a controlled trial into clinical practice. Study results are relevant to healthcare decisions and policy. They may serve to improve quality of treatment, and shorten the time frame between the development and widespread dissemination of effective methods, thereby reducing health cost expenditure. The results of this study will not only inform about the degree to which the new methods lead to an improvement of treatment course and outcome, but also about whether the effects of routine psychotherapeutic treatment

  16. Transfer of manualized Short Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy (STPP for social phobia into clinical practice: study protocol for a cluster-randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leweke Frank

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychodynamic psychotherapy is frequently applied in the treatment of social phobia. Nevertheless, there has been a lack of studies on the transfer of manualized treatments to routine psychodynamic practice. Our study is the first one to examine the effects of additional training in a manualized Short Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy (STPP procedure on outcome in routine psychotherapy for social phobia. This study is an extension to a large multi-site RCT (N = 512 comparing the efficacy of STPP to Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT of Social Phobia. Methods/Design The manualized treatment is designed for a time limited approach with 25 individual sessions of STPP over 6 months. Private practitioners will be randomized to training in manualized STPP vs. treatment as usual without a specific training (control condition. We plan to enrol a total of 105 patients (84 completers. Assessments will be conducted before treatment starts, after 8 and 15 weeks, after 25 treatment sessions, at the end of treatment, 6 months and 12 months after termination of treatment. The primary outcome measure is the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale. Remission from social phobia is defined scoring with 30 or less points on this scale. Discussion We will investigate how the treatment can be transferred from a controlled trial into the less structured setting of routine clinical care. This question represents Phase IV of psychotherapy research. It combines the benefits of randomized controlled and naturalistic research. The study is genuinely designed to promote faster and more widespread dissemination of effective interventions. It will answer the questions whether manualized STPP can be implemented into routine outpatient care, whether the new methods improve treatment courses and outcomes and whether treatment effects reached in routine psychotherapeutic treatments are comparable to those of the controlled, strictly manualized treatment of the main study

  17. Use of a religious hymn in remission of symptoms of social phobia (social anxiety disorder): a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khouzam, Hani Raoul; Ghafoori, Bita; Nichols, Emma E A

    2005-04-01

    This case report described a veteran with social anxiety disorder who reported fears of negative evaluation by others, social avoidance, and accompanying physiological symptoms of heart palpitations, gastrointestinal discomfort, muscle tension and mental confusion. The symptoms of social anxiety disorder subsided with the use of a Christian hymn "Be Still My Soul" and its accompanying musical poem, in Finlandia. The veteran attributed the symptom remission to the feeling of stillness and surrender to God conveyed by the words and music of the hymn. Although previous studies have shown that both music and religious beliefs can affect mental health, the findings in this case cannot be generalized without conducting further prospective empirical studies.

  18. Dysfunctional attitudes and anxiety sensitivity in the manifestation and first onset of social anxiety disorder versus specific phobia and healthy: A prospective longitudinal study

    OpenAIRE

    Rudaz, M.; Becker, E.S.; Margraf, J; Ledermann, T; Meyer, A.H.; Craske, M.G.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the role of two cognitive vulnerability factors, anxiety sensitivity and dysfunctional attitudes, in the prediction of the manifestation and onset of social anxiety disorder relative to specific phobia and relative to healthy controls. Women, aged between 18 and 24 years, were studied at baseline and 18 months later using the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule-Lifetime-ADIS-IV-L and the Anxiety Sensitivity Index-ASI and the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale-DAS. First, 52 wo...

  19. The spread of fear: symbolic generalization mediates graded threat-avoidance in specific phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymond, Simon; Schlund, Michael W; Roche, Bryan; Whelan, Robert

    2014-02-01

    Overgeneralization of fear and threat-avoidance represents a formidable barrier to successful clinical treatment of anxiety disorders. While stimulus generalization along quantifiable physical dimensions has been studied extensively, less consideration has been given to symbolic generalization, in which stimuli are indirectly and arbitrarily related. The present study examined whether the magnitude and extent of symbolic generalization of threat-avoidance and threat-beliefs differed between spider-phobic and nonphobic individuals. Initially, participants learned two sets of stimulus equivalence relations (A1 = B1 = C1; A2 = B2 = C2). Next, one cue (B1) was established as a conditioned stimulus (CS + ; threat) that signalled onset of spider images and prompted avoidance, and another cue (B2) was established as a CS- (safety cue) that signalled the absence of such images. Subsequent testing showed that phobics compared to nonphobics exhibited greater symbolic generalization of threat-avoidance to threat cues A1 and C1 (indirect CS+ threat cues related via symmetry and equivalence, respectively), while all individuals showed nonavoidance to indirect safety cues A2 and C2. The enhanced symbolic generalization of threat-beliefs and avoidance behaviour observed in spider phobics warrants further investigation.

  20. One session treatment for specific phobias in children: Comorbid anxiety disorders and treatment outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Sarah M; Strege, Marlene V; Oar, Ella L; Ollendick, Thomas H

    2017-03-01

    One-Session Treatment (OST) for specific phobias has been shown to be effective in reducing phobia severity; however, the effect of different types of co-occurring anxiety disorders on OST outcomes is unknown. The present study examined (1) the effects of co-occurring generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social anxiety disorder (SAD), or another non-targeted specific phobia (OSP) on the efficacy of OST for specific phobias, and (2) the effects of OST on these co-occurring disorders following treatment. Three groups of 18 youth (7-15 years) with a specific phobia and comorbid GAD, SAD, or OSP were matched on age, gender, and phobia type. Outcome measures included diagnostic status and severity, and clinician rated improvement. All groups demonstrated an improvement in their specific phobia following treatment. Treatment was equally effective regardless of co-occurring anxiety disorder. In addition, comorbid anxiety disorders improved following OST; however, this effect was not equal across groups. The SAD group showed poorer improvement in their comorbid disorder than the GAD group post-treatment. However, the SAD group continued to improve and this differential effect was not evident six-months following treatment. The current study sample was small, with insufficient power to detect small and medium effect sizes. Further, the sample only included a portion of individuals with primary GAD or SAD, which may have attenuated the findings. The current study demonstrated that co-occurring anxiety disorders did not interfere with phobia treatment. OST, despite targeting a single specific phobia type, significantly reduced comorbid symptomatology across multiple anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Decrease in self-esteem mediates the association between symptoms of social phobia and depression in middle adolescence in a sex-specific manner: a 2-year follow-up of a prospective population cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väänänen, Juha-Matti; Isomaa, Rasmus; Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu; Fröjd, Sari; Helminen, Mika; Marttunen, Mauri

    2014-03-19

    Social phobia and depression are common, highly comorbid disorders in middle adolescence. The mechanism underlying this comorbidity, however, is unclear. Decrease in self-esteem caused by the initial disorder might play a decisive role in the development of the subsequent disorder. The present study aimed to determine whether the association between symptoms of social phobia and depression is mediated by decrease in self-esteem in mid-adolescent girls and boys. As a part of the prospective Adolescent Mental Health Cohort (AMCH), subjects of this study were 9th grade pupils (mean age, 15.5) responding to a survey conducted in 2002-2003 (T1) and to a 2-year follow-up survey in 2004-2005 (T2) (N = 2070, mean age 17.6 years, 54.5% girls). Symptoms of social phobia without symptoms of depression at age 15 and symptoms of depression at age 17 were associated only among boys, and this association was mediated by decrease in self-esteem. Symptoms of depression without symptoms of social phobia at age 15 and symptoms of social phobia at age 17 were associated only among girls, and this association was partially mediated by decrease in self-esteem. Decrease in self-esteem plays a decisive role in the association between social phobia and depression. Self-esteem should be a key focus in interventions for adolescents suffering from social phobia or depression. Efficient intervention for the first disorder might help to prevent the decline in self-esteem and thus the incidence of the subsequent disorder. These findings are based on a sample of Finnish adolescents and should be confirmed in other jurisdictions or in more ethnically diverse samples.

  2. Decrease in self-esteem mediates the association between symptoms of social phobia and depression in middle adolescence in a sex-specific manner: a 2-year follow-up of a prospective population cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Social phobia and depression are common, highly comorbid disorders in middle adolescence. The mechanism underlying this comorbidity, however, is unclear. Decrease in self-esteem caused by the initial disorder might play a decisive role in the development of the subsequent disorder. The present study aimed to determine whether the association between symptoms of social phobia and depression is mediated by decrease in self-esteem in mid-adolescent girls and boys. Methods As a part of the prospective Adolescent Mental Health Cohort (AMCH), subjects of this study were 9th grade pupils (mean age, 15.5) responding to a survey conducted in 2002–2003 (T1) and to a 2-year follow-up survey in 2004–2005 (T2) (N = 2070, mean age 17.6 years, 54.5% girls). Results Symptoms of social phobia without symptoms of depression at age 15 and symptoms of depression at age 17 were associated only among boys, and this association was mediated by decrease in self-esteem. Symptoms of depression without symptoms of social phobia at age 15 and symptoms of social phobia at age 17 were associated only among girls, and this association was partially mediated by decrease in self-esteem. Conclusions Decrease in self-esteem plays a decisive role in the association between social phobia and depression. Self-esteem should be a key focus in interventions for adolescents suffering from social phobia or depression. Efficient intervention for the first disorder might help to prevent the decline in self-esteem and thus the incidence of the subsequent disorder. These findings are based on a sample of Finnish adolescents and should be confirmed in other jurisdictions or in more ethnically diverse samples. PMID:24641987

  3. Desenvolvimento da versão em português do Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI Desarrollo de la versión en portugués del Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI Development of the Brazilian Portuguese-language version of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Picon

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O objetivo do estudo foi desenvolver a versão em português do Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI, adaptada à cultura brasileira. MÉTODOS: Após aprovação de seus autores, foram realizadas: a tradução, retrotradução e discussão entre os tradutores e os autores norte-americanos para elaboração de versão final do SPAI Português; b validade de face por avaliação de peritos; c equivalência lingüística através de estudo da correlação entre teste e o reteste dos escores das versões em português e inglês, aplicados alternadamente, em amostra de 18 voluntários bilíngües, ambos os gêneros e d estudo de praticidade (aceitabilidade e utilidade (aplicabilidade do SPAI Português através das taxas de adesão e de preenchimento inadequado em amostra populacional de 365 universitários, ambos os gêneros. RESULTADOS: A versão final do SPAI Português apresenta equivalência lingüística, semântica e técnica, e validade de face plenamente satisfatórias. A equivalência lingüística foi testada através dos coeficientes de correlação de Pearson e intraclasse para o escore diferencial (total de 0,87 (IC 95% 0,64-0,96 0,87 (IC 95% 0,63-0,95, respectivamente (p OBJETIVO: El objetivo del estudio ha sido desarrollar la versión en portugués, adaptada a la cultura brasileña, del Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI. MÉTODOS: Tras aprobación de sus autores, se realizaron: a la traducción, retrotraducción y discusión entre los traductores y autores estadounidenses para elaboración de la versión final del SPAI Portugués; b validez de cara por evaluación de peritos; c equivalencia lingüística a través de estudio de la correlación entre la prueba y la reprueba de los escores de las versiones en portugués e inglés, aplicados alternadamente, en muestra de 18 voluntarios bilingües de ambos géneros y d estudio de practicidad (aceptabilidad y utilidad (aplicabilidad del SPAI Portugués a través de

  4. Cross- cultural validation of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN: study of the items and internal consistency Validação transcultural da versão para o português do Brasil do Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN: estudo dos itens e da consistência interna

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    Flávia de Lima Osório

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present study was to carry out the cross- cultural validation for Brazilian Portuguese of the Social Phobia Inventory, an instrument for the evaluation of fear, avoidance and physiological symptoms associated with social anxiety disorder. METHOD: The process of translation and adaptation involved four bilingual professionals, appreciation and approval of the back- translation by the authors of the original scale, a pilot study with 30 Brazilian university students, and appreciation by raters who confirmed the face validity of the Portuguese version, which was named " Inventário de Fobia Social" . As part of the psychometric study of the Social Phobia Inventory, analysis of the items and evaluation of the internal consistency of the instrument were performed in a study conducted on 2314 university students. RESULTS: The results demonstrated that item 11, related to the fear of public speaking, was the most frequently scored item. The correlation of the items with the total score was quite adequate, ranging from 0.44 to 0.71, as was the internal consistency, which ranged from 0.71 to 0.90. DISCUSSION/CONCLUSION: The authors conclude that the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Social Phobia Inventory proved to be adequate regarding the psychometric properties initially studied, with qualities quite close to those of the original study. Studies that will evaluate the remaining indicators of validity of the Social Phobia Inventory in clinical and non-clinical samples are considered to be opportune and necessary.OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo foi realizar a validação transcultural para o português do Brasil do Social Phobia Inventory, um instrumento para avaliação e mensuração dos sintomas de medo, evitação e sintomas fisiológicos associados ao transtorno de ansiedade social. MÉTODO: O processo de tradução e adaptação envolveu quatro profissionais bilingües, apreciação e aprovação da back

  5. Validation of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children (SPAI-C in a sample of Brazilian children

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    G.J.C. Gauer

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to examine the factor structure and psychometric properties of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children (SPAI-C, an instrument developed in the United States and applied to a sample of Brazilian schoolchildren. The process included the translation of the original material from English into Portuguese by two bilingual psychiatrists and a back translation by a bilingual physician. Both the front and back translations were revised by a bilingual child psychiatrist. The study was performed using a cross-sectional design and the Portuguese version of the SPAI-C was applied to a sample of 1954 children enrolled in 3rd to 8th grade attending 2 private and 11 public schools. Eighty-one subjects were excluded due to an incomplete questionnaire and 2 children refused to participate. The final sample consisted of 1871 children, 938 girls (50.1% and 933 boys (49.8%, ranging in age from 9 to 14 years. The majority of the students were Caucasian (89.0% and the remainder were African-Brazilian (11.0%. The Pearson product-moment correlation showed that the two-week test-retest reliability coefficient was r = 0.780 and Cronbach's alpha was 0.946. The factor structure was almost similar to that reported in previous studies. The results regarding the internal consistency, the test-retest reliability and the factor structure were similar to the findings obtained in studies performed on English speaking children. The present study showed that the Portuguese language version of SPAI-C is a reliable and valid measure of social anxiety for Brazilian children.

  6. Relationship between adult social phobia and childhood anxiety Relação entre fobia social na vida adulta e ansiedade na infância

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    Gisele Gus Manfro

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of traumas and the presence of childhood anxiety disorders in adult patients with social phobia and investigate their influence on the presentation of the disorder. METHODS: Twenty-four adult patients with social phobia were asked about the presence of trauma before the age of 16. The K-SADS-E and the DICA-P interviews were used to assess these patients regarding childhood anxiety disorders. RESULTS: Twelve (50% patients reported a history of trauma before the age of 16. The presence of trauma did not influence the presentation of the disorder. Seventy-five percent of patients had a history of anxiety disorders in childhood. Patients with a history of at least 2 childhood anxiety disorders had an increased lifetime prevalence of major depression (10 vs. 3; p=.04 and family history of psychiatric disorders (13 vs. 6; p=.02. CONCLUSION: Anxiety disorder in childhood is associated with family history of psychiatric disorders. The presence of more than one diagnosis of anxiety disorder in childhood can be considered a risk factor for the development of depression in adult patients with social phobia.OBJETIVO: A meta desse estudo foi avaliar a prevalência de traumas e a presença de transtornos de ansiedade na infância em pacientes adultos com fobia social e investigar sua influência na apresentação do transtorno. MÉTODOS: Vinte e quatro pacientes adultos com fobia social foram questionados sobre a presença de trauma antes dos 16 anos. A presença de transtornos de ansiedade na infância foi avaliada por meio do K-SADS-E e DICA-P. RESULTADOS: Doze (50% pacientes relataram história de trauma antes dos 16 anos. A presença de trauma não influenciou a apresentação do transtorno de ansiedade social. Três quartos dos pacientes apresentavam história de transtorno de ansiedade na infância. Pacientes com história de dois ou mais transtornos de ansiedade na infância tinham uma

  7. Anxiety, Fears, and Phobias (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Anxiety, Fears, and Phobias KidsHealth > For Parents > Anxiety, Fears, ... unsettling experiences and challenging situations of life. Many Anxieties and Fears Are Normal Anxiety is defined as " ...

  8. A cross-sectional study of correlation of body image anxiety with social phobia and their association with depression in the adolescents from a rural area of Sangli district in India

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    Vivek Baliram Waghachavare

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prevailing socio-cultural influences lead females to desire a thin body and males a muscular body, especially in adolescents. This results in body image anxiety which may lead to social phobia. Together they can develop depression. The aim was to study the correlation of body image anxiety with social phobia and their association with depression, among adolescents. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted in randomly selected colleges from a rural area of Sangli district Maharashtra, India. Stratified random sampling technique used with sample size 805. Pretested self-administered questionnaire used. Percentage, Chi-square test, binary logistic regression model was used to estimate odds ratio (OR and its 95% confidence intervals. Results: Of 997 study subjects body image anxiety, social phobia and depression were observed in 232 (23.3%, 193 (19.4% and 326 (32.7% participants, respectively. Binary logistic regression showed that body image anxiety (OR = 1.849 [1.22, 2.804]; P = 0.004 and social phobia (OR = 4.575 [2.952-7.09]; P < 0.001 were significant predictors for depression. Conclusions: Body image anxiety and social phobia are linked with the development of depression. This impresses the need for timely counseling and education among adolescents.

  9. Morals, medicine and change: morality brokers, social phobias, and French psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Stephanie

    2008-06-01

    This paper will examine how French neurotics are being transformed into 'social phobics' and how the appearance of this group may be tied to new personal and social ideals. There are many people and factors that contribute to this changing definition of mental illness. Amongst these, I will focus on the role of three groups who are most vocally acting as morality brokers in the creation of these new subjects: psychiatrists, patients' groups and pharmaceutical companies.

  10. Specific phobias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Alfons O

    2009-09-01

    Exposure based treatments in which patients are systematically confronted with their feared objects of situations are highly effective in the treatment of specific phobias and produce stable improvement both in reported fear and behavioral avoidance. Exposure in reality is more effective in most cases than exposure in sensu. For situations that are difficult to realize, exposure in virtual environments has become increasingly valuable. Exposure in vivo is clearly superior to pharmacotherapy, although cognitive enhancers have been successfully used recently to increase the effect of exposure therapy. The induction of relaxation is not a necessary precondition for exposure therapy. Rather the current mechanisms of change focus on extinction learning as being the central mechanism both on a cognitive level namely that the feared object is no longer associated with severely threatening consequence but also on an affective level, meaning that feared cue is no longer capable to activate the fear circuit in the brain. Accordingly future diagnostic categorizations of phobic disorders in the DSM-V should rather focus on the pattern of the fear response that needs to be changed than on the eliciting cues or situations that are avoided.

  11. Social phobia: individual response patterns and the effects of behavioral and cognitive interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mersch, P P; Emmelkamp, P M; Bögels, S M; van der Sleen, J

    1989-01-01

    In the present study, the role of individual response patterns in the treatment of social phobic patients was investigated. Seventy-four patients were diagnosed as social phobics. On the basis of extreme scores on a behavioral test (the Simulated Social Interaction Test) and on a cognitive measure (the Rational Behavior Inventory), the response patterns of 39 patients were analyzed, and the patients themselves were classified as either 'behavioral reactors' or 'cognitive reactors'. Half of the patients with each response pattern received a behavioral focused treatment, i.e. social skills training (SST), while the other half received a cognitive oriented treatment, i.e. rational emotive therapy (RET). Patients received group therapy in eight weekly sessions. Within-group differences showed a considerable improvement in all treatment groups. Between-group differences failed to lend support to the hypothesis that treatment that fits a response pattern (i.e. SST for behavioral reactors and RET for cognitive reactors) will result in a greater improvement than one that does not.

  12. EMDR therapy for specific fears and phobias: the phobia protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jongh, A.; Luber, M.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter illustrates how EMDR Therapy can be applied in the treatment of fears and specific phobias. These conditions are highly prevalent in the general population, and are characterized by an unreasonable and severe fear related to exposure to specific objects or situations, which tend to

  13. EMDR therapy for specific fears and phobias: the phobia protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jongh, A.; Luber, M.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter illustrates how EMDR Therapy can be applied in the treatment of fears and specific phobias. These conditions are highly prevalent in the general population, and are characterized by an unreasonable and severe fear related to exposure to specific objects or situations, which tend to resu

  14. Mediating effects of bullying involvement on the relationship of body mass index with social phobia, depression, suicidality, and self-esteem and sex differences in adolescents in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Cheng-Fang; Liu, Tai-Ling; Ko, Chih-Hung; Wu, Yu-Yu; Cheng, Chung-Ping

    2014-03-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the mediating effect of bullying involvement on the relationships between body mass index (BMI) and mental health problems, including social phobia, depression, suicidality, and low self-esteem among adolescents in Taiwan. The moderation effect of sex on the mediating role of bullying involvement was also examined. Five thousand two hundred and fifty-two students of high schools completed the questionnaires. Victimization and perpetration of passive and active bullying were assessed using the Chinese version of the School Bullying Experience Questionnaire. BMI was calculated from self-reported weight and height measurements. The Social Phobia Inventory, the Mandarin Chinese version of the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale, the suicidality-related questionnaire from the epidemiological version of the Kiddie-Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia, and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale were applied to assess social phobia, depression, suicidality, and low self-esteem, respectively. The mediating effect of bullying involvement on the associations between increased BMI and mental health problems was examined by the Sobel test. The moderation effect of sex on the mediating role of bullying involvement was tested by the multiple-group structural equation model. Victimization of passive and active bullying and perpetration of passive bullying, but not perpetration of active bullying, had a mediating effect on the relationships between increased BMI and all four mental health problems. Sex did not have a significant moderation effect on the mediating role of bullying involvement. Bullying involvement should be a target of prevention and intervention in developing a strategy to improve mental health among adolescents with increased BMI.

  15. Does individual attention improve the effect of group treatment of adolescents with social phobia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo José Olivares-Olivares

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio experimental es aportar evidencia empírica respecto de la relación eficacia-eficiencia de uno de los componentes (atención individualizada del programa de tratamiento psicológico estructurado Intervención en Adolescentes con Fobia Social (IAFS en jóvenes que presentan fobia social generalizada. Los cincuenta y siete sujetos participantes (63% mujeres, de edades comprendidas entre 14 y 18 años, fueron asignados al azar a tres condiciones experimentales: a IAFS sin atención individualizada, b IAFS con 6 sesiones de atención individualizada y c IAFS con 12 sesiones de atención individualizada. Los resultados muestran que los grupos que incluyen sesiones de atención individualizada alcanzan mejores resultados en la mayor parte de las medidas que evalúan la ansiedad y evitación social en el seguimiento a los 6 y 12 meses, constatándose también esta tendencia en las variables autoestima y adaptación. Se discuten estos resultados a la luz del incremento de los costes que conlleva el seguimiento individualizado de los participantes frente a la condición sin este componente.

  16. Psychophysiological evidence for cortisol-induced reduction in early bias for implicit social threat in social phobia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peer, J.M. van; Spinhoven, P.; Roelofs, K.

    2010-01-01

    The stress hormone cortisol is important for the regulation of social motivational processes. High cortisol levels have been associated with social fear and avoidance, which play an important role in social anxiety disorder (SAD), as does hypervigilant processing of social threat. However, causal ef

  17. Analyzation of the Tridimensional Personality Traits in the Social Phobia Patients in a Hospital, Wenzhou%温州市某医院社交恐惧症患者的三维人格特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林子江; 何金彩; 杨闯

    2012-01-01

    目的:通过分析,了解社交恐惧症患者的三维人格特征及成因.方法:采用三维人格问卷(Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire,TPQ)对60例门诊社交恐惧症患者及60名正常人进行人格评定,并用独立样本的t检验对两组的(得分)结果进行比较.结果:社交恐惧组在NS1(寻求刺激)因子、RD2(持之以恒)因子、在HA(躲避伤害性)维度总得分及各HA因子上的得分均高于正常对照组,社交恐惧组在RD3(依恋)因子上的得分低于正常对照组.结论:社交恐惧症患者与正常人相比,更倾向追求刺激,躲避伤害,缺少依恋;HA(躲避伤害性)量表分的高低可反映社交恐惧的严重程度.%Objective: The paper investigated the tridimensional personality traits of the social phobia patients. Methods; 60 social phobia patients and 60 normal persons were measured with the TPQ by t-test. ResultS:The social phobia patients group scored higher on the NS1, the RD2, the total scores of harm-avoidance dimension and each HA; The social phobia patients group scored lower on the RD3. These significant differences were observed (P<0.01). Conclusion; The trait of the social phobia patients is more to pursue stimulation, avoid of harm, be absence of attachment; the literature shows a consistent relationship between harm avoidance and social phobia.

  18. A new inventory for assessing cognitions in social phobia: The validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the social thoughts and beliefs scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayfun Doğan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of The Social Thoughts and Beliefs Scale (STABS, it’s developed for assessing cognitions in social phobia by Turner and et al. (2003. STABS was administered 532 university students (343 female and 188 male from two different universities in Turkey. In order to examine the structure validity and of STABS confirmatory factor analysis have been carried out. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the two-factor model fitted the research data. The reliability of the scale was examined by test re-test and Cronbach alpha methods. The Cronbach alpha for the STABS’ total score was .90. The computed test re-test reliability coefficient for the STABS was .88. Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965, and Interpersonal Cognitive Distortions Scale (Hamamcı and Büyüköztürk, 2003 was used for the criterion validity. There were statistically significant positive correlations between STABS and these scales. The Turkish version of STABS demonstrated good psychometric properties, with a high level of internal consistency.

  19. A new inventory for assessing cognitions in social phobia: The validity and reliability study of the Turkish version of the social thoughts and beliefs scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayfun Doğan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of The Social Thoughts and Beliefs Scale (STABS, developed for assesing cognitions in social phobia by Turner and et al. (2003. STABS was administered  532 university students (343 female and 188 male from two diffirent universities in Turkey. In order to examine the structure validity and factor structures of STABS confirmatory factor analysis have been carried out. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the two-factor model fitted the data. The reliability of the scale was examined by test re-test, Cronbach alpha and split-half methods. The Cronbach alpha for the STABS’ total score was .90 and split-half .87. The computed test re-test reliability coefficient for the STABS was .88. Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965 and Interpersonal Cognitive Distortions Scale (Hamamcı ve Büyüköztürk, 2003 was used for the criterion validity. There was statistically significant positive correlations between STABS and these scales. The Turkish version of STABS demonstrated good psychometric properties, with a high level of internal consistency.

  20. The structure of genetic and environmental risk factors for fears and phobias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loken, E K; Hettema, J M; Aggen, S H; Kendler, K S

    2014-08-01

    Although prior genetic studies of interview-assessed fears and phobias have shown that genetic factors predispose individuals to fears and phobias, they have been restricted to the DSM-III to DSM-IV aggregated subtypes of phobias rather than to individual fearful and phobic stimuli. We examined the lifetime history of fears and/or phobias in response to 21 individual phobic stimuli in 4067 personally interviewed twins from same-sex pairs from the Virginia Adult Twin Study of Psychiatric and Substance Abuse Disorders (VATSPSUD). We performed multivariate statistical analyses using Mx and Mplus. The best-fitting model for the 21 phobic stimuli included four genetic factors (agora-social-acrophobia, animal phobia, blood-injection-illness phobia and claustrophobia) and three environmental factors (agora-social-hospital phobia, animal phobia, and situational phobia). This study provides the first view of the architecture of genetic and environmental risk factors for phobic disorders and their subtypes. The genetic factors of the phobias support the DSM-IV and DSM-5 constructs of animal and blood-injection-injury phobias but do not support the separation of agoraphobia from social phobia. The results also do not show a coherent genetic factor for the DSM-IV and DSM-5 situational phobia. Finally, the patterns of co-morbidity across individual fears and phobias produced by genetic and environmental influences differ appreciably.

  1. 论社交恐惧症影响因素与心理干预%Influencing factors of social phobia and mental intervention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    左红霞

    2014-01-01

    社交恐惧症通常在青春期起病,影响患者的日常生活。有相当一部分患者害怕与人接触,担心被别人发现而拒绝进行心理咨询和治疗。本文从社交恐惧症的诊断、心理病理加以阐述,并提出心理干预措施,为临床诊断、治疗和干预提出理论依据和指导。%Social phobia usually falls ill in puberty and influences patients ’ daily life. Plenty of patients who are afraid of contact with others and worry them-selves to be discovered refuse psychological counseling and treatment. T his paper elaborates the diagnosis and psychopathology of social phobia and put forward mental intervention measure in order to provide theoretical basis and guidance for clinical diagnosis ,treatment and intervention.

  2. The genetic epidemiology of irrational fears and phobias in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, K S; Myers, J; Prescott, C A; Neale, M C

    2001-03-01

    Much of our knowledge of the role of genetic factors in the etiology of phobias comes from one population-based sample of female twins. We examined the sources of individual differences in the risks for phobias and their associated irrational fears in male twins. In personal interviews with both members of 1198 male-male twin pairs (707 monozygotic [MZ] and 491 dizygotic [DZ]) ascertained from a population-based registry, we assessed the lifetime history of agoraphobia and social, animal, situational, and blood/injury phobias as well as their associated irrational fears. Twin resemblance was assessed by means of probandwise concordance, odds ratios, tetrachoric correlations, and univariate and multivariate biometrical model fitting. The suggestive results obtained by analysis of phobias only were supported by analyzing both fears and phobias. All 5 phobia subtypes aggregate within twin-pairs. This aggregation is due largely or solely to genetic factors with heritability of liabilities ranging from 25% to 37%. Multivariate analysis revealed a common genetic factor, genetic factors specific to each subtype, and a common familial-environmental factor. In male subjects, genetic risk factors, which are partially common across all subtypes and partially subtype specific, play a moderate role in the etiology of phobias and their associated irrational fears. Family environment probably has an impact on risk for agoraphobia and social phobia. The genetic liability to blood/injury phobias is not distinct from those of the more typical phobias.

  3. Psychophysiological evidence for cortisol-induced reduction in early bias for implicit social threat in social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Peer, Jacobien M; Spinhoven, Philip; Roelofs, Karin

    2010-01-01

    The stress hormone cortisol is important for the regulation of social motivational processes. High cortisol levels have been associated with social fear and avoidance, which play an important role in social anxiety disorder (SAD), as does hypervigilant processing of social threat. However, causal effects of cortisol on threat processing in SAD remain unclear. In an event-related potential (ERP) study we investigated the effects of cortisol on task-irrelevant (implicit) processing of social threat in SAD, exploring the temporal dynamics as well as the role of symptom severity and stimulus awareness. Angry face processing was measured in participants with clinical SAD after double-blind, within-subject oral administration of cortisol (50mg) and placebo, using a masked and an unmasked emotional Stroop task. Both tasks showed significantly increased P2 midline ERP amplitudes for angry compared to neutral and happy faces in the placebo condition, reflecting an early attentional bias for social threat in SAD. Furthermore, cortisol administration significantly decreased P2 amplitudes for masked angry faces. This effect correlated with social anxiety, showing stronger decreases in patients with higher levels of social anxiety. These results indicate a highly specific effect of cortisol on early motivated attention to social threat and, together with previous findings, highlight the importance of motivational context (stimulus- or task-relevance) as well as symptom severity.

  4. Social phobia: individual response patterns and the long-term effects of behavioral and cognitive interventions. A follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mersch, P P; Emmelkamp, P M; Lips, C

    1991-01-01

    In this study the long-term effectiveness of Social Skills Training (SST) and Rational Emotive Therapy (RET), on social phobia was studied, as well as the differential influence of patient characteristics on treatment effectiveness. Fifty-seven patients were assessed 14 months after the post-test. Results showed that long-term effectiveness was independent of the response-pattern of the patients. Comparisons between methods, irrespective of the response-pattern of the patients, showed no differences in effectiveness in favor of either SST or RET. Explorative analysis indicated the potential predictive power for treatment-outcome of confederate ratings of overt behavior on the SSIT. Patients who needed additional treatment appeared to perform significantly worse on this measure at the pretest. No factors could be traced that predict relapse after a relatively successful treatment.

  5. How specific is specific phobia? Different neural response patterns in two subtypes of specific phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueken, Ulrike; Kruschwitz, Johann Daniel; Muehlhan, Markus; Siegert, Jens; Hoyer, Jürgen; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2011-05-01

    Specific phobia of the animal subtype has been employed as a model disorder exploring the neurocircuitry of anxiety disorders, but evidence is lacking whether the detected neural response pattern accounts for all animal subtypes, nor across other phobia subtypes. The present study aimed at directly comparing two subtypes of specific phobia: snake phobia (SP) representing the animal, and dental phobia (DP) representing the blood-injection-injury subtype. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), brain activation and skin conductance was measured during phobogenic video stimulation in 12 DP, 12 SP, and 17 healthy controls. For SP, the previously described activation of fear circuitry structures encompassing the insula, anterior cingulate cortex and thalamus could be replicated and was furthermore associated with autonomic arousal. In contrast, DP showed circumscribed activation of the prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex (PFC/OFC) when directly compared to SP, being dissociated from autonomic arousal. Results provide preliminary evidence for the idea that snake and dental phobia are characterized by distinct underlying neural systems during sustained emotional processing with evaluation processes in DP being controlled by orbitofrontal areas, whereas phobogenic reactions in SP are primarily guided by limbic and paralimbic structures. Findings support the current diagnostic classification conventions, separating distinct subtypes in DSM-IV-TR. They highlight that caution might be warranted though for generalizing findings derived from animal phobia to other phobic and anxiety disorders. If replicated, results could contribute to a better understanding of underlying neurobiological mechanisms of specific phobia and their respective classification.

  6. Screening for Specific Phobias

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disorder Specific Phobias Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Depression Bipolar Disorder Suicide and Prevention Stress Related Illnesses Myth-Conceptions Find ...

  7. Specific fears and phobias. Epidemiology and classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, G C; Magee, W J; Eaton, W W; Wittchen, H U; Kessler, R C

    1998-09-01

    Data on eight specific fears representing DSM-III-R simple phobia were analysed to evaluate: (a) their prevalence and (b) the validity of subtypes of specific phobia defined by DSM-IV. A modified version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview was administered to a probability sample of 8098 community respondents. Correlates of responses to questions concerning these fears were analysed. The most prevalent specific fears were of animals among women, and of heights among men. Slight evidence was found for specific phobia subtypes. Number of fears, independent of type, powerfully predicted impairment, comorbidity, illness course, demographic features, and family psychopathology. Number of specific fears may mark a general predisposition to psychopathology. More detailed information is needed to resolve the question of specific phobia subtypes.

  8. Type D personality is associated with social anxiety in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupper, Nina; Denollet, Johan

    2014-06-01

    Research on the emotional processes associated with Type D personality is important for its further conceptualization. We examined the associations of Type D personality with social and general anxiety symptoms in a large community sample. The aim of the current study was to disentangle the associations of Type D personality and its components with social anxiety and general anxiety in a large sample from the general population. A random sample of 2,475 adults from the general population filled out questionnaires to assess Type D personality (DS-14), social anxiety (SIAS(10), SPS(11), BFNE-II), and general anxiety (HADS-A, GAD-7). Type D individuals were characterized by increased levels of both social and general anxiety. The social inhibition (SI) component of Type D personality was most strongly associated with social interaction anxiety (r = .63), while negative affectivity (NA) was strongly associated with general anxiety (GAD-7: r = .70; HADS-A: r = .66). Within social anxiety, SI was more strongly associated with facets of social interaction anxiety than with social phobia. Multiple regression analysis showed that the synergistic interaction of NA and SI was a predictor of social anxiety (SIAS(10): β = .32, p interaction was not a significant predictor of general anxiety. Logistic regression using the dichotomous Type D classification demonstrated a 9.1-fold (95%CI, 7.0-11.8) increased odds of a score in the highest quartile of social interaction anxiety and a 7.6-fold (95%CI, 5.8-9.8) increased odds of high social phobia. Odds ratios for clinically relevant levels of general anxiety were 8.3 (95%CI, 5.5-12.5) for GAD-7 and 6.5 (95%CI, 3.4-12.6) for HADS-A. In the general population, Type D individuals were characterized by both social and general anxiety. The SI component of Type D is strongly associated with social interaction anxiety and the synergistic interaction of NA and SI was associated with high social anxiety, above and beyond the main NA and

  9. Is dental phobia a blood-injection-injury phobia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houtem, C.M.H.H.; Aartman, I.H.A.; Boomsma, D.I.; Ligthart, L.; Visscher, C.M.; de Jongh, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dental phobia is part of the Blood-Injection-Injury (B-I-I) phobia subtype of specific phobia within DSM-IV-TR. To investigate the conceptual validity of this classification, the purpose of the present study was to determine the co-occurrence of dental phobia, typical dental (and B-I-I re

  10. Is dental phobia a blood-injection-injury phobia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houtem, C.M.H.H.; Aartman, I.H.A.; Boomsma, D.I.; Ligthart, L.; Visscher, C.M.; de Jongh, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dental phobia is part of the Blood-Injection-Injury (B-I-I) phobia subtype of specific phobia within DSM-IV-TR. To investigate the conceptual validity of this classification, the purpose of the present study was to determine the co-occurrence of dental phobia, typical dental (and B-I-I re

  11. Disgust and spider phobia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulkens, SAN; de Jong, Peter; Merckelbach, H

    1996-01-01

    Twenty-four women with spider phobia and 45 nonphobic women completed the Disgust Questionnaire(DQ; P. Rozin, A. E. Fallen, & R. Mandell, 1984) and the Spider Phobia Questionnaire (SPQ; R. Klorman, T. C. Weerts, J. E. Hastings, B. G. Melamed, gr P. J. Lang, 1974). Participants also underwent behavio

  12. Disgust and spider phobia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulkens, SAN; de Jong, Peter; Merckelbach, H

    1996-01-01

    Twenty-four women with spider phobia and 45 nonphobic women completed the Disgust Questionnaire(DQ; P. Rozin, A. E. Fallen, & R. Mandell, 1984) and the Spider Phobia Questionnaire (SPQ; R. Klorman, T. C. Weerts, J. E. Hastings, B. G. Melamed, gr P. J. Lang, 1974). Participants also underwent behavio

  13. Changing core beliefs with trial-based cognitive therapy may improve quality of life in social phobia: a randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vania Bitencourt Powell

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine whether there are differences in quality of life (QoL improvement after treatment with the trial-based thought record (TBTR versus conventional cognitive therapy (CCT in patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD. Method: A randomized trial comparing TBTR with a set of CCT techniques, which included the standard 7-column dysfunctional thought record (DTR and the positive data log (PDL in patients with SAD, generalized type. Results: Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA revealed a significant time effect in the general health, vitality, social functioning, and mental health domains of the Short Form 36. It also indicated significant treatment effects on the bodily pain, social functioning, role-emotional, and mental health domains, with higher scores in the TBTR group. One-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA, using pretreatment values as covariates, showed that TBTR was associated with significantly better QoL post-treatment (bodily pain, social functioning and role-emotional and at follow-up (role-emotional. A significant treatment effect on the role-emotional domain at 12-month follow-up denoted a sustained effect of TBTR relative to CCT. Conclusion: This study provided preliminary evidence that TBTR is at least as effective as CCT in improving several domains of QoL in SAD, specifically when the standard 7-column DTR and the PDL are used.

  14. Treatment of specific phobia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Yujuan; Fyer, Abby J; Lipsitz, Josh D

    2007-04-01

    This is a comprehensive review of treatment studies in specific phobia. Acute and long-term efficacy studies of in vivo exposure, virtual reality, cognitive therapy and other treatments from 1960 to 2005 were retrieved from computer search engines. Although specific phobia is a chronic illness and animal extinction studies suggest that relapse is a common phenomenon, little is known about long-term outcome. Treatment gains are generally maintained for one year, but longer follow-up studies are needed to better understand and prevent relapse. Acutely, the treatments are not equally effective among the phobia subtypes. Most phobias respond robustly to in vivo exposure, but it is associated with high dropout rates and low treatment acceptance. Response to systematic desensitization is more moderate. A few studies suggest that virtual reality may be effective in flying and height phobia, but this needs to be substantiated by more controlled trials. Cognitive therapy is most helpful in claustrophobia, and blood-injury phobia is uniquely responsive to applied tension. The limited data on medication have not been promising with the exception of adjunctive D-clycoserine. Despite the acute benefits of in vivo exposure, greater attention should be paid to improve treatment acceptance and retention, and additional controlled studies of more acceptable treatments are needed.

  15. 童年期虐待、应对方式、自尊与青少年社交恐惧症的相关研究%The correlational study between childhood abuse, coping style, self esteem and adolescent social phobia.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    麻爱华; 于相芬; 刘西俊; 董俊玲; 王相立

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the correlation between childhood abuse, coping style, self esteem and adolescent social phobia, and to explore its relationship with onset age, course of disease and severity of adolescent social phobia. Methods A total of 110 adolescents with social phobia according with CCMD-3 diagnostic criteria and 142 healthy controls were assessed with Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-28 item Short Form (CTQ-SF) , Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire (SCSQ) and Self-Esteem Scale (SES). Moreover, the adolescents with social phobia were assessed with Social Avoidance and Distress Scale ( SAD) and their general clinical data were collected. Results Compared with healthy controls, adolescent social phobia group showed significantly higher total score and all dimensional scores of CTQ-SF ( P < 0. 05) , higher score of positive coping and negative coping of SCSQ ( P < 0. 05) , lower score of SES (P<0. 05). Correlation analysis indicated that score of SAD was significantly positively correlated with total score of CTQ-SF, dimensional scores of CTQ-SF and score of negative coping (P < 0. 01 ), while was significantly negatively correlated with score of positive coping and score of SES (P < 0. 01 ). Non-conditional Logistic regression analysis showed that the level of childhood abuse, emotional abuse (EA) , emotional neglect ( EN) , negative coping and self-esteem took effect on the onset of adolescent social phobia. The onset age was significantly negatively related with total score of CTQ-SF, EA score and EN score (P < 0. 01 ). The course of disease was significantly positively related with the severity of EA and EN (P < 0.05). Conclusion The adolescents with social phobia usually experience more childhood abuse. Risk factors of adolescent social phobia consist of childhood abuse, emotional abuse, emotional neglect, negative coping style and low self-esteem. While positive coping style is protection factor of adolescent social phobia. And the more serious

  16. No distinctions between different types of anxiety symptoms in pre-adolescents from the general population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferdinand, RF; van Lang, NDJ; Ormel, J; Verhulst, FC

    2006-01-01

    Studies aimed at anxiety symptoms in children from the general population samples often make distinctions between symptoms of Separation Anxiety, Social Phobia, Panic Disorder, and Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Given the high comorbidity rates between these disorders, the usefulness of such

  17. Weaving the (neuronal) web: fear learning in spider phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweckendiek, Jan; Klucken, Tim; Merz, Christian J; Tabbert, Katharina; Walter, Bertram; Ambach, Wolfgang; Vaitl, Dieter; Stark, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    Theories of specific phobias consider classical conditioning as a central mechanism in the pathogenesis and maintenance of the disorder. Although the neuronal network underlying human fear conditioning is understood in considerable detail, no study to date has examined the neuronal correlates of fear conditioning directly in patients with specific phobias. Using functional magnet resonance imaging (fMRI) we investigated conditioned responses using phobia-relevant and non-phobia-relevant unconditioned stimuli in patients with specific phobias (n=15) and healthy controls (n=14) by means of a differential picture-picture conditioning paradigm: three neutral geometric figures (conditioned stimuli) were followed by either pictures of spiders, highly aversive scenes or household items (unconditioned stimuli), respectively. Enhanced activations within the fear network (medial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala, insula and thalamus) were observed in response to the phobia-related conditioned stimulus. Further, spider phobic subjects displayed higher amygdala activation in response to the phobia-related conditioned stimulus than to the non-phobia-related conditioned stimulus. Moreover, no differences between patients and healthy controls emerged regarding the non-phobia-related conditioned stimulus. The results imply that learned phobic fear is based on exaggerated responses in structures belonging to the fear network and emphasize the importance of the amygdala in the processing of phobic fear. Further, altered responding of the fear network in patients was only observed in response to the phobia-related conditioned stimulus but not to the non-phobia-related conditioned stimulus indicating no differences in general conditionability between patients with specific phobias and healthy controls. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Using a hybrid model to investigate the comorbidity and symptom overlap between social phobia and the other anxiety disorders and unipolar mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gros, Daniel F; McCabe, Randi E; Antony, Martin M

    2013-11-30

    New hybrid models of psychopathology have been proposed that combine the current categorical approach with symptom dimensions that are common across various disorders. The present study investigated the new hybrid model of social anxiety in a large sample of participants with anxiety disorders and unipolar mood disorders to improve understanding of the comorbidity and symptom overlap between social phobia (SOC) and the other anxiety disorders and unipolar mood disorders. Six hundred and eighty two participants from a specialized outpatient clinic for anxiety treatment completed a semi-structured diagnostic interview and the Multidimensional Assessment of Social Anxiety (MASA). A hybrid model symptom profile was identified for SOC and compared with each of the other principal diagnoses. Significant group differences were identified on each of the MASA scales. Differences also were identified when common sets of comorbidities were compared within participants diagnosed with SOC. The findings demonstrated the influence of both the principal diagnosis of SOC and other anxiety disorders and unipolar mood disorders as well as the influence of comorbid diagnoses with SOC on the six symptom dimensions. These findings highlight the need to shift to transdiagnostic assessment and treatment practices that go beyond the disorder-specific focus of the current categorical diagnostic systems.

  19. Social Anxiety Disorder (Social Phobia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the condition. Negative experiences. Children who experience teasing, bullying, rejection, ridicule or humiliation may be more prone ... mental illness in the past? If yes, what type of therapy was most beneficial? Have you ever ...

  20. Predictors of Response to an Attention Modification Program in Generalized Social Phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Nader; Taylor, Charles T.; Donohue, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: At least 3 randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind studies have supported the efficacy of computerized attention modification programs (AMPs) in reducing symptoms of anxiety in patients diagnosed with an anxiety disorder. In this study we examined patient characteristics that predicted response to AMP in a large sample of…

  1. Specific Phobia among U.S. Adolescents: Phenomenology and Typology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstein, Marcy; Georgiades, Katholiki; He, Jian-Ping; Schmitz, Anja; Feig, Emily; Khazanov, Gabriela Kattan; Merikangas, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Background Investigators have proposed the diagnostic value of a generalized subtype of specific phobia, with classification based upon the number of phobic fears. However, current and future typologies of specific phobia classify the condition by the nature of phobic fears. This study investigated the clinical relevance of these alternative typologies by: (1) presenting the prevalence and correlates of specific phobia separately by the number and nature of phobia types; and (2) examining the clinical and psychiatric correlates of specific phobia according to these alternative typologies. Methods The National Comorbidity Survey Replication-Adolescent Supplement (NCS-A) is a nationally representative face-to-face survey of 10,123 adolescents aged 13–18 years in the continental United States. Results Most adolescents with specific phobia met criteria for more than one type of phobia in their lifetime, however rates were fairly similar across DSM-IV/5 subtypes. Sex differences were consistent across DSM-IV/5 subtypes, but varied by the number of phobic types, with a female predominance observed among those with multiple types of phobias. Adolescents with multiple types of phobias exhibited an early age of onset, elevated severity and impairment, and among the highest rates of other psychiatric disorders. However, certain DSM-IV/5 subtypes (i.e. blood-injection-injury and situational) were also uniquely associated with severity and psychiatric comorbidity. Conclusions Results indicate that both quantitative and DSM-IV/5 typologies of specific phobia demonstrate diagnostic value. Moreover, in addition to certain DSM-IV/5 subtypes, a generalized subtype based on the number of phobias may also characterize youth who are at greatest risk for future difficulties. PMID:23108894

  2. Adaptação transcultural para o português do Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN para utilização entre estudantes adolescentes Adaptación transcultural al portugués del Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN para utilización entre estudiantes adolescentes Portuguese-language cross-cultural adaptation of the Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN to be used with adolescent students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane Vilete

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: É crescente o interesse em estudar a Fobia Social, sobretudo em faixas etárias jovens, requerendo instrumentos de autopreenchimento para identificação do transtorno. Esse estudo consistiu na adaptação transcultural do Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN para sua utilização entre adolescentes estudantes brasileiros. MÉTODOS: O processo de adaptação envolveu quatro etapas: tradução; retroversão; apreciação das versões com elaboração de uma versão de consenso; e pré-teste comentado. RESULTADOS: Para cada item do instrumento, são apresentados os resultados das quatro etapas e a versão final do instrumento em português. DISCUSSÃO: É importante a utilização de mais de uma tradução e retroversão para possibilitar a comparação dos itens e a identificação de erros e assim permitir a escolha dos termos mais adequados. A realização do pré-teste comentado em um grupo semelhante à população alvo possibilita a melhor adequação do instrumento à população em que será utilizado. CONCLUSÃO: Instrumentos elaborados em língua estrangeira necessitam de processo cuidadoso de adaptação transcultural para sua utilização em uma realidade sociocultural distinta.INTRODUCCIÓN: Es creciente el interés en estudiar la Fobia Social, sobre todo en el franjas de la edad de los jóvenes, requiriendo instrumentos de auto relleno para la identificación del trastorno. Ese estudio consistió en la adaptación del Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN, para su utilización entre los adolescentes estudiantes brasileños. MÉTODOS: El proceso de adaptación abarca cuatro etapas: Traducción, Retroversión, apreciación de las Versiones, con elaboración de otra versión de Acuerdos y preteste comentado. RESULTADOS: Para cada ítem del instrumento, son presentados los resultados de las cuatro etapas y la versión final del instrumento en portugués. DISCUSIÓN: Es importante la utilización de más de una traducción y retraducci

  3. Genes, Fears, Phobias, and Phobic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Gregory

    1990-01-01

    Surveyed literature on genetics and fears and phobias to determine what might be heritable. Found, for ordinary fears among the general population, heredity appears to contribute mainly to a trait of general fearfulness and may be a major reason for the strong intercorrelation among different fears. Found evidence of little environmental…

  4. Find Your Voice: Eliminate Classroom Phobias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Michael V.

    2007-01-01

    The academically underprepared community college student may also be psychosocially underprepared for college, a condition contributing to the development of classroom-specific social phobia and to the high attrition rate at community colleges. The "Find Your Voice Program" uses individual and group cognitive-behavioral techniques to develop…

  5. [A specific phobia of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS phobia)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitskiĭ, G N; Gilod, V M; Levin, O S

    2012-01-01

    A specific phobia of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS phobia) was not previously described in the literature. We examined 21 patients, 11 men and 10 women, aged 28-72 years, with symptoms of this phobia. Only 23% of patients had a history of the psychiatric disorder in the past. The duration of phobia symptoms was significantly higher in patients with moderate and severe phobia than in mild cases (1.5±0.6 and 5.0±1.1 months respectively; рphobia was correlated with its duration (r= -0.5; p=0.004). The primary character of phobia was established in 52.4% of patients basing on the regression of phobia symptoms assessed by the Hamilton anxiety scale after psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy (17±4 and 3±1 scores before and 3 months after treatment, respectively; p<0.05).

  6. Blood Injury and Injection Phobia: The Neglected One

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ab Latif Wani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood injury and injection (BII phobia is a unique phobia associated with a diphasic cardiovascular response. The aim of this survey was to report the prevalence of BII phobia, its heritability, and clinical characteristics among the males and females in the Indian subcontinent. An interview and a survey were conducted using a developed BII phobia 21-item questionnaire among 3261 participant males (n=1648 and females (n=1613. Cronbach’ alpha (α of 0.972 of internal consistency was reported. The prevalence of BII phobia and associated fainting in females was slightly more than double in the males with a significant gender related effect. Similar avoidance behaviours involving hospital visits were reported for both males and females. The relative frequency of BII phobia among first and third degree relatives was found to be higher than among second degree relatives. Depression was found highly comorbid with BII phobia while a low rate of obsessive compulsion disorder (OCD and social anxiety disorder (SAD was reported. Morbidity associated with BII phobia may increase dramatically when other medical problems coincide with it.

  7. Cannabidiol reduces the anxiety induced by simulated public speaking in treatment-naïve social phobia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamaschi, Mateus M; Queiroz, Regina Helena Costa; Chagas, Marcos Hortes Nisihara; de Oliveira, Danielle Chaves Gomes; De Martinis, Bruno Spinosa; Kapczinski, Flávio; Quevedo, João; Roesler, Rafael; Schröder, Nadja; Nardi, Antonio E; Martín-Santos, Rocio; Hallak, Jaime Eduardo Cecílio; Zuardi, Antonio Waldo; Crippa, José Alexandre S

    2011-05-01

    Generalized Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) is one of the most common anxiety conditions with impairment in social life. Cannabidiol (CBD), one major non-psychotomimetic compound of the cannabis sativa plant, has shown anxiolytic effects both in humans and in animals. This preliminary study aimed to compare the effects of a simulation public speaking test (SPST) on healthy control (HC) patients and treatment-naïve SAD patients who received a single dose of CBD or placebo. A total of 24 never-treated patients with SAD were allocated to receive either CBD (600 mg; n=12) or placebo (placebo; n=12) in a double-blind randomized design 1 h and a half before the test. The same number of HC (n=12) performed the SPST without receiving any medication. Each volunteer participated in only one experimental session in a double-blind procedure. Subjective ratings on the Visual Analogue Mood Scale (VAMS) and Negative Self-Statement scale (SSPS-N) and physiological measures (blood pressure, heart rate, and skin conductance) were measured at six different time points during the SPST. The results were submitted to a repeated-measures analysis of variance. Pretreatment with CBD significantly reduced anxiety, cognitive impairment and discomfort in their speech performance, and significantly decreased alert in their anticipatory speech. The placebo group presented higher anxiety, cognitive impairment, discomfort, and alert levels when compared with the control group as assessed with the VAMS. The SSPS-N scores evidenced significant increases during the testing of placebo group that was almost abolished in the CBD group. No significant differences were observed between CBD and HC in SSPS-N scores or in the cognitive impairment, discomfort, and alert factors of VAMS. The increase in anxiety induced by the SPST on subjects with SAD was reduced with the use of CBD, resulting in a similar response as the HC.

  8. A Case Report of Social phobia in College Students%一例大学生社交恐怖症的案例分析报告

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晶; 杨德祥

    2011-01-01

    对一倒社交恐怖症心理帮助情况的咨询记录及分析报告,结合求助者相关资料和SCL-90,SDS、SAS测验的结果,从生物因素、社会因素、认知因素、个性因素和防御机制等几个方面分析了该心理障碍形成与发展过程,并在几种相似的心理障碍中做了鉴别诊断,确诊为恐怖性神经症中的社交恐怖症,然后根据系统脱敏和合理情绪疗法的理论与方法做了有效的干预和治疗,根据SCL-90后测的减分率及预后求助者的学习生活情况证明本次咨询为有效咨询。%According to some counseling records and analysis reports of psychological support of social phobia,combined with the related documentation and tested results from SCL-90,SDS、SAS,analyzes the formation and development of mental disorders from the aspects

  9. How cognitive performance-induced stress can influence right VLPFC activation: an fMRI study in healthy subjects and in patients with social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koric, Lejla; Volle, Emmanuelle; Seassau, Magali; Bernard, Frédéric A; Mancini, Julien; Dubois, Bruno; Pelissolo, Antoine; Levy, Richard

    2012-08-01

    The neural bases of interactions between anxiety and cognitive control are not fully understood. We conducted an fMRI study in healthy participants and in patients with an anxiety disorder (social phobia) to determine the impact of stress on the brain network involved in cognitive control. Participants performed two working memory tasks that differed in their level of performance-induced stress. In both groups, the cognitive tasks activated a frontoparietal network, involved in working memory tasks. A supplementary activation was observed in the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) in patients during the more stressful cognitive task. Region of interest analyses showed that activation in the right VLPFC decreased in the more stressful condition as compared to the less stressful one in healthy subjects and remain at a similar level in the two cognitive tasks in patients. This pattern was specific to the right when compared to the left VLPFC activation. Anxiety was positively correlated with right VLPFC activation across groups. Finally, left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) activation was higher in healthy subjects than in patients in the more stressful task. These findings demonstrate that in healthy subjects, stress induces an increased activation in left DLPFC, a critical region for cognitive control, and a decreased activation in the right VLPFC, an area associated with anxiety. In patients, the differential modulation between these dorsal and ventral PFC regions disappears. This absence of modulation may limit anxious patients' ability to adapt to demanding cognitive control tasks.

  10. Evaluating the efficacy of endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy for generalized social anxiety disorder with blushing complaints: a comparison with sertraline and no treatment-santiago de chile 2003-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadresic, Enrique; Súarez, Claudio; Palacios, Estela; Palacios, Fernanda; Matus, Patricia

    2011-11-01

    No study has yet compared the efficacy of endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy for treating facial blushing with other treatment or no treatment. We conducted a prospective, observational, open-label, clinical study to compare endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy for blushing with generalized social anxiety disorder versus sertraline treatment and no treatment. Three-hundred and thirty consecutive patients seeking treatment for their blushing were assessed by psychiatric interview and patient-rated scales. The Brief Social Phobia Scale was the primary outcome measure. Patients meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for generalized social anxiety disorder, scoring 20 points or more in the Brief Social Phobia Scale and 19 points or more in the Social Phobia Inventory were considered eligible and followed up for a mean of 11 months (range 1-64) after endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy or initiation of sertraline. At baseline, 97 percent of the endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy-treated group, 87 percent of the sertraline-treated group, and 78 percent of the nontreated group rated their blushing as being "severe" or "extreme." At follow up, 16 percent of endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy-treated patients, 32 percent of sertraline-treated patients, and 57 percent of untreated patients reported this degree of blushing. At endpoint, Brief Social Phobia Scale total scores exhibited a greater decline with either treatment than with no treatment. Nonetheless, in comparison to no treatment, only the results obtained with endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy achieved statistical significance (p=0.003). Compensatory sweating occurred in 99 percent of patients who underwent endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy. High degrees of satisfaction with treatment were reported by 89 percent of patients undergoing endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy and by 59 percent of patients taking medication. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy was associated to a

  11. Social Engineering a General Approach

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    Valerica GREAVU-SERBAN

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Social engineering is considered to be a taboo subject in nowadays society. It involves the use of social skills or to obtain usernames, passwords, credit card data, or to compromise or altering the information and systems of an entity. Social engineering methods are numerous and people using it are extremely ingenious and adaptable. This technique takes advantage of the intrinsic nature of mankind, to manipulate and obtain sensitive information, persuading people into divulge it, using exceptional communication skills. Thus, five models of persuasion were identified, based on: simplicity, interest, incongruity, confidence and empathy, exploiting key factors which predispose people to fall victim to attacks of social engineering such as greed, self-interest, guilt or ignorance. It is well known fact that security is as strong as the weakest link in its chain (individuals therefore, beyond technical measures, staff training is the key to success in defending against such attacks.

  12. Conditioning experiences and phobias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merckelbach, H.; de Ruiter, C.; van den Hout, M.A.; Hoekstra, R.

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to examine the extent to which phobias are associated with a conditioning pathway to fear. The Phobic Origin Questionnaire (Öst and Hugdahl, Behav. Res. Ther. 19, 439-477, 1981) was administered to a sample of 91 phobic outpatients (patients with panic disorder wi

  13. Specific Phobia in Youth: Phenomenology and Psychological Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollendick, Thomas H.; Raishevich, Natoshia; Davis, Thompson E.; Sirbu, Cristian; Öst, Lars-Göran

    2012-01-01

    Sociodemographic and psychological characteristics of 62 youth with animal and natural environment types of specific phobia were examined in a treatment-seeking sample. Differences due to age, sex, ethnicity, family structure, and family socioeconomic status were not found between youth with the two types of specific phobia. Moreover, differences were not obtained between the two groups in the clinical severity of their phobias, the perceived dangerousness of the feared outcomes associated with their phobias, the perceived levels of coping with their phobias, or overall fearfulness. However, differences between youth with the two types of specific phobias were found on somatic/anxious symptoms, depressive symptoms, and life satisfaction. In addition, differences were noted on withdrawn, somatic complaints, anxious/depressed symptoms, and social problems as reported by the mothers of these youngsters. Finally, differences in the percent of co-occurring anxiety disorders between youth with the two types of specific phobia were found. On all of the domains in which differences were found, youth with the natural environment type fared more poorly than those with the animal type. These findings converge with those obtained in treatment studies which indicate that youth with the natural environment type are more difficult to treat than youth with the animal type. PMID:20171334

  14. Specific phobia in youth: phenomenology and psychological characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollendick, Thomas H; Raishevich, Natoshia; Davis, Thompson E; Sirbu, Cristian; Ost, Lars-Göran

    2010-03-01

    Sociodemographic and psychological characteristics of 62 youth with animal and natural environment types of specific phobia were examined in a treatment-seeking sample. Differences due to age, sex, ethnicity, family structure, and family socioeconomic status were not found between youth with the two types of specific phobia. Moreover, differences were not obtained between the two groups in the clinical severity of their phobias, the perceived dangerousness of the feared outcomes associated with their phobias, the perceived levels of coping with their phobias, or overall fearfulness. However, differences between youth with the two types of specific phobias were found on somatic/anxious symptoms, depressive symptoms, and life satisfaction. In addition, differences were noted on withdrawn, somatic complaints, anxious/depressed symptoms, and social problems as reported by the mothers of these youngsters. Finally, differences in the percent of co-occurring anxiety disorders between youth with the two types of specific phobia were found. On all of the domains in which differences were found, youth with the natural environment type fared more poorly than those with the animal type. These findings converge with those obtained in treatment studies which indicate that youth with the natural environment type are more difficult to treat than youth with the animal type.

  15. A pilot study on normative data for two social anxiety measures: The Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory and the Social Anxiety Scale for Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Olivares

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Pese a que la fobia social es uno de los trastornos mentales más frecuentes en la adolescencia, existe poca investigación publicada sobre instrumentos de evaluación de la misma, bien hayan sido diseñados y/o adaptados para población adolescente. Este estudio piloto proporciona los primeros resultados sobre datos normativos en población adolescente de lengua española del Inventario de Ansiedad y Fobia Social (SPAI y la Escala de Ansiedad Social para Adolescentes (SAS-A. El SPAI y la SASA fueron cumplimentados por 303 adolescentes con y sin fobia social. Los resultados preliminares apoyan tanto a la subescala de Fobia Social del SPAI como a la puntuación Total de la SAS-A como las mejores medidas para minimizar los falsos positivos y negativos. No obstante, la mayor tasa de acuerdo se encontró cuando tanto el SPAI como la SAS-A se usaron conjuntamente, lo cual apoya la complementariedad de ambas escalas, ya que su uso conjunto incrementa la eficiencia en el diagnóstico de la fobia social, además de sugerir que estos instrumentos de evaluación parecen ser las medidas más apropiadas para su empleo como herramientas de muestreo

  16. School phobia in children with dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łodygowska, Ewa; Czepita, Damian A

    2012-01-01

    Dyslexic disorders are found in many children, affecting the emotional and social sphere and producing negative consequences for school functioning of the child. The aim of the present work was to determine the impact of the type of therapy on school phobia in dyslexic children. 165 dyslexic children were examined using the questionnaire "Me and my school" developed by Elzbieta Skrzypek-Siwińska. The therapeutic experience of the children was taken into account and three groups were formed: 1) children with regular therapy; 2) children with occasional therapy; 3) children without therapy. Children with occasional therapy demonstrated higher levels of school phobia. These children exhibited a higher level of fear in situations when their knowledge was tested. Girls revealed a higher level of school phobia and knowledge testing fear, regardless of their therapeutic experience. The present study disclosed that the quality of therapy affects the emotional sphere of dyslexic children. Irregular therapy can produce serious consequences in the form of enhanced school phobia.

  17. Sex differences in genetic and environmental risk factors for irrational fears and phobias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, K S; Jacobson, K C; Myers, J; Prescott, C A

    2002-02-01

    For irrational fears and their associated phobias, epidemiological studies suggest sex differences in prevalence and twin studies report significant genetic effects. How does sex impact on the familial transmission of liability to fears and phobias? In personal interviews with over 3000 complete pairs (of whom 1058 were opposite-sex dizygotic pairs), ascertained from a population-based registry, we assessed the lifetime prevalence of five phobias and their associated irrational fears analysed using a multiple threshold model. Twin resemblance was assessed by polychoric correlations and biometrical model-fitting incorporating sex-specific effects. For agoraphobia, situational and blood/injury fear/phobia, the best fit model suggested equal heritability in males and females and genetic correlations between the sexes of less than +0.50. For animal fear/phobias by contrast, the best fit model suggested equal heritability in males and females and a genetic correlation of unity. No evidence was found for an impact of family environment on liability to these fears or phobias. For social phobias, twin resemblance in males was explained by genetic factors and in females by familial-environmental factors. The impact of sex on genetic risk may differ meaningfully across phobia subtypes. Sex-specific genetic risk factors may exist for agoraphobia, social, situational and blood-injury phobias but not for animal fear/phobia. These results should be interpreted in the context of the limited power of twin studies, even with large sample sizes, to resolve sex-specific genetic effects.

  18. 社交恐怖障碍患者执行功能与工作记忆能力研究%A study on the executive function and working memory ability in patients with social phobia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高艳杰; 曲鸿儒; 毛富强

    2011-01-01

    探讨社交恐怖障碍患者的执行功能、工作记忆能力与正常对照组的差异.方法 采用威斯康星分类卡片测验(Wisconsin Card Sorting Test,WSCT)以及数字广度、空间广度、多图形空间广度测验对42名社交恐怖障碍患者和42名健康对照者的执行功能、工作记忆能力进行评估.结果 在WSCT测验中,社交恐怖障碍患者非持续错误数明显高于对照组[分别为(18.75±6.20)分,(8.89±3.22)分],差异具有统计学意义.社交恐怖障碍患者工作记忆能力测验中数字广度[分别为(7.25±1.35)分,(8.03 ±2.30)分]、空间广度[分别为(6.11±1.85)分,(8.61±2.87)分]以及多图形空间广度[分别为(4.03±1.39)分,(5.18±1.07)分]成绩均低于对照组,差异具有统计学意义.结论 社交恐怖障碍患者存在工作记忆受损,而这可能是社交恐怖障碍患者学业以及社会功能不良的神经心理学机制.%Objective To explore the executive function and working memory ability of patients with social phobia. Methods The study included 42 social phobia patients whose age, sex, and level of education were matched with those of a healthy control group. Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and Digit Span, Spatial Span, Multiple-Objects-Spatial span were used to study the executive function and working memory. Results Patients with social phobia scored higher than the control group in terms of the number of non perseverative errors on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test ( 18. 75 ± 6. 20, 8. 89 ± 3. 22 respectively ). No differences were observed in perseverative errors and other scores between the patient and control group. Patients with social phobia scored lower than the control group in terms of Digit Span(7.25 ±1.35,8.03 ±2. 30 respectively) ,Spatial Span(6. 11±1.85,8.61 ±2.87 respectively) and Multiple-Objects-Spatial span(4.03 ± 1. 39 ,5. 18 ± 1.07 respectively). Conclusion Working memory ability in the social phobia patients is impaired, and this may cause

  19. Radiation: facts, fallacies and phobias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigg, D R

    2007-02-01

    There is frequent debate in the media and the scientific published reports about the use of radiation for diagnosis and treatment, the benefits and risks of the nuclear industry, uranium mining and the storage of radioactive wastes. Driving this debate is increasing concern about reliance on fossil fuels for power generation for which alternatives are required. Unfortunately, there is generally a poor understanding of the relevant basic sciences compounded by widespread irrational fear of irradiation (radiation phobia). Radioactivity, with special reference to uranium and plutonium is simply described. How radiation affect tissues and the potential hazards to individuals and populations are explained. The origins of radiation phobia and its harmful consequences are examined. Whether we like it or not, Australia is heavily involved in the uranium industry by virtue of having one-third of the world's known reserves, exports of which are worth approximately $470m annually. As this paper has been written as simply as possible, it may also be of interest to readers who may have had little scientific training. It may be downloaded from the web using references provided in this article. It is concluded that ignorance and fear are major impediments to rational debate on radiation issues.

  20. Cortisol-induced enhancement of emotional face processing in social phobia depends on symptom severity and motivational context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Peer, Jacobien M; Spinhoven, Philip; van Dijk, J Gert; Roelofs, Karin

    2009-05-01

    We investigated the effects of cortisol administration on approach and avoidance tendencies in 20 patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD). Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were measured during a reaction time task, in which patients evaluated the emotional expression of photographs of happy and angry faces by making an approaching (flexion) or avoiding (extension) arm movement. Patients showed significant avoidance tendencies for angry but not for happy faces, both in the placebo and cortisol condition. Moreover, ERP analyses showed a significant interaction of condition by severity of social anxiety on early positive (P150) amplitudes during avoidance compared to approach, indicating that cortisol increases early processing of social stimuli (in particular angry faces) during avoidance. This result replicates previous findings from a non-clinical sample of high anxious individuals and demonstrates their relevance for clinical SAD. Apparently the cortisol-induced increase in processing of angry faces in SAD depends on symptom severity and motivational context.

  1. Glucocorticoids for the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder and phobias: a novel therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Margraf, Jürgen

    2008-04-07

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and phobias belong to the most common anxiety disorders and to the most common psychiatric illnesses in general. In both disorders, aversive memories are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis and symptomatology. Previously, we have reported that elevated glucocorticoid levels inhibit memory retrieval in animals and healthy humans. We therefore hypothesized that the administration of glucocorticoids might also inhibit the retrieval of aversive memory, thereby reducing symptoms in patients with PTSD and phobias. In recent clinical studies, we found first evidence to support this hypothesis. In patients with PTSD, low-dose cortisol treatment for one month reduced symptoms of traumatic memories without causing adverse side effects. Furthermore, we found evidence for a prolonged effect of the cortisol treatment. Persistent retrieval and reconsolidation of traumatic memories is a process that keeps these memories vivid and thereby the disorder alive. By inhibiting memory retrieval, cortisol may weaken the traumatic memory trace, and thus reduce symptoms even beyond the treatment period. In patients with social phobia, we found that a single oral administration of cortisone 1 h before a socio-evaluative stressor significantly reduced self-reported fear during the anticipation-, exposure-, and recovery phase of the stressor. In subjects with spider phobia, repeated oral administration of cortisol 1 h before exposure to a spider photograph induced a progressive reduction of stimulus-induced fear. This effect was maintained when subjects were exposed to the stimulus again two days after the last cortisol administration, indicating that cortisol facilitated the extinction of phobic fear. In conclusion, by a common mechanism of reducing the retrieval of aversive memories, glucocorticoids may be suited for the treatment of PTSD as well as phobias. More studies are needed to further evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of

  2. Validação da versão em português do Mini-Inventário de Fobia Social (Mini-SPIN Validation of the portuguese version of the Mini-Social Phobia Inventory (Mini-SPIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo José Fonseca D'El Rey

    2009-12-01

    value of 98.6% and incorrect classification rate of 16.9%. With score of 7 points, was observed an increase in the specificity and positive predictive value (88.6% and 62.7%, while the sensitivity and negative predictive value (84.8% and 96.2% remained high. The Portuguese version of the Mini-SPIN showed satisfactory psychometric qualities in terms of discriminative validity. In this study, the cut-off of 7, was considered to be the most suitable to screening of the generalized social phobia.

  3. Cortisol-induced enhancement of emotional face processing in social phobia depends on symptom severity and motivational context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peer, J.M. van; Spinhoven, P.; Dijk, J.G. van; Roelofs, K.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the effects of cortisol administration on approach and avoidance tendencies in 20 patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD). Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were measured during a reaction time task, in which patients evaluated the emotional expression of photographs of happy

  4. Prevalence of common phobias and their socio-demographic correlates in children and adolescents in a traditional developing society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bener, A; Ghuloum, S; Dafeeah, E E

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the most common phobias in children and adolescents and to determine the prevalence, age distribution, and socio-demographic correlates of phobias. This was a prospective cross-sectional study conducted at public and private schools from July 2009 to February 2009. The questionnaire included socio-demographic information, extra-curricular activities and hobbies, behaviour at home and various phobic fears and it was distributed among children aged 6 to 18 years. Psychiatrists determined the definitive diagnosis for various phobias by checking and screening their symptoms. Of the studied subjects, 44% were males and 56% were females. The overall prevalence of phobia in children and adolescents was 19.7%. Among children with phobia, females had higher rates of phobias (62.4% vs 37.6%) than males. Nearly half of total sufferers were in the 12-15 year age group (46.3%). Social phobia (12.7%) was the commonest phobia found followed by agoraphobia (8.6%). Secondary school children were highly afflicted with social phobia (14.9%), agoraphobia (11.7%) and specific phobia (9.6%), while preparatory students (8.3%) were more likely to have 'medical' phobia (fear of physical illness, medical tests and procedures). A significant difference was observed between the age groups in children with agoraphobia (p=0.002). The overall prevalence of phobia in children and adolescents in Qatar was higher than rates found in other epidemiologic studies, with the most common phobias observed being social phobia, agoraphobia and specific phobia.

  5. Noise Phobia in Dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangle

    Full Text Available Fear of thunderstorms and other forms of noise phobia are common problems in dogs. Administering medications along with changing the pet’s environment, and using behavior modification techniques can help ease the fear. Above all, do not give your pet any attention or reward when he is showing signs of fear; this will only reinforce the fearful behavior. [Veterinary World 2008; 1(11.000: 351-352

  6. A Report on the Case of a College Student's Social Phobia Consultation%一例大学生社交恐怖症咨询案例报告

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李春民; 李焕

    2013-01-01

    Through the use of Morita therapy and Ellis rational e-motive therapy, the consultation of a social phobia patient was made. Through the consultation, the patient's social communica-tion disorder was basically controlled, basically reached the counseling effect. The consultation proves that Morita therapy and Ellis rational emotive therapy are effective for the consultation and treatment of social phobia.%通过运用森田疗法和艾利斯合理情绪疗法,对一例社交恐怖症患者进行了咨询。通过咨询,求助者的社会交往障碍得到基本的控制,基本达到了咨询的效果。经过这次咨询,证明森田疗法和艾利斯合理情绪疗法对社交恐怖症进行咨询和治疗是有效的。

  7. Effect of quetiapine vs. placebo on response to two virtual public speaking exposures in individuals with social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Christopher B; Kushner, Matt G; Thuras, Paul D; Murphy, Tom G; Van Demark, Joani B; Adson, David E

    2009-04-01

    Clinical practice and open-label studies suggest that quetiapine (an atypical anti-psychotic) might improve symptoms for individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD). The purpose of this study was to provide a rigorous test of the acute impact of a single dose of quetiapine (25mg) on SAD symptoms. Individuals with SAD (N=20) were exposed to a 4-min virtual reality (VR) public speaking challenge after having received quetiapine or placebo (double-blind) 1h earlier. A parallel VR challenge occurred 1 week later using a counter-balanced cross-over (within subject) design for the medication-placebo order between the two sessions. There was no significant drug effect for quetiapine on the primary outcome measures. However, quetiapine was associated with significantly elevated heart rate and sleepiness compared with placebo. Study findings suggest that a single dose of 25mg quetiapine is not effective in alleviating SAD symptoms in individuals with fears of public speaking.

  8. A Case Study of a College Student's Psychological Counseling for Social Phobia%一例大学生社交恐怖症的心理咨询过程

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    强冬梅

    2016-01-01

    This case starts from the collection of data about an undergraduate with social phobia .Then we utilize'Correcting the Unreasonable Cognition'in Cognitive Therapy to reconstruct correct cognition and make a psycho-logical intervention for the client by the 'Systematic desensitization Therapy'in Behavior Therapy .After six months'counseling and treatment , we have obtained great effect:the undergraduate's symptoms of social phobia have disappeared and he has normal interpersonal communication in life .%通过对某在校大学生社交恐怖症开展资料收集,运用认知疗法中的矫正不合理认知并重建正确认知,用行为疗法中的系统脱敏疗法对来访者的社交恐怖症状进行心理干预。经过半年多的咨询与治疗,取得了较好的效果,社交恐怖症状消失,能正常地人际交往和生活。

  9. Impact of alcohol intoxication and withdrawal syndrome on social phobia and panic disorder in alcoholic inpatients Impacto das fases de intoxicação e de abstinência de álcool sobre a fobia social e o transtorno de pânico em pacientes alcoolistas hospitalizados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Barbosa Terra

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the impact of alcohol intoxication and withdrawal on the course of social phobia and panic disorder. METHOD: A group of 41 alcoholic inpatients undergoing detoxification therapy were interviewed using the SCID-I (DSM-IV and questions to detect fluctuations in the course of social phobia and panic disorder as a function of the different phases in alcohol dependence (intoxication, withdrawal, and lucid interval. RESULTS: Only 1 (2.4% patient presented panic disorder throughout life, and 9 (21.9% had panic attacks during alcohol intoxication or during the withdrawal syndrome. Sixteen (39% alcoholic patients showed social phobia with onset prior to drug use. However, drinking eventually became unable to alleviate social phobia symptoms or worsened such symptoms in 31.2% of social-phobic patients. While patients with social phobia reported a significant improvement in psychiatric symptoms during alcohol intoxication, patients experiencing panic attacks worsened significantly during intoxication. In the withdrawal phase, patients with social phobia tended to have more and more intense phobic symptoms. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that the impact of alcohol intoxication is different for social phobia as compared to panic disorder, at first decreasing the social-phobic symptoms but later aggravating them. In panic disorder, the impact of intoxication by alcohol is more harmful, at least in the short term.OBJETIVO: Estudar o impacto das fases de intoxicação e de abstinência do uso de álcool sobre o curso da fobia social e do transtorno de pânico. MÉTODO: Um grupo de 41 pacientes hospitalizados por dependência de álcool foi entrevistado com o SCID-I (DSM-IV, adicionado de perguntas para detectar as flutuações no curso da fobia social e do transtorno do pânico em função das diferentes fases do uso da droga (intoxicação, abstinência e intervalo lúcido. RESULTADOS: Apenas um (2,4% paciente, apresentou transtorno

  10. Schumpeter's general theory of social evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Esben Sloth

    The recent neo-Schumpeterian and evolutionary economics appears to cover a much smaller range of topics than Joseph Schumpeter confronted. Thus, it has hardly been recognised that Schumpeter wanted to develop a general theory that served the analysis of evolution in any sector of social life as w...

  11. The effect and safety of escitalopram and alprazolam in the treatment of social phobia%艾司西酞普兰与阿普唑仑治疗社交恐惧症的疗效和安全性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑梅

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To explore the efficacy and safety of escitalopram and alprazolam in the treatment of social phobia.Methods:67 cases with social phobia were randomly divided into the escitalopram group and alprazolam group.The course of treatment was all 12 weeks.We assessed the therapeutic effect with liebowitz social anxiety scale(LSAS) and hamilton anxiety scale(HAMA),and evaluated the adverse reactions with side effects scale(TESS).Results:After 12 weeks of treatment,the excellence rate of escitalopram group was 73.5% ,and the effective rate was 85.3% .In alprazolam group,the excellence rate was 69.7% ,and the effective rate was 84.8%.There was no significant difference between the two groups(P>0.05).Adverse reaction of escitalopram group was less than that of alprazolam group.Conclusion:The effect of escitalopram in the treatment of social phobia is good,and its adverse reaction is less than alprazolam.%目的:探讨艾司西酞普兰与阿普唑仑治疗社交恐惧症的疗效和安全性。方法:将67例社交恐惧症患者随机分为艾司西酞普兰组及阿普唑仑组,疗程均12周。疗效评定采用Liebowitz社交焦虑量表(LSAS)及汉密尔顿焦虑量表(HAMA),临床四级疗效评定,以不良反应量表(TESS)评定不良反应。结果:治疗12周后,艾司西酞普兰组显效率73.5%,有效率85.3%;阿普唑仑组显效率69.7%,有效率84.8%,两组疗效差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),艾司西酞普兰组不良反应少于阿普唑仑组。结论:艾司西酞普兰治疗社交恐惧症疗效肯定且比阿普唑仑不良反应少。

  12. Bio-phobias/techno-philias: virtual reality exposure as treatment for phobias of 'nature'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Joyce; Smith, Mick

    2003-09-01

    In modern society natural objects like spiders or snakes have a primary role as the loci of specific phobias. Drawing on interviews with members of the UK National Phobics Society (NPS) and associated service providers, this paper explores the implications of the increasingly significant role played by new media, particularly Virtual Reality technologies, in the treatment of these 'bio-phobias'. While advanced technological approaches provide new possibilities for individual sufferers to experiment with and control their phobic responses they also exemplify certain aspects of those specifically modern social relations that are the media within which bio-phobic behaviours develop. From a critical sociological perspective the techno-philic move to the medium of cyber-space may actually exaggerate characteristically modern social relations that seek (but never convincingly manage) to assert complete 'cultural' control over the unpredictable 'natural' elements threatening our cultural integrity.

  13. Panic and phobic anxiety: associations among neuroticism, physiological hyperarousal, anxiety sensitivity, and three phobias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longley, Susan L; Watson, David; Noyes, Russell; Yoder, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    A dimensional and psychometrically informed taxonomy of anxiety is emerging, but the specific and nonspecific dimensions of panic and phobic anxiety require greater clarification. In this study, confirmatory factor analyses of data from a sample of 438 college students were used to validate a model of panic and phobic anxiety with six content factors; multiple scales from self-report measures were indicators of each model component. The model included a nonspecific component of (1) neuroticism and two specific components of panic attack, (2) physiological hyperarousal, and (3) anxiety sensitivity. The model also included three phobia components of (4) classically defined agoraphobia, (5) social phobia, and (6) blood-injection phobia. In these data, agoraphobia correlated more strongly with both the social phobia and blood phobia components than with either the physiological hyperarousal or the anxiety sensitivity components. These findings suggest that the association between panic attacks and agoraphobia warrants greater attention.

  14. Schumpeter's general theory of social evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Esben Sloth

    The recent neo-Schumpeterian and evolutionary economics appears to cover a much smaller range of topics than Joseph Schumpeter confronted. Thus, it has hardly been recognised that Schumpeter wanted to develop a general theory that served the analysis of evolution in any sector of social life...... as well as the analysis of the evolution of social life as a whole. This paper demonstrates this ambition by studying his first two books (from 1908 and 1912, partly available in recent English translations). Schumpeter's starting point was the Walrasian System, which he generalised for the study of any...

  15. The treatment of social phobia: the differential effectiveness of exposure in vivo and an integration of exposure in vivo, rational emotive therapy and social skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mersch, P P

    1995-03-01

    Thirty-four social phobic patients were treated with either exposure in vivo or an integrated treatment, consisting of rational emotive therapy, social skills training and exposure in vivo. Comparison with a waiting-list control group showed the effectiveness of both treatments. Contrary to expectations, the integrated approach was not superior over exposure in vivo alone. Also, the long-term effectiveness of both treatments was equally good.

  16. Determinants of public phobia about infectious diseases in South Korea: effect of health communication and gender difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minsoo; Choi, Mankyu; Lee, Tae-Ro

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the individual and social determinants of the public's phobia of infectious diseases in South Korea, where collective action was recently fueled by the public phobia over mad cow disease (bovine spongiform encephalopathy [BSE]). Gender-specific multivariate regression was used to compare the public perception of BSE and highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). The analysis results differentiated between the determinants of the phobia for the 2 diseases, BSE and HPAI (N = 1002). As with HIV/AIDS and leprosy, the public fear of HPAI was expressed as a disease phobia that seeks to ensure the social exclusion of infection sources, whereas the fear of BSE was influenced by social and communication factors. Therefore, BSE, unlike previous HPAI, can be rapidly amplified amid the growing distrust in health communication, in which case the social determinants of disease phobia are associated with communicator trust, social values, and political attitude toward diseases rather than disease perception.

  17. Comparison of the life events,social support and defense mechanisms between patients with social phobia and normal controls in China%社交恐惧症患者与正常对照的生活事件、社会支持和防御机制的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董帝英; 周光燕

    2011-01-01

    Background:It is uncertain how stressful life events,social support networks and psychological defense mechanisms interact with each other to ameliorate or exacerbate the impairment in social functioning experienced by patients with a diagnosis of social phobia.Objective: Compare the relationship of stress,social support and defense mechanisms between patients with social phobia and normal control subjects.Methods:38 newly diagnosed patients with social phobia seen at the Zi Lang Hospital in Nantong between October 2009 and August 2010 were administered a Life Event Scale,the Social Support Rating Scale and the Defense Style Questionnaire.The results were compared with those for 38 normal controls.Results: There were no differences in the in the numbers of positive and negative life events between the two groups but the psychological impact of both positive and negative life events on the social phobia group were significantly greater than on the control group.Based on the results of the Social Support Rating Scale the mean (SD) scores of objective support,subjective support,total support and utilization of social support in the social phobia group were all significantly lower than those in the control group.Results of the Defense Style Questionnaire showed that compared to the control group the total score for immature defenses was significantly higher (i.e.,respondents were more likely to report using these defenses) and the total score for the mature defenses was significantly lower in the social phobia group.The social phobia group was significantly more likely to report using the neurotic defenses of repression,avoidance,isolation,and increased social association but significantly less likely to report using the neurotic defenses of reaction formation,denial,and anticipation.Conclusion: Differential patterns of life events do not appear to be important in the etiology of social phobia.Compared to normal control subjects,patients with social phobia have a less

  18. Finding gene-environment interactions for Phobias

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory, Alice M.; Lau, Jennifer Y. F.; Eley, Thalia C

    2008-01-01

    Phobias are common disorders causing a great deal of suffering. Studies of gene-environment interaction (G × E) have revealed much about the complex processes underlying the development of various psychiatric disorders but have told us little about phobias. This article describes what is already known about genetic and environmental influences upon phobias and suggests how this information can be used to optimise the chances of discovering G × Es for phobias. In addition to the careful concep...

  19. Recent trends in the study of specific phobias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pull, Charles B

    2008-01-01

    Specific phobias are prevalent and often disabling anxiety disorders. The present review examines relevant investigations that have been published during the last 2 years on major aspects of this group of disorders. Recent studies have come mainly from epidemiology, brain imagery and cognitive-behavioral therapy, including virtual reality exposure therapy. Studies published in the last 2 years confirm the high prevalence of specific phobias in the general population and provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying the fear reaction after exposure to a phobic stimulus.

  20. Blood-Injury-Illness Phobia: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyer, Bruce A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Surveys empirical literature pertaining to phobias of blood, injury, or illness (BII); defines BII phobia as selectively associated with vasovagal fainting response upon exposure to phobic stimuli. Presents clinical, demographic, and etiological information from 15 BII phobics and suggests that BII phobia warrants diagnostic category separate from…

  1. Fobia social e transtorno de pânico: relação temporal com dependência de substâncias psicoativas Fobia Social y trastorno de pánico: relación temporaria con dependencia de sustancias psicoactivas Social phobia and panic disorder: temporal relation with psychoactive substance dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Barbosa Terra

    2003-12-01

    sustancias psicoactivas. MÉTODO: los diagnósticos psiquiátricos fueron obtenidos a través de entrevista clínica semi-estructurada (SCID-I, basada en los criterios do DSM-IV. Un cuestionario fue desenvuelto por los autores, visando estudiar el relacionamiento temporáneo entre el inicio del trastorno del uso de sustancias, y el principio de trastorno de pánico y de la fobia social. RESULTADOS: apenas 1 (2.1 % paciente presentó trastorno de pánico antes del uso de sustancias psicoactivas. La mayoría de los pacientes con ataques de pánico, cumplían criterios para el diagnóstico de trastorno de ansiedad inducido por el uso de sustancias: 11 (22.9% de los pacientes tuvieron ataques de pánico apenas durante la intoxicación o en el síndrome de abstinencia, o sea, secundariamente al uso de drogas. Cuanto a la fobia social, 16 (33.3% pacientes presentaban este trastorno, siendo que, en todos, la fobia social se inició antes de comenzar el uso de sustancias psicoactivas. CONCLUSIONES: lo descubierto confirma la elevada frecuencia de fobia social en pacientes dependientes de sustancias psicoactivas, y refuerza la hipótesis de la auto-medicación en esta comorbidad, una vez que esta fobia tiende a preceder el uso de drogas. Cuanto al trastorno de pánico, en nuestra muestra, este parece derivar de una complicación del uso de sustancias psicoactivas.INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study is: 1 to determine the prevalence of panic disorder and social phobia in patients hospitalized due to the use of psychoactive substances; 2 to determine the temporal relation between the beginning of these anxiety disorders and the beginning of the use of psychoactive substances. METHODS: The psychiatric diagnoses were made by means of semi-structured clinical interviews (SCID-I, based on DSM-IV criteria. A questionnaire was developed by the authors for the purpose of studying the temporal relation between the beginning of the disorder due to psychoactive substances and the beginning

  2. Finding gene-environment interactions for phobias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Alice M; Lau, Jennifer Y F; Eley, Thalia C

    2008-03-01

    Phobias are common disorders causing a great deal of suffering. Studies of gene-environment interaction (G x E) have revealed much about the complex processes underlying the development of various psychiatric disorders but have told us little about phobias. This article describes what is already known about genetic and environmental influences upon phobias and suggests how this information can be used to optimise the chances of discovering G x Es for phobias. In addition to the careful conceptualisation of new studies, it is suggested that data already collected should be re-analysed in light of increased understanding of processes influencing phobias.

  3. Consistência interna da versão em português do Mini-Inventário de Fobia Social (Mini-SPIN Internal consistency of the Portuguese version of the Mini-Social Phobia Inventory (Mini-SPIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo J. Fonseca D'El Rey

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: A fobia social é um grave transtorno de ansiedade que traz incapacitação e sofrimento. OBJETIVOS: Investigar a consistência interna da versão em português do Mini-Inventário de Fobia Social (Mini-SPIN. MÉTODOS: Foi realizado um estudo da consistência interna do Mini-SPIN em uma amostra de 206 estudantes universitários da cidade de São Paulo, SP. RESULTADOS: A consistência interna do instrumento, analisada pelo coeficiente alfa de Cronbach, foi de 0,81. CONCLUSÕES: Esses achados permitiram concluir que a versão em português do Mini-SPIN exibiu resultados de boa consistência interna, semelhantes aos da versão original em inglês.BACKGROUND: Social phobia is a severe anxiety disorder that brings disability and distress. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the internal consistency of the Portuguese version of the Mini-Social Phobia Inventory (Mini-SPIN. METHODS: We conducted a study of internal consistency of the Mini-SPIN in a sample of 206 college students of the city of São Paulo, SP. RESULTS: The internal consistency of the instrument, analyzed by Cronbach's alpha coefficient, was 0.81. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the Portuguese version of the Mini-SPIN has a good internal consistency, similar to those obtained with the original English version.

  4. FEARS AND PHOBIAS IN THE PERSON’S «ANXIETY ROW» PHENOMENA STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Astakhova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fear is determined as part of a sequence of so-called «number of anxiety» phenomena (fright – alarm – fear – horror – panics. Phobia isdetermined as alarming upsetting. The origin and development of fears and phobias are examined from the social viewpoint in terms of theinfluence of the «alarm raw» phenomena on the development of both an individual and the whole society.

  5. 团体心理辅导对大学生社交恐惧症状的影响%Effects of Group Psychological Counseling on the Social Phobia Symptoms of the College Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺斌

    2015-01-01

    为通过团体心理辅导活动改善大学生的社交恐惧症状,本人对漯河医专36名大学生进行了8次系列团体辅导,在辅导前后利用青少年生活事件量表、社会支持评定量表、抑郁自评量表、焦虑自评量表、社交回避及苦恼量表和自尊量表对实验组和控制组进行前测和后测,并对两组的得分差异进行显著性检验。研究发现,团体辅导前实验组与控制组成员在社会支持评定得分、社会回避与痛苦、抑郁自评和自尊得分等方面显著性高于控制组,实验组在实验前后在社会回避及苦恼量表上的得分差异具有显著的统计学意义(P <0.01);团体心理辅导后实验组和控制组被调查者在上述量表上的得分差异均不具有统计学意义。这就意味着团体辅导可以有效改善大学生的社交恐惧状况,有利于其心理健康水平的提升。%In order to lower the social phobia level of the college students through group psychological counseling, thirty - six college students in Luohe Medical College were psychologically counseled in groups for eight times by us. Then the ASLEC,SSRS,SDS,SAS,SAD and SES were used to test the experimental group and the control group before and after the test. What’s more,the significance testing was carried out on the difference in scores of the two groups. The study found before the group psychological counseling,the scores of the experimental group are signifi-cantly higher than the control group on the aspects of social supporting rating,social avoidance and distress and self- rating depression as well as self - esteem;the difference on the scores of the social avoidance and distress scale of the experimental group is also of significant statistical significance before and after the test;after group psychological counseling,the scores of the informants in both the experimental group and the control group are not of significant statistical significance

  6. [Social anxiety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabel-Sarron, Christine

    2010-06-20

    Social anxiety disorders are various, frequent and invalidant. Social phobia is characterized by marked and persistent fear of social or performance situations in which embarrassment may occur including, for example, fear of public speaking. In clinical setting, the majority of social phobics report fears of more than one type of social situation. Social phobia tends to develop early in life, with a life time prevalence of 2-4%. Pharmacotherapy and behavioural and cognitive therapy are communly used.

  7. Anxiety disorders and onset of cardiovascular disease: the differential impact of panic, phobias and worry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batelaan, Neeltje M; ten Have, Margreet; van Balkom, Anton J L M; Tuithof, Marlous; de Graaf, Ron

    2014-03-01

    Anxiety has been linked to onset of cardiovascular disease. This study examines the differential impact of types of anxiety (panic, phobia and worry) on 3-year onset of non-fatal cardiovascular disease (CVD). By investigating anxiety disorders as opposed to anxiety symptoms and by using a reliable diagnostic instrument to assess anxiety, limitations of previous studies are considered. 5149 persons at risk for CVD were interviewed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. The panic-type included panic disorder and panic attacks; the phobic-type included agoraphobia and social phobia, and the worry-type included generalized anxiety disorder. CVD was self-reported and required treatment or monitoring by a doctor. Analyses were adjusted for sociodemographics, behavioral variables, and comorbid somatic and psychiatric disorders. During follow-up, 62 persons (1.2%) developed CVD. Baseline generalized anxiety disorder was strongly associated with onset of CVD (adjusted OR: 3.39). Further research should replicate findings and focus on biological underpinnings of this association.

  8. Comparing the prevalence rates of social phobia in a community according to ICD-10 and DSM-III-R Comparando estimativas de prevalência da fobia social na comunidade empregando-se a CID-10 e a DSM-III-R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Lopes Rocha

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This population-based study aimed to compare the prevalence rates of social phobia using DSM-III-R and CID-10, based on the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI, in a Brazilian community. METHODS: This survey was carried out in a representative sample of 1,041 residents from Bambuí, Minas Gerais, Brazil (attrition rate = 14.7%. The Brazilian version of the CIDI was used. One-month, one-year and lifetime social phobia prevalence rates were estimated, employing the DSM-III-R and ICD-10 classifications, using the CIDI computer program. RESULTS: One-month, one-year, and life prevalence rates of social phobia, based on the DSM-III-R (7.9, 9.0 and 11.7% respectively were higher than those based on the ICD-10 (4.7, 5.2 and 6.7% respectively; p OBJETIVO: Este estudo populacional visa comparar estimativas de prevalência de fobia social empregando-se a CID-10 e a DSM-III-R em uma comunidade brasileira. MÉTODOS: O levantamento foi realizado em uma amostra representativa de 1.041 residentes de Bambuí, Minas Gerais, Brasil (perda = 14,7%. Foi utilizada a versão brasileira da Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI. As prevalências de 1 mês, 1 ano e vida foram estimadas empregando-se as classificações CID-10 e DSM-III-R, utilizando-se o programa de computador da CIDI. RESULTADOS: As prevalências de 1 mês, 1 ano e vida da fobia social, baseadas na DSM-III-R (7,9, 9,0 e 11,7% respectivamente foram mais elevadas que aquelas baseadas na CID-10 (4,7, 5,2 e 6,7%, respectivamente; p < 0,01 para todos. CONCLUSÃO: Nossos resultados reforçam a hipótese de que as taxas de prevalência de fobia social são mais elevadas quando baseadas na DSM-III-R em comparação com a CID-10.

  9. Incidence of Phobias in Iranian Psychiatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. DANESHMAND

    1975-01-01

    Full Text Available During 1972 a study was undertaken in Roozbeh Mental Hospital of Tehran University to investigate the prevalence of phobias among the patients suffering from one type or another ofmental disorders. It was found that about 10 percent of the total patients visited in the hospital were suffering from phobia. Moreover, darkness, corpse, crowd, pet animals, fear from cancer and syphilis accounted for 79%of the most common phobias, among the 655 recorded cases.

  10. Referrals from general practitioners to a social services department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, M G

    1983-01-01

    One year's referrals from general practitioners to a social services department were studied. There was a low referral rate and a bias towards women, the elderly and the less affluent. The referrals were predominantly made for practical help with problems of ill health. A high proportion of clients were allocated to non-social work staff, and the social service intervention, generally of short duration, showed a sympathetic response to the practical requests of general practitioners. The limited use of social workers by doctors is considered to be the result of ignorance or scepticism about psychodynamic social work skills. Closer liaison between general practitioners and social workers, and a clearer presentation by social workers of their professional skills, are suggested solutions to this problem.

  11. No distinctions between different types of anxiety symptoms in pre-adolescents from the general population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferdinand, RF; van Lang, NDJ; Ormel, J; Verhulst, FC

    2006-01-01

    Studies aimed at anxiety symptoms in children from the general population samples often make distinctions between symptoms of Separation Anxiety, Social Phobia, Panic Disorder, and Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Given the high comorbidity rates between these disorders, the usefulness of such distinct

  12. No distinctions between different types of anxiety symptoms in pre-adolescents from the general population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferdinand, RF; van Lang, NDJ; Ormel, J; Verhulst, FC

    2006-01-01

    Studies aimed at anxiety symptoms in children from the general population samples often make distinctions between symptoms of Separation Anxiety, Social Phobia, Panic Disorder, and Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Given the high comorbidity rates between these disorders, the usefulness of such distinct

  13. General systems theory and scientific interpretation of social reality

    OpenAIRE

    Kaluzhsky, Mikhail

    2001-01-01

    An article about the use of the methodology of general systems theory and the theory of self-organization as a methodological basis of scientific interpretation of social reality. The author analyzes the role of ideology and propaganda in the different concepts of interpretation of social reality (social Darwinism, Marxism, etc.). The main conclusion of the paper is the need deideologization scientific knowledge.

  14. Could virtual reality be effective in treating children with phobias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Stéphane

    2011-02-01

    The use of virtual reality to treat anxiety disorders in adults is gaining popularity and its efficacy is supported by numerous outcome studies. Similar research for children is lagging behind. The outcome studies on the use of virtual reality to treat anxiety disorders in children currently address only specific phobias, and all of the available trials are reviewed in this article. Despite the limited number of studies, results are very encouraging for the treatment of school and spider phobias. A study with adolescents suggests that, at least for social anxiety, exposure stimuli would be more effective if they were developed specifically for younger populations. Virtual reality may not increase children's motivation towards therapy unless their fearful apprehension is addressed before initiating the treatment.

  15. School Phobia: Etiology, Evaluation and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Charles P.

    School phobia is an irrational fear or anxiety about attending school. Definite distinctions can be made between the school phobic and the truant, both of whom miss school on a regular basis. It appears that the incidence of school phobia is evenly distributed between the sexes and among age levels from 5 through 15 years, and is not significantly…

  16. Specific phobia predicts psychopathology in young women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trumpf, J.; Margraf, J.; Vriends, N.; Meyer, A.H.; Becker, E.S.

    2010-01-01

    Although specific phobia is characterized by an early age at onset and by high rates of comorbidity, few studies have examined comorbid relationships prospectively. The present study investigated the association between specific phobia and the risk of a broad range of psychopathology among young wom

  17. Social environment and frequent attendance in Danish general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsted, Peter; Olesen, Frede

    2005-01-01

    inequalities in health or whether social factors in themselves determine the use of general practice. AIM: To examine if social factors are associated with frequent attendance in general practice after adjusting for physical and psychological health variables. DESIGN OF STUDY: Population-based cross...... during the period November 1997-October 1998. A questionnaire about physical, psychological and social factors was sent to the patients. The associations between social factors and frequent attendance were adjusted for physical and psychological health and tendency towards somatisation. RESULTS: A total...

  18. Impact of social prescribing on general practice workload and polypharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, A M; McCauley, F; McCarron, M O

    2017-07-01

    Social prescribing has emerged as a useful tool for helping patients overcome some of the social and behavioural determinants of poor health. There has been little research on the impact of social prescribing on use of primary healthcare resources. This study sought to determine whether social prescribing activities influenced patient-general practitioner (GP) contacts and polypharmacy. Quality-improvement design with social prescribing activity interventions from an urban general practice in Northern Ireland. Patients over 65 years of age with a chronic condition who attended their GP frequently or had multiple medications were offered a social prescribing activity. Participants' contacts with GP and the new repeat prescriptions before and during the social prescribing activity were measured. The total number of repeat prescriptions per patient was compared at the time of referral and 6-12 months later. Indications for referral, primary diagnoses and reasons for declining participation in a social prescribing activity after referral were prospectively recorded. Sixty-eight patients agreed to participate but only 28 (41%) engaged in a prescribed social activity. There was no statistically significant difference in GP contacts (visits to GP, home visits or telephone calls) or number of new repeat prescriptions between referral and completion of 12 weeks of social prescribing activity. Similarly there was no statistically significant difference in the total number of repeat prescriptions between referral and 6-12 months after social prescribing activity in either intention to treat or per protocol analyses. Social prescribing participants had similar demographic factors. Mental health issues (anxiety and/or depression) were more common among participants than those who were referred but declined participation in a social prescribing activity (P = 0.022). While social prescribing may help patients' self-esteem and well-being, it may not decrease GP workload. Further

  19. Self-Monitoring as a Means to Generalize Social Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Social skills are important for success in school as well as in life. Social skills training (SST) has been effective in teaching students required skills within the context of the training site, but often these have not generalized to additional settings (DuPaul & Eckert, 1994). This study researches the effect of adding self-management to an…

  20. Fear or disgust? The role of emotions in spider phobia and blood-injection-injury phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çavuşoğlu, Merve; Dirik, Gülay

    2011-01-01

    According to the literature, it is assumed that fear and anxiety are basic emotions in anxiety disorders. Many recent studies report that disgust, as well as fear, has an important role in the etiology and maintenance of anxiety disorders. Evaluation of the role of disgust in anxiety disorders has led the theoretical and empirical literature in a new direction, beyond the traditional emphasis on fear. Most of this basic research has focused on specific phobias, such as blood-injection-injury phobia and spider phobia. Findings obtained from evaluation of physiological and cognitive processes, and subjective and behavioral experiences clearly show that in addition to fear, emotional reactions to phobic stimuli also include disgust; however, empirical studies show that disgust and fear have different relative impacts on specific phobias. To illustrate, individuals experience disgust as the basic emotion in blood-injection-injury phobia, whereas both fear and disgust are experienced in spider phobia. Nevertheless, it is concluded that fear has a more fundamental role in the latter. Yet, research indicates that basic emotions different from those identified from neural structures or physiological responses, such as heart rate, can be identified if facial expressions and cognitive appraisals are taken into account. In the present review the role of fear and disgust in blood-injection-injury phobia vs. spider phobia are discussed, based on the relationship between the phobias and disgust sensitivity, disgust as part of phobic responses, and disgust-motivated avoidance behavior.

  1. Explaining Large-N Cooperation: Generalized Social Trust and the Social Exchange Heuristic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a new argument that links generalized social trust and collective action in situations with a large number of actors, who do not have specific information on each other. Generalized social trust enhances large-N cooperation through the social exchange heuristic, which stimul...... hypothesized, there is scant micro level evidence as it has mainly been tested at the macro level. The results show that people holding generalized social trust cooperate more readily in large-N dilemmas, and that they most likely do so because of the social exchange heuristic.......This article presents a new argument that links generalized social trust and collective action in situations with a large number of actors, who do not have specific information on each other. Generalized social trust enhances large-N cooperation through the social exchange heuristic, which...... stimulate conditional cooperation in social dilemmas. Using data from a survey in four countries and recycling behavior as an indicator of collective action, this explanation is tested with individual level data. While the relationship between generalized social trust and large-N collective action is often...

  2. Phobias

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fifth graders yelled from inside the big elevators. "Hurry up, don't you want to get to ... KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- ...

  3. Topical corticosteroid addiction and phobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparajita Ghosh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Corticosteroids, one of the most widely prescribed topical drugs, have been used for about six decades till date. However, rampant misuse and abuse down the years has given the drug a bad name. Topical steroid abuse may lead to two major problems which lie at the opposing ends of the psychosomatic spectrum. Topical steroid addiction, a phenomenon that came to be recognized about a decade after the introduction of the molecule is manifested as psychological distress and rebound phenomenon on stoppage of the drug. The rebound phenomenon, which can affect various parts of the body particularly the face and the genitalia has been reported by various names in the literature. TC phobia which lies at the opposite end of the psychiatric spectrum of steroid abuse has been reported particularly among parents of atopic children. Management of both conditions is difficult and frustrating. Psychological counseling and support can be of immense help in both the conditions.

  4. Anxiety, Fears, and Phobias (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Anxiety, Fears, and Phobias KidsHealth > For Parents > Anxiety, Fears, ... unsettling experiences and challenging situations of life. Many Anxieties and Fears Are Normal Anxiety is defined as " ...

  5. Treatment of specific phobia in older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Pachana, Nancy A; Rana M Woodward; Gerard JA Byrne

    2007-01-01

    Nancy A Pachana1, Rana M Woodward1, Gerard JA Byrne21School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia 2School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, AustraliaAbstract: Phobias are common in later life, yet treatment research in this population remains scant. The efficacy of exposure therapy, in combination with other Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) components, in the treatment of specific phobia with a middle and older aged sample was examined. Sixteen adults a...

  6. Specific phobia predicts psychopathology in young women

    OpenAIRE

    Trumpf, Julia; Margraf, Jürgen; Vriends, Noortje; Meyer, Andrea Hans; Becker, Eni S

    2009-01-01

    Background Although specific phobia is characterized by an early age at onset and by high rates of comorbidity, few studies have examined comorbid relationships prospectively. Objectives The present study investigated the association between specific phobia and the risk of a broad range of psychopathology among young women in the community. Method Data came from the Dresden Predictor Study in which 1,538 German women (18–25 years) completed a diagnostic interview at two time points. Results W...

  7. Comorbidity in youth with specific phobias: Impact of comorbidity on treatment outcome and the impact of treatment on comorbid disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollendick, Thomas H; Ost, Lars-Göran; Reuterskiöld, Lena; Costa, Natalie

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was twofold. In an analysis of data from an existing randomized control trial of brief cognitive behavioral treatment on specific phobias (One-Session Treatment, OST; Ollendick et al., 2009), we examined 1) the effect of comorbid specific phobias and other anxiety disorders on treatment outcomes, and 2) the effect of treatment of the specific phobia on these co-occurring disorders. These relations were explored in 100 youth presenting with animal, natural environment, situational, and "other" types of phobia. Youth were reliably diagnosed with the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for DSM-IV: Child and Parent versions (Silverman & Albano, 1996). Clinician severity ratings at post-treatment and 6-month follow-up were examined as were parent and child treatment outcome satisfaction measures. Results indicated that the presence of comorbid phobias or anxiety disorders did not affect treatment outcomes; moreover, treatment of the targeted specific phobias led to significant reductions in the clinical severity of other co-occurring specific phobias and related anxiety disorders. These findings speak to the generalization of the effects of this time-limited treatment approach. Implications for treatment of principal and comorbid disorders are discussed, and possible mechanisms for these effects are commented upon.

  8. Confiabilidade da versão em Português do Inventário de Fobia Social (SPIN entre adolescentes estudantes do Município do Rio de Janeiro Reliability of the Portuguese-language version of the Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN among adolescent students in the city of Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane Maria Pereira Vilete

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Acredita-se que a fobia social teria início na adolescência e que precederia outros transtornos mentais, sendo importante a sua investigação nos jovens. Até o momento, não há nenhuma escala de fobia social validada para a nossa população. Neste estudo investigou-se a confiabilidade da versão em Português do Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN entre escolares adolescentes da rede pública do Município do Rio de Janeiro. Após a versão do SPIN para o Português, conduziu-se um estudo de confiabilidade teste-reteste com 190 adolescentes de duas escolas, estimando-se os coeficientes de correlação intraclasse (CCIC, kappa ponderado (kw² e ajuste de modelos log-lineares. Foram ainda construídos gráficos Bland & Altman. Observou-se uma boa consistência interna (a de Cronbach = 0,88 e boa confiabilidade da pontuação total do instrumento (CCIC = 0,78. A confiabilidade das perguntas isoladas não foi tão boa (kw² variando de 0,32 a 0,65. O modelo log-linear de melhor ajuste aos dados na maior parte dos itens foi o de "semi-associação". Esses achados nos permitiram concluir que a versão em português do SPIN exibiu resultados de boa confiabilidade, semelhantes aos da versão original em Inglês.It is believed that social phobia has its onset during adolescence and precedes other mental disorders; it is thus important to investigate the condition among young people. To date there is no self-reported scale validated for the Brazilian population. The present study investigated the reliability of the Portuguese-language version of the Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN among adolescent students from public schools in the city of Rio de Janeiro. After SPIN was translated into Portuguese, a test-retest reliability study was carried out with 190 students. Intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC and weighted kappa (kw² were estimated, log-linear models were fitted, and Bland & Altman graphs were built. The Portuguese version showed good internal

  9. Prevalence of dental fear and phobia relative to other fear and phobia subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterink, F.M.D.; de Jongh, A.; Hoogstraten, J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to estimate the point prevalence of dental fear and dental phobia relative to 10 other common fears and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV-TR subtypes of specific phobia. Data were also analysed to examine differences with regard to se

  10. Prevalence of dental fear and phobia relative to other fear and phobia subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterink, Floor M D; de Jongh, Ad; Hoogstraten, Johan

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to estimate the point prevalence of dental fear and dental phobia relative to 10 other common fears and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV-TR subtypes of specific phobia. Data were also analysed to examine differences with regard to severity, presence of distressing recollections of fear-related events, gender, and prevalence across age. Data were obtained by means of a survey of 1,959 Dutch adults, 18-93 yr of age. Phobias were assessed based on DSM-IV-TR criteria, whereas severity of present fears was assessed using visual analogue scales. The prevalence of dental fear was 24.3%, which is lower than for fear of snakes (34.8%), heights (30.8%), and physical injuries (27.2%). Among phobias, dental phobia was the most common (3.7%), followed by height phobia (3.1%) and spider phobia (2.7%). Fear of dental treatment was associated with female gender, rated as more severe than any other fear, and was most strongly associated with intrusive re-experiencing (49.4%). The findings suggest that dental fear is a remarkably severe and stable condition with a long duration. The high prevalence of dental phobia in the Netherlands is intriguing and warrants investigation in other countries.

  11. Prevalence of dental fear and phobia relative to other fear and phobia subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterink, F.M.D.; de Jongh, A.; Hoogstraten, J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to estimate the point prevalence of dental fear and dental phobia relative to 10 other common fears and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV-TR subtypes of specific phobia. Data were also analysed to examine differences with regard to

  12. Fear factors: cross validation of specific phobia domains in a community-based sample of African American adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, L Kevin; Vines, Lauren; Petrie, Jenny

    2011-05-01

    The current study attempted a cross-validation of specific phobia domains in a community-based sample of African American adults based on a previous model of phobia domains in a college student sample of African Americans. Subjects were 100 African American community-dwelling adults who completed the Fear Survey Schedule-Second Edition (FSS-II). Domains of fear were created using a similar procedure as the original, college sample of African American adults. A model including all of the phobia domains from the FSS-II was initially tested and resulted in poor model fit. Cross-validation was subsequently attempted through examining the original factor pattern of specific phobia domains from the college sample (Chapman, Kertz, Zurlage, & Woodruff-Borden, 2008). Data from the current, community based sample of African American adults provided poor fit to this model. The trimmed model for the current sample included the animal and social anxiety factors as in the original model. The natural environment-type specific phobia factor did not provide adequate fit for the community-based sample of African Americans. Results indicated that although different factor loading patterns of fear may exist among community-based African Americans as compared to African American college students, both animal and social fears are nearly identical in both groups, indicating a possible cultural homogeneity for phobias in African Americans. Potential explanations of these findings and future directions are discussed.

  13. Relationship between social participation and general health among the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbasali Yazdani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health promoting behaviors in the elderly can potentially improve their health and reduce health care costs. This study was aimed to investigate the relationship of social participation with general health among the elderly people. Methods: The research population in this correlational study included all elderly people (aged 60 and older in district 5 of Tehran. A total of 80 persons were selected by convenience sampling method. In order to collect data, a researcher-made social participation questionnaire and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28 were used. Kolmogorov–Smirnov test, Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficient, U-Mann-Whitney test and simple linear regression were applied to analyze the data. Results: The findings showed no statistically significant correlation between social participation and general health and its dimensions (P>0.05. Among demographic variables, only age was negatively correlated with social participation (P<0/05. Conclusions: Absence of relationship between social participation and health may be attributed to the effect of peripheral factors like social, economical and political situation during which the research was performed. A similar study in a more stable time or other places may contribute to the generalizability of the findings.

  14. Workplace phobia--a first explorative study on its relation to established anxiety disorders, sick leave, and work-directed treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschalla, Beate; Linden, Michael

    2009-10-01

    Workplace phobia is defined as a phobic anxiety reaction with symptoms of panic occurring when thinking of or approaching the workplace. People suffering from workplace phobia regularly avoid confrontation with the workplace and are often on sick leave. The specific characteristics of workplace phobia are investigated empirically in comparison to established anxiety disorders. Two hundred thirty patients from an inpatient psychosomatic rehabilitation hospital were interviewed concerning workplace phobia and established anxiety disorders. Additionally, the patients filled in self-rating questionnaires on general and workplace phobic symptom load. Subjectively perceived degree of work load, sick leave, and therapy participation were assessed. Participants with workplace phobia reached significantly higher scores in workplace phobia self-rating than did participants with established anxiety disorders. A similar significant difference was not found concerning the general psychosomatic symptom load. Workplace phobics were more often on sick leave than patients with established anxiety disorders. Workplace phobia can occur as an alonestanding anxiety disorder. It has an own clinical value due to its specific consequences for work participation. Workplace phobia requires special therapeutic attention and treatment instead of purely 'sick leave' certification.

  15. The Portuguese language version of social phobia and Anxiety Inventory: analysis of items and internal consistency in a Brazilian sample of 1,014 undergraduate students Versão para o português do Inventário de Fobia Social e Ansiedade: análise de itens e consistência interna numa amostra de 1.014 estudantes universitários brasileiros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Picon

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Theoretical and empirical analysis of items and internal consistency of the Portuguese-language version of Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI-Portuguese. METHODS: Social phobia experts conducted a 45-item content analysis of the SPAI-Portuguese administered to a sample of 1,014 university students. Item discrimination was evaluated by Student's t test; interitem, mean and item-to-total correlations, by Pearson coefficient; reliability was estimated by Cronbach's alpha. RESULTS: There was 100% agreement among experts concerning the 45 items. On the SPAI-Portuguese 43 items were discriminative (p OBJETIVO: Análise teórica e empírica dos itens e da consistência interna da versão em português do Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI-Português e subescalas. MÉTODOS: Peritos em fobia social conduziram análise de conteúdo dos 45 itens do SPAI-Português, administrado a 1.014 estudantes universitários. A discriminação dos itens foi avaliada por teste t de Student; correlações interitens, médias e item/total por coeficientes de Pearson; fidedignidade pelo alfa de Cronbach. RESULTADOS: Concordância plena entre os peritos para os 45 itens. SPAI-Português com 43 itens discriminativos (p < 0,05. Alguns itens, entre as subescalas, apresentaram coeficientes abaixo de 0,2. As médias das correlações interitens foram: 0,41 na subescala fobia social; 0,32 na subescala agorafobia; e 0,32 no SPAI-Português. As correlações item/total foram maiores do que 0,3 (p < 0,001. Alfas de Cronbach foram: 0,95 no SPAI-Português; 0,96 na subescala de fobia social; 0,85 na subescala de agorafobia. CONCLUSÃO: O conteúdo dos itens foi relacionado aos constructos subjacentes (agorafobia e fobia social, com discriminabilidade de 43 itens do SPAI-Português. As correlações médias interitens e alfas revelaram consistência interna de SPAI-Português e subescalas, além de multidimensionalidade das mesmas. Nenhum item foi suprimido

  16. Oxytocin in General Anxiety and Social Fear: A Translational Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Inga D; Slattery, David A

    2016-02-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) has been revealed as a profound anxiolytic and antistress factor of the brain, besides its many prosocial and reproductive effects. Therefore, there is substantial scientific and medical interest in its potential therapeutic use for the treatment of psychopathologies associated with anxiety, fear, and social dysfunctions, such as generalized anxiety disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and social anxiety disorder, as well as autism and schizophrenia, among others. Focusing on preclinical studies, we review the existing evidence for the regulatory capacity of OXT to fine-tune general and social anxiety-related behaviors, as well as cued and social fear conditioning from a translational perspective. The available evidence from animal and human studies substantiates the hypothesis of an imbalance of the endogenous brain OXT system in the etiology of anxiety disorders, particularly those with a social component such as social anxiety disorder. In addition, such an imbalance of the OXT system is also likely to be the consequence of chronic OXT treatment resulting in a dose-dependent reduction in OXT receptor availability and increased anxiety.

  17. The cyclical social choice of primary vs. general election candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurrild-Klitgaard, Peter

    The manner in which US presidential elections are organized make them ripe for empirical manifestations of the “voting paradoxes” identified by social choice theorists. This note illustrates the general point with polling data involving the two leading Democrats and the three leading Republicans ...

  18. Paediatric Blood-Injection-Injury Phobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena Johnson

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Blood-Injection-Injury phobia is a major health issue throughout the life span. It usually starts in early childhood. Avoidance of health care is seen in such individuals. Children with blood injection injury phobia have uncontrollable fear of blood, injury, injections and needles. Because of the intense fear, these children will do everything possible to avoid it. Various physical symptoms including increased heart rate, chest discomfort, trembling movements, feeling of choking and syncope may occur in these children on mentioning about blood, needles or any injury. Vasovagal fainting with diphasic response pattern occurs in about twenty percent of children on exposure to the phobic stimulus. Other anxiety disorders, depressive disorders and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder also occur co-morbidly in children with blood-injection-injury phobia which makes the prognosis poor. Avoidance of health care due to phobia causes significant negative impact on health outcomes. Hence early diagnosis and urgent management of blood-injection-injury phobia in children is essential.

  19. Treatment of specific phobia in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy A Pachana

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Nancy A Pachana1, Rana M Woodward1, Gerard JA Byrne21School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia 2School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, AustraliaAbstract: Phobias are common in later life, yet treatment research in this population remains scant. The efficacy of exposure therapy, in combination with other Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT components, in the treatment of specific phobia with a middle and older aged sample was examined. Sixteen adults aged 45–68 with DSM-IV diagnosis of a specific phobia received a manualized intervention over ten weeks, and were compared with a control group. Results indicated significant time effects in the treatment group for the primary outcome variables of phobic severity and avoidance as well as secondary outcome variables including depression and anxiety. Symptom presence and severity also significantly declined in the treatment group. No significant changes in state anxiety were noted across the treatment period. Such results provide support for the efficacy of exposure combined with CBT treatment for specific phobia in middle to older aged adults.Keywords: anxiety, phobia, older adults, cognitive behavioral therapy

  20. One-session treatment for specific phobias: a review of Öst's single-session exposure with children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollendick, Thomas H; Davis, Thompson E

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this brief paper is to review the current status of one-session treatment (OST) for specific phobias in children and adolescents. Following a brief historical overview and description of OST, we systematically describe eight studies that have examined its efficacy in children and adolescents aged between 7 and17 years. We also explore phobia subtypes, age, gender, and comorbidity as possible moderators of treatment outcome. Studies have been conducted in Australia, Austria, the Netherlands, the USA, and Sweden. Although there is limited evidence that OST works better for animal phobias than other subtypes of phobias and for girls than boys, across studies there is considerable evidence that it is generally effective across phobia subtypes and for both boys and girls. No age differences in outcomes were noted, nor were any differences noted due to comorbidity. OST was found to be equally effective with children and adolescents with co-occurring multiple phobias and other anxiety disorders. Moreover, in at least one study, it was found to reduce untreated phobic and anxiety disorders in addition to the treated phobias. It is concluded that OST is a highly effective intervention for the treatment of specific phobias in children and adolescents.

  1. Study about the profile of symptoms and personalities in social phobia patients accompanied with sensitive delusion of reference%伴与不伴敏感性关系妄想的社交恐惧症症状及个性因素研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈冠军; 杨兴洁; 夏莉华; 马长生

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the differences of symptoms and personalities between social phobia patients with sensitive delusion of reference (SDR) and those without SDR, and to provide theoretical support for clinical therapy. Methods 41 cases with social phobia were investigated and were divided into study group (31 cases accompanied with SDR) and control group (10 cases without SDR) by using SCL-90 and clinical interrogation. Scores of SCL-90 and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ) were compared between the two groups. Results 75.61% of cases coexisted SDR. They had higher scores in SCL-90 and lower scores in EPQ-E when compared with patients without SDR. The differences were significant (P<0.01). Conclusion Sensitive delusion of reference may be one of the characteristic symptoms of social phobia. Introrse temperament in personality factors may be the important risk factor of sensitive delusion of reference.%目的 探讨伴与不伴敏感性关系妄想的社交恐惧症患者在症状及个性方面的差异,为临床治疗提供理论依据.方法 采用症状自评量表(SCL-90),结合临床问诊,对41例社交恐惧症患者进行评定;采用艾森克人格问卷(EPQ)对伴有敏感性关系妄想的社交恐惧症患者31例与不伴敏感性关系妄想的社交恐惧症患者10例进行对照研究.结果 75.61%的患者伴有敏感性关系妄想,伴妄想与不伴妄想者相比SCL-90各项因子得分均高,EPQ中E分较低,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).结论 敏感性关系妄想是社交恐惧症重症患者的症状特征,而性格内向是敏感性关系妄想的一个重要因素.

  2. Prevalence of dental fear and phobia relative to other fear and phobia subtypes

    OpenAIRE

    Oosterink, F.M.D.; De Jongh, A.; Hoogstraten, J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to estimate the point prevalence of dental fear and dental phobia relative to 10 other common fears and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV-TR subtypes of specific phobia. Data were also analysed to examine differences with regard to severity, presence of distressing recollections of fear-related events, gender, and prevalence across age. Data were obtained by means of a survey of 1,959 Dutch adults, 18-93 yr of age. Phobias were...

  3. A social skills training program for preschoolers with developmental delays. Generalization and social validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, L A; Matson, J L

    1995-04-01

    This investigation was designed to assess a social skills training program with 32 developmentally delayed preschoolers. Subjects were evaluated in an unstructured play session, matched for levels of appropriate and inappropriate social behaviors, and assigned to either a treatment or control condition. The treatment group (N = 16) was presented with a 6-week protocol involving positive reinforcement, modeling, rehearsal, feedback, and time out. Controls (N = 16) received no instruction beyond regular classroom activities during the 6 weeks. The two groups were reevaluated in a posttest session and again in a generalization setting where two peers with developmental delays (not included in either experimental condition) were included. Prosocial behaviors were successfully taught and maintained in generalization settings. Efforts to reduce inappropriate behaviors were less successful. A test of social validity via teachers' ratings of videotapes of pretest and posttest assessments was also conducted. Implications for generalization and social validity research are discussed.

  4. NINE-YEAR FOLLOW-UP OF SPECIFIC PHOBIA IN A POPULATION SAMPLE OF OLDER PEOPLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigström, Robert; Skoog, Ingmar; Karlsson, Björn; Nilsson, Johan; Östling, Svante

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about the long-term course of specific phobia (SP) in the general population. We examined the prevalence and course of SP and subthreshold fears in an older population followed over 9 years. A psychiatric examination was performed in a population-based sample of 558 70-year-olds, among whom 303 dementia-free survivors were followed up at both ages 75 and 79. Fears were rated with respect to level of anxiety and social or other consequences. DSM-IV SP was diagnosed when fears were associated with prominent anxiety and had social or other consequences. All other fears were labeled subthreshold fears. The prevalence of SP declined from 9.9% at age 70 to 4.0% at age 79. The reason was that the prevalence of fears associated with prominent anxiety (mandatory in the diagnosis) decreased whereas the prevalence of fears that gave social or other consequences remained stable. A total of 14.5% of the population had SP at least once during the study. Among these, 11.4% had SP and 65.9% had specific fear at all three examinations. The prevalence of fears associated with prominent anxiety decreased with age, resulting in an overall decline in the prevalence of SP. SP seems to be a fluctuating disorder, and in most cases an exacerbation of chronic subthreshold fears. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Demographics, clinical characteristics and quality of life of Brazilian women with driving phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Rafael T da; Carvalho, Marcele Regine de; Cantini, Jessye; Freire, Rafael Christophe da Rocha; Nardi, Antonio E

    2014-02-01

    Driving phobia is associated with serious consequences such as restriction of freedom, career impairments and social embarrassment. The main objective of this paper is to compare clinical characteristics and quality of life between women with driving phobia and women without this phobia. These factors were assessed using structured interviews, semi-structured questionnaires, scales and inventories. We accessed diagnoses, depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, anxiety traits, driving cognitions and quality of life. There was no difference between groups with regard to demographic data and driving history. Both groups were also equivalent in the number of traumatic events and accidents experienced while driving or riding. The fear of driving group showed higher state and trait anxiety scores. A high frequency of cognitive distortions can explain why people with driving phobia often engage in maladaptive safety behaviors in an attempt to protect themselves from unpredicted dangers when driving. Regarding quality of life, the control group had slightly higher scores on all subscales, but significant differences were observed for only three scales: "functional capacity", "social aspects", and "mental health". More studies with larger samples more instruments and other contexts are needed to further investigate the clinical characteristics and personality traits of people who have a fear of driving. © 2014.

  6. Persistence of Specific Phobia From Adolescence to Early Adulthood: Longitudinal Follow-Up of the Mexican Adolescent Mental Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albor, Yesica C; Benjet, Corina; Méndez, Enrique; Medina-Mora, María Elena

    2017-03-01

    Specific phobia is one of the most common psychiatric disorders in the general population, begins at a younger age, and has high comorbidity. However, it receives less treatment than other disorders, perhaps because it is circumscribed to a specific object or situation that can be avoided or is difficult to differentiate from developmentally adaptive fear. Longitudinal studies are needed to clarify its clinical significance, risk factors, and course. This study was designed to determine the persistence of specific phobia in participants during an 8-year period from adolescence to young adulthood and its predictors in a Mexican cohort. 1,071 respondents from a representative 2-wave panel sample participated in the Mexican Adolescent Mental Health Survey in 2005 and in the follow-up survey in 2013. DSM-IV disorders were evaluated with the World Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Of adolescents with specific phobia at baseline, 17.46% persisted into adulthood. Persistence of specific phobia was predicted by an age of onset of disorder in adolescence (risk ratio [RR] = 2.83, 95% CI, 1.30-6.13), parental neglect (RR = 2.76, 95% CI, 1.35-5.65), a first-degree relative with specific phobia (RR = 2.69, 95% CI, 1.34-5.39) and economic adversities (RR = 2.06, 95% CI, 1.21-3.53). Noncomorbid specific phobia in adolescence predicted incidence of other anxiety and substance use disorders in early adulthood (RR = 1.98; 95% CI, 1.11-3.54 and RR = 1.35; 95% CI, 1.07-1.69, respectively). While many adolescents with specific phobia remit in adulthood, there are early adult consequences of adolescent phobia and identifiable risk factors for persistence that suggest a group of adolescents that might benefit from early intervention.

  7. Risk Reduction Technologies in General Practice and Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devin Rexvid

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available General practitioners (GPs and social workers (SWs are professions whose professional autonomy and discretion have changed in the so-called risk and audit society. The aim of this article is to compare GPs’ and SWs’ responses to Evidence-Based and Organizational Risk Reduction Technologies (ERRT and ORRT. It is based on a content analysis of 54 peer-reviewed empirical articles. The results show that both professions held ambivalent positions towards ERRT. The response towards ORRT differed in that GPs were sceptical whilst SWs took a more pragmatic view. Furthermore the results suggest that SWs might experience professional benefits by adopting an adherent approach to the increased dissemination of risk reduction technologies (RRT. GPs, however, did not seem to experience such benefits. Keywords: Profession, risk, social worker, general practitioner, risk reduction technologies, evidence-based practice/medicine 

  8. The evolution of generalized reciprocity in social interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkl, Bernhard

    2015-09-01

    Generalized reciprocity has been proposed as a mechanism for enabling continued cooperation between unrelated individuals. It can be described by the simple rule "help somebody if you received help from someone", and as it does not require individual recognition, complex cognition or extended memory capacities, it has the potential to explain cooperation in a large number of organisms. In a panmictic population this mechanism is vulnerable to defection by individuals who readily accept help but do not help themselves. Here, I investigate to what extent the limitation of social interactions to a social neighborhood can lead to conditions that favor generalized reciprocity in the absence of population structuring. It can be shown that cooperation is likely to evolve if one assumes certain sparse interaction graphs, if strategies are discrete, and if spontaneous helping and reciprocating are independently inherited.

  9. The cyclical social choice of primary vs. general election candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurrild-Klitgaard, Peter

    The manner in which US presidential elections are organized make them ripe for empirical manifestations of the “voting paradoxes” identified by social choice theorists. This note illustrates the general point with polling data involving the two leading Democrats and the three leading Republicans...... at the beginning of the 2016 presidential primaries, suggesting that all five candidates may be alternatives in one or more cyclical majorities, i.e., where no candidate cannot be beaten by at least one other...

  10. Risk reduction technologies in general practice and social work

    OpenAIRE

    Rexvid, Devin; Blom, Björn; Evertsson, Lars; Forssén, Annika

    2012-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) and social workers (SWs) are professions whose professional autonomy and discretion have changed in the so-called risk and audit society. The aim of this article is to compare GPs’ and SWs’ responses to Evidence-Based and Organizational Risk Reduction Technologies (ERRT and ORRT). It is based on a content analysis of 54 peer-reviewed empirical articles. The results show that both professions held ambivalent positions towards ERRT. The response towards ORRT differed...

  11. Risk Reduction Technologies in General Practice and Social Work

    OpenAIRE

    Devin Rexvid; Björn Blom; Lars Evertsson; Annika Forssén

    2012-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) and social workers (SWs) are professions whose professional autonomy and discretion have changed in the so-called risk and audit society. The aim of this article is to compare GPs’ and SWs’ responses to Evidence-Based and Organizational Risk Reduction Technologies (ERRT and ORRT). It is based on a content analysis of 54 peer-reviewed empirical articles. The results show that both professions held ambivalent positions towards ERRT. The response towards ORRT differed...

  12. 伴与不伴敏感性关系妄想的社交恐怖症及强迫症患者人格及症状特征的比较%Comparison of personality and symptom characteristics in social phobia patients with or without sensi-tive delusion of reference and in obsessive compulsive disorder patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨兴洁; 韩笑乐; 夏莉华; 张保华; 杨甫德; 陈冠军

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the personality and symptom characteristics in social phobia pa-tients with or without sensitive delusion of reference by comparing to the patients with obsessive compulsive dis-order. Method:Eighty-three cases were investigated with Eysenck personality questionnaire(EPQ)and symp-tom checklist(SCL-90),including 28 cases of social phobia with sensitive delusion of reference,25 cases of so-cial phobia without sensitive delusion of reference and 30 cases of obsessive-compulsive disorder. The results of the 3 groups were analyzed and compared with each other. Results:The differences of somatization factor,co-ercive factor,interpersonal sensitivity factor,anxiety factor,psychic syndrome factor and total score in SCL-90 in 3 groups were significant(P0. 05). The difference of E factor in EPQ in 3 groups was significant(P0. 05). Conclusion:Social phobia patients with sensitive delusion of reference have more similar personality and syptom characteristics with obsessive compulsive disorder patients.%目的:通过与强迫症患者比较,探讨伴与不伴敏感性关系妄想的社交恐怖症患者的人格特征及症状特点方法:对83例伴与不伴敏感性关系妄想的社交恐怖症、强迫症患者进行艾森克人格问卷(EPQ)、症状自评量表(SCL-90)的检测评定。对3组患者间的人格以及症状进行比较。结果:SCL-90结果中,总分、躯体化因子、强迫因子、人际敏感因子、焦虑因子、精神病因子在3组之间的差异有统计学意义(P均0.05)。EPQ结果中,3组间内外向因子分差异有统计学意义(P0.05)。结论:与不伴有敏感性关系妄想的社交恐怖症患者相比,伴有敏感性关系妄想的社交恐怖症患者与强迫症患者有更加相似的人格特征,并且在症状的严重程度方面,也更有相似性。

  13. The evolution of generalized reciprocity on social interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doorn, Gerrit Sander; Taborsky, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Generalized reciprocity (help anyone, if helped by someone) is a minimal strategy capable of supporting cooperation between unrelated individuals. Its simplicity makes it an attractive model to explain the evolution of reciprocal altruism in animals that lack the information or cognitive skills needed for other types of reciprocity. Yet, generalized reciprocity is anonymous and thus defenseless against exploitation by defectors. Recognizing that animals hardly ever interact randomly, we investigate whether social network structure can mitigate this vulnerability. Our results show that heterogeneous interaction patterns strongly support the evolution of generalized reciprocity. The future probability of being rewarded for an altruistic act is inversely proportional to the average connectivity of the social network when cooperators are rare. Accordingly, sparse networks are conducive to the invasion of reciprocal altruism. Moreover, the evolutionary stability of cooperation is enhanced by a modular network structure. Communities of reciprocal altruists are protected against exploitation, because modularity increases the mean access time, that is, the average number of steps that it takes for a random walk on the network to reach a defector. Sparseness and community structure are characteristic properties of vertebrate social interaction patterns, as illustrated by network data from natural populations ranging from fish to primates.

  14. SOCIAL AUDIT OF THE MUNICIPAL SYSTEM OF GENERAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Zerchaninova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the theory and practice of social audit of the municipal system of general education. The authors have developed a conceptual model of social audit to accurately identify both the short- and long-term development prospects of the given system. The paper describes the social audit procedures in Berezovsky municipal district of Sverdlovsk region including four stages: the content analysis of municipal documents concerning the development strategy of the general education system, diagnosis of the current conditions and problems, effectiveness evaluation of the municipal system of general education, and practical  recommendations for improving the education quality. The above mentioned audit demonstrates that the indices of education development are unsystematically tracked, obstructing therefore the adjustment process. To solve the given problems the following measures are recommended: personnel policy development, creating the regional managerial reserve and organizing management workshops, informing the teachers about the modern educational tools, and updating the municipal program of the «Educational System Development of Berezovsky Municipal District for 20011–20015». However, the above suggestions target only the current problems disregarding the challenges of tomorrow which require the advancing strategy. In authors’ opinion, the main emphasis should be re-placed on the quality improvement of the municipal educational services instead of the infrastructure reinforcement. 

  15. SOCIAL AUDIT OF THE MUNICIPAL SYSTEM OF GENERAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Zerchaninova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the theory and practice of social audit of the municipal system of general education. The authors have developed a conceptual model of social audit to accurately identify both the short- and long-term development prospects of the given system. The paper describes the social audit procedures in Berezovsky municipal district of Sverdlovsk region including four stages: the content analysis of municipal documents concerning the development strategy of the general education system, diagnosis of the current conditions and problems, effectiveness evaluation of the municipal system of general education, and practical  recommendations for improving the education quality. The above mentioned audit demonstrates that the indices of education development are unsystematically tracked, obstructing therefore the adjustment process. To solve the given problems the following measures are recommended: personnel policy development, creating the regional managerial reserve and organizing management workshops, informing the teachers about the modern educational tools, and updating the municipal program of the «Educational System Development of Berezovsky Municipal District for 20011–20015». However, the above suggestions target only the current problems disregarding the challenges of tomorrow which require the advancing strategy. In authors’ opinion, the main emphasis should be re-placed on the quality improvement of the municipal educational services instead of the infrastructure reinforcement. 

  16. THE TREATMENT OF SOCIAL PHOBIA - THE DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTIVENESS OF EXPOSURE IN-VIVO AND AN INTEGRATION OF EXPOSURE IN-VIVO, RATIONAL-EMOTIVE THERAPY AND SOCIAL SKILLS TRAINING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MERSCH, PPA

    1995-01-01

    Thirty-four social phobic patients were treated with either exposure in vivo or an integrated treatment, consisting of rational emotive therapy, social skills training and exposure in viva. Comparison with a waiting-list control group showed the effectiveness of both treatments. Contrary to expectat

  17. THE TREATMENT OF SOCIAL PHOBIA - THE DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTIVENESS OF EXPOSURE IN-VIVO AND AN INTEGRATION OF EXPOSURE IN-VIVO, RATIONAL-EMOTIVE THERAPY AND SOCIAL SKILLS TRAINING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MERSCH, PPA

    Thirty-four social phobic patients were treated with either exposure in vivo or an integrated treatment, consisting of rational emotive therapy, social skills training and exposure in viva. Comparison with a waiting-list control group showed the effectiveness of both treatments. Contrary to

  18. Resting EEG asymmetry and spider phobia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merckelbach, H; Muris, P; Pool, K; de Jong, Peter

    1998-01-01

    This study examined whether resting EEG asymmetries are related to symptom severity and treatment outcome in spider phobia. Prior to treatment, EEG was recorded in a sample of spider phobic patients (N = 16). Correlations between frontal and parietal asymmetries in alpha power, on the one hand, and

  19. Relationship between needle phobia and dental anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majstorovic, M.; Veerkamp, J.S.J.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This cross-sectional study aimed to explain the nature of needle phobia and its relationship in dental phobic children with evidence on age-related differences. Methods: The study used 2,865 patients (52% boys, 48% girls), 4 to 11 years old (mean=7.18 years). The patient sample included ran

  20. Epidemiology of fears and specific phobia in adolescence: results from the Mexican Adolescent Mental Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjet, Corina; Borges, Guilherme; Stein, Dan J; Méndez, Enrique; Medina-Mora, María Elena

    2012-02-01

    Specific phobia is among the most common disorders in the general adolescent population, but also among the least studied. The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence of specific fears among adolescents, the proportion of those with fears who meet criteria for specific phobia, and the proportion who recognize their fears as excessive and to identify comorbidity with other disorders and factors associated with severity and treatment. 3,005 youth aged 12 to 17 years participated in the Mexican Adolescent Mental Health Survey, a stratified multistage probability sample representative of adolescents living in Mexico City in 2005. Fears, specific phobia, and 20 other DSM-IV psychiatric disorders were evaluated with the adolescent computerized version of the World Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Interview, administered by trained lay interviewers in the participants' homes. Descriptive, logistic regression, and discrete-time survival analyses were employed. Most adolescents reported at least 1 fear (76.5%); 36.5% of those met lifetime criteria for specific phobia, and 27.3% met criteria in the prior 12 months. Blood-injection-injury and animal fears were the most common types. Females were more likely to report any fear, to have more fear types, and to meet diagnostic criteria. Increased numbers of fears were associated with increased odds of meeting specific phobia criteria and with increased impairment. Among teens with specific phobia, 71.3% recognized their fear as excessive, 9.7% to 12.3% reported severe impairment, and only 6.5% had received treatment. Severity of impairment and comorbid disorders were associated with treatment seeking. The large percentage of adolescents meeting diagnostic criteria coupled with the low proportion with serious impairment suggests that current diagnostic thresholds may be too low or not developmentally sensitive. Future research should address the nature of impairment for adolescents with specific

  1. Does generalized social trust lead to associational membership? Unraveling a bowl of well-tossed spaghetti

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    2011-01-01

    Within the social capital literature it is often assumed that membership of voluntary associations causes generalized social trust and not the other way around. This study challenges this assumption by investigating if generalized social trust causes membership in a novel design that yields valid...... provide rare individual level evidence for a connection between generalized social trust and collective action in that generalized social trust in particular increases membership of associations producing public goods....

  2. Does generalized social trust lead to associational membership? Unraveling a bowl of well-tossed spaghetti

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    Within the social capital literature it is often assumed that membership of voluntary associations causes generalized social trust and not the other way around. This study challenges this assumption by investigating if generalized social trust causes membership in a novel design that yields valid....... Moreover, the study provide rare individual level evidence for a connection between generalized social trust and collective action in that generalized social trust in particular increases membership of associations producing public goods....

  3. 家庭环境、认知倾向、自尊与青少年社交恐惧症的相关性研究%The correlational study between family environment,cognitive disposition,self-esteem and adolescent social phobia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    麻爱华; 王相立

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨家庭环境、认知倾向、自尊与青少年社交恐惧症的相关性.方法 采用家庭环境量表中文版(FES-CV)、认知倾向问卷(CAOT)、自尊量表(SES)对110例青少年社交恐惧症患者及142名健康对照进行测查,并对患者进行社交回避及苦恼量表(SAD)评定.结果 病例组CAOT总分、乐观因子分、亲密度、情感表达、成功性、娱乐性、组织性因子分和自尊分明显低于对照组,矛盾性得分高于对照组.病例组SAD分与CAOT总分、乐观因子、亲密度、情感表达及SES评分呈显著负相关;而与矛盾性因子分呈显著正相关.患者病情严重程度与乐观因子、亲密度、情感表达、SES评分呈显著负相关,起病年龄与之呈显著正相关.病程与亲密度、情感表达、自尊评分呈显著负相关,与矛盾性评分呈显著正相关.结论消极的认知倾向、低亲密度、低情感表达、高矛盾性及低自尊是青少年社交恐惧症发病的主要危险因素.认知倾向越消极,家庭环境亲密度、情感表达及自尊程度越低,其病情越严重、起病年龄越早.病程长与低亲密度、低情感表达、矛盾多和低自尊相关.%Objective To investigate the correlation between family environment,cognitive disposition,self-esteem and adolescent social phobia.Methods 110 adolescents with social phobia and 142 healthy control subjects were selected.They were surveyed by Family Environment Scale of Chinese version (FES-CV),cognitive appraisal orientation test (CAOT),and Self-Esteem Scale (SES).Moreover,the adolescents with social phobia were administered with Social Avoidance and Distress Scale (SAD).Results When compared with the controls,the score of adolescent social phobia group showed significantly lower score in total and optimistic factor of CAOT,cohesion,expressiveness,achievement,activerecreational orientation,organization and self-esteem; but higher in conflict factor.The analysis of the

  4. Ideologies in conflict in XXI century: Islamophobia vs Western phobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Bermejo Laguna

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently started the new millennium, the West is witness a conflict between two ideologies that converge to use Islam as a weapon of choice with which declared opponents. To Islamophobia, that joins large sectors of the Western population and whose strategy involves systematically revile the Islamic civilization, with the purpose of ratting as Muslim enemies to men and women who reside in Western societies, opposes the Western phobia which is monopolized by native radical ideologies of the Islamic world. Identified these two philosophies, the aim of this research pursues the separately analysis from both to come to conclude as necessary the alteration of the foundations that are supporting, to avoid being affected as sensitive areas as the personal and social safety. The methodology, consisting in the exposition of causes that may be indicative of the mutual resentment that his followers profess themselves, comes to demostrate the impact that those speeches have the time to build an enemy; fed, on the one hand, of imaginary fears, the rejection of all meaning of multicultural theory of modern societies, and therefore, negative cultural concessions to people who do not promote them in their societies of origin. The Western phobia, sponsored by the Islamist ideology, comes to introduce Islam in the early stages as the resource with which to face the Western supremacy, and from there to promote violence against those who have usurped their land, and are reproaching their lano interest in addressing proposals for modern political, social or family. Only proposals of intercultural harmony and rejection of the discourses that make Islam a political and military ideology may prevent that these ideologies continue gaining accessions.

  5. Family Generated and Delivered Social Story Intervention: Acquisition, Maintenance, and Generalization of Social Skills in Youths with ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olcay-Gül, Seray; Tekin-Iftar, Elif

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether (a) family members were able to learn to write a social story and deliver social story intervention to teach social skills to their children (age 12 to 16) with ASD, (b) youths with ASD acquired and maintained the targeted social skills and generalized these skills across novel situations. Multiple…

  6. Repeated Strains, Social Control, Social Learning, and Delinquency: Testing an Integrated Model of General Strain Theory in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Wan-Ning; Haas, Ain; Chen, Xiaojin; Pi, Yijun

    2014-01-01

    In Agnew's general strain theory, repeated strains can generate crime and delinquency by reducing social control and fostering social learning of crime. Using a sample of 615 middle-and high-school students in China, this study examines how social control and social learning variables mediate the effect of repeated strains in school and at home on…

  7. Treating cockroach phobia with augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella, Cristina; Bretón-López, Juani; Quero, Soledad; Baños, Rosa; García-Palacios, Azucena

    2010-09-01

    In vivo exposure is the recommended treatment of choice for specific phobias; however, it demonstrates a high attrition rate and is not effective in all instances. The use of virtual reality (VR) has improved the acceptance of exposure treatments to some individuals. Augmented reality (AR) is a variation of VR wherein the user sees the real world augmented by virtual elements. The present study tests an AR system in the short (posttreatment) and long term (3, 6, and 12 months) for the treatment of cockroach phobia using a multiple baseline design across individuals (with 6 participants). The AR exposure therapy was applied using the "one-session treatment" guidelines developed by Ost, Salkovskis, and Hellström (1991). Results showed that AR was effective at treating cockroach phobia. All participants improved significantly in all outcome measures after treatment; furthermore, the treatment gains were maintained at 3, 6, and 12-month follow-up periods. This study discusses the advantages of AR as well as its potential applications.

  8. State Phobia and Civil Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dean, Mitchell; Villadsen, Kaspar

    and Guattari, François Ewald, and Blandine Kreigel, in relation to whom he carved out a position. And it entails an examination of his legacy in Hardt and Negri, the theorists of Empire, or in Nikolas Rose, the influential English sociologist. Foucault's own view is highly ambiguous: he claims to be concerned...... with the exercise of political sovereignty, yet his work cannot make visible the concept of the state. Moving beyond Foucault, the authors outline new ways of conceiving the state's role in establishing social order and in mediating between an inequality-producing capitalist economy and the juridical equality...

  9. Frequency, comorbidity, and psychosocial impairment of specific phobia in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essau, C A; Conradt, J; Petermann, F

    2000-06-01

    Investigated the frequency, comorbidity, and psychosocial impairment of specific phobia and specific fears among 1,035 adolescents 12 to 17 years old. The adolescents were recruited from 36 schools in the province of Bremen, Germany. Specific phobia and other psychiatric disorders were coded based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed. [DSM-IV]; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) criteria using the computerized Munich version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (Wittchen & Pfister, 1996). Thirty-six (3.5%) of the adolescents met DSM-IV criteria for specific phobia sometime in their life. Of all the subtypes of specific phobia, animal and natural environment phobia were the most common. More girls than boys received the diagnosis of specific phobia. One third of the adolescents with specific phobia also had depressive and somatoform disorders. Despite the high level of psychosocial impairment experienced by individuals with specific phobia both during the worst episode of their disorder and in the last 4 weeks, only a small portion of them sought professional help.

  10. Phobia and phobic memories: an old issue with new concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ab Latif Wani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article is a short report on phobias and the recent study which shows that phobias act as the memories in the brain which can inherit from one generation to another generation to transfer experiences in the newly generation. [Dis Mol Med 2014; 2(4.000: 70-72

  11. Nice Doggie! Contact Desensitization Plus Reinforcement Decreases Dog Phobias for Children with Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Tyner, Shannon; Brewer, Adam; Helman, Meghan; Leon, Yanerys; Pritchard, Joshua; Schlund, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Dog phobias are common in individuals with autism; however, evidence supporting behavioral interventions is limited. The current study evaluated the efficacy of contact desensitization plus reinforcement on dog phobic behavior exhibited by three children diagnosed with autism. The treatment package improved contact with dogs in analog and naturalistic settings and the improvements were maintained at follow-up and in generalization tests. Parents/caregivers also provided high consumer satisfac...

  12. 15 Años del Sistema General de Seguridad Social

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Félix Patiño Restrepo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available

    (Documento modificado de la presentación ante el “1er Congreso Internacional Medicina y Salud”, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México, DF, abril 23-24 de 2009

    La Comisión de Salud de la Academia Nacional de Medicina de Colombia desarrolla un análisis continuo y un estudio permanente de la profunda reforma de la seguridad social en salud de corte neoliberal que implantó la Ley 100 de diciembre 23 de 1993 mediante la creación del Sistema General de Seguridad Social en Salud (SGSSS.(1,2

    La reforma produjo una honda crisis en el sector y dio como resultado la privatización del sistema de salud, la desaparición del Instituto Colombiano de Seguros Sociales y una posición dominante oligopólica de las corporaciones intermediarias aseguradoras con efectos muy negativos sobre la medicina como profesión y como ciencia.

    Aunque motivo de controversia según quien informa, los indicadores de salud pública no mejoraron, y algunos se han deteriorado. Las tasas de mortalidad por SIDA siguen aumentando; el índice anual parasitario de malaria asciende. Tenemos ahora problema con enfermedades reemergentes. Los indicadores de salud materna, las tasas de complicaciones perinatales no muestran cambios significativos durante los últimos años; la tasa de embarazo en adolescentes es muy alta. Los programas de vacunación, que en una época dieron a Colombia una posición destacada en el continente, se deterioraron, y solo hasta ahora comienzan a repuntar.

    Sin embargo, algunos informes sí muestran mejoría en los indicadores de salud, tales como mortalidad materna, mortalidad infantil o mortalidad por enfermedad diarreica aguda; la tasa de mortalidad por tuberculosis no muestra mejoría significativa.(3

  13. Evaluating Perceived Probability of Threat-Relevant Outcomes and Temporal Orientation in Flying Phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromoustakos, Elena; Clark, Gavin I; Rock, Adam J

    2016-01-01

    Probability bias regarding threat-relevant outcomes has been demonstrated across anxiety disorders but has not been investigated in flying phobia. Individual temporal orientation (time perspective) may be hypothesised to influence estimates of negative outcomes occurring. The present study investigated whether probability bias could be demonstrated in flying phobia and whether probability estimates of negative flying events was predicted by time perspective. Sixty flying phobic and fifty-five non-flying-phobic adults were recruited to complete an online questionnaire. Participants completed the Flight Anxiety Scale, Probability Scale (measuring perceived probability of flying-negative events, general-negative and general positive events) and the Past-Negative, Future and Present-Hedonistic subscales of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (variables argued to predict mental travel forward and backward in time). The flying phobic group estimated the probability of flying negative and general negative events occurring as significantly higher than non-flying phobics. Past-Negative scores (positively) and Present-Hedonistic scores (negatively) predicted probability estimates of flying negative events. The Future Orientation subscale did not significantly predict probability estimates. This study is the first to demonstrate probability bias for threat-relevant outcomes in flying phobia. Results suggest that time perspective may influence perceived probability of threat-relevant outcomes but the nature of this relationship remains to be determined.

  14. An Evaluation of Multi-Component Exposure Treatment of Needle Phobia in an Adult with Autism and Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Jason J.; Symons, Frank J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Fear of medical procedures in general and needles in particular can be a difficult clinical challenge to providing effective health care for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Methods: A changing criterion design was used to examine graduated exposure treatment for blood-injury-injection phobia in an adult…

  15. An Evaluation of Multi-Component Exposure Treatment of Needle Phobia in an Adult with Autism and Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Jason J.; Symons, Frank J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Fear of medical procedures in general and needles in particular can be a difficult clinical challenge to providing effective health care for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Methods: A changing criterion design was used to examine graduated exposure treatment for blood-injury-injection phobia in an adult…

  16. Self-Management of Social Initiations by Kindergarten Students with Disabilities in the General Education Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Brooke M.; Gast, David L.; Luscre, Deanna

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of a self-management intervention on social interaction behaviors was evaluated for students with disabilities and social deficits. Four students enrolled in a general education kindergarten classroom were taught to self-monitor social initiations during nonstructured social time via a digital wrist counter. The number of social…

  17. LA REFORMA DEL SISTEMA GENERAL DE SEGURIDAD SOCIAL EN SALUD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Malagón Londoño

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    La Academia Nacional de Medicina de Colombia en repetidas ocasiones, desde el año 1998, ha denunciado las notables defi ciencias del Sistema General de Seguridad Social en Salud (SGSSS que implantó la Ley 100 de diciembre 23 de 1993. 

    El SGSSS, que debiera ser sistema de aseguramiento con propósito social, se ha convertido en negocio donde priman los intereses económicos con descuido en la calidad de los servicios; hizo profunda crisis, principalmente por causa de los excesivos costos que conlleva el modelo de intermediación comercial. Se ha creado una inaceptable posición oligopólica dominante de los aseguradores, que parece haber suplantado al estado en la defi nición de las políticas y en la orientación del SGSSS e interfiere la buena prestación de los servicios. Manifestación prominente de esto es la creciente y descontrolada integración vertical. 

    El sistema colombiano de intermediación comercial es costoso, inequitativo, ineficiente y va contra los principios constitucionales que definen la salud como derecho humano, en detrimento del bien común.

    El SGSSS, a los 18 años de su implantación, aún no cuenta con un sistema de información y las bases de datos existentes en las EPS, y también en el FOSYGA, distan de ser confiables. Se reconoce que un sistema de salud es en esencia un sistema de información. Los hospitales y clínicas de Colombia, especialmente las instituciones de carácter público, tienen una cartera que, se estima, es cinco o seis veces mayor que la cartera reclamada por las EPS, buena parte de la cual ya es de difícil cobro. Sin embargo, la prioridad ha sido resolver el problema económico de las EPS, no el de los hospitales.

    Son muchas las voces que claman por un riguroso control de la manera como las EPS invierten los recursos de la salud, de carácter público por ser recursos parafiscales. Las EPS muestran un grande y rápido crecimiento patrimonial y han

  18. Reliability of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI Portuguese version in a heterogeneous sample of Brazilian university students Fidedignidade da versão em português do Inventário de Ansiedade e Fobia Social (SPAI em amostra heterogênea de estudantes universitários brasileiros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Picon

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate internal consistency and temporal stability trough test re-test reliability of the Portuguese version of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI in a heterogeneous Brazilian sample. METHODS: After informed consent, the translated and adapted version of the SPAI Portuguese was tested and re-tested at a 14-day interval in a sample of 225 university students, both genders, from 4 different undergraduate courses. After double data entry, statistical analysis included Cronbach's alphas, Pearson and intra-class correlation coefficients. RESULTS: The studied sample consisted of 213 students from 4 sub-samples: 95 law students, 31 social communication students, 54 civil engineering students and 33 dental medicine students. The mean age was 23 (±6 years and 110 (51.6% were female. The Cronbach' alpha was 0.96, no difference for both genders. The differential (total score of the SPAI Portuguese showed Pearson coefficient 0.83 (95% CI 0.78-0.87 and Intra-class coefficient 0.83 (95% CI 0.78-0.86. There was no statistical difference in Pearson coefficients between genders (p = 0.121 and the 4 sub-samples (p = 0.258. CONCLUSION: The results do not ensure validity, however, the SPAI Portuguese version presented a good content homogeneity with satisfactory level of internal consistency. The temporal stability evaluated was substantial. The results showed that the Portuguese SPAI presents perfectly acceptable reliability for both genders and suggest that it can be used in Brazilian populationsOBJETIVO: Avaliar consistência interna e estabilidade temporal, através de fidedignidade teste-reteste, da versão em português do Inventário de Ansiedade e Fobia Social (SPAI, em uma amostra brasileira heterogênea. MÉTODOS: Após consentimento informado, a versão traduzida e adaptada para o português do SPAI foi testada e re-testada, com 14 dias de intervalo, em uma amostra de 225 estudantes universitários de ambos os gêneros, de

  19. High Magnitude of Social Anxiety Disorder in School Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kindie Mekuria

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Social phobia is the most prevalent and chronic type of anxiety disorder worldwide and it affects occupational, educational, and social affairs of the individual. Social phobia is also known for its association with depression and substance use disorder. Objective. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and associated factors of social phobia among high school students in Ethiopia. Methods. Cross-sectional study was conducted among 386 randomly selected students. Data were collected using pretested and self-administered questionnaire. Social phobia was assessed by using Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN. Logistic regression was used to analyze the data with 95% confidence interval and variables with p value less than 0.05 were considered as statistically significant. Results. From 386 study participants, 106 (27.5% of them were positive for social phobia. Being female (AOR = 3.1; 95% CI: 1.82–5.27, current alcohol drinking (AOR = 1.75; 95% CI: 1.03–2.98, poor social support (AOR = 2.40; 95% CI: 1.17–4.92, and living with single parent (AOR = 5.72; 95% CI: 2.98–10.99 were significantly associated with social phobia. Conclusion. The proportion of social phobia was higher compared to previous evidences. School-based youth-friendly mental health services might be helpful to tackle this problem.

  20. A general approach-avoidance hypothesis of oxytocin: accounting for social and non-social effects of oxytocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harari-Dahan, Osnat; Bernstein, Amit

    2014-11-01

    We critically reexamine extant theory and empirical study of Oxytocin. We question whether OT is, in fact, a "social neuropeptide" as argued in dominant theories of OT. We critically review human and animal research on the social and non-social effects of Oxytocin, including behavioral, psychophysiological, neurobiological, and neuroimaging studies. We find that extant (social) theories of Oxytocin do not account for well-documented non-social effects of Oxytocin. Furthermore, we find a range of evidence that social and non-social effects of Oxytocin may be mediated by core approach-avoidance motivational processes. We propose a General Approach-avoidance Hypothesis of Oxytocin (GAAO). We argue that the GAAO may provide a parsimonious account of established social and non-social effects of Oxytocin. We thus re-conceptualize the basic function(s) and mechanism(s) of action of Oxytocin. Finally, we highlight implications of the GAAO for basic and clinical research in humans

  1. Why Fever Phobia Is Still Common?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, Suzan; Usak, Esma; Koksal, Tulin; Canbal, Metin

    2016-01-01

    Background Fever is a reliable sign of illness, but it also evokes fear and anxiety. It is not the fever itself but the fear of possible complications and accompanying symptoms that is important for pediatricians and parents. Objectives We aimed to investigate maternal understanding of fever, its potential consequences, and impacts on the treatment of children. Patients and Methods A questionnaire was use to explore the attitudes, knowledge, and practices of mothers of 861 children brought to four medical centers in different regions of Turkey in 2012, with fever being the chief complaint. All the children were aged 3 months - 15 years. Results Among the 861 mothers, 92.2% favored antipyretics for fever, either alone or in addition to external cooling measures. Most favored paracetamol or ibuprofen. In this study, the appropriate use of antipyretics was 75.2%, which was higher than that reported in the literature. In common with previous reports, seizures and brain damage were perceived as the most frightening and harmful effects of fever. All the mothers expressed concerns about fever, but they were most common among the highly educated or those with one child. Conclusions Fever phobia remains common, not only among low socioeconomic status mothers but also among those of high socioeconomic status. Healthcare providers should take fever phobia into account and provide correct information to caregivers about fever at all visits. PMID:27781110

  2. Nausea in Specific Phobia of Vomiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen Trinka

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Specific phobia of vomiting (SPOV is a clinical condition with early onset, chronic course and substantial psychosocial impairment due to a rigorous avoidance behavior. A primary symptom which drives patients to consult a medical practitioner is nausea. In this study our aim was to further analyze this symptom of SPOV and examined its role in the development and manifestation of the phobia. We conducted an internet survey in the german SPOV-internet-forum. We calculated a nausea score and grouped participants in a high- and low-nausea group to examine the relationship between nausea and characteristics of the fear of vomiting. In this sample (N = 131, nausea was fairly common in most participants with fear of vomiting. Participants in the high-nausea group had significantly higher ratings of subjective fear and significantly longer duration of fear of vomiting. Additionally, the high-nausea group contained more participants with a body mass index below 19 than the low-nausea group. The present findings suggest that nausea is a core symptom in SPOV which is closely related to intensity of the fear, duration of the fear, and body weight. Future research should investigate if nausea-specific design of treatment could improve therapy outcome.

  3. Nausea in specific phobia of vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höller, Yvonne; van Overveld, Mark; Jutglar, Heili; Trinka, Eugen

    2013-09-01

    Specific phobia of vomiting (SPOV) is a clinical condition with early onset, chronic course and substantial psychosocial impairment due to a rigorous avoidance behavior. A primary symptom which drives patients to consult a medical practitioner is nausea. In this study our aim was to further analyze this symptom of SPOV and examined its role in the development and manifestation of the phobia. We conducted an internet survey in the german SPOV-internet-forum. We calculated a nausea score and grouped participants in a high-and low-nausea group to examine the relationship between nausea and characteristics of the fear of vomiting. In this sample (N = 131), nausea was fairly common in most participants with fear of vomiting. Participants in the high-nausea group had significantly higher ratings of subjective fear and significantly longer duration of fear of vomiting. Additionally, the high-nausea group contained more participants with a body mass index below 19 than the low-nausea group. The present findings suggest that nausea is a core symptom in SPOV which is closely related to intensity of the fear, duration of the fear, and body weight. Future research should investigate if nausea-specific design of treatment could improve therapy outcome.

  4. The SPAIC-11 and SPAICP-11: Two Brief Child- and Parent-Rated Measures of Social Anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Bunnell, Brian E.; Beidel,Deborah C.; LIU, LIWEN; Joseph, Dana L.; Higa-McMillan, Charmaine

    2015-01-01

    The Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children-11 (SPAIC-11) and Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children’s Parents-11 (SPAICP-11) were developed as brief versions of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory - Child and Parent Versions via item response theory (IRT) using child and parent reports of social anxiety. A sample of 496 children was analyzed using IRT analyses, revealing 11 items that exhibit measurement equivalence across parent and child reports. Descriptive and psyc...

  5. Social Desirability, Environmental Attitudes, and General Ecological Behaviour in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oerke, Britta; Bogner, Franz X.

    2013-01-01

    Socially desirable responses have been widely discussed as potentially biasing self-reported measures of environmental attitude and behaviour assessment. The direct and moderating effect of social desirability on children has not been analysed before. By applying a Lie scale together with a two-factor environmental attitude set measure and a scale…

  6. Neuro-linguistic programming and application in treatment of phobias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunaratne, Mahishika

    2010-11-01

    Phobias are a prevalent and often debilitating mental health problem all over the world. This article aims to explore what is known about the use of Neuro-linguistic Programming (NLP) as a treatment for this condition. Whilst there is abundant experiential evidence from NLP practitioners attesting to the efficacy of this method as a treatment for phobias, experimental research in this area is somewhat limited. This paper reviews evidence available in literature produced in the UK and US and reveals that NLP is a successful treatment for phobias as well as being particularly efficient due to the relatively brief time period it takes to effect an improvement.

  7. Avoidance learning, Pavlovian conditioning, and the development of phobias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddle, D A; Bond, N W

    1988-10-01

    This paper examines the role of Pavlovian conditioning in the acquisition, maintenance and elimination of human phobias. Because many conceptualizations of human fears and phobias are based on data from studies of avoidance learning in animals, we first review theories of avoidance. Our conclusion is that none of the extant theories provides an adequate account of avoidance learning, and we propose a model of avoidance that involves Pavlovian, but not instrumental learning. We then analyse critically arguments that Pavlovian conditioning plays only a small role in the aetiology of fears. Finally, the paper examines the implications of a conditioning model of avoidance for the study of human fears and phobias.

  8. The assessment and treatment of specific phobias: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grös, Daniel F; Antony, Martin M

    2006-08-01

    Specific phobia is one of the most common and easily treated mental disorders. In this review, empirically supported assessment and treatment procedures for specific phobia are discussed. Exposure-based treatments in particular are highlighted given their demonstrated effectiveness for this condition. The format and characteristics of exposure-based treatment and predictors of treatment response are outlined to provide recommendations for maximizing outcome. In addition, several other treatments for specific phobia are reviewed and critiqued, including cognitive therapy, virtual reality, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, applied tension, and pharmacologic treatments. The review concludes with a discussion of future directions for research.

  9. One Session Treatment for Specific Phobias: An Adaptation for Paediatric Blood-Injection-Injury Phobia in Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oar, Ella L; Farrell, Lara J; Ollendick, Thomas H

    2015-12-01

    Blood-injection-injury (BII) phobia is a chronic and debilitating disorder, which has largely been neglected in the child literature. The present paper briefly reviews the aetiology of specific phobias with particular attention to BII and provides an integrated developmental model of this disorder in youth. Evidence-based treatments for child-specific phobias are discussed, and the development of a modified one session treatment (OST) approach to enhance treatment outcomes for BII phobia in children and adolescents is described. This approach is illustrated in two children with a primary diagnosis of BII phobia. The cases illustrate the unique challenges associated with treating BII in youth and the need for a modified intervention. Modifications included addressing the role of pain (e.g., psychoeducation, more graduated exposure steps) and disgust (e.g., disgust eliciting exposure tasks) in the expression of the phobia and fainting in the maintenance of this phobia. Moreover, it is recommended that parents be more actively involved throughout treatment (e.g., education session prior to OST, contingency management training, guidance regarding planning exposure tasks following treatment) and for families to participate in a structured e-therapy maintenance programme post-treatment.

  10. THE EXAMINATION OF FEAR LEVELS FROM PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORTS LESSON OF STUDENTS BY ILLUSTRATED PHOBIA TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zekiye

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Physical education and sports classes are generally amongst the students’ favourite classes. Children manifest themselves primarily with their behaviours in social life. Thus, physical education classes play a crucial role in improving individual differences and biological structure. The behaviours that were seen in the other classes may differ from those in the physical education classes. While the danger of injury in physical education classes may discourage the students, that is not the case in the other classes. The aim of this study is to investigate the sixth-graders' fears towards physical education classes by taking into consideration some variances.The study that was done in 2012-2013 spring term was carried out in the provinces of Van, Trabzon, Gümüşhane, Erzurum, Muş and Ağrı with 262 sixth-graders consisting of 147 females and 115 males by testing them with the illustrated phobia test. In the study, it has been investigated whether the variances such as the students' genders, residences, number of siblings, educational background of their parents, type of the movies they watch have any effects on liking or having phobia of the physical education lesson with the help of the illustrated phobia test. As a method, the illustrated phobia test’s part that was prepared for the sports hall and that was improved by Bös / Mechling (1985 has been used. It consisted of 6 pictures that were taken in sports hall and 7 pictures that were taken in water. In the data analysis t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA and correlation analysis were used.According to analysis of variance results, thoughts of jumping over the vault overcoming the medic ball obstacle, walking over balance beam, hands free hanging downward on chin-up bar with feet differentiated significiantly according to their love rates of physical education (p<0.05. Also, thoughts of hanging one handed on the climbing hawser, hands free hanging downward on chin-up bar with feet

  11. Effects of social capital on general health status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Ayano

    2014-02-14

    This paper discusses the concept of social capital as a potential factor in understanding the controversial relationship between income inequality and individual health status, arguing a positive, important role for social capital. Most of the health research literature focuses on individual health status and reveals that social capital increases individual health. However, the difficulty in measuring social capital, together with what may be the nearly impossible task of attributing causality, should relegate the concept to a more theoretical role in health research. Nonetheless, social capital receives academic attention as a potentially important factor in health research. This paper finds that the mixed results of empirical research on income inequality and health status remain a problem in the context of defining a stable relationship between socioeconomic status and health status. Clearly, further research is needed to elaborate on the income inequality and health relationship. In addition, focused, rigorous examination of social capital in a health context is needed before health researchers can comfortably introduce it as a concept of influence or significance.

  12. Nice Doggie! Contact Desensitization Plus Reinforcement Decreases Dog Phobias for Children with Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyner, Shannon; Brewer, Adam; Helman, Meghan; Leon, Yanerys; Pritchard, Joshua; Schlund, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Dog phobias are common in individuals with autism; however, evidence supporting behavioral interventions is limited. The current study evaluated the efficacy of contact desensitization plus reinforcement on dog phobic behavior exhibited by three children diagnosed with autism. The treatment package improved contact with dogs in analog and naturalistic settings and the improvements were maintained at follow-up and in generalization tests. Parents/caregivers also provided high consumer satisfaction reports.Approximately 30 % of individuals diagnosed with autism also receive a comorbid diagnosis of a clinical phobia.Research has shown that behavioral treatment for dog phobias in individuals with intellectual disabilities is contact desensitization plus reinforcement using two hierarchies: size of the dog and distance to the dog; no escape extinction was necessary.The current systematic replication shows that this treatment package was effective for children with autism using only a single hierarchy composed of distance to the dog.Future practitioners may wish to examine whether this treatment package also produces changes in supplemental physiological measures such as pupil dilation, heart rate, galvanic skin responses, and respiration.

  13. Script Fading for Children with Autism: Generalization of Social Initiation Skills from School to Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichnick, Alison Marie

    2013-01-01

    A critical component of teaching social skills to people with autism is the generalization of behavior change across a variety of untrained situations during which social skills are appropriate. The script-fading procedure is an effective technology for teaching social skills to people with autism, but few researchers have established cues in the…

  14. Breaking the mathematics phobia of secondary school students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... the use of behaviour method of teaching mathematics to alleviate the Mathematics Phobia among secondary school students.

  15. The Legacy of Seligman's "Phobias and Preparedness" (1971).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Richard J

    2016-09-01

    Seligman's (1971) classic article, "Phobias and Preparedness," marked a break from traditional conditioning theories of the etiology of phobias, inspiring a line of research integrating evolutionary theory with learning theory. In this article, I briefly sketch the context motivating the preparedness theory of phobias before summarizing the initial wave of laboratory conditioning experiments pioneered by Öhman and conducted by his team and by others to test predictions derived from Seligman's theory. Finally, I review the legacy of Seligman's article, including theoretical developments embodied in Öhman and Mineka's fear module approach as well as alternatives for explaining "preparedness" phenomena, including the selective sensitization, expectancy, and nonassociative theories. Although Seligman himself soon moved on to other topics, his seminal article in Behavior Therapy continues to inspire research more than four decades later that has deepened our understanding of the etiology of phobias. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. The Effects of General Social Support and Social Support for Racial Discrimination on African American Women's Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seawell, Asani H; Cutrona, Carolyn E; Russell, Daniel W

    2014-02-01

    The present longitudinal study examined the role of general and tailored social support in mitigating the deleterious impact of racial discrimination on depressive symptoms and optimism in a large sample of African American women. Participants were 590 African American women who completed measures assessing racial discrimination, general social support, tailored social support for racial discrimination, depressive symptoms, and optimism at two time points (2001-2002 and 2003-2004). Our results indicated that higher levels of general and tailored social support predicted optimism one year later; changes in both types of support also predicted changes in optimism over time. Although initial levels of neither measure of social support predicted depressive symptoms over time, changes in tailored support predicted changes in depressive symptoms. We also sought to determine whether general and tailored social support "buffer" or diminish the negative effects of racial discrimination on depressive symptoms and optimism. Our results revealed a classic buffering effect of tailored social support, but not general support on depressive symptoms for women experiencing high levels of discrimination.

  17. IT and Activity Displacement: Behavioral Evidence from the U.S. General Social Survey (GSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, John P.; Martin, Steven

    2009-01-01

    In order to track social change during a period of the rapid advances brought about by new information technologies (IT), a targeted module of IT-relevant and Internet questions was added to the 2000, 2002 and 2004 samples of the General Social Survey (GSS). The general issue inherent in and guiding the questions asked (as well as the analyses…

  18. Differences in social relations between persons with type 2 diabetes and the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempler, Nana Folmann; Ekholm, Ola; Willaing, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Poor social support and lack of social network are well-established risk factors for morbidity and mortality in general populations. Good social relations, such as social support and network contacts, are associated with better self-management and fewer psychosocial problems in persons...... with type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether persons with type 2 diabetes have poorer social relations than the general population. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey in three settings: a specialist diabetes clinic (SDC) (n = 1084), a web panel (WP) consisting...... of persons with type 2 diabetes (n = 1491) and a sample from the 2010 Danish Health and Morbidity Survey, representative of the general population (n = 15,165). We compared social relations using multivariate logistic regression. Results: Compared to the general population, persons with type 2 diabetes more...

  19. Instruments for the assessment of social anxiety disorder: Validation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osório, Flávia de Lima; Crippa, José Alexandre de Souza; Loureiro, Sonia Regina

    2012-10-22

    Great progress has been observed in the literature over the last decade regarding the validation of instruments for the assessment of Social Anxiety Disorder in the Brazilian context. Particularly outstanding in this respect is the production of a group of Brazilian investigators regarding the psychometric study of the following instruments: Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, Social Phobia Inventory, Brief Social Phobia Scale, Disability Profile, Liebowitz Self-Rated Disability Scale, Social Phobia Safety Behaviors Scale and Self-Statements During Public Speaking Scale, which have proved to be appropriate and valid for use in the adult Brazilian population, representing resources for the assessment of social anxiety in clinical and experimental situations.

  20. Single-session gamified virtual reality exposure therapy for spider phobia vs. traditional exposure therapy: study protocol for a randomized controlled non-inferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloff, Alexander; Lindner, Philip; Hamilton, William; Reuterskiöld, Lena; Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per

    2016-02-02

    Traditional one-session exposure therapy (OST) in which a patient is gradually exposed to feared stimuli for up to 3 h in a one-session format has been found effective for the treatment of specific phobias. However, many individuals with specific phobia are reluctant to seek help, and access to care is lacking due to logistic challenges of accessing, collecting, storing, and/or maintaining stimuli. Virtual reality (VR) exposure therapy may improve upon existing techniques by facilitating access, decreasing cost, and increasing acceptability and effectiveness. The aim of this study is to compare traditional OST with in vivo spiders and a human therapist with a newly developed single-session gamified VR exposure therapy application with modern VR hardware, virtual spiders, and a virtual therapist. Participants with specific phobia to spiders (N = 100) will be recruited from the general public, screened, and randomized to either VR exposure therapy (n = 50) or traditional OST (n = 50). A behavioral approach test using in vivo spiders will serve as the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcome measures will include spider phobia questionnaires and self-reported anxiety, depression, and quality of life. Outcomes will be assessed using a non-inferiority design at baseline and at 1, 12, and 52 weeks after treatment. VR exposure therapy has previously been evaluated as a treatment for specific phobias, but there has been a lack of high-quality randomized controlled trials. A new generation of modern, consumer-ready VR devices is being released that are advancing existing technology and have the potential to improve clinical availability and treatment effectiveness. The VR medium is also particularly suitable for taking advantage of recent phobia treatment research emphasizing engagement and new learning, as opposed to physiological habituation. This study compares a market-ready, gamified VR spider phobia exposure application, delivered using consumer VR hardware, with

  1. Enhancing Generalization of Social Skills: Making Social Skills Curricula Effective after the Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh Kent; MacKay, Leslie D.

    2008-01-01

    Sometimes educators are puzzled by how students can demonstrate a social skill perfectly during a practice session in a social skills curriculum but fail to use the same skill in real-life situations. Students with a lack of social skills are more likely to experience teacher and peer rejection, and are more at risk for negative life outcomes,…

  2. Social relations and loneliness among older patients consulting their general practitioner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Tina Drud; Sandholdt, Håkon; Waldorff, Frans Boch

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Social relations are important for people and affect their quality of life, morbidity and mortality. This holds true especially for older persons. General practitioners (GPs) are in a unique position to address social relations and loneliness; however, no GP population-based studies...... have assessed older patients' social relations and loneliness. The aim of this study was to analyse the social relations and loneliness of patients aged 65 years and above consulting their GP. METHODS: This survey counted the participation of 12 general practices in the Capital Region of Denmark...

  3. Social relations and loneliness among older patients consulting their general practitioner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Tina Drud; Sandholdt, Håkon; Waldorff, Frans Boch

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Social relations are important for people and affect their quality of life, morbidity and mortality. This holds true especially for older persons. General practitioners (GPs) are in a unique position to address social relations and loneliness; however, no GP population-based studies...... have assessed older patients’ social relations and loneliness. The aim of this study was to analyse the social relations and loneliness of patients aged 65 years and above consulting their GP. Methods: This survey counted the participation of 12 general practices in the Capital Region of Denmark...

  4. A Multivariate Genetic Analysis of Specific Phobia, Separation Anxiety and Social Phobia in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eley, Thalia C.; Rijsdijk, Fruhling V.; Perrin, Sean; O'Connor, Thomas G.; Bolton, Derek

    2008-01-01

    Background: Comorbidity amongst anxiety disorders is very common in children as in adults and leads to considerable distress and impairment, yet is poorly understood. Multivariate genetic analyses can shed light on the origins of this comorbidity by revealing whether genetic or environmental risks for one disorder also influence another. We…

  5. IMPACT OF SPECIFIC PHOBIA ON THE RISK OF ONSET OF MENTAL DISORDERS: A 10-YEAR PROSPECTIVE-LONGITUDINAL COMMUNITY STUDY OF ADOLESCENTS AND YOUNG ADULTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieb, Roselind; Miché, Marcel; Gloster, Andrew T; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Meyer, Andrea H; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    The role of specific phobia as a potentially important psychopathological precursor condition to more severe mental disorders is understudied. We examined the prospective-longitudinal association of early childhood/adolescent phobia with subsequent mental disorders and the proportion of outcome disease incidence attributable to specific phobia simultaneously for a broad range of disorders. N = 2210 14- to 24-year-old community subjects were followed up for 10 years. DSM-IV-specific phobia as exposure and a broad range of DSM-IV mental disorders as outcomes were assessed with the DSM-IV/M-CIDI. Logistic regressions, adjusting for confounders, were used to estimate the associations of specific phobia with the subsequent onset of outcome disorders. Baseline specific phobia predicted the subsequent first onset of anxiety disorders [panic disorder: risk ratio (RR) = 4.38, 95% confidence interval (2.34, 8.21); generalized anxiety disorder: RR = 4.10 (2.19, 7.69); posttraumatic stress disorder: RR = 2.15 (1.13, 4.10); obsessive-compulsive disorder: RR = 3.79 (1.63, 8.82)], affective disorders [major depression: RR = 1.54 (1.16, 2.03); bipolar disorder: RR = 2.20 (1.10, 4.41); dysthymia: RR = 2.75 (1.48, 5.11)], pain disorder: RR = 1.52 (1.14, 2.02), and eating disorders: RR = 2.27 (1.14, 4.51). Population attributable fractions (PAFs; i.e., proportion of outcome disease incidence in the total population attributable to specific phobia) were highest for panic disorder (PAF = 22.9), generalized anxiety disorder (PAF = 32.3), and obsessive-compulsive disorders (PAF = 30.2). This study provides strong evidence that specific phobia is an early onset disorder predicting the subsequent onset of a range of disorders. Future studies should examine the underlying mechanisms and the potential of using specific phobia as a target for prevention of subsequent psychopathology. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Mechanisms of visual threat detection in specific phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weierich, Mariann R; Treat, Teresa A

    2015-01-01

    People with anxiety or stress-related disorders attend differently to threat-relevant compared with non-threat stimuli, yet the temporal mechanisms of differential allocation of attention are not well understood. We investigated two independent mechanisms of temporal processing of visual threat by comparing spider-phobic and non-fearful participants using a rapid serial visual presentation task. Consistent with prior literature, spider phobics, but not non-fearful controls, displayed threat-specific facilitated detection of spider stimuli relative to negative stimuli and neutral stimuli. Further, signal detection analyses revealed that facilitated threat detection in spider-phobic participants was driven by greater sensitivity to threat stimulus features and a trend towards a lower threshold for detecting spider stimuli. However, phobic participants did not display reliably slowed temporal disengagement from threat-relevant stimuli. These findings advance our understanding of threat feature processing that might contribute to the onset and maintenance of symptoms in specific phobia and disorders that involve visual threat information more generally.

  7. Psychological study of AIDS-phobia population%艾滋病恐惧症的心理健康研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林长闯; 褚坚; 虞海萍; 石华孟; 张岚

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate psychology state of AIDS-phobia population. Methods 50 AIDS-pho-bia patients and 50 healthy controls were enrolled and tested with SCL-90,EPQ, LES and social support scale. Results Scores of SCL-90 in AIDS-phobia patients are significantly more than those in controls. Scores of anxiety, depres-sion,compulsion,dread and somatization in AIDS-phobia patients are significantly more than those in controls. Scores of negative life event scale in AIDS-phobia patients are significantly more than those in controls. Scores of positive life event scale in AIDS-phobia patients are significandy less than those in controls. Scores of social support scale in AIDS-phobia patients are significantly less than those in controls. Conclusions Anxiety, depression, compulsion, dread and somatization are primary clinical manifestation of AiDS-phobia. Personal character,negative life event and lack of social support might be nosogenesis correlated with AIDS-phobia.%目的 观察艾滋病恐惧症人群的心理状态.方法 对50例艾滋病恐惧症患者和50例健康对照组采用症状自评量表(SCL-90)、艾森克人格量表(EPQ)、生活事件量表(LES)及社会支持量表进行心理健康测试.结果 艾滋病恐惧症的SCL-90总分及焦虑、抑郁、强迫、恐怖及躯体化各因子分值均显著高于对照组.EPQ量表分示:E量表分较对照组偏低,N、P量表分较对照组明显偏高.生活事件量表的负性生活事件量表分高于对照组,正性事件量表分明显低于对照组.社会支持量表分明显低于对照组.结论 焦虑、抑郁、强迫、恐怖及躯体化是艾滋病恐惧症的主要临床特点.其发病的相关因素与个性特征、负性生活事件及社会支持系统较弱有关.

  8. The evolution of generalized reciprocity on social interaction networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, Gerrit Sander; Taborsky, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Generalized reciprocity (help anyone, if helped by someone) is a minimal strategy capable of supporting cooperation between unrelated individuals. Its simplicity makes it an attractive model to explain the evolution of reciprocal altruism in animals that lack the information or cognitive skills need

  9. Specific phobia is a frequent non-motor feature in stiff man syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Henningsen, P.; Meinck, H

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate systematically the rate and type of phobia in stiff man syndrome and its variants, and to compare patients with stiff man syndrome with and without phobia for sociodemographic and neurological characteristics.

  10. A review and meta-analysis of the heritability of specific phobia subtypes and corresponding fears

    OpenAIRE

    van Houtem, C.M.H.H.; Laine, M.L.; Boomsma, D.I.; Ligthart, L.; van Wijk, A J; De Jongh, A.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence from twin studies suggests that genetic factors contribute to the risk of developing a fear or a phobia. The aim of the present study was to review the current literature regarding twin studies describing the genetic basis of specific phobias and their corresponding fears. The analysis included five twin studies on fears and ten twin studies on specific phobias. Heritability estimates of fear subtypes and specific phobia subtypes both varied widely, even within the subtypes. A meta-a...

  11. Brain dynamics in spider-phobic individuals exposed to phobia-relevant and other emotional stimuli

    OpenAIRE

    Michalowski, Jaroslaw; Melzig, Christiane; Weike, Almut I.; Stockburger, Jessica; Schupp, Harald Thomas; Hamm, Alfons

    2009-01-01

    Dense sensor event-related brain potentials were measured in participants with spider phobia and nonfearful controls during viewing of phobia-relevant spider and standard emotional (pleasant, unpleasant, neutral) pictures. Irrespective of the picture content, spider phobia participants responded with larger P1 amplitudes than controls, suggesting increased vigilance in this group. Furthermore, spider phobia participants showed a significantly enlarged early posterior negativity (EPN) and late...

  12. Harm beliefs and coping expectancies in youth with specific phobias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollendick, Thomas H; Öst, Lars-Göran; Ryan, Sarah M; Capriola, Nicole N; Reuterskiöld, Lena

    2017-04-01

    Catastrophic beliefs and lowered coping expectancies are often present in individuals with specific phobias (SPs). The current study examined these beliefs and expectancies in 251 youth who received One Session Treatment for one of the three most common types of SP in youth (animals, natural environment, and situational). We compared the children's subjective beliefs to objective ratings of the likelihood of occurrence and the dangerousness of the feared events. Results revealed pre-treatment differences in the youths' beliefs across phobia types and age. Specifically, children with animal phobias rated their beliefs as more likely to occur than did children with environmental and situational phobias. In addition, older children rated their beliefs as more dangerous than younger children. However, regardless of phobia type or child age, the beliefs improved following treatment. Changes in catastrophic beliefs and coping expectancies were related to changes in clinical severity following treatment but not 6-months following treatment. Moreover, at pre-treatment, children viewed their beliefs as significantly more catastrophic and likely to occur than did independent coders of these beliefs; however, these differences were no longer evident following treatment. Clinical implications are discussed, highlighting how changes in beliefs and expectancies might be associated with treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Social relations and loneliness among older patients consulting their general practitioner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Tina Drud; Waldorff, Frans Boch

    2017-01-01

    have assessed older patients' social relations and loneliness. The aim of this study was to analyse the social relations and loneliness of patients aged 65 years and above consulting their GP. METHODS: This survey counted the participation of 12 general practices in the Capital Region of Denmark...

  14. Use of video modeling to increase generalization of social play by children with autism

    OpenAIRE

    Nikopoulos, C K

    2007-01-01

    The use of video modeling to increase generalization of social play skills in children with autism is discussed. The possible reasons that have made this procedure so favorable among researchers and practitioners are explored. Two studies are described in which video modeling increased the generalization of social play in 6 children, and critical features of procedure are emphasized. Suggestions regarding the potential mechanisms responsible for the effectiveness of this procedure are discuss...

  15. Pure animal phobia is more specific than other specific phobias: epidemiological evidence from the Zurich Study, the ZInEP and the PsyCoLaus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta; Rodgers, Stephanie; Müller, Mario; Hengartner, Michael P; Aleksandrowicz, Aleksandra; Kawohl, Wolfram; Heekeren, Karsten; Rössler, Wulf; Angst, Jules; Castelao, Enrique; Vandeleur, Caroline; Preisig, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Interest in subtypes of mental disorders is growing in parallel with continuing research progress in psychiatry. The aim of this study was to examine pure animal phobia in contrast to other specific phobias and a mixed subtype. Data from three representative Swiss community samples were analysed: PsyCoLaus (n = 3720), the ZInEP Epidemiology Survey (n = 1500) and the Zurich Study (n = 591). Pure animal phobia and mixed animal/other specific phobias consistently displayed a low age at onset of first symptoms (8-12 years) and clear preponderance of females (OR > 3). Meanwhile, other specific phobias started up to 10 years later and displayed almost a balanced sex ratio. Pure animal phobia showed no associations with any included risk factors and comorbid disorders, in contrast to numerous associations found in the mixed subtype and in other specific phobias. Across the whole range of epidemiological parameters examined in three different samples, pure animal phobia seems to represent a different entity compared to other specific phobias. The etiopathogenetic mechanisms and risk factors associated with pure animal phobias appear less clear than ever.

  16. The Successful Treatment of Specific Phobia in a College Counseling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Jonathan M.; Cook-Nobles, Robin

    2011-01-01

    Specific phobias are highly prevalent among college students and can be quite debilitating. However, students often do not present for treatment for phobias and, when they do, often do not receive effective treatment. This article will present a case study of the effective treatment of specific phobia using cognitive-behavioral therapy with an…

  17. The Successful Treatment of Specific Phobia in a College Counseling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Jonathan M.; Cook-Nobles, Robin

    2011-01-01

    Specific phobias are highly prevalent among college students and can be quite debilitating. However, students often do not present for treatment for phobias and, when they do, often do not receive effective treatment. This article will present a case study of the effective treatment of specific phobia using cognitive-behavioral therapy with an…

  18. [Social factors and pathomorphosis of phobic disorders in adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovina, A G

    2011-01-01

    Author studied 330 patients (265 boys and 65 girls), aged 15-17 years, with phobic disorders. The common trends of the sociogenic pathomorphosis of these disorders were revealed. The socially determined pathomorphosis of phobias in adolescence manifests itself in the appearance of new phobic objects, changes in subjects of phobias and frequencies of their types. Social phobic states, most vulnerable to environmental factors, that reached the level of psychopatologically completed syndromes were the most frequent (20.7% of all phobias). In their structure, there were fears of social interaction, about a half of them (10.3%) directly relating with school situations (erytophobia, school phobia, fears of incompetence, phobia of public speaking etc). A model of assistance to adolescents with phobic disorders is suggested.

  19. Social safety, general health and physical activity: changes in neighbourhood safety and the role of social cohesion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijsbroek, A.; Droomers, M.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Hardyns, W.; Stronks, K.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether changes over time in reported area crime and perceived area safety were related to self-rated general health and physical activity (PA), in order to provide support for a causal relationship between social safety and health. Additionally, we investigated

  20. Social safety, general health and physical activity: changes in neighbourhood safety and the role of social cohesion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijsbroek, A.; Droomers, M.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Hardyns, W.; Stronks, K.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether changes over time in reported area crime and perceived area safety were related to self-rated general health and physical activity (PA), in order to provide support for a causal relationship between social safety and health. Additionally, we investigated

  1. Young Children's Inductive Generalizations about Social Categories: When Is Gender Essential?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillow, Bradford H.; Pearson, RaeAnne M.; Allen, Cara

    2015-01-01

    Two experiments investigated 3- to 5-year-olds' inductive generalizations about social categories. In Experiment 1, participants were shown pictures of children contrasting in appearance and either gender or classmate status, and were asked to generalize either biological properties or behaviors. Contrary to expectations, performance did not…

  2. Self-reported social skills impairment explains elevated autistic traits in individuals with generalized social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonge, Natasha A; Rodebaugh, Thomas L; Fernandez, Katya C; Lim, Michelle H

    2016-03-01

    Screening for autism in individuals with generalized social anxiety disorder (GSAD) is complicated by symptom overlap between GSAD and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We examined the prevalence of self-reported autistic traits within a sample of participants with a diagnosis of GSAD (n=37) compared to individuals without a GSAD diagnosis (NOSAD; n=26). Of the GSAD sample participants, 70.84% self-reported autistic traits above a cut-off of 65 on the Autism Quotient-Short (AQ-S) and reported significantly more autistic traits on 3 of 5 AQ-S subscales compared to the NOSAD group. Diagnosis uniquely predicted variation in the social skills subscale above and beyond the other subscales and other predictors. Furthermore, variation in the social skills subscale largely explained group differences on the other subscales. Our results suggest caution in utilizing measures like the AQ-S with clinical populations characterized by social difficulties such as individuals with a GSAD diagnosis.

  3. Generalization Effects in Evaluative Conditioning: Evidence for Attitude Transfer Effects from Single Exemplars to Social Categories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Tina; Kuchenbrandt, Dieta

    2017-01-01

    The present research investigated whether evaluatively conditioned attitudes toward members of a social category (CSs) generalize to other stimuli belonging to the same category as the CSs (generalization at the stimulus level) and to the category itself (generalization at the category level). In four experiments, USs were paired with schematic or naturalistic CSs belonging to certain fictitious groups. Afterward, attitudes toward the CSs, toward non-presented exemplars of the CS category, and toward the CS category were assessed. Results revealed evidence for generalization effects in EC on both the stimulus and the category level. Transfer effects were greater when participants’ awareness of the CS–US contingency (CA) was high. Moreover, we found differences in generalization between the stimulus and category level, indicating that different processes might contribute to the effects. Theoretical and practical implications such as using EC as a tool for changing attitudes toward social groups will be discussed. PMID:28197118

  4. Spirituality and Religion among the General Public: Implications for Social Work Discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, David R

    2015-07-01

    Conceptualizations play a central role in social work discourse, shaping actions in the areas of practice, research, and education. Although many formulations of spirituality and religion have been advanced by social work scholars, the views of members of the general public have been largely absent from the professional conversation. The present article adds to the profession's evolving discussion on spirituality and religion by describing common understandings of spirituality and religion among the general population and by discussing the implication of these views for social work discourse on spirituality and religion. By understanding common views among the public, the social work profession is better positioned to provide ethical and professional services that respect clients' spiritual beliefs and values.

  5. Computer-Assisted Exposure Treatment for Flight Phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortella-Feliu, Miguel; Bornas, Xavier; Llabres, Jordi

    2008-01-01

    This review introduces the state of the art in computer-assisted treatment for behavioural disorders. The core of the paper is devoted to describe one of these interventions providing computer-assisted exposure for flight phobia treatment, the Computer-Assisted Fear of Flying Treatment (CAFFT). The rationale, contents and structure of the CAFFT…

  6. Untangling genetic networks of panic, phobia, fear and anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafuerte, Sandra; Burmeister, Margit

    2003-01-01

    As is the case for normal individual variation in anxiety levels, the conditions panic disorder, agoraphobia and other phobias have a significant genetic basis. Recent reports have started to untangle the genetic relationships between predispositions to anxiety and anxiety disorders. PMID:12914652

  7. Effect of Subject Control and Graduated Exposure on Snake Phobias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepner, Alain; Cauthen, Nelson R.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of two of the variables in Leitenberg's graduated exposure technique for treating phobias, graduated exposure and subject control of the exposure time, was investigated using 15 snake-phobic subjects. Subjective fear significantly decreased from pretesting to posttesting. (Author)

  8. Prevalence of common phobias and their socio-demographic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The overall prevalence of phobia in children and adolescents in Qatar was higher than rates found in other epidemiologic .... Obese (>30 Kg/M2). 23(6.9). 12(9.5) ..... students and its relation to self-esteem and Body image. Can J.

  9. Phobia-relevant illusory correlations : The role of phobic responsivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Peter; Merckelbach, H

    2000-01-01

    The authors investigated the role of phobic responsivity in the generation of phobia-relevant illusory correlations. As a means of disentangling the contributions of prior fear and elicited fear responses, half of a group of phobic women received 1 mg alprazolam (n = 21), and half received a placebo

  10. Special Educators and Mathematics Phobia: An Initial Qualitative Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Michael; Hourcade, Jack J.

    2010-01-01

    Special educators are uniquely challenged to be content experts in all curricular areas, including mathematics, because students in their caseloads may require academic instruction in any area. However, special educators with math phobia may be limited in their ability to provide effective instruction to their students with mathematical deficits…

  11. Meta-analysis of functional brain imaging in specific phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipser, Jonathan C; Singh, Leesha; Stein, Dan J

    2013-07-01

    Although specific phobia is a prevalent anxiety disorder, evidence regarding its underlying functional neuroanatomy is inconsistent. A meta-analysis was undertaken to identify brain regions that were consistently responsive to phobic stimuli, and to characterize changes in brain activation following cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). We searched the PubMed, SCOPUS and PsycINFO databases to identify positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging studies comparing brain activation in specific phobia patients and healthy controls. Two raters independently extracted study data from all the eligible studies, and pooled coordinates from these studies using activation likelihood estimation, a quantitative meta-analytic technique. Resulting statistical parametric maps were compared between patients and healthy controls, in response to phobic versus fear-evoking stimuli, and before and after therapy. Thirteen studies were included, comprising 327 participants. Regions that were consistently activated in response to phobic stimuli included the left insula, amygdala, and globus pallidus. Compared to healthy controls, phobic subjects had increased activation in response to phobic stimuli in the left amygdala/globus pallidus, left insula, right thalamus (pulvinar), and cerebellum. Following exposure-based therapy widespread deactivation was observed in the right frontal cortex, limbic cortex, basal ganglia and cerebellum, with increased activation detected in the thalamus. Exposure to phobia-specific stimuli elicits brain activation that is consistent with current understandings of the neuroanatomy of fear conditioning and extinction. There is evidence that the effects of CBT in specific phobia may be mediated through the same underlying neurocircuitry.

  12. Ambulatory Assessment in Panic Disorder and Specific Phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpers, Georg W.

    2009-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent mental disorders. In panic disorder, panic attacks often occur at unpredictable times, making it difficult to study these episodes in the laboratory. In specific phobias, symptoms occur in very circumscribed situations and specific triggers are sometimes difficult to reproduce in the laboratory.…

  13. IT based social media impacts on Indonesian general legislative elections 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Abdillah, Leon Andretti

    2014-01-01

    The information technology applications in cyberspace (the internet) are currently dominated by social media. The author investigates and explores the advantages of social media implementation of any political party in Indonesian general legislative elections 2014. There are twelve national political parties participating in the election as contestants plus three local political parties in Aceh. In this research, author focus on national political parties only. The author visited, analyzed, a...

  14. Domain-specific and domain-general processes in social perception--A complementary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, John; D'Ausilio, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    In this brief discussion, we explicate and evaluate Heyes and colleagues' deflationary approach to interpreting apparent evidence of domain-specific processes for social perception. We argue that the deflationary approach sheds important light on how functionally specific processes in social perception can be subserved at least in part by domain-general processes. On the other hand, we also argue that the fruitfulness of this approach has been unnecessarily hampered by a contrastive conception of the relationship between domain-general and domain-specific processes. As an alternative, we propose a complementary conception: the identification of domain-general processes that are engaged in instances of social perception can play a positive, structuring role by adding additional constraints to be accounted for in modelling the domain-specific processes that are also involved in such instances. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Making Cooperation Work: Generalized Social Trust and Large-N Collective Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    with high levels of generalized social trust more readily undertake pro-environmental behavior like recycling or supporting environmental associations. These results are sustained at the national level; countries with trusting citizens have higher recycling rates and more members of environmental......It has often been argued that generalized social trust, the belief that most people are trustworthy, enhances cooperation in large-N collective action dilemmas. Large-N dilemmas are situations where an actor has to decide whether to contribute to the provision of public goods that benefit a large...... on survey and national level data from several countries is used to investigate if, how, and when generalized social trust leads to collective action. Specifically, citizens' behavior in relation to the environment is used as the indicator of voluntary public good provision. This indicator affords excellent...

  16. The Influence of General Discrimination and Social Context on Young Urban Expecting Couples' Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Derrick M; Campbell, Christina; Washington, Keahnan; Albritton, Tashuna; Divney, Anna; Magriples, Urania; Kershaw, Trace

    2016-04-01

    Young expecting parents face a great deal of challenges as they transition into parenthood. This paper sought to identify racial and gender differences in the relationship between general discrimination, neighborhood problems, neighborhood cohesion, and social support on the depressive and stress symptoms among young expecting couples. Results indicated perceived general discrimination and less social support was associated with increased stress and depression. More neighborhood problems were related to increased depression and more neighborhood cohesion was related to less stress. Moderator analyses showed that the influence of general discrimination and stress was stronger for women than men. In addition, neighborhood cohesion was protective on stress for Blacks and Whites but not for Hispanics. These results indicate the need to address the broader social context for young expectant couples.

  17. The multidimensional nature and multicultural validity of a new measure of social anxiety: the Social Anxiety Questionnaire for Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballo, Vicente E; Salazar, Isabel C; Irurtia, María Jesús; Arias, Benito; Hofmann, Stefan G

    2012-06-01

    Much has been written about the situations most often feared by persons with social phobia, and several self-report measures are frequently used to assess such feared situations. However, it is not clear whether the situations feared by persons with social phobia form unidimensional or multidimensional factors. If these situations are multidimensional, reliance on a total score of feared situations would not reflect important differences between those dimensions. This research examined the multidimensional nature and multicultural validity of a newly developed instrument (the Social Anxiety Questionnaire for Adults [SAQ-A]) in two studies with a total of 539 patients diagnosed with social phobia and 15,753 nonpatients from 20 different countries. The structure (five clear and solid factors) and psychometric properties of the final instrument (the SAQ-A30) support the multidimensional nature of social anxiety and provide a new perspective in the assessment of social phobia.

  18. General practitioners’ assessment practices of patients' need for lifestyle intervention. A vignette study on the impact of social distance on general practitioners’ patient assessments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilsvard, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    In Denmark, as in other welfare countries, the general practitioner is the first point of contact in the health services, which stresses the general practitioners’ role as gatekeeper and mediator of the health services. General practitioners’ work is characterized by a relatively extensive...... discretion, especially in preventive contexts with no clear-cut guidelines. However, despite its potential influence, few studies have focused on whether social distance has an impact on general practitioners’ assessment practices of patients, which thus seems to be a blind spot in the literature. To study...... the mechanisms facilitating the process of social distance systematically, I apply the vignette method. Drawing on Bourdieu’s theoretical framework of social distance, I examine how general practitioners assess different socially positioned patients as needy for preventive lifestyle intervention. I expect social...

  19. From the general to the specific: How social trust motivates relational trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Blaine G

    2016-01-01

    When people form beliefs about the trustworthiness of others with respect to particular matters (i.e., when individuals trust), theory suggests that they rely on preexistent cognitive schemas regarding the general cooperativeness of individuals and organizations (i.e., social trust). In spite of prior work, the impact of social trust on relational trust-or what Russell Hardin (2002) calls trust as a three-part relation where actor A trusts actor B with reference to matter Y-is not well established. Four vignette experiments were administered to Amazon.com Mechanical Turk workers (N = 1388 and N = 1419) and to public university undergraduate students (N = 995 and N = 956) in order to investigate the relationship between social trust and relational trust. Measures of general social trust and particular social trust produced statistically equivalent effects that were positively associated with relational trust. Political trust, however, was statistically unrelated to relational trust. These results support the idea that people rely on schemas and stereotypes concerned with the general cooperativeness and helpfulness of others when forming beliefs about another person's trustworthiness with respect to a particular matter at hand. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Intelligence Makes People Think like Economists: Evidence from the General Social Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Bryan; Miller, Stephen C.

    2010-01-01

    Education is by far the strongest predictor of whether a non-economist will share the economic beliefs of the average economist. (Caplan, 2001) Is the effect of education as large as it seems? Or is education largely a proxy for cognitive ability? Using data from the General Social Survey (GSS), we show that the estimated effect of education…

  1. The Effect of General Creative Personality and Freedom of Task Choice on Adolescents' Social Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Chuanhua; Hu, Bi Ying; Ngwira, Flemmings Fishani; Jing, Zhi; Zhou, Zongkui

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of general creative personality and freedom of task choice on the social creativity of adolescents. The results indicated, first, that senior high school students scored higher than junior high school students. Second, girls scored higher than boys on originality, fluency, flexibility, appropriateness, and…

  2. The Benchmarking Capacity of a General Outcome Measure of Academic Language in Science and Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Paul; Lastrapes, Renée E.

    2016-01-01

    The amount of research evaluating the technical merits of general outcome measures of science and social studies achievement is growing. This study targeted criterion validity for critical content monitoring. Questions addressed the concurrent criterion validity of alternate presentation formats of critical content monitoring and the measure's…

  3. The Social Profile of Students in Basic General Education in Ecuador: A Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buri, Olga Elizabeth Minchala; Stefos, Efstathios

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the social profile of students who are enrolled in Basic General Education in Ecuador. Both a descriptive and multidimensional statistical analysis was carried out based on the data provided by the National Survey of Employment, Unemployment and Underemployment in 2015. The descriptive analysis shows the…

  4. Teacher Assistance Team Social Validity: A Perspective from General Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia-Berardi, Anne; Hall, Tracey E.

    2007-01-01

    General education teachers are the most frequent consumers of Teacher Assistance Team (TAT) services; therefore, their satisfaction with the purpose, process and outcome associated with this model of prereferral intervention may influence its acceptability, use, implementation, and effectiveness (social validity). Seven empirical studies assessing…

  5. A Reliability Generalization Study of the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beretvas, S, Natasha; Meyers, Jason L.; Leite, Walter L.

    2002-01-01

    Conducted a reliability generalization study of the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale (D. Crowne and D. Marlowe, 1960). Analysis of 93 studies show that the predicted score reliability for male adolescents was 0.53, and reliability for men's responses was lower than for women's. Discusses the need for further analysis of the scale. (SLD)

  6. [Rethinking how health is promoted in the Colombian general health-related social security system (Sistema General de Seguridad Social en Salud)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslava-Castañeda, Juan C

    2006-12-01

    This article takes stock of how promoting health (PH) (promoción de la salud - PS) has been understood within an international setting and gives three meanings for promotion: as general policy orientation, as a set of actions and as a special dimension of sanitary work. Interest expressed in giving it a specific basis distinguishing it from prevention, transcending educational work, has emerged from the subtle differences established from such different ways of coming to terms with PH. After recognising the challenge posed by PH in the field of health, the text succinctly describes how discourse regarding PH has been introduced in Colombia and discusses how an attempt has been made to be more precise regarding its place in the general health-related social security system. Efforts currently being made in Colombia regarding making PH become a reality within the Colombian health system are then mentioned.

  7. EU governance and social services of general interest: When even the UK is concerned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristea Koukiadaki

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The level of autonomy afforded to Member States to define certain services as ‘services of general interest’ and to shelter them from the market so as to promote social objectives has become in recent years a highly sensitive topic among EU and national policy actors and organisations. The increased activity in this area of the European Commission and the general absence of guidance on the conditions necessary to render such services of general interest by the European Court of Justice (ECJ have resulted in uncertainty concerning the interaction of EU law with social services and more generally public services in the EU Member States. By focusing on the EU regulation on social services of general interest, the paper evaluates how the nature and provision of such services in the UK has been susceptible to changes as a result of the Services Directives, EU public procurement and competition law. The implementation of liberalisation plans in the UK well before any EU initiatives in this area meant that such services have been open to market forces well before other Member States. However, this has not led to the absence of concerns regarding the precise impact of EU law in this area. Recent policy initiatives by the Coalition government may expand further the degree of marketisation and increase the scope for interaction between EU and national-level regulation.

  8. Social anxiety in 17-year-olds in Stockholm, Sweden - A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    2004-05-20

    May 20, 2004 ... tigated the connection between potential risk factors and so- cial anxiety. ... and part of maturing.3 Lifetime prevalence of social phobia ranges from ... Keywords: Social Anxiety Disorder, School, Point Prevalence, Adolescents.

  9. Rates and predictors of remission in young women with specific phobia: a prospective community study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumpf, Julia; Becker, Eni S; Vriends, Noortje; Meyer, Andrea H; Margraf, Jürgen

    2009-10-01

    This prospective study reports rates and predictors of remission in young women with specific phobia. Data came from a prospective community study, in which German women (aged 18-25 years) completed an extended version of the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule (ADIS-IV-L) at two time points. Of the 137 women with specific phobia at baseline, 41.6% were partially remitted and an additional 19.0% were fully remitted at follow-up, defined as absence of any specific fears. A remitting course of specific phobia was predicted by residual protective factors at baseline, especially participants' positive mental health and life satisfaction. Baseline levels of stress, coping skills, cognitive factors, psychopathology, and specific phobia characteristics did not predict remission. Results show that specific phobia in young women rarely takes a stable course at the full diagnostic threshold. The factors that influence remission of specific phobia are different from those that predict the incidence.

  10. Psychotherapy for Anxiety in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-28

    Autism Spectrum Disorders; Autism; Asperger's Syndrome; Pervasive Developmental Disability - Not Otherwise Specified; Obsessive-compulsive Disorder; Social Phobia; Generalized Anxiety Disorder; Specific Phobia; Separation Anxiety Disorder

  11. Exposure-Focused Family-Based CBT for Youth With ASD and Comorbid Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-07

    Autism; Asperger's Syndrome; Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified; Generalized Anxiety Disorder; Social Phobia; Separation Anxiety Disorder; Obsessive-compulsive Disorder; Specific Phobia

  12. Effect of fluvoxamine treatment on cognitive bias to the emotional facial information in social phobia%氟伏沙明对社交恐惧症患者情绪图片信息认知偏倚的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚建军; 张紫娟

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨氟伏沙明对社交恐惧症患者情绪图片信息认知偏倚的影响.方法 选择符合CCMD-3社交恐惧症诊断标准的26例患者作为实验组,与实验组性别、年龄匹配的26例健康人作为对照组.实验组予氟伏沙明治疗8周.两组分别在治疗前以及8周后予情绪图片刺激的点探测任务检测,比较治疗前以及8周后反应时以及注意偏向分差别.结果 实验组8周后HAMA明显低于治疗前(P<0.05).重复测量ANOVA显示,探测位置主效应显著,异侧位置的反应时长于同侧位置(P<0.05);情绪面孔图片类型与组间水平交互作用显著(P<0.05);探测位置与组间水平交互作用显著(P<0.05);情绪面孔图片类型与探测位置交互作用显著(P<0.05);情绪面孔图片类型×探测位置×组间水平交互作用显著(P<0.05),1sD比较显示实验组对恐惧面孔图片异侧位置的反应时长于同侧位置(P<0.05).实验组治疗8周后对恐惧面孔图片反应时以及注意偏向分明显低于治疗前(均P< 0.05).结论 社交恐惧症患者对恐惧面孔图片信息表现出认知偏倚,氟伏沙明具有改善认知偏倚的作用.%Objective To investigate the effect of fluvoxamine treatment on cognitive bias to the e-motional facial information in patients with social phobia(SP). Methods 26 patients met CCMD—3 criteria for SP were enrolled as research group and marched sexual and age 26 healthy persons enrolled as control group. Patients were treated with fluvoxamine for 8weeks. All participants measured with Dot-probe task of Emotional facial information at base and after 8 weeks. RTs and attentional bias scores were compared respectively. Results After 8 weeks, HAMA scores in research group were lower than that of at base (P RTs of antarafacial site were longer than that of homonymy site. It revealed a significant probe site and group interaction (P < 0. 05), a significant Emotional facial information type and

  13. Virtual reality exposure therapy in the treatment of driving phobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Thomaz da Costa

    Full Text Available A growing number of researches has appeared on virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET to treat anxiety disorders. The purpose of this article was to review some evidences that support the VRET efficacy to treat driving phobia. The studies were identified through computerized search (PubMed/Medline, Web of Science, and Scielo databases from 1984 to 2007. Some findings are promising. Anxiety/avoidance ratings declined from pre to post-treatment. VRET may be used as a first step in the treatment of driving phobia, as long as it may facilitate the in vivo exposure, thus reducing risks and high costs of such exposure. Notwithstanding, more randomized/controlled clinical trials are required to prove its efficacy.

  14. The therapeutic lamp: treating small-animal phobias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrzesien, Maja; Alcañiz, Mariano; Botella, Cristina; Burkhardt, Jean-Marie; Bretón-López, Juana; Ortega, Mario; Brotons, Daniel Beneito

    2013-01-01

    We all have an irrational fear or two. Some of us get scared by an unexpected visit from a spider in our house; others get nervous when they look down from a high building. Fear is an evolutionary and adaptive function that can promote self-preservation and help us deal with the feared object or situation. However, when this state becomes excessive, it might develop into psychological disorders such as phobias, producing high anxiety and affecting everyday life. The Therapeutic Lamp is an interactive projection-based augmented-reality system for treating small-animal phobias. It aims to increase patient-therapist communication, promote more natural interaction, and improve the patient's engagement in the therapy.

  15. Diseño y Validación del Cuestionario de Autoesquemas Desadaptativos en Fobia Social cad-fs / Design and Validation of Maladaptive Self-Schemas Questionnaire for Social Phobia CAD-FS / Desenho e Validação do Questionário de Autoesquemas Desadaptativos em Fobia Social QAD-FS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Toro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Se diseñó y validó el Cuestionario de Autoesquemas Desadaptativos en la Fobia Social (CAD-FS para evaluar los contenidos cognitivos disfuncionales de estos trastornos. Se obtuvo la validez de contenido por medio de tres jurados expertos. Con una muestra de 1,413 participantes con edad promedio de 26.41 años (DE=8.51, la consistencia interna fue α=.86, con una adecuada validez de criterio con la escala de Temor a la Evaluación Negativa (r=656, p<.01. A su vez, según el análisis de la teoría de respuesta al ítem se ajustó a los parámetros del modelo de crédito parcial de Masters. Se recomienda este instrumento para la evaluación de la fobia social durante el tratamiento cognitivo conductual.

  16. Strategies to manage patients with dental anxiety and dental phobia: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appukuttan DP

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Deva Priya Appukuttan Department of Periodontics, Sri Ramakrishna Mission Dental College and Hospital, Chennai, India Abstract: Dental anxiety and phobia result in avoidance of dental care. It is a frequently encountered problem in dental offices. Formulating acceptable evidence-based therapies for such patients is essential, or else they can be a considerable source of stress for the dentist. These patients need to be identified at the earliest opportunity and their concerns addressed. The initial interaction between the dentist and the patient can reveal the presence of anxiety, fear, and phobia. In such situations, subjective evaluation by interviews and self-reporting on fear and anxiety scales and objective assessment of blood pressure, pulse rate, pulse oximetry, finger temperature, and galvanic skin response can greatly enhance the diagnosis and enable categorization of these individuals as mildly, moderately, or highly anxious or dental phobics. Broadly, dental anxiety can be managed by psychotherapeutic interventions, pharmacological interventions, or a combination of both, depending on the level of dental anxiety, patient characteristics, and clinical situations. Psychotherapeutic interventions are either behaviorally or cognitively oriented. Pharmacologically, these patients can be managed using either sedation or general anesthesia. Behavior-modification therapies aim to change unacceptable behaviors through learning, and involve muscle relaxation and relaxation breathing, along with guided imagery and physiological monitoring using biofeedback, hypnosis, acupuncture, distraction, positive reinforcement, stop-signaling, and exposure-based treatments, such as systematic desensitization, “tell-show-do”, and modeling. Cognitive strategies aim to alter and restructure the content of negative cognitions and enhance control over the negative thoughts. Cognitive behavior therapy is a combination of behavior therapy and cognitive therapy

  17. Brain dynamics in spider-phobic individuals exposed to phobia-relevant and other emotional stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalowski, Jaroslaw M; Melzig, Christiane A; Weike, Almut I; Stockburger, Jessica; Schupp, Harald T; Hamm, Alfons O

    2009-06-01

    Dense sensor event-related brain potentials were measured in participants with spider phobia and nonfearful controls during viewing of phobia-relevant spider and standard emotional (pleasant, unpleasant, neutral) pictures. Irrespective of the picture content, spider phobia participants responded with larger P1 amplitudes than controls, suggesting increased vigilance in this group. Furthermore, spider phobia participants showed a significantly enlarged early posterior negativity (EPN) and late positive potential (LPP) during the encoding of phobia-relevant pictures compared to nonfearful controls. No group differences were observed for standard emotional materials indicating that these effects were specific to phobia-relevant material. Within group comparisons of the spider phobia group, though, revealed comparable EPN and LPP evoked by spider pictures and emotional (unpleasant and pleasant) picture contents. These results demonstrate a temporal unfolding in perceptual processing from unspecific vigilance (P1) to preferential responding (EPN and LPP) to phobia-relevant materials in the spider phobia group. However, at the level of early stimulus processing, these effects of increased attention seem to be related to emotional relevance of the stimulus cues rather than reflecting a fear-specific response.

  18. Virtual reality therapy: an effective treatment for phobias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, M M; North, S M; Coble, J R

    1998-01-01

    Behavioral therapy techniques for treating phobias often includes graded exposure of the patient to anxiety-producing stimuli (Systematic Desensitization). However, in utilizing systematic desensitization, research reviews demonstrate that many patients appear to have difficulty in applying imaginative techniques. This chapter describes the Virtual Reality Therapy (VRT), a new therapeutical approach that can be used to overcome some of the difficulties inherent in the traditional treatment of phobias. VRT, like current imaginal and in vivo modalities, can generate stimuli that could be utilized in desensitization therapy. Like systematic desensitization therapy, VRT can provide stimuli for patients who have difficulty in imagining scenes and/or are too phobic to experience real situations. As far as we know, the idea of using virtual reality technology to combat psychological disorders was first conceived within the Human-Computer Interaction Group at Clark Atlanta University in November 1992. Since then, we have successfully conducted the first known pilot experiments in the use of virtual reality technologies in the treatment of specific phobias: fear of flying, fear of heights, fear of being in certain situations (such as a dark barn, an enclosed bridge over a river, and in the presence of an animal [a black cat] in a dark room), and fear of public speaking. The results of these experiments are described.

  19. Phobias, other psychiatric comorbidities and chronic migraine Fobias, outras comorbidades psiquiátricas e enxaqueca crônica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Corchs

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Comorbidity of chronic migraine (CM with psychiatric disorders, mostly anxiety and mood disorders, is a well-recognized phenomenon. Phobias are one of the most common anxiety disorders in the general population. Phobias are more common in migraineurs than non-migraineurs. The clinical profile of phobias in CM has never been studied. METHOD: We investigated the psychiatric profile in 56 patients with CM using the SCID I/P interview. RESULTS: Lifetime criteria for at least one mental disorder was found in 87.5% of the sample; 75% met criteria for at least one lifetime anxiety disorder and 60.7% of our sample fulfilled DSM-IV criteria for lifetime phobic avoidant disorders. Mood and anxiety scores were higher in phobic patients than in non-phobic CM controls. Number of phobias correlated with higher levels of anxiety and depression. CONCLUSION: Phobias are common in CM. Its recognition may influence its management. Early treatment may lead to better prognosis.INTRODUÇÃO: As comorbidades psiquiátricas das enxaquecas crônicas são bem conhecidas. As fobias, transtorno ansioso mais comum, são mais prevalentes entre enxaquecosos do que entre não enxaquecosos. O perfil clínico de fobias em uma população enxaquecosa nunca foi estudado. MÉTODO: Estudamos aspectos psiquiátricos de uma população de 56 pacientes com enxaqueca crônica. RESULTADOS: Usando o SCID I/P para o DSM-IV, critérios diagnósticos para ao menos algum transtorno psiquiátrico durante a vida foram preenchidos por 87,5% de nossa amostra, 75% para ao menos um transtorno ansioso e 60,7% para condições fóbicas em algum momento de suas vidas. Os escores de ansiedade e humor foram maiores entre os fóbicos e o número de fobias teve correlação positiva com o grau de ansiedade e depressão. CONCLUSÃO: Fobias são comuns na enxaqueca crônica e seu reconhecimento poderia influenciar seu manejo e melhorar seu prognóstico.

  20. phobia and women's sport in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africans across the divides of race, class, gender and geography. The argument for using sport to foster social cohesion in South Africa rests on two ...... 'There's got to be a man in there': Reading intersections between gender, race and ...

  1. The multiple dimensions of the social anxiety spectrum in mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Jay C; Cyranowski, Jill M; Rucci, Paola; Cassano, Giovanni B; Frank, Ellen

    2012-09-01

    Major depressive disorder and bipolar spectrum disorders are debilitating conditions associated with severe impairment. The presence of co-occurring social phobia can make the clinical course of these disorders even more challenging. To better understand the nature of social anxiety in the context of ongoing mood disorders, we report the results of exploratory factor analyses of the Social Phobia Spectrum Self-Report Instrument (SHY), a 162-item measure designed to capture the full spectrum of manifestations and features associated with social anxiety experienced across the lifespan. We examined data from 359 adult outpatients diagnosed with major depressive disorder and 403 outpatients diagnosed with a bipolar spectrum disorder. The measure was divided into its two components: the SHY-General (SHY-G), reflecting general social anxiety features, and the SHY-Specific (SHY-S), reflecting anxiety in specific situations. Exploratory factor analyses were conducted for each using tetrachoric correlation matrices and an unweighted least squares estimator. Item invariance was evaluated for important patient subgroups. Five factors were identified for the SHY-G, representing general features of social anxiety: Fear of Social Disapproval, Childhood Social Anxiety, Somatic Social Anxiety, Excessive Agreeableness, and Behavioral Submission. Seven specific-situation factors were identified from the SHY-S: Writing in Public, Dating, Public Speaking, Eating in Public, Shopping Fears, Using Public Restrooms, and Unstructured Social Interactions. The identified dimensions provide clinically valuable information about the nature of the social fears experienced by individuals diagnosed with mood disorders and could help guide the development of tailored treatment strategies for individuals with co-occurring mood disorders and social anxiety.

  2. The Housing Careers of Older Canadians: An Investigation Using Cycle 16 of the General Social Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Haan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we use the Aging and Social Support Survey (GSS16 and the theoretical conception of a ‘housing career’ to identify the correlates of housing tenure (rent vs. own among Canadians age 45 and over. We draw on primarily US literature to isolate three general explanatory clusters (social support, health, and economic characteristics. Based on analyses using logistic regression, the results indicate that the majority of variation in housing tenure exists due to standard demographic and household characteristics. In fact, of the three focal explanatory clusters, only social support characteristics significantly enhance model fit beyond the baseline model, suggesting that the housing tenure of older Canadians hinges heavily on fairly standard characteristics.

  3. Relational Coordination and Organisational Social Capital Association with Characteristics of General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundstrøm, Sanne Lykke; Edwards, Kasper; Bøllingtoft Knudsen, Thomas;

    2014-01-01

    Background. Relational coordination (RC) and organisational social capital (OSC) aremeasures of novel aspects of an organisation’s performance, which have not previously been analysed together, in general practice. Objectives.The aim of this studywas to analyse the associations between RC and OSC......, and characteristics of general practice. Methods. Questionnaire survey study comprising 2074 practices in Denmark. Results. General practitioners (GPs) rated both RC and OSC in their general practice higher than their secretaries and nurses. The practice form was statistically significantly associated with high RC...... and OSC. RC was positively associated with the number of patients listed with a practice per staff, where staff is defined as all members of a practice including both owners and employees. Conclusion. The study showed that RC and OSC were significantly associated with type of profession and practice type...

  4. Qualities and Inequalities in Online Social Networks through the Lens of the Generalized Friendship Paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Naghmeh; Rabbat, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The friendship paradox is the phenomenon that in social networks, people on average have fewer friends than their friends do. The generalized friendship paradox is an extension to attributes other than the number of friends. The friendship paradox and its generalized version have gathered recent attention due to the information they provide about network structure and local inequalities. In this paper, we propose several measures of nodal qualities which capture different aspects of their activities and influence in online social networks. Using these measures we analyse the prevalence of the generalized friendship paradox over Twitter and we report high levels of prevalence (up to over 90% of nodes). We contend that this prevalence of the friendship paradox and its generalized version arise because of the hierarchical nature of the connections in the network. This hierarchy is nested as opposed to being star-like. We conclude that these paradoxes are collective phenomena not created merely by a minority of well-connected or high-attribute nodes. Moreover, our results show that a large fraction of individuals can experience the generalized friendship paradox even in the absence of a significant correlation between degrees and attributes.

  5. THE ROLE OF LONELINESS IN THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SOCIAL ANXIETY AND SUBJECTIVE WELL-BEING: USING THE SOCIAL PHOBIA INVENTORY (SPIN) AS A MEASURE/Uloga osamljenosti u odnosu socijalne anksioznosti i subjektivne dobrobiti: upotreba Inventara socijalne fobije (SPIN) kao mjere

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Antonija Maricic; Marina Stambuk

    2015-01-01

      The purpose of this study was to test the mediating role of loneliness in the relationship between social anxiety and subjective well-being while taking into account the multidimensionality of social anxiety...

  6. Social class in childhood and general health in adulthood: questionnaire study of contribution of psychological attributes

    OpenAIRE

    Bosma, Hans; Mheen, Dike; Mackenbach, Johan

    1999-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To determine the contribution of psychological attributes (personality characteristics and coping styles) to the association between social class in childhood and adult health among men and women. DESIGN: Partly retrospective, partly cross sectional study conducted in the framework of the Dutch GLOBE study. SUBJECTS: Sample of general population from south east Netherlands consisting of 2174 men and women aged 25-74 years. Baseline self reported data from 1991 provided ...

  7. Exploring college students' use of general and alcohol-related social media and their associations with alcohol-related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Eric W; Pinkleton, Bruce E; Weintraub Austin, Erica; Reyes-Velázquez, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol marketers have increasingly moved their advertising efforts into digital and social media venues. As a result, the purpose of this study is to investigate associations between students' use of social media, their exposure to alcohol marketing messages through social media, and their alcohol-related beliefs and behaviors. Public and private university students (N = 637) participated November and December 2011 and April 2012. College students completed online surveys to measure their exposure to social and online media generally, as well as their alcohol-related digital media use and alcohol use. Use of social media related to alcohol marketing predicted alcohol consumption and engaging in risky behaviors, whereas the use of social media more generally did not. Students' use of alcohol-related social media-marketing content associates with their problem drinking. Results have implications for alcohol abuse reduction efforts targeted at college students and suggest the importance of considering social, cultural, and cognitive factors in campaign planning and design.

  8. Illusory correlation and social anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Peter; Merckelbach, H; Bogels, S; Kindt, M

    1998-01-01

    An illusory correlation (IC) experiment examined the presence of a phobia-relevant covariation bias in the context of social anxiety. Low (n = 28) and high (n = 32) social anxious women were shown a series of slides comprising pictures of angry, happy and neutral faces which were randomly paired wit

  9. Fear of being laughed at and social anxiety: A preliminary psychometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Carretero-Dios

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study examines the relationship between questionnaire measures of social phobia and gelotophobia. A sample of 211 Colombian adults filled in Spanish versions of the Social Anxiety and Distress scale (SAD; Watson & Friend, 1969, the Fear of Negative Evaluation scale (FNE; Watson & Friend, 1969 and the GELOPH (Ruch & Proyer, 2008. Results confirmed that both Social Anxiety and Distress and Fear of Negative Evaluation scale overlapped with the fear of being laughed at without being identical with it. The SAD and FNE correlated highly with the GELOPH but not all high scorers in these scales expressed a fear of being laughed at. Furthermore, an item factor analysis yielded three factors that were mostly loaded by items of the respective scales. This three-factor structure was verified using confirmatory factor analysis. A measure model where one general factor of social anxiety was specified, or another one where two different factors were defined (gelotophobia vs. social anxiety assessed by SAD and FNE showed a very poor fit to the data. It is concluded that the fear of being laughed cannot fully be accounted for by these measures of social phobia.

  10. The relation between public speaking anxiety and social anxiety: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöte, Anke W; Kint, Marcia J W; Miers, Anne C; Westenberg, P Michiel

    2009-04-01

    This article reviewed the literature on public speaking anxiety in the context of social phobia subtyping. In total, 18 empirical studies on subtype issues related to public speaking anxiety were analyzed. Results of the reviewed studies are discussed in relation to their research method, that is, whether it focused on qualitative or quantitative aspects of subtype differences and whether it used a clinical or community sample. Evidence supported the premise that public speaking anxiety is a distinct subtype, qualitatively and quantitatively different from other subtypes of social phobia. The significance of this finding for social phobia studies using speech tasks to assess participants' state anxiety and behavioral performance is discussed.

  11. 儿童牙科恐惧症产生原因的研究进展%Research progress of the causes of children's dental phobia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王俊艳; 牛一山

    2016-01-01

    牙科恐惧症是一种防碍人们接受牙科治疗与护理的社会心理疾病,儿童牙科恐惧症发病率高,是急需解决的临床问题。该文就儿童牙科恐惧症的产生原因及其研究进展作一综述。%Dental phobia is a kind of social mental illness, which prevents people from dental treatment and nursing. It is urgently needed to be solved. This article focuses on reviewing the research progress of the causes of children's dental phobia.

  12. A review and meta-analysis of the heritability of specific phobia subtypes and corresponding fears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Houtem, C M H H; Laine, M L; Boomsma, D I; Ligthart, L; van Wijk, A J; De Jongh, A

    2013-05-01

    Evidence from twin studies suggests that genetic factors contribute to the risk of developing a fear or a phobia. The aim of the present study was to review the current literature regarding twin studies describing the genetic basis of specific phobias and their corresponding fears. The analysis included five twin studies on fears and ten twin studies on specific phobias. Heritability estimates of fear subtypes and specific phobia subtypes both varied widely, even within the subtypes. A meta-analysis performed on the twin study results indicated that fears and specific phobias are moderately heritable. The highest mean heritability (±SEM) among fear subtypes was found for animal fear (45%±0.004), and among specific phobias for the blood-injury-injection phobia (33%±0.06). For most phenotypes, variance could be explained solely by additive genetic and unique environmental effects. Given the dearth of independent data on the heritability of specific phobias and fears, additional research is needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A review and meta-analysis of the heritability of specific phobia subtypes and corresponding fears

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houtem, C.M.H.H.; Laine, M.L.; Boomsma, D.I.; Ligthart, L.; van Wijk, A.J.; de Jongh, A.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence from twin studies suggests that genetic factors contribute to the risk of developing a fear or a phobia. The aim of the present study was to review the current literature regarding twin studies describing the genetic basis of specific phobias and their corresponding fears. The analysis

  14. Conceptual and Methodological Issues in the Behavioral Assessment and Treatment of Children's Fears and Phobias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratochwill, Thomas R.; Morris, Richard J.

    1985-01-01

    A review of the conceptual and methodological considerations in assessment and treatment of children's fears and phobias is presented. Areas discussed include the definitional problems in the field, analogue and clinical research, experimental research methods, and criteria for the evaluation of outcome in fear and phobia research. (Author/DWH)

  15. Counterconditioning in the treatment of spider phobia : effects on disgust, fear and valence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Peter; Vorage, [Unknown; van den Hout, MA

    2000-01-01

    From the perspective that disgust is a core feature of spider phobia, we investigated whether the treatment efficacy could be improved by adding a counterconditioning procedure. Women with a clinically diagnosed spider phobia (N = 34) were randomly assigned to the regular one-session exposure condit

  16. Evidence-Based Behavioral Treatment of Dog Phobia with Young Children: Two Case Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Anna C.; Rudy, Brittany M.; Davis, Thompson E., III; Matson, Johnny L.

    2013-01-01

    Specific phobias are among the most common anxiety disorders, especially in children. Unfortunately, a paucity of literature exists regarding the treatment of specific phobia in young children, despite the knowledge that traditional techniques (i.e., cognitive-behavioral therapy [CBT]) may not be practical. Therefore, the purpose of this article…

  17. A pilot study of regional cerebral blood flow in children with school phobia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱昀

    2006-01-01

    Objective To explore the characteristics of the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in children with school phobia. Methods The single - photon emission commputed tomography were performed in 17 children with school phobia and 11 normal controls. The rCBF distribution in regions of interest (ROIs) was compared

  18. Assessing Pre-Service Teachers' Computer Phobia Levels in Terms of Gender and Experience, Turkish Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursavas, Omer Faruk; Karal, Hasan

    2009-01-01

    In this study it is aimed to determine the level of pre-service teachers' computer phobia. Whether or not computer phobia meaningfully varies statistically according to gender and computer experience has been tested in the study. The study was performed on 430 pre-service teachers at the Education Faculty in Rize/Turkey. Data in the study were…

  19. Abolition of lifelong specific phobia: a novel therapeutic consequence of left mesial temporal lobectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binks, S; Chan, D; Medford, N

    2015-02-01

    Numerous imaging studies have confirmed the amygdala as prominent within a neural network mediating specific phobia, including arachnophobia. We report the case of a patient in whom arachnophobia was abolished after left temporal mesial lobectomy, with unchanged fear responses to other stimuli. The phenomenon of abolition of specific phobia after amygdala removal has not, to our knowledge, been previously reported.

  20. Efficacy of virtual reality exposure therapy for treatment of dental phobia: a randomized control trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raghav, K.; Van Wijk, A.J.; Abdullah, F.; Islam, M.N.; Bernatchez, M.; De Jongh, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy (VRET) is found to be a promising and a viable alternative for in vivo exposure in the treatment of specific phobias. However, its usefulness for treating dental phobia is unexplored. The aims of the present study are to determine: (a) the efficacy of VRE

  1. Usefulness of a trauma-focused treatment approach for travel phobia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jongh, A.; Holmshaw, M.; Carswell, W.; van Wijk, A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite its prevalence and potential impact on functioning, there are surprisingly little data regarding the treatment responsiveness of travel phobia. The purpose of this non-randomized study was to evaluate the usefulness of a trauma-focused treatment approach for travel phobia, or milder travel a

  2. What's the Worry with Social Anxiety? Comparing Cognitive Processes in Children with Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Social Anxiety Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, Cate S; Donovan, Caroline L; Spence, Susan H; March, Sonja; Holmes, Monique C

    2016-12-05

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) in children is often comorbid with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). We investigated whether worry, intolerance of uncertainty, beliefs about worry, negative problem orientation and cognitive avoidance, that are typically associated with GAD, are present in children with SAD. Participants included 60 children (8-12 years), matched on age and gender. Groups included children: with primary GAD and without SAD (GAD); with primary SAD and without GAD (SAD); and without an anxiety disorder (NAD). GAD and SAD groups scored significantly higher than the NAD group on worry, intolerance of uncertainty, negative beliefs about worry and negative problem orientation, however, they did not score differently from each other. Only the GAD group scored significantly higher than the NAD group on cognitive avoidance. These findings further understanding of the structure of SAD and suggest that the high comorbidity between SAD and GAD may be due to similar underlying processes within the disorders.

  3. Preliminary Evidence of White Matter Abnormality in the Uncinate Fasciculus in Generalized Social Anxiety Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, K. Luan; Orlichenko, Anton; Boyd, Erin; Angstadt, Mike; Coccaro, Emil F.; Liberzon, Israel; Arfanakis, Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    Background Individuals with generalized social anxiety disorder (GSAD) exhibit exaggerated amygdala reactivity to aversive social stimuli. These findings could be explained by microstructural abnormalities in white matter (WM) tracts that connect the amygdala and prefrontal cortex, which is known to modulate the amygdala’s response to threat. The goal of this study was to investigate brain frontal WM abnormalities by using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in patients with social anxiety disorder. Method A Turboprop DTI sequence was used to acquire diffusion tensor images in thirty patients with GSAD and thirty matched healthy controls. Fractional anisotropy, an index of axonal organization, within WM was quantified in individual subjects and an automated voxel-based, whole-brain method was used to analyze group differences. Results Compared to healthy controls, patients had significantly lower fractional anisotropy localized to the right uncinate fasciculus WM near the orbitofrontal cortex. There were no areas of higher fractional anisotropy in patients than controls. Conclusions These findings point to an abnormality in the uncinate fasciculus, the major WM tract connecting the frontal cortex to the amygdala and other limbic temporal regions, in GSAD which could underlie the aberrant amygdala-prefrontal interactions resulting in dysfunctional social threat processing in this illness. PMID:19362707

  4. Color obsessions and phobias in autism spectrum disorders: the case of J.G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, Amanda K; Heaton, Pamela; Hill, Elisabeth; Franklin, Anna

    2014-06-01

    The current study is the first investigation of color 'obsessions' and 'phobias' in ASD. We investigate the color perception and cognition of J.G., a boy with ASD who has a strong obsession with blue, and a strong phobia of other colors. J.G.'s performance on a series of color tasks (color-entity association; chromatic discrimination; color classification) is compared to 13 children with and without autism who do not have color obsessions or phobias. The findings lead to the formalization of two hypotheses: (i) color obsessions and phobias in individuals with ASD are related to an unusually strong ability to associate colors with entities; (ii) color obsessions are related to hyposensitivity, and color phobias to hypersensitivity, in the affected regions of color space.

  5. Relations of the factors of the tripartite model of anxiety and depression to types of social anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Alicia A; Heimberg, Richard G; Coles, Meredith E; Gibb, Brandon E; Liebowitz, Michael R; Schneier, Franklin R

    2006-11-01

    Our primary goal was to examine the relations of the specific components of the tripartite model of anxiety and depression [Clark, L. A., Watson, D. (1991). Tripartite model of anxiety and depression: Psychometric evidence and taxonomic implications. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 100, 316-336] to two types of social anxiety (social interaction anxiety and performance anxiety) in 148 individuals with social phobia. In line with previous research, overall social anxiety was more closely related to the anhedonic depression (AD) or low positive affect factor of the tripartite model than to the physiological hyerarousal factor, controlling for general distress. However, as hypothesized, performance anxiety was more closely associated with the physiological hyerarousal factor, whereas social interaction anxiety was more closely associated with the AD or low positive affect factor. We also examined the convergent and discriminant validity of the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire (MASQ; [Watson, D., Clark, L. A. (1991). The mood and anxiety symptom questionnaire. Unpublished manuscript, University of Iowa City]). Intercorrelations of the MASQ subscales were as expected, but correlations with measures of social anxiety, nonsocial anxiety, and depression provided only modest support for convergent and discriminant validity. Findings from this study provide a more detailed account of the specific components of the tripartite model that characterize the diversity of symptoms subsumed by social phobia.

  6. The Generalization of Attachment Representations to New Social Situations: Predicting Behavior during Initial Interactions with Strangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Brooke C.; Cassidy, Jude; Ramos-Marcuse, Fatima

    2008-01-01

    The idea that attachment representations are generalized to new social situations and guide behavior with unfamiliar others is central to attachment theory. However, research regarding this important theoretical postulate has been lacking in adolescence and adulthood, as most research has focused on establishing the influence of attachment representations on close relationship dynamics. Thus, the goal of this investigation was to examine the extent to which attachment representations are predictive of adolescents’ initial behavior when meeting and interacting with new peers. High school adolescents (N = 135) participated with unfamiliar peers from another school in two social support interactions that were videotaped and coded by independent observers. Results indicated that attachment representations (assessed through interview and self-report measures) were predictive of behaviors exhibited during the discussions. Theoretical implications of results and contributions to existing literature are discussed. PMID:19025297

  7. Defensive mobilization in specific phobia: fear specificity, negative affectivity, and diagnostic prominence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTeague, Lisa M; Lang, Peter J; Wangelin, Bethany C; Laplante, Marie-Claude; Bradley, Margaret M

    2012-07-01

    Understanding of exaggerated responsivity in specific phobia-its physiology and neural mediators-has advanced considerably. However, despite strong phenotypic evidence that prominence of specific phobia relative to co-occurring conditions (i.e., principal versus nonprincipal disorder) is associated with dramatic differences in subjective distress, there is yet no consideration of such comorbidity issues on objective defensive reactivity. A community sample of specific phobia (n = 74 principal; n = 86 nonprincipal) and control (n = 76) participants imagined threatening and neutral events while acoustic startle probes were presented and eyeblinks (orbicularis occuli) recorded. Changes in heart rate, skin conductance level, and facial expressivity were also measured. Principal specific phobia patients far exceeded control participants in startle reflex and autonomic reactivity during idiographic fear imagery. Distinguishing between single and multiple phobias within principal phobia and comparing these with nonprincipal phobia revealed a continuum of decreasing defensive mobilization: single patients were strongly reactive, multiple patients were intermediate, and nonprincipal patients were attenuated-the inverse of measures of pervasive anxiety and dysphoria (i.e., negative affectivity). Further, as more disorders supplanted specific phobia from principal disorder, overall defensive mobilization was systematically more impaired. The exaggerated responsivity characteristic of specific phobia is limited to those patients for whom circumscribed fear is the most impairing condition and coincident with little additional affective psychopathology. As specific phobia is superseded in severity by broad and chronic negative affectivity, defensive reactivity progressively diminishes. Focal fears may still be clinically significant but not reflected in objective defensive mobilization. Copyright © 2012 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  8. The Effects of General Social Support and Social Support for Racial Discrimination on African American Women’s Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seawell, Asani H.; Cutrona, Carolyn E.; Russell, Daniel W.

    2012-01-01

    The present longitudinal study examined the role of general and tailored social support in mitigating the deleterious impact of racial discrimination on depressive symptoms and optimism in a large sample of African American women. Participants were 590 African American women who completed measures assessing racial discrimination, general social support, tailored social support for racial discrimination, depressive symptoms, and optimism at two time points (2001–2002 and 2003–2004). Our results indicated that higher levels of general and tailored social support predicted optimism one year later; changes in both types of support also predicted changes in optimism over time. Although initial levels of neither measure of social support predicted depressive symptoms over time, changes in tailored support predicted changes in depressive symptoms. We also sought to determine whether general and tailored social support “buffer” or diminish the negative effects of racial discrimination on depressive symptoms and optimism. Our results revealed a classic buffering effect of tailored social support, but not general support on depressive symptoms for women experiencing high levels of discrimination. PMID:24443614

  9. Hypnotherapy: the salutogenic solution to dealing with phobias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Maria; Gregory, Colette

    2015-05-01

    Evidence suggests that around a quarter of women can suffer from an intense fear of giving birth (tocophobia). This can be costly to these women in terms of enduring negative effects of the increased use of medical interventions associated with tocophobia. Other phobias, such as white coat hypertension, can also be problematic in pregnancy. This article describes the establishment of a hypnotherapy service within the antenatal day assessment unit at East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust and recounts a recent case study in which the use of hypnotherapy was employed to help Rebecca, a white coat hypertension sufferer, to successfully manage her condition.

  10. The Yin and Yang of support from significant others: Influence of general social support and partner support of avoidance in the context of treatment for social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapee, Ronald M; Peters, Lorna; Carpenter, Leigh; Gaston, Jonathan E

    2015-06-01

    Support from social networks is generally considered to protect against mental disorder but in some circumstances support for negative behaviours (such as avoidance) may be counterproductive. Given the critical interplay between social anxiety disorder and social interactions, it is surprising that the relationship of support from significant others to this disorder has received so little attention. The current study evaluated the reciprocal relationships between perceived social support and perceived partner support for avoidance behaviours (avoidance support) among a sample of 131 participants with social anxiety disorder who were assessed three times within the context of a treatment outcome study. A new measure of partner support for avoidance behaviours was developed, called the Avoidance Support Measure, and showed adequate internal consistency and construct validity. Correlations at baseline showed significant negative relationships between perceived social support and social anxiety and significant positive relationships between avoidance support and social anxiety. Path analysis showed that perceived social support at Times 1 and 2 negatively predicted future social anxiety at Times 2 and 3. On the other hand, only a single predictive relationship involving avoidance support was significant and showed that social anxiety at Time 1 positively predicted avoidance support at Time 2. These early results point to the different ways that support from significant others might relate to social anxiety and suggest that further work in this area may be fruitful.

  11. La responsabilidad social corporativa en el nuevo Plan General de Contabilidad

    OpenAIRE

    Arimany Serrat, Núria; Sabata, Anna

    2010-01-01

    EI artículo analiza la información financiera derivada del Plan General de Contabilidad respecto a la responsabilidad social corporativa, con especial referencia a la información medioambiental que detalla la memoria. También se detalla un trabajo de investigación consistente en analizar la información suministrada voluntariamente por las empresas, a través del sistema de gestión medioambiental europeo EMAS, para poder determinar la información de esta naturaleza que podría ser...

  12. Social security in a general equilibrium model with endogenous government behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drissen, E; Van Winden, F

    1991-05-01

    "In this paper attention is focused on the economic and political effects of an aging population. For that purpose, a general equilibrium model is used that allows for an endogenous analysis of decision making on government policies. We concentrate here on the effects of an aging population on expenditures and levels of social security benefits, the provision of public goods and services, the private output and intergenerational conflicts. Special attention will be paid to the effects of changes in the retirement age and in capital endowments. Furthermore, the effects of issues related to aging, as changes in the political influence structure and the motive of other-directedness by others, are investigated."

  13. Towards the understanding of social reality in general theory of institutional facts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Alexander Giraldo Chavarriaga

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper offers a critical interpretation of the general theory of institutional facts, which intents to comprehend, on the basis of a basic regulatory structure with functions assignments, how objective social reality is constructed. We discuss problems, approaches, and theoretical methods employed by Searle, in contrast to sociological constructivism, examining the issues of autoreferentiality of the concept of institutionality, the search for objectivity, the adoption of external realism, the concept of truth, the role of language, and intentionality in the theory. Finally, the author verifies if the theory in question complies with some of the features that a general theory of regulation should have, according to the criteria of René Thom.

  14. Sistemas territoriales de salud frente al sistema general de seguridad social en salud de Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Introducción: El artículo expone los elementos y fundamentos que podrían avalar la generación de sistemas de seguridad social en salud territorial, en complementación con el sistema general preexistente. Materiales y Métodos: La eclosión generalizada en los sistemas de salud, implica la revisión de los modelos propuestos de carácter central y territorial. El análisis económico institucional, permite analizar las condiciones que tienen los sistemas generales para impactar en los esquemas terri...

  15. Impact of social problem-solving training on aggressive boys: skill acquisition, behavior change, and generalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevremont, D C; Foster, S L

    1993-02-01

    This study examined the impact of social problem-solving training on the behavior of five aggressive boys. Acquisition of problem-solving skills and changes in classroom behavior were evaluated using multiple-baseline designs within and across subjects. A generalization-programming procedure to promote the use of problem-solving skills in the natural environment was introduced across children in multiple-baseline fashion. Direct observation and behavior ratings were used to evaluate the treatment. Results indicated that each subject acquired the problem-solving skills at levels comparable to well-adjusted peers. Only one child showed behavioral improvement coincident with problem-solving skill acquisition. Three others showed moderate behavior change after the generalization-programming procedure was introduced. Only one child's gains on teacher ratings were maintained at the 6-month followup. The results suggest that cognitive-behavioral treatment of childrens' aggressive behavior may produce changes of limited magnitude and durability.

  16. Terapia cognitivo-comportamental da fobia social: modelos e técnicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo J. Fonseca D'El Rey

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A fobia social é um dos transtornos mentais mais prevalentes na população geral. As principais formas de tratamento são a psicoterapia e a farmacoterapia. Este artigo tem como objetivo realizar uma breve revisão bibliográfica dos mais importantes modelos e técnicas cognitivas e comportamentais da fobia social. Os modelos antigos - modelo de déficit de habilidades sociais, modelo de crenças irracionais, modelo da vulnerabilidade cognitiva e os modelos integrativos - serão revisados brevemente. Serão apresentadas as técnicas de tratamento - como a exposição, reestruturação cognitiva, técnicas de relaxamento e treino de habilidades sociais. Estudos de metaanálise sobre a eficácia da terapia cognitivo-comportamental no tratamento da fobia social também serão descritos.La fobia social es uno de los trastornos mentales más prevalentes en la población general. Las principales formas de tratamiento son la psicoterapia y la farmacoterapia. Este artículo posee como objetivo realizar una breve revisión bibliográfica de los más importantes modelos y técnicas cognitivas y comportamentales de la fobia social. Los modelos antiguos - modelo de déficit de habilidades sociales, modelo de creencias irracionales, modelo de la vulnerabilidad cognitiva y los modelos integrativos - serán revisados brevemente. Serán presentadas las técnicas de tratamiento - como la exposición, reestructuración cognitiva, técnicas de relajamiento y entrenamiento de habilidades sociales. Estudios de metaanálisis sobre la eficacia de la terapia cognitivo-comportamental en el tratamiento de la fobia social también serán descritos.Social phobia is a widespread mental disorder in the general population. The main forms of treatment are psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy. This article has as objective to carry out a brief bibliographical review of the most important cognitive and behavior models and techniques of social phobia. The old models - social

  17. Sistemas territoriales de salud frente al sistema general de seguridad social en salud de Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahir Alexander Gutiérrez Ossa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: El artículo expone los elementos y fundamentos que podrían avalar la generación de sistemas de seguridad social en salud territorial, en complementación con el sistema general preexistente. Materiales y Métodos: La eclosión generalizada en los sistemas de salud, implica la revisión de los modelos propuestos de carácter central y territorial. El análisis económico institucional, permite analizar las condiciones que tienen los sistemas generales para impactar en los esquemas territoriales. Resultados: Es el momento preciso, para que el sistema general en Colombia responda efectivamente en la materia, y que tanto ello, podría dar cuenta de la capacidad sistémica del mismo en el escenario territorial. Discusión: Es importante, que las gobernaciones y municipios planteen el alcance de dicha iniciativa. El Sistema General de Seguridad Social en Salud en Colombia, gira en torno a modelos y no a la concepción de sistema de salud efectivamente. Conclusiones: La definición de sistema de salud está opacando la atención para definir lo que implica efectivamente la salud, independiente de cualquier sistema al que se pretenda apuntar al final. Palabras clave: Cobertura de Servicios Públicos de Salud, Evaluación en Salud, Sistemas Multiinstitucionales, Sistemas Nacionales de Salud, Políticas Públicas de Salud. (Fuente: DeCS BIREME. Cómo citar este artículo: Gutiérrez Ossa JA, Restrepo Avendaño RD. Sistemas territoriales de salud frente al sistema general de seguridad social en salud de Colombia. Rev Cuid. 2014; 5(1: 623-32.

  18. Are Generalized Anxiety and Depression Symptoms Associated with Social Competence in Children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Krista Haley Smith; Iarocci, Grace

    2017-02-20

    Generalized anxiety and depression symptoms may be associated with poorer social outcomes among children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) without intellectual disability. The goal of this study was to examine whether generalized anxiety and depression symptoms were associated with social competence after accounting for IQ, age, and gender in typically developing children and in children with ASD. Results indicated that for the TD group, generalized anxiety and depression accounted for 38% of the variance in social competence and for children with ASD, they accounted for 29% of the variance in social competence. However, only depression accounted for a significant amount of the variance. The findings underscore the importance of assessing the social impact of internalizing symptoms in children with ASD.

  19. Phobias of attachment-related inner states in the psychotherapy of adult survivors of childhood complex trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liotti, Giovanni

    2013-11-01

    The clinical case described in this article illustrates the value of taking into account the dynamics of disorganized attachment in the assessment of attachment-related phobias (phobia of attachment and phobia of attachment loss) during the psychotherapy of chronically traumatized patients. These seemingly opposite phobias typically coexist in the same patient, appear as phobias of both inner states (affect phobias) and relational experiences, and are linked to dissociated representations of self-with-other. Theory and research on attachment disorganization provide a clinician-friendly conceptual framework for capturing both the intrapsychic (e.g., intrusive and nonintegrated mental states) and the relational (e.g., dramatic unsolvable dilemmas in interpersonal exchanges) aspects of the attachment-related phobias. The therapeutic strategy and the key interventions that logically follow from a case formulation based on this conceptual framework are examined.

  20. A General Stochastic Information Diffusion Model in Social Networks Based on Epidemic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Sotoodeh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Social networks are an important infrastructure forinformation, viruses and innovations propagation.Since users’behavior has influenced by other users’ activity, some groups of people would be made regard to similarity of users’interests. On the other hand, dealing with many events in real worlds, can be justified in social networks; spreadingdisease is one instance of them. People’s manner and infection severity are more important parameters in dissemination of diseases. Both of these reasons derive, whether the diffusion leads to an epidemic or not. SIRS is a hybrid model of SIR and SIS disease models to spread contamination. A person in this model can be returned tosusceptible state after it removed. According to communities which are established on the social network, we use thecompartmental type of SIRS model. During this paper, a general compartmental information diffusion model wouldbe proposed and extracted some of the beneficial parameters to analyze our model. To adapt our model to realistic behaviors, we use Mark ovian model, which would be helpful to create a stochastic manner of the proposed model.In the case of random model, we can calculate probabilities of transaction between states and predicting value of each state. The comparison between two mode of themodel shows that, the prediction of population would beverified in each state.

  1. Pavlovian extinction, phobias, and the limits of the cognitive paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furedy, J J; Riley, D M; Fredrikson, M

    1983-01-01

    The slow or total lack of decrease in some autonomic responses during extinction in aversive conditioning and concomitant verbalization of fear have remained a problem for learning theories and psychophysiology. Removal of the aversive stimulus should result in a rapid decrement in responding, as it does in cognitive and somatic systems. In laboratory analogues of phobia and clinical neurosis, however, such decreases do not occur in some autonomic responses and reported fear. In this article three areas of research are presented in which dissociations occur between cognitive and autonomic responses: 1) relational learning, 2) phobia, and 3) incubation. The data indicate that there are some important distinctions to be made concerning the properties of different psychological and physiological systems. These distinctions pertain to the differences between cognitive and noncognitive systems, between the two branches of the ANS, and between acquisition and extinction processes. These distinctions lead to a number of hypotheses concerning dissociations between response systems and have important implications for the understanding and treatment of neurosis.

  2. Endogenous cortisol levels influence exposure therapy in spider phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lass-Hennemann, Johanna; Michael, Tanja

    2014-09-01

    Previous research in patients with phobia showed that the administration of glucocorticoids reduces fear in phobic situations and enhances exposure therapy. Glucocorticoids underlie a daily cycle with a peak in the morning and low levels during the evening and night. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether exposure is more effective when conducted in the morning when endogenous cortisol levels are high. Sixty patients meeting DSM IV criteria for specific phobia (animal type) were randomly assigned to one-session exposure treatment either at 08.00 a.m. (high cortisol group) or at 06.00 p.m. (low cortisol group). Participants returned for a posttreatment assessment one week after therapy and a follow-up assessment three months after therapy. Both groups showed good outcome, but patients treated in the morning exhibited significantly less fear of spiders in the behavioral approach test (BAT) and a trend for lower scores on the Fear of Spiders Questionnaire (FSQ) than patients treated in the evening. This effect was present at posttreatment and follow-up. Our findings indicate that exposure therapy is more effective in the morning than in the evening. We suggest that this may be due to higher endogenous cortisol levels in the morning group that enhance extinction memory.

  3. Individual and social learning processes involved in the acquisition and generalization of tool use in macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macellini, S.; Maranesi, M.; Bonini, L.; Simone, L.; Rozzi, S.; Ferrari, P. F.; Fogassi, L.

    2012-01-01

    Macaques can efficiently use several tools, but their capacity to discriminate the relevant physical features of a tool and the social factors contributing to their acquisition are still poorly explored. In a series of studies, we investigated macaques' ability to generalize the use of a stick as a tool to new objects having different physical features (study 1), or to new contexts, requiring them to adapt the previously learned motor strategy (study 2). We then assessed whether the observation of a skilled model might facilitate tool-use learning by naive observer monkeys (study 3). Results of study 1 and study 2 showed that monkeys trained to use a tool generalize this ability to tools of different shape and length, and learn to adapt their motor strategy to a new task. Study 3 demonstrated that observing a skilled model increases the observers' manipulations of a stick, thus facilitating the individual discovery of the relevant properties of this object as a tool. These findings support the view that in macaques, the motor system can be modified through tool use and that it has a limited capacity to adjust the learnt motor skills to a new context. Social factors, although important to facilitate the interaction with tools, are not crucial for tool-use learning. PMID:22106424

  4. How do general practice residents use social networking sites in asynchronous distance learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisonneuve, Hubert; Chambe, Juliette; Lorenzo, Mathieu; Pelaccia, Thierry

    2015-09-21

    Blended learning environments - involving both face-to-face and remote interactions - make it easier to adapt learning programs to constraints such as residents' location and low teacher-student ratio. Social networking sites (SNS) such as Facebook®, while not originally intended to be used as learning environments, may be adapted for the distance-learning part of training programs. The purpose of our study was to explore the use of SNS for asynchronous distance learning in a blended learning environment as well as its influence on learners' face-to-face interactions. We conducted a qualitative study and carried out semi-structured interviews. We performed purposeful sampling for maximal variation to include eight general practice residents in 2(nd) and 3(rd) year training. A thematic analysis was performed. The social integration of SNS facilitates the engagement of users in their learning tasks. This may also stimulate students' interactions and group cohesion when members meet up in person. Most of the general practice residents who work in the blended learning environment we studied had a positive appraisal on their use of SNS. In particular, we report a positive impact on their engagement in learning and their participation in discussions during face-to-face instruction. Further studies are needed in order to evaluate the effectiveness of SNS in blended learning environments and the appropriation of SNS by teachers.

  5. Social Skills Training Augments the Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, James D.; Gaudiano, Brandon A.; Rheingold, Alyssa A.; Myers, Valerie H.; Dalrymple, Kristy; Nolan, Elizabeth M.

    2005-01-01

    Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy (CBGT) is the most widely researched intervention program for social anxiety disorder (SAD, also known as social phobia), with a number of studies demonstrating its effectiveness. Another common treatment, social skills training (SST), has also been shown to be efficacious for SAD. The present study compared the…

  6. Measuring Social Anxiety in 11 Countries Development and Validation of the Social Anxiety Questionnaire for Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caballo, V.E.; Salazar, I.C.; Irurtia, M.J.; Arias, B.; Hofmann, S.G.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on two studies conducted to develop and validate a new self-report measure of social phobia/anxiety - the Social Anxiety Questionnaire for Adults (SAQ-A) (Cuestionario de ansiedad social para adultos, CASO-A). A diary-item recording procedure was used to generate the initial pool

  7. Brief Report: No Association between Parental Age and Extreme Social-Communicative Autistic Traits in the General Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Elise B.; Munir, Kerim; McCormick, Marie C.; Koenen, Karestan C.; Santangelo, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    This is the first investigation of the relationship between parental age and extreme social-communicative autistic traits in the general population. The parents of 5,246 children in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) completed the Social and Communication Disorders Checklist (SCDC). The association between parental age…

  8. Self-Control, Social Factors, and Delinquency: A Test of the General Theory of Crime among Adolescents in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nicole W. T.; Cheung, Yuet W.

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to test the predictive power of self-control theory for delinquency in a Chinese context, and to explore if social factors as predicted in social bonding theory, differential association theory, general strain theory, and labeling theory have effects on delinquency in the presence of self-control. Self-report data…

  9. A Re-Assessment of Factors Associated with Environmental Concern and Behavior Using the 2010 General Social Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Todd P.; Fernandes, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The associations between social and psychological influences and environmental attitudes, intentions and behavior have generated considerable interest, both in the fields of environmental behavior and of environmental education. We use the 2010 General Social Survey (GSS) to study these associations and expand the scope of earlier studies by…

  10. The Housing Careers of Older Canadians: An Investigation Using Cycle 16 of the General Social Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perks, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available EnglishIn this paper we use the Aging and Social Support Survey (GSS16 and the theoretical conception of a ‘housing career’ to identify the correlates of housing tenure (rent vs.own among Canadians age 45 and over. We draw on primarily US literature to isolate three general explanatory clusters (social support, health, and economic characteristics.Based on analyses using logistic regression, the results indicate that the majority of variation in housing tenure exists due to standard demographic and household characteristics. In fact, of the three focal explanatory clusters, only social support characteristics significantly enhance model fit beyond the baseline model, suggesting that the housing tenure of older Canadians hinges heavily on fairly standard characteristics.FrenchDans cet article, nous nous sommes servis de l’enquête « Vieillissement et soutien social» (ESG16 et de la théorie du cycle de vie du logement pour identifier les corrélatsdes modes d’occupation (location vs. propriétariat chez les canadiens âgés de 45 ans etplus. Nous avons principalement puisé la littérature des États-Unis pour isoler trois groupesexplicatifs généraux (caractéristiques: de support social, de santé, et économiques.Les résultats, basés sur des analyses de régression logistique, indiquent que la majoritédes variations dans les modes d’occupation peuvent être attribuées à des caractéristiquesdémographiques et économiques de base. En effet, des trois groupes explicatifs focaux, cesont seulement les caractéristiques de support social qui ont fait monter l’ajustement dumodèle en delà du modèle de base, ce qui suggère que les modes d’occupation des logementspour les canadiens d’un certain âge dépend beaucoup des caractéristiques de base.Mots clés: Cycle de vie du logement, modes d’occupation de logements, adultes âgés

  11. Risk factors associated with interdog aggression and shooting phobias among purebred dogs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rugbjerg, Helene; Proschowsky, Helle Friis; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær

    2003-01-01

    aggression, separation anxiety and shooting phobia. Compared to Labrador Retrievers, the following breeds and breed groups had higher odds of being reported to have interdog dominance aggression: Belgian Sheepdogs, Dachshunds, Dalmatians, German, Shepherds, Hovawarts, Pinschers, Rottweilers, Scent dogs...... and Spitz dogs. Poodles, retrieving/flushing dogs, Sheepdogs, Spitz dogs and terriers had higher odds of shooting phobia. The odds of interdog dominance aggression were higher among dogs owned by younger dog owners compared to dogs owned by older dog owners. Dogs living in the capital area of Copenhagen had...... phobia. Dogs belonging to dog breeders had reduced odds of being reported to have the investigated behaviour problems....

  12. Assessing stimulus control and promoting generalization via video modeling when teaching social responses to children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, JoAnna; Lerman, Dorothea C; Lechago, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    We taught social responses to young children with autism using an adult as the recipient of the social interaction and then assessed generalization of performance to adults and peers who had not participated in the training. Although the participants' performance was similar across adults, responding was less consistent with peers, and a subsequent probe suggested that the recipient of the social behavior (adults vs. peers) controlled responding. We then evaluated the effects of having participants observe a video of a peer engaged in the targeted social behavior with another peer who provided reinforcement for the social response. Results suggested that certain irrelevant stimuli (adult vs. peer recipient) were more likely to exert stimulus control over responding than others (setting, materials) and that video viewing was an efficient way to promote generalization to peers.

  13. A general framework for analyzing sustainability of social-ecological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrom, Elinor

    2009-07-24

    A major problem worldwide is the potential loss of fisheries, forests, and water resources. Understanding of the processes that lead to improvements in or deterioration of natural resources is limited, because scientific disciplines use different concepts and languages to describe and explain complex social-ecological systems (SESs). Without a common framework to organize findings, isolated knowledge does not cumulate. Until recently, accepted theory has assumed that resource users will never self-organize to maintain their resources and that governments must impose solutions. Research in multiple disciplines, however, has found that some government policies accelerate resource destruction, whereas some resource users have invested their time and energy to achieve sustainability. A general framework is used to identify 10 subsystem variables that affect the likelihood of self-organization in efforts to achieve a sustainable SES.

  14. Reliability and efficiency of generalized rumor spreading model on complex social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Naimi, Yaghoob

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the generalized rumor spreading model and investigate some properties of this model on different complex social networks. Despite pervious rumor models that both the spreader-spreader ($SS$) and the spreader-stifler ($SR$) interactions have the same rate $\\alpha$, we define $\\alpha^{(1)}$ and $\\alpha^{(2)}$ for $SS$ and $SR$ interactions, respectively. The effect of variation of $\\alpha^{(1)}$ and $\\alpha^{(2)}$ on the final density of stiflers is investigated. Furthermore, the influence of the topological structure of the network in rumor spreading is studied by analyzing the behavior of several global parameters such as reliability and efficiency. Our results show that while networks with homogeneous connectivity patterns reach a higher reliability, scale-free topologies need a less time to reach a steady state with respect the rumor.

  15. Reliability and Efficiency of Generalized Rumor Spreading Model on Complex Social Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaghoob Naimi; Mohammad Naimi

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the generalized rumor spreading model and investigate some properties of this model on different complex social networks.Despite pervious rumor models that both the spreader-spreader (SS) and the spreaderstifler (SR) interactions have the same rate α,we define α(1) and α(2) for SS and SR interactions,respectively.The effect of variation of α(1) and α(2) on the final density of stiflers is investigated.Furthermore,the influence of the topological structure of the network in rumor spreading is studied by analyzing the behavior of several global parameters such as reliability and efficiency.Our results show that while networks with homogeneous connectivity patterns reach a higher reliability,scale-free topologies need a less time to reach a steady state with respect the rumor.

  16. The social validity of a national assessment centre for selection into general practice training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Annette; Roberts, Chris; Clark, Tyler; Mossman, Karyn

    2014-12-21

    Internationally, recruiting the best candidates is central to the success of postgraduate training programs and the quality of the medical workforce. So far there has been little theoretically informed research considering selection systems from the perspective of the candidates. We explored candidates' perception of the fairness of a National Assessment Centre (NAC) approach for selection into Australian general practice training, where candidates were assessed by a Multiple Mini Interview (MMI) and a written Situational Judgment Test (SJT), for suitability to undertake general practice (GP) training. In 2013, 1,930 medical practitioners, who were eligible to work in Australia attended one of 14 NACs in each of 5 states and 2 territories. A survey was distributed to each candidate at the conclusion of their assessment, which included open-ended questions aimed at eliciting candidates' perceived benefits and challenges of the selection process. A framework analysis was informed by the theoretical lens of Social Validity Theory. Qualitative data was available from 46% (n = 886/1,930) of candidates, who found the NAC experience fair and informative for their training and career goals, but wanted to be provided with more information in preparation. Candidates valued being able to communicate their skills during the MMI, but found some difficulty in interpreting the questions. A significant minority had concerns that a lack of relevant GP experience may inhibit their performance. Candidates also expressed concerns about the time limits within the written paper, particularly if English was not their first language. They also expressed a desire for formative feedback during the interview process. During any job selection process, not only is the organisation assessing the candidates, but the candidates are also assessing the organisation. However, a focus on the candidate experience throughout an organisation's selection process may provide benefits to both

  17. Out of sight, but still in mind: electrocortical correlates of attentional capture in spider phobia as revealed by a 'dot probe' paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutgeb, Verena; Sarlo, Michela; Schöngassner, Florian; Schienle, Anne

    2015-02-01

    The current investigation focused on attentional processes in spider phobia. Twenty phobics and 20 controls performed a dot-probe task while event-related potentials were recorded. In each trial they viewed a picture pair (a spider or a generally disgust eliciting picture that was paired with a neutral picture) for either 100 or 1500 ms. After the offset a visual probe (a dot) was presented either at the previous position of the emotionally relevant or the neutral slide and participants were asked to indicate with a button press whether the dot had been presented on the left or the right side of the screen. Results revealed a modulation of the centro-parietal P300 (340-500 ms after picture onset). Amplitudes were higher when the dot replaced a spider than when it replaced a neutral picture. This was phobia-specific, as it was only present in phobics and did not appear in response to disgust pictures. Moreover, the modulation could only be shown for short presentation times. The results are interpreted to reflect motivated attention in spider phobia, if disorder-relevant and neutral pictures are shown simultaneously. As the modulation of the P300 was found after picture offset, attentional allocation seems to be persist after the phobic object is no longer present.

  18. One-session treatment of specific phobias in youth: a randomized clinical trial in the United States and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollendick, Thomas H; Ost, Lars-Göran; Reuterskiöld, Lena; Costa, Natalie; Cederlund, Rio; Sirbu, Cristian; Davis, Thompson E; Jarrett, Matthew A

    2009-06-01

    One hundred and ninety-six youth, ages 7-16, who fulfilled Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.) criteria for various specific phobias were randomized to a one-session exposure treatment, education support treatment, or a wait list control group. After the waiting period, the wait list participants were offered treatment and, if interested, rerandomized to 1 of the 2 active treatments. The phobias were assessed with semistructured diagnostic interviews, clinician severity ratings, and behavioral avoidance tests, whereas fears, general anxiety, depression, and behavior problems were assessed with self- and parent report measures. Assessments were completed pretreatment, posttreatment, and at 6 months following treatment. Results showed that both treatment conditions were superior to the wait list control condition and that 1-session exposure treatment was superior to education support treatment on clinician ratings of phobic severity, percentage of participants who were diagnosis free, child ratings of anxiety during the behavioral avoidance test, and treatment satisfaction as reported by the youth and their parents. There were no differences on self-report measures. Treatment effects were maintained at follow-up. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  19. Social safety, self-rated general health and physical activity: changes in area crime, area safety feelings and the role of social cohesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruijsbroek, Annemarie; Droomers, Mariël; Groenewegen, Peter P; Hardyns, Wim; Stronks, Karien

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether changes over time in reported area crime and perceived area safety were related to self-rated general health and physical activity (PA), in order to provide support for a causal relationship between social safety and health. Additionally, we investigated whether social cohesion protects the residents against the negative impact of unsafe areas on health and PA. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were performed on Dutch survey data, including 47,926 respondents living in 2974 areas. An increase in area level unsafety feelings between 2009 and 2011 was associated with more people reporting poor general health in 2012 in that area, but was not related to PA. Changes in reported area crime were not related to either poor general health or PA. The social cohesion in the area did not modify the effect of changes in social safety on health and PA. The results suggest that tackling feelings of unsafety in an area might contribute to the better general health of the residents. Because changes in area social safety were not associated with PA, we found no leads that such health benefits were achieved through an increase in physical activity.

  20. Does major depressive disorder in parents predict specific fears and phobias in offspring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biel, Matthew G; Klein, Rachel G; Mannuzza, Salvatore; Roizen, Erica R; Truong, Nhan L; Roberson-Nay, Roxann; Pine, Daniel S

    2008-01-01

    Evidence suggests a relationship between parental depression and phobias in offspring as well as links between childhood fears and risk for major depression. This study examines the relationship between major depressive disorder (MDD) and anxiety disorders in parents and specific fears and phobias in offspring. Three hundred and eighteen children of parents with lifetime MDD, anxiety disorder, MDD+anxiety disorder, or neither were psychiatrically assessed via parent interview. Rates of specific phobias in offspring did not differ significantly across parental groups. Specific fears were significantly elevated in offspring of parents with MDD+anxiety disorder relative to the other groups (MDD, anxiety disorder, and controls, which did not differ). We failed to find increased phobias in offspring of parents with MDD without anxiety disorder. Elevated rates of specific fears in offspring of parents with MDD+anxiety disorder may be a function of more severe parental psychopathology, increased genetic loading, or unmeasured environmental influences. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Social safety, general health and physical activity: changes in neighbourhood safety and the role of social cohesion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijsbroek, A.; Droomers, M.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Hardyns, W.; Stronks, K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Area crime and perceived safety are two components of social safety that are presumed to affect individual health and health related behaviour. So far, most studies have used cross-sectional data to study this relation. We have investigated changes in social safety in relation to self-ra

  2. Effectiveness of social work intervention with a systematic approach to improve general health in opioid addicts in addiction treatment centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheb G

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ghoncheh Raheb,1,2 Esmat Khaleghi,1 Amir Moghanibashi-Mansourieh,1 Ali Farhoudian,2 Robab Teymouri3 1Department of Social Work, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2Substance Abuse and Dependence Research Center, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 3Pediatric Neurorehabilitation Research Center, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran Purpose: This study takes a systematic approach to investigate the effect of social work intervention aimed at increasing general health among opioid addicts in addiction treatment centers. Patients and methods: This is an experimental plan (pretest to posttest with a control group; the study sample included 60 patients with drug dependencies undergoing treatment in addiction treatment centers. These patients were randomly assigned as case (30 and control (30 groups. The case group was subjected to intervention over ten sessions, whereas the control group received no intervention. Both groups then passed through a posttest, while a follow-up was conducted after 4 months. Data were obtained via a General Health Questionnaire. Results: A covariance analysis test and independent and dependent t-test results indicated that a social work intervention adopting systematic approach was effective in increasing the general health of drug-addicted patients under treatment. Conclusion: Thus, the nature of the presence of social workers in addiction treatment centers has been effective and can have a significant influence by reducing anxiety and insomnia and somatic symptoms, improving patients’ self-understanding and self-recognition, and enhancing social functioning. Keywords: social work, intervention, systematic approach, general health, opioid addicts

  3. Participants needed for new study on parental involvement in treatment of children with phobias

    OpenAIRE

    Doss, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Virginia Tech's Child Study Center, part of the College of Science, is seeking children with phobias, and their parents, to participate in a study of the effectiveness of parental involvement in treating their children's fears. In order to be considered for the project, children must be between the ages of 7 and 12, have a specific phobia, and be able to travel to Blacksburg for the treatment program.

  4. A Systematic Review of the Treatment of Fears and Phobias Among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Lydon, Sinead; Healy, Olive

    2014-01-01

    PUBLISHED Research indicates that fears and phobias are significantly more prevalent, and emerge in response to a greater variety of stimuli, among children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) than among their developmentally disabled or typically developing peers. Such findings are problematic given the difficulty of assessing and identifying fears or phobias among the ASD population and the challenge of identifying effective treatments for those with core diagnostic deficits in compreh...

  5. Initial and sustained brain responses to threat anticipation in blood-injection-injury phobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie Brinkmann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood-injection-injury (BII phobia differs from other subtypes of specific phobia in that it is associated with elevated disgust-sensitivity as well as specific autonomic and brain responses during processing of phobia-relevant stimuli. To what extent these features play a role already during threat anticipation is unclear. In the current fMRI experiment, 16 female BII phobics and 16 female healthy controls anticipated the presentation of phobia-specific and neutral pictures. On the behavioral level, anxiety dominated the anticipatory period in BII phobics relative to controls, while both anxiety and disgust were elevated during picture presentation. By applying two different models for the analysis of brain responses to anticipation of phobia-specific versus neutral stimuli, we found initial and sustained increases of activation in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, insula, lateral and medial prefrontal cortex (PFC, thalamus and visual areas, as well as initial activation in the amygdala for BII phobics as compared to healthy controls. These results suggest that BII phobia is characterized by activation of a typical neural defense network during threat anticipation, with anxiety as the predominant emotion.

  6. Social anxiety predicts avoidance behaviour in virtual encounters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinck, M.; Rörtgen, T.; Lange, W.G.; Dotsch, R.; Wigboldus, D.H.J.; Becker, E.S.

    2010-01-01

    Avoidant behaviour is critical in social anxiety and social phobia, being a major factor in the maintenance of anxiety. However, almost all previous studies of social avoidance were restricted to using self-reports for the study of intentional aspects of avoidance. In contrast, the current study use

  7. A MEASUREMENT OF SOCIAL SUPPORT IN EPIDEMIOLOGIC RESEARCH - THE SOCIAL EXPERIENCES CHECKLIST TESTED IN A GENERAL-POPULATION IN THE NETHERLANDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANOOSTROM, MA; TIJHUIS, MAR; DEHAES, JCJM; KROMHOUT, D

    1995-01-01

    Study objective - This study aimed to examine in a general population the psychometric qualities of an instrument designed to measure positive and negative social experiences that had been developed in a clinical setting. Design - The Netherlands monitoring project on cardiovascular disease risk fac

  8. Social safety, self-rated general health and physical activity : Changes in area crime, area safety feelings and the role of social cohesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijsbroek, Annemarie; Droomers, Mariël; Groenewegen, Peter P.; Hardyns, Wim; Stronks, Karien

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether changes over time in reported area crime and perceived area safety were related to self-rated general health and physical activity (PA), in order to provide support for a causal relationship between social safety and health. Additionally, we investigated

  9. Social safety, self-rated general health and physical activity : Changes in area crime, area safety feelings and the role of social cohesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijsbroek, Annemarie; Droomers, Mariël; Groenewegen, Peter P.; Hardyns, Wim; Stronks, Karien

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether changes over time in reported area crime and perceived area safety were related to self-rated general health and physical activity (PA), in order to provide support for a causal relationship between social safety and health. Additionally, we investigated

  10. Science, the public, and social elites: how the general public, scientists, top politicians and managers perceive science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prpić, Katarina

    2011-11-01

    This paper finds that the Croatian public's and the social elites' perceptions of science are a mixture of scientific and technological optimism, of the tendency to absolve science of social responsibility, of skepticism about the social effects of science, and of cognitive optimism and skepticism. However, perceptions differ significantly according to the different social roles and the wider value system of the observed groups. The survey data show some key similarities, as well as certain specificities in the configuration of the types of views of the four groups--the public, scientists, politicians and managers. The results suggest that the well-known typology of the four cultures reveals some of the ideologies of the key actors of scientific and technological policy. The greatest social, primarily educational and socio-spatial, differentiation of the perceptions of science was found in the general public.

  11. Generally civilized context of governing the social organization of the world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Gaievska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Analyzing the contemporary global mechanisms of governing relationships between peoples represented both in procedural and institutional aspects the author notes their fundamental and globally civilized meanings in the historical progress of mankind to a higher level of social system organization. Therefore, the actual European process and principles of creating the efficient ordering system, according to which certain international institutional structures function, should be considered in the context of today’s total sovereignty and at the same time ensuring the safety of international relations. This trend suggests that the presence of some basic concepts of self-governance aimed at creating mechanisms for intergovernmental governance in the global community should remove the possibility of destabilization of international cooperation. Thus, generally civilized pillars of social governance, including international relations, lie in the understanding that people have to base their relationships on principles of the highest administrative feasibility, which should embrace economic, political and spiritual energy of any nation. This interpretation of general issues of international relations seems quite logical and well grounded in the light of recent developments in Ukraine. Therefore, the expression “reason rules the world” should be viewed as an objective opportunity of any institution through the energy of its own organization and by management to achieve a holistic level of the system which is too important for humanity, which in its historical development has always longed for a high level of organization, and consequently reached in its civilization development a level where management has become the most productive type of production. In this view management as a science can be perceived as the most lucrative and prudent source of allocating capital. Biological organizational evolution appears to have been locked: in its highest

  12. Domain-General Contributions to Social Reasoning: Theory of Mind and Deontic Reasoning Re-Explored

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Margaret C.; Moscovitch, Morris

    2007-01-01

    Using older adults and dual-task interference, we examined performance on two social reasoning tasks: theory of mind (ToM) tasks and versions of the deontic selection task involving social contracts and hazardous conditions. In line with performance accounts of social reasoning (Leslie, Friedman, & German, 2004), evidence from both aging and the…

  13. Domain-General Contributions to Social Reasoning: Theory of Mind and Deontic Reasoning Re-Explored

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Margaret C.; Moscovitch, Morris

    2007-01-01

    Using older adults and dual-task interference, we examined performance on two social reasoning tasks: theory of mind (ToM) tasks and versions of the deontic selection task involving social contracts and hazardous conditions. In line with performance accounts of social reasoning (Leslie, Friedman, & German, 2004), evidence from both aging and the…

  14. Generalized behavioral framework for choice models of social influence: Behavioral and data concerns in travel behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maness, M.; Cirillo, C.; Dugundji, E.R.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, transportation has begun a shift from an individual focus to a social focus. Accordingly, discrete choice models have begun to integrate social context into its framework. Social influence, the process of having one’s behavior be affected by others, has been one approach t

  15. Benefits General Education Students Receive from Inclusion Classes and Social Skills Training Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Denise Marie

    2012-01-01

    Social inclusion has become an increasingly relevant issue in public school education during the past several years. Differences between social skills in students who were educated in inclusion elementary school classrooms and those who were not placed in inclusion classrooms were examined. Teachers were asked to rate the social skills of students…

  16. Benefits General Education Students Receive from Inclusion Classes and Social Skills Training Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Denise Marie

    2012-01-01

    Social inclusion has become an increasingly relevant issue in public school education during the past several years. Differences between social skills in students who were educated in inclusion elementary school classrooms and those who were not placed in inclusion classrooms were examined. Teachers were asked to rate the social skills of students…

  17. Dynamics of brain responses to phobic-related stimulation in specific phobia subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caseras, Xavier; Mataix-Cols, David; Trasovares, Maria Victoria; López-Solà, Marina; Ortriz, Hector; Pujol, Jesus; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Michael J; Torrubia, Rafael

    2010-10-01

    Very few studies have investigated to what extent different subtypes of specific phobia share the same underlying functional neuroanatomy. This study aims to investigate the potential differences in the anatomy and dynamics of the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses associated with spider and blood-injection-injury phobias. We used an event-related paradigm in 14 untreated spider phobics, 15 untreated blood-injection-injury phobics and 17 controls. Phobic images successfully induced distress only in phobic participants. Both phobic groups showed a similar pattern of heart rate increase following the presentation of phobic stimuli, this being different from controls. The presentation of phobic images induced activity within the same brain network in all participants, although the intensity of brain responses was significantly higher in phobics. Only blood-injection-injury phobics showed greater activity in the ventral prefrontal cortex compared with controls. This phobia group also presented a lower activity peak in the left amygdala compared with spider phobics. Importantly, looking at the dynamics of BOLD responses, both phobia groups showed a quicker time-to-peak in the right amygdala than controls, but only spider phobics also differed from controls in this parameter within the left amygdala. Considering these and previous findings, both phobia subtypes show very similar responses regarding their immediate reaction to phobia-related images, but critical differences in their sustained responses to these stimuli. These results highlight the importance of considering complex mental processes potentially associated with coping and emotion regulation processes, rather than exclusively focusing on primary neural responses to threat, when investigating fear and phobias.

  18. Social Reconnection Revisited: The Effects of Social Exclusion Risk on Reciprocity, Trust, and General Risk-Taking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derfler-Rozin, Rellie; Pillutla, Madan; Thau, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesize that people at risk of exclusion from groups will engage in actions that can socially reconnect them with others and test the hypothesis in four studies. We show that participants at risk of exclusion reciprocated the behavior of an unknown person (Study 1a) and a potential excluder (Study 1b) more compared to two control groups…

  19. Social Reconnection Revisited: The Effects of Social Exclusion Risk on Reciprocity, Trust, and General Risk-Taking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derfler-Rozin, Rellie; Pillutla, Madan; Thau, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesize that people at risk of exclusion from groups will engage in actions that can socially reconnect them with others and test the hypothesis in four studies. We show that participants at risk of exclusion reciprocated the behavior of an unknown person (Study 1a) and a potential excluder (Study 1b) more compared to two control groups…

  20. Garantía del derecho a la salud en Colombia contradicciones del sistema general de seguridad social en salud con el estado social de derecho en Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    López Rodríguez, Diana Angélica

    2013-01-01

    Este documento analiza la garantía por parte del Estado colombiano del derecho a la atención en salud como elemento fundamental del derecho a la salud, con el actual sistema de atención, desde la revisión de la relación de correspondencia entre los principios y objetivos constitucionales del Estado Social de Derecho y su materialización en el Sistema General de Seguridad Social en Salud (SGSSS). Se concluye que el sostenimiento del actual SGSSS ha generado una quiebra del principio de garanti...