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Sample records for generalized liquid drop

  1. Deformed Potential Energy of Super Heavy Element Z = 120 in a Generalized Liquid Drop Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Bao-Qiu; MA Zhong-Yu; ZHU Zhi-Yuan; SONG Hong-Qiu; ZHAO Yao-Lin

    2005-01-01

    @@ The macroscopic deformed potential energy for super-heavy elements Z = 120 is determined within a generalized liquid drop model (GLDM). The shell correction is calculated with the Strutinsky method and the microscopic single particle energies are derived from the shell model in an axially deformed Woods-Saxon potential with the same quasi-molecular shape. The total potential energy of a nucleus is calculated by the macro-microscopic method as the summation of the liquid-drop energy and the Strutinsky shell correction. The theory is adopted to describe the deformed potential energies in a set of cold reactions. The neck in the quasi-molecular shape is responsible to the deep valley of the fusion barrier due to shell corrections. In the cold fusion path, the doublehump fusion barrier is predicted by the shell correction and complete fusion events may occur. The results show that some of projectile-target combinations in the entrance channel, such as 50Ca+252Fm→ 302120* and 58Fe+244pu→ 302120*, favour the fusion reaction, which can be considered as candidates for the synthesis of super heavy nuclei Z = 120 and the former might be the best cold fusion reaction to produce the nucleus 302120among them.

  2. Fusion Barrier of Super-heavy Elements in a Generalized Liquid Drop Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENBao-Qiu; MAZhong-Yu

    2004-01-01

    The macroscopic deformed potential energies for super-heavy elements Z = 110,112,114,116,118 arc determined within a generalized liquid drop model (GLDM). A quasi-molecular mechanism is introduced to describe the deformation of a nucleus in the GLDM and the shell model simultaneously. The macroscopic energy of a twocenter nuclear system in the GLDM includes the volume-, surface-, and Coulomb-energies, the proximity effect at each mass asymmetry, and accurate nuclear radius. The shell correction is calculated by the Strutinsky method and the microscopic single particle energies are derived from a shell model in an axially deformed Woods-Saxon potential with the quasi-molecular shape. The total potential energy of a nucleus can be calculated by the macro-microscopic method as the summation of the liquid-drop energy and the Strutinsky shell correction. The theory is applied to predict the fusion barriers of the cold reactions 64Ni + 208 spb → 272 110*, 70Zn + 208pb → 278 112*, 76Ge + 208seb → 284 114*,82Se + 208pb → 29 116*, 86Kr + 208pb → 294 118*. It is found that the neck in the quasi-molecular shape is responsible for the deep valley of the fusion barrier. In the cold fusion path, double-hump fusion barriers could be predicted by the shell corrections and complete fusion events may occur.

  3. Deformed Potential Energy of 263Db in a Generalized Liquid Drop Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈宝秋; 马中玉; 赵耀林

    2003-01-01

    The macroscopic deformed potential energy for super-heavy nuclei 263 Db,which governs the entrance and alpha decay channels,is determined within a generalized liquid drop model(GLDM).A quasi-molecular shape is as sumed in the GLDM,which includes volume-,surface-,and Coulomb-energies,proximity effects,mass asymmetry,and an accurate nuclear radius.The microscopic single particle energies are derived from a shell model in an axially deformed Woods-Saxon potential with a quasi-molecular shape.The shell correction is calculated by the Strutinsky method.The total deformed potential energy of a nucleus can be calculated by the macro-microscopic method as the summation of the liquid-drop energy and the Strutinsky shell correction.The theory is applied to predict the deformed potential energy of the experiment 22Ne + 241Am → 263Db* → 259Db + 4n,which was performed on the Heavy Ion Accelerator in Lanzhou.It is found that the neck in the quasi-molecular shape is responsible for the deep valley of the fusion barrier due to the shell corrections.In the cold fusion path,the double-hump fusion barrier is predicted by the shell correction and complete fusion events may occur.

  4. Fusion Barrier of Super-heavy Elements in a Generalized Liquid Drop Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Bao-Qiu; MA Zhong-Yu

    2004-01-01

    The macroscopic deformed potential energies for super-heavy elements Z = 110,112,114,116,118 are determined within a generalized liquid drop model (GLDM). A quasi-molecular mechanism is introduced to describe the deformation of a nucleus in the GLDM and the shell model simultaneously. The macroscopic energy of a twocenter nuclear system in the GLDM includes the volume-, surface-, and Coulomb-energies, the proximity effect at each mass asymmetry, and accurate nuclear radius. The shell correction is calculated by the Strutinsky method and the microscopic single particle energies are derived from a shell model in an axially deformed Woods-Saxon potential with the quasi-molecular shape. The total potential energy of a nucleus can be calculated by the macro-microscopic method as the summation of the liquid-drop energy and the Strutinsky shell correction. The theory is applied to predict the fusion barriers of the cold reactions 64Ni + 208Pb → 272110*, 70Zn + 208Pb → 278112*, 76Ge + 208pb → 284114*,82Se + 208Pb → 290116*, 86Kr + 208Pb → 294118*. It is found that the neck in the quasi-molecular shape is responsible for the deep valley of the fusion barrier. In the cold fusion path, double-hump fusion barriers could be predicted by the shell corrections and complete fusion events may occur.

  5. Alpha and light nucleus emission within a generalized liquid drop model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, G.; Bonilla, C.; Moustabchir, R.

    2002-11-01

    The potential energy governing the spontaneous α, C, O, F, Ne, Mg and Si emissions has been determined within a generalized liquid drop model including the proximity effects between the emitted light nucleus and the daughter one and taking into account empirically the experimental Q value. The decay path has been described by a quasi-molecular shape sequence leading rapidly to two spherical touching nuclei before crossing the barrier. The partial half-lives deduced from the WKB barrier penetration probabability are in very good agreement with experimental data and accurate analytical expressions are proposed. The partial half-lives of the Be, Li, He and H sub-barrier emissions have been calculated by adding an excitation energy to the Q value and new formulae are given.

  6. Coalescence of Liquid Drops

    CERN Document Server

    Eggers, J; Stone, H A; Eggers, Jens; Lister, John R.; Stone, Howard A.

    1999-01-01

    When two drops of radius $R$ touch, surface tension drives an initially singular motion which joins them into a bigger drop with smaller surface area. This motion is always viscously dominated at early times. We focus on the early-time behavior of the radius $\\rmn$ of the small bridge between the two drops. The flow is driven by a highly curved meniscus of length $2\\pi \\rmn$ and width $\\Delta\\ll\\rmn$ around the bridge, from which we conclude that the leading-order problem is asymptotically equivalent to its two-dimensional counterpart. An exact two-dimensional solution for the case of inviscid surroundings [Hopper, J. Fluid Mech. ${\\bf 213}$, 349 (1990)] shows that R)]$; and thus the same is true in three dimensions. The case of coalescence with an external viscous fluid is also studied in detail both analytically and numerically. A significantly different structure is found in which the outer fluid forms a toroidal bubble of radius $\\Delta \\propto \\rmn^{3/2}$ at the meniscus and $\\rmn \\sim (t\\gamma/4\\pi\\eta)...

  7. Liquid Drop Measuring Device for Analyzing Liquid Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Based on the correlation between certain properties of liquid and the properties of the corresponding liquid drop formed under given conditions, a liquid drop measuring device is utilized to monitor the drop formation process of the liquid sample with photoelectric measuring methods. The mechanical and optical characteristic of the liquid is explored with the optical fibers from the internal of the liquid drop during its formation. The drop head capacitor is utilized to monitor the growth process of the liquid drop to gain the drop volume information related to the physical property of liquid. The unique liquid drop trace containing the integrated properties of liquid is generated, and it is proved by experiment that for different liquids their liquid drop traces are different. The analysis on liquid properties and discrimination between different liquids can be proceeded with the liquid drop trace obtained by the liquid drop measuring device.

  8. Liquid drops on soft solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbers, Luuk A.; Weijs, Joost H.; Das, Siddhartha; Botto, Lorenzo; Andreotti, Bruno; Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2014-03-01

    A sessile drop can elastically deform a substrate by the action of capillary forces. The typical size of the deformation is given by the ratio of surface tension and the elastic modulus, γ / E , which can reach up to 10-100 microns for soft elastomers. In this talk we theoretically show that the contact angles of drops on such a surface exhibit two transitions when increasing γ / E : (i) the microsocopic geometry of the contact line first develops a Neumann-like cusp when γ / E is of the order of few nanometers, (ii) the macroscopic angle of the drop is altered only when γ / E reaches the size of the drop. Using the same framework we then show that two neighboring drops exhibit an effective interaction, mediated by the deformation of the elastic medium. This is in analogy to the well-known Cheerios effect, where small particles at a liquid interface attract each other due to the meniscus deformations. Here we reveal the nature of drop-drop interactions on a soft substrate by combining numerical and analytical calculations.

  9. Pressure Drop of Non-Newtonian Liquid Flow Through Elbows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Experimental data on the pressure drop across different types of elbow for non-Newtonian pseudoplastic liquid flow in laminar condition have been presented. A generalized correlation has been developed for predicting the frictional pressure drop across the elbows in the horizontal plane.

  10. Leidenfrost drops on a heated liquid pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquet, L.; Sobac, B.; Darbois-Texier, B.; Duchesne, A.; Brandenbourger, M.; Rednikov, A.; Colinet, P.; Dorbolo, S.

    2016-09-01

    We show that a volatile liquid drop placed at the surface of a nonvolatile liquid pool warmer than the boiling point of the drop can be held in a Leidenfrost state even for vanishingly small superheats. Such an observation points to the importance of the substrate roughness, negligible in the case considered here, in determining the threshold Leidenfrost temperature. A theoretical model based on the one proposed by Sobac et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 053011 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.053011] is developed in order to rationalize the experimental data. The shapes of the drop and of the liquid substrate are analyzed. The model notably provides scalings for the vapor film thickness profile. For small drops, these scalings appear to be identical to the case of a Leidenfrost drop on a solid substrate. For large drops, in contrast, they are different, and no evidence of chimney formation has been observed either experimentally or theoretically in the range of drop sizes considered in this study. Concerning the evaporation dynamics, the radius is shown to decrease linearly with time whatever the drop size, which differs from the case of a Leidenfrost drop on a solid substrate. For high superheats, the characteristic lifetime of the drops versus the superheat follows a scaling law that is derived from the model, but, at low superheats, it deviates from this scaling by rather saturating.

  11. $^{8}$Be, $^{12}$C, $^{16}$O, $^{20}$Ne, $^{24}$Mg, and $^{32}$S nuclei and alpha clustering within a generalized liquid drop model

    CERN Document Server

    Royer, G; Eudes, P

    2015-01-01

    The potential energy governing the shape and the entrance and decay channels of the 12 C, 16 O, 20 Ne, 24 Mg, and 32 S 4n-nuclei has been determined within a generalized liquid drop model. Different three-dimensional and planar shapes have been investigated: linear chain, triangle, square, tetrahedron, pentagon, trigonal bipyramid, square pyramid, hexagon, octahedron, octogon and cube. The rms radii of the linear chains are higher than the experimental rms radii of the ground states. The binding energies of the planar shapes at the contact point are lower than the ones of the three-dimensional configurations. The a particle plus A-4 daughter configuration leads always to the lowest potential barrier relatively to the sphere configuration.

  12. Leidenfrost drops on a heated liquid pool

    CERN Document Server

    Maquet, Laurent; Darbois-Texier, Baptiste; Brandenbourger, Martin; Rednikov, Alexey; Colinet, Pierre; Dorbolo, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    We show that a volatile liquid drop placed at the surface of a non-volatile liquid pool warmer than the boiling point of the drop can experience a Leidenfrost effect even for vanishingly small superheats. Such an observation points to the importance of the substrate roughness, negligible in the case considered here, in determining the threshold Leidenfrost temperature. A theoretical model based on the one proposed by Sobac et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 053011 (2014)] is developed in order to rationalize the experimental data. The shapes of the drop and of the substrate are analyzed. The model notably provides scalings for the vapor film thickness. For small drops, these scalings appear to be identical to the case of a Leidenfrost drop on a solid substrate. For large drops, in contrast, they are different and no evidence of chimney formation has been observed either experimentally or theoretically in the range of drop sizes considered in this study. Concerning the evaporation dynamics, the radius is shown to decrea...

  13. Spreading of liquid drops over porous substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starov, V M; Zhdanov, S A; Kosvintsev, S R; Sobolev, V D; Velarde, M G

    2003-07-01

    The spreading of small liquid drops over thin and thick porous layers (dry or saturated with the same liquid) has been investigated in the case of both complete wetting (silicone oils of different viscosities) and partial wetting (aqueous SDS solutions of different concentrations). Nitrocellulose membranes of different porosity and different average pore size have been used as a model of thin porous layers, glass and metal filters have been used as a model of thick porous substrates. The first problem under investigation has been the spreading of small liquid drops over thin porous layers saturated with the same liquid. An evolution equation describing the drop spreading has been deduced, which showed that both an effective lubrication and the liquid exchange between the drop and the porous substrates are equally important. Spreading of silicone oils over different nitrocellulose microfiltration membranes was carried out. The experimental laws of the radius of spreading on time confirmed the theory predictions. The spreading of small liquid drops over thin dry porous layers has also been investigated from both theoretical and experimental points of view. The drop motion over a dry porous layer appears caused by the interplay of two processes: (a). the spreading of the drop over already saturated parts of the porous layer, which results in a growth of the drop base, and (b). the imbibition of the liquid from the drop into the porous substrate, which results in a shrinkage of the drop base and a growth of the wetted region inside the porous layer. As a result of these two competing processes the radius of the drop base goes through a maximum as time proceeds. A system of two differential equations has been derived to describe the time evolution of the radii of both the drop base and the wetted region inside the porous layer. This system includes two parameters, one accounts for the effective lubrication coefficient of the liquid over the wetted porous substrate, and

  14. Ultrasonic characterization of single drops of liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01

    Ultrasonic characterization of single drops of liquids. The present invention includes the use of two closely spaced transducers, or one transducer and a closely spaced reflector plate, to form an interferometer suitable for ultrasonic characterization of droplet-size and smaller samples without the need for a container. The droplet is held between the interferometer elements, whose distance apart may be adjusted, by surface tension. The surfaces of the interferometer elements may be readily cleansed by a stream of solvent followed by purified air when it is desired to change samples. A single drop of liquid is sufficient for high-quality measurement. Examples of samples which may be investigated using the apparatus and method of the present invention include biological specimens (tear drops; blood and other body fluid samples; samples from tumors, tissues, and organs; secretions from tissues and organs; snake and bee venom, etc.) for diagnostic evaluation, samples in forensic investigations, and detection of drugs in small quantities.

  15. Liquid drops sliding down an inclined plane

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Inwon

    2012-01-01

    We investigate a one-dimensional model describing the motion of liquid drops sliding down an inclined plane (the so-called quasi-static approximation model). We prove existence and uniqueness of a solution and investigate its long time behavior for both homogeneous and inhomogeneous medium (i.e. constant and non-constant contact angle). We also obtain some homogenization results.

  16. Drop impact of shear thickening liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Boyer, Francois; Dijksman, J Frits; Lohse, Detlef

    2013-01-01

    The impact of drops of concentrated non-Brownian suspensions (cornstarch and polystyrene spheres) onto a solid surface is investigated experimentally. The spreading dynamics and maxi- mal deformation of the droplet of such shear thickening liquids are found to be markedly different from the impact of Newtonian drops. A particularly striking observation is that the maximal de- formation is independent of the drop velocity and that the deformation suddenly stops during the impact phase. Both observations are due to the shear-thickening rheology of the suspensions, as is theoretically explained from a balance between the kinetic energy and the viscously-dissipated en- ergy, from which we establish a scaling relation between drop maximal deformation and rheological parameters of concentrated suspensions.

  17. Drop Impact on to Moving Liquid Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Sánchez, Beatriz Natividad; Castrejón-Pita, José Rafael; Castrejón-Pita, Alfonso Arturo; Hutchings, Ian M.

    2014-11-01

    The deposition of droplets on to moving liquid substrates is an omnipresent situation both in nature and industry. A diverse spectrum of phenomena emerges from this simple process. In this work we present a parametric experimental study that discerns the dynamics of the impact in terms of the physical properties of the fluid and the relative velocity between the impacting drop and the moving liquid pool. The behaviour ranges from smooth coalescence (characterized by little mixing) to violent splashing (generation of multiple satellite droplets and interfacial vorticity). In addition, transitional regimes such as bouncing and surfing are also found. We classify the system dynamics and show a parametric diagram for the conditions of each regime. This work was supported by the EPSRC (Grant EP/H018913/1), the Royal Society, Becas Santander Universidades and the International Relationships Office of the University of Extremadura.

  18. Impact Dynamics of Oxidized Liquid Metal Drops

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Qin; Jaeger, Heinrich M

    2013-01-01

    With exposure to air, many liquid metals spontaneously generate an oxide layer on their surface. In oscillatory rheological tests, this skin is found to introduce a yield stress that typically dominates the elastic response but can be tuned by exposing the metal to hydrochloric acid solutions of different concentration. We systematically studied the normal impact of eutectic gallium-indium (eGaIn) drops under different oxidation conditions and show how this leads to two different dynamical regimes. At low impact velocity (or low Weber number), eGaIn droplets display strong recoil and rebound from the impacted surface when the oxide layer is removed. In addition, the degree of drop deformation or spreading during the impact is controlled by the oxide skin. We show that the scaling law known from ordinary liquids for the maximum spreading radius as a function of impact velocity can still be applied to the case of oxidized eGaIn if an effective Weber number $We^{\\star}$ is employed that uses an effective surface...

  19. Impact dynamics of oxidized liquid metal drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qin; Brown, Eric; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2013-04-01

    With exposure to air, many liquid metals spontaneously generate an oxide layer on their surface. In oscillatory rheological tests, this skin is found to introduce a yield stress that typically dominates the elastic response but can be tuned by exposing the metal to hydrochloric acid solutions of different concentration. We systematically studied the normal impact of eutectic gallium-indium (eGaIn) drops under different oxidation conditions and show how this leads to two different dynamical regimes. At low impact velocity (or low Weber number), eGaIn droplets display strong recoil and rebound from the impacted surface when the oxide layer is removed. In addition, the degree of drop deformation or spreading during impact is controlled by the oxide skin. We show that the scaling law known from ordinary liquids for the maximum spreading radius as a function of impact velocity can still be applied to the case of oxidized eGaIn if an effective Weber number We is employed that uses an effective surface tension factoring in the yield stress. In contrast, no influence on spreading from different oxidations conditions is observed for high impact velocity. This suggests that the initial kinetic energy is mostly damped by bulk viscous dissipation. Results from both regimes can be collapsed in an impact phase diagram controlled by two variables, the maximum spreading factor Pm=R0/Rm, given by the ratio of initial to maximum drop radius, and the impact number K=We/Re4/5, which scales with the effective Weber number We as well as the Reynolds number Re. The data exhibit a transition from capillary to viscous behavior at a critical impact number Kc≈0.1.

  20. Planar equilibrium shapes of a liquid drop on a membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Chung-Yuen; Jagota, Anand

    2015-12-14

    The equilibrium shape of a small liquid drop on a smooth rigid surface is governed by the minimization of energy with respect to the change in configuration, represented by the well-known Young's equation. In contrast, the equilibrium shape near the line separating three immiscible fluid phases is determined by force balance, represented by Neumann's Triangle. These two are limiting cases of the more general situation of a drop on a deformable, elastic substrate. Specifically, we have analyzed planar equilibrium shapes of a liquid drop on a deformable membrane. We show that to determine its equilibrium shape one must simultaneously satisfy configurational energy and mechanical force balance along with a constraint on the liquid volume. The first condition generalizes Young's equation to include changes in stored elastic energy upon changing the configuration. The second condition generalizes the force balance conditions by relating tensions to membrane stretches via their constitutive elastic behavior. The transition from Young's equation to Neumann's triangle is governed by the value of the elasto-capillary number, β = TRo/μh, where TRo is twice the surface tension of the solid-vapor interface, μ is the shear modulus of the membrane, and h is its thickness.

  1. Rolling ferrofluid drop on the surface of a liquid

    CERN Document Server

    Sterr, V; Morozov, K I; Rehberg, I; Engel, A; Richter, R

    2008-01-01

    We report on the controlled transport of drops of magnetic liquid, which are swimming on top of a non-magnetic liquid layer. A magnetic field which is rotating in a vertical plane creates a torque on the drop. Due to surface stresses within the immiscible liquid beneath, the drop is propelled forward. We measure the drop speed for different field amplitudes, field frequencies and drop volumes. Simplifying theoretical models describe the drop either as a solid sphere with a Navier slip boundary condition, or as a liquid half-sphere. An analytical expression for the drop speed is obtained which is free of any fitting parameters and is well in accordance with the experimental measurements. Possible microfluidic applications of the rolling drop are also discussed.

  2. Maximal air bubble entrainment at liquid-drop impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwhuis, W.; van der Veen, Roeland; Tran, Tuan; Keij, D.L.; Winkels, K.G.; Peters, I.R.; van der Meer, Roger M.; Sun, Chao; Snoeijer, Jacobus Hendrikus; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    At impact of a liquid drop on a solid surface, an air bubble can be entrapped. Here, we show that two competing effects minimize the (relative) size of this entrained air bubble: for large drop impact velocity and large droplets, the inertia of the liquid flattens the entrained bubble, whereas for

  3. Inverse Leidenfrost Effect: Levitating Drops on Liquid Nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adda-Bedia, M; Kumar, S; Lechenault, F; Moulinet, S; Schillaci, M; Vella, D

    2016-05-03

    We explore the interaction between a liquid drop (initially at room temperature) and a bath of liquid nitrogen. In this scenario, heat transfer occurs through film-boiling: a nitrogen vapor layer develops that may cause the drop to levitate at the bath surface. We report the phenomenology of this inverse Leidenfrost effect, investigating the effect of the drop size and density by using an aqueous solution of a tungsten salt to vary the drop density. We find that (depending on its size and density) a drop either levitates or instantaneously sinks into the bulk nitrogen. We begin by measuring the duration of the levitation as a function of the radius R and density ρd of the liquid drop. We find that the levitation time increases roughly linearly with drop radius but depends weakly on the drop density. However, for sufficiently large drops, R ≥ Rc(ρd), the drop sinks instantaneously; levitation does not occur. This sinking of a (relatively) hot droplet induces film-boiling, releasing a stream of vapor bubbles for a well-defined length of time. We study the duration of this immersed-drop bubbling finding similar scalings (but with different prefactors) to the levitating drop case. With these observations, we study the physical factors limiting the levitation and immersed-film-boiling times, proposing a simple model that explains the scalings observed for the duration of these phenomena, as well as the boundary of (R,ρd) parameter space that separates them.

  4. Ultrasonic atomization of liquids in drop-chain acoustic fountains

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, Julianna C.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    When focused ultrasound waves of moderate intensity in liquid encounter an air interface, a chain of drops emerges from the liquid surface to form what is known as a drop-chain fountain. Atomization, or the emission of micro-droplets, occurs when the acoustic intensity exceeds a liquid-dependent threshold. While the cavitation-wave hypothesis, which states that atomization arises from a combination of capillary-wave instabilities and cavitation bubble oscillations, is currently the most accep...

  5. Deformed liquid marbles: Freezing drop oscillations with powders

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, Jeremy

    2012-09-01

    In this work we show that when a liquid drop impacts onto a fine-grained hydrophobic powder, the final form of the drop can be very different from the spherical form with which it impacts. In all cases, the drop rebounds due to the hydrophobic nature of the powder. However, we find that above a critical impact speed, the drop undergoes a permanent deformation to a highly non-spherical shape with a near-complete coverage of powder, which then freezes the drop oscillations during rebound. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Behavior of liquid drop situated between two oscillating planes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenchenko, A E [Institute of Metallurgy, Russian Academy of Science, Ural Branch, 101 Amundsen str., Ekaterinburg 620219 (Russian Federation); Beskachko, V P [South Ural State University, 76 Lenin str., Chelyabinsk 454080 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: korenchenko@physics.susu.ac.ru

    2008-02-15

    The levitation drop technique is widely used for the measurement of the surface tension and viscosity of liquids. An experiment with a drop situated between two horizontal rigid planes gives the same possibilities. The dynamic problem is solved numerically in the following cases: (1) the free oscillations of the drop when the plates are motionless; (2) the forced oscillations when the upper plate makes a translational vibration in the normal direction. The possibility of viscosity determination in such experiments is shown.

  7. Cavitation Bubble Dynamics inside Liquid Drops in Microgravity

    OpenAIRE

    Obreschkow, D.; Kobel, P.; Dorsaz, N.; De Bosset, A.; Nicollier, C.; Farhat, M.

    2006-01-01

    We studied spark-generated cavitation bubbles inside water drops produced in microgravity. High-speed visualizations disclosed unique effects of the spherical and nearly isolated liquid volume. In particular, (1) toroidally collapsing bubbles generate two liquid jets escaping from the drop, and the "splash jet" discloses a remarkable broadening. (2) Shockwaves induce a strong form of secondary cavitation due to the particular shockwave confinement. This feature offers a novel way to estimate ...

  8. Partial coalescence of sessile drops with different liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcia, Rodica; Bestehorn, Michael

    2014-11-01

    We examine numerically the interaction between two deformable drops consisting of two perfectly miscible liquids sitting on a solid substrate under a given contact angle. Driven by solutal Marangoni forces, several distinct coalescence regimes are achieved after the droplets collision. Phase diagrams for different control parameters are emphasized, which give predictions about drop behavior along the solid substrates, control of various interfacial effects, manipulations of tiny droplets in micro- and nano-fluidic devices without power supply, design of droplets or cleaning surfaces. This work was partially supported by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) under the project ``Dynamics of interfaces between drops with miscible liquids''.

  9. Oblique drop impact onto a deep liquid pool

    CERN Document Server

    Gielen, Marise V; Benschop, Jos; Riepen, Michel; Voronina, Victoria; Lohse, Detlef; Snoeijer, Jacco H; Versluis, Michel; Gelderblom, Hanneke

    2016-01-01

    Oblique impact of drops on a solid or liquid surface is frequently observed in nature. Most studies on drop impact and splashing, however, focus on perpendicular impact. Here, we study oblique impact onto a deep liquid pool, where we quantify the splashing threshold, maximal cavity dimensions and cavity collapse by high-speed imaging above and below the water surface. Three different impact regimes are identified: smooth deposition onto the pool, splashing in the direction of impact only, and splashing in all directions. We provide scaling arguments that delineate these regimes by accounting for drop impact angle and Weber number. The angle of the axis of the cavity created below the water surface follows the impact angle of the drop independent of the Weber number, while cavity depth and its displacement with respect to the impact position depend on the Weber number. Weber number dependency of both the cavity depth and displacement is modeled using an energy argument.

  10. A liquid drop model for embedded atom method cluster energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, C. W.; Abel, P. B.; Ferrante, J.

    1996-01-01

    Minimum energy configurations for homonuclear clusters containing from two to twenty-two atoms of six metals, Ag, Au, Cu, Ni, Pd, and Pt have been calculated using the Embedded Atom Method (EAM). The average energy per atom as a function of cluster size has been fit to a liquid drop model, giving estimates of the surface and curvature energies. The liquid drop model gives a good representation of the relationship between average energy and cluster size. As a test the resulting surface energies are compared to EAM surface energy calculations for various low-index crystal faces with reasonable agreement.

  11. Maximal air bubble entrainment at liquid drop impact

    CERN Document Server

    Bouwhuis, Wilco; Tran, Tuan; Keij, Diederik L; Winkels, Koen G; Peters, Ivo R; van der Meer, Devaraj; Sun, Chao; Snoeijer, Jacco H; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    At impact of a liquid drop on a solid surface an air bubble can be entrapped. Here we show that two competing effects minimize the (relative) size of this entrained air bubble: For large drop impact velocity and large droplets the inertia of the liquid flattens the entrained bubble, whereas for small impact velocity and small droplets capillary forces minimize the entrained bubble. However, we demonstrate experimentally, theoretically, and numerically that in between there is an optimum, leading to maximal air bubble entrapment. Our results have a strong bearing on various applications in printing technology, microelectronics, immersion lithography, diagnostics, or agriculture.

  12. Coalescence collision of liquid drops I: Off-center collisions of equal-size drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Acevedo-Malavé

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method (SPH is used here to model off-center collisions of equal-size liquid drops in a three-dimensional space. In this study the Weber number is calculated for several conditions of the droplets dynamics and the velocity vector fields formed inside the drops during the collision process are shown. For the permanent coalescence the evolution of the kinetic and internal energy is shown and also the approaching to equilibrium of the resulting drop. Depending of the Weber number three possible outcomes for the collision of droplets is obtained: permanent coalescence, flocculation and fragmentation. The fragmentation phenomena are modeled and the formation of small satellite drops can be seen. The ligament that is formed follows the “end pinching” mechanism and it is transformed into a flat structure.

  13. Coalescence collision of liquid drops II: Off-center collisions of unequal-size drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Acevedo-Malavé

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We applied the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method to simulate for first time in the three-dimensional space the hydrodynamic off-center collisions of unequal-size liquid drops in a vacuum environment. The Weber number for several conditions of the droplets dynamics is determined. Also the velocity vector fields inside the drops are shown in the collision process. The evolution of the kinetic and internal energy is shown for the permanent coalescence case. The resulting drops tend to deform, and depending of the Weber number two possible outcomes for the collision of droplets arise: either permanent coalescence or flocculation. In the permanent coalescence of the drops a fragmentation case is modeled, yielding the formation of little satellite droplets.

  14. Drop interaction with solid boundaries in liquid/liquid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoloi, Ankur Deep

    The present experimental work was motivated primarily by the CO 2 sequestration process. In a possible scenario during this process, gravity driven CO2 bubbles coalesce at an interface near the rock surface. In another scenario, trapped CO2 fluid may escape from a porous matrix overcoming interfacial force inside a pore. Based on these potential scenarios, the current research was divided into two broad experimental studies. In the first part, coalescence at a quiescent interface of two analogous fluids (silicone oil and water/glycerin mixture) was investigated for water/glycerin drops with Bond number (Bo) ~7 and Ohnesorge number ~ 0.01 using high-speed imaging and time-resolved tomographic PIV. Two perturbation cases with a solid particle wetted in oil and water/glycerin placed adjacent to the coalescing drop were considered. The results were compared with coalescence of a single drop and that of a drop neighBored by a second drop of equivalent size. Each perturbing object caused an initial tilting of the drop, influencing its rupture location, subsequent film retraction and eventual collapse behavior. Once tilted, drops typically ruptured near their lowest vertical position which was located either toward or away from the perturbing object depending on the case. The trends in local retraction speed of the ruptured film and the overall dynamics of the collapsing drops were discussed in detail. In the second part, the motion of gravity driven drops (B o~0.8-11) through a confining orifice d/Dwater/glycerin, surrounded by silicone oil, fall toward and encounter the orifice plate after reaching terminal speed. The effects of surface wettability were investigated for Both round-edged and sharp-edged orifices. For the round-edged case, a thin film of surrounding oil prevented the drop fluid from contacting the orifice surface, such that the flow outcomes of the drops were independent of surface wettability. For d/Dsurface tension time scale. For the sharp-edged case

  15. Liquid-drop-like model for cylindrical helium systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szybisz, Leszek

    2000-08-01

    Free liquid 4He at T=0 K with cylindrical symmetry is studied. The ground-state energy and chemical potential are computed by using a density functional approach. A liquid-drop-like model is formulated for analyzing the behavior of these observables as a function of the size of the systems. It is shown that such a model allows to get precise information about the asymptotic values of the energy per particle and surface tension.

  16. Drop impact on thin liquid films using TIRM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, Min; Ying Sun Team

    2015-11-01

    Drop impact on thin liquid films is relevant to a number of industrial processes such as pesticide spraying and repellent surface research such as self-cleaning applications. In this study, we systematically investigate the drop impact dynamics on thin liquid films on plain glass substrates by varying the film thickness, viscosity and impact velocity. High speed imaging is used to track the droplet morphology and trajectory over time as well as observing instability developments at high Weber number impacts. Moreover, the air layer between the drop and thin film upon drop impact is probed by total internal reflection microscopy (TIRM) where the grayscale intensity is used to measure the air layer thickness and spreading radius over time. For low We impact on thick films (We ~ 10), the effect of the air entrainment is pronounced where the adhesion of the droplet to the wall is delayed by the air depletion and liquid film drainage, whereas for high We impact (We >100) the air layer is no longer formed and instead, the drop contact with the wall is limited only to the film drainage for all film thicknesses. In addition, the maximum spreading radius of the droplet is analyzed for varying thin film thickness and viscosity.

  17. A liquid drop RC filter apparatus for detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanayakkara, Yasith S; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2011-11-01

    A new analytical detector based on a liquid drop resistor-capacitor (RC) filter is described, in which transformed gain vs. frequency curves are used to analyze compounds. This detector can be used to detect either charged or neutral species (that are dielectrically different) which are dissolved in a liquid (e.g., water, alcohol, solvent mixtures, etc.). This device was fabricated by modifying an electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD)-based experimental setup. When a liquid drop is placed on a dielectric surface, the system acts as a RC filter. At a given frequency, gain is a function of conductivity, surface tension, dielectric constant, double-layer thickness of the solid-liquid drop interface, as well as the applied voltage. Since different liquids and solutions have different physical properties, each liquid/solution has a unique curve (peak) in gain vs. frequency plot. This is the basic principle behind the detector. Different amounts of zinc chloride dissolved in water, benzalkonium chloride in water, 1-methylimidazole in water, cetyltrimethyl-ammonium chloride (CTAC) in water, and CTAC dissolved in ethylene glycol solutions were tested with the detector as proof of principle. The device can be used as a stand-alone detector or can easily be coupled with droplet based microfluidic lab-on-a-chip systems such as EWOD-based microfluidic chips.

  18. Drop Impact on Liquid Surfaces: Formation of Lens and Spherical Drops at the Air-Liquid Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Yakhshi-Tafti, Ehsan; Kumar, Ranganathan; 10.1016/j.jcis.2010.06.029

    2010-01-01

    Droplets at the air-liquid interface of immiscible liquids usually form partially-submerged lens shapes (e.g. water on oil). In addition to this structure, we showed that droplets released from critical heights above the target liquid can sustain the impact and at the end maintain a spherical ball-shape configuration above the surface, despite undergoing large deformation. Spherical drops are unstable and will transform into the lens mode due to slight disturbances. Precision dispensing needles with various tip diameter sizes were used to release pendant drops of deionized water onto the surface of fluorocarbon liquid (FC-43, 3M). A cubic relationship was found between the nozzle tip diameter and the released droplet diameter. Drop impact was recorded by a high speed camera at a rate of 2000 frames per second. In order for the water drops to sustain the impact and retain a spherical configuration at the surface of the target liquid pool, it is required that they be of a critical size and be released from a ce...

  19. Monte Carlo studies of nuclei and quantum liquid drops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandharipande, V.R.; Pieper, S.C.

    1989-01-01

    The progress in application of variational and Green's function Monte Carlo methods to nuclei is reviewed. The nature of single-particle orbitals in correlated quantum liquid drops is discussed, and it is suggested that the difference between quasi-particle and mean-field orbitals may be of importance in nuclear structure physics. 27 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Trapped liquid drop at the end of capillary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengjia; Yen, Hung-Yu; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2013-10-01

    The liquid drop captured at the capillary end, which is observed in capillary valve and pendant drop technique, is investigated theoretically and experimentally. Because of contact line pinning of the lower meniscus, the lower contact angle is able to rise from the intrinsic contact angle (θ*) so that the external force acting on the drop can be balanced by the capillary force. In the absence of contact angle hysteresis (CAH), the upper contact angle remains at θ*. However, in the presence of CAH, the upper contact angle can descend to provide more capillary force. The coupling between the lower and upper contact angles determines the equilibrium shape of the captured drop. In a capillary valve, the pinned contact line can move across the edge as the pressure difference exceeds the valving pressure, which depends on the geometrical characteristic and wetting property of the valve opening. When CAH is considered, the valving pressure is elevated because the capillary force is enhanced by the receding contact angle. For a pendant drop under gravity, the maximal capillary force is achieved as the lower contact angle reaches 180° in the absence of CAH. However, in the presence of CAH, four regimes can be identified by three critical drop volumes. The lower contact angle can exceed 180°, and therefore the drop takes on the shape of a light bulb, which does not exist in the absence of CAH. The comparisons between Surface Evolver simulations and experiments are quite well.

  1. Alcohol drops on miscible liquid: mixing or spreading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoungsoo; Muller, Koen; Shardt, Orest; Afkhami, Shahriar; Stone, Howard

    2016-11-01

    We studied how a sessile drop of alcohol behaves when placed on a fully miscible liquid. The dynamics of the subsequent mixing and spreading were captured by using a high-speed camera and investigated by varying parameters (e.g., surface tension, density, and viscosity). We observed that a deposited alcohol drop on a liquid bath remains as a floating lens shape, the alcohol liquid leaks out along the rim of the droplet, and it spreads axi-symmetrically along the bottom liquid interface. To visualize spreading and mixing features, we used time-resolved Particle Tacking Velocimetry and a Schlieren method. We observed a localized mixing flow at the rim of the floating droplet where the maximum flow speed is obtained, driven by a solutal Marangoni effect. Underneath the interface of the bath liquid, a viscous boundary layer develops while the alcohol liquid spreads along the radial direction. We also observed a finite quasi-steady interfacial flow velocity regime after the alcohol droplet touched the bottom liquid surface. In this regime, the flow speed linearly increases inside the floating lens, and outside the lens the flow speed decays along the r-direction with a power-law slope, Ur r - 1 / 2 . Physical arguments to support the observations will be discussed.

  2. Vapor condensation onto a non-volatile liquid drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inci, Levent; Bowles, Richard K., E-mail: richard.bowles@usask.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5C9 (Canada)

    2013-12-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations of miscible and partially miscible binary Lennard–Jones mixtures are used to study the dynamics and thermodynamics of vapor condensation onto a non-volatile liquid drop in the canonical ensemble. When the system volume is large, the driving force for condensation is low and only a submonolayer of the solvent is adsorbed onto the liquid drop. A small degree of mixing of the solvent phase into the core of the particles occurs for the miscible system. At smaller volumes, complete film formation is observed and the dynamics of film growth are dominated by cluster-cluster coalescence. Mixing into the core of the droplet is also observed for partially miscible systems below an onset volume suggesting the presence of a solubility transition. We also develop a non-volatile liquid drop model, based on the capillarity approximations, that exhibits a solubility transition between small and large drops for partially miscible mixtures and has a hysteresis loop similar to the one observed in the deliquescence of small soluble salt particles. The properties of the model are compared to our simulation results and the model is used to study the formulation of classical nucleation theory for systems with low free energy barriers.

  3. Effect of surface charge convection and shape deformation on the dielectrophoretic motion of a liquid drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Shubhadeep; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-04-01

    The dielectrophoretic motion and shape deformation of a Newtonian liquid drop in an otherwise quiescent Newtonian liquid medium in the presence of an axisymmetric nonuniform dc electric field consisting of uniform and quadrupole components is investigated. The theory put forward by Feng [J. Q. Feng, Phys. Rev. E 54, 4438 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevE.54.4438] is generalized by incorporating the following two nonlinear effects—surface charge convection and shape deformation—towards determining the drop velocity. This two-way coupled moving boundary problem is solved analytically by considering small values of electric Reynolds number (ratio of charge relaxation time scale to the convection time scale) and electric capillary number (ratio of electrical stress to the surface tension) under the framework of the leaky dielectric model. We focus on investigating the effects of charge convection and shape deformation for different drop-medium combinations. A perfectly conducting drop suspended in a leaky (or perfectly) dielectric medium always deforms to a prolate shape and this kind of shape deformation always augments the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. For a perfectly dielectric drop suspended in a perfectly dielectric medium, the shape deformation leads to either increase (for prolate shape) or decrease (for oblate shape) in the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. Both surface charge convection and shape deformation affect the drop motion for leaky dielectric drops. The combined effect of these can significantly increase or decrease the dielectrophoretic drop velocity depending on the electrohydrodynamic properties of both the liquids and the relative strength of the electric Reynolds number and electric capillary number. Finally, comparison with the existing experiments reveals better agreement with the present theory.

  4. Interface Tracking Simulation of Drops Rising through Liquids in a Vertical Pipe Using Three Coordinate Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Hayashi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Interface tracking simulations of single drops rising through a vertical pipe are carried out using three coordinate systems, i.e. cylindrical, general curvilinear and Cartesian coordinates, to investigate the effects of coordinate system and spatial resolution on the accuracy of predictions. Experiments of single drops in a vertical pipe are also conducted to obtain experimental data for comparisons with simulations. The drop shape observed are spheroidal and deformed spheroidal at low values of the diameter ratio, Λ, of the sphere-volume equivalent diameter of a drop to the pipe diameter, whereas they take bullet-shapes at large Λ. The conclusions obtained are as follows: (1 the effects of coordinate system on drop shape are small at low Λ. At large Λ, the effects are also small for drops in a low viscosity system, whereas non-physical shape distortion takes place when the Cartesian coordinates are used with low spatial resolution for drops in a high viscosity system, and (2 the drop terminal velocity and the velocity profile in the liquid film between a bullet-shaped drop and a pipe wall are well predicted using all the coordinate systems tested even at low spatial resolution.

  5. Liquid-drop model for the surface energy of nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanda, Karuna Kar, E-mail: nanda@mrc.iisc.ernet.in [Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2012-04-09

    Based on the liquid-drop model, we have evaluated the Tolman length and surface energy of nanoparticles for different elements and compared with other theoretical models as well as the available simulated data. The predictions of the model show good agreement with the simulated results. Like the cohesive energy and melting temperature, the size-dependency of surface energy is also shape-dependent. -- Highlights: ► Derivation of size-dependent surface energy based on a liquid-drop model. ► Evaluated the Tolman length for different elements. ► Predictions of the model show good agreement with the simulated results. ► Shape-dependent Tolman's length.

  6. Coalescence of Immiscible Liquid Metal Drop on Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Li, Jie; Wang, Long; Duan, Yunrui; Li, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the wetting and coalescence of liquid Al and Pb drops on four carbon-based substrates. We highlight the importance of the microstructure and surface topography of substrates in the coalescence process. Our results show that the effect of substrate on coalescence is achieved by changing the wettability of the Pb metal. Additionally, we determine the critical distance between nonadjacent Al and Pb films required for coalescence. These findings improve our understanding of the coalescence of immiscible liquid metals at the atomistic level. PMID:27667589

  7. Ternary cluster decay within the liquid drop model

    CERN Document Server

    Royer, G; Dubillot, M; Leonard, E

    2008-01-01

    Longitudinal ternary and binary fission barriers of $^{36}$Ar, $^{56}$Ni and $^{252}$Cf nuclei have been determined within a rotational liquid drop model taking into account the nuclear proximity energy. For the light nuclei the heights of the ternary fission barriers become competitive with the binary ones at high angular momenta since the maximum lies at an outer position and has a much higher moment of inertia.

  8. Ternary cluster decay within the liquid drop model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, G.; Degiorgio, K.; Dubillot, M.; Leonard, E.

    2008-05-01

    Longitudinal ternary and binary fission barriers of 36Ar, 56Ni and 252Cf nuclei have been determined within a rotational liquid drop model taking into account the nuclear proximity energy. For the light nuclei the heights of the ternary fission barriers become competitive with the binary ones at high angular momenta since the maximum lies at an outer position and has a much higher moment of inertia.

  9. Effect of Brownian Coagulation on the Liquid-liquid Decomposition in Gas-atomized Alloy Drops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiuzhou ZHAO; Lingling GAO; Jie HE; L.Ratke

    2006-01-01

    Modeling and simulation have been carried out for Al-Pb alloys to investigate the Brownian coagulation effect on the microstructure development in a gas-atomized drop during the liquid-liquid decomposition.The results indicate that Brownian coagulation has a weak effect on the nucleation and a relatively strong effect on coarsening the minority phase droplets. The influence of Brownian coagulation on the liquid-liquid decomposition decreases with the increase in the diameter (or the decrease in the cooling rate) of the atomized drop.

  10. Queues with Dropping Functions and General Arrival Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chydzinski, Andrzej; Mrozowski, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    In a queueing system with the dropping function the arriving customer can be denied service (dropped) with the probability that is a function of the queue length at the time of arrival of this customer. The potential applicability of such mechanism is very wide due to the fact that by choosing the shape of this function one can easily manipulate several performance characteristics of the queueing system. In this paper we carry out analysis of the queueing system with the dropping function and a very general model of arrival process--the model which includes batch arrivals and the interarrival time autocorrelation, and allows for fitting the actual shape of the interarrival time distribution and its moments. For such a system we obtain formulas for the distribution of the queue length and the overall customer loss ratio. The analytical results are accompanied with numerical examples computed for several dropping functions.

  11. Coalescence of Liquid Drops: Different Models Versus Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Sprittles, James

    2012-01-01

    The process of coalescence of two identical liquid drops is simulated numerically in the framework of two essentially different mathematical models, and the results are compared with experimental data on the very early stages of the coalescence process reported recently. The first model tested is the `conventional' one, where it is assumed that coalescence as the formation of a single body of fluid occurs by an instant appearance of a liquid bridge smoothly connecting the two drops, and the subsequent process is the evolution of this single body of fluid driven by capillary forces. The second model under investigation considers coalescence as a process where a section of the free surface becomes trapped between the bulk phases as the drops are pressed against each other, and it is the gradual disappearance of this `internal interface' that leads to the formation of a single body of fluid and the conventional model taking over. Using the full numerical solution of the problem in the framework of each of the tw...

  12. Liquid drops attract or repel by the inverted Cheerios effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpitschka, Stefan; Pandey, Anupam; Lubbers, Luuk A.; Weijs, Joost H.; Botto, Lorenzo; Das, Siddhartha; Andreotti, Bruno; Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2016-01-01

    Solid particles floating at a liquid interface exhibit a long-ranged attraction mediated by surface tension. In the absence of bulk elasticity, this is the dominant lateral interaction of mechanical origin. Here, we show that an analogous long-range interaction occurs between adjacent droplets on solid substrates, which crucially relies on a combination of capillarity and bulk elasticity. We experimentally observe the interaction between droplets on soft gels and provide a theoretical framework that quantitatively predicts the interaction force between the droplets. Remarkably, we find that, although on thick substrates the interaction is purely attractive and leads to drop–drop coalescence, for relatively thin substrates a short-range repulsion occurs, which prevents the two drops from coming into direct contact. This versatile interaction is the liquid-on-solid analog of the “Cheerios effect.” The effect will strongly influence the condensation and coarsening of drops on soft polymer films, and has potential implications for colloidal assembly and mechanobiology. PMID:27298348

  13. Coalescence of liquid drops: Different models versus experiment

    KAUST Repository

    Sprittles, J. E.

    2012-01-01

    The process of coalescence of two identical liquid drops is simulated numerically in the framework of two essentially different mathematical models, and the results are compared with experimental data on the very early stages of the coalescence process reported recently. The first model tested is the "conventional" one, where it is assumed that coalescence as the formation of a single body of fluid occurs by an instant appearance of a liquid bridge smoothly connecting the two drops, and the subsequent process is the evolution of this single body of fluid driven by capillary forces. The second model under investigation considers coalescence as a process where a section of the free surface becomes trapped between the bulk phases as the drops are pressed against each other, and it is the gradual disappearance of this "internal interface" that leads to the formation of a single body of fluid and the conventional model taking over. Using the full numerical solution of the problem in the framework of each of the two models, we show that the recently reported electrical measurements probing the very early stages of the process are better described by the interface formation/disappearance model. New theory-guided experiments are suggested that would help to further elucidate the details of the coalescence phenomenon. As a by-product of our research, the range of validity of different "scaling laws" advanced as approximate solutions to the problem formulated using the conventional model is established. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  14. Bubble migration inside a liquid drop in a space laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, P.; Shankar, N.; Cole, R.; Subramanian, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    The design of experiments in materials processing for trials on board the Shuttle are described. Thermocapillary flows will be examined as an aid to mixing in the formation of glasses. Acoustically levitated molten glass spheres will be spot heated to induce surface flow away from the hot spot to induce mixing. The surface flows are also expected to cause internal convective motion which will drive entrained gas bubbles toward the hot spot, a process also enhanced by the presence of thermal gradients. The method is called fining, and will be augmented by rotation of the sphere to cause bubble migration toward the axes of rotation to form one large bubble which is more easily removed. Centering techniques to fix the maximum centering accuracy will also be tried. Ground-based studies of bubble migration in a rotating liquid and in a temperature gradient in a liquid drop are reviewed.

  15. Experimental study of liquid drop impact onto a powder surface

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, Jeremy

    2010-11-01

    The initial dynamics of liquid drop impact onto powder surfaces is studied experimentally using high-speed photography. For a range of bed packing fractions, φ, liquid physical properties and impact velocities, ui, we observe a variety of phenomena that can be representative of a hydrophobic surface, a rough surface or a porous medium. The solids packing fraction in the bed, 0.38≤φ≤0.65, and the impact Weber number, 3.5≤We=ρDui 2/φ≤750, (where ρ, D and φ are the drop density, diameter and surface tension respectively) are shown to be the critical parameters governing the outcome of an impact. For high packing fractions, φ≳0.5, we show that the observed spreading, rebound and splashing can be broadly characterised in terms of the Weber number while for looser packing fractions, φ≲0.5, we observe powder ejectas and provide a qualitative description of the granule nucleation at the centre of the impact sites. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Dissolution and growth of a multicomponent drop in an immiscible liquid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chu, S.G.; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The mass flux at the surface of a drop in an immiscible host liquid is dictated by the composition of the drop surface. In a binary system, this composition is essentially constant in time and equals the solubility of the drop constituent in the host liquid. This situation has been treated in a clas

  17. Dissolution and growth of a multicomponent drop in an immiscible liquid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chu, S.G.; Prosperetti, A.

    2016-01-01

    The mass flux at the surface of a drop in an immiscible host liquid is dictated by the composition of the drop surface. In a binary system, this composition is essentially constant in time and equals the solubility of the drop constituent in the host liquid. This situation has been treated in a clas

  18. Drop Fragmentation at Impact onto a Bath of an Immiscible Liquid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lhuissier, H.E.; Sun, Chao; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2013-01-01

    The impact of a drop onto a deep bath of an immiscible liquid is studied with emphasis on the drop fragmentation into a collection of noncoalescing daughter drops. At impact the drop flattens and spreads at the surface of the crater it transiently opens in the bath and reaches a maximum deformation,

  19. Drop Fragmentation at Impact onto a Bath of an Immiscible Liquid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lhuissier, H.E.; Sun, C.; Prosperetti, A.; Lohse, D.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of a drop onto a deep bath of an immiscible liquid is studied with emphasis on the drop fragmentation into a collection of noncoalescing daughter drops. At impact the drop flattens and spreads at the surface of the crater it transiently opens in the bath and reaches a maximum deformation,

  20. Drop size in a liquid pulsed sieve-plate extraction column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Usman

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The (Benzoic acid + kerosene + water system was studied in a 5.0 cm diameter liquid pulsed liquid-liquid extraction column with a total number of 80 sieve plates. The effect of pulsation intensity, dispersed phase superficial velocity, and continuous phase superficial velocity on volume-surface mean diameter was studied. Generally, the mean drop diameter decreased more rapidly with the increase of pulsation intensities and superficial velocities at low pulsation intensities and superficial velocities. However, the effect was not found to be significant at higher pulsation intensities and higher superficial velocities. In the interpretation of the experimental results, the drop size was observed to be a function of the operating regimes (mixer-settler, dispersion, and emulsion of the pulsed sieve-plate extraction column. The experimental mean drop diameters were compared to the most acceptable analytical drop size correlation developed by Kumar and Hartland (1986. The correlation proved to be in good agreement for the column operating in the dispersion regime.

  1. Evaporation dynamics of a liquid drop on a non-miscible liquid bath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirat, Christophe; Ramos-Canut, Stella; Caupin, Frederic; wetting Team

    2016-11-01

    When a liquid drop sits on a solid surface, it is well known that the wetting and evaporation properties strongly depend on the environmental and wetting conditions. In this experimental study, we investigate the coupled spreading-evaporation dynamics of a liquid drop, made of a mixture of water and ethanol, gently deposited on a non-miscible oil bath. After a fast spreading stage due to a positive spreading parameter, the drop starts to recede while the evaporation is going on. Subsequently, a Marangoni instability develops as alcohol evaporates faster than water. In particular, depending on the initial alcohol-water ratio, a set of rim instabilities takes place. Radial droplet ejections can be observed, with various droplet speeds, sizes and frequencies.

  2. Acoustic levitation of liquid drops: Dynamics, manipulation and phase transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Duyang; Yu, Yinkai; Chen, Zhen; Li, Xiaoguang; Wu, Hongjing; Geng, Xingguo

    2017-05-01

    The technique of acoustic levitation normally produces a standing wave and the potential well of the sound field can be used to trap small objects. Since no solid surface is involved it has been widely applied for the study of fluid physics, nucleation, bio/chemical processes, and various forms of soft matter. In this article, we survey the works on drop dynamics in acoustic levitation, focus on how the dynamic behavior is related to the rheological properties and discuss the possibility to develop a novel rheometer based on this technique. We review the methods and applications of acoustic levitation for the manipulation of both liquid and solid samples and emphasize the important progress made in the study of phase transitions and bio-chemical analysis. We also highlight the possible open areas for future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effective liquid drop description for alpha decay of atomic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, O.A.P.; Duarte, S.B. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rodriguez, O.; Guzman, F. [Instituto Superior de Ciencia y Tecnologia Nuclear (ISCTN), La Habana (Cuba); Goncalves, M. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Garcia, F. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1998-06-01

    Alpha decay half-lives are presented in the framework of an effective liquid drop model for different combination of mass transfer descriptions and inertia coefficients. Calculated half-life-values for ground-state to ground-state favoured alpha transitions are compared with available, updated experimental data. Results have shown that the present model is very suitable to treat the alpha decay process on equal foot as cluster radioactivity and cold fission processes. Better agreement with the data is found when the sub-set of even-even alpha emitters are considered in the calculation. (author) 44 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.; e-mail: telo at ird.gov.br

  4. The Dynamics of Liquid Drops Coalescing in the Inertial Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Sprittles, James E

    2014-01-01

    We examine the dynamics of two coalescing liquid drops in the `inertial regime', where the effects of viscosity are negligible and the propagation of the bridge front connecting the drops can be considered as `local'. The solution fully computed in the framework of classical fluid-mechanics allows this regime to be identified and the accuracy of the approximating scaling laws proposed to describe the propagation of the bridge to be established. It is shown that the scaling law known for this regime has a very limited region of accuracy and, as a result, in describing experimental data it has frequently been applied outside its limits of applicability. The origin of the scaling law's shortcoming appears to be the fact that it accounts for the capillary pressure due only to the longitudinal curvature of the free surface as the driving force for the process. To address this deficiency, the scaling law is extended to account for both the longitudinal and azimuthal curvatures at the bridge front which, fortuitousl...

  5. Drop Dynamics and Speciation in Isolation of Metals from Liquid Wastes by Reactive Scavenging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arne J. Pearlstein; Alexander Scheeline

    2002-08-30

    Computational and experimental studies of the motion and dynamics of liquid drops in gas flows were conducted with relevance to reactive scavenging of metals from atomized liquid waste. Navier-Stoke's computations of deformable drops revealed a range of conditions from which prolate drops are expected, and showed how frajectiones of deformable drops undergoing deceleration can be computed. Experimental work focused on development of emission fluorescence, and scattering diagnostics. The instrument developed was used to image drop shapes, soot, and nonaxisymmetric departures from steady flow in a 22kw combustor

  6. Rheological properties, shape oscillations, and coalescence of liquid drops with surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfel, R. E.; Holt, R. G.

    1990-01-01

    A method was developed to deduce dynamic interfacial properties of liquid drops. The method involves measuring the frequency and damping of free quadrupole oscillations of an acoustically levitated drop. Experimental results from pure liquid-liquid systems agree well with theoretical predictions. Additionally, the effects of surfactants is considered. Extension of these results to a proposed microgravity experiment on the drop physics module (DPM) in USML-1 are discussed. Efforts are also underway to model the time history of the thickness of the fluid layer between two pre-coalescence drops, and to measure the film thickness experimentally. Preliminary results will be reported, along with plans for coalescence experiments proposed for USML-1.

  7. Preliminary Analysis of Liquid Metal MHD Pressure Drop in the Blanket for the FDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王红艳; 吴宜灿; 何晓雄

    2002-01-01

    Preliminary analysis and calculation of liquid metal Li17Pb83 magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop in the blanket for the FDS have been presented to evaluate the significance of MHD effects on the thermal-hydraulic design of the blanket. To decrease the liquid metal MHD pressure drop, Al2O3 is applied as an electronically insulated coating onto the inner surface of the ducts. The requirement for the insulated coating to reduce the additional leakage pressure drop caused by coating imperfections has been analyzed. Finally, the total liquid metal MHD pressure drop and magnetic pump power in the FDS blanket have been given.

  8. On the coalescence of sessile drops with miscible liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcia, R; Bestehorn, M

    2011-08-01

    Sessile drops sitting on highly wettable solid substrates fuse in qualitatively different ways after contact, depending on the surface tension gradients between the mixing droplets. In early time evolution the drop coalescence can be fast or delayed (intermittent). In long time evolution a secondary drop formation can occur. We study numerically droplet dynamics during coalescence in two and three spatial dimensions, within a phase field approach. We discuss criteria to distinguish different coalescence regimes. A comparison with recent experiments will be done.

  9. Contact angles of liquid drops on super hydrophobic surfaces: understanding the role of flattening of drops by gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extrand, C W; Moon, Sung In

    2010-11-16

    Measurement of contact angles on super hydrophobic surfaces by conventional methods can produce ambiguous results. Experimental difficulties in constructing tangent lines, gravitational distortion or erroneous assumptions regarding the extent of spreading can lead to underestimation of contact angles. Three models were used to estimate drop shape and perceived contact angles on completely nonwetting super hydrophobic surfaces. One of the models employed the classic numerical solutions from Bashforth and Adams. Additionally, two approximate models were derived as part of this work. All three showed significant distortion of microliter-sized drops and similar trends in perceived contact angles. Liquid drops of several microliters are traditionally used in sessile contact angle measurements. Drops of this size are expected to and indeed undergo significant flattening on super hydrophobic surfaces, even if the wetting interactions are minimal. The distortion is more pronounced if the liquid has a lesser surface tension or greater density. For surfaces that are completely nonwetting, underestimation of contact angles can be tens of degrees. Our modeling efforts suggest that accurate contact angle measurements on super hydrophobic surfaces would require very small sessile drops, on the order of hundreds of picoliters.

  10. Research of Characteristics of Gas-liquid Two-phase Pressure Drop in Microreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Dan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the research system of nitrogen and deionized water, this paper researches the pressure drop of gas-liquid two-phase flow in the circular microchannel with an inner diameter which is respectively 0.9mm and 0.5mm, analyzes the effect of microchannel diameter on gas-liquid two-phase frictional pressure drop in the microchannel reactor, and compares with the result of frictional pressure drop and the predicting result of divided-phase flow pattern. The result shows that, the gas-liquid two-phase frictional pressure drop in the microchannel significantly increases with the decreasing microchannel diameter; Lockhart-Martinelli relationship in divided-phase flow pattern can preferably predict the gas-liquid two-phase frictional pressure drop in the microchannel, but the Tabular constant needs to be corrected.

  11. Impact of a Liquid Drop on a Granular Medium: inertia, viscosity and surface tension effects on the drop deformation

    CERN Document Server

    Nefzaoui, Elyes

    2010-01-01

    An experimental study of liquid drop impacts on a granular medium is proposed. Four fluids were used to vary physical properties: pure distilled water, water with glycerol at 2 concentrations 1:1 and 1:2 v/v and water with Tween 20 at the concentration of 0.1g/l. The drop free fall height was varied to obtain a Weber number (We) between 10 and 2000. Results showed that obtained crater morphologies highly depend on the impacting drop kinetic energy E_{K}. Different behaviours during the drop spreading, receding and absorption are highlighted as function of the fluids viscosity and surface tension. Experimental absorption times are also commented and compared with a simplified theoretical model. Drops maximal extensions and craters diameters were found to scale as $We^{1/5}$ and $E_K^{1/5}$ respectively. In both cases, found dependencies are smaller than those reported in literature: $We^{1/4}$ for drop impacts on solid or granular surfaces and $E_K^{1/4}$ for spherical solid impacts on granular media.

  12. Experimental Investigation of Pressure Drop Hysteresis in a Cocurrent Gas-Liquid Upflow Packed Bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐红彬; 毛在砂

    2001-01-01

    Extensive experimental work on hysteresis in a cocurrent gas-liquid upflow packed bed was carried out with three kinds of packings and the air-water system. However, only when packed with small glass beads (φ1.4 mm) was the bed pressure drop hysteresis observed. Two more liquids with different liquid properties were employed to further examine the influence of parameters on pressure drop hysteresis. The similarity of pressure drop hysteresis in packed beds was concluded in combination of experimental evidence reported in literature.

  13. Research of Characteristics of Gas-liquid Two-phase Pressure Drop in Microreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Li Dan

    2015-01-01

    With the research system of nitrogen and deionized water, this paper researches the pressure drop of gas-liquid two-phase flow in the circular microchannel with an inner diameter which is respectively 0.9mm and 0.5mm, analyzes the effect of microchannel diameter on gas-liquid two-phase frictional pressure drop in the microchannel reactor, and compares with the result of frictional pressure drop and the predicting result of divided-phase flow pattern. The result shows that, the gas-liquid two-...

  14. Evaporation of pure liquid sessile and spherical suspended drops: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbil, H Yildirim

    2012-01-15

    A sessile drop is an isolated drop which has been deposited on a solid substrate where the wetted area is limited by a contact line and characterized by contact angle, contact radius and drop height. Diffusion-controlled evaporation of a sessile drop in an ambient gas is an important topic of interest because it plays a crucial role in many scientific applications such as controlling the deposition of particles on solid surfaces, in ink-jet printing, spraying of pesticides, micro/nano material fabrication, thin film coatings, biochemical assays, drop wise cooling, deposition of DNA/RNA micro-arrays, and manufacture of novel optical and electronic materials in the last decades. This paper presents a review of the published articles for a period of approximately 120 years related to the evaporation of both sessile drops and nearly spherical droplets suspended from thin fibers. After presenting a brief history of the subject, we discuss the basic theory comprising evaporation of micrometer and millimeter sized spherical drops, self cooling on the drop surface and evaporation rate of sessile drops on solids. The effects of drop cooling, resultant lateral evaporative flux and Marangoni flows on evaporation rate are also discussed. This review also has some special topics such as drop evaporation on superhydrophobic surfaces, determination of the receding contact angle from drop evaporation, substrate thermal conductivity effect on drop evaporation and the rate evaporation of water in liquid marbles.

  15. Evaporation of drops on two parallel fibers: influence of the liquid morphology and fiber elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duprat, Camille; Bick, Alison D; Warren, Patrick B; Stone, Howard A

    2013-06-25

    We investigate experimentally the evaporation of liquid accumulated on a pair of parallel fibers, rigid or flexible. The liquid wetting the fibers can adopt two distinct morphologies: a compact drop shape, whose evaporation dynamics is similar to that of an isolated aerosol droplet, or a long liquid column of constant cross-section, whose evaporation dynamics depends upon the aspect ratio of the column. We thus find that the evaporation rate is constant for drops, while it increases strongly for columns as the interfiber distance decreases, and we propose a model to explain this behavior. When the fibers are flexible, the transition from drops to columns can be induced by the deformation of the fibers because of the capillary forces applied by the drop. Thus, we find that the evaporation rate increases with increasing flexibility. Furthermore, complex morphology transitions occur upon drying, which results in spreading of the drop as it evaporates.

  16. Drop Characteristics of non-Newtonian Impinging Jets at High Generalized Bird-Carreau Jet Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, Paul E.; Rodrigues, Neil S.

    2015-11-01

    The current study investigates the drop characteristics of three Carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) sprays produced by the impingement of two liquid jets. The three water-based solutions used in this work (0.5 wt.-% CMC-7MF, 0.8 wt.-% CMC-7MF, and 1.4 wt.-% CMC-7MF) exhibited strong shear-thinning, non-Newtonian behavior - characterized by the Bird-Carreau rheological model. A generalized Bird-Carreau jet Reynolds number was used as the primary parameter to characterize the drop size and the drop velocity, which were measured using Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA). PDA optical configuration enabled a drop size measurement range of approximately 2.3 to 116.2 μm. 50,000 drops were measured at each test condition to ensure statistical significance. The arithmetic mean diameter (D10) , Sauter mean diameter (D32) , and mass median diameter (MMD) were used as representative diameters to characterize drop size. The mean axial drop velocity Uz -mean along with its root-mean square Uz -rms were used to characterize drop velocity. Incredibly, measurements for all three CMC liquids and reference DI water sprays seemed to follow a single curve for D32 and MMD drop diameters in the high generalized Bird-Carreau jet Reynolds number range considered in this work (9.21E +03

  17. A Model for Predicting Holdup and Pressure Drop in Gas-Liquid Stratified Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The time-dependent liquid film thickness and pressure drop were measured by using parallel-wire conductance probes and capacitance differential-preesure transducers. Applying the eddy viscosity theory and an appropriate correlation of interfacial sear stress,a new two-dimensional separated model of holdup and pressure drop of turbulent/turbulent gas-liquid stratified flow was presented. Prediction results agreed well with experimental data.

  18. Generalized Liquid Film Atomization Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HeraldoS.Couto; DemetrioBastos-Netto

    2000-01-01

    The increase of the fuel burning area required by most practical combustion processes in order to guarantee the minimum energy density rate release for their start up and operation is normally achieved by the proper choice among several existing types of atomizers.For instance.impinging and multi-impinging jets atomizers are used in rocket combustion chambers.while splash-plate atomizers find their use when wall film cooling is required.Pressure swirl atomizers,either of simplex or duplex kind,along with Y-jet or SPider Jet atomizers are used in industrial applications and in turbine combustion chambers.Notice.however,that all the types of atomizing devices listed above have one point in common:they are of pre-filming kind.i.e.,befor the droplet spray is generated,a liquid film is formed.This liquid film is broken into unstable ligaments which contract under the action of surface tension forming the droplets.Once the film thickness is estimated.the droplets'SMD(Sauter Mean Diameter)can be calculated.yielding a crucial prameter for the combustion chamber design.However,although this mechanism of droplet fromation has been under study for several decades.most of the available results.are based upon experimental data.valid for a special type of atomizer under the given sepcific conditions only.This work offers a generalized theory for theoretically estimating the SMD of sprays generated by liquid pre-filming atomizers in gereral.

  19. Ignition of partially shattered liquid fuel drops in a reflected shock wave environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzba, A. S.; Kauffman, C. W.; Nicholls, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the ignition of individual fuel drops after their interaction with an incident and a reflected shock wave near the end wall of a shock tube has been carried out. The influence of the aerodynamic shattering of the fuel drop by the convective flow on the ignition characteristics has been examined by varying the drop-end wall separation distance. Data are presented which show the ignition delay times to be a function of the various experimental conditions encountered in this study. A comparison is made with previous investigations concerning the ignition of a liquid fuel drop due only to the interaction with an incident shock wave.

  20. Motion of liquid drops on surfaces induced by asymmetric vibration: role of contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettu, Srinivas; Chaudhury, Manoj K

    2011-08-16

    Hysteresis of wetting, like the Coulombic friction at solid/solid interface, impedes the motion of a liquid drop on a surface when subjected to an external field. Here, we present a counterintuitive example, where some amount of hysteresis enables a drop to move on a surface when it is subjected to a periodic but asymmetric vibration. Experiments show that a surface either with a negligible or high hysteresis is not conducive to any drop motion. Some finite hysteresis of contact angle is needed to break the periodic symmetry of the forcing function for the drift to occur. These experimental results are consistent with simulations, in which a drop is approximated as a linear harmonic oscillator. The experiment also sheds light on the effect of the drop size on flow reversal, where drops of different sizes move in opposite directions due to the difference in the phase of the oscillation of their center of mass.

  1. Flow Visualization in Evaporating Liquid Drops and Measurement of Dynamic Contact Angles and Spreading Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Neng-Li; Chao, David F.

    2001-01-01

    A new hybrid optical system, consisting of reflection-refracted shadowgraphy and top-view photography, is used to visualize flow phenomena and simultaneously measure the spreading and instant dynamic contact angle in a volatile-liquid drop on a nontransparent substrate. Thermocapillary convection in the drop, induced by evaporation, and the drop real-time profile data are synchronously recorded by video recording systems. Experimental results obtained from this unique technique clearly reveal that thermocapillary convection strongly affects the spreading process and the characteristics of dynamic contact angle of the drop. Comprehensive information of a sessile drop, including the local contact angle along the periphery, the instability of the three-phase contact line, and the deformation of the drop shape is obtained and analyzed.

  2. Flow Induced Coalescence of Drops in a Viscous Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, L. Gary

    2002-11-01

    The problem of flow-induced coalescence has been the subject of many experimental and theoretical studies. In recent years, this work has been motivated by the role that this process plays in the formation of polymer blends, which is currently the major route to new polymeric materials with desired macroscopic properties. In order to control this process, we need to understand the conditions for coalescence and their dependence on fluid and flow properties, including the effects of surfactants (known as "compatibilizers" in the polymer blend literature). With a few exceptions, experimental studies have been based upon measurements of the mean drop size (or size distribution) in an emulsion or blend following flow in either blending devices or simple rheometry flows. The four-roll mill, on the other hand, provides an opportunity to study the coalescence process at the scale of individual drops. When such experiments are carried out, we find some surprises vis a vis expectations from simple models of the drop collision/film drainage and rupture process that leads to coalescence. In this talk, we review recent experimental work in this field, and discuss the relationship to present theory

  3. A comprehensive analysis of the evaporation of a liquid spherical drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobac, B; Talbot, P; Haut, B; Rednikov, A; Colinet, P

    2015-01-15

    In this paper, a new comprehensive analysis of a suspended drop of a pure liquid evaporating into air is presented. Based on mass and energy conservation equations, a quasi-steady model is developed including diffusive and convective transports, and considering the non-isothermia of the gas phase. The main original feature of this simple analytical model lies in the consideration of the local dependence of the physico-chemical properties of the gas on the gas temperature, which has a significant influence on the evaporation process at high temperatures. The influence of the atmospheric conditions on the interfacial evaporation flux, molar fraction and temperature is investigated. Simplified versions of the model are developed to highlight the key mechanisms governing the evaporation process. For the conditions considered in this work, the convective transport appears to be opposed to the evaporation process leading to a decrease of the evaporation flux. However, this effect is relatively limited, the Péclet numbers happening to be small. In addition, the gas isothermia assumption never appears to be valid here, even at room temperature, due to the large temperature gradient that develops in the gas phase. These two conclusions are explained by the fact that heat transfer from the gas to the liquid appears to be the step limiting the evaporation process. Regardless of the complexity of the developed model, yet excluding extremely small droplets, the square of the drop radius decreases linearly over time (R(2) law). The assumptions of the model are rigorously discussed and general criteria are established, independently of the liquid-gas couple considered.

  4. Noncoalescence of sessile drops from different but miscible liquids: hydrodynamic analysis of the twin drop contour as a self-stabilizing traveling wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpitschka, Stefan; Riegler, Hans

    2012-08-10

    Capillarity always favors drop fusion. Nevertheless, sessile drops from different but completely miscible liquids often do not fuse instantaneously upon contact. Rather, intermediate noncoalescence is observed. Two separate drop bodies, connected by a thin liquid neck, move over the substrate. Supported by new experimental data, a thin film hydrodynamic analysis of this state is presented. Presumably advective and diffusive volume fluxes in the neck region establish a localized and temporarily stable surface tension gradient. This induces a local surface (Marangoni) flow that stabilizes a traveling wave, i.e., the observed moving twin drop configuration. The theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with the experimental findings.

  5. Non-coalescence of sessile drops from different but miscible liquids: Hydrodynamic analysis of the twin drop contour as self stabilizing, traveling wave

    CERN Document Server

    Karpitschka, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Capillarity always favors drop fusion. Nevertheless sessile drops from different but completely miscible liquids often do not fuse instantaneously upon contact. Rather, intermediate non-coalescence is observed. Two separate drop bodies, connected by a thin liquid neck move over the substrate. Supported by new experimental data a thin film hydrodynamic analysis of this state is presented. Presumably advective and diffusive volume fluxes in the neck region establish a localized and temporarily stable surface tension gradient. This induces a local surface (Marangoni) flow that stabilizes a traveling wave i.e., the observed moving twin drop configuration. The theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with the experimental findings.

  6. Development of device for trapping a superheated liquid drop and life-time measurements of the drop by radiation-induced evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawamura, Teruko; Sugiyama, Noriyuki; Homma, Akira; Narita, Masakuni [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-08-01

    In this study a detection sensitivity evaluation was made by measuring the life time of a single liquid drop. A device trapping a superheated drop was developed, where a single drop of test liquid was trapped at a specified position and then irradiated. Therefore, the volume of the drop can be measured before the irradiation. Wakeshima originally developed the device, in which a test liquid drop was injected and superheated in a supporting liquid, to measure the limit of superheat of the liquid. Apfel modified Wakeshima's device by applying an acoustic field to be able to trap and decompress a superheated liquid drop. The device in the present study is similar to Apfel's. But the inlet part is cooled because the boiling point of the test liquid is lower than room temperature. In this device the superheated drop of trans-2-butene (C{sub 4}H{sub 8}, boiling point=0.8degC) was exposed to Am-Be neutrons and {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays and its life time was measured. (author)

  7. Assessing the accuracy of contact angle measurements for sessile drops on liquid-repellent surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Siddarth; McKinley, Gareth H; Cohen, Robert E

    2011-11-15

    Gravity-induced sagging can amplify variations in goniometric measurements of the contact angles of sessile drops on super-liquid-repellent surfaces. The very large value of the effective contact angle leads to increased optical noise in the drop profile near the solid-liquid free surface and the progressive failure of simple geometric approximations. We demonstrate a systematic approach to determining the effective contact angle of drops on super-repellent surfaces. We use a perturbation solution of the Bashforth-Adams equation to estimate the contact angles of sessile drops of water, ethylene glycol, and diiodomethane on an omniphobic surface using direct measurements of the maximum drop width and height. The results and analysis can be represented in terms of a dimensionless Bond number that depends on the maximum drop width and the capillary length of the liquid to quantify the extent of gravity-induced sagging. Finally, we illustrate the inherent sensitivity of goniometric contact angle measurement techniques to drop dimensions as the apparent contact angle approaches 180°.

  8. Investigation of wetting behavior of coal-chars with liquid iron by sessile drop method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena Sahajwalla

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Using the sessile drop approach, the wettability of four non-graphitic coal-chars with electrolytic iron and Fe-2 % C-0.01 % S alloy has been determined at 1550°C, in a horizontal tube resistance furnace with an argon atmosphere. The ash concentration in chars ranged between 9.04 to 12.61 wt %, with alumina and silica as predominant ash components. The contact angles of these chars with liquid Fe-2 % C-0.01 % S alloy showed lesser variations with time as compared to corresponding angles with electrolytic iron. While the initial contact angles ranged between 106° and 137°, the contact angles for all coal-chars were quite similar after 60 minutes of contact (105 - 110°. While no well defined correlations could be observed between the initial char structure (Lc values and ash concentration / composition and contact angles in the initial stages of contact, the contact angles over extended periods were significantly affected by the presence of reaction products and impurity deposits in the interfacial region. With coal-chars generally showing a non-wetting behavior with liquid iron, these results are discussed in terms of the transfer of carbon and sulphur by mass transport across the interface, the formation of an enriched interfacial layer containing calcium, sulphur and alumina, reduction of reducible oxides such as silica and iron oxides, and possible transfer of these elements into the liquid iron.

  9. Density Measurement of Liquid Ni-Ta Alloys by a Modified Sessile Drop Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Liang; XIAO Feng; TAO Zainan; Kusuhiro Mukai

    2005-01-01

    The density of liquid Ni-Ta alloys was measured by using a modified sessile drop method. It is found that the density of the liquid Ni-Ta alloys decreases with the increasing temperature, but increases with the increase of tantalum concentration in the alloys. The molar volume of liquid Ni-Ta binary alloys increases with the increase of temperature and tantalum concentration.

  10. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of evaporation and explosive boiling of liquid drops in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G.; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2015-07-01

    The rapid evaporation and explosive boiling of a van der Waals (vdW) liquid drop in microgravity is simulated numerically in two-space dimensions using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The numerical approach is fully adaptive and incorporates the effects of surface tension, latent heat, mass transfer across the interface, and liquid-vapor interface dynamics. Thermocapillary forces are modeled by coupling the hydrodynamics to a diffuse-interface description of the liquid-vapor interface. The models start from a nonequilibrium square-shaped liquid of varying density and temperature. For a fixed density, the drop temperature is increased gradually to predict the point separating normal boiling at subcritical heating from explosive boiling at the superheat limit for this vdW fluid. At subcritical heating, spontaneous evaporation produces stable drops floating in a vapor atmosphere, while at near-critical heating, a bubble is nucleated inside the drop, which then collapses upon itself, leaving a smaller equilibrated drop embedded in its own vapor. At the superheat limit, unstable bubble growth leads to either fragmentation or violent disruption of the liquid layer into small secondary drops, depending on the liquid density. At higher superheats, explosive boiling occurs for all densities. The experimentally observed wrinkling of the bubble surface driven by rapid evaporation followed by a Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the thin liquid layer and the linear growth of the bubble radius with time are reproduced by the simulations. The predicted superheat limit (Ts≈0.96 ) is close to the theoretically derived value of Ts=1 at zero ambient pressure for this vdW fluid.

  11. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of evaporation and explosive boiling of liquid drops in microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2015-07-01

    The rapid evaporation and explosive boiling of a van der Waals (vdW) liquid drop in microgravity is simulated numerically in two-space dimensions using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The numerical approach is fully adaptive and incorporates the effects of surface tension, latent heat, mass transfer across the interface, and liquid-vapor interface dynamics. Thermocapillary forces are modeled by coupling the hydrodynamics to a diffuse-interface description of the liquid-vapor interface. The models start from a nonequilibrium square-shaped liquid of varying density and temperature. For a fixed density, the drop temperature is increased gradually to predict the point separating normal boiling at subcritical heating from explosive boiling at the superheat limit for this vdW fluid. At subcritical heating, spontaneous evaporation produces stable drops floating in a vapor atmosphere, while at near-critical heating, a bubble is nucleated inside the drop, which then collapses upon itself, leaving a smaller equilibrated drop embedded in its own vapor. At the superheat limit, unstable bubble growth leads to either fragmentation or violent disruption of the liquid layer into small secondary drops, depending on the liquid density. At higher superheats, explosive boiling occurs for all densities. The experimentally observed wrinkling of the bubble surface driven by rapid evaporation followed by a Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the thin liquid layer and the linear growth of the bubble radius with time are reproduced by the simulations. The predicted superheat limit (T(s)≈0.96) is close to the theoretically derived value of T(s)=1 at zero ambient pressure for this vdW fluid.

  12. Inverted Cheerios effect: Liquid drops attract or repel by elasto-capillarity

    CERN Document Server

    Karpitschka, S; Lubbers, L A; Weijs, J H; Botto, L; Das, S; Andreotti, B; Snoeijer, J H

    2016-01-01

    Solid particles floating at a liquid interface exhibit a long-ranged attraction mediated by surface tension. In the absence of bulk elasticity, this is the dominant lateral interaction of mechanical origin. Here we show that an analogous long-range interaction occurs between adjacent droplets on solid substrates, which crucially relies on a combination of capillarity and bulk elasticity. We experimentally observe the interaction between droplets on soft gels and provide a theoretical framework that quantitatively predicts the migration velocity of the droplets. Remarkably, we find that while on thick substrates the interaction is purely attractive and leads to drop-drop coalescence, for relatively thin substrates a short-range repulsion occurs which prevents the two drops from coming into direct contact. This versatile, new interaction is the liquid-on-solid analogue of the "Cheerios effect". The effect will strongly influence the condensation and coarsening of drop soft polymer films, and has potential impli...

  13. Influence of dispersion degree of water drops on efficiency of extinguishing of flammable liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korolchenko Dmitriy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Depending on the size of water drops, process of fire extinguishing is focused either in a zone of combustion or on a burning liquid surface. This article considers two alternate solutions of a heat balance equation. The first solution allows us to trace decrease of temperature of a flammable liquid (FL surface to a temperature lower than fuel flash point at which combustion is stopped. And the second solution allows us to analyze decrease of burnout rate to a negligible value at which steam-air mixture becomes nonflammable. As a result of solve of a heat balance equation it was made the following conclusion: water drops which size is equal to 100 μm will completely evaporate in a zone of combustion with extent of 1 m if the flying speed of drops is even 16 mps (acc. to Stokes v = 3 mps; whereas drops of larger size will evaporate only partially.

  14. Granular impact cratering by liquid drops: Understanding raindrop imprints through an analogy to asteroid strikes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Runchen; Zhang, Qianyun; Tjugito, Hendro; Cheng, Xiang

    2015-01-13

    When a granular material is impacted by a sphere, its surface deforms like a liquid yet it preserves a circular crater like a solid. Although the mechanism of granular impact cratering by solid spheres is well explored, our knowledge on granular impact cratering by liquid drops is still very limited. Here, by combining high-speed photography with high-precision laser profilometry, we investigate liquid-drop impact dynamics on granular surface and monitor the morphology of resulting impact craters. Surprisingly, we find that despite the enormous energy and length difference, granular impact cratering by liquid drops follows the same energy scaling and reproduces the same crater morphology as that of asteroid impact craters. Inspired by this similarity, we integrate the physical insight from planetary sciences, the liquid marble model from fluid mechanics, and the concept of jamming transition from granular physics into a simple theoretical framework that quantitatively describes all of the main features of liquid-drop imprints in granular media. Our study sheds light on the mechanisms governing raindrop impacts on granular surfaces and reveals a remarkable analogy between familiar phenomena of raining and catastrophic asteroid strikes.

  15. Experimental study of high temperature particle dropping in coolant liquid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Tianshu; YANG Yanhua; LI Xiaoyan; HU Zhihua

    2007-01-01

    A series of experiments of the premixing stage of fuel-coolant interactions (FCI), namely the particles falling into water, were carried out. The force on the particles during the course of falling has been studied. The dropping character of hot particle was influenced by three main parameters, i.e., particle temperature, particle diameter and coolant subcooling that varied over a wide range. A high-speed camera recorded the falling speed of the particle and the moving curves were obtained. The experimental results showed that for the film boiling on the surface of particle and water, the temperature increase of either particle or coolant would slow down the particle falling velocity. The falling velocity of particle in small diameter is lower than that of the bigger particle. The present work can provide an experimental foundation for further investigation of high-speed transient evaporation heat transfer.

  16. Evaporation dynamics and Marangoni number estimation for sessile picoliter liquid drop of binary mixture solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lebedev-Stepanov Peter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose the evaporation model of picoliter sessile drop of binary solvent mixture (with infinitely soluble in each other components based on Hu and Larson solution for single solvent sessile drop and Raoult law for saturated vapor density of components of binary mixture in wide range of undimensional molar binary concentration of the components. Concentration Marangoni number estimation for such a system is also considered for prediction of liquid flows structure for further applications in dissipative particle dynamics in binary mixture evaporating drop.

  17. Vibrations of liquid drops in film boiling phenomena: the mathematical model

    CERN Document Server

    Casal, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Flattened liquid drops poured on a very hot surface evaporate quite slowly and float on a film of their own vapour. In the cavities of a surface, an unusual type of vibrational motions occurs. Large vibrations take place and different forms of dynamic drops are possible. They form elliptic patterns with two lobes or hypotrochoid patterns with three lobes or more. The lobes are turning relatively to the hot surface. We present a model of vibrating motions of the drops. Frequencies of the vibrations are calculated regarding the number of lobes. The computations agree with experiments.

  18. The capacitive drop tensiometer - a novel multianalysing technique for measuring the properties of liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. H.; Augousti, A. T.; Mason, J.; McMillan, N. D.

    1999-01-01

    A new instrumental method for measuring the physical properties of a liquid has been developed. The instrument, called a capacitive drop tensiometer (CDT), is based on the drop volume principle in combination with a capacitive transducer. A delivery head with a specialized wetting design was constructed for forming drops. The capacitive transducer uses the delivery head as one of its plates and a cylindrical ring plate, which surrounds the delivery head and the space occupied by the drop that is formed, as another. Excellent linearity is achieved by optimizing the design, with an accuracy of drop volume measurement of approximately 0957-0233/10/1/007/img6. The system is suitable for measuring both drops in equilibrium and those in the process of growing. Its capability of real-time measurement makes it particularly useful for volatile liquids, in which instance the measurement of drop volume using a flowmeter or a pump is no longer reliable. The CDT can also be used to determine concentration. It was found that the concentration curve is linear for aqueous glycerol solutions although not so for aqueous ethanol solutions. The CDT's ability to measure surface tension was also explored and experimental results are presented here.

  19. Diffuse-interface modeling of liquid-vapor coexistence in equilibrium drops using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2014-07-01

    We study numerically liquid-vapor phase separation in two-dimensional, nonisothermal, van der Waals (vdW) liquid drops using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). In contrast to previous SPH simulations of drop formation, our approach is fully adaptive and follows the diffuse-interface model for a single-component fluid, where a reversible, capillary (Korteweg) force is added to the equations of motion to model the rapid but smooth transition of physical quantities through the interface separating the bulk phases. Surface tension arises naturally from the cohesive part of the vdW equation of state and the capillary forces. The drop models all start from a square-shaped liquid and spinodal decomposition is investigated for a range of initial densities and temperatures. The simulations predict the formation of stable, subcritical liquid drops with a vapor atmosphere, with the densities and temperatures of coexisting liquid and vapor in the vdW phase diagram closely matching the binodal curve. We find that the values of surface tension, as determined from the Young-Laplace equation, are in good agreement with the results of independent numerical simulations and experimental data. The models also predict the increase of the vapor pressure with temperature and the fitting to the numerical data reproduces very well the Clausius-Clapeyron relation, thus allowing for the calculation of the vaporization pressure for this vdW fluid.

  20. Direct numerical simulation of gaseous mixing layers laden with multicomponent-liquid drops: liquid-specific effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Clercq, Patrick C.; Bellan, Josette

    2005-06-01

    A representation of multicomponent-liquid (MC-liquid) composition as a linear combination of two single-Gamma probability distribution functions (PDFs) is used to describe a large number of MC-liquid drops evaporating in a gas flow. The PDF, called the double-Gamma PDF, depends on the molar mass. The gas-phase conservation equations are written in an Eulerian frame and the drops are described in a Lagrangian frame. Gas conservation equations for mass, momentum, species and energy are combined with differential conservation equations for the first four moments of the gas-composition PDF and coupled to the perfect gas equation of state. Source terms in all conservation equations account for the gas/drop interaction. The drop governing equations encompass differential conservation statements for position, mass, momentum, energy and four moments of the liquid-composition PDF. Simulations are performed for a three-dimensional mixing layer whose lower stream is initially laden with drops colder than the surrounding gas. Initial perturbations excite the layer to promote the double pairing of its four initial spanwise vortices to an ultimate vortex. During the layer evolution, the drops heat and evaporate. The results address the layer evolution, and the state of the gas and drops when layers reach a momentum-thickness maximum past the double vortex pairing. Of interest is the influence of the liquid composition on the development of the vortical features of the flow, on the vortical state reached after the second pairing, and on the gas temperature and composition. The MC-liquid simulations are initiated with a single-Gamma PDF composition so as to explore the development of the double-Gamma PDF. Examination of equivalent simulations with n-decane, diesel and three kerosenes as the liquid, permits assessment of the single-species versus the MC-liquid aspect, and of mixture composition specific effects. Global layer growth and global rotational characteristics are

  1. Determination of Trace Amounts of Lead with ETAAS After Single Drop Microextraction and Dispersive Liquid Liquid Microextraction Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Efeçınar M.; Çakır P.; Şatıroğlu N.

    2013-01-01

    Two liquid-phase microextraction procedures, single-drop microextraction (SDME) and dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction (DLLME), have been developed for the determination of lead by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Both methods were based on the formation of lead iodide-Rhodamine B complex which is in phosphoric acid medium. In the presence of KI, anionic lead iodide was complexed with Rhodamine B as an ion-association complex. Several factors that may be affected o...

  2. Hydrodynamics coalescence collision of three liquid drops in 3D with smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Acevedo-Malavé

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method (SPH has been useful to model continuous fluid. This method is employed to obtain approximate numerical solutions of the equations in fluid dynamics by replacing the fluid with a set of particles. These particles may be interpreted as corresponding to interpolation points from which properties of the fluid can be determined. The SPH method is particularly useful when the fluid motion produces a big deformation and a large velocity of the whole fluid. In this study, the SPH method is applied to simulate for the first time the hydrodynamic collision of three equal-size liquid drops in the three-dimensional space. Ranges of value for the droplets collision velocity are chosen giving rise to the following different results for the collision: permanent coalescence, fragmentation, and flocculation of the drops. The velocity vector fields formed inside the drops during the collision process are presented. Three possible scenarios for fragmentation of liquid drops are shown. Multiple satellite drops arise from the ligaments on the surface of the formed bigger drop.

  3. Method of orientation control and experimental investigation using a liquid-drop micromanipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin; Wang, Han; Gan, Yuming; Huang, Weijun; Aoyama, Hisayuki

    2017-04-01

    Orientation adjustment of the micro-component is the key but most difficult part of micro-assembly. In this paper, the mechanism and physical process for orientation adjustment of micro-components absorbed by a liquid-drop micromanipulator are analyzed. The transformation relationship between the orientation of micro-components and the shape of the liquid-drop micromanipulator tip is studied. The quantitative mapping relationship between the shape of the liquid-drop micromanipulator tip and the orientation of micro components is established. A method to quantitatively control the tilt and rotation of micro-components is presented, and the feasibility of the method is verified by experiment. The results show that the orientation of a micro-component absorbed by a liquid-drop micromanipulator varies with the orientation of the micromanipulator. Quantitative control of the orientation of the micro-component can be realized by changing the shape of micromanipulator tip by controlling the upward and downward movement of tungsten rods.

  4. Clean pressure drop of non-newtonian liquid flow across stacked-disc filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerman, J.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    1993-01-01

    The present paper deals with clean pressure drop and power-law liquid across stacked-disc filters. Firstly, from mass and momentum (Darcy's law) balances the governing equations of the process are derived. Subsequently, these equations are reduced to a single dimensionless differential equation whos

  5. Electrical field induced curvature increase on a drop of conducting liquid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bienia, M.; Vallade, M.; Quilliet, C.; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther

    2006-01-01

    We present an analytical approach using conformal mapping to the free-boundary problem of the shape of a liquid drop submitted to a strong electrical field, as encountered in electrowetting systems. In agreement with recent numerical calculations, we show that both the curvature of the surface

  6. Note: A top-view optical approach for observing the coalescence of liquid drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luhai; Zhang, Guifu; Wu, Haiyi; Yang, Jiming; Zhu, Yujian

    2016-02-01

    We developed a new device that is capable of top-view optical examination of the coalescence of liquid drops. The device exhibits great potential for visualization, particularly for the early stage of liquid bridge expansion, owing to the use of a high-speed shadowgraph technique. The fluid densities of the two approaching drops and that of the ambient fluid are carefully selected to be negligibly different, which allows the size of the generated drops to be unlimitedly large in principle. The unique system design allows the point of coalescence between two drops to serve as an undisturbed optical pathway through which to image the coalescence process. The proposed technique extended the dimensionless initial finite radius of the liquid bridge to 0.001, in contrast to 0.01 obtained for conventional optical measurements. An examination of the growth of the bridge radius for a water and oil-tetrachloroethylene system provided results similar to Paulsen's power laws of the inertially limited viscous and inertial regimes. Furthermore, a miniscule shift in the center of the liquid bridge was detected at the point of crossover between the two regimes, which can be scarcely distinguished with conventional side-view techniques.

  7. Shell corrections to a liquid-drop description of nuclear masses and radii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieperink, A. E. L.; Van Isacker, P.

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that a consistent treatment of nuclear bulk and surface effects leads to an improved version of the liquid-drop mass formula with modified symmetry and Coulomb terms. If in addition shell effects are modelled through the counting of the number of valence nucleons, a very simple mass form

  8. Electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) of sessile liquid drops on rheologically tuned soft surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Ranabir; Chakraborty, Suman

    2013-01-01

    The Young-Lippmann equation does not address the influence of mechanical properties of the dielectric layer, like elasticity, on the electrowetting behaviour of sessile liquid drops, within the classical electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) framework. Here, we show for the first time, the alterations in the electrowetting response of conductive liquid drops over rheologically tuned soft surfaces. The influence of decreasing dielectric elasticity on the electrowetting behaviour is experimentally demonstrated by delineating the variations in apparent contact angle, and contact radius, over a complete electrowetting cycle, for substrates with varying elasticity. The significant effects of surface softness, on the electrowetting phenomenon, are explained by taking in purview the liquid-substrate interfacial interactions, as dictated by surface elasticity.

  9. Janus Gel Fabrication Using Liquid Drop Coalescence and Limited Mixing in the Hele-Shaw Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Brittany; Moran, Alexis; Lee, Donghee; Ryu, Sangjin

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogel substrates of tunable stiffness have been actively utilized for in vitro cell mechanobiology study. Here we present a new method to fabricate Janus polyacrylamide gel based on limited mixing between liquid drops coalescing in the Hele-Shaw geometry. Two pre-polymer drops with different concentrations were sandwiched and squeezed between two parallel glass surfaces. Once the drops coalesced in the decreased gap between the surfaces, gelation was initiated by UV light exposure with various time delays. AFM nano-indentation was utilized to map the Young's modulus of obtained gels. Fabricated Janus gels had two regions of different Young's moduli interfaced by the stiffness gradient zone, and the width of the gradient zone increased with the delay time. We acknowledge support from Bioengineering for Human Health grant from UNL and UNMC, and NSF REU grant for UNL.

  10. Electrohydrodynamic migration of a spherical drop in a general quadratic flow

    CERN Document Server

    Mandal, Shubhadeep; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the motion of a spherical drop in a general quadratic flow acted upon by an arbitrarily oriented externally applied uniform electric field. The drop and media are considered to be leaky dielectrics. The flow field affects the distribution of charges on the drop surface, which leads to alteration in the electric field, thereby affecting the velocity field through the Maxwell stress on the fluid-fluid interface. The two-way coupled electrohydrodynamics is central towards dictating the motion of the drop in the flow field. We analytically address the electric potential distribution and Stokesian flow field in and around the drop in a general quadratic flow for small electric Reynolds number (which is the ratio of the charge relaxation time scale to the convective time scale). As a special case, we consider a drop in an unbounded cylindrical Poiseuille flow and show that, an otherwise absent, cross-stream drop migration may be obtained in the presence of a uniform electric field. Depending on the d...

  11. Nucleation efficiency of R134a as a sensitive liquid for superheated drop emulsion detector

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mala Das; R Sarkar; P K Mondal; S Saha; B K Chatterjee; S C Roy

    2010-10-01

    Superheated emulsion detector is known to detect neutrons, γ-rays and other charged particles. The present work includes the study of nucleation efficiency of super-heated drops of one of the CFC-free liquids, R134a (C2H2F4), to fast neutrons, its response to -rays from 241Am and 137Cs and compare its nucleation efficiency with that of R12. The observation indicates that because of the presence of hydrogen, the nucleation efficiency is less in R134a than in R12 in the present neutron energy range of considera-tion. R134a is one of the most environment-friendly, commercially available liquid that is suitable for superheated drop detector, specially in neutron dosimetry and one needs to investigate it in detail.

  12. Single-drop liquid phase microextraction accelerated by surface acoustic wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Anliang; Zha, Yan

    2013-03-01

    A single-drop liquid phase microextraction method is presented, in which surface acoustic wave (SAW) is used for accelerating extraction speed. A pair of interdigital transducers with 27.5 MHz center frequency is fabricated on a 128° yx-LiNbO3 substrate. A radio frequency signal is applied to one of interdigital transducers to excite SAW. Plastic straw is filled with PDMS, leaving 1 mL for holding sample solution. Plastic straw with sample solution droplet is then dipping into extractant, into which SAW is radiated. Mass transportation from sample solution to extractant drop is accelerated due to acoustic streaming, and extraction time is decreased. An ionic liquid and an acid green-25 solution are used for extraction experiments. Results show that the extraction process is almost finished within 2 min, and extraction speed is increased with radio frequency signal power.

  13. Oscillations of weakly viscous conducting liquid drops in a strong magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Priede, Jānis

    2010-01-01

    We analyse small-amplitude oscillations of weakly viscous and electrically conducting liquid drop in a strong uniform DC magnetic field. An asymptotic solution is obtained showing that magnetic field does not affect the shape eigenmodes, which remain the spherical harmonics as in the non-magnetic case. Strong magnetic field, however, constrains the liquid flow associated with the oscillations and, thus, it reduces the oscillations frequency by increasing the apparent inertia of the liquid. In such a field, liquid oscillates in a two-dimensional (2D) way as solid columns aligned with the field. Two types of oscillations are possible: longitudinal and transversal to the field. Such oscillations are weakly damped by strong magnetic field. The stronger the field, the weaker the damping, except for the axisymmetric transversal modes, which are magnetically overdamped because they are not kinematically compatible with 2D flow. Because magnetic damping decreases inversely with the square of the field strength, visco...

  14. Study of the fission process of deformed Na clusters in liquid-drop stabilized jellium model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Payami

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available   In this work, using the liquid drop model in the context of the stabilized jellium model, we have studied the fission of charged Na clusters. In this study we have assumed a deformed non-spherical shape for the cluster. The ground state energies, critical sizes, fission barrier height, and the evaporation energies have been calculated. The results show a better agreement to the experimental results compared to our earlier work.

  15. Deflection of a liquid metal jet/drop in a tokamak environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelekasis, Nikos, E-mail: pel@uth.gr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Thessaly, Volos 38334 (Greece); Benos, Lefteris [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Thessaly, Volos 38334 (Greece); Gomes, Rui [Associação EURATOM/IST, Centro de Fusão Nuclear, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • We model steady flow of a liquid metal jet inside an electromagnetic field in the presence of inertia and capillary forces. • Similar analysis is performed for the motion of a liquid metal spherical drop. • The deflection of the trajectory is predicted as a function of the intensity of the externally imposed magnetic and electric fields. • The analysis is used as a proof of principle study in reference to experimental observations of jet/drop deflection due to j{sup →}×B{sup →} effects in the ISTTOK tokamak. • We discuss the possibility of using liquid metal flows as an alternative approach toward enhancing power exhaust in tokamak facilities. - Abstract: The interaction of a liquid gallium jet with plasma has been investigated in the ISTTOK tokamak. The jet was observed to remain intact during its interaction with plasma, within a certain length beyond which drop formation was observed. Significant deflection of the jet was detected as soon as plasma production was started. Furthermore, a strong dependency of the deflection magnitude on plasma position was observed that could be correlated with plasma potential gradients. As a means to capture and, possibly, quantify this effect, a preliminary magnetohydrodynamic analysis was performed in order to predict the trajectory of a jet that is traveling inside an electromagnetic field. The effect of Lorentz forces, gravity and pressure drop are accounted for in a unidirectional model that assumes a small jet radius in comparison with the trajectory length. The effect of external electric potential gradients on jet deflection was ascertained in conjunction with the importance of electric stresses in modulating the jet speed and radius. Analysis of the results reported in the ISTTOK experiments identifies the process of jet break-up as a capillary instability. The trajectory of the ensuing droplets is modeled and intensification of the deflection process is predicted in the presence of Lorentz

  16. Capillary Drop Penetration Method to Characterize the Liquid Wetting of Powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhanjie; Wang, Yifan; Muzzio, Fernando J; Callegari, Gerardo; Drazer, German

    2017-01-10

    We present a method to characterize the wettability of powders, based on the penetration dynamics of a sessile drop deposited on a slightly compressed powder bed. First, we show that a direct comparison of the wetting properties of different liquids is possible without having to solve the three-dimensional liquid penetration problem, by considering the appropriate dimensionless variables. We show that the contact area between the sessile drop and the powder bed remains constant during most of the penetration process and demonstrate that as a result, the evolution of the dimensionless penetration volume is given by a universal function of the dimensionless time, with no dimensionless parameters. Then, using a reference liquid that completely wets the powder, it is possible to obtain an effective contact angle for a test liquid of interest, independent of other properties of the powder bed, such as permeability and a characteristic pore size. We apply the proposed method to estimate the contact angle of water with different powder blends, by using silicone oil as the reference liquid. Finally, to highlight the potential of the proposed method to characterize pharmaceutical powders, we consider a blend of lactose, acetaminophen, and a small amount of lubricant (magnesium stearate). The proposed method adequately captures a significant decrease in hydrophilicity that results from exposing the blend to excessive mixing, a well-known effect in the pharmaceutical industry.

  17. Getting in shape: molten wax drop deformation and solidification at an immiscible liquid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beesabathuni, Shilpa N; Lindberg, Seth E; Caggioni, Marco; Wesner, Chris; Shen, Amy Q

    2015-05-01

    The controlled production of non-spherical shaped particles is important for many applications such as food processing, consumer goods, adsorbents, drug delivery, and optical sensing. In this paper, we investigated the deformation and simultaneous solidification of millimeter size molten wax drops as they impacted an immiscible liquid interface of higher density. By varying initial temperature and viscoelasticity of the molten drop, drop size, impact velocity, viscosity and temperature of the bath fluid, and the interfacial tension between the molten wax and bath fluid, spherical molten wax drops impinged on a cooling water bath and were arrested into non-spherical solidified particles in the form of ellipsoid, mushroom, disc, and flake-like shapes. We constructed cursory phase diagrams for the various particle shapes generated over a range of Weber, Capillary, Reynolds, and Stefan numbers, governed by the interfacial, inertial, viscous, and thermal effects. We solved a simplified heat transfer problem to estimate the time required to initiate the solidification at the interface of a spherical molten wax droplet and cooling aqueous bath after impact. By correlating this time with the molten wax drop deformation history captured from high speed imaging experiments, we elucidate the delicate balance of interfacial, inertial, viscous, and thermal forces that determine the final morphology of wax particles.

  18. Application of dispersive liquid-liquid-solidified floating organic drop microextraction and ETAAS for the preconcentration and determination of indium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafzadeh Afshar, Elham; Taher, Mohammad Ali; Fazelirad, Hamid; Naghizadeh, Matin

    2017-03-01

    A new, simple and efficient method, including dispersive liquid-liquid-solidified floating organic drop microextraction and then electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry, has been developed for the preconcentration and determination of ultratrace amounts of indium. The method was applied to preconcentrate the indium-1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol complex in 25 μL 1-undecanol. The various factors affecting the extraction efficiency, such as pH, type and volume of extraction solvent, type and volume of disperser solvent, sample volume, ionic strength, and ligand concentration, were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, an enrichment factor of 62.5, precision of ±4.75%, a detection limit of 55.6 ng L(-1), and for the calibration graph a linear range of 96.0-3360 ng L(-1) were obtained. The method was used for the extraction and determination of indium in water and standard samples with satisfactory results. Graphical Abstract Preconcentration of indium ions via liquid-liquid-solidified floating organic drop microextraction method and determination by ETAAS.

  19. Density of liquid NiCoAlCr quarternary alloys measured by modified sessile drop method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Liang; ZHANG Shu-fang; XIAO Feng; YANG Ling-chuan; DONG Jian-xin; CAO Chun-lan; TAO Zai-nan; K. MUKAI

    2006-01-01

    The densities of liquid NiCoAlCr quaternary alloys with a fixed molar ratio of Ni to Co to Al (x(Ni)-x(Co)-x(Al)≈73-12-15) which is close to the average value of the commercial Ni-based superalloys TMS75, INCO713, CM247LC and CMSX-4, and the mass fraction of chromium changes from 0 to 9% were measured by a modified sessile drop method. It is found that with increasing temperature and chromium concentration in the alloys, the densities of the liquid NiCoAlCr quaternary alloys decrease, whereas the molar volume of the liquid NiCoAlCr quaternary alloys increases. And the liquid densities of NiCoAlCr quaternary alloys calculated from the partial molar volumes of nickel, cobalt, aluminum and chromium in the corresponding Ni-bases binary alloys are in good agreement with the experimental ones, i.e. within the error tolerance range the densities of the liquid Ni-based multi-component alloys can be predicted from the partial volumes of elements in Ni-based binary alloys in liquid state. The molar volume of liquid NiCoAlCr binary alloy shows a negative deviation from the ideal linear mixing and the deviation changes small with the increase of chromium concentration at the same temperature.

  20. Liquid drops on a surface: Using density functional theory to calculate the binding potential and drop profiles and comparing with results from mesoscopic modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Adam P.; Thiele, Uwe; Archer, Andrew J.

    2015-02-01

    The contribution to the free energy for a film of liquid of thickness h on a solid surface due to the interactions between the solid-liquid and liquid-gas interfaces is given by the binding potential, g(h). The precise form of g(h) determines whether or not the liquid wets the surface. Note that differentiating g(h) gives the Derjaguin or disjoining pressure. We develop a microscopic density functional theory (DFT) based method for calculating g(h), allowing us to relate the form of g(h) to the nature of the molecular interactions in the system. We present results based on using a simple lattice gas model, to demonstrate the procedure. In order to describe the static and dynamic behaviour of non-uniform liquid films and drops on surfaces, a mesoscopic free energy based on g(h) is often used. We calculate such equilibrium film height profiles and also directly calculate using DFT the corresponding density profiles for liquid drops on surfaces. Comparing quantities such as the contact angle and also the shape of the drops, we find good agreement between the two methods. We also study in detail the effect on g(h) of truncating the range of the dispersion forces, both those between the fluid molecules and those between the fluid and wall. We find that truncating can have a significant effect on g(h) and the associated wetting behaviour of the fluid.

  1. Density of Liquid Ni-Mo Alloys Measured by a Modified Sessile Drop Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang FANG; Zushu LI; ZaiNan TAO; Feng XIAO

    2004-01-01

    The density of liquid binary Ni-Mo alloys with molybdenum concentration from 0 to 20% (mass fraction) was measured by a modified sessile drop method. It has been found that the density of the liquid Ni-Mo alloys decreases with increasing temperature, but increases with the increase of molybdenum concentration in the alloys. The molar volume of liquid Ni-Mo binary alloys increases with the increase of temperature and molybdenum concentration. The partial molar volume of molybdenum in Ni-Mo binary alloy has been approximately calculated as [13.18 - 2.65 × 10-3T + (-47.94 + 3.10 × 10-2T) × 10-2XMo] × 10-6m3·mol-1. The molar volume of Ni-Mo alloy determined in the present work shows a negative deviation from the ideal linear mixing molar volume.

  2. THE INTERACTION OF LIQUID DROPS WITH A ROTATING GAS STREAM WITHIN A RAPIDLY REVOLVING ANNULAR ENCLOSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. AROUSSI

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The flow phenomena occurring around a rotating shaft are extremely complex and are a common feature in turbomachinery such as the bearing chambers of aero engines. As the liquid jet impinges onto the shaft, circumferential streams of lubricating liquid droplets centrifuge away from the rotor surface and impinge onto the inner circumference of the stationary case. A further break-up of drops occurred whilst rotating around the shaft before impacting on to the casing surface. Non-intrusive laser techniques have been employed to aid the visualisation processes and the analysis of the flow phenomena occurring within the rotating annular enclosure. Results reveal that, the liquid flow conditions and the shaft rotation regimes, along with the aerodynamic movement of the air circulating around the shaft influence the dynamics of the droplets and consequently the lubrication processes within the bearing chambers.

  3. Headspace liquid-phase microextraction of methamphetamine and amphetamine in urine by an aqueous drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Yi [Department of Sciences, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York, 445 W 59th Street, New York, NY 10019 (United States)]. E-mail: yhe@jjay.cuny.edu; Vargas, Angelica [Department of Sciences, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York, 445 W 59th Street, New York, NY 10019 (United States); Kang, Youn-Jung [Department of Sciences, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York, 445 W 59th Street, New York, NY 10019 (United States)

    2007-04-25

    This study developed a headspace liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) method by using a single aqueous drop in combination with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-UV detection for the determination of methamphetamine (MAP) and amphetamine (AP) in urine samples. The analytes, volatile and basic, were released from sample matrix into the headspace first, and then protonated and dissolved in an aqueous H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} drop hanging in the headspace by a HPLC syringe. After extraction, this drop was directly injected into HPLC. Parameters affecting extraction efficiency were investigated and optimized. This method showed good linearity in the investigated concentration range of 1.0-1500 {mu}g L{sup -1}, repeatability of the extraction (R.S.D. < 5%, n = 6), and low detection limits (0.3 {mu}g L{sup -1} for both analytes). Enrichment factors of about 400-fold and 220-fold were achieved for MAP and AP, respectively, at optimum conditions. The feasibility of the method was demonstrated by analyzing human urine samples.

  4. Collision and coalescence of liquid drops in a dynamically active ambient fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambath, Krishnaraj; Subramani, Hariprasad; Basaran, Osman

    2012-11-01

    The fluid dynamics of the collision and coalescence of liquid drops has intrigued scientists and engineers for more than a century owing to its ubiquitousness in nature, e.g. raindrop coalescence, and industry, e.g. breaking of emulsions in the oil and gas industry. The complexity of the underlying dynamics, e.g. occurrence of hydrodynamic singularities, has required study of the problem at different scales - macroscopic, mesoscopic and molecular - using stochastic and deterministic methods. In this work, we adopt a multiscale, deterministic method to simulate the approach, collision, and eventual coalescence of two drops where the drops as well as the ambient fluid are incompressible, Newtonian fluids. The free boundary problem governing the dynamics consists of the Navier-Stokes system and associated initial and boundary conditions that have been augmented to account for the effects of disjoining pressure as the separation between the drops becomes of the order of a few hundred nanometers. This free boundary problem is solved by a Galerkin finite element-based algorithm. The approach and results to be reported build on earlier work by Leal and coworkers, and are used to identify conditions conducive for coalescence in terms of flow and fluid properties.

  5. A simple expression for pressure drops of water and other low molecular liquids in the flow through micro-orifices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Tomiichi; Ushida, Akiomi; Narumi, Takatsune

    2015-12-01

    Flows are generally divided into two types: shear flows and shear-free elongational (extensional) flows. Both are necessary for a thorough understanding of the flow properties of a fluid. Shear flows are easy to achieve in practice, for example, through Poiseuille or Couette flows. Shear-free elongational flows are experimentally hard to achieve, resulting in an incomplete understanding of the flow properties of fluids in micro-devices. Nevertheless, flows through micro-orifices are useful for probing the properties of elongational flows at high elongational rates; although these flows exhibit shear and elongation, the elongation is dominant and the shear is negligible in the central region of the flows. We previously reported an anomalous reduction in pressure drops in the flows of water, a 50/50 mixture of glycerol and water, and silicone oils through micro-orifices. In the present paper, we rearrange the data presented in the previous paper and reveal a simple relationship where the pressure drop is proportional to the velocity through the micro-orifices, independent of the orifice diameter and the viscosity of the liquids tested. We explain our observations by introducing a "fluid element" model, in which fluid elements are formed on entering the orifice. The model is based on the idea that low molecular liquids, including water, generate strong elongational stress, similar to a polymer solution, in the flow through micro-orifices.

  6. CFD analysis of pressure drop across grid spacers in rod bundles compared to correlations and heavy liquid metal experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batta, A., E-mail: batta@kit.edu; Class, A.G., E-mail: class@kit.edu

    2017-02-15

    Early studies of the flow in rod bundles with spacer grids suggest that the pressure drop can be decomposed in contributions due to flow area variations by spacer grids and frictional losses along the rods. For these shape and frictional losses simple correlations based on theoretical and experimental data have been proposed. In the OECD benchmark study LACANES it was observed that correlations could well describe the flow behavior of the heavy liquid metal loop including a rod bundle with the exception of the core region, where different experts chose different pressure-loss correlations for the losses due to spacer grids. Here, RANS–CFD simulations provided very good data compared to the experimental data. It was observed that the most commonly applied Rehme correlation underestimated the shape losses. The available correlations relate the pressure drop across a grid spacer to the relative plugging of the spacer i.e. solidity e{sub max}. More sophisticated correlations distinct between spacer grids with round or sharp leading edge shape. The purpose of this study is to (i) show that CFD is suitable to predict pressure drop across spacer grids and (ii) to access the generality of pressure drop correlations. By verification and validation of CFD results against experimental data obtained in KALLA we show (i). The generality (ii) is challenged by considering three cases which yield identical pressure drop in the correlations. First we test the effect of surface roughness, a parameter not present in the correlations. Here we compare a simulation assuming a typical surface roughness representing the experimental situation to a perfectly smooth spacer surface. Second we reverse the flow direction for the spacer grid employed in the experiments which is asymmetric. The flow direction reversal is chosen for convenience, since an asymmetric spacer grid with given blockage ratio, may result in different flow situations depending on flow direction. Obviously blockage

  7. A general approach to double-moment normalization of drop size distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, G.W.; Zawadzki, I.; Szyrmer, W.; Sempere Torres, D.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2004-01-01

    Normalization of drop size distributions (DSDs) is reexamined here. First, an extension of the scaling normalization that uses one moment of the DSD as a scaling parameter to a more general scaling normalization that uses two moments as scaling parameters of the normalization is presented. In additi

  8. Pressure drop in contraction flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    This note is a supplement to Dynamic of Polymeric Liquids (DPL) page 178. DPL gives an equation for the pressure drop in a tapered (and circular) contraction, valid only at low angles. Here the general definition of contraction flow (the Bagley correction) and a more general method to find...... the pressure drop in a contraction are given....

  9. Dynamic response of a thin sessile drop of conductive liquid to an abruptly applied or removed electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corson, L. T.; Mottram, N. J.; Duffy, B. R.; Wilson, S. K.; Tsakonas, C.; Brown, C. V.

    2016-10-01

    We consider, both theoretically and experimentally, a thin sessile drop of conductive liquid that rests on the lower plate of a parallel-plate capacitor. We derive analytical expressions for both the initial deformation and the relaxation dynamics of the drop as the electric field is either abruptly applied or abruptly removed, as functions of the geometrical, electrical, and material parameters, and investigate the ranges of validity of these expressions by comparison with full numerical simulations. These expressions provide a reasonable description of the experimentally measured dynamic response of a drop of conductive ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium tetrafluoroborate.

  10. The impalement of water drops impinging onto hydrophobic/superhydrophobic graphite surfaces: the role of dynamic pressure, hammer pressure and liquid penetration time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittoni, Paola G.; Lin, Ya-Chi; Lin, Shi-Yow

    2014-05-01

    Droplet impingement experiments at low Weber numbers were conducted by digitizing silhouettes of impacting water drops onto unlike graphite substrates, typified by different advancing water contact angles (θa): 140 and 160°. The relaxation of wetting diameter, dynamic contact angle, and drop shapes were measured. The purpose was to carefully investigate the phenomenology and possible causes of the failure of the superhydrophobicity. During impact and spreading phases, all the drops impinging onto both graphite substrates showed a similar behavior. Then, after an initial free recoil, drops impinging at lower impact velocities onto graphite substrates characterized by θa = 140° clearly exhibited time intervals in which the wetting diameter appeared to be almost constant. The duration of this pinned phase was observed decreasing with increasing the impact height and almost completely disappearing for drops impinging at higher impact velocities. This behavior has never been reported before, and, contrariwise, water droplets impinging at lower impact velocities onto hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces have been generally observed more freely retracting, and ultimately rebounding, compared to drops impacting at higher velocities. In the present study, this latter behavior was recorded just for drops impinging onto graphite surfaces characterized by θa = 160°. A theoretical description of the experimental results was proposed, specifically investigating the role of dynamic pressure, hammer pressure and liquid penetration time during the impact, spreading and recoil stages.

  11. Investigation of wetting behavior of coal-chars with liquid iron by sessile drop method.

    OpenAIRE

    Veena Sahajwalla; Fiona McCarthy; Rita Khanna

    2008-01-01

    Using the sessile drop approach, the wettability of four non-graphitic coal-chars with electrolytic iron and Fe-2 % C-0.01 % S alloy has been determined at 1550°C, in a horizontal tube resistance furnace with an argon atmosphere. The ash concentration in chars ranged between 9.04 to 12.61 wt %, with alumina and silica as predominant ash components. The contact angles of these chars with liquid Fe-2 % C-0.01 % S alloy showed lesser variations with time as compared to corresponding angles with ...

  12. Effect of ice contamination of liquid-nitrogen drops in film boiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoessow, G. J.; Chmielewski, C. E.; Baumeister, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    Previously reported vaporization time data of liquid nitrogen drops in film boiling on a flat plate are about 30 percent shorter than predicted from standard laminar film boiling theory. This theory, however, had been found to successfully correlate the data for conventional fluids such as water, ethanol, benzene, or carbon tetrachloride. Experimental evidence that some of the discrepancy for cryogenic fluids results from ice contamination due to condensation is presented. The data indicate a fairly linear decrease in droplet evaporation time with the diameter of the ice crystal residue. After correcting the raw data for ice contamination along with convection, a comparison of theory with experiment shows good agreement.

  13. Effect of ice contamination on liquid-nitrogen drops in film boiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoessow, G. J.; Chmielewski, C. E.; Baumeister, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    Previously reported vaporization time data of liquid nitrogen drops in film boiling on a flat plate are about 30 percent shorter than predicted from standard laminar film boiling theory. This theory, however, had been found to successfully correlate the data for conventional fluids such as water, ethanol, benzene, or carbon tetrachloride. This paper presents experimental evidence that some of the discrepancy for cryogenic fluids results from ice contamination due to condensation. The data indicate a fairly linear decrease in droplet evaporation time with the diameter of the ice crystal residue. After correcting the raw data for ice contamination along with convection, a comparison of theory with experiment shows good agreement.

  14. Enhancing efficiency of using water due to explosive breakup of liquid drop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borisova Anastasia G.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Using high-speed video recording, the experiments were performed to research quantitative characteristics of explosive breakup phenomenon of 5–15 μl water droplets containing 2×2×1 mm and 2×2×2 mm solid inclusions, when heated in a tube furnace at temperatures of 1070–1370 K. Experimental results report number and size of the droplets detached during explosive breakup. We show that the fragmentation of liquid layer covering solid particles facilitates the increase the evaporation surface area 15-fold versus the initial surface area of a drop.

  15. Influence of different liquid-drop-based bindings on lighter mass fragments and entropy production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rohit; Shivani; Gautam, Sakshi [Panjab University, Department of Physics, Chandigarh (India)

    2016-04-15

    We study the production of lighter fragments and associated phenomena within the Quantum Molecular Dynamics (QMD) model. The Minimum Spanning Tree (MST) method is used to identify the pre-clusters. The final stable fragments were identified by imposing binding energy criteria on the fragments formed using the MST method. The effect of different binding energy criteria was investigated by employing various liquid-drop-based binding energy formulae. Though light clusters show significant effect of different binding energies, their associated phenomenon, i.e. entropy production is insensitive towards different binding energy criteria. (orig.)

  16. Liquid-bridge breakup in contact-drop dispensing: Liquid-bridge stability with a free contact line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Amir; Hill, Reghan J.; van de Ven, Theo G. M.

    2015-08-01

    The static stability of weightless liquid bridges with a free contact line with respect to axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric perturbations is studied. Constant-volume and constant-pressure stability regions are constructed in slenderness versus cylindrical volume diagrams for fixed contact angles. Bifurcations along the stability-region boundaries are characterized by the structure of axisymmetric bridge branches and families of equilibria. A wave-number definition is presented based on the pieces-of-sphere states at branch terminal points to classify equilibrium branches and identify branch connections. Compared with liquid bridges pinned at two equal disks, the free contact line breaks the equatorial and reflective symmetries, affecting the lower boundary of the constant-volume stability region where axisymmetric perturbations are critical. Stability is lost at transcritical bifurcations and turning points along this boundary. Our results furnish the maximum-slenderness stability limit for drop deposition on real surfaces when the contact angle approaches the receding contact angle.

  17. Liquid-bridge breakup in contact-drop dispensing: Liquid-bridge stability with a free contact line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Amir; Hill, Reghan J; van de Ven, Theo G M

    2015-08-01

    The static stability of weightless liquid bridges with a free contact line with respect to axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric perturbations is studied. Constant-volume and constant-pressure stability regions are constructed in slenderness versus cylindrical volume diagrams for fixed contact angles. Bifurcations along the stability-region boundaries are characterized by the structure of axisymmetric bridge branches and families of equilibria. A wave-number definition is presented based on the pieces-of-sphere states at branch terminal points to classify equilibrium branches and identify branch connections. Compared with liquid bridges pinned at two equal disks, the free contact line breaks the equatorial and reflective symmetries, affecting the lower boundary of the constant-volume stability region where axisymmetric perturbations are critical. Stability is lost at transcritical bifurcations and turning points along this boundary. Our results furnish the maximum-slenderness stability limit for drop deposition on real surfaces when the contact angle approaches the receding contact angle.

  18. Preliminary drop-tower experiments on liquid-interface geometry in partially filled containers at zero gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedley, G.

    1990-01-01

    Plexiglass containers with rounded trapezoidal cross sections were designed and built to test the validity of Concus and Finn's existence theorem (1974, 1983) for a bounded free liquid surface at zero gravity. Experiments were carried out at the NASA Lewis two-second drop tower. Dyed ethanol-water solutions and three immiscible liquid pairs, with one liquid dyed, were tested. High-speed movies were used to record the liquid motion. Liquid rose to the top of the smaller end of the containers when the contact angle was small enough, in agreement with the theory. Liquid interface motion demonstrated a strong dependence on physical properties, including surface roughness and contamination.

  19. General methodology for evaluating the adhesion force of drops and bubbles on solid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, C; Carmona, F J; Pierce, E; Marengo, M; Amirfazli, A

    2009-06-01

    The shortcomings of the current formulation for calculating the adhesion force for drops and bubbles with noncircular contact lines are discussed. A general formulation to evaluate the adhesion force due to surface forces is presented. Also, a novel methodology, that is, IBAFA, image based adhesion force analysis, was developed to allow implementation of the general formulation. IBAFA is based on the use of multiple profile images of a drop. The images are analyzed (1) to accurately reconstruct the contact line shape, which is analytically represented by a Fourier cosine series, and (2) to measure contact angles at multiple locations along the contact line and determine the contact angle distribution based on a linear piecewise interpolation routine. The contact line shape reconstruction procedure was validated with both actual experiments and simulated experiments. The procedure for the evaluation of the adhesion force was tested using simulated experiments with synthetic drops of known shapes. A comparison with current methods showed that simplifying assumptions (e.g., elliptical contact line or linear contact angle distribution) used in these methods result in errors up to 76% in the estimated adhesion force. However, the drop adhesion force evaluated using IBAFA results in small errors on the order of 1%.

  20. Not spreading in reverse: The dewetting of a liquid film into a single drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Andrew M J; Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo; Newton, Michael I; Brown, Carl V; McHale, Glen

    2016-09-01

    Wetting and dewetting are both fundamental modes of motion of liquids on solid surfaces. They are critically important for processes in biology, chemistry, and engineering, such as drying, coating, and lubrication. However, recent progress in wetting, which has led to new fields such as superhydrophobicity and liquid marbles, has not been matched by dewetting. A significant problem has been the inability to study the model system of a uniform film dewetting from a nonwetting surface to a single macroscopic droplet-a barrier that does not exist for the reverse wetting process of a droplet spreading into a film. We report the dewetting of a dielectrophoresis-induced film into a single equilibrium droplet. The emergent picture of the full dewetting dynamics is of an initial regime, where a liquid rim recedes at constant speed and constant dynamic contact angle, followed by a relatively short exponential relaxation of a spherical cap shape. This sharply contrasts with the reverse wetting process, where a spreading droplet follows a smooth sequence of spherical cap shapes. Complementary numerical simulations and a hydrodynamic model reveal a local dewetting mechanism driven by the equilibrium contact angle, where contact line slip dominates the dewetting dynamics. Our conclusions can be used to understand a wide variety of processes involving liquid dewetting, such as drop rebound, condensation, and evaporation. In overcoming the barrier to studying single film-to-droplet dewetting, our results provide new approaches to fluid manipulation and uses of dewetting, such as inducing films of prescribed initial shapes and slip-controlled liquid retraction.

  1. Not spreading in reverse: The dewetting of a liquid film into a single drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Andrew M. J.; Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo; Newton, Michael I.; Brown, Carl V.; McHale, Glen

    2016-01-01

    Wetting and dewetting are both fundamental modes of motion of liquids on solid surfaces. They are critically important for processes in biology, chemistry, and engineering, such as drying, coating, and lubrication. However, recent progress in wetting, which has led to new fields such as superhydrophobicity and liquid marbles, has not been matched by dewetting. A significant problem has been the inability to study the model system of a uniform film dewetting from a nonwetting surface to a single macroscopic droplet—a barrier that does not exist for the reverse wetting process of a droplet spreading into a film. We report the dewetting of a dielectrophoresis-induced film into a single equilibrium droplet. The emergent picture of the full dewetting dynamics is of an initial regime, where a liquid rim recedes at constant speed and constant dynamic contact angle, followed by a relatively short exponential relaxation of a spherical cap shape. This sharply contrasts with the reverse wetting process, where a spreading droplet follows a smooth sequence of spherical cap shapes. Complementary numerical simulations and a hydrodynamic model reveal a local dewetting mechanism driven by the equilibrium contact angle, where contact line slip dominates the dewetting dynamics. Our conclusions can be used to understand a wide variety of processes involving liquid dewetting, such as drop rebound, condensation, and evaporation. In overcoming the barrier to studying single film-to-droplet dewetting, our results provide new approaches to fluid manipulation and uses of dewetting, such as inducing films of prescribed initial shapes and slip-controlled liquid retraction.

  2. The dynamics of liquid drops and their interaction with solids of varying wettabilities

    KAUST Repository

    Sprittles, J. E.

    2012-01-01

    Microdrop impact and spreading phenomena are explored as an interface formation process using a recently developed computational framework. The accuracy of the results obtained from this framework for the simulation of high deformation free-surface flows is confirmed by a comparison with previous numerical studies for the large amplitude oscillations of free liquid drops. Our code\\'s ability to produce high resolution benchmark calculations for dynamic wetting flows is then demonstrated by simulating microdrop impact and spreading on surfaces of greatly differing wettability. The simulations allow one to see features of the process which go beyond the resolution available to experimental analysis. Strong interfacial effects which are observed at the microfluidic scale are then harnessed by designing surfaces of varying wettability that allow new methods of flow control to be developed. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Determination of Benzalkonium Chloride in Nasal Drops by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danijela A. Kostić

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC system was used in the reversed phase mode for the determination of benzalkonium chloride (BKC in nosal drops. A Chromolit RP-18e, 100 x 4.6, (UM6077/035 column was used at 40 °C. The mobile phase, optimized through an experimental design, was a 70:30 (v/v mixture of 0.057M Na-heksansulphonate potassium, dihydrogen orthophosphate buffer (pH 2.9 and acetonitrile, pumped at a flow rate of 1.75 mL/min at maintaining column temperature at 40 °C. Maximum UV detection was achieved at 215 nm. The method was validated in terms of selectivity, linearity, repeatability, precision and accuracy. The method was successfully applied for the determination of BKC in a pharmaceutical formulation of nasal drop solution without any interference from common excipients and drug substance. All the validation parameters were within the acceptance range, concordant to ICH guidelines.

  4. Determination of benzalkonium chloride in viscous ophthalmic drops of azithromycin by high-performance liquid chromatography *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yan; Xu, Sheng-jie; Wang, Shi-chun; Tu, Jia-sheng

    2009-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system was used in the reversed phase mode for the determination of benzalkonium chloride (BKC) in azithromycin viscous ophthalmic drops. A Venusil-XBP(L)-C18 (150 mm×4.6 mm, 5 μm) column was used at 50 °C. The mobile phase consisted of a mixture of methanol-potassium phosphate (16:5, v/v). Two sample preparation methods were compared. The results suggested that, compared with an extraction procedure, a deproteinization procedure was much quicker and more convenient. Using the deproteinization procedure for sample preparation, calibration curves were linear in the range 5.0~50 μg/ml. The within-day and inter-day coefficients of variation were less than 10%. The average recoveries were determined as 96.70%, 98.52%, and 97.96% at concentrations of 10.0, 30.0, and 50.0 μg/ml, respectively. Variability in precision did not exceed 5%. In conclusion, this HPLC method using a simple sample treatment procedure appears suitable for monitoring BKC content in azithromycin viscous ophthalmic drops. PMID:19946951

  5. Variation of rain intensity and drop size distribution with General Weather Patterns (GWL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghada, Wael; Buras, Allan; Lüpke, Marvin; Menzel, Annette

    2017-04-01

    Short-duration rainfall extremes may cause flash floods in certain catchments (e.g. cities or fast responding watersheds) and pose a great risk to affected communities. In order to predict their occurrence under future climate change scenarios, their link to atmospheric circulation patterns needs to be well understood. We used a comprehensive data set of meteorological data (temperature, rain gauge precipitation) and precipitation spectra measured by a disdrometer (OTT PARSIVEL) between October 2008 and June 2010 at Freising, southern Germany. For the 21 months of the study period, we integrated the disdrometer spectra over intervals of 10 minutes to correspond to the temporal resolution of the weather station data and discarded measurements with air temperatures below 0°C. Daily General Weather Patterns ("Großwetterlagen", GWL) were downloaded from the website of the German Meteorological Service. Out of the 29 GWL, 14 were included in the analysis for which we had at least 12 rain events during our study period. For the definition of a rain event, we tested different lengths of minimum inter-event times and chose 30 min as a good compromise between number and length of resulting events; rain events started when more than 0.001 mm/h (sensitivity of the disdrometer) were recorded. The length of the rain events ranged between 10 min and 28 h (median 130 min) with the maximum rain intensity recorded being 134 mm/h on 24-07-2009. Seasonal differences were identified for rain event average intensities and maximum intensities per event. The influence of GWL on rain properties such as rain intensity and drop size distribution per time step and per event was investigated based on the above mentioned rain event definition. Pairwise Wilcoxon-tests revealed that higher rain intensity and larger drops were associated with the GWL "Low over the British Isles" (TB), whereas low rain intensities and less drops per interval were associated with the GWL "High over Central Europe

  6. Determination of Trace Amounts of Lead with ETAAS After Single Drop Microextraction and Dispersive Liquid Liquid Microextraction Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efeçınar M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Two liquid-phase microextraction procedures, single-drop microextraction (SDME and dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction (DLLME, have been developed for the determination of lead by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS. Both methods were based on the formation of lead iodide-Rhodamine B complex which is in phosphoric acid medium. In the presence of KI, anionic lead iodide was complexed with Rhodamine B as an ion-association complex. Several factors that may be affected on the SDME and DLLME methods were optimized. In the optimum experimental conditions, the limit of detection (3s and the enhancement factor were 0.008 μgL−1 and 152 for SDME and 0.0129 μgL−1 and 89 for DLLME respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD for eight replicate determinations of 0.25 μgL−1 Pb was 4.6% for SDME and 0.5 μgL−1 Pb was 2.9% for DLLME. The developed methods were validated by the analysis of certified reference materials, and applied successfully to the determination of lead in several water and food samples.

  7. Manipulation of Contact Angles and Interfacial Lengths of Liquid Drops using Electro-Kinetic Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X.; Nolte, D. D.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    Traditionally, capillary pressure is determined by increasing or decreasing external fluid pressures to change the immiscible fluid saturation in a porous medium. The resulting saturation and interfacial area are then linked to the capillary pressure through constitutive equations. A key question is whether externally measured pressures are sensitive to changes in distributions that arise from internal changes in contact angles. As a first step in addressing this question, we investigated the effect of electro-kinetic manipulation on interfacial area and contact angles for a fixed saturation. An EWOD (electro-wetting on dielectric) technique was used to alter the contact angle of single 10 μL droplets of a 1M KCl-H2O solution. A liquid droplet was placed on a glass cover slip (18 mm x 18 mm) coated with a layer of silver (100 nm in thickness) to act as an electrode and then spin-coated with polyimide (a dielectric). A platinum wire was inserted into the droplet and connected to an AC voltage source. The glass plate electrode was connected to ground. Measurements were made for Vrms voltages between 0 to 300 V at a frequency of 50 Hz. Two CCD cameras were used to image changes in the shape of a droplet. One camera was placed on a microscope to capture a top view of a drop in order to measure changes in areal extent and the perimeter of the drop. The second camera imaged a drop from the side to measure contact angles and side-view areal extent and perimeter. At low voltages, the cosine of the contact angle, θ, after applying voltage was linearly dependent on Vrms2. Several experiments showed that the slope of the low-voltage relationship of cos θ vs Vrms2 remained constant for all trials. As the voltage increased, the contact angle saturated. From the side-view images, the contact angle and interfacial length decreased with increasing voltage. From the top-view images, the drop shape changed from circular to elliptical-to irregular as the voltage increased

  8. How to reduce resistance to movement of alkane liquid drops across tilted surfaces without relying on surface roughening and perfluorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urata, Chihiro; Masheder, Benjamin; Cheng, Dalton F; Hozumi, Atsushi

    2012-12-21

    Alkylsilane-derived monolayer-covered surfaces generally display a reasonably good level of hydrophobicity but poor oleophobicity. Here, we demonstrate that the physical attributes of alkylsilane-derived surfaces (liquid-like or solid-like) are dependent on the alkyl chain length and density, and these factors subsequently have significant influence upon the dynamic dewetting behavior toward alkanes (C(n)H(2n+2), where n = 7-16). In this study, we prepared and characterized hybrid films through a simple sol-gel process based on the cohydrolysis and co-condensation of a mixture of a range of alkyltriethoxysilanes (C(n)H(2n+1)Si(OEt)(3), where n = 3, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18) and tetramethoxysilane (TMOS). Surprisingly, when the carbon number (C(n)) of alkyl chain was 10 and below, the produced hybrid films were all smooth, highly transparent, and showed negligible contact angle (CA) hysteresis. On these hybrid surfaces, 5 μL drops of alkanes (n-hexadecane, n-dodecane, and n-decane) could move easily at low tilt angles (oleophobicity. Therefore, the critical C(n) of alkyl chain used for determining final dynamic dewetting behavior against alkane liquids was 12. Furthermore, our hybrid surfaces exhibited excellent antifingerprint properties, particularly demonstrating low adhesion and easy removal from the surface.

  9. Numerical simulation of Marangoni effects of single drops induced by interphase mass transfer in liquid-liquid extraction systems by the level set method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The mathematical model of mass transfer-induced Marangoni effect is formulated. The drop surface evolution is captured by the level set method, in which the interface is represented by the embedded set of zero level of a scalar distance function defined in the whole computational domain. Numerical simulation of the Marangoni effect induced by interphase mass transfer to/from deformable single drops in unsteady motion in liquid-liquid extraction systems is performed in a Eulerian axisymmetric reference frame. The occurrence and development of the Marangoni effect are simulated, and the re- sults are in good agreement with the classical theoretical analysis and previous simulation.

  10. Numerical simulation of Marangoni effects of single drops induced by interphase mass transfer in liquid-liquid extraction systems by the level set method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG JianFeng; YANG Chao; MAO ZaiSha

    2008-01-01

    The mathematical model of mass transfer-induced Marangoni effect is formulated. The drop surface evolution is captured by the level set method, in which the interface is represented by the embedded set of zero level of a scalar distance function defined in the whole computational domain. Numerical simulation of the Marangoni effect induced by interphase mass transfer to/from deformable single drops in unsteady motion in liquid-liquid extraction systems is performed in a Eulerian axisymmetric reference frame. The occurrence and development of the Marangoni effect are simulated, and the re-sults are in good agreement with the classical theoretical analysis and previous simulation.

  11. Modulated exponential films generated by surface acoustic waves and their role in liquid wicking and aerosolization at a pinned drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taller, Daniel; Go, David B.; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2013-05-01

    The exponentially decaying acoustic pressure of scattered surface acoustic waves (SAWs) at the contact line of a liquid film pinned to filter paper is shown to sustain a high curvature conic tip with micron-sized modulations whose dimension grows exponentially from the tip. The large negative capillary pressure in the film, necessary for offsetting the large positive acoustic pressure at the contact line, also creates significant negative hydrodynamic pressure and robust wicking action through the paper. An asymptotic analysis of this intricate pressure matching between the quasistatic conic film and bulk drop shows that the necessary SAW power to pump liquid from the filter paper and aerosolize, expressed in terms of the acoustic pressure scaled by the drop capillary pressure, grows exponentially with respect to twice the acoustic decay constant multiplied by the drop length, with a universal preexponential coefficient. Global rapid aerosolization occurs at a SAW power twice as high, beyond which the wicking rate saturates.

  12. A PHYSICAL MODEL FOR PREDICTING THE PRESSURE DROP OF GAS-LIQUID SLUG FLOW IN HORIZONTAL PIPES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive treatment of all sources of pressure drop within intermittent gas-liquid flow is presented. A slug unit is divided into three parts and the pressure gradient of each part is calculated separately. In the mixing zone the momentum theory is employed and the mixing process between the film and slug is simulated by a two-dimensional wall jet entering a large reservoir to calculate the mixing length. The boundary layer theory is utilized to calculate the pressure drop for the slug body and the momentum equation of the film zone is integrated to calculate the pressure drop for the film zone. The pressure drop predicted in present model is in good agreement with all the measurements.

  13. Effect of chamber pressure on spreading and splashing of liquid drops upon impact on a dry smooth stationary surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Neeraj Kumar; Zhang, Yan; Ratner, Albert

    2011-08-01

    Liquid drop impacts on a smooth surface were studied at elevated chamber pressures to characterize the effect of gas pressure on drop spreading and splashing. Five common liquids were tested at impact speeds between 1.0 and 3.5 m/s and pressure up to 12 bars. Based on experiments at atmospheric pressure, a modification to the "free spreading" model (Scheller and Bousfield in AIChE Paper 41(6):1357-1367, 1995) has been proposed that improves the prediction accuracy of maximum spread factors from an error of 15-5%. At high chamber pressures, drop spreading and maximum spread factor were found to be independent of pressure. The splash ratio (Xu et al. in Phys Rev Lett 94:184505, 2005) showed a non-constant behavior, and a power-law model was demonstrated to predict the increase in splash ratio with decreasing impact speed in the low impact speed regime. Also, drop shape was found to affect splash promotion or suppression for an asymmetry greater than 7-8% of the equivalent drop diameter. The observations of the current work could be especially useful for the study of formation of deposits and wall combustion in engine cylinders.

  14. Volumetric thermal measurements using thermo-liquid crystal (TLC) micro-particles in evaporating drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Rodrigo; Marin, Alvaro Gomez; Kaehler, Christian

    2013-11-01

    Freely evaporating sessile droplets develop weak temperature gradients that can generate Marangoni flows at the drop's surface. Quantitative temperature measurements of small gradients at such scales are very difficult. In this work, a method to track the temperature of individual thermo-liquid crystal (TLC) particles is employed to extract the temperature field inside an evaporating droplet. TLC thermography has been investigated for several years but the low quality of individual TLC particles, as well as the methods used to extract temperature from their color appearance, has prevented the development of a reliable approach to track their temperature individually. In order to overcome these challenges, an emulsion of stable non-encapsulated TLC micro particles with a narrower size distribution than that of commercial encapsulated TLC solutions was used along with a multi-variable calibration approach, as opposed to the direct hue-temperature relationship usually implemented (Segura et al., Microfluid Nanofluid, 2012). In addition, an optimized color space was implemented as well as circular polarization filtering to remove background noise and improve signal-to-noise ratio. Using this technique, a 3D temperature-velocity field within a droplet could be simultaneously resolved.

  15. Crater evolution after the impact of a drop onto a semi-infinite liquid target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisighini, Alfio; Cossali, Gianpietro E; Tropea, Cameron; Roisman, Ilia V

    2010-09-01

    This paper is devoted to an experimental and theoretical investigation of the crater formed by the impact of a single drop onto a semi-infinite target of the same liquid. The shape of the crater at various time instances after impact has been observed using a high-speed video system and then accurately characterized. A theoretical model for the crater expansion has been developed, which is able to predict the temporal variation of the crater depth for sufficiently high Weber, Froude, and Reynolds numbers. The flow around the crater is approximated by an irrotational velocity field past a moving and expanding sphere. The equations describing the propagation of the surface of the crater have been obtained from the balance of stresses at the crater interface, accounting for inertia, gravity, and surface tension. The temporal evolution of the crater depth has been calculated by numerical solution of the equations of motion. The agreement between the theoretical predictions and experimental data are rather good.

  16. Temeprature-dependent Seeger's liquid drop energy for nuclei up to Z=118

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, BirBikram; Kumar, Raj; Bansal, Manie; Gupta, Raj K

    2011-01-01

    Seeger's semi-empirical mass formula is revisited for two of its constants (bulk constant {\\alpha}(0) and neutron-proton asymmetry constant a_{a}) readjusted to obtain the ground-state (g.s.) binding energies of nuclei within a precision of <1.5 MeV and for nuclei up to Z=118. The aim is to include the temperature T-dependence on experimental binding energies, and not to obtain the new parameter set of Seeger's liquid drop energy VLDM . Our proceedure is to define the g.s. binding energy B = V_{LDM} + {\\delta}U, as per Strutinsky renormalization procedure, and using the empirical shell corrections {\\delta}U of Myers and Swiatecki, fit the constants of V_{LDM} to obtain the experimental binding energy Bexpt or theoretically calculated Btheo if data were not available. The T-dependence of the constants of V_{LDM}, is introduced as per the work of Davidson et al., where the pairing energy {\\delta}(T) is modified as per new calculations on compound nucleus decays. The newly fitted constants of V_{LDM} at T=0 a...

  17. Coupling of anionic wetting agents to dust of sulfide ores by dropping liquid method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Chao; OU Jia-cai; ZHOU Bo

    2005-01-01

    By using the experimental approach of dropping liquid, the coupling of three anionic wetting agents with ten dust samples of sulfide ores was studied, and particularly the wetting effects of the wetting agents on the sulfide dust influenced by factors of agent concentration and sulfate additive in the wetting agent solutions were investigated. The results show that when the solution temperature is about 20 ℃, all the selected wetting agents are effective to most dust samples, but the effect is different. Wetting agents are more effective to the dust which is difficult to be wetted. Wetting agent solution with sodium sulfate can improve the wetting ability of sulfide dust. For sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate, the suitable concentration of sodium sulfate is 1-2 mmol/L. The cost of wetting agents can be reduced because the sodium sulfate is much cheaper than many surfactants. Since the dust of sulfide ores is composed of various minerals and elements, the whole effect of depressing dust should be considered while innovating a wetting agent.

  18. Effects of Evaporation/Condensation on Spreading and Contact Angle of a Volatile Liquid Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.; Singh, Bhim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Effects of evaporation/condensation on spreading and contact angle were experimentally studied. A sessile drop of R-113 was tested at different vapor environments to determine the effects of evaporation/condensation on the evolution of contact diameter and contact angle of the drop. Condensation on the drop surface occurs at both the saturated and a nonsaturated vapor environments and promotes the spreading. When the drop is placed in the saturated vapor environment it tends to completely wetting and spreads rapidly. In a nonsaturated vapor environment, the evolution of the sessile drop is divided three stages: condensation-spreading stage, evaporation-retracting stage and rapid contracting stage. In the first stage the drop behaves as in the saturated environment. In the evaporation -retracting stage, the competition between spreading and evaporation of the drop determines the evolution characteristics of the contact diameter and the contact angle. A lower evaporation rate struggles against the spreading power to turn the drop from spreading to retracting with a continuous increase of the contact angle. The drop placed in open air has a much higher evaporation rate. The strong evaporation suppresses the spreading and accelerates the retraction of the drop with a linear decrease of the contact diameter. The contraction of the evaporating drops is gradually accelerated when the contact diameter decreases to 3 min and less till drying up, though the evaporation rate is gradually slowing down.

  19. The effect of temperature and gas Reynolds number on evaporation of a sessile liquid drop in mini-channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlik Evgeniy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental setup has been designed and manufactured to study the evaporation processes of liquid drop under blowing gas in mini-channel. The height of channel can be varied from 3 to 20 mm. Substrates are removable and its surface temperature is kept to constant value. The shadow method is main measurement technique. Series of experiments with 100 μl water drop on polished stainless still substrate are carried out in channel with 9 mm height. Dependences of evaporating rate for different range of temperatures and gas Reynolds numbers are obtained.

  20. The effect of temperature and gas Reynolds number on evaporation of a sessile liquid drop in mini-channel

    OpenAIRE

    Orlik Evgeniy; Bykovskaya Elena; Bai Bo-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Experimental setup has been designed and manufactured to study the evaporation processes of liquid drop under blowing gas in mini-channel. The height of channel can be varied from 3 to 20 mm. Substrates are removable and its surface temperature is kept to constant value. The shadow method is main measurement technique. Series of experiments with 100 μl water drop on polished stainless still substrate are carried out in channel with 9 mm height. Dependences of evaporating rate for different ra...

  1. A New Open-Source Nuclear Equation of State Framework based on the Liquid-Drop Model with Skyrme Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Schneider, Andre; Roberts, Luke; Ott, Christian

    2017-01-01

    The equation of state (EOS) of dense matter is an essential ingredient for numerical simulations of many astrophysical phenomena. We implement a modular open-source Fortran 90 code to construct the EOS of hot dense matter for astrophysical applications. For high density matter we use a non-relativistic liquid-drop description of nuclei that includes surface effects in a single nucleus approximation (SNA). The model is based on the work of Lattimer and Swesty and has been generalized to accommodate most Skyrme parametrizations available in the literature. Low density matter is described as an ensemble of nuclei in nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE). The transition between the SNA and NSE regimes is performed via a continuous function that smoothly blends their Helmholtz free energy. To account for the existence of 2 solar mass neutron stars, we extend the formalism to allow for a stiffening of the EOS at densities above 3 times nuclear saturation density, where the properties of matter are presently poorly constrained. We study how different Skyrme parametrizations affect the EOS, neutron star mass-radius relationships, and the spherically symmetric collapse and post-bounce supernova evolution of massive stars.

  2. Rapid extraction and determination of amphetamines in human urine samples using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and solidification of floating organic drop followed by high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi-Jouibari, Toraj; Fattahi, Nazir; Shamsipur, Mojtaba

    2014-06-01

    A novel, rapid, simple and sensitive dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method based on the solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) combined with high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV) was used to determine amphetamine and methamphetamine in urine samples. The factors affecting the extraction efficiency of DLLME-SFO such as the kind and volume of the extraction and the disperser solvents, effect of concentration of K2CO3 and extraction time were investigated and the optimal extraction conditions were established. Under the optimum conditions (extraction solvent: 30.0μl 1-undecanol; disperser solvent: 300μl acetonitrile; buffer concentration: 2% (w/v) K2CO3 and extraction time: 1min), calibration curves are linear in the range of 10-3000μgl(-1) and limit of detections (LODs) are in the range of 2-8μgl(-1). The relative standard deviations (RSDs) for 100μgl(-1) of amphetamine and methamphetamine in diluted urine are in the range of 6.2-7.8% (n=7). The method was successfully applied for the determination of amphetamine and methamphetamine in the actual urine samples. The relative recoveries of urine samples spiked with amphetamine and methamphetamine are 87.8-113.2%. The obtained results show that DLLME-SFO combined with HPLC-UV is a fast and simple method for the determination of amphetamine and methamphetamine in urine.

  3. Effects of non-uniform interfacial tension in small Reynolds number flow past a spherical liquid drop

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D P Mason; G M Moremedi

    2011-09-01

    A singular perturbation solution is given for small Reynolds number flow past a spherical liquid drop. The interfacial tension required to maintain the drop in a spherical shape is calculated. When the interfacial tension gradient exceeds a critical value, a region of reversed flow occurs on the interface at the rear and the interior flow splits into two parts with reversed circulation at the rear. The magnitude of the interior fluid velocity is small, of order the Reynolds number. A thin transition layer attached to the drop at the rear occurs in the exterior flow. The effects could model the stagnant cap which forms as surfactant is added but the results apply however the variability in the interfacial tension might have been induced.

  4. Pressure drop and cavitation investigations on static helical-grooved square, triangular and curved cavity liquid labyrinth seals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asok, S.P., E-mail: asoksp@yahoo.co [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mepco Schlenk Engineering College (MSEC), Sivakasi, Tamilnadu 626005 (India); Sankaranarayanasamy, K. [National Institute of Technology, Trichy (India); Sundararajan, T. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai (India); Vaidyanathan, G. [Fast Reactor Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam (India); Kumar, K. Udhaya [Department of Mechanical Engineering, MSEC, Sivakasi (India)

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: Design and testing of newer and novel helical-grooved profiles of labyrinths capable of ensuring high pressure drops even at low liquid flow rates. Implementation of genetic algorithm in the optimization of labyrinth seal through surrogate modelling means. Application of CFD in three-dimensional fluid flow and cavitation analysis for static helical grooved labyrinth seals. - Abstract: Sodium cooled Fast Breeder Reactors (FBR) form the second stage of India's Nuclear power programme. Through a narrow annular space in the grid plate assembly of a prototype FBR, a very low leakage flow of liquid metal sodium should pass, experiencing a stipulated high pressure drop, and without much cavitation. To achieve this, a suitable labyrinth seal is required to be developed for use in the annulus. Water is employed as the model testing liquid which is estimated to experience a pressure drop ratio of 10.5 at the rated leakage flow. Previously studied circular or sinusoidal-grooved square, triangular or curved cavity labyrinth seals were unable to meet this value. In the present work, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analyses are carried out on Helical-grooved Square cavity Labyrinth Seals (HSLS), using commercial code Fluent. It is found that the geometrical configuration of the grooves plays a major role on the pressure drop. Experimental results reveal close agreement with CFD predictions. An optimal configuration of this square cavity seal is identified by applying genetic algorithm (GA) using commercial packages. It meets just about 24% of the targeted value. Later, using parametric CFD analyses, a Helical-grooved Triangular cavity Labyrinth Seal (HTLS) and different Helical-grooved Curved cavity Labyrinth Seals (HCLS) are analysed. The most favourable profile is tested and found to reach the required pressure drop. CFD cavitation analyses predict the intensity of cavitation in these seals to be below prohibitive levels.

  5. Modeling electrokinetics in ionic liquids: General

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chao [Physical and Computational Science Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Bao, Jie [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Pan, Wenxiao [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison WI USA; Sun, Xin [Physical and Computational Science Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA

    2017-04-07

    Using direct numerical simulations we provide a thorough study on the electrokinetics of ionic liquids. In particular, the modfied Poisson-Nernst-Planck (MPNP) equations are solved to capture the crowding and overscreening effects that are the characteristics of an ionic liquid. For modeling electrokinetic flows in an ionic liquid, the MPNP equations are coupled with the Navier-Stokes equations to study the coupling of ion transport, hydrodynamics, and electrostatic forces. Specifically, we consider the ion transport between two parallel plates, charging dynamics in a 2D straight-walled pore, electro-osmotic ow in a nano-channel, electroconvective instability on a plane ion-selective surface, and electroconvective ow on a curved ion-selective surface. We discuss how the crowding and overscreening effects and their interplay affect the electrokinetic behaviors of ionic liquids in these application problems.

  6. Puddle jumping: Spontaneous ejection of large liquid droplets from hydrophobic surfaces during drop tower tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attari, B.; Weislogel, M.; Wollman, A.; Chen, Y.; Snyder, T.

    2016-10-01

    Large droplets and puddles jump spontaneously from sufficiently hydrophobic surfaces during routine drop tower tests. The simple low-cost passive mechanism can in turn be used as an experimental device to investigate dynamic droplet phenomena for drops up to 104 times larger than their normal terrestrial counterparts. We provide and/or confirm quick and qualitative design guides for such "drop shooters" as employed in drop tower tests including relationships to predict droplet ejection durations and velocities as functions of drop volume, surface texture, surface contour, wettability pattern, and fluid properties including contact angle. The latter is determined via profile image comparisons with numerical equilibrium interface computations. Water drop volumes of 0.04-400 ml at ejection speeds of -0.007-0.12 m/s are demonstrated herein. A sample application of the drop jump method is made to the classic problem of low-gravity phase change heat transfer for large impinging drops. Many other candidate problems might be identified by the reader.

  7. Octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS)-coated ionic liquid drops: Micro-reactors for homogenous catalytic reactions at designated interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoning; Cai, Yuguang

    2012-01-01

    An ionic liquid (IL), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim]Cl) can assemble on prefabricated carboxylic acid-terminated chemical patterns on octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) film. The chemical pattern controls the position, shape and size of the IL on the surface. After the IL assembly - by incubating IL drops assembled on sample surface in an OTS silane vapor - an OTS layer was coated on the IL drop surface which encapsulated the IL drop. The OTS-coated capsule can exist stably under aqueous solution. The OTS coating protected the IL drops from being instantaneously dissolved by other solutions. We found that a homogenous catalyst (FeCl(3)) dissolved in [Bmim]Cl can be assembled together on the chemical patterns and subsequently encapsulated together with [Bmim]Cl by OTS coating. The pinhole defects within the vapor-coated silane layer provide space for the catalyst inside the capsule and reactants outside the capsule to meet and react. When the OTS-coated capsule containing a FeCl(3)/IL mixture was soaked under H(2)O(2) solution, the Fe(3+) ions catalyzed the decomposition reaction of hydrogen peroxide at the vapor-coated OTS-water interface. Since the shape and position of the interface is defined by the underneath chemical pattern, our findings show that the OTS-coated IL drops assembled on chemical patterns can be used as novel micro-reactors. This allows homogenous catalytic reactions to occur at the designated interfaces.

  8. Octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS-coated ionic liquid drops: Micro-reactors for homogenous catalytic reactions at designated interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An ionic liquid (IL, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim]Cl can assemble on prefabricated carboxylic acid–terminated chemical patterns on octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS film. The chemical pattern controls the position, shape and size of the IL on the surface. After the IL assembly – by incubating IL drops assembled on sample surface in an OTS silane vapor – an OTS layer was coated on the IL drop surface which encapsulated the IL drop. The OTS-coated capsule can exist stably under aqueous solution. The OTS coating protected the IL drops from being instantaneously dissolved by other solutions. We found that a homogenous catalyst (FeCl3 dissolved in [Bmim]Cl can be assembled together on the chemical patterns and subsequently encapsulated together with [Bmim]Cl by OTS coating. The pinhole defects within the vapor-coated silane layer provide space for the catalyst inside the capsule and reactants outside the capsule to meet and react. When the OTS-coated capsule containing a FeCl3/IL mixture was soaked under H2O2 solution, the Fe3+ ions catalyzed the decomposition reaction of hydrogen peroxide at the vapor-coated OTS-water interface. Since the shape and position of the interface is defined by the underneath chemical pattern, our findings show that the OTS-coated IL drops assembled on chemical patterns can be used as novel micro-reactors. This allows homogenous catalytic reactions to occur at the designated interfaces.

  9. Experimental investigation of liquid-liquid system drop size distribution in Taylor-Couette flow and its application in the CFD simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzad, Reza; Puttinger, Stefan; Pirker, Stefan; Schneiderbauer, Simon

    2016-11-01

    Liquid-liquid systems are widely used in the several industries such as food, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, chemical and petroleum. Drop size distribution (DSD) plays a key role as it strongly affects the overall mass and heat transfer in the liquid-liquid systems. To understand the underlying mechanisms single drop breakup experiments have been done by several researchers in the Taylor-Couette flow; however, most of those studies concentrate on the laminar flow regime and therefore, there is no sufficient amount of data in the case of in turbulent flows. The well-defined pattern of the Taylor-Couette flow enables the possibility to investigate DSD as a function of the local fluid dynamic properties, such as shear rate, which is in contrast to more complex devices such as stirred tank reactors. This paper deals with the experimental investigation of liquid-liquid DSD in Taylor-Couette flow. From high speed camera images we found a simple correlation for the Sauter mean diameter as a function of the local shear employing image processing. It is shown that this correlation holds for different oil-in-water emulsions. Finally, this empirical correlation for the DSD is used as an input data for a CFD simulation to compute the local breakup of individual droplets in a stirred tank reactor.

  10. Pressure drop in contraction flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    This note is a supplement to Dynamic of Polymeric Liquids (DPL) page 178. DPL gives an equation for the pressure drop in a tapered (and circular) contraction, valid only at low angles. Here the general definition of contraction flow (the Bagley correction) and a more general method to find...

  11. Numerical modelling of the impact of a liquid drop on the surface of a two-phase fluid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochan, Agata; Lamorski, Krzysztof; Bieganowski, Andrzej; Ryżak, Magdalena

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was validation of a numerical model of the impact of a liquid drop on the surface of a two-phase system of immiscible fluids. The drop impact phenomenon was recorded using a high-speed camera (Vision Research MIRO M310) and the data were recorded at 2000 frames per second. The numerical calculations were performed with the Finite Volume Method (FVM) solving the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations for three phases: air and two selected immiscible fluids. The Volume of Fluid (VOF) technique was employed for modelling of the boundaries between the phases. Numerical modelling was done with the Finite Volume Method using an available OpenFOAM software. The experiment was based on three variables: • the height from which the drop of the selected fluids fell (the speed of the drop), • the thickness of the layers of the two selected immiscible fluids (a thin layer of the fluid with a lower density was spread over the higher-density fluid), • the size of the fluid droplet. The velocity and radius of the falling drop was calculated based on the recorded images. The used parameters allowed adequate projection of the impact of fluid droplets on a system of two immiscible liquids. Development of the numerical model of splash may further have practical applications in environmental protection (spraying of hazardous fluids, spread of fuels and other hazardous substances as a result of disasters, spraying (water cooling) of hot surfaces), and in agriculture (prevention of soil erosion). The study was partially funded from the National Science Centre (Poland) based on the decision no. DEC-2012/07/N/ST10/03280.

  12. The Evaporation of Liquid Micro-Drops on the Heated Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semenov Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaporation of a heated sessile water micro-drop was studied experimentally at the substrate temperature and surrounding atmosphere from 30 to 50 °C. The studies were performed on the float glass substrate with aluminum nanocoating of optical quality. The research has shown that the specific rate of evaporation (mass loss per unit of the drop surface area increases with the decrease in droplet volume and at the last stage several times exceeds the initial value.

  13. Estimates of pressure gradients in PEMFC gas channels due to blockage by static liquid drops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatraman, M.; Shimpalee, S.; Van Zee, J.W. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of South Carolina, 301 Main St., Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Moon, Sung In; Extrand, C.W. [Entegris, Inc., 3500 Lyman Boulevard, Chaska, MN 55318 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    Numerical analyses are presented to explain the effect of drop size and contact angle on local pressures inside small channels. These pressures and channel characteristics are of interest when water condenses in the gas channels of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells and hence the study uses Reynolds numbers consistent with as typical utilization of reacting gases in 200 cm{sup 2} flow fields (i.e., 200 < Re < 1500 and stoichiometries of 1.2-2.0 at 1.0 A/cm{sup 2}). The analyses were performed using three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic techniques and the results show that pressure drops are minimal until the blockage was greater than 50%. As blockage increased further, due to larger drops or increased hydrophobicity, pressure drop increased. The results of a stagnant drop are supported by visualization experiments, which show minimal distortion of the drop for these low flow rates, small ratios, and hydrophobic contact angles. Proper scaling parameters and design criteria for microchannels validation experiments are presented. (author)

  14. Headspace Hanging Drop Liquid Phase Microextraction and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Flavors from Clove Buds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Mi Jin; Shin, Yeon Jae; Oh, Se Yeon; Kim, Nam Sun; Kim, Kun; Lee, Dong Sun [Seoul Women' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15

    A novel sample pretreatment technique, headspace hanging drop liquid phase microextraction (HS-LPME) was studied and applied to the determination of flavors from solid clove buds by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Several parameters affecting on HS-LPME such as organic solvent drop volume, extraction time, extraction temperature and phase ratio were investigated. 1-Octanol was selected as the extracting solvent, drop size was fixed to 0.6 μL. 60 min extraction time at 25 .deg. C was chosen. HS-LPME has the good efficiency demonstrated by the higher partition equilibrium constant (K{sub lh}) values and concentration factor (CF) values. The limits of detection (LOD) were 1.5-3.2 ng. The amounts of eugenol, β-caryophyllene and eugenol acetate from the clove bud sample were 1.90 mg/g, 1.47 mg/g and 7.0 mg/g, respectively. This hanging drop based method is a simple, fast and easy sample enrichment technique using minimal solvent. HSLPME is an alternative sample preparation method for the analysis of volatile aroma compounds by GC-MS.

  15. 46 CFR 154.1300 - Liquid level gauging system: General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1300 Liquid level gauging system: General. (a) If Table 4 lists a closed... type device, electronic or magnetic probe, or bubble tube indicator. (b) If Table 4 lists a...

  16. A generalized theory of chromatography and multistep liquid extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizhkov, V. P.; Boitsov, V. N.

    2017-03-01

    A generalized theory of chromatography and multistep liquid extraction is developed. The principles of highly efficient processes for fine preparative separation of binary mixture components on a fixed sorbent layer are discussed.

  17. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop and high-performance liquid chromatography to the analysis of cocaine's major adulterants in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, Laís Cristina Santana; Matos, Humberto Reis; Dórea, Haroldo Silveira; Pimentel, Maria Fernanda; de Santana, Danielle Cristine Almeida Silva; de Santana, Fernando José Malagueño

    2017-02-01

    A simple method has been proposed for the determination of cocaine's major adulterants (caffeine, levamisole, lidocaine, phenacetin, diltiazem, and hydroxyzine) in human urine by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) in combination with high-performance liquid chromatography - photodiode array detector (HPLC-PDA). The reversed-phase chromatographic separation was obtained with a column C18 extended (250×4.6mm; 5μm; 80Å) in gradient elution mode using acetonitrile-trifluoroacetic acid 0.026% (v,v) (pH=2.5) at 1mLmin(-1) as mobile phase, at 25°C, and detection at 235nm. The analysis time was 25min. This condition had the best resolution factors (>1.15), retention factors (>0.68), number of plates (>2094.9), and separation factors (>1.05) for all targets, indicating a good separation. The kind of extraction and dispersive solvent were investigated for unifactorial design. The buffer pH, the volume of extraction and disperser solvent, and the amount of salt were optimized for full factorial design. Under optimum conditions, human urine samples were alkalized with 0.5M sodium phosphate buffer (pH 10) and added to sodium chloride (20%m/v). Acetonitrile (150μL) and 1-dodecanol (30μL) were used as dispersive and extraction solvent, respectively. The method presented linear range of 312.5-3125ngmL(-1) to caffeine and levamisole and 187.5-1875ngmL(-1) to lidocaine, phenacetin, diltiazem, and hydroxyzine. The limit of quantification was 187.5ngmL(-1) to lidocaine, phenacetin, diltiazem, and hydroxyzine and 312.5ngmL(-1) for caffeine and levamisole. The recovery mean values were between 6.0 and 42.6%. The method showed good precision and accuracy, with within- and between-run relative standard deviation and relative error less than 15%. The samples were stable after freeze-thaw cycle and short-term room temperature stability tests. Besides, this method was satisfactorily applied in urine of cocaine users. It

  18. Simultaneous monitoring of protein adsorption at the solid-liquid interface from sessile solution droplets by ellipsometry and axisymmetric drop shape analysis by profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wormeester, H; Busscher, HK

    1999-01-01

    In this paper two in situ techniques are combined to simultaneously examine protein adsorption at the solid-liquid interface from sessile solution droplets. With axisymmetric drop shape analysis by profile (ADSA-P) the change in solid-liquid interfacial tension is determined, while ellipsometry is e

  19. Simultaneous monitoring of protein adsorption at the solid–liquid interface from sessile solution droplets by ellipsometry and axisymmetric drop shape analysis by profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordmans, Jaap; Wormeester, Herbert; Busscher, Henk J.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper two in situ techniques are combined to simultaneously examine protein adsorption at the solid–liquid interface from sessile solution droplets. With axisymmetric drop shape analysis by profile (ADSA-P) the change in solid–liquid interfacial tension is determined, while ellipsometry is e

  20. Equilibrium shape and location of a liquid drop acoustically positioned in a resonant rectangular chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, H. W.; Barmatz, M.; Shipley, C.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of a standing wave field in a rectangular chamber on the shape and location of an acoustically positioned drop or bubble is calculated. The sample deformation and equilibrium position are obtained from an analysis of the spherical harmonic projections of the total surface stress tensor. The method of calculation relies on the assumed condition that the sample is only slightly distorted from a spherical form. The equilibrium location of a levitated drop is combined with a formula introduced by Hasegawa (1979) to calcualte the ka dependence of the radiation force function. The present theory is valid for large as well as small ka values. Calculations in the small ka limit agree with previous theories and experimental results. Examples are presented for nonplane-wave modes as well as plane-wave rectangular modes.

  1. Interactions between drops of molten Al-Li alloys and liquid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyder, M.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Nelson, L.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Duda, P.M.; Hyndman, D.A. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, at the request of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), studied the interactions between single drops of molten aluminum-lithium alloys and water. Most experiments were performed with ``B`` alloy (3.1 w/o Li, balance A1). Objectives were to develop experimental procedures for preparing and delivering the melt drops and diagnostics for characterizing the interactions, measure hydrogen generated by the reaction between melt and water, examine debris recovered after the interaction, determine changes in the aqueous phase produced by the melt-water chemical reactions, and determine whether steam explosions occur spontaneously under the conditions studied. Although many H{sub 2} bubbles were generated after the drops entered the water, spontaneous steam explosions never occurred when globules of the ``B`` alloy at temperatures between 700 and 1000C fell freely through water at room temperature, or upon or during subsequent contact with submerged aluminum or stainless steel surfaces. Total amounts of H{sub 2} (STP) increased from about 2 to 9 cm{sup 3}/per gram of melt as initial melt temperature increased over this range of temperatures.

  2. General aspects of solid on liquid growth mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laux, E; Charmet, J; Haquette, H; Banakh, O; Jeandupeux, L; Graf, B; Keppner, H, E-mail: Herbert.Keppner@he-arc.c [University of Applied Science Arc, Eplatures-Grise 17, CH-2300 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland)

    2009-08-01

    Liquids, in general, tend to have a lower density as solids and therefore it is not straightforward to deposit solid over liquids in a way that the liquid becomes hermetically sealed under the solid layer. The authors review that several phenomena that can easily be observed in nature are only due to particular anomalies and solid on liquid is rather an exception as the rule. Natural solid on liquid systems are lacking of thermal, mechanical or chemical stability. It is not surprising, that one is not at all used thinking about to e.g. replace the gate oxide in a thin film transistor by a thin film of oil, or, to find in other microsystems functional liquids between a stack of thin solid films. However, once this becomes a serious option, a large variety of new Microsystems with new functionalities can be easily designed. In another paper (this conference and [1]) the authors pioneered that the polymer Parylene (poly(p-xylylene)) can be deposited on liquids coming already quite close to the above mentioned vision. In this paper the authors ask if one can synthesize other solid on liquid systems and surprisingly conclude, based on experimental evidence, that solid on liquid deposition seems to rather be the rule and not the exception.

  3. A Generalized Equation of State for High-Pressure Liquids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Yan-bo; TONG Jing-shan

    2005-01-01

    An equation of state (EOS) for high-pressure liquids, I.e., Tait EOS, is deduced according to isothermal compressibility KT=-1/V·((а)V/(а)p)T·.Based on the equation, a generalized EOS for high pressure-liquids is established by using the reduced state principle and introducing a characteristic parameter-configuration factorξ.Reasonably satisfactory P-V-T data for many organic compounds, including some polar components, were calculated by using the equation.

  4. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic drop followed by ICP-MS for the simultaneous determination of heavy metals in wastewaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Peng, Guilong; He, Qiang; Zhu, Hui; Al-Hamadani, Sulala M. Z. F.

    2015-04-01

    In the present work, a dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) combined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was developed for the determination of Pb, Co, Cu, Ni, Zn. The influences of analytical parameters, including pH, extraction solvent volume, disperser solvent volume, concentration of chelating agent on the quantitative recoveries of Pb, Co, Cu, Ni, Zn were investigated. The effect of the interfering ions on the analytes recovery was also investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the limits of detection were 0.97-2.18 ng L-1. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) were 2.62-4.51% (n = 7, C = 20 ng L-1). The proposed method was successfully applied for the analysis of ultra trace metals in wastewater samples.

  5. How pinning and contact angle hysteresis govern quasi-static liquid drop transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H; Tang, T; Zhao, H; Law, K-Y; Amirfazli, A

    2016-02-21

    This paper presents both experimental and numerical simulations of liquid transfer between two solid surfaces with contact angle hysteresis (CAH). Systematic studies on the role of the advancing contact angle (θa), receding contact angle (θr) and CAH in determining the transfer ratio (volume of the liquid transferred onto the acceptor surface over the total liquid volume) and the maximum adhesion force (Fmax) were performed. The transfer ratio was found to be governed by contact line pinning at the end of the transfer process caused by CAH of surfaces. A map based on θr of the two surfaces was generated to identify the three regimes for liquid transfer: (I) contact line pinning occurs only on the donor surface, (II) contact line pinning occurs on both surfaces, and (III) contact line pinning occurs only on the acceptor surface. With this map, an empirical equation is provided which is able to estimate the transfer ratio by only knowing θr of the two surfaces. The value of Fmax is found to be strongly influenced by the contact line pinning in the early stretching stage. For symmetric liquid bridges between two identical surfaces, Fmax may be determined only by θa, only by θr, or by both θa and θr, depending on the magnitude of the contact angles. For asymmetric bridges, Fmax is found to be affected by the period when contact lines are pinned on both surfaces.

  6. Nuclear-deformation energies according to a liquid-drop model with a sharp surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blocki, J.; Swiatecki, W.J.

    1982-05-01

    We present an atlas of 665 deformation-energy maps and 150 maps of other properties of interest, relevant for nuclear systems idealized as uniformly charged drops endowed with a surface tension. The nuclear shapes are parametrized in terms of two spheres modified by a smoothly fitted quadratic surface of revolution and are specified by three variables: asymmetry, sphere separation, and a neck variable (that goes over into a fragment-deformation variable after scission). The maps and related tables should be useful for the study of macroscopic aspects of nuclear fission and of collisions between any two nuclei in the periodic table.

  7. The coffee-drop phenomenon and its time fluctuations: Self-sustained oscillations in colloidal liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakhno, T. A.; Yakhno, V. G.

    2017-03-01

    The instant coffee model has been taken to study self-sustained oscillations in liquid dispersive media using dynamic self-organization processes in drying droplets that stay sessile on a solid wetted substrate. The width of the formed ring and the dynamics of mechanical properties of the drying sediment and the way they fluctuated over 11 h of the experiment have been measured. Analysis has shown a high degree of correlation between these indicators. This dynamics reflects processes that develop in the examined liquid medium. The possible mechanism of self-sustained oscillations, which is related to the aggregation-disaggregation of the colloidal phase and fluctuations of the interphase tension, has been discussed. The practical significance of this work is that fluctuation processes in liquid dispersive media need to be taken into account as a natural source of systematic measurement error.

  8. Picoliter Drop-On-Demand Dispensing for Multiplex Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Joseph P.; Parent, Lucas R.; Cantlon, Joshua; Eickhoff, Holger; Bared, Guido; Evans, James E.; Gianneschi, Nathan C.

    2016-05-03

    Abstract

    Liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM) provides a unique insight into the dynamics of nanomaterials in solution. Controlling the addition of multiple solutions to the liquid cell remains a key hurdle in our ability to increase throughput and to study processes dependent on solution mixing including chemical reactions. Here, we report that a piezo dispensing technique allows for mixing of multiple solutions directly within the viewing area. This technique permits deposition of 50 pL droplets of various aqueous solutions onto the liquid cell window, before assembly of the cell in a fully controlled manner. This proof-of-concept study highlights the great potential of picoliter dispensing in combination with LCTEM for observing nanoparticle mixing in the solution phase and the creation of chemical gradients.

  9. A generalized number theory problem applied to ideal liquids and to terminological lexis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov, V. P.; Maslova, T. V.

    2017-01-01

    We consider the notion of number of degrees of freedom in number theory and thermodynamics. This notion is applied to notions of terminology such as terms, slogans, themes, rules, and regulations. Prohibitions are interpreted as restrictions on the number of degrees of freedom. We present a theorem on the small number of degrees of freedom as a consequence of the generalized partitio numerorum problem. We analyze the relationship between thermodynamically ideal liquids with the lexical background that a term acquires in the process of communication. Examples showing how this background may be enhanced are considered. We discuss the question of the coagulation of drops in connection with the forecast of analogs of the gas-ideal liquid phase transition in social-political processes.

  10. Effect of solute transfer and interfacial instabilities on scalar and velocity field around a drop rising in quiescent liquid channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanwale, Makrand A.; Khadamkar, Hrushikesh P.; Mathpati, Channamallikarjun S.

    2015-11-01

    Physics of development of flow structures around the drop rising with solute transfer is highly influenced by the interfacial behaviour and is remarkably different than a particle rising under the same conditions. We report on the use of simultaneous particle image velocimetry-planar laser induced fluorescence technique to measure scalar and velocity fields around a drop rising in a quiescent liquid channel. The selected continuous phase is glycerol, and the drop consists of a mixture of toluene, acetone, and a dye rhodamine-6G, with acetone working as a interfacial tension depressant. The drop lies in the spherical region with Eötvös number, Eo = 1.95, Morton number, M = 78.20 and the particle Reynolds number being, Rep = 0.053. With Rep approaching that of creeping flow, we analyse the effect of interfacial instabilities solely, contrary to other investigations [M. Wegener et al., "Impact of Marangoni instabilities on the fluid dynamic behaviour of organic droplets," Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 52, 2543-2551 (2009); S. Burghoff and E. Y. Kenig, "A CFD model for mass transfer and interfacial phenomena on single droplets," AIChE J. 52, 4071-4078 (2006); J. Wang et al., "Numerical simulation of the Marangoni effect on transient mass transfer from single moving deformable drops," AIChE J. 57, 2670-2683 (2011); R. F. Engberg, M. Wegener, and E. Y. Kenig, "The impact of Marangoni convection on fluid dynamics and mass transfer at deformable single rising droplets—A numerical study," Chem. Eng. Sci. 116, 208-222 (2014)] which account for turbulence as well as interfacial instabilities with Rep in the turbulent range. The velocity and concentration fields obtained are subjected to scale-wise energy decomposition using continuous wavelet transform. Scale-wise probability distribution functions of wavelet coefficients are calculated to check intermittent non-Gaussian behaviour for simultaneous velocity and scalar statistics. Multi-fractal singularity spectra for scalar

  11. Anomalous thermally induced pinning of a liquid drop on a solid substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettu, Srinivas; Kanungo, Mandakini; Law, Kock-Yee

    2013-08-27

    The effect of substrate temperature on the wetting and spreading behavior of a UV ink monomer has been studied as a surrogate for the ink on four different substrates: DTC (digital top coat)-coated BOPP (biaxial oriented polypropylene), Flexo-coated BOPP, DTC-coated SGE (semigloss elite) paper, and Flexo-coated SGE paper. Results show that the dynamic contact angles of the monomer decrease exponentially over time after contacting the surface, and the rate of spreading is consistently higher at 95 °C than at 22 °C. This observation indicates that spreading is controlled by the viscosity of the monomer as it decreases with temperature. An anomalous temperature effect is observed for the static contact angle on the DTC-coated BOPP substrate. The static contact angle at 95 °C is significantly larger than that at 22 °C (52° versus 30°). This is counterintuitive, as the surface tension of the monomer is shown to decease with increasing temperature. Microscopy (SEM and AFM) studies suggest that there is little interaction between the DTC coating solution and the BOPP substrate during the fast-drying coating process. This results in a smooth coated surface and, more importantly, voids between the BOPP nanofibers underneath the DTC coating. As the DTC-BOPP substrate is heated to 95 °C, fiber expansions occur. Microscopy results show that nanosized protrusions are formed on the DTC surface. We attribute it to fiber expansions in the vertical direction. Fiber expansions in the lateral direction causes little surface morphology change as the expanded materials only fill the voids laterally between the nanofiber network. We suggest that the protrusions on the surface create strong resistance to the wetting process and pin the monomer drop into a metastable wetting state. This interpretation is supported by the sliding angle and sessile drop height experiments.

  12. Crystal deposition patterns from evaporating sessile drops on superhydrophobic and liquid impregnated surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Samantha; Dash, Susmita; Varanasi, Kripa; Varanasi Group Team

    2016-11-01

    Accelerated corrosion and scale buildup near oceans is partially due to deposition of salty sea mist onto ships, cars, and building structures. Many corrosion preventative measures are expensive, time intensive, and/or have negative impacts on the environment. One solution is the use of specific surfaces that are engineered for scale resistance. In this work, we show that we can delay crystallization and reduce scale adhesion on specifically engineered liquid impregnated surfaces (LIS). The low contact angle hysteresis of the LIS results in a sliding contact line of the saline droplet during evaporation, and the elevated energy barrier of the smooth liquid interface delays crystallization. Experiments conducted on surfaces with different wettability also demonstrate the corresponding influence in controlling salt crystal polymorphism.

  13. Drop deposition on surfaces with contact-angle hysteresis: Liquid-bridge stability and breakup

    OpenAIRE

    Akbari, Amir; Hill, Reghan J.

    2015-01-01

    We study the stability and breakup of liquid bridges with a free contact line on a surface with contact-angle hysteresis under zero-gravity conditions. Theoretical predictions of the stability limits are validated by experimental measurements. Experiments are conducted in a water-methanol-silicon oil system where the gravity force is offset by buoyancy. We highlight cases where stability is lost during the transition from a pinned-pinned to pinned-free interface when the receding contact angl...

  14. Generalization of Martinelli-Nelson method of pressure drop calculation in two-phase flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trela Marian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple method of pressure drop calculation for two-phase flows of different fluids during convective boiling in channels is presented. It is based on experimental data of pressure drop multiplier R and void fraction φ obtained by Martinelli and Nelson for boiling of water in vertical tubes. The data cover the whole two-phase domain from ambient to critical pressure. Unfortunately, they have been presented in graphical forms. The first step in the procedure proposed in the paper was a transformation of the graphical data into analytical formulas which contain such dimensionless quantities as steam quality x, Martinelli parameter X, multiplier Φl2 and dimensionless coefficients D, m, E and k. In the second step, simple analytical formulas were determined to express the dimensionless coefficients as a function of physical property parameter K. In this way two simple analytical expressions for the multiplier R and void fraction φ were obtained. They are in analytical dimensionless form so they may be used directly for different fluids, not only for water. This is the main advantage of the proposed method.

  15. Coalescence of a Drop inside another Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugundhan, Vivek; Jian, Zhen; Yang, Fan; Li, Erqiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2016-11-01

    Coalescence dynamics of a pendent drop sitting inside another drop, has been studied experimentally and in numerical simulations. Using an in-house fabricated composite micro-nozzle, a smaller salt-water drop is introduced inside a larger oil drop which is pendent in a tank containing the same liquid as the inner drop. On touching the surface of outer drop, the inner drop coalesces with the surrounding liquid forming a vortex ring, which grows in time to form a mushroom-like structure. The initial dynamics at the first bridge opening up is quantified using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), while matching the refractive index of the two liquids. The phenomenon is also numerically simulated using the open-source code Gerris. The problem is fully governed by two non-dimensional parameters: the Ohnesorge number and the diameter ratios of the two drops. The validated numerical model is used to better understand the dynamics of the phenomenon. In some cases a coalescence cascade is observed with liquid draining intermittently and the inner drop reducing in size.

  16. Rising and boiling of a drop of volatile liquid in a heavier one: application to the LMFBR severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigny, Sylvain L.; Coste, Pierre F. [DEN/DER/SSTH, CEA/Grenoble, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The rising and, simultaneously the boiling, of a droplet of volatile liquid in a heavier one is computation-ally investigated. Our calculations are performed with the help of the SIMMER code, in which a specific DNS algorithm is developed, to represent surface tension between the different media in an explicit way. This is required to represent the physical contact that occurs between two liquids and the vapor from the lighter one, since interfacial heat transfers, and therefore boiling kinetics, merely depend on it. The behavior of the three fluids system is of interest as a key phenomenon related to the transition phase of LMFBR severe accidents, before the formation of a fully developed bubble column. The driven force due to the boiling of steel drops can play a major role in the relocation, and, consequently, the recriticality of UO{sub 2} fuel. The problem is investigated focusing first on analytical experiments, built-up with simulating materials, and for which accurate experimental results are provided. The dependence of results with regard to thermodynamical and physical properties is underlined. This point is of interest in view of some uncertainties in the knowledge of data concerning the materials present in the reactor at high temperature. The pressure level is a key parameter in the accident scenarios: its influence is uppermost on the volumic mass of the gas. It is also outlined. (authors)

  17. Drop Tower Setup to Study the Diffusion-driven Growth of a Foam Ball in Supersaturated Liquids in Microgravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Martínez, Patricia; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Javier; van der Meer, Devaraj; Sperl, Matthias

    2017-08-01

    The diffusion-driven growth of a foam ball is a phenomenon that appears in many manufacturing process as well as in a variety of geological phenomena. Usually these processes are greatly affected by gravity, as foam is much lighter than the surrounding liquid. However, the growth of the foam free of gravity effects is still very relevant, as it is connected to manufacturing in space and to the formation of rocks in meteorites and other small celestial bodies. The aim of this research is to investigate experimentally the growth of a bubble cloud growing in a gas-supersaturated liquid in microgravity conditions. Here, we describe the experiments carried out in the drop tower of the Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM). In few words, a foam seed is formed with spark-induced cavitation in carbonated water, whose time evolution is recorded with two high-speed cameras. Our preliminary results shed some light on how the size of the foam ball scales with time, in particular at times much longer than what could be studied in normal conditions, i.e. on the surface of the Earth, where the dynamics of the foam is already dominated by gravity after several milliseconds.

  18. A general approach to double-moment normalization of drop size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, G. W.; Sempere-Torres, D.; Uijlenhoet, R.; Zawadzki, I.

    2003-04-01

    Normalization of drop size distributions (DSDs) is re-examined here. First, we present an extension of scaling normalization using one moment of the DSD as a parameter (as introduced by Sempere-Torres et al, 1994) to a scaling normalization using two moments as parameters of the normalization. It is shown that the normalization of Testud et al. (2001) is a particular case of the two-moment scaling normalization. Thus, a unified vision of the question of DSDs normalization and a good model representation of DSDs is given. Data analysis shows that from the point of view of moment estimation least square regression is slightly more effective than moment estimation from the normalized average DSD.

  19. Enhancement of Sensitivity for Determination of Phenols in Environmental Water Samples by Single-drop Liquid Phase Microextraction Using Ionic Liquid prior to HPLC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Xiang ZHOU; Jun Ping XIAO; Cun Ling YE; Xin Ming WANG

    2006-01-01

    A single-drop liquid phase micro-extraction procedure using 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([C4MIM][PF6]) was demonstrated for the sensitive determination of four phenols in water samples. Under the optimized conditions, the linear range of proposed phenol, 2-naphthol, 2-nitrophenol and 4-chlorophenol, respectively. The experimental results indicated that the effect of complex matrices natural water samples could be resolved with addition of sodium ethylene diamine tetracetate (EDTA) into the samples. Excellent spiked recoveries were achieved for these four phenols ranged from 86.2%-114.9 %. All these facts demonstrated that the proposed method with merits of low cost, simplicity and easy operating would be a competitive alternative procedure for the determination of such compounds at trace level.

  20. Liquid-drop formalism and free-energy surfaces in binary homogeneous nucleation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laaksonen, A. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Kuopio, P.O. Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio (Finland)]|[Department of Physics, P.O. Box 9, 00014 University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); McGraw, R. [Department of Applied Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Vehkamaeki, H. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 9, 00014 University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland)]|[University College London, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    1999-08-01

    Three different derivations of the classical binary nucleation theory are considered in detail. It is shown that the derivation originally presented by Wilemski [J. Chem. Phys. {bold 80}, 1370 (1984)] is consistent with more extensive derivations [Oxtoby and Kashchiev, J. Chem. Phys. {bold 100}, 7665 (1994)]; Debenedetti, {ital Metastable Liquids: Concepts and Principles} (Princeton University Press, Princeton, 1996) if and only if the assumption is made that the surface of tension of the binary nucleus coincides with the dividing surface specified by the surface condition {summation}n{sub si}v{sub li}=0, where the n{sub si} denote surface excess numbers of molecules of species {ital i}, and the v{close_quote}s are partial molecular volumes. From this condition, it follows that (1) the surface tension is curvature independent and (2) that the nucleus volume is V={summation}n{sub li}v{sub li}={summation}g{sub i}v{sub li}, where the n{sub li} are the numbers of molecules in the uniform liquid phase of the droplet model encompassed by the surface of tension, and the g{sub i} are the total molecular occupation numbers contained by the nucleus. We show, furthermore, that the above surface condition leads to explicit formulas for the surface excess numbers n{sub si} in the nucleus. Computations for the ethanol{endash}water system show that the surface number for water molecules (n{sub s,H{sub 2}O}) causes the negative occupation numbers (g{sub H{sub 2}O}) obtained earlier using the classical nucleation theory. The unphysical behavior produced by the classical theory for surface active systems is thus a direct consequence of the assumption of curvature independence of surface tension. Based on the explicit formulas for n{sub si}, we calculate the full free-energy surfaces for binary nucleation in the revised classical theory and compare these with the free-energy surfaces in the Doyle (unrevised classical) theory. Significant differences in nucleus size and composition

  1. ASI: Dunaliella marine microalgae to drop-in replacement liquid transportation fuel

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Weicheng

    2013-09-11

    Microalgae are a promising biofuels feedstock, theoretically yielding concentrations of triacylglycerides (TAGs) per unit area that are far higher than traditional feedstocks due to their rapid growth. Dunaliella is particularly advantageous as a feedstock because it is currently commercially mass cultured, thrives in salt water, and has no cell wall. Fourteen strains of Dunaliella have been investigated for growth rates and lipid production in mass culture and tested for enhanced lipid production under a range of environmental stressors including salinity, pH, nitrogen and phosphorus limitation, and light regime. The nuclear genome has been sequenced for four of these strains, with the objective of increasing carbon flux through genetic engineering. Electroflocculation followed by osmotic membrane rupturing may be a very energy and cost efficient means of harvesting the lipid bodies from Dunaliella. A technically feasible and scalable thermo-catalytic process to convert the lipids into replacements for liquid transportation fuels has been developed. The lipids were converted into long-chain alkanes through continuous thermal hydrolysis followed by fed-batch thermo-catalytic decarboxylation. These alkanes can be reformed into renewable diesel via conventional catalytic hydrocarbon isomerization reactions to improve cold flow properties, if desired. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Environ Prog, 32: 916-925, 2013 Copyright © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Environ Prog.

  2. Hydrodynamic features of centrifugal contactor separators; experimental studies on liquid hold-up, residence time distribution, phase behavior and drop size distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuur, B.; Kraai, G.N.; Winkelman, J.G.N.; Heeres, H.

    2012-01-01

    The liquid hold-up, residence time distributions (RTD), drop size distributions and continuous/dispersed phase for a typical centrifugal contactor separator (CCS) of the type CINC V02 were determined experimentally for various L-L systems. The hold-up ratio of the different solvents was mainly a fun

  3. Hydrodynamic features of centrifugal contactor separators : Experimental studies on liquid hold-up, residence time distribution, phase behavior and drop size distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuur, Boelo; Kraai, Gerard N.; Winkelman, Jozef G. M.; Heeres, Hero J.

    2012-01-01

    The liquid hold-up, residence time distributions (RTD), drop size distributions and continuous/dispersed phase for a typical centrifugal contactor separator (CCS) of the type CINC V02 were determined experimentally for various L-L systems. The hold-up ratio of the different solvents was mainly a fun

  4. A SURVEY OF THE PARAMETER SPACE OF THE COMPRESSIBLE LIQUID DROP MODEL AS APPLIED TO THE NEUTRON STAR INNER CRUST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, W. G.; Gearheart, M.; Li Baoan, E-mail: william.newton@tamuc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University-Commerce, Commerce, TX 75429-3011 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    We present a systematic survey of the range of predictions of the neutron star inner crust composition, crust-core transition densities and pressures, and density range of the nuclear 'pasta' phases at the bottom of the crust provided by the compressible liquid drop model in light of the current experimental and theoretical constraints on model parameters. Using a Skyrme-like model for nuclear matter, we construct baseline sequences of crust models by consistently varying the density dependence of the bulk symmetry energy at nuclear saturation density, L, under two conditions: (1) that the magnitude of the symmetry energy at saturation density J is held constant, and (2) J correlates with L under the constraint that the pure neutron matter (PNM) equation of state (EoS) satisfies the results of ab initio calculations at low densities. Such baseline crust models facilitate consistent exploration of the L dependence of crustal properties. The remaining surface energy and symmetric nuclear matter parameters are systematically varied around the baseline, and different functional forms of the PNM EoS at sub-saturation densities implemented, to estimate theoretical 'error bars' for the baseline predictions. Inner crust composition and transition densities are shown to be most sensitive to the surface energy at very low proton fractions and to the behavior of the sub-saturation PNM EoS. Recent calculations of the energies of neutron drops suggest that the low-proton-fraction surface energy might be higher than predicted in Skyrme-like models, which our study suggests may result in a greatly reduced volume of pasta in the crust than conventionally predicted.

  5. Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Based on Solidification of Floating Organic Drop Followed by Gas Chromatography-Electron Capture Detector for Determination of Some Pesticides in Water Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Bashiri Juybari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO followed by gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD was developed for determination of some pesticides in the water samples. Some important parameters, such as type and volumes of extraction and disperser solvent and salt effect on the extraction recovery of analytes from aqueous solution were investigated. Under the optimum conditions (extraction solvent: 1-undecanol, 15.0 μL; disperser solvent: acetone, 1.0 mL, and without salt addition, the preconcentration factors were obtained ranged from 802 to 915 for analytes. The linear ranges were from 0.05 to 100 μg L−1, and detection limits ranged from 0.05 to 0.008 μg L−1. The relative standard deviations (RSDs%, =5 were between 3.2% and 6.7%. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of target analytes in the tap, sea, and river water samples, and satisfactory recoveries were obtained.

  6. Separation/preconcentration and determination of vanadium with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadollahi, Tahereh; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Shabani, Ali Mohammad Haji

    2010-06-30

    A novel dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) for separation/preconcentration of ultra trace amount of vanadium and its determination with the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was developed. The DLLME-SFO behavior of vanadium (V) using N-benzoyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine (BPHA) as complexing agent was systematically investigated. The factors influencing the complex formation and extraction by DLLME-SFO method were optimized. Under the optimized conditions: 100 microL, 200 microL and 25 mL of extraction solvent (1-undecanol), disperser solvent (acetone) and sample volume, respectively, an enrichment factor of 184, a detection limit (based on 3S(b)/m) of 7 ng L(-1) and a relative standard deviation of 4.6% (at 500 ng L(-1)) were obtained. The calibration graph using the preconcentration system for vanadium was linear from 20 to 1000 ng L(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.9996. The method was successfully applied for the determination of vanadium in water and parsley.

  7. Indirect spectrophotometric determination of ultra trace amounts of selenium based on dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction-solidified floating organic drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji Shabani, Ali Mohammad; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Nozohor, Mahnaz

    2013-12-01

    A novel dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction-solidified floating organic drop (DLLME-SFOD) method combined with fiber optic-linear array detection spectrophotometry has been developed for the indirect determination of selenium. The method is based on the oxidation of the I- to iodine by inorganic Se(IV). The produced I2 reacts with the excess of I- ions in acidic media to give triiodide ions. The I3- is then extracted into 1-undecanol by DLLME-SFOD upon the formation of an ion pair with cetyltrimethylammonium cation. The extracted ion pair is determined by measuring its absorption at 360 nm. The absorbance signal is proportional to the selenium concentration in the aqueous phase. Under optimum conditions, the method provided an enrichment factor of 250 with a detection limit of 16.0 μg L-1 and a linear dynamic range of 40.0-1000.0 μg L-1. The relative standard deviation was found to be 2.1% (n = 7) at 100.0 μg L-1 concentration level. The method was successfully applied to the determination of selenium in water samples and selenium plus tablet.

  8. Solid-Phase Extraction Followed by Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Based on Solidification of Floating Organic Drop for the Determination of Parabens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Beshare; Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Fattahi, Nazir

    2015-09-01

    A dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop method combined with solid-phase extraction (500-mg C18 sorbent) was developed for preconcentration and determination of some parabens. The experimental parameters influencing the extraction efficiency such as the type of extraction and disperser solvents, as well as their volumes, breakthrough volume, flow rate and salt addition were studied and optimized. The optimum experimental conditions found included: sample volume, 100 mL; KCl concentration, 1% (w/v); extraction solvent (1-undecanol) volume, 20 µL and disperser solvent (acetone) volume, 250 µL. Under the optimum experimental conditions, calibration graphs were linear in the range of 1-200 µg L(-1) with limits of detection ranged from 0.3 to 1.7 µg L(-1). The relative standard deviations were in the range of 1.2-3.1% (n = 5). The enrichment factors and absolute recoveries of parabens in different matrices were 245-1886 and 9.0-69.8%, respectively. The method was applied to the simultaneous determination of parabens in different matrices. The relative recoveries from water, shampoo and mouth rinse samples, which have been spiked at different levels of parabens, were 87.83-112.25%, 82.80-108.40% and 90.10-97.60%, respectively. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop for preconcentration and determination of trace amounts of copper by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadaş, Cennet; Kara, Derya

    2017-04-01

    A novel, simple, rapid, sensitive, inexpensive and environmentally friendly dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method based on the solidification of a floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) was developed for the determination of copper by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). N-o-Vanillidine-2-amino-p-cresol was used as a chelating ligand and 1-undecanol was selected as an extraction solvent. The main parameters affecting the performance of DLLME-SFO, such as sample pH, volume of extraction solvent, extraction time, concentration of the chelating ligand, salt effect, centrifugation time and sample volume were investigated and optimized. The effect of interfering ions on the recovery of copper was also examined. Under the optimum conditions, the detection limit (3σ) was 0.93μgL(-1) for Cu using a sample volume of 20mL, yielding a preconcentration factor of 20. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of Cu in tap, river and seawater, rice flour and black tea samples as well as certified reference materials.

  10. Optimization of dispersive liquid-phase microextraction based on solidified floating organic drop combined with high-performance liquid chromatography for the analysis of glucocorticoid residues in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuan; Zheng, Zhiqun; Huang, Liying; Yao, Hong; Wu, Xiao Shan; Li, Shaoguang; Lin, Dandan

    2017-05-10

    A rapid, simple, cost-effective dispersive liquid-phase microextraction based on solidified floating organic drop (SFOD-LPME) was developed in this study. Along with high-performance liquid chromatography, we used the developed approach to determine and enrich trace amounts of four glucocorticoids, namely, prednisone, betamethasone, dexamethasone, and cortisone acetate, in animal-derived food. We also investigated and optimized several important parameters that influenced the extraction efficiency of SFOD-LPME. These parameters include the extractant species, volumes of extraction and dispersant solvents, sodium chloride addition, sample pH, extraction time and temperature, and stirring rate. Under optimum experimental conditions, the calibration graph exhibited linearity over the range of 1.2-200.0ng/ml for the four analytes, with a reasonable linearity(r(2): 0.9990-0.9999). The enrichment factor was 142-276, and the detection limits was 0.39-0.46ng/ml (0.078-0.23μg/kg). This method was successfully applied to analyze actual food samples, and good spiked recoveries of over 81.5%-114.3% were obtained.

  11. Liquid-liquid Microextraction Based on Solidification of Floating Organic Drops Coupled with Gas Chromatography for Analyzing Trace Benzene, Toluene and Xylene in Water Samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Mao-sheng; HUANG Jia-rong; ZHENG Xiang-hua; XIE Qiong-fang

    2011-01-01

    A new liquid-liquid microextraction method based on the solidification of floating organic drops coupled with gas chromatography was developed for the determination of trace benzene,toluene and xylene(BTX)in water samples.In the microextraction procedure,a microdrop of n-decanol was delivered to the surface of the analytes' solution,and stirred for a desired time.Following the absolute extraction,the sample vial was cooled in an ice bath for 10 min.The solidified n-decanol was then transferred into a plastic tube and melted naturally; and 1 μL of it was injected into gas chromatography for analysis.Factors relevant to the extraction efficiency were studied and optimized.The optimal experimental conditions were:15 μL of n-decanol as extractive solvent,30 mL of solution containing analytes,no salt,the stirring rate 400 r/min,the extraction temperature 30 ℃,and the extraction time 30 min.Under those optimized conditions,the detection limit(LOD)of analytes was in a range of 0.05-0.10 ng/mL by the developed method.A good linearity(r>0.99)in a calibration range of 0.01-100 μg/mL was obtained.The recoveries of the real samples at different spiked levels of BTX were in the range from 92.2% to 103.4%.

  12. Capabilities and limitations of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of floating organic drop for the extraction of organic pollutants from water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Avila, Luz E; Rojo-Portillo, Tania; Covarrubias-Herrera, Rosario; Peña-Alvarez, Araceli

    2013-12-17

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) is one of the most interesting sample preparation techniques developed in recent years. Although several applications have been reported, the potentiality and limitations of this simple and rapid extraction technique have not been made sufficiently explicit. In this work, the extraction efficiency of DLLME-SFO for pollutants from different chemical families was determined. Studied compounds include: 10 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, 5 pesticides (chlorophenoxy herbicides and DDT), 8 phenols and 6 sulfonamides, thus, covering a large range of polarity and hydrophobicity (LogKow 0-7, overall). After optimization of extraction conditions using 1-dodecanol as extractant, the procedure was applied for extraction of each family from 10-mL spiked water samples, only adjusting sample pH as required. Absolute recoveries for pollutants with LogKow 3-7 were >70% and recovery values within this group (18 compounds) were independent of structure or hydrophobicity; the precision of recovery was very acceptable (RSD0.995). Extraction recoveries for pollutants with LogKow 1.46-2.8 were in the range 13-62%, directly depending on individual LogKow values; however, good linearity (r(2)>0.993) and precision (RSD<6.5%) were also demonstrated for these polar solutes, despite recovery level. DLLME-SFO with 1-dodecanol completely failed for extraction of compounds with LogKow≤1 (sulfa drugs), other more polar extraction solvents (ionic liquids) should be explored for highly hydrophilic pollutants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Pollination Drop in Juniperus communis: Response to Deposited Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugnaini, Serena; Nepi, Massimo; Guarnieri, Massimo; Piotto, Beti; Pacini, Ettore

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims The pollination drop is a liquid secretion produced by the ovule and exposed outside the micropyle. In many gymnosperms, pollen lands on the surface of the pollination drop, rehydrates and enters the ovule as the drop retracts. The objective of this work was to study the formation of the pollination drop in Juniperus communis, its carbohydrate composition and the response to deposition of conspecific pollen, foreign pollen and other particulate material, in an attempt to clarify the mechanism of pollination drop retraction. Method Branches with female cones close to pollination drop secretion were collected. On the first day of pollination drop exposure, an eyelash mounted on a wooden stick with paraffin was used to collect pollen or silica gel particles, which were then deposited by contact with the drop. Volume changes in pollination drops were measured by using a stereomicroscope with a micrometer eyepiece 3 h after deposition. The volume of non-pollinated control drops was also recorded. On the first day of secretion, drops were also collected for sugar analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography. Key Results The pollination drop persisted for about 12 d if not pollinated, and formed again after removal for up to four consecutive days. After pollination with viable conspecific pollen, the drop retracted quickly and did not form again. Partial withdrawal occurred after deposition of other biological and non-biological material. Fructose was the dominant sugar; glucose was also present but at a much lower percentage. Conclusions Sugar analysis confirmed the general trend of fructose dominance in gymnosperm pollination drops. Complete pollination drop withdrawal appears to be triggered by a biochemical mechanism resulting from interaction between pollen and drop constituents. The results of particle deposition suggest the existence of a non-specific, particle-size-dependent mechanism that induces partial pollination drop withdrawal

  14. From basic physics to mechanisms of toxicity: the "liquid drop" approach applied to develop predictive classification models for toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizochenko, Natalia; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Gajewicz, Agnieszka; Kuz'min, Victor; Puzyn, Tomasz; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2014-11-21

    Many metal oxide nanoparticles are able to cause persistent stress to live organisms, including humans, when discharged to the environment. To understand the mechanism of metal oxide nanoparticles' toxicity and reduce the number of experiments, the development of predictive toxicity models is important. In this study, performed on a series of nanoparticles, the comparative quantitative-structure activity relationship (nano-QSAR) analyses of their toxicity towards E. coli and HaCaT cells were established. A new approach for representation of nanoparticles' structure is presented. For description of the supramolecular structure of nanoparticles the "liquid drop" model was applied. It is expected that a novel, proposed approach could be of general use for predictions related to nanomaterials. In addition, in our study fragmental simplex descriptors and several ligand-metal binding characteristics were calculated. The developed nano-QSAR models were validated and reliably predict the toxicity of all studied metal oxide nanoparticles. Based on the comparative analysis of contributed properties in both models the LDM-based descriptors were revealed to have an almost similar level of contribution to toxicity in both cases, while other parameters (van der Waals interactions, electronegativity and metal-ligand binding characteristics) have unequal contribution levels. In addition, the models developed here suggest different mechanisms of nanotoxicity for these two types of cells.

  15. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method based on solidification of floating organic drop combined with gas chromatography with electron-capture or mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Mei-I; Huang, Shang-Da

    2008-11-21

    A simple dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) method based on solidification of a floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) technique combined with gas chromatography/electron-capture detection (GC/ECD) or gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has been developed. The proposed method is simple, low in cost, and of high precision. It overcomes the most important problem in DLLME, the high-toxic solvent used. Halogenated organic compounds (HOCs) in water samples were determined as the model compounds. The parameters optimized for the DLLME-SFO technique were as follows: A mixture of 0.5 mL acetone, containing 10 microL 2-dodecanol (2-DD-OH), was rapidly injected by syringe into the 5 mL water sample. After centrifugation, the fine 2-DD-OH droplets (8+/-0.5 microL) were floated at the top of the screwcap test tube. The test tube was then cooled in an ice bath. After 5 min the 2-DD-OH solvent had solidified and was then transferred into a conical vial; it melted quickly at room temperature and 3 microL (for GC/ECD) or 2 microL (for GC/MS) of it was injected into a gas chromatograph for analysis. The limit of detection (LOD) for this technique was 0.005-0.05microgL(-1) for GC/ECD and was 0.005-0.047 microgL(-1) for GC/MS, respectively. The linear range of the calibration curve of DLLME-SFO was from 0.01 to 500 microgL(-1) with a coefficient of estimation (r2)>0.996 for GC/ECD and was from 0.02 to 500 microgL(-1) with a coefficient of estimation (r2)>0.996 for GC/MS.

  16. Low-density solvent-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with single-drop microextraction for the fast determination of chlorophenols in environmental water samples by high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyi; Xue, Aifang; Chen, Hao; Li, Shengqing

    2013-03-08

    A new format of fast three-phase microextraction by combining low-density solvent-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and single-drop microextraction (SDME) was for the first time developed for the determination of chlorophenols in environmental water samples. The extraction procedure includes a 2 min DLLME pre-extraction and a 10 min SDME back-extraction. A portion of low-density solvent (toluene) was used as organic phase and injected into the aqueous sample (donor phase) with methanol as disperser. The analytes were pre-extracted into the organic phase within 2 min. A thin layer of the organic phase formed on the top of the aqueous phase by a 2 min centrifugation. Then a drop of acceptor solution was introduced into the upper layer and SDME was carried out for the back-extraction. The stirring step typically involved in SDME and LLLME is avoided with the benefit of the high speed and efficiency of DLLME pre-extraction. After extraction, the acceptor drop was withdrawn and directly injected into a high performance liquid chromatography instrument with ultraviolet detection for analysis. Five chlorophenols, 4-chlorophenol, 2-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, and pentachlorophenol, were selected as model compounds for developing and evaluating the method. Factors affecting extraction efficiency were studied, including the organic solvent, the disperser solvent, the composition of donor phase and acceptor phase, the volume of acceptor microdrop, and the extraction time. At optimal conditions, the method showed low detection limit (0.016-0.084 μg/L) for the five chlorophenols, good linearity (from 0.2-250 to 1.0-250 μg/L, depending on the analytes) and repeatability (RSD below 8.2, n=5). The simple, fast, and efficient feature of the proposed method was demonstrated by the analysis of chlorophenols in environmental water samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Liquid bridge pinch off and satelite drop formation under thermocapillary effect in Japanese Experiment Module 'Kibo' aboard the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Ueno, Ichiro; Ohnishi, Mitsuru; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Masato; Matsumoto, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    The long-duration fluid physics experiments on a thermocapillary-driven flow have been carried out on the Japanese experiment module 'Kibo' aboard the International Space Station (ISS) since 2008. In these experiments, various aspects of thermocapillary convection in a half-zone (HZ) liquid bridge of high Prandtl number fluid have been examined under the advantages of the long-duration high-quality microgravity environment. This fluid dynamics video introduce a pinch off of liquid bridge of 30 mm in diameter as a part of the on-orbit experiments. The effect of thermocapillary-driven flow on the pinch off and satellite drop formation is examined.

  18. The effects of nonuniform surface tension on the axisymmetric gravity-driven spreading of a thin liquid drop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Momoniat

    2005-01-01

    surface tension can be represented as a power law in r. The effect of this nonuniformity is to reduce the surface tension at the centre of the drop and increase it at the foot of the drop. This results in a deflection away from the solution for spreading under gravity only and the formation of a capillary ridge.

  19. New equations of state based on liquid drop model of heavy nuclei and quantum approach to light nuclei for core-collapse supernova simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Furusawa, Shun; Yamada, Shoichi; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2013-01-01

    We construct new equations of state for baryons at sub-nuclear densities for the use in core-collapse simulations of massive stars. The abundance of various nuclei is obtained together with thermodynamic quantities. A model free energy is constructed, based on the relativistic mean field theory for nucleons and the mass formula for nuclei with the proton number up to ~ 1000. The formulation is an extension of the previous model, in which we adopted the liquid drop model to all nuclei under the nuclear statistical equilibrium. We reformulate the new liquid drop model so that the temperature dependences of bulk energies could be taken into account. Furthermore, we extend the region in the nuclear chart, in which shell affects are included, by using theoretical mass data in addition to experimental ones. We also adopt a quantum theoretical mass evaluation of light nuclei, which incorporates the Pauli- and self-energy shifts that are not included in the ordinary liquid drop model. The pasta phases for heavy nucle...

  20. NEW EQUATIONS OF STATE BASED ON THE LIQUID DROP MODEL OF HEAVY NUCLEI AND QUANTUM APPROACH TO LIGHT NUCLEI FOR CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furusawa, Shun; Yamada, Shoichi [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke [Numazu College of Technology, Ooka 3600, Numazu, Shizuoka 410-8501 (Japan); Suzuki, Hideyuki, E-mail: furusawa@heap.phys.waseda.ac.jp [Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Yamazaki 2641, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

    2013-08-01

    We construct new equations of state for baryons at subnuclear densities for the use in core-collapse simulations of massive stars. The abundance of various nuclei is obtained together with thermodynamic quantities. A model free energy is constructed, based on the relativistic mean field theory for nucleons and the mass formula for nuclei with the proton number up to {approx}1000. The formulation is an extension of the previous model, in which we adopted the liquid drop model to all nuclei under the nuclear statistical equilibrium. We reformulate the new liquid drop model so that the temperature dependences of bulk energies could be taken into account. Furthermore, we extend the region in the nuclear chart, in which shell effects are included, by using theoretical mass data in addition to experimental ones. We also adopt a quantum-theoretical mass evaluation of light nuclei, which incorporates the Pauli- and self-energy shifts that are not included in the ordinary liquid drop model. The pasta phases for heavy nuclei are taken into account in the same way as in the previous model. We find that the abundances of heavy nuclei are modified by the shell effects of nuclei and temperature dependence of bulk energies. These changes may have an important effect on the rates of electron captures and coherent neutrino scatterings on nuclei in supernova cores. The abundances of light nuclei are also modified by the new mass evaluation, which may affect the heating and cooling rates of supernova cores and shocked envelopes.

  1. Modeling Evaporation of Drops of Different Kerosenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    A mathematical model describes the evaporation of drops of a hydrocarbon liquid composed of as many as hundreds of chemical species. The model is intended especially for application to any of several types of kerosenes commonly used as fuels. The concept of continuous thermodynamics, according to which the chemical composition of the evaporating multicomponent liquid is described by use of a probability distribution function (PDF). However, the present model is more generally applicable than is its immediate predecessor.

  2. Liquid general anesthetics lower critical temperatures in plasma membrane vesicles

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, Ellyn; Machta, Benjamin B; Veatch, Sarah L

    2013-01-01

    A large and diverse array of small hydrophobic molecules induce general anesthesia. Their efficacy as anesthetics has been shown to correlate both with their affinity for a hydrophobic environment and with their potency in inhibiting certain ligand gated ion channels. Here we explore the effects that n-alcohols and other liquid anesthetics have on the two-dimensional miscibility critical point observed in cell derived giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs). We show that anesthetics depress the critical temperature (Tc) of these GPMVs without strongly altering the ratio of the two liquid phases found below Tc. The magnitude of this affect is consistent across n-alcohols when their concentration is rescaled by the median anesthetic concentration (AC50) for tadpole anesthesia, but not when plotted against the overall concentration in solution. At AC50 we see a 4{\\deg}C downward shift in Tc, much larger than is typically seen in the main chain transition at these anesthetic concentrations. GPMV miscibility critic...

  3. Spectrophotometric determination of iron species using a combination of artificial neural networks and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghadam, Masoud Rohani; Shabani, Ali Mohammad Haji [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Yazd University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dadfarnia, Shayessteh, E-mail: sdadfarnia@yazduni.ac.ir [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Yazd University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination of DLLME-SFO/fiber optic-linear array detection/chemometric methods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simultaneous determination of complexes with overlapping spectra. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel DLLME-SFO method is proposed for extraction of iron species. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The extracted iron species are simultaneous determined using PC-ANNs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The enhancement factor of 162 and 125 are achieved for Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+}, respectively. - Abstract: A dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) and artificial neural networks method was developed for the simultaneous separation/preconcentration and speciation of iron in water samples. In this method, an appropriate mixture of ethanol (as the disperser solvent) and 1-undecanol (as the extracting solvent) containing appropriate amount of 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) (as the complexing agent) was injected rapidly into the water sample containing iron (II) and iron (III) species. At this step, the iron species interacted with the TTA and extracted into the 1-undecanol. After the phase separation, the absorbance of the extracted irons was measured in the wavelength region of 450-600 nm. The artificial neural networks were then applied for simultaneous determination of individual iron species. Under optimum conditions, the calibration graphs were linear in the range of 95-1070 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 31-350 {mu}g L{sup -1} with detection limits of 25 and 8 {mu}g L{sup -1} for iron (II) and iron (III), respectively. The relative standard deviations (R.S.D., n = 6) were lower than 4.2%. The enhancement factor of 162 and 125 were obtained for Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+} ions, respectively. The procedure was applied to power plant drum water and several potable water samples; and accuracy was assessed through the recovery experiments and independent analysis by graphite

  4. Mechanisms of liquid sheet breakup and the resulting drop size distributions; Part 2: strand breakup and experimental observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spielbauer, T.M.; Aidum, C.K. (Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States))

    1992-03-01

    This paper reports that both a wave mechanism and a perforation mechanism have been proposed as the first step in the breakup of fluid sheets. For black liquor sprays, the dominant mechanism is the formation and growth of perforations according to either mechanism, cylindrical strands develop and subsequently break up to form drops. By combining the results of analyzing the breakup of both the sheet and strands, only a discrete number of drop sizes can be predicted from the wave mechanism.

  5. Bubble and drop interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Miller

    2011-01-01

    The book aims at describing the most important experimental methods for characterizing liquid interfaces, such as drop profile analysis, bubble pressure and drop volume tensiometry, capillary pressure technique, and oscillating drops and bubbles. Besides the details of experimental set ups, also the underlying theoretical basis is presented in detail. In addition, a number of applications based on drops and bubbles is discussed, such as rising bubbles and the very complex process of flotation. Also wetting, characterized by the dynamics of advancing contact angles is discussed critically. Spec

  6. Ultra-Trace Determination of Copper and Silver in Environmental Samples by Using Ionic Liquid-Based Single Drop Microextraction-Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Abolhasani

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A sensitive, selective and effective ionic liquid-based single drop microextraction technique wasdeveloped by using ionic liquid, 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate, C6MIMPF6, coupledwith electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS for the determination of copper and silver inenvironmental samples. Dithizone was used as chelating agent. Several factors that influence themicroextraction efficiency and ETAAS signal, such as pH, dithizone concentration, extraction time, amounts ofionic liquid, stirring rate, pyrolysis and atomization temperature were investigated and the microextractionconditions were established. In the optimum experimental conditions, the detection limits (3 s of the methodwere 4 and 8 ng L-1 and corresponding relative standard deviations (0.1 μg L-1, n = 6 were 4.2% and 4.8% forAg and Cu, respectively. The developed method was validated by analysis of a certified reference material andapplied to the determination of silver and copper.

  7. From basic physics to mechanisms of toxicity: the ``liquid drop'' approach applied to develop predictive classification models for toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizochenko, Natalia; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Gajewicz, Agnieszka; Kuz'min, Victor; Puzyn, Tomasz; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2014-10-01

    Many metal oxide nanoparticles are able to cause persistent stress to live organisms, including humans, when discharged to the environment. To understand the mechanism of metal oxide nanoparticles' toxicity and reduce the number of experiments, the development of predictive toxicity models is important. In this study, performed on a series of nanoparticles, the comparative quantitative-structure activity relationship (nano-QSAR) analyses of their toxicity towards E. coli and HaCaT cells were established. A new approach for representation of nanoparticles' structure is presented. For description of the supramolecular structure of nanoparticles the ``liquid drop'' model was applied. It is expected that a novel, proposed approach could be of general use for predictions related to nanomaterials. In addition, in our study fragmental simplex descriptors and several ligand-metal binding characteristics were calculated. The developed nano-QSAR models were validated and reliably predict the toxicity of all studied metal oxide nanoparticles. Based on the comparative analysis of contributed properties in both models the LDM-based descriptors were revealed to have an almost similar level of contribution to toxicity in both cases, while other parameters (van der Waals interactions, electronegativity and metal-ligand binding characteristics) have unequal contribution levels. In addition, the models developed here suggest different mechanisms of nanotoxicity for these two types of cells.Many metal oxide nanoparticles are able to cause persistent stress to live organisms, including humans, when discharged to the environment. To understand the mechanism of metal oxide nanoparticles' toxicity and reduce the number of experiments, the development of predictive toxicity models is important. In this study, performed on a series of nanoparticles, the comparative quantitative-structure activity relationship (nano-QSAR) analyses of their toxicity towards E. coli and HaCaT cells were

  8. Comprehensive quantitative analysis of Chinese patent drug YinHuang drop pill by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tin-Long; An, Ya-Qi; Yan, Bing-Chao; Yue, Rui-Qi; Zhang, Tian-Bo; Ho, Hing-Man; Ren, Tian-Jing; Fung, Hau-Yee; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang; Liu, Zhong-Liang; Pu, Jian-Xin; Han, Quan-Bin; Sun, Han-Dong

    2016-06-01

    YinHuang drop pill (YHDP) is a new preparation, derived from the traditional YinHuang (YH) decoction. Since drop pills are one of the newly developed forms of Chinese patent drugs, not much research has been done regarding the quality and efficacy. This study aims to establish a comprehensive quantitative analysis of the chemical profile of YHDP. ultra high-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS/MS) was used to identify 34 non-sugar small molecules including 15 flavonoids, 9 phenolic acids, 5 saponins, 1 iridoid, and 4 iridoid glycosides in YHDP samples, and 26 of them were quantitatively determined. Sugar composition of YHDP in terms of fructose, glucose and sucrose was examined via a high performance liquid chromatography-evaporative light scattering detector on an amide column (HPLC-NH2P-ELSD). Macromolecules were examined by high performance gel permeation chromatography coupled with ELSD (HPGPC-ELSD). The content of the drop pill's skeleton component PEG-4000 was also quantified via ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with charged aerosol detector (UHPLC-CAD). The results showed that up to 73% (w/w) of YHDP could be quantitatively determined. Small molecules accounted for approximately 5%, PEG-4000 represented 68%, while no sugars or macromolecules were found. Furthermore, YHDP showed no significant differences in terms of daily dosage, compared to YinHuang granules and YinHuang oral liquid; however, it has a higher small molecules content compared to YinHuang lozenge.

  9. Influence of the fluid structure on the binding potential: Comparing liquid drop profiles from density functional theory with results from mesoscopic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Adam P.; Thiele, Uwe; Archer, Andrew J.

    2017-02-01

    For a film of liquid on a solid surface, the binding potential g(h) gives the free energy as a function of the film thickness h and also the closely related (structural) disjoining pressure Π =-∂g /∂h . The wetting behaviour of the liquid is encoded in the binding potential and the equilibrium film thickness corresponds to the value at the minimum of g(h). Here, the method we developed in the work of Hughes et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 074702 (2015)], and applied with a simple discrete lattice-gas model, is used with continuum density functional theory (DFT) to calculate the binding potential for a Lennard-Jones fluid and other simple liquids. The DFT used is based on fundamental measure theory and so incorporates the influence of the layered packing of molecules at the surface and the corresponding oscillatory density profile. The binding potential is frequently input in mesoscale models from which liquid drop shapes and even dynamics can be calculated. Here we show that the equilibrium droplet profiles calculated using the mesoscale theory are in good agreement with the profiles calculated directly from the microscopic DFT. For liquids composed of particles where the range of the attraction is much less than the diameter of the particles, we find that at low temperatures g(h) decays in an oscillatory fashion with increasing h, leading to highly structured terraced liquid droplets.

  10. Sessile drops in microgravity

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2013-01-01

    Interfaces with a liquid are governing several phenomena. For instance, these interfaces are giving the shape of sessile droplets and rule the spread of liquids on surfaces. Here we analyze the shape of sessile axisymmetric drops and how it is depending on the gravity, obtaining results in agreement with experimental observations under conditions of microgravity.

  11. Investigation of wetting characteristics of liquid iron on dense MgAION-based ceramics by X-ray sessile drop technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z. T.; Matsushita, T.; Seetharaman, S.; Li, W. C.

    2006-06-01

    The wetting characteristics of liquid iron on dense MgAION-based composite ceramics were investigated using X-ray sessile drop technique. The contact angles were measured on substrates of different composites as functions of temperature and varying partial pressures of oxygen. The results with pure argon gas showed that contact angles kept almost constant in the temperature range 1823 to 1873 K. The contact angle was found to show a slight increase with increasing boron nitride (BN) content in MgAION-BN composites. These are attributed to the higher contact angle between BN substrate and liquid iron drop compared with that obtained for MgAION substrate. When the CO-CO2-Ar gas mixtures were introduced into the system, the contact angle showed an initial quick decrease followed by a slow decrease and then a period of nearly constant contact angle at a given temperature corresponding to the steady-state condition. Even in this case, BN seemed to cause an increase in the equilibrium contact angle. The equilibrium contact angle was found to decrease with increasing temperature. XRD results indicated that the substrate was oxidized and the oxidation products combined with FeO formed by the oxidation of the iron drop to from FeAl2O4 and Mg1-xFex) These were likely to form a ternary FeO-Al2O3-MgO slag or a quaternary slag by combining with B2O3. An interesting observation is that the iron drop moved away from the original site, probably due to the Marangoni effect.

  12. In-drop capillary spooling of spider capture thread inspires hybrid fibers with mixed solid-liquid mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elettro, Hervé; Neukirch, Sébastien; Vollrath, Fritz; Antkowiak, Arnaud

    2016-05-01

    An essential element in the web-trap architecture, the capture silk spun by ecribellate orb spiders consists of glue droplets sitting astride a silk filament. Mechanically this thread presents a mixed solid-liquid behavior unknown to date. Under extension, capture silk behaves as a particularly stretchy solid, owing to its molecular nanosprings, but it totally switches behavior in compression to now become liquid-like: It shrinks with no apparent limit while exerting a constant tension. Here, we unravel the physics underpinning the unique behavior of this ”liquid wire” and demonstrate that its mechanical response originates in the shape-switching of the silk filament induced by buckling within the droplets. Learning from this natural example of geometry and mechanics, we manufactured programmable liquid wires that present previously unidentified pathways for the design of new hybrid solid-liquid materials.

  13. Stirring-controlled solidified floating solid-liquid drop microextraction as a new solid phase-enhanced liquid-phase microextraction method by exploiting magnetic carbon nanotube-nickel hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazaghi, Mehri; Mousavi, Hassan Zavvar; Shirkhanloo, Hamid; Rashidi, Alimorad

    2017-01-25

    A specific technique is introduced to overcome limitations of classical solidification of floating organic drop microextraction, such as tedious and time-consuming centrifuge step and using disperser solvent, by facile and efficient participation of solid and liquid phases. In this proposed method of stirring-controlled solidified floating solid-liquid drop microextraction (SC-SF-SLDME), magnetic carbon nanotube-nickel hybrid (MNi-CNT) as a solid part of the extractors are dispersed ultrasonically in sample solution, and the procedure followed by dispersion of liquid phase (1-undecanol) through high-rate stirring and easily recollection of MNi-CNT in organic solvent droplets through hydrophobic force. With the reduction in speed of stirring, one solid-liquid drop is formed on top of the solution. MNi-CNT acts as both extractor and the coalescence helper between organic droplets for a facile recollection. MNi-CNT was prepared by spray pyrolysis of nickel oleate/toluene mixture at 1000 °C. Four tyrosine kinase inhibitors were selected as model analytes and the effecting parameters were investigated. The results confirmed that magnetic nanoadsorbent has an important role in the procedure and complete collection of dispersed solvent is not achieved in the absence of the solid phase. Also, short extraction time exhibited success of the proposed method and effect of dispersed solid/liquid phases. The limits of quantification (LOQs) for imatinib, sunitinib, erlotinib, and nilotinib were determined to be as low as 0.7, 1.7, 0.6, and 1.0 μg L(-1), respectively. The intra-day precisions (RSDs) were lower than 4.5%. Method performance was investigated by determination of mentioned tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in human serum and cerebrospinal fluid samples with good recoveries in the range of 93-98%.

  14. Drag on Sessile Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Andrew J. B.; Fleck, Brian; Nobes, David; Sen, Debjyoti; Amirfazli, Alidad; University of Alberta Mechanical Engineering Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    We present the first ever direct measurements of the coefficient of drag on sessile drops at Reynolds numbers from the creeping flow regime up to the point of incipient motion, made using a newly developed floating element differential drag sensor. Surfaces of different wettabilities (PMMA, Teflon, and a superhydrophobic surface (SHS)), wet by water, hexadecane, and various silicone oils, are used to study the effects of drop shape, and fluid properties on drag. The relation between drag coefficient and Reynolds number (scaled by drop height) varies slightly with liquid-solid system and drop volume with results suggesting the drop experiences increased drag compared to similar shaped solid bodies due to drop oscillation influencing the otherwise laminar flow. Drops adopting more spherical shapes are seen to experience the greatest force at any given airspeed. This indicates that the relative exposed areas of drops is an important consideration in terms of force, with implications for the shedding of drops in applications such as airfoil icing and fuel cell flooding. The measurement technique used in this work can be adapted to measure drag force on other deformable, lightly adhered objects such as dust, sand, snow, vesicles, foams, and biofilms. The authours acknowledge NSERC, Alberta Innovates Technology Futures, and the Killam Trusts.

  15. Summary report for ITER Task-T19: MHD pressure drop and heat transfer study for liquid metal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Claude B.; Hua, Thanh Q.; Natesan, Ken; Kirillov, Igor R.; Vitkovski, Ivan V.; Anisimov, Aleksandr M.

    1995-03-01

    A key feasibility issue for the ITER Vanadium/Lithium breeding blanket is the question of insulator coatings. Design calculations show that an electrically insulating layer is necessary to maintain an acceptably low MHD pressure drop. To begin experimental investigations of the MHD performance of candidate insulator materials and the technology for putting them in place, a new test section was prepared. Aluminum oxide was chosen as the first candidate insulating material because it may be used in combination with NaK in the ITER vacuum vessel and/or the divertor. Details on the methods used to produce the aluminum oxide layer as well as the microstructures of the coating and the aluminide sublayer are presented and discussed. The overall MHD pressure drop, local MHD pressure gradient, local transverse MHD pressure difference, and surface voltage distributions in both the circumferential and the axial directions are reported and discussed. The positive results obtained here for high-temperature NaK have two beneficial implications for ITER. First, since NaK may be used in the vacuum vessel and/or the divertor, these results support the design approach of using electrically insulating coatings to substantially reduce MHD pressure drop. Secondly, while Al2O3/SS is not the same coating/base material combination which would be used in the advanced blanket, this work nonetheless shows that it is possible to produce a viable insulating coating which is stable in contact with a high temperature alkali metal coolant.

  16. [The general analytical methods for gases dissolved in liquids: sonoluminescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jiu-Shuai; Liu, Yan

    2009-10-01

    How to analyze the gases dissolved in water or organic liquids is a challenging problem in analytical chemistry. Till the present time, only the dissolved oxygen in water can be analyzed by chemical and instrumental methods, while other gases, e. g. CO2, N2, CH4, Ar, He, Ke, still can not be analyzed by chemical or instrumental methods. The present paper gives a review on using sonoluminescence for gas analysis in water or organic liquids.

  17. Influence of Bond Number on the Contact Angle of Liquid Drops Deposited on Solid Substrates%Bond数变化对固壁液滴接触角的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱志强; 汪洋; 刘秋生

    2012-01-01

    本文利用微重力落塔实验研究了Bond数改变时,PTFE和铝板表面上正滴和倒滴接触角的动态变化。实验发现液滴接触角与Bond数的大小有关,当Bond数趋于0时,还与其放置状态有关。本文采用VOF方法对Bond数变化引起的液滴形状及内部流动变化进行二维数值模拟,结果显示液滴内部的流动控制着液滴的外形和接触角。%The behaviors of liquid drops in microgravity have been experimentally performed in Beijing 3.6 s Drop Tower. Contact angle dynamic behaviors of sessile and pendant liquid drops on PTFE and Aluminum were measured and analyzed for varying Bond number. It was found that Bond number had direct influence on the drop contact angle. And the drops with different status (sessile or pendant) also exhibited dissimilar contact angle behaviors when Bond number closed to zero. For comparison, the VOF methodology was introduced to analyze numerically the influence of Bond number on the shapes and inner bulk flow fields of liquid drops. It indicated that the bulk flow could influence the shape and contact angle of drops evidently.

  18. Parametric instability of a liquid metal sessile drop under the action of low-frequency alternating magnetic fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Zuo-sheng; GUO Jia-hong; REN Zhong-ming

    2013-01-01

    A 2-D mathematical model is developed in order to simulate a parametric electromagnetic instability oscillation process of a liquid metal droplet under the action of low frequency magnetic field.The Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method and weak form constraint boundary condition are introduced in this model for implementation of the surface tension and electromagnetic force on liquid droplet free surface.The results of the numerical calculations indicate the appearance of various regimes of oscillation.It is found that according to the magnetic field frequency various types of oscillation modes may be found.The oscillation is originated from an instability phenomenon.The stability diagram of liquid metal droplet in the parameter space of magnetic frequency and magnetic flux density is determined numerically.The diagram is very similar to that found in the so-called parametric instability.

  19. Pressure Drop and Experiment of Liquid Rocket Engine Filter%液体火箭发动机用过滤器流阻特性及试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    窦唯

    2011-01-01

    Liquid rocket engine filter is an important element which ensures clean working liquid and reliable operation of the test equipment and engine. The reasonable filer design is a key factor to ensure liquid rocket engine success. Therefore, in order to prevent extra material appearance in liquid pipeline, gas pipeline etc. which would affect engine's normal work, a filter was designed according to the requirements of the engine system. The characteristics of the pressure drop are studied theoretically. And the liquid flow experiment is carried out. The analysis of theory and experimental results shows that the designed filter meets the requirements of the engine system.%液体火箭发动机用过滤器是保持工质清洁,保证试验设备和发动机可靠工作的重要设备,合理的过滤器设计是保证液体火箭发动机发射成败与否的关键因素.因此,为了防止液体火箭发动机液路、气路等管路出现多余物影响发动机正常工作,根据发动机系统的要求设计了某过滤器,从理论上研究了其流阻特性,并开展了液流试验研究.通过对比分析,理论和试验结果表明,所设计的过滤器满足发动机系统的要求.

  20. Ionic-liquid-assisted microwave distillation coupled with headspace single-drop microextraction followed by GC-MS for the rapid analysis of essential oil in Dryopteris fragrans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jiao; Gai, Qing-Yan; Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng; Zhao, Chun-Jian; Fu, Yu-Jie; Ma, Wei

    2013-12-01

    A rapid, green and effective miniaturized sample preparation technique, ionic-liquid-assisted microwave distillation coupled with headspace single-drop microextraction was developed for the extraction of essential oil from dried Dryopteris fragrans. 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate was the optimal ionic liquid as the destruction agent of plant cell walls and microwave absorption was medium. n-Heptadecane (2.0 μL) was adopted as the suspended microdrop solvent in the headspace for the extraction and concentration of essential oil. The optimal parameters of the proposed method were an irradiation power of 300 W, sample mass of 0.9 g, mass ratio of ionic liquids to sample of 2.8, extraction temperature of 79°C, and extraction time of 3.6 min. In comparison to the previous reports, the proposed technique could equally monitor all the essential oil components with no significant differences in a simple way, which was more rapid and required a much lower amount of sample. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Standard practice for liquid penetrant examination for general industry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for penetrant examination of materials. Penetrant testing is a nondestructive testing method for detecting discontinuities that are open to the surface such as cracks, seams, laps, cold shuts, shrinkage, laminations, through leaks, or lack of fusion and is applicable to in-process, final, and maintenance testing. It can be effectively used in the examination of nonporous, metallic materials, ferrous and nonferrous metals, and of nonmetallic materials such as nonporous glazed or fully densified ceramics, as well as certain nonporous plastics, and glass. 1.2 This practice also provides a reference: 1.2.1 By which a liquid penetrant examination process recommended or required by individual organizations can be reviewed to ascertain its applicability and completeness. 1.2.2 For use in the preparation of process specifications and procedures dealing with the liquid penetrant testing of parts and materials. Agreement by the customer requesting penetrant inspection is strongly rec...

  2. On-line liquid phase micro-extraction based on drop-in-plug sequential injection lab-at-valve platform for metal determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitani, Constantina [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Anthemidis, Aristidis N., E-mail: anthemid@chem.auth.gr [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece)

    2013-04-10

    Highlights: ► Drop-in-plug micro-extraction based on SI-LAV platform for metal preconcentration. ► Automatic liquid phase micro-extraction coupled with FAAS. ► Organic solvents with density higher than water are used. ► Lead determination in environmental water and urine samples. -- Abstract: A novel automatic on-line liquid phase micro-extraction method based on drop-in-plug sequential injection lab-at-valve (LAV) platform was proposed for metal preconcentration and determination. A flow-through micro-extraction chamber mounted at the selection valve was adopted without the need of sophisticated lab-on-valve components. Coupled to flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), the potential of this lab-at-valve scheme is demonstrated for trace lead determination in environmental and biological water samples. A hydrophobic complex of lead with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) was formed on-line and subsequently extracted into an 80 μL plug of chloroform. The extraction procedure was performed by forming micro-droplets of aqueous phase into the plug of the extractant. All critical parameters that affect the efficiency of the system were studied and optimized. The proposed method offered good performance characteristics and high preconcentration ratios. For 10 mL sample consumption an enhancement factor of 125 was obtained. The detection limit was 1.8 μg L{sup −1} and the precision expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD) at 50.0 μg L{sup −1} of lead was 2.9%. The proposed method was evaluated by analyzing certified reference materials and applied for lead determination in natural waters and urine samples.

  3. Soft drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larkoski, Andrew J. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Marzani, Simone [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham University,South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Soyez, Gregory [IPhT, CEA Saclay, CNRS URA 2306,F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Thaler, Jesse [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2014-05-29

    We introduce a new jet substructure technique called “soft drop declustering”, which recursively removes soft wide-angle radiation from a jet. The soft drop algorithm depends on two parameters — a soft threshold z{sub cut} and an angular exponent β — with the β=0 limit corresponding roughly to the (modified) mass drop procedure. To gain an analytic understanding of soft drop and highlight the β dependence, we perform resummed calculations for three observables on soft-dropped jets: the energy correlation functions, the groomed jet radius, and the energy loss due to soft drop. The β=0 limit of the energy loss is particularly interesting, since it is not only “Sudakov safe” but also largely insensitive to the value of the strong coupling constant. While our calculations are strictly accurate only to modified leading-logarithmic order, we also include a discussion of higher-order effects such as multiple emissions and (the absence of) non-global logarithms. We compare our analytic results to parton shower simulations and find good agreement, and we also estimate the impact of non-perturbative effects such as hadronization and the underlying event. Finally, we demonstrate how soft drop can be used for tagging boosted W bosons, and we speculate on the potential advantages of using soft drop for pileup mitigation.

  4. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop for simultaneous separation/preconcentration of nickel, cobalt and copper prior to determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mooud Amirkavei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop for simultaneous extraction of trace amounts of nickel, cobalt and copper followed by their determination with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry was developed. 300 µL of acetone and 1-undecanol was injected into an aqueous sample containing diethyldithiocarbamate complexes of metal ions. For a sample volume of 10 mL, enrichment factors of 277, 270 and 300 and detection limits of 1.2, 1.1 and 1 ng L-1 for nickel, cobalt and copper were obtained, respectively. The method was applied to the extraction and determination of these metals in different water samples.

  5. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop for simultaneous separation/preconcentration of nickel, cobalt and copper prior to determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mooud Amirkavei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop for simultaneous extraction of trace amounts of nickel, cobalt and copper followed by their determination with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry was developed. 300 µL of acetone and 1-undecanol was injected into an aqueous sample containing diethyldithiocarbamate complexes of metal ions. For a sample volume of 10 mL, enrichment factors of 277, 270 and 300 and detection limits of 1.2, 1.1 and 1 ng L-1 for nickel, cobalt and copper were obtained, respectively. The method was applied to the extraction and determination of these metals in different water samples.

  6. On Regularity Criteria for the Two-Dimensional Generalized Liquid Crystal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We establish the regularity criteria for the two-dimensional generalized liquid crystal model. It turns out that the global existence results satisfy our regularity criteria naturally.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Drops Falling to and Splashing on Liquid Interfaces%液滴溅落的数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐军

    1999-01-01

    将二阶投影方法和水平集技巧相结合,求解二维Navier-Stokes方程,以模拟水滴溅落的过程.与其他方法不同,本方法不需额外的技巧,就能自然地处理自由界面出现的尖点,角点等.数值计算过程中无重新初始化步骤.%The 2-D full Navier-Stokes equations are solved by second-order projection method coupled to level set technique to model the process of a drop falling to and impacting on a free surface of the same liquid. Striking discrepancies between the method and others are that the former includes the resistance and the upward-directed acceleration effects of the ambient liquid,and incorporates the effects of viscosity, gravity, and surface tension. Without applying any rejoining or repositioning techniques,the method can deal with singularities as cusps and corners appearing on the configuration,naturally, while main features of the procedures under various conditions observed in physical experiments can be captured in our numerical examples. As anupdated version,the approach employs no reinitilization treatment.

  8. Direct determination of 2,4,6-tricholoroanisole in wines by single-drop ionic liquid microextraction coupled with multicapillary column separation and ion mobility spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Sillero, Isabel; Cárdenas, Soledad; Valcárcel, Miguel

    2011-10-21

    This article evaluates the capability of single drop ionic liquid microextraction coupled with multicapillary column (MCC) and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) for the determination of 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (2,4,6-TCA) in wines. The proposed methodology permits the direct analysis of the samples without any additional treatment other than dilution. This is achieved thanks to the selectivity provided by the ionic liquid selected as extractant, 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-imide, as well as the response of the analyte in the IMS working in negative ionization mode. Moreover, the multicapillary column avoids the interference of ethanol in the ion mobility spectra. The analysis of the sample takes ca. 35 min to be completed. The limit of detection was low as 0.01 ng L(-1) using 2 mL of wine sample. Different calibration curves were constructed using aqueous standards, red and white wines, being the signals comparable, with an RSD similar to the method variability. Finally, a set of samples of different nature and packed in different containers were analysed. It was found than those with cork stoppers presented the highest concentration of 2,4,6-TCA.

  9. Rapid analysis of Fructus forsythiae essential oil by ionic liquids-assisted microwave distillation coupled with headspace single-drop microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jiao; Ma, Dan-Hui; Gai, Qing-Yan; Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng; Fu, Yu-Jie; Ma, Wei

    2013-12-04

    A rapid, green and effective miniaturized sample preparation and analytical technique, i.e. ionic liquids-assisted microwave distillation coupled with headspace single-drop microextraction (ILAMD-HS-SDME) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for the analysis of essential oil (EO) in Fructus forsythiae. In this work, ionic liquids (ILs) were not only used as the absorption medium of microwave irradiation but also as the destruction agent of plant cell walls. 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim]OAc) was chosen as the optimal ILs. Moreover, n-heptadecane (2.0 μL) was selected as the appropriate suspended solvent for the extraction and concentration of EO. Extraction conditions of the proposed method were optimized using the relative peak area of EO constituents as the index, and the optimal operational parameters were obtained as follows: irradiation power (300 W), sample mass (0.7 g), mass ratio of ILs to sample (2.4), temperature (78°C) and time (3.4 min). In comparison to previous reports, the proposed method was faster and required smaller sample amount but could equally monitor all EO constituents with no significant differences.

  10. Combined phase-field and MD simulations of diffusion drop and ordering at [Ni{sub x}Zr{sub 1-x}]{sub liquid}-Zr{sub crystal} interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerdane, M.; Wendler, F.; Nestler, B. [Institute of Materials and Processes, Karlsruhe University of Applied Sciences (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    We combine phase-field (PF) modeling and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to show that the velocity of the solidification front in a two-phase [Ni{sub x}Zr{sub 1-x}]{sub liquid}-Zr{sub crystal} structure is strongly affected by the drop of the liquid diffusion when approaching the solid-liquid interface. The latter is defined through a suitable order parameter that distinguishes between crystalline and liquid atomic environment. The diffusion drop near the interface is attributed to the pronounced short range order inherent to the Ni{sub x}Zr{sub 1-x} melt. The system transforms into a massive lateral ordering in the vicinity of the Zr crystalline wall. Our combined PF-MD analysis points out the shortcoming of the standard interpolation procedure, usually applied in constructing the phase dependent diffusivity, to describe the confinement effect caused by the crystalline wall at low temperatures.

  11. Gas Pressure-Drop Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal

    2010-01-01

    Most chemical engineering undergraduate laboratories have fluid mechanics experiments in which pressure drops through pipes are measured over a range of Reynolds numbers. The standard fluid is liquid water, which is essentially incompressible. Since density is constant, pressure drop does not depend on the pressure in the pipe. In addition, flow…

  12. Coalescence of sessile drops

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolayev, Vadim; Pomeau, Yves; Andrieu, Claire

    2016-01-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical description of the kinetics of coalescence of two water drops on a plane solid surface. The case of partial wetting is considered. The drops are in an atmosphere of nitrogen saturated with water where they grow by condensation and eventually touch each other and coalesce. A new convex composite drop is rapidly formed that then exponentially and slowly relaxes to an equilibrium hemispherical cap. The characteristic relaxation time is proportional to the drop radius R * at final equilibrium. This relaxation time appears to be nearly 10 7 times larger than the bulk capillary relaxation time t b = R * $\\eta$/$\\sigma$, where $\\sigma$ is the gas--liquid surface tension and $\\eta$ is the liquid shear viscosity. In order to explain this extremely large relaxation time, we consider a model that involves an Arrhenius kinetic factor resulting from a liquid--vapour phase change in the vicinity of the contact line. The model results in a large relaxation time of order t b exp(L/R...

  13. Soft Drop

    CERN Document Server

    Larkoski, Andrew J; Soyez, Gregory; Thaler, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new jet substructure technique called "soft drop declustering", which recursively removes soft wide-angle radiation from a jet. The soft drop algorithm depends on two parameters--a soft threshold $z_\\text{cut}$ and an angular exponent $\\beta$--with the $\\beta = 0$ limit corresponding roughly to the (modified) mass drop procedure. To gain an analytic understanding of soft drop and highlight the $\\beta$ dependence, we perform resummed calculations for three observables on soft-dropped jets: the energy correlation functions, the groomed jet radius, and the energy loss due to soft drop. The $\\beta = 0$ limit of the energy loss is particularly interesting, since it is not only "Sudakov safe" but also largely insensitive to the value of the strong coupling constant. While our calculations are strictly accurate only to modified leading-logarithmic order, we also include a discussion of higher-order effects such as multiple emissions and (the absence of) non-global logarithms. We compare our analytic r...

  14. A validated stability-indicating high performance liquid chromatographic method for moxifloxacin hydrochloride and ketorolac tromethamine eye drops and its application in pH dependent degradation kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayant B Dave

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: A fixed dose combination of moxifloxacin hydrochloride and ketorolac tromethamine is used in ratio of 1:1 as eye drops for the treatment of the reduction of post operative inflammatory conditions of the eye. A simple, precise, and accurate High Performance Liquid Chromatographic (HPLC method was developed and validated for determination of moxifloxacin hydrochloride and ketorolac tromethamine in eye drops. Materials and Methods: Isocratic HPLC separation was achieved on a ACE C 18 column (C 18 (5 μm, 150 mm×4.6 mm, i.d. using the mobile phase 10 mM potassium di-hydrogen phosphate buffer pH 4.6-Acetonitrile (75:25 v/v at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The detection was performed at 307 nm. Drugs were subjected to acid, alkali and neutral hydrolysis, oxidation and photo degradation. Moreover, the proposed HPLC method was utilized to investigate the pH dependent degradation kinetics of moxifloxacin hydrochloride and ketorolac tromethamine in buffer solutions at different pH values like 2.0, 6.8 and 9.0. Results and Conclusion: The retention time (t R of moxifloxacin hydrochloride and ketorolac tromethamine were 3.81±0.01 and 8.82±0.02 min, respectively. The method was linear in the concentration range of 2-20 μ/mL each for moxifloxacin hydrochloride and ketorolac tromethamine with a correlation coefficient of 0.9996 and 0.9999, respectively. The method was validated for linearity, precision, accuracy, robustness, specificity, limit of detection and limit of quantitation. The drugs could be effectively separated from different degradation products and hence the method can be used for stability analysis. Different kinetics parameters like apparent first-order rate constant, half-life and t 90 (time for 90% potency left were calculated.

  15. A NOVEL METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF TRACE THORIUM BY DISPERSIVE LIQUID-LIQUID MICROEXTRACTION BASED ON SOLIDIFICATION OF FLOATING ORGANIC DROP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rezaee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic droplets was used for the preconcentration and determination of thorium in the water samples. In this method, acetone and 1-undecanol were used as disperser and extraction solvents, respectively, and the ligand 1-(2-thenoyl-3,3,3-trifluoracetone reagent (TTA and Aliquat 336 was used as a chelating agent and an ion-paring reagent, for the extraction of thorium, respectively. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry was applied for the quantitation of the analyte after preconcentration. The effect of various factors, such as the extraction and disperser solvent, sample pH, concentration of TTA and concentration of aliquat336 were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration graph was linear within the thorium content range of 1.0-250 µg L-1 with a detection limit of 0.2 µg L-1. The method was also successfully applied for the determination of thorium in the different water samples.

  16. 49 CFR 179.400 - General specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General specification applicable to cryogenic... MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113 and 107A) § 179.400 General specification applicable to cryogenic...

  17. Generalized breakup and coalescence models for population balance modelling of liquid-liquid flows

    CERN Document Server

    Traczyk, Marcin; Thompson, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Population balance framework is a useful tool that can be used to describe size distribution of droplets in a liquid-liquid dispersion. Breakup and coalescence models provide closures for mathematical formulation of the population balance equation (PBE) and are crucial for accu- rate predictions of the mean droplet size in the flow. Number of closures for both breakup and coalescence can be identified in the literature and most of them need an estimation of model parameters that can differ even by several orders of magnitude on a case to case basis. In this paper we review the fundamental assumptions and derivation of breakup and coalescence ker- nels. Subsequently, we rigorously apply two-stage optimization over several independent sets of experiments in order to identify model parameters. Two-stage identification allows us to estab- lish new parametric dependencies valid for experiments that vary over large ranges of important non-dimensional groups. This be adopted for optimization of parameters in breakup...

  18. Investigations of levitated helium drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Dwight Lawrence

    1999-11-01

    We report on the development of two systems capable of levitating drops of liquid helium. Helium drops of ˜20 mum have been levitated with the radiation pressure from two counter-propagating Nd:YAG laser beams. Drops are produced with a submerged piezoelectric transducer, and could be held for up to three minutes in our optical trap. Calculations show that Brillouin and Raman scattering of the laser light in the liquid helium produces a negligible rate of evaporation of the drop. Evaporation caused by the enhanced vapor pressure of the curved drop surfaces appears to be a significant effect limiting the drop lifetimes. Helium drops as large as 2 cm in diameter have been suspended in the earth's gravitational field with a magnetic field. A commercial superconducting solenoid provides the necessary field, field-gradient product required to levitate the drops. Drops are cooled to 0.5 K with a helium-3 refrigerator, and can be held in the trap indefinitely. We have found that when two or more drops are levitated in the same magnetic trap, the drops often remain in a state of apparent contact without coalescing. This effect is a result of the evaporation of liquid from between the two drops, and is found to occur only for normal fluid drops. We can induce shape oscillations in charged, levitated drops with an applied ac electric field. We have measured the resonance frequencies and damping rates for the l = 2 mode of oscillation as function of temperature. We have also developed a theory to describe the small amplitude shape oscillations of a He II drop surrounded by its saturated vapor. In our theory, we have considered two sets of boundary conditions---one where the drop does not evaporate and another in which the liquid and vapor are in thermodynamic equilibrium. We have found that both solutions give a frequency that agrees well with experiment, but that the data for the damping rate agree better with the solution without evaporation.

  19. Rapid analysis of Fructus forsythiae essential oil by ionic liquids-assisted microwave distillation coupled with headspace single-drop microextraction followed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Jiao [State Key Laboratory of Tree Genetics and Breeding, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Ma, Dan-Hui [College of Life Sciences, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Gai, Qing-Yan; Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng [State Engineering Laboratory of Bio-Resource Eco-Utilization, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Fu, Yu-Jie, E-mail: yujie_fu2002@yahoo.com [State Engineering Laboratory of Bio-Resource Eco-Utilization, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Ma, Wei, E-mail: mawei@hljucm.net [State Key Laboratory of Tree Genetics and Breeding, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); School of Pharmaceutical, Heilongjiang University of Chinese Medicine, Harbin 150040 (China)

    2013-12-04

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A new ILAMD-HS-SDME method is developed for the microextraction of essential oil. •ILs used as destruction agent of plant cell walls and microwave absorption medium. •Parameters affecting the extraction efficiency are optimized by Box–Behnken design. •Procedure benefits: similar constituents, shorter duration and smaller sample amount. •ILAMD-HS-SDME followed by GC–MS is a promising technique in analytical fields. -- Abstract: A rapid, green and effective miniaturized sample preparation and analytical technique, i.e. ionic liquids-assisted microwave distillation coupled with headspace single-drop microextraction (ILAMD-HS-SDME) followed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) was developed for the analysis of essential oil (EO) in Fructus forsythiae. In this work, ionic liquids (ILs) were not only used as the absorption medium of microwave irradiation but also as the destruction agent of plant cell walls. 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C{sub 2}mim]OAc) was chosen as the optimal ILs. Moreover, n-heptadecane (2.0 μL) was selected as the appropriate suspended solvent for the extraction and concentration of EO. Extraction conditions of the proposed method were optimized using the relative peak area of EO constituents as the index, and the optimal operational parameters were obtained as follows: irradiation power (300 W), sample mass (0.7 g), mass ratio of ILs to sample (2.4), temperature (78 °C) and time (3.4 min). In comparison to previous reports, the proposed method was faster and required smaller sample amount but could equally monitor all EO constituents with no significant differences.

  20. Seeing Below the Drop: Direct Nano-to-microscale Imaging of Complex Interfaces involving Solid, Liquid, and Gas Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rykaczewski, Konrad; Landin, Trevan; Walker, Marlon L.; Scott, John Henry J.; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2012-11-01

    Nanostructured surfaces with special wetting properties have the potential to transform number of industries, including power generation, water desalination, gas and oil production, and microelectronics thermal management. Predicting the wetting properties of these surfaces requires detailed knowledge of the geometry and the composition of the contact volume linking the droplet to the underlying substrate. Surprisingly, a general nano-to-microscale method for direct imaging of such interfaces has previously not been developed. Here we introduce a three dimensional imaging method which resolves this one-hundred-year-old metrology gap in wetting research. Specifically, we demonstrate direct nano-to-microscale imaging of complex fluidic interfaces using cryofixation in combination with cryo-FIB/SEM. We show that application of this method yields previously unattainable quantitative information about the interfacial geometry of water condensed on silicon nanowire forests with hydrophilic and hydrophobic surface termination in the presence or absence of an intermediate water repelling oil. We also discuss imaging artifacts and the advantages of secondary and backscatter electron imaging, Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (EDS), and three dimensional FIB/SEM tomography.

  1. Contact angle hysteresis of liquid drops as means to measure adhesive energy of zein on solid substrates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L Muthuselvi; Aruna Dhathathreyan

    2006-03-01

    Adhesion of zein to solid substrates has been studied using surface energy profiles as indices and by adhesion mapping using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Different plasticizers like glycerol and sorbitol have been used to form mixed films with zein and properties of these films are studied using surface energy profiles. Comparison of the results from the different mixed samples with those from the pure zein films showed that force mapping could identify areas rich in protein. The adhesion maps produced were deconvoluted from sample topography and contrasted with the data obtained from contact angle measurements. A comparison of the two methods shows that the extent of contact angle hysteresis is indicative of both hydrophobicity of the surface as well as the force of adhesion. Mechanical properties and microstructure of zein films prepared by casting from solutions and using Langmuir-Blodgett film technique have been investigated. Pure zein seemed brittle and exhibited an essentially linear relationship between stress and strain. Films with plasticizer were tougher than these films. In general, mixed films showed better mechanical properties than pure films and had higher ultimate tensile strength and increased per cent elongation. Further, the mixed films of zein showed a higher force of adhesion compared to the pure films.

  2. Simultaneous extraction and quantification of lamotrigine, phenobarbital, and phenytoin in human plasma and urine samples using solidified floating organic drop microextraction and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Mohammad; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Haji Shabani, Ali Mohammad; Abbasi, Bijan

    2015-07-01

    A novel and simple method based on solidified floating organic drop microextraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection has been developed for simultaneous preconcentration and determination of phenobarbital, lamotrigine, and phenytoin in human plasma and urine samples. Factors affecting microextraction efficiency such as the type and volume of the extraction solvent, sample pH, extraction time, stirring rate, extraction temperature, ionic strength, and sample volume were optimized. Under the optimum conditions (i.e. extraction solvent, 1-undecanol (40 μL); sample pH, 8.0; temperature, 25°C; stirring rate, 500 rpm; sample volume, 7 mL; potassium chloride concentration, 5% and extraction time, 50 min), the limits of detection for phenobarbital, lamotrigine, and phenytoin were 1.0, 0.1, and 0.3 μg/L, respectively. Also, the calibration curves for phenobarbital, lamotrigine, and phenytoin were linear in the concentration range of 2.0-300.0, 0.3-200.0, and 1.0-200.0 μg/L, respectively. The relative standard deviations for six replicate extractions and determinations of phenobarbital, lamotrigine, and phenytoin at 50 μg/L level were less than 4.6%. The method was successfully applied to determine phenobarbital, lamotrigine, and phenytoin in plasma and urine samples. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Solidified floating organic drop microextraction combined with high performance liquid chromatography for the determination of carbamazepine in human plasma and urine samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad ASADI; Ali Mohammad HAJI SHABANI; Shayessteh DADFARNIA; Bijan ABBASI

    2015-01-01

    Solidified floating organic drop microextraction( SFODME)in combination with high performance liquid chromatography was used for separation/preconcentration and determination of carbamazepine( CBZ)in human plasma and urine samples. Parameters that affect the extraction efficiency such as the type and volume of extraction solvent,ionic strength,sodium hydroxide concentration,stirring rate,sample volume and extrac-tion time,were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions( extraction solvent,40 μL of 1-un-decanol;sodium hydroxide concentration,1 mol/L;temperature,50 ℃;stirring speed,400 r/min;sample vol-ume,8 mL;sodium chloride concentration,3%( w/v)and extraction time,60 min)the calibration curve was found to be linear in the mass concentration range of 0. 4-700. 0 μg/L. The limit of detection( LOD)was 0. 1μg/L and the relative standard deviation( RSD)for six replicate extraction and determination of carbamazepine at 100 μg/L level was found to be 4. 1%. The method was successfully applied to the determination of CBZ in human plasma and urine samples.

  4. Vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop combined with high performance liquid chromatography for determination of naproxen and nabumetone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Mohammad; Haji Shabani, Ali Mohammad; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Abbasi, Bijan

    2015-12-18

    A novel, rapid, simple and green vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification microextraction method based on solidification of floating organic drop was developed for simultaneous separation/preconcentration and determination of ultra trace amounts of naproxen and nabumetone with high performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection. Some parameters influencing the extraction efficiency of analytes such as type and volume of extractant, type and concentration of surfactant, sample pH, KCl concentration, sample volume, and vortex time were investigated and optimized. Under optimal conditions, the calibration graph exhibited linearity in the range of 3.0-300.0ngL(-1) for naproxen and 7.0-300.0ngL(-1) for nabumetone with a good coefficient of determination (R(2)>0.999). The limits of detection were 0.9 and 2.1ngL(-1). The relative standard deviations for inter- and intra-day assays were in the range of 5.8-10.1% and 3.8-6.1%, respectively. The method was applied to the determination of naproxen and nabumetone in urine, water, wastewater and milk samples and the accuracy was evaluated through recovery experiments.

  5. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop combined with field-amplified sample injection in capillary electrophoresis for the determination of beta(2)-agonists in bovine urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Us, Murat Faruk; Alshana, Usama; Lubbad, Ibrahim; Göğer, Nilgün G; Ertaş, Nusret

    2013-03-01

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) was for the first time combined with field-amplified sample injection (FASI) in CE to determine four β(2)-agonists (cimbuterol, clenbuterol, mabuterol, and mapenterol) in bovine urine. Optimum BGE consisted of 20 mM borate buffer and 0.1 mM SDS. Using salting-out extraction, β(2)-agonists were extracted into ACN that was then used as the disperser solvent in DLLME-SFO. Optimum DLLME-SFO conditions were: 1.0 mL ACN, 50 μL 1-undecanol (extraction solvent), total extraction time 1.5 min, no salt addition. Back extraction into an aqueous solution (pH 2.0) facilitated direct injection of β(2)-agonists into CE. Compared to conventional CZE, DLLME-SFO-FASI-CE achieved sensitivity enhancement factors of 41-1046 resulting in LODs in the range of 1.80-37.0 μg L(-1). Linear dynamic ranges of 0.15-10.0 mg L(-1) for cimbuterol and 15-1000 μg L(-1) for the other analytes were obtained with coefficients of determination (R(2)) ≥ 0.9901 and RSD% ≤5.5 (n = 5). Finally, the applicability of the proposed method was successfully confirmed by determination of the four β(2)-agonists in spiked bovine urine samples and accuracy higher than 96.0% was obtained.

  6. A novel method for the determination of trace copper in cereals by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Xia Wu; Qiu Hua Wu; Chun Wang; Zhi Wang

    2011-01-01

    A novel, simple, rapid, efficient and environment-friendly method for the determination of trace copper in cereal samples was developed by using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) followed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. In the DLLME-SFO, copper was complexed with 8-hydroxy quinoline and extracted into a small volume of 1-dodecanol, which is of low density, low toxicity and proper melting point near room temperature. The experimental parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration graph exhibited linearity over the range of 0.5-500 ng/mL with the correlation coefficient (r) of 0.9996. The enrichment factor was 122 and the limit of detection was 0.1 ng/mL. The method was applied to the determination of copper in the complex matrix samples such as rice and millet with the recoveries for the spiked samples at 5.0 and 10.0 μg/g falling in the range of 92.0-98.0% and the relative standard deviation of 3.9-5.7%.

  7. Simultaneous extraction and determination of albendazole and triclabendazole by a novel syringe to syringe dispersive liquid phase microextraction-solidified floating organic drop combined with high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Mohammad; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Haji Shabani, Ali Mohammad

    2016-08-17

    A syringe to syringe dispersive liquid phase microextraction-solidified floating organic drop was introduced and used for the simultaneous extraction of trace amounts of albendazole and triclabendazole from different matrices. The extracted analytes were determined by high performance liquid chromatography along with fluorescence detection. The analytical parameters affecting the microextraction efficiency including the nature and volume of the extraction solvent, sample volume, sample pH, ionic strength and the cycles of extraction were optimized. The calibration curves were linear in the range of 0.1-30.0 μg L(-1) and 0.2-30.0 μg L(-1) with determination coefficients of 0.9999 and 0.9998 for albendazole and triclabendazole respectively. The detection limits defined as three folds of the signal to noise ratio were found to be 0.02 μg L(-1) for albendazole and 0.06 μg L(-1) for triclabendazole. The inter-day and intra-day precision (RSD%) for both analytes at three concentration levels (0.5, 2.0 and 10.0 μg L(-1)) were in the range of 6.3-10.1% and 5.0-7.5% respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to determine albendazole and triclabendazole in water, cow milk, honey, and urine samples.

  8. Detection and determination of common benzodiazepines and their metabolites in blood samples of forensic science interest. Microcolumn cleanup and high-performance liquid chromatography with reductive electrochemical detection at a pendent mercury drop electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, J B; Parry, D A

    1988-09-30

    Benzodiazepines in the blood samples typical of forensic science work are recovered from 100-250 microliters amounts of blood (diluted with aqueous sodium octyl sulphate to suppress protein binding) onto microcolumns of Porapak-T, and finally eluted into 60-microliters volumes of aqueous acetonitrile. The eluates may be taken directly for analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with reductive amperometric detection at a pendent mercury drop electrode held at potentials down to -1.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl. For high sensitivity work the electrode is preceded by a coulometric detector fitted with porous carbon electrodes held at 0 V (proprietary reference electrode). The technique detects all of the commonly encountered benzodiazepines and others except clobazam, which contains no azomethine group. The detection limits generally are in the range 1-5 ng/ml (40-200 pg HPLC-injected) in hemolyzed human blood, with recovery values of 84-95%, depending on the actual benzodiazepine, over the range examined (less than or equal to 2.14 micrograms/ml). The respective values for the metabolites of nitrazepam are 8-12 ng/ml and 75-84%. The technique is very much less susceptible to the interferences afflicting other commonly applied techniques, and facilitates considerably the analysis of degraded samples.

  9. Self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory of the dynamics of multicomponent atomic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro-Lázaro, Edilio; Mendoza-Méndez, Patricia; Elizondo-Aguilera, Luis Fernando; Perera-Burgos, Jorge Adrián; Ramírez-González, Pedro Ezequiel; Pérez-Ángel, Gabriel; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón; Medina-Noyola, Magdaleno

    2017-05-01

    A fundamental challenge of the theory of liquids is to understand the similarities and differences in the macroscopic dynamics of both colloidal and atomic liquids, which originate in the (Newtonian or Brownian) nature of the microscopic motion of their constituents. Starting from the recently discovered long-time dynamic equivalence between a colloidal and an atomic liquid that share the same interparticle pair potential, in this work we develop a self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory for the dynamics of equilibrium multicomponent atomic liquids, applicable as an approximate but quantitative theory describing the long-time diffusive dynamical properties of simple equilibrium atomic liquids. When complemented with a Gaussian-like approximation, this theory is also able to provide a reasonable representation of the passage from a ballistic to diffusive behavior. We illustrate the applicability of the resulting theory with three particular examples, namely, a monodisperse and a polydisperse monocomponent hard-sphere liquid and a highly size-asymmetric binary hard-sphere mixture. To assess the quantitative accuracy of our results, we perform event-driven molecular dynamics simulations, which corroborate the general features of the theoretical predictions.

  10. General collection efficiency for liquid isooctane and tetramethylsilane in pulsed radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, B; Wickman, G; Bahar-Gogani, J

    1997-10-01

    The general collection efficiency in pulsed radiation was studied for isooctane (C8H18) and tetramethylsilane (Si(CH3)4). These two liquids were used as sensitive media in a parallel-plate liquid ionization chamber with a 1 mm sensitive layer. Measurements were carried out using 20 MV photon radiation from a linear accelerator with a pulse repetition frequency of 30 pulses/second and a pulse length of 3.5 microseconds. The general collection efficiency was determined for polarizing voltages in the interval 1000-2000 V for isooctane and 500-2000 V for tetramethylsilane and for pulse doses in the interval 0.06-1.9 mGy/pulse. An air ionization chamber was used as a pulse dose reference monitor. The experimental results were compared with those predicted by the equation for the general collection efficiency for gases in pulsed radiation, using the permittivity of each of the liquids. It was found that for general collection efficiencies down to 80% the differences between the predicted and experimental general collection efficiencies in the two liquids were within +/- 1% at electric field strengths exceeding 10(6) V m-1.

  11. Star-shaped Oscillations of Leidenfrost Drops

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Xiaolei; Burton, Justin C

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the self-organized, star-shaped oscillations of Leidenfrost drops. The drops levitate on a cushion of evaporated vapor over a heated, curved surface. We observe modes with $n = 2-13$ lobes around the drop periphery. We find that both the wavelength and frequency of the oscillations depend only on the capillary length of the liquid, and are independent of the drop radius and substrate temperature. However, the number of observed modes depend sensitively on the liquid viscosity. The dominant frequency of pressure variations under the drop is approximately twice that the drop oscillation frequency, consistent with a parametric forcing mechanism. Our results suggest that the star-shaped oscillations are hydrodynamic in origin, and are driven by capillary waves beneath the drop. The exact mechanism by which the vapor flow initiates the capillary waves is likely related to static "brim waves" in levitated, viscous drops.

  12. Low-Flow Liquid Desiccant Air Conditioning: General Guidance and Site Considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozubal, E.; Herrmann, L.; Deru, M.; Clark, J.

    2014-09-01

    Dehumidification or latent cooling in buildings is an area of growing interest that has been identified as needing more research and improved technologies for higher performance. Heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems typically expend excessive energy by using overcool-and-reheat strategies to dehumidify buildings. These systems first overcool ventilation air to remove moisture and then reheat the air to meet comfort requirements. Another common strategy incorporates solid desiccant rotors that remove moisture from the air more efficiently; however, these systems increase fan energy consumption because of the high airside pressure drop of solid desiccant rotors and can add heat of absorption to the ventilation air. Alternatively, liquid desiccant air-conditioning (LDAC) technology provides an innovative dehumidification solution that: (1) eliminates the need for overcooling and reheating from traditional cooling systems; and (2) avoids the increased fan energy and air heating from solid desiccant rotor systems.

  13. Fully automated ionic liquid-based headspace single drop microextraction coupled to GC-MS/MS to determine musk fragrances in environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallecillos, Laura; Pocurull, Eva; Borrull, Francesc

    2012-09-15

    A fully automated ionic liquid-based headspace single drop microextraction (IL-HS-SDME) procedure has been developed for the first time to preconcentrate trace amounts of ten musk fragrances extensively used in personal care products (six polycyclic musks, three nitro musks and one polycyclic musk degradation product) from wastewater samples prior to analysis by gas chromatography and ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (GC-IT-MS/MS). Due to the low volatility of the ILs, a large internal diameter liner (3.4 mm i.d.) was used to improve the ILs evaporation. Furthermore, a piece of glass wool was introduced into the liner to avoid the entrance of the ILs in the GC column and a guard column was used to prevent analytical column damages. The main factors influencing the IL-HS-SDME were optimized. For all species, the highest enrichments factors were achieved using 1 μL of 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([OMIM][PF(6)]) ionic liquid exposed in the headspace of 10 mL water samples containing 300 g L(-1) of NaCl and stirred at 750 rpm and 60 °C for 45 min. All compounds were determined by direct injection GC-IT-MS/MS with a chromatographic time of 19 min. Method detection limits were found in the low ng mL(-1) range between 0.010 ng mL(-1) and 0.030 ng mL(-1) depending on the target analytes. Also, under optimized conditions, the method gave good levels of intra-day and inter-day repeatabilities in wastewater samples with relative standard deviations varying between 3% and 6% and 5% and 11%, respectively (n=3, 1 ng mL(-1)). The applicability of the method was tested with different wastewater samples from influent and effluent urban wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and one potable treatment plant (PTP). The analysis of influent urban wastewater revealed the presence of galaxolide and tonalide at concentrations of between 2.10 ng mL(-1) and 0.29 ng mL(-1) and 0.32 ng mL(-1) and waters from PTP only galaxolide was found at a concentration higher than MQL.

  14. 基于液滴指纹图的波形分析算法的改进%Improvement of Waveform Analysis Algorithm Based on Liquid Drop Fingerprint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晶; 宋晴; 黄加勇; 吴迪; 张春松

    2011-01-01

    不同的液体在相同的夜滴分析系统中,光纤信号的强弱不同,电容信号的强弱即液滴体积不同,液滴指纹图的波峰波谷的高度、位置以及峰的形状不同,液滴指纹图的曲线长度和曲线下的面积不同;因此,对光电液滴指纹图进行波形分析,计算波形参数,可以实现特征提取并区分不同液体.针对波形分析算法在特征提取过程中存在的两个缺陷,即最值检测时可能错误识别波谷位置和邻域比较时产生大量等值数据集,提出了改进的波形分析算法;对改进前后的波形分析算法进行了分析比较,改进后的算法有效提高了波形参数的准确性.%There are some visible differences for different liquids in the same experimental system, such as the output tiber voltage ( or the light intensity), the output capacitor voltage (or the drop volume), the peak height and the profile of fingerprint, and the curve area surrounded by the fingerprint and the axis. So waveform analysis method and calculated parameters characterizing waveform are employed for feature extraction to identify different liquids. The classical waveform analysis algorithm in feature extraction has two defects: failure to identify the real hollow by extreme detection from maximum and creating excessive equivalent data sets by adjacent comparison. This paper presents an improved one, which improves the accuracy of the waveform parameters.

  15. How to freeze drop oscillations with powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Jeremy; Zhu, Ying; Vakarelski, Ivan; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2012-11-01

    We present experiments that show when a water drop impacts onto a bed of fine, hydrophobic powder, the final form of the drop can be very different from the spherical form with which it impacts. For all drop impact speeds, the drop rebounds due to the hydrophobic nature of the powder. However, we observe that above a critical impact speed, the drop undergoes a permanent deformation to a highly non-spherical shape with a complete coverage of powder, thus creating a deformed liquid marble. This powder coating acts to freeze the drop oscillations during rebound.

  16. Drop spreading with random viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    We examine theoretically the spreading of a viscous liquid drop over a thin film of uniform thickness, assuming the liquid's viscosity is regulated by the concentration of a solute that is carried passively by the spreading flow. The solute is assumed to be initially heterogeneous, having a spatial distribution with prescribed statistical features. To examine how this variability influences the drop's motion, we investigate spreading in a planar geometry using lubrication theory, combining numerical simulations with asymptotic analysis. We assume diffusion is sufficient to suppress solute concentration gradients across but not along the film. The solute field beneath the bulk of the drop is stretched by the spreading flow, such that the initial solute concentration immediately behind the drop's effective contact lines has a long-lived influence on the spreading rate. Over long periods, solute swept up from the precursor film accumulates in a short region behind the contact line, allowing patches of elevated v...

  17. Experimental Study of Pressure Drop in Compressible Fluid through Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Min Kyo [Hanwha Corporation Defence R and D Center, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Do Hun; Seo, Chan Woo; Lee, Seoung Youn; Jang, Seok Pil; Koo, Jaye [Korea Aerospace Univ., Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    This study proposes the characteristics of the pressure drop in a compressible fluid through porous media for application to a porous injector in a liquid rocket engine in order to improve the uniformity of the drop size distribution and the mixing performance of shear coaxial injectors. The fluid through the porous media is a Non-Darcy flow that shows a Nonlinear relation between the pressure drop and the velocity at high speed and high mass flow rate. The pressure drop of the Non-Darcy flow can be derived using the Ferrochrome equation that includes the losses of viscous and inertia resistance. The permeability and Erg un coefficient represented as a function of the pressure drop and pore size can be applied to the porous injector, where the fluid through the porous media is compressible. A generalized correlation between the pressure drop in relation to the pore size was derived.

  18. Speciation of As(III) and As(V) in water samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after solid phase extraction combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Fattahi, Nazir; Assadi, Yaghoub; Sadeghi, Marzieh; Sharafi, Kiomars

    2014-12-01

    A solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) method, using diethyldithiphosphate (DDTP) as a proper chelating agent, has been developed as an ultra preconcentration technique for the determination of inorganic arsenic in water samples prior to graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Variables affecting the performance of both steps were thoroughly investigated. Under optimized conditions, 100mL of As(ΙΙΙ) solution was first concentrated using a solid phase sorbent. The extract was collected in 2.0 mL of acetone and 60.0 µL of 1-undecanol was added into the collecting solvent. The mixture was then injected rapidly into 5.0 mL of pure water for further DLLME-SFO. Total inorganic As(III, V) was extracted similarly after reduction of As(V) to As(III) with potassium iodide and sodium thiosulfate and As(V) concentration was calculated by difference. A mixture of Pd(NO3)2 and Mg(NO3)2 was used as a chemical modifier in GFAAS. The analytical characteristics of the method were determined. The calibration graph was linear in the rage of 10-100 ng L(-1) with detection limit of 2.5 ng L(-1). Repeatability (intra-day) and reproducibility (inter-day) of method based on seven replicate measurements of 80 ng L(-1) of As(ΙΙΙ) were 6.8% and 7.5%, respectively. The method was successfully applied to speciation of As(III), As(V) and determination of the total amount of As in water samples and in a certified reference material (NIST RSM 1643e).

  19. Inelastic X-ray scattering on liquid benzene analyzed using a generalized Langevin equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Koji; Fukuyama, Nami; Yamaguchi, Toshio; Hosokawa, Shinya; Uchiyama, Hiroshi; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Baron, Alfred Q. R.

    2017-07-01

    The dynamic structure factor, S(Q,ω), of liquid benzene was measured by meV-resolved inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) and analyzed using a generalized Langevin model with a memory function including fast, μ-relaxation and slow, structural, α-relaxation. The model well reproduced the experimental S(Q,ω) of liquid benzene. The dispersion relation of the collective excitation energy yields the high-frequency sound velocity for liquid benzene as related to the α-relaxation. The ratio of the high-frequency to the adiabatic sound velocity is approximately 1.5, larger to that of carbon tetrachloride and smaller than those of methanol and water, reflecting the nature of intermolecular interactions.

  20. Drops spreading on flexible fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somszor, Katarzyna; Boulogne, François; Sauret, Alban; Dressaire, Emilie; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    Fibrous media are encountered in many engineered systems such as textile, paper and insulating materials. In most of these materials, fibers are randomly oriented and form a complex network in which drops of wetting liquid tend to accumulate at the nodes of the network. Here we investigate the role of the fiber flexibility on the spreading of a small volume of liquid on a pair of crossed flexible fibers. A drop of silicone oil is dispensed at the point of contact of the fibers and we characterize the liquid morphologies as we vary the volume of liquid, the angle between the fibers, and the length and bending modulus of the fibers. Drop morphologies previously reported for rigid fibers, i.e. a drop, a column and a mixed morphology, are also observed on flexible fibers with modified domains of existence. Moreover, at small inclination angles of the fibers, a new behavior is observed: the fibers bend and collapse. Depending on the volume, the liquid can adopt a column or a mixed morphology on the collapsed fibers. We rationalize our observations with a model based on energetic considerations. Our study suggests that the fiber flexibility adds a rich variety of behaviors that can be crucial for industrial applications.

  1. Superheated drop neutron spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Das, M; Roy, B; Roy, S C; Das, Mala

    2000-01-01

    Superheated drops are known to detect neutrons through the nucleation caused by the recoil nuclei produced by the interactions of neutrons with the atoms constituting the superheated liquid molecule. A novel method of finding the neutron energy from the temperature dependence response of SDD has been developed. From the equivalence between the dependence of threshold energy for nucleation on temperature of SDD and the dependence of dE/dx of the recoil ions with the energy of the neutron, a new method of finding the neutron energy spectrum of a polychromatic as well as monochromatic neutron source has been developed.

  2. Two touching spherical drops in a uniaxial compressional flow: The effect of interfacial slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Sachin; Ramachandran, Arun

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a semi-analytical solution for the problem of two touching drops with slipping interfaces pushed against each other in a uniaxial compressional flow at low capillary and Reynolds numbers. The jump in the tangential velocity at the liquid-liquid interface is modeled using the Navier slip condition. Analytical solutions of the contact force, the drop-scale stresses, and the drop-scale pressure are provided as functions of the slip coefficient (" separators=" α ) , the viscosity ratio (" separators=" κ ) , and the drop size ratio (" separators=" k ) . Since unequal drop sizes are considered, two problems are solved in the tangent sphere co-ordinate system to determine the steady state position: a pair of touching drops with its contact point at the origin of an axisymmetric straining flow, and two touching drops placed in a uniform flow parallel to the axis of symmetry of the drops. A general observation is that the effect of slip is manifested most strongly for drops whose viscosity is much greater than the suspending fluid (" separators=" κ ≫ 1 ) . For highly viscous drops, the flow and stress fields transition from those corresponding to solid particles for ακ ≪ 1, to those for inviscid drops in the limit ακ ≫ 1. The analytical expressions provided here for the contact force and the stress distributions will serve to provide the restrictions that complete the definition of the lubrication flow problem in the thin film between the two colliding drops. While the contact force that drains fluid out of the thin film is relatively unaffected by slip, the tangential stress and pressure in the near-contact region are mitigated significantly for ακ ≫ 1. The latter is expected to assist coalescence at high capillary numbers.

  3. Dopamine Polymerization in Liquid Marbles: A General Route to Janus Particle Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Yifeng; Sun, Guanqing; Ngai, To

    2016-04-01

    Coating a liquid with a particle shell not only renders a droplet superhydrophobic but also isolates a well-confined microenvironment for miniaturized chemical processes. Previously, we have demonstrated that particles at the liquid marble interface provide an ideal platform for the site-selective modification of superhydrophobic particles. However, the need for a special chemical reaction limits their potential use for the fabrication of Janus particles with various properties. Herein, we combine the employment of liquid marbles as microreactors with the remarkable adhesive ability of polydopamine to develop a general route for the synthesis of Janus particles from micrometer-sized superhydrophobic particles. We demonstrate that dopamine polymerization and deposition inside liquid marbles could be used for the selective surface modification of microsized silica particles, resulting in the formation of Janus particles. Moreover, it is possible to manipulate the Janus balance of the particles via the addition of surfactants and/or organic solvents to tune the interfacial energy. More importantly, owing to the many functional groups in polydopamine, we show that versatile strategies could be introduced to use these partially polydopamine-coated silica particles as platforms for further modification, including nanoparticle immobilization, metal ion chelation and reduction, as well as for chemical reactions. Given the flexibility in the choice of cores and the modification strategies, this developed method is distinctive in its high universality, good controllability, and great practicability.

  4. Shape oscillation of a levitated drop in an acoustic field

    CERN Document Server

    Ran, Weiyu

    2013-01-01

    A `star drop' refers to the patterns created when a drop, flattened by some force, is excited into shape mode oscillations. These patterns are perhaps best understood as the two dimensional analog to the more common three dimensional shape mode oscillations. In this fluid dynamics video an ultrasonic standing wave was used to levitate a liquid drop. The drop was then flattened into a disk by increasing the field strength. This flattened drop was then excited to create star drop patterns by exciting the drop at its resonance frequency. Different oscillatory modes were induced by varying the drop radius, fluid properties, and frequency at which the field strength was modulated.

  5. Drop size distributions and related properties of fog for five locations measured from aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, J. Allen

    1994-01-01

    Fog drop size distributions were collected from aircraft as part of the Synthetic Vision Technology Demonstration Program. Three west coast marine advection fogs, one frontal fog, and a radiation fog were sampled from the top of the cloud to the bottom as the aircraft descended on a 3-degree glideslope. Drop size versus altitude versus concentration are shown in three dimensional plots for each 10-meter altitude interval from 1-minute samples. Also shown are median volume radius and liquid water content. Advection fogs contained the largest drops with median volume radius of 5-8 micrometers, although the drop sizes in the radiation fog were also large just above the runway surface. Liquid water content increased with height, and the total number of drops generally increased with time. Multimodal variations in number density and particle size were noted in most samples where there was a peak concentration of small drops (2-5 micrometers) at low altitudes, midaltitude peak of drops 5-11 micrometers, and high-altitude peak of the larger drops (11-15 micrometers and above). These observations are compared with others and corroborate previous results in fog gross properties, although there is considerable variation with time and altitude even in the same type of fog.

  6. A Different Cone: Bursting Drops in Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuanhe

    2013-03-01

    Drops in fluids tend to be spheres--a shape that minimizes surface energy. In thunderstorm clouds, drops can become unstable and emit thin jets when charged beyond certain limits. The instability of electrified drops in gases and liquids has been widely studied and used in applications including ink-jet printing, electrospinning nano-fibers, microfluidics and electrospray ionization. Here we report a different scenario: drops in solids become unstable and burst under sufficiently high electric fields. We find the instability of drops in solids morphologically resembles that in liquids, but the critical electric field for the instability follows a different scaling due to elasticity of solids. Our observations and theoretical models not only advance the fundamental understanding of electrified drops but also suggest a new failure mechanism of high-energy-density dielectric polymers, which have diverse applications ranging from capacitors for power grids and electric vehicles to muscle-like transducers for soft robots and energy harvesting.

  7. A liquid-drop model for the heavy-ion fusion below the Coulomb barrier; Um modelo de gota liquida para a fusao de ions pesados abaixo da barreira coulombiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Carlos Eduardo Magalhaes de

    1988-03-01

    The enhancement of sub-barrier fusion observed in heavy ion collisions is studied in a liquid-drop model. It is shown that shape degrees of freedom related to neck formation play an important role in the fusion process, and increase the low energy fusion rates. The model predictions are in a quite satisfactory agreement with the experimental data, and major discrepancies seem to be found only for those systems where specific nuclear structure effects should also be considered. (author). 83 refs, 54 figs.

  8. THE INFLUENCE OF DROPLET VOLUME AND CONTACT-ANGLE ON LIQUID SURFACE-TENSION MEASUREMENTS BY AXISYMMETRICAL DROP SHAPE ANALYSIS-PROFILE (ADSA-P)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BUSSCHER, HJ

    1991-01-01

    The axisymmetric drop shape analysis-profile (ADSA-P) technique was evaluated with respect to the influence of contact angle and droplet volume. The system was implemented on our standard contact angle measuring apparatus employing a Vidicon video camera and a 512 x 256 pixels framegrabber. For cali

  9. Fluid Mechanics of Liquid-Liquid Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, John Reed

    numerical simulations are satisfactorily compared with n-heptane/water experiments and previous simplified analyses based on drop formation before and after jetting. Although the program and numerical techniques developed in this dissertation have been used mainly to solve problems involving liquid-liquid jets and drops, many features of more complex and general liquid-liquid contacting systems are explored in the process.

  10. Fluid Flower : Microliquid Patterning via Drop Impact

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Minhee

    2008-01-01

    In microfluidic technologies, direct patterning of liquid without resorting to micromachined solid structures has various advantages including reduction of the frictional dissipation and the fabrication cost. This fluid dynamics video illustrates the method to micropattern a liquid on a solid surface with drop impact. We experimentally show that a water drop impacting with the wettability-patterned solid retracts fast on the hydrophobic regions while being arrested on the hydrophilic areas.

  11. Interfacial Instabilities in Evaporating Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Ross; Sefiane, Khellil; Matar, Omar

    2007-11-01

    We study the effect of substrate thermal properties on the evaporation of sessile drops of various liquids. An infra-red imaging technique was used to record the interfacial temperature. This technique illustrates the non-uniformity in interfacial temperature distribution that characterises the evaporation process. Our results also demonstrate that the evaporation of methanol droplets is accompanied by the formation of wave-trains in the interfacial temperature field; similar patterns, however, were not observed in the case of water droplets. More complex patterns are observed for FC-72 refrigerant drops. The effect of substrate thermal conductivity on the structure of the complex pattern formation is also elucidated.

  12. Generalized Liquid Crystals: Giant Fluctuations and the Vestigial Chiral Order of I , O , and T Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ke; Nissinen, Jaakko; Slager, Robert-Jan; Wu, Kai; Zaanen, Jan

    2016-10-01

    The physics of nematic liquid crystals has been the subject of intensive research since the late 19th century. However, the focus of this pursuit has been centered around uniaxial and biaxial nematics associated with constituents bearing a D∞ h or D2 h symmetry, respectively. In view of general symmetries, however, these are singularly special since nematic order can in principle involve any point-group symmetry. Given the progress in tailoring nanoparticles with particular shapes and interactions, this vast family of "generalized nematics" might become accessible in the laboratory. Little is known because the order parameter theories associated with the highly symmetric point groups are remarkably complicated, involving tensor order parameters of high rank. Here, we show that the generic features of the statistical physics of such systems can be studied in a highly flexible and efficient fashion using a mathematical tool borrowed from high-energy physics: discrete non-Abelian gauge theory. Explicitly, we construct a family of lattice gauge models encapsulating nematic ordering of general three-dimensional point-group symmetries. We find that the most symmetrical generalized nematics are subjected to thermal fluctuations of unprecedented severity. As a result, novel forms of fluctuation phenomena become possible. In particular, we demonstrate that a vestigial phase carrying no more than chiral order becomes ubiquitous departing from high point-group symmetry chiral building blocks, such as I , O , and T symmetric matter.

  13. Use of volatile organic solvents in headspace liquid-phase microextraction by direct cooling of the organic drop using a simple cooling capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiasvand, Ali Reza; Yazdankhah, Fatemeh; Hajipour, Somayeh

    2016-08-01

    A low-cost and simple cooling-assisted headspace liquid-phase microextraction device for the extraction and determination of 2,6,6-trimethyl-1,3 cyclohexadiene-1-carboxaldehyde (safranal) in Saffron samples, using volatile organic solvents, was fabricated and evaluated. The main part of the cooling-assisted headspace liquid-phase microextraction system was a cooling capsule, with a Teflon microcup to hold the extracting organic solvent, which is able to directly cool down the extraction phase while the sample matrix is simultaneously heated. Different experimental factors such as type of organic extraction solvent, sample temperature, extraction solvent temperature, and extraction time were optimized. The optimal conditions were obtained as: extraction solvent, methanol (10 μL); extraction temperature, 60°C; extraction solvent temperature, 0°C; and extraction time, 20 min. Good linearity of the calibration curve (R(2) = 0.995) was obtained in the concentration range of 0.01-50.0 μg/mL. The limit of detection was 0.001 μg/mL. The relative standard deviation for 1.0 μg/mL of safranal was 10.7% (n = 6). The proposed cooling-assisted headspace liquid-phase microextraction device was coupled (off-line) to high-performance liquid chromatography and used for the determination of safranal in Saffron samples. Reasonable agreement was observed between the results of the cooling-assisted headspace liquid-phase microextraction high-performance liquid chromatography method and those obtained by a validated ultrasound-assisted solvent extraction procedure.

  14. Enhancement of the capabilities of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with derivatization: general principles and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fengguo; Zou, Li; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Zunjian; Ong, Choon Nam

    2011-01-01

    The integration of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) with derivatization is a relatively new and unique strategy that could add value and could enhance the capabilities of LC-MS-based technologies. The derivatization process could be carried out in various analytical steps, for example, sampling, storage, sample preparation, HPLC separation, and MS detection. This review presents an overview of derivatization-based LC-MS strategy over the past 10 years and covers both the general principles and applications in the fields of pharmaceutical and biomedical analysis, biomarker and metabolomic research, environmental analysis, and food-safety evaluation. The underlying mechanisms and theories for derivative reagent selection are summarized and highlighted to guide future studies.

  15. Excess heat capacity of the (Li1−xCax)F1+x liquid solution determined by differential scanning calorimetry and drop calorimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capelli, E.; Benes, O.; Konings, R.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The work presents the measured heat capacity of the (Li1−xCax)F1+x liquid solution. Four samples with different compositions have been prepared and measured using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter. Since this technique was newly adopted for measuring encapsulated fluoride samples, some

  16. Equilibrium drop surface profiles in electric fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugele, F.; Buehrle, J.

    2007-01-01

    Electrowetting is becoming a more and more frequently used tool to manipulate liquids in various microfluidic applications. On the scale of the entire drop, the effect of electrowetting is to reduce the apparent contact angle of partially wetting conductive liquids upon application of an external vo

  17. Hard-sphere and hard-disk freezing from the differential formulation of the generalized effective liquid approximation

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Tejero, Carlos; Cuesta, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    We apply the differential formulation of the generalized effective liquid approximation to the study of hard-sphere and hard-disk freezing. We show that the thermodynamic properties of the solid phase are rather insensitive to the compressibility factor of the fluid phase used to map the solid onto the effective liquid. The solid-fluid coexistence data instead are quite dependent on the equation of state describing the fluid phase. Very accurate results, as compared with the simulation data, ...

  18. A generalized model on the evaluation of entropy and entropy of mixing of liquid Na-Sn alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpathy, Alok; Sengupta, Saumendu

    2017-01-01

    Recently proposed theory of entropy of mixing of the structurally inhomogeneous binary liquid alloys of alkali metals and group-IV elements is applied successfully to the liquid Na-Sn alloy. This alloy indicates chemical short range ordering (CSRO) i.e. exhibits partially salt like characteristics due to strong tendencies to compound formation, in the solid as well as in the liquid state. So, the generalized model for entropy of charged-hard-spheres mixture of arbitrary charge and size is employed to evaluate entropies of mixing, treating the sample as partially charge transfer system. The computed entropies of mixing are in excellent agreement with the experimental data.

  19. Application of the two-dose-rate method for general recombination correction for liquid ionization chambers in continuous beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Jonas; Tölli, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    A method to correct for the general recombination losses for liquid ionization chambers in continuous beams has been developed. The proposed method has been derived from Greening's theory for continuous beams and is based on measuring the signal from a liquid ionization chamber and an air filled monitor ionization chamber at two different dose rates. The method has been tested with two plane parallel liquid ionization chambers in a continuous radiation x-ray beam with a tube voltage of 120 kV and with dose rates between 2 and 13 Gy min-1. The liquids used as sensitive media in the chambers were isooctane (C8H18) and tetramethylsilane (Si(CH3)4). The general recombination effect was studied using chamber polarizing voltages of 100, 300, 500, 700 and 900 V for both liquids. The relative standard deviation of the results for the collection efficiency with respect to general recombination was found to be a maximum of 0.7% for isooctane and 2.4% for tetramethylsilane. The results are in excellent agreement with Greening's theory for collection efficiencies over 90%. The measured and corrected signals from the liquid ionization chambers used in this work are in very good agreement with the air filled monitor chamber with respect to signal to dose linearity.

  20. Application of the two-dose-rate method for general recombination correction for liquid ionization chambers in continuous beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Jonas; Toelli, Heikki, E-mail: jonas.andersson@radfys.umu.se [Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics, Umeaa University, SE-901 85 Umeaa (Sweden)

    2011-01-21

    A method to correct for the general recombination losses for liquid ionization chambers in continuous beams has been developed. The proposed method has been derived from Greening's theory for continuous beams and is based on measuring the signal from a liquid ionization chamber and an air filled monitor ionization chamber at two different dose rates. The method has been tested with two plane parallel liquid ionization chambers in a continuous radiation x-ray beam with a tube voltage of 120 kV and with dose rates between 2 and 13 Gy min{sup -1}. The liquids used as sensitive media in the chambers were isooctane (C{sub 8}H{sub 18}) and tetramethylsilane (Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 4}). The general recombination effect was studied using chamber polarizing voltages of 100, 300, 500, 700 and 900 V for both liquids. The relative standard deviation of the results for the collection efficiency with respect to general recombination was found to be a maximum of 0.7% for isooctane and 2.4% for tetramethylsilane. The results are in excellent agreement with Greening's theory for collection efficiencies over 90%. The measured and corrected signals from the liquid ionization chambers used in this work are in very good agreement with the air filled monitor chamber with respect to signal to dose linearity.

  1. 气-液-固自然循环流化床中的流动特性和压降%Flow Properties and Pressure Drop of Gas-Liquid-Solid Natural Circulating in Fluidized-Bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐国鹏; 姜峰; 赵燕禹; 赵国华; 周震; 李修伦

    2009-01-01

    A fluidized-bed evaporator for gas-liquid-solid natural circulation was set up to research the flow and distribution of solid particles and pressure drop of liquid-solid two-phase flow in a heating pipe bundle. With CCD image collecting and processing system,the influences of the particle kinds,particle holdup and additive air amount were studied. The experimental results show that air inlet positions have much effect on the distribution of solid particles in the heating pipe bundle. The form of moving and fluidization of solid particles in up-channel is different from that in down-channel. In up-channel,solid particles make circulating movement with the central part rising and perimeter dropping. As the density decreases,the distribution of solid particles in up-channel gradually becomes uniform. In down-channel,solid particles form two big whirls at both sides of the central axis. As additive air amount increases,the rotation rate of whirls increases. When the air is input from the up-channel,the pressure drop of liquid-solid two-phase flow in the heating pipe bundle increases with the increase of particles holdup and air amount. The pressure drop model of liquid-solid two-phase flow in the heating pipe bundle has been set up,and the calculated data agree well with the experimental results.%建立了气-液-固冷模多管自然循环流化床蒸发器,利用CCD图像采集和处理系统,研究了固体颗粒的种类、含率和通气量等操作参数对于固体颗粒的流化和运动形态、分布以及加热管束中液-固两相流压降的影响.结果表明:通气位置对于固体颗粒在加热管束中的分布影响较大.在上、下管箱中,固体颗粒的运动和流化形态不同.在上管箱中,固体颗粒形成中心上升、四周下降的循环运动,并且随着其密度的降低,固体颗粒在上管箱中的分布逐渐趋向均匀;在下管箱中,固体颗粒在中心轴的两侧形成两个大的旋涡,旋涡的旋转速度随着

  2. The bounce-splash of a viscoelastic drop

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Sanchez, Federico; Zenit, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    This is an entry for the Gallery of Fluid Motion of the 61st Annual Meeting of the APS-DFD (fluid dynamics videos). This video shows the collision and rebound of viscoelastic drops against a solid wall. Using a high speed camera, the process of approach, contact and rebound of drops of a viscoelastic liquid is observed. We found that these drops first splash, similar to what is observed in Newtonian colliding drops; after a few instants, the liquid recoils, recovering its original drop shape and bounce off the wall.

  3. Mass transfer intensification of nanofluid single drops with effect of temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saien, Javad; Zardoshti, Mahdi [Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    The hydrodynamics and mass transfer of organic nanofluid single drops in liquid-liquid extraction process were investigated within temperature range of 20 to 40 .deg. C. Nanofluid drops of toluene+acetic acid, containing surface modified magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) with concentration within the range of (0.0005-0.005) wt%, were conducted in aqueous continuous phase. The rate of solute mass transfer was generally enhanced with NPs until about 0.002wt%, and small drops benefited more. The enhancement reached 184.1% with 0.002 wt% of NPs at 40 .deg. C; however, adding more NPs led to the mass transfer to either remain constant or face a reduction, depending on the applied temperature. The mass transfer coefficient was nicely reproduced using a developed correlation for enhancement factor of molecular diffusivity as a function of Reynolds and Schmidt numbers.

  4. A general strategy to fabricate simple polyoxometalate nanostructures: electrochemistry-assisted laser ablation in liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pu; Liang, Ying; Lin, Xianzhong; Wang, Chengxin; Yang, Guowei

    2011-06-28

    Polyoxometalate nanostructures have attracted much attention because of significant technical demands in applications such as catalysts, sensors, and smart windows. Therefore, researchers have recently developed many methods for the synthesis of these nanomaterials. However, these techniques have many visible flaws such as high temperatures or high pressure environments, various templates or additives, demanding and complicated synthesis procedures as well as the presence of impurities in the final products. We therefore propose a general strategy for the fabrication of particular polyoxometalate nanostructures by electrochemically assisted laser ablation in liquid (ECLAL). These polyoxometalates are usually simple as they typically contain two metals and are not soluble in water. This approach is a green, simple, and catalyst-free approach under an ambient environment. Apart from these merits, this novel technique allows researchers to choose and design interesting solid targets and to use an electrochemical approach toward the fabrication of polyoxometalate nanostructures for the purpose of fundamental research and for potential applications. Using the synthesis of Cu(3)Mo(2)O(9) nanorods as an example, we substantiate the validity of the proposed strategy. For the fabrication of Cu(3)Mo(2)O(9) nanostructures, we chose molybdenum as a solid target for laser ablation in liquid copper electrodes for the electrochemical reaction and water as a solvent for the ECLAL synthesis. We successfully fabricated Cu(3)(OH)(2)(MoO(4))(2) nanorods with magnetic properties. Interestingly, we obtained well-defined Cu(3)Mo(2)O(9) nanorods by annealing the Cu(3)(OH)(2)(MoO(4))(2) nanostructures at 500 °C. Additionally, the basic physics and chemistry involved in the ECLAL fabrication of nanostructures are discussed.

  5. Influence of aqueous electrolytes on the wetting behavior of hydrophobic solid polymers-low-rate dynamic liquid/fluid contact angle measurements using axisymmetric drop shape analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welzel, Petra B; Rauwolf, Cordula; Yudin, Olexandr; Grundke, Karina

    2002-07-01

    The interaction of inorganic ions with low-energy hydrophobic surfaces was examined using model systems of solid polymers without ionizable functional surface groups in aqueous electrolyte solutions. Low-rate dynamic contact angle measurements with captive bubbles in conjunction with axisymmetric drop shape analysis (ADSA) were performed to study the influence of electrolyte ions (in the aqueous test solutions) on the wettability of the polymers. When various types of ions were used, no significant change in advancing and receding contact angles was observed. The contact angle hysteresis was small. The zeta potential of the model polymers in aqueous electrolyte solutions was determined from streaming potential measurements. The variation of the zeta potential at different pH levels indicates preferential adsorption of hydroxyl ions at this interface. However, the presence of electrolytes at the interface between water and the different model polymers did not influence the macroscopic contact angle. The results may suggest the absence of any specific interaction between the ions and the solid polymer, as this should result in changes of hydrophobicity. Similar to the air/water interface, the composition and the potential of the polymer/water interface are obviously determined predominantly by the aqueous phase with only slight influence from the solid phase.

  6. A sessile drop setup for the time-resolved synchrotron study of solid-liquid interactions: Application to intermetallic formation in 55%Al-Zn alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernier, N., E-mail: n.bernier@yahoo.fr; De Bruyn, D.; De Craene, M.; Scheers, J.; Claessens, S. [OCAS N.V., ArcelorMittal Global R and D Gent, Pres. J.F. Kennedylaan 3, 9060 Zelzate (Belgium); Vaughan, G. B. M.; Vitoux, H.; Gleyzolle, H.; Gorges, B. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2014-04-28

    We introduce a dedicated setup for measuring by synchrotron diffraction in-situ crystallographic and chemical information at the solid–liquid interface. This setup mostly consists of a double-heating furnace composed of a resistive heating for the solid surface and an inductive heating to produce a liquid droplet. The available high energy and high flux beams allow the rapid reaction kinetics to be investigated with very good time resolution down to 1 ms. An application of this setup is illustrated for the growth mechanisms of intermetallic phases during the hot-dipping of steel in a 55%Al-Zn bath. Results show that the three η-Al{sub 5}Fe{sub 2}, θ-Al{sub 13}Fe{sub 4}, and α-Al{sub 8}Fe{sub 2}Si phases grow at different times and rates during the dipping process, whereas the face-centered cubic AlFe{sub 3} phase is not formed.

  7. Eye Drop Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Involved News About Us Donate In This Section Eye Drop Tips en Español email Send this article ... the reach of children. Steps For Putting In Eye Drops: Start by tilting your head backward while ...

  8. Dilating Eye Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) Pink eye (defined) Retinopathy of Prematurity Strabismus Stye (defined) Vision ... Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) Pink eye (defined) Retinopathy of Prematurity Strabismus Stye (defined) Vision ...

  9. General collection efficiency for liquid isooctane and tetramethylsilane used as sensitive media in a parallel-plate ionization chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, B; Wickman, G

    1997-01-01

    The general collection efficiency has been measured in liquid isooctane (C8H18) and tetramethylsilane (Si(CH3)4) used as the sensitive media in a parallel-plate ionization chamber, with an electrode distance of 1 mm, intended for photon and electron dosimetry applications. The liquid ionization chamber was irradiated at different dose rates by 140 keV photons from the decay of radioactive 99mTc. The measurements were made at potential differences of 50, 100, 200 and 500 V. Measurements were performed for each liquid and electric field strength, with the decay rate of 99mTc used as the dose-rate reference. The maximum dose rate was about 150 mGy min-1 in each experiment. When the measured general collection efficiency values are compared with the theoretical predictions for collection efficiency in gases, it is found that the latter also describe the general collection efficiency in the two liquids within 1% of the saturation current for collection efficiencies down to 60% when using experimentally determined recombination rate constants and on mobilities characteristic of each of the liquids.

  10. Drop deformation by laser-pulse impact

    CERN Document Server

    Gelderblom, Hanneke; Klein, Alexander L; Bouwhuis, Wilco; Lohse, Detlef; Villermaux, Emmanuel; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2015-01-01

    A free-falling absorbing liquid drop hit by a nanosecond laser-pulse experiences a strong recoil-pressure kick. As a consequence, the drop propels forward and deforms into a thin sheet which eventually fragments. We study how the drop deformation depends on the pulse shape and drop properties. We first derive the velocity field inside the drop on the timescale of the pressure pulse, when the drop is still spherical. This yields the kinetic-energy partition inside the drop, which precisely measures the deformation rate with respect to the propulsion rate, before surface tension comes into play. On the timescale where surface tension is important the drop has evolved into a thin sheet. Its expansion dynamics is described with a slender-slope model, which uses the impulsive energy-partition as an initial condition. Completed with boundary integral simulations, this two-stage model explains the entire drop dynamics and its dependance on the pulse shape: for a given propulsion, a tightly focused pulse results in a...

  11. Dancing drops over vibrating substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcia, Rodica; Borcia, Ion Dan; Helbig, Markus; Meier, Martin; Egbers, Christoph; Bestehorn, Michael

    2017-04-01

    We study the motion of a liquid drop on a solid plate simultaneously submitted to horizontal and vertical harmonic vibrations. The investigation is done via a phase field model earlier developed for describing static and dynamic contact angles. The density field is nearly constant in every bulk region (ρ = 1 in the liquid phase, ρ ≈ 0 in the vapor phase) and varies continuously from one phase to the other with a rapid but smooth variation across the interfaces. Complicated explicit boundary conditions along the interface are avoided and captured implicitly by gradient terms of ρ in the hydrodynamic basic equations. The contact angle θ is controlled through the density at the solid substrate ρ S , a free parameter varying between 0 and 1 [R. Borcia, I.D. Borcia, M. Bestehorn, Phys. Rev. E 78, 066307 (2008)]. We emphasize the swaying and the spreading modes, earlier theoretically identified by Benilov and Billingham via a shallow-water model for drops climbing uphill along an inclined plane oscillating vertically [E.S. Benilov, J. Billingham, J. Fluid Mech. 674, 93 (2011)]. The numerical phase field simulations will be completed by experiments. Some ways to prevent the release of the dancing drops along a hydrophobic surface into the gas atmosphere are also discussed in this paper.

  12. Isobaric Molecular Dynamics Version of the Generalized Replica Exchange Method (gREM): Liquid-Vapor Equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Małolepsza, Edyta; Secor, Maxim; Keyes, Tom

    2015-10-22

    A prescription for sampling isobaric generalized ensembles with molecular dynamics is presented and applied to the generalized replica exchange method (gREM), which was designed to simulate first-order phase transitions. The properties of the isobaric gREM ensemble are discussed, and a study is presented for the liquid-vapor equilibrium of the guest molecules given for gas hydrate formation with the mW water model. Phase diagrams, critical parameters, and a law of corresponding states are obtained.

  13. Universality in freezing of an asymmetric drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Md Farhad; Waghmare, Prashant R.

    2016-12-01

    We present the evidence of universality in conical tip formation during the freezing of arbitrary-shaped sessile droplets. The focus is to demonstrate the relationship between this universality and the liquid drop shape. We observe that, in the case of asymmetric drops, this universal shape is achieved when the tip reconfigures by changing its location, which subsequently alters the frozen drop shape. The proposed "two-triangle" model quantifies the change in the tip configuration as a function of the asymmetry of the drop that shows a good agreement with the experimental evidence. Finally, based on the experimental and theoretical exercise, we propose the scaling dependence between the variations in the tip configuration and the asymmetry of the drop.

  14. Liquid pearls

    CERN Document Server

    Bremond, Nicolas; Bibette, Jérôme

    2010-01-01

    This fluid dynamics video reports how to form liquid core capsules having a thin hydrogel elastic membrane named liquid pearls. These fish-egg like structures are initially made of a millimetric liquid drop, aqueous or not, coated with an aqueous liquid film containing sodium alginate that gels once the double drop enters a calcium chloride bath. The creation of such pearls with micrometer thick membrane requires to suppress mixing until gelling takes place. Here, we show that superimposing a two dimensional surfactant precipitation at the interface confers a transient rigidity that can damp the shear induced instability at impact. Based on this, pearls containing almost any type of liquids can be created. The video focuses on the dynamics of the entry of the compound drop into the gelling bath.

  15. Density of Liquid Binary Ni-W Alloys Measured by Modified Sessile Drop Method%用改良静滴法测量液态Ni-W二元合金的密度

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方亮; 肖锋; 陶再南

    2004-01-01

    In order ot provide a scientific base for studying the shrinkage, transport phenomena and macrosegregation during the solidification of an alloy, the density of liquid binary Ni-W alloys with tungsten concentration from 0 to 15 mass% was measured by a modified sessile drop method. It has been found that the density of the liquid Ni-W alloys decreases with increasing temperature, but increases with the increase of tungsten concentration in the alloys. The molar volume of liquid Ni-W binary alloys increases with the increase of temperature and tungsten concentration. The partial molar volume of tungsten in Ni-W binary alloy has been evaluated approximately as (10.80-1.35× 10-3T) × 10-6 m3·mol-1.%为了给研究合金在凝固过程中发生收缩、迁移现象和偏析提供科学依据,我们用改良静滴法对钨浓度为0到15%的液态Ni-W二元合金的密度进行了测量.结果表明:Ni-W二元合金的液态密度随温度的增加而减少,但随合金中钨浓度的增加而增加;液态Ni-W二元合金的摩尔体积随温度和合金中钨浓度的增加而增加.金属钨在Ni-W二元合金中的偏摩尔体积约为(10.80-1.35×10-3T)×10-6m3·mol-1.

  16. Wetting of a liquid surface by another immiscible liquid in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Gilles; Ross, Guy G.; Andrzejewski, Lukasz

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of interfacial properties is essential to the development of new drugs either on earth or, particularly, in the absence of gravity. Under the reduced gravity conditions of parabolic flights, we have shown that, using an appropriate cell setup in order to control liquid surfaces, a liquid drop can be expanded onto and withdrawn from another immiscible liquid, which permits the measurement of the contact angle of this system. Surface energies of liquids being easily measurable, this technique allows a verification of numerous models used in interface science. During each parabola, 20 s of microgravity measurements permitted the acquisition of video pictures of these drops. Contact angles have been obtained from goniometric analysis of the recorded images. Generally, the drops obtained satisfied the equilibrium state predicted by Neumann's equations. However, unexpected long lasting metastable drops have also been observed on a curved unconfined liquid surface. The existence of a drop-sinking barrier, larger for a curved liquid surface, is proposed to explain this observation.

  17. Deviation of viscous drops at chemical steps

    CERN Document Server

    Semprebon, Ciro; Filippi, Daniele; Perlini, Luca; Pierno, Matteo; Brinkmann, Martin; Mistura, Giampaolo

    2016-01-01

    We present systematic wetting experiments and numerical simulations of gravity driven liquid drops sliding on a plane substrate decorated with a linear chemical step. Surprisingly, the optimal direction to observe crossing is not the one perpendicular to the step, but a finite angle that depends on the material parameters. We computed the landscapes of the force acting on the drop by means of a contact line mobility model showing that contact angle hysteresis dominates the dynamics at the step and determines whether the drop passes onto the lower substrate. This analysis is very well supported by the experimental dynamic phase diagram in terms of pinning, crossing, sliding and sliding followed by pinning.

  18. Drop impact splashing and air entrapment

    KAUST Repository

    Thoraval, Marie-Jean

    2013-03-01

    Drop impact is a canonical problem in fluid mechanics, with numerous applications in industrial as well as natural phenomena. The extremely simple initial configuration of the experiment can produce a very large variety of fast and complex dynamics. Scientific progress was made in parallel with major improvements in imaging and computational technologies. Most recently, high-speed imaging video cameras have opened the exploration of new phenomena occurring at the micro-second scale, and parallel computing allowed realistic direct numerical simulations of drop impacts. We combine these tools to bring a new understanding of two fundamental aspects of drop impacts: splashing and air entrapment. The early dynamics of a drop impacting on a liquid pool at high velocity produces an ejecta sheet, emerging horizontally in the neck between the drop and the pool. We show how the interaction of this thin liquid sheet with the air, the drop or the pool, can produce micro-droplets and bubble rings. Then we detail how the breakup of the air film stretched between the drop and the pool for lower impact velocities can produce a myriad of micro-bubbles.

  19. Conically shaped drops in electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Howard A.; Brenner, Michael P.; Lister, John R.

    1996-11-01

    When an electric field is applied to a dielectric liquid containing a suspended immiscible fluid drop, the drop deforms into a prolate ellipsoidal shape. Above a critical field strength the drop develops conical ends, as first observed by Zeleny [Phys. Rev. 10, 1 (1917)] and Wilson & Taylor [Proc. Camb. Phil. Soc. 22, 728 (1925)] for, respectively, the case of conducting drops and soap films in air. The case of two dielectric liquids was studied recently using a slender drop approximation by Li, Halsey & Lobkovsky [Europhys. Lett 27, 575 (1994)]. In this presentation we further develop the slender body approximation to obtain coupled ordinary differential equations for the electric field and the drop shape. Analytical formulae are derived which approximately give the cone angle as a function of the dielectric constant ratio between the two fluids, and the minimum applied electric field at which conical tips first form as a function of the dielectric constant ratio. Finally, drops shapes are calculated numerically and compared with the common prolate shape assumption.

  20. Is the crime drop of the 1990s in Canada and the USA associated with a general decline in risky and health-related behavior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sandeep; Lalumière, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Crime rates dropped unexpectedly and dramatically in the 1990s in Canada and the USA. The decline was not restricted to particular types of crime, the particular methodologies of crime reports, demographic characteristics, or geographical areas. Psychological studies of individuals have suggested a link between crime and different types of risky behavior (e.g., dangerous driving, unsafe sex, substance use). Based on this link, we examined whether national rates of various risky behaviors declined in the 1990s, and whether rates of crime and risky behavior covary over time. Several American and Canadian databases reporting annual or biennial data on risky behavior indicators were examined. Results indicate that most of the risky behavior indicators in the domains of violent behavior, accidents, sexual behavior, and school dropout declined in the 1990s. Furthermore, time series analyses suggest that rates of various risky behaviors tend to covary with homicide over long periods of time. An important exception to these results is substance use in various contexts. We discuss some theoretical implications of the results.

  1. Drop splash on a smooth, dry surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboux, Guillaume; Gordillo, Jose Manuel; Korobkin, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    It is our purpose here to determine the conditions under which a drop of a given liquid with a known radius R impacting against a smooth impermeable surface at a velocity V, will either spread axisymmetrically onto the substrate or will create a splash, giving rise to usually undesired star-shaped patterns. In our experimental setup, drops are generated injecting low viscosity liquids falling under the action of gravity from a stainless steel hypodermic needle. The experimental observations using two high speed cameras operating simultaneously and placed perpendicularly to each other reveal that, initially, the drop deforms axisymmetrically, with A (T) the radius of the wetted area. For high enough values of the drop impact velocity, a thin sheet of liquid starts to be ejected from A (T) at a velocity Vjet > V for instants of time such that T >=Tc . If Vjet is above a certain threshold, which depends on the solid wetting properties as well as on the material properties of both the liquid and the atmospheric gas, the rim of the lamella dewets the solid to finally break into drops. Using Wagner's theory we demonstrate that A (T) =√{ 3 RVT } and our results also reveal that Tc We - 1 / 2 =(ρV2 R / σ) - 1 / 2 and Vjet We 1 / 4 .

  2. Characterization of maleic acid/anhydride copolymer films by low-rate dynamic liquid-fluid contact angle measurements using axisymmetric drop shape analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlmann, Petra; Skorupa, Sebastian; Werner, Carsten; Grundke, Karina

    2005-07-05

    Thin films of alternating maleic acid/anhydride copolymers (poly(octadecene-alt-maleic acid/anhydride), POMA; poly(propene-alt-maleic acid/anhydride), PPMA; poly(styrene-alt-maleic acid/anhydride), PSMA) were studied to unravel the influence of the comonomer characteristics in the backbone on the surface-energetic properties of the copolymer films in the dry state and in contact with aqueous solutions. Water contact angle measurements revealed a graduation of the wettability of the dry hydrolyzed and annealed copolymer films that was dependent on the comonomer unit. It ranged from moderately hydrophilic (PPMA, annealed gamma(sv) = 39.9 mJ/m2) to very hydrophobic (POMA, annealed, gamma(sv) = 18.4 mJ/m2) surfaces. Liquid-fluid contact angle measurements using captive air bubbles were performed in different aqueous media (pure water, phosphate-buffered saline, and 10(-)(3) M KCl of two different pH values (pH = 3 and pH = 10) to study the copolymer films in their hydrated states relevant for biointerfacial phenomena. It was found that the graduation of the wettability of the copolymer films in the dry state is overall maintained upon immersion in aqueous solutions. The dependence of the wettability on the pH value of the aqueous medium could be related to the (de)protonation of the carboxylic groups.

  3. Coalescence of bubbles and drops in an outer fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Paulsen, Joseph D; Kannan, Anerudh; Burton, Justin C; Nagel, Sidney R

    2014-01-01

    When two liquid drops touch, a microscopic connecting liquid bridge forms and rapidly grows as the two drops merge into one. Whereas coalescence has been thoroughly studied when drops coalesce in vacuum or air, many important situations involve coalescence in a dense surrounding fluid, such as oil coalescence in brine. Here we study the merging of gas bubbles and liquid drops in an external fluid. Our data indicate that the flows occur over much larger length scales in the outer fluid than inside the drops themselves. Thus we find that the asymptotic early regime is always dominated by the viscosity of the drops, independent of the external fluid. A phase diagram showing the crossovers into the different possible late-time dynamics identifies a dimensionless number that signifies when the external viscosity can be important.

  4. Development of revolving drop surface tensiometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, S; Sakai, K

    2012-01-01

    A revolving drop surface tensiometer, which measures the surface tension of a small amount of liquid, is proposed. A remarkable feature of this device is that while using the pendant drop method, it employs a centrifugal force to deform the liquid droplet. The centrifugal force induces a large distortion of the droplet, which enables an accurate measurement of the surface tension to be made. In our experimental setup, the centrifugal force can be increased so that the apparent acceleration becomes up to 100 times larger than that due to gravity, and the capability of this method to measure surface tensions was demonstrated with ethylene glycol.

  5. Transformation of the bridge during drop separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chashechkin, Yu. D.; Prokhorov, V. E.

    2016-05-01

    The geometry of flows during separation of pendant drops of liquids with significantly different physical properties (alcohol, water, glycerin, oil) has been studied by high-speed video recording. The dynamics of the processes involving the formation of bridges of two characteristic shapes—slightly nonuniform in thickness and with thinning of the upper and lower ends—has been investigated. It has been shown that the shape change of the separated bridge has a number of stages determined by the properties of the liquid. As a result, the bridge is transformed into a small drop—a satellite drop.

  6. Fundamental Studies of Jumping-Drop Thermal Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-29

    Reverse mode with liquid trapped by the colder superhydrophilic surface. ............... 2 Figure 2. Fabrication of the jumping-drop thermal diode...mode, Figure 1b), liquid water is trapped by it and no phase-change heat transfer takes place; heat mainly escapes through ineffective conduction...self- propelled jumping drops returning the working fluid from the colder superhydrophobic surface; (b) Reverse mode with liquid trapped by the colder

  7. Self-consistent generalized Langevin-equation theory for liquids of nonspherically interacting particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizondo-Aguilera, L F; Zubieta Rico, P F; Ruiz-Estrada, H; Alarcón-Waess, O

    2014-11-01

    A self-consistent generalized Langevin-equation theory is proposed to describe the self- and collective dynamics of a liquid of linear Brownian particles. The equations of motion for the spherical harmonics projections of the collective and self-intermediate-scattering functions, F_{lm,lm}(k,t) and F_{lm,lm}^{S}(k,t), are derived as a contraction of the description involving the stochastic equations of the corresponding tensorial one-particle density n_{lm}(k,t) and the translational (α=T) and rotational (α=R) current densities j_{lm}^{α}(k,t). Similar to the spherical case, these dynamic equations require as an external input the equilibrium structural properties of the system contained in the projections of the static structure factor, denoted by S_{lm,lm}(k). Complementing these exact equations with simple (Vineyard-like) approximate relations for the collective and the self-memory functions we propose a closed self-consistent set of equations for the dynamic properties involved. In the long-time asymptotic limit, these equations become the so-called bifurcation equations, whose solutions (the nonergodicity parameters) can be written, extending the spherical case, in terms of one translational and one orientational scalar dynamic order parameter, γ_{T} and γ_{R}, which characterize the possible dynamical arrest transitions of the system. As a concrete illustrative application of this theory we determine the dynamic arrest diagram of the dipolar hard-sphere fluid. In qualitative agreement with mode coupling theory, the present self-consistent equations also predict three different regions in the state space spanned by the macroscopic control parameters η (volume fraction) and T* (scaled temperature): a region of fully ergodic states, a region of mixed states, in which the translational degrees of freedom become arrested while the orientational degrees of freedom remain ergodic, and a region of fully nonergodic states.

  8. Size of the top jet drop produced by bubble bursting

    CERN Document Server

    Ghabache, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    As a bubble bursts at a liquid-air interface, a tiny liquid jet rises and can release the so-called \\textit{jet drops}. In this paper, the size of the top jet drop produced by a bubble bursting is investigated experimentally. We determine, and discuss, the first scaling law enabling the determination of the top jet drop size as a function of the corresponding mother bubble radius and the liquid properties (viscosity, surface tension, density), along with its regime of existence. Furthermore, in the aim of decoupling experimentally the effects of bubble collapse and jet dynamics on the drop detachment, we propose a new scaling providing the top drop size only as a function of the jet velocity and liquid parameters. In particular, this allows us to untangle the intricate roles of viscosity, gravity and surface tension in the \\textit{end-pinching} of the bubble bursting jet.

  9. Drop rebound after impact: the role of the receding contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, C; Villa, F; Bernagozzi, I; Amirfazli, A; Marengo, M

    2013-12-31

    Data from the literature suggest that the rebound of a drop from a surface can be achieved when the wettability is low, i.e., when contact angles, measured at the triple line (solid-liquid-air), are high. However, no clear criterion exists to predict when a drop will rebound from a surface and which is the key wetting parameter to govern drop rebound (e.g., the "equilibrium" contact angle, θeq, the advancing and the receding contact angles, θA and θR, respectively, the contact angle hysteresis, Δθ, or any combination of these parameters). To clarify the conditions for drop rebound, we conducted experimental tests on different dry solid surfaces with variable wettability, from hydrophobic to superhydrophobic surfaces, with advancing contact angles 108° contact angles 89° contact angle is the key wetting parameter that influences drop rebound, along with surface hydrophobicity: for the investigated impact conditions (drop diameter 2.4 contact angles higher than 100°. Also, the drop rebound time decreased by increasing the receding contact angle. It was also shown that in general care must be taken when using statically defined wetting parameters (such as advancing and receding contact angles) to predict the dynamic behavior of a liquid on a solid surface because the dynamics of the phenomenon may affect surface wetting close to the impact point (e.g., as a result of the transition from the Cassie-Baxter to Wenzel state in the case of the so-called superhydrophobic surfaces) and thus affect the drop rebound.

  10. Total Gaussian curvature, drop shapes and the range of applicability of drop shape techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Sameh M I; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2014-02-01

    Drop shape techniques are used extensively for surface tension measurement. It is well-documented that, as the drop/bubble shape becomes close to spherical, the performance of all drop shape techniques deteriorates. There have been efforts quantifying the range of applicability of drop techniques by studying the deviation of Laplacian drops from the spherical shape. A shape parameter was introduced in the literature and was modified several times to accommodate different drop constellations. However, new problems arise every time a new configuration is considered. Therefore, there is a need for a universal shape parameter applicable to pendant drops, sessile drops, liquid bridges as well as captive bubbles. In this work, the use of the total Gaussian curvature in a unified approach for the shape parameter is introduced for that purpose. The total Gaussian curvature is a dimensionless quantity that is commonly used in differential geometry and surface thermodynamics, and can be easily calculated for different Laplacian drop shapes. The new definition of the shape parameter using the total Gaussian curvature is applied here to both pendant and constrained sessile drops as an illustration. The analysis showed that the new definition is superior and reflects experimental results better than previous definitions, especially at extreme values of the Bond number.

  11. 矩形通道内两相脉动流平均摩擦压降实验研究%Experimental Study on Average Frictional Pressure Drop of Gas-liquid Two-phase Pulsatile Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周豹; 高璞珍; 谭思超; 田竞达; 张虹

    2013-01-01

    通过对截面为40 mm ×3 mm窄矩形通道内不同正弦脉动周期、振幅、平均流量工况下氮气-水两相流(平均分液相雷诺数 Rel<10000,平均分气相雷诺数 Reg <800)进行实验研究,发现两相脉动流与单相水脉动流的规律不同,平均压差对脉动周期、振幅不敏感。应用各经验公式计算的脉动工况下平均摩擦压降的偏差与稳态工况的计算偏差在数值和分布上均无明显差异,且计算值分布在测量值两侧、相对偏差基本小于20%。其中,Mishima-Hibiki方法和Lee-Lee方法的计算结果与测量结果吻合良好,相对偏差在10%以内,说明两相流摩擦压降经验公式同样适用于脉动工况下平均摩擦压降的计算。%The gas-liquid two-phase pulsatile flow was studied in a rectangular channel with 40 mm × 3 mm cross section under different periods ,flow rate amplitudes and its mean values (mean Rel < 10 000 ,mean Reg < 800) .There was difference between the single phase pulsatile flow and the gas-liquid two-phase pulsatile flow ,and pulsation period and amplitude were not sensitive for the average frictional pressure drop .There was no significant difference on the values and distribution between the calculation deviations in pulsatile flow and the calculation deviations in steady flow by using different empirical formulas .Almost all of the relative deviations were less than 20% , and the relative deviations of Mishima-Hibiki method and Lee-Lee method were less than 10% .The results show that the empirical formulas for the two-phase steady flow frictional pressure drop are also suitable for the calculation of the average value of two-phase pulsatile flow .

  12. On the derivation of Young's equation for sessile drops: nonequilibrium effects due to evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Golovko, Dmytro S; Bonaccurso, Elmar

    2007-05-17

    Sessile liquid drops have a higher vapor pressure than planar liquid surfaces, as quantified by Kelvin's equation. In classical derivations of Young's equation, this fact is often not taken into account. For an open system, a sessile liquid drop is never in thermodynamic equilibrium and will eventually evaporate. Practically, for macroscopic drops the time of evaporation is so long that nonequilibrium effects are negligible. For microscopic drops evaporation cannot be neglected. When a liquid is confined to a closed system, real equilibrium can be established. Experiments on the evaporation of water drops confirm the calculations.

  13. Experimental Investigation of Pendant and Sessile Drops in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhi-Qiang; Brutin, David; Liu, Qiu-Sheng; Wang, Yang; Mourembles, Alexandre; Xie, Jing-Chang; Tadrist, Lounes

    2010-09-01

    The experiments regarding the contact angle behavior of pendant and sessile evaporating drops were carried out in microgravity environment. All the experiments were performed in the Drop Tower of Beijing, which could supply about 3.6 s of microgravity (free-fall) time. In the experiments, firstly, drops were injected to create before microgravity. The wettability at different surfaces, contact angles dependance on the surface temperature, contact angle variety in sessile and pendant drops were measured. Different influence of the surface temperature on the contact angle of the drops were found for different substrates. To verify the feasibility of drops creation in microgravity and obtain effective techniques for the forthcoming satellite experiments, we tried to inject liquid to create bigger drop as soon as the drop entering microgravity condition. The contact angle behaviors during injection in microgravity were also obtained.

  14. Merging drops in a Teflon tube, and transferring fluid between them, illustrated by protein crystallization and drug screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerborn, A; Prastowo, A; Cook, P R; Walsh, E

    2015-01-01

    The ability to manipulate drops with small volumes has many practical applications. Current microfluidic devices generally exploit channel geometry and/or active external equipment to control drops. Here we use a Teflon tube attached to a syringe pump and exploit the properties of interfaces between three immiscible liquids to create particular fluidic architectures. We then go on to merge any number of drops (with volumes of micro- to nano-liters) at predefined points in time and space in the tube; for example, 51 drops were merged in a defined order to yield one large drop. Using a different architecture, specified amounts of fluid were transferred between 2 nl drops at specified rates; for example, 2.5 pl aliquots were transferred (at rates of ~500 fl s(-1)) between two drops through inter-connecting nano-channels (width ~40 nm). One proof-of-principle experiment involved screening conditions required to crystallize a protein (using a concentration gradient created using such nano-channels). Another demonstrated biocompatibility; drugs were mixed with human cells grown in suspension or on surfaces, and the treated cells responded like those grown conventionally. Although most experiments were performed manually, moderate high-throughput potential was demonstrated by mixing ~1000 different pairs of 50 nl drops in ~15 min using a robot. We suggest this reusable, low-cost, and versatile methodology could facilitate the introduction of microfluidics into workflows of many experimental laboratories.

  15. Settling of copper drops in molten slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warczok, A.; Utigard, T. A.

    1995-02-01

    The settling of suspended metal and sulfide droplets in liquid metallurgical, slags can be affected by electric fields. The migration of droplets due to electrocapillary motion phenomena may be used to enhance the recovery of suspended matte/metal droplets and thereby to increase the recovery of pay metals. An experimental technique was developed for the purpose of measuring the effect of electric fields on the settling rate of metallic drops in liquid slags. Copper drops suspended in CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-Cu2O slags were found to migrate toward the cathode. Electric fields can increase the settling rate of 5-mm-diameter copper drops 3 times or decrease the settling until levitation by reversal of the electric field. The enhanced settling due to electric fields decreases with increasing Cu2O contents in the slag.

  16. Turbulence, bubbles and drops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van der Roeland Cornelis Adriaan

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, several questions related to drop impact and Taylor-Couette turbulence are answered. The deformation of a drop just before impact can cause a bubble to be entrapped. For many applications, such as inkjet printing, it is crucial to control the size of this entrapped bubble. To study t

  17. Youth Crime Drop. Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Jeffrey A.

    This report examines the recent drop in violent crime in the United States, discussing how much of the decrease seen between 1995-99 is attributable to juveniles (under age 18 years) and older youth (18-24 years). Analysis of current FBI arrest data indicates that not only did America's violent crime drop continue through 1999, but falling youth…

  18. Scaling the drop size in coflow experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro-Hernandez, E; Gordillo, J M [Area de Mecanica de Fluidos, Universidad de Sevilla, Avenida de los Descubrimientos s/n, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Gundabala, V; Fernandez-Nieves, A [School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)], E-mail: jgordill@us.es

    2009-07-15

    We perform extensive experiments with coflowing liquids in microfluidic devices and provide a closed expression for the drop size as a function of measurable parameters in the jetting regime that accounts for the experimental observations; this expression works irrespective of how the jets are produced, providing a powerful design tool for this type of experiments.

  19. Drop Shaping by Laser-Pulse Impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, A.L.; Bouwhuis, W.; Visser, C.W.; Lhuissier, H.E.; Sun, C.; Snoeijer, J.H.; Villermaux, E.; Lohse, D.; Gelderblom, H.

    2015-01-01

    We show how the deposition of laser energy induces propulsion and strong deformation of an absorbing liquid body. Combining high speed with stroboscopic imaging, we observe that a millimeter-sized dyed water drop hit by a millijoule nanosecond laser pulse propels forward at several meters per second

  20. Electric field induced deformation of sessile drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corson, Lindsey; Tsakonas, Costas; Duffy, Brian; Mottram, Nigel; Brown, Carl; Wilson, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    The ability to control the shape of a drop with the application of an electric field has been exploited for many technological applications including measuring surface tension, producing an optical display device, and optimising the optical properties of microlenses. In this work we consider, both theoretically and experimentally, the deformation of pinned sessile drops with contact angles close to either 0° or 90° resting on the lower substrate inside a parallel plate capacitor due to an A.C. electric field. Using both asymptotic and numerical approaches we obtain predictive equations for the static and dynamic drop shape deformations as functions of the key experimental parameters (drop size, capacitor plate separation, electric field magnitude and contact angle). The asymptotic results agree well with the experimental results for a range of liquids. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of EPSRC via research Grants EP/J009865 and EP/J009873.

  1. Micro-splashing by drop impacts

    KAUST Repository

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2012-07-18

    We use ultra-high-speed video imaging to observe directly the earliest onset of prompt splashing when a drop impacts onto a smooth solid surface. We capture the start of the ejecta sheet travelling along the solid substrate and show how it breaks up immediately upon emergence from the underneath the drop. The resulting micro-droplets are much smaller and faster than previously reported and may have gone unobserved owing to their very small size and rapid ejection velocities, which approach 100 m s-1, for typical impact conditions of large rain drops. We propose a phenomenological mechanism which predicts the velocity and size distribution of the resulting microdroplets. We also observe azimuthal undulations which may help promote the earliest breakup of the ejecta. This instability occurs in the cusp in the free surface where the drop surface meets the radially ejected liquid sheet. © 2012 Cambridge University Press.

  2. Charge and Size Distributions of Electrospray Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Juan L; de la Mora JF

    1997-02-15

    The distributions of charge q and diameter d of drops emitted from electrified liquid cones in the cone-jet mode are investigated with two aerosol instruments. A differential mobility analyzer (DMA, Vienna type) first samples the spray drops, selects those with electrical mobilities within a narrow band, and either measures the associated current or passes them to a second instrument. The drops may also be individually counted optically and sized by sampling them into an aerodynamic size spectrometer (API's Aerosizer). For a given cone-jet, the distribution of charge q for the main electrospray drops is some 2.5 times broader than their distribution of diameters d, with qmax/qmin approximately 4. But mobility-selected drops have relative standard deviations of only 5% for both d and q, showing that the support of the (q, d) distribution is a narrow band centered around a curve q(d). The approximate one-dimensionality of this support region is explained through the mechanism of jet breakup, which is a random process with only one degree of freedom: the wavelength of axial modulation of the jet. The observed near constancy of the charge over volume ratio (q approximately d3) shows that the charge is frozen in the liquid surface at the time scale of the breakup process. The charge over volume ratio of the primary drops varies between 98 and 55% of the ratio of spray current I over liquid flow rate Q, and decreases at increasing Q. I/Q is therefore an unreliable measure of the charge density of these drops.

  3. Interaction of Drops on a Soft Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbers, Luuk A.; Weijs, Joost H.; Das, Siddhartha; Botto, Lorenzo; Andreotti, Bruno; Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2013-11-01

    A sessile drop can elastically deform a substrate by the action of capillary forces. The typical size of the deformation is given by the ratio of surface tension and the elastic modulus, γ / E , which can reach up to 10-100 microns for soft elastomers. In this talk we theoretically show that the contact angles of drops on such a surface exhibit two transitions when increasing γ / E : (i) the microsocopic geometry of the contact line first develops a Neumann-like cusp when γ / E is of the order of few nanometers, (ii) the macroscopic angle of the drop is altered only when γ / E reaches the size of the drop. Using the same framework we then show that two neighboring drops exhibit an effective interaction, mediated by the deformation of the elastic medium. This is in analogy to the well-known Cheerios effect, where small particles at a liquid interface attract eachother due to the meniscus deformations. Here we reveal the nature of drop-drop interactions on a soft substrate by combining numerical and analytical calculations.

  4. Vibration-induced drop atomization and bursting

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, A. J.; Vukasinovic, B.; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, A.

    2003-02-01

    A liquid drop placed on a vibrating diaphragm will burst into a fine spray of smaller secondary droplets if it is driven at the proper frequency and amplitude. The process begins when capillary waves appear on the free surface of the drop and then grow in amplitude and complexity as the acceleration amplitude of the diaphragm is slowly increased from zero. When the acceleration of the diaphragm rises above a well-defined critical value, small secondary droplets begin to be ejected from the free-surface wave crests. Then, quite suddenly, the entire volume of the drop is ejected from the vibrating diaphragm in the form of a spray. This event is the result of an interaction between the fluid dynamical process of droplet ejection and the vibrational dynamics of the diaphragm. During droplet ejection, the effective mass of the drop diaphragm system decreases and the resonance frequency of the system increases. If the initial forcing frequency is above the resonance frequency of the system, droplet ejection causes the system to move closer to resonance, which in turn causes more vigorous vibration and faster droplet ejection. This ultimately leads to drop bursting. In this paper, the basic phenomenon of vibration-induced drop atomization and drop bursting will be introduced, demonstrated, and characterized. Experimental results and a simple mathematical model of the process will be presented and used to explain the basic physics of the system.

  5. Development of Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Based on Solidification of Floating Organic Drop for the Sensitive Determination of Trace Copper in Water and Beverage Samples by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chunxia; Zhao, Bin; Li, Yingli; Wu, Qiuhua; Wang, Chun; Wang, Zhi [Agricultural University of Hebei, Baoding (China)

    2011-03-15

    A dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet (DLLME-SFO) has been developed as a new approach for the extraction of trace copper in water and beverage samples followed by the determination with flame atomic absorption spectrometry. In the DLLME-SFO, 8-hydroxy quinoline, 1-dodecanol, and methanol were used as chelating agent, extraction solvent and dispersive solvent, respectively. The experimental parameters related to the DLLME-SFO such as the type and volume of the extraction and dispersive solvent, extraction time, sample volume, the concentration of chelating agent and salt addition were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the enrichment factor for copper was 122. The method was linear in the range from 0.5 to 300 ng mL{sup -1} of copper in the samples with a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.9996 and a limit of detection of 0.1 ng mL{sup -1}. The method was applied to the determination of copper in water and beverage samples. The recoveries for the spiked water and beverage samples at the copper concentration levels of 5.0 and 10.0 ng mL{sup -1} were in the range between 92.0% and 108.0%. The relative standard deviations (RSD) varied from 3.0% to 5.6%.

  6. Comparison Between the Kutateladze-Khabakhpasheva and Ostwald-De Waele Rheological Models in Describing Generalized Newtonian Liquids with the Use of Experimental Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaidullin, B. R.; Vachagina, E. K.; Kadyirov, A. I.

    2016-07-01

    The results of viscosimetric measurements of generalized Newtonian liquids (glycerin, 3% solution of Na-CMC, 70% water solution of starch, TNK Magnum SAE 5W40 motor oil) in the temperature range from 274 to 323 K and shear rates of up to 320 1/s are presented. The method of determining the rheological constants of the Kutateladze-Khabakhpasheva model and of the Ostwald-de Waele model of liquid viscosity power law for generalized Newtonian liquids is presented. The rheological constants of both models are obtained for the indicated liquids.

  7. Direct observation of drops on slippery lubricant-infused surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberger, Frank; Xie, Jing; Encinas, Noemí; Hardy, Alexandre; Klapper, Markus; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Vollmer, Doris

    2015-10-14

    For a liquid droplet to slide down a solid planar surface, the surface usually has to be tilted above a critical angle of approximately 10°. By contrast, droplets of nearly any liquid "slip" on lubricant-infused textured surfaces - so termed slippery surfaces - when tilted by only a few degrees. The mechanism of how the lubricant alters the static and dynamic properties of the drop remains elusive because the drop-lubricant interface is hidden. Here, we image the shape of drops on lubricant-infused surfaces by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The contact angle of the drop-lubricant interface with the substrate exceeds 140°, although macroscopic contour images suggest angles as low as 60°. Confocal microscopy of moving drops reveals fundamentally different processes at the front and rear. Drops recede via discrete depinning events from surface protrusions at a defined receding contact angle, whereas the advancing contact angle is 180°. Drops slide easily, as the apparent contact angles with the substrate are high and the drop-lubricant interfacial tension is typically lower than the drop-air interfacial tension. Slippery surfaces resemble superhydrophobic surfaces with two main differences: drops on a slippery surface are surrounded by a wetting ridge of adjustable height and the air underneath the drop in the case of a superhydrophobic surface is replaced by lubricant in the case of a slippery surface.

  8. Drop Tower Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, William A. Toby

    2014-10-01

    The drop towers of yesteryear were used to make lead shot for muskets, as described in The Physics Teacher1 in April 2012. However, modern drop towers are essentially elevators designed so that the cable can "break" on demand, creating an environment with microgravity for a short period of time, currently up to nine seconds at the drop tower in Bremen, Germany. Using these drop towers, one can briefly investigate various physical systems operating in this near zero-g environment. The resulting "Drop Tower Physics" is a new and exciting way to challenge students with a physical example that requires solid knowledge of many basic physics principles, and it forces them to practice the scientific method. The question is, "How would a simple toy, like a pendulum, behave when it is suddenly exposed to a zero-g environment?" The student must then postulate a particular behavior, test the hypothesis against physical principles, and if the hypothesis conforms to these chosen physical laws, the student can formulate a final conclusion. At that point having access to a drop tower is very convenient, in that the student can then experimentally test his or her conclusion. The purpose of this discussion is to explain the response of these physical systems ("toys") when the transition is made to a zero-g environment and to provide video demonstrations of this behavior to support in-class discussions of Drop Tower Physics.

  9. Shaping and Capturing Leidenfrost drops with a magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Piroird, Keyvan; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David

    2012-01-01

    Liquid oxygen, which is intrinsically paramagnetic, also undergoes Leidenfrost effect at room temperature. In this article, we first study the deformation of oxygen drops in a magnetic field via an effective capillary length, that includes the magnetic force. In a second part, we show that these ultra-mobile drops passing above a magnet significantly slow down and can even be trapped if slow enough. The critical velocity below which a drop is captured is determined from the deformation induced by the field.

  10. Drop impacts on electrospun nanofiber membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Rakesh P.; Sinha-Ray, Suman; Yarin, Alexander; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam

    2013-11-01

    This work reports a study of drop impacts of polar and non-polar liquids onto electrospun nanofiber membranes (of 8-10 mm thickness and pore sizes of 3-6 nm) with an increasing degree of hydrophobicity. The nanofibers used were electrospun from polyacrylonitrile (PAN), nylon 6/6, polycaprolactone (PCL) and Teflon. It was found that for any liquid/fiber pair there exists a threshold impact velocity (1.5 to 3 m/s) above which water penetrates membranes irrespective of their wettability. The low surface tension liquid left the rear side of sufficiently thin membranes as a millipede-like system of tiny jets protruding through a number of pores. For such a high surface tension liquid as water, jets immediately merged into a single bigger jet, which formed secondary drops due to capillary instability. An especially non-trivial result is that superhydrophobicity of the porous nano-textured Teflon skeleton with the interconnected pores is incapable of preventing water penetration due to drop impact, even at relatively low impact velocities close to 3.46 m/s. A theoretical estimate of the critical membrane thickness sufficient for complete viscous dissipation of the kinetic energy of penetrating liquid corroborates with the experimental data. The current work is supported by the Nonwovens Cooperative Research Center (NCRC).

  11. Pressure Tensor of Nanoscopic Liquid Drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José G. Segovia-López

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the structure of an inhomogeneous fluid of one or several components that forms a spherical interface. Using the stress tensor of Percus–Romero, which depends on the density of one particle and the intermolecular potential, it provides an analytical development leading to the microscopic expressions of the pressure differences and the interfacial properties of both systems. The results are compared with a previous study and agree with the description of the mean field.

  12. Liquid drop effects in subbarrier transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H.J.

    1990-08-01

    Reaction products from a multitude of binary channels are observed to emerge at large c.m. angles at subbarrier energies for the {sup 50}Ti {plus} {sup 93}Nb system. The energy spectra of these products and the distance where they first emerge indicate that these reaction products result from the neck which is formed outside the Coulomb barrier. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Experimental analysis of general ion recombination in a liquid-filled ionization chamber in high-energy photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Eunah; Seuntjens, Jan [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital (L5-113), 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada); Davis, Stephen [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal General Hospital (L5-112), 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: To study experimentally the general ion recombination effect in a liquid-filled ionization chamber (LIC) in high-energy photon beams. Methods: The general ion recombination effect on the response of a micro liquid ion chamber (microLion) was investigated with a 6 MV photon beam in normal and SRS modes produced from a Varian{sup Registered-Sign} Novalis Tx{sup TM} linear accelerator. Dose rates of the linear accelerator were set to 100, 400, and 1000 MU/min, which correspond to pulse repetition frequencies of 60, 240, and 600 Hz, respectively. Polarization voltages applied to the microLion were +800 and +400 V. The relative collection efficiency of the microLion response as a function of dose per pulse was experimentally measured with changing polarization voltage and pulse repetition frequencies and was compared with the theoretically calculated value. Results: For the 60 Hz pulse repetition frequency, the experimental relative collection efficiency was not different from the theoretical one for a pulsed beam more than 0.3% for both polarization voltages. For a pulsed radiation beam with a higher pulse repetition frequency, the experimental relative collection efficiency converged to the theoretically calculated efficiency for continuous beams. This result indicates that the response of the microLion tends toward the response to a continuous beam with increasing pulse repetition frequency of a pulsed beam because of low ion mobility in the liquid. Conclusions: This work suggests an empirical method to correct for differences in general ion recombination of a LIC between different radiation fields. More work is needed to quantitatively explain the LIC general ion recombination behavior in pulsed beams generated from linear accelerators.

  14. Large Eddy Simulation of jets laden with evaporating drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboissetier, A.; Okong'o, N.; Bellan, J.

    2004-01-01

    LES of a circular jet laden with evaporating liquid drops are conducted to assess computational-drop modeling and three different SGS-flux models: the Scale Similarity model (SSC), using a constant coefficient calibrated on a temporal mixing layer DNS database, and dynamic-coefficient Gradient and Smagorinsky models.

  15. Atomized spraying of liquid metal droplets on desired substrate surfaces as a generalized way for ubiquitous printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin; Gao, Yunxia; Liu, Jing

    2014-09-01

    A direct electronics printing technique through atomized spraying for patterning room-temperature liquid metal droplets on desired substrate surfaces is proposed and experimentally demonstrated for the first time. This method is highly flexible and capable of fabricating electronic components on various target objects, with either flat or rough surfaces, made of different materials, or having different orientations from 2D to 3D geometrical configurations. With a pre-designed mask, the liquid metal ink can be directly deposited on the substrate to form various specific patterns which lead to the rapid prototyping of electronic devices. Further, extended printing strategies were also suggested to illustrate the adaptability of the method. For example, it can be used for making transparent conductive film with an optical transmittance of 47 % and a sheet resistance of 5.167Ω/□ due to natural porous structure. Different from the former direct writing technology where large surface tension and poor adhesion between the liquid metal and the substrate often impede the flexible printing process, the liquid metal here no longer needs to be pre-oxidized to guarantee its applicability on target substrates. One critical mechanism was that the atomized liquid metal microdroplets can be quickly oxidized in the air due to its large specific surface area, resulting in a significant increase of the adhesion capacity and thus firm deposition of the ink to the substrate. This study paved a generalized way for pervasively and directly printing electronics on various substrates which are expected to be significant in a wide spectrum of electrical engineering areas.

  16. Drop impact entrapment of bubble rings

    KAUST Repository

    Thoraval, M.-J.

    2013-04-29

    We use ultra-high-speed video imaging to look at the initial contact of a drop impacting on a liquid layer. We observe experimentally the vortex street and the bubble-ring entrapments predicted numerically, for high impact velocities, by Thoraval et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., vol. 108, 2012, article 264506). These dynamics mainly occur within 50 -s after the first contact, requiring imaging at 1 million f.p.s. For a water drop impacting on a thin layer of water, the entrapment of isolated bubbles starts through azimuthal instability, which forms at low impact velocities, in the neck connecting the drop and pool. For Reynolds number Re above -12 000, up to 10 partial bubble rings have been observed at the base of the ejecta, starting when the contact is -20% of the drop size. More regular bubble rings are observed for a pool of ethanol or methanol. The video imaging shows rotation around some of these air cylinders, which can temporarily delay their breakup into micro-bubbles. The different refractive index in the pool liquid reveals the destabilization of the vortices and the formation of streamwise vortices and intricate vortex tangles. Fine-scale axisymmetry is thereby destroyed. We show also that the shape of the drop has a strong influence on these dynamics. 2013 Cambridge University Press.

  17. Quantitative testing of robustness on superomniphobic surfaces by drop impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Phuong Nhung; Brunet, Philippe; Coffinier, Yannick; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2010-12-07

    The quality of a liquid-repellent surface is quantified by both the apparent contact angle θ(0) that a sessile drop adopts on it and the value of the liquid pressure threshold the surface can withstand without being impaled by the liquid, hence maintaining a low-friction condition. We designed surfaces covered with nanowires obtained by the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth technique that are able to repel most of the existing nonpolar liquids including those with very low surface tension as well as many polar liquids with moderate to high surface tension. These superomniphobic surfaces exhibit apparent contact angles ranging from 125 to 160° depending on the liquid. We tested the robustness of the surfaces against impalement by carrying out drop impact experiments. Our results show how this robustness depends on Young's contact angle θ(0) related to the surface tension of the liquid and that the orientational growth of nanowires is a favorable factor for robustness.

  18. Drop dynamics on a stretched viscoelastic filament: An experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixinho, Jorge; Renoult, Marie-Charlotte; Crumeyrolle, Olivier; Mutabazi, Innocent

    2016-11-01

    Capillary pressure can destabilize a thin liquid filament during breakup into a succession of drops. Besides, the addition of a linear, high molecular weight, flexible and soluble polymer is enough to modify the morphology of this instability. In the time period preceding the breakup, the development of beads-on-a-string structures where drops are connected by thin threads is monitored. The drops dynamics involve drop formation, drop migration and drop coalescence. Experiments using a high-speed camera on stretched bridges of viscoelastic polymeric solutions were conducted for a range of viscosities and polymer concentrations. The rheological properties of the solutions are also quantified through conventional shear rheology and normal stress difference. The overall goal of this experimental investigation is to gain more insight into the formation and time evolution of the drops. The project BIOENGINE is co-financed by the European Union with the European regional development fund and by the Normandie Regional Council.

  19. Modeling evaporation of sessile drops with moving contact lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murisic, N; Kondic, L

    2008-12-01

    We consider evaporation of pure liquid drops on a thermally conductive substrate. Two commonly used evaporative models are considered: one that concentrates on the liquid phase in determining the evaporative flux and the other one that centers on the gas-vapor phase. A single governing equation for the evolution of drop thickness, including both models, is developed. We show how the derived governing equation can be used to predict which evaporation model is appropriate for different considered experimental conditions.

  20. Delayed Frost Growth on Jumping-Drop Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreyko, Jonathan B [ORNL; Collier, Pat [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Self-propelled jumping drops are continuously removed from a condensing superhydrophobic surface to enable a micrometric steady-state drop size. Here, we report that subcooled condensate on a chilled superhydrophobic surface are able to repeatedly jump off the surface before heterogeneous ice nucleation occurs. Frost still forms on the superhydrophobic surface due to ice nucleation at neighboring edge defects, which eventually spreads over the entire surface via an inter-drop frost wave. The growth of this inter-drop frost front is shown to be up to three times slower on the superhydrophobic surface compared to a control hydrophobic surface, due to the jumping-drop effect dynamically minimizing the average drop size and surface coverage of the condensate. A simple scaling model is developed to relate the success and speed of inter-drop ice bridging to the drop size distribution. While other reports of condensation frosting on superhydrophobic surfaces have focused exclusively on liquid-solid ice nucleation for isolated drops, these findings reveal that the growth of frost is an inter-drop phenomenon that is strongly coupled to the wettability and drop size distribution of the surface. A jumping-drop superhydrophobic condenser was found to be superior to a conventional dropwise condenser in two respects: preventing heterogeneous ice nucleation by continuously removing subcooled condensate, and delaying frost growth by minimizing the success of interdrop ice bridge formation.

  1. Dielectrophoresis of a surfactant-laden viscous drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Shubhadeep; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-06-01

    The dielectrophoresis of a surfactant-laden viscous drop in the presence of non-uniform DC electric field is investigated analytically and numerically. Considering the presence of bulk-insoluble surfactants at the drop interface, we first perform asymptotic solution for both low and high surface Péclet numbers, where the surface Péclet number signifies the strength of surface convection of surfactants as compared to the diffusion at the drop interface. Neglecting fluid inertia and interfacial charge convection effects, we obtain explicit expression for dielectrophoretic drop velocity for low and high Péclet numbers by assuming small deviation of drop shape from sphericity and small deviation of surfactant concentration from the equilibrium uniform distribution. We then depict a numerical solution, assuming spherical drop, for arbitrary values of Péclet number. Our analyses demonstrate that the asymptotic solution shows excellent agreement with the numerical solution in the limiting conditions of low and high Péclet numbers. The present analysis shows that the flow-induced redistribution of the surfactants at the drop interface generates Marangoni stress, owing to the influence of the surfactant distribution on the local interfacial tension, at the drop interface and significantly alters the drop velocity at steady state. For a perfectly conducting/dielectric drop suspended in perfectly dielectric medium, Marangoni stress always retards the dielectrophoretic velocity of the drop as compared with a surfactant-free drop. For a leaky dielectric drop suspended in another leaky dielectric medium, in the low Péclet number limit, depending on the electrical conductivity and permittivity of both the liquids, the Marangoni stress may aid or retard the dielectrophoretic velocity of the drop. The Marangoni stress also has the ability to move the drop in the opposite direction as compared with a surfactant-free drop. This non-intuitive reverse motion of the drop is

  2. Electrohydrodynamic removal of particles from drop surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nudurupati, S.; Janjua, M.; Singh, P.; Aubry, N.

    2009-07-01

    A uniform electric field is used for cleaning drops of the particles they often carry on their surface. In a first step, particles migrate to either the drop’s poles or equator. This is due to the presence of an electrostatic force for which an analytical expression is derived. In a second step, particles concentrated near the poles are released into the ambient liquid via tip streaming, and those near the equator are removed by stretching the drop and breaking it into several droplets. In the latter case, particles are all concentrated in a small middle daughter droplet.

  3. Millikan "oil drop" stabilized by growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L K; Gertler, A W; Reiss, H

    1979-01-26

    A diffusion cloud chamber has been used to qualitatively study some dynamic properties of liquid drops by suspending them in an electric field at the plane of saturation (p/ps = 1, where p is the actual partial pressure of the vapor at a given elevation and ps is the equilibrium pressure at that temperature characteristic of that elevation). By varying the strength of the electric field, it is possible to change the size of the suspended droplets and even, if desired, to isolate a single drop.

  4. Rain Drop Charge Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    S, Sreekanth T.

    begin{center} Large Large Rain Drop Charge Sensor Sreekanth T S*, Suby Symon*, G. Mohan Kumar (1) , S. Murali Das (2) *Atmospheric Sciences Division, Centre for Earth Science Studies, Thiruvananthapuram 695011 (1) D-330, Swathi Nagar, West Fort, Thiruvananthapuram 695023 (2) Kavyam, Manacaud, Thiruvananthapuram 695009 begin{center} ABSTRACT To study the inter-relations with precipitation electricity and precipitation microphysical parameters a rain drop charge sensor was designed and developed at CESS Electronics & Instrumentation Laboratory. Simultaneous measurement of electric charge and fall speed of rain drops could be done using this charge sensor. A cylindrical metal tube (sensor tube) of 30 cm length is placed inside another thick metal cover opened at top and bottom for electromagnetic shielding. Mouth of the sensor tube is exposed and bottom part is covered with metal net in the shielding cover. The instrument is designed in such a way that rain drops can pass only through unhindered inside the sensor tube. When electrically charged rain drops pass through the sensor tube, it is charged to the same magnitude of drop charge but with opposite polarity. The sensor tube is electrically connected the inverted input of a current to voltage converter operational amplifier using op-amp AD549. Since the sensor is electrically connected to the virtual ground of the op-amp, the charge flows to the ground and the generated current is converted to amplified voltage. This output voltage is recorded using a high frequency (1kHz) voltage recorder. From the recorded pulse, charge magnitude, polarity and fall speed of rain drop are calculated. From the fall speed drop diameter also can be calculated. The prototype is now under test running at CESS campus. As the magnitude of charge in rain drops is an indication of accumulated charge in clouds in lightning, this instrument has potential application in the field of risk and disaster management. By knowing the charge

  5. Coalescence and noncoalescence of sessile drops: impact of surface forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpitschka, Stefan; Hanske, Christoph; Fery, Andreas; Riegler, Hans

    2014-06-17

    Due to capillarity, sessile droplets of identical liquids will instantaneously fuse when they come in contact at their three-phase lines. However, with drops of different, completely miscible liquids, instantaneous coalescence can be suppressed. Instead, the drops remain in a state of noncoalescence for some time, with the two drop bodies connected only by a thin neck. The reason for this noncoalescence is the surface tension difference, Δγ, between the liquids. If Δγ is sufficiently large, then it induces a sufficiently strong Marangoni flow, which keeps the main drop bodies temporarily separated. Studies with spreading drops have revealed that the boundary between instantaneous coalescence and noncoalescence is sharp (Karpitschka, S.; Riegler, H. J. Fluid. Mech. 2014, 743, R1). The boundary is a function of two parameters only: Δγ and Θ(a), the arithmetic mean of the contact angles in the moment of drop-drop contact. It appears plausible that surface forces (the disjoining pressure) could also influence the coalescence behavior. However, in experiments with spreading drops, surface forces always promote coalescence and their influence might be obscured. Therefore, we present here coalescence experiments with partially wetting liquids and compare the results to the spreading case. We adjust different equilibrium contact angles (i.e., different surface forces) with different substrate surface coatings. As for spreading drops, we observe a sharp boundary between regimes of coalescence and noncoalescence. The boundary follows the same power law relation for both partially and completely wetting cases. Therefore, we conclude that surface forces have no significant, explicit influence on the coalescence behavior of sessile drops from different miscible liquids.

  6. Nanofluid Drop Evaporation: Experiment, Theory, and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerken, William James

    Nanofluids, stable colloidal suspensions of nanoparticles in a base fluid, have potential applications in the heat transfer, combustion and propulsion, manufacturing, and medical fields. Experiments were conducted to determine the evaporation rate of room temperature, millimeter-sized pendant drops of ethanol laden with varying amounts (0-3% by weight) of 40-60 nm aluminum nanoparticles (nAl). Time-resolved high-resolution drop images were collected for the determination of early-time evaporation rate (D2/D 02 > 0.75), shown to exhibit D-square law behavior, and surface tension. Results show an asymptotic decrease in pendant drop evaporation rate with increasing nAl loading. The evaporation rate decreases by approximately 15% at around 1% to 3% nAl loading relative to the evaporation rate of pure ethanol. Surface tension was observed to be unaffected by nAl loading up to 3% by weight. A model was developed to describe the evaporation of the nanofluid pendant drops based on D-square law analysis for the gas domain and a description of the reduction in liquid fraction available for evaporation due to nanoparticle agglomerate packing near the evaporating drop surface. Model predictions are in relatively good agreement with experiment, within a few percent of measured nanofluid pendant drop evaporation rate. The evaporation of pinned nanofluid sessile drops was also considered via modeling. It was found that the same mechanism for nanofluid evaporation rate reduction used to explain pendant drops could be used for sessile drops. That mechanism is a reduction in evaporation rate due to a reduction in available ethanol for evaporation at the drop surface caused by the packing of nanoparticle agglomerates near the drop surface. Comparisons of the present modeling predictions with sessile drop evaporation rate measurements reported for nAl/ethanol nanofluids by Sefiane and Bennacer [11] are in fairly good agreement. Portions of this abstract previously appeared as: W. J

  7. Theoretical Exploration of Barrel-Shaped Drops on Cactus Spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Cheng

    2015-11-03

    To survive an arid environment, desert cacti are capable of harvesting water from fog by transporting condensed water drops using their spines. Cactus spines have a conical shape. In this work, on the basis of the difference of liquid pressure, a new theoretical model has been developed for a barrel-shaped liquid drop on a conical wire. This model is further simplified to interpret the effects of contact angles, conical angle, surface microgrooves, and gravity on the drop movement along a cactus spine.

  8. Studies of the Stability and Dynamics of Levitated Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikumar, A.; Lee, Chun Ping; Wang, T. G.

    1996-01-01

    This is a review of our experimental and theoretical studies relating to equilibrium and stability of liquid drops, typically of low viscosity, levitated in air by a sound field. The major emphasis here is on the physical principles and understanding behind the stability of levitated drops. A comparison with experimental data is also given, along with some fascinating pictures from high-speed photography. One of the aspects we shall deal with is how a drop can suddenly burst in an intense sound field; a phenomenon which can find applications in atomization technology. Also, we are currently investigating the phenomenon of suppression of coalescence between drops levitated in intense acoustic fields.

  9. Generalized nematohydrodynamic boundary conditions with application to bistable twisted nematic liquid-crystal displays

    KAUST Repository

    Fang, Angbo

    2008-12-08

    Parallel to the highly successful Ericksen-Leslie hydrodynamic theory for the bulk behavior of nematic liquid crystals (NLCs), we derive a set of coupled hydrodynamic boundary conditions to describe the NLC dynamics near NLC-solid interfaces. In our boundary conditions, translational flux (flow slippage) and rotational flux (surface director relaxation) are coupled according to the Onsager variational principle of least energy dissipation. The application of our boundary conditions to the truly bistable π -twist NLC cell reveals a complete picture of the dynamic switching processes. It is found that the thus far overlooked translation-rotation dissipative coupling at solid surfaces can accelerate surface director relaxation and enhance the flow rate. This can be utilized to improve the performance of electro-optical nematic devices by lowering the required switching voltages and reducing the switching times. © 2008 The American Physical Society.

  10. Drops in Space: Super Oscillations and Surfactant Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfel, Robert E.; Tian, Yuren; Jankovsky, Joseph; Shi, Tao; Chen, X.; Holt, R. Glynn; Trinh, Eugene; Croonquist, Arvid; Thornton, Kathyrn C.; Sacco, Albert, Jr.; Coleman, Catherine; Leslie, Fred W.; Matthiesen, David H.

    1996-01-01

    An unprecedented microgravity observation of maximal shape oscillations of a surfactant-bearing water drop the size of a ping pong ball was observed during a mission of Space Shuttle Columbia as part of the second United States Microgravity Laboratory-USML-2 (STS-73, October 20-November 5, 1995). The observation was precipitated by the action of an intense sound field which produced a deforming force on the drop. When this deforming force was suddenly reduced, the drop executed nearly free and axisymmetric oscillations for several cycles, demonstrating a remarkable amplitude of nonlinear motion. Whether arising from the discussion of modes of oscillation of the atomic nucleus, or the explosion of stars, or how rain forms, the complex processes influencing the motion, fission, and coalescence of drops have fascinated scientists for centuries. Therefore, the axisymmetric oscillations of a maximally deformed liquid drop are noteworthy, not only for their scientific value but also for their aesthetic character. Scientists from Yale University, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and Vanderbilt University conducted liquid drop experiments in microgravity using the acoustic positioning/manipulation environment of the Drop Physics Module (DPM). The Yale/JPL group's objectives were to study the rheological properties of liquid drop surfaces on which are adsorbed surfactant molecules, and to infer surface properties such as surface tension, Gibb's elasticity, and surface dilatational viscosity by using a theory which relies on spherical symmetry to solve the momentum and mass transport equations.

  11. Lambda-dropping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Schultz, Ulrik Pagh

    1997-01-01

    ;rbæk's case study presented at PEPM '95, most polyvariant specializers for procedural programs operate on recursive equations. To this end, in a pre-processing phase, they lambda-lift source programs into recursive equations, As a result, residual programs are also expressed as recursive equations, often......Lambda-lifting a functional program transforms it into a set of recursive equations. We present the symmetric transformation: lambda-dropping. Lambda-dropping a set of recursive equations restores block structure and lexical scope.For lack of scope, recursive equations must carry around all...... with dozens of parameters, which most compilers do not handle efficiently. Lambda-dropping in a post-processing phase restores their block structure and lexical scope thereby significantly reducing both the compile time and the run time of residual programs....

  12. Tunable transport of drops on a vibrating inclined fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Bick, Alison; Sauret, Alban; Stone, Howard A

    2015-01-01

    Transport of liquid drops in fibrous media occurs in various engineering systems such as fog harvesting or cleaning of textiles. The ability to tune or to control liquid movement can increase the system efficiency and enable new engineering applications. In this Letter, we experimentally investigate how partially wetting drops on a single fiber can be manipulated by vibrating the fiber. We show that a sliding motion along the fiber or a dripping of the drop can be triggered by standing waves. We identify the conditions on the drop volume, the fiber tilt angle and the amplitude and frequency of oscillations to observe these different behaviors. Finally, we experimentally illustrate that vibrations can be used to control the transport and the collection of water drops along a fiber using a combination of the sliding and dripping transitions.

  13. Capillary-inertial colloidal catapults upon drop coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Roger L.; Liu, Fangjie; Feng, James J.; Chen, Chuan-Hua

    2016-07-01

    Surface energy released upon drop coalescence is known to power the self-propelled jumping of liquid droplets on superhydrophobic solid surfaces, and the jumping droplets can additionally carry colloidal payloads toward self-cleaning. Here, we show that drop coalescence on a spherical particle leads to self-propelled launching of the particle from virtually any solid surface. The main prerequisite is an intermediate wettability of the particle, such that the momentum from the capillary-inertial drop coalescence process can be transferred to the particle. By momentum conservation, the launching velocity of the particle-drop complex is proportional to the capillary-inertial velocity based on the drop radius and to the fraction of the liquid mass in the total mass. The capillary-inertial catapult is not only an alternative mechanism for removing colloidal contaminants, but also a useful model system for studying ballistospore launching.

  14. The surface temperature of free evaporating drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodulin, V. Y.; Letushko, V. N.; Nizovtsev, M. I.; Sterlyagov, A. N.

    2016-10-01

    Complex experimental and theoretical investigation of heat and mass transfer processes was performed at evaporation of free liquid drops. For theoretical calculation the emission-diffusion model was proposed. This allowed taking into account the characteristics of evaporation of small droplets, for which heat and mass transfer processes are not described in the conventional diffusion model. The calculation results of evaporation of droplets of different sizes were compared using two models: the conventional diffusion and emission-diffusion models. To verify the proposed physical model, the evaporation of droplets suspended on a polypropylene fiber was experimentally investigated. The form of droplets in the evaporation process was determined using microphotographing. The temperature was measured on the surfaces of evaporating drops using infrared thermography. The experimental results have showed good agreement with the numerical data for the time of evaporation and the temperature of evaporating drops.

  15. Drop impact on a flexible fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Dressaire, Emilie; Boulogne, François; Stone, Howard A

    2015-01-01

    When droplets impact fibrous media, the liquid can be captured by the fibers or contact then break away. Previous studies have shown that the efficiency of drop capture by a rigid fiber depends on the impact velocity and defined a threshold velocity below which the drop is captured. However, it is necessary to consider the coupling of elastic and capillary effects to achieve a greater understanding of the capture process for soft substrates. Here, we study experimentally the dynamics of a single drop impacting on a thin flexible fiber. Our results demonstrate that the threshold capture velocity depends on the flexibility of fibers in a non-monotonic way. We conclude that tuning the mechanical properties of fibers can optimize the efficiency of droplet capture.

  16. Impact of granular drops

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, J. O.

    2013-07-15

    We investigate the spreading and splashing of granular drops during impact with a solid target. The granular drops are formed from roughly spherical balls of sand mixed with water, which is used as a binder to hold the ball together during free-fall. We measure the instantaneous spread diameter for different impact speeds and find that the normalized spread diameter d/D grows as (tV/D)1/2. The speeds of the grains ejected during the “splash” are measured and they rarely exceed twice that of the impact speed.

  17. Structure Determination of Unknown Organic Liquids Using NMR and IR Spectroscopy: A General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavel, John T.; Hyde, Erin C.; Bruch, Martha D.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment introduced general chemistry students to the basic concepts of organic structures and to the power of spectroscopic methods for structure determination. Students employed a combination of IR and NMR spectroscopy to perform de novo structure determination of unknown alcohols, without being provided with a list of possible…

  18. Structure Determination of Unknown Organic Liquids Using NMR and IR Spectroscopy: A General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavel, John T.; Hyde, Erin C.; Bruch, Martha D.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment introduced general chemistry students to the basic concepts of organic structures and to the power of spectroscopic methods for structure determination. Students employed a combination of IR and NMR spectroscopy to perform de novo structure determination of unknown alcohols, without being provided with a list of possible…

  19. Sliding viscoelastic drops on slippery surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.; Clarke, A.; Rothstein, J. P.; Poole, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    We study the sliding of drops of constant-viscosity dilute elastic liquids (Boger fluids) on various surfaces caused by sudden surface inclination. For smooth or roughened hydrophilic surfaces, such as glass or acrylic, there is essentially no difference between these elastic liquids and a Newtonian comparator fluid (with identical shear viscosity, surface tension, and static contact angle). In contrast for embossed polytetrafluoroethylene superhydrophobic surfaces, profound differences are observed: the elastic drops slide at a significantly reduced rate and complex branch-like patterns are left on the surface by the drop's wake including, on various scales, beads-on-a-string like phenomena. Microscopy images indicate that the strong viscoelastic effect is caused by stretching filaments of fluid from isolated islands, residing at pinning sites on the surface pillars, of the order ˜30 μm in size. On this scale, the local strain rates are sufficient to extend the polymer chains, locally increasing the extensional viscosity of the solution, retarding the drop and leaving behind striking branch-like structures on much larger scales.

  20. A comparison of different experimental methods for general recombination correction for liquid ionization chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Jonas; Kaiser, Franz-Joachim; Gomez, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    experimental methods for general recombination correction for LICs are compared and investigated for both pulsed and continuous beams. The experimental methods are all based on one of two approaches: either measurements at two different dose rates (two-dose-rate methods), or measurements at three different LIC...... recommended by the manufacturer of the LICs used, the agreement between the different methods is generally within the experimental uncertainties. For pulsed beams, the agreement between the methods is poor. The inaccuracies found in the results from the three-voltage methods are associated with numerical...... difficulties in solving the resulting equation systems, which also make these methods sensitive to small variations in the experimental data. These issues are more pronounced for the case of pulsed beams. Furthermore, the results suggest that the theoretical modelling of initial recombination used in the three...

  1. Mathematical Modelling of the Evaporating Liquid Films on the Basis of the Generalized Interface Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goncharova Olga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The two-dimensional films, flowing down an inclined, non-uniformly heated substrate are studied. The results contain the new mathematical models developed with the help of the long-wave approximation of the Navier-Stokes and heat transfer equations or Oberbeck-Boussinesq equations in the case, when the generalized conditions are formulated at thermocapillary interface. The evolution equations for the film thickness include the effects of gravity, viscosity, capillarity, thermocapillarity, additional stress effects and evaporation.

  2. How geometry determines the coalescence of low-viscosity drops

    CERN Document Server

    Eddi, A; Snoeijer, J H

    2013-01-01

    The coalescence of water drops on a substrate is studied experimentally. We focus on the rapid growth of the bridge connecting the two drops, which very quickly after contact ensues from a balance of surface tension and liquid inertia. For drops with contact angles below $90^\\circ$, we find that the bridge grows with a self-similar dynamics that is characterized by a height $h\\sim t^{2/3}$. By contrast, the geometry of coalescence changes dramatically for contact angles at $90^\\circ$, for which we observe $h\\sim t^{1/2}$, just as for freely suspended spherical drops in the inertial regime. We present a geometric model that quantitatively captures the transition from 2/3 to 1/2 exponent, and unifies the inertial coalescence of sessile drops and freely suspended drops.

  3. Numerical simulation of deformation process of viscous liquid drop based on the incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics∗%基于不可压缩光滑粒子动力学的黏性液滴变形过程仿真*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱流潮

    2013-01-01

      应用基于投影算法的不可压缩光滑粒子动力学(incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics, ISPH)法对黏性液滴变形过程进行了数值仿真。对于张力失稳导致的粒子非物理簇集问题,采用粒子移位技术加以解决。为了验证本文ISPH算法的精度和稳定性,分别模拟了圆形黏性液滴的拉伸变形过程以及方形液滴的旋转变形过程,得到了不同时刻液滴内部的压力变化特征,准确地捕捉了液滴自由面演化过程,并将数值计算结果与文献中的解析解进行了比较。分析结果表明,基于投影算法的不可压缩光滑粒子动力学方法结合粒子移位技术,能够有效地模拟黏性液滴变形过程,可以得到精确和稳定的结果。%  A projection-based incompressible smooth particle hydrodynamics (ISPH) is applied to the simulation of the deformation process of viscous liquid drop. In our numerical computation, the particle shifting technique is used to overcome particle clustering due to the tensile instability in SPH. In order to verify the proposed ISPH, numerical simulations of a viscous circle drop stretching and a viscous square drop rotating are carried out. The pressure distribution in the drop is obtained, and the deformation process of viscous liquid drop is correctly captured. Comparisons between numerical results and the analytical solutions in the literature are presented. The simulation results show that the projection-based ISPH with particle shifting technique can be used to simulate the deformation process of viscous liquid drop with stability and accuracy.

  4. Sessile Drop Evaporation and Leidenfrost Phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    A. K. Mozumder; M. R. Ullah; Hossain, A.; Islam, M A

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Quenching and cooling are important process in manufacturing industry for controlling the mechanical properties of materials, where evaporation is a vital mode of heat transfer. Approach: This study experimentally investigated the evaporation of sessile drop for four different heated surfaces of Aluminum, Brass, Copper and Mild steel with a combination of four different liquids as Methanol, Ethanol, Water and NaCl solution. The time of evaporation for the droplet on the hot...

  5. Drops with non-circular footprints

    CERN Document Server

    Ravazzoli, Pablo D; Diez, Javier A

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study the morphology of drops formed on partially wetting substrates, whose footprint is not circular. This type of drops is a consequence of the breakup processes occurring in thin films when anisotropic contact line motions take place. The anisotropy is basically due to hysteresis effects of the contact angle since some parts of the contact line are wetting, while others are dewetting. Here, we obtain a peculiar drop shape from the rupture of a long liquid filament sitting on a solid substrate, and analyze its shape and contact angles by means of goniometric and refractive techniques. We also find a non--trivial steady state solution for the drop shape within the long wave approximation (lubrication theory), and compare most of its features with experimental data. This solution is presented both in Cartesian and polar coordinates, whose constants must be determined by a certain group of measured parameters. Besides, we obtain the dynamics of the drop generation from numerical simulations of...

  6. Drops with non-circular footprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravazzoli, Pablo D.; González, Alejandro G.; Diez, Javier A.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we study the morphology of drops formed on partially wetting substrates, whose footprint is not circular. These drops are consequence of the breakup processes occurring in thin films when anisotropic contact line motions take place. The anisotropy is basically due to the hysteresis of the contact angle since there is a wetting process in some parts of the contact line, while a dewetting occurs in other parts. Here, we obtain a characteristic drop shape from the rupture of a long liquid filament sitting on a solid substrate. We analyze its shape and contact angles by means of goniometric and refractive techniques. We also find a non-trivial steady state solution for the drop shape within the long wave approximation (lubrication theory), and we compare most of its features with experimental data. This solution is presented both in Cartesian and polar coordinates, whose constants must be determined by a certain group of measured parameters. Besides, we obtain the dynamics of the drop generation from numerical simulations of the full Navier-Stokes equation, where we emulate the hysteretic effects with an appropriate spatial distribution of the static contact angle over the substrate.

  7. Cusp formation in drops inside Taylor cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Alvaro G.; Loscertales, Ignacio G.; Barrero, Antonio

    2005-11-01

    Here, we report the formation of cusp in insulating drops inside compound Taylor cones. The action of the electrical shear stress acting on the outer interface, which is transmitted by viscous forces inside the Taylor cone, tends to deform the drop of insulating liquid placed inside. For appropriate values of the capillary number, the insulating drop develops a steady cusp angle which depends on both the capillary number and the conducting to insulating viscosity ratio. A self-similar analysis has been developed to qualitatively describe the flow inside these compounds Taylor cones. Any perturbation of the cusp gives rise to an intermittent emission of tiny droplets; this effect may recall the tip-streaming observed by G.I. Taylor in his four-roll mill device. This emission can be stabilized by an appropriate control of the injected flow rate of the insulating liquid. When the capillary number increases, the cusped interface turns into a spout which flows coated by the conducting liquid forming the electrified coaxial jet which has been successfully employed for the production of nanocapsules, coaxial nanofibers and nanotubes (Science 295, n. 5560, 1695, 2002; JACS 126, 5376, 2004).

  8. The Drop Tower Bremen -An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kampen, Peter; Könemann, Thorben; Rath, Hans J.

    The Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM) was founded in 1985 as an institute of the University of Bremen, which focuses on research on gravitational and space-related phenomena. In 1988, the construction of ZARM`s drop tower began. Since its inau-guration in September 1990, the eye-catching Drop Tower Bremen with a height of 146m and its characteristic glass roof has become twice a landmark on the campus of the University of Bremen and the emblem of the technology park Bremen. As such an outstanding symbol of space science in Bremen the drop tower provides an european unique facility for experiments under conditions of high-quality weightlessness with residual gravitational accelerations in the microgravity regime. The period of maximum 4.74s of each freely falling experiment at the Drop Tower Bremen is only limited by the height of the drop tower vacuum tube, which was fully manufactured of steal and enclosed by an outer concrete shell. Thus, the pure free fall height of each microgravity drop experiment is approximately 110m. By using the later in-stalled catapult system established in 2004 ZARM`s short-term microgravity laboratory is able to nearly double the time of free fall. This world-wide inimitable capsule catapult system meets scientists` demand of extending the period of weightlessness. During the catapult operation the experiment capsule performs a vertical parabolic flight within the drop tower vacuum tube. In this way the time of microgravity can be extended to slightly over 9s. Either in the drop or in the catapult operation routine the repetition rates of microgravity experiments at ZARM`s drop tower facility are the same, generally up to 3 times per day. In comparison to orbital platforms the ground-based laboratory Drop Tower Bremen represents an economic alternative with a permanent access to weightlessness on earth. Moreover, the exceptional high quality of weightlessness in order of 1e-6 g (in the frequency range below 100

  9. The bifurcation diagram of drops in a sphere/plane geometry: influence of contact angle hysteresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, de Riëlle; Gorcum, van M.; Semprebon, C.; Duits, M.H.G.; Brinkmann, M.; Mugele, F.

    2014-01-01

    We study liquid drops that are present in a generic geometry, namely the gap in between a sphere and a plane. For the ideal system without contact angle hysteresis, the drop position is solely dependent on the contact angle, drop volume, and sphere/ plane separation distance. Performing a geometric

  10. A two-dose-rate method for general recombination correction for liquid ionization chambers in pulsed beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toelli, Heikki; Sjoegren, Rickard; Wendelsten, Mikael, E-mail: heikki.tolli@radfys.umu.s [Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics, Umeaa University, SE-901 85 Umeaa (Sweden)

    2010-08-07

    The correction for general recombination losses in liquid ionization chambers (LICs) is more complex than that in air-filled ionization chambers. The reason for this is that the saturation charge in LICs, i.e. the charge that escapes initial recombination, depends on the applied voltage. This paper presents a method, based on measurements at two different dose rates in a pulsed beam, for general recombination correction in LICs. The Boag theory for pulsed beams is used and the collection efficiency is determined by numerical methods which are equivalent to the two-voltage method used in dosimetry with air-filled ionization chambers. The method has been tested in experiments in water in a 20 MeV electron beam using two LICs filled with isooctane and tetramethylsilane. The dose per pulse in the electron beam was varied between 0.1 mGy/pulse and 8 mGy/pulse. The relative standard deviations of the collection efficiencies determined with the two-dose-rate method ranged between 0.1% and 1.5%. The dose-rate variations of the general recombination corrected charge measured with the LICs are in excellent agreement with the corresponding values obtained with an air-filled plane parallel ionization chamber.

  11. Development of a general model for determination of thermal conductivity of liquid chemical compounds at atmospheric pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gharagheizi, Farhad; Ilani‐Kashkouli, Poorandokht; Sattari, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    In this communication, a general model for representation/presentation of the liquid thermal conductivity of chemical compounds (mostly organic) at 1 atm pressure for temperatures below normal boiling point and at saturation pressure for temperatures above the normal boiling point is developed...... of the model comprise temperature, acentric factor, critical pressure, normal boiling temperature, and molecular weight. Nearly 80% of the data set (15,221 data) is randomly assigned to develop the model equation, 10% of the data set (1902 data) is used to validate the model, and the remaining data (1902 data......) were implemented to evaluate its predictive power. The average absolute relative deviation of the model results from the DIPPR 801 data is less than 9%. In terms of simplicity and wide range of applicability, this empirical model shows acceptable accuracy. © 2012 American Institute of Chemical...

  12. Polarisations of quasi-waves in a general anisotropic porous solid saturated with viscous liquid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M D Sharma

    2005-08-01

    Wave propagation is studied in a general anisotropic poroelastic solid saturated with a viscous fluid flowing through its pores of anisotropic permeability. The extended version of Biot's theory is used to derive a system of modified Christoffel equations for the propagation of plane harmonic waves in such media. The non-trivial solution of this system is ensured by a biquadratic equation whose roots represent the complex velocities of four attenuating quasi-waves in the medium. These complex velocities define phase velocity and attenuation of each quasi-wave propagating along a given phase direction in three-dimensional space. The solution itself defines the polarisations of the quasi-waves along with phase shift. The variations of polarisations of quasi-waves with their phase direction, are computed for a realistic numerical model.

  13. Cells as Drops and Drops as Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufresne, Eric R.

    2013-03-01

    How do the mechanical properties of tissues emerge from the interactions of individual cells? To shed some light on this fundamental biological question, we consider a model system of clusters of cohesive cells adherent to soft substrates. We quantify traction forces over a wide range of cluster sizes. The scaling of traction stresses with cluster size suggests the emergence of an apparent surface tension for large colonies. To explore the possible impact of cellular surface tension on physiology, we consider the behavior of liquid droplets on soft substrates. In this case, we find that the competition of surface tension and substrate elasticity can lead to rich phenomenology, mimicking certain aspects of the physiology of cells and tissues.

  14. Viscous Coalescence of Two Drops in a Saturated Vapor Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroudi, Lina; Nagel, Sidney R.; Morris, Jeffrey F.; Lee, Taehun

    2016-11-01

    When two liquid drops come into contact, a microscopic liquid bridge forms between them and rapidly expands until the two drops merge into a single bigger drop. Numerous studies have been devoted to the investigation of the coalescence singularity in the case where the drops coalesce in a medium of negligible vapor pressure such as vacuum or air. However, coalescence of liquid drops may also take place in a medium of relatively high vapor pressure (condensable vapor phase), where the effect of the surrounding vapor phase should not be neglected, such as the merging of drops in clouds. In this study, we carry out Lattice Boltzmann numerical simulations to investigate the dynamics of viscous coalescence in a saturated vapor phase. Attention is paid to the effect of the vapor phase on the formation and growth dynamics of the liquid bridge in the viscous regime. We observe that the onset of the coalescence occurs earlier and the expansion of the bridge initially proceeds faster when the coalescence takes place in a saturated vapor compared to the coalescence in a non-condensable gas. The initially faster evolution of the coalescence process in the saturated vapor is caused by the vapor transport through condensation during the early stages of the coalescence.

  15. Drop by drop scattering properties of a radar bin : a numerical experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gires, Auguste; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the development and initial results of a numerical simulation of pseudo-radar observations computed as the sum of the electric field backscattered by each drop. Simulations are carried out for three successive radar bins with a gate length of 30 m and beam width of 1°. The first step is the simulation of a 100 m x 100 m x 100 m volume with all its drops. The 3D raindrop generator relies on the findings on the rainfall field very small scales (mm to few tens of m) spatio-temporal structure, of the HYDROP experiment and a recent analysis of 2D video disdrometer data in a Multifractal framework. More precisely: (i) The Liquid Water Content (LWC) distribution is represented with the help a multiplicative cascade down to 0.5 m, below which it is considered as homogeneous. (ii) Within each 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5 m3 patch, liquid water is distributed into drops according to a pre-defined Drop Size Distribution (DSD) and located randomly uniformly. (iii) Such configuration is compared with the one consisting of the same drops uniformly distributed over the 50 x 50 x 50 m3 volume. Then the backscattered field by the drops located within a radar bin are computed as the sum a individual contribution. Antenna beam weighing is taken into account Due to the fact that the radar wave length is much smaller than the "patches" size for rainfall, it appears that as theoretically expected we retrieved an exponential distribution for potential measure horizontal reflectivity. A much lower dispersion is noticed for differential reflectivity. We show that a simple ballistic assumption for drop velocities does not enable to reproduce radar observations, and turbulence must be taken into account. Finally the sensitivity of these outputs to the various model parameters is quantified.

  16. Axisymmetric model of drop spreading on a horizontal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Aashutosh; Muralidhar, K.

    2015-09-01

    Spreading of an initially spherical liquid drop over a textured surface is analyzed by solving an integral form of the governing equations. The mathematical model extends Navier-Stokes equations by including surface tension at the gas-liquid boundary and a force distribution at the three phase contact line. While interfacial tension scales with drop curvature, the motion of the contact line depends on the departure of instantaneous contact angle from its equilibrium value. The numerical solution is obtained by discretizing the spreading drop into disk elements. The Bond number range considered is 0.01-1. Results obtained for sessile drops are in conformity with limiting cases reported in the literature [J. C. Bird et al., "Short-time dynamics of partial wetting," Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 234501 (2008)]. They further reveal multiple time scales that are reported in experiments [K. G. Winkels et al., "Initial spreading of low-viscosity drops on partially wetting surfaces," Phys. Rev. E 85, 055301 (2012) and A. Eddi et al., "Short time dynamics of viscous drop spreading," Phys. Fluids 25, 013102 (2013)]. Spreading of water and glycerin drops over fully and partially wetting surfaces is studied in terms of excess pressure, wall shear stress, and the dimensions of the footprint. Contact line motion is seen to be correctly captured in the simulations. Water drops show oscillations during spreading while glycerin spreads uniformly over the surface.

  17. Generalized multiple internal standard method for quantitative liquid chromatography mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuan-Liang; Chen, Zeng-Ping; Chen, Yao; Shi, Cai-Xia; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2016-05-06

    In this contribution, a multiplicative effects model for generalized multiple-internal-standard method (MEMGMIS) was proposed to solve the signal instability problem of LC-MS over time. MEMGMIS model seamlessly integrates the multiple-internal-standard strategy with multivariate calibration method, and takes full use of all the information carried by multiple internal standards during the quantification of target analytes. Unlike the existing methods based on multiple internal standards, MEMGMIS does not require selecting an optimal internal standard for the quantification of a specific analyte from multiple internal standards used. MEMGMIS was applied to a proof-of-concept model system: the simultaneous quantitative analysis of five edible artificial colorants in two kinds of cocktail drinks. Experimental results demonstrated that MEMGMIS models established on LC-MS data of calibration samples prepared with ultrapure water could provide quite satisfactory concentration predictions for colorants in cocktail samples from their LC-MS data measured 10days after the LC-MS analysis of the calibration samples. The average relative prediction errors of MEMGMIS models did not exceed 6.0%, considerably better than the corresponding values of commonly used univariate calibration models combined with multiple internal standards. The advantages of good performance and simple implementation render MEMGMIS model a promising alternative tool in quantitative LC-MS assays.

  18. A posterirori study of models for large eddy simulations of drop-laden flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboissetier, A.; Okong'o, N. A.; Bellan, J.

    2003-01-01

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is conducted of a three-dimensional temporal mixing layer whose stream is initially laden with liquid drops which may evaporate during the simulation. The gas-phase equations are written in Eulerian frame for two perfect gas species (carrier gas and vapor emanating from the drops), while the liquid-phase equations are written in a Lagrangian frame.

  19. Validation of an All-Pressure Fluid Drop Model: Heptane Fluid Drops in Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harstad, K.; Bellan, J.; Bulzan, Daniel L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Despite the fact that supercritical fluids occur both in nature and in industrial situations, the fundamentals of their behavior is poorly understood because supercritical fluids combine the characteristics of both liquids and gases, and therefore their behavior is not intuitive. There are several specific reasons for the lack of understanding: First, data from (mostly optical) measurements can be very misleading because regions of high density thus observed are frequently identified with liquids. A common misconception is that if in an experiment one can optically identify "drops" and "ligaments", the observed fluid must be in a liquid state. This inference is incorrect because in fact optical measurements detect any large change (i.e. gradients) in density. Thus, the density ratio may be well below Omicron(10(exp 3)) that characterizes its liquid/gas value, but the measurement will still identify a change in the index of refraction providing that the change is sudden (steep gradients). As shown by simulations of supercritical fluids, under certain conditions the density gradients may remain large during the supercritical binary fluids mixing, thus making them optically identifiable. Therefore, there is no inconsistency between the optical observation of high density regions and the fluids being in a supercritical state. A second misconception is that because a fluid has a liquid-like density, it is appropriate to model it as a liquid. However, such fluids may have liquid-like densities while their transport properties differ from those of a liquid. Considering that the critical pressure of most fuel hydrocarbons used in Diesel and gas turbine engines is in the range of 1.5 - 3 MPa, and the fact that the maximum pressure attained in these engines is about 6 Mps, it is clear that the fuel in the combustion chamber will experience both subcritical and supercritical conditions. Studies of drop behavior over a wide range of pressures were performed in the past

  20. When a water drop freezes before it solidifies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavehpour, Pirouz; Davis, Stephen; Tavakoli, Faryar

    2012-11-01

    When a drop of liquid is placed on a substrate which temperature is below the melting point of the liquid, one would expect the drop to solidify instantaneously. However, many liquids, such as water, must be subcooled to solidify below its melting temperature due to homogeneous nucleation's high activation energy. Most of the drop solidification research, particularly for water, phase change is assumed to occur at equilibrium freezing temperature; however, this is not the case. We found that after a certain degree of supercooling, a kinetic based nucleation begins and latent heat of fusion is suddenly liberated, causing an increase in liquid temperature. At the end of this stage, approximately 20% of the drop is crystallized. This phenomenon is known among metallurgists as recalescence. This is followed by a slow solidification process at the melting point. As a water droplet spreads on a cold substrate, its contact line stops just prior to freezing inception from the liquid-solid interface. In this study, we assert that recalescence prior to solidification may be the cause of water's sudden immobility, which results in a fixed contact angle and droplet diameter. In our experiments, the nucleation front initiates from the trijunction point and propagates to the drop volume.

  1. Impact of water drops on small targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozhkov, A.; Prunet-Foch, B.; Vignes-Adler, M.

    2002-10-01

    The collision of water drops against small targets was studied experimentally by means of a high-speed photography technique. The drop impact velocity was about 3.5 m/s. Drop diameters were in the range of 2.8-4.0 mm. The target was a stainless steel disk of 3.9 mm diameter. The drop spread beyond the target like a central cap surrounded by a thin, slightly conical lamella bounded by a thicker rim. By mounting a small obstacle near the target, surface-tension driven Mach waves in the flowing lamella were generated, which are formally equivalent to the familiar compressibility driven Mach waves in gas dynamics. From the measurement of the Mach angle, the values of some flow parameters could be obtained as functions of time, which provided insight into the flow structure. The liquid flowed from the central cap to the liquid rim through the thin lamella at constant momentum flux. At a certain stage of the process, most of the liquid accumulated in the rim and the internal part of the lamella became metastable. In this situation, a rupture wave propagating through the metastable internal part of the lamella caused the rim to retract while forming outwardly directed secondary jets. The jets disintegrated into secondary droplets due to the Savart-Plateau-Rayleigh instability. Prior to the end of the retraction, an internal circular wave of rupture was formed. It originated at the target and then it propagated to meet the retracting rim. Their meeting resulted in a crown of tiny droplets. A theoretical analysis of the ejection process is proposed.

  2. Hydrodynamics of evaporating sessile drops

    CERN Document Server

    Barash, L Yu

    2010-01-01

    Several dynamical stages of the Marangoni convection of an evaporating sessile drop are obtained. We jointly take into account the hydrodynamics of an evaporating sessile drop, effects of the thermal conduction in the drop and the diffusion of vapor in air. The stages are characterized by different number of vortices in the drop and the spatial location of vortices. During the early stage the array of vortices arises near a surface of the drop and induces a non-monotonic spatial distribution of the temperature over the drop surface. The number of near-surface vortices in the drop is controlled by the Marangoni cell size, which is calculated similar to that given by Pearson for flat fluid layers. The number of vortices quickly decreases with time, resulting in three bulk vortices in the intermediate stage. The vortex structure finally evolves into the single convection vortex in the drop, existing during about 1/2 of the evaporation time.

  3. Leidenfrost Drop on a Step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagubeau, Guillaume; Le Merrer, Marie; Clanet, Christophe; Quere, David

    2008-11-01

    When deposited on a hot plate, a water droplet evaporates quickly. However, a vapor film appears under the drop above a critical temperature, called Leidenfrost temperature, which insulates the drop from its substrate. Linke & al (2006) reported a spontaneous movement of such a drop, when deposited on a ratchet. We study here the case of a flat substrate decorated with a single micrometric step. The drop is deposited on the lower part of the plate and pushed towards the step at small constant velocity. If the kinetic energy of the drop is sufficient, it can climb up the step. In that case, depending on the substrate temperature, the drop can either be decelerated or accelerated by the step. We try to understand the dynamics of these drops, especially the regime where they accelerate. Taking advantage of this phenomenon, we could then build a multiple-step setup, making it possible for a Leidenfrost drop to climb stairs.

  4. Spreading of miscible liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Daniel J.; Haward, Simon J.; Shen, Amy Q.; Fuller, Gerald G.

    2016-05-01

    Miscible liquids commonly contact one another in natural and technological situations, often in the proximity of a solid substrate. In the scenario where a drop of one liquid finds itself on a solid surface and immersed within a second, miscible liquid, it will spread spontaneously across the surface. We show experimental findings of the spreading of sessile drops in miscible environments that have distinctly different shape evolution and power-law dynamics from sessile drops that spread in immiscible environments, which have been reported previously. We develop a characteristic time to scale radial data of the spreading sessile drops based on a drainage flow due to gravity. This time scale is effective for a homologous subset of the liquids studied. However, it has limitations when applied to significantly chemically different, yet miscible, liquid pairings; we postulate that the surface energies between each liquid and the solid surface becomes important for this other subset of the liquids studied. Initial experiments performed with pendant drops in miscible environments support the drainage flow observed in the sessile drop systems.

  5. MHD pressure drop in ferritic pipes of fusion blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimann, J.; Buehler, Leo E-mail: leo.buehler@iket.fzk.de; Messadek, K.; Stieglitz, R

    2003-09-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic flows in pipes of ferromagnetic material is an important issue for liquid metal blanket concepts using MANET as wall material. Fusion relevant magnetic fields of 4-8 T cause high pressure drop in the blanket header where a massive structure of ferromagnetic material exists. It is briefly outlined that in the blanket the reduction of pressure drop due to magnetic shielding is limited to about 10%. Remarkable reduction of pressure drop is possible by means of electrical insulation that prevents currents from short-circuiting through the very thick walls of the headers. Direct contact of the insulating material with the liquid metal is excluded by using metallic liners. Results are reported on the fabrication of such a test section and corresponding pressure drop measurements confirm the effective contribution of the electrical decoupling.

  6. Electrically modulated dynamic spreading of drops on soft surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Ranabir; Daga, Ashish; DasGupta, Sunando; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-07-01

    The intricate interaction between the deformability of a substrate and the dynamic spreading of a liquid drop on the same, under the application of an electrical voltage, has remained far from being well understood. Here, we demonstrate that electrospreading dynamics on soft substrates is dictated by the combined interplay of electrocapillarity, the wetting line friction, and the viscoelastic energy dissipation at the contact line. Our results reveal that during such electro-elastocapillarity mediated spreading of a sessile drop, the contact radius evolution exhibits a universal power-law in a substrate elasticity based non-dimensional time, with an electrical voltage dependent spreading exponent. Simultaneously, the macroscopic dynamic contact angle variation follows a general power-law in the contact line velocity, normalized by elasticity dependent characteristic velocity scale. These findings will be beneficial for comprehending droplet spreading dynamics stemming from the combination of electrically modulated spreading and "soft wetting." Hence, our results are likely to provide the foundation for the development of a plethora of applications involving droplet manipulations by exploiting the interplay between electrically triggered spreading and substrate-compliance over interfacial scales.

  7. Drop splashing is independent of substrate wetting

    CERN Document Server

    Latka, Andrzej; Nagel, Sidney R; de Pablo, Juan J

    2016-01-01

    A liquid drop impacting a dry solid surface with sufficient kinetic energy will splash, breaking apart into numerous secondary droplets. This phenomenon shows many similarities to forced wetting, including the entrainment of air at the contact line. Because of these similarities and the fact that forced wetting has been shown to depend on the wetting properties of the surface, existing theories predict splashing to depend on wetting properties as well. However, using high-speed interference imaging we observe that wetting properties have no effect on splashing for various liquid-surface combinations. Additionally, by fully resolving the Navier-Stokes equations at length and time scales inaccessible to experiments, we find that the shape and motion of the air-liquid interface at the contact line are independent of wettability. We use these findings to evaluate existing theories and to compare splashing with forced wetting.

  8. Substrate constraint modifies the Rayleigh spectrum of vibrating sessile drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Ti; Bostwick, Joshua B; Steen, Paul H; Daniel, Susan

    2013-08-01

    In this work, we study the resonance behavior of mechanically oscillated, sessile water drops. By mechanically oscillating sessile drops vertically and within prescribed ranges of frequencies and amplitudes, a rich collection of resonance modes are observed and their dynamics subsequently investigated. We first present our method of identifying each mode uniquely, through association with spherical harmonics and according to their geometric patterns. Next, we compare our measured resonance frequencies of drops to theoretical predictions using both the classical theory of Lord Rayleigh and Lamb for free, oscillating drops, and a prediction by Bostwick and Steen that explicitly considers the effect of the solid substrate on drop dynamics. Finally, we report observations and analysis of drop mode mixing, or the simultaneous coexistence of multiple mode shapes within the resonating sessile drop driven by one sinusoidal signal of a single frequency. The dynamic response of a deformable liquid drop constrained by the substrate it is in contact with is of interest in a number of applications, such as drop atomization and ink jet printing, switchable electronically controlled capillary adhesion, optical microlens devices, as well as digital microfluidic applications where control of droplet motion is induced by means of a harmonically driven substrate.

  9. Substrate constraint modifies the Rayleigh spectrum of vibrating sessile drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Ti; Bostwick, Joshua B.; Steen, Paul H.; Daniel, Susan

    2013-08-01

    In this work, we study the resonance behavior of mechanically oscillated, sessile water drops. By mechanically oscillating sessile drops vertically and within prescribed ranges of frequencies and amplitudes, a rich collection of resonance modes are observed and their dynamics subsequently investigated. We first present our method of identifying each mode uniquely, through association with spherical harmonics and according to their geometric patterns. Next, we compare our measured resonance frequencies of drops to theoretical predictions using both the classical theory of Lord Rayleigh and Lamb for free, oscillating drops, and a prediction by Bostwick and Steen that explicitly considers the effect of the solid substrate on drop dynamics. Finally, we report observations and analysis of drop mode mixing, or the simultaneous coexistence of multiple mode shapes within the resonating sessile drop driven by one sinusoidal signal of a single frequency. The dynamic response of a deformable liquid drop constrained by the substrate it is in contact with is of interest in a number of applications, such as drop atomization and ink jet printing, switchable electronically controlled capillary adhesion, optical microlens devices, as well as digital microfluidic applications where control of droplet motion is induced by means of a harmonically driven substrate.

  10. Sessile drop deformations under an impinging jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, James Q.

    2015-08-01

    The problem of steady axisymmetric deformations of a liquid sessile drop on a flat solid surface under an impinging gas jet is of interest for understanding the fundamental behavior of free surface flows as well as for establishing the theoretical basis in process design for the Aerosol direct-write technology. It is studied here numerically using a Galerkin finite-element method, by computing solutions of Navier-Stokes equations. For effective material deposition in Aerosol printing, the desired value of Reynolds number for the laminar gas jet is found to be greater than ~500. The sessile drop can be severely deformed by an impinging gas jet when the capillary number is approaching a critical value beyond which no steady axisymmetric free surface deformation can exist. Solution branches in a parameter space show turning points at the critical values of capillary number, which typically indicate the onset of free surface shape instability. By tracking solution branches around turning points with an arc-length continuation algorithm, critical values of capillary number can be accurately determined. Near turning points, all the free surface profiles in various parameter settings take a common shape with a dimple at the center and bulge near the contact line. An empirical formula for the critical capillary number for sessile drops with contact angle is derived for typical ranges of jet Reynolds number and relative drop sizes especially pertinent to Aerosol printing.

  11. Drop impact entrapment of bubble rings

    CERN Document Server

    Thoraval, M -J; Etoh, T G; Thoroddsen, S T

    2012-01-01

    We use ultra-high-speed video imaging to look at the initial contact of a drop impacting onto a liquid layer. We observe experimentally the vortex street and the bubble-ring entrapments predicted numerically, for high impact velocities, by Thoraval et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 264506 (2012)]. These dynamics occur mostly within 50 {\\mu}s after the first contact, requiring imaging at 1 million frames/sec. For a water drop impacting onto a thin layer of water, the entrapment of isolated bubbles starts through azimuthal instability, which forms at low impact velocities, in the neck connecting the drop and pool. For Re above about 12 000, up to 10 partial bubble-rings have been observed at the base of the ejecta, starting when the contact is about 20% of the drop size. More regular bubble rings are observed for a pool of ethanol or methanol. The video imaging shows rotation around some of these air cylinders, which can temporarily delay their breakup into microbubbles. The different refractive index in the pool l...

  12. Symmetry-breaking in drop bouncing on curved surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yahua; Li, Jing; Yeomans, Julia M; Wang, Zuankai

    2015-01-01

    The impact of liquid drops on solid surfaces is ubiquitous in nature, and of practical importance in many industrial processes. A drop hitting a flat surface retains a circular symmetry throughout the impact process. Here we show that a drop impinging on Echevaria leaves exhibits asymmetric bouncing dynamics with distinct spreading and retraction along two perpendicular directions. This is a direct consequence of the cylindrical leaves which have a convex/concave architecture of size comparable to the drop. Systematic experimental investigations on mimetic surfaces and lattice Boltzmann simulations reveal that this novel phenomenon results from an asymmetric momentum and mass distribution that allows for preferential fluid pumping around the drop rim. The asymmetry of the bouncing leads to ~40% reduction in contact time.

  13. Drops on soft solids: Free energy and double transition of contact angles

    CERN Document Server

    Lubbers, Luuk A; Botto, Lorenzo; Das, Siddhartha; Andreotti, Bruno; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2013-01-01

    The equilibrium shape of liquid drops on elastic substrates is determined by minimising elastic and capillary free energies. The problem is governed by three length scales: the size of the drop $R$, the molecular size $a$, and the ratio of surface tension to elastic modulus $\\gamma/E$. We show that the contact angles undergo two transitions upon changing the substrates from rigid to soft. The microscopic wetting angles deviate from Young's law when $\\gamma/Ea \\gg 1$, while the apparent macroscopic angle only changes in the very soft limit $\\gamma/ER \\gg 1$. Details of the elastic deformations are worked out in the simplifying case where the surface energy of the solid is assumed independent of the elastic strain. The total free energy is found to be lowest on softer substrates, consistent with recent experiments. Finally, we discuss how the variational framework can be generalized to properly account for surface stress.

  14. Strength of self-pinning in coffee drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latka, Andrzej; Kawczinski, Kimberly; Nagel, Sidney

    The equilibrium contact angle θe of a liquid drop placed on a solid surface is uniquely determined by a balance of surface tension forces according to Young's Equation, yet is rarely observed in real systems. Due to contact angle hysteresis, liquids can make contact with a surface at any angle between the receding and advancing contact angle: θR coffee stain. For coffee θR = 0 , thus as the drop evaporates the contact line remains pinned at its initial location. This results in the majority of the coffee being deposited in a characteristic ring at the drop's original boundary. We investigate how solid particles suspended in a liquid could so strongly influence contact angle hysteresis, by measuring the receding contact angle of a drop at various times during the evaporation process. For low solute concentrations, θR slowly decreases as the drop evaporates, but remains positive. Surprisingly, we find that increasing the solute concentration results in θR = 0 and a fully pinned contact line almost immediately after the drop is deposited.

  15. Correlation for Sessile Drop Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly-Zion, Peter; Pursell, Christopher; Wassom, Gregory; Mandelkorn, Brenton; Nkinthorn, Chris

    2016-11-01

    To better understand how the evaporation of sessile drops and small puddles is controlled by the vapor phase transport mechanisms of mass diffusion and buoyancy-induced convection, the evaporation rates of eight liquids evaporating under a broad range of ambient conditions were correlated with physical and geometrical properties. Examination of the correlation provides valuable insight into how the roles of diffusive and convective transport change with physical and geometrical parameters. The correlation predicts measured evaporation rates to within a root-mean-square error of 7.3%. The correlation is composed of two terms, a term which provides the rate of evaporation under diffusion-only conditions, and a term which provides the influence of convection. This second term suggests the manner in which the processes of diffusion and convection are coupled. Both processes are dependent on the distribution of the vapor, through the molar concentration gradient for diffusion and through the mass density gradient for convection. The term representing the influence of convection is approximately inversely proportional to the square root of diffusivity, indicating the tendency of diffusive transport to reduce convection by making the vapor distribution more uniform. Financial support was provided by the ACS Petroleum Research Fund.

  16. Spreading Behaviour of Silicone Oil and Glycerol Drops on Coated Papers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ilyas KHAN

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of physical properties represented by viscosity and surface tension of liquid spreading on coated papers was investigated. Two substrates of different surface roughness were used to study the spreading behaviour of silicon oil and glycerine/water solutions in terms of contact angle, wetted drop base area and drop height as a function of time. The liquid spreading on coated papers was found to vary depending on the liquid physical properties. Liquids with lower surface tension (silicon oil and viscosity prevailed better wettability and vice versa. High surface roughness reduced the liquid spreading. Despite being traditionally used as a wetting indicator, contact angles were found to be insufficient to evaluate the spreading of liquids on these substrates. Hence, other parameters such as drop base area and drop height should also be considered.

  17. Diffraction and interference of walking drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucci, Giuseppe; Harris, Daniel M.; Bush, John W. M.

    2016-11-01

    A decade ago, Yves Couder and Emmanuel Fort discovered a wave-particle association on the macroscopic scale: a drop can bounce indefinitely on a vibrating bath of the same liquid and can be piloted by the waves that it generates. These walking droplets have been shown to exhibit several quantum-like features, including single-particle diffraction and interference. Recently, the original diffraction and interference experiments of Couder and Fort have been revisited and contested. We have revisited this system using an improved experimental set-up, and observed a strong dependence of the behavior on system parameters, including drop size and vibrational forcing. In both the single- and the double-slit geometries, the diffraction pattern is dominated by the interaction of the walking droplet with a planar boundary. Critically, in the double-slit geometry, the walking droplet is influenced by both slits by virtue of its spatially extended wave field. NSF support via CMMI-1333242.

  18. Efficient simulation of gas-liquid pipe flows using a generalized population balance equation coupled with the algebraic slip model

    KAUST Repository

    Icardi, Matteo

    2014-09-01

    The inhomogeneous generalized population balance equation, which is discretized with the direct quadrature method of moment (DQMOM), is solved to predict the bubble size distribution (BSD) in a vertical pipe flow. The proposed model is compared with a more classical approach where bubbles are characterized with a constant mean size. The turbulent two-phase flow field, which is modeled using a Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equation approach, is assumed to be in local equilibrium, thus the relative gas and liquid (slip) velocities can be calculated with the algebraic slip model, thereby accounting for the drag, lift, and lubrication forces. The complex relationship between the bubble size distribution and the resulting forces is described accurately by the DQMOM. Each quadrature node and weight represents a class of bubbles with characteristic size and number density, which change dynamically in time and space to preserve the first moments of the BSD. The predictions obtained are validated against previously published experimental data, thereby demonstrating the advantages of this approach for large-scale systems as well as suggesting future extensions to long piping systems and more complex geometries. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  19. Is a Knowledge of Surface Topology and Contact Angles Enough to Define the Drop Impact Outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavasi, Ileana; Veronesi, Federico; Caldarelli, Aurora; Zani, Maurizio; Raimondo, Mariarosa; Marengo, Marco

    2016-06-28

    It is well known that a superhydrophobic surface may not be able to repel impacting droplets because of the so-called Cassie-to-Wenzel transition. It has been proven that a critical value of the receding contact angle (θR) exists for the complete rebound of water, recently experimentally measured to be 100° for a large range of impact velocities. On the contrary, in the present work, no rebound was observed when low-surface-tension liquids such as hexadecane (σ = 27.5 mN/m at 25 °C) are concerned, even for very low impact velocities and very high values of θR and low contact angle hysteresis. Therefore, the critical threshold of θR ≈ 100° does not sound acceptable for all liquids and for all hydrophobic surfaces. For the same Weber numbers, a Cassie-to-Wenzel state transition occurs after the impact as a result of the easier penetration of low-surface-tension fluids in the surface structure. Hence, a criterion for the drop rebound of low-surface-tension liquids must consider not only the contact angle values with surfaces but also their surface tension and viscosity. This suggests that, even if it is possible to produce surfaces with enhanced static repellence against oils and organics, generally the realization of synthetic materials with self-cleaning and antisticking abilities in dynamic phenomena, such as spray impact, remains an unsolved task. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the chemistry of the surface, the physicochemical interactions with the liquid drops, and the possible wettability gradient of the surface asperity also play important roles in determining the critical Weber number above which impalement occurs. Therefore, the classical numerical simulations of drop impact on dry surfaces are definitively not able to capture the final outcomes of the impact for all possible fluids if the surface topology and chemistry and/or the wettability gradient in the surface structure are not properly reflected.

  20. Modeling the vertical motion of drops bouncing on a bounded fluid reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchette, François

    2016-03-01

    We present a first-principles model of drops bouncing on a liquid reservoir. We consider a nearly inviscid liquid reservoir and track the waves that develop in a bounded domain. Bouncing drops are modeled as vertical linear springs. We obtain an expression for the contact force between drop and liquid surface and a model where the only adjustable parameter is an effective viscosity used to describe the waves on the reservoir's surface. With no adjustable parameters associated to the drop, we recover experimental bouncing times and restitution coefficients. We use our model to describe the effect of the Bond, Ohnesorge, and Weber numbers on drops bouncing on a stationary reservoir. We also use our model to describe drops bouncing on an oscillated reservoir, describing various bouncing modes and a walking threshold.

  1. Drop Size Dependence of the Contact Angle of Nanodroplets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Hong-Kai; FANG Hai-Ping

    2005-01-01

    @@ The contact angle of nanosized non-polarized argon sessile droplets on a solid substrate is studied by using molecular dynamics simulations.It is found that the drop size dependence of the contact angle is sensitive to the interaction between the liquid molecules and solid molecules.The contact angle decreases with the decreasing drop size for larger interaction between the liquid molecules and the solid substrate, and vice versa.This observation is consistent with most of the previous theoretical and experimental results.

  2. Communications: Wall free capillarity and pendant drop removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Siang-Jie; Chang, Feng-Ming; Chan, Seong Heng; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2010-04-28

    When a sessile drop encounters a pendant drop through a hole, it is generally anticipated that they will coalesce and flow downward due to gravity. However, like "wall-free" capillarity, we show that the pendant drop may be sucked up by a sliding drop instantaneously if the radius of the curvature of the former is smaller than that of the later. This phenomenon can be explained by Laplace-Young equation and convective Ostwald ripening. Our results indicate that superhydrophilic perforated surface can be used as an effective way for the removal of small droplets adhering to the inner walls of microchannel systems.

  3. Determination of trace cadmium by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry%浮动液滴固化分散液相微萃取-火焰原子吸收光谱法测定环境样品中的镉

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦九红; 杨君; 向国强

    2011-01-01

    A new method was established to determine trace cadmium in environmental samples by combining dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The main parameters affecting the performance of DLLME-SFO, such as type and volume of extraction solvent,pH, concentration of chelating agent, extraction temperature and time, were investigated. It was found that, under the optimized experimental conditions, the method had a detection limit (3σ) of 0.14 μg/L, linear range of 2.0-50.0 μg/L, relative standard deviation (RSD) of 2. 5 /% (c = 10.0 μg/L, n = 7), and enrichment factor of 18. The method was successfully applied to determine trace cadmium in the certified reference water sample (GBW(E) 080531) and various to-be-tested water samples. The analytical result for the certified reference water sample was in good agreement with the certified value, and the recoveries for the spiked water samples were in a range of 94 %-103 %.%建立了以十一醇为萃取剂,吡咯烷二硫代甲酸铵(APDC)为螯合剂的浮动液滴固化分散液相微萃取-火焰原子吸收光谱法(DLLME-SFO-FAAS)测定环境样品中痕量镉的分析方法;优化了分散剂、萃取剂的类型和体积,考察了溶液pH值、APDC浓度以及萃取温度和时间对萃取效率的影响.结果表明,该法检出限(3σ)为0.14μg/L,相对标准偏差RSD为2.5%(c=10.0 μg/L,n=7),线性范围为2.0~50.0 μg/L,富集倍数18.将其用于水中镉标准物质(GBW(E)080531)和实际环境水样中痕量镉的测定,测定值与标准值吻合良好,实际样品的加标回收率为94%~103%.

  4. Dynamics and universal scaling law in geometrically-controlled sessile drop evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáenz, P J; Wray, A W; Che, Z; Matar, O K; Valluri, P; Kim, J; Sefiane, K

    2017-03-15

    The evaporation of a liquid drop on a solid substrate is a remarkably common phenomenon. Yet, the complexity of the underlying mechanisms has constrained previous studies to spherically symmetric configurations. Here we investigate well-defined, non-spherical evaporating drops of pure liquids and binary mixtures. We deduce a universal scaling law for the evaporation rate valid for any shape and demonstrate that more curved regions lead to preferential localized depositions in particle-laden drops. Furthermore, geometry induces well-defined flow structures within the drop that change according to the driving mechanism. In the case of binary mixtures, geometry dictates the spatial segregation of the more volatile component as it is depleted. Our results suggest that the drop geometry can be exploited to prescribe the particle deposition and evaporative dynamics of pure drops and the mixing characteristics of multicomponent drops, which may be of interest to a wide range of industrial and scientific applications.

  5. Investigation of drop coalescence via transient shape evolution: A sequential event based approach

    CERN Document Server

    Haldar, Krishnayan; Behera, Manas Ranjan; Chakraborty, Sudipto

    2015-01-01

    While a drop of liquid is placed on another liquid surface, two possible coalescence outcomes are observed. The parent drop bounces several times, floats and then disappears within the liquid pool without producing daughter droplets. This is called complete coalescence. Another outcome is the generation of secondary droplets from the primary drop itself. This is called partial coalescence. Repetitions of such phenomenon as a successive self-similar event is also known as coalescence cascade. In a nutshell, complete coalescence is governed strongly by swallowing mechanism whereas partial coalescence is attributed to slippage mechanism and solutal Marangoni flow. Here we use high speed camera and witness that water drop coalesces completely after impacting on pool of liquid whereas drop of non-ionic surfactant (TWEEN 20) coalesces partially. We also observe that number of daughter droplet generation is a strong function of surfactant concentration. Here we utilise the images to elaborately explain both the phen...

  6. Transition from Cassie to impaled state during drop impact on groove-textured solid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaikuntanathan, V; Sivakumar, D

    2014-05-07

    Liquid drops impacted on textured surfaces undergo a transition from the Cassie state characterized by the presence of air pockets inside the roughness valleys below the drop to an impaled state with at least one of the roughness valleys filled with drop liquid. This occurs when the drop impact velocity exceeds a particular value referred to as the critical impact velocity. The present study investigates such a transition process during water drop impact on surfaces textured with unidirectional parallel grooves referred to as groove-textured surfaces. The process of liquid impalement into a groove in the vicinity of drop impact through de-pinning of the three-phase contact line (TPCL) beneath the drop as well as the critical impact velocity were identified experimentally from high speed video recordings of water drop impact on six different groove-textured surfaces made from intrinsically hydrophilic (stainless steel) as well as intrinsically hydrophobic (PDMS and rough aluminum) materials. The surface energy of various 2-D configurations of liquid-vapor interface beneath the drop near the drop impact point was theoretically investigated to identify the locally stable configurations and establish a pathway for the liquid impalement process. A force balance analysis performed on the liquid-vapor interface configuration just prior to TPCL de-pinning provided an expression for the critical drop impact velocity, Uo,cr, beyond which the drop state transitions from the Cassie to an impaled state. The theoretical model predicts that Uo,cr increases with the increase in pillar side angle, α, and intrinsic hydrophobicity whereas it decreases with the increase in groove top width, w, of the groove-textured surface. The quantitative predictions of the theoretical model were found to show good agreement with the experimental measurements of Uo,cr plotted against the surface texture geometry factor in our model, {tan(α/2)/w}(0.5).

  7. Delayed frost growth on jumping-drop superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreyko, Jonathan B; Collier, C Patrick

    2013-02-26

    Self-propelled jumping drops are continuously removed from a condensing superhydrophobic surface to enable a micrometric steady-state drop size. Here, we report that subcooled condensate on a chilled superhydrophobic surface are able to repeatedly jump off the surface before heterogeneous ice nucleation occurs. Frost still forms on the superhydrophobic surface due to ice nucleation at neighboring edge defects, which eventually spreads over the entire surface via an interdrop frost wave. The growth of this interdrop frost front is shown to be up to 3 times slower on the superhydrophobic surface compared to a control hydrophobic surface, due to the jumping-drop effect dynamically minimizing the average drop size and surface coverage of the condensate. A simple scaling model is developed to relate the success and speed of interdrop ice bridging to the drop size distribution. While other reports of condensation frosting on superhydrophobic surfaces have focused exclusively on liquid-solid ice nucleation for isolated drops, these findings reveal that the growth of frost is an interdrop phenomenon that is strongly coupled to the wettability and drop size distribution of the surface. A jumping-drop superhydrophobic condenser minimized frost formation relative to a conventional dropwise condenser in two respects: preventing heterogeneous ice nucleation by continuously removing subcooled condensate, and delaying frost growth by limiting the success of interdrop ice bridge formation.

  8. Asymmetric Spreading of a Drop upon Impact onto a Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almohammadi, H; Amirfazli, A

    2017-06-13

    Study of the spreading of an impacting drop onto a surface has gained importance recently due to applications in printing, coating, and icing. Limited studies are conducted to understand asymmetric spreading of a drop seen upon drop impact onto a moving surface; there is no relation to describe such spreading. Here, we experimentally studied the spreading of a drop over a moving surface; such study also provides insights for systems where a drop impacts at an angle relative to a surface, i.e., drop has both normal and tangential velocities relative to the surface. We developed a model that for the first time allows prediction of time evolution for the asymmetric shape of the lamella during spreading. The developed model is demonstrated to be valid for a range of liquids and surface wettabilities as well as drop and surface velocities, making this study a comprehensive examination of the topic. We also found out how surface wettability can affect the recoil of the drop after spreading and explained the role of contact angle hysteresis and receding contact angle in delaying the recoil process.

  9. Exploding Water Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Water has the unusual property that it expands on freezing, so that ice has a specific gravity of 0.92 compared to 1.0 for liquid water. The most familiar demonstration of this property is ice cubes floating in a glass of water. A more dramatic demonstration is the ice bomb shown in Fig. 1. Here a cast iron flask is filled with water and tightly…

  10. Small-Scale Variability of Large Cloud Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshak, Alexander; Knyazikhin, Y.; Wiscombe, Warren

    2004-01-01

    Cloud droplet size distribution is one of the most fundamental subjects in cloud physics. Understanding of spatial distribution and small-scale fluctuations of cloud droplets is essential for both cloud physics and atmospheric radiation. For cloud physics, it relates to the coalescence growth of raindrops while for radiation, it has a strong impact on a cloud's radiative properties. Most of the existing cloud radiation and precipitation formation models assume that the mean number of drops with a given radius varies proportionally to volume. The analysis of microphysical data on liquid water drop sizes shows that, for sufficiently small volumes, the number is proportional to the drop size dependent power of the volume. For abundant small drops present, the exponent is 1 as assumed in the conventional approach. However, for rarer large drops, the exponents fall below unity. At small scales, therefore, the mean number of large drops decreases with volume at a slower rate than the conventional approach assumes, suggesting more large drops at these scales than conventional models account for; their impact is consequently underestimated. Size dependent models of spatial distribution of cloud drops that simulate the observed power laws show strong drop clustering, the more so the larger the drops. The degree of clustering is determined by the observed exponents. The strong clustering of large drops arises naturally from the observed power-law statistics. Current theories of photon-cloud interaction and warm rain formation will need radical revision in order to produce these statistics; their underlying equations are unable to yield the observed power law.

  11. Numerical simulation of drop impact on a thin film: the origin of the droplets in the splashing regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhihua; Che, Zhizhao; Ismail, Renad; Pain, Chris; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    Drop impact on a liquid layer is a feature of numerous multiphase flow problems, and has been the subject of numerous theoretical, experimental and numerical investigations. In the splashing regime, however, little attention has been focused on the origin of the droplets that are formed during the splashing process. The objective of this study is to investigate this issue numerically in order to improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying splashing as a function of the relevant system parameters. In contrast to the conventional two-phase flow approach, commonly used to simulate splashing, here, a three-dimensional, three-phase flow model, with adaptive, unstructured meshing, is employed to study the liquid (droplet) - gas (surrounding air) - liquid (thin film) system. In the cases to be presented, both liquid phases have the same fluid property, although, clearly, our method can be used in the more general case of two different liquids. Numerical results of droplet impact on a thin film are analysed to determine whether the origin of the droplets following impact corresponds to the mother drop, or the thin film, or both. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  12. Apparent contact angle of an evaporating drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, S. J. S.

    2012-11-01

    In experiments by Poulard et al. (2005), a sessile drop of perfectly wetting liquid evaporates from a non-heated substrate into an under-saturated mixture of vapour with an inert gas; evaporation is limited by vapour diffusion. The system exhibits an apparent contact angle θ that is a flow property. Under certain conditions, the apparent contact line was stationary relative to the substrate; we predict θ for this case. Observed values of θ are small, allowing lubrication analysis of the liquid film. The liquid and vapour flows are coupled through conditions holding at the phase interface; in particular, vapour partial pressure there is related to the local value of liquid pressure through the Kelvin condition. Because the droplet is shallow, the interfacial conditions can be transferred to the solid-liquid interface at y = 0 . We show that the dimensionless partial pressure p (x , y) and the film thickness h (x) are determined by solving ∇2 p = 0 for y > 0 subject to a matching condition at infinity, and the conditions - p = L hxx +h-3 and (h3px) x + 3py = 0 at y = 0 . The parameter L controls the ratio of Laplace to disjoining pressure. We analyse this b.v.p. for the experimentally-relevant case L --> 0 .

  13. Dynamics of a drop trapped inside a horizontal circular hydraulic jump

    CERN Document Server

    Duchesne, Alexis; Lebon, Luc; Pirat, Christophe; Limat, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    A drop of moderate size deposited inside a horizontal circular hydraulic jump of the same liquid remains trapped at the shock front and does not coalesce. In this situation the drop is moving along the jump and one observes two different motions: a periodic one (it orbitates at constant speed) and an irregular one involving reversals of the orbital motion. Modeling the drop as a rigid sphere exchanging friction with liquid across a thin film of air, we recover the orbital motion and the internal rotation of the drop. This internal rotation is experimentally observed.

  14. Drop Impact on a Solid Surface

    KAUST Repository

    Josserand, C.

    2015-09-22

    © Copyright 2016 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved. A drop hitting a solid surface can deposit, bounce, or splash. Splashing arises from the breakup of a fine liquid sheet that is ejected radially along the substrate. Bouncing and deposition depend crucially on the wetting properties of the substrate. In this review, we focus on recent experimental and theoretical studies, which aim at unraveling the underlying physics, characterized by the delicate interplay of not only liquid inertia, viscosity, and surface tension, but also the surrounding gas. The gas cushions the initial contact; it is entrapped in a central microbubble on the substrate; and it promotes the so-called corona splash, by lifting the lamella away from the solid. Particular attention is paid to the influence of surface roughness, natural or engineered to enhance repellency, relevant in many applications.

  15. Drop detachment and motion on fuel cell electrode materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Eric; Hellstern, Thomas; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G; Benziger, Jay

    2012-02-01

    Liquid water is pushed through flow channels of fuel cells, where one surface is a porous carbon electrode made up of carbon fibers. Water drops grow on the fibrous carbon surface in the gas flow channel. The drops adhere to the superficial fiber surfaces but exhibit little penetration into the voids between the fibers. The fibrous surfaces are hydrophobic, but there is a substantial threshold force necessary to initiate water drop motion. Once the water drops begin to move, however, the adhesive force decreases and drops move with minimal friction, similar to motion on superhydrophobic materials. We report here studies of water wetting and water drop motion on typical porous carbon materials (carbon paper and carbon cloth) employed in fuel cells. The static coefficient of friction on these textured surfaces is comparable to that for smooth Teflon. But the dynamic coefficient of friction is several orders of magnitude smaller on the textured surfaces than on smooth Teflon. Carbon cloth displays a much smaller static contact angle hysteresis than carbon paper due to its two-scale roughness. The dynamic contact angle hysteresis for carbon paper is greatly reduced compared to the static contact angle hysteresis. Enhanced dynamic hydrophobicity is suggested to result from the extent to which a dynamic contact line can track topological heterogeneities of the liquid/solid interface.

  16. Sessile Drop Evaporation and Leidenfrost Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Mozumder

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Quenching and cooling are important process in manufacturing industry for controlling the mechanical properties of materials, where evaporation is a vital mode of heat transfer. Approach: This study experimentally investigated the evaporation of sessile drop for four different heated surfaces of Aluminum, Brass, Copper and Mild steel with a combination of four different liquids as Methanol, Ethanol, Water and NaCl solution. The time of evaporation for the droplet on the hot metallic surface was measured and compared with a proposed correlation as well. With the time temperature plot of these experimental data, the Leidenfrost phenomena had been elucidated. In the pool boiling curve for liquid, just after the transition boiling region and before the film boiling region, the heat transfer approaches its minimum value. The corresponding temperature of this minimum value was termed as the Leidenfrost temperature and the phenomenon is known as Leidenfrost phenomena. According to the experimental data, the Leidenfrost temperature was within a range of 150-200°C for all the experimental conditions. Results: This revealed that Leidenfrost temperature was independent of thermo-physical properties of solid and liquid. Sessile drop evaporation time was the maximum for water, then decreases gradually for Nacl solution, methanol and was the minimum for ethanol for a particular solid material. On the other hand, this time was the highest for copper and the lowest for mild steel for a specific liquid. Conclusion: The experimental data for the evaporation time fairly agree with the proposed correlation within a certain range. The collected time and temperature data may be used as a good data bank for the researchers.

  17. Drop floating on a granular raft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambon-Puillet, Etienne; Josserand, Christophe; Protiere, Suzie

    2015-11-01

    When a droplet comes in contact with a bath of the same liquid, it coalesces to minimize the surface energy. This phenomenon reduces emulsion stability and is usually fought with surfactant molecules. Another way to slow down coalescence is to use colloidal solid particles. In this case the particles spontaneously migrate to the interface to form ``Pickering'' emulsions and act as a barrier between droplets. Here we use dense, large particles (~ 500 μm) which form a monolayer at an oil/water interface that we call a granular raft. When a droplet is placed on top of such a raft, for a given set of particle properties (contact angle/size), the raft prevents coalescence indefinitely. However, in contrast to what happens when a droplet is placed on a hydrophobic surface and never wets the surface, here the droplet is strongly anchored to the raft and deforms it. We will use this specific configuration to probe the mechanical response of the granular raft: by controlling the droplet volume we can impose tensile or compressive stresses. Finally we will show that the drop, spherical at first, slowly takes a more complex shape as it's volume increases. This shape is not reversible as the drop volume is decreased. The drop can become oblate or prolate with wrinkling of the raft.

  18. Ultrafast Drop Movements Arising from Curvature Gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Lv, Cunjing; Chuang, Yin-Chuan; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Yin, Yajun; Zheng, Quanshui

    2011-01-01

    We report experimental observation of a kind of fast spontaneous movements of water drops on surfaces of cones with diameters from 0.1 to 1.5 mm. The observed maximum speed (0.22 m/s) under ambient conditions were at least two orders of magnitude higher than that resulting from any known single spontaneous movement mechanism, for example, Marangoni effect due to gradient of surface tension. We trapped even higher spontaneous movement speeds (up to 125 m/s) in virtual experiments for drops on nanoscale cones by using molecular dynamics simulations. The underlying mechanism is found to be universally effective - drops on any surface either hydrophilic or hydrophobic with varying mean curvature are subject to driving forces toward the gradient direction of the mean curvature. The larger the mean curvature of the surface and the lower the contact angle of the liquid are, the stronger the driving force will be. This discovery can lead to more effective techniques for transporting droplets.

  19. Empirical Correlations and CFD Simulations of Vertical Two-Phase Gas-Liquid (Newtonian and Non-Newtonian) Flow Compared Against Experimental Data of Void Fraction and Pressure Drop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratkovich, Nicolas Rios; Bentzen, Thomas Ruby; Majumder, S.K.

    2012-01-01

    Gas-Newtonian liquid two-phase flows (TPFs) are presented in several industrial processes (i.e. oil-gas industry). In spite of the common occurrence of these TPFs, their understanding is limited compared to single-phase flows. Different studies on TPF have focus on developing empirical correlatio...

  20. Impact of ultra-viscous drops: air-film gliding and extreme wetting

    KAUST Repository

    Langley, K.

    2017-01-23

    A drop impacting on a solid surface must push away the intervening gas layer before making contact. This entails a large lubricating air pressure which can deform the bottom of the drop, thus entrapping a bubble under its centre. For a millimetric water drop, the viscous-dominated flow in the thin air layer counteracts the inertia of the drop liquid. For highly viscous drops the viscous stresses within the liquid also affect the interplay between the drop and the gas. Here the drop also forms a central dimple, but its outer edge is surrounded by an extended thin air film, without contacting the solid. This is in sharp contrast with impacts of lower-viscosity drops where a kink in the drop surface forms at the edge of the central disc and makes a circular contact with the solid. Larger drop viscosities make the central air dimple thinner. The thin outer air film subsequently ruptures at numerous random locations around the periphery, when it reaches below 150 nm thickness. This thickness we measure using high-speed two-colour interferometry. The wetted circular contacts expand rapidly, at orders of magnitude larger velocities than would be predicted by a capillary-viscous balance. The spreading velocity of the wetting spots is independent of the liquid viscosity. This may suggest enhanced slip of the contact line, assisted by rarefied-gas effects, or van der Waals forces in what we call extreme wetting. Myriads of micro-bubbles are captured between the local wetting spots.

  1. Spray characterization during vibration-induced drop atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukasinovic, Bojan; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    2004-02-01

    Vibration-induced drop atomization is a process of rapid droplet ejection from a larger liquid drop. This occurs when a liquid drop resting on a thin diaphragm is vibrated under the appropriate forcing conditions using an attached piezoelectric actuator. The resulting spray of small droplets is characterized in this work using high-speed imaging and particle-tracking techniques. The results show that the average spatial and velocity distributions of the spray droplets are fairly axisymmetric during all stages of the atomization. The mean diameter of the droplets depends on the forcing frequency to the -2/3 power. The ejection velocity of the spray droplets depends on both the magnitude and the rate of change of the forcing amplitude. Thus, controlling the characteristics of the forcing signal may lead to strategies for controlling the spray process in specific applications.

  2. Drop by drop backscattered signal of a 50 × 50 × 50 m3 volume: A numerical experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gires, A.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.; Schertzer, D.

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this paper is to analyse the influence of individual drop positions on a backscattered radar signal. This is achieved through a numerical experiment: a 3D rain drop field generator is developed and implemented over a volume of 50 × 50 × 50 m3, and then the sum of the electromagnetic waves backscattered by its hydrometeors is computed. Finally the temporal evolution over 1 s is modelled with simplistic assumptions. For the rainfall generator, the liquid water content (LWC) distribution is represented with the help of a multiplicative cascade down to 0.5 m, below which it is considered as homogeneous. Within each 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 m3 patch, liquid water is distributed into drops, located randomly uniformly according to a pre-defined drop size distribution (DSD). Such configuration is compared with the one consisting of the same drops being uniformly distributed over the entire 50 × 50 × 50 m3 volume. Due to the fact that the radar wave length is much smaller than the size of a rainfall "patch", it appears that, in agreement with the theory, we retrieve an exponential distribution for potential measures on horizontal reflectivity. Much thinner dispersion is noticed for differential reflectivity. We show that a simple ballistic assumption for drop velocities does not enable the reproduction of radar observations, and turbulence should be taken into account. Finally the sensitivity of these outputs to the various model parameters is quantified.

  3. Satellite Formation during Coalescence of Unequal Size Drops

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, F. H.

    2009-03-12

    The coalescence of a drop with a flat liquid surface pinches off a satellite from its top, in the well-known coalescence cascade, whereas the coalescence of two equally sized drops does not appear to leave such a satellite. Herein we perform experiments to identify the critical diameter ratio of two drops, above which a satellite is produced during their coalescence. We find that the critical parent ratio is as small as 1.55, but grows monotonically with the Ohnesorge number. The daughter size is typically about 50% of the mother drop. However, we have identified novel pinch-off dynamics close to the critical size ratio, where the satellite does not fully separate, but rather goes directly into a second stage of the coalescence cascade, thus generating a much smaller satellite droplet.

  4. Assessment of the relative error in the automation task by sessile drop method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. О. Levitskaya

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of the relative error in the sessile drop method automation. Further development of the sessile drop method is directly related to the development of new techniques and specially developed algorithms enabling automatic computer calculation of surface properties. The sessile drop method mathematical apparatus improvement, drop circuit equation transformation to a form suitable for working, the drop surface calculation method automation, analysis of relative errors in the calculation of surface tension are relevant and are important in experimental determinations. The surface tension measurement relative error, as well as the error caused by the drop ellipsoidness in the plan were determined in the task of the sessile drop automation. It should be noted that if the drop maximum diameter (l is big or if the ratio of l to the drop height above the equatorial diameter(h is big, the relative error in the measurement of surface tension by sessile drop method does not depend much on the equatorial diameter of the drop and ellipsoidness of the drop. In this case, the accuracy of determination of the surface tension varies from 1,0 to 0,5%. At lower values the drop ellipsoidness begins to affect the relative error of surface tension (from 1,2 to 0,8%, but in this case the drop ellipsoidness is less. Therefore, in subsequent experiments, we used larger drops. On the basis of the assessment of the relative error in determining the liquid surface tension by sessile drop method caused by drop ellipsoidness in the plan, the tables showing the limits of the drop parameters (h and l measurement necessary accuracy to get the overall relative error have been made up. Previously, the surface tension used to be calculated with the relative error in the range of 2-3%

  5. 局部凸空间中的Drop定理,Phelps引理和Ekeland变分原理的推广%Generalizations of Drop Theorem, Phelps' Lemma and Ekeland's Principle in Locally Convex Spaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺飞; 刘德; 罗成

    2007-01-01

    在局部凸空间框架下,我们利用Drop定理,Phelps引理和Ekeland交分原理的赋范线性空间的形式对其分别进行了推广.并且阐述了这些定理之间以及和它们赋范线性空间的形式之间是等价的.%In locally convex spaces, we extend drop theorem, Phelps' lemma and Ekeland's principle by using their own normed linear spaces versions. Moreover we show that these theorems are equivalent to each other and to their normed linear spaces counterparts.

  6. Solid surface wetting and the deployment of drops in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, E. H.; Depew, J.

    1994-02-01

    The complete or partial deployment of liquid samples in low gravity is primarily influenced by the interfacial properties of the specific liquid and solid materials used because the overwhelming bias of the Earth gravitational acceleration is removed. This study addresses the engineering aspects of injecting and deploying drops of prescribed volume into an acoustic positioning chamber in microgravity. The specific problems of interest are the design, testing, and implementation of injector tips to be used in a simultaneously retracting dual-injector system in the Drop Physics Module microgravity experiment facility. Prior to release, the liquid to be deployed must be retained within a restricted area at the very end of the injectors under dynamic stimuli from the continuous injection flow as well as from the stepped motion of the injectors. The final released drop must have a well determined volume and negligible residual linear or angular momentum. The outcome of Earth-based short-duration low gravity experiments had been the selection of two types of injector tips which were flown as back-up parts. They were successfully utilized during the USML-1 Spacelab mission as the primary tips. The combination of a larger contact surface, liquid pinning with a sharp edge, and selective coating of strategic tip surfaces with a non-wetting compound has allowed a significant increase in the success rate of deployment of simple and compound drops of aqueous solutions of glycerol and silicone oil. The diameter of the samples studied in the Drop Physics Module range between 0.3 and 2.7 cm. The tests conducted on-orbit with a manually operated small device have allowed the calibration of the volume deployed for a few drop sizes. The design for improved tips to be used during the next USML flight is based on these results.

  7. Internal flow measurements of drop impacting a solid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S. Santosh; Karn, Ashish; Arndt, Roger E. A.; Hong, Jiarong

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the fundamental physical process involved in drop impacts is important for a variety of engineering and scientific applications. Despite exhaustive research efforts on the dynamics of drop morphology upon impact, very few studies investigate the fluid dynamics induced within a drop upon impact. This study employs planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) with fluorescent particles to quantify the internal flow field of a drop impact on a solid surface. The image distortion caused by the curved liquid-air interface at the drop boundary is corrected using a ray-tracing algorithm. PIV analysis using the corrected images has yielded interesting insights into the flow initiated within a drop upon impact. Depending on the pre-impact conditions, characterized by impact number, different vortex modes are observed in the recoil phase of the drop impact. Further, the strength of these vortices and the kinetic energy of the internal flow field have been quantified. Our studies show a consistent negative power law correlation between vortex strength, internal kinetic energy and the impact number.

  8. Modeling drop impacts on inclined flowing soap films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Saikat; Yawar, Ali; Concha, Andres; Bandi, Mahesh

    2015-11-01

    Small drops impinging on soap films flowing at an angle primarily exhibit three fundamental regimes of post-impact dynamics: (a) the drop bounces off the film surface, (b) it coalesces with the downstream flow, and (c) it pierces through the film. During impact, the drop deforms along with a simultaneous, almost elastic deformation of the film transverse to the stream direction. Hence, the governing dynamics for this interaction present the rare opportunity to explore the in-tandem effects of elasticity and hydrodynamics alike. In this talk, we outline the analytical framework to study the drop impact dynamics. The model assumes a deformable drop and a deformable three-dimensional soap film and invokes a parametric study to qualify the three mentioned impact types. The physical parameters include the impact angle, drop impact speed, and the diameters of the drop prior to and during impact when it deforms and spreads out. Our model system offers a path towards optimization of interactions between a spray and a flowing liquid.

  9. Many Drops Interactions II: Simulation of Coalescence, Flocculation and Fragmentation of Multiple Colliding Drops with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Acevedo-Malavé

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the SPH method is applied to simulate for the first time the multiple hydrodynamics collisions and the formation of clusters of equally sized liquid drops in three-dimensional space. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics is a Lagrangian mesh-free formalism and has been useful to model continuous fluid. This formalism is employed to solve the Navier-Stokes equations by replacing the fluid with a set of particles. These particles are interpolation points from which properties of the fluid can be determined. We observe that when the velocity of collision varies between 0.2 mm/ms and 30.0 mm/ms different results may arise, such as: coalescence, fragmentation and formation of clusters of liquid drops. The velocity vector fields formed inside the drops during the collision process are shown.

  10. Many Drops Interactions I: Simulation of Coalescence, Flocculation and Fragmentation of Multiple Colliding Drops with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Acevedo-Malavé

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH is a Lagrangian mesh-free formalism and has been useful to model continuous fluid. This formalism is employed to solve the Navier-Stokes equations by replacing the fluid with a set of particles. These particles are interpolation points from which properties of the fluid can be determined. In this study, the SPH method is applied to simulate the hydrodynamics interaction of many drops, showing some settings for the coalescence, fragmentation and flocculation problem of equally sized liquid drops in three-dimensional spaces. For small velocities the drops interact only through their deformed surfaces and the flocculation of the droplets arises. This result is very different if the collision velocity is large enough for the fragmentation of droplets takes place. We observe that for velocities around 15 mm/ms the coalescence of droplets occurs. The velocity vector fields formed inside the drops during the collision process are shown.

  11. Dynamics of a disturbed sessile drop measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuiggan, Patricia M; Grave, Daniel A; Wallace, Jay S; Cheng, Shengfeng; Prosperetti, Andrea; Robbins, Mark O

    2011-10-04

    A new method for studying the dynamics of a sessile drop by atomic force microscopy (AFM) is demonstrated. A hydrophobic microsphere (radius, r ∼ 20-30 μm) is brought into contact with a small sessile water drop resting on a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface. When the microsphere touches the liquid surface, the meniscus rises onto it because of capillary forces. Although the microsphere volume is 6 orders of magnitude smaller than the drop, it excites the normal resonance modes of the liquid interface. The sphere is pinned at the interface, whose small (drop volumes between 5 and 200 μL. The results for the two lowest normal modes are quantitatively consistent with continuum calculations for the natural frequency of hemispherical drops with no adjustable parameters. The method may enable sensitive measurements of volume, surface tension, and viscosity of small drops.

  12. The migration of a compound drop due to thermocapillarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, David S.; Subramanian, R. Shankar; Balasubramaniam, R.

    1990-01-01

    The quasistatic thermocapillary motion of a compound drop in an unbounded fluid possessing a uniform temperature gradient is analyzed. For completeness, gravitational effects are included in the treatment. The general model is formulated, and the equations for the concentric case are solved using spherical polar coordinates, while the eccentric case is handled using bispherical coordinates. Results are given for the velocity of the drop as well as that of the droplet with respect to the drop, along with useful approximations. Illustrative results are presented graphically for the thermocapillary migration of a compound drop in the special case when the droplet is a gas bubble. In addition to the velocities of the drop and the bubble, representative isotherms and streamlines also are presented which display interesting qualitative features.

  13. Numerical study on drop formation through a micro nozzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Il; Son, Gi Hun [Sogang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-02-01

    The drop ejection process from a micro nozzle is investigated by numerically solving the conservation equations for mass and momentum. The liquid-gas interface is tracked by a level set method which is extended for two-fluid flows with irregular solid boundaries. Based on the numerical results, the liquid jet breaking and droplet formation behavior is found to depend strongly on the pulse type of forcing pressure and the contact angle at the gas-liquid-solid interline. The negative pressure forcing can be used to control the formation of satelite droplets. Also, various nozzle shapes are tested to investigate their effect on droplet formation.

  14. Building designed granular towers one drop at a time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopin, Julien; Kudrolli, Arshad

    2011-11-11

    A dense granular suspension dripping on an imbibing surface is observed to give rise to slender mechanically stable structures that we call granular towers. Successive drops of grain-liquid mixtures are shown to solidify rapidly upon contact with a liquid absorbing substrate. A balance of excess liquid flux and drainage rate is found to capture the typical growth and height of the towers. The tower width is captured by the Weber number, which gives the relative importance of inertia and capillary forces. Various symmetric, smooth, corrugated, zigzag, and chiral structures are observed by varying the impact velocity and the flux rate from droplet to jetting regime.

  15. Excited Sessile Drops Perform Harmonically

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Chun-Ti; Steen, Paul H

    2013-01-01

    In our fluid dynamics video, we demonstrate our method of visualizing and identifying various mode shapes of mechanically oscillated sessile drops. By placing metal mesh under an oscillating drop and projecting light from below, the drop's shape is visualized by the visually deformed mesh pattern seen in the top view. The observed modes are subsequently identified by their number of layers and sectors. An alternative identification associates them with spherical harmonics, as demonstrated in the tutorial. Clips of various observed modes are presented, followed by a 10-second quiz of mode identification.

  16. Universal mechanism for air entrainment during liquid impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrix, Maurice H.W.; Bouwhuis, Wilco; Meer, van der Devaraj; Lohse, Detlef; Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2016-01-01

    When a millimetre-sized liquid drop approaches a deep liquid pool, both the interface of the drop and the pool deform before the drop touches the pool. The build-up of air pressure prior to coalescence is responsible for this deformation. Due to this deformation, air can be entrained at the bottom o

  17. Understanding the drop impact on moving hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almohammadi, H; Amirfazli, A

    2017-03-08

    In this paper, a systematic study was performed to understand the drop impact on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces that were moving in the horizontal direction. Drops (D0 = 2.5 mm) of liquids with three different viscosities were used. Wide ranges of drop normal velocity (0.5 to 3.4 m s(-1)) and surface velocity (0 to 17 m s(-1)) were studied. High speed imaging from the top and side was used to capture the impact phenomena. It was found that drop impact behavior on a moving surface significantly differs from that on a stationary surface at both the lamella extension stage (i.e. t ≤ tmax) and the retraction stage (t > tmax). Starting with the lamella extension stage, it was observed that the drop spreads asymmetrically over a moving surface. It was also found that the splashing behavior of the drop upon impact on a moving surface, unlike the understanding in the literature, is azimuthally different along the lamella contact line. In the case of the drop spreading over a moving surface, the surface movement stretches the expanded lamella in the direction of the surface motion. For hydrophilic surfaces, the stretched lamella pins to the surface and moves with the surface velocity; however, for hydrophobic surfaces, the lamella recoils during such stretching. A new model was developed to determine the splashing threshold of the drop impact on a moving surface. The model is capable of describing the azimuthally different behavior of the splashing which is a function of normal capillary and Weber numbers, surface velocity, and surface wettability. It was also found that the increase of the viscosity decreases the splashing threshold. Finally, comprehensive regime maps of the drop impact outcome on a moving surface were provided for both t ≤ tmax and t > tmax stages.

  18. Drops on soft solids: free energy and double transition of contact angles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbers, L.A.; Weijs, J.H.; Botto, L.; Das, S.; Andreotti, B.; Snoeijer, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    The equilibrium shape of liquid drops on elastic substrates is determined by minimizing elastic and capillary free energies, focusing on thick incompressible substrates. The problem is governed by three length scales: the size of the drop R, the molecular size a and the ratio of surface tension to e

  19. Neutron-gamma discrimination by pulse analysis with superheated drop detector

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Mala; Saha, S; Bhattacharya, S; Bhattacharjee, P

    2010-01-01

    Superheated drop detector (SDD) consisting of drops of superheated liquid of halocarbon is irradiated to neutrons and gamma-rays from 252Cf fission neutron source and 137Cs gamma source separately. The analysis of pulse height of the signals in the neutron and gamma-ray sensitive temperature provides strong information on the identification of neutron and gamma-ray induced events.

  20. A pressure drop model for PWR grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dong Seok; In, Wang Ki; Bang, Je Geon; Jung, Youn Ho; Chun, Tae Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    A pressure drop model for the PWR grids with and without mixing device is proposed at single phase based on the fluid mechanistic approach. Total pressure loss is expressed in additive way for form and frictional losses. The general friction factor correlations and form drag coefficients available in the open literatures are used to the model. As the results, the model shows better predictions than the existing ones for the non-mixing grids, and reasonable agreements with the available experimental data for mixing grids. Therefore it is concluded that the proposed model for pressure drop can provide sufficiently good approximation for grid optimization and design calculation in advanced grid development. 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  1. The general phase behavior of mixtures of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]amide ionic liquids with n-alkyl alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Vlad R; Will, Stefan; Schröer, Wolffram; Rathke, Bernd

    2012-05-14

    The liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) phase behavior of mixtures of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]amide (C(2)mimNTf(2)) with the n-alkyl alcohols (C(n)OH; 3≤n≤8) is described. By applying the cloud-point method, the LLEs were determined over a temperature range of 275-423 K at ambient pressure. Partial miscibility with upper critical solution temperatures (UCST) was observed. The UCST increase with increasing chain length of the alcohols. The phase diagrams were analyzed numerically by presuming Ising criticality. Concepts for the description of the asymmetry of the phase diagram by presuming the validity of the rectilinear diameter rule or a nonlinear diameter requested by the theory of complete scaling were applied. The results (UCST, critical composition, width and diameter of the phase diagrams) are compared with similar systems and discussed in terms of the corresponding state behavior; they map on a single curve. From at least 45 individual phase diagrams, general aspects of the behavior of this ionic liquid-alcohol mixture type were extracted. A simple empirical relationship was formulated to allow the description of the UCST with an accuracy of about 10 K when taking the ratio of the molar volumes of the alcohol and the 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cation of the ionic liquid into account. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Work of Adhesion of a Sessile Drop to a Clean Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroder

    1999-05-15

    According to the Young-Dupré equation, as interpreted by Bangham and Razouk, the work of adhesion of a sessile drop to a smooth solid surface is given by WS(V)L = gammaL (1 + cos θ), where θ is the equilibrium contact angle measured at equilibrium of the system with the saturated vapor of the liquid, and WS(V)L is the work of adhesion of that drop to the solid surface which is in equilibrium with that vapor and may contain an adlayer of the vapor. For calculation of WSL, the work of adhesion of a sessile drop to a clean solid surface, the equation WSL = gammaL (1 + cos θ) + Pie is generally used (although Bangham and Razouk never proposed it). Pie is the negative of the free energy of formation of the adlayer, sometimes called the spreading pressure. In the present work it is shown that the latter equation cannot be accurate. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  3. 45-FOOT HIGH DROP TOWER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Drop Tower is used to simulate and measure the impact shocks that are exerted on parachute loads when they hit the ground. It is also used for HSL static lift to...

  4. Anomalous water drop bouncing on a nanotextured surface by the Leidenfrost levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Doo Jin; Song, Young Seok

    2016-05-01

    We report an anomalous liquid drop bouncing phenomenon that is generated by the Leidenfrost levitation due to a vapor layer reducing energy dissipation during the collision. The Leidenfrost levitation of water drops on both a hydrophobic surface and nanotextured Cassie surface is investigated. When the water drop is positioned onto the hydrophobic surface, a superhydrophobic feature is observed by the levitation effect due to the vapor film, which results in a slow evaporation of the drop due to the low thermal conductivity of the vapor layer that inhibits heat transfer between the heated surface and the water drop. In contrast, for the nanotextured surface, the water drop can bounce off after impact on the surface when it overcomes gravitational and adhesion forces. The spontaneous water drop bouncing on the nanotextured surface is powered by the combination effect of the Leidenfrost levitation and the non-wetting Cassie state.

  5. Local analysis of the contact region of an evaporating sessile drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, S. J. S.

    2014-11-01

    In experiments by Guéna et al. (2007), a drop of perfectly wetting pure liquid evaporates from a non-heated substrate at a rate controlled by vapour diffusion. The drop spreads until reaching a radius a determined by initial drop volume; the apparent contact line then reverses direction. The apparent contact angle measured at reversal was found experimentally to vary as a - 1 / 6 for a drops θ decreases more strongly. Local analysis (Morris, J. Fluid Mech. 739, 308 (2014)) predicts that θ ~a - 1 / 6 ; for the smaller drops obeying the 1/6th rule, predicted values agree with experiment to within 10-30%. Though the behaviour of drops smaller than the capillary length thus appears to be understood, that of larger drops is not.

  6. Mass-spring model of a self-pulsating drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, Charles; Pimienta, Véronique

    2013-12-03

    Self-pulsating sessile drops are a striking example of the richness of far-from-equilibrium liquid/liquid systems. The complex dynamics of such systems is still not fully understood, and simple models are required to grasp the mechanisms at stake. In this article, we present a simple mass-spring mechanical model of the highly regular drop pulsations observed in Pimienta, V.; Brost, M.; Kovalchuk, N.; Bresch, S.; Steinbock, O. Complex shapes and dynamics of dissolving drops of dichloromethane. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2011, 50, 10728-10731. We introduce an effective time-dependent spreading coefficient that sums up all of the forces (due to evaporation, solubilization, surfactant transfer, coffee ring effect, solutal and thermal Marangoni flows, drop elasticity, etc.) that pull or push the edge of a dichloromethane liquid lens, and we show how to account for the periodic rim breakup. The model is examined and compared against experimental observations. The spreading parts of the pulsations are very rapid and cannot be explained by a constant positive spreading coefficient or superspreading.

  7. Frozen impacted drop: From fragmentation to hierarchical crack patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Séon, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We investigate experimentally the quenching of a liquid pancake, obtained through the impact of a water drop on a cold solid substrate ($0$ to $-60^\\circ$C). We show that, below a certain substrate temperature, fractures appear on the frozen pancake and the crack patterns change from a 2D fragmentation regime to a hierarchical fracture regime as the thermal shock is stronger. The different regimes are discussed and the transition temperatures are estimated through classical fracture scaling arguments. Finally, a phase diagram presents how these regimes can be controlled by the drop impact parameters.

  8. Drops and bubbles in contact with solid surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrari, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The third volume in a series dedicated to colloids and interfaces, Drops and Bubbles in Contact with Solid Surfaces presents an up-to-date overview of the fundamentals and applications of drops and bubbles and their interaction with solid surfaces. The chapters cover the theoretical and experimental aspects of wetting and wettability, liquid-solid interfacial properties, and spreading dynamics on different surfaces, including a special section on polymers. The book examines issues related to interpretation of contact angle from nano to macro systems. Expert contributors discuss interesting pec

  9. The motion of bubbles inside drops in containerless processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, N.; Annamalai, P.; Cole, R.; Subramanian, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical model of thermocapillary bubble motion inside a drop, located in a space laboratory, due to an arbitrary axisymmetric temperature distribution on the drop surface was constructed. Typical results for the stream function and temperature fields as well as the migration velocity of the bubble were obtained in the quasistatic limit. The motion of bubbles in a rotating body of liquid was studied experimentally, and an approximate theoretical model was developed. Comparison of the experimental observations of the bubble trajectories and centering times with theoretical predictions lends qualified support to the theory.

  10. Morphology of viscoplastic drop impact on viscoplastic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Simeng; Bertola, Volfango

    2017-01-25

    The impact of viscoplastic drops onto viscoplastic substrates characterized by different magnitudes of the yield stress is investigated experimentally. The interaction between viscoplastic drops and surfaces has an important application in additive manufacturing, where a fresh layer of material is deposited on a partially cured or dried layer of the same material. So far, no systematic studies on this subject have been reported in literature. The impact morphology of different drop/substrate combinations, with yield stresses ranging from 1.13 Pa to 11.7 Pa, was studied by high speed imaging for impact Weber numbers between 15 and 85. Experimental data were compared with one of the existing models for Newtonian drop impact onto liquid surfaces. Results show the magnitude of the yield stress of drop/substrate strongly affects the final shape of the impacting drop, permanently deformed at the end of impact. The comparison between experimental data and model predictions suggests the crater evolution model is only valid when predicting the evolution of the crater at sufficiently high Weber numbers.

  11. Market liquidity around earnings announcements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, M.

    2002-01-01

    Prior literature indicates that bid-ask spreads are higher and depths are lower around earnings announcements than during non-announcement periods. This thesis investigates two important aspects of this drop in market liquidity, namely (a) the ability of management to mitigate the drop in market

  12. Market liquidity around earnings announcements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, M.

    2002-01-01

    Prior literature indicates that bid-ask spreads are higher and depths are lower around earnings announcements than during non-announcement periods. This thesis investigates two important aspects of this drop in market liquidity, namely (a) the ability of management to mitigate the drop in market liq

  13. The Simulation Study of Fluid Physical Properties on Drop Formation of Drop-on-demand Inkjet Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Lei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inkjet printing is a method for directly patterning and fabricating patterns without the need for masks. However, the physical phenomenon in inkjet printing process is very complicated with the coupling of piezoelectricity, elasticity, and free surface fluid dynamics. The authors use the volume of fluid (VOF method as implemented in the commercial code FLUENT to model the details of the drop formation process. The influence of viscosity and surface tension of the liquid on the droplet formation process is investigated. Consequently, we find that the speed of liquid plays an important role for the jet stability. The viscosity of liquid greatly influences the final speed of droplet. However, the surface tension of liquid does not much affect the speed of droplet. It changes the shape of the liquid thread and final droplet.

  14. Automated microfluidic screening assay platform based on DropLab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wen-Bin; Sun, Meng; Gu, Shu-Qing; Zhu, Ying; Fang, Qun

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes DropLab, an automated microfluidic platform for programming droplet-based reactions and screening in the nanoliter range. DropLab can meter liquids with picoliter-scale precision, mix multiple components sequentially to assemble composite droplets, and perform screening reactions and assays in linear or two-dimensional droplet array with extremely low sample and reagent consumptions. A novel droplet generation approach based on the droplet assembling strategy was developed to produce multicomponent droplets in the nanoliter to picoliter range with high controllability on the size and composition of each droplet. The DropLab system was built using a short capillary with a tapered tip, a syringe pump with picoliter precision, and an automated liquid presenting system. The tapered capillary was used for precise liquid metering and mixing, droplet assembling, and droplet array storage. Two different liquid presenting systems were developed based on the slotted-vial array design and multiwell plate design to automatically present various samples, reagents, and oil to the capillary. Using the tapered-tip capillary and the picoliter-scale precision syringe pump, the minimum unit of the droplet volume in the present system reached ~20 pL. Without the need of complex microchannel networks, various droplets with different size (20 pL-25 nL), composition, and sequence were automatically assembled, aiming to multiple screening targets by simply adjusting the types, volumes, and mixing ratios of aspirated liquids on demand. The utility of DropLab was demonstrated in enzyme inhibition assays, protein crystallization screening, and identification of trace reducible carbohydrates.

  15. Visualization study of evaporation of single n-pentane drops in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehara, N.; Nojima, K.; Mori, Y. H.

    1993-12-01

    A laser shadowgraph system was constructed to enable successive filming of a drop or a bubble rising or falling in an immiscible liquid confined within a vertical column. The assembly was applied to a study of the evaporation of n-pentane drops in a stagnant medium of water. The liquid/vapor two-phase bubble evolving from each pentane drop was observed together with its wake, the morphology and the dynamics of which are our primary concern in considering the mechanism of the medium-to-bubble heat transfer.

  16. Drop Spreading with Random Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Jensen, Oliver

    2016-11-01

    Airway mucus acts as a barrier to protect the lung. However as a biological material, its physical properties are known imperfectly and can be spatially heterogeneous. In this study we assess the impact of these uncertainties on the rate of spreading of a drop (representing an inhaled aerosol) over a mucus film. We model the film as Newtonian, having a viscosity that depends linearly on the concentration of a passive solute (a crude proxy for mucin proteins). Given an initial random solute (and hence viscosity) distribution, described as a Gaussian random field with a given correlation structure, we seek to quantify the uncertainties in outcomes as the drop spreads. Using lubrication theory, we describe the spreading of the drop in terms of a system of coupled nonlinear PDEs governing the evolution of film height and the vertically-averaged solute concentration. We perform Monte Carlo simulations to predict the variability in the drop centre location and width (1D) or area (2D). We show how simulation results are well described (at much lower computational cost) by a low-order model using a weak disorder expansion. Our results show for example how variability in the drop location is a non-monotonic function of the solute correlation length increases. Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

  17. Thermophysical Properties of Liquid AlTi-Based Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egry, I.; Holland-Moritz, D.; Novakovic, R.; Ricci, E.; Wunderlich, R.; Sobczak, N.

    2010-05-01

    The surface tension and density of three liquid AlTi-based alloys (AlTiV, AlTiNb, and AlTiTa) have been measured using electromagnetic levitation as a tool for containerless processing. Surface tension has been determined by the oscillating-drop method, while the density was measured using a shadowgraph technique. Both quantities were determined over a wide temperature range, including the undercooled regime. In addition, sessile-drop and pendant-drop experiments to determine the surface tension were performed in a recently built high-temperature furnace. The measured data were compared to thermodynamic calculations using phenomenological models and the Butler equation. Generally, good agreement was found.

  18. The Design of Speed of Dropping Liquid Monitoring Device Based on Microcomputer System%基于单片机系统的液体点滴速度监控装置的设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    滕春阳; 孙长江; 随顺科

    2011-01-01

    This system design AT89S52 SCM is as the core,with the keyboard and infrared sensor system in 1602 as input,liquid crystal display and motor as the output of the system of intelligent control and testing system.Infusion The system consists of water droplets speed test system,water speed control system,display device and single-chip microcomputer system,wireless transmission system,the keyboard and the alarm system components,etc.%本系统设计是以AT89S52单片机为核心,以键盘及红外对射式传感器作为输入系统,以1602液晶显示屏及电动机作为输出系统的智能化输液控制及检测系统。该系统主要由水滴速度测试系统、水速控制系统、显示装置、单片机系统、无线传输系统、键盘和报警等系统组成。

  19. Drop stability in wind: theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungyon

    2015-11-01

    Water drops may remain pinned on a solid substrate against external forcing due to contact angle hysteresis. Schmucker and White investigated this phenomenon experimentally in a high Reynolds number regime, by measuring the critical wind velocity at which partially wetting water drops depin inside a wind tunnel. Due to the unsteady turbulent boundary layer, droplets are observed to undergo vortex-shedding induced oscillations. By contrast, the overall elongation of the drop prior to depinning occurs on a much slower timescale with self-similar droplet shapes at the onset. Based on these observations, a simple, quasi-static model of depinning droplet is developed by implementing the phenomenological description of the boundary layer. The resultant model successfully captures the critical onset of droplet motion and is the first of on-going studies that connect the classical boundary layer theory with droplet dynamics.

  20. Tuning the resonant frequencies of a drop by a magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Jamin, Timothée; Bacri, Jean-Claude; Falcon, Eric

    2016-01-01

    We report an experimental study of a magnetic liquid drop deposited on a superhydrophobic substrate and subjected to vertical vibrations in presence of a static magnetic field. It is well-known that a flattened drop of usual liquid displays oscillating lobes at its periphery when vibrated. By adding ferromagnetic nanoparticles to a water drop and varying the strength of the magnetic field, we are experimentally able to efficiently tune the resonant frequencies of the drop. By using conservation energy arguments, we show that the magnetic field contribution is equivalent to adding an effective negative surface tension to the drop. Our model is found in good agreement with the experiments with no fitting parameter.

  1. Tuning the resonant frequencies of a drop by a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamin, Timothée; Djama, Yacine; Bacri, Jean-Claude; Falcon, Eric

    2016-06-01

    We report an experimental study of a magnetic liquid drop deposited on a superhydrophobic substrate and subjected to vertical vibrations in the presence of a static magnetic field. It is well known that a flattened drop of usual liquid displays oscillating lobes at its periphery when vibrated. By adding ferromagnetic nanoparticles to a water drop and varying the strength of the magnetic field, we are experimentally able to efficiently tune the resonant frequencies of the drop. By using conservation energy arguments, we show that the magnetic field contribution is equivalent to adding an effective negative surface tension to the drop. Our model is found to be in good agreement with the experiments with no fitting parameter.

  2. Drops transformed from a continuous flow on a superhydrophobic incline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katariya, Mayur; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2013-08-01

    Biochemical analysis with discrete drops on superhydrophobic surfaces will benefit from low loss, low contamination and open access features, but is challenged by the ability to generate them. A simple approach for delivering the drops from a continuous flow through an inclined superhydrophobic surface here showed the rear pinning contact line to be strongly influential in retention, providing potential for volume control, yet without any lossy daughter droplet formation. At a high flowrate regime prior to jetting, the liquid body was found to develop a grown out section that was able to flip up and down to be airborne, depending on the gravitational effect. While the section was airborne, the drop was able to increase its volume without the action of the three-phase mechanics dictating detachment.

  3. When sessile drops are no longer small: transitions from spherical to fully flattened.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extrand, C W; Moon, Sung In

    2010-07-20

    We measured the dimensions and contact angles of sessile drops using three liquids on a variety of polymer and silicon surfaces. Drops ranged in size from a few microliters to several milliliters. With increasing liquid volume, heights of the drops initially rose steeply and then gradually tapered to a constant value. The heights of small, undistorted drops as well as the heights of the largest drops were accurately predicted by well-established models. A recently derived expression for meniscus height was used to estimate the heights of intermediate-size drops. While it was not exact, this expression produced reasonable approximations without having to resort to iterative numerical methods. We also identified transition points where gravity began to distort drop shape and ultimately limited drop height. Relatively simple closed analytical expressions for estimating these transition points were also derived. Predicted values of the height and volume at the onset of distortion agreed fairly well with the measured ones. Contact angles carefully measured by the tangent method were independent of drop size.

  4. Partial coalescence from bubbles to drops

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, F. H.

    2015-10-07

    The coalescence of drops is a fundamental process in the coarsening of emulsions. However, counter-intuitively, this coalescence process can produce a satellite, approximately half the size of the original drop, which is detrimental to the overall coarsening. This also occurs during the coalescence of bubbles, while the resulting satellite is much smaller, approximately 10 %. To understand this difference, we have conducted a set of coalescence experiments using xenon bubbles inside a pressure chamber, where we can continuously raise the pressure from 1 up to 85 atm and thereby vary the density ratio between the inner and outer fluid, from 0.005 up to unity. Using high-speed video imaging, we observe a continuous increase in satellite size as the inner density is varied from the bubble to emulsion-droplet conditions, with the most rapid changes occurring as the bubble density grows up to 15 % of that of the surrounding liquid. We propose a model that successfully relates the satellite size to the capillary wave mode responsible for its pinch-off and the overall deformations from the drainage. The wavelength of the primary wave changes during its travel to the apex, with the instantaneous speed adjusting to the local wavelength. By estimating the travel time of this wave mode on the bubble surface, we also show that the model is consistent with the experiments. This wavenumber is determined by both the global drainage as well as the interface shapes during the rapid coalescence in the neck connecting the two drops or bubbles. The rate of drainage is shown to scale with the density of the inner fluid. Empirically, we find that the pinch-off occurs when 60 % of the bubble fluid has drained from it. Numerical simulations using the volume-of-fluid method with dynamic adaptive grid refinement can reproduce these dynamics, as well as show the associated vortical structure and stirring of the coalescing fluid masses. Enhanced stirring is observed for cases with second

  5. Dynamics of Drop Formation in an Electric Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notz; Basaran

    1999-05-01

    The effect of an electric field on the formation of a drop of an inviscid, perfectly conducting liquid from a capillary which protrudes from the top plate of a parallel-plate capacitor into a surrounding dynamically inactive, insulating gas is studied computationally. This free boundary problem which is comprised of the surface Bernoulli equation for the transient drop shape and the Laplace equation for the velocity potential inside the drop and the electrostatic potential outside the drop is solved by a method of lines incorporating the finite element method for spatial discretization. The finite element algorithm employed relies on judicious use of remeshing and element addition to a two-region adaptive mesh to accommodate large domain deformations, and allows the computations to proceed until the thickness of the neck connecting an about to form drop to the rest of the liquid in the capillary is less than 0.1% of the capillary radius. The accuracy of the computations is demonstrated by showing that in the absence of an electric field predictions made with the new algorithm are in excellent agreement with boundary integral calculations (Schulkes, R. M. S. M. J. Fluid Mech. 278, 83 (1994)) and experimental measurements on water drops (Zhang, X., and Basaran, O. A. Phys. Fluids 7(6), 1184 (1995)). In the presence of an electric field, the algorithm predicts that as the strength of the applied field increases, the mode of drop formation changes from simple dripping to jetting to so-called microdripping, in accordance with experimental observations (Cloupeau, M., and Prunet-Foch, B. J. Aerosol Sci. 25(6), 1021 (1994); Zhang, X., and Basaran, O. A. J. Fluid Mech. 326, 239 (1996)). Computational predictions of the primary drop volume and drop length at breakup are reported over a wide range of values of the ratios of electrical, gravitational, and inertial forces to surface tension force. In contrast to previously mentioned cases where both the flow rate in the tube

  6. Universal evolution of a viscous-capillary spreading drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thampi, Sumesh P; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Adhikari, Ronojoy; Govindarajan, Rama

    2016-07-13

    The rate of spreading or retraction of a drop on a flat substrate is determined through a balance of surface tension and hydrodynamic flow. While asymptotic regimes are known, no general rate equation has hitherto been available. Here, we revisit this classic problem, in a regime governed by capillary and viscous forces, by performing an exhaustive numerical study of drop evolution as a function of the contact angle with the substrate. Our study reveals a universal evolution of the drop radius parameterised only by the substrate wettability. Two limits of this evolution recover the familiar exponential and algebraic regimes. Our results show quantitative comparison with the evolution derived from lubrication theory, indicating that dissipation at the contact line is the key determinant in drop evolution. Our work, both numerical and theoretical, provides a foundation for studying the full temporal dynamics of droplet evolution under the influence of external fields and thermal fluctuations, which are of importance in nanofluidics.

  7. Vibration spectroscopy of a sessile drop and its contact line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettu, S; Chaudhury, M K

    2012-10-02

    Resonance frequencies of small sessile liquid drops (1-20 μL) were estimated from the power spectra of their height fluctuations after subjecting them to white noise vibration. Various resonance modes could be identified with this method as a function of the mass of the drop. Studies with water drops on such supports as polystyrene (θ ≈ 80°) and a superhydrophobic surface of microfibrillar silicone rubber (θ ≈ 162°) demonstrated that the resonant frequency decreases with the contact angle, θ. This trend is in remarkable agreement with the current models of the resonant vibration of sessile drops. A novel aspect of this study is the analysis of the modes of a slipping contact line that indicated that its higher frequency modes are more severely damped than its lower ones. Another case is with the glycerol-water solutions, where the resonance frequency decreases with the concentration of glycerol purely due to the capillary effects. The interface fluctuation, on the other hand, is strongly correlated with the kinematic viscosity of the liquid. Thus, these experiments provide a means to measure the surface tension and the viscosity of very small droplets.

  8. Fluid flow in drying drops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelderblom, H.

    2013-01-01

    When a suspension drop evaporates, it leaves behind a drying stain. Examples of these drying stains encountered in daily life are coffee or tea stains on a table top, mineral rings on glassware that comes out of the dishwasher, or the salt deposits on the streets in winter. Drying stains are also pr

  9. New identities for sessile drops

    CERN Document Server

    Hajirahimi, Maryam; Fatollahi, Amir H

    2014-01-01

    A new set of mathematical identities is presented for axi-symmetric sessile drops on flat and curved substrates. The geometrical parameters, including the apex curvature and height, and the contact radius, are related by the identities. The validity of the identities are checked by various numerical solutions both for flat and curved substrates.

  10. Egg Drop: An Invention Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Alan J.

    1973-01-01

    Describes an activity designed to stimulate elementary and junior high students to become actively engaged in thinking creatively rather than only analytically, convergently, or repetitively. The activity requires students to devise means of dropping an egg from a height without it breaking. (JR)

  11. Evaporating Drops of Alkane Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Guéna, Geoffroy; Poulard, Christophe; Cazabat, Anne-Marie

    2005-01-01

    22 pages 9 figures; Alkane mixtures are model systems where the influence of surface tension gradients during the spreading and the evaporation of wetting drops can be easily studied. The surface tension gradients are mainly induced by concentration gradients, mass diffusion being a stabilising process. Depending on the relative concentration of the mixture, a rich pattern of behaviours is obtained.

  12. ``Quantum'' interference with bouncing drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohr, Tomas; Andersen, Anders; Madsen, Jacob; Reichelt, Christian; Lautrup, Benny; Ellegaard, Clive; Levinsen, Mogens

    2013-11-01

    In a series of recent papers (most recently) Yves Couder and collaborators have explored the dynamics of walking drops on the surface of a vibrated bath of silicon oil and have demonstrated a close analogy to quantum phenomena. The bouncing drop together with the surface wave that it excites seems to be very similar to the pilot wave envisaged by de Broglie for quantum particles. In particular, have studied a double slit experiment with walking drops, where an interference pattern identical to the quantum version is found even though it is possible to follow the orbits of the drops and unambigously determine which slit it goes through, something which in quantum mechanics would be ruled out by the Heisenberg uncertainly relations. We have repeated the experiment and present a somewhat more complicated picture. Theoretically, we study a Schrödinger equation with a source term originating from a localised ``particle'' being simultaneously guided by the wave. We present simple solutions to such a field theory and discuss the fundamental difficulties met by such a theory in order to comply with quantum mechanics.

  13. Drops, contact lines, and electrowetting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mannetje, 't D.J.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we study the behaviour of drops and contact lines under the influence of electric fields, and how these can answer fundamental and industrial questions. Our focus is on studying the varying balance of the electric field, hysteresis forces and inertia as the speed of a contact line chan

  14. Evaporating Drops of Alkane Mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Gu'ena, G; Poulard, C; Cazabat, Anne-Marie; Gu\\'{e}na, Geoffroy; Poulard, Christophe

    2005-01-01

    Alkane mixtures are model systems where the influence of surface tension gradients during the spreading and the evaporation of wetting drops can be easily studied. The surface tension gradients are mainly induced by concentration gradients, mass diffusion being a stabilising process. Depending on the relative concentration of the mixture, a rich pattern of behaviours is obtained.

  15. Clusters Formation of Drops from Many Droplets Collisions: A 3D Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Acevedo-Malavé

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Here the SPH method is applied to simulate in the three-dimensional space the multiple hydrodynamics collisions and formation of clusters of equal-size liquid drops in a vacuum environment. For a range of velocity values from 0.2 mm/ms to 30.0 mm/ms we observe three possible scenarios, such as: coalescence and cluster formation of drops. When the collision velocity is too low the droplets interact only through their deformed surfaces. If this velocity is around 15.0 mm/ms the coalescence of the drops is observed, and after some time starting on t=0 a flat circular section is observed between the colliding drops. This interface disappears when the dynamics runs and the drops finally coalesce. The velocity vector fields were computed for the different scenarios showing some zones inside the drops where the fluid velocity is diminished and other zones where the SPH particles are accelerated.

  16. A device for precision neutralization of electric charge of small drops using ionized air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Sewan; Kim, Peter C.; Lee, Eric R.; Lee, Irwin T.; Perl, Martin L.; Rogers, Howard; Loomba, Dinesh

    2003-10-01

    For use in our Millikan type liquid drop searches for fractional charge elementary particles we have developed a simple ionized air device for neutralizing a narrow stream of small drops. The neutralizer has been used for drops ranging in diameter from 10 to 25 μm. The width of the produced charge distribution is given by the Boltzmann equilibrium charge distribution and the mean of the distribution is set by a bias voltage. Using the bias voltage, the mean can be set with a precision of better than e, the electron charge. The use of the neutralizer is illustrated in an application to mineral oil drops produced with charges of the order of 1000e. We also show the interesting case of silicone oil drops that are produced in our drop generator with a charge distribution narrower than the Boltzmann equilibrium charge distribution, the charge distribution being broadened by the neutralizer.

  17. A Device for Precision Neutralization of Electric Charge of Small Drops Using Ionized Air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Sewan

    2003-03-17

    For use in our Millikan type liquid drop searches for fractional charge elementary particles we have developed a simple ionized air device for neutralizing a narrow stream of small drops. The neutralizer has been used for drops ranging in diameter from 10 to 25 {micro}m. The width of the produced charge distribution is given by the Boltzmann equilibrium charge distribution and the mean of the distribution is set by a bias voltage. Using the bias voltage, the mean can be set with a precision of better than e, the electron charge. The use of the neutralizer is illustrated in an application to mineral oil drops produced with charges of the order of 1000e. We also show the interesting case of silicone oil drops that are produced in our drop generator with a charge distribution narrower than the Boltzmann equilibrium charge distribution, the charge distribution being broadened by the neutralizer.

  18. Retraction dynamics of aquous drops upon impact on nonwetting surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolo, D; Bonn, D; Bartolo, Denis; Josserand, Christophe; Bonn, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    We study the impact and subsequent retraction dynamics of liquid droplets upon high-speed impact on hydrophobic surfaces. Performing extensive experiments, we show that the drop retraction rate is a material constant and does not depend on the impact velocity. We show that when increasing the Ohnesorge number, $\\Oh=\\eta/\\sqrt{\\rho R_{\\rm I} \\gamma}$, the retraction, i.e. dewetting, dynamics crosses over from a capillaro-inertial regime to a capillaro-viscous regime. We rationalize the experimental observations by a simple but robust semi-quantitative model for the solid-liquid contact line dynamics inspired by the standard theories for thin film dewetting.

  19. Hildebrand solubility parameters measurement via sessile drops evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaohua; Li, Bingquan; Sokolov, Jonathan C.; Rafailovich, Miriam H.; Gewaily, Dina

    2005-08-01

    A method for the measurement of Hildebrand solubility parameter has been developed. This method was based on the measurement of the sessile drop contact angle and contact base width during its evaporation. Experimental results showed that this method is accurate and insensitive to the measurement conditions. The major advantages of this method are that it is time efficient and requires a small amount of liquid (microliter) for the measurement.

  20. Creeping motion of long bubbles and drops in capillary tubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westborg, Henrik; Hassager, Ole

    1989-01-01

    The flow of inviscid bubbles and viscous drops in capillary tubes has been simulated by a Galerkin finite element method with surface tension included at the bubble/liquid interface. The results show good agreement with published experimental results. At low capillary numbers the front and the re...... and the snap-off time increases with increasing capillary number. Snap-off without a sudden decrease of the flow rate does not seem to occur in constrictions of circular cross section....